WorldWideScience

Sample records for spin quantum computer

  1. Quantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel; Hams, Anthony; Miyashita, Seiji; Saito, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the stability of quantum computations on physically realizable quantum computers by simulating quantum spin models representing quantum computer hardware. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum

  2. Spin networks and quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, L.; Lomonaco, S. Jr.

    2008-01-01

    We review the q-deformed spin network approach to Topological Quantum Field Theory and apply these methods to produce unitary representations of the braid groups that are dense in the unitary groups. The simplest case of these models is the Fibonacci model, itself universal for quantum computation. We here formulate these braid group representations in a form suitable for computation and algebraic work. (authors)

  3. Quantum computing using nuclear spins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cejnar, P.

    2002-01-01

    In December 2001, a group of physicists at Stanford University and at the IBM research center in California announced the first experimental implementation of the Shor quantum factorization algorithm with 7 quantum bits. The nuclear magnetic resonance method applied appears to be a promising approach to the realization of quantum computers. Quantum computing, which is a very interesting field of application of the laws of the quantum world, is demonstrated on examples

  4. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-17

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time [Formula: see text] as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  5. Quantum computation with nuclear spins in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, H.

    2008-01-24

    The role of nuclear spins for quantum information processing in quantum dots is theoretically investigated in this thesis. Building on the established fact that the most strongly coupled environment for the potential electron spin quantum bit are the surrounding lattice nuclear spins interacting via the hyperfine interaction, we turn this vice into a virtue by designing schemes for harnessing this strong coupling. In this perspective, the ensemble of nuclear spins can be considered an asset, suitable for an active role in quantum information processing due to its intrinsic long coherence times. We present experimentally feasible protocols for the polarization, i.e. initialization, of the nuclear spins and a quantitative solution to our derived master equation. The polarization limiting destructive interference effects, caused by the collective nature of the nuclear coupling to the electron spin, are studied in detail. Efficient ways of mitigating these constraints are presented, demonstrating that highly polarized nuclear ensembles in quantum dots are feasible. At high, but not perfect, polarization of the nuclei the evolution of an electron spin in contact with the spin bath can be efficiently studied by means of a truncation of the Hilbert space. It is shown that the electron spin can function as a mediator of universal quantum gates for collective nuclear spin qubits, yielding a promising architecture for quantum information processing. Furthermore, we show that at high polarization the hyperfine interaction of electron and nuclear spins resembles the celebrated Jaynes-Cummings model of quantum optics. This result opens the door for transfer of knowledge from the mature field of quantum computation with atoms and photons. Additionally, tailored specifically for the quantum dot environment, we propose a novel scheme for the generation of highly squeezed collective nuclear states. Finally we demonstrate that even an unprepared completely mixed nuclear spin

  6. Quantum computation with nuclear spins in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christ, H.

    2008-01-01

    The role of nuclear spins for quantum information processing in quantum dots is theoretically investigated in this thesis. Building on the established fact that the most strongly coupled environment for the potential electron spin quantum bit are the surrounding lattice nuclear spins interacting via the hyperfine interaction, we turn this vice into a virtue by designing schemes for harnessing this strong coupling. In this perspective, the ensemble of nuclear spins can be considered an asset, suitable for an active role in quantum information processing due to its intrinsic long coherence times. We present experimentally feasible protocols for the polarization, i.e. initialization, of the nuclear spins and a quantitative solution to our derived master equation. The polarization limiting destructive interference effects, caused by the collective nature of the nuclear coupling to the electron spin, are studied in detail. Efficient ways of mitigating these constraints are presented, demonstrating that highly polarized nuclear ensembles in quantum dots are feasible. At high, but not perfect, polarization of the nuclei the evolution of an electron spin in contact with the spin bath can be efficiently studied by means of a truncation of the Hilbert space. It is shown that the electron spin can function as a mediator of universal quantum gates for collective nuclear spin qubits, yielding a promising architecture for quantum information processing. Furthermore, we show that at high polarization the hyperfine interaction of electron and nuclear spins resembles the celebrated Jaynes-Cummings model of quantum optics. This result opens the door for transfer of knowledge from the mature field of quantum computation with atoms and photons. Additionally, tailored specifically for the quantum dot environment, we propose a novel scheme for the generation of highly squeezed collective nuclear states. Finally we demonstrate that even an unprepared completely mixed nuclear spin

  7. Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Sato, Kazunobu; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2015-01-28

    A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits, which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins, which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems, are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, compared with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: one is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing ESR/MR pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology.

  8. Quantum Computing with an Electron Spin Ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesenberg, Janus; Ardavan, A.; Briggs, G.A.D.

    2009-01-01

    We propose to encode a register of quantum bits in different collective electron spin wave excitations in a solid medium. Coupling to spins is enabled by locating them in the vicinity of a superconducting transmission line cavity, and making use of their strong collective coupling to the quantized...

  9. An endohedral fullerene-based nuclear spin quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Chenyong; Suter, Dieter; Du Jiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new scalable quantum computer architecture based on endohedral fullerene molecules. Qubits are encoded in the nuclear spins of the endohedral atoms, which posses even longer coherence times than the electron spins which are used as the qubits in previous proposals. To address the individual qubits, we use the hyperfine interaction, which distinguishes two modes (active and passive) of the nuclear spin. Two-qubit quantum gates are effectively implemented by employing the electronic dipolar interaction between adjacent molecules. The electron spins also assist in the qubit initialization and readout. Our architecture should be significantly easier to implement than earlier proposals for spin-based quantum computers, such as the concept of Kane [B.E. Kane, Nature 393 (1998) 133]. - Research highlights: → We propose an endohedral fullerene-based scalable quantum computer architecture. → Qubits are encoded on nuclear spins, while electron spins serve as auxiliaries. → Nuclear spins are individually addressed using the hyperfine interaction. → Two-qubit gates are implemented through the medium of electron spins.

  10. Computer studies of multiple-quantum spin dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdoch, J.B.

    1982-11-01

    The excitation and detection of multiple-quantum (MQ) transitions in Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy is an interesting problem in the quantum mechanical dynamics of spin systems as well as an important new technique for investigation of molecular structure. In particular, multiple-quantum spectroscopy can be used to simplify overly complex spectra or to separate the various interactions between a nucleus and its environment. The emphasis of this work is on computer simulation of spin-system evolution to better relate theory and experiment

  11. Computer studies of multiple-quantum spin dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdoch, J.B.

    1982-11-01

    The excitation and detection of multiple-quantum (MQ) transitions in Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy is an interesting problem in the quantum mechanical dynamics of spin systems as well as an important new technique for investigation of molecular structure. In particular, multiple-quantum spectroscopy can be used to simplify overly complex spectra or to separate the various interactions between a nucleus and its environment. The emphasis of this work is on computer simulation of spin-system evolution to better relate theory and experiment.

  12. Silicon CMOS architecture for a spin-based quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhorst, M; Eenink, H G J; Yang, C H; Dzurak, A S

    2017-12-15

    Recent advances in quantum error correction codes for fault-tolerant quantum computing and physical realizations of high-fidelity qubits in multiple platforms give promise for the construction of a quantum computer based on millions of interacting qubits. However, the classical-quantum interface remains a nascent field of exploration. Here, we propose an architecture for a silicon-based quantum computer processor based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We show how a transistor-based control circuit together with charge-storage electrodes can be used to operate a dense and scalable two-dimensional qubit system. The qubits are defined by the spin state of a single electron confined in quantum dots, coupled via exchange interactions, controlled using a microwave cavity, and measured via gate-based dispersive readout. We implement a spin qubit surface code, showing the prospects for universal quantum computation. We discuss the challenges and focus areas that need to be addressed, providing a path for large-scale quantum computing.

  13. Spin Glass a Bridge Between Quantum Computation and Statistical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohzeki, Masayuki

    2013-09-01

    In this chapter, we show two fascinating topics lying between quantum information processing and statistical mechanics. First, we introduce an elaborated technique, the surface code, to prepare the particular quantum state with robustness against decoherence. Interestingly, the theoretical limitation of the surface code, accuracy threshold, to restore the quantum state has a close connection with the problem on the phase transition in a special model known as spin glasses, which is one of the most active researches in statistical mechanics. The phase transition in spin glasses is an intractable problem, since we must strive many-body system with complicated interactions with change of their signs depending on the distance between spins. Fortunately, recent progress in spin-glass theory enables us to predict the precise location of the critical point, at which the phase transition occurs. It means that statistical mechanics is available for revealing one of the most interesting parts in quantum information processing. We show how to import the special tool in statistical mechanics into the problem on the accuracy threshold in quantum computation. Second, we show another interesting technique to employ quantum nature, quantum annealing. The purpose of quantum annealing is to search for the most favored solution of a multivariable function, namely optimization problem. The most typical instance is the traveling salesman problem to find the minimum tour while visiting all the cities. In quantum annealing, we introduce quantum fluctuation to drive a particular system with the artificial Hamiltonian, in which the ground state represents the optimal solution of the specific problem we desire to solve. Induction of the quantum fluctuation gives rise to the quantum tunneling effect, which allows nontrivial hopping from state to state. We then sketch a strategy to control the quantum fluctuation efficiently reaching the ground state. Such a generic framework is called

  14. Quantum computation in semiconductor quantum dots of electron-spin asymmetric anisotropic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiang; Zhu Shiqun

    2007-01-01

    The universal quantum computation is obtained when there exists asymmetric anisotropic exchange between electron spins in coupled semiconductor quantum dots. The asymmetric Heisenberg model can be transformed into the isotropic model through the control of two local unitary rotations for the realization of essential quantum gates. The rotations on each qubit are symmetrical and depend on the strength and orientation of asymmetric exchange. The implementation of the axially symmetric local magnetic fields can assist the construction of quantum logic gates in anisotropic coupled quantum dots. This proposal can efficiently use each physical electron spin as a logical qubit in the universal quantum computation

  15. Optically Controlled Quantum Dot Spins for Scaleable Quantum Computing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steel, Duncan G

    2006-01-01

    .... Sham is responsible for theoretical support & concept development. The group at Michigan along with this QuaCGR student are responsible for experimental demonstration of key experimental demonstrations for quantum computing...

  16. Parallel computer calculation of quantum spin lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarcq, J.

    1998-01-01

    Numerical simulation allows the theorists to convince themselves about the validity of the models they use. Particularly by simulating the spin lattices one can judge about the validity of a conjecture. Simulating a system defined by a large number of degrees of freedom requires highly sophisticated machines. This study deals with modelling the magnetic interactions between the ions of a crystal. Many exact results have been found for spin 1/2 systems but not for systems of other spins for which many simulation have been carried out. The interest for simulations has been renewed by the Haldane's conjecture stipulating the existence of a energy gap between the ground state and the first excited states of a spin 1 lattice. The existence of this gap has been experimentally demonstrated. This report contains the following four chapters: 1. Spin systems; 2. Calculation of eigenvalues; 3. Programming; 4. Parallel calculation

  17. Spin-based all-optical quantum computation with quantum dots: Understanding and suppressing decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calarco, T.; Datta, A.; Fedichev, P.; Zoller, P.; Pazy, E.

    2003-01-01

    We present an all-optical implementation of quantum computation using semiconductor quantum dots. Quantum memory is represented by the spin of an excess electron stored in each dot. Two-qubit gates are realized by switching on trion-trion interactions between different dots. State selectivity is achieved via conditional laser excitation exploiting Pauli exclusion principle. Read out is performed via a quantum-jump technique. We analyze the effect on our scheme's performance of the main imperfections present in real quantum dots: exciton decay, hole mixing, and phonon decoherence. We introduce an adiabatic gate procedure that allows one to circumvent these effects and evaluate quantitatively its fidelity

  18. Solid-state nuclear-spin quantum computer based on magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, G. P.; Doolen, G. D.; Hammel, P. C.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a nuclear-spin quantum computer based on magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). It is shown that an MRFM single-electron spin measurement provides three essential requirements for quantum computation in solids: (a) preparation of the ground state, (b) one- and two-qubit quantum logic gates, and (c) a measurement of the final state. The proposed quantum computer can operate at temperatures up to 1 K. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  19. Silicon-based spin and charge quantum computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belita Koiller

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon-based quantum-computer architectures have attracted attention because of their promise for scalability and their potential for synergetically utilizing the available resources associated with the existing Si technology infrastructure. Electronic and nuclear spins of shallow donors (e.g. phosphorus in Si are ideal candidates for qubits in such proposals due to the relatively long spin coherence times. For these spin qubits, donor electron charge manipulation by external gates is a key ingredient for control and read-out of single-qubit operations, while shallow donor exchange gates are frequently invoked to perform two-qubit operations. More recently, charge qubits based on tunnel coupling in P+2 substitutional molecular ions in Si have also been proposed. We discuss the feasibility of the building blocks involved in shallow donor quantum computation in silicon, taking into account the peculiarities of silicon electronic structure, in particular the six degenerate states at the conduction band edge. We show that quantum interference among these states does not significantly affect operations involving a single donor, but leads to fast oscillations in electron exchange coupling and on tunnel-coupling strength when the donor pair relative position is changed on a lattice-parameter scale. These studies illustrate the considerable potential as well as the tremendous challenges posed by donor spin and charge as candidates for qubits in silicon.Arquiteturas de computadores quânticos baseadas em silício vêm atraindo atenção devido às suas perspectivas de escalabilidade e utilização dos recursos já instalados associados à tecnologia do Si. Spins eletrônicos e nucleares de doadores rasos (por exemplo fósforo em Si são candidatos ideais para bits quânticos (qubits nestas propostas, devido aos tempos de coerência relativamente longos dos spins em matrizes de Si. Para estes qubits de spin, a manipulação da carga do elétron do doador

  20. Optically Driven Spin Based Quantum Dots for Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    is accomplished by a modified optical RKKY (ORKKY) interaction yielding a Heisenberg Hamiltonian coupling between the two spins. High speed state...the Zeeman resonance are cancelled out through feedback via the DNP mechanism (Fig. 3d ). The quantitative enhancement of T2* by this mechanism is...the latter a global-basis interaction. An example of a global-basis interaction between qubits is Heisenberg exchange, where a bases-invariant

  1. Fully Automated Quantum-Chemistry-Based Computation of Spin-Spin-Coupled Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph; Dohm, Sebastian; Hansen, Andreas; Pisarek, Jana; Pracht, Philipp; Seibert, Jakob; Neese, Frank

    2017-11-13

    We present a composite procedure for the quantum-chemical computation of spin-spin-coupled 1 H NMR spectra for general, flexible molecules in solution that is based on four main steps, namely conformer/rotamer ensemble (CRE) generation by the fast tight-binding method GFN-xTB and a newly developed search algorithm, computation of the relative free energies and NMR parameters, and solving the spin Hamiltonian. In this way the NMR-specific nuclear permutation problem is solved, and the correct spin symmetries are obtained. Energies, shielding constants, and spin-spin couplings are computed at state-of-the-art DFT levels with continuum solvation. A few (in)organic and transition-metal complexes are presented, and very good, unprecedented agreement between the theoretical and experimental spectra was achieved. The approach is routinely applicable to systems with up to 100-150 atoms and may open new avenues for the detailed (conformational) structure elucidation of, for example, natural products or drug molecules. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  2. Scalable photonic quantum computing assisted by quantum-dot spin in double-sided optical microcavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2013-07-29

    We investigate the possibility of achieving scalable photonic quantum computing by the giant optical circular birefringence induced by a quantum-dot spin in a double-sided optical microcavity as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We construct a deterministic controlled-not gate on two photonic qubits by two single-photon input-output processes and the readout on an electron-medium spin confined in an optical resonant microcavity. This idea could be applied to multi-qubit gates on photonic qubits and we give the quantum circuit for a three-photon Toffoli gate. High fidelities and high efficiencies could be achieved when the side leakage to the cavity loss rate is low. It is worth pointing out that our devices work in both the strong and the weak coupling regimes.

  3. Single Qubit Spin Readout and Initialization in a Quantum Dot Quantum Computer: Design and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahan, Charles; Friesen, Mark; Joynt, Robert; Eriksson, M. A.

    2003-03-01

    Although electron spin qubits in semiconductors are attractive from the viewpoint of low environmental coupling and long coherence times, spin readout remains a challenge for quantum dot quantum computing. Unfortunately, promising schemes based on spin-charge transduction introduce external couplings in the form of reference qubits or Coulomb blockade leads. Here, we propose a twist on the spin-charge transduction scheme, converting spin information to orbital information within a single quantum dot (QD). The same QD can be used for initialization, gating, and readout, without unnecessary external couplings. We present detailed investigations into such a scheme in both SiGe and GaAs systems: simulations, including capacitive coupling to a RF-SET, calculations of coherent oscillation times which determine the read-out speed, and calculations of electron spin relaxation times which determine the initialization speed. We find that both initialization and readout can be performed within the same architecture. Work supported by NSF-QuBIC and MRSEC programs, ARDA, and NSA.

  4. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-12-18

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low.

  5. Optically Driven Spin Based Quantum Dots for Quantum Computing - Research Area 6 Physics 6.3.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-15

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This program conducted experimental and theoretical research aimed at developing an optically driven quantum dot quantum ...computer, where, the qubit is the spin of the electron trapped in a self-assembled quantum dot in InAs. Optical manipulation using the trion state...reports. In this reporting period, we discovered the nuclear spin quieting first discovered in 2008 is present in vertically coupled quantum dots but

  6. Hybrid spin and valley quantum computing with singlet-triplet qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohling, Niklas; Russ, Maximilian; Burkard, Guido

    2014-10-24

    The valley degree of freedom in the electronic band structure of silicon, graphene, and other materials is often considered to be an obstacle for quantum computing (QC) based on electron spins in quantum dots. Here we show that control over the valley state opens new possibilities for quantum information processing. Combining qubits encoded in the singlet-triplet subspace of spin and valley states allows for universal QC using a universal two-qubit gate directly provided by the exchange interaction. We show how spin and valley qubits can be separated in order to allow for single-qubit rotations.

  7. Fan-out Estimation in Spin-based Quantum Computer Scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thien; Hill, Charles D; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; James, Matthew R

    2017-10-17

    Solid-state spin-based qubits offer good prospects for scaling based on their long coherence times and nexus to large-scale electronic scale-up technologies. However, high-threshold quantum error correction requires a two-dimensional qubit array operating in parallel, posing significant challenges in fabrication and control. While architectures incorporating distributed quantum control meet this challenge head-on, most designs rely on individual control and readout of all qubits with high gate densities. We analysed the fan-out routing overhead of a dedicated control line architecture, basing the analysis on a generalised solid-state spin qubit platform parameterised to encompass Coulomb confined (e.g. donor based spin qubits) or electrostatically confined (e.g. quantum dot based spin qubits) implementations. The spatial scalability under this model is estimated using standard electronic routing methods and present-day fabrication constraints. Based on reasonable assumptions for qubit control and readout we estimate 10 2 -10 5 physical qubits, depending on the quantum interconnect implementation, can be integrated and fanned-out independently. Assuming relatively long control-free interconnects the scalability can be extended. Ultimately, the universal quantum computation may necessitate a much higher number of integrated qubits, indicating that higher dimensional electronics fabrication and/or multiplexed distributed control and readout schemes may be the preferredstrategy for large-scale implementation.

  8. Decoherence in Quantum Spin Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H; Dobrovitski, VV; Landau, DP; Lewis, SP; Schuttler, HB

    2003-01-01

    Computer simulations of decoherence in quantum spin systems require the solution of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for interacting quantum spin systems over extended periods of time. We use exact diagonalization, the Chebyshev polynomial technique, four Suzuki-formula algorithms, and the

  9. Spin Ensembles Coupled to Superconducting Resonators: A Scalable Architecture for Solid-State Quantum Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chang-Yong; Li Shao-Hua; Hou Qi-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    A design is proposed for scalable solid-state quantum computing, which is based on collectively enhanced magnetic coupling between nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles and superconducting transmission line resonators interconnected by current-biased Josephson junction superconducting phase qubit. In this hybrid system, we realize distant multi-qubit controlled phase gate operations and generate distant multi-qubit entangled W-like states, being indispensable resource to quantum computation. Our proposed architecture consists of solid-state spin ensembles and circuit QED, and could achieve quantum computing in a solid-state environment with high-fidelity and scalable way. The experimental feasibility is discussed, and the implementation efficiency is demonstrated numerically. (general)

  10. Simulation of quantum computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H; Michielsen, K; Hams, AH; Miyashita, S; Saito, K; Landau, DP; Lewis, SP; Schuttler, HB

    2001-01-01

    We describe a simulation approach to study the functioning of Quantum Computer hardware. The latter is modeled by a collection of interacting spin-1/2 objects. The time evolution of this spin system maps one-to-one to a quantum program carried out by the Quantum Computer. Our simulation software

  11. Simulation of quantum computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H. De; Michielsen, K.; Hams, A.H.; Miyashita, S.; Saito, K.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a simulation approach to study the functioning of Quantum Computer hardware. The latter is modeled by a collection of interacting spin-1/2 objects. The time evolution of this spin system maps one-to-one to a quantum program carried out by the Quantum Computer. Our simulation software

  12. Stability of topologically-protected quantum computing proposals as seen through spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzgraber, H G; Andrist, R S

    2013-01-01

    Sensitivity to noise makes most of the current quantum computing schemes prone to error and nonscalable, allowing only for small proof-of-principle devices. Topologically-protected quantum computing aims at solving this problem by encoding quantum bits and gates in topological properties of the hardware medium that are immune to noise that does not impact the entire system at once. There are different approaches to achieve topological stability or active error correction, ranging from quasiparticle braidings to spin models and topological colour codes. The stability of these proposals against noise can be quantified by their error threshold. This figure of merit can be computed by mapping the problem onto complex statistical-mechanical spin-glass models with local disorder on nontrival lattices that can have many-body interactions and are sometimes described by lattice gauge theories. The error threshold for a given source of error then represents the point in the temperature-disorder phase diagram where a stable symmetry-broken phase vanishes. An overview of the techniques used to estimate the error thresholds is given, as well as a summary of recent results on the stability of different topologically-protected quantum computing schemes to different error sources

  13. Quantum computing and spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantser, V.

    2007-01-01

    Tentative to build a computer, which can operate according to the quantum laws, has leaded to concept of quantum computing algorithms and hardware. In this review we highlight recent developments which point the way to quantum computing on the basis solid state nanostructures after some general considerations concerning quantum information science and introducing a set of basic requirements for any quantum computer proposal. One of the major direction of research on the way to quantum computing is to exploit the spin (in addition to the orbital) degree of freedom of the electron, giving birth to the field of spintronics. We address some semiconductor approach based on spin orbit coupling in semiconductor nanostructures. (authors)

  14. Quantum spin Hall phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    We review our recent theoretical works on the quantum spin Hall effect. First we compare edge states in various 2D systems, and see whether they are robust or fragile against perturbations. Through the comparisons we see the robust nature of edge states in 2D quantum spin Hall phases. We see how it is protected by the Z 2 topological number, and reveal the nature of the Z 2 topological number by studying the phase transition between the quantum spin Hall and insulator phases. We also review our theoretical proposal of the ultrathin bismuth film as a candidate to the 2D quantum spin Hall system. (author)

  15. Quantum spin transistor with a Heisenberg spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchukov, O. V.; Volosniev, A. G.; Valiente, M.; Petrosyan, D.; Zinner, N. T.

    2016-01-01

    Spin chains are paradigmatic systems for the studies of quantum phases and phase transitions, and for quantum information applications, including quantum computation and short-distance quantum communication. Here we propose and analyse a scheme for conditional state transfer in a Heisenberg XXZ spin chain which realizes a quantum spin transistor. In our scheme, the absence or presence of a control spin excitation in the central gate part of the spin chain results in either perfect transfer of an arbitrary state of a target spin between the weakly coupled input and output ports, or its complete blockade at the input port. We also discuss a possible proof-of-concept realization of the corresponding spin chain with a one-dimensional ensemble of cold atoms with strong contact interactions. Our scheme is generally applicable to various implementations of tunable spin chains, and it paves the way for the realization of integrated quantum logic elements. PMID:27721438

  16. Noise-Resilient Quantum Computing with a Nitrogen-Vacancy Center and Nuclear Spins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, J; Wang, Z-Y; Plenio, M B

    2016-09-23

    Selective control of qubits in a quantum register for the purposes of quantum information processing represents a critical challenge for dense spin ensembles in solid-state systems. Here we present a protocol that achieves a complete set of selective electron-nuclear gates and single nuclear rotations in such an ensemble in diamond facilitated by a nearby nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center. The protocol suppresses internuclear interactions as well as unwanted coupling between the NV center and other spins of the ensemble to achieve quantum gate fidelities well exceeding 99%. Notably, our method can be applied to weakly coupled, distant spins representing a scalable procedure that exploits the exceptional properties of nuclear spins in diamond as robust quantum memories.

  17. Spin network quantum simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Marzuoli, Annalisa; Rasetti, Mario

    2002-01-01

    We propose a general setting for a universal representation of the quantum structure on which quantum information stands, whose dynamical evolution (information manipulation) is based on angular momentum recoupling theory. Such scheme complies with the notion of 'quantum simulator' in the sense of Feynmann, and is shown to be related with the topological quantum field theory approach to quantum computation.

  18. Introduction to quantum computers

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Gennady P; Mainieri, Ronnie; Tsifrinovich, Vladimir I

    1998-01-01

    Quantum computing promises to solve problems which are intractable on digital computers. Highly parallel quantum algorithms can decrease the computational time for some problems by many orders of magnitude. This important book explains how quantum computers can do these amazing things. Several algorithms are illustrated: the discrete Fourier transform, Shor’s algorithm for prime factorization; algorithms for quantum logic gates; physical implementations of quantum logic gates in ion traps and in spin chains; the simplest schemes for quantum error correction; correction of errors caused by im

  19. Quantum Statistical Mechanics on a Quantum Computer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H. De; Hams, A.H.; Michielsen, K.; Miyashita, S.; Saito, K.; Saito, E.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a simulation method for a quantum spin model of a generic, general purpose quantum computer. The use of this quantum computer simulator is illustrated through several implementations of Grover’s database search algorithm. Some preliminary results on the stability of quantum algorithms

  20. Quantum computers and quantum computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiev, Kamil' A

    2005-01-01

    This review outlines the principles of operation of quantum computers and their elements. The theory of ideal computers that do not interact with the environment and are immune to quantum decohering processes is presented. Decohering processes in quantum computers are investigated. The review considers methods for correcting quantum computing errors arising from the decoherence of the state of the quantum computer, as well as possible methods for the suppression of the decohering processes. A brief enumeration of proposed quantum computer realizations concludes the review. (reviews of topical problems)

  1. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the first part of this article, we had looked at how quantum physics can be harnessed to make the building blocks of a quantum computer. In this concluding part, we look at algorithms which can exploit the power of this computational device, and some practical difficulties in building such a device. Quantum Algorithms.

  2. Defects in Quantum Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Zurek, Wojciech H; Zwolak, Michael

    2018-03-14

    The shift of interest from general purpose quantum computers to adiabatic quantum computing or quantum annealing calls for a broadly applicable and easy to implement test to assess how quantum or adiabatic is a specific hardware. Here we propose such a test based on an exactly solvable many body system-the quantum Ising chain in transverse field-and implement it on the D-Wave machine. An ideal adiabatic quench of the quantum Ising chain should lead to an ordered broken symmetry ground state with all spins aligned in the same direction. An actual quench can be imperfect due to decoherence, noise, flaws in the implemented Hamiltonian, or simply too fast to be adiabatic. Imperfections result in topological defects: Spins change orientation, kinks punctuating ordered sections of the chain. The number of such defects quantifies the extent by which the quantum computer misses the ground state, and is, therefore, imperfect.

  3. Quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, D.

    1992-01-01

    As computers become ever more complex, they inevitably become smaller. This leads to a need for components which are fabricated and operate on increasingly smaller size scales. Quantum theory is already taken into account in microelectronics design. This article explores how quantum theory will need to be incorporated into computers in future in order to give them their components functionality. Computation tasks which depend on quantum effects will become possible. Physicists may have to reconsider their perspective on computation in the light of understanding developed in connection with universal quantum computers. (UK)

  4. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It was suggested that the dynamics of quantum systems could be used to perform computation in a much more efficient way. After this initial excitement, things slowed down for some time till 1994 when Peter Shor announced his polynomial time factorization algorithm 1 which uses quantum dynamics. The study of quantum ...

  5. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    quantum dynamics. The study of quantum systems for computation has come into its own since then. In this article we will look at a few concepts which make this framewor k so powerful. 2. Quantum Physics Basics. Consider an electron (say, in a H atom) with two energy levels (ground state and one excited state). In general ...

  6. Barrier versus tilt exchange gate operations in spin-based quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2018-04-01

    We present a theory for understanding the exchange interaction between electron spins in neighboring quantum dots, either by changing the detuning of the two quantum dots or independently tuning the tunneling barrier between quantum dots. The Hubbard model and a more realistic confining-potential model are used to investigate how the tilting and barrier control affect the effective exchange coupling and thus the gate fidelity in both the detuning and symmetric regimes. We show that the exchange coupling is less sensitive to the charge noise through tunnel barrier control (while allowing for exchange coupling operations on a sweet spot where the exchange interaction has zero derivative with respect to the detuning). Both GaAs and Si quantum dots are considered, and we compare our results with experimental data showing qualitative agreements. Our results answer the open question of why barrier gates are preferable to tilt gates for exchange-based gate operations.

  7. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 9. Quantum Computing - Building Blocks of a Quantum Computer. C S Vijay Vishal Gupta. General Article Volume 5 Issue 9 September 2000 pp 69-81. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The subject of quantum computing brings together ideas from classical information theory, computer science, and quantum physics. This review aims to summarize not just quantum computing, but the whole subject of quantum information theory. Information can be identified as the most general thing which must propagate from a cause to an effect. It therefore has a fundamentally important role in the science of physics. However, the mathematical treatment of information, especially information processing, is quite recent, dating from the mid-20th century. This has meant that the full significance of information as a basic concept in physics is only now being discovered. This is especially true in quantum mechanics. The theory of quantum information and computing puts this significance on a firm footing, and has led to some profound and exciting new insights into the natural world. Among these are the use of quantum states to permit the secure transmission of classical information (quantum cryptography), the use of quantum entanglement to permit reliable transmission of quantum states (teleportation), the possibility of preserving quantum coherence in the presence of irreversible noise processes (quantum error correction), and the use of controlled quantum evolution for efficient computation (quantum computation). The common theme of all these insights is the use of quantum entanglement as a computational resource. It turns out that information theory and quantum mechanics fit together very well. In order to explain their relationship, this review begins with an introduction to classical information theory and computer science, including Shannon's theorem, error correcting codes, Turing machines and computational complexity. The principles of quantum mechanics are then outlined, and the Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) experiment described. The EPR-Bell correlations, and quantum entanglement in general, form the essential new ingredient which distinguishes quantum from

  9. Spin squeezing and quantum correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2 states. A coherent spin-s state. (CSS) θ φ can then be thought of as having no quantum correlations as the constituent. 2s elementary spins point in the same direction ˆn(θ φ) which is the mean spin direction. 2. State classification and squeezing. In order to discuss squeezing, we begin with the squeezing condition itself.

  10. Quantum computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, T D; Jelezko, F; Laflamme, R; Nakamura, Y; Monroe, C; O'Brien, J L

    2010-03-04

    Over the past several decades, quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing information encoded in systems that exhibit unique quantum properties? Today it is understood that the answer is yes, and many research groups around the world are working towards the highly ambitious technological goal of building a quantum computer, which would dramatically improve computational power for particular tasks. A number of physical systems, spanning much of modern physics, are being developed for quantum computation. However, it remains unclear which technology, if any, will ultimately prove successful. Here we describe the latest developments for each of the leading approaches and explain the major challenges for the future.

  11. Spin Switching via Quantum Dot Spin Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergs, N. M.; Bender, S. A.; Duine, R. A.; Schuricht, D.

    2018-01-01

    We develop a theory for spin transport and magnetization dynamics in a quantum dot spin valve, i.e., two magnetic reservoirs coupled to a quantum dot. Our theory is able to take into account effects of strong correlations. We demonstrate that, as a result of these strong correlations, the dot gate voltage enables control over the current-induced torques on the magnets and, in particular, enables voltage-controlled magnetic switching. The electrical resistance of the structure can be used to read out the magnetic state. Our model may be realized by a number of experimental systems, including magnetic scanning-tunneling microscope tips and artificial quantum dot systems.

  12. Quantum computation with superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Irastorza Gabilondo, Amaia

    2017-01-01

    Quantum computation using supercoducting qubits. Qubits are quantum bits used in quantum computers. Superconducting qubits are a strong option for building a quantum computer. But not just that, as they are macroscopic objects they question the limits of quantum physics.

  13. Quantum Computation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 9. Quantum Computation - Particle and Wave Aspects of Algorithms. Apoorva Patel. General Article Volume 16 Issue 9 September 2011 pp 821-835. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Universal quantum computing with nanowire double quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Peng

    2011-01-01

    We present a method for implementing universal quantum computing using a singlet and triplets of nanowire double quantum dots coupled to a one-dimensional transmission line resonator. This method is suitable and of interest for both quantum computing and quantum control with inhibition of spontaneous emission, enhanced spin qubit lifetime, strong coupling and quantum nondemolition measurements of spin qubits. We analyze the performance and stability of all the required operations and emphasize that all techniques are feasible with current experimental technology.

  15. Molecular spin qudits for quantum algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pineda, Eufemio; Godfrin, Clément; Balestro, Franck; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Ruben, Mario

    2018-01-22

    Presently, one of the most ambitious technological goals is the development of devices working under the laws of quantum mechanics. One prominent target is the quantum computer, which would allow the processing of information at quantum level for purposes not achievable with even the most powerful computer resources. The large-scale implementation of quantum information would be a game changer for current technology, because it would allow unprecedented parallelised computation and secure encryption based on the principles of quantum superposition and entanglement. Currently, there are several physical platforms racing to achieve the level of performance required for the quantum hardware to step into the realm of practical quantum information applications. Several materials have been proposed to fulfil this task, ranging from quantum dots, Bose-Einstein condensates, spin impurities, superconducting circuits, molecules, amongst others. Magnetic molecules are among the list of promising building blocks, due to (i) their intrinsic monodispersity, (ii) discrete energy levels (iii) the possibility of chemical quantum state engineering, and (iv) their multilevel characteristics that lead to Qudits, where the dimension of the Hilbert space is d > 2. Herein we review how a molecular nuclear spin qudit, (d = 4), known as TbPc 2 , gathers all the necessary requirements to perform as a molecular hardware platform with a first generation of molecular devices enabling even quantum algorithm operations.

  16. Nuclear Spins in Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erlingsson, S.I.

    2003-01-01

    The main theme of this thesis is the hyperfine interaction between the many lattice nuclear spins and electron spins localized in GaAs quantum dots. This interaction is an intrinsic property of the material. Despite the fact that this interaction is rather weak, it can, as shown in this thesis,

  17. Spin waves and spin instabilities in quantum plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Andreev, P. A.; Kuz'menkov, L. S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe main ideas of method of many-particle quantum hydrodynamics allows to derive equations for description of quantum plasma evolution. We also present definitions of collective quantum variables suitable for quantum plasmas. We show that evolution of magnetic moments (spins) in quantum plasmas leads to several new branches of wave dispersion: spin-electromagnetic plasma waves and self-consistent spin waves. Propagation of neutron beams through quantum plasmas is also considered. Inst...

  18. Relativistic quantum chemistry on quantum computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veis, L.; Visnak, J.; Fleig, T.

    2012-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed a remarkable interest in the application of quantum computing for solving problems in quantum chemistry more efficiently than classical computers allow. Very recently, proof-of-principle experimental realizations have been reported. However, so far only...... the nonrelativistic regime (i.e., the Schrodinger equation) has been explored, while it is well known that relativistic effects can be very important in chemistry. We present a quantum algorithm for relativistic computations of molecular energies. We show how to efficiently solve the eigenproblem of the Dirac......-Coulomb Hamiltonian on a quantum computer and demonstrate the functionality of the proposed procedure by numerical simulations of computations of the spin-orbit splitting in the SbH molecule. Finally, we propose quantum circuits with three qubits and nine or ten controlled-NOT (CNOT) gates, which implement a proof...

  19. Disorder and Quantum Spin Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N.; Bonville, P.; Lhotel, E.; Guitteny, S.; Wildes, A.; Decorse, C.; Ciomaga Hatnean, M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Mirebeau, I.; Petit, S.

    2017-10-01

    We report on diffuse neutron scattering experiments providing evidence for the presence of random strains in the quantum spin-ice candidate Pr2Zr2O7 . Since Pr3 + is a non-Kramers ion, the strain deeply modifies the picture of Ising magnetic moments governing the low-temperature properties of this material. It is shown that the derived strain distribution accounts for the temperature dependence of the specific heat and of the spin-excitation spectra. Taking advantage of mean-field and spin-dynamics simulations, we argue that the randomness in Pr2Zr2O7 promotes a new state of matter, which is disordered yet characterized by short-range antiferroquadrupolar correlations, and from which emerge spin-ice-like excitations. Thus, this study gives an original research route in the field of quantum spin ice.

  20. Disorder and Quantum Spin Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Martin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on diffuse neutron scattering experiments providing evidence for the presence of random strains in the quantum spin-ice candidate Pr_{2}Zr_{2}O_{7}. Since Pr^{3+} is a non-Kramers ion, the strain deeply modifies the picture of Ising magnetic moments governing the low-temperature properties of this material. It is shown that the derived strain distribution accounts for the temperature dependence of the specific heat and of the spin-excitation spectra. Taking advantage of mean-field and spin-dynamics simulations, we argue that the randomness in Pr_{2}Zr_{2}O_{7} promotes a new state of matter, which is disordered yet characterized by short-range antiferroquadrupolar correlations, and from which emerge spin-ice-like excitations. Thus, this study gives an original research route in the field of quantum spin ice.

  1. An Efficient Algorithm for Simulating the Real-Time Quantum Dynamics of a Single Spin-1/2 Coupled to Specific Spin-1/2 Baths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novotny, M.A.; Guerra, M.; Raedt, H. De; Michielsen, K.; Jin, F.

    2012-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for the computation of the real-time dependence of a single quantum spin-1/2 coupled to a specific set of quantum spin-1/2 baths is presented. The specific spin baths have couplings only with the spin operators Sx between bath spins and the central spin. We calculate spin

  2. Quantum walk computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-01-01

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer

  3. Molecular Magnets for Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takayoshi

    2009-06-01

    We review recent progress in molecular magnets especially in the viewpoint of the application for quantum computing. After a brief introduction to single-molecule magnets (SMMs), a method for qubit manipulation by using non-equidistant spin sublevels of a SMM will be introduced. A weakly-coupled dimer of two SMMs is also a candidate for quantum computing, which shows no quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) at zero field. In the AF ring Cr7Ni system, the large tunnel splitting is a great advantage to reduce decoherence during manipulation, which can be a possible candidate to realize quantum computer devices in future.

  4. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  5. Quantum walks, quantum gates, and quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, Andrew P.; Stamp, P. C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The physics of quantum walks on graphs is formulated in Hamiltonian language, both for simple quantum walks and for composite walks, where extra discrete degrees of freedom live at each node of the graph. It is shown how to map between quantum walk Hamiltonians and Hamiltonians for qubit systems and quantum circuits; this is done for both single-excitation and multiexcitation encodings. Specific examples of spin chains, as well as static and dynamic systems of qubits, are mapped to quantum walks, and walks on hyperlattices and hypercubes are mapped to various gate systems. We also show how to map a quantum circuit performing the quantum Fourier transform, the key element of Shor's algorithm, to a quantum walk system doing the same. The results herein are an essential preliminary to a Hamiltonian formulation of quantum walks in which coupling to a dynamic quantum environment is included

  6. Quantum spin correction scheme based on spin-correlation functional for Kohn-Sham spin density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Shusuke; Takeda, Ryo; Nakata, Kazuto; Takada, Toshikazu; Shoji, Mitsuo; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple quantum correction scheme for ab initio Kohn-Sham spin density functional theory (KS-SDFT). This scheme is based on a mapping from ab initio results to a Heisenberg model Hamiltonian. The effective exchange integral is estimated by using energies and spin correlation functionals calculated by ab initio KS-SDFT. The quantum-corrected spin-correlation functional is open to be designed to cover specific quantum spin fluctuations. In this article, we present a simple correction for dinuclear compounds having multiple bonds. The computational results are discussed in relation to multireference (MR) DFT, by which we treat the quantum many-body effects explicitly

  7. Quantum spin quadrumer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatua, Subhankar; Shankar, R.; Ganesh, R.

    2018-02-01

    A fundamental motif in frustrated magnetism is the fully mutually coupled cluster of N spins, with each spin coupled to every other spin. Clusters with N =2 and 3 have been extensively studied as building blocks of square and triangular lattice antiferromagnets. In both cases, large-S semiclassical descriptions have been fruitfully constructed, providing insights into the physics of macroscopic magnetic systems. Here, we develop a semiclassical theory for the N =4 cluster. This problem has rich mathematical structure with a ground-state space that has nontrivial topology. We show that ground states are appropriately parametrized by a unit vector order parameter and a rotation matrix. Remarkably, in the low-energy description, the physics of the cluster reduces to that of an emergent free spin-S spin and a rigid rotor. This successfully explains the spectrum of the quadrumer and its associated degeneracies. However, this mapping does not hold in the vicinity of collinear ground states due to a subtle effect that arises from the nonmanifold nature of the ground-state space. We demonstrate this by an analysis of soft fluctuations, showing that collinear states have a larger number of soft modes. Nevertheless, as these singularities only occur on a subset of measure zero, the mapping to a spin and a rotor provides a good description of the quadrumer. We interpret thermodynamic properties of the quadrumer that are accessible in molecular magnets, in terms of the rotor and spin degrees of freedom. Our study paves the way for field theoretic descriptions of systems such as pyrochlore magnets.

  8. Physics of quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belokurov, V.V.; Khrustalev, O.A.; Sadovnichij, V.A.; Timofeevskaya, O.D.

    2003-01-01

    In the paper, the modern status of the theory of quantum computation is considered. The fundamental principles of quantum computers and their basic notions such as quantum processors and computational basis states of the quantum Turing machine as well as the quantum Fourier transform are discussed. Some possible experimental realizations on the basis of NMR methods are given

  9. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  10. Quantum computational supremacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrow, Aram W; Montanaro, Ashley

    2017-09-13

    The field of quantum algorithms aims to find ways to speed up the solution of computational problems by using a quantum computer. A key milestone in this field will be when a universal quantum computer performs a computational task that is beyond the capability of any classical computer, an event known as quantum supremacy. This would be easier to achieve experimentally than full-scale quantum computing, but involves new theoretical challenges. Here we present the leading proposals to achieve quantum supremacy, and discuss how we can reliably compare the power of a classical computer to the power of a quantum computer.

  11. In Vivo EPR Resolution Enhancement Using Techniques Known from Quantum Computing Spin Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Robabeh; Halpern, Howard J; Takui, Takeji

    2017-01-01

    A crucial issue with in vivo biological/medical EPR is its low signal-to-noise ratio, giving rise to the low spectroscopic resolution. We propose quantum hyperpolarization techniques based on 'Heat Bath Algorithmic Cooling', allowing possible approaches for improving the resolution in magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging.

  12. Spin squeezing and quantum correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spin squeezing and quantum correlations. K S MALLESH1, SWARNAMALA SIRSI2, MAHMOUD A A SBAIH1, P N DEEPAK1 and G RAMACHANDRAN3. 1Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006, India. 2 Department of Physics, Yuvaraja's College, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 005, ...

