WorldWideScience

Sample records for spi-ms molecular organic

  1. Organic Molecular Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Schwoerer, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the physical aspects of organic solids. All phenomena which are necessary in order to understand modern technical applications are being dealt with in a way which makes the concepts of the topics accessible for students. The chapters - from the basics, production and characterization of organic solids and layers to organic semiconductors, superconductors and opto-electronical applications - have been arranged in a logical and well thought-out order.

  2. Properties of Molecular organized assemblies at interfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dr.AURNA

    Organized molecular assemblies. An organized molecular assembly is a group of atoms or ..... Simulations of the growth of clusters on a .... dynamics and function. ➢Actively ... Study of amphiphilic derivatives of YIGSR, mutated at hyper active ...

  3. Organic-based molecular switches for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Noelia; Martín-Lasanta, Ana; Alvarez de Cienfuegos, Luis; Ribagorda, Maria; Parra, Andres; Cuerva, Juan M

    2011-10-05

    In a general sense, molecular electronics (ME) is the branch of nanotechnology which studies the application of molecular building blocks for the fabrication of electronic components. Among the different types of molecules, organic compounds have been revealed as promising candidates for ME, due to the easy access, great structural diversity and suitable electronic and mechanical properties. Thanks to these useful capabilities, organic molecules have been used to emulate electronic devices at the nanoscopic scale. In this feature article, we present the diverse strategies used to develop organic switches towards ME with special attention to non-volatile systems.

  4. Molecular characterization of organic electronic films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLongchamp, Dean M; Kline, R Joseph; Fischer, Daniel A; Richter, Lee J; Toney, Michael F

    2011-01-18

    Organic electronics have emerged as a viable competitor to amorphous silicon for the active layer in low-cost electronics. The critical performance of organic electronic materials is closely related to their morphology and molecular packing. Unlike their inorganic counterparts, polymers combine complex repeat unit structure and crystalline disorder. This combination prevents any single technique from being able to uniquely solve the packing arrangement of the molecules. Here, a general methodology for combining multiple, complementary techniques that provide accurate unit cell dimensions and molecular orientation is described. The combination of measurements results in a nearly complete picture of the organic film morphology. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Controlling Molecular Doping in Organic Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ian E; Moulé, Adam J

    2017-11-01

    The field of organic electronics thrives on the hope of enabling low-cost, solution-processed electronic devices with mechanical, optoelectronic, and chemical properties not available from inorganic semiconductors. A key to the success of these aspirations is the ability to controllably dope organic semiconductors with high spatial resolution. Here, recent progress in molecular doping of organic semiconductors is summarized, with an emphasis on solution-processed p-type doped polymeric semiconductors. Highlighted topics include how solution-processing techniques can control the distribution, diffusion, and density of dopants within the organic semiconductor, and, in turn, affect the electronic properties of the material. Research in these areas has recently intensified, thanks to advances in chemical synthesis, improved understanding of charged states in organic materials, and a focus on relating fabrication techniques to morphology. Significant disorder in these systems, along with complex interactions between doping and film morphology, is often responsible for charge trapping and low doping efficiency. However, the strong coupling between doping, solubility, and morphology can be harnessed to control crystallinity, create doping gradients, and pattern polymers. These breakthroughs suggest a role for molecular doping not only in device function but also in fabrication-applications beyond those directly analogous to inorganic doping. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Contorted Organic Semiconductors for Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu

    This thesis focuses on the synthesis, properties and applications of two types of contorted organic molecules: contorted molecular ribbons and conjugated corrals. We utilized the power of reaction chemistry to writing information into conjugated molecules with contorted structures and studied "structure-property" relationships. The unique properties of the molecules were expressed in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as field-effect transistors, solar cells, photodetectors, etc. In Chapter 2, I describe the design and synthesis of a new graphene ribbon architecture that consists of perylenediimide (PDI) subunits fused together by ethylene bridges. We created a prototype series of oligomers consisting of the dimer, trimer, and tetramer. The steric congestion at the fusion point between the PDI units creates helical junctions, and longer oligomers form helical ribbons. Thin films of these oligomers form the active layer in n-type field effect transistors. UV-vis spectroscopy reveals the emergence of an intense long-wavelength transition in the tetramer. From DFT calculations, we find that the HOMO-2 to LUMO transition is isoenergetic with the HOMO to LUMO transition in the tetramer. We probe these transitions directly using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The HOMO-2 to LUMO transition electronically connects the PDI subunits with the ethylene bridges, and its energy depends on the length of the oligomer. In Chapter 3, I describe an efficiency of 6.1% for a solution processed non-fullerene solar cell using a helical PDI dimer as the electron acceptor. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces, indicating that charge carriers are created from photogenerated excitons in both the electron donor and acceptor phases. Light-intensity-dependent current?voltage measurements suggested different recombination rates under short-circuit and open-circuit conditions. In

  7. Nonequilibrium emergent phenomena in organic molecular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrano, Matteo

    2015-07-15

    The manipulation of matter with ultrashort laser pulses is a relevant research field from both a fundamental and an applied perspective, owing to the efficient coupling to the electronic degrees of freedom on femtosecond timescales and the ability to induce transient phases that cannot be realized in equilibrium scenarios. Strongly correlated materials are a natural environment for the observation of such novel and emergent out-of-equilibrium physics because small modifications to the electron-electron interactions can induce transitions between remarkably different macroscopic phases. One of the most effective means of modifying the effective electron-electron interactions is to perturb the crystal structure through pressure, strain or even light. However, it remains largely unexplored how perturbing the structural degrees of freedom affects the electron dynamics of the transiently driven states and how the interplay of correlations and electron-lattice interactions determine the intrinsic timescales of these nonequilibrium states. This thesis investigates how to control the light-induced nonequilibrium electronic properties in strongly correlated organics, that are highly tunable with moderate variations of external parameters, by perturbing their structural degrees of freedom, either via static pressures or vibrational excitation. We study the role of correlations in determining the relaxation rate of holes (holons) and double occupancies (doublons) in a solid state Mott insulator, the ET-F{sub 2}TCNQ, driven across a transient insulator-to-metal transition. By mapping holon-doublon lifetimes onto the ground-state electronic interactions, we found that the decay rate of the photoinjected quasiparticles depends on the degree of correlation between carriers and is affected by the presence of a competition between local recombination and delocalization of holon-doublon pairs. By optically controlling the effective correlations in organic molecular crystals through

  8. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer/Metal Organic Framework Based Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhong Guo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review describes recent advances in the concept of molecular imprinting using metal organic frameworks (MOF for development of chemical sensors. Two main strategies regarding the fabrication, performance and applications of recent sensors based on molecularly imprinted polymers associated with MOF are presented: molecularly imprinted MOF films and molecularly imprinted core-shell nanoparticles using MOF as core. The associated transduction modes are also discussed. A brief conclusion and future expectations are described herein.

  9. Progresses in organic field-effect transistors and molecular electronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Weiping; Xu Wei; Hu Wenping; Liu Yunqi; Zhu Daoben

    2006-01-01

    In the past years,organic semiconductors have been extensively investigated as electronic materials for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs).In this review,we briefly summarize the current status of organic field-effect transistors including materials design,device physics,molecular electronics and the applications of carbon nanotubes in molecular electronics.Future prospects and investigations required to improve the OFET performance are also involved.

  10. Interfacial polarization phenomena in organic molecular films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Manaka, Takaaki

    2006-01-01

    Electrostatic phenomena occurring at the interface between metal/organic and organic/organic materials are discussed from the viewpoint of dielectrics physics. Focusing on two important origins of surface polarization phenomena, orientational ordering of polar molecules and displacement of excess charges at the interface, surface polarization phenomena of organic thin films are discussed. To define the orientational order of polar molecules, orientational order parameters are introduced, and surface polarization due to the alignment of dipoles is expressed. The generation of Maxwell displacement current (MDC) and optical second harmonic generation (SHG) that are specific for surface organic monomolecular films are discussed, and some experimental evidence are shown. As an extension of the concept of surface Fermi level introduced to discuss the electrostatic phenomena due to electron transfer at the interface between metal-organic insulators, the surface Fermi level is extended to the discussion on the electrostatic phenomena of organic semiconductor materials on metals. In this paper, some experimental evidence of surface polarization originating from polar molecules and displacement of excess charges are shown. After that, with consideration of these surface phenomena, single electron tunneling of organic films are briefly discussed in association with surface polarization phenomena

  11. Organically bound sulphur in coal: A molecular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1992-01-01

    A critical review of literature concerning the molecular characterization of low and high molecular weight organosulphur constitutents present in coal as well as a detailed analysis of organic sulphur compounds present in flash evaporates and pyrolysates of a suite of coals ranging in sulphur

  12. Interface Engineering for Organic Electronics; Manufacturing of Hybrid Inorganic-Organic Molecular Crystal Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Veen, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors are at the basis of Organic Electronics. Objective of this dissertation is “to fabricate high-quality organic molecular single-crystal devices”, to explore the intrinsic properties of organic semiconductors. To achieve this, the in situ fabrication of complete field-effect

  13. Design strategies for organic semiconductors beyond the molecular formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Zachary B; Müllen, Klaus; Bazan, Guillermo C

    2012-09-01

    Organic semiconducting materials based on polymers and molecular systems containing an electronically delocalized structure are the basis of emerging optoelectronic technologies such as plastic solar cells and flexible transistors. For isolated molecules, guidelines exist that rely on the molecular formula to tailor the frontier (highest occupied or lowest unoccupied) molecular orbital energy levels and optical absorption profiles. Much less control can be achieved over relevant properties, however, as one makes the transition to the ensemble behaviour characteristic of the solid state. Polymeric materials are also challenging owing to the statistical description of the average number of repeat units. Here we draw attention to the limitations of molecular formulae as predictive tools for achieving properties relevant to device performances. Illustrative examples highlight the relevance of organization across multiple length scales, and how device performances--although relevant for practical applications--poorly reflect the success of molecular design.

  14. Hybrid organic-inorganic rotaxanes and molecular shuttles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin-Fa; Leigh, David A; Pritchard, Robin G; Schultz, David; Teat, Simon J; Timco, Grigore A; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2009-03-19

    The tetravalency of carbon and its ability to form covalent bonds with itself and other elements enables large organic molecules with complex structures, functions and dynamics to be constructed. The varied electronic configurations and bonding patterns of inorganic elements, on the other hand, can impart diverse electronic, magnetic, catalytic and other useful properties to molecular-level structures. Some hybrid organic-inorganic materials that combine features of both chemistries have been developed, most notably metal-organic frameworks, dense and extended organic-inorganic frameworks and coordination polymers. Metal ions have also been incorporated into molecules that contain interlocked subunits, such as rotaxanes and catenanes, and structures in which many inorganic clusters encircle polymer chains have been described. Here we report the synthesis of a series of discrete rotaxane molecules in which inorganic and organic structural units are linked together mechanically at the molecular level. Structural units (dialkyammonium groups) in dumb-bell-shaped organic molecules template the assembly of essentially inorganic 'rings' about 'axles' to form rotaxanes consisting of various numbers of rings and axles. One of the rotaxanes behaves as a 'molecular shuttle': the ring moves between two binding sites on the axle in a large-amplitude motion typical of some synthetic molecular machine systems. The architecture of the rotaxanes ensures that the electronic, magnetic and paramagnetic characteristics of the inorganic rings-properties that could make them suitable as qubits for quantum computers-can influence, and potentially be influenced by, the organic portion of the molecule.

  15. Molecular orientation and electronic structure at organic heterojunction interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Shu [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 Singapore (Singapore); Zhong, Jian Qiang; Wee, Andrew T.S. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Chen, Wei, E-mail: phycw@nus.edu.sg [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); National University of Singapore (Suzhou) Research Institute, Suzhou (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Molecular orientation at the organic heterojunction interfaces. • Energy level alignments at the organic heterojunction interfaces. • Gap-states mediated interfacial energy level alignment. - Abstract: Due to the highly anisotropic nature of π-conjugated molecules, the molecular orientation in organic thin films can significantly affect light absorption, charge transport, energy level alignment (ELA) and hence device performance. Synchrotron-based near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy represents a powerful technique for probing molecular orientation. The aim of this review paper is to provide a balanced assessment on the investigation of molecular orientation at the organic–organic heterojunction (OOH) interface by NEXAFS, as well as the gap-states mediated orientation dependent energy level alignment at OOH interfaces. We highlight recent progress in elucidating molecular orientation at OOH interfaces dominated by various interfacial interactions, gap-states controlled orientation dependent energy level alignments at OOH interfaces, and the manipulations of molecular orientation and ELA in OOH.

  16. The molecular spin filter constructed from 1D organic chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Ning; Wang, Baolin; Bian, Baoan

    2014-01-01

    We proposed a molecular spin filter, which is constructed from the 1D metallic organic chain (Fe n+1 (C 6 H 4 ) n ). The spin-polarized transport properties of the molecular spin filter are explored by combining density functional theory with nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. Theoretical results reveal that Fe n+1 (C 6 H 4 ) n molecular chain exhibits robust spin filtering effect, and only the spin-down electrons can transmit through the molecular chain. At the given bias voltage window [−1 eV,1 eV], the calculated spin filter efficiency is close to 100% in the case of n≥3. We find that the effect of spin polarization origin from both Fe n+1 and (C 6 H 4 ) n . In addition, negative difference resistance behavior appears in Fe n+1 (C 6 H 4 ) n molecular chain. The results can help us understand the spin transport properties of organic molecular chain. - Highlights: • Theoretical results reveal that Fe n+1 (C 6 H 4 ) n molecular chain exhibits robust spin filtering effect. • The effect of spin polarization origin from both of Fe n+1 and (C 6 H 4 ) n . • Negative difference resistance behavior appears in Fe n+1 (C 6 H 4 ) n molecular chain

  17. The molecular nature of photovoltage losses in organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schlenker, Cody W.

    2011-01-01

    Since the inception of heterojunction organic photovoltaic research the organic/organic interface has been thought to play a crucial role in determining the magnitude of the open-circuit voltage. Yet, the task of defining the molecular properties dictating the photovoltage delivered by these devices, that employ mixed or neat layers of different organic molecules to convert incident photons to electricity, is still an active area of research. This will likely be a key step in designing the new materials required for improving future device efficiencies. With the intent to underscore the importance of considering both thermodynamic and kinetic factors, this article highlights recent progress in elucidating molecular characteristics dictating photovoltage losses in heterojunction organic photovoltaics. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Molecular evolution, intracellular organization, and the quinary structure of proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    McConkey, E H

    1982-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows that at least half of 370 denatured polypeptides from hamster cells and human cells are indistinguishable in terms of isoelectric points and molecular weights. Molecular evolution may have been more conservative for this set of proteins than sequence studies on soluble proteins have implied. This may be a consequence of complexities of intracellular organization and the numerous macromolecular interactions in which most ...

  19. Unraveling the mechanism of molecular doping in organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mityashin, Alexander; Olivier, Yoann; Van Regemorter, Tanguy; Rolin, Cedric; Verlaak, Stijn; Martinelli, Nicolas G; Beljonne, David; Cornil, Jérôme; Genoe, Jan; Heremans, Paul

    2012-03-22

    The mechanism by which molecular dopants donate free charge carriers to the host organic semiconductor is investigated and is found to be quite different from the one in inorganic semiconductors. In organics, a strong correlation between the doping concentration and its charge donation efficiency is demonstrated. Moreover, there is a threshold doping level below which doping simply has no electrical effect. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Molecular materials for organic field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T

    2008-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors are important applications of thin films of molecular materials. A variety of materials have been explored for improving the performance of organic transistors. The materials are conventionally classified as p-channel and n-channel, but not only the performance but also even the carrier polarity is greatly dependent on the combinations of organic semiconductors and electrode materials. In this review, particular emphasis is laid on multi-sulfur compounds such as tetrathiafulvalenes and metal dithiolates. These compounds are components of highly conducting materials such as organic superconductors, but are also used in organic transistors. The charge-transfer complexes are used in organic transistors as active layers as well as electrodes. (topical review)

  1. Molecular fingerprints in the electronic properties of crystalline organic semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciuchi, S.; Hatch, R.C.; Höchst, H.

    2012-01-01

    bands can be achieved in organic semiconductors provided that one properly accounts for the coupling to molecular vibrational modes and the presence of disorder. Our findings rationalize the growing experimental evidence that even the best band structure theories based on a many-body treatment...... of electronic interactions cannot reproduce the experimental photoemission data in this important class of materials....

  2. Hydrothermally stable molecular separation membranes from organically linked silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castricum, H.L.; Sah, A; Blank, D.H.A.; Ten Elshof, J.E. [Inorganic Materials Science, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Kreiter, R.; Vente, J.F. [ECN Energy Efficiency in the Industry, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-06-15

    A highly hydrothermally stable microporous network material has been developed that can be applied in energy-efficient molecular sieving. The material was synthesized by employing organically bridged monomers in acid-catalysed sol-gel hydrolysis and condensation, and is composed of covalently bonded organic and inorganic moieties. Due to its hybrid nature, it withstands higher temperatures than organic polymers and exhibits high solvolytical and acid stability. A thin film membrane that was prepared with the hybrid material was found to be stable in the dehydration of n-butanol at 150C for almost two years. This membrane is the first that combines a high resistance against water at elevated temperatures with a high separation factor and permeance. It therefore has high potential for energy-efficient molecular separation under industrial conditions, including the dehydration of organic solvents. The organically bridged monomers induce increased toughness in the thin film layer. This suppresses hydrolysis of Si-O-Si network bonds and results in a high resistance towards stress-induced cracking. The large non-hydrolysable units thus remain well incorporated in the surrounding matrix such that the material combines high (pore) structural and mechanical stability. The sol mean particle size was found to be a viable parameter to tune the thickness of the membrane layer and thus optimize the separation performance. We anticipate that other hybrid organosilicas can be made in a similar fashion, to yield a whole new class of materials with superior molecular sieving properties and high hydrothermal stability.

  3. Molecular dynamic simulations of the sputtering of multilayer organic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Postawa, Z; Piaskowy, J; Krantzman, K; Winograd, N; Garrison, B J

    2003-01-01

    Sputtering of organic overlayers has been modeled using molecular dynamics computer simulations. The investigated systems are composed of benzene molecules condensed into one, two and three layers on an Ag left brace 1 1 1 right brace surface. The formed organic overlayers were bombarded with 4 keV Ar projectiles at normal incidence. The development of the collision cascade in the organic overlayer was investigated. The sputtering yield, mass, internal and kinetic energy distributions of ejected particles have been analyzed as a function of the thickness of the organic layer. The results show that all emission characteristics are sensitive to the variation of layer thickness. Although most of the ejected intact benzene molecules originate from the topmost layer, the emission of particles located initially in second and third layers is significant. The analysis indicates that the metallic substrate plays a dominant role in the ejection of intact organic molecules.

  4. Suppressing molecular vibrations in organic semiconductors by inducing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takayoshi; Häusermann, Roger; Tsurumi, Junto; Soeda, Junshi; Okada, Yugo; Yamashita, Yu; Akamatsu, Norihisa; Shishido, Atsushi; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Yanagisawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    2016-04-04

    Organic molecular semiconductors are solution processable, enabling the growth of large-area single-crystal semiconductors. Improving the performance of organic semiconductor devices by increasing the charge mobility is an ongoing quest, which calls for novel molecular and material design, and improved processing conditions. Here we show a method to increase the charge mobility in organic single-crystal field-effect transistors, by taking advantage of the inherent softness of organic semiconductors. We compress the crystal lattice uniaxially by bending the flexible devices, leading to an improved charge transport. The mobility increases from 9.7 to 16.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) by 70% under 3% strain. In-depth analysis indicates that compressing the crystal structure directly restricts the vibration of the molecules, thus suppresses dynamic disorder, a unique mechanism in organic semiconductors. Since strain can be easily induced during the fabrication process, we expect our method to be exploited to build high-performance organic devices.

  5. From molecular design and materials construction to organic nanophotonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Nanophotonics has recently received broad research interest, since it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations in electronic circuits. Diverse optical materials down to the wavelength scale are required to develop nanophotonic devices, including functional components for light emission, transmission, and detection. During the past decade, the chemists have made their own contributions to this interdisciplinary field, especially from the controlled fabrication of nanophotonic molecules and materials. In this context, organic micro- or nanocrystals have been developed as a very promising kind of building block in the construction of novel units for integrated nanophotonics, mainly due to the great versatility in organic molecular structures and their flexibility for the subsequent processing. Following the pioneering works on organic nanolasers and optical waveguides, the organic nanophotonic materials and devices have attracted increasing interest and developed rapidly during the past few years. In this Account, we review our research on the photonic performance of molecular micro- or nanostructures and the latest breakthroughs toward organic nanophotonic devices. Overall, the versatile features of organic materials are highlighted, because they brings tunable optical properties based on molecular design, size-dependent light confinement in low-dimensional structures, and various device geometries for nanophotonic integration. The molecular diversity enables abundant optical transitions in conjugated π-electron systems, and thus brings specific photonic functions into molecular aggregates. The morphology of these micro- or nanostructures can be further controlled based on the weak intermolecular interactions during molecular assembly process, making the aggregates show photon confinement or light guiding properties as nanophotonic materials. By adoption of some active processes in the composite of two or more

  6. Organization of a radioisotope based molecular biology laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-12-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has revolutionized the application of molecular techniques to medicine. Together with other molecular biology techniques it is being increasingly applied to human health for identifying prognostic markers and drug resistant profiles, developing diagnostic tests and genotyping systems and for treatment follow-up of certain diseases in developed countries. Developing Member States have expressed their need to also benefit from the dissemination of molecular advances. The use of radioisotopes, as a step in the detection process or for increased sensitivity and specificity is well established, making it ideally suitable for technology transfer. Many molecular based projects using isotopes for detecting and studying micro organisms, hereditary and neoplastic diseases are received for approval every year. In keeping with the IAEA's programme, several training activities and seminars have been organized to enhance the capabilities of developing Member States to employ in vitro nuclear medicine technologies for managing their important health problems and for undertaking related basic and clinical research. The background material for this publication was collected at training activities and from feedback received from participants at research and coordination meetings. In addition, a consultants' meeting was held in June 2004 to compile the first draft of this report. Previous IAEA TECDOCS, namely IAEA-TECDOC-748 and IAEA-TECDOC-1001, focused on molecular techniques and their application to medicine while the present publication provides information on organization of the laboratory, quality assurance and radio-safety. The technology has specific requirements of the way the laboratory is organized (e.g. for avoiding contamination and false positives in PCR) and of quality assurance in order to provide accurate information to decision makers. In addition while users of the technology accept the scientific rationale of using radio

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of graphoepitaxy of organic semiconductors, sexithiophene, and pentacene: Molecular-scale mechanisms of organic graphoepitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Susumu

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the organic semiconductors α-sexithiophene (6T) and pentacene were carried out to clarify the mechanism of organic graphoepitaxy at the molecular level. First, the models of the grooved substrates were made and the surfaces of the inside of the grooves were modified with -OH or -OSi(CH3)3, making the surfaces hydrophilic or hydrophobic. By the MD simulations of 6T, it was found that three stable azimuthal directions exist (0, ˜45, and 90° the angle that the c-axis makes with the groove), being consistent with experimental results. MD simulations of deposition processes of 6T and pentacene were also carried out, and pentacene molecules showed the spontaneous formation of herringbone packing during deposition. Some pentacene molecules stood on the surface and formed a cluster whose a-axis was parallel to the groove. It is expected that a deep understanding of the molecular-scale mechanisms will lead graphoepitaxy to practical applications, improving the performance of organic devices.

  8. Organic Cocrystals: New Strategy for Molecular Collaborative Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zhu, Weigang; Dong, Huanli; Zhang, Xiaotao; Li, Rongjin; Hu, Wenping

    2016-12-01

    Organic cocrystals that are composed of two or more components usually exhibit novel, unpredictable, and even unique properties rather than a simple combination of the properties of their components, such as white-light emission, ambipolar charge transport, nonlinear optics, and ferroelectricity. Since cocrystal engineering represents a novel strategy for synthesizing multifunctional materials, which opens the door for molecular collaborative innovation, it has aroused much attention in recent years. However, as it is also a relatively new research field, it is only in its early stages of development. In order to provide readers with an understanding of the future design of cocrystals for potential applications, a brief review of organic cocrystals is presented here, including an introduction to organic cocrystals as well as discussions of cocrystal preparation, methods and techniques of characterization, and multifunctional applications of cocrystals. Moreover, the outlook for further studies and applications of cocrystal engineering is considered.

  9. Molecular and polymeric organic semiconductors for applications in photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinhardt, G.

    2000-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on molecular as well as polymeric semiconductors were investigated and characterized. The organic materials presented here exhibit the advantages of low price, low processing costs and the possibility of tuning their optical properties. The photovoltaic properties were investigated by photocurrent action spectroscopy and I/V-characterization and the electric field distribution in each layer by electroabsorption spectroscopy. Single layer devices of molecular semiconductors and semiconducting polymers like methyl-substituted polyparaphenylene, CN-Ether-PPV, copper-phthalocyanine, the terryleneimide DOTer, the perylene derivatives BBP-perylene and polyBBP-perylene show low photocurrents as well as a small photovoltaic effect in their pristine form. One way to enhance the performance is to blend the active layer with molecular dopands like a soluble form of titaniumoxophthalocyanine or the aromatic macromolecule RS19 or to combine two organic semiconductors in heterostructure devices. The motivation for these experiments was the optimization of either charge transfer or energy transfer from one molecule to its neighbor molecule. A model based on the internal filter effect was used for fitting the photoresponse of single layer devices. For optimising heterostructure solar cells a more sophisticated theoretical model taking into account interference effects was used. (author)

  10. Quantitative Determination of Organic Semiconductor Microstructure from the Molecular to Device Scale

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan; Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Miller, Chad E.; Salleo, Alberto; Toney, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to demonstrate quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale. The quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale

  11. Capture of organic iodides from nuclear waste by metal-organic framework-based molecular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baiyan; Dong, Xinglong; Wang, Hao; Ma, Dingxuan; Tan, Kui; Jensen, Stephanie; Deibert, Benjamin J; Butler, Joseph; Cure, Jeremy; Shi, Zhan; Thonhauser, Timo; Chabal, Yves J; Han, Yu; Li, Jing

    2017-09-07

    Effective capture of radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste remains a significant challenge due to the drawbacks of current adsorbents such as low uptake capacity, high cost, and non-recyclability. We report here a general approach to overcome this challenge by creating radioactive organic iodide molecular traps through functionalization of metal-organic framework materials with tertiary amine-binding sites. The molecular trap exhibits a high CH 3 I saturation uptake capacity of 71 wt% at 150 °C, which is more than 340% higher than the industrial adsorbent Ag 0 @MOR under identical conditions. These functionalized metal-organic frameworks also serve as good adsorbents at low temperatures. Furthermore, the resulting adsorbent can be recycled multiple times without loss of capacity, making recyclability a reality. In combination with its chemical and thermal stability, high capture efficiency and low cost, the adsorbent demonstrates promise for industrial radioactive organic iodides capture from nuclear waste. The capture mechanism was investigated by experimental and theoretical methods.Capturing radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste is important for safe nuclear energy usage, but remains a significant challenge. Here, Li and co-workers fabricate a stable metal-organic framework functionalized with tertiary amine groups that exhibits high capacities for radioactive organic iodides uptake.

  12. Capture of organic iodides from nuclear waste by metal-organic framework-based molecular traps

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Baiyan

    2017-09-01

    Effective capture of radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste remains a significant challenge due to the drawbacks of current adsorbents such as low uptake capacity, high cost, and non-recyclability. We report here a general approach to overcome this challenge by creating radioactive organic iodide molecular traps through functionalization of metal-organic framework materials with tertiary amine-binding sites. The molecular trap exhibits a high CH3I saturation uptake capacity of 71 wt% at 150 °C, which is more than 340% higher than the industrial adsorbent Ag0@MOR under identical conditions. These functionalized metal-organic frameworks also serve as good adsorbents at low temperatures. Furthermore, the resulting adsorbent can be recycled multiple times without loss of capacity, making recyclability a reality. In combination with its chemical and thermal stability, high capture efficiency and low cost, the adsorbent demonstrates promise for industrial radioactive organic iodides capture from nuclear waste. The capture mechanism was investigated by experimental and theoretical methods.Capturing radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste is important for safe nuclear energy usage, but remains a significant challenge. Here, Li and co-workers fabricate a stable metal-organic framework functionalized with tertiary amine groups that exhibits high capacities for radioactive organic iodides uptake.

  13. Langmuir-Blodgett films of molecular organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talham, Daniel R; Yamamoto, Takashi; Meisel, Mark W

    2008-01-01

    Langmuir-Blodgett methods are perhaps the original approach for achieving controlled deposition of organic thin films. Molecules are first organized into a monolayer array on the surface of water before transfer as a monolayer onto solid supports. Molecular monolayers, multilayers, and multilayered heterostructures can be achieved. The capability of exercising such control over thin film assemblies has attracted materials chemists and physicists to develop Langmuir-Blodgett films for studies on organic conductors, magnets, non-linear optics, rectifiers, and intermolecular electron transfer. This article reviews objectives in each of these areas and selects some specific examples from the literature to highlight the state of the art, mostly from the point of view of the chemical systems that are studied. Mixed organic/inorganic hybrid films represent a new direction for Langmuir-Blodgett films in materials science, combining conventional inorganic solid-state phenomena with the properties of the organic networks, and recent examples, taken principally from the authors' work, are highlighted

  14. Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based Molecular Mechanics for Organic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Pengyu; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W

    2011-10-11

    An empirical potential based on permanent atomic multipoles and atomic induced dipoles is reported for alkanes, alcohols, amines, sulfides, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amides, aromatics and other small organic molecules. Permanent atomic multipole moments through quadrupole moments have been derived from gas phase ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The van der Waals parameters are obtained by fitting to gas phase homodimer QM energies and structures, as well as experimental densities and heats of vaporization of neat liquids. As a validation, the hydrogen bonding energies and structures of gas phase heterodimers with water are evaluated using the resulting potential. For 32 homo- and heterodimers, the association energy agrees with ab initio results to within 0.4 kcal/mol. The RMS deviation of hydrogen bond distance from QM optimized geometry is less than 0.06 Å. In addition, liquid self-diffusion and static dielectric constants computed from molecular dynamics simulation are consistent with experimental values. The force field is also used to compute the solvation free energy of 27 compounds not included in the parameterization process, with a RMS error of 0.69 kcal/mol. The results obtained in this study suggest the AMOEBA force field performs well across different environments and phases. The key algorithms involved in the electrostatic model and a protocol for developing parameters are detailed to facilitate extension to additional molecular systems.

  15. Molecular Determinants of Dissolved Organic Matter Reactivity in Lake Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Mostovaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lakes in the boreal region have been recognized as the biogeochemical hotspots, yet many questions regarding the regulators of organic matter processing in these systems remain open. Molecular composition can be an important determinant of dissolved organic matter (DOM fate in freshwater systems, but many aspects of this relationship remain unclear due to the complexity of DOM and its interactions in the natural environment. Here, we combine ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS with kinetic modeling of decay of >1,300 individual DOM molecular formulae identified by mass spectrometry, to evaluate the role of specific molecular characteristics in decomposition of lake water DOM. Our data is derived from a 4 months microbial decomposition experiment, carried out on water from three Swedish lakes, with the set-up including natural lake water, as well as the lake water pretreated with UV light. The relative decay rate of every molecular formula was estimated by fitting a single exponential model to the change in FT-ICR-MS signal intensities over decomposition time. We found a continuous range of exponential decay coefficients (kexp within different groups of compounds and show that for highly unsaturated and phenolic compounds the distribution of kexp was shifted toward the lowest values. Contrary to this general trend, plant-derived polyphenols and polycondensed aromatics were on average more reactive than compounds with an intermediate aromaticity. The decay rate of aromatic compounds increased with increasing nominal oxidation state of carbon, and molecular mass in some cases showed an inverse relationship with kexp in the UV-manipulated treatment. Further, we observe an increase in formulae-specific kexp as a result of the UV pretreatment. General trends in reactivity identified among major compound groups emphasize the importance of the intrinsic controllers of lake water DOM decay. However, we additionally indicate that each

  16. Molecular Understanding of Organic Solar Cells: The Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2009-11-17

    (Figure presented) Our objective in this Account is 3-fold. First, we provide an overview of the optical and electronic processes that take place in a solid-state organic solar cell, which we define as a cell in which the semiconducting materials between the electrodes are organic, be them polymers, oligomers, or small molecules; this discussion is also meant to set the conceptual framework in which many of the contributions to this Special Issue on Photovoltaics can We viewed. We successively turn our attention to (i) optical absorption and exciton formation, (ii) exciton migration to the donor - acceptor interface, (iii) exciton dissociation into charge carriers, resulting in the appearance of holes in the donor and electrons in the acceptor, (iv) charge-carrier mobility, and (v) charge collection at the electrodes. For each of these processes, we also describe the theoretical challenges that need to be overcome to gain a comprehensive understanding at the molecular level. Finally, we highlight recent theoretical advances, in particular regarding the determination of the energetics and dynamics at organic - organic interfaces, and underline that the right balance needs to be found for the optimization of material parameters that often result in opposite effects on the photovoltaic performance. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  17. Influence of Molecular Shape on Molecular Orientation and Stability of Vapor-Deposited Organic Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Diane M.; Johnson, Noah D.; Ediger, M. D.

    Physical vapor deposition is commonly used to prepare active layers in organic electronics. Recently, it has been shown that molecular orientation and packing can be tuned by changing the substrate temperature during deposition, while still producing macroscopically homogeneous films. These amorphous materials can be highly anisotropic when prepared with low substrate temperatures, and they can exhibit exceptional kinetic stability; films retain their favorable packing when heated to high temperatures. Here, we study the influence of molecular shape on molecular orientation and stability. We investigate disc-shaped molecules, such as TCTA and m-MTDATA, nearly spherical molecules, such as Alq3, and linear molecules covering a broad range of aspect ratios, such as p-TTP and BSB-Cz. Disc-shaped molecules have preferential horizontal orientation when deposited at low substrate temperatures, and their orientation can be tuned by changing the substrate temperature. Alq3 forms stable, amorphous films that are optically isotropic when vapor deposited over a broad range of substrate temperatures. This work may guide the choice of material and deposition conditions for vapor-deposited films used in organic electronics and allow for more efficient devices to be fabricated.

  18. Molecular pharmacology of promiscuous seven transmembrane receptors sensing organic nutrients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Johansen, Lars Dan; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    drug targets, to treat, for example, type II diabetes by mimicking food intake by potent agonists or positive allosteric modulators. The ligand-receptor interactions of the promiscuous receptors of organic nutrients thus remain an interesting subject of emerging functional importance....... in taste tissue, the gastrointestinal tract, endocrine glands, adipose tissue, and/or kidney. These receptors thus hold the potential to act as sensors of food intake, regulating, for example, release of incretin hormones from the gut, insulin/glucagon from the pancreas, and leptin from adipose tissue....... The promiscuous tendency in ligand recognition of these receptors is in contrast to the typical specific interaction with one physiological agonist seen for most receptors, which challenges the classic "lock-and-key" concept. We here review the molecular mechanisms of nutrient sensing of the calcium...

  19. Measurement of incident molecular temperature in the formation of organic thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takahiro; Matsubara, Ryosuke; Hayakawa, Munetaka; Shimoyama, Akifumi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tsuji, Akira; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Kubono, Atsushi

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the effects of incident molecular temperature on organic-thin-film growth by vacuum evaporation, quantitative analysis of molecular temperature is required. In this study, we propose a method of determining molecular temperature based on the heat exchange between a platinum filament and molecular vapor. Molecular temperature is estimated from filament temperature, which remains unchanged even under molecular vapor supply. The results indicate that our method has sufficient sensitivity to evaluate the molecular temperature under the typical growth rate used for fabrication of functional organic thin films.

  20. Particle size dependence of biogenic secondary organic aerosol molecular composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Peijun; Johnston, Murray V.

    2017-06-01

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is initiated by the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the gas phase whose products subsequently partition to the particle phase. Non-volatile molecules have a negligible evaporation rate and grow particles at their condensation rate. Semi-volatile molecules have a significant evaporation rate and grow particles at a much slower rate than their condensation rate. Particle phase chemistry may enhance particle growth if it transforms partitioned semi-volatile molecules into non-volatile products. In principle, changes in molecular composition as a function of particle size allow non-volatile molecules that have condensed from the gas phase (a surface-limited process) to be distinguished from those produced by particle phase reaction (a volume-limited process). In this work, SOA was produced by β-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor. Aerosol exiting the reactor was size-selected with a differential mobility analyzer, and individual particle sizes between 35 and 110 nm in diameter were characterized by on- and offline mass spectrometry. Both the average oxygen-to-carbon (O / C) ratio and carbon oxidation state (OSc) were found to decrease with increasing particle size, while the relative signal intensity of oligomers increased with increasing particle size. These results are consistent with oligomer formation primarily in the particle phase (accretion reactions, which become more favored as the volume-to-surface-area ratio of the particle increases). Analysis of a series of polydisperse SOA samples showed similar dependencies: as the mass loading increased (and average volume-to-surface-area ratio increased), the average O / C ratio and OSc decreased, while the relative intensity of oligomer ions increased. The results illustrate the potential impact that particle phase chemistry can have on biogenic SOA formation and the particle size range where this chemistry becomes important.

  1. Particle size dependence of biogenic secondary organic aerosol molecular composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA is initiated by the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the gas phase whose products subsequently partition to the particle phase. Non-volatile molecules have a negligible evaporation rate and grow particles at their condensation rate. Semi-volatile molecules have a significant evaporation rate and grow particles at a much slower rate than their condensation rate. Particle phase chemistry may enhance particle growth if it transforms partitioned semi-volatile molecules into non-volatile products. In principle, changes in molecular composition as a function of particle size allow non-volatile molecules that have condensed from the gas phase (a surface-limited process to be distinguished from those produced by particle phase reaction (a volume-limited process. In this work, SOA was produced by β-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor. Aerosol exiting the reactor was size-selected with a differential mobility analyzer, and individual particle sizes between 35 and 110 nm in diameter were characterized by on- and offline mass spectrometry. Both the average oxygen-to-carbon (O ∕ C ratio and carbon oxidation state (OSc were found to decrease with increasing particle size, while the relative signal intensity of oligomers increased with increasing particle size. These results are consistent with oligomer formation primarily in the particle phase (accretion reactions, which become more favored as the volume-to-surface-area ratio of the particle increases. Analysis of a series of polydisperse SOA samples showed similar dependencies: as the mass loading increased (and average volume-to-surface-area ratio increased, the average O ∕ C ratio and OSc decreased, while the relative intensity of oligomer ions increased. The results illustrate the potential impact that particle phase chemistry can have on biogenic SOA formation and the particle size range where this chemistry becomes

  2. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM): a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbioso, Antonio; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Advances in water chemistry in the last decade have improved our knowledge about the genesis, composition, and structure of dissolved organic matter, and its effect on the environment. Improvements in analytical technology, for example Fourier-transform ion cyclotron (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS), homo and hetero-correlated multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and excitation emission matrix fluorimetry (EEMF) with parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis for UV-fluorescence spectroscopy have resulted in these advances. Improved purification methods, for example ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis, have enabled facile desalting and concentration of freshly collected DOM samples, thereby complementing the analytical process. Although its molecular weight (MW) remains undefined, DOM is described as a complex mixture of low-MW substances and larger-MW biomolecules, for example proteins, polysaccharides, and exocellular macromolecules. There is a general consensus that marine DOM originates from terrestrial and marine sources. A combination of diagenetic and microbial processes contributes to its origin, resulting in refractory organic matter which acts as carbon sink in the ocean. Ocean DOM is derived partially from humified products of plants decay dissolved in fresh water and transported to the ocean, and partially from proteinaceous and polysaccharide material from phytoplankton metabolism, which undergoes in-situ microbial processes, becoming refractory. Some of the DOM interacts with radiation and is, therefore, defined as chromophoric DOM (CDOM). CDOM is classified as terrestrial, marine, anthropogenic, or mixed, depending on its origin. Terrestrial CDOM reaches the oceans via estuaries, whereas autochthonous CDOM is formed in sea water by microbial activity; anthropogenic CDOM is a result of human activity. CDOM also affects the quality of water, by shielding it from solar radiation, and constitutes a carbon sink pool. Evidence in support

  3. Nitrogen mineralization in a simulated rhizosphere as influenced by low molecular weight organic substances

    OpenAIRE

    Begum, Shamim Ara; Kader, MD Abdul; Sleutel, Steven; De Neve, Stefaan

    2012-01-01

    Rhizodeposits consist of over 200 organic compounds, mainly low-molecular-weight organic substances (LMWOS) such as amino acids (AA), carbohydrates (CH) and carboxylic acids (CA), lipids and phenols. Those LMWOS influence nutrient turnover, particularly N turnover. However, the exact influence of these organic substances on nitrogen mineralization is yet unknown. Therefore, the stimulatory effects of low molecular weight organic substances on nitrogen mineralization in the rhizosphere of a si...