  13. Coherent electron-spin-resonance manipulation of three individual spins in a triple quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noiri, A. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Yoneda, J.; Nakajima, T.; Otsuka, T.; Delbecq, M. R.; Takeda, K.; Tarucha, S. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); RIKEN, Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Amaha, S.; Allison, G. [RIKEN, Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-04-11

    Quantum dot arrays provide a promising platform for quantum information processing. For universal quantum simulation and computation, one central issue is to demonstrate the exhaustive controllability of quantum states. Here, we report the addressable manipulation of three single electron spins in a triple quantum dot using a technique combining electron-spin-resonance and a micro-magnet. The micro-magnet makes the local Zeeman field difference between neighboring spins much larger than the nuclear field fluctuation, which ensures the addressable driving of electron-spin-resonance by shifting the resonance condition for each spin. We observe distinct coherent Rabi oscillations for three spins in a semiconductor triple quantum dot with up to 25 MHz spin rotation frequencies. This individual manipulation over three spins enables us to arbitrarily change the magnetic spin quantum number of the three spin system, and thus to operate a triple-dot device as a three-qubit system in combination with the existing technique of exchange operations among three spins.

  14. Comb entanglement in quantum spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keating, J. P.; Mezzadri, F.; Novaes, M.

    2006-01-01

    Bipartite entanglement in the ground state of a chain of N quantum spins can be quantified either by computing pairwise concurrence or by dividing the chain into two complementary subsystems. In the latter case the smaller subsystem is usually a single spin or a block of adjacent spins and the entanglement differentiates between critical and noncritical regimes. Here we extend this approach by considering a more general setting: our smaller subsystem S A consists of a comb of L spins, spaced p sites apart. Our results are thus not restricted to a simple area law, but contain nonlocal information, parametrized by the spacing p. For the XX model we calculate the von Neumann entropy analytically when N→∞ and investigate its dependence on L and p. We find that an external magnetic field induces an unexpected length scale for entanglement in this case

  15. Quantum Computing for Computer Architects

    CERN Document Server

    Metodi, Tzvetan

    2011-01-01

    Quantum computers can (in theory) solve certain problems far faster than a classical computer running any known classical algorithm. While existing technologies for building quantum computers are in their infancy, it is not too early to consider their scalability and reliability in the context of the design of large-scale quantum computers. To architect such systems, one must understand what it takes to design and model a balanced, fault-tolerant quantum computer architecture. The goal of this lecture is to provide architectural abstractions for the design of a quantum computer and to explore

  16. Experimental Realization of a Quantum Spin Pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, Susan; Potok, R.; M. Marcus, C.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate the operation of a quantum spin pump based on cyclic radio-frequency excitation of a GaAs quantum dot, including the ability to pump pure spin without pumping charge. The device takes advantage of bidirectional mesoscopic fluctuations of pumped current, made spin......-dependent by the application of an in-plane Zeeman field. Spin currents are measured by placing the pump in a focusing geometry with a spin-selective collector....

  17. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To start the quantum algorithm we prepare a super- position of numbers from 0 to M - 1 using the Walsh-. Hadamard transformation on ... Hence, we create a state in which the ampli- tudes have the same period as f. This we do by measur- .... IT Business Incubator. Department of Physics. liT Powai,. Mumbai 400 076, India.

  18. Storing quantum information in spins and high-sensitivity ESR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, John J. L.; Bertet, Patrice

    2018-02-01

    Quantum information, encoded within the states of quantum systems, represents a novel and rich form of information which has inspired new types of computers and communications systems. Many diverse electron spin systems have been studied with a view to storing quantum information, including molecular radicals, point defects and impurities in inorganic systems, and quantum dots in semiconductor devices. In these systems, spin coherence times can exceed seconds, single spins can be addressed through electrical and optical methods, and new spin systems with advantageous properties continue to be identified. Spin ensembles strongly coupled to microwave resonators can, in principle, be used to store the coherent states of single microwave photons, enabling so-called microwave quantum memories. We discuss key requirements in realising such memories, including considerations for superconducting resonators whose frequency can be tuned onto resonance with the spins. Finally, progress towards microwave quantum memories and other developments in the field of superconducting quantum devices are being used to push the limits of sensitivity of inductively-detected electron spin resonance. The state-of-the-art currently stands at around 65 spins per √{ Hz } , with prospects to scale down to even fewer spins.

  19. Storing quantum information in spins and high-sensitivity ESR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, John J L; Bertet, Patrice

    2018-02-01

    Quantum information, encoded within the states of quantum systems, represents a novel and rich form of information which has inspired new types of computers and communications systems. Many diverse electron spin systems have been studied with a view to storing quantum information, including molecular radicals, point defects and impurities in inorganic systems, and quantum dots in semiconductor devices. In these systems, spin coherence times can exceed seconds, single spins can be addressed through electrical and optical methods, and new spin systems with advantageous properties continue to be identified. Spin ensembles strongly coupled to microwave resonators can, in principle, be used to store the coherent states of single microwave photons, enabling so-called microwave quantum memories. We discuss key requirements in realising such memories, including considerations for superconducting resonators whose frequency can be tuned onto resonance with the spins. Finally, progress towards microwave quantum memories and other developments in the field of superconducting quantum devices are being used to push the limits of sensitivity of inductively-detected electron spin resonance. The state-of-the-art currently stands at around 65 spins per Hz, with prospects to scale down to even fewer spins. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Spin Splitting in Different Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Yafei

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the spin splitting in four undoped asymmetric quantum wells in the absence of external electric field and magnetic field. The quantum well geometry dependence of spin splitting is studied with the Rashba and the Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling included. The results show that the structure of quantum well plays an important role in spin splitting. The Rashba and the Dresselhaus spin splitting in four asymmetric quantum wells are quite different. The origin of the distinction is discussed in this work. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  1. Optimal blind quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantri, Atul; Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A; Fitzsimons, Joseph F

    2013-12-06

    Blind quantum computation allows a client with limited quantum capabilities to interact with a remote quantum computer to perform an arbitrary quantum computation, while keeping the description of that computation hidden from the remote quantum computer. While a number of protocols have been proposed in recent years, little is currently understood about the resources necessary to accomplish the task. Here, we present general techniques for upper and lower bounding the quantum communication necessary to perform blind quantum computation, and use these techniques to establish concrete bounds for common choices of the client's quantum capabilities. Our results show that the universal blind quantum computation protocol of Broadbent, Fitzsimons, and Kashefi, comes within a factor of 8/3 of optimal when the client is restricted to preparing single qubits. However, we describe a generalization of this protocol which requires exponentially less quantum communication when the client has a more sophisticated device.

  2. Quantum Spin Lenses in Atomic Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Glaetzle

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose and discuss quantum spin lenses, where quantum states of delocalized spin excitations in an atomic medium are focused in space in a coherent quantum process down to (essentially single atoms. These can be employed to create controlled interactions in a quantum light-matter interface, where photonic qubits stored in an atomic ensemble are mapped to a quantum register represented by single atoms. We propose Hamiltonians for quantum spin lenses as inhomogeneous spin models on lattices, which can be realized with Rydberg atoms in 1D, 2D, and 3D, and with strings of trapped ions. We discuss both linear and nonlinear quantum spin lenses: in a nonlinear lens, repulsive spin-spin interactions lead to focusing dynamics conditional to the number of spin excitations. This allows the mapping of quantum superpositions of delocalized spin excitations to superpositions of spatial spin patterns, which can be addressed by light fields and manipulated. Finally, we propose multifocal quantum spin lenses as a way to generate and distribute entanglement between distant atoms in an atomic lattice array.

  3. Ultrafast optical control of individual quantum dot spin qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Greve, Kristiaan; Press, David; McMahon, Peter L; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Single spins in semiconductor quantum dots form a promising platform for solid-state quantum information processing. The spin-up and spin-down states of a single electron or hole, trapped inside a quantum dot, can represent a single qubit with a reasonably long decoherence time. The spin qubit can be optically coupled to excited (charged exciton) states that are also trapped in the quantum dot, which provides a mechanism to quickly initialize, manipulate and measure the spin state with optical pulses, and to interface between a stationary matter qubit and a ‘flying’ photonic qubit for quantum communication and distributed quantum information processing. The interaction of the spin qubit with light may be enhanced by placing the quantum dot inside a monolithic microcavity. An entire system, consisting of a two-dimensional array of quantum dots and a planar microcavity, may plausibly be constructed by modern semiconductor nano-fabrication technology and could offer a path toward chip-sized scalable quantum repeaters and quantum computers. This article reviews the recent experimental developments in optical control of single quantum dot spins for quantum information processing. We highlight demonstrations of a complete set of all-optical single-qubit operations on a single quantum dot spin: initialization, an arbitrary SU(2) gate, and measurement. We review the decoherence and dephasing mechanisms due to hyperfine interaction with the nuclear-spin bath, and show how the single-qubit operations can be combined to perform spin echo sequences that extend the qubit decoherence from a few nanoseconds to several microseconds, more than 5 orders of magnitude longer than the single-qubit gate time. Two-qubit coupling is discussed, both within a single chip by means of exchange coupling of nearby spins and optically induced geometric phases, as well as over longer-distances. Long-distance spin–spin entanglement can be generated if each spin can emit a photon that is

  4. Quantum spin transport in semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Christoph

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we study and quantitatively predict the quantum spin Hall effect, the spin-orbit interaction induced intrinsic spin-Hall effect, spin-orbit induced magnetizations, and spin-polarized electric currents in nanostructured two-dimensional electron or hole gases with and without the presence of magnetic fields. We propose concrete device geometries for the generation, detection, and manipulation of spin polarization and spin-polarized currents. To this end a novel multi-band quantum transport theory, that we termed the multi-scattering Buettiker probe model, is developed. The method treats quantum interference and coherence in open quantum devices on the same footing as incoherent scattering and incorporates inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a gauge-invariant and nonperturbative manner. The spin-orbit interaction parameters that control effects such as band energy spin splittings, g-factors, and spin relaxations are calculated microscopically in terms of an atomistic relativistic tight-binding model. We calculate the transverse electron focusing in external magnetic and electric fields. We have performed detailed studies of the intrinsic spin-Hall effect and its inverse effect in various material systems and geometries. We find a geometry dependent threshold value for the spin-orbit interaction for the inverse intrinsic spin-Hall effect that cannot be met by n-type GaAs structures. We propose geometries that spin polarize electric current in zero magnetic field and analyze the out-of-plane spin polarization by all electrical means. We predict unexpectedly large spin-orbit induced spin-polarization effects in zero magnetic fields that are caused by resonant enhancements of the spin-orbit interaction in specially band engineered and geometrically designed p-type nanostructures. We propose a concrete realization of a spin transistor in HgTe quantum wells, that employs the helical edge channel in the quantum spin Hall effect.

  5. Quantum spin transport in semiconductor nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we study and quantitatively predict the quantum spin Hall effect, the spin-orbit interaction induced intrinsic spin-Hall effect, spin-orbit induced magnetizations, and spin-polarized electric currents in nanostructured two-dimensional electron or hole gases with and without the presence of magnetic fields. We propose concrete device geometries for the generation, detection, and manipulation of spin polarization and spin-polarized currents. To this end a novel multi-band quantum transport theory, that we termed the multi-scattering Buettiker probe model, is developed. The method treats quantum interference and coherence in open quantum devices on the same footing as incoherent scattering and incorporates inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a gauge-invariant and nonperturbative manner. The spin-orbit interaction parameters that control effects such as band energy spin splittings, g-factors, and spin relaxations are calculated microscopically in terms of an atomistic relativistic tight-binding model. We calculate the transverse electron focusing in external magnetic and electric fields. We have performed detailed studies of the intrinsic spin-Hall effect and its inverse effect in various material systems and geometries. We find a geometry dependent threshold value for the spin-orbit interaction for the inverse intrinsic spin-Hall effect that cannot be met by n-type GaAs structures. We propose geometries that spin polarize electric current in zero magnetic field and analyze the out-of-plane spin polarization by all electrical means. We predict unexpectedly large spin-orbit induced spin-polarization effects in zero magnetic fields that are caused by resonant enhancements of the spin-orbit interaction in specially band engineered and geometrically designed p-type nanostructures. We propose a concrete realization of a spin transistor in HgTe quantum wells, that employs the helical edge channel in the quantum spin Hall effect.

  6. High-field spin dynamics of antiferromagnetic quantum spin chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enderle, M.; Regnault, L.P.; Broholm, C.

    2000-01-01

    present recent work on the high-field spin dynamics of the S = I antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains NENP (Haldane ground state) and CsNiCl3 (quasi-1D HAF close to the quantum critical point), the uniform S = 1/2 chain CTS, and the spin-Peierls system CuGeO3. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B,V. All rights......The characteristic internal order of macroscopic quantum ground states in one-dimensional spin systems is usually not directly accessible, but reflected in the spin dynamics and the field dependence of the magnetic excitations. In high magnetic fields quantum phase transitions are expected. We...

  7. Quantum computing and probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, David K

    2009-11-25

    Over the past two decades, quantum computing has become a popular and promising approach to trying to solve computationally difficult problems. Missing in many descriptions of quantum computing is just how probability enters into the process. Here, we discuss some simple examples of how uncertainty and probability enter, and how this and the ideas of quantum computing challenge our interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is found that this uncertainty can lead to intrinsic decoherence, and this raises challenges for error correction.

  8. Quantum computing and probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferry, David K

    2009-01-01

    Over the past two decades, quantum computing has become a popular and promising approach to trying to solve computationally difficult problems. Missing in many descriptions of quantum computing is just how probability enters into the process. Here, we discuss some simple examples of how uncertainty and probability enter, and how this and the ideas of quantum computing challenge our interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is found that this uncertainty can lead to intrinsic decoherence, and this raises challenges for error correction. (viewpoint)

  9. Quantum mechanics and computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirac Sasturain, J. I.

    2000-01-01

    We review how some of the basic principles of Quantum Mechanics can be used in the field of computation. In particular, we explain why a quantum computer can perform certain tasks in a much more efficient way than the computers we have available nowadays. We give the requirements for a quantum system to be able to implement a quantum computer and illustrate these requirements in some particular physical situations. (Author) 16 refs

  10. Cluster State Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Computation Background In the standard quantum circuit model ( QCM ) paradigm, quantum computations are executed by successive unitary operations acting...overhead in the standard QCM to photon-based quantum computation. In the OWQC approach a quantum computation proceeds as follows: (i) a classical...the MBQC paradigm and its comparison/contrast with the usual QCM approach. Grover’s search algorithm (GSA) serves as an important prototypical

  11. Cluster State Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Computation Background In the standard Quantum Circuit Model ( QCM ) paradigm, quantum computations are executed by successive unitary operations acting upon...resource overhead in the standard QCM to photon-based quantum computation. In the OWQC approach a quantum computation proceeds as follows: (i) A classical...Grover’s search algorithm (GSA) on an unsorted list of elements in the MBQC paradigm, and its comparison/contrast with the usual QCM approach. GSA

  12. Electron Spin Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, X.; Belhadj, T.; Urbaszek, B.; Amand, T.; Krebs, O.; Lemaitre, A.; Voisin, P.

    2011-01-01

    An electron spin confined to a semiconductor quantum dot is not subject to the classical spin relaxation mechanisms known for free carriers but it strongly interacts with the nuclear spin system via the hyperfine interaction. We show in time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy experiments on ensembles of self assembled InAs quantum dots in GaAs that this interaction leads to strong electron spin dephasing.

  13. Spin current through quantum-dot spin valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J; Xing, D Y

    2006-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of the influence of the Coulomb interaction on the equilibrium spin current in a quantum-dot spin valve, in which the quantum dot described by the Anderson impurity model is coupled to two ferromagnetic leads with noncollinear magnetizations. In the Kondo regime, electrons transmit through the quantum dot via higher-order virtual processes, in which the spin of either lead electrons or a localized electron on the quantum dot may reverse. It is found that the magnitude of the spin current decreases with increasing Coulomb interactions due to spin flip effects on the dot. However, the spatial direction of the spin current remains unchanged; it is determined only by the exchange coupling between two noncollinear magnetizations

  14. Quantum computing: Quantum advantage deferred

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Andrew M.

    2017-12-01

    A type of optics experiment called a boson sampler could be among the easiest routes to demonstrating the power of quantum computers. But recent work shows that super-classical boson sampling may be a long way off.

  15. Quantum information. Teleportation - cryptography - quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenneker, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test facility, quantum teleportation, the reality of quanta, interaction-free quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view in the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  16. Quantum analogue computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  17. Scalable optical quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manykin, E A; Mel'nichenko, E V

    2014-01-01

    A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr 3+ , regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y 2 SiO 5 ) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications. (quantum computer)

  18. Spin chain for quantum strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beisert, N.

    2005-01-01

    We review and compare the integrable structures in N=4 gauge theory and string theory on AdS 5 x S 5 . Recently, Bethe ansaetze for gauge theory/weak coupling and string theory/strong coupling were proposed to describe scaling dimensions in the su(2) subsector. Here we investigate the Bethe equations for quantum string theory, naively extrapolated to weak coupling. Excitingly, we find a spin chain Hamiltonian similar, but not equal, to the gauge theory dilatation operator. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Quantum Spin Transport in Mesoscopic Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zein W. A.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Spin-dependent conductance of ballistic mesoscopic interferometer is investigated. The quantum interferometer is in the form of ring, in which a quantum dot is embedded in one arm. This quantum dot is connected to one lead via tunnel barrier. Both Aharonov- Casher and Aharonov-Bohm e ects are studied. Our results confirm the interplay of spin-orbit coupling and quantum interference e ects in such confined quantum systems. This investigation is valuable for spintronics application, for example, quantum information processing.

  20. Quantum discord and quantum phase transition in spin chains

    OpenAIRE

    Dillenschneider, Raoul

    2008-01-01

    Quantum phase transitions of the transverse Ising and antiferromagnetic XXZ spin S=1/2 chains are studied using quantum discord. Quantum discord allows the measure of quantum correlations present in many-body quantum systems. It is shown that the amount of quantum correlations increases close to the critical points. The observations are in agreement with the information provided by the concurrence which measures the entanglement of the many-body system.

  1. Quantum Knitting Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Matsuo, Shigemasa; Hatakenaka, Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    We propose a fluxon-controlled quantum computer incorporated with three-qubit quantum error correction using special gate operations, i.e., joint-phase and SWAP gate operations, inherent in capacitively coupled superconducting flux qubits. The proposed quantum computer acts exactly like a knitting machine at home.

  2. Electron Spins in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, R.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding and controlling the behavior of the spin degree of freedom of single electrons, confined in semiconductor quantum dots. This research work is motivated by the prospects of using the electron spin as a quantum bit (qubit), the basic

  3. Quantum computation by measurement and quantum memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    What resources are universal for quantum computation? In the standard model of a quantum computer, a computation consists of a sequence of unitary gates acting coherently on the qubits making up the computer. This requirement for coherent unitary dynamical operations is widely believed to be the critical element of quantum computation. Here we show that a very different model involving only projective measurements and quantum memory is also universal for quantum computation. In particular, no coherent unitary dynamics are involved in the computation

  4. On quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oraevsky, Anatolii N

    2000-01-01

    Attention is given to the fact that a computer whose functioning is based on the state superposition principle can be realised with classical, as well as quantum, elements. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-01-01

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  6. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-07-04

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  7. Intrinsic quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutchfield, James P.; Wiesner, Karoline

    2008-01-01

    We introduce ways to measure information storage in quantum systems, using a recently introduced computation-theoretic model that accounts for measurement effects. The first, the quantum excess entropy, quantifies the shared information between a quantum process's past and its future. The second, the quantum transient information, determines the difficulty with which an observer comes to know the internal state of a quantum process through measurements. We contrast these with von Neumann entropy and quantum entropy rate and provide a closed-form expression for the latter for the class of deterministic quantum processes

  8. Quantum computation with two-dimensional graphene quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jie-Sen; Li Zhi-Bing; Yao Dao-Xin

    2012-01-01

    We study an array of graphene nano sheets that form a two-dimensional S = 1/2 Kagome spin lattice used for quantum computation. The edge states of the graphene nano sheets are used to form quantum dots to confine electrons and perform the computation. We propose two schemes of bang-bang control to combat decoherence and realize gate operations on this array of quantum dots. It is shown that both schemes contain a great amount of information for quantum computation. The corresponding gate operations are also proposed. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  9. Entanglement entropy in random quantum spin-S chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saguia, A.; Boechat, B.; Continentino, M. A.; Sarandy, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the scaling of entanglement entropy in the random singlet phase (RSP) of disordered quantum magnetic chains of general spin S. Through an analysis of the general structure of the RSP, we show that the entanglement entropy scales logarithmically with the size of a block, and we provide a closed expression for this scaling. This result is applicable for arbitrary quantum spin chains in the RSP, being dependent only on the magnitude S of the spin. Remarkably, the logarithmic scaling holds for the disordered chain even if the pure chain with no disorder does not exhibit conformal invariance, as is the case for Heisenberg integer-spin chains. Our conclusions are supported by explicit evaluations of the entanglement entropy for random spin-1 and spin-3/2 chains using an asymptotically exact real-space renormalization group approach

  10. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  11. Scalable quantum computer architecture with coupled donor-quantum dot qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Thomas; Lo, Cheuk Chi; Weis, Christoph; Lyon, Stephen; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-08-26

    A quantum bit computing architecture includes a plurality of single spin memory donor atoms embedded in a semiconductor layer, a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, wherein a first voltage applied across at least one pair of the aligned quantum dot and donor atom controls a donor-quantum dot coupling. A method of performing quantum computing in a scalable architecture quantum computing apparatus includes arranging a pattern of single spin memory donor atoms in a semiconductor layer, forming a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, applying a first voltage across at least one aligned pair of a quantum dot and donor atom to control a donor-quantum dot coupling, and applying a second voltage between one or more quantum dots to control a Heisenberg exchange J coupling between quantum dots and to cause transport of a single spin polarized electron between quantum dots.

  12. Explorations in quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Colin P

    2011-01-01

    By the year 2020, the basic memory components of a computer will be the size of individual atoms. At such scales, the current theory of computation will become invalid. ""Quantum computing"" is reinventing the foundations of computer science and information theory in a way that is consistent with quantum physics - the most accurate model of reality currently known. Remarkably, this theory predicts that quantum computers can perform certain tasks breathtakingly faster than classical computers -- and, better yet, can accomplish mind-boggling feats such as teleporting information, breaking suppos

  13. Controlling electron quantum dot qubits by spin-orbit interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stano, P.

    2007-01-01

    Single electron confined in a quantum dot is studied. A special emphasis is laid on the spin properties and the influence of spin-orbit interactions on the system. The study is motivated by a perspective exploitation of the spin of the confined electron as a qubit, a basic building block of in a foreseen quantum computer. The electron is described using the single band effective mass approximation, with parameters typical for a lateral electrostatically defined quantum dot in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The stemming data for the analysis are obtained by numerical methods of exact diagonalization, however, all important conclusions are explained analytically. The work focuses on three main areas -- electron spectrum, phonon induced relaxation and electrically and magnetically induced Rabi oscillations. It is shown, how spin-orbit interactions influence the energy spectrum, cause finite spin relaxation and allow for all-electrical manipulation of the spin qubit. Among the main results is the discovery of easy passages, where the spin relaxation is unusually slow and the qubit is protected against parasitic electrical fields connected with manipulation by resonant electromagnetic fields. The results provide direct guide for manufacturing quantum dots with much improved properties, suitable for realizing single electron spin qubits. (orig.)

  14. Controlling electron quantum dot qubits by spin-orbit interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stano, P.

    2007-01-15

    Single electron confined in a quantum dot is studied. A special emphasis is laid on the spin properties and the influence of spin-orbit interactions on the system. The study is motivated by a perspective exploitation of the spin of the confined electron as a qubit, a basic building block of in a foreseen quantum computer. The electron is described using the single band effective mass approximation, with parameters typical for a lateral electrostatically defined quantum dot in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The stemming data for the analysis are obtained by numerical methods of exact diagonalization, however, all important conclusions are explained analytically. The work focuses on three main areas -- electron spectrum, phonon induced relaxation and electrically and magnetically induced Rabi oscillations. It is shown, how spin-orbit interactions influence the energy spectrum, cause finite spin relaxation and allow for all-electrical manipulation of the spin qubit. Among the main results is the discovery of easy passages, where the spin relaxation is unusually slow and the qubit is protected against parasitic electrical fields connected with manipulation by resonant electromagnetic fields. The results provide direct guide for manufacturing quantum dots with much improved properties, suitable for realizing single electron spin qubits. (orig.)

  15. Noise in tunneling spin current across coupled quantum spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftergood, Joshua; Takei, So

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically study the spin current and its dc noise generated between two spin-1 /2 spin chains weakly coupled at a single site in the presence of an over-population of spin excitations and a temperature elevation in one subsystem relative to the other, and we compare the corresponding transport quantities across two weakly coupled magnetic insulators hosting magnons. In the spin chain scenario, we find that applying a temperature bias exclusively leads to a vanishing spin current and a concomitant divergence in the spin Fano factor, defined as the spin current noise-to-signal ratio. This divergence is shown to have an exact analogy to the physics of electron scattering between fractional quantum Hall edge states and not to arise in the magnon scenario. We also reveal a suppression in the spin current noise that exclusively arises in the spin chain scenario due to the fermion nature of the spin-1/2 operators. We discuss how the spin Fano factor may be extracted experimentally via the inverse spin Hall effect used extensively in spintronics.

  16. Quantum Computing in Solid State Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggiero, B; Granata, C

    2006-01-01

    The aim of Quantum Computation in Solid State Systems is to report on recent theoretical and experimental results on the macroscopic quantum coherence of mesoscopic systems, as well as on solid state realization of qubits and quantum gates. Particular attention has been given to coherence effects in Josephson devices. Other solid state systems, including quantum dots, optical, ion, and spin devices which exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence are also discussed. Quantum Computation in Solid State Systems discusses experimental implementation of quantum computing and information processing devices, and in particular observations of quantum behavior in several solid state systems. On the theoretical side, the complementary expertise of the contributors provides models of the various structures in connection with the problem of minimizing decoherence.

  17. Simulating electron spin entanglement in a double quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Moreno, M. A.; Hernandez de La Luz, A. D.; Meza-Montes, Lilia

    2011-03-01

    One of the biggest advantages of having a working quantum-computing device when compared with a classical one, is the exponential speedup of calculations. This exponential increase is based on the ability of a quantum system to create and operate on entangled states. In order to study theoretically the entanglement between two electron spins, we simulate the dynamics of two electron spins in an electrostatically-defined double quantum dot with a finite barrier height between the dots. Electrons are initially confined to separated quantum dots. Barrier height is varied and the spin entanglement as a function of this variation is investigated. The evolution of the system is simulated by using a numerical approach for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for two particles. Partially supported by VIEP-BUAP.

  18. Quantum Analog Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  19. Molecular Realizations of Quantum Computing 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Mikio; Ota, Yukihiro; Rahimi, Robabeh; Kondo, Yasushi; Tada-Umezaki, Masahito

    2009-06-01

    Liquid-state NMR quantum computer: working principle and some examples / Y. Kondo -- Flux qubits, tunable coupling and beyond / A. O. Niskanen -- Josephson phase qubits, and quantum communication via a resonant cavity / M. A. Sillanpää -- Quantum computing using pulse-based electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR): molecular spin-qubits / K. Sato ... [et al.] -- Fullerene C[symbol]: a possible molecular quantum computer / T. Wakabayashi -- Molecular magnets for quantum computation / T. Kuroda -- Errors in a plausible scheme of quantum gates in Kane's model / Y. Ota -- Yet another formulation for quantum simultaneous noncooperative bimatrix games / A. SaiToh, R. Rahimi, M. Nakahara -- Continuous-variable teleportation of single-photon states and an accidental cloning of a photonic qubit in two-channel teleportation / T. Ide.

  20. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeffner, H.; Roos, C.F.; Blatt, R.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computers hold the promise of solving certain computational tasks much more efficiently than classical computers. We review recent experimental advances towards a quantum computer with trapped ions. In particular, various implementations of qubits, quantum gates and some key experiments are discussed. Furthermore, we review some implementations of quantum algorithms such as a deterministic teleportation of quantum information and an error correction scheme

  1. Scheme for Quantum Computing Immune to Decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Colin; Vatan, Farrokh

    2008-01-01

    A constructive scheme has been devised to enable mapping of any quantum computation into a spintronic circuit in which the computation is encoded in a basis that is, in principle, immune to quantum decoherence. The scheme is implemented by an algorithm that utilizes multiple physical spins to encode each logical bit in such a way that collective errors affecting all the physical spins do not disturb the logical bit. The scheme is expected to be of use to experimenters working on spintronic implementations of quantum logic. Spintronic computing devices use quantum-mechanical spins (typically, electron spins) to encode logical bits. Bits thus encoded (denoted qubits) are potentially susceptible to errors caused by noise and decoherence. The traditional model of quantum computation is based partly on the assumption that each qubit is implemented by use of a single two-state quantum system, such as an electron or other spin-1.2 particle. It can be surprisingly difficult to achieve certain gate operations . most notably, those of arbitrary 1-qubit gates . in spintronic hardware according to this model. However, ironically, certain 2-qubit interactions (in particular, spin-spin exchange interactions) can be achieved relatively easily in spintronic hardware. Therefore, it would be fortunate if it were possible to implement any 1-qubit gate by use of a spin-spin exchange interaction. While such a direct representation is not possible, it is possible to achieve an arbitrary 1-qubit gate indirectly by means of a sequence of four spin-spin exchange interactions, which could be implemented by use of four exchange gates. Accordingly, the present scheme provides for mapping any 1-qubit gate in the logical basis into an equivalent sequence of at most four spin-spin exchange interactions in the physical (encoded) basis. The complexity of the mathematical derivation of the scheme from basic quantum principles precludes a description within this article; it must suffice to report

  2. Spin-engineered quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Fleurov, V.; Ivanov, V. A.; Peeters, F. M.; Vagner, I. D.

    2001-01-01

    Spatially nonhomogeneously spin polarized nuclei are proposed as a new mechanism to monitor electron states in a nanostructure, or as a means to createn and, if necessary, reshape such nanostructures in the course of the experiment. We found that a polarization of nulear spins may lift the spin polarization of the electron states in a nanostructure and, if sufficiently strong, leads to a polarization of the electron spins. Polarized nuclear spins may form an energy landscape capable of bindin...

  3. Quantum decoration transformation for spin models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braz, F.F.; Rodrigues, F.C.; Souza, S.M. de; Rojas, Onofre

    2016-01-01

    It is quite relevant the extension of decoration transformation for quantum spin models since most of the real materials could be well described by Heisenberg type models. Here we propose an exact quantum decoration transformation and also showing interesting properties such as the persistence of symmetry and the symmetry breaking during this transformation. Although the proposed transformation, in principle, cannot be used to map exactly a quantum spin lattice model into another quantum spin lattice model, since the operators are non-commutative. However, it is possible the mapping in the “classical” limit, establishing an equivalence between both quantum spin lattice models. To study the validity of this approach for quantum spin lattice model, we use the Zassenhaus formula, and we verify how the correction could influence the decoration transformation. But this correction could be useless to improve the quantum decoration transformation because it involves the second-nearest-neighbor and further nearest neighbor couplings, which leads into a cumbersome task to establish the equivalence between both lattice models. This correction also gives us valuable information about its contribution, for most of the Heisenberg type models, this correction could be irrelevant at least up to the third order term of Zassenhaus formula. This transformation is applied to a finite size Heisenberg chain, comparing with the exact numerical results, our result is consistent for weak xy-anisotropy coupling. We also apply to bond-alternating Ising–Heisenberg chain model, obtaining an accurate result in the limit of the quasi-Ising chain.

  4. Quantum entanglement and quantum computational algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 56; Issue 2-3. Quantum entanglement ... Arvind. Quantum information processing Volume 56 Issue 2-3 February-March 2001 pp 357-365 ... The existence of entangled quantum states gives extra power to quantum computers over their classical counterparts. Quantum ...

  5. Higher-order spin and charge dynamics in a quantum dot-lead hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R; Amaha, Shinichi; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Allison, Giles; Stano, Peter; Noiri, Akito; Ito, Takumi; Loss, Daniel; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D; Tarucha, Seigo

    2017-09-22

    Understanding the dynamics of open quantum systems is important and challenging in basic physics and applications for quantum devices and quantum computing. Semiconductor quantum dots offer a good platform to explore the physics of open quantum systems because we can tune parameters including the coupling to the environment or leads. Here, we apply the fast single-shot measurement techniques from spin qubit experiments to explore the spin and charge dynamics due to tunnel coupling to a lead in a quantum dot-lead hybrid system. We experimentally observe both spin and charge time evolution via first- and second-order tunneling processes, and reveal the dynamics of the spin-flip through the intermediate state. These results enable and stimulate the exploration of spin dynamics in dot-lead hybrid systems, and may offer useful resources for spin manipulation and simulation of open quantum systems.

  6. Quantum spin dynamics in molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuenberger, M.N.; Meier, F.; Loss, D.

    2003-01-01

    The detailed theoretical understanding of quantum spin dynamics in various molecular magnets is an important step on the roadway to technological applications of these systems. Quantum effects in both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic molecular clusters are, by now, theoretically well understood. Ferromagnetic molecular clusters allow one to study the interplay of incoherent quantum tunneling and thermally activated transitions between states with different spin orientation. The Berry phase oscillations found in Fe 8 are signatures of the quantum mechanical interference of different tunneling paths. Antiferromagnetic molecular clusters are promising candidates for the observation of coherent quantum tunneling on the mesoscopic scale. Although challenging, application of molecular magnetic clusters for data storage and quantum data processing are within experimental reach already with present day technology. Refs. 77 (author)

  7. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  8. Review of quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, S.

    1992-01-01

    Digital computers are machines that can be programmed to perform logical and arithmetical operations. Contemporary digital computers are ''universal,'' in the sense that a program that runs on one computer can, if properly compiled, run on any other computer that has access to enough memory space and time. Any one universal computer can simulate the operation of any other; and the set of tasks that any such machine can perform is common to all universal machines. Since Bennett's discovery that computation can be carried out in a non-dissipative fashion, a number of Hamiltonian quantum-mechanical systems have been proposed whose time-evolutions over discrete intervals are equivalent to those of specific universal computers. The first quantum-mechanical treatment of computers was given by Benioff, who exhibited a Hamiltonian system with a basis whose members corresponded to the logical states of a Turing machine. In order to make the Hamiltonian local, in the sense that its structure depended only on the part of the computation being performed at that time, Benioff found it necessary to make the Hamiltonian time-dependent. Feynman discovered a way to make the computational Hamiltonian both local and time-independent by incorporating the direction of computation in the initial condition. In Feynman's quantum computer, the program is a carefully prepared wave packet that propagates through different computational states. Deutsch presented a quantum computer that exploits the possibility of existing in a superposition of computational states to perform tasks that a classical computer cannot, such as generating purely random numbers, and carrying out superpositions of computations as a method of parallel processing. In this paper, we show that such computers, by virtue of their common function, possess a common form for their quantum dynamics

  9. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C Language

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  10. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  11. Quantum information processing with electronic and nuclear spins in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Paul Victor

    Traditional electronic and communication devices operate by processing binary information encoded as bits. Such digital devices have led to the most advanced technologies that we encounter in our everyday lives and they influence virtually every aspect of our society. Nonetheless, there exists a much richer way to encode and process information. By encoding information in quantum mechanical states as qubits, phenomena such as coherence and entanglement can be harnessed to execute tasks that are intractable to digital devices. Under this paradigm, it should be possible to realize quantum computers, quantum communication networks and quantum sensors that outperform their classical counterparts. The electronic spin states of color-center defects in the semiconductor silicon carbide have recently emerged as promising qubit candidates. They have long-lived quantum coherence up to room temperature, they can be controlled with mature magnetic resonance techniques, and they have a built-in optical interface operating near the telecommunication bands. In this thesis I will present two of our contributions to this field. The first is the electric-field control of electron spin qubits. This development lays foundation for quantum electronics that operate via electrical gating, much like traditional electronics. The second is the universal control and entanglement of electron and nuclear spin qubits in an ensemble under ambient conditions. This development lays foundation for quantum devices that have a built-in redundancy and can operate in real-world conditions. Both developments represent important steps towards practical quantum devices in an electronic grade material.

  12. Quantum steady computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castagnoli, G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that current conceptions of quantum mechanical computers inherit from conventional digital machines two apparently interacting features, machine imperfection and temporal development of the computational process. On account of machine imperfection, the process would become ideally reversible only in the limiting case of zero speed. Therefore the process is irreversible in practice and cannot be considered to be a fundamental quantum one. By giving up classical features and using a linear, reversible and non-sequential representation of the computational process - not realizable in classical machines - the process can be identified with the mathematical form of a quantum steady state. This form of steady quantum computation would seem to have an important bearing on the notion of cognition

  13. Spin storage in quantum dot ensembles and single quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, Dominik

    2009-10-15

    This thesis deals with the investigation of spin relaxation of electrons and holes in small ensembles of self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques. Furthermore, a method to detect the spin orientation in a single quantum dot was developed in the framework of this thesis. A spin storage device was used to optically generate oriented electron spins in small frequency selected quantum dot ensembles using circularly polarized optical excitation. The spin orientation can be determined by the polarization of the time delayed electroluminescence signal generated by the device after a continuously variable storage time. The degree of spin polarized initialization was found to be limited to 0.6 at high magnetic fields, where anisotropic effects are compensated. The spin relaxation was directly measured as a function of magnetic field, lattice temperature and s-shell transition energy of the quantum dot by varying the spin storage time up to 30 ms. Very long spin lifetimes are obtained with a lower limit of T{sub 1}=20 ms at B=4 T and T=1 K. A strong magnetic field dependence T{sub 1}{proportional_to}B{sup -5} has been observed for low temperatures of T=1 K which weakens as the temperature is increased. In addition, the temperature dependence has been determined with T{sub 1}{proportional_to}T{sup -1}. The characteristic dependencies on magnetic field and temperature lead to the identification of the spin relaxation mechanism, which is governed by spin-orbit coupling and mediated by single phonon scattering. This finding is qualitatively supported by the energy dependent measurements. The investigations were extended to a modified device design that enabled studying the spin relaxation dynamics of heavy holes in self-assembled quantum dots. The measurements show a polarization memory effect for holes with up to 0.1 degree of polarization. Furthermore, investigations of the time dynamics of the hole spin relaxation reveal surprisingly long lifetimes T{sub 1}{sup h

  14. Spin storage in quantum dot ensembles and single quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiss, Dominik

    2009-01-01

    This thesis deals with the investigation of spin relaxation of electrons and holes in small ensembles of self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques. Furthermore, a method to detect the spin orientation in a single quantum dot was developed in the framework of this thesis. A spin storage device was used to optically generate oriented electron spins in small frequency selected quantum dot ensembles using circularly polarized optical excitation. The spin orientation can be determined by the polarization of the time delayed electroluminescence signal generated by the device after a continuously variable storage time. The degree of spin polarized initialization was found to be limited to 0.6 at high magnetic fields, where anisotropic effects are compensated. The spin relaxation was directly measured as a function of magnetic field, lattice temperature and s-shell transition energy of the quantum dot by varying the spin storage time up to 30 ms. Very long spin lifetimes are obtained with a lower limit of T 1 =20 ms at B=4 T and T=1 K. A strong magnetic field dependence T 1 ∝B -5 has been observed for low temperatures of T=1 K which weakens as the temperature is increased. In addition, the temperature dependence has been determined with T 1 ∝T -1 . The characteristic dependencies on magnetic field and temperature lead to the identification of the spin relaxation mechanism, which is governed by spin-orbit coupling and mediated by single phonon scattering. This finding is qualitatively supported by the energy dependent measurements. The investigations were extended to a modified device design that enabled studying the spin relaxation dynamics of heavy holes in self-assembled quantum dots. The measurements show a polarization memory effect for holes with up to 0.1 degree of polarization. Furthermore, investigations of the time dynamics of the hole spin relaxation reveal surprisingly long lifetimes T 1 h in the microsecond range, therefore, comparable with

  15. New Hamiltonians for loop quantum cosmology with arbitrary spin representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Achour, Jibril; Brahma, Suddhasattwa; Geiller, Marc

    2017-04-01

    In loop quantum cosmology, one has to make a choice of SU(2) irreducible representation in which to compute holonomies and regularize the curvature of the connection. The systematic choice made in the literature is to work in the fundamental representation, and very little is known about the physics associated with higher spin labels. This constitutes an ambiguity of which the understanding, we believe, is fundamental for connecting loop quantum cosmology to full theories of quantum gravity like loop quantum gravity, its spin foam formulation, or cosmological group field theory. We take a step in this direction by providing here a new closed formula for the Hamiltonian of flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker models regularized in a representation of arbitrary spin. This expression is furthermore polynomial in the basic variables which correspond to well-defined operators in the quantum theory, takes into account the so-called inverse-volume corrections, and treats in a unified way two different regularization schemes for the curvature. After studying the effective classical dynamics corresponding to single and multiple-spin Hamiltonians, we study the behavior of the critical density when the number of representations is increased and the stability of the difference equations in the quantum theory.

  16. Quantum Spin Liquids in Frustrated Spin-1 Diamond Antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buessen, Finn Lasse; Hering, Max; Reuther, Johannes; Trebst, Simon

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by the recent synthesis of the spin-1 A -site spinel NiRh2 O4 , we investigate the classical to quantum crossover of a frustrated J1-J2 Heisenberg model on the diamond lattice upon varying the spin length S . Applying a recently developed pseudospin functional renormalization group approach for arbitrary spin-S magnets, we find that systems with S ≥3 /2 reside in the classical regime, where the low-temperature physics is dominated by the formation of coplanar spirals and a thermal (order-by-disorder) transition. For smaller local moments S =1 or S =1 /2 , we find that the system evades a thermal ordering transition and forms a quantum spiral spin liquid where the fluctuations are restricted to characteristic momentum-space surfaces. For the tetragonal phase of NiRh2 O4 , a modified J1-J2--J2⊥ exchange model is found to favor a conventionally ordered Néel state (for arbitrary spin S ), even in the presence of a strong local single-ion spin anisotropy, and it requires additional sources of frustration to explain the experimentally observed absence of a thermal ordering transition.

  17. Towards topological quantum computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, D.; Mironov, A.; Mironov, S.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, An.

    2018-01-01

    Quantum R-matrices, the entangling deformations of non-entangling (classical) permutations, provide a distinguished basis in the space of unitary evolutions and, consequently, a natural choice for a minimal set of basic operations (universal gates) for quantum computation. Yet they play a special role in group theory, integrable systems and modern theory of non-perturbative calculations in quantum field and string theory. Despite recent developments in those fields the idea of topological quantum computing and use of R-matrices, in particular, practically reduce to reinterpretation of standard sets of quantum gates, and subsequently algorithms, in terms of available topological ones. In this paper we summarize a modern view on quantum R-matrix calculus and propose to look at the R-matrices acting in the space of irreducible representations, which are unitary for the real-valued couplings in Chern-Simons theory, as the fundamental set of universal gates for topological quantum computer. Such an approach calls for a more thorough investigation of the relation between topological invariants of knots and quantum algorithms.

  18. Towards topological quantum computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Melnikov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum R-matrices, the entangling deformations of non-entangling (classical permutations, provide a distinguished basis in the space of unitary evolutions and, consequently, a natural choice for a minimal set of basic operations (universal gates for quantum computation. Yet they play a special role in group theory, integrable systems and modern theory of non-perturbative calculations in quantum field and string theory. Despite recent developments in those fields the idea of topological quantum computing and use of R-matrices, in particular, practically reduce to reinterpretation of standard sets of quantum gates, and subsequently algorithms, in terms of available topological ones. In this paper we summarize a modern view on quantum R-matrix calculus and propose to look at the R-matrices acting in the space of irreducible representations, which are unitary for the real-valued couplings in Chern–Simons theory, as the fundamental set of universal gates for topological quantum computer. Such an approach calls for a more thorough investigation of the relation between topological invariants of knots and quantum algorithms.

  19. Josephson Circuits as Vector Quantum Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samach, Gabriel; Kerman, Andrew J.

    While superconducting circuits based on Josephson junction technology can be engineered to represent spins in the quantum transverse-field Ising model, no circuit architecture to date has succeeded in emulating the vector quantum spin models of interest for next-generation quantum annealers and quantum simulators. Here, we present novel Josephson circuits which may provide these capabilities. We discuss our rigorous quantum-mechanical simulations of these circuits, as well as the larger architectures they may enable. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  20. Transitions in the computational power of thermal states for measurement-based quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Sean D.; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Jennings, David; Doherty, Andrew C.; Rudolph, Terry

    2009-01-01

    We show that the usefulness of the thermal state of a specific spin-lattice model for measurement-based quantum computing exhibits a transition between two distinct 'phases' - one in which every state is a universal resource for quantum computation, and another in which any local measurement sequence can be simulated efficiently on a classical computer. Remarkably, this transition in computational power does not coincide with any phase transition, classical, or quantum in the underlying spin-lattice model.

  1. Spin-orbit interaction in multiple quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Ya-Fei, E-mail: haoyafei@zjnu.cn [Physics Department, Zhejiang Normal University, Zhejiang 321004 (China)

    2015-01-07

    In this paper, we investigate how the structure of multiple quantum wells affects spin-orbit interactions. To increase the interface-related Rashba spin splitting and the strength of the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, we designed three kinds of multiple quantum wells. We demonstrate that the structure of the multiple quantum wells strongly affected the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, increasing the interface-related Rashba spin splitting to up to 26% larger in multiple quantum wells than in a stepped quantum well. We also show that the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction similarly influenced the spin relaxation time of multiple quantum wells and that of a stepped quantum well. The increase in the interface-related Rashba spin splitting originates from the relationship between interface-related Rashba spin splitting and electron probability density. Our results suggest that multiple quantum wells can be good candidates for spintronic devices.

  2. Spin-orbit interaction in multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Ya-Fei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the structure of multiple quantum wells affects spin-orbit interactions. To increase the interface-related Rashba spin splitting and the strength of the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, we designed three kinds of multiple quantum wells. We demonstrate that the structure of the multiple quantum wells strongly affected the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, increasing the interface-related Rashba spin splitting to up to 26% larger in multiple quantum wells than in a stepped quantum well. We also show that the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction similarly influenced the spin relaxation time of multiple quantum wells and that of a stepped quantum well. The increase in the interface-related Rashba spin splitting originates from the relationship between interface-related Rashba spin splitting and electron probability density. Our results suggest that multiple quantum wells can be good candidates for spintronic devices

  3. Converting a real quantum spin bath to an effective classical noise acting on a central spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Wayne M.; Young, Kevin; Das Sarma, Sankar

    2014-09-01

    We present a cluster expansion method for approximating quantum spin-bath dynamics in terms of a classical Gaussian stochastic process. The cluster expansion produces the two-point correlation function of the approximate classical bath, permitting rapid evaluation of noise-mitigating quantum control strategies without resorting to computationally intensive dynamical decoupling models. Our approximation is valid for the wide class of models possessing negligible back-action and nearly-Gaussian noise. We study several instances of the central spin decoherence problem in which the central spin and randomly-located bath spins are alike and dipolarly coupled. For various pulse sequences, we compare the coherence echo decay computed explicitly quantum mechanically versus those computed using our approximate classical model, and obtain agreement in most, but not all, cases. We demonstrate the utility of these classical noise models by efficiently searching for the 4-pulse sequences that maximally mitigate decoherence in each of these cases, a computationally expensive task in the explicit quantum model.

  4. Verifiable Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashefi, Elham

    Over the next five to ten years we will see a state of flux as quantum devices become part of the mainstream computing landscape. However adopting and applying such a highly variable and novel technology is both costly and risky as this quantum approach has an acute verification and validation problem: On the one hand, since classical computations cannot scale up to the computational power of quantum mechanics, verifying the correctness of a quantum-mediated computation is challenging; on the other hand, the underlying quantum structure resists classical certification analysis. Our grand aim is to settle these key milestones to make the translation from theory to practice possible. Currently the most efficient ways to verify a quantum computation is to employ cryptographic methods. I will present the current state of the art of various existing protocols where generally there exists a trade-off between the practicality of the scheme versus their generality, trust assumptions and security level. EK gratefully acknowledges funding through EPSRC Grants EP/N003829/1 and EP/M013243/1.

  5. Quantum spin liquid and spin ice states in new pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Romain

    Magnetic systems with competing interactions can adopt exotic ground states. A particularly promising class is that of the geometrically frustrated magnets, such as the A2B2O7 pyrochlores, in which unusual spin liquids appear. Some of these phases feature short-range correlated states analogous to a Coulomb phase and give rise to emergent quasiparticle excitations. Although cases like the classical spin ice are reasonably well understood, the theoretical expectation is that quantum fluctuations lead to novel phases which are quantum spin liquids (QSLs). For instance, the quantum spin ice (QSI) is a generalization of the classical spin ice state to include quantum fluctuations, such that the effective theory becomes emergent quantum electrodynamics - the classical monopoles become coherent quantum quasiparticles, and a novel excitation playing the role of the photon appears. In this talk, I will present results on three novel materials with potential for QSL states. Each of them corresponds to a way to potentially strengthen the role of quantum fluctuations on the ground state properties of pyrochlore magnets. Firstly, I will demonstrate that, in Tb2Hf2O7, where a sizeable gap isolates the non-Kramers ground state doublet at low temperature, a large amount of anion Frenkel disorder leads to quenched random crystal fields and disordered magnetic interactions. The detailed study of this material demonstrates that disorder can play a crucial role in preventing long-range magnetic order at low temperatures, and instead induces a strongly-fluctuating Coulomb spin liquid with defect-induced frozen magnetic degrees of freedom. Secondly, I will present results on another QSL candidate based on non-Kramers ions, Pr2Hf2O7, which displays striking characteristics of the ferromagnetic correlations expected in a QSI. Finally, in the pyrochlore Ce2Sn2O7, where macroscopic measurements suggest an antiferromagnetic liquid ground state with quantum fluctuations, I will present

  6. Edge physics of the quantum spin Hall insulator from a quantum dot excited by optical absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Romain; Moore, Joel E

    2014-04-11

    The gapless edge modes of the quantum spin Hall insulator form a helical liquid in which the direction of motion along the edge is determined by the spin orientation of the electrons. In order to probe the Luttinger liquid physics of these edge states and their interaction with a magnetic (Kondo) impurity, we consider a setup where the helical liquid is tunnel coupled to a semiconductor quantum dot that is excited by optical absorption, thereby inducing an effective quantum quench of the tunneling. At low energy, the absorption spectrum is dominated by a power-law singularity. The corresponding exponent is directly related to the interaction strength (Luttinger parameter) and can be computed exactly using boundary conformal field theory thanks to the unique nature of the quantum spin Hall edge.

  7. Quantum computational webs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.; Eisert, J.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the notion of quantum computational webs: These are quantum states universal for measurement-based computation, which can be built up from a collection of simple primitives. The primitive elements--reminiscent of building blocks in a construction kit--are (i) one-dimensional states (computational quantum wires) with the power to process one logical qubit and (ii) suitable couplings, which connect the wires to a computationally universal web. All elements are preparable by nearest-neighbor interactions in a single pass, of the kind accessible in a number of physical architectures. We provide a complete classification of qubit wires, a physically well-motivated class of universal resources that can be fully understood. Finally, we sketch possible realizations in superlattices and explore the power of coupling mechanisms based on Ising or exchange interactions.

  8. Quantum spin liquid signatures in Kitaev-like frustrated magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohlke, Matthias; Wachtel, Gideon; Yamaji, Youhei; Pollmann, Frank; Kim, Yong Baek

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on α -RuCl3 , we investigate a possible quantum spin liquid ground state of the honeycomb-lattice spin model with bond-dependent interactions. We consider the K -Γ model, where K and Γ represent the Kitaev and symmetric-anisotropic interactions between spin-1/2 moments on the honeycomb lattice. Using the infinite density matrix renormalization group, we provide compelling evidence for the existence of quantum spin liquid phases in an extended region of the phase diagram. In particular, we use transfer-matrix spectra to show the evolution of two-particle excitations with well-defined two-dimensional dispersion, which is a strong signature of a quantum spin liquid. These results are compared with predictions from Majorana mean-field theory and used to infer the quasiparticle excitation spectra. Further, we compute the dynamical structure factor using finite-size cluster computations and show that the results resemble the scattering continuum seen in neutron-scattering experiments on α -RuCl3 . We discuss these results in light of recent and future experiments.

  9. Spin Entanglement Witness for Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sougato; Mazumdar, Anupam; Morley, Gavin W.; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Toroš, Marko; Paternostro, Mauro; Geraci, Andrew A.; Barker, Peter F.; Kim, M. S.; Milburn, Gerard

    2017-12-01

    Understanding gravity in the framework of quantum mechanics is one of the great challenges in modern physics. However, the lack of empirical evidence has lead to a debate on whether gravity is a quantum entity. Despite varied proposed probes for quantum gravity, it is fair to say that there are no feasible ideas yet to test its quantum coherent behavior directly in a laboratory experiment. Here, we introduce an idea for such a test based on the principle that two objects cannot be entangled without a quantum mediator. We show that despite the weakness of gravity, the phase evolution induced by the gravitational interaction of two micron size test masses in adjacent matter-wave interferometers can detectably entangle them even when they are placed far apart enough to keep Casimir-Polder forces at bay. We provide a prescription for witnessing this entanglement, which certifies gravity as a quantum coherent mediator, through simple spin correlation measurements.

  10. Introduction to topological quantum matter & quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Stanescu, Tudor D

    2017-01-01

    What is -topological- about topological quantum states? How many types of topological quantum phases are there? What is a zero-energy Majorana mode, how can it be realized in a solid state system, and how can it be used as a platform for topological quantum computation? What is quantum computation and what makes it different from classical computation? Addressing these and other related questions, Introduction to Topological Quantum Matter & Quantum Computation provides an introduction to and a synthesis of a fascinating and rapidly expanding research field emerging at the crossroads of condensed matter physics, mathematics, and computer science. Providing the big picture, this book is ideal for graduate students and researchers entering this field as it allows for the fruitful transfer of paradigms and ideas amongst different areas, and includes many specific examples to help the reader understand abstract and sometimes challenging concepts. It explores the topological quantum world beyond the well-know...

  11. Adiabatic Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landahl, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    Quantum computers promise to exploit counterintuitive quantum physics principles like superposition, entanglement, and uncertainty to solve problems using fundamentally fewer steps than any conventional computer ever could. The mere possibility of such a device has sharpened our understanding of quantum coherent information, just as lasers did for our understanding of coherent light. The chief obstacle to developing quantum computer technology is decoherence--one of the fastest phenomena in all of physics. In principle, decoherence can be overcome by using clever entangled redundancies in a process called fault-tolerant quantum error correction. However, the quality and scale of technology required to realize this solution appears distant. An exciting alternative is a proposal called ``adiabatic'' quantum computing (AQC), in which adiabatic quantum physics keeps the computer in its lowest-energy configuration throughout its operation, rendering it immune to many decoherence sources. The Adiabatic Quantum Architectures In Ultracold Systems (AQUARIUS) Grand Challenge Project at Sandia seeks to demonstrate this robustness in the laboratory and point a path forward for future hardware development. We are building devices in AQUARIUS that realize the AQC architecture on up to three quantum bits (``qubits'') in two platforms: Cs atoms laser-cooled to below 5 microkelvin and Si quantum dots cryo-cooled to below 100 millikelvin. We are also expanding theoretical frontiers by developing methods for scalable universal AQC in these platforms. We have successfully demonstrated operational qubits in both platforms and have even run modest one-qubit calculations using our Cs device. In the course of reaching our primary proof-of-principle demonstrations, we have developed multiple spinoff technologies including nanofabricated diffractive optical elements that define optical-tweezer trap arrays and atomic-scale Si lithography commensurate with placing individual donor atoms with

  12. Robust dynamical decoupling for quantum computing and quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Alexandre M; Alvarez, Gonzalo A; Suter, Dieter

    2011-06-17

    Dynamical decoupling (DD) is a popular technique for protecting qubits from the environment. However, unless special care is taken, experimental errors in the control pulses used in this technique can destroy the quantum information instead of preserving it. Here, we investigate techniques for making DD sequences robust against different types of experimental errors while retaining good decoupling efficiency in a fluctuating environment. We present experimental data from solid-state nuclear spin qubits and introduce a new DD sequence that is suitable for quantum computing and quantum memory.

  13. Computational quantum chemistry website

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the contents of a web page related to research on the development of quantum chemistry methods for computational thermochemistry and the application of quantum chemistry methods to problems in material chemistry and chemical sciences. Research programs highlighted include: Gaussian-2 theory; Density functional theory; Molecular sieve materials; Diamond thin-film growth from buckyball precursors; Electronic structure calculations on lithium polymer electrolytes; Long-distance electronic coupling in donor/acceptor molecules; and Computational studies of NOx reactions in radioactive waste storage

  14. Quantum Computations: Fundamentals and Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplij, S.A.; Shapoval, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    Basic concepts of quantum information theory, principles of quantum calculations and the possibility of creation on this basis unique on calculation power and functioning principle device, named quantum computer, are concerned. The main blocks of quantum logic, schemes of quantum calculations implementation, as well as some known today effective quantum algorithms, called to realize advantages of quantum calculations upon classical, are presented here. Among them special place is taken by Shor's algorithm of number factorization and Grover's algorithm of unsorted database search. Phenomena of decoherence, its influence on quantum computer stability and methods of quantum errors correction are described

  15. Nanosecond-timescale spin transfer using individual electrons in a quadruple-quantum-dot device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baart, T. A.; Jovanovic, N.; Vandersypen, L. M. K. [QuTech and Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-07-25

    The ability to coherently transport electron-spin states between different sites of gate-defined semiconductor quantum dots is an essential ingredient for a quantum-dot-based quantum computer. Previous shuttles using electrostatic gating were too slow to move an electron within the spin dephasing time across an array. Here, we report a nanosecond-timescale spin transfer of individual electrons across a quadruple-quantum-dot device. Utilizing enhanced relaxation rates at a so-called hot spot, we can upper bound the shuttle time to at most 150 ns. While actual shuttle times are likely shorter, 150 ns is already fast enough to preserve spin coherence in, e.g., silicon based quantum dots. This work therefore realizes an important prerequisite for coherent spin transfer in quantum dot arrays.

  16. Abstract quantum computing machines and quantum computational logics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Maria Luisa Dalla; Giuntini, Roberto; Sergioli, Giuseppe; Leporini, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Classical and quantum parallelism are deeply different, although it is sometimes claimed that quantum Turing machines are nothing but special examples of classical probabilistic machines. We introduce the concepts of deterministic state machine, classical probabilistic state machine and quantum state machine. On this basis, we discuss the question: To what extent can quantum state machines be simulated by classical probabilistic state machines? Each state machine is devoted to a single task determined by its program. Real computers, however, behave differently, being able to solve different kinds of problems. This capacity can be modeled, in the quantum case, by the mathematical notion of abstract quantum computing machine, whose different programs determine different quantum state machines. The computations of abstract quantum computing machines can be linguistically described by the formulas of a particular form of quantum logic, termed quantum computational logic.

  17. Spin wave Feynman diagram vertex computation package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alexander; Javernick, Philip; Datta, Trinanjan

    Spin wave theory is a well-established theoretical technique that can correctly predict the physical behavior of ordered magnetic states. However, computing the effects of an interacting spin wave theory incorporating magnons involve a laborious by hand derivation of Feynman diagram vertices. The process is tedious and time consuming. Hence, to improve productivity and have another means to check the analytical calculations, we have devised a Feynman Diagram Vertex Computation package. In this talk, we will describe our research group's effort to implement a Mathematica based symbolic Feynman diagram vertex computation package that computes spin wave vertices. Utilizing the non-commutative algebra package NCAlgebra as an add-on to Mathematica, symbolic expressions for the Feynman diagram vertices of a Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet are obtained. Our existing code reproduces the well-known expressions of a nearest neighbor square lattice Heisenberg model. We also discuss the case of a triangular lattice Heisenberg model where non collinear terms contribute to the vertex interactions.

  18. Topological Excitations in Quantum Spin Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Chaudhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin and significance of topological excitations in quantum spin models in low dimensions are presented in detail. Besides a general review, our own work in this area is described in great depth. Apart from theoretical analysis of the existence and properties of spin vortices and antivortices, the possible experimental consequences and signatures are also highlighted. In particular, the distinguishing features between the even and odd charged topological excitations are brought out through a detailed analysis of the topological term in the quantum action. Moreover, an interesting symmetry property is predicted between the excitations from a ferromagnetic model and an antiferromagnetic model. Through a novel approach of ours, a bridge is established between field theoretical formalism and the well-known statistical mechanical treatment of Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT transition involving these topological excitations. Furthermore, a detailed phenomenological analysis of the experimentally observed static and dynamic magnetic properties of the layered magnetic materials, possessing XY anisotropy in the in-plane spin-spin couplings, is undertaken to test the theoretical predictions regarding the behaviour of these excitations. The importance and the crucial role of quantum spin fluctuations in these studies are also brought out very clearly by our analysis.

  19. Quantum mechanical calculation of electron spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Long

    2017-11-01

    The classical and quantum mechanical methods are used respectively to calculate the electron spin. It is shown that the classical method cannot derive the correct magnetic moment value. Assuming that the rest energy of the electron originates from the kinetic energy of the virtual particles, the electron spin motion equation and spin wave function can be derived. In the case of the quantum numbers of spin angular momentum and magnetic moment being 1/2 and 1 respectively, their correct values can be obtained. In the meanwhile, the anomalous magnetic moment is evaluated based on the wave function of the spinning electron. Suppose the probability of virtual photons converting into electron-positron pairs to be 0.00141, the result agrees with that of quantum electrodynamics. Given that the energy of the virtual photon obeys the classical Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, the self-energy of the electron will be finite. In addition, the hierarchy problem can be solved with the same hypothesis.

  20. Adiabatic quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2018-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) started as an approach to solving optimization problems and has evolved into an important universal alternative to the standard circuit model of quantum computing, with deep connections to both classical and quantum complexity theory and condensed matter physics. This review gives an account of the major theoretical developments in the field, while focusing on the closed-system setting. The review is organized around a series of topics that are essential to an understanding of the underlying principles of AQC, its algorithmic accomplishments and limitations, and its scope in the more general setting of computational complexity theory. Several variants are presented of the adiabatic theorem, the cornerstone of AQC, and examples are given of explicit AQC algorithms that exhibit a quantum speedup. An overview of several proofs of the universality of AQC and related Hamiltonian quantum complexity theory is given. Considerable space is devoted to stoquastic AQC, the setting of most AQC work to date, where obstructions to success and their possible resolutions are discussed.

  1. Optimal state encoding for quantum walks and quantum communication over spin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haselgrove, Henry L.

    2005-01-01

    Recent work has shown that a simple chain of interacting spins can be used as a medium for high-fidelity quantum communication. We describe a scheme for quantum communication using a spin system that conserves z spin, but otherwise is arbitrary. The sender and receiver are assumed to directly control several spins each, with the sender encoding the message state onto the larger state space of her control spins. Given that the encoding for the 'zero' message basis state is chosen to be the all-spin-down state, we show how to find the encoding for the 'one' basis state that maximizes the fidelity of communication, using a simple method based on the singular-value decomposition. Also, we show that this solution can be used to increase communication fidelity in a rather different circumstance: where no encoding of initial states is used, but where the sender and receiver control exactly two spins each and vary the interactions on those spins over time. The methods presented are computationally efficient, and numerical examples are given for systems having up to 300 spins

  2. Demonstration of blind quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Stefanie; Kashefi, Elham; Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joseph F; Zeilinger, Anton; Walther, Philip

    2012-01-20

    Quantum computers, besides offering substantial computational speedups, are also expected to preserve the privacy of a computation. We present an experimental demonstration of blind quantum computing in which the input, computation, and output all remain unknown to the computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement-based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum server. Various blind delegated computations, including one- and two-qubit gates and the Deutsch and Grover quantum algorithms, are demonstrated. The client only needs to be able to prepare and transmit individual photonic qubits. Our demonstration is crucial for unconditionally secure quantum cloud computing and might become a key ingredient for real-life applications, especially when considering the challenges of making powerful quantum computers widely available.

  3. Quantum cellular automaton for universal quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raussendorf, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a quantum cellular automaton capable of performing universal quantum computation. The automaton has an elementary transition function that acts on Margolus cells of 2x2 qubits, and both the 'quantum input' and the program are encoded in the initial state of the system

  4. Quantum entanglement and quantum computational algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The existence of entangled quantum states gives extra power to quantum computers over their classical counterparts. Quantum entanglement shows up qualitatively at the level of two qubits. We demonstrate that the one- and the two-bit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm does not require entanglement and can be mapped ...

  5. Parallel quantum computing in a single ensemble quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Guilu; Xiao, L.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a parallel quantum computing mode for ensemble quantum computer. In this mode, some qubits are in pure states while other qubits are in mixed states. It enables a single ensemble quantum computer to perform 'single-instruction-multidata' type of parallel computation. Parallel quantum computing can provide additional speedup in Grover's algorithm and Shor's algorithm. In addition, it also makes a fuller use of qubit resources in an ensemble quantum computer. As a result, some qubits discarded in the preparation of an effective pure state in the Schulman-Varizani and the Cleve-DiVincenzo algorithms can be reutilized

  6. Spin relaxation in quantum dots: Role of the phonon modulated spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, A. M.; Romano, C. L.; Sanz, L.; Marques, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the spin relaxation rates in a parabolic InSb quantum dots due to the spin interaction with acoustical phonons. We considered the deformation potential mechanism as the dominant electron-phonon coupling in the Pavlov-Firsov spin-phonon Hamiltonian. We analyze the behavior of the spin relaxation rates as a function of an external magnetic field and mean quantum dot radius. Effects of the spin admixture due to Dresselhaus contribution to spin-orbit interaction are also discussed.

  7. Towards quantum networks of single spins: analysis of a quantum memory with an optical interface in diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, M S; Kalb, N; Reiserer, A; Taminiau, T H; Hanson, R

    2015-01-01

    Single defect centers in diamond have emerged as a powerful platform for quantum optics experiments and quantum information processing tasks. Connecting spatially separated nodes via optical photons into a quantum network will enable distributed quantum computing and long-range quantum communication. Initial experiments on trapped atoms and ions as well as defects in diamond have demonstrated entanglement between two nodes over several meters. To realize multi-node networks, additional quantum bit systems that store quantum states while new entanglement links are established are highly desirable. Such memories allow for entanglement distillation, purification and quantum repeater protocols that extend the size, speed and distance of the network. However, to be effective, the memory must be robust against the entanglement generation protocol, which typically must be repeated many times. Here we evaluate the prospects of using carbon nuclear spins in diamond as quantum memories that are compatible with quantum networks based on single nitrogen vacancy (NV) defects in diamond. We present a theoretical framework to describe the dephasing of the nuclear spins under repeated generation of NV spin-photon entanglement and show that quantum states can be stored during hundreds of repetitions using typical experimental coupling parameters. This result demonstrates that nuclear spins with weak hyperfine couplings are promising quantum memories for quantum networks.

  8. Quantum computers: Definition and implementations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Kok, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The DiVincenzo criteria for implementing a quantum computer have been seminal in focusing both experimental and theoretical research in quantum-information processing. These criteria were formulated specifically for the circuit model of quantum computing. However, several new models for quantum computing (paradigms) have been proposed that do not seem to fit the criteria well. Therefore, the question is what are the general criteria for implementing quantum computers. To this end, a formal operational definition of a quantum computer is introduced. It is then shown that, according to this definition, a device is a quantum computer if it obeys the following criteria: Any quantum computer must consist of a quantum memory, with an additional structure that (1) facilitates a controlled quantum evolution of the quantum memory; (2) includes a method for information theoretic cooling of the memory; and (3) provides a readout mechanism for subsets of the quantum memory. The criteria are met when the device is scalable and operates fault tolerantly. We discuss various existing quantum computing paradigms and how they fit within this framework. Finally, we present a decision tree for selecting an avenue toward building a quantum computer. This is intended to help experimentalists determine the most natural paradigm given a particular physical implementation.

  9. A surface code quantum computer in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Charles D; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J; House, Matthew G; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2015-10-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel-posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited.

  10. Spin squeezing and quantum correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Taking the case of = 1, we show that the `non-oriented' nature and hence squeezing arise from the intrinsic quantum correlations that exist among the ... Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006, India; Department of Physics, Yuvaraja's College, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 005, India ...

  11. A Heterogeneous Quantum Computer Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, X.; Riesebos, L.; Lao, L.; Garcia Almudever, C.; Sebastiano, F.; Versluis, R.; Charbon, E.; Bertels, K.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a high level view of the heterogeneous quantum computer architecture as any future quantum computer will consist of both a classical and quantum computing part. The classical part is needed for error correction as well as for the execution of algorithms that contain both

  12. Quantum entanglement and quantum computational algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We discuss in this paper how entanglement prevents the mapping or realisation of a quantum computation using ... possibility of mapping a quantum computer onto classical optical fields breaks down. To mathematically ..... sesses the capacity to generate entangled states from non-entangled ones. To see this clearly, let us ...

  13. Zero field spin splitting in asymmetric quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Yafei

    2012-01-01

    Spin splitting of asymmetric quantum wells is theoretically investigated in the absence of any electric field, including the contribution of interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction as well as linear and cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction. The effect of interface asymmetry on three types of spin-orbit interaction is discussed. The results show that interface-related Rashba and linear Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction can be increased and cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction can be decreased by well structure design. For wide quantum wells, the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction dominates under certain conditions, resulting in decreased spin relaxation time.

  14. Quantum non demolition measurement of a single nuclear spin in a room temperature solid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Phillip; Beck, Johannes; Steiner, Matthias; Rathgen, Helmut; Rempp, Florian; Zarrabi, Navid; Dolde, Florian; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg [Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Hemmer, Philip [A and M University, Texas (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The measurement process and its interpretation are in the focus of quantum mechanics since its early days. Today's ability to isolate single quantum objects allows experimental demonstration of former ''gedankenexperiments'' like measurement induced quantum state collaps. Rapidly growing quantum technologies explore fundamental aspects of measurements in quantum computing, however for solid state systems such experiments require operation at very low temperatures. Here we show that projective quantum measurement can be performed on a single nuclear spin in diamond under ambient conditions. Using quantum non demolition (QND) readout we are able to detect quantum jumps and the quantum Zeno effect emphasising the addressability of fundamental questions of quantum mechanics in solids. Single shot measurements with fidelities exceeding 0.9 enable efficient state initialization, quantum error correction and entanglement pumping that is crucial for quantum information processing including measurement based schemes and distributed quantum networks.

  15. Quantum computing. Defining and detecting quantum speedup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønnow, Troels F; Wang, Zhihui; Job, Joshua; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V; Wecker, David; Martinis, John M; Lidar, Daniel A; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-25

    The development of small-scale quantum devices raises the question of how to fairly assess and detect quantum speedup. Here, we show how to define and measure quantum speedup and how to avoid pitfalls that might mask or fake such a speedup. We illustrate our discussion with data from tests run on a D-Wave Two device with up to 503 qubits. By using random spin glass instances as a benchmark, we found no evidence of quantum speedup when the entire data set is considered and obtained inconclusive results when comparing subsets of instances on an instance-by-instance basis. Our results do not rule out the possibility of speedup for other classes of problems and illustrate the subtle nature of the quantum speedup question. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Quantum description of nuclear spin cooling in a quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giedke, Geza; Christ, H.; Cirac, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    We study theoretically the cooling of an ensemble of nuclear spins coupled to the spin of a localized electron in a quantum dot. We obtain a master equation for the state of the nuclear spins interacting with a sequence of polarized electrons that allows to study quantitatively the cooling process including the effect of nuclear spin coherences, which can lead to 'dark states' of the nuclear system in which further cooling is inhibited. We show that the inhomogeneous Knight field mitigates this effect strongly and that the remaining dark state limitations can be overcome by very few shifts of the electron wave function, allowing for cooling far beyond the dark state limit. Numerical integration of the master equation indicates that polarizations larger than 90% can be achieved within a millisecond timescale.

  17. Quantum entropy and uncertainty for two-mode squeezed, coherent and intelligent spin states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragone, C.; Mundarain, D.

    1993-01-01

    We compute the quantum entropy for monomode and two-mode systems set in squeezed states. Thereafter, the quantum entropy is also calculated for angular momentum algebra when the system is either in a coherent or in an intelligent spin state. These values are compared with the corresponding values of the respective uncertainties. In general, quantum entropies and uncertainties have the same minimum and maximum points. However, for coherent and intelligent spin states, it is found that some minima for the quantum entropy turn out to be uncertainty maxima. We feel that the quantum entropy we use provides the right answer, since it is given in an essentially unique way.

  18. Quantum computer for dummies (in Russian)

    OpenAIRE

    Grozin, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    An introduction (in Russian) to quantum computers, quantum cryptography, and quantum teleportation for students who have no previous knowledge of these subjects, but know quantum mechanics. Several simple examples are considered in detail using the quantum computer emulator QCL.

  19. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    stored ions,” Adv. Atom Mol. Phys., vol. Volume 3, pp. 53–72 1968. [48] P. H. Dawson, Quadrupole Mass Spectometry and Its Applications, Melville, NY... DATE December 2011 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ion trap Quantum Computing 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...researcher [30] that introduced the concept of ion traps in the 1950s. His experiments focused on separating atoms with different masses in order to

  20. Destructive quantum interference in spin tunneling problems

    OpenAIRE

    von Delft, Jan; Henley, Christopher L.

    1992-01-01

    In some spin tunneling problems, there are several different but symmetry-related tunneling paths that connect the same initial and final configurations. The topological phase factors of the corresponding tunneling amplitudes can lead to destructive interference between the different paths, so that the total tunneling amplitude is zero. In the study of tunneling between different ground state configurations of the Kagom\\'{e}-lattice quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet, this occurs when the spi...

  1. Quantum computing on encrypted data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, K A G; Broadbent, A; Shalm, L K; Yan, Z; Lavoie, J; Prevedel, R; Jennewein, T; Resch, K J

    2014-01-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting privacy. Recently, protocols to achieve this on classical computing systems have been found. Here, we present an efficient solution to the quantum analogue of this problem that enables arbitrary quantum computations to be carried out on encrypted quantum data. We prove that an untrusted server can implement a universal set of quantum gates on encrypted quantum bits (qubits) without learning any information about the inputs, while the client, knowing the decryption key, can easily decrypt the results of the computation. We experimentally demonstrate, using single photons and linear optics, the encryption and decryption scheme on a set of gates sufficient for arbitrary quantum computations. As our protocol requires few extra resources compared with other schemes it can be easily incorporated into the design of future quantum servers. These results will play a key role in enabling the development of secure distributed quantum systems.

  2. Mesonic states in quantum spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Olga; Moessner, Roderich; Sondhi, Shivaji

    We study magnetic monopoles in quantum spin ice, whose dynamics is induced by a transverse field term. We find that the bipartiteness of the state graph of the model and the local spin ice rule constraints result in the presence of an approximately flat band at the classical energy of the nearest neighbor monopole pair. The degeneracy of the so-called mesonic states making up the flat band splits at the same order as the spin ice ground state manifold. We show that the mesonic states result in a crisp neutron scattering signature of magnetic monopoles in the system, and that the momentum dependence of the structure factor may allow for the detection of quantum fluctuations in a spin ice system near the classical limit. This work was supported by the Helmholtz Virtual Institute New States of Matter and their Excitations, NSF Grant No. DMR-1311781; Alexander von Humboldt Foundation; DFG via SFB 1143; and LabEX ENS-ICFP: ANR-10-LABX-0010/ANR-10-IDEX-0001-02 PSL*.

  3. Programmable architecture for quantum computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J.; Wang, L.; Charbon, E.; Wang, B.

    2013-01-01

    A programmable architecture called “quantum FPGA (field-programmable gate array)” (QFPGA) is presented for quantum computing, which is a hybrid model combining the advantages of the qubus system and the measurement-based quantum computation. There are two kinds of buses in QFPGA, the local bus and

  4. Experimental Adiabatic Quantum Factorization under Ambient Conditions Based on a Solid-State Single Spin System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kebiao; Xie, Tianyu; Li, Zhaokai; Xu, Xiangkun; Wang, Mengqi; Ye, Xiangyu; Kong, Fei; Geng, Jianpei; Duan, Changkui; Shi, Fazhan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-03-31

    The adiabatic quantum computation is a universal and robust method of quantum computing. In this architecture, the problem can be solved by adiabatically evolving the quantum processor from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to that of a final one, which encodes the solution of the problem. Adiabatic quantum computation has been proved to be a compatible candidate for scalable quantum computation. In this Letter, we report on the experimental realization of an adiabatic quantum algorithm on a single solid spin system under ambient conditions. All elements of adiabatic quantum computation, including initial state preparation, adiabatic evolution (simulated by optimal control), and final state read-out, are realized experimentally. As an example, we found the ground state of the problem Hamiltonian S_{z}I_{z} on our adiabatic quantum processor, which can be mapped to the factorization of 35 into its prime factors 5 and 7.

  5. Intrinsic spin lifetimes in GaAs (110) quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Georg; Roemer, Michael; Huebner, Jens; Oestreich, Michael [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Schuh, Dieter; Wegscheider, Werner [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    GaAs(110) quantum wells attract great attention due to the long spin lifetime for electron spins along the growth axis and are, therefore, of interest for future spin based optoelectronic devices. At low temperatures, optical injection of a finite spin polarization yields strongly enhanced spin dephasing due to the Bir Aronov Pikus mechanism that arises from the exchange interaction between electrons and holes. Thus, the intrinsic spin lifetime in GaAs(110) quantum wells has been unknown. In this work, the non-demolition technique of spin noise spectroscopy, which only relies on statistical spin fluctuations, is applied to GaAs(110) quantum wells in order to measure the intrinsic spin lifetimes. Furthermore, the Brownian motion of the electrons modifies the linewidth of the measured spin noise spectra due to time of flight broadening. This effect uniquely allows to study electronic motion at thermal equilibrium.

  6. Interfacing external quantum devices to a universal quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagana, Antonio A; Lohe, Max A; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer. © 2011 Lagana et al.

  7. Quantum computing with defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors.

  8. Adiabatic Theorem for Quantum Spin Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, S.; De Roeck, W.; Fraas, M.

    2017-08-01

    The first proof of the quantum adiabatic theorem was given as early as 1928. Today, this theorem is increasingly applied in a many-body context, e.g., in quantum annealing and in studies of topological properties of matter. In this setup, the rate of variation ɛ of local terms is indeed small compared to the gap, but the rate of variation of the total, extensive Hamiltonian, is not. Therefore, applications to many-body systems are not covered by the proofs and arguments in the literature. In this Letter, we prove a version of the adiabatic theorem for gapped ground states of interacting quantum spin systems, under assumptions that remain valid in the thermodynamic limit. As an application, we give a mathematical proof of Kubo's linear response formula for a broad class of gapped interacting systems. We predict that the density of nonadiabatic excitations is exponentially small in the driving rate and the scaling of the exponent depends on the dimension.

  9. Quantum Computation and Many Worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Hewitt-Horsman, Clare

    2002-01-01

    An Everett (`Many Worlds') interpretation of quantum mechanics due to Saunders and Zurek is presented in detail. This is used to give a physical description of the process of a quantum computation. Objections to such an understanding are discussed.

  10. Spin transport properties in a double quantum ring with Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Azadeh S.; Eslami, Leila; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi; Abolhassani, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    We study spin-resolved electron transport in a double quantum ring in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction and a magnetic flux using quantum waveguide theory. We show that, at the proper values of the system parameters such as the Rashba coupling constant, the radius of the rings, and the angle between the leads, the double quantum ring can act as a perfect electron spin-inverter with very high efficiency. Also, the double quantum ring can work as a spin switch. The spin polarization of transmitted electrons can be controlled and changed from -1 to +1 by using a magnetic flux.

  11. Towards quantum chemistry on a quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon, B P; Whitfield, J D; Gillett, G G; Goggin, M E; Almeida, M P; Kassal, I; Biamonte, J D; Mohseni, M; Powell, B J; Barbieri, M; Aspuru-Guzik, A; White, A G

    2010-02-01

    Exact first-principles calculations of molecular properties are currently intractable because their computational cost grows exponentially with both the number of atoms and basis set size. A solution is to move to a radically different model of computing by building a quantum computer, which is a device that uses quantum systems themselves to store and process data. Here we report the application of the latest photonic quantum computer technology to calculate properties of the smallest molecular system: the hydrogen molecule in a minimal basis. We calculate the complete energy spectrum to 20 bits of precision and discuss how the technique can be expanded to solve large-scale chemical problems that lie beyond the reach of modern supercomputers. These results represent an early practical step toward a powerful tool with a broad range of quantum-chemical applications.

  12. Characterizing and engineering tunable spin functionality inside indium arsenide/gallium arsenide quantum dot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiwen

    The continual downsizing of the basic functional units used in the electronics industry has motivated the study of the quantum computation and related topics. To overcome the limitations of classical physics and engineering, some unique quantum mechanical features, especially entanglement and superpositions have begun to be considered as important properties for future bits. Including these quantum mechanical features is attractive because the ability to utilize quantum mechanics can dramatically enhance computational power. Among the various ways of constructing the basic building blocks for quantum computation, we are particularly interested in using spins inside epitaxially grown InAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules as quantum bits (qubits). The ability to design and engineer nanostructures with tailored quantum properties is critical to engineering quantum computers and other novel electro-optical devices and is one of the key challenges for scaling up new ideas for device application. In this thesis, we will focus on how the structure and composition of quantum dot molecules can be used to control spin properties and charge interactions. Tunable spin and charge properties can enable new, more scalable, methods of initializing and manipulating quantum information. In this thesis, we demonstrate one method to enable electric-field tunability of Zeeman splitting for a single electron spin inside a quantum dot molecules by using heterostructure engineering techniques to modify the barrier that separates quantum dots. We describe how these structural changes to the quantum dot molecules also change charge interactions and propose ways to use this effect to enable accurate measurement of coulomb interactions and possibly charge occupancy inside these complicated quantum dot molecules.

  13. Quantum information. Teleportation - cryptography - quantum computer; Quanteninformation. Teleportation - Kryptografie - Quantencomputer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenneker, Carsten (comp.)

    2012-11-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test facility, quantum teleportation, the reality of quanta, interaction-free quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view in the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  14. Quantum state transfer in spin chains via shortcuts to adiabaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bi-Hua; Kang, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ye-Hong; Shi, Zhi-Cheng; Song, Jie; Xia, Yan

    2018-01-01

    Based on shortcuts to adiabaticity and quantum Zeno dynamics, we present a protocol to implement quantum state transfer (QST) in a quantum spin-1/2 chain. In the protocol, the complex Hamiltonian of an N -site system is simplified, and a simple effective Hamiltonian is present. It is shown that only the control of the coupling strengths between the boundary spins and the bulk spins are required for QST. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the protocol possesses high efficiency and is robust against the decay and the fluctuations of the control fields. The protocol might provide an alternative choice for transferring quantum states via spin chain systems.

  15. Quantum information transfer between topological and spin qubit systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leijnse, Martin; Flensberg, Karsten [Nano-Science Center and Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-07-01

    In this talk I introduce a method to coherently transfer quantum information, and to create entanglement, between topological qubits and conventional spin qubits. The transfer method uses gated control to transfer an electron (spin qubit) between a quantum dot and edge Majorana modes in adjacent topological superconductors. Because of the spin polarization of the Majorana modes, the electron transfer translates spin superposition states into superposition states of the Majorana system, and vice versa. Furthermore, I discuss how a topological superconductor can be used to facilitate long-distance quantum information transfer and entanglement between spatially separated spin qubits.

  16. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  17. Quantum Optimization of Fully Connected Spin Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Venturelli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many NP-hard problems can be seen as the task of finding a ground state of a disordered highly connected Ising spin glass. If solutions are sought by means of quantum annealing, it is often necessary to represent those graphs in the annealer’s hardware by means of the graph-minor embedding technique, generating a final Hamiltonian consisting of coupled chains of ferromagnetically bound spins, whose binding energy is a free parameter. In order to investigate the effect of embedding on problems of interest, the fully connected Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model with random ±1 couplings is programmed on the D-Wave Two^{TM} annealer using up to 270 qubits interacting on a Chimera-type graph. We present the best embedding prescriptions for encoding the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick problem in the Chimera graph. The results indicate that the optimal choice of embedding parameters could be associated with the emergence of the spin-glass phase of the embedded problem, whose presence was previously uncertain. This optimal parameter setting allows the performance of the quantum annealer to compete with (and potentially outperform, in the absence of analog control errors optimized simulated annealing algorithms.

  18. Massively parallel quantum computer simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, K.; Michielsen, K.; De Raedt, H.; Trieu, B.; Arnold, G.; Richter, M.; Lippert, Th.; Watanabe, H.; Ito, N.

    2007-01-01

    We describe portable software to simulate universal quantum computers on massive parallel Computers. We illustrate the use of the simulation software by running various quantum algorithms on different computer architectures, such as a IBM BlueGene/L, a IBM Regatta p690+, a Hitachi SR11000/J1, a Cray

  19. Spin dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Deuretzbacher, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated spin dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum gas. Through spin-changing collisions, two clouds with opposite spin orientations are spontaneously created in a Bose-Einstein condensate. After ballistic expansion, both clouds acquire ring-shaped density distributions with superimp......We have investigated spin dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum gas. Through spin-changing collisions, two clouds with opposite spin orientations are spontaneously created in a Bose-Einstein condensate. After ballistic expansion, both clouds acquire ring-shaped density distributions...... with nonlocal Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement....

  20. Quantum control and coherence of interacting spins in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, G.

    2012-01-01

    The field of quantum science and technology has generated many ideas for new revolutionary devices that exploit the quantum mechanical properties of small-scale systems. Isolated solid state spins play a large role in quantum technologies. They can be used as basic building blocks for a quantum

  1. Blind Quantum Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvail, Louis; Arrighi, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of "having someone carry out the work of executing a function for you, but without letting him learn anything about your input". Say Alice wants Bob to compute some known function f upon her input x, but wants to prevent Bob from learning anything about x. The situa......We investigate the possibility of "having someone carry out the work of executing a function for you, but without letting him learn anything about your input". Say Alice wants Bob to compute some known function f upon her input x, but wants to prevent Bob from learning anything about x....... The situation arises for instance if client Alice has limited computational resources in comparison with mistrusted server Bob, or if x is an inherently mobile piece of data. Could there be a protocol whereby Bob is forced to compute f(x) "blindly", i.e. without observing x? We provide such a blind computation...... protocol for the class of functions which admit an efficient procedure to generate random input-output pairs, e.g. factorization. The cheat-sensitive security achieved relies only upon quantum theory being true. The security analysis carried out assumes the eavesdropper performs individual attacks....

  2. Spin star as a switch for quantum networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung, Man-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Quantum state transfer is an important task in quantum information processing. It is known that one can engineer the couplings of a one-dimensional spin chain to achieve the goal of perfect state transfer. To leverage the value of these spin chains, a spin star is potentially useful for connecting different parts of a quantum network. In this work, we extend the spin-chain engineering problem to the problems with a topology of a star network. We show that a permanently coupled spin star can function as a network switch for transferring quantum states selectively from one node to another by varying the local potentials only. Together with one-dimensional chains, this result allows applications of quantum state transfer to be applied to more general quantum networks.

  3. Gate errors in solid-state quantum-computer architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xuedong; Das Sarma, S.

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically consider possible errors in solid-state quantum computation due to the interplay of the complex solid-state environment and gate imperfections. In particular, we study two examples of gate operations in the opposite ends of the gate speed spectrum, an adiabatic gate operation in electron-spin-based quantum dot quantum computation and a sudden gate operation in Cooper-pair-box superconducting quantum computation. We evaluate quantitatively the nonadiabatic operation of a two-qubit gate in a two-electron double quantum dot. We also analyze the nonsudden pulse gate in a Cooper-pair-box-based quantum-computer model. In both cases our numerical results show strong influences of the higher excited states of the system on the gate operation, clearly demonstrating the importance of a detailed understanding of the relevant Hilbert-space structure on the quantum-computer operations

  4. Quantum Computing-Building Blocks of a Quantum Computer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 9. Quantum Computing - Building Blocks of a Quantum Computer. C S Vijay Vishal Gupta. General Article Volume 5 Issue 9 September 2000 pp 69-81. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Effect of quantum tunneling on spin Hall magnetoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Seulgi; Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Manske, Dirk

    2017-02-22

    We present a formalism that simultaneously incorporates the effect of quantum tunneling and spin diffusion on the spin Hall magnetoresistance observed in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator bilayers (such as Pt/Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 ) and normal metal/ferromagnetic metal bilayers (such as Pt/Co), in which the angle of magnetization influences the magnetoresistance of the normal metal. In the normal metal side the spin diffusion is known to affect the landscape of the spin accumulation caused by spin Hall effect and subsequently the magnetoresistance, while on the ferromagnet side the quantum tunneling effect is detrimental to the interface spin current which also affects the spin accumulation. The influence of generic material properties such as spin diffusion length, layer thickness, interface coupling, and insulating gap can be quantified in a unified manner, and experiments that reveal the quantum feature of the magnetoresistance are suggested.