  4. Study of molecular movements in some organic crystals by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, M.

    1971-01-01

    After a discussion on molecular crystals (generalities, movements within molecular solids, study of movements, complexes by charge transfer) and some specific ones (molecular complexes of trinitrobenzene or TNB), this research thesis reports the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study molecular movements: generalities on broadband NMR, spin relaxation and strong field network, observation of the absorption signal and measurement of the second moment. The last part reports and discusses experimental results obtained on TNB-naphthalene, on TNB-azulene, on TNB-benzothiophene, and on TNB-indole

  5. Molecular pharmacology of promiscuous seven transmembrane receptors sensing organic nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Johansen, Lars Dan; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-09-01

    A number of highly promiscuous seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors have been cloned and characterized within the last few years. It is noteworthy that many of these receptors are activated broadly by amino acids, proteolytic degradation products, carbohydrates, or free fatty acids and are expressed in taste tissue, the gastrointestinal tract, endocrine glands, adipose tissue, and/or kidney. These receptors thus hold the potential to act as sensors of food intake, regulating, for example, release of incretin hormones from the gut, insulin/glucagon from the pancreas, and leptin from adipose tissue. The promiscuous tendency in ligand recognition of these receptors is in contrast to the typical specific interaction with one physiological agonist seen for most receptors, which challenges the classic "lock-and-key" concept. We here review the molecular mechanisms of nutrient sensing of the calcium-sensing receptor, the G protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A), and the taste1 receptor T1R1/T1R3, which are sensing L-alpha-amino acids, the carbohydrate-sensing T1R2/T1R3 receptor, the proteolytic degradation product sensor GPR93 (also termed GPR92), and the free fatty acid (FFA) sensing receptors FFA1, FFA2, FFA3, GPR84, and GPR120. The involvement of the individual receptors in sensing of food intake has been validated to different degrees because of limited availability of specific pharmacological tools and/or receptor knockout mice. However, as a group, the receptors represent potential drug targets, to treat, for example, type II diabetes by mimicking food intake by potent agonists or positive allosteric modulators. The ligand-receptor interactions of the promiscuous receptors of organic nutrients thus remain an interesting subject of emerging functional importance.

  6. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Luis R. Domingo

    2016-01-01

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through ...

  7. Electronic properties of organic monolayers and molecular devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These devices exhibit a marked current–voltage rectification behavior due to resonant transport between the Si conduction band and the molecule highest occupied molecular orbital of the molecule. We discuss the role of metal Fermi level pinning in the current–voltage behavior of these molecular junctions. We also ...

  8. Editorial: Molecular Organization of Membranes: Where Biology Meets Biophysics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cebecauer, Marek; Holowka, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 113 (2017), s. 1-3 ISSN 2296-634X Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : nanodomains * membrane properties * cell membrane Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology

  9. Ion beam effects in organic molecular solids and polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesan, T.; Calcagno, L.; Elman, B.S.; Foti, G.

    1987-01-01

    In general ion implantation leads to irreversible changes in organic films and hence it is important to understand the damage mechanisms in these solids. Most of the technology based on irradiation effects in organics must somehow make use of the fact that the chemistry of the organic films is easily changed. This chapter is organized to explore the various ion induced chemical changes in the organic films followed by a description of the optical and electrical property changes produced in the films due to the ion irradiation

  10. The role of molecular markers and marker assisted selection in breeding for organic agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lammerts van Bueren, E.T.; Backes, G.; de Vriend, H.

    2010-01-01

    markers is not self-evident and is often debated. Organic and low-input farming conditions require breeding for robust and flexible varieties, which may be hampered by too much focus on the molecular level. Pros and contras for application of molecular markers in breeding for organic agriculture...... was the topic of a recent European plant breeding workshop. The participants evaluated strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of the use of molecular markers and we formalized their inputs into breeder’s perspectives and perspectives seen from the organic sector’s standpoint. Clear strengths were...

  11. Multi-scale calculation of the electric properties of organic-based devices from the molecular structure

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Haoyuan; Qiu, Yong; Duan, Lian

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed to calculate the electric properties of organic-based devices from the molecular structure. The charge transfer rate is obtained using non-adiabatic molecular dynamics. The organic film in the device is modeled using

  12. Molecular approaches to detect and study the organisms causing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review will summarise the molecular approaches used to detect and analyse the genomes of Babesia bovis, B. bigemina and Anaplasma marginale which cause bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. These tick borne diseases are widely distributed in Africa, Asia, Australia, and Central and South America and for ...

  13. New organic semiconductors with imide/amide-containing molecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Guanxin; Cai, Zhengxu; Chen, Xin; Luo, Hewei; Li, Yonghai; Wang, Jianguo; Zhang, Deqing

    2014-10-29

    Due to their high electron affinities, chemical and thermal stabilities, π-conjugated molecules with imide/amide frameworks have received considerable attentions as promising candidates for high-performance optoelectronic materials, particularly for organic semiconductors with high carrier mobilities. The purpose of this Research News is to give an overview of recent advances in development of high performance imide/amide based organic semiconductors for field-effect transistors. It covers naphthalene diimide-, perylene diimide- and amide-based conjugated molecules and polymers for organic semiconductors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Towards bridging the gap from molecular forces to the movement of organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2004-01-01

    Muscles are responsible for generating the forces required for the movement of multicellular organisms. Microscopically, these forces arise as a consequence of motor proteins (myosin) pulling and sliding along actin filaments. Current knowledge states that the molecular forces between actin...

  15. SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKERS IN URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER FROM PHILADELPHIA, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic molecular markers were measured in airborne particulate matter (PM10) from the City of Philadelphia North Broad Street air quality monitoring site to identify the seasonal abundances of key tracer compounds together with their dominant sources. Daily PM10...

  16. Hybrid organic semiconductor lasers for bio-molecular sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughey, Anne-Marie; Foucher, Caroline; Guilhabert, Benoit; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L; Skabara, Peter J; Burley, Glenn; Dawson, Martin D; Laurand, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Bio-functionalised luminescent organic semiconductors are attractive for biophotonics because they can act as efficient laser materials while simultaneously interacting with molecules. In this paper, we present and discuss a laser biosensor platform that utilises a gain layer made of such an organic semiconductor material. The simple structure of the sensor and its operation principle are described. Nanolayer detection is shown experimentally and analysed theoretically in order to assess the potential and the limits of the biosensor. The advantage conferred by the organic semiconductor is explained, and comparisons to laser sensors using alternative dye-doped materials are made. Specific biomolecular sensing is demonstrated, and routes to functionalisation with nucleic acid probes, and future developments opened up by this achievement, are highlighted. Finally, attractive formats for sensing applications are mentioned, as well as colloidal quantum dots, which in the future could be used in conjunction with organic semiconductors.

  17. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  18. Effect of polar surfaces on organic molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharia, Onise; Tsyshevskiy, Roman; Kuklja, Maija; University of Maryland College Park Team

    Polar oxide materials reveal intriguing opportunities in the field of electronics, superconductivity and nanotechnology. While behavior of polar surfaces has been widely studied on oxide materials and oxide-oxide interfaces, manifestations and properties of polar surfaces in molecular crystals are still poorly understood. Here we discover that the polar catastrophe phenomenon, known on oxides, also takes place in molecular materials as illustrated with an example of cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) crystals. We show that the surface charge separation is a feasible compensation mechanism to counterbalance the macroscopic dipole moment and remove the electrostatic instability. We discuss the role of surface charge on degradation of polar surfaces, electrical conductivity, optical band-gap closure and surface metallization. Research is supported by the US ONR (Grants N00014-16-1-2069 and N00014-16-1-2346) and NSF. We used NERSC, XSEDE and MARCC computational resources.

  19. Ultrasonic Studies of Molecular Interactions in Organic Binary Liquid Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thirumaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity have been measured for the mixtures of 1-alkanols such as 1-propanol and 1-butanol with N-N dimethylformamide (DMF at 303 K. The experimental data have been used to calculate the acoustical parameters namely adiabatic compressibility (β, free length (Lf, free volume (Vf and internal pressure (πi. The excess values of the above parameters are also evaluated and discussed in the light of molecular interaction existing in the mixtures. It is obvious that there is a formation of hydrogen bonding between DMF and 1-alkanols. Further, the addition of DMF causes dissociation of hydrogen bonded structure of 1-alkanols. The evaluated excess values confirm that the molecular association is more pronounced in system-II comparing to the system-I.

  20. Molecular analysis of the replication program in unicellular model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuraman, M K; Brewer, Bonita J

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotes have long been reported to show temporal programs of replication, different portions of the genome being replicated at different times in S phase, with the added possibility of developmentally regulated changes in this pattern depending on species and cell type. Unicellular model organisms, primarily the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have been central to our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the regulation of replication origins and the temporal program of replication in particular. But what exactly is a temporal program of replication, and how might it arise? In this article, we explore this question, drawing again on the wealth of experimental information in unicellular model organisms.

  1. Molecular Understanding of Organic Solar Cells: The Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Bré das, Jean-Luc; Norton, Joseph E.; Cornil, Jé rô me; Coropceanu, Veaceslav

    2009-01-01

    (Figure presented) Our objective in this Account is 3-fold. First, we provide an overview of the optical and electronic processes that take place in a solid-state organic solar cell, which we define as a cell in which the semiconducting materials

  2. Molecular catalysis and high-volume organic synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khidekel, M L; Vasserberg, V E

    1977-01-01

    The field of catalysis is very wide. The properties of catalysts are briefly reviewed and compared with the properties of enzymes. Various uses of enxymes in industry (sugar from corn, cellulose breakdown, etc.) are pointed out. The types of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts for use in organic synthesis are discussed. 48 refs. (SJR)

  3. Application of molecular spectroscopy to the determination of organic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leicknam, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    Some brief accounts are presented followed by a discussion about various physico-chemical techniques: Raman spectrometry, infrared spectrometry, resonance Raman spectrometry, conformational analysis and polarized Rayleigh diffusion. Applications of the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to nucleotide structure in aqueous solution are described as well as some applications of neutron scattering to the study of organic structures [fr

  4. The molecular nature of photovoltage losses in organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schlenker, Cody W.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    dictating the photovoltage delivered by these devices, that employ mixed or neat layers of different organic molecules to convert incident photons to electricity, is still an active area of research. This will likely be a key step in designing the new

  5. Molecular physiology of weak organic acid stress in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, J.W.A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which weak organic acid (WOA) preservatives inhibit growth of microorganisms may differ between different WOAs and these differences are not well understood. The aim of this thesis has been to obtain a better understanding of the mode of action of these preservatives by which they

  6. Molecular Phylogenetic: Organism Taxonomy Method Based on Evolution History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.L.P Indi Dharmayanti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic is described as taxonomy classification of an organism based on its evolution history namely its phylogeny and as a part of systematic science that has objective to determine phylogeny of organism according to its characteristic. Phylogenetic analysis from amino acid and protein usually became important area in sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis can be used to follow the rapid change of a species such as virus. The phylogenetic evolution tree is a two dimensional of a species graphic that shows relationship among organisms or particularly among their gene sequences. The sequence separation are referred as taxa (singular taxon that is defined as phylogenetically distinct units on the tree. The tree consists of outer branches or leaves that represents taxa and nodes and branch represent correlation among taxa. When the nucleotide sequence from two different organism are similar, they were inferred to be descended from common ancestor. There were three methods which were used in phylogenetic, namely (1 Maximum parsimony, (2 Distance, and (3 Maximum likehoood. Those methods generally are applied to construct the evolutionary tree or the best tree for determine sequence variation in group. Every method is usually used for different analysis and data.

  7. Molecular transport behaviour of organic solvents through halloysite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Micro and Nano Materials Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Institute of Technical ... The transport behaviour of three organic solvents (benzene, toluene and xylene) through halloysite nan- ... ena play important roles in different areas of engineering and ... their blends by an equilibrium swelling method has been.

  8. A new parallel molecular dynamics algorithm for organic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plimpton, S.; Hendrickson, B.; Heffelfinger, G.

    1993-01-01

    A new parallel algorithm for simulating bonded molecular systems such as polymers and proteins by molecular dynamics (MD) is presented. In contrast to methods that extract parallelism by breaking the spatial domain into sub-pieces, the new method does not require regular geometries or uniform particle densities to achieve high parallel efficiency. For very large, regular systems spatial methods are often the best choice, but in practice the new method is faster for systems with tens-of-thousands of atoms simulated on large numbers of processors. It is also several times faster than the techniques commonly used for parallelizing bonded MD that assign a subset of atoms to each processor and require all-to-all communication. Implementation of the algorithm in a CHARMm-like MD model with many body forces and constraint dynamics is discussed and timings on the Intel Delta and Paragon machines are given. Example calculations using the algorithm in simulations of polymers and liquid-crystal molecules will also be briefly discussed

  9. A sense of time: how molecular clocks organize metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohsaka, Akira; Bass, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of an internal temporal clockwork that coordinates behavior and metabolism according to the rising and setting of the sun was first revealed in flies and plants. However, in the past decade, a molecular transcription-translation feedback loop with similar properties has also been identified in mammals. In mammals, this transcriptional oscillator programs 24-hour cycles in sleep, activity and feeding within the master pacemaker neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. More recent studies have shown that the core transcription mechanism is also present in other locations within the brain, in addition to many peripheral tissues. Processes ranging from glucose transport to gluconeogenesis, lipolysis, adipogenesis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are controlled through overlapping transcription networks that are tied to the clock and are thus time sensitive. Because disruption of tissue timing occurs when food intake, activity and sleep are altered, understanding how these many tissue clocks are synchronized to tick at the same time each day, and determining how each tissue 'senses time' set by these molecular clocks might open new insight into human disease, including disorders of sleep, circadian disruption, diabetes and obesity.

  10. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis R. Domingo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT, is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT, the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through a rigorous quantum chemical analysis of the changes of the electron density as well as the energies associated with these changes along the reaction path in order to understand experimental outcomes. Studies performed using MEDT allow establishing a modern rationalisation and to gain insight into molecular mechanisms and reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

  11. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Luis R

    2016-09-30

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through a rigorous quantum chemical analysis of the changes of the electron density as well as the energies associated with these changes along the reaction path in order to understand experimental outcomes. Studies performed using MEDT allow establishing a modern rationalisation and to gain insight into molecular mechanisms and reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

  12. Role of Molecular Weight on the Mechanical Device Properties of Organic Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bruner, Christopher; Dauskardt, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    important implications for long-Term reliability, manufacturing, and future applications of electronic organic thin films. In this work, we show that the molecular weight rr-P3HT in organic solar cells can also significantly change the internal cohesion

  13. An overview of molecular acceptors for organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudhomme Piétrick

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic solar cells (OSCs have gained serious attention during the last decade and are now considered as one of the future photovoltaic technologies for low-cost power production. The first dream of attaining 10% of power coefficient efficiency has now become a reality thanks to the development of new materials and an impressive work achieved to understand, control and optimize structure and morphology of the device. But most of the effort devoted to the development of new materials concerned the optimization of the donor material, with less attention for acceptors which to date remain dominated by fullerenes and their derivatives. This short review presents the progress in the use of non-fullerene small molecules and fullerene-based acceptors with the aim of evaluating the challenge for the next generation of acceptors in organic photovoltaics.

  14. Molecular analysis of the replication program in unicellular model organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Raghuraman, M. K.; Brewer, Bonita J.

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotes have long been reported to show temporal programs of replication, different portions of the genome being replicated at different times in S phase, with the added possibility of developmentally regulated changes in this pattern depending on species and cell type. Unicellular model organisms, primarily the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have been central to our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the regulation of replication origins and the temporal program o...

  15. The Structural, Functional and Molecular Organization of the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eNieuwenhuys

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to Wilhelm His (1891, 1893 the brainstem consists of two longitudinal zones, the dorsal alar plate (sensory in nature and the ventral basal plate (motor in nature. Johnston and Herrick indicated that both plates can be subdivided into separate somatic and visceral zones, distinguishing somatosensory and viscerosensory zones within the alar plate, and visceromotor and somatomotor zones within the basal plate. To test the validity of this ‘four-functional-zones’ concept, I developed a topological procedure, surveying the spatial relationships of the various cell masses in the brainstem in a single figure. Brainstems of 16 different anamniote species were analyzed, and revealed that the brainstems are clearly divisible into four morphological zones, which correspond largely with the functional zones of Johnston and Herrick. Exceptions include (1 the magnocellular vestibular nucleus situated in the viscerosensory zone; (2 the basal plate containing a number of evidently non-motor centres (superior and inferior olives. Nevertheless the ‘functional zonal model’ has explanatory value. Thus, it is possible to interpret certain brain specializations related to particular behavioural profiles, as ‘local hypertrophies’ of one or two functional columns. Recent developmental molecular studies on brains of birds and mammals confirmed the presence of longitudinal zones, and also showed molecularly defined transverse bands or neuromeres throughout development. The intersecting boundaries of the longitudinal zones and the transverse bands appeared to delimit radially arranged histogenetic domains. Because neuromeres have been observed in embryonic and larval stages of numerous anamniote species, it may be hypothesized that the brainstems of all vertebrates share a basic organizational plan, in which intersecting longitudinal and transverse zones form fundamental histogenetic and genoarchitectonic units.

  16. Molecular simulation of a model of dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Rebecca; Sposito, Garrison; Diallo, Mamadou S; Schulten, Hans-Rolf

    2005-08-01

    A series of atomistic simulations was performed to assess the ability of the Schulten dissolved organic matter (DOM) molecule, a well-established model humic molecule, to reproduce the physical and chemical behavior of natural humic substances. The unhydrated DOM molecule had a bulk density value appropriate to humic matter, but its Hildebrand solubility parameter was lower than the range of current experimental estimates. Under hydrated conditions, the DOM molecule went through conformational adjustments that resulted in disruption of intramolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds), although few water molecules penetrated the organic interior. The radius of gyration of the hydrated DOM molecule was similar to those measured for aquatic humic substances. To simulate humic materials under aqueous conditions with varying pH levels, carboxyl groups were deprotonated, and hydrated Na+ or Ca2+ were added to balance the resulting negative charge. Because of intrusion of the cation hydrates, the model metal-humic structures were more porous, had greater solvent-accessible surface areas, and formed more H-bonds with water than the protonated, hydrated DOM molecule. Relative to Na+, Ca2+ was both more strongly bound to carboxylate groups and more fully hydrated. This difference was attributed to the higher charge of the divalent cation. The Ca-DOM hydrate, however, featured fewer H-bonds than the Na-DOM hydrate, perhaps because of the reduced orientational freedom of organic moieties and water molecules imposed by Ca2+. The present work is, to our knowledge, the first rigorous computational exploration regarding the behavior of a model humic molecule under a range of physical conditions typical of soil and water systems.

  17. Molecular Organization Induced Anisotropic Properties of Perylene - Silica Hybrid Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramulu, Deepa; Turaga, Shuvan Prashant; Bettiol, Andrew Anthony; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2017-08-10

    Optically active silica nanoparticles are interesting owing to high stability and easy accessibility. Unlike previous reports on dye loaded silica particles, here we address an important question on how optical properties are dependent on the aggregation-induced segregation of perylene molecules inside and outside the silica nanoparticles. Three differentially functionalized fluorescent perylene - silica hybrid nanoparticles are prepared from appropriate ratios of perylene derivatives and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and investigated the structure property correlation (P-ST, P-NP and P-SF). The particles differ from each other on the distribution, organization and intermolecular interaction of perylene inside or outside the silica matrix. Structure and morphology of all hybrid nanoparticles were characterized using a range of techniques such as electron microscope, optical spectroscopic measurements and thermal analysis. The organizations of perylene in three different silica nanoparticles were explored using steady-state fluorescence, fluorescence anisotropy, lifetime measurements and solid state polarized spectroscopic studies. The interactions and changes in optical properties of the silica nanoparticles in presence of different amines were tested and quantified both in solution and in vapor phase using fluorescence quenching studies. The synthesized materials can be regenerated after washing with water and reused for sensing of amines.

  18. Molecular depth profiling of organic and biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, John S. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: John.Fletcher@manchester.ac.uk; Conlan, Xavier A. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Lockyer, Nicholas P. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Vickerman, John C. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-30

    Atomic depth profiling using secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, is common in the field micro-electronics; however, the generation of molecular information as a function of sample depth is difficult due to the accumulation of damage both on and beneath the sample surface. The introduction of polyatomic ion beams such as SF{sub 5} and C{sub 60} have raised the possibility of overcoming this problem as they deposit the majority of their energy in the upper surface of the sample resulting in increased sputter yields but with a complimentary reduction in sub-surface damage accumulation. In this paper we report the depth profile analysis of the bio-polymer polycaprolactone, PCL, using the polyatomic ions Au{sub 3}{sup +} and C{sub 60}{sup +} and the monoatomic Au{sup +}. Results are compared to recent analysis of a similar sample using SF{sub 5}{sup +}. C{sub 60}{sup +} depth profiling of cellulose is also demonstrated, an experiment that has been reported as unsuccessful when attempted with SF{sub 5}{sup +} implications for biological analysis are discussed.

  19. Control of mobility in molecular organic semiconductors by dendrimer generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, J. M.; Samuel, I. D.; Beavington, R.; Frampton, M. J.; Burn, P. L.; Bässler, H.

    2001-04-01

    Conjugated dendrimers are of interest as novel materials for light-emitting diodes. They consist of a luminescent chromophore at the core with highly branched conjugated dendron sidegroups. In these materials, light emission occurs from the core and is independent of generation. The dendron branching controls the separation between the chromophores. We present here a family of conjugated dendrimers and investigate the effect of dendron branching on light emission and charge transport. We apply a number of transport measurement techniques to thin films of a conjugated dendrimer in a light-emitting diode configuration to determine the effect of chromophore spacing on charge transport. We find that the mobility is reduced by two orders of magnitude as the size of the molecule doubles with increased branching or dendrimer generation. The degree of branching allows a unique control of mobility by molecular structure. An increase in chromophore separation also results in a reduction of intermolecular interactions, which reduces the red emission tail in film photoluminescence. We find that the steady-state charge transport is well described by a simple device model incorporating the effect of generation, and use the materials to shed light on the interpretation of transient electroluminescence data. We demonstrate the significance of the ability to tune the mobility in bilayer devices, where a more balanced charge transport can be achieved.

  20. Nonlinear ultrafast optical response in organic molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Talat S.; Turkowski, Volodymyr; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2012-02-01

    We analyze possible nonlinear excitonic effects in the organic molecule crystals by using a combined time-dependent DFT and many-body approach. In particular, we analyze possible effects of the time-dependent (retarded)interaction between different types of excitations, Frenkel excitons, charge transfer excitons and excimers, on the electric and the optical response of the system. We pay special attention to the case of constant electric field and ultrafast pulses, including that of four-wave mixing experiments. As a specific application we examine the optical excitations of pentacene nanocrystals and compare the results with available experimental data.[1] Our results demostrate that the nonlinear effects can play an important role in the optical response of these systems. [1] A. Kabakchiev, ``Scanning Tunneling Luminescence of Pentacene Nanocrystals'', PhD Thesis (EPFL, Lausanne, 2010).

  1. Field-effect transistors based on self-organized molecular nanostripes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavallini, M.; Stoliare, P.; Moulin, J.-F.

    2005-01-01

    Charge transport properties in organic semiconductors depend strongly on molecular order. Here we demonstrate field-effect transistors where drain current flows through a precisely defined array of nanostripes made of crystalline and highly ordered molecules. The molecular stripes are fabricated ...... by the menisci once the critical concentration is reached and self-organizes into molecularly ordered stripes 100-200 nm wide and a few monolayers high. The charge mobility measured along the stripes is 2 orders of magnitude larger than the values measured for spin-coated thin films....... across the channel of the transistor by a stamp-assisted deposition of the molecular semiconductors from a solution. As the solvent evaporates, the capillary forces drive the solution to form menisci under the stamp protrusions. The solute precipitates only in the regions where the solution is confined...

  2. Interfacial self-organization of bolaamphiphiles bearing mesogenic groups: relationships between the molecular structures and their self-organized morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Liu, Guanqing; Xu, Rui; Yin, Shouchun; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xi

    2008-04-15

    This article discusses the relationship between the molecular structure of bolaamphiphiles bearing mesogenic groups and their interfacial self-organized morphology. On the basis of the molecular structures of bolaamphiphiles, we designed and synthesized a series of molecules with different hydrophobic alkyl chain lengths, hydrophilic headgroups, mesogenic groups, and connectors between the alkyl chains and the mesogenic group. Through investigating their interfacial self-organization behavior, some experiential rules are summarized: (1) An appropriate alkyl chain length is necessary to form stable surface micelles; (2) different categories of headgroups have a great effect on the interfacial self-organized morphology; (3) different types of mesogenic groups have little effect on the structure of the interfacial assembly when it is changed from biphenyl to azobenzene or stilbene; (4) the orientation of the ester linker between the mesogenic group and alkyl chain can greatly influence the interfacial self-organization behavior. It is anticipated that this line of research may be helpful for the molecular engineering of bolaamphiphiles to form tailor-made morphologies.

  3. All-organic microelectromechanical systems integrating specific molecular recognition--a new generation of chemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayela, Cédric; Dubourg, Georges; Pellet, Claude; Haupt, Karsten

    2014-09-03

    Cantilever-type all-organic microelectromechanical systems based on molecularly imprinted polymers for specific analyte recognition are used as chemical sensors. They are produced by a simple spray-coating-shadow-masking process. Analyte binding to the cantilever generates a measurable change in its resonance frequency. This allows label-free detection by direct mass sensing of low-molecular-weight analytes at nanomolar concentrations. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Self-organized patterns of macroscopic quantum tunneling in molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garanin, D A; Chudnovsky, E M

    2009-03-06

    We study low temperature resonant spin tunneling in molecular magnets induced by a field sweep with account of dipole-dipole interactions. Numerical simulations uncovered formation of self-organized patterns of the magnetization and of the ensuing dipolar field that provide resonant conditions inside a finite volume of the crystal. This effect is robust with respect to disorder and should be relevant to the dynamics of the magnetization steps observed in molecular magnets.

  5. Biogenic, urban, and wildfire influences on the molecular composition of dissolved organic compounds in cloud water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ryan D.; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Peng, Zhuoyu; Boone, Eric; Chu, Rosalie K.; Dukett, James E.; Gunsch, Matthew J.; Zhang, Wuliang; Tolic, Nikola; Laskin, Alexander; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2017-12-01

    Organic aerosol formation and transformation occurs within aqueous aerosol and cloud droplets, yet little is known about the composition of high molecular weight organic compounds in cloud water. Cloud water samples collected at Whiteface Mountain, New York, during August-September 2014 were analyzed by ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular composition of dissolved organic carbon, with a focus on sulfur- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Organic molecular composition was evaluated in the context of cloud water inorganic ion concentrations, pH, and total organic carbon concentrations to gain insights into the sources and aqueous-phase processes of the observed high molecular weight organic compounds. Cloud water acidity was positively correlated with the average oxygen : carbon ratio of the organic constituents, suggesting the possibility for aqueous acid-catalyzed (prior to cloud droplet activation or during/after cloud droplet evaporation) and/or radical (within cloud droplets) oxidation processes. Many tracer compounds recently identified in laboratory studies of bulk aqueous-phase reactions were identified in the cloud water. Organosulfate compounds, with both biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compound precursors, were detected for cloud water samples influenced by air masses that had traveled over forested and populated areas. Oxidation products of long-chain (C10-12) alkane precursors were detected during urban influence. Influence of Canadian wildfires resulted in increased numbers of identified sulfur-containing compounds and oligomeric species, including those formed through aqueous-phase reactions involving methylglyoxal. Light-absorbing aqueous-phase products of syringol and guaiacol oxidation were observed in the wildfire-influenced samples, and dinitroaromatic compounds were observed in all cloud water samples (wildfire, biogenic, and urban-influenced). Overall, the cloud water molecular composition depended on

  6. Molecular Intercalation and Cohesion of Organic Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bruner, Christopher; Miller, Nichole C.; McGehee, Michael D.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2013-01-01

    The phase separated bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer in BHJ polymer:fullerene organic photovoltaic devices (OPV) are mechanically weak with low values of cohesion. Improved cohesion is important for OPV device thermomechanical reliability. BHJ devices are investigated and how fullerene intercalation within the active layer affects cohesive properties in the BHJ is shown. The intercalation of fullerenes between the side chains of the polymers poly(3,3″′-didocecyl quaterthiophene) (PQT-12) and poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (pBTTT) is shown to enhance BHJ layer cohesion. Cohesion values range from ≈1 to 5 J m -2, depending on the polymer:fullerene blend, processing conditions, and composition. Devices with non-intercalated BHJ layers are found to have significantly reduced values of cohesion. The resulting device power conversion efficiencies (PCE) are also investigated and correlated with the device cohesion. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Molecular Intercalation and Cohesion of Organic Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bruner, Christopher

    2013-01-17

    The phase separated bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer in BHJ polymer:fullerene organic photovoltaic devices (OPV) are mechanically weak with low values of cohesion. Improved cohesion is important for OPV device thermomechanical reliability. BHJ devices are investigated and how fullerene intercalation within the active layer affects cohesive properties in the BHJ is shown. The intercalation of fullerenes between the side chains of the polymers poly(3,3″′-didocecyl quaterthiophene) (PQT-12) and poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (pBTTT) is shown to enhance BHJ layer cohesion. Cohesion values range from ≈1 to 5 J m -2, depending on the polymer:fullerene blend, processing conditions, and composition. Devices with non-intercalated BHJ layers are found to have significantly reduced values of cohesion. The resulting device power conversion efficiencies (PCE) are also investigated and correlated with the device cohesion. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Implantation of organic matter through water onto solid substrates by a laser induced molecular jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pihosh, Y.; Goto, M.; Kasahara, A.; Tosa, M.

    2008-01-01

    Organic molecular dots were successfully produced by means of a nano second pulsed dye laser on glass and indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates, with sizes of several hundred nanometres. The method involves the transfer of organic molecules from the source Coumarin 6 (C6) and poly [2-methoxy, 5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-p-phenylene-venylene] (MEH-PPV) films onto a target material through a water filled space-gap using a laser induced molecular jet (LIMJ). In this way, the organic dots of Coumarin 6 and MEH-PPV molecules were successfully implanted onto the glass and ITO targets. The present results demonstrate the possibility to significantly improve photo electronic or photoelectric devices such as novel photonic crystal and molecular device sensors, and so on

  9. Quantitative Determination of Organic Semiconductor Microstructure from the Molecular to Device Scale

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan

    2012-10-10

    A study was conducted to demonstrate quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale. The quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale was key to obtaining precise description of the molecular structure and microstructure of the materials of interest. This information combined with electrical characterization and modeling allowed for the establishment of general design rules to guide future rational design of materials and devices. Investigations revealed that a number and variety of defects were the largest contributors to the existence of disorder within a lattice, as organic semiconductor crystals were dominated by weak van der Waals bonding. Crystallite size, texture, and variations in structure due to spatial confinement and interfaces were also found to be relevant for transport of free charge carriers and bound excitonic species over distances that were important for device operation.

  10. Tissue organization by cadherin adhesion molecules: dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenetic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Carien M.; Leckband, Deborah; Yap, Alpha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cadherin-based tissue morphogenesis. Tissue physiology is profoundly influenced by the distinctive organizations of cells in organs and tissues. In metazoa, adhesion receptors of the classical cadherin family play important roles in establishing and maintaining such tissue organization. Indeed, it is apparent that cadherins participate in a range of morphogenetic events that range from support of tissue integrity to dynamic cellular rearrangements. A comprehensive understanding of cadherin-based morphogenesis must then define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that support these distinct cadherin biologies. Here we focus on four key mechanistic elements: the molecular basis for adhesion through cadherin ectodomains; the regulation of cadherin expression at the cell surface; cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulation by cell signaling. We discuss current progress and outline issues for further research in these fields. PMID:21527735

  11. Supramolecular chemistry: from molecular information towards self-organization and complex matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2004-01-01

    Molecular chemistry has developed a wide range of very powerful procedures for constructing ever more sophisticated molecules from atoms linked by covalent bonds. Beyond molecular chemistry lies supramolecular chemistry, which aims at developing highly complex chemical systems from components interacting via non-covalent intermolecular forces. By the appropriate manipulation of these interactions, supramolecular chemistry became progressively the chemistry of molecular information, involving the storage of information at the molecular level, in the structural features, and its retrieval, transfer, and processing at the supramolecular level, through molecular recognition processes operating via specific interactional algorithms. This has paved the way towards apprehending chemistry also as an information science. Numerous receptors capable of recognizing, i.e. selectively binding, specific substrates have been developed, based on the molecular information stored in the interacting species. Suitably functionalized receptors may perform supramolecular catalysis and selective transport processes. In combination with polymolecular organization, recognition opens ways towards the design of molecular and supramolecular devices based on functional (photoactive, electroactive, ionoactive, etc) components. A step beyond preorganization consists in the design of systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components. Self-organization processes, directed by the molecular information stored in the components and read out at the supramolecular level through specific interactions, represent the operation of programmed chemical systems. They have been implemented for the generation of a variety of discrete functional architectures of either organic or inorganic nature. Self-organization processes also give access to advanced supramolecular materials, such as

  12. Protein Dynamics in Organic Media at Varying Water Activity Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar; Abildskov, Jens; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2012-01-01

    In nonaqueous enzymology, control of enzyme hydration is commonly approached by fixing the thermodynamic water activity of the medium. In this work, we present a strategy for evaluating the water activity in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins in water/organic solvent mixtures. The method...... relies on determining the water content of the bulk phase and uses a combination of Kirkwood−Buff theory and free energy calculations to determine corresponding activity coefficients. We apply the method in a molecular dynamics study of Candida antarctica lipase B in pure water and the organic solvents...

  13. Origin and role of gap states in organic semiconductor studied by UPS: as the nature of organic molecular crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jin-Peng; Bussolotti, Fabio; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews experimental studies on ‘bridging electronic structure and charge transport property of organic semiconductors’ performed using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and related methods mainly in Chiba University, Japan, in particular on the investigation of the origin and the role of electronic states existing in the highest occupied molecular orbital band–lowest unoccupied molecular orbital band (HOMO–LUMO) gap. We summarize experimental observations including direct measurements of ‘invisible’ gap states with ultrahigh sensitivity UPS, which demonstrate that there exist intrinsic gap states in organic semiconductors. We firstly describe the nature of organic molecular solids to understand features of organic semiconductors because such intrinsic gap states are a result of the interplay of these features, which give the principal difference between the organic semiconductor and inorganic counterpart. We then discuss (i) the origin and role of the band gap states in relation to intermolecular interaction/band dispersion and electron–phonon coupling, (ii) the Fermi level pinning issue in organic semiconductors, and (iii) the method of computing the Fermi level position within the HOMO–LUMO gap for experimental groups. The gap states of organic semiconductors appear easily when a weak perturbation is applied to the organic system, namely by contact with other material, by injecting a charge, by elevating temperature, and by exposure to 1 atm gas. What we finally found is that tailing states of HOMO and LUMO always exist, and their energy distributions must not be symmetric; they thus produce a larger Fermi level shift from the mid gap position than previously thought. Furthermore, as shown by computational work, Fermi level pinning , which is a well-known phenomena in semiconductor devices field, occurs in weakly interacting organic/conductor systems without any gap states if the system temperature is not zero ( T

  14. Origin and role of gap states in organic semiconductor studied by UPS: as the nature of organic molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-Peng; Bussolotti, Fabio; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews experimental studies on ‘bridging electronic structure and charge transport property of organic semiconductors’ performed using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and related methods mainly in Chiba University, Japan, in particular on the investigation of the origin and the role of electronic states existing in the highest occupied molecular orbital band-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital band (HOMO-LUMO) gap. We summarize experimental observations including direct measurements of ‘invisible’ gap states with ultrahigh sensitivity UPS, which demonstrate that there exist intrinsic gap states in organic semiconductors. We firstly describe the nature of organic molecular solids to understand features of organic semiconductors because such intrinsic gap states are a result of the interplay of these features, which give the principal difference between the organic semiconductor and inorganic counterpart. We then discuss (i) the origin and role of the band gap states in relation to intermolecular interaction/band dispersion and electron-phonon coupling, (ii) the Fermi level pinning issue in organic semiconductors, and (iii) the method of computing the Fermi level position within the HOMO-LUMO gap for experimental groups. The gap states of organic semiconductors appear easily when a weak perturbation is applied to the organic system, namely by contact with other material, by injecting a charge, by elevating temperature, and by exposure to 1 atm gas. What we finally found is that tailing states of HOMO and LUMO always exist, and their energy distributions must not be symmetric; they thus produce a larger Fermi level shift from the mid gap position than previously thought. Furthermore, as shown by computational work, Fermi level pinning, which is a well-known phenomena in semiconductor devices field, occurs in weakly interacting organic/conductor systems without any gap states if the system temperature is not zero (T  >  0). We

  15. Investigation into the use of molecular hydrogen on the growth of gallium nitride via metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billingsley, Daniel; Pritchett, David; Henderson, Walter; Carver, Alexander G.; Burnham, Shawn D.; Doolittle, W.A. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 777 Atlantic Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) has been investigated as a means to improve ammonia nitridation efficiency and attempts to reduce carbon contamination in ammonia-based metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE). A 30% improvement in crystalline quality, inferred from XRD, as well as an increase in subsequent GaN bulk growth rate was observed when bare sapphire was subject to H{sub 2} annealing before nitridation. However, the use of H{sub 2} during GaN homoepitaxy on GaN templates resulted in increased carbon contamination and decreased growth rate of GaN. The results demonstrate promise and proper uses of H{sub 2} during GaN growth under certain conditions. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Phosphorus release from phosphate rock and iron phosphate by low-molecular-weight organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren-kou; Zhu, Yong-guan; Chittleborough, David

    2004-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight(LMW) organic acids widely exist in soils, particularly in the rhizosphere. A series of batch experiments were carried out to investigate the phosphorus release from rock phosphate and iron phosphate by low-molecular-weight organic acids. Results showed that citric acid had the highest capacity to solubilize P from both rock and iron phosphate. P solubilization from rock phosphate and iron phosphate resulted in net proton consumption. P release from rock phosphate was positively correlated with the pKa values. P release from iron phosphate was positively correlated with Fe-organic acid stability constants except for aromatic acids, but was notcorrelated with pKa. Increase in the concentrations of organic acids enhanced P solubilization from both rock and iron phosphate almost linearly. Addition of phenolic compounds further increased the P release from iron phosphate. Initial solution pH had much more substantial effect on P release from rock phosphate than from iron phosphate.