  6. Simulating chemistry using quantum computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassal, Ivan; Whitfield, James D; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Yung, Man-Hong; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2011-01-01

    The difficulty of simulating quantum systems, well known to quantum chemists, prompted the idea of quantum computation. One can avoid the steep scaling associated with the exact simulation of increasingly large quantum systems on conventional computers, by mapping the quantum system to another, more controllable one. In this review, we discuss to what extent the ideas in quantum computation, now a well-established field, have been applied to chemical problems. We describe algorithms that achieve significant advantages for the electronic-structure problem, the simulation of chemical dynamics, protein folding, and other tasks. Although theory is still ahead of experiment, we outline recent advances that have led to the first chemical calculations on small quantum information processors.

  7. Quantum Entanglement of a Tunneling Spin with Mechanical Modes of a Torsional Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Garanin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We solve the Schrödinger equation for various quantum regimes describing a tunneling macrospin coupled to a torsional oscillator. The energy spectrum and freezing of spin tunneling are studied. Magnetic susceptibility, noise spectrum, and decoherence due to entanglement of spin and mechanical modes are computed. We show that the presence of a tunneling spin can be detected via splitting of the mechanical mode at the resonance. Our results apply to experiments with magnetic molecules coupled to nanoresonators.

  8. Algorithms on ensemble quantum computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykin, P Oscar; Mor, Tal; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Vatan, Farrokh

    2010-06-01

    In ensemble (or bulk) quantum computation, all computations are performed on an ensemble of computers rather than on a single computer. Measurements of qubits in an individual computer cannot be performed; instead, only expectation values (over the complete ensemble of computers) can be measured. As a result of this limitation on the model of computation, many algorithms cannot be processed directly on such computers, and must be modified, as the common strategy of delaying the measurements usually does not resolve this ensemble-measurement problem. Here we present several new strategies for resolving this problem. Based on these strategies we provide new versions of some of the most important quantum algorithms, versions that are suitable for implementing on ensemble quantum computers, e.g., on liquid NMR quantum computers. These algorithms are Shor's factorization algorithm, Grover's search algorithm (with several marked items), and an algorithm for quantum fault-tolerant computation. The first two algorithms are simply modified using a randomizing and a sorting strategies. For the last algorithm, we develop a classical-quantum hybrid strategy for removing measurements. We use it to present a novel quantum fault-tolerant scheme. More explicitly, we present schemes for fault-tolerant measurement-free implementation of Toffoli and σ(z)(¼) as these operations cannot be implemented "bitwise", and their standard fault-tolerant implementations require measurement.

  9. Models of optical quantum computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krovi Hari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available I review some work on models of quantum computing, optical implementations of these models, as well as the associated computational power. In particular, we discuss the circuit model and cluster state implementations using quantum optics with various encodings such as dual rail encoding, Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding, and coherent state encoding. Then we discuss intermediate models of optical computing such as boson sampling and its variants. Finally, we review some recent work in optical implementations of adiabatic quantum computing and analog optical computing. We also provide a brief description of the relevant aspects from complexity theory needed to understand the results surveyed.

  10. Quantum computing with defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Joel

    2011-03-01

    The development of a quantum computer is contingent upon the identification and design of systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information. One of the most promising candidates consists of a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV-1) center, since it is an individually-addressable quantum system that can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. While the success of the NV-1 stems from its nature as a localized ``deep-center'' point defect, no systematic effort has been made to identify other defects that might behave in a similar way. We provide guidelines for identifying other defect centers with similar properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate systems. To elucidate these points, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV-1 center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). Using hybrid functionals, we report formation energies, configuration-coordinate diagrams, and defect-level diagrams to compare and contrast the properties of these defects. We find that the NC VSi - 1 center in SiC, a structural analog of the NV-1 center in diamond, may be a suitable center with very different optical transition energies. We also discuss how the proposed criteria can be translated into guidelines to discover NV analogs in other tetrahedrally coordinated materials. This work was performed in collaboration with J. R. Weber, W. F. Koehl, B. B. Buckley, A. Janotti, C. G. Van de Walle, and D. D. Awschalom. This work was supported by ARO, AFOSR, and NSF.

  11. Coherent Dynamics of a Hybrid Quantum Spin-Mechanical Oscillator System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kenneth William, III

    A fully functional quantum computer must contain at least two important components: a quantum memory for storing and manipulating quantum information and a quantum data bus to securely transfer information between quantum memories. Typically, a quantum memory is composed of a matter system, such as an atom or an electron spin, due to their prolonged quantum coherence. Alternatively, a quantum data bus is typically composed of some propagating degree of freedom, such as a photon, which can retain quantum information over long distances. Therefore, a quantum computer will likely be a hybrid quantum device, consisting of two or more disparate quantum systems. However, there must be a reliable and controllable quantum interface between the memory and bus in order to faithfully interconvert quantum information. The current engineering challenge for quantum computers is scaling the device to large numbers of controllable quantum systems, which will ultimately depend on the choice of the quantum elements and interfaces utilized in the device. In this thesis, we present and characterize a hybrid quantum device comprised of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers embedded in a high quality factor diamond mechanical oscillator. The electron spin of the NV center is a leading candidate for the realization of a quantum memory due to its exceptional quantum coherence times. On the other hand, mechanical oscillators are highly sensitive to a wide variety of external forces, and have the potential to serve as a long-range quantum bus between quantum systems of disparate energy scales. These two elements are interfaced through crystal strain generated by vibrations of the mechanical oscillator. Importantly, a strain interface allows for a scalable architecture, and furthermore, opens the door to integration into a larger quantum network through coupling to an optical interface. There are a few important engineering challenges associated with this device. First, there have been no

  12. Quantum revivals and magnetization tunneling in effective spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizanac, M.; Altwein, D.; Vedmedenko, E. Y.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum mechanical objects or nano-objects have been proposed as bits for information storage. While time-averaged properties of magnetic, quantum-mechanical particles have been extensively studied experimentally and theoretically, experimental investigations of the real time evolution of magnetization in the quantum regime were not possible until recent developments in pump-probe techniques. Here we investigate the quantum dynamics of effective spin systems by means of analytical and numerical treatments. Particular attention is paid to the quantum revival time and its relation to the magnetization tunneling. The quantum revival time has been initially defined as the recurrence time of a total wave-function. Here we show that the quantum revivals of wave-functions and expectation values in spin systems may be quite different which gives rise to a more sophisticated definition of the quantum revival within the realm of experimental research. Particularly, the revival times for integer spins coincide which is not the case for half-integer spins. Furthermore, the quantum revival is found to be shortest for integer ratios between the on-site anisotropy and an external magnetic field paving the way to novel methods of anisotropy measurements. We show that the quantum tunneling of magnetization at avoided level crossing is coherent to the quantum revival time of expectation values, leading to a connection between these two fundamental properties of quantum mechanical spins.

  13. Quantum computing with trapped ions, atoms and light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2001-01-01

    We consider experimental issues relevant to quantum computing, and discuss the best way to achieve the essential requirements of reliable quantum memory and gate operations. Nuclear spins in trapped ions or atoms are a very promising candidate for the qubits. We estimate the parameters required to couple atoms using light via cavity QED in order to achieve quantum gates. We briefly comment on recent improvements to the Cirac-Zoller method for coupling trapped ions via their vibrational degree of freedom. Error processes result in a trade-off between quantum gate speed and failure probability. A useful quantum computer does appear to be feasible using a combination of ion trap and optical methods. The best understood method to stabilize a large computer relies on quantum error correction. The essential ideas of this are discussed, and recent estimates of the noise requirements in a quantum computing device are given

  14. Towards a spin-ensemble quantum memory for superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grezes, Cécile; Kubo, Yuimaru; Julsgaard, Brian; Umeda, Takahide; Isoya, Junichi; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Ohshima, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Diniz, Igor; Auffeves, Alexia; Jacques, Vincent; Roch, Jean-François; Vion, Denis; Esteve, Daniel; Moelmer, Klaus; Bertet, Patrice

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews efforts to build a new type of quantum device, which combines an ensemble of electronic spins with long coherence times, and a small-scale superconducting quantum processor. The goal is to store over long times arbitrary qubit states in orthogonal collective modes of the spin-ensemble, and to retrieve them on-demand. We first present the protocol devised for such a multi-mode quantum memory. We then describe a series of experimental results using NV (as in nitrogen vacancy) center spins in diamond, which demonstrate its main building blocks: the transfer of arbitrary quantum states from a qubit into the spin ensemble, and the multi-mode retrieval of classical microwave pulses down to the single-photon level with a Hahn-echo like sequence. A reset of the spin memory is implemented in-between two successive sequences using optical repumping of the spins. xml:lang="fr"

  15. Noise in tunneling spin current across coupled quantum spin chains

    OpenAIRE

    Aftergood, Joshua; Takei, So

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study the spin current and its dc noise generated between two spin-1/2 spin chains weakly coupled at a single site in the presence of an over-population of spin excitations and a temperature elevation in one subsystem relative to the other, and compare the corresponding transport quantities across two weakly coupled magnetic insulators hosting magnons. In the spin chain scenario, we find that applying a temperature bias exclusively leads to a vanishing spin current and a conc...

  16. Electric field control of emergent electrodynamics in quantum spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantagne-Hurtubise, Étienne; Bhattacharjee, Subhro; Moessner, R.

    2017-09-01

    We study the coupling between conventional (Maxwell) and emergent electrodynamics in quantum spin ice, a 3+1-dimensional U (1 ) quantum spin liquid. We find that a uniform electric field can be used to tune the properties of both the ground state and excitations of the spin liquid. In particular, it induces emergent birefringence, rendering the speed of the emergent light anisotropic and polarization-dependent. A sufficiently strong electric field triggers a quantum phase transition into new U (1 ) quantum spin liquid phases, which trap emergent electric π fluxes. The flux patterns of these new phases depend on the direction of the electric field. Strikingly, some of the canonical pinch points in the spin structure factor, characteristic of classical spin ice, emerge near the phase transition, while they are absent in the quantum spin liquid phases. Estimating the electric field strength required, we find that this transition is potentially accessible experimentally. Finally, we propose a minimal mechanism by which an oscillating electric field can generate emergent radiation inside a quantum spin ice material with non-Kramers spin doublets.

  17. Efficient universal blind quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Maccone, Lorenzo; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Rudolph, Terry G

    2013-12-06

    We give a cheat sensitive protocol for blind universal quantum computation that is efficient in terms of computational and communication resources: it allows one party to perform an arbitrary computation on a second party's quantum computer without revealing either which computation is performed, or its input and output. The first party's computational capabilities can be extremely limited: she must only be able to create and measure single-qubit superposition states. The second party is not required to use measurement-based quantum computation. The protocol requires the (optimal) exchange of O(Jlog2(N)) single-qubit states, where J is the computational depth and N is the number of qubits needed for the computation.

  18. Duality quantum computer and the efficient quantum simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Long, Gui-Lu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we firstly briefly review the duality quantum computer. Distinctly, the generalized quantum gates, the basic evolution operators in a duality quantum computer are no longer unitary, and they can be expressed in terms of linear combinations of unitary operators. All linear bounded operators can be realized in a duality quantum computer, and unitary operators are just the extreme points of the set of generalized quantum gates. A d-slits duality quantum computer can be realized in...

  19. Quantum corrections for spinning particles in de Sitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröb, Markus B.; Verdaguer, Enric

    2017-04-01

    We compute the one-loop quantum corrections to the gravitational potentials of a spinning point particle in a de Sitter background, due to the vacuum polarisation induced by conformal fields in an effective field theory approach. We consider arbitrary conformal field theories, assuming only that the theory contains a large number N of fields in order to separate their contribution from the one induced by virtual gravitons. The corrections are described in a gauge-invariant way, classifying the induced metric perturbations around the de Sitter background according to their behaviour under transformations on equal-time hypersurfaces. There are six gauge-invariant modes: two scalar Bardeen potentials, one transverse vector and one transverse traceless tensor, of which one scalar and the vector couple to the spinning particle. The quantum corrections consist of three different parts: a generalisation of the flat-space correction, which is only significant at distances of the order of the Planck length; a constant correction depending on the undetermined parameters of the renormalised effective action; and a term which grows logarithmically with the distance from the particle. This last term is the most interesting, and when resummed gives a modified power law, enhancing the gravitational force at large distances. As a check on the accuracy of our calculation, we recover the linearised Kerr-de Sitter metric in the classical limit and the flat-space quantum correction in the limit of vanishing Hubble constant.

  20. Insecurity of quantum secure computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    1997-08-01

    It had been widely claimed that quantum mechanics can protect private information during public decision in, for example, the so-called two-party secure computation. If this were the case, quantum smart-cards, storing confidential information accessible only to a proper reader, could prevent fake teller machines from learning the PIN (personal identification number) from the customers' input. Although such optimism has been challenged by the recent surprising discovery of the insecurity of the so-called quantum bit commitment, the security of quantum two-party computation itself remains unaddressed. Here I answer this question directly by showing that all one-sided two-party computations (which allow only one of the two parties to learn the result) are necessarily insecure. As corollaries to my results, quantum one-way oblivious password identification and the so-called quantum one-out-of-two oblivious transfer are impossible. I also construct a class of functions that cannot be computed securely in any two-sided two-party computation. Nevertheless, quantum cryptography remains useful in key distribution and can still provide partial security in ``quantum money'' proposed by Wiesner.

  1. Universal blind quantum computation for hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He-Liang; Bao, Wan-Su; Li, Tan; Li, Feng-Guang; Fu, Xiang-Qun; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Hai-Long; Wang, Xiang

    2017-08-01

    As progress on the development of building quantum computer continues to advance, first-generation practical quantum computers will be available for ordinary users in the cloud style similar to IBM's Quantum Experience nowadays. Clients can remotely access the quantum servers using some simple devices. In such a situation, it is of prime importance to keep the security of the client's information. Blind quantum computation protocols enable a client with limited quantum technology to delegate her quantum computation to a quantum server without leaking any privacy. To date, blind quantum computation has been considered only for an individual quantum system. However, practical universal quantum computer is likely to be a hybrid system. Here, we take the first step to construct a framework of blind quantum computation for the hybrid system, which provides a more feasible way for scalable blind quantum computation.

  2. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  3. A quantum computer only needs one universe

    OpenAIRE

    Steane, A. M.

    2000-01-01

    The nature of quantum computation is discussed. It is argued that, in terms of the amount of information manipulated in a given time, quantum and classical computation are equally efficient. Quantum superposition does not permit quantum computers to ``perform many computations simultaneously'' except in a highly qualified and to some extent misleading sense. Quantum computation is therefore not well described by interpretations of quantum mechanics which invoke the concept of vast numbers of ...

  4. Loop quantum cosmology and spin foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Campiglia, Miguel; Henderson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is used to provide concrete evidence in support of the general paradigm underlying spin foam models (SFMs). Specifically, it is shown that: (i) the physical inner product in the timeless framework equals the transition amplitude in the deparameterized theory; (ii) this quantity admits a vertex expansion a la SFMs in which the M-th term refers just to M volume transitions, without any reference to the time at which the transition takes place; (iii) the exact physical inner product is obtained by summing over just the discrete geometries; no 'continuum limit' is involved; and, (iv) the vertex expansion can be interpreted as a perturbative expansion in the spirit of group field theory. This sum over histories reformulation of LQC also addresses certain other issues which are briefly summarized.

  5. Electron spin resonance and spin-valley physics in a silicon double quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaojie; Ruskov, Rusko; Xiao, Ming; Tahan, Charles; Jiang, HongWen

    2014-05-14

    Silicon quantum dots are a leading approach for solid-state quantum bits. However, developing this technology is complicated by the multi-valley nature of silicon. Here we observe transport of individual electrons in a silicon CMOS-based double quantum dot under electron spin resonance. An anticrossing of the driven dot energy levels is observed when the Zeeman and valley splittings coincide. A detected anticrossing splitting of 60 MHz is interpreted as a direct measure of spin and valley mixing, facilitated by spin-orbit interaction in the presence of non-ideal interfaces. A lower bound of spin dephasing time of 63 ns is extracted. We also describe a possible experimental evidence of an unconventional spin-valley blockade, despite the assumption of non-ideal interfaces. This understanding of silicon spin-valley physics should enable better control and read-out techniques for the spin qubits in an all CMOS silicon approach.

  6. Experimental quantum computing without entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon, B P; Barbieri, M; Almeida, M P; White, A G

    2008-11-14

    Deterministic quantum computation with one pure qubit (DQC1) is an efficient model of computation that uses highly mixed states. Unlike pure-state models, its power is not derived from the generation of a large amount of entanglement. Instead it has been proposed that other nonclassical correlations are responsible for the computational speedup, and that these can be captured by the quantum discord. In this Letter we implement DQC1 in an all-optical architecture, and experimentally observe the generated correlations. We find no entanglement, but large amounts of quantum discord-except in three cases where an efficient classical simulation is always possible. Our results show that even fully separable, highly mixed, states can contain intrinsically quantum mechanical correlations and that these could offer a valuable resource for quantum information technologies.

  7. Effect of the shape on the spin state and exchange in quantum dots. Feynman path integral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevkunov, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    The ab initio computer simulation of the mixed quantum states of 1–5-nm model ellipsoid quantum dots with “soft” walls containing two and three quantum-indistinguishable nonrelativistic electrons has been performed by the path integral method. The calculation has been carried out beyond the single-electron and mean-field approximations with the fundamentally exact inclusion of Coulomb and exchange correlations of all orders and the spin variable. Distributions over the eigenfunctions of the spin-squared operator, as well as the equilibrium spin numbers, have been obtained depending on the shape of a quantum dot and the temperature. The complete set of basis functions symmetrized in permutations according to the spin of the system has been obtained by application of the Young symmetry operators. The dependence of the energy on the shape of the quantum dot corresponds to the negative sign of the surface tension at its boundary. The calculation indicates that the spin magnetic susceptibility in the system of two electrons decreases strongly for spherical quantum dots (“pairing” of spins) and the temperature dependences have a pronounced maximum whose position depends on the shape of the quantum dot. For three electrons in an oblate quantum dot, the inversion of the energy levels of spin states is observed and affects the spin magnetic susceptibility. The results indicate a strong dependence of the energy of collective spin states of electrons on the detailed inclusion of exchange and Coulomb spatial correlations

  8. Quantum gravitational corrections for spinning particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fröb, Markus B.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the quantum corrections to the gauge-invariant gravitational potentials of spinning particles in flat space, induced by loops of both massive and massless matter fields of various types. While the corrections to the Newtonian potential induced by massless conformal matter for spinless particles are well known, and the same corrections due to massless minimally coupled scalars http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0264-9381/27/24/245008, massless non-conformal scalars http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.87.104027 and massive scalars, fermions and vector bosons http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.91.064047 have been recently derived, spinning particles receive additional corrections which are the subject of the present work. We give both fully analytic results valid for all distances from the particle, and present numerical results as well as asymptotic expansions. At large distances from the particle, the corrections due to massive fields are exponentially suppressed in comparison to the corrections from massless fields, as one would expect. However, a surprising result of our analysis is that close to the particle itself, on distances comparable to the Compton wavelength of the massive fields running in the loops, these corrections can be enhanced with respect to the massless case.

  9. Quantum statistical metastability for a finite spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garanin, D. A.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    We study quantum-classical escape-rate transitions for uniaxial and biaxial models with finite spins S=10 (such as Mn12Ac and Fe8) and S=100 by a direct numerical approach. At second-order transitions the level making a dominant contribution into thermally assisted tunneling changes gradually with temperature whereas at first-order transitions a group of levels is skipped. For finite spins, the quasiclassical boundaries between first- and second-order transitions are shifted, favoring a second-order transition: For Fe8 in zero field the transition should be first order according to a theory with S-->∞, but we show that there are no skipped levels at the transition. Applying a field along the hard axis in Fe8 makes transition the strongest first order. For the same model with S=100 we confirmed the existence of a region where a second-order transition is followed by a first-order transition [X. Martínes Hidalgo and E. M. Chudnovsky, J. Phys.: Condensed Matter 12, 4243 (2000)].

  10. Quantum information and computing

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, M; Watanabe, N

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of this volume is to emphasize the multidisciplinary aspects of this very active new line of research in which concrete technological and industrial realizations require the combined efforts of experimental and theoretical physicists, mathematicians and engineers. Contents: Coherent Quantum Control of ?-Atoms through the Stochastic Limit (L Accardi et al.); Recent Advances in Quantum White Noise Calculus (L Accardi & A Boukas); Joint Extension of States of Fermion Subsystems (H Araki); Fidelity of Quantum Teleportation Model Using Beam Splittings (K-H Fichtner et al.); Quantum

  11. Advanced Materials for Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    with Magnons co-PI: Leszek Malkinski w/ Postdoc Dr. Seong-Gi Min Project Name: Quantum Computing with Magnons 1. Brief Narrative: Quanta of...spinwaves called magnons can be used to exchange quantum information between solid state qubits. The project was driven by the concept of spiwave bus

  12. Stability of holonomic quantum computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, V.I.; Kuzmin, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    We study the stability of holonomic quantum computations with respect to errors in assignment of control parameters. The general expression for fidelity is obtained. In the small errors limit the simple formulae for the fidelity decrease rate is derived

  13. Minimal ancilla mediated quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, Timothy J.; Kendon, Viv

    2014-01-01

    Schemes of universal quantum computation in which the interactions between the computational elements, in a computational register, are mediated by some ancillary system are of interest due to their relevance to the physical implementation of a quantum computer. Furthermore, reducing the level of control required over both the ancillary and register systems has the potential to simplify any experimental implementation. In this paper we consider how to minimise the control needed to implement universal quantum computation in an ancilla-mediated fashion. Considering computational schemes which require no measurements and hence evolve by unitary dynamics for the global system, we show that when employing an ancilla qubit there are certain fixed-time ancilla-register interactions which, along with ancilla initialisation in the computational basis, are universal for quantum computation with no additional control of either the ancilla or the register. We develop two distinct models based on locally inequivalent interactions and we then discuss the relationship between these unitary models and the measurement-based ancilla-mediated models known as ancilla-driven quantum computation. (orig.)

  14. The "Proton Spin Crisis" — a Quantum Query

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansson J.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The “proton spin crisis” was introduced in the late 1980s, when the EMC-experiment revealed that little or nothing of a proton’s spin seemed to be carried by its quarks. The main objective of this paper is to point out that it is wrong to assume that the proton spin, as measured by completely different experimental setups, should be the same in all circumstances, an assumption explicitly made in all present theoretical treatments of the “crisis”. As spin is a genuine quantum property, without any objective existence outside its measuring apparatus context, proper account of quantum mechanical measurement theory must be taken.

  15. Pumped double quantum dot with spin-orbit coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We study driven by an external electric field quantum orbital and spin dynamics of electron in a one-dimensional double quantum dot with spin-orbit coupling. Two types of external perturbation are considered: a periodic field at the Zeeman frequency and a single half-period pulse. Spin-orbit coupling leads to a nontrivial evolution in the spin and orbital channels and to a strongly spin- dependent probability density distribution. Both the interdot tunneling and the driven motion contribute into the spin evolution. These results can be important for the design of the spin manipulation schemes in semiconductor nanostructures. PACS numbers: 73.63.Kv,72.25.Dc,72.25.Pn

  16. Scaling of quantum Fisher information close to the quantum phase transition in the XY spin chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, En-Jia, E-mail: yeenjia@jiangnan.edu.cn [Jiangsu Provincial Research Center of Light Industrial Optoelectronic Engineering and Technology, School of Science, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Hu, Zheng-Da [Jiangsu Provincial Research Center of Light Industrial Optoelectronic Engineering and Technology, School of Science, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Wu, Wei [Zhejiang Institute of Modern Physics and Physics Department, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2016-12-01

    The quantum phase transition of an XY spin chain is investigated by employing the quantum Fisher information encoded in the ground state. It is shown that the quantum Fisher information is an effective tool for characterizing the quantum criticality. The quantum Fisher information, its first and second derivatives versus the transverse field display the phenomena of sudden transition, sudden jump and divergence, respectively. Besides, the analysis of finite size scaling for the second derivative of quantum Fisher information is performed.

  17. Machine learning Z2 quantum spin liquids with quasiparticle statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Melko, Roger G.; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2017-12-01

    After decades of progress and effort, obtaining a phase diagram for a strongly correlated topological system still remains a challenge. Although in principle one could turn to Wilson loops and long-range entanglement, evaluating these nonlocal observables at many points in phase space can be prohibitively costly. With growing excitement over topological quantum computation comes the need for an efficient approach for obtaining topological phase diagrams. Here we turn to machine learning using quantum loop topography (QLT), a notion we have recently introduced. Specifically, we propose a construction of QLT that is sensitive to quasiparticle statistics. We then use mutual statistics between the spinons and visons to detect a Z2 quantum spin liquid in a multiparameter phase space. We successfully obtain the quantum phase boundary between the topological and trivial phases using a simple feed-forward neural network. Furthermore, we demonstrate advantages of our approach for the evaluation of phase diagrams relating to speed and storage. Such statistics-based machine learning of topological phases opens new efficient routes to studying topological phase diagrams in strongly correlated systems.

  18. Quantum entanglement and spin control in silicon nanocrystal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Berec

    Full Text Available Selective coherence control and electrically mediated exchange coupling of single electron spin between triplet and singlet states using numerically derived optimal control of proton pulses is demonstrated. We obtained spatial confinement below size of the Bohr radius for proton spin chain FWHM. Precise manipulation of individual spins and polarization of electron spin states are analyzed via proton induced emission and controlled population of energy shells in pure (29Si nanocrystal. Entangled quantum states of channeled proton trajectories are mapped in transverse and angular phase space of (29Si axial channel alignment in order to avoid transversal excitations. Proton density and proton energy as impact parameter functions are characterized in single particle density matrix via discretization of diagonal and nearest off-diagonal elements. We combined high field and low densities (1 MeV/92 nm to create inseparable quantum state by superimposing the hyperpolarizationed proton spin chain with electron spin of (29Si. Quantum discretization of density of states (DOS was performed by the Monte Carlo simulation method using numerical solutions of proton equations of motion. Distribution of gaussian coherent states is obtained by continuous modulation of individual spin phase and amplitude. Obtained results allow precise engineering and faithful mapping of spin states. This would provide the effective quantum key distribution (QKD and transmission of quantum information over remote distances between quantum memory centers for scalable quantum communication network. Furthermore, obtained results give insights in application of channeled protons subatomic microscopy as a complete versatile scanning-probe system capable of both quantum engineering of charged particle states and characterization of quantum states below diffraction limit linear and in-depth resolution.PACS NUMBERS: 03.65.Ud, 03.67.Bg, 61.85.+p, 67.30.hj.

  19. Physical Realizations of Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Kanemitsu, Shigeru; Salomaa, Martti; Takagi, Shin; Are the DiVincenzo Criteria Fulfilled in 2004 ?

    2006-01-01

    The contributors of this volume are working at the forefront of various realizations of quantum computers. They survey the recent developments in each realization, in the context of the DiVincenzo criteria, including nuclear magnetic resonance, Josephson junctions, quantum dots, and trapped ions. There are also some theoretical contributions which have relevance in the physical realizations of a quantum computer. This book fills the gap between elementary introductions to the subject and highly specialized research papers to allow beginning graduate students to understand the cutting-edge of r

  20. Efficient spin filter using multi-terminal quantum dot with spin-orbit interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose a multi-terminal spin filter using a quantum dot with spin-orbit interaction. First, we formulate the spin Hall effect (SHE in a quantum dot connected to three leads. We show that the SHE is significantly enhanced by the resonant tunneling if the level spacing in the quantum dot is smaller than the level broadening. We stress that the SHE is tunable by changing the tunnel coupling to the third lead. Next, we perform a numerical simulation for a multi-terminal spin filter using a quantum dot fabricated on semiconductor heterostructures. The spin filter shows an efficiency of more than 50% when the conditions for the enhanced SHE are satisfied. PACS numbers: 72.25.Dc,71.70.Ej,73.63.Kv,85.75.-d

  1. Spin and tunneling dynamics in an asymmetrical double quantum dot with spin-orbit coupling: Selective spin transport device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhav K.; Jha, Pradeep K.; Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we study the spin and tunneling dynamics as a function of magnetic field in a one-dimensional GaAs double quantum dot with both the Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. In particular, we consider different spatial widths for the spin-up and spin-down electronic states. We find that the spin dynamics is a superposition of slow as well as fast Rabi oscillations. It is found that the Rashba interaction strength as well as the external magnetic field strongly modifies the slow Rabi oscillations which is particularly useful for implementing solid state selective spin transport device.

  2. Fast Electrical Control of Single Electron Spins in Quantum Dots with Vanishing Influence from Nuclear Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, J.; Otsuka, T.; Nakajima, T.; Takakura, T.; Obata, T.; Pioro-Ladrière, M.; Lu, H.; Palmstrøm, C. J.; Gossard, A. C.; Tarucha, S.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate fast universal electrical spin manipulation with inhomogeneous magnetic fields. With fast Rabi frequency up to 127 MHz, we leave the conventional regime of strong nuclear-spin influence and observe a spin-flip fidelity >96 % , a distinct chevron Rabi pattern in the spectral-time domain, and a spin resonance linewidth limited by the Rabi frequency, not by the dephasing rate. In addition, we establish fast z rotations up to 54 MHz by directly controlling the spin phase. Our findings will significantly facilitate tomography and error correction with electron spins in quantum dots.

  3. Anisotropic intrinsic spin Hall effect in quantum wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, A W; Akis, R; Ferry, D K

    2011-01-01

    We use numerical simulations to investigate the spin Hall effect in quantum wires in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling. We find that the intrinsic spin Hall effect is highly anisotropic with respect to the orientation of the wire, and that the nature of this anisotropy depends strongly on the electron density and the relative strengths of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings. In particular, at low densities, when only one subband of the quantum wire is occupied, the spin Hall effect is strongest for electron momentum along the [1-bar 10] axis, which is the opposite of what is expected for the purely 2D case. In addition, when more than one subband is occupied, the strength and anisotropy of the spin Hall effect can vary greatly over relatively small changes in electron density, which makes it difficult to predict which wire orientation will maximize the strength of the spin Hall effect. These results help to illuminate the role of quantum confinement in spin-orbit-coupled systems, and can serve as a guide for future experimental work on the use of quantum wires for spin-Hall-based spintronic applications. (paper)

  4. Dissipation Assisted Quantum Memory with Coupled Spin Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Verstraete, Frank; Cirac, Ignacio; Lukin, Mikhail

    2009-05-01

    Dissipative dynamics often destroys quantum coherences. However, one can use dissipation to suppress decoherence. A well-known example is the so-called quantum Zeno effect, in which one can freeze the evolution using dissipative processes (e.g., frequently projecting the system to its initial state). Similarly, the undesired decoherence of quantum bits can also be suppressed using controlled dissipation. We propose and analyze the use of this generalization of quantum Zeno effect for protecting the quantum information encoded in the coupled spin systems. This new approach may potentially enhance the performance of quantum memories, in systems such as nitrogen-vacancy color-centers in diamond.

  5. Research progress on quantum informatics and quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yusheng

    2018-03-01

    Quantum informatics is an emerging interdisciplinary subject developed by the combination of quantum mechanics, information science, and computer science in the 1980s. The birth and development of quantum information science has far-reaching significance in science and technology. At present, the application of quantum information technology has become the direction of people’s efforts. The preparation, storage, purification and regulation, transmission, quantum coding and decoding of quantum state have become the hotspot of scientists and technicians, which have a profound impact on the national economy and the people’s livelihood, technology and defense technology. This paper first summarizes the background of quantum information science and quantum computer and the current situation of domestic and foreign research, and then introduces the basic knowledge and basic concepts of quantum computing. Finally, several quantum algorithms are introduced in detail, including Quantum Fourier transform, Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm, Shor’s quantum algorithm, quantum phase estimation.

  6. Quantum Computing With Quasiparticles of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Averin, Dmitri

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this project was the theoretical study of quantum computation based on controlled transfer of individual quasiparticles in systems of quantum antidots in the regime of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect (FQHE...

  7. Quantum Computing in Diamond

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prawer, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this proposal is to demonstrate the key elements needed to construct a logical qubit in diamond by exploiting the remarkable quantum properties of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) optical centre...

  8. Resonance fluorescence and electron spin in semiconductor quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yong

    2009-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation contains the first observation of spin-resolved resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot and its application of direct measurement of electron spin dynamics. The Mollow triplet and the Mollow quintuplet, which are the hallmarks of resonance fluorescence, are presented as the non-spin-resolved and spin-resolved resonance fluorescence spectrum, respectively. The negligible laser background contribution, the near pure radiative broadened spectrum and the anti-bunching photon statistics imply the sideband photons are background-free and near transform-limited single photons. This demonstration is a promising step towards the heralded single photon generation and electron spin readout. Instead of resolving spectrum, an alternative spin-readout scheme by counting resonance fluorescence photons under moderate laser power is demonstrated. The measurements of n-shot time-resolved resonance fluorescence readout are carried out to reveal electron spin dynamics of the measurement induced back action and the spin relaxation. Hyperfine interaction and heavy-light hole mixing are identified as the relevant mechanisms for the back action and phonon-assistant spin-orbit interaction dominates the spin relaxation. After a detailed discussion on charge-spin configurations in coupled quantum dots system, the single-shot readout on electron spin are proposed. (orig.)

  9. Resonance fluorescence and electron spin in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong

    2009-11-18

    The work presented in this dissertation contains the first observation of spin-resolved resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot and its application of direct measurement of electron spin dynamics. The Mollow triplet and the Mollow quintuplet, which are the hallmarks of resonance fluorescence, are presented as the non-spin-resolved and spin-resolved resonance fluorescence spectrum, respectively. The negligible laser background contribution, the near pure radiative broadened spectrum and the anti-bunching photon statistics imply the sideband photons are background-free and near transform-limited single photons. This demonstration is a promising step towards the heralded single photon generation and electron spin readout. Instead of resolving spectrum, an alternative spin-readout scheme by counting resonance fluorescence photons under moderate laser power is demonstrated. The measurements of n-shot time-resolved resonance fluorescence readout are carried out to reveal electron spin dynamics of the measurement induced back action and the spin relaxation. Hyperfine interaction and heavy-light hole mixing are identified as the relevant mechanisms for the back action and phonon-assistant spin-orbit interaction dominates the spin relaxation. After a detailed discussion on charge-spin configurations in coupled quantum dots system, the single-shot readout on electron spin are proposed. (orig.)

  10. Quantum Artificial Life in an IBM Quantum Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U.; Sanz, M.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first experimental realization of a quantum artificial life algorithm in a quantum computer. The quantum biomimetic protocol encodes tailored quantum behaviors belonging to living systems, namely, self-replication, mutation, interaction between individuals, and death, into the cloud quantum computer IBM ibmqx4. In this experiment, entanglement spreads throughout generations of individuals, where genuine quantum information features are inherited through genealogical networks. A...

  11. Quantum Computation with Ultrafast Laser Pulse Shaping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum computing exploits the quantum mechanical na- ture of matter to exist in multiple possible states simulta- neously. BUilding up on the digital binary logic of bits, quantum computing is built on the basis of interacting two- level quantum systems or 'qubits' that follow the laws of quantum mechanics. Addressability of ...

  12. Simulation of quantum many-body systems and quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Lugui

    2010-01-01

    Benioff and Feynman independently proposed quantum computer from the need of reversible computing and simulation of many-body systems. In this talk, I will briefly review the development of quantum computer, and report the study of many-body interactions in simple quantum computer and related development. (authors)

  13. Resolving spin-orbit- and hyperfine-mediated electric dipole spin resonance in a quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, M; Nowack, K C; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Vandersypen, L M K

    2013-03-08

    We investigate the electric manipulation of a single-electron spin in a single gate-defined quantum dot. We observe that so-far neglected differences between the hyperfine- and spin-orbit-mediated electric dipole spin resonance conditions have important consequences at high magnetic fields. In experiments using adiabatic rapid passage to invert the electron spin, we observe an unusually wide and asymmetric response as a function of the magnetic field. Simulations support the interpretation of the line shape in terms of four different resonance conditions. These findings may lead to isotope-selective control of dynamic nuclear polarization in quantum dots.

  14. Matchgate circuits and compressed quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyajian, W.L.

    2015-01-01

    exact diagonal- ization. In Part II, we deal with the compressed way of quantum computation mentioned above, used to simulate physically interesting behaviours of large systems. To give an example, consider an experimental set–up, where up to 8 qubits can be well controlled. Such a set–up can be used to simulate certain interactions of 2 8 = 256 qubits. In [Boyajian et al. (2013)], we generalised the results from [Kraus (2011)], and demonstrated how the adiabatic evolution of the 1D XY-model can be simulated via an exponentially smaller quantum system. More precisely, it is shown there, how the phase transition of such a model of a spin chain consisting out of n qubits can be observed via a compressed algorithm processing only log( n ) qubits. The feasibility of such a compressed quantum simulation is due to the fact that the adiabatic evolution and the measurement of the magnetization employed to observe the phase transition can be described by a matchgate circuit. Remarkably, the number of elementary gates, i.e. the number of single and two-qubit gates which are required to implement the compressed simulation can be even smaller than required to implement the original matchgate circuit. This compressed algorithm has already been experimentally realized using NMR quantum computing [Li et al. (2014)]. In [Boyajian et al. (2013)] we showed that not only the quantum phase transition can be observed in this way, but that various other interesting processes, such as quantum quenching, where the evolution is non–adiabatic, and general time evolutions can be simulated with an exponentially smaller system. In Part II, we also recall the results from [Boyajian and Kraus (2015)] where we extend the notion of compressed quantum simulation even further. We consider the XY-model and derive compressed circuits to simulate the behavior of the thermal and any excited state of the system. To this end, we use the diagonalization of the XY-Hamiltonian presented in[ Verstraete et al

  15. Spin-polarized spin-orbit-split quantum-well states in a metal film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varykhalov, Andrei; Sanchez-Barriga, Jaime; Gudat, Wolfgang; Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Rader, Oliver [BESSY Berlin (Germany); Shikin, Alexander M. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Elements with high atomic number Z lead to a large spin-orbit coupling. Such materials can be used to create spin-polarized electronic states without the presence of a ferromagnet or an external magnetic field if the solid exhibits an inversion asymmetry. We create large spin-orbit splittings using a tungsten crystal as substrate and break the structural inversion symmetry through deposition of a gold quantum film. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, it is demonstrated that quantum-well states forming in the gold film are spin-orbit split and spin polarized up to a thickness of at least 10 atomic layers. This is a considerable progress as compared to the current literature which reports spin-orbit split states at metal surfaces which are either pure or covered by at most a monoatomic layer of adsorbates.

  16. Non magnetic neutron spin quantum precession using multilayer spin splitter and a phase-spin echo interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebisawa, T.; Tasaki, S.; Kawai, T.; Akiyoshi, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Achiwa, N.; Hino, M.; Otake, Y.; Funahashi, H.

    1996-08-01

    The authors have developed cold neutron optics and interferometry using multilayer mirrors. The advantages of the multilayer mirrors are their applicability to long wavelength neutrons and a great variety of the mirror performance. The idea of the present spin interferometry is based on nonmagnetic neutron spin quantum precession using multilayer spin splitters. The equation for polarized neutrons means that the polarized neutrons are equivalent to the coherent superposition of two parallel spin eigenstates. The structure and principle of a multilayer spin splitter are explained, and the nonmagnetic gap layer of the multilayer spin splitter gives rise to neutron spin quantum precession. The performance test of the multilayer spin splitter were made with a new spin interferometer, which is analogous optically to a spin echo system with vertical precession field. The spin interferometers were installed at Kyoto University research reactor and the JRR-3. The testing method and the results are reported. The performance tests on a new phase-spin echo interferometer are described, and its applications to the development of a high resolution spin echo system and a Jamin type cold neutron interferometer are proposed. (K.I.)

  17. Using a quantum computer to investigate quantum chaos

    OpenAIRE

    Schack, Ruediger

    1997-01-01

    We show that the quantum baker's map, a prototypical map invented for theoretical studies of quantum chaos, has a very simple realization in terms of quantum gates. Chaos in the quantum baker's map could be investigated experimentally on a quantum computer based on only 3 qubits.

  18. Fundamentals of universality in one-way quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nest, M van den; Duer, W; Miyake, A; Briegel, H J

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we build a framework allowing for a systematic investigation of the fundamental issue: 'Which quantum states serve as universal resources for measurement-based (one-way) quantum computation?' We start our study by re-examining what is exactly meant by 'universality' in quantum computation, and what the implications are for universal one-way quantum computation. Given the framework of a measurement-based quantum computer, where quantum information is processed by local operations only, we find that the most general universal one-way quantum computer is one which is capable of accepting arbitrary classical inputs and producing arbitrary quantum outputs-we refer to this property as CQ-universality. We then show that a systematic study of CQ-universality in one-way quantum computation is possible by identifying entanglement features that are required to be present in every universal resource. In particular, we find that a large class of entanglement measures must reach its supremum on every universal resource. These insights are used to identify several families of states as being not universal, such as one-dimensional (1D) cluster states, Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states, W states, and ground states of non-critical 1D spin systems. Our criteria are strengthened by considering the efficiency of a quantum computation, and we find that entanglement measures must obey a certain scaling law with the system size for all efficient universal resources. This again leads to examples of non-universal resources, such as, e.g. ground states of critical 1D spin systems. On the other hand, we provide several examples of efficient universal resources, namely graph states corresponding to hexagonal, triangular and Kagome lattices. Finally, we consider the more general notion of encoded CQ-universality, where quantum outputs are allowed to be produced in an encoded form. Again we provide entanglement-based criteria for encoded universality. Moreover, we present a

  19. A quantum spin system with random interactions I

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . In order to study the dynamics of a quantum spin glass we model it as a .... Next we construct a family of strongly continuous one-parameter groups of c-auto- morphisms which determine the evolution of the spin system. To this end, we have ...

  20. Spin and Uncertainty in the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestenes, David

    1979-01-01

    Points out that quantum mechanics interpretations, using Heisenberg's Uncertainty Relations for the position and momentum of an electron, have their drawbacks. The interpretations are limited to the Schrodinger theory and fail to take into account either spin or relativity. Shows why spin cannot be ignored. (Author/GA)

  1. Exchange cotunneling through quantum dots with spin-orbit coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paaske, Jens; Andersen, Andreas; Flensberg, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effects of spin-orbit interaction (SOI) on the exchange cotunneling through a spinful Coulomb blockaded quantum dot. In the case of zero magnetic field, Kondo effect is shown to take place via a Kramers doublet and the SOI will merely affect the Kondo temperature. In contrast, we...

  2. Quantum ballistic evolution in quantum mechanics: Application to quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benioff, P.

    1996-01-01

    Quantum computers are important examples of processes whose evolution can be described in terms of iterations of single-step operators or their adjoints. Based on this, Hamiltonian evolution of processes with associated step operators T is investigated here. The main limitation of this paper is to processes which evolve quantum ballistically, i.e., motion restricted to a collection of nonintersecting or distinct paths on an arbitrary basis. The main goal of this paper is proof of a theorem which gives necessary and sufficient conditions that T must satisfy so that there exists a Hamiltonian description of quantum ballistic evolution for the process, namely, that T is a partial isometry and is orthogonality preserving and stable on some basis. Simple examples of quantum ballistic evolution for quantum Turing machines with one and with more than one type of elementary step are discussed. It is seen that for nondeterministic machines the basis set can be quite complex with much entanglement present. It is also proven that, given a step operator T for an arbitrary deterministic quantum Turing machine, it is decidable if T is stable and orthogonality preserving, and if quantum ballistic evolution is possible. The proof fails if T is a step operator for a nondeterministic machine. It is an open question if such a decision procedure exists for nondeterministic machines. This problem does not occur in classical mechanics. Also the definition of quantum Turing machines used here is compared with that used by other authors. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. High-fidelity quantum gates on quantum-dot-confined electron spins in low-Q optical microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Gao, Jian-Cun; Deng, Fu-Guo; Long, Gui-Lu

    2018-04-01

    We propose some high-fidelity quantum circuits for quantum computing on electron spins of quantum dots (QD) embedded in low-Q optical microcavities, including the two-qubit controlled-NOT gate and the multiple-target-qubit controlled-NOT gate. The fidelities of both quantum gates can, in principle, be robust to imperfections involved in a practical input-output process of a single photon by converting the infidelity into a heralded error. Furthermore, the influence of two different decay channels is detailed. By decreasing the quality factor of the present microcavity, we can largely increase the efficiencies of these quantum gates while their high fidelities remain unaffected. This proposal also has another advantage regarding its experimental feasibility, in that both quantum gates can work faithfully even when the QD-cavity systems are non-identical, which is of particular importance in current semiconductor QD technology.

  4. QCE : A Simulator for Quantum Computer Hardware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, Kristel; Raedt, Hans De

    2003-01-01

    The Quantum Computer Emulator (QCE) described in this paper consists of a simulator of a generic, general purpose quantum computer and a graphical user interface. The latter is used to control the simulator, to define the hardware of the quantum computer and to debug and execute quantum algorithms.

  5. Dynamics of open quantum spin systems : An assessment of the quantum master equation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, P.; De Raedt, H.; Miyashita, S.; Jin, F.; Michielsen, K.

    2016-01-01

    Data of the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation of a system containing one spin-1/2 particle interacting with a bath of up to 32 spin-1/2 particles is used to construct a Markovian quantum master equation describing the dynamics of the system spin. The procedure of

  6. Probing quantum coherence in single-atom electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Bae, Yujeong; Choi, Taeyoung; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquin; Heinrich, Andreas J.; Lutz, Christoper P.

    2018-01-01

    Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins. PMID:29464211

  7. Probing quantum coherence in single-atom electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian D; Yang, Kai; Bae, Yujeong; Choi, Taeyoung; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquin; Heinrich, Andreas J; Lutz, Christoper P

    2018-02-01

    Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T 2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T 2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins.

  8. Universal spin dynamics in quantum wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, E. A.; Zülicke, U.; Winkler, R.

    2017-10-01

    We discuss the universal spin dynamics in quasi-one-dimensional systems including the real spin in narrow-gap semiconductors like InAs and InSb, the valley pseudospin in staggered single-layer graphene, and the combination of real spin and valley pseudospin characterizing single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, WS2, MoS2, and WSe2. All these systems can be described by the same Dirac-like Hamiltonian. Spin-dependent observable effects in one of these systems thus have counterparts in each of the other systems. Effects discussed in more detail include equilibrium spin currents, current-induced spin polarization (Edelstein effect), and spin currents generated via adiabatic spin pumping. Our work also suggests that a long-debated spin-dependent correction to the position operator in single-band models should be absent.

  9. Handbook of computational quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, David B

    2005-01-01

    Quantum chemistry forms the basis of molecular modeling, a tool widely used to obtain important chemical information and visual images of molecular systems. Recent advances in computing have resulted in considerable developments in molecular modeling, and these developments have led to significant achievements in the design and synthesis of drugs and catalysts. This comprehensive text provides upper-level undergraduates and graduate students with an introduction to the implementation of quantum ideas in molecular modeling, exploring practical applications alongside theoretical explanations.Wri

  10. Blind Quantum Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvail, Louis; Arrighi, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    protocol for the class of functions which admit an efficient procedure to generate random input-output pairs, e.g. factorization. The cheat-sensitive security achieved relies only upon quantum theory being true. The security analysis carried out assumes the eavesdropper performs individual attacks....

  11. Quantum dynamics and entanglement of spins on a square lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Bech; Rønnow, Henrik Moodysson; McMorrow, Desmond Francis

    2007-01-01

    Bulk magnetism in solids is fundamentally quantum mechanical in nature. Yet in many situations, including our everyday encounters with magnetic materials, quantum effects are masked, and it often suffices to think of magnetism in terms of the interaction between classical dipole moments. Whereas ......, suggesting entanglement of spins at short distances in the simplest of all two-dimensional quantum antiferromagnets, the square lattice Heisenberg system.......Bulk magnetism in solids is fundamentally quantum mechanical in nature. Yet in many situations, including our everyday encounters with magnetic materials, quantum effects are masked, and it often suffices to think of magnetism in terms of the interaction between classical dipole moments. Whereas...... this intuition generally holds for ferromagnets, even as the size of the magnetic moment is reduced to that of a single electron spin (the quantum limit), it breaks down spectacularly for antiferromagnets, particularly in low dimensions. Considerable theoretical and experimental progress has been made...

  12. Quantum phases of spinful Fermi gases in optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, E.; Citro, R.; Barsanti, M.; Rossini, D.; Chiofalo, M.-L.

    2018-04-01

    We explore the quantum phases emerging from the interplay between spin and motional degrees of freedom of a one-dimensional quantum fluid of spinful fermionic atoms, effectively interacting via a photon-mediating mechanism with tunable sign and strength g , as it can be realized in present-day experiments with optical cavities. We find the emergence, in the very same system, of spin- and atomic-density wave ordering, accompanied by the occurrence of superfluidity for g >0 , while cavity photons are seen to drive strong correlations at all g values, with fermionic character for g >0 , and bosonic character for g analysis.

  13. Inertia effects in the real-time dynamics of a quantum spin coupled to a Fermi sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayad, Mohammad; Rausch, Roman; Potthoff, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Spin dynamics in the Kondo impurity model, initiated by suddenly switching the direction of a local magnetic field, is studied by means of the time-dependent density-matrix renormalization group. Quantum effects are identified by systematic computations for different spin quantum numbers S and by comparing with tight-binding spin-dynamics theory for the classical-spin Kondo model. We demonstrate that, besides the conventional precessional motion and relaxation, the quantum-spin dynamics shows nutation, similar to a spinning top. Opposed to semiclassical theory, however, the nutation is efficiently damped on an extremely short time scale. The effect is explained in the large-S limit as quantum dephasing of the eigenmodes in an emergent two-spin model that is weakly entangled with the bulk of the system. We argue that, apart from the Kondo effect, the damping of nutational motion is essentially the only characteristics of the quantum nature of the spin. Qualitative agreement between quantum and semiclassical spin dynamics is found down to S=1/2 .

  14. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianov, S N; Moiseev, S A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks. (quantum computations)

  15. Introduction to Quantum Information/Computing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Costianes, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    Quantum Information Technology (QIT) is a relatively new area of research whose purpose is to take advantage of the quantum nature of matter and energy to design and build quantum computers which have the potential of improved...

  16. Quantum spin systems on infinite lattices a concise introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Naaijkens, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    This course-based primer offers readers a concise introduction to the description of quantum mechanical systems with infinitely many degrees of freedom – and quantum spin systems in particular – using the operator algebraic approach. Here, the observables are modeled using elements of some operator algebra, usually a C*-algebra. This text introduces readers to the framework and the necessary mathematical tools without assuming much mathematical background, making it more accessible than advanced monographs. The book also highlights the usefulness of the so-called thermodynamic limit of quantum spin systems, which is the limit of infinite system size. For example, this makes it possible to clearly distinguish between local and global properties, without having to keep track of the system size. Together with Lieb-Robinson bounds, which play a similar role in quantum spin systems to that of the speed of light in relativistic theories, this approach allows ideas from relativistic field theories to be implemen...

  17. Ammonia-based quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, Andrew J.; Cain, Paul A.; Williams, David A.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a scheme for quantum computation using two eigenstates of ammonia or similar molecules. Individual ammonia molecules are confined inside fullerenes and used as two-level qubit systems. Interaction between these ammonia qubits takes place via the electric dipole moments, and in particular we show how a controlled-NOT gate could be implemented. After computation the qubit is measured with a single-electron electrometer sensitive enough to differentiate between the dipole moments of different states. We also discuss a possible implementation based on a quantum cellular automaton

  18. Quantum Walks for Computer Scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Venegas-Andraca, Salvador

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computation, one of the latest joint ventures between physics and the theory of computation, is a scientific field whose main goals include the development of hardware and algorithms based on the quantum mechanical properties of those physical systems used to implement such algorithms. Solving difficult tasks (for example, the Satisfiability Problem and other NP-complete problems) requires the development of sophisticated algorithms, many of which employ stochastic processes as their mathematical basis. Discrete random walks are a popular choice among those stochastic processes. Inspir

  19. Stopping power of two-dimensional spin quantum electron gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei; Yi, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Quantum effects can contribute significantly to the electronic stopping powers in the interactions between the fast moving beams and the degenerate electron gases. From the Pauli equation, the spin quantum hydrodynamic (SQHD) model is derived and used to calculate the stopping power and the induced electron density for protons moving above a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas with considering spin effect under an external in-plane magnetic field. In our calculation, the stopping power is not only modulated by the spin direction, but also varied with the strength of the spin effect. It is demonstrated that the spin effect can obviously enhance or reduce the stopping power of a 2D electron gas within a laboratory magnetic field condition (several tens of Tesla), thus a negative stopping power appears at some specific proton velocity, which implies the protons drain energy from the Pauli gas, showing another significant example of the low-dimensional physics.

  20. Many-Body Quantum Spin Dynamics with Monte Carlo Trajectories on a Discrete Phase Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schachenmayer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Interacting spin systems are of fundamental relevance in different areas of physics, as well as in quantum information science and biology. These spin models represent the simplest, yet not fully understood, manifestation of quantum many-body systems. An important outstanding problem is the efficient numerical computation of dynamics in large spin systems. Here, we propose a new semiclassical method to study many-body spin dynamics in generic spin lattice models. The method is based on a discrete Monte Carlo sampling in phase space in the framework of the so-called truncated Wigner approximation. Comparisons with analytical and numerically exact calculations demonstrate the power of the technique. They show that it correctly reproduces the dynamics of one- and two-point correlations and spin squeezing at short times, thus capturing entanglement. Our results open the possibility to study the quantum dynamics accessible to recent experiments in regimes where other numerical methods are inapplicable.

  1. Spin-resolved electron waiting times in a quantum-dot spin valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gaomin; Xu, Fuming; Mi, Shuo; Wang, Jian

    2018-04-01

    We study the electronic waiting-time distributions (WTDs) in a noninteracting quantum-dot spin valve by varying spin polarization and the noncollinear angle between the magnetizations of the leads using the scattering matrix approach. Since the quantum-dot spin valve involves two channels (spin up and down) in both the incoming and outgoing channels, we study three different kinds of WTDs, which are two-channel WTD, spin-resolved single-channel WTD, and cross-channel WTD. We analyze the behaviors of WTDs in short times, correlated with the current behaviors for different spin polarizations and noncollinear angles. Cross-channel WTD reflects the correlation between two spin channels and can be used to characterize the spin-transfer torque process. We study the influence of the earlier detection on the subsequent detection from the perspective of cross-channel WTD, and define the influence degree quantity as the cumulative absolute difference between cross-channel WTDs and first-passage time distributions to quantitatively characterize the spin-flip process. We observe that influence degree versus spin-transfer torque for different noncollinear angles as well as different polarizations collapse into a single curve showing universal behaviors. This demonstrates that cross-channel WTDs can be a pathway to characterize spin correlation in spintronics system.

  2. Geometric phases and quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedral, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In my lectures I will talk about the notion of the geometric phase and explain its relevance for both fundamental quantum mechanics as well as quantum computation. The phase will be at first introduced via the idea of Pancharatnam which involves interference of three or more light beams. This notion will then be generalized to the evolving quantum systems. I will discuss both pure and mixed states as well as unitary and non-unitary evolutions. I will also show how the concept of the vacuum induced geometric phase arises in quantum optics. A simple measurement scheme involving a Mach Zehnder interferometer will be presented and will be used to illustrate all the concepts in the lecture. Finally, I will expose a simple generalization of the geometric phase to evolving degenerate states. This will be seen to lead to the possibility of universal quantum computation using geometric effects only. Moreover, this contains a promise of intrinsically fault tolerant quantum information processing, whose prospects will be outlined at the end of the lecture. (author)

  3. Self-correcting quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombin, H; Chhajlany, R W; Horodecki, M; Martin-Delgado, M A

    2013-01-01

    Is the notion of a quantum computer (QC) resilient to thermal noise unphysical? We address this question from a constructive perspective and show that local quantum Hamiltonian models provide self-correcting QCs. To this end, we first give a sufficient condition on the connectedness of excitations for a stabilizer code model to be a self-correcting quantum memory. We then study the two main examples of topological stabilizer codes in arbitrary dimensions and establish their self-correcting capabilities. Also, we address the transversality properties of topological color codes, showing that six-dimensional color codes provide a self-correcting model that allows the transversal and local implementation of a universal set of operations in seven spatial dimensions. Finally, we give a procedure for initializing such quantum memories at finite temperature. (paper)

  4. Resonant coherent quantum tunneling of the magnetization of spin-½ systems : Spin-parity effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Pablos, D.; García, N.; Raedt, H. De

    1997-01-01

    We perform quantum dynamical calculations to study the reversal of the magnetization for systems of a few spin-½ particles with a general biaxial anisotropy in the presence of an external magnetic field at T=0 and with no dissipation. Collective quantum tunneling of the magnetization is demonstrated

  5. New Approaches to Quantum Computing using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colvin, M; Krishnan, V V

    2003-01-01

    The power of a quantum computer (QC) relies on the fundamental concept of the superposition in quantum mechanics and thus allowing an inherent large-scale parallelization of computation. In a QC, binary information embodied in a quantum system, such as spin degrees of freedom of a spin-1/2 particle forms the qubits (quantum mechanical bits), over which appropriate logical gates perform the computation. In classical computers, the basic unit of information is the bit, which can take a value of either 0 or 1. Bits are connected together by logic gates to form logic circuits to implement complex logical operations. The expansion of modern computers has been driven by the developments of faster, smaller and cheaper logic gates. As the size of the logic gates become smaller toward the level of atomic dimensions, the performance of such a system is no longer considered classical but is rather governed by quantum mechanics. Quantum computers offer the potentially superior prospect of solving computational problems that are intractable to classical computers such as efficient database searches and cryptography. A variety of algorithms have been developed recently, most notably Shor's algorithm for factorizing long numbers into prime factors in polynomial time and Grover's quantum search algorithm. The algorithms that were of only theoretical interest as recently, until several methods were proposed to build an experimental QC. These methods include, trapped ions, cavity-QED, coupled quantum dots, Josephson junctions, spin resonance transistors, linear optics and nuclear magnetic resonance. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely capable of constructing small QCs and several algorithms have been implemented successfully. NMR-QC differs from other implementations in one important way that it is not a single QC, but a statistical ensemble of them. Thus, quantum computing based on NMR is considered as ensemble quantum computing. In NMR quantum computing, the spins with

  6. Continuous-variable blind quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2012-12-07

    Blind quantum computation is a secure delegated quantum computing protocol where Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, delegates her computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output, and algorithm. Protocols of blind quantum computation have been proposed for several qudit measurement-based computation models, such as the graph state model, the Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki model, and the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal topological model. Here, we consider blind quantum computation for the continuous-variable measurement-based model. We show that blind quantum computation is possible for the infinite squeezing case. We also show that the finite squeezing causes no additional problem in the blind setup apart from the one inherent to the continuous-variable measurement-based quantum computation.

  7. Quantum computation and quantum communication theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Pavicic, Mladen

    2005-01-01

    The field of quantum computing has experienced rapid development and many different experimental and theoretical groups have emerged worldwide.This book presents the key elements of quantum computation and communication theories and their implementation in an easy-to-read manner for readers coming from physics, mathematics and computer science backgrounds. Integrating both theoretical aspects and experimental verifications of developing quantum computers, the author explains why particular mathematical methods, physical models and realistic implementations might provide critical steps towards achieving the final goal - constructing quantum computers and quantum networks. The book serves as an excellent introduction for new researchers and also provides a useful review for specialists in the field.

  8. Spin manipulation and spin-lattice interaction in magnetic colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2014-11-01

    We report on the spin-lattice interaction and coherent manipulation of electron spins in Mn-doped colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) by electron spin resonance. We show that the phase memory time,TM , is limited by Mn-Mn dipolar interactions, hyperfine interactions of the protons (1H) on the QD capping ligands with Mn ions in their proximity (Rabi oscillations. Our findings suggest routes to the rational design of magnetic colloidal QDs with phase memory times exceeding the current limits of relevance for the implementation of QDs as qubits in quantum information processing.

  9. Quantum Computation: Entangling with the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Commercial applications of quantum computation have become viable due to the rapid progress of the field in the recent years. Efficient quantum algorithms are discovered to cope with the most challenging real-world problems that are too hard for classical computers. Manufactured quantum hardware has reached unprecedented precision and controllability, enabling fault-tolerant quantum computation. Here, I give a brief introduction on what principles in quantum mechanics promise its unparalleled computational power. I will discuss several important quantum algorithms that achieve exponential or polynomial speedup over any classical algorithm. Building a quantum computer is a daunting task, and I will talk about the criteria and various implementations of quantum computers. I conclude the talk with near-future commercial applications of a quantum computer.

  10. ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Van Dam, Wim [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farhi, Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gaitan, Frank [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Humble, Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jordan, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Landahl, Andrew J [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Love, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lucas, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Preskill, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Muller, Richard P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Svore, Krysta [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiebe, Nathan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, Carl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report details the findings of the DOE ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science that was organized to assess the viability of quantum computing technologies to meet the computational requirements of the DOE’s science and energy mission, and to identify the potential impact of quantum technologies. The workshop was held on February 17-18, 2015, in Bethesda, MD, to solicit input from members of the quantum computing community. The workshop considered models of quantum computation and programming environments, physical science applications relevant to DOE's science mission as well as quantum simulation, and applied mathematics topics including potential quantum algorithms for linear algebra, graph theory, and machine learning. This report summarizes these perspectives into an outlook on the opportunities for quantum computing to impact problems relevant to the DOE’s mission as well as the additional research required to bring quantum computing to the point where it can have such impact.

  11. Problems and solutions in quantum computing and quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Steeb, Willi-Hans

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computing and quantum information are two of the fastest growing and most exciting research fields in physics. Entanglement, teleportation and the possibility of using the non-local behavior of quantum mechanics to factor integers in random polynomial time have also added to this new interest. This book supplies a huge collection of problems in quantum computing and quantum information together with their detailed solutions, which will prove to be invaluable to students as well as researchers in these fields. All the important concepts and topics such as quantum gates and quantum circuits, product Hilbert spaces, entanglement and entanglement measures, deportation, Bell states, Bell inequality, Schmidt decomposition, quantum Fourier transform, magic gate, von Neumann entropy, quantum cryptography, quantum error corrections, number states and Bose operators, coherent states, squeezed states, Gaussian states, POVM measurement, quantum optics networks, beam splitter, phase shifter and Kerr Hamilton opera...

  12. Reversible computing fundamentals, quantum computing, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    De Vos, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Written by one of the few top internationally recognized experts in the field, this book concentrates on those topics that will remain fundamental, such as low power computing, reversible programming languages, and applications in thermodynamics. It describes reversible computing from various points of view: Boolean algebra, group theory, logic circuits, low-power electronics, communication, software, quantum computing. It is this multidisciplinary approach that makes it unique.Backed by numerous examples, this is useful for all levels of the scientific and academic community, from undergr

  13. Interactive Quantum Mechanics Quantum Experiments on the Computer

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, S; Dahmen, H.D

    2011-01-01

    Extra Materials available on extras.springer.com INTERACTIVE QUANTUM MECHANICS allows students to perform their own quantum-physics experiments on their computer, in vivid 3D color graphics. Topics covered include: •        harmonic waves and wave packets, •        free particles as well as bound states and scattering in various potentials in one and three dimensions (both stationary and time dependent), •        two-particle systems, coupled harmonic oscillators, •        distinguishable and indistinguishable particles, •        coherent and squeezed states in time-dependent motion, •        quantized angular momentum, •        spin and magnetic resonance, •        hybridization. For the present edition the physics scope has been widened appreciably. Moreover, INTERQUANTA can now produce user-defined movies of quantum-mechanical situations. Movies can be viewed directly and also be saved to be shown later in any browser. Sections on spec...

  14. Quantum measurement and entanglement of spin quantum bits in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfaff, W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents a set of experiments that explore the possible realisation of a macroscopic quantum network based on solid-state quantum bits. Such a quantum network would allow for studying quantum mechanics on large scales (meters, or even kilometers), and can open new possibilities for

  15. An Early Quantum Computing Proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Stephen Russell [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexander, Francis Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barros, Kipton Marcos [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daniels, Marcus G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gattiker, James R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamada, Michael Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Howse, James Walter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Loncaric, Josip [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pakin, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Somma, Rolando Diego [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vernon, Louis James [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-04-04

    The D-Wave 2X is the third generation of quantum processing created by D-Wave. NASA (with Google and USRA) and Lockheed Martin (with USC), both own D-Wave systems. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) purchased a D-Wave 2X in November 2015. The D-Wave 2X processor contains (nominally) 1152 quantum bits (or qubits) and is designed to specifically perform quantum annealing, which is a well-known method for finding a global minimum of an optimization problem. This methodology is based on direct execution of a quantum evolution in experimental quantum hardware. While this can be a powerful method for solving particular kinds of problems, it also means that the D-Wave 2X processor is not a general computing processor and cannot be programmed to perform a wide variety of tasks. It is a highly specialized processor, well beyond what NNSA currently thinks of as an “advanced architecture.”A D-Wave is best described as a quantum optimizer. That is, it uses quantum superposition to find the lowest energy state of a system by repeated doses of power and settling stages. The D-Wave produces multiple solutions to any suitably formulated problem, one of which is the lowest energy state solution (global minimum). Mapping problems onto the D-Wave requires defining an objective function to be minimized and then encoding that function in the Hamiltonian of the D-Wave system. The quantum annealing method is then used to find the lowest energy configuration of the Hamiltonian using the current D-Wave Two, two-level, quantum processor. This is not always an easy thing to do, and the D-Wave Two has significant limitations that restrict problem sizes that can be run and algorithmic choices that can be made. Furthermore, as more people are exploring this technology, it has become clear that it is very difficult to come up with general approaches to optimization that can both utilize the D-Wave and that can do better than highly developed algorithms on conventional computers for

  16. Spin Entanglement Witness for Quantum Gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bose, Sougato; Mazumdar, Anupam; Morley, Gavin W.; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Toros, Marko; Paternostro, Mauro; Geraci, Andrew A.; Barker, Peter F.; Kim, M. S.; Milburn, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Understanding gravity in the framework of quantum mechanics is one of the great challenges in modern physics. However, the lack of empirical evidence has lead to a debate on whether gravity is a quantum entity. Despite varied proposed probes for quantum gravity, it is fair to say that there are no

  17. Quantum uncertainty in critical systems with three spins interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrijo, Thiago M; Avelar, Ardiley T; Céleri, Lucas C

    2015-01-01

    In this article we consider two spin-1/2 chains described, respectively, by the thermodynamic limit of the XY model with the usual two site interaction, and an extension of this model (without taking the thermodynamics limit), called XYT, were a three site interaction term is presented. To investigate the critical behaviour of such systems we employ tools from quantum information theory. Specifically, we show that the local quantum uncertainty, a quantity introduced in order to quantify the minimum quantum share of the variance of a local measurement, can be used to indicate quantum phase transitions presented by these models at zero temperature. Due to the connection of this quantity with the quantum Fisher information, the results presented here may be relevant for quantum metrology and quantum thermodynamics. (paper)

  18. Dynamics of Coupled Quantum Spin Chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    Static and dynamical properties of weakly coupled antiferromagnetic spin chains are treated using a mean-field approximation for the interchain coupling and exact results for the resulting effective one-dimensional problem. Results for staggered magnetization, Nacute eel temperature, and spin wave excitations are in agreement with experiments on KCuF 3 . The existence of a narrow longitudinal mode is predicted. The results are in agreement with general scaling arguments, contrary to spin wave theory. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  19. Double Rashba Quantum Dots Ring as a Spin Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Feng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe theoretically propose a double quantum dots (QDs ring to filter the electron spin that works due to the Rashba spin–orbit interaction (RSOI existing inside the QDs, the spin-dependent inter-dot tunneling coupling and the magnetic flux penetrating through the ring. By varying the RSOI-induced phase factor, the magnetic flux and the strength of the spin-dependent inter-dot tunneling coupling, which arises from a constant magnetic field applied on the tunneling junction between the QDs, a 100% spin-polarized conductance can be obtained. We show that both the spin orientations and the magnitude of it can be controlled by adjusting the above-mentioned parameters. The spin filtering effect is robust even in the presence of strong intra-dot Coulomb interactions and arbitrary dot-lead coupling configurations.

  20. Fractional Spin Fluctuations as a Precursor of Quantum Spin Liquids: Majorana Dynamical Mean-Field Study for the Kitaev Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Junki; Nasu, Joji; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-10-07

    Experimental identification of quantum spin liquids remains a challenge, as the pristine nature is to be seen in asymptotically low temperatures. We here theoretically show that the precursor of quantum spin liquids appears in the spin dynamics in the paramagnetic state over a wide temperature range. Using the cluster dynamical mean-field theory and the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method, which are newly developed in the Majorana fermion representation, we calculate the dynamical spin structure factor, relaxation rate in nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic susceptibility for the honeycomb Kitaev model whose ground state is a canonical example of the quantum spin liquid. We find that dynamical spin correlations show peculiar temperature and frequency dependence even below the temperature where static correlations saturate. The results provide the experimentally accessible symptoms of the fluctuating fractionalized spins evincing the quantum spin liquids.

  1. General Quantum Interference Principle and Duality Computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Guilu

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we propose a general principle of quantum interference for quantum system, and based on this we propose a new type of computing machine, the duality computer, that may outperform in principle both classical computer and the quantum computer. According to the general principle of quantum interference, the very essence of quantum interference is the interference of the sub-waves of the quantum system itself. A quantum system considered here can be any quantum system: a single microscopic particle, a composite quantum system such as an atom or a molecule, or a loose collection of a few quantum objects such as two independent photons. In the duality computer, the wave of the duality computer is split into several sub-waves and they pass through different routes, where different computing gate operations are performed. These sub-waves are then re-combined to interfere to give the computational results. The quantum computer, however, has only used the particle nature of quantum object. In a duality computer, it may be possible to find a marked item from an unsorted database using only a single query, and all NP-complete problems may have polynomial algorithms. Two proof-of-the-principle designs of the duality computer are presented: the giant molecule scheme and the nonlinear quantum optics scheme. We also propose thought experiment to check the related fundamental issues, the measurement efficiency of a partial wave function.

  2. Prediction for spin Fano factor generated by biased quantum spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftergood, Joshua; Takei, So

    We theoretically study noise in the spin current injected into a normal metal from a 1D Heisenberg spin- 1 / 2 antiferromagnet. We consider the noise generated in two separate scenarios: first by inducing an over-population of one chiral mode relative to the other in the spin chain at uniform temperature, and second by elevating the temperature of the spin chain relative to the metal, i.e., by way of the spin Seebeck effect. We compute excess noise in the normal metal generated by the coupling to the spin chain and predict the spin Fano factor, defined as the noise in the spin current normalized by the average spin current, for both scenarios. The authors thank the PSC-CUNY Research Award Program for its support.

  3. Tunable self-assembled spin chains of strongly interacting cold atoms for demonstration of reliable quantum state transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, N. J. S.; Marchukov, O. V.; Petrosyan, D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient computational method to treat long, one-dimensional systems of strongly-interacting atoms forming self-assembled spin chains. Such systems can be used to realize many spin chain model Hamiltonians tunable by the external confining potential. As a concrete...... demonstration, we consider quantum state transfer in a Heisenberg spin chain and we show how to determine the confining potential in order to obtain nearly-perfect state transfer....

  4. Magnetic qubits as hardware for quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejada, J.; Chudnovsky, E.; Barco, E. del

    2000-01-01

    We propose two potential realisations for quantum bits based on nanometre scale magnetic particles of large spin S and high anisotropy molecular clusters. In case (1) the bit-value basis states vertical bar-0> and vertical bar-1> are the ground and first excited spin states S z = S and S-1, separated by an energy gap given by the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency. In case (2), when there is significant tunnelling through the anisotropy barrier, the qubit states correspond to the symmetric, vertical bar-0>, and antisymmetric, vertical bar-1>, combinations of the two-fold degenerate ground state S z = ± S. In each case the temperature of operation must be low compared to the energy gap, Δ, between the states vertical bar-0> and vertical bar-1>. The gap Δ in case (2) can be controlled with an external magnetic field perpendicular to the easy axis of the molecular cluster. The states of different molecular clusters and magnetic particles may be entangled by connecting them by superconducting lines with Josephson switches, leading to the potential for quantum computing hardware. (author)

  5. Magnetic qubits as hardware for quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejada, J.; Chudnovsky, E.; Barco, E. del [and others

    2000-07-01

    We propose two potential realisations for quantum bits based on nanometre scale magnetic particles of large spin S and high anisotropy molecular clusters. In case (1) the bit-value basis states vertical bar-0> and vertical bar-1> are the ground and first excited spin states S{sub z} = S and S-1, separated by an energy gap given by the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency. In case (2), when there is significant tunnelling through the anisotropy barrier, the qubit states correspond to the symmetric, vertical bar-0>, and antisymmetric, vertical bar-1>, combinations of the two-fold degenerate ground state S{sub z} = {+-} S. In each case the temperature of operation must be low compared to the energy gap, {delta}, between the states vertical bar-0> and vertical bar-1>. The gap {delta} in case (2) can be controlled with an external magnetic field perpendicular to the easy axis of the molecular cluster. The states of different molecular clusters and magnetic particles may be entangled by connecting them by superconducting lines with Josephson switches, leading to the potential for quantum computing hardware. (author)

  6. Quantum chemistry simulation on quantum computers: theories and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Boruo; Xu, Nanyang; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-07-14

    It has been claimed that quantum computers can mimic quantum systems efficiently in the polynomial scale. Traditionally, those simulations are carried out numerically on classical computers, which are inevitably confronted with the exponential growth of required resources, with the increasing size of quantum systems. Quantum computers avoid this problem, and thus provide a possible solution for large quantum systems. In this paper, we first discuss the ideas of quantum simulation, the background of quantum simulators, their categories, and the development in both theories and experiments. We then present a brief introduction to quantum chemistry evaluated via classical computers followed by typical procedures of quantum simulation towards quantum chemistry. Reviewed are not only theoretical proposals but also proof-of-principle experimental implementations, via a small quantum computer, which include the evaluation of the static molecular eigenenergy and the simulation of chemical reaction dynamics. Although the experimental development is still behind the theory, we give prospects and suggestions for future experiments. We anticipate that in the near future quantum simulation will become a powerful tool for quantum chemistry over classical computations.

  7. Quantum computing from the ground up

    CERN Document Server

    Perry, Riley Tipton

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computing - the application of quantum mechanics to information - represents a fundamental break from classical information and promises to dramatically increase a computer's power. Many difficult problems, such as the factorization of large numbers, have so far resisted attack by classical computers yet are easily solved with quantum computers. If they become feasible, quantum computers will end standard practices such as RSA encryption. Most of the books or papers on quantum computing require (or assume) prior knowledge of certain areas such as linear algebra or quantum mechanics. The majority of the currently-available literature is hard to understand for the average computer enthusiast or interested layman. This text attempts to teach quantum computing from the ground up in an easily readable way, providing a comprehensive tutorial that includes all the necessary mathematics, computer science and physics.

  8. Quantum communication and state transfer in spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Jeugt, Joris

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of a single spin excitation state in certain linear spin chains, as a model for quantum communication. We consider first the simplest possible spin chain, where the spin chain data (the nearest neighbour interaction strengths and the magnetic field strengths) are constant throughout the chain. The time evolution of a single spin state is determined, and this time evolution is illustrated by means of an animation. Some years ago it was discovered that when the spin chain data are of a special form so-called perfect state transfer takes place. These special spin chain data can be linked to the Jacobi matrix entries of Krawtchouk polynomials or dual Hahn polynomials. We discuss here the case related to Krawtchouk polynomials, and illustrate the possibility of perfect state transfer by an animation showing the time evolution of the spin chain from an initial single spin state. Very recently, these ideas were extended to discrete orthogonal polynomials of q-hypergeometric type. Here, a remarkable result is a new analytic model where perfect state transfer is achieved: this is when the spin chain data are related to the Jacobi matrix of q-Krawtchouk polynomials. This case is discussed here, and again illustrated by means of an animation.

  9. Exploiting Locality in Quantum Computation for Quantum Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Jarrod R; Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-12-18

    Accurate prediction of chemical and material properties from first-principles quantum chemistry is a challenging task on traditional computers. Recent developments in quantum computation offer a route toward highly accurate solutions with polynomial cost; however, this solution still carries a large overhead. In this Perspective, we aim to bring together known results about the locality of physical interactions from quantum chemistry with ideas from quantum computation. We show that the utilization of spatial locality combined with the Bravyi-Kitaev transformation offers an improvement in the scaling of known quantum algorithms for quantum chemistry and provides numerical examples to help illustrate this point. We combine these developments to improve the outlook for the future of quantum chemistry on quantum computers.

  10. Tunneling between edge states in a quantum spin Hall system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ström, Anders; Johannesson, Henrik

    2009-03-06

    We analyze a quantum spin Hall device with a point contact connecting two of its edges. The contact supports a net spin tunneling current that can be probed experimentally via a two-terminal resistance measurement. We find that the low-bias tunneling current and the differential conductance exhibit scaling with voltage and temperature that depend nonlinearly on the strength of the electron-electron interaction.

  11. Control of entanglement transitions in quantum spin clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Hannah R.; Quintanilla, Jorge; Perring, Toby G.; Amico, Luigi; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2017-12-01

    Quantum spin clusters provide a platform for the experimental study of many-body entanglement. Here we address a simple model of a single-molecule nanomagnet featuring N interacting spins in a transverse field. The field can control an entanglement transition (ET). We calculate the magnetization, low-energy gap, and neutron-scattering cross section and find that the ET has distinct signatures, detectable at temperatures as high as 5% of the interaction strength. The signatures are stronger for smaller clusters.

  12. Geometry of quantum computation with qutrits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Yu, Zu-Huan; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Determining the quantum circuit complexity of a unitary operation is an important problem in quantum computation. By using the mathematical techniques of Riemannian geometry, we investigate the efficient quantum circuits in quantum computation with n qutrits. We show that the optimal quantum circuits are essentially equivalent to the shortest path between two points in a certain curved geometry of SU(3(n)). As an example, three-qutrit systems are investigated in detail.

  13. Photo-Induced Spin Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, M Idrish

    2009-01-17

    We experimentally investigate the dynamics of spins in GaAs quantum wells under applied electric bias by photoluminescence (PL) measurements excited with circularly polarized light. The bias-dependent circular polarization of PL (P(PL)) with and without magnetic field is studied. The P(PL) without magnetic field is found to be decayed with an enhancement of increasing the strength of the negative bias. However, P(PL) in a transverse magnetic field shows oscillations under an electric bias, indicating that the precession of electron spin occurs in quantum wells. The results are discussed based on the electron-hole exchange interaction in the electric field.

  14. Photo-Induced Spin Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miah M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We experimentally investigate the dynamics of spins in GaAs quantum wells under applied electric bias by photoluminescence (PL measurements excited with circularly polarized light. The bias-dependent circular polarization of PL (P PL with and without magnetic field is studied. TheP PLwithout magnetic field is found to be decayed with an enhancement of increasing the strength of the negative bias. However,P PLin a transverse magnetic field shows oscillations under an electric bias, indicating that the precession of electron spin occurs in quantum wells. The results are discussed based on the electron–hole exchange interaction in the electric field.

  15. Single electron-spin memory with a semiconductor quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Robert J; Dewhurst, Samuel J; Stevenson, R Mark; Atkinson, Paola; Bennett, Anthony J; Ward, Martin B; Cooper, Ken; Ritchie, David A; Shields, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    We show storage of the circular polarization of an optical field, transferring it to the spin-state of an individual electron confined in a single semiconductor quantum dot. The state is subsequently read out through the electronically-triggered emission of a single photon. The emitted photon shares the same polarization as the initial pulse but has a different energy, making the transfer of quantum information between different physical systems possible. With an applied magnetic field of 2 T, spin memory is preserved for at least 1000 times more than the exciton's radiative lifetime

  16. Efficient one-way quantum computations for quantum error correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Wei; Wei Zhaohui

    2009-01-01

    We show how to explicitly construct an O(nd) size and constant quantum depth circuit which encodes any given n-qubit stabilizer code with d generators. Our construction is derived using the graphic description for stabilizer codes and the one-way quantum computation model. Our result demonstrates how to use cluster states as scalable resources for many multi-qubit entangled states and how to use the one-way quantum computation model to improve the design of quantum algorithms.

  17. Toward a superconducting quantum computer. Harnessing macroscopic quantum coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jaw-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Intensive research on the construction of superconducting quantum computers has produced numerous important achievements. The quantum bit (qubit), based on the Josephson junction, is at the heart of this research. This macroscopic system has the ability to control quantum coherence. This article reviews the current state of quantum computing as well as its history, and discusses its future. Although progress has been rapid, the field remains beset with unsolved issues, and there are still many new research opportunities open to physicists and engineers.

  18. A quantum-dot spin qubit with coherence limited by charge noise and fidelity higher than 99.9%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Allison, Giles; Honda, Takumu; Kodera, Tetsuo; Oda, Shunri; Hoshi, Yusuke; Usami, Noritaka; Itoh, Kohei M.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2018-02-01

    The isolation of qubits from noise sources, such as surrounding nuclear spins and spin-electric susceptibility1-4, has enabled extensions of quantum coherence times in recent pivotal advances towards the concrete implementation of spin-based quantum computation. In fact, the possibility of achieving enhanced quantum coherence has been substantially doubted for nanostructures due to the characteristic high degree of background charge fluctuations5-7. Still, a sizeable spin-electric coupling will be needed in realistic multiple-qubit systems to address single-spin and spin-spin manipulations8-10. Here, we realize a single-electron spin qubit with an isotopically enriched phase coherence time (20 μs)11,12 and fast electrical control speed (up to 30 MHz) mediated by extrinsic spin-electric coupling. Using rapid spin rotations, we reveal that the free-evolution dephasing is caused by charge noise—rather than conventional magnetic noise—as highlighted by a 1/f spectrum extended over seven decades of frequency. The qubit exhibits superior performance with single-qubit gate fidelities exceeding 99.9% on average, offering a promising route to large-scale spin-qubit systems with fault-tolerant controllability.

  19. Layered Architectures for Quantum Computers and Quantum Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nathan C.

    This chapter examines how to organize quantum computers and repeaters using a systematic framework known as layered architecture, where machine control is organized in layers associated with specialized tasks. The framework is flexible and could be used for analysis and comparison of quantum information systems. To demonstrate the design principles in practice, we develop architectures for quantum computers and quantum repeaters based on optically controlled quantum dots, showing how a myriad of technologies must operate synchronously to achieve fault-tolerance. Optical control makes information processing in this system very fast, scalable to large problem sizes, and extendable to quantum communication.

  20. Seeking Quantum Speedup Through Spin Glasses: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut G. Katzgraber

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable progress in the design and construction of quantum annealing devices. However, a conclusive detection of quantum speedup over traditional silicon-based machines remains elusive, despite multiple careful studies. In this work we outline strategies to design hard tunable benchmark instances based on insights from the study of spin glasses—the archetypal random benchmark problem for novel algorithms and optimization devices. We propose to complement head-to-head scaling studies that compare quantum annealing machines to state-of-the-art classical codes with an approach that compares the performance of different algorithms and/or computing architectures on different classes of computationally hard tunable spin-glass instances. The advantage of such an approach lies in having to compare only the performance hit felt by a given algorithm and/or architecture when the instance complexity is increased. Furthermore, we propose a methodology that might not directly translate into the detection of quantum speedup but might elucidate whether quantum annealing has a “quantum advantage” over corresponding classical algorithms, such as simulated annealing. Our results on a 496-qubit D-Wave Two quantum annealing device are compared to recently used state-of-the-art thermal simulated annealing codes.

  1. Optimal control of fast and high-fidelity quantum state transfer in spin-1/2 chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiong-Peng [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Shao, Bin, E-mail: sbin610@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Hu, Shuai; Zou, Jian [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wu, Lian-Ao [Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science, The Basque Country University (EHU/UPV), PO Box 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2016-12-15

    Spin chains are promising candidates for quantum communication and computation. Using quantum optimal control (OC) theory based on the Krotov method, we present a protocol to perform quantum state transfer with fast and high fidelity by only manipulating the boundary spins in a quantum spin-1/2 chain. The achieved speed is about one order of magnitude faster than that is possible in the Lyapunov control case for comparable fidelities. Additionally, it has a fundamental limit for OC beyond which optimization is not possible. The controls are exerted only on the couplings between the boundary spins and their neighbors, so that the scheme has good scalability. We also demonstrate that the resulting OC scheme is robust against disorder in the chain.

  2. Spin and edge channel dependent transport through quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridder, T; Rogge, M C; Haug, R J [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)], E-mail: ridder@nano.uni-hannover.de

    2008-11-12

    We investigate the influence of spin polarized currents and non-equilibrated edge channels on the transport properties of a single quantum dot. Polarized currents are realized by the manual depletion of edge channels in high magnetic fields via a metallic top gate covering the source contact in the system. We observe a suppression and enhancement in the conductance of the quantum dot dependent on the edge channel configuration in the leads.

  3. Spin-orbit-enhanced Wigner localization in quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, Andrea; Malet, F.; Cremon, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate quantum dots with Rashba spin-orbit coupling in the strongly-correlated regime. We show that the presence of the Rashba interaction enhances the Wigner localization in these systems, making it achievable for higher densities than those at which it is observed in Rashba-free quantum...... dots. Recurring shapes in the pair distribution functions of the yrast spectrum, which might be associated with rotational and vibrational modes, are also reported....

  4. Field dependence of the electron spin relaxation in quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Carlos; Chudnovsky, E M; Garanin, D A

    2005-10-14

    The interaction of the electron spin with local elastic twists due to transverse phonons is studied. The universal dependence of the spin-relaxation rate on the strength and direction of the magnetic field is obtained in terms of the electron gyromagnetic tensor and macroscopic elastic constants of the solid. The theory contains no unknown parameters and it can be easily tested in experiment. At high magnetic field it provides a parameter-free lower bound on the electron spin relaxation in quantum dots.

  5. Unconditionally verifiable blind quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimons, Joseph F.; Kashefi, Elham

    2017-07-01

    Blind quantum computing (BQC) allows a client to have a server carry out a quantum computation for them such that the client's input, output, and computation remain private. A desirable property for any BQC protocol is verification, whereby the client can verify with high probability whether the server has followed the instructions of the protocol or if there has been some deviation resulting in a corrupted output state. A verifiable BQC protocol can be viewed as an interactive proof system leading to consequences for complexity theory. We previously proposed [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, Atlanta, 2009 (IEEE, Piscataway, 2009), p. 517] a universal and unconditionally secure BQC scheme where the client only needs to be able to prepare single qubits in separable states randomly chosen from a finite set and send them to the server, who has the balance of the required quantum computational resources. In this paper we extend that protocol with additional functionality allowing blind computational basis measurements, which we use to construct another verifiable BQC protocol based on a different class of resource states. We rigorously prove that the probability of failing to detect an incorrect output is exponentially small in a security parameter, while resource overhead remains polynomial in this parameter. This resource state allows entangling gates to be performed between arbitrary pairs of logical qubits with only constant overhead. This is a significant improvement on the original scheme, which required that all computations to be performed must first be put into a nearest-neighbor form, incurring linear overhead in the number of qubits. Such an improvement has important consequences for efficiency and fault-tolerance thresholds.