  17. Molecular Entropy, Thermal Efficiency, and Designing of Working Fluids for Organic Rankine Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingtao; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Zhiyou

    2012-06-01

    A shortage of fossil energy sources boosts the utilization of renewable energy. Among numerous novel techniques, recovering energy from low-grade heat sources through power generation via organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) is one of the focuses. Properties of working fluids are crucial for the ORC's performance. Many studies have been done to select proper working fluids or to design new working fluids. However, no researcher has systematically investigated the relationship between molecular structures and thermal efficiencies of various working fluids for an ideal ORC. This paper has investigated the interrelations of molecular structures, molecular entropies, and thermal efficiencies of various working fluids for an ideal ORC. By calculating thermal efficiencies and molecular entropies, we find that the molecular entropy is the most appropriate thermophysical property of a working fluid to determine how much energy can be converted into work and how much cannot in a system. Generally speaking, working fluids with low entropies will generally have high thermal efficiency for an ideal ORC. Based on this understanding, the direct interrelations of molecular structures and entropies provide an explicit interrelation between molecular structures and thermal efficiencies, and thus provide an insightful direction for molecular design of novel working fluids for ORCs.

  18. Molecular and Cellular Organization of Taste Neurons in Adult Drosophila Pharynx

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Chieh David Chen; Anupama Dahanukar

    2017-01-01

    Summary: The Drosophila pharyngeal taste organs are poorly characterized despite their location at important sites for monitoring food quality. Functional analysis of pharyngeal neurons has been hindered by the paucity of molecular tools to manipulate them, as well as their relative inaccessibility for neurophysiological investigations. Here, we generate receptor-to-neuron maps of all three pharyngeal taste organs by performing a comprehensive chemoreceptor-GAL4/LexA expression analysis. The ...

  19. Capture of organic iodides from nuclear waste by metal-organic framework-based molecular traps

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Baiyan; Dong, Xinglong; Wang, Hao; Ma, Dingxuan; Tan, Kui; Jensen, Stephanie; Deibert, Benjamin J.; Butler, Joseph; Cure, Jeremy; Shi, Zhan; Thonhauser, Timo; Chabal, Yves J.; Han, Yu; Li, Jing

    2017-01-01

    capture from nuclear waste. The capture mechanism was investigated by experimental and theoretical methods.Capturing radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste is important for safe nuclear energy usage, but remains a significant challenge. Here, Li

  20. Dependence of negative muon depolarization on molecular weight and temperature in organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuraev, A.A.; Evseev, V.S.; Obukhov, Yu.V.; Roganov, V.S.

    2009-01-01

    An atomic capture of negative muons in the aliphatic spirit series, the dependence of muon rest polarization on the molecular weight of spirit have been studied. The temperature dependence of depolarization in benzole and styrene has been obtained. The results on depolarization are being interpreted basing on notions about chemical interactions of mesic atoms in organic compounds. (author)

  1. Using Biocatalysis to Integrate Organic Chemistry into a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Mande; Archer, Crystal; Feske, Brent D.; Mateer, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Current cutting-edge biomedical investigation requires that the researcher have an operational understanding of several diverse disciplines. Biocatalysis is a field of science that operates at the crossroads of organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology, and provides an excellent model for interdisciplinary research. We…

  2. Stepwise transformation of the molecular building blocks in a porphyrin-encapsulating metal-organic material

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, ZhenJie; Wojtas, Łukasz; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Zaworotko, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    When immersed in solutions containing Cu(II) cations, the microporous metal-organic material P11 ([Cd4(BPT)4]·[Cd(C 44H36N8)(S)]·[S], BPT = biphenyl-3,4′,5-tricarboxylate) undergoes a transformation of its [Cd 2(COO)6]2- molecular building blocks

  3. Exploiting large-pore metal-organic frameworks for separations through entropic molecular mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres-Knoop, A.; Dubbeldam, D.

    2015-01-01

    We review the molecular mechanisms behind adsorption and the separations of mixtures in metal-organic frameworks and zeolites. Separation mechanisms can be based on differences in the affinity of the adsorbate with the framework and on entropic effects. To develop next-generation adsorbents, the

  4. Ozonation of humic substances: Effects on molecular weight distributions of organic carbon and trihalomethane formation potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amy, G.L.; Kuo, C.J.; Sierka, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Four different sources of humic substances were studied to determine the effects of ozonation on molecular weight distributions, based on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). Solutions of two soil-derived fulvic acids and a one soil-derived humic acid, as well as dissolved organic matter (DOM) associated with a natural water source were studied. Both gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and ultrafiltration (UF) were employed to define apparent molecular weight (AMW). Applied ozone doses ranged from 2.0 to 2.5 mg O 3 /mg DOC. Overall samples of untreated and ozonated waters, as well as individual molecular weight fractions, were characterized according to DOC, uv absorbance, and THMFP. Ozonation resulted in a significant disappearance of higher AMW material with a corresponding increase in lower AMW material. Although little overall reduction in DOC concentration was observed, significant overall reductions in UV absorbance and THMFP levels were observed

  5. Molecular organization and dynamics of micellar phase of polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes: ESR spin probe study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, A. M.; Kasaikin, V. A.; Zakharova, Yu. A.; Aliev, I. I.; Baranovsky, V. Yu.; Doseva, V.; Yasina, L. L.

    2002-04-01

    Molecular dynamics and organization of the micellar phase of complexes of linear polyelectrolytes with ionogenic and non-ionogenic surfactants was studied by the ESR spin probe method. Complexes of polyacrylic acid (PAA) and sodium polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) with alkyltrimethylammonium bromides (ATAB), as well as complexes of poly- N, N'-dimethyldiallylammonium chloride (PDACL) with sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) were studied. The micellar phase of such complexes is highly organized molecular system, molecular ordering of which near the polymeric chain is much higher than in the 'center' of the micelle, it depends on the polymer-detergent interaction, flexibility of polymeric chain and length of carbonic part of the detergent molecule. Complexes of polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) with non-ionic detergent (dodecyl-substituted polyethyleneglycol), show that the local mobility of surfactant in such complexes is significantly lower than in 'free' micelles and depends on the number of micellar particles participating in formation of complexes.

  6. Molecular Indicators of the Supply of Marine and Terrigenous Organic Matter to a Pleistocene Organic-Matter–Rich Layer in the Alboran Basin (Western Mediterranean Sea)

    OpenAIRE

    Rinna, J.; Hauschildt, M.; Rullkötter, J.

    1999-01-01

    The organic matter in sediment series across two organic-matter–rich layers from Ocean Drilling Program Hole 977A drilled in the Alboran Basin of the Western Mediterranean Sea has been characterized by organic geochemical methods. Organic carbon contents reached more than 2% in the organic-matter–rich layer and was ~1% in the background sediment under and overlying it. Molecular compositions of the extractable bitumens in the organic-matter–rich layer for a wide range of compound ...

  7. Investigation of a metal-organic interface. Realization and understanding of a molecular switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neucheva, Olga [Forschungszentrum Juelich (DE). Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN), Functional Nanostructures at Surfaces (IBN-3)

    2010-07-01

    The field of molecular organic electronics is an emerging and very dynamic area. The continued trend to miniaturisation, combined with increasing complexity and cost of production in conventional semiconductor electronics, forces companies to turn their attention to alternatives that promise the next levels of scale at significantly lower cost. After consumer electronic devices based on organic transistors, such as TVs and book readers, have already been presented, molecular electronics is expected to offer the next breakthrough in feature size. Unfortunately, most of the organic/metal interfaces contain intrinsic defects that break the homogeneity of the interface properties. In this thesis, the electronic and structural properties of such defects were examined in order to understand the influence of the inhomogeneities on the quality of the interface layer. However, the main focus of this work was the investigation of the local properties of a single molecule. Taking advantage of the Scanning Tunnelling Microscope's (STM's) ability to act as a local probe, a single molecular switch was realized and studied. Moreover, in close collaboration with theory groups, the underlying mechanism driving the switching process was identified and described. Besides the investigation of the switching process, the ability of the STM to build nanostructures of different shapes from large organic molecules was shown. Knowing the parameters for realization and control of the switching process and for building the molecular corrals, the results of this investigation enable the reconstruction of the studied molecular ensemble and its deployment in electric molecular circuits, constituting a next step towards further miniaturization of electronic devices. (orig.)

  8. Ultrahigh Density Array of Vertically Aligned Small-molecular Organic Nanowires on Arbitrary Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starko-Bowes, Ryan; Pramanik, Sandipan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years π-conjugated organic semiconductors have emerged as the active material in a number of diverse applications including large-area, low-cost displays, photovoltaics, printable and flexible electronics and organic spin valves. Organics allow (a) low-cost, low-temperature processing and (b) molecular-level design of electronic, optical and spin transport characteristics. Such features are not readily available for mainstream inorganic semiconductors, which have enabled organics to carve a niche in the silicon-dominated electronics market. The first generation of organic-based devices has focused on thin film geometries, grown by physical vapor deposition or solution processing. However, it has been realized that organic nanostructures can be used to enhance performance of above-mentioned applications and significant effort has been invested in exploring methods for organic nanostructure fabrication. A particularly interesting class of organic nanostructures is the one in which vertically oriented organic nanowires, nanorods or nanotubes are organized in a well-regimented, high-density array. Such structures are highly versatile and are ideal morphological architectures for various applications such as chemical sensors, split-dipole nanoantennas, photovoltaic devices with radially heterostructured "core-shell" nanowires, and memory devices with a cross-point geometry. Such architecture is generally realized by a template-directed approach. In the past this method has been used to grow metal and inorganic semiconductor nanowire arrays. More recently π-conjugated polymer nanowires have been grown within nanoporous templates. However, these approaches have had limited success in growing nanowires of technologically important π-conjugated small molecular weight organics, such as tris-8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq3), rubrene and methanofullerenes, which are commonly used in diverse areas including organic displays, photovoltaics, thin film transistors

  9. Importance of dewetting in organic molecular-beam deposition: Pentacene on gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beernink, G.; Strunskus, T.; Witte, G.; Woell, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    Organic molecular-beam deposition of pentacene on gold substrates has been investigated using a multitechnique approach. The morphology of the organic thin films depends strongly on the substrate temperature. Pronounced dewetting and island formation are observed at room temperature. Whereas pentacene molecules adopt a planar monolayer structure, they continue to grow in an upright orientation in multilayer films as inferred from x-ray absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. These results are in pronounced contrast to a recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study by Kang and Zhu [Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 3248 (2003)] and indicate fundamental problems in the interpretation of STM measurements for organic thin films

  10. Effects of molecular weight of natural organic matter on cadmium mobility in soil environments and its carbon isotope characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahara, Y.; Kubota, T.; Wakayama, R.; Nakano-Ohta, T.; Nakamura, T.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the role of natural organic matter in cadmium mobility in soil environments. We collected the dissolved organic matter from two different types of natural waters: pond surface water, which is oxic, and deep anoxic groundwater. The collected organic matter was fractionated into four groups with molecular weights (unit: Da (Daltons)) of 3 , 1-10 x 10 3 , 10-100 x 10 3 , and > 100 x 10 3 . The organic matter source was land plants, based on the carbon isotope ratios (δ 13 C/ 12 C). The organic matter in surface water originated from presently growing land plants, based on 14 C dating, but the organic matter in deep groundwater originated from land plants that grew approximately 4000 years ago. However, some carbon was supplied by the high-molecular-weight fraction of humic substances in soil or sediments. Cadmium interacted in a system of siliceous sand, fractionated organic matter, and water. The lowest molecular weight fraction of organic matter ( 3 ) bound more cadmium than did the higher molecular weight fractions. Organic matter in deep groundwater was more strongly bound to cadmium than was organic matter in surface water. The binding behaviours of organic matter with cadmium depended on concentration, age, molecular weight, and degradation conditions of the organic matter in natural waters. Consequently, the dissolved, low-molecular-weight fraction in organic matter strongly influences cadmium migration and mobility in the environment

  11. Direct Photolithography on Molecular Crystals for High Performance Organic Optoelectronic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yifan; Zhang, Lei; Leydecker, Tim; Samorì, Paolo

    2018-05-23

    Organic crystals are generated via the bottom-up self-assembly of molecular building blocks which are held together through weak noncovalent interactions. Although they revealed extraordinary charge transport characteristics, their labile nature represents a major drawback toward their integration in optoelectronic devices when the use of sophisticated patterning techniques is required. Here we have devised a radically new method to enable the use of photolithography directly on molecular crystals, with a spatial resolution below 300 nm, thereby allowing the precise wiring up of multiple crystals on demand. Two archetypal organic crystals, i.e., p-type 2,7-diphenyl[1]benzothieno[3,2- b][1]benzothiophene (Dph-BTBT) nanoflakes and n-type N, N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C8) nanowires, have been exploited as active materials to realize high-performance top-contact organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), inverter and p-n heterojunction photovoltaic devices supported on plastic substrate. The compatibility of our direct photolithography technique with organic molecular crystals is key for exploiting the full potential of organic electronics for sophisticated large-area devices and logic circuitries, thus paving the way toward novel applications in plastic (opto)electronics.

  12. Molecular and Cellular Organization of Taste Neurons in Adult Drosophila Pharynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chieh David Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The Drosophila pharyngeal taste organs are poorly characterized despite their location at important sites for monitoring food quality. Functional analysis of pharyngeal neurons has been hindered by the paucity of molecular tools to manipulate them, as well as their relative inaccessibility for neurophysiological investigations. Here, we generate receptor-to-neuron maps of all three pharyngeal taste organs by performing a comprehensive chemoreceptor-GAL4/LexA expression analysis. The organization of pharyngeal neurons reveals similarities and distinctions in receptor repertoires and neuronal groupings compared to external taste neurons. We validate the mapping results by pinpointing a single pharyngeal neuron required for feeding avoidance of L-canavanine. Inducible activation of pharyngeal taste neurons reveals functional differences between external and internal taste neurons and functional subdivision within pharyngeal sweet neurons. Our results provide roadmaps of pharyngeal taste organs in an insect model system for probing the role of these understudied neurons in controlling feeding behaviors. : Chen and Dahanukar carry out a large-scale, systematic analysis to understand the molecular organization of pharyngeal taste neurons. Taking advantage of the molecular genetic toolkit that arises from this map, they use genetic dissection strategies to probe the functional roles of selected pharyngeal neurons in food choice. Keywords: Drosophila, taste, pharynx, chemosensory receptors, gustatory receptors, ionotropic receptors, feeding

  13. Tracing of variabilities within a geological barrier by molecular organic geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautevelle, Yann; Michels, Raymond; Malartre, Fabrice; Elie, Marcel; Trouiller, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The Callovo-Oxfordian claystones located at 500 m depth at Bure (Meuse, France) are currently being investigated by Andra (the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency) for testing the feasibility of long-term and deep geological nuclear waste disposal. In order to evaluate its potential as a geological barrier, it is very important to study, assess and describe its physico-chemical variability. The molecular biomarker composition of 150 samples of these claystones and their surrounding limestones carry diverse information on the sources of the sedimentary organic matter, the chemistry of the depositional environment, the preservation and diagenesis conditions. It also allows assessing the degree of lateral and vertical variability of the organic matter within these sedimentary series. The abundance of unsaturated biomarkers, the distribution of steroids and hopanoids and CPI values >2 prove the thermal immaturity of the organic matter. The co-occurrence of plankton, bacteria and land plant biomarkers indicate that the organic matter is a mixture of marine and continental contributions. The data also reveal that the organic matter was deposited under oxic and open-sea conditions except for a brief event of photic zone anoxia at the beginning of the Middle Callovian. In the claystones, the geosynthesis of diasterenes is favored to the detriment of the formation of steranes, especially in smectite-rich levels, and the organic matter is rapidly isolated from oxidizing then reducing conditions after the deposition due to the protective effect of clays. On the scale investigated, the claystones are characterized by a unique molecular facies and are thus homogenous from their organic content point of view. Yet, detailed investigation of specific molecular families indicates changes related to major claystone-limestone transitions. The homogeneity of these claystones can be explained by the paleogeographic position of their depositional setting and the plane

  14. Hybrid inorganic–organic superlattice structures with atomic layer deposition/molecular layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynell, Tommi; Yamauchi, Hisao; Karppinen, Maarit, E-mail: maarit.karppinen@aalto.fi [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2014-01-15

    A combination of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) and molecular layer deposition (MLD) techniques is successfully employed to fabricate thin films incorporating superlattice structures that consist of single layers of organic molecules between thicker layers of ZnO. Diethyl zinc and water are used as precursors for the deposition of ZnO by ALD, while three different organic precursors are investigated for the MLD part: hydroquinone, 4-aminophenol and 4,4′-oxydianiline. The successful superlattice formation with all the organic precursors is verified through x-ray reflectivity studies. The effects of the interspersed organic layers/superlattice structure on the electrical and thermoelectric properties of ZnO are investigated through resistivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements at room temperature. The results suggest an increase in carrier concentration for small concentrations of organic layers, while higher concentrations seem to lead to rather large reductions in carrier concentration.

  15. New organic-inorganic hybrid molecular systems and highly organized materials in catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustov, L. M.

    2015-11-01

    Definitions of hybrid materials are suggested, and applications of these materials are considered. Particular attention is focused on the application of hybrid materials in hydrogenation, partial oxidation, plant biomass conversion, and natural gas reforming, primarily on the use of core-shell nanoparticles and decorated metal nanoparticles in these reactions. Application prospects of various hybrid materials, particularly those of metal-organic frameworks, are discussed.

  16. Exploring the energy landscape of the charge transport levels in organic semiconductors at the molecular scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornil, J; Verlaak, S; Martinelli, N; Mityashin, A; Olivier, Y; Van Regemorter, T; D'Avino, G; Muccioli, L; Zannoni, C; Castet, F; Beljonne, D; Heremans, P

    2013-02-19

    strongly interacting electron-hole pairs can potentially escape from their Coulomb well, a process that is at the heart of photoconversion or molecular doping. Yet they do, with near-quantitative yield in some cases. Limited screening by the low dielectric medium in organic materials leads to subtle static and dynamic electronic polarization effects that strongly impact the energy landscape for charges, which offers a rationale for this apparent inconsistency. In this Account, we use different theoretical approaches to predict the energy landscape of charge carriers at the molecular level and review a few case studies highlighting the role of electrostatic interactions in conjugated organic molecules. We describe the pros and cons of different theoretical approaches that provide access to the energy landscape defining the motion of charge carriers. We illustrate the applications of these approaches through selected examples involving OFETs, OLEDs, and solar cells. The three selected examples collectively show that energetic disorder governs device performances and highlights the relevance of theoretical tools to probe energy landscapes in molecular assemblies.

  17. Understanding flocculation mechanism of graphene oxide for organic dyes from water: Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Flocculation treatment processes play an important role in water and wastewater pretreatment. Here we investigate experimentally and theoretically the possibility of using graphene oxide (GO as a flocculant to remove methylene blue (MB from water. Experimental results show that GO can remove almost all MB from aqueous solutions at its optimal dosages and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that MB cations quickly congregate around GO in water. Furthermore, PIXEL energy contribution analysis reveals that most of the strong interactions between GO and MB are of a van der Waals (London dispersion character. These results offer new insights for shedding light on the molecular mechanism of interaction between GO and organic pollutants.

  18. CALCULATION OF COEFFICIENT OF SHARING OCTANOL-WATER OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING MOLECULAR DESCRIPTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Souyei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR study is carried out to develop correlations that relate the molecular structures of organic compounds to their Octanol- Water partition coefficients, Kow , using molecular descriptors. The correlations are simple in application with good accuracy, which provide an easy, direct and relatively accurate way to calculate Kow. Such calculation gives us a model that gives results in remarkable correlation with the descriptors of blocks fragments of the atom-centered and functional groups (R2 = 0.949, δ = 0477 (R2 = 0.926,δ = 0,548 respectively.