  6. Adiabatic quantum computation and quantum annealing theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    McGeoch, Catherine C

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is an alternative to the better-known gate model of quantum computation. The two models are polynomially equivalent, but otherwise quite dissimilar: one property that distinguishes AQC from the gate model is its analog nature. Quantum annealing (QA) describes a type of heuristic search algorithm that can be implemented to run in the ``native instruction set'''' of an AQC platform. D-Wave Systems Inc. manufactures {quantum annealing processor chips} that exploit quantum properties to realize QA computations in hardware. The chips form the centerpiece of a nov

  7. Quantum machine learning what quantum computing means to data mining

    CERN Document Server

    Wittek, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Quantum Machine Learning bridges the gap between abstract developments in quantum computing and the applied research on machine learning. Paring down the complexity of the disciplines involved, it focuses on providing a synthesis that explains the most important machine learning algorithms in a quantum framework. Theoretical advances in quantum computing are hard to follow for computer scientists, and sometimes even for researchers involved in the field. The lack of a step-by-step guide hampers the broader understanding of this emergent interdisciplinary body of research. Quantum Machine L

  8. Quantum Nonlocality with Spins in Diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensen, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we experimentally investigate quantum nonlocality: entangled states of spatially separated objects. Entanglement is one of the most striking consequences of the quantum formalism developed in the 1920's; the predicted outcomes of independent measurements on entangled objects reveal

  9. Adiabatic Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant

    2013-03-01

    We are implementing a new platform for adiabatic quantum computation (AQC)[2] based on trapped neutral atoms whose coupling is mediated by the dipole-dipole interactions of Rydberg states. Ground state cesium atoms are dressed by laser fields in a manner conditional on the Rydberg blockade mechanism,[3,4] thereby providing the requisite entangling interactions. As a benchmark we study a Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problem whose solution is found in the ground state spin configuration of an Ising-like model. In collaboration with Lambert Parazzoli, Sandia National Laboratories; Aaron Hankin, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; James Chin-Wen Chou, Yuan-Yu Jau, Peter Schwindt, Cort Johnson, and George Burns, Sandia National Laboratories; Tyler Keating, Krittika Goyal, and Ivan Deutsch, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; and Andrew Landahl, Sandia National Laboratories. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories

  10. Continuous-Variable Quantum Computation of Oracle Decision Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, Mark R. A.

    the relative performances of different choices of the encoding bases. We extend our formalism to include quantum algorithms in the continuously parameterized yet finite-dimensional Hilbert space of a coherent spin system. We show that the highest-squeezed spin state possible can be approximated by a superposition of two states thus transcending the usual model of using a single basis state as algorithm input. As a particular example, we show that the close Hadamard oracle-decision problem, which is related to the Hadamard codewords of digital communications theory, can be solved quantitatively more efficiently using this computational model than by any known classical algorithm.

  11. A quantum computer only needs one universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steane, A. M.

    The nature of quantum computation is discussed. It is argued that, in terms of the amount of information manipulated in a given time, quantum and classical computation are equally efficient. Quantum superposition does not permit quantum computers to "perform many computations simultaneously" except in a highly qualified and to some extent misleading sense. Quantum computation is therefore not well described by interpretations of quantum mechanics which invoke the concept of vast numbers of parallel universes. Rather, entanglement makes available types of computation processes which, while not exponentially larger than classical ones, are unavailable to classical systems. The essence of quantum computation is that it uses entanglement to generate and manipulate a physical representation of the correlations between logical entities, without the need to completely represent the logical entities themselves.

  12. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-18

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  13. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M.; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources. PMID:28674011

  14. Nonadiabatic corrections to a quantum dot quantum computer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The time of operation of an adiabatic quantum computer must be less than the decoherence time, otherwise the computer would be nonoperative. So far, the nonadiabatic corrections to an adiabatic quantum computer are merely theoretical considerations. By the above reason, we consider the particular case of a ...

  15. Nonadiabatic corrections to a quantum dot quantum computer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The time of operation of an adiabatic quantum computer must be less than the decoherence time, otherwise the computer would be nonoperative. So far, the nonadiabatic corrections to an adiabatic quantum computer are merely theoretical considerations. By the above reason, we consider the particular case of a ...

  16. Nonadiabatic corrections to a quantum dot quantum computer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... Abstract. The time of operation of an adiabatic quantum computer must be less than the decoherence time, otherwise the computer would be nonoperative. So far, the nonadiabatic cor- rections to an adiabatic quantum computer are merely theoretical considerations. By the above reason, we consider the ...

  17. Geometry of discrete quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Andrew J.; Ortiz, Gerardo; Sabry, Amr; Tai, Yu-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Conventional quantum computing entails a geometry based on the description of an n-qubit state using 2n infinite precision complex numbers denoting a vector in a Hilbert space. Such numbers are in general uncomputable using any real-world resources, and, if we have the idea of physical law as some kind of computational algorithm of the universe, we would be compelled to alter our descriptions of physics to be consistent with computable numbers. Our purpose here is to examine the geometric implications of using finite fields Fp and finite complexified fields \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} (based on primes p congruent to 3 (mod4)) as the basis for computations in a theory of discrete quantum computing, which would therefore become a computable theory. Because the states of a discrete n-qubit system are in principle enumerable, we are able to determine the proportions of entangled and unentangled states. In particular, we extend the Hopf fibration that defines the irreducible state space of conventional continuous n-qubit theories (which is the complex projective space \\mathbf {CP}^{2^{n}-1}) to an analogous discrete geometry in which the Hopf circle for any n is found to be a discrete set of p + 1 points. The tally of unit-length n-qubit states is given, and reduced via the generalized Hopf fibration to \\mathbf {DCP}^{2^{n}-1}, the discrete analogue of the complex projective space, which has p^{2^{n}-1} (p-1)\\,\\prod _{k=1}^{n-1} ( p^{2^{k}}+1) irreducible states. Using a measure of entanglement, the purity, we explore the entanglement features of discrete quantum states and find that the n-qubit states based on the complexified field \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} have pn(p - 1)n unentangled states (the product of the tally for a single qubit) with purity 1, and they have pn + 1(p - 1)(p + 1)n - 1 maximally entangled states with purity zero.

  18. The quantum brachistochrone problem for an arbitrary spin in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmak, A. R.; Tkachuk, V. M.

    2015-06-01

    We consider quantum brachistochrone evolution for a spin-s system on rotational manifolds. Such manifolds are determined by the rotation of the eigenstates of the operator of projection of spin-s on some direction. The Fubini-Study metrics of these manifolds are those of spheres with radii dependent on the value of the spin and on the value of the spin projection. The conditions for optimal evolution of the spin-s system on rotational manifolds are obtained.

  19. PREFACE: Quantum Information, Communication, Computation and Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, F.; Fannes, M.; Floreanini, R.; Petritis, D.

    2007-07-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to information related fields such as communication, computation and cryptography is a fast growing line of research that has been witnessing an outburst of theoretical and experimental results, with possible practical applications. On the one hand, quantum cryptography with its impact on secrecy of transmission is having its first important actual implementations; on the other hand, the recent advances in quantum optics, ion trapping, BEC manipulation, spin and quantum dot technologies allow us to put to direct test a great deal of theoretical ideas and results. These achievements have stimulated a reborn interest in various aspects of quantum mechanics, creating a unique interplay between physics, both theoretical and experimental, mathematics, information theory and computer science. In view of all these developments, it appeared timely to organize a meeting where graduate students and young researchers could be exposed to the fundamentals of the theory, while senior experts could exchange their latest results. The activity was structured as a school followed by a workshop, and took place at The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and The International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy, from 12-23 June 2006. The meeting was part of the activity of the Joint European Master Curriculum Development Programme in Quantum Information, Communication, Cryptography and Computation, involving the Universities of Cergy-Pontoise (France), Chania (Greece), Leuven (Belgium), Rennes1 (France) and Trieste (Italy). This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical collects 22 contributions from well known experts who took part in the workshop. They summarize the present day status of the research in the manifold aspects of quantum information. The issue is opened by two review articles, the first by G Adesso and F Illuminati discussing entanglement in continuous variable

  20. Qudit quantum computation in the Jaynes-Cummings model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mischuck, Brian; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    We have developed methods for performing qudit quantum computation in the Jaynes-Cummings model with the qudits residing in a finite subspace of individual harmonic oscillator modes, resonantly coupled to a spin-1/2 system. The first method determines analytical control sequences for the one......- and two-qudit gates necessary for universal quantum computation by breaking down the desired unitary transformations into a series of state preparations implemented with the Law-Eberly scheme [ Law and Eberly Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 1055 (1996)]. The second method replaces some of the analytical pulse...

  1. Emergence of the persistent spin helix in semiconductor quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koralek, Jake; Weber, Chris; Orenstein, Joe; Bernevig, Andrei; Zhang, Shoucheng; Mack, Shawn; Awschalom, David

    2008-01-01

    According to Noether's theorem, for every symmetry in nature there is a corresponding conservation law. For example, invariance with respect to spatial translation corresponds to conservation of momentum. In another well-known example, invariance with respect to rotation of the electron's spin, or SU(2) symmetry, leads to conservation of spin polarization. For electrons in a solid, this symmetry is ordinarily broken by spin-orbit (SO) coupling, allowing spin angular momentum to flow to orbital angular momentum. However, it has recently been predicted that SU(2) can be recovered in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), despite the presence of SO coupling. The corresponding conserved quantities include the amplitude and phase of a helical spin density wave termed the 'persistent spin helix' (PSH) .2 SU(2) is restored, in principle, when the strength of two dominant SO interactions, the Rashba (alpha) and linear Dresselhaus (beta 1), are equal. This symmetry is predicted to be robust against all forms of spin-independent scattering, including electron-electron interactions, but is broken by the cubic Dresselhaus term (beta 3) and spin-dependent scattering. When these terms are negligible, the distance over which spin information can propagate is predicted to diverge as alpha approaches beta 1. Here we observe experimentally the emergence of the PSH in GaAs quantum wells (QW's) by independently tuning alpha and beta 1. Using transient spin-grating spectroscopy (TSG), we find a spin-lifetime enhancement of two orders of magnitude near the symmetry point. Excellent quantitative agreement with theory across a wide range of sample parameters allows us to obtain an absolute measure of all relevant SO terms, identifying beta 3 as the main SU(2) violating term in our samples. The tunable suppression of spin-relaxation demonstrated in this work is well-suited for application to spintronics

  2. Emergence of the Persistent Spin Helix in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koralek, Jake

    2011-01-01

    According to Noether's theorem, for every symmetry in nature there is a corresponding conservation law. For example, invariance with respect to spatial translation corresponds to conservation of momentum. In another well-known example, invariance with respect to rotation of the electron's spin, or SU(2) symmetry, leads to conservation of spin polarization. For electrons in a solid, this symmetry is ordinarily broken by spin-orbit (SO) coupling, allowing spin angular momentum to flow to orbital angular momentum. However, it has recently been predicted that SU(2) can be recovered in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), despite the presence of SO coupling. The corresponding conserved quantities include the amplitude and phase of a helical spin density wave termed the 'persistent spin helix' (PSH). SU(2) is restored, in principle, when the strength of two dominant SO interactions, the Rashba (α) and linear Dresselhaus (β 1 ), are equal. This symmetry is predicted to be robust against all forms of spin-independent scattering, including electron-electron interactions, but is broken by the cubic Dresselhaus term (β 3 ) and spin-dependent scattering. When these terms are negligible, the distance over which spin information can propagate is predicted to diverge as α → β 1 . Here we observe experimentally the emergence of the PSH in GaAs quantum wells (QW's) by independently tuning α and β 1 . Using transient spin-grating spectroscopy (TSG), we find a spin-lifetime enhancement of two orders of magnitude near the symmetry point. Excellent quantitative agreement with theory across a wide range of sample parameters allows us to obtain an absolute measure of all relevant SO terms, identifying β 3 as the main SU(2) violating term in our samples. The tunable suppression of spin-relaxation demonstrated in this work is well-suited for application to spintronics.

  3. Weak antilocalization and spin precession in quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knap, W.; Skierbiszewski, C.; Zduniak, A.; Litwin-Staszewska, E.; Bertho, D.; Kobbi, F.; Robert, J. L.; Pikus, G. E.; Pikus, F. G.; Iordanskii, S. V.; Mosser, V.; Zekentes, K.; Lyanda-Geller, Yu. B.

    1996-02-01

    The results of magnetoconductivity measurements in GaxIn1-xAs quantum wells are presented. The observed magnetoconductivity appears due to the quantum interference, which lead to the weak localization effect. It is established that the details of the weak localization are controlled by the spin splitting of electron spectra. A theory is developed that takes into account both linear and cubic in electron wave-vector terms in spin splitting, which arise due to the lack of inversion center in the crystal, as well as the linear terms that appear when the well itself is asymmetric. It is established that, unlike spin-relaxation rate, contributions of different terms into magnetoconductivity are not additive. It is demonstrated that in the interval of electron densities under investigation [(0.98-1.85)×1012 cm-2 ] all three contributions are comparable and have to be taken into account to achieve a good agreement between the theory and experiment. The results obtained from comparison of the experiment and the theory have allowed us to determine what mechanisms dominate the spin-relaxation in quantum wells and to improve the accuracy of determination of spin-splitting parameters in A3B5 crystals and two-dimensional structures.

  4. The Quantum Human Computer (QHC) Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    This article attempts to suggest the existence of a human computer called Quantum Human Computer (QHC) on the basis of an analogy between human beings and computers. To date, there are two types of computers: Binary and Quantum. The former operates on the basis of binary logic where an object is said to exist in either of the two states of 1 and…

  5. Quantum computation of scattering amplitudes in scalar quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeter-Aydeniz, Kübra; Siopsis, George

    2018-02-01

    We present a quantum algorithm for the calculation of scattering amplitudes of massive charged scalar particles in scalar quantum electrodynamics. Our algorithm is based on continuous-variable quantum computing architecture resulting in exponential speedup over classical methods. We derive a simple form of the Hamiltonian including interactions and a straightforward implementation of the constraint due to gauge invariance.

  6. Transport in quantum spin Hall edges in contact to a quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Bruno; Camjayi, Alberto; Arrachea, Liliana

    2016-09-01

    We study the transport mechanisms taking place in a quantum spin Hall bar with an embedded quantum dot, where electrons localize and experience Coulomb interaction U as well as spin-flip processes λ . We solve the problem with nonequilibrium Green functions. We focus on the linear-response regime and treat the many-body interactions with quantum Monte Carlo. The effects of U and λ are competitive and the induced transport takes place through different channels. The two mechanisms can be switched by changing the occupation of the dot with a gate voltage.

  7. Quantum description of spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetti, D.

    2007-01-01

    Starting from a phenomenological Hamiltonian originally written in terms of angular momentum operators we derive a new quantum angle-based Hamiltonian that allows for a discussion on the quantum spin tunneling. The study of the applicability of the present approach, carried out in calculations with a soluble quasi-spin model, shows that we are allowed to use our method in the description of physical systems such as the Mn12-acetate molecule, as well as the octanuclear iron cluster, Fe8, in a reliable way. With the present description the interpretation of the spin tunneling is seen to be direct, the spectra and energy barriers of those systems are obtained, and it is shown that they agree with the experimental ones.

  8. Spin-Orbital Quantum Liquid on the Honeycomb Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Corboz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The main characteristic of Mott insulators, as compared to band insulators, is to host low-energy spin fluctuations. In addition, Mott insulators often possess orbital degrees of freedom when crystal-field levels are partially filled. While in the majority of Mott insulators, spins and orbitals develop long-range order, the possibility for the ground state to be a quantum liquid opens new perspectives. In this paper, we provide clear evidence that the spin-orbital SU(4 symmetric Kugel-Khomskii model of Mott insulators on the honeycomb lattice is a quantum spin-orbital liquid. The absence of any form of symmetry breaking—lattice or SU(N—is supported by a combination of semiclassical and numerical approaches: flavor-wave theory, tensor network algorithm, and exact diagonalizations. In addition, all properties revealed by these methods are very accurately accounted for by a projected variational wave function based on the π-flux state of fermions on the honeycomb lattice at 1/4 filling. In that state, correlations are algebraic because of the presence of a Dirac point at the Fermi level, suggesting that the symmetric Kugel-Khomskii model on the honeycomb lattice is an algebraic quantum spin-orbital liquid. This model provides an interesting starting point to understanding the recently discovered spin-orbital-liquid behavior of Ba_{3}CuSb_{2}O_{9}. The present results also suggest the choice of optical lattices with honeycomb geometry in the search for quantum liquids in ultracold four-color fermionic atoms.

  9. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingrich, Robert M.; Williams, Colin P.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for designing quantum circuits that perform non-unitary quantum computations on n-qubit states probabilistically, and give analytic expressions for the success probability and fidelity.

  10. Type II Quantum Computing With Superconductors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orlando, Terry

    2004-01-01

    ... for adiabatic quantum computing using these qubits. The major experimental results on single superconducting persistent current qubits have been the observation of the quantum energy level crossings in niobium qubits, and the microwave measurements...

  11. Operating Spin Echo in the Quantum Regime for an Atomic-Ensemble Quantum Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Jun; Jiang, Yan; Yang, Sheng-Jun; Zhao, Bo; Bao, Xiao-Hui; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-09-25

    Spin echo is a powerful technique to extend atomic or nuclear coherence times by overcoming the dephasing due to inhomogeneous broadenings. However, there are disputes about the feasibility of applying this technique to an ensemble-based quantum memory at the single-quanta level. In this experimental study, we find that noise due to imperfections of the rephasing pulses has both intense superradiant and weak isotropic parts. By properly arranging the beam directions and optimizing the pulse fidelities, we successfully manage to operate the spin echo technique in the quantum regime by observing nonclassical photon-photon correlations as well as the quantum behavior of retrieved photons. Our work for the first time demonstrates the feasibility of harnessing the spin echo method to extend the lifetime of ensemble-based quantum memories at the single-quanta level.

  12. Equal-Spin Andreev Reflection on Junctions of Spin-Resolved Quantum Hall Bulk State and Spin-Singlet Superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Sadashige; Ueda, Kento; Baba, Shoji; Kamata, Hiroshi; Tateno, Mizuki; Shabani, Javad; Palmstrøm, Christopher J; Tarucha, Seigo

    2018-02-22

    The recent development of superconducting spintronics has revealed the spin-triplet superconducting proximity effect from a spin-singlet superconductor into a spin-polarized normal metal. In addition recently superconducting junctions using semiconductors are in demand for highly controlled experiments to engineer topological superconductivity. Here we report experimental observation of Andreev reflection in junctions of spin-resolved quantum Hall (QH) states in an InAs quantum well and the spin-singlet superconductor NbTi. The measured conductance indicates a sub-gap feature and two peaks on the outer side of the sub-gap feature in the QH plateau-transition regime increases. The observed structures can be explained by considering transport with Andreev reflection from two channels, one originating from equal-spin Andreev reflection intermediated by spin-flip processes and second arising from normal Andreev reflection. This result indicates the possibility to induce the superconducting proximity gap in the the QH bulk state, and the possibility for the development of superconducting spintronics in semiconductor devices.

  13. Quantum correlation dynamics subjected to critical spin environment with short-range anisotropic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J L; Zhang, X Z

    2016-09-06

    Short-range interaction among the spins can not only results in the rich phase diagram but also brings about fascinating phenomenon both in the contexts of quantum computing and information. In this paper, we investigate the quantum correlation of the system coupled to a surrounding environment with short-range anisotropic interaction. It is shown that the decay of quantum correlation of the central spins measured by pairwise entanglement and quantum discord can serve as a signature of quantum phase transition. In addition, we study the decoherence factor of the system when the environment is in the vicinity of the phase transition point. In the strong coupling regime, the decay of the decoherence factor exhibits Gaussian envelop in the time domain. However, in weak coupling limit, the quantum correlation of the system is robust against the disturbance of the magnetic field through optimal control of the anisotropic short-range interaction strength. Based on this, the effects of the short-range anisotropic interaction on the sudden transition from classical to quantum decoherence are also presented.

  14. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-03-17

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions.

  15. Persistent Spin Current in a Hard-Wall Confining Quantum Wire with Weak Dresselhaus Spin-Orbit Coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xi; Zhou Guanghui

    2009-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the spin current in a quantum wire with weak Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling connected to two normal conductors. Both the quantum wire and conductors are described by a hard-wall confining potential. Using the electron wave-functions in the quantum wire and a new definition of spin current, we have calculated the elements of linear spin current density j s,xi T and j s,yi T (i = x, y, z). We find that the elements j T s,xx and j T s,yy have a antisymmetrical relation and the element j T s,yz has the same amount level as j s,xx T and j s,yy T . We also find a net linear spin current density, which has peaks at the center of quantum wire. The net linear spin current can induce a linear electric field, which may imply a way of spin current detection.

  16. Memory-built-in quantum cloning in a hybrid solid-state spin register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W-B; Zu, C; He, L; Zhang, W-G; Duan, L-M

    2015-07-16

    As a way to circumvent the quantum no-cloning theorem, approximate quantum cloning protocols have received wide attention with remarkable applications. Copying of quantum states to memory qubits provides an important strategy for eavesdropping in quantum cryptography. We report an experiment that realizes cloning of quantum states from an electron spin to a nuclear spin in a hybrid solid-state spin register with near-optimal fidelity. The nuclear spin provides an ideal memory qubit at room temperature, which stores the cloned quantum states for a millisecond under ambient conditions, exceeding the lifetime of the original quantum state carried by the electron spin by orders of magnitude. The realization of a cloning machine with built-in quantum memory provides a key step for application of quantum cloning in quantum information science.

  17. Quantum spin and charge pumping through double quantum dots with ferromagnetic leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Hui, E-mail: hpan@buaa.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Measurement-Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Chen, Ziyu; Zhao, Sufen [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Lue, Rong [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-06-06

    The pumping of electrons through double quantum dots (DQDs) attached to ferromagnetic leads have been theoretically investigated by using the nonequilibrium Green's function method. It is found that an oscillating electric field applied to the quantum dot may give rise to the pumped charge and spin currents. In the case that both leads are ferromagnet, a pure spin current can be generated in the antiparallel magnetization configuration, where no net charge current exists. The possibility of manipulating the pumped spin current is explored by tuning the dot level and the ac field. By making use of various tunings, the magnitude and direction of the pumped spin current can be well controlled. For the case that only one lead is ferromagnetic, both of the charge and spin currents can be pumped and flow in opposite directions on the average. The control of the magnitude and direction of the pumped charge and spin currents is also discussed by means of the magnetic flux threading through the DQD ring. -- Highlights: → We theoretically investigate the pumping of electrons through double quantum dots attached to ferromagnetic leads. → An oscillating electric field applied to the quantum dot may give rise to the pumped charge and spin currents. → When both leads are ferromagnet, a pure spin current can be generated in the antiparallel magnetization configuration. → By making use of various tunings, the magnitude and direction of the pumped spin current can be well controlled. → When only one lead is ferromagnetic, both of the charge and spin currents can be pumped and flow in opposite directions.

  18. Epidemic Dynamics in Open Quantum Spin Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; Marcuzzi, Matteo; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2017-10-01

    We explore the nonequilibrium evolution and stationary states of an open many-body system that displays epidemic spreading dynamics in a classical and a quantum regime. Our study is motivated by recent experiments conducted in strongly interacting gases of highly excited Rydberg atoms where the facilitated excitation of Rydberg states competes with radiative decay. These systems approximately implement open quantum versions of models for population dynamics or disease spreading where species can be in a healthy, infected or immune state. We show that in a two-dimensional lattice, depending on the dominance of either classical or quantum effects, the system may display a different kind of nonequilibrium phase transition. We moreover discuss the observability of our findings in laser driven Rydberg gases with particular focus on the role of long-range interactions.

  19. Embracing the quantum limit in silicon computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, John J L; McCamey, Dane R; Eriksson, Mark A; Lyon, Stephen A

    2011-11-16

    Quantum computers hold the promise of massive performance enhancements across a range of applications, from cryptography and databases to revolutionary scientific simulation tools. Such computers would make use of the same quantum mechanical phenomena that pose limitations on the continued shrinking of conventional information processing devices. Many of the key requirements for quantum computing differ markedly from those of conventional computers. However, silicon, which plays a central part in conventional information processing, has many properties that make it a superb platform around which to build a quantum computer. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  20. Contextuality supplies the 'magic' for quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Mark; Wallman, Joel; Veitch, Victor; Emerson, Joseph

    2014-06-19

    Quantum computers promise dramatic advantages over their classical counterparts, but the source of the power in quantum computing has remained elusive. Here we prove a remarkable equivalence between the onset of contextuality and the possibility of universal quantum computation via 'magic state' distillation, which is the leading model for experimentally realizing a fault-tolerant quantum computer. This is a conceptually satisfying link, because contextuality, which precludes a simple 'hidden variable' model of quantum mechanics, provides one of the fundamental characterizations of uniquely quantum phenomena. Furthermore, this connection suggests a unifying paradigm for the resources of quantum information: the non-locality of quantum theory is a particular kind of contextuality, and non-locality is already known to be a critical resource for achieving advantages with quantum communication. In addition to clarifying these fundamental issues, this work advances the resource framework for quantum computation, which has a number of practical applications, such as characterizing the efficiency and trade-offs between distinct theoretical and experimental schemes for achieving robust quantum computation, and putting bounds on the overhead cost for the classical simulation of quantum algorithms.

  1. Quantum Random Networks for Type 2 Quantum Computers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allara, David L; Hasslacher, Brosl

    2006-01-01

    Random boolean networks (RBNs) have been studied theoretically and computationally in order to be able to use their remarkable self-healing and large basins of altercation properties as quantum computing architectures, especially...

  2. Blind topological measurement-based quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Blind quantum computation is a novel secure quantum-computing protocol that enables Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, to delegate her quantum computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output and algorithm. A recent proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating blind quantum computation in an optical system has raised new challenges regarding the scalability of blind quantum computation in realistic noisy conditions. Here we show that fault-tolerant blind quantum computation is possible in a topologically protected manner using the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal scheme. The error threshold of our scheme is 4.3 × 10(-3), which is comparable to that (7.5 × 10(-3)) of non-blind topological quantum computation. As the error per gate of the order 10(-3) was already achieved in some experimental systems, our result implies that secure cloud quantum computation is within reach.

  3. Quantum computing with incoherent resources and quantum jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M F; Cunha, M Terra; Chaves, R; Carvalho, A R R

    2012-04-27

    Spontaneous emission and the inelastic scattering of photons are two natural processes usually associated with decoherence and the reduction in the capacity to process quantum information. Here we show that, when suitably detected, these photons are sufficient to build all the fundamental blocks needed to perform quantum computation in the emitting qubits while protecting them from deleterious dissipative effects. We exemplify this by showing how to efficiently prepare graph states for the implementation of measurement-based quantum computation.

  4. Quantum phase transitions in random XY spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunder, J.E.; McKenzie, R.H.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The XY spin chain in a transverse field is one of the simplest quantum spin models. It is a reasonable model for heavy fermion materials such as CeCu 6-x Au x . It has two quantum phase transitions: the Ising transition and the anisotropic transition. Quantum phase transitions occur at zero temperature. We are investigating what effect the introduction of randomness has on these quantum phase transitions. Disordered systems which undergo quantum phase transitions can exhibit new universality classes. The universality class of a phase transition is defined by the set of critical exponents. In a random system with quantum phase transitions we can observe Griffiths-McCoy singularities. Such singularities are observed in regions which have no long range order, so they are not classified as critical regions, yet they display phenomena normally associated with critical points, such as a diverging susceptibility. Griffiths-McCoy phases are due to rare regions with stronger than! average interactions and may be present far from the quantum critical point. We show how the random XY spin chain may be mapped onto a random Dirac equation. This allows us to calculate the density of states without making any approximations. From the density of states we can describe the conditions which should allow a Griffiths-McCoy phase. We find that for the Ising transition the dynamic critical exponent, z, is not universal. It is proportional to the disorder strength and inversely proportional to the energy gap, hence z becomes infinite at the critical point where the energy gap vanishes

  5. Stretchable Persistent Spin Helices in GaAs Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettwiler, Florian; Fu, Jiyong; Mack, Shawn; Weigele, Pirmin J.; Egues, J. Carlos; Awschalom, David D.; Zumbühl, Dominik M.

    2017-07-01

    the extracted spin-diffusion lengths and decay times show a significant enhancement near α =β . Since within the continuous-locking regime quantum transport is diffusive (2D) for charge while ballistic (1D) for spin and thus amenable to coherent spin control, stretchable PSHs could provide the platform for the much heralded long-distance communication ˜8 - 25 μ m between solid-state spin qubits, where the spin diffusion length for α ≠β is an order of magnitude smaller.

  6. Stretchable Persistent Spin Helices in GaAs Quantum Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Dettwiler

    2017-07-01

    sufficiently weak so that the extracted spin-diffusion lengths and decay times show a significant enhancement near α=β. Since within the continuous-locking regime quantum transport is diffusive (2D for charge while ballistic (1D for spin and thus amenable to coherent spin control, stretchable PSHs could provide the platform for the much heralded long-distance communication ∼8–25  μm between solid-state spin qubits, where the spin diffusion length for α≠β is an order of magnitude smaller.

  7. Analytic renormalized bipartite and tripartite quantum discords with quantum phase transition in XXZ spins chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joya, Wajid; Khan, Salman; Khalid Khan, M.; Alam, Sher

    2017-05-01

    The behavior of bipartite quantum discord (BQD) and tripartite quantum discord (TQD) in the Heisenberg XXZ spins chain is investigated with the increasing size of the system using the approach of the quantum renormalization group method. Analytical relations for both BQD and TQD are obtained and the results are checked through numerical optimization. In the thermodynamics limit, both types of discord exhibit quantum phase transition (QPT). The boundary of QPT links the phases of saturated discord and zero discord. The first derivative of both discords becomes discontinuous at the critical point, which corresponds to the second-order phase transition. Qualitatively identical, the amount of saturated BQD strongly depends on the relative positions of spins inside a block. TQD can be a better candidate than BQD both for analyzing QPT and implementing quantum information tasks. The scaling behavior in the vicinity of the critical point is discussed.

  8. Novel spin effects in quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1993-02-01

    This report discusses a number of interesting hadronic spin effects which test fundamental features of perturbative and non-perturbative QCD. These include constraints on the shape and normalization of the polarized quark and gluon structure functions of the proton; the principle of hadron helicity retention in high x F inclusive reactions; predictions based on total hadron helicity conservation in high momentum transfer exclusive reactions; the dependence of nuclear structure functions and shadowing on virtual photon polarization; and general constraints on the magnetic moment of hadrons. I also will discuss the implications of several measurements which are in striking conflict with leading-twist perturbative QCD predictions, such as the extraordinarily large spin correlation A NN observed in large angle proton-proton scattering, the anomalously large ρπ branching ratio of the J/ψ, and the rapidly changing polarization dependence of both J/ψ and continuum lepton pair hadroproduction observed at large x F

  9. An edge index for the quantum spin-Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodan, Emil

    2009-01-01

    Quantum spin-Hall systems are topological insulators displaying dissipationless spin currents flowing at the edges of the samples. In contradistinction to the quantum Hall systems where the charge conductance of the edge modes is quantized, the spin conductance is not and it remained an open problem to find the observable whose edge current is quantized. In this paper, we define a particular observable and the edge current corresponding to this observable. We show that this current is quantized and that the quantization is given by the index of a certain Fredholm operator. This provides a new topological invariant that is shown to take the generic values 0 and 2, in line with the Z 2 topological classification of time-reversal invariant systems. The result gives an effective tool for the investigation of the edge structure in quantum spin-Hall systems. Based on a reasonable assumption, we also show that the edge conducting channels are not destroyed by a random edge. (fast track communication)

  10. Quantum simulator for spin-orbital magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehler, Adam

    2016-01-01

    In this dissertation we focus on many-body phenomena on a quantum level. In particular fermionic quantum gases in a temperature regime approaching absolute zero. Ultracold quantum gases have proven to be a versatile framework for Theorists and Experimentalists to probe many-body quantum mechanics. They also serve to quantum simulate solid state problems in a clean and controllable environment. The use of optical lattices include the advantage of tuning the required lattice structure nearly at will and lack the experimental shortcomings compared to the solid state, like the presence of lattice dislocations. The relevant lattice parameters can be easily tuned without changing the setup. In recent years many goals within theory and experiments of ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices were achieved. This emphasizes the significance of ongoing research with ultracold quantum gases on optical lattices. We present two aspects of modern theory of ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices. On the one hand, we implement orbital physics in a setup of optical lattices and on the other, we find elusive Majorana fermions in a setup with ultracold fermionic gases. Both aspects are well-known in solid state systems, but did not make the step towards ultracold quantum gases so far. We propose and investigate setups to quantum simulate these challenges in the framework of optical lattices. The first part of this work concerns the implementation of orbital physics in optical lattices. The orbital structure of atoms reveals novel phenomena in solid state systems. This raises the interest in creating optical lattice systems exhibiting analog behavior, as dictated by the orbitals in the solid state. We derive the microscopic Hamiltonian for a p-orbital system and investigate it in detail. For this Hamiltonian we perform a mean-field treatment and discover novel phase transitions including a possible tricritical point. In the analysis of the strong coupling regime we find an

  11. DOE pushes for useful quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is joining the quest to develop quantum computers, devices that would exploit quantum mechanics to crack problems that overwhelm conventional computers. The initiative comes as Google and other companies race to build a quantum computer that can demonstrate "quantum supremacy" by beating classical computers on a test problem. But reaching that milestone will not mean practical uses are at hand, and the new $40 million DOE effort is intended to spur the development of useful quantum computing algorithms for its work in chemistry, materials science, nuclear physics, and particle physics. With the resources at its 17 national laboratories, DOE could play a key role in developing the machines, researchers say, although finding problems with which quantum computers can help isn't so easy.

  12. Quantum fields on the computer

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    This book provides an overview of recent progress in computer simulations of nonperturbative phenomena in quantum field theory, particularly in the context of the lattice approach. It is a collection of extensive self-contained reviews of various subtopics, including algorithms, spectroscopy, finite temperature physics, Yukawa and chiral theories, bounds on the Higgs meson mass, the renormalization group, and weak decays of hadrons.Physicists with some knowledge of lattice gauge ideas will find this book a useful and interesting source of information on the recent developments in the field.

  13. Topological spinon bands and vison excitations in spin-orbit coupled quantum spin liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, Jonas; Reuther, Johannes

    2017-12-01

    Spin liquids are exotic quantum states characterized by the existence of fractional and deconfined quasiparticle excitations, referred to as spinons and visons. Their fractional nature establishes topological properties such as a protected ground-state degeneracy. This work investigates spin-orbit coupled spin liquids where, additionally, topology enters via nontrivial band structures of the spinons. We revisit the Z2 spin-liquid phases that have recently been identified in a projective symmetry-group analysis on the square lattice when spin-rotation symmetry is maximally lifted [J. Reuther et al., Phys. Rev. B 90, 174417 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.174417]. We find that in the case of nearest-neighbor couplings only, Z2 spin liquids on the square lattice always exhibit trivial spinon bands. Adding second-neighbor terms, the simplest projective symmetry-group solution closely resembles the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model for topological insulators. Assuming that the emergent gauge fields are static, we investigate vison excitations, which we confirm to be deconfined in all investigated spin phases. Particularly, if the spinon bands are topological, the spinons and visons form bound states consisting of several spinon-Majorana zero modes coupling to one vison. The existence of such zero modes follows from an exact mapping between these spin phases and topological p +i p superconductors with vortices. We propose experimental probes to detect such states in real materials.

  14. Environmental Effects on Quantum Reversal of Mesoscopic Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, R.; Chiorescu, I.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Barbara, B.; Jansen, A. G. M.; Caneschi, A.; Mueller, A.; Tkachuk, A. M.

    2002-10-01

    We describe what we learnt these last years on quantum reversal of large magnetic moments, using mainly conventional SQUID or micro-SQUID magnetometry. Beside the case of ferromagnetic nanoparticles with 103 - 105 atoms (e.g. Co, Ni, Fe, Ferrites), most fruitful systems appeared to be ensembles of magnetic molecules. These molecules, generally arranged in single crystals, carry relatively small magnetic moments (S = 10 in Mn12-ac and Fe8). They are sufficiently apart from each other not to be coupled by exchange interactions. The ground multiplet is split over an energy barrier of tens of kelvin (≈ 67 K for Mn12) by a strong local crystal field, leading to an Ising-type ground-state. Only weak inter-molecular dipolar interactions are present, as well as intra-molecular interactions, such as hyperfine interactions. Quantum properties of molecule spins are crucially dependent on their magnetic environment of electronic and nuclear spins (the spin bath). Energy fluctuations of the spin bath of about 0.1 K are important, especially at very low temperatures. In particular, they are much larger than the ground-state tunnel splitting of large-spin molecules in low applied fields, of about 10-8 K or even less (such a low value is due to the presence of large energy barriers). Theoretical predictions are experimentally checked for tunneling effects in the presence of non-equilibrated or equilibrated spin-energy distribution. It is also shown that the phonon-bath plays no role in low field, except when the temperature approaches the cross-over temperature to the thermal activation regime. In fact, spin-phonon transitions can play a role only if the tunnel splitting is not too small in comparison with kBT. This is the case both for large-spin molecules in a large magnetic field (e.g. Mn12-ac in a few tesla) and for low-spin molecules, as shown with the study of the molecule V15 (Hilbert space dimension as large as 215 and spin 1/2). We also give our latest results on the

  15. Scalar spin chirality and quantum hall effect on triangular lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Ivar [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Cristian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We study the Kondo Lattice and Hubbard models on a triangular lattice for band filling factor 3/4. We show that a simple non-coplanar chiral spin ordering (scalar spin chirality) is naturally realized in both models due to perfect nesting of the fermi surface. The resulting triple-Q magnetic ordering is a natural counterpart of the collinear Neel ordering of the half-filled square lattice Hubbard model. We show that the obtained chiral phase exhibits a spontaneous quantum Hall-effect with {sigma}{sub xy} = e{sup 2}/h.

  16. Quantum critical spin-2 chain with emergent SU(3) symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pochung; Xue, Zhi-Long; McCulloch, I P; Chung, Ming-Chiang; Huang, Chao-Chun; Yip, S-K

    2015-04-10

    We study the quantum critical phase of an SU(2) symmetric spin-2 chain obtained from spin-2 bosons in a one-dimensional lattice. We obtain the scaling of the finite-size energies and entanglement entropy by exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization group methods. From the numerical results of the energy spectra, central charge, and scaling dimension we identify the conformal field theory describing the whole critical phase to be the SU(3)_{1} Wess-Zumino-Witten model. We find that, while the Hamiltonian is only SU(2) invariant, in this critical phase there is an emergent SU(3) symmetry in the thermodynamic limit.

  17. Some Thoughts Regarding Practical Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Debabrata; Gomez, Richard; Lanzagorta, Marco; Uhlmann, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    Quantum computing has become an important area of research in computer science because of its potential to provide more efficient algorithmic solutions to certain problems than are possible with classical computing. The ability of performing parallel operations over an exponentially large computational space has proved to be the main advantage of the quantum computing model. In this regard, we are particularly interested in the potential applications of quantum computers to enhance real software systems of interest to the defense, industrial, scientific and financial communities. However, while much has been written in popular and scientific literature about the benefits of the quantum computational model, several of the problems associated to the practical implementation of real-life complex software systems in quantum computers are often ignored. In this presentation we will argue that practical quantum computation is not as straightforward as commonly advertised, even if the technological problems associated to the manufacturing and engineering of large-scale quantum registers were solved overnight. We will discuss some of the frequently overlooked difficulties that plague quantum computing in the areas of memories, I/O, addressing schemes, compilers, oracles, approximate information copying, logical debugging, error correction and fault-tolerant computing protocols.

  18. Half-integral spin from quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    For a certain class of three-manifolds, the angular momentum of an asymptotically flat quantum gravitational field can have half-integral values. In the absence of a full theory of quantum gravity, this result relies on a set of apparently natural assumptions governing the kinematics of such a theory. A key feature is that state vectors are in general invariant only under asymptotically trivial diffeomorphisms that can be continuously deformed to the identity. Angular momentum is associated with diffeomorphisms that look asymptotically like rotations; and the question of whether half-integral values occur depends on whether the diffeomorphism associated with a 2π rotation is itself deformable to the identity. (author)

  19. Computational quantum magnetism: Role of noncollinear magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Arthur J.; Nakamura, Kohji

    2009-01-01

    We are witnessing today a golden age of innovation with novel magnetic materials and with discoveries important for both basic science and device applications. Computation and simulation have played a key role in the dramatic advances of the past and those we are witnessing today. A goal-driving computational science-simulations of every-increasing complexity of more and more realistic models has been brought into greater focus with greater computing power to run sophisticated and powerful software codes like our highly precise full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method. Indeed, significant progress has been achieved from advanced first-principles FLAPW calculations for the predictions of surface/interface magnetism. One recently resolved challenging issue is the role of noncollinear magnetism (NCM) that arises not only through the SOC, but also from the breaking of symmetry at surfaces and interfaces. For this, we will further review some specific advances we are witnessing today, including complex magnetic phenomena from noncollinear magnetism with no shape approximation for the magnetization (perpendicular MCA in transition-metal overlayers and superlattices; unidirectional anisotropy and exchange bias in FM and AFM bilayers; constricted domain walls important in quantum spin interfaces; and curling magnetic nano-scale dots as new candidates for non-volatile memory applications) and most recently providing new predictions and understanding of magnetism in novel materials such as magnetic semiconductors and multi-ferroic systems

  20. Computing quantum discord is NP-complete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yichen

    2014-01-01

    We study the computational complexity of quantum discord (a measure of quantum correlation beyond entanglement), and prove that computing quantum discord is NP-complete. Therefore, quantum discord is computationally intractable: the running time of any algorithm for computing quantum discord is believed to grow exponentially with the dimension of the Hilbert space so that computing quantum discord in a quantum system of moderate size is not possible in practice. As by-products, some entanglement measures (namely entanglement cost, entanglement of formation, relative entropy of entanglement, squashed entanglement, classical squashed entanglement, conditional entanglement of mutual information, and broadcast regularization of mutual information) and constrained Holevo capacity are NP-hard/NP-complete to compute. These complexity-theoretic results are directly applicable in common randomness distillation, quantum state merging, entanglement distillation, superdense coding, and quantum teleportation; they may offer significant insights into quantum information processing. Moreover, we prove the NP-completeness of two typical problems: linear optimization over classical states and detecting classical states in a convex set, providing evidence that working with classical states is generically computationally intractable. (paper)

  1. The Heisenberg representation of quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottesman, D.

    1998-06-24

    Since Shor`s discovery of an algorithm to factor numbers on a quantum computer in polynomial time, quantum computation has become a subject of immense interest. Unfortunately, one of the key features of quantum computers--the difficulty of describing them on classical computers--also makes it difficult to describe and understand precisely what can be done with them. A formalism describing the evolution of operators rather than states has proven extremely fruitful in understanding an important class of quantum operations. States used in error correction and certain communication protocols can be described by their stabilizer, a group of tensor products of Pauli matrices. Even this simple group structure is sufficient to allow a rich range of quantum effects, although it falls short of the full power of quantum computation.

  2. Quantum-mechanical computers and uncomputability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, S.

    1993-01-01

    The time evolution operator for any quantum-mechanical computer is diagonalizable, but to obtain the diagonal decomposition of a program state of the computer is as hard as actually performing the computation corresponding to the program. In particular, if a quantum-mechanical system is capable of universal computation, then the diagonal decomposition of program states is uncomputable. As a result, in a universe in which local variables support universal computation, a quantum-mechanical theory for that universe that supplies its spectrum cannot supply the spectral decomposition of the computational variables. A ''theory of everything'' can be simultaneously correct and fundamentally incomplete

  3. About the velocity operator for spinning particles in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salesi, Giovanni; Recami, Erasmo; Rodrigues Junior, Waldyr A.

    1995-12-01

    Starting from the formal expressions of the hydrodynamical (or local) quantities employed in the applications of Clifford Algebras to quantum mechanics, we introduce - in terms of the ordinary tensorial framework - a new definition for the field of a generic quantity. By translating from Clifford into sensor algebra, we also propose a new (non-relativistic) velocity operator for a spin 1/2 particle. This operator is the sum of the ordinary part p/m describing the mean motion (the motion of the center-of-mass), and of a second part associated with the so-called Zitterbewegung, which is the spin internal motion observed in the center-of-mass frame. This spin component of the velocity operator is non-zero not only in the Pauli theoretical framework in presence of external magnetic fields and spin precession, but also in the Schroedinger case, when the wave-function is a spin eigenstate. In the latter case, one gets a decomposition of the velocity field for the Madelueng fluid into two distinct parts: which constitutes the non-relativistic analogue of the Gordon decomposition for the Dirac current. We find furthermore that the Zitterbewegung motion involves a velocity field which is solenoidal, and that the local angular velocity is parallel to the spin vector. In presence of a non-constant spin vector (Pauli case) we have, besides the component normal to spin present even in the Schroedinger theory, also a component of the local velocity which is parallel to the rotor of the spin vector. (author). 19 refs

  4. Quantum Computer Games: Schrodinger Cat and Hounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2012-01-01

    The quantum computer game "Schrodinger cat and hounds" is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. "Schrodinger cat and hounds" demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and…

  5. Quantum Information and Computation (QUIC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kimble, H

    2001-01-01

    .... Principal accomplishments include an experiment to localize atoms within a high quality factor optical cavity for the implementation of quantum logic and the realization of quantum teleportation...

  6. Nonlinear optics quantum computing with circuit QED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Prabin; Hafezi, Mohammad; Taylor, J M

    2013-02-08

    One approach to quantum information processing is to use photons as quantum bits and rely on linear optical elements for most operations. However, some optical nonlinearity is necessary to enable universal quantum computing. Here, we suggest a circuit-QED approach to nonlinear optics quantum computing in the microwave regime, including a deterministic two-photon phase gate. Our specific example uses a hybrid quantum system comprising a LC resonator coupled to a superconducting flux qubit to implement a nonlinear coupling. Compared to the self-Kerr nonlinearity, we find that our approach has improved tolerance to noise in the qubit while maintaining fast operation.

  7. QSPIN: A High Level Java API for Quantum Computing Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Tim

    2017-01-01

    QSPIN is a high level Java language API for experimentation in QC models used in the calculation of Ising spin glass ground states and related quadratic unconstrained binary optimization (QUBO) problems. The Java API is intended to facilitate research in advanced QC algorithms such as hybrid quantum-classical solvers, automatic selection of constraint and optimization parameters, and techniques for the correction and mitigation of model and solution errors. QSPIN includes high level solver objects tailored to the D-Wave quantum annealing architecture that implement hybrid quantum-classical algorithms [Booth et al.] for solving large problems on small quantum devices, elimination of variables via roof duality, and classical computing optimization methods such as GPU accelerated simulated annealing and tabu search for comparison. A test suite of documented NP-complete applications ranging from graph coloring, covering, and partitioning to integer programming and scheduling are provided to demonstrate current capabilities.

  8. Dissipative environment may improve the quantum annealing performances of the ferromagnetic p -spin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarelli, G.; De Filippis, G.; Cataudella, V.; Lucignano, P.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the quantum annealing of the ferromagnetic p -spin model in a dissipative environment (p =5 and p =7 ). This model, in the large-p limit, codifies Grover's algorithm for searching in an unsorted database [L. K. Grover, Proceedings of the 28th Annual ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing (ACM, New York, 1996), pp. 212-219]. The dissipative environment is described by a phonon bath in thermal equilibrium at finite temperature. The dynamics is studied in the framework of a Lindblad master equation for the reduced density matrix describing only the spins. Exploiting the symmetries of our model Hamiltonian, we can describe many spins and extrapolate expected trends for large N and p . While at weak system-bath coupling the dissipative environment has detrimental effects on the annealing results, we show that in the intermediate-coupling regime, the phonon bath seems to speed up the annealing at low temperatures. This improvement in the performance is likely not due to thermal fluctuation but rather arises from a correlated spin-bath state and persists even at zero temperature. This result may pave the way to a new scenario in which, by appropriately engineering the system-bath coupling, one may optimize quantum annealing performances below either the purely quantum or the classical limit.

  9. Disciplines, models, and computers: the path to computational quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhard, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Many disciplines and scientific fields have undergone a computational turn in the past several decades. This paper analyzes this sort of turn by investigating the case of computational quantum chemistry. The main claim is that the transformation from quantum to computational quantum chemistry involved changes in three dimensions. First, on the side of instrumentation, small computers and a networked infrastructure took over the lead from centralized mainframe architecture. Second, a new conception of computational modeling became feasible and assumed a crucial role. And third, the field of computa- tional quantum chemistry became organized in a market-like fashion and this market is much bigger than the number of quantum theory experts. These claims will be substantiated by an investigation of the so-called density functional theory (DFT), the arguably pivotal theory in the turn to computational quantum chemistry around 1990.

  10. Single-copy entanglement in critical quantum spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisert, J.; Cramer, M.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the single-copy entanglement as a quantity to assess quantum correlations in the ground state in quantum many-body systems. We show for a large class of models that already on the level of single specimens of spin chains, criticality is accompanied with the possibility of distilling a maximally entangled state of arbitrary dimension from a sufficiently large block deterministically, with local operations and classical communication. These analytical results--which refine previous results on the divergence of block entropy as the rate at which maximally entangled pairs can be distilled from many identically prepared chains--are made quantitative for general isotropic translationally invariant spin chains that can be mapped onto a quasifree fermionic system, and for the anisotropic XY model. For the XX model, we provide the asymptotic scaling of ∼(1/6)log 2 (L), and contrast it with the block entropy

  11. Dynamics of spins in semiconductor quantum wells under drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrish Miah, M.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of spins in semiconductor quantum wells under applied electric bias has been investigated by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The bias-dependent polarization of PL (P PL ) was measured at different temperatures. The P PL was found to decay with an enhancement of increasing the strength of the negative bias, with an exception occurred for a low value of the negative bias. The P PL was also found to depend on the temperature. The P PL in the presence of a transverse magnetic field was also studied. The results showed that P PL in the magnetic field oscillates under an applied bias, demonstrating that the dephasing of electron spin occurs during the drift transport in semiconductor quantum wells.

  12. Dynamics of spins in semiconductor quantum wells under drift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrish Miah, M., E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.a [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2009-09-15

    The dynamics of spins in semiconductor quantum wells under applied electric bias has been investigated by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The bias-dependent polarization of PL (P{sub PL}) was measured at different temperatures. The P{sub PL} was found to decay with an enhancement of increasing the strength of the negative bias, with an exception occurred for a low value of the negative bias. The P{sub PL} was also found to depend on the temperature. The P{sub PL} in the presence of a transverse magnetic field was also studied. The results showed that P{sub PL} in the magnetic field oscillates under an applied bias, demonstrating that the dephasing of electron spin occurs during the drift transport in semiconductor quantum wells.

  13. Canonical Drude Weight for Non-integrable Quantum Spin Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropietro, Vieri; Porta, Marcello

    2018-03-01

    The Drude weight is a central quantity for the transport properties of quantum spin chains. The canonical definition of Drude weight is directly related to Kubo formula of conductivity. However, the difficulty in the evaluation of such expression has led to several alternative formulations, accessible to different methods. In particular, the Euclidean, or imaginary-time, Drude weight can be studied via rigorous renormalization group. As a result, in the past years several universality results have been proven for such quantity at zero temperature; remarkably, the proofs work for both integrable and non-integrable quantum spin chains. Here we establish the equivalence of Euclidean and canonical Drude weights at zero temperature. Our proof is based on rigorous renormalization group methods, Ward identities, and complex analytic ideas.

  14. Computational mechanics of classical spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, David Polant

    How does nature self-organize and how can scientists discover such organization? Is there an objective notion of pattern, or is the discovery of patterns a purely subjective process? And what mathematical vocabulary is appropriate for describing and quantifying pattern, structure, and organization? This dissertation compares and contrasts the way in which statistical mechanics, information theory, and computational mechanics address these questions. After an in-depth review of the statistical mechanical, information theoretic, and computational mechanical approaches to structure and pattern, I present exact analytic results for the excess entropy and ɛ- machines for one-dimensional, finite-range discrete classical spin systems. The excess entropy, a form of mutual information, is an information theoretic measure of apparent spatial memory. The ɛ-machine-the central object of computational mechanics-is defined as the minimal model capable of statistically reproducing a given configuration, where the model is chosen to belong to the least powerful model class(es) in a stochastic generalization of the discrete computation hierarchy. These results for one-dimensional spin systems demonstrate that the measures of pattern from information theory and computational mechanics differ from known thermodynamic and statistical mechanical functions. Moreover, they capture important structural features that are otherwise missed. In particular, the excess entropy serves to detect ordered, low entropy density patterns. It is superior in many respects to other functions used to probe the structure of a distribution, such as structure factors and the specific heat. More generally, ɛ-machines are seen to be the most direct approach to revealing the group and semigroup symmetries possessed by the spatial patterns and to estimating the minimum amount of memory required to reproduce the configuration ensemble, a quantity known as the statistical complexity. It is shown that the

  15. Spin and rotations in Galois field quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Lay Nam; Lewis, Zachary; Minic, Djordje; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the properties of Galois field quantum mechanics constructed on a vector space over the finite Galois field GF(q). In particular, we look at two-level systems analogous to spin, and discuss how SO(3) rotations could be embodied in such a system. We also consider two-particle ‘spin’ correlations and show that the Clauser–Horne-Shimony–Holt inequality is nonetheless not violated in this model. (paper)

  16. Quantum computer: an appliance for playing market games

    OpenAIRE

    Piotrowski, Edward W.; Sladkowski, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recent development in quantum computation and quantum information theory allows to extend the scope of game theory for the quantum world. The authors have recently proposed a quantum description of financial market in terms of quantum game theory. The paper contain an analysis of such markets that shows that there would be advantage in using quantum computers and quantum strategies.

  17. Study of quantum spin correlations of relativistic electron pairs - Testing nonlocality of relativistic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodek, K.; Rozpędzik, D.; Zejma, J.; Caban, P.; Rembieliński, J.; Włodarczyk, M.; Ciborowski, J.; Enders, J.; Köhler, A.; Kozela, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Polish-German project QUEST aims at studying relativistic quantum spin correlations of the Einstein-Rosen-Podolsky-Bohm type, through measurement of the correlation function and the corresponding probabilities for relativistic electron pairs. The results will be compared to theoretical predictions obtained by us within the framework of relativistic quantum mechanics, based on assumptions regarding the form of the relativistic spin operator. Agreement or divergence will be interpreted in the context of non-uniqueness of the relativistic spin operator in quantum mechanics as well as dependence of the correlation function on the choice of observables representing the spin. Pairs of correlated electrons will originate from the Mo/ller scattering of polarized 15 MeV electrons provided by the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator S-DALINAC, TU Darmstadt, incident on a Be target. Spin projections will be determined using the Mott polarimetry technique. Measurements (starting 2013) are planned for longitudinal and transverse beam polarizations and different orientations of the beam polarization vector w.r.t. the Mo/ller scattering plane. This is the first project to study relativistic spin correlations for particles with mass

  18. The potential of the quantum computer

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Physics Section of the University of Geneva is continuing its series of lectures, open to the general public, on the most recent developments in the field of physics. The next lecture, given by Professor Michel Devoret of Yale University in the United States, will be on the potential of the quantum computer. The quantum computer is, as yet, a hypothetical machine which would operate on the basic principles of quantum mechanics. Compared to standard computers, it represents a significant gain in computing power for certain complex calculations. Quantum operations can simultaneously explore a very large number of possibilities. The correction of quantum errors, which until recently had been deemed impossible, has now become a well-established technique. Several prototypes for, as yet, very simple quantum processors have been developed. The lecture will begin with a demonstration in the auditorium of the detection of cosmic rays and, in collaboration with Professor E. Ellberger of the Conservatoire de M...

  19. Continuously observing a dynamically decoupled spin-1 quantum gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. P.; Kewming, M. J.; Turner, L. D.

    2018-01-01

    We continuously observe dynamical decoupling in a spin-1 quantum gas using a weak optical measurement of spin precession. Continuous dynamical decoupling modifies the character and energy spectrum of spin states to render them insensitive to parasitic fluctuations. Continuous observation measures this new spectrum in a single preparation of the quantum gas. The measured time series contains seven tones, which spectrogram analysis parses as splittings, coherences, and coupling strengths between the decoupled states in real time. With this we locate a regime where a transition between two states is decoupled from magnetic-field instabilities up to fourth order, complementary to a parallel work at higher fields [D. Trypogeorgos et al., preceding paper, Phys. Rev. A 97, 013407 (2018), 10.1103/PhysRevA.97.013407]. The decoupled microscale quantum gas offers magnetic sensitivity in a tunable band, persistent over many milliseconds: the length scales, frequencies, and durations relevant to many applications, including sensing biomagnetic phenomena such as neural spike trains.

  20. Quantum spin Hall effect in twisted bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchiaro, F.; Guinea, F.; San-Jose, P.

    2017-06-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment (Sanchez-Yamagishi et al 2016 Nat. Nanotechnol. 214) reporting evidence of helical spin-polarized edge states in layer-biased twisted bilayer graphene under a magnetic flux, we study the possibility of stabilising a quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase in such a system, without Zeeman or spin-orbit couplings, and with a QSH gap induced instead by electronic interactions. We analyse how magnetic flux, electric field, interlayer rotation angle, and interactions (treated at a mean field level) combine to produce a pseudo-QSH with broken time-reversal symmetry, and spin-polarized helical edge states. The effect is a consequence of a robust interaction-induced ferrimagnetic ordering of the quantum Hall ground state under an interlayer bias, provided the two rotated layers are effectively decoupled at low energies. We discuss in detail the electronic structure and the constraints on system parameters, such as the angle, interactions and magnetic flux, required to reach the pseudo-QSH phase. We find, in particular, that purely local electronic interactions are not sufficient to account for the experimental observations, which demand at least nearest-neighbour interactions to be included.

  1. Accounting Principles are Simulated on Quantum Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Diep, Do Ngoc; Giang, Do Hoang

    2005-01-01

    The paper is devoted to a new idea of simulation of accounting by quantum computing. We expose the actual accounting principles in a pure mathematics language. After that we simulated the accounting principles on quantum computers. We show that all arbitrary accounting actions are exhausted by the described basic actions. The main problem of accounting are reduced to some system of linear equations in the economic model of Leontief. In this simulation we use our constructed quantum Gau\\ss-Jor...

  2. Quantum Genetic Algorithms for Computer Scientists

    OpenAIRE

    Lahoz Beltrá, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) are a class of evolutionary algorithms inspired by Darwinian natural selection. They are popular heuristic optimisation methods based on simulated genetic mechanisms, i.e., mutation, crossover, etc. and population dynamical processes such as reproduction, selection, etc. Over the last decade, the possibility to emulate a quantum computer (a computer using quantum-mechanical phenomena to perform operations on data) has led to a new class of GAs known as “Quantum Geneti...

  3. Realization of a holonomic quantum computer in a chain of three-level systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gürkan, Zeynep Nilhan; Sjöqvist, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Holonomic quantum computation is the idea to use non-Abelian geometric phases to implement universal quantum gates that are robust to fluctuations in control parameters. Here, we propose a compact design for a holonomic quantum computer based on coupled three-level systems. The scheme does not require adiabatic evolution and can be implemented in arrays of atoms or ions trapped in tailored standing wave potentials. - Highlights: • We develop a novel scheme for universal holonomic quantum computation. • The scheme involves non-Abelian geometric phases in a spin-chain. • The resources scale linearly with the number of logical qubits. • The scheme does not require adiabatic evolution.

  4. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Mølmer, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits...... quantum computing....

  5. Wavelets and Wavelet Packets on Quantum Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Klappenecker, Andreas

    1999-01-01

    We show how periodized wavelet packet transforms and periodized wavelet transforms can be implemented on a quantum computer. Surprisingly, we find that the implementation of wavelet packet transforms is less costly than the implementation of wavelet transforms on a quantum computer.

  6. Quantum Computation with Ultrafast Laser Pulse Shaping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum Computation with Ultrafast. Laser Pulse Shaping. Debabrata Goswami is at the Department of. Chemistry, Indian. Institute of Technology,. Kanpur, where he explores the applications of ultrafast shaped pulses to bio-imaging, coherent control, high-speed communication and quantum computing. Keywords. Qubit ...

  7. Quantum state transfer in spin chains with q-deformed interaction terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarov, E I; Van der Jeugt, J

    2010-01-01

    We study the time evolution of a single spin excitation state in certain linear spin chains, as a model for quantum communication. Some years ago it was discovered that when the spin chain data (the nearest-neighbour interaction strengths and the magnetic field strengths) are related to the Jacobi matrix entries of Krawtchouk polynomials or dual Hahn polynomials the so-called perfect state transfer takes place. The extension of these ideas to other types of discrete orthogonal polynomials did not lead to new models with perfect state transfer, but did allow more insight in the general computation of the correlation function. In this paper, we extend the study to discrete orthogonal polynomials of q-hypergeometric type. A remarkable result is a new analytic model where perfect state transfer is achieved: this is when the spin chain data are related to the Jacobi matrix of q-Krawtchouk polynomials. The other cases studied here (affine q-Krawtchouk polynomials, quantum q-Krawtchouk polynomials, dual q-Krawtchouk polynomials, q-Hahn polynomials, dual q-Hahn polynomials and q-Racah polynomials) do not give rise to models with perfect state transfer. However, the computation of the correlation function itself is quite interesting, leading to advanced q-series manipulations.

  8. Quantum computational capability of a 2D valence bond solid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Akimasa

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Our model is the 2D valence bond solid phase of a quantum antiferromagnet. → Universal quantum computation is processed by measurements of quantum correlations. → An intrinsic complexity of strongly-correlated quantum systems could be a resource. - Abstract: Quantum phases of naturally-occurring systems exhibit distinctive collective phenomena as manifestation of their many-body correlations, in contrast to our persistent technological challenge to engineer at will such strong correlations artificially. Here we show theoretically that quantum correlations exhibited in the 2D valence bond solid phase of a quantum antiferromagnet, modeled by Affleck, Kennedy, Lieb, and Tasaki (AKLT) as a precursor of spin liquids and topological orders, are sufficiently complex yet structured enough to simulate universal quantum computation when every single spin can be measured individually. This unveils that an intrinsic complexity of naturally-occurring 2D quantum systems-which has been a long-standing challenge for traditional computers-could be tamed as a computationally valuable resource, even if we are limited not to create newly entanglement during computation. Our constructive protocol leverages a novel way to herald the correlations suitable for deterministic quantum computation through a random sampling, and may be extensible to other ground states of various 2D valence bond phases beyond the AKLT state.

  9. Influence of intrinsic spin-flip processes on spin-polarized transport through quantum dots in the cotunneling regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weymann, I.; Barnas, J.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of intrinsic spin relaxation on spin-polarized cotunneling through quantum dots coupled to ferromagnetic leads is analyzed theoretically. It is shown that the zero bias anomaly, which occurs due to the interplay of single-barrier and double-barrier cotunneling processes, becomes suppressed by spin relaxation processes on the dot. Diode-like features of the transport characteristics in the cotunneling regime have been found in asymmetrical systems. These features are also suppressed by the spin relaxation processes

  10. Dynamical sensitivity control of a single-spin quantum sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazariev, Andrii; Arroyo-Camejo, Silvia; Rahane, Ganesh; Kavatamane, Vinaya Kumar; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan

    2017-07-26

    The Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) defect in diamond is a unique quantum system that offers precision sensing of nanoscale physical quantities at room temperature beyond the current state-of-the-art. The benchmark parameters for nanoscale magnetometry applications are sensitivity, spectral resolution, and dynamic range. Under realistic conditions the NV sensors controlled by conventional sensing schemes suffer from limitations of these parameters. Here we experimentally show a new method called dynamical sensitivity control (DYSCO) that boost the benchmark parameters and thus extends the practical applicability of the NV spin for nanoscale sensing. In contrast to conventional dynamical decoupling schemes, where π pulse trains toggle the spin precession abruptly, the DYSCO method allows for a smooth, analog modulation of the quantum probe's sensitivity. Our method decouples frequency selectivity and spectral resolution unconstrained over the bandwidth (1.85 MHz-392 Hz in our experiments). Using DYSCO we demonstrate high-accuracy NV magnetometry without |2π| ambiguities, an enhancement of the dynamic range by a factor of 4 · 10 3 , and interrogation times exceeding 2 ms in off-the-shelf diamond. In a broader perspective the DYSCO method provides a handle on the inherent dynamics of quantum systems offering decisive advantages for NV centre based applications notably in quantum information and single molecule NMR/MRI.

  11. Quantum model of a solid-state spin qubit: Ni cluster on a silicon surface by the generalized spin Hamiltonian and X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farberovich, Oleg V. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Beverly and Raymond Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Research Center for Nanoscale Structure of Matter, Southern Federal University, Zorge 5, 344090 Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Voronezh State University, Voronezh 394000 (Russian Federation); Mazalova, Victoria L., E-mail: mazalova@sfedu.ru [Research Center for Nanoscale Structure of Matter, Southern Federal University, Zorge 5, 344090 Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Soldatov, Alexander V. [Research Center for Nanoscale Structure of Matter, Southern Federal University, Zorge 5, 344090 Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    pattern with the anisotropic exchange models conventionally used for the analysis of this system and, with the results of the experimental XANES spectra, shows that our complex investigations provide a good description of the pattern of the spin levels and the spin structures of the nanomagnetic Ni{sub 7} qubit. The results are discussed in the view of the general problem of the solid-state spin qubits and the spin structure of the Ni cluster. - Highlights: • We present the model of the quantum solid-state qubit. • We have studied the Rabi oscillations and the electron spin decoherence. • The quantum entanglement is important for a quantum computation. • We have analyzed a behavior of the entanglement in the finite clusters.

  12. Performing quantum computing experiments in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum computing technology has reached a second renaissance in the past five years. Increased interest from both the private and public sector combined with extraordinary theoretical and experimental progress has solidified this technology as a major advancement in the 21st century. As anticipated my many, some of the first realizations of quantum computing technology has occured over the cloud, with users logging onto dedicated hardware over the classical internet. Recently, IBM has released the Quantum Experience, which allows users to access a five-qubit quantum processor. In this paper we take advantage of this online availability of actual quantum hardware and present four quantum information experiments. We utilize the IBM chip to realize protocols in quantum error correction, quantum arithmetic, quantum graph theory, and fault-tolerant quantum computation by accessing the device remotely through the cloud. While the results are subject to significant noise, the correct results are returned from the chip. This demonstrates the power of experimental groups opening up their technology to a wider audience and will hopefully allow for the next stage of development in quantum information technology.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo studies of a metallic spin-density wave transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, Max Henner

    2017-01-20

    Plenty experimental evidence indicates that quantum critical phenomena give rise to much of the rich physics observed in strongly correlated itinerant electron systems such as the high temperature superconductors. A quantum critical point of particular interest is found at the zero-temperature onset of spin-density wave order in two-dimensional metals. The appropriate low-energy theory poses an exceptionally hard problem to analytic theory, therefore the unbiased and controlled numerical approach pursued in this thesis provides important contributions on the road to comprehensive understanding. After discussing the phenomenology of quantum criticality, a sign-problem-free determinantal quantum Monte Carlo approach is introduced and an extensive toolbox of numerical methods is described in a self-contained way. By the means of large-scale computer simulations we have solved a lattice realization of the universal effective theory of interest. The finite-temperature phase diagram, showing both a quasi-long-range spin-density wave ordered phase and a d-wave superconducting dome, is discussed in its entirety. Close to the quantum phase transition we find evidence for unusual scaling of the order parameter correlations and for non-Fermi liquid behavior at isolated hot spots on the Fermi surface.

  14. Computational Bottlenecks of Quantum Adiabatic Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knysh, Sergey

    2015-03-01

    Quantum annealing in a transverse field with rate dΓ / dt inversely proportional to the system size N suppresses non-adiabatic transitions for fully connected spin glass such as the Sherrington-Kirpatrick (SK) model at the quantum critical point. This alone is not sufficient to ensure that the problem is solvable in polynomial time. I conjecture the appearance of small gaps associated with macroscopic tunneling events deep in the spin glass phase. This effect is demonstrated rigorously for the annealing of a toy model that shares a set of crtical exponents with SK model: Hopfield network with two Gaussian patterns. It presents with 0 . 15 lnN additional bottlenecks with gaps that scale as a stretched exponential exp[-c (NΓ) 3 / 4]. Further, I extend the analysis to the ρ-landscapes model (random energy model with correlations) which more faithfully represents real spin glasses.

  15. Quantum Computation Using Optically Coupled Quantum Dot Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Anantram, M. P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowhury, V. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A solid state model for quantum computation has potential advantages in terms of the ease of fabrication, characterization, and integration. The fundamental requirements for a quantum computer involve the realization of basic processing units (qubits), and a scheme for controlled switching and coupling among the qubits, which enables one to perform controlled operations on qubits. We propose a model for quantum computation based on optically coupled quantum dot arrays, which is computationally similar to the atomic model proposed by Cirac and Zoller. In this model, individual qubits are comprised of two coupled quantum dots, and an array of these basic units is placed in an optical cavity. Switching among the states of the individual units is done by controlled laser pulses via near field interaction using the NSOM technology. Controlled rotations involving two or more qubits are performed via common cavity mode photon. We have calculated critical times, including the spontaneous emission and switching times, and show that they are comparable to the best times projected for other proposed models of quantum computation. We have also shown the feasibility of accessing individual quantum dots using the NSOM technology by calculating the photon density at the tip, and estimating the power necessary to perform the basic controlled operations. We are currently in the process of estimating the decoherence times for this system; however, we have formulated initial arguments which seem to indicate that the decoherence times will be comparable, if not longer, than many other proposed models.

  16. Nonadiabatic corrections to a quantum dot quantum computer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... semiclassical limit) the number of operations of such a computer would be approximately the same as that of a classical computer. Our results suggest that for an adiabatic quantum computer to operate successfully within the decoherence times, it is necessary to take into account nonadiabatic corrections.

  17. Video Encryption and Decryption on Quantum Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Iliyasu, Abdullah M.; Venegas-Andraca, Salvador E.; Yang, Huamin

    2015-08-01

    A method for video encryption and decryption on quantum computers is proposed based on color information transformations on each frame encoding the content of the encoding the content of the video. The proposed method provides a flexible operation to encrypt quantum video by means of the quantum measurement in order to enhance the security of the video. To validate the proposed approach, a tetris tile-matching puzzle game video is utilized in the experimental simulations. The results obtained suggest that the proposed method enhances the security and speed of quantum video encryption and decryption, both properties required for secure transmission and sharing of video content in quantum communication.

  18. Tomograms for open quantum systems: In(finite) dimensional optical and spin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thapliyal, Kishore; Banerjee, Subhashish; Pathak, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Tomograms are obtained as probability distributions and are used to reconstruct a quantum state from experimentally measured values. We study the evolution of tomograms for different quantum systems, both finite and infinite dimensional. In realistic experimental conditions, quantum states are exposed to the ambient environment and hence subject to effects like decoherence and dissipation, which are dealt with here, consistently, using the formalism of open quantum systems. This is extremely relevant from the perspective of experimental implementation and issues related to state reconstruction in quantum computation and communication. These considerations are also expected to affect the quasiprobability distribution obtained from experimentally generated tomograms and nonclassicality observed from them. -- Highlights: •Tomograms are constructed for open quantum systems. •Finite and infinite dimensional quantum systems are studied. •Finite dimensional systems (phase states, single & two qubit spin states) are studied. •A dissipative harmonic oscillator is considered as an infinite dimensional system. •Both pure dephasing as well as dissipation effects are studied.

  19. Complexity Bounds for Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-22

    iently thanin lassi al omputation, onstru tion of small ir uits whi h an arry out phase estimation, show-ing that the quantum ontent of strong...on lower bounds for omputing parity or fanout using onstant or log depth quantum ir uits, quantum simulations of lassi al ir uit elements and...lasses, su h as thresh-old and mod fun tions, and the general relationships between quantum omplexity lasses and orre-sponding lassi al lasses

  20. Spin-orbital quantum liquid on the honeycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corboz, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    The symmetric Kugel-Khomskii can be seen as a minimal model describing the interactions between spin and orbital degrees of freedom in transition-metal oxides with orbital degeneracy, and it is equivalent to the SU(4) Heisenberg model of four-color fermionic atoms. We present simulation results for this model on various two-dimensional lattices obtained with infinite projected-entangled pair states (iPEPS), an efficient variational tensor-network ansatz for two dimensional wave functions in the thermodynamic limit. This approach can be seen as a two-dimensional generalization of matrix product states - the underlying ansatz of the density matrix renormalization group method. We find a rich variety of exotic phases: while on the square and checkerboard lattices the ground state exhibits dimer-Néel order and plaquette order, respectively, quantum fluctuations on the honeycomb lattice destroy any order, giving rise to a spin-orbital liquid. Our results are supported from flavor-wave theory and exact diagonalization. Furthermore, the properties of the spin-orbital liquid state on the honeycomb lattice are accurately accounted for by a projected variational wave-function based on the pi-flux state of fermions on the honeycomb lattice at 1/4-filling. In that state, correlations are algebraic because of the presence of a Dirac point at the Fermi level, suggesting that the ground state is an algebraic spin-orbital liquid. This model provides a good starting point to understand the recently discovered spin-orbital liquid behavior of Ba3CuSb2O9. The present results also suggest to choose optical lattices with honeycomb geometry in the search for quantum liquids in ultra-cold four-color fermionic atoms. We acknowledge the financial support from the Swiss National Science Foundation.

  1. Computational security of quantum encryption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alagic, G.; Broadbent, A.; Fefferman, B.; Gagliardoni, T.; Schaffner, C.; St. Jules, M.; Nascimento, A.C.A.; Barreto, P.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical devices have the potential to transform cryptography. Most research in this area has focused either on the information-theoretic advantages of quantum protocols or on the security of classical cryptographic schemes against quantum attacks. In this work, we initiate the study of

  2. Quantum interference effect in electron tunneling through a quantum-dot-ring spin valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing-Min; Zhao, Jia; Zhang, Kai-Cheng; Peng, Ya-Jing; Chi, Feng

    2011-03-28

    Spin-dependent transport through a quantum-dot (QD) ring coupled to ferromagnetic leads with noncollinear magnetizations is studied theoretically. Tunneling current, current spin polarization and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as functions of the bias voltage and the direct coupling strength between the two leads are analyzed by the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. It is shown that the magnitudes of these quantities are sensitive to the relative angle between the leads' magnetic moments and the quantum interference effect originated from the inter-lead coupling. We pay particular attention on the Coulomb blockade regime and find the relative current magnitudes of different magnetization angles can be reversed by tuning the inter-lead coupling strength, resulting in sign change of the TMR. For large enough inter-lead coupling strength, the current spin polarizations for parallel and antiparallel magnetic configurations will approach to unit and zero, respectively.PACS numbers:

  3. Quantum interference effect in electron tunneling through a quantum-dot-ring spin valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Jing-Min

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spin-dependent transport through a quantum-dot (QD ring coupled to ferromagnetic leads with noncollinear magnetizations is studied theoretically. Tunneling current, current spin polarization and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR as functions of the bias voltage and the direct coupling strength between the two leads are analyzed by the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. It is shown that the magnitudes of these quantities are sensitive to the relative angle between the leads' magnetic moments and the quantum interference effect originated from the inter-lead coupling. We pay particular attention on the Coulomb blockade regime and find the relative current magnitudes of different magnetization angles can be reversed by tuning the inter-lead coupling strength, resulting in sign change of the TMR. For large enough inter-lead coupling strength, the current spin polarizations for parallel and antiparallel magnetic configurations will approach to unit and zero, respectively. PACS numbers:

  4. Faster quantum chemistry simulation on fault-tolerant quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cody Jones, N; McMahon, Peter L; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Whitfield, James D; Yung, Man-Hong; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Van Meter, Rodney

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computers can in principle simulate quantum physics exponentially faster than their classical counterparts, but some technical hurdles remain. We propose methods which substantially improve the performance of a particular form of simulation, ab initio quantum chemistry, on fault-tolerant quantum computers; these methods generalize readily to other quantum simulation problems. Quantum teleportation plays a key role in these improvements and is used extensively as a computing resource. To improve execution time, we examine techniques for constructing arbitrary gates which perform substantially faster than circuits based on the conventional Solovay–Kitaev algorithm (Dawson and Nielsen 2006 Quantum Inform. Comput. 6 81). For a given approximation error ϵ, arbitrary single-qubit gates can be produced fault-tolerantly and using a restricted set of gates in time which is O(log ϵ) or O(log log ϵ); with sufficient parallel preparation of ancillas, constant average depth is possible using a method we call programmable ancilla rotations. Moreover, we construct and analyze efficient implementations of first- and second-quantized simulation algorithms using the fault-tolerant arbitrary gates and other techniques, such as implementing various subroutines in constant time. A specific example we analyze is the ground-state energy calculation for lithium hydride. (paper)

  5. Observation of Quantum Jumps of a Single Quantum Dot Spin Using Submicrosecond Single-Shot Optical Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delteil, Aymeric; Gao, Wei-bo; Fallahi, Parisa; Miguel-Sanchez, Javier; Imamoǧlu, Atac

    2014-03-01

    Single-shot readout of individual qubits is typically the slowest process among the elementary single- and two-qubit operations required for quantum information processing. Here, we use resonance fluorescence from a single-electron charged quantum dot to read out the spin-qubit state in 800 nanoseconds with a fidelity exceeding 80%. Observation of the spin evolution on longer time scales reveals quantum jumps of the spin state: we use the experimentally determined waiting-time distribution to characterize the quantum jumps.

  6. Long lived quantum memory with nuclear atomic spins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinatra, A.; Reinaudi, G.; Dantan, A.; Giacobino, E.; Pinard, M.

    2005-01-01

    We propose store non-classical states of light into the macroscopic collective nuclear spin (10 18 atoms) of a 3 He vapor, using metastability exchange collisions. We show that these collisions currently used to transfer orientation from the metastable state 2 3 S 1 to the ground state state of 3 He, may conserve quantum correlations and give a possible experimental scheme to perfectly map a squeezed vacuum field state onto a nuclear spin state, which should allow for extremely long storage times (hours). In addition to the apparent interest for quantum information, the scheme offers the intriguing possibility to create a long-lived non classical state for spins. During a metastability exchange collision an atom in the ground state state and an atom in the metastable triplet state 2 3 S exchange their electronic spin variables. The ground state atom is then brought into the metastable state and vice-versa. A laser transition is accessible from the metastable state so that the metastable atoms are coupled with light. This, together with metastability exchange collisions, provides an effective coupling between ground state atoms and light. In our scheme, a coherent field and a squeezed vacuum field excite a Raman transition between Zeeman sublevels of the metastable state, after the system is prepared in the fully polarized state by preliminary optical pumping. According to the intensity of the coherent field, which acts as a control parameter, the squeezing of the field can be selectively transferred either to metastable or to ground state atoms. Once it is encoded in the purely nuclear spin of the ground state of 3 He, which is 20 eV apart from the nearest excited state and interacts very little with the environment, the quantum state can survive for times as long as several hours. By lighting up only the coherent field in the same configuration as for the 'writing' phase, the nuclear spin memory can be 'read' after a long delay, the squeezing being transferred

  7. Quantum field theory treatment of magnetic effects on the spin and orbital angular momentum of a free electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurian, P.; Verzegnassi, C.

    2016-01-01

    We consider in a quantum field theory framework the effects of a classical magnetic field on the spin and orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a free electron. We derive formulae for the changes in the spin and OAM due to the introduction of a general classical background field. We consider then a constant magnetic field, in which case the relevant expressions of the effects become much simpler and conversions between spin and OAM become readily apparent. An estimate of the expectation values for a realistic electron state is also given. Our findings may be of interest to researchers in spintronics and the field of quantum biology, where electron spin has been implicated on macroscopic time and energy scales. - Highlights: • We present the first field theory treatment of magnetic changes in electron spin. • Changes in spin and orbital angular momentum (OAM) are correlated and calculated. • Expectation values of spin–OAM changes for a realistic electron state are computed. • Earth's magnetic field produces non-negligible changes in spin of a few percent. • Results apply to spin–OAM conversion in electron vortex beams and quantum biology.

  8. Racing a quantum computer through Minkowski spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biamonte, Jacob D

    2010-01-01

    The Lorentzian length of a timelike curve connecting both endpoints of a computation in Minkowski spacetime is smaller than the Lorentzian length of the corresponding geodesic. In this talk, I will point out some properties of spacetime that allow an inertial classical computer to outperform a quantum one, at the completion of a long journey. We will focus on a comparison between the optimal quadratic Grover speed up from quantum computing and an n=2 speedup using classical computers and relativistic effects. These results are not practical as a new model of computation, but allow us to probe the ultimate limits physics places on computers.

  9. A Quantum Dot with Spin-Orbit Interaction--Analytical Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, B.; Roy, B.

    2009-01-01

    The practical applicability of a semiconductor quantum dot with spin-orbit interaction gives an impetus to study analytical solutions to one- and two-electron quantum dots with or without a magnetic field.

  10. Pairwise correlations via quantum discord and its geometric measure in a four-qubit spin chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Baset A. Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic of pairwise correlations, including quantum entanglement (QE and discord (QD with geometric measure of quantum discord (GMQD, are shown in the four-qubit Heisenberg XX spin chain. The results show that the effect of the entanglement degree of the initial state on the pairwise correlations is stronger for alternate qubits than it is for nearest-neighbor qubits. This parameter results in sudden death for QE, but it cannot do so for QD and GMQD. With different values for this entanglement parameter of the initial state, QD and GMQD differ and are sensitive for any change in this parameter. It is found that GMQD is more robust than both QD and QE to describe correlations with nonzero values, which offers a valuable resource for quantum computation.

  11. Logical spin-filtering in a triangular network of quantum nanorings with a Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, E.; Sanavi Khoshnoud, D.; Naeimi, A. S.

    2018-01-01

    The spin-resolved electron transport through a triangular network of quantum nanorings is studied in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) and a magnetic flux using quantum waveguide theory. This study illustrates that, by tuning Rashba constant, magnetic flux and incoming electron energy, the triangular network of quantum rings can act as a perfect logical spin-filtering with high efficiency. By changing in the energy of incoming electron, at a proper value of the Rashba constant and magnetic flux, a reverse in the direction of spin can take place in the triangular network of quantum nanorings. Furthermore, the triangular network of quantum nanorings can be designed as a device and shows several simultaneous spintronic properties such as spin-splitter and spin-inverter. This spin-splitting is dependent on the energy of the incoming electron. Additionally, different polarizations can be achieved in the two outgoing leads from an originally incoming spin state that simulates a Stern-Gerlach apparatus.

  12. Tunable spin-polarized edge transport in inverted quantum-well junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanclares, Dimy; Lima, Leandro R. F.; Lewenkopf, Caio H.; da Silva, Luis G. G. V. Dias

    2017-10-01

    Inverted HgTe/CdTe quantum wells have been used as a platform for the realization of two-dimensional topological insulators, bulk insulator materials with spin-helical metallic edge states protected by time-reversal symmetry. This paper investigates the spectrum and the charge transport in HgTe/CdTe quantum well junctions both in the topological regime and in the absence of time-reversal symmetry. We model the system using the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang effective Hamiltonian and compute the transport properties using recursive Green's functions with a finite differences' method. Specifically, we have studied the material's spatially resolved conductance in a setup with a gated central region, forming monopolar (n -n'-n ) and heteropolar (n -p -n , n -TI-n ) double junctions, which have been recently realized in experiments. We find regimes in which the edge states carry spin-polarized currents in the central region even in the presence of a small magnetic field, which breaks time-reversal symmetry. More interestingly, the conductance displays spin-dependent, Fabry-Perót-like oscillations as a function of the central gate voltage producing tunable, fully spin-polarized currents through the device.

  13. Quantum spin/valley Hall effect and topological insulator phase transitions in silicene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2013-04-26

    We present a theoretical realization of quantum spin and quantum valley Hall effects in silicene. We show that combination of an electric field and intrinsic spin-orbit interaction leads to quantum phase transitions at the charge neutrality point. This phase transition from a two dimensional topological insulator to a trivial insulating state is accompanied by a quenching of the quantum spin Hall effect and the onset of a quantum valley Hall effect, providing a tool to experimentally tune the topological state of silicene. In contrast to graphene and other conventional topological insulators, the proposed effects in silicene are accessible to experiments.

  14. Measurement Based Quantum Computation on Fractal Lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Hajdušek

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article we extend on work which establishes an analology between one-way quantum computation and thermodynamics to see how the former can be performed on fractal lattices. We find fractals lattices of arbitrary dimension greater than one which do all act as good resources for one-way quantum computation, and sets of fractal lattices with dimension greater than one all of which do not. The difference is put down to other topological factors such as ramification and connectivity. This work adds confidence to the analogy and highlights new features to what we require for universal resources for one-way quantum computation.

  15. Application of Blind Quantum Computation to Two-Party Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Li, Qin; Yu, Fang; Chan, Wai Hong

    2018-03-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) allows a client who has only limited quantum power to achieve quantum computation with the help of a remote quantum server and still keep the client's input, output, and algorithm private. Recently, Kashefi and Wallden extended BQC to achieve two-party quantum computation which allows two parties Alice and Bob to perform a joint unitary transform upon their inputs. However, in their protocol Alice has to prepare rotated single qubits and perform Pauli operations, and Bob needs to have a powerful quantum computer. In this work, we also utilize the idea of BQC to put forward an improved two-party quantum computation protocol in which the operations of both Alice and Bob are simplified since Alice only needs to apply Pauli operations and Bob is just required to prepare and encrypt his input qubits.

  16. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-06

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  17. Materials Frontiers to Empower Quantum Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoinette Jane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sarrao, John Louis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Richardson, Christopher [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-06-11

    This is an exciting time at the nexus of quantum computing and materials research. The materials frontiers described in this report represent a significant advance in electronic materials and our understanding of the interactions between the local material and a manufactured quantum state. Simultaneously, directed efforts to solve materials issues related to quantum computing provide an opportunity to control and probe the fundamental arrangement of matter that will impact all electronic materials. An opportunity exists to extend our understanding of materials functionality from electronic-grade to quantum-grade by achieving a predictive understanding of noise and decoherence in qubits and their origins in materials defects and environmental coupling. Realizing this vision systematically and predictively will be transformative for quantum computing and will represent a qualitative step forward in materials prediction and control.

  18. Nonequilibrium Transport through a Spinful Quantum Dot with Superconducting Leads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Brian Møller; Flensberg, Karsten; Koerting, Verena

    2011-01-01

    We study the nonlinear cotunneling current through a spinful quantum dot contacted by two superconducting leads. Applying a general nonequilibrium Green function formalism to an effective Kondo model, we study the rich variation in the IV characteristics with varying asymmetry in the tunnel...... coupling to source and drain electrodes. The current is found to be carried, respectively, by multiple Andreev reflections in the symmetric limit, and by spin-induced Yu-Shiba-Rusinov bound states in the strongly asymmetric limit. The interplay between these two mechanisms leads to qualitatively different...... IV characteristics in the crossover regime of intermediate symmetry, consistent with recent experimental observations of negative differential conductance and repositioned conductance peaks in subgap cotunneling spectroscopy....

  19. Electrical Initialization of Electron and Nuclear Spins in a Single Quantum Dot at Zero Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadiz, Fabian; Djeffal, Abdelhak; Lagarde, Delphine; Balocchi, Andrea; Tao, Bingshan; Xu, Bo; Liang, Shiheng; Stoffel, Mathieu; Devaux, Xavier; Jaffres, Henri; George, Jean-Marie; Hehn, Michel; Mangin, Stephane; Carrere, Helene; Marie, Xavier; Amand, Thierry; Han, Xiufeng; Wang, Zhanguo; Urbaszek, Bernhard; Lu, Yuan; Renucci, Pierre

    2018-04-11

    The emission of circularly polarized light from a single quantum dot relies on the injection of carriers with well-defined spin polarization. Here we demonstrate single dot electroluminescence (EL) with a circular polarization degree up to 35% at zero applied magnetic field. The injection of spin-polarized electrons is achieved by combining ultrathin CoFeB electrodes on top of a spin-LED device with p-type InGaAs quantum dots in the active region. We measure an Overhauser shift of several microelectronvolts at zero magnetic field for the positively charged exciton (trion X + ) EL emission, which changes sign as we reverse the injected electron spin orientation. This is a signature of dynamic polarization of the nuclear spins in the quantum dot induced by the hyperfine interaction with the electrically injected electron spin. This study paves the way for electrical control of nuclear spin polarization in a single quantum dot without any external magnetic field.