  19. Impact of low molecular weight organic acids and dissolved organic matter on sorption and mobility of isoproturon in two soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qing; Wu, Hai Lang; Xu, Yun; Guo, Li Juan; Liu, Kai; Gao, Hui Min; Yang, Hong

    2011-06-15

    Isoproturon is a selective herbicide belonging to the phenylurea family and widely used for pre- and post-emergence control of annual weeds. Soil amendments (e.g. organic compounds or dissolved organic matter) may affect environmental behavior and bioavailability of pesticides. However, whether the physiochemical process of isoproturon in soils is affected by organic amendments and how it is affected in different soil types are unknown. To evaluate the impact of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) on sorption/desorption and mobility of isoproturon in soils, comprehensive analyses were performed using two distinct soil types (Eutric gleysols and Hap udic cambisols). Our analysis revealed that adsorption of isoproturon in Eutric gleysols was depressed, and desorption and mobility of isoproturon were promoted in the presence of DOM and LMWOA. However, the opposite result was observed with Hap udic cambisols, suggesting that the soil type affected predominantly the physiochemical process. We also characterized differential components of the soils using three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and show that the two soils displayed different intensity of absorption bands for several functional groups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prediction of the Fate of Organic Compounds in the Environment From Their Molecular Properties: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamy, Laure; Patureau, Dominique; Barriuso, Enrique; Bedos, Carole; Bessac, Fabienne; Louchart, Xavier; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Miege, Cecile; Benoit, Pierre

    2015-06-18

    A comprehensive review of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) allowing the prediction of the fate of organic compounds in the environment from their molecular properties was done. The considered processes were water dissolution, dissociation, volatilization, retention on soils and sediments (mainly adsorption and desorption), degradation (biotic and abiotic), and absorption by plants. A total of 790 equations involving 686 structural molecular descriptors are reported to estimate 90 environmental parameters related to these processes. A significant number of equations was found for dissociation process (pK a ), water dissolution or hydrophobic behavior (especially through the K OW parameter), adsorption to soils and biodegradation. A lack of QSAR was observed to estimate desorption or potential of transfer to water. Among the 686 molecular descriptors, five were found to be dominant in the 790 collected equations and the most generic ones: four quantum-chemical descriptors, the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (E HOMO ) and the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E LUMO ), polarizability (α) and dipole moment (μ), and one constitutional descriptor, the molecular weight. Keeping in mind that the combination of descriptors belonging to different categories (constitutional, topological, quantum-chemical) led to improve QSAR performances, these descriptors should be considered for the development of new QSAR, for further predictions of environmental parameters. This review also allows finding of the relevant QSAR equations to predict the fate of a wide diversity of compounds in the environment.

  1. Linking the Molecular Signature of Heteroatomic Dissolved Organic Matter to Watershed Characteristics in World Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sasha; Riedel, Thomas; Niggemann, Jutta; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Dittmar, Thorsten; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2015-12-01

    Large world rivers are significant sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the oceans. Watershed geomorphology and land use can drive the quality and reactivity of DOM. Determining the molecular composition of riverine DOM is essential for understanding its source, mobility and fate across landscapes. In this study, DOM from the main stem of 10 global rivers covering a wide climatic range and land use features was molecularly characterized via ultrahigh-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). FT-ICR mass spectral data revealed an overall similarity in molecular components among the rivers. However, when focusing specifically on the contribution of nonoxygen heteroatomic molecular formulas (CHON, CHOS, CHOP, etc.) to the bulk molecular signature, patterns relating DOM composition and watershed land use became apparent. Greater abundances of N- and S-containing molecular formulas were identified as unique to rivers influenced by anthropogenic inputs, whereas rivers with primarily forested watersheds had DOM signatures relatively depleted in heteroatomic content. A strong correlation between cropland cover and dissolved black nitrogen was established when focusing specifically on the pyrogenic class of compounds. This study demonstrated how changes in land use directly affect downstream DOM quality and could impact C and nutrient cycling on a global scale.

  2. Identification of the sources of primary organic aerosols at urban schools: A molecular marker approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crilley, Leigh R.; Qadir, Raeed M.; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Orasche, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    Children are particularly susceptible to air pollution and schools are examples of urban microenvironments that can account for a large portion of children's exposure to airborne particles. Thus this paper aimed to determine the sources of primary airborne particles that children are exposed to at school by analyzing selected organic molecular markers at 11 urban schools in Brisbane, Australia. Positive matrix factorization analysis identified four sources at the schools: vehicle emissions, biomass burning, meat cooking and plant wax emissions accounting for 45%, 29%, 16% and 7%, of the organic carbon respectively. Biomass burning peaked in winter due to prescribed burning of bushland around Brisbane. Overall, the results indicated that both local (traffic) and regional (biomass burning) sources of primary organic aerosols influence the levels of ambient particles that children are exposed at the schools. These results have implications for potential control strategies for mitigating exposure at schools. - Highlights: • Selected organic molecular markers at 11 urban schools were analyzed. • Four sources of primary organic aerosols were identified by PMF at the schools. • Both local and regional sources were found to influence exposure at the schools. • The results have implications for mitigation of children's exposure at schools. - The identification of the most important sources of primary organic aerosols at urban schools has implications for control strategies for mitigating children's exposure at schools

  3. Heat-resistant organic molecular layer as a joint interface for metal reduction on plastics surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang, Jing; Aisawa, Sumio; Hirahara, Hidetoshi; Kudo, Takahiro; Mori, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In situ adsorption behaviors of TES on PA6 surface were clarified by QCM. • Highest adsorption of TES on PA6 was obtained in pH 3 and 0.1 M solution. • Molecular layers of TES with uniform structures were prepared on PA6 surface. • TES layer improved PA6 local heat resistance from 150 °C to 230 °C. • TES molecular layer successfully reduced Ag ion to Ag"0. - Abstract: Heat-resistant organic molecular layers have been fabricated by triazine-based silane coupling agent for metal reduction on plastic surfaces using adsorption method. These molecular layers were used as an interfacial layer between polyamide (PA6) and metal solution to reduce Ag"+ ion to Ag"0. The interfacial behaviors of triazine molecular layer at the interfaces between PA6 and Ag solution were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The kinetics of molecular adsorption on PA6 was investigated by using triazine-based silane coupling agent solutions at different pH and concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and local nano thermal analysis were employed to characterize the surfaces and interfaces. The nano thermal analysis results show that molecular layers of triazine-based silane coupling agent greatly improved heat resistance of PA6 resin from 170 °C up to 230 °C. This research developed an in-depth insight for molecular behaviors of triazine-based silane coupling agent at the PA6 and Ag solution interfaces and should be of significant value for interfacial research between plastics and metal solution in plating industry.

  4. Heat-resistant organic molecular layer as a joint interface for metal reduction on plastics surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Jing [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Aisawa, Sumio, E-mail: aisawa@iwate-u.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Hirahara, Hidetoshi [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Kudo, Takahiro [Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan); Mori, Kunio [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In situ adsorption behaviors of TES on PA6 surface were clarified by QCM. • Highest adsorption of TES on PA6 was obtained in pH 3 and 0.1 M solution. • Molecular layers of TES with uniform structures were prepared on PA6 surface. • TES layer improved PA6 local heat resistance from 150 °C to 230 °C. • TES molecular layer successfully reduced Ag ion to Ag{sup 0}. - Abstract: Heat-resistant organic molecular layers have been fabricated by triazine-based silane coupling agent for metal reduction on plastic surfaces using adsorption method. These molecular layers were used as an interfacial layer between polyamide (PA6) and metal solution to reduce Ag{sup +} ion to Ag{sup 0}. The interfacial behaviors of triazine molecular layer at the interfaces between PA6 and Ag solution were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The kinetics of molecular adsorption on PA6 was investigated by using triazine-based silane coupling agent solutions at different pH and concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and local nano thermal analysis were employed to characterize the surfaces and interfaces. The nano thermal analysis results show that molecular layers of triazine-based silane coupling agent greatly improved heat resistance of PA6 resin from 170 °C up to 230 °C. This research developed an in-depth insight for molecular behaviors of triazine-based silane coupling agent at the PA6 and Ag solution interfaces and should be of significant value for interfacial research between plastics and metal solution in plating industry.

  5. Ultrafast Electron Transfer at Organic Semiconductor Interfaces: Importance of Molecular Orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Ayzner, Alexander L.

    2015-01-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  6. Ultrafast Electron Transfer at Organic Semiconductor Interfaces: Importance of Molecular Orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do-Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  7. Inorganic-Organic Coating via Molecular Layer Deposition Enables Long Life Sodium Metal Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Goncharova, Lyudmila V; Zhang, Qian; Kaghazchi, Payam; Sun, Qian; Lushington, Andrew; Wang, Biqiong; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2017-09-13

    Metallic Na anode is considered as a promising alternative candidate for Na ion batteries (NIBs) and Na metal batteries (NMBs) due to its high specific capacity, and low potential. However, the unstable solid electrolyte interphase layer caused by serious corrosion and reaction in electrolyte will lead to big challenges, including dendrite growth, low Coulombic efficiency and even safety issues. In this paper, we first demonstrate the inorganic-organic coating via advanced molecular layer deposition (alucone) as a protective layer for metallic Na anode. By protecting Na anode with controllable alucone layer, the dendrites and mossy Na formation have been effectively suppressed and the lifetime has been significantly improved. Moreover, the molecular layer deposition alucone coating shows better performances than the atomic layer deposition Al 2 O 3 coating. The novel design of molecular layer deposition protected Na metal anode may bring in new opportunities to the realization of the next-generation high energy-density NIBs and NMBs.

  8. Preliminary Design of Molecular Sieve for Removing Organic Iodide in Containment Filtered Venting System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Tong Kyu; Shin, So Eun; Lee, Byung Chul [Heungdeok IT Valley Bldg., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jun [Gemvax and KAEL Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, to increase the DF for gaseous iodine species, especially organic iodide, molecular sieve filled by silver exchanged zeolites is proposed and designed preliminarily. Its aerodynamic analysis is also performed and presented. In order to increase the DF for gaseous organic iodide, deep-bed type molecular sieve was proposed and designed preliminarily. Total 1,620kg of silver exchanged zeolites were filled evenly in 10 beds of the molecular sieve. The safety factor in the case of 20m{sup 3}/s will be smaller than the counterpart of the standard case (6m{sup 3}/s). However, if the adsorption capacity of the zeolites is larger than 3.09mg/g when the residence time is 0.09 second, the designed molecular sieve can be used at 20m3/s of volumetric flow rate. The removal efficiency for organic iodide should be considered as well as economical aspects in the design of molecular sieve. In the event of nuclear power plant (NPP) severe accident, the nuclear reactor containment might suffer damage resulting from overpressure caused by decay heat. In order to prevent this containment damage, containment venting has been considered as one of effective methods. However, since vented gases contain radioactive fission products, they should be filtered to be released to environment. Generally, containment filtered venting system (CFVS) is installed on NPP to achieve this aim. Even though great amount of efforts have been devoted to developing the CFVS using various filtering methods, the decontaminant factor (DF) for radioactive gaseous iodide is still unsatisfactory while DFs for radioactive aerosols and elemental iodine are very high.

  9. MOLECULAR COMPLEXES OF SULPHUR DIOXIDE WITH N,O-CONTAINING ORGANIC BASES (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Khoma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The literature data on the synthesis, stoichiometry, structure and relative stability of molecular  complexes of sulphur dioxide with N,O-containing organic bases have been systematized and  generalized. It was shown that the yield of the reaction product of sulfur dioxide with organic  bases (such as amines are strongly influenced by the conditions of synthesis: the nature of  the solvent (basicity, polarity, the temperature and SO2:L ratio in the reaction medium. The stoichiometry of SO2*nL molecular complexes depends on ligand denticity, as well as its  ability to H-bonding. The reaction of the sulfur oxide (IV with organic bases can give S←N and S←O complexes. With the increase of the value of base proton affinity the decrease ΔrSN values has been marked. Characteristic parameter Δr SN = r SN – a1(rS+ rN (where rSNis the S←N donor-acceptor bond length has been determined by microwave spectroscopy and X-ray analysis, rSand rNwere the tabulated values of the homopolar covalent radii of sulphur and nitrogen heteroatoms. The dependence of formation enthalpy of molecular complexes of basic amines and spectral characteristics has been noted; enthalpy-entropy compensation for S←N and S←O complex-es has been stated. Despite the limited experimental data on the thermodynamics of complex formation and the lengths of donor-acceptor bonds for the same compounds it has been found bond S←N strength in SO2 molecular complexes to depend on the intrinsic value of ΔrSN. The contribution of van der Waals forces and charge transfer forces to the formation of molecular complexes of sulphur dioxide has been stated.

  10. Nanopatched Graphene with Molecular Self-Assembly Toward Graphene-Organic Hybrid Soft Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Boseok; Lee, Seong Kyu; Jung, Jaehyuck; Joe, Minwoong; Lee, Seon Baek; Kim, Jinsung; Lee, Changgu; Cho, Kilwon

    2018-04-30

    Increasing the mechanical durability of large-area polycrystalline single-atom-thick materials is a necessary step toward the development of practical and reliable soft electronics based on these materials. Here, it is shown that the surface assembly of organosilane by weak epitaxy forms nanometer-thick organic patches on a monolayer graphene surface and dramatically increases the material's resistance to harsh postprocessing environments, thereby increasing the number of ways in which graphene can be processed. The nanopatched graphene with the improved mechanical durability enables stable operation when used as transparent electrodes of wearable strain sensors. Also, the nanopatched graphene applied as an electrode modulates the molecular orientation of deposited organic semiconductor layers, and yields favorable nominal charge injection for organic transistors. These results demonstrate the potential for use of self-assembled organic nanopatches in graphene-based soft electronics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Microscopic properties of ionic liquid/organic semiconductor interfaces revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Yasuyuki; Miyamoto, Hiroo; Imanishi, Akihito; Takeya, Jun; Inagaki, Kouji; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Fukui, Ken-Ichi

    2018-05-09

    Electric double-layer transistors based on ionic liquid/organic semiconductor interfaces have been extensively studied during the past decade because of their high carrier densities at low operation voltages. Microscopic structures and the dynamics of ionic liquids likely determine the device performance; however, knowledge of these is limited by a lack of appropriate experimental tools. In this study, we investigated ionic liquid/organic semiconductor interfaces using molecular dynamics to reveal the microscopic properties of ionic liquids. The organic semiconductors include pentacene, rubrene, fullerene, and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). While ionic liquids close to the substrate always form the specific layered structures, the surface properties of organic semiconductors drastically alter the ionic dynamics. Ionic liquids at the fullerene interface behave as a two-dimensional ionic crystal because of the energy gain derived from the favorable electrostatic interaction on the corrugated periodic substrate.

  12. Molecular and cellular organization of taste neurons in adult Drosophila pharynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chieh (David); Dahanukar, Anupama

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY The Drosophila pharyngeal taste organs are poorly characterized despite their location at important sites for monitoring food quality. Functional analysis of pharyngeal neurons has been hindered by the paucity of molecular tools to manipulate them, as well as their relative inaccessibility for neurophysiological investigations. Here, we generate receptor-to-neuron maps of all three pharyngeal taste organs by performing a comprehensive chemoreceptor-GAL4/LexA expression analysis. The organization of pharyngeal neurons reveals similarities and distinctions in receptor repertoires and neuronal groupings compared to external taste neurons. We validate the mapping results by pinpointing a single pharyngeal neuron required for feeding avoidance of L-canavanine. Inducible activation of pharyngeal taste neurons reveals functional differences between external and internal taste neurons and functional subdivision within pharyngeal sweet neurons. Our results provide road maps of pharyngeal taste organs in an insect model system for probing the role of these understudied neurons in controlling feeding behaviors. PMID:29212040

  13. Molecular doping for control of gate bias stress in organic thin film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, Moritz P., E-mail: hein@iapp.de; Lüssem, Björn; Jankowski, Jens; Tietze, Max L.; Riede, Moritz K. [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Zakhidov, Alexander A. [Fraunhofer COMEDD, Maria-Reiche-Str. 2, 01109 Dresden (Germany); Leo, Karl [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Fraunhofer COMEDD, Maria-Reiche-Str. 2, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-01-06

    The key active devices of future organic electronic circuits are organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). Reliability of OTFTs remains one of the most challenging obstacles to be overcome for broad commercial applications. In particular, bias stress was identified as the key instability under operation for numerous OTFT devices and interfaces. Despite a multitude of experimental observations, a comprehensive mechanism describing this behavior is still missing. Furthermore, controlled methods to overcome these instabilities are so far lacking. Here, we present the approach to control and significantly alleviate the bias stress effect by using molecular doping at low concentrations. For pentacene and silicon oxide as gate oxide, we are able to reduce the time constant of degradation by three orders of magnitude. The effect of molecular doping on the bias stress behavior is explained in terms of the shift of Fermi Level and, thus, exponentially reduced proton generation at the pentacene/oxide interface.

  14. Molecular doping for control of gate bias stress in organic thin film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, Moritz P.; Lüssem, Björn; Jankowski, Jens; Tietze, Max L.; Riede, Moritz K.; Zakhidov, Alexander A.; Leo, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The key active devices of future organic electronic circuits are organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). Reliability of OTFTs remains one of the most challenging obstacles to be overcome for broad commercial applications. In particular, bias stress was identified as the key instability under operation for numerous OTFT devices and interfaces. Despite a multitude of experimental observations, a comprehensive mechanism describing this behavior is still missing. Furthermore, controlled methods to overcome these instabilities are so far lacking. Here, we present the approach to control and significantly alleviate the bias stress effect by using molecular doping at low concentrations. For pentacene and silicon oxide as gate oxide, we are able to reduce the time constant of degradation by three orders of magnitude. The effect of molecular doping on the bias stress behavior is explained in terms of the shift of Fermi Level and, thus, exponentially reduced proton generation at the pentacene/oxide interface

  15. Molecular-scale simulation of electroluminescence in a multilayer white organic light-emitting diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mesta, Murat; Carvelli, Marco; de Vries, Rein J

    2013-01-01

    we show that it is feasible to carry out Monte Carlo simulations including all of these molecular-scale processes for a hybrid multilayer organic light-emitting diode combining red and green phosphorescent layers with a blue fluorescent layer. The simulated current density and emission profile......In multilayer white organic light-emitting diodes the electronic processes in the various layers--injection and motion of charges as well as generation, diffusion and radiative decay of excitons--should be concerted such that efficient, stable and colour-balanced electroluminescence can occur. Here...

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Synaptic Specificity: Spotlight on Hippocampal and Cerebellar Synapse Organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dongseok; Bae, Sungwon; Yoon, Taek Han; Ko, Jaewon

    2018-04-18

    Synapses and neural circuits form with exquisite specificity during brain development to allow the precise and appropriate flow of neural information. Although this property of synapses and neural circuits has been extensively investigated for more than a century, molecular mechanisms underlying this property are only recently being unveiled. Recent studies highlight several classes of cell-surface proteins as organizing hubs in building structural and functional architectures of specific synapses and neural circuits. In the present minireview, we discuss recent findings on various synapse organizers that confer the distinct properties of specific synapse types and neural circuit architectures in mammalian brains, with a particular focus on the hippocampus and cerebellum.

  17. Molecular signatures of biogeochemical transformations in dissolved organic matter from ten World Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Riedel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rivers carry large amounts of dissolved organic matter (DOM to the oceans thereby connecting terrestrial and marine element cycles. Photo-degradation in conjunction with microbial turnover is considered a major pathway by which terrigenous DOM is decomposed. To reveal globally relevant patterns behind this process, we performed photo-degradation experiments and year-long bio-assays on DOM from ten of the largest world rivers that collectively account for more than one-third of the fresh water discharge to the global ocean. We furthermore tested the hypothesis that the terrigenous component in deep ocean DOM may be far higher than biomarker studies suggest, because of the selective photochemical destruction of characteristic biomolecules from vascular plants. DOM was molecularly characterized by a combination of non-targeted ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry and quantitative molecular tracer analyses. We show that the reactivity of DOM is globally related to broad catchment properties. Basins that are dominated by forest and grassland export more photo-degradable DOM than other rivers. Chromophoric compounds are mainly vascular plant-derived polyphenols, and partially carry a pyrogenic signature from vegetation fires. These forest and grassland dominated rivers lost up to 50% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC during irradiation, and up to 85% of DOC was lost in total if subsequently bio-incubated for one year. Basins covered by cropland, on the other hand, export DOM with a higher proportion of photo-resistant and bio-available DOM which is enriched in nitrogen. In these rivers, 30% or less of DOC was photodegraded. Consistent with previous studies, we found that riverine DOM resembled marine DOM in its broad molecular composition after extensive degradation, mainly due to almost complete removal of aromatics. More detailed molecular fingerprinting analysis (based on the relative abundance of >4000 DOM molecular formulae, however, revealed

  18. Molecular Analysis and Genomic Organization of Major DNA Satellites in Banana (Musa spp.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čížková, Jana; Hřibová, Eva; Humplíková, Lenka; Christelová, Pavla; Suchánková, Pavla; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2013) E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500380901; GA MŠk(CZ) LG12021 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Program:ED Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : IN-SITU HYBRIDIZATION * LARGE-SCALE ORGANIZATION * RIBOSOMAL-RNA GENES Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  19. Electronic sputtering of large organic molecules and its application in bio molecular mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundqvist, B.U.R.