  20. Spin dynamics of an individual Cr atom in a semiconductor quantum dot under optical excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A. [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, 305-8573 Tsukuba (Japan); Utsumi, H.; Kuroda, S. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, 305-8573 Tsukuba (Japan); Boukari, H.; Besombes, L., E-mail: lucien.besombes@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-08-01

    We studied the spin dynamics of a Cr atom incorporated in a II-VI semiconductor quantum dot using photon correlation techniques. We used recently developed singly Cr-doped CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots to access the spin of an individual magnetic atom. Auto-correlation of the photons emitted by the quantum dot under continuous wave optical excitation reveals fluctuations of the localized spin with a timescale in the 10 ns range. Cross-correlation gives quantitative transfer time between Cr spin states. A calculation of the time dependence of the spin levels population in Cr-doped quantum dots shows that the observed spin dynamics is dominated by the exciton-Cr interaction. These measurements also provide a lower bound in the 20 ns range for the intrinsic Cr spin relaxation time.

  1. Quantum Computing and the Limits of the Efficiently Computable

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I'll discuss how computational complexity---the study of what can and can't be feasibly computed---has been interacting with physics in interesting and unexpected ways. I'll first give a crash course about computer science's P vs. NP problem, as well as about the capabilities and limits of quantum computers. I'll then touch on speculative models of computation that would go even beyond quantum computers, using (for example) hypothetical nonlinearities in the Schrodinger equation. Finally, I'll discuss BosonSampling ---a proposal for a simple form of quantum computing, which nevertheless seems intractable to simulate using a classical computer---as well as the role of computational complexity in the black hole information puzzle.

  2. Strictly contractive quantum channels and physically realizable quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raginsky, Maxim

    2002-01-01

    We study the robustness of quantum computers under the influence of errors modeled by strictly contractive channels. A channel T is defined to be strictly contractive if, for any pair of density operators ρ, σ in its domain, parallel Tρ-Tσ parallel 1 ≤k parallel ρ-σ parallel 1 for some 0≤k 1 denotes the trace norm). In other words, strictly contractive channels render the states of the computer less distinguishable in the sense of quantum detection theory. Starting from the premise that all experimental procedures can be carried out with finite precision, we argue that there exists a physically meaningful connection between strictly contractive channels and errors in physically realizable quantum computers. We show that, in the absence of error correction, sensitivity of quantum memories and computers to strictly contractive errors grows exponentially with storage time and computation time, respectively, and depends only on the constant k and the measurement precision. We prove that strict contractivity rules out the possibility of perfect error correction, and give an argument that approximate error correction, which covers previous work on fault-tolerant quantum computation as a special case, is possible

  3. Spin-orbit coupled molecular quantum magnetism realized in inorganic solid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Youn; Do, S-H; Choi, K-Y; Kang, J-H; Jang, Dongjin; Schmidt, B; Brando, Manuel; Kim, B-H; Kim, D-H; Butch, N P; Lee, Seongsu; Park, J-H; Ji, Sungdae

    2016-09-21

    Molecular quantum magnetism involving an isolated spin state is of particular interest due to the characteristic quantum phenomena underlying spin qubits or molecular spintronics for quantum information devices, as demonstrated in magnetic metal-organic molecular systems, the so-called molecular magnets. Here we report the molecular quantum magnetism realized in an inorganic solid Ba3Yb2Zn5O11 with spin-orbit coupled pseudospin-½ Yb(3+) ions. The magnetization represents the magnetic quantum values of an isolated Yb4 tetrahedron with a total (pseudo)spin 0, 1 and 2. Inelastic neutron scattering results reveal that a large Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction originating from strong spin-orbit coupling of Yb 4f is a key ingredient to explain magnetic excitations of the molecular magnet states. The Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction allows a non-adiabatic quantum transition between avoided crossing energy levels, and also results in unexpected magnetic behaviours in conventional molecular magnets.

  4. Quantum Correlation in Matrix Product States of One-Dimensional Spin Chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jing-Min

    2015-01-01

    For our proposed composite parity-conserved matrix product state (MPS), if only a spin block length is larger than 1, any two such spin blocks have correlation including classical correlation and quantum correlation. Both the total correlation and the classical correlation become larger than that in any subcomponent; while the quantum correlations of the two nearest-neighbor spin blocks and the two next-nearest-neighbor spin blocks become smaller and for other conditions the quantum correlation becomes larger, i.e., the increase or the production of the long-range quantum correlation is at the cost of reducing the short-range quantum correlation, which deserves to be investigated in the future; and the ration of the quantum correlation to the total correlation monotonically decreases to a steady value as the spacing spin length increasing. (paper)

  5. Experimental comparison of two quantum computing architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Norbert M; Maslov, Dmitri; Roetteler, Martin; Debnath, Shantanu; Figgatt, Caroline; Landsman, Kevin A; Wright, Kenneth; Monroe, Christopher

    2017-03-28

    We run a selection of algorithms on two state-of-the-art 5-qubit quantum computers that are based on different technology platforms. One is a publicly accessible superconducting transmon device (www. ibm.com/ibm-q) with limited connectivity, and the other is a fully connected trapped-ion system. Even though the two systems have different native quantum interactions, both can be programed in a way that is blind to the underlying hardware, thus allowing a comparison of identical quantum algorithms between different physical systems. We show that quantum algorithms and circuits that use more connectivity clearly benefit from a better-connected system of qubits. Although the quantum systems here are not yet large enough to eclipse classical computers, this experiment exposes critical factors of scaling quantum computers, such as qubit connectivity and gate expressivity. In addition, the results suggest that codesigning particular quantum applications with the hardware itself will be paramount in successfully using quantum computers in the future.

  6. Is the Brain a Quantum Computer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Abninder; Eliasmith, Chris; Kroon, Frederick W.; Weinstein, Steven; Thagard, Paul

    2006-01-01

    We argue that computation via quantum mechanical processes is irrelevant to explaining how brains produce thought, contrary to the ongoing speculations of many theorists. First, quantum effects do not have the temporal properties required for neural information processing. Second, there are substantial physical obstacles to any organic…

  7. The Spin-Foam Approach to Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Perez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the present status of the spin-foam approach to the quantization of gravity. Special attention is payed to the pedagogical presentation of the recently-introduced new models for four-dimensional quantum gravity. The models are motivated by a suitable implementation of the path integral quantization of the Plebanski formulation of gravity on a simplicial regularization. The article also includes a self contained treatment of 2+1 gravity. The simple nature of the latter provides the basis and a perspective for the analysis of both conceptual and technical issues that remain open in four dimensions.

  8. Chiral heat transport in driven quantum Hall and quantum spin Hall edge states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    We consider a model for an edge state of electronic systems in the quantum Hall regime with filling ν=1 and in the quantum spin Hall regime. In both cases, the system is in contact with two reservoirs by tunneling at point contacts. Both systems are locally driven by applying an ac voltage in one of the contacts. By weakly coupling them to a third reservoir, the transport of the generated heat is studied in two different ways: (i) when the third reservoir acts as a thermometer, the local temperature is sensed and (ii) when the third reservoir acts as a voltage probe, the time-dependent local voltage is sensed. Our results indicate a chiral propagation of the heat along the edge in the quantum Hall and in the quantum spin Hall cases (if the injected electrons are spin polarized). We also show that a analogous picture is obtained if instead of heating by ac driving the system is put in contact to a stationary reservoir at a higher temperature. In both cases, the temperature profile shows that the electrons along the edge thermalize with the closest “upstream” reservoir.

  9. Relativistic quantum chemistry on quantum computers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veis, Libor; Višňák, Jakub; Fleig, T.; Knecht, S.; Saue, T.; Visscher, L.; Pittner, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 3 (2012), 030304 ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0626 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : simulation * algorithm * computation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.042, year: 2012

  10. An introduction to quantum computing algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Pittenger, Arthur O

    2000-01-01

    In 1994 Peter Shor [65] published a factoring algorithm for a quantum computer that finds the prime factors of a composite integer N more efficiently than is possible with the known algorithms for a classical com­ puter. Since the difficulty of the factoring problem is crucial for the se­ curity of a public key encryption system, interest (and funding) in quan­ tum computing and quantum computation suddenly blossomed. Quan­ tum computing had arrived. The study of the role of quantum mechanics in the theory of computa­ tion seems to have begun in the early 1980s with the publications of Paul Benioff [6]' [7] who considered a quantum mechanical model of computers and the computation process. A related question was discussed shortly thereafter by Richard Feynman [35] who began from a different perspec­ tive by asking what kind of computer should be used to simulate physics. His analysis led him to the belief that with a suitable class of "quantum machines" one could imitate any quantum system.

  11. Transport spin dependent in nanostructures: Current and geometry effect of quantum dots in presence of spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Gutiérrez, H.; Pérez-Merchancano, S. T.; Beltran-Rios, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we study the quantum electron transport through a Quantum Dots Structure (QDs), with different geometries, embedded in a Quantum Well (QW). The behaviour of the current through the nanostructure (dot and well) is studied considering the orbital spin coupling of the electrons and the Rashba effect, by means of the second quantization theory and the standard model of Green’s functions. Our results show the behaviour of the current in the quantum system as a function of the electric field, presenting resonant states for specific values of both the external field and the spin polarization. Similarly, the behaviour of the current on the nanostructure changes when the geometry of the QD and the size of the same are modified as a function of the polarization of the electron spin and the potential of quantum confinement.

  12. The quantum brachistochrone problem for an arbitrary spin in a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmak, A.R., E-mail: andrijkuzmak@gmail.com; Tkachuk, V.M., E-mail: voltkachuk@gmail.com

    2015-06-26

    We consider quantum brachistochrone evolution for a spin-s system on rotational manifolds. Such manifolds are determined by the rotation of the eigenstates of the operator of projection of spin-s on some direction. The Fubini–Study metrics of these manifolds are those of spheres with radii dependent on the value of the spin and on the value of the spin projection. The conditions for optimal evolution of the spin-s system on rotational manifolds are obtained. - Highlights: • The Fubini–Study metrics of rotational manifolds of spin-s system are considered. • It is shown that they are spheres. • The brachistochrone problem for a spin-s system on rotational manifolds is examined.

  13. Quantum computing based on semiconductor nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frolov, S.M.; Plissard, S.R.; Nadj-Perge, S.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    A quantum computer will have computational power beyond that of conventional computers, which can be exploited for solving important and complex problems, such as predicting the conformations of large biological molecules. Materials play a major role in this emerging technology, as they can enable

  14. Optimised resource construction for verifiable quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashefi, Elham; Wallden, Petros

    2017-01-01

    Recent developments have brought the possibility of achieving scalable quantum networks and quantum devices closer. From the computational point of view these emerging technologies become relevant when they are no longer classically simulatable. Hence a pressing challenge is the construction of practical methods to verify the correctness of the outcome produced by universal or non-universal quantum devices. A promising approach that has been extensively explored is the scheme of verification via encryption through blind quantum computation. We present here a new construction that simplifies the required resources for any such verifiable protocol. We obtain an overhead that is linear in the size of the input (computation), while the security parameter remains independent of the size of the computation and can be made exponentially small (with a small extra cost). Furthermore our construction is generic and could be applied to any universal or non-universal scheme with a given underlying graph. (paper)

  15. Distributed quantum computing with single photon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beige, A.; Kwek, L.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Distributed quantum computing requires the ability to perform nonlocal gate operations between the distant nodes (stationary qubits) of a large network. To achieve this, it has been proposed to interconvert stationary qubits with flying qubits. In contrast to this, we show that distributed quantum computing only requires the ability to encode stationary qubits into flying qubits but not the conversion of flying qubits into stationary qubits. We describe a scheme for the realization of an eventually deterministic controlled phase gate by performing measurements on pairs of flying qubits. Our scheme could be implemented with a linear optics quantum computing setup including sources for the generation of single photons on demand, linear optics elements and photon detectors. In the presence of photon loss and finite detector efficiencies, the scheme could be used to build large cluster states for one way quantum computing with a high fidelity. (author)

  16. Computer science: Data analysis meets quantum physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Steven

    2017-10-01

    A technique that combines machine learning and quantum computing has been used to identify the particles known as Higgs bosons. The method could find applications in many areas of science. See Letter p.375

  17. Scaling ion traps for quantum computing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a chipscale, multi-zone, surface electrode ion trap is reported. The modular design and fabrication techniques used are anticipated to advance scalability of ion trap quantum computing architectures...

  18. Exact computation and large angular momentum asymptotics of 3nj symbols: Semiclassical disentangling of spin networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Roger W.; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Silva Ferreira, Cristiane da

    2008-01-01

    Spin networks, namely, the 3nj symbols of quantum angular momentum theory and their generalizations to groups other than SU(2) and to quantum groups, permeate many areas of pure and applied science. The issues of their computation and characterization for large values of their entries are a challenge for diverse fields, such as spectroscopy and quantum chemistry, molecular and condensed matter physics, quantum computing, and the geometry of space time. Here we record progress both in their efficient calculation and in the study of the large j asymptotics. For the 9j symbol, a prototypical entangled network, we present and extensively check numerically formulas that illustrate the passage to the semiclassical limit, manifesting both the occurrence of disentangling and the discrete-continuum transition.

  19. Universal quantum computation in a semiconductor quantum wire network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sau, Jay D.; Das Sarma, S.; Tewari, Sumanta

    2010-01-01

    Universal quantum computation (UQC) using Majorana fermions on a two-dimensional topological superconducting (TS) medium remains an outstanding open problem. This is because the quantum gate set that can be generated by braiding of the Majorana fermions does not include any two-qubit gate and also no single-qubit π/8 phase gate. In principle, it is possible to create these crucial extra gates using quantum interference of Majorana fermion currents. However, it is not clear if the motion of the various order parameter defects (vortices, domain walls, etc.), to which the Majorana fermions are bound in a TS medium, can be quantum coherent. We show that these obstacles can be overcome using a semiconductor quantum wire network in the vicinity of an s-wave superconductor, by constructing topologically protected two-qubit gates and any arbitrary single-qubit phase gate in a topologically unprotected manner, which can be error corrected using magic-state distillation. Thus our strategy, using a judicious combination of topologically protected and unprotected gate operations, realizes UQC on a quantum wire network with a remarkably high error threshold of 0.14 as compared to 10 -3 to 10 -4 in ordinary unprotected quantum computation.

  20. Braid group representation on quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Ryan Kasyfil, E-mail: kasyfilryan@gmail.com [Department of Computational Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia); Muchtadi-Alamsyah, Intan, E-mail: ntan@math.itb.ac.id [Algebra Research Group, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    There are many studies about topological representation of quantum computation recently. One of diagram representation of quantum computation is by using ZX-Calculus. In this paper we will make a diagrammatical scheme of Dense Coding. We also proved that ZX-Calculus diagram of maximally entangle state satisfies Yang-Baxter Equation and therefore, we can construct a Braid Group representation of set of maximally entangle state.

  1. Iterated Gate Teleportation and Blind Quantum Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A; Fitzsimons, Joseph F

    2015-06-05

    Blind quantum computation allows a user to delegate a computation to an untrusted server while keeping the computation hidden. A number of recent works have sought to establish bounds on the communication requirements necessary to implement blind computation, and a bound based on the no-programming theorem of Nielsen and Chuang has emerged as a natural limiting factor. Here we show that this constraint only holds in limited scenarios, and show how to overcome it using a novel method of iterated gate teleportations. This technique enables drastic reductions in the communication required for distributed quantum protocols, extending beyond the blind computation setting. Applied to blind quantum computation, this technique offers significant efficiency improvements, and in some scenarios offers an exponential reduction in communication requirements.

  2. Private quantum computation: an introduction to blind quantum computing and related protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2017-06-01

    Quantum technologies hold the promise of not only faster algorithmic processing of data, via quantum computation, but also of more secure communications, in the form of quantum cryptography. In recent years, a number of protocols have emerged which seek to marry these concepts for the purpose of securing computation rather than communication. These protocols address the task of securely delegating quantum computation to an untrusted device while maintaining the privacy, and in some instances the integrity, of the computation. We present a review of the progress to date in this emerging area.

  3. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buluta, Iulia; Ashhab, Sahel; Nori, Franco, E-mail: fnori@riken.jp [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Remarkable progress towards realizing quantum computation has been achieved using natural and artificial atoms as qubits. This paper presents a brief overview of the current status of different types of qubits. On the one hand, natural atoms (such as neutral atoms and ions) have long coherence times, and could be stored in large arrays, providing ideal 'quantum memories'. On the other hand, artificial atoms (such as superconducting circuits or semiconductor quantum dots) have the advantage of custom-designed features and could be used as 'quantum processing units'. Natural and artificial atoms can be coupled with each other and can also be interfaced with photons for long-distance communications. Hybrid devices made of natural/artificial atoms and photons may provide the next-generation design for quantum computers.

  4. A quantum simulation approach for a three-dimensional Ising spin model—Comparison to mean field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaosen Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We use a recently developed quantum simulation approach to study the properties of a three-dimensional Ising model consisting of S = 1/2 quantum spins localized at the sites of a simple cubic lattice. We assume nearest-neighbor interaction between spins with an exchange interaction that can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic. It is found that the computational method quickly converges towards the expected equilibrium spin configurations. The resulting spontaneous magnetization curves corresponding to the two types of magnetic interactions under consideration were found to be almost identical to the ones obtained via quantum mean field theory at all temperatures. The derived total energies, total free energies, magnetic entropies and specific heats per mole of spins show no sizeable differences from known theoretical values. Furthermore, the results of the simulations for two different 3D Ising systems containing 4×4×4 and 20×20×20 spins localized at the sites of a simple cubic lattice were found to be almost identical to each other. This finding suggests that the self-consistent algorithm approach of the current simulation method allows one to obtain the physical bulk properties of a large magnetic system by relying on simulations of a much smaller spin system sample. Therefore, the method presently considered appears to be not only very accurate as gauged by comparison to mean field theory, but also able to greatly increase the speed of simulations.

  5. Robust quantum-network memory using decoherence-protected subspaces of nuclear spins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiserer, A.A.; Kalb, N.; Blok, M.S.; van Bemmelen, Koen J M; Taminiau, T.H.; Hanson, R.; Twitchen, Daniel J.; Markham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The realization of a network of quantum registers is an outstanding challenge in quantum science and technology. We experimentally investigate a network node that consists of a single nitrogen-vacancy center electronic spin hyperfine coupled to nearby nuclear spins. We demonstrate individual

  6. Quantum spin-glass transition in the two-dimensional electron gas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 2 ... Spin glasses; quantum phase transition; ferromagnetism; electron gas. ... We argue that a quantum transition involving the destruction of the spin-glass order in an applied in-plane magnetic field offers a natural explanation of some features of recent ...

  7. Nanomagnet coupled to quantum spin Hall edge: An adiabatic quantum motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; von Oppen, Felix

    2015-11-01

    The precessing magnetization of a magnetic islands coupled to a quantum spin Hall edge pumps charge along the edge. Conversely, a bias voltage applied to the edge makes the magnetization precess. We point out that this device realizes an adiabatic quantum motor and discuss the efficiency of its operation based on a scattering matrix approach akin to Landauer-Büttiker theory. Scattering theory provides a microscopic derivation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the magnetization dynamics of the device, including spin-transfer torque, Gilbert damping, and Langevin torque. We find that the device can be viewed as a Thouless motor, attaining unit efficiency when the chemical potential of the edge states falls into the magnetization-induced gap. For more general parameters, we characterize the device by means of a figure of merit analogous to the ZT value in thermoelectrics.

  8. Reprint of : Nanomagnet coupled to quantum spin Hall edge: An adiabatic quantum motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    The precessing magnetization of a magnetic islands coupled to a quantum spin Hall edge pumps charge along the edge. Conversely, a bias voltage applied to the edge makes the magnetization precess. We point out that this device realizes an adiabatic quantum motor and discuss the efficiency of its operation based on a scattering matrix approach akin to Landauer-Büttiker theory. Scattering theory provides a microscopic derivation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the magnetization dynamics of the device, including spin-transfer torque, Gilbert damping, and Langevin torque. We find that the device can be viewed as a Thouless motor, attaining unit efficiency when the chemical potential of the edge states falls into the magnetization-induced gap. For more general parameters, we characterize the device by means of a figure of merit analogous to the ZT value in thermoelectrics.

  9. Quantum Genetic Algorithms for Computer Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Lahoz-Beltra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic algorithms (GAs are a class of evolutionary algorithms inspired by Darwinian natural selection. They are popular heuristic optimisation methods based on simulated genetic mechanisms, i.e., mutation, crossover, etc. and population dynamical processes such as reproduction, selection, etc. Over the last decade, the possibility to emulate a quantum computer (a computer using quantum-mechanical phenomena to perform operations on data has led to a new class of GAs known as “Quantum Genetic Algorithms” (QGAs. In this review, we present a discussion, future potential, pros and cons of this new class of GAs. The review will be oriented towards computer scientists interested in QGAs “avoiding” the possible difficulties of quantum-mechanical phenomena.

  10. Quantum algorithms for computational nuclear physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Višňák Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While quantum algorithms have been studied as an efficient tool for the stationary state energy determination in the case of molecular quantum systems, no similar study for analogical problems in computational nuclear physics (computation of energy levels of nuclei from empirical nucleon-nucleon or quark-quark potentials have been realized yet. Although the difference between the above mentioned studies might seem negligible, it will be examined. First steps towards a particular simulation (on classical computer of the Iterative Phase Estimation Algorithm for deuterium and tritium nuclei energy level computation will be carried out with the aim to prove algorithm feasibility (and extensibility to heavier nuclei for its possible practical realization on a real quantum computer.

  11. Efficient quantum circuits for one-way quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Liu, Yu-Xi; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco

    2009-03-13

    While Ising-type interactions are ideal for implementing controlled phase flip gates in one-way quantum computing, natural interactions between solid-state qubits are most often described by either the XY or the Heisenberg models. We show an efficient way of generating cluster states directly using either the imaginary SWAP (iSWAP) gate for the XY model, or the sqrt[SWAP] gate for the Heisenberg model. Our approach thus makes one-way quantum computing more feasible for solid-state devices.

  12. Universality of black hole quantum computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvali, Gia [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); New York Univ., NY (United States). Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics; Gomez, Cesar [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica UAM-CSIC; Luest, Dieter [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Omar, Yasser [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes (Portugal). Physics of Information and Quantum Technologies Group; Lisboa Univ. (Portugal). Inst. Superior Tecnico; Richter, Benedikt [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Instituto de Telecomunicacoes (Portugal). Physics of Information and Quantum Technologies Group; Lisboa Univ. (Portugal). Inst. Superior Tecnico

    2017-01-15

    By analyzing the key properties of black holes from the point of view of quantum information, we derive a model-independent picture of black hole quantum computing. It has been noticed that this picture exhibits striking similarities with quantum critical condensates, allowing the use of a common language to describe quantum computing in both systems. We analyze such quantum computing by allowing coupling to external modes, under the condition that the external influence must be soft-enough in order not to offset the basic properties of the system. We derive model-independent bounds on some crucial time-scales, such as the times of gate operation, decoherence, maximal entanglement and total scrambling. We show that for black hole type quantum computers all these time-scales are of the order of the black hole half-life time. Furthermore, we construct explicitly a set of Hamiltonians that generates a universal set of quantum gates for the black hole type computer. We find that the gates work at maximal energy efficiency. Furthermore, we establish a fundamental bound on the complexity of quantum circuits encoded on these systems, and characterize the unitary operations that are implementable. It becomes apparent that the computational power is very limited due to the fact that the black hole life-time is of the same order of the gate operation time. As a consequence, it is impossible to retrieve its information, within the life-time of a black hole, by externally coupling to the black hole qubits. However, we show that, in principle, coupling to some of the internal degrees of freedom allows acquiring knowledge about the micro-state. Still, due to the trivial complexity of operations that can be performed, there is no time advantage over the collection of Hawking radiation and subsequent decoding. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Spin-Relaxation Anisotropy in a GaAs Quantum Dot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarlino, P.; Kawakami, E.; Stano, P.; Shafiei, M.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2014-01-01

    We report that the electron spin-relaxation time T1 in a GaAs quantum dot with a spin-1/2 ground state has a 180° periodicity in the orientation of the in-plane magnetic field. This periodicity has been predicted for circular dots as being due to the interplay of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin orbit

  14. Nuclear spin dynamics in double quantum dots : Fixed points, transients, and intermittency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudner, M.S.; Koppens, F.H.L.; Folk, J.A.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.; Levitov, L.S.

    2011-01-01

    Transport through spin-blockaded quantum dots provides a means for electrical control and detection of nuclear spin dynamics in the host material. Although such experiments have become increasingly popular in recent years, interpretation of their results in terms of the underlying nuclear spin

  15. Transient charging and discharging of spin-polarized electrons in a quantum dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Souza, Fabricio; Leao, S.A.; Gester, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    We study spin-polarized transient transport in a quantum dot coupled to two ferromagnetic leads subjected to a rectangular bias voltage pulse. Time-dependent spin-resolved currents, occupations, spin accumulation, and tunneling magnetoresistance TMR are calculated using both nonequilibrium Green...

  16. Disentanglement of two qubits coupled to an XY spin chain: Role of quantum phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zigang; Li Shushen; Zhang Ping

    2007-01-01

    We study the disentanglement evolution of two spin qubits which interact with a general XY spin-chain environment. The dynamical process of the disentanglement is numerically and analytically investigated in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition (QPT) of the spin chain in both weak and strong coupling cases. We find that the disentanglement of the two spin qubits may be greatly enhanced by the quantum critical behavior of the environmental spin chain. We give a detailed analysis to facilitate the understanding of the QPT-enhanced decaying behavior of the coherence factor. Furthermore, the scaling behavior in the disentanglement dynamics is also revealed and analyzed

  17. Analytical theory and possible detection of the ac quantum spin Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, W Y; Ren, Y J; Lin, Z X; Shen, R; Sheng, L; Sheng, D N; Xing, D Y

    2017-07-11

    We develop an analytical theory of the low-frequency ac quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect based upon the scattering matrix formalism. It is shown that the ac QSH effect can be interpreted as a bulk quantum pumping effect. When the electron spin is conserved, the integer-quantized ac spin Hall conductivity can be linked to the winding numbers of the reflection matrices in the electrodes, which also equal to the bulk spin Chern numbers of the QSH material. Furthermore, a possible experimental scheme by using ferromagnetic metals as electrodes is proposed to detect the topological ac spin current by electrical means.

  18. Quantum simulation of spin models on an arbitrary lattice with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenblit, S; Kafri, D; Campbell, W C; Islam, R; Edwards, E E; Monroe, C; Gong, Z-X; Lin, G-D; Duan, L-M; Kim, J; Kim, K

    2012-01-01

    A collection of trapped atomic ions represents one of the most attractive platforms for the quantum simulation of interacting spin networks and quantum magnetism. Spin-dependent optical dipole forces applied to an ion crystal create long-range effective spin–spin interactions and allow the simulation of spin Hamiltonians that possess nontrivial phases and dynamics. Here we show how the appropriate design of laser fields can provide for arbitrary multidimensional spin–spin interaction graphs even for the case of a linear spatial array of ions. This scheme uses currently available trap technology and is scalable to levels where the classical methods of simulation are intractable. (paper)

  19. Spin Squeezing and Entanglement with Room Temperature Atoms for Quantum Sensing and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Heng

    Abstract In this thesis, different experiments on spin squeezing and entanglement involving room temperature ensembles of Cesium atoms are described. The key method is the off-resonant Faraday interaction of spin-polarized atomic ensemble with a light field. And the key component is the micro......-fabricated vapor cell coupled into an optical cavity. Quantum backaction evading measurement of one quadrature of collective spin components by stroboscopically modulating the intensity of probe beam at twice Larmor frequency is used to generate the spin-squeezed state. A projection noise limited optical...... of spin states surpasses a classical benchmark, demonstrating the true quantum teleportation....

  20. Distortion of frustrated spin cluster caused by quantum fluctuation due to magneto-elastic coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, Kiyosi; Honda, Ikumi

    2007-01-01

    We study the effects of magneto-elastic coupling on frustrated spin states of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a regular triangle and tetrahedron made of spin 1/2 or 1. Displacement of spin is considered as a quantum-mechanical variable. Distortion of clusters occurs through quantum fluctuation of normal modes caused by magneto-elastic coupling. The nonmagnetic phase transitions of vanadium and chromium spinels are discussed

  1. Coupled Spins in Diamond: From Quantum Control to Metrology and Many-Body Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Kucsko, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The study of quantum mechanics, together with the ability to coherently control and manipulate quantum systems in the lab has led to a myriad of discoveries and real world applications. In this thesis we present experiments demonstrating precise control of an individual long-lived spin qubit as well as sensing applications for biology and investigation of quantum many-body dynamics. Stable quantum bits, capable both of storing quantum information for macroscopic time scales and of integra...

  2. Field control of anisotropic spin transport and spin helix dynamics in a modulation-doped GaAs quantum well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, S.; Passmann, F.; Singh, A.; Ruppert, C.; Poshakinskiy, A. V.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Moore, J. N.; Yusa, G.; Mano, T.; Noda, T.; Li, X.; Bristow, A. D.; Betz, M.

    2018-03-01

    Electron spin transport and dynamics are investigated in a single, high-mobility, modulation-doped, GaAs quantum well using ultrafast two-color Kerr-rotation microspectroscopy, supported by qualitative kinetic theory simulations of spin diffusion and transport. Evolution of the spins is governed by the Dresselhaus bulk and Rashba structural inversion asymmetries, which manifest as an effective magnetic field that can be extracted directly from the experimental coherent spin precession. A spin-precession length λSOI is defined as one complete precession in the effective magnetic field. It is observed that application of (i) an out-of-plane electric field changes the spin decay time and λSOI through the Rashba component of the spin-orbit coupling, (ii) an in-plane magnetic field allows for extraction of the Dresselhaus and Rashba parameters, and (iii) an in-plane electric field markedly modifies both the λSOI and diffusion coefficient.

  3. Readout of a single electron spin in a double quantum dot using a quantum point contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianping; Ouyang Shihua; You, J Q; Lam, C.-H.

    2008-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a single electron spin in a double quantum dot (DQD) and its readout via a quantum point contact (QPC). We model the system microscopically and derive rate equations for the reduced electron density matrix of the DQD. Two cases with one and two electrons in the DQD are studied. In the one-electron case, with different Zeeman splittings in the two dots, the electron spin states are distinctly characterized by a constant and an oscillatory current through the QPC. In the two-electron case, the readout of the spin state of the electron in one of the dots called the qubit dot is essentially similar after considering hyperfine interactions between the electrons and the nuclear spins of the host materials and a uniform magnetic field applied to the DQD. Moreover, to ensure that an electron is properly injected into the qubit dot, we propose to determine the success of the electron injection from the variations of the QPC current after applying an oscillating magnetic field to the qubit dot

  4. Biologically inspired path to quantum computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogryzko, Vasily; Ozhigov, Yuri

    2014-12-01

    We describe an approach to quantum computer inspired by the information processing at the molecular level in living cells. It is based on the separation of a small ensemble of qubits inside the living system (e.g., a bacterial cell), such that coherent quantum states of this ensemble remain practically unchanged for a long time. We use the notion of a quantum kernel to describe such an ensemble. Quantum kernel is not strictly connected with certain particles; it permanently exchanges atoms and molecules with the environment, which makes quantum kernel a virtual notion. There are many reasons to expect that the state of quantum kernel of a living system can be treated as the stationary state of some Hamiltonian. While the quantum kernel is responsible for the stability of dynamics at the time scale of cellular life, at the longer inter-generation time scale it can change, varying smoothly in the course of biological evolution. To the first level of approximation, quantum kernel can be described in the framework of qubit modification of Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model, in which the relaxation corresponds to the exchange of matter between quantum kernel and the rest of the cell and is represented as Lindblad super-operators.

  5. Construction of a universal quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagana, Antonio A.; Lohe, M. A.; Smekal, Lorenz von

    2009-01-01

    We construct a universal quantum computer following Deutsch's original proposal of a universal quantum Turing machine (UQTM). Like Deutsch's UQTM, our machine can emulate any classical Turing machine and can execute any algorithm that can be implemented in the quantum gate array framework but under the control of a quantum program, and hence is universal. We present the architecture of the machine, which consists of a memory tape and a processor and describe the observables that comprise the registers of the processor and the instruction set, which includes a set of operations that can approximate any unitary operation to any desired accuracy and hence is quantum computationally universal. We present the unitary evolution operators that act on the machine to achieve universal computation and discuss each of them in detail and specify and discuss explicit program halting and concatenation schemes. We define and describe a set of primitive programs in order to demonstrate the universal nature of the machine. These primitive programs facilitate the implementation of more complex algorithms and we demonstrate their use by presenting a program that computes the NAND function, thereby also showing that the machine can compute any classically computable function.

  6. Relaxation times of the two-phonon processes with spin-flip and spin-conserving in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zi-Wu, E-mail: zwwang@semi.ac.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, Department of Physics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, Lei [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215125 (China); Li, Shu-Shen [Institute of Semiconductor, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-04-07

    We perform a theoretical investigation on the two-phonon processes of the spin-flip and spin-conserving relaxation in quantum dots in the frame of the Huang-Rhys' lattice relaxation model. We find that the relaxation time of the spin-flip is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the spin-conserving, which is in agreement with previous experimental measurements. Moreover, the opposite variational trends of the relaxation time as a function of the energy separation for two-phonon processes are obtained in different temperature regime. The relaxation times display the oscillatory behaviors at the demarcation point with increasing magnetic field, where the energy separation matches the optical phonon energy and results in the optical phonon resonance. These results are useful in understanding the intraband levels' relaxation in quantum dots and could be helpful in designing photoelectric and spin-memory devices.

  7. Quantum Heterogeneous Computing for Satellite Positioning Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, G.; Kumar, V.; Dulny, J., III

    2016-12-01

    Hard optimization problems occur in many fields of academic study and practical situations. We present results in which quantum heterogeneous computing is used to solve a real-world optimization problem: satellite positioning. Optimization problems like this can scale very rapidly with problem size, and become unsolvable with traditional brute-force methods. Typically, such problems have been approximately solved with heuristic approaches; however, these methods can take a long time to calculate and are not guaranteed to find optimal solutions. Quantum computing offers the possibility of producing significant speed-up and improved solution quality. There are now commercially available quantum annealing (QA) devices that are designed to solve difficult optimization problems. These devices have 1000+ quantum bits, but they have significant hardware size and connectivity limitations. We present a novel heterogeneous computing stack that combines QA and classical machine learning and allows the use of QA on problems larger than the quantum hardware could solve in isolation. We begin by analyzing the satellite positioning problem with a heuristic solver, the genetic algorithm. The classical computer's comparatively large available memory can explore the full problem space and converge to a solution relatively close to the true optimum. The QA device can then evolve directly to the optimal solution within this more limited space. Preliminary experiments, using the Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) algorithm to simulate QA hardware, have produced promising results. Working with problem instances with known global minima, we find a solution within 8% in a matter of seconds, and within 5% in a few minutes. Future studies include replacing QMC with commercially available quantum hardware and exploring more problem sets and model parameters. Our results have important implications for how heterogeneous quantum computing can be used to solve difficult optimization problems in any

  8. Scalable Quantum Networks for Distributed Computing and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0007 Scalable Quantum Networks for Distributed Computing and Sensing Ian Walmsley THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD Final Report 04/01...photon. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, quantum information processing, quantum computation , photonics, quantum networks, quantum memory 16. SECURITY...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Final report for “Scalable Quantum Networks for Distributed Computing and Sensing” Project 12-2076; Sept 2012 through Aug 2015

  9. Qubus ancilla-driven quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Katherine Louise; De, Suvabrata; Kendon, Viv; Munro, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid matter-optical systems offer a robust, scalable path to quantum computation. Such systems have an ancilla which acts as a bus connecting the qubits. We demonstrate how using a continuous variable qubus as the ancilla provides savings in the total number of operations required when computing with many qubits

  10. Imaging currents in HgTe quantum wells in the quantum spin Hall regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowack, Katja C.; Spanton, Eric M.; Baenninger, Matthias; König, Markus; Kirtley, John R.; Kalisky, Beena; Ames, C.; Leubner, Philipp; Brüne, Christoph; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens W.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2013-06-16

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) state is a state of matter characterized by a non-trivial topology of its band structure, and associated conducting edge channels. The QSH state was predicted and experimentally demonstrated to be realized in HgTe quantum wells. The existence of the edge channels has been inferred from local and non-local transport measurements in sufficiently small devices. Here we directly confirm the existence of the edge channels by imaging the magnetic fields produced by current flowing in large Hall bars made from HgTe quantum wells. These images distinguish between current that passes through each edge and the bulk. On tuning the bulk conductivity by gating or raising the temperature, we observe a regime in which the edge channels clearly coexist with the conducting bulk, providing input to the question of how ballistic transport may be limited in the edge channels. Our results represent a versatile method for characterization of new QSH materials systems.

  11. Computationally inexpensive interpretation of magnetic data for finite spin clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Aagaard; Weihe, Høgni; Bendix, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We show that high-temperature expansion of the partition function is a computationally convenient tool to interpretation of magnetic properties of spin clusters wherein the spin centers are interacting via an isotropic Heisenberg exchange operator. High-temperature expansions up to order 12 are u...

  12. Quantum phase transitions in effective spin-ladder models for graphene zigzag nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Cornelie; Wessel, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    We examine the magnetic correlations in quantum spin models that were derived recently as effective low-energy theories for electronic correlation effects on the edge states of graphene nanoribbons. For this purpose, we employ quantum Monte Carlo simulations to access the large-distance properties, accounting for quantum fluctuations beyond mean-field-theory approaches to edge magnetism. For certain chiral nanoribbons, antiferromagnetic interedge couplings were previously found to induce a gapped quantum disordered ground state of the effective spin model. We find that the extended nature of the intraedge couplings in the effective spin model for zigzag nanoribbons leads to a quantum phase transition at a large, finite value of the interedge coupling. This quantum critical point separates the quantum disordered region from a gapless phase of stable edge magnetism at weak intraedge coupling, which includes the ground states of spin-ladder models for wide zigzag nanoribbons. To study the quantum critical behavior, the effective spin model can be related to a model of two antiferromagnetically coupled Haldane-Shastry spin-half chains with long-ranged ferromagnetic intrachain couplings. The results for the critical exponents are compared also to several recent renormalization-group calculations for related long-ranged interacting quantum systems.

  13. Entanglement of the quantum system with spin-spin coupling created by optical excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chenghua

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the quantum entanglement characteristics of the system consisting an intermediary molecule with an optically excited triplet and two bilateral spin-1/2 nucleons. The two nuclear spins both couple to the excitation state which is caused by a pulsed laser. We study the linear entropy and entangling power of the evolution operator acting on the product state of the system. We deduce the entangling power when the energy state has a uniform distribution, and we find that the entanglement of the system shows a certain stability. In this paper, several standard expressions are analyzed and calculated in detail, including the detailed solution for the quantum entropy as well as the calculation of the linear entropy and entangling power, which are based on this solution. In comparing the linear entropy and entangling power, we find that the latter is the average of the former. Subsequently, we present an alternative derivation of the evolution operator and find that the result is consistent with that of the traditional method. When the evolution operator acts on the average of the product states, the entangling power of the evolution operator presents a distinct changing trend.

  14. Unordered Tuples in Quantum Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Furber

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the C*-algebra of an ordered pair of qubits is M_2 (x M_2. What about unordered pairs? We show in detail that M_3 (+ C is the C*-algebra of an unordered pair of qubits. Then we use Schur-Weyl duality to characterize the C*-algebra of an unordered n-tuple of d-level quantum systems. Using some further elementary representation theory and number theory, we characterize the quantum cycles. We finish with a characterization of the von Neumann algebra for unordered words.

  15. Information-theoretic temporal Bell inequality and quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikoshi, Fumiaki

    2006-01-01

    An information-theoretic temporal Bell inequality is formulated to contrast classical and quantum computations. Any classical algorithm satisfies the inequality, while quantum ones can violate it. Therefore, the violation of the inequality is an immediate consequence of the quantumness in the computation. Furthermore, this approach suggests a notion of temporal nonlocality in quantum computation

  16. Universal quantum computation with unlabelled qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severini, Simone [Department of Mathematics and Department of Computer Science, University of York, Heslington, YO10 5DD York (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-30

    We show that an nth root of the Walsh-Hadamard transform (obtained from the Hadamard gate and a cyclic permutation of the qubits), together with two diagonal matrices, namely a local qubit-flip (for a fixed but arbitrary qubit) and a non-local phase-flip (for a fixed but arbitrary coefficient), can do universal quantum computation on n qubits. A quantum computation, making use of n qubits and based on these operations, is then a word of variable length, but whose letters are always taken from an alphabet of cardinality three. Therefore, in contrast with other universal sets, no choice of qubit lines is needed for the application of the operations described here. A quantum algorithm based on this set can be interpreted as a discrete diffusion of a quantum particle on a de Bruijn graph, corrected on-the-fly by auxiliary modifications of the phases associated with the arcs.

  17. Entanglement and Quantum Computation: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, R.B.

    2000-06-27

    This report presents a selective compilation of basic facts from the fields of particle entanglement and quantum information processing prepared for those non-experts in these fields that may have interest in an area of physics showing counterintuitive, ''spooky'' (Einstein's words) behavior. In fact, quantum information processing could, in the near future, provide a new technology to sustain the benefits to the U.S. economy due to advanced computer technology.

  18. Universal dephasing control during quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Goren; Kurizki, Gershon

    2007-01-01

    Dephasing is a ubiquitous phenomenon that leads to the loss of coherence in quantum systems and the corruption of quantum information. We present a universal dynamical control approach to combat dephasing during all stages of quantum computation, namely, storage and single- and two-qubit operators. We show that (a) tailoring multifrequency gate pulses to the dephasing dynamics can increase fidelity; (b) cross-dephasing, introduced by entanglement, can be eliminated by appropriate control fields; (c) counterintuitively and contrary to previous schemes, one can increase the gate duration, while simultaneously increasing the total gate fidelity

  19. Universal dephasing control during quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Goren; Kurizki, Gershon

    2007-10-01

    Dephasing is a ubiquitous phenomenon that leads to the loss of coherence in quantum systems and the corruption of quantum information. We present a universal dynamical control approach to combat dephasing during all stages of quantum computation, namely, storage and single- and two-qubit operators. We show that (a) tailoring multifrequency gate pulses to the dephasing dynamics can increase fidelity; (b) cross-dephasing, introduced by entanglement, can be eliminated by appropriate control fields; (c) counterintuitively and contrary to previous schemes, one can increase the gate duration, while simultaneously increasing the total gate fidelity.

  20. Blind quantum computation with identity authentication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Li, Zhulin; Chan, Wai Hong; Zhang, Shengyu; Liu, Chengdong

    2018-04-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) allows a client with relatively few quantum resources or poor quantum technologies to delegate his computational problem to a quantum server such that the client's input, output, and algorithm are kept private. However, all existing BQC protocols focus on correctness verification of quantum computation but neglect authentication of participants' identity which probably leads to man-in-the-middle attacks or denial-of-service attacks. In this work, we use quantum identification to overcome such two kinds of attack for BQC, which will be called QI-BQC. We propose two QI-BQC protocols based on a typical single-server BQC protocol and a double-server BQC protocol. The two protocols can ensure both data integrity and mutual identification between participants with the help of a third trusted party (TTP). In addition, an unjammable public channel between a client and a server which is indispensable in previous BQC protocols is unnecessary, although it is required between TTP and each participant at some instant. Furthermore, the method to achieve identity verification in the presented protocols is general and it can be applied to other similar BQC protocols.