    1992-01-01

    This is a review of research which has its origin in the discovery of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry (PDMS). Two main fields of research have developed, namely fundamental studies of the ejection process at fast ion impact and studies of applications of the new mass spectrometric technique. In this review the emphasis will be on the process of electronic sputtering of organic solids but also applications of this process in bio molecular mass spectrometry will be discussed. (author)

  20. Influence of Frenkel Excitons and Charge Transfer States on the Spectroscopic Properties of Organic Molecular Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Gisslén, Linus Mathias

    2010-01-01

    Perylene derivatives are robust organic dyes absorbing and emitting light in the visible range and in the near infrared. They display a strong tendency to self-assemble into molecular aggregates, liquid crystals, or even crystals. In this thesis, we have demonstrated a successful realization of a theoretical approach describing the fundamental interactions influencing on exciton transfer in crystalline perylenes pigments. Furthermore, the microscopic parameter set obtained has allowed to calc...

  1. Molecular self-assembly approaches for supramolecular electronic and organic electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Hin-Lap

    Molecular self-assembly represents an efficient bottom-up strategy to generate structurally well-defined aggregates of semiconducting pi-conjugated materials. The capability of tuning the chemical structures, intermolecular interactions and nanostructures through molecular engineering and novel materials processing renders it possible to tailor a large number of unprecedented properties such as charge transport, energy transfer and light harvesting. This approach does not only benefit traditional electronic devices based on bulk materials, but also generate a new research area so called "supramolecular electronics" in which electronic devices are built up with individual supramolecular nanostructures with size in the sub-hundred nanometers range. My work combined molecular self-assembly together with several novel materials processing techniques to control the nucleation and growth of organic semiconducting nanostructures from different type of pi-conjugated materials. By tailoring the interactions between the molecules using hydrogen bonds and pi-pi stacking, semiconducting nanoplatelets and nanowires with tunable sizes can be fabricated in solution. These supramolecular nanostructures were further patterned and aligned on solid substrates through printing and chemical templating methods. The capability to control the different hierarchies of organization on surface provides an important platform to study their structural-induced electronic properties. In addition to using molecular self-assembly to create different organic nanostructures, functional self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed by spontaneous chemisorption on surfaces was used to tune the interfacial property in organic solar cells. Devices showed dramatically improved performance when appropriate SAMs were applied to optimize the contact property for efficiency charge collection.

  2. Elucidating the principles of the molecular organization of heteropolymeric tight junction strands

    OpenAIRE

    Piontek, Jörg; Fritzsche, Susanne; Cording, Jimmi; Richter, Sandra; Hartwig, Jens; Walter, Maria; Yu, Dan; Turner, Jerrold R.; Gehring, Claudia; Rahn, Hans-Peter; Wolburg, Hartwig; Blasig, Ingolf E.

    2011-01-01

    Paracellular barrier properties of tissues are mainly determined by the composition of claudin hetero-polymers. To analyze the molecular organization of tight junctions (TJ), we investigated the ability of claudins (Cld) to form homo- and heteromers. Cld1, -2, -3, -5, and -12 expressed in cerebral barriers were investigated. TJ-strands were reconstituted by claudin-transfection of HEK293-cells. cis-Interactions and/or spatial proximity were analyzed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer i...

  3. The shear flow processing of controlled DNA tethering and stretching for organic molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guihua; Kushwaha, Amit; Lee, Jungkyu K; Shaqfeh, Eric S G; Bao, Zhenan

    2011-01-25

    DNA has been recently explored as a powerful tool for developing molecular scaffolds for making reproducible and reliable metal contacts to single organic semiconducting molecules. A critical step in the process of exploiting DNA-organic molecule-DNA (DOD) array structures is the controlled tethering and stretching of DNA molecules. Here we report the development of reproducible surface chemistry for tethering DNA molecules at tunable density and demonstrate shear flow processing as a rationally controlled approach for stretching/aligning DNA molecules of various lengths. Through enzymatic cleavage of λ-phage DNA to yield a series of DNA chains of various lengths from 17.3 μm down to 4.2 μm, we have investigated the flow/extension behavior of these tethered DNA molecules under different flow strengths in the flow-gradient plane. We compared Brownian dynamic simulations for the flow dynamics of tethered λ-DNA in shear, and found our flow-gradient plane experimental results matched well with our bead-spring simulations. The shear flow processing demonstrated in our studies represents a controllable approach for tethering and stretching DNA molecules of various lengths. Together with further metallization of DNA chains within DOD structures, this bottom-up approach can potentially enable efficient and reliable fabrication of large-scale nanoelectronic devices based on single organic molecules, therefore opening opportunities in both fundamental understanding of charge transport at the single molecular level and many exciting applications for ever-shrinking molecular circuits.

  4. The molecular structure of the insoluble organic matter isolated from Murchison carbonaceous chondrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, F.; Derenne, S.

    2009-04-01

    During these last 10 years, our group has characterized the various molecular moieties of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from carbonaceous meteorites with the aim of reconstructing its overall molecular structure. Indeed, a precise knowledge of the structure of an organic macromolecule contains irreplaceable information that traces its mechanisms of synthesis and its conditions of formation. Such a modelled structure will be presented. Carbonaceous chondrites contain up to 3 wt % of carbon that is under the form of soluble and insoluble fractions. The IOM, which constitutes more than 75 wt% of the bulk organic matter, was isolated from the bulk rock through successive acid dissolutions. The chemical structure of the isolated IOM has been studied by both (1) destructive and (2) non destructive methods. Methods include thermal and chemical degradations followed by GC/MS, spectroscopic techniques (nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy; X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance) along with high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Although each technique alone cannot provide definite information on the chemical structure of such a complex material, the combination of the results can be used to reconstruct the molecular structure of the IOM. The proposed structure accounts for all these measured parameters. The details of this structure reveal information of the conditions of its formation in space and allow to discuss the mechanisms of organo-synthesis in the cosmochemical context of the formation of the solar system.

  5. An optimized intermolecular force field for hydrogen-bonded organic molecular crystals using atomic multipole electrostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Thompson, Hugh P. G.; Day, Graeme M.

    2016-01-01

    An empirically parameterized intermolecular force field is developed for crystal structure modelling and prediction. The model is optimized for use with an atomic multipole description of electrostatic interactions. We present a re-parameterization of a popular intermolecular force field for describing intermolecular interactions in the organic solid state. Specifically we optimize the performance of the exp-6 force field when used in conjunction with atomic multipole electrostatics. We also parameterize force fields that are optimized for use with multipoles derived from polarized molecular electron densities, to account for induction effects in molecular crystals. Parameterization is performed against a set of 186 experimentally determined, low-temperature crystal structures and 53 measured sublimation enthalpies of hydrogen-bonding organic molecules. The resulting force fields are tested on a validation set of 129 crystal structures and show improved reproduction of the structures and lattice energies of a range of organic molecular crystals compared with the original force field with atomic partial charge electrostatics. Unit-cell dimensions of the validation set are typically reproduced to within 3% with the re-parameterized force fields. Lattice energies, which were all included during parameterization, are systematically underestimated when compared with measured sublimation enthalpies, with mean absolute errors of between 7.4 and 9.0%

  6. Organic Photovoltaic Devices Based on Oriented n-Type Molecular Films Deposited on Oriented Polythiophene Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizokuro, Toshiko; Tanigaki, Nobutaka; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Shibata, Yousei; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki

    2018-04-01

    The molecular orientation of π-conjugated molecules has been reported to significantly affect the performance of organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs) based on molecular films. Hence, the control of molecular orientation is a key issue toward the improvement of OPV performance. In this research, oriented thin films of an n-type molecule, 3,4,9,10-Perylenetetracarboxylic Bisbenzimida-zole (PTCBI), were formed by deposition on in-plane oriented polythiophene (PT) films. Orientation of the PTCBI films was evaluated by polarized UV-vis spectroscopy and 2D-Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Results indicated that PTCBI molecules on PT film exhibit nearly edge-on and in-plane orientation (with molecular long axis along the substrate), whereas PTCBI molecules without PT film exhibit neither. OPVs composed of PTCBI molecular film with and without PT were fabricated and evaluated for correlation of orientation with performance. The OPVs composed of PTCBI film with PT showed higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) than that of film without PT. The experiment indicated that in-plane orientation of PTCBI molecules absorbs incident light more efficiently, leading to increase in PCE.

  7. Functional Molecular Diversity of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter Is Reduced during Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mentges

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic matter (DOM is a highly diverse mixture of compounds, accounting for one of the world's largest active carbon pools. The surprising recalcitrance of some DOM compounds to bacterial degradation has recently been associated with its diversity. However, little is known about large-scale patterns of marine DOM diversity and its change through degradation, in particular considering the functional diversity of DOM. Here, we analyze the development of marine DOM diversity during degradation in two data sets comprising DOM of very different ages: a three-year mesocosm experiment and highly-resolved field samples from the Atlantic and Southern Ocean. The DOM molecular composition was determined using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. We quantify DOM diversity using three conceptually different diversity measures, namely richness of molecular formulas, abundance-based diversity, and functional molecular diversity. Using these measures we find stable molecular richness of DOM with age >1 year, systematic changes in the molecules' abundance distribution with degradation state, and increasing homogeneity with respect to chemical properties for more degraded DOM. Coinciding with differences in sea water density, the spatial field data separated clearly into regions of high and low diversity. The joint application of different diversity measures yields a comprehensive overview on temporal and spatial patterns of molecular diversity, valuable for general conclusions on drivers and consequences of marine DOM diversity.

  8. Computation of Dielectric Response in Molecular Solids for High Capacitance Organic Dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Henry M; Marks, Tobin J; Ratner, Mark A

    2016-09-20

    The dielectric response of a material is central to numerous processes spanning the fields of chemistry, materials science, biology, and physics. Despite this broad importance across these disciplines, describing the dielectric environment of a molecular system at the level of first-principles theory and computation remains a great challenge and is of importance to understand the behavior of existing systems as well as to guide the design and synthetic realization of new ones. Furthermore, with recent advances in molecular electronics, nanotechnology, and molecular biology, it has become necessary to predict the dielectric properties of molecular systems that are often difficult or impossible to measure experimentally. In these scenarios, it is would be highly desirable to be able to determine dielectric response through efficient, accurate, and chemically informative calculations. A good example of where theoretical modeling of dielectric response would be valuable is in the development of high-capacitance organic gate dielectrics for unconventional electronics such as those that could be fabricated by high-throughput printing techniques. Gate dielectrics are fundamental components of all transistor-based logic circuitry, and the combination high dielectric constant and nanoscopic thickness (i.e., high capacitance) is essential to achieving high switching speeds and low power consumption. Molecule-based dielectrics offer the promise of cheap, flexible, and mass producible electronics when used in conjunction with unconventional organic or inorganic semiconducting materials to fabricate organic field effect transistors (OFETs). The molecular dielectrics developed to date typically have limited dielectric response, which results in low capacitances, translating into poor performance of the resulting OFETs. Furthermore, the development of better performing dielectric materials has been hindered by the current highly empirical and labor-intensive pace of synthetic

  9. Molecular Electrical Doping of Organic Semiconductors: Fundamental Mechanisms and Emerging Dopant Design Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Ingo; Heimel, Georg; Oehzelt, Martin; Winkler, Stefanie; Koch, Norbert

    2016-03-15

    Today's information society depends on our ability to controllably dope inorganic semiconductors, such as silicon, thereby tuning their electrical properties to application-specific demands. For optoelectronic devices, organic semiconductors, that is, conjugated polymers and molecules, have emerged as superior alternative owing to the ease of tuning their optical gap through chemical variability and their potential for low-cost, large-area processing on flexible substrates. There, the potential of molecular electrical doping for improving the performance of, for example, organic light-emitting devices or organic solar cells has only recently been established. The doping efficiency, however, remains conspicuously low, highlighting the fact that the underlying mechanisms of molecular doping in organic semiconductors are only little understood compared with their inorganic counterparts. Here, we review the broad range of phenomena observed upon molecularly doping organic semiconductors and identify two distinctly different scenarios: the pairwise formation of both organic semiconductor and dopant ions on one hand and the emergence of ground state charge transfer complexes between organic semiconductor and dopant through supramolecular hybridization of their respective frontier molecular orbitals on the other hand. Evidence for the occurrence of these two scenarios is subsequently discussed on the basis of the characteristic and strikingly different signatures of the individual species involved in the respective doping processes in a variety of spectroscopic techniques. The critical importance of a statistical view of doping, rather than a bimolecular picture, is then highlighted by employing numerical simulations, which reveal one of the main differences between inorganic and organic semiconductors to be their respective density of electronic states and the doping induced changes thereof. Engineering the density of states of doped organic semiconductors, the Fermi

  10. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and elemental analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldridge, S.M., E-mail: simon.eldridge@dpi.nsw.gov.au [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); NSW Department of Primary Industries, Bruxner Highway, Wollongbar, NSW 2477 (Australia); Chen, C.R. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Xu, Z.H. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Nelson, P.N. [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD 4870 (Australia); Boyd, S.E. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Meszaros, I. [Formerly NSW Department of Primary Industries, Richmond, NSW 2753 (Australia); Chan, K.Y. [Graduate School of Environment, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109 (Australia); Formerly NSW Department of Primary Industries, Richmond, NSW 2753 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state {sup 13}C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  11. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldridge, S.M.; Chen, C.R.; Xu, Z.H.; Nelson, P.N.; Boyd, S.E.; Meszaros, I.; Chan, K.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state 13 C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes

  12. Synthesis and Surface-Specific Analysis of Molecular Constituents Relevant to Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be, A. G.; Upshur, M. A.; Chase, H. M.; Geiger, F.; Thomson, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles formed from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) remain a principal, yet elusive, class of airborne particulate matter that impacts the Earth's radiation budget. Given the characteristic molecular complexity comprising biogenic SOA particles, chemical information selective to the gas-aerosol interface may be valuable in the investigation of such systems, as surface considerations likely dictate the phenomena driving particle evolution mechanisms and climate effects. In particular, cloud activation processes may be parameterized using the surface tension depression that coincides with partitioning of surface-active organic species to the gas-droplet interface. However, the extent to which surface chemical processes, such as cloud droplet condensation, are influenced by the chemical structure and reactivity of individual surface-active molecules in SOA particles is largely unknown. We seek to study terpene-derived organic species relevant to the surfaces of biogenic SOA particles via synthesis of putative oxidation products followed by analysis using surface-selective physicochemical measurements. Using dynamic surface tension measurements, considerable differences are observed in the surface tension depression of aqueous pendant droplets that contain synthetically prepared ozonolysis products derived from abundant terpene precursors. Furthermore, sum frequency generation spectroscopy is utilized for comparison of the surface vibrational spectral responses of synthesized reference compounds with those observed for laboratory aerosol toward probing the surface composition of SOA material. Such ongoing findings highlight the underlying importance of molecular structure and reactivity when considering the surface chemistry of biogenic terpene-derived atmospheric aerosols.

  13. Temperature effects on multiphase reactions of organic molecular markers: A modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Vikram; Chen, Ying; Yao, Guangming; Nakao, Shunsuke

    2018-04-01

    Various molecular markers are used in source apportionment studies. In early studies, molecular markers were assumed to be inert. However, recent studies suggest that molecular markers can decay rapidly through multiphase reactions, which makes interpretation of marker measurements challenging. This study presents a simplified model to account for the effects of temperature and relative humidity on the lifetime of molecular markers through a shift in gas-particle partitioning as well as a change in viscosity of the condensed phase. As a model case, this study examines the stability of levoglucosan, a key marker species of biomass burning, over a wide temperature range relevant to summertime and wintertime. Despite the importance of wood combustion for space heating in winter, the lifetime of levoglucosan in wintertime is not well understood. The model predicts that in low-temperature conditions, levoglucosan predominantly remains in the particle phase, and therefore its loss due to gas-phase oxidation reactions is significantly reduced. Furthermore, the movement of the levoglucosan from the bulk of the particle to the particle surface is reduced due to low diffusivity in the semi-solid state. The simplified model developed in this study reasonably reproduces upper and lower bounds of the lifetime of levoglucosan investigated in previous studies. The model results show that the levoglucosan depletion after seven days reduces significantly from ∼98% at 25 °C to marker (lifetime > 1 week) even at 60% relative humidity irrespective of the assumed fragility parameter D that controls estimated diffusivity. The model shows that lifetime of an organic molecular marker strongly depends on assumed D especially when a semi-volatile marker is in semi-solid organic aerosol.

  14. Immobilizing Organic-Based Molecular Switches into Metal-Organic Frameworks: A Promising Strategy for Switching in Solid State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Bo; Meng, Yi; Xie, Yang; Du, Ke; Sue, Andrew C-H; Wang, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Organic-based molecular switches (OMS) are essential components for the ultimate miniaturization of nanoscale electronics and devices. For practical applications, it is often necessary for OMS to be incorporated into functional solid-state materials. However, the switching characteristics of OMS in solution are usually not transferrable to the solid state, presumably because of spatial confinement or inefficient conversion in densely packed solid phase. A promising way to circumvent this issue is harboring the functional OMS within the robust and porous environment of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as their organic components. In this feature article, recent research progress of OMS-based MOFs is briefly summarized. The switching behaviors of OMS under different stimuli (e.g., light, redox, pH, etc.) in the MOF state are first introduced. After that, the technological applications of these OMS-based MOFs in different areas, including CO 2 adsorption, gas separation, drug delivery, photodynamic therapy, and sensing, are outlined. Finally, perspectives and future challenges are discussed in the conclusion. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Molecular signatures in femtosecond laser-induced organic plasmas: comparison with nanosecond laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-01-28

    During the last few years, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has evolved significantly in the molecular sensing area through the optical monitoring of emissions from organic plasmas. Large efforts have been made to study the formation pathways of diatomic radicals as well as their connections with the bonding framework of molecular solids. Together with the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules, laser ablation parameters seem to be closely tied to the observed spectral signatures. This research focuses on evaluating the impact of laser pulse duration on the production of diatomic species that populate plasmas of organic materials. Differences in relative intensities of spectral signatures from the plasmas of several organic molecules induced in femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) ablation regimes have been studied. Beyond the abundance and origin of diatomic radicals that seed the plasma, findings reveal the crucial role of the ablation regime in the breakage pattern of the molecule. The laser pulse duration dictates the fragments and atoms resulting from the vaporized molecules, promoting some formation routes at the expense of other paths. The larger amount of fragments formed by fs pulses advocates a direct release of native bonds and a subsequent seeding of the plasma with diatomic species. In contrast, in the ns ablation regime, the atomic recombinations and single displacement processes dominate the contribution to diatomic radicals, as long as atomization of molecules prevails over their progressive decomposition. Consequently, fs-LIBS better reflects correlations between strengths of emissions from diatomic species and molecular structure as compared to ns-LIBS. These new results entail a further step towards the specificity in the analysis of molecular solids by fs-LIBS.

  16. Engineered Molecular Layers For Organic Electronic Applications: A Confocal Scanning Raman Spectroscopy (CSRS) Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paez-Sierra, Beynor-Antonio; Kolotovska, Viktoriia; Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio

    2011-01-01

    We present CSRS maps of magnetically modified vanadyl phthalocyanine (VOPc) thin films forming conduction channels in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). The VOPc films with a nominal thickness of about 100 nm were produced by organic molecular beam deposition in high vacuum. During the growth conditions the substrates were exposed to a magnetic field (B) from a bar magnet. The CSRS maps revealed significant changes of the organic fields upon preparation conditions. The highest field effect mobility, electrical current and anisotropy of the CSRS-topography is achieved in layers grown with B parallel to the substrate plane, while intermediate and lowest values are achieved in devices grown with B perpendicular to the substrate and without, respectively.

  17. Microporous silica prepared by organic templating: relationship between the molecular template and pore structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Cao, Guozhong; Kale, Rahul P.; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Lu, Yunfeng; Prabakar, S.

    1999-01-01

    Microporous silica materials with a controlled pore size and a narrow pore size distribution have been prepared by sol-gel processing using an organic-templating approach. Microporous networks were formed by pyrolytic removal of organic ligands (methacryloxypropyl groups) from organic/inorganic hybrid materials synthesized by copolymerization of 3-methacryloxypropylsilane (MPS) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). Molecular simulations and experimental measurements were conducted to examine the relationship between the microstructural characteristics of the porous silica (e.g., pore size, total pore volume, and pore connectivity) and the size and amount of organic template ligands added. Adsorption measurements suggest that the final porosity of the microporous silica is due to both primary pores (those present in the hybrid materials prior to pyrolysis) and secondary pores (those created by pyrolytic removal of organic templates). Primary pores were inaccessible to N(sub 2) at 77 K but accessible to CO(sub 2) at 195 K; secondary pores were accessible to both N(sub 2) (at 77 K) and CO(sub 2) (at 195 K) in adsorption measurements. Primary porosity decreases with the amount of organic ligands added because of the enhanced densification of MPS/TEOS hybrid materials as the mole fraction of trifunctional MPS moieties increases. pore volumes measured by nitrogen adsorption experiments at 77 K suggest that the secondary (template-derived) porosity exhibits a percolation behavior as the template concentration is increased. Gas permeation experiments indicate that the secondary pores are approximately 5(angstrom) in diameter, consistent with predictions based on molecular simulations

  18. Molecular insights into the microbial formation of marine dissolved organic matter: recalcitrant or labile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, B. P.; Kattner, G.; Witt, M.; Passow, U.

    2014-08-01

    The degradation of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important control variable in the global carbon cycle. For our understanding of the kinetics of organic matter cycling in the ocean, it is crucial to achieve a mechanistic and molecular understanding of its transformation processes. A long-term microbial experiment was performed to follow the production of non-labile DOM by marine bacteria. Two different glucose concentrations and dissolved algal exudates were used as substrates. We monitored the bacterial abundance, concentrations of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), nutrients, amino acids and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) for 2 years. The molecular characterization of extracted DOM was performed by ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) after 70 days and after ∼2 years of incubation. Although glucose quickly degraded, a non-labile DOC background (5-9% of the initial DOC) was generated in the glucose incubations. Only 20% of the organic carbon from the algal exudate degraded within the 2 years of incubation. The degradation rates for the non-labile DOC background in the different treatments varied between 1 and 11 μmol DOC L-1 year-1. Transparent exopolymer particles, which are released by microorganisms, were produced during glucose degradation but decreased back to half of the maximum concentration within less than 3 weeks (degradation rate: 25 μg xanthan gum equivalents L-1 d-1) and were below detection in all treatments after 2 years. Additional glucose was added after 2 years to test whether labile substrate can promote the degradation of background DOC (co-metabolism; priming effect). A priming effect was not observed but the glucose addition led to a slight increase of background DOC. The molecular analysis demonstrated that DOM generated during glucose degradation differed appreciably from DOM transformed during the degradation of the algal exudates. Our

  19. Role of Molecular Weight on the Mechanical Device Properties of Organic Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bruner, Christopher

    2014-02-11

    For semiconducting polymers, such as regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene-2, 5-diyl) (rr-P3HT), the molecular weight has been correlated to charge carrier field-effect mobilities, surface morphology, and gelation rates in solution and therefore has important implications for long-Term reliability, manufacturing, and future applications of electronic organic thin films. In this work, we show that the molecular weight rr-P3HT in organic solar cells can also significantly change the internal cohesion of the photoactive layer using micromechanical testing techniques. Cohesive values ranged from ∼0.5 to ∼17 J m -2, following the general trend of greater cohesion with increasing molecular weight. Using nanodynamic mechanical analysis, we attribute the increase in cohesion to increased plasticity which helps dissipate the applied energy. Finally, we correlate photovoltaic efficiency with cohesion to assess the device physics pertinent to optimizing device reliability. This research elucidates the fundamental parameters which affect both the mechanical stability and efficiency of polymer solar cells. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  20. Model of molecular structure of the insoluble organic matter isolated from Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenne, Sylvie; Robert, François

    2010-09-01

    The molecular structure of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) from Murchison meteorite has been investigated by our group for several years using a large set of analytical methods including various spectroscopies (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy), high resolution electron microscopy, and thermal (pyrolyses in the presence or not of tetramethylammonium hydroxide) and chemical (RuO4 oxidation) degradations. Taken together, these techniques provided a wealth of qualitative and quantitative information, from which we derived 11 elemental and molecular parameters on the same IOM residue. In addition to the basic elemental composition, these parameters describe the distribution of the different types of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms as well as the size of the polyaromatic units. For this molecular structure, we therefore propose a model which fits with these 11 molecular quantitative parameters. Several cosmochemical implications are derived from this structure. Based on the fact that aromatic moieties are highly substituted and aliphatic chains highly branched, it can be anticipated that the synthesis of this IOM occurred through successive additions of single carbon units in the gas-phase ending by a spontaneous cyclization for chain length ≥7 C. As a whole, these observations favor an organosynthesis in the solar T-Tauri disk.

  1. Theoretical study of substitution effects on molecular reorganization energy in organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hua; Niu, Yingli; Peng, Qian; Shuai, Zhigang; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2011-09-14

    Chemical substitutions are powerful molecular design tools to enhance the performance of organic semiconductors, for instance, to improve solubility, intermolecular stacking, or film quality. However, at the microscopic level, substitutions in general tend to increase the molecular reorganization energy and thus decrease the intrinsic charge-carrier mobility. Through density functional theory calculations, we elucidate strategies that could be followed to reduce the reorganization energy upon chemical substitution. Specific examples are given here for hole-transport materials including indolo-carbazoles and several triarylamine derivatives. Through decomposition of the total reorganization energy into the internal coordinate space, we are able to identify the molecular segment that provides the most important contributions to the reorganization energy. It is found that when substitution reduces (enhances) the amplitude of the relevant frontier molecular orbital in that segment, the total reorganization energy decreases (increases). In particular, chlorination at appropriate positions can significantly reduce the reorganization energy. Several other substituents are shown to play a similar role, to a greater or lesser extent. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  2. Molecular mechanisms of FK506-induced hypertension in solid organ transplantation patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jianglin; Guo Ren; Liu Shikun; Chen Qingjie; Zuo Shanru; Yang Meng; Zuo Xiaocong

    2014-01-01

    Objective Tacrolimus (FK506) is an immunosuppressive drug,which is widely used to prevent rejection of transplanted organs.However,chronic administration of FK506 leads to hypertension in solid organ transplantation patients,and its molecular mechanisms are much more complicated.In this review,we will discuss the above-mentioned molecular mechanisms of FK506-induced hypertension in solid organ transplantation subjects.Data sources The data analyzed in this review were mainly from relevant articles without restriction on the publication date reported in PubMed.The terms "FK506" or "tacrolimus" and "hypertension"were used for the literature search.Study selection Original articles with no limitation of research design and critical reviews containing data relevant to FK506-induced hypertension and its molecular mechanisms were retrieved,reviewed and analyzed.Results There are several molecular mechanisms attributed to FK506-induced hypertension in solid organ transplantation subjects.First,FK506 binds FK506 binding protein 12 and its related isoform 12.6 (FKBP12/12.6) and removes them from intracellular ryanodine receptors that induce a calcium ion leakage from the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum.The conventional protein kinase C beta II (cPKCβⅡ)-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase at Thr495,which reduces the production of NO,was activated by calcium ion leakage.Second,transforming growth factor receptor/SMAD2/3 signaling activation plays an important role in Treg/Th17 cell imbalance in T cells which toget converge to cause inflammation,endothelial dysfunction,and hypertension following tacrolimus treatment.Third,the activation of with-no-K(Lys) kinases/STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase/thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride co-transporter (WNKs/SPAK/NCC) pathway has a central role in tacrolimus-induced hypertension.Finally,the enhanced activity of renal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system seems to play a crucial role in

  3. Mesoporous thin films of ``molecular squares'' as sensors for volatile organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefe, M.H.; Slone, R.V.; Hupp, J.T.; Czaplewski, K.F.; Snurr, R.Q.; Stern, C.L.

    2000-04-18

    Mesoporous thin films of rhenium-based molecular squares, [Re(CO){sub 3}Cl(L)]{sub 4} (L = pyrazine, 4,4{prime}-bipyridine), have been utilized as sensors for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The sensing was conducted using a quartz crystal microbalance with the target compounds present in the gas phase at concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 1 mM. Quartz crystal microbalance studies with these materials allowed for distinction between the following VOCs: (1) small aromatic versus aliphatic molecules of almost identical size and volatility and (2) an array of benzene molecules derivatized with electron donating/withdrawing substituents. The experiments suggest that the mesoporous host materials interact with VOC guest molecules through both van der Waals and weak charge-transfer interactions. In addition, size selectivity is shown by exposure of the molecular squares to cyclic ethers of differing size.

  4. Molecular-scale shear response of the organic semiconductor β -DBDCS (100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Asencio, Rubén; Moreno-Ramírez, Jorge S.; Pimentel, Carlos; Casado, Santiago; Matta, Micaela; Gierschner, Johannes; Muccioli, Luca; Yoon, Seong-Jun; Varghese, Shinto; Park, Soo Young; Gnecco, Enrico; Pina, Carlos M.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we present friction-force microscopy (FFM) lattice-resolved images acquired on the (100) facet of the semiconductor organic oligomer (2 Z ,2'Z )-3 , 3' -(1,4-phenylene)bis(2-(4-butoxyphenyl)acrylonitrile) (β -DBDCS) crystal in water at room temperature. Stick-slip contrast, lateral contact stiffness, and friction forces are found to depend strongly on the sliding direction due to the anisotropic packing of the molecular chains forming the crystal surface along the [010] and [001] directions. The anisotropy also causes the maximum value of the normal force applicable before wearing to increase by a factor of 3 when the scan is performed along the [001] direction on the (100) face. Altogether, our results contribute to achieving a better understanding of the molecular origin of friction anisotropy on soft crystalline surfaces, which has been often hypothesized but rarely investigated in the literature.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of sputtering of organic overlayers by slow, large clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzeznik, L.; Czerwinski, B.; Garrison, B.J.; Winograd, N.; Postawa, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The ion-stimulated desorption of organic molecules by impact of large and slow clusters is examined using molecular dynamics (MDs) computer simulations. The investigated system, represented by a monolayer of benzene deposited on Ag{1 1 1}, is irradiated with projectiles composed of thousands of noble gas atoms having a kinetic energy of 0.1-20 eV/atom. The sputtering yield of molecular species and the kinetic energy distributions are analyzed and compared to the results obtain for PS4 overlayer. The simulations demonstrate quite clearly that the physics of ejection by large and slow clusters is distinct from the ejection events stimulated by the popular SIMS clusters, like C 60 , Au 3 and SF 5 at tens of keV energies.

  6. Static secondary ion mass spectrometry for organic and inorganic molecular analysis in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Rita van; Vaeck, Luc van; Adriaens, Annemie; Adams, Freddy

    2003-01-01

    The use of mass spectra in secondary ion mass spectrometry (S-SIMS) to characterise the molecular composition of inorganic and organic analytes at the surface of solid samples is investigated. Methodological aspects such as mass resolution, mass accuracy, precision and accuracy of isotope abundance measurements, influence of electron flooding and sample morphology are addressed to assess the possibilities and limitations that the methodology can offer to support the structural assignment of the detected ions. The in-sample and between-sample reproducibility of relative peak intensities under optimised conditions is within 10%, but experimental conditions and local hydration, oxidation or contamination can drastically affect the mass spectra. As a result, the use of fingerprinting for identification becomes compromised. Therefore, the preferred way of interpretation becomes the deductive structural approach, based on the use of the empirical desorption-ionisation model. This approach is shown to allow the molecular composition of inorganic and organic components at the surface of solids to be characterised. Examples of inorganic speciation and identification of organic additives with unknown composition in inorganic salt mixtures are given. The methodology is discussed in terms of foreseen developments with respect to the use of polyatomic primary ions

  7. High-Throughput Molecular Simulations of Metal Organic Frameworks for CO2 Separation: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur Erucar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Metal organic frameworks (MOFs have emerged as great alternatives to traditional nanoporous materials for CO2 separation applications. MOFs are porous materials that are formed by self-assembly of transition metals and organic ligands. The most important advantage of MOFs over well-known porous materials is the possibility to generate multiple materials with varying structural properties and chemical functionalities by changing the combination of metal centers and organic linkers during the synthesis. This leads to a large diversity of materials with various pore sizes and shapes that can be efficiently used for CO2 separations. Since the number of synthesized MOFs has already reached to several thousand, experimental investigation of each MOF at the lab-scale is not practical. High-throughput computational screening of MOFs is a great opportunity to identify the best materials for CO2 separation and to gain molecular-level insights into the structure–performance relationships. This type of knowledge can be used to design new materials with the desired structural features that can lead to extraordinarily high CO2 selectivities. In this mini-review, we focused on developments in high-throughput molecular simulations of MOFs for CO2 separations. After reviewing the current studies on this topic, we discussed the opportunities and challenges in the field and addressed the potential future developments.

  8. Diaryl fluorene-Based Shape-Persistent Organic Nano molecular Frameworks via Iterative Friedel-Crafts Protocol toward Multicomponent Organic Semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, G.W.; Wang, L.; Xie, L.H.; Hou, X.Y.; Liu, Z.D.; Huang, W.; Huang, W.

    2013-01-01

    We describe bottom-up fluorenol approach to create soluble covalent organic nano molecular architectures (ONAs) as potential multicomponent organic semiconductors (MOSs). BPyFBFFA as a typical model of ONAs and MOSs exhibits a persistent chair-shaped geometric structure that consists of hole-transporting tri phenylamine (TPA), high-efficiency ter fluorene, and high-mobility pyrenes. BPyFBFFA was synthesized via the intermediates PyFA and BPyFA with iterative Friedel-Crafts reactions and Suzuki cross-coupling reactions. BPyFBFFA behaves as an efficient blue light-emitter without the low-energy green emission band. Complex diaryl fluorenes (CDAFs) are promising candidates for nano scale covalent organic frameworks and MOSs. Friedel-Crafts protocols offer versatile toolboxes for molecular architects to frame chemistry and materials, nano science, and molecular nano technology as well as molecular manufactures

  9. Molecular and isotope constraints on the formation of the insoluble organic matter of carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenne, Sylvie; Robert, François

    2017-04-01

    The origin of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) of the carbonaceous meteorites remains an unsolved issue despite major achievements in the knowledge of its chemical structure. The latter led us to propose a model for its molecular structure. Based on the relationship between the aromatic moieties of the macromolecular structure and their aliphatic linkages, it was recently suggested that, its synthesis has taken place in the gas phase of the disk surrounding the Sun in its early T-Tauri phase and that organic radicals have played a central role in this organo-synthesis. To test experimentally this pathway, we submitted short hydrocarbons (methane, pentane, octane) to a microwave plasma discharge so as to produce in situ CHx radicals. The black organic residue deposited contained both soluble and insoluble OM. The comparison at the molecular level between the thus synthesized IOM and that of meteorite led to strong similarities thus supporting the proposed pathway for its organo-synthesis. Moreover, in the meteorite IOM, systematic deuterium enrichment relative to the protosolar value is observed at the bulk sample scale and micrometer-sized grains exhibit dramatic enrichments in deuterium interpreted as a heritage of the interstellar medium or resulting from ion-molecule reactions taking place in the diffuse part of the solar disk. In the aforementioned synthesized IOM, NanoSIMS analyses revealed large variations at a sub-micrometric spatial resolution. They likely reflect the differences in the D/H ratios of the CHx radicals whose polymerization is at the origin of the IOM. These isotopic heterogeneities are commensurable with those observed in meteorite IOM. As a consequence, the appearance of organic radicals in the ionized regions of the T-Tauri solar disk may have triggered the formation of organic compounds. This laboratory synthesis thus shed a new light on the formation conditions and pathways of the IOM of carbonaceous chondrites.

  10. Study on the interactions of Ag nanoparticles with low molecular weight organic matter using first principles calculations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nyangiwe, Nangamso N

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available with natural organic matter (NOMs) and ENPs inherent physicochemical properties. Herein, density functional theory (DFT), classical lattice dynamics (CLD), and quantum mechanical calculations based on frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory were applied...

  11. Molecular corridors and parameterizations of volatility in the chemical evolution of organic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation and aging of organic aerosols (OA proceed through multiple steps of chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases, which is challenging for the interpretation of field measurements and laboratory experiments as well as accurate representation of OA evolution in atmospheric aerosol models. Based on data from over 30 000 compounds, we show that organic compounds with a wide variety of functional groups fall into molecular corridors, characterized by a tight inverse correlation between molar mass and volatility. We developed parameterizations to predict the saturation mass concentration of organic compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur from the elemental composition that can be measured by soft-ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry. Field measurement data from new particle formation events, biomass burning, cloud/fog processing, and indoor environments were mapped into molecular corridors to characterize the chemical nature of the observed OA components. We found that less-oxidized indoor OA are constrained to a corridor of low molar mass and high volatility, whereas highly oxygenated compounds in atmospheric water extend to high molar mass and low volatility. Among the nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds identified in atmospheric aerosols, amines tend to exhibit low molar mass and high volatility, whereas organonitrates and organosulfates follow high O : C corridors extending to high molar mass and low volatility. We suggest that the consideration of molar mass and molecular corridors can help to constrain volatility and particle-phase state in the modeling of OA particularly for nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds.

  12. Morphological and molecular evidence for functional organization along the rostrocaudal axis of the adult zebrafish intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Siew

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zebrafish intestine is a simple tapered tube that is folded into three sections. However, whether the intestine is functionally similar along its length remains unknown. Thus, a systematic structural and functional characterization of the zebrafish intestine is desirable for future studies of the digestive tract and the intestinal biology and development. Results To characterize the structure and function of the adult zebrafish intestine, we divided the intestine into seven roughly equal-length segments, S1-S7, and systematically examined the morphology of the mucosal lining, histology of the epithelium, and molecular signatures from transcriptome analysis. Prominent morphological features are circumferentially-oriented villar ridges in segments S1-S6 and the absence of crypts. Molecular characterization of the transcriptome from each segment shows that segments S1-S5 are very similar while S6 and S7 unique. Gene ontology analyses reveal that S1-S5 express genes whose functions involve metabolism of carbohydrates, transport of lipids and energy generation, while the last two segments display relatively limited function. Based on comparative Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, the first five segments share strong similarity with human and mouse small intestine while S6 shows similarity with human cecum and rectum, and S7 with human rectum. The intestinal tract does not display the anatomical, morphological, and molecular signatures of a stomach and thus we conclude that this organ is absent from the zebrafish digestive system. Conclusions Our genome-wide gene expression data indicate that, despite the lack of crypts, the rostral, mid, and caudal portions of the zebrafish intestine have distinct functions analogous to the mammalian small and large intestine, respectively. Organization of ridge structures represents a unique feature of zebrafish intestine, though they produce similar cross sections to mammalian intestines

  13. Partition Coefficients of Organic Molecules in Squalane and Water/Ethanol Mixtures by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard, Rasmus; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Economou, Ioannis G.

    2011-01-01

    coefficient can be estimated for both a small hydrophilic and a hydrophobic organic molecules between squalane (used here to mimic low density poly ethylene) and water/ethanol solutes using thermodynamic integration to calculate the free energy of solvation. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed, using...... the GROMACS software, by slowly decoupling of firstly the electrostatic and then the Lennard–Jones interactions between molecules in the simulation box. These calculations depend very much on the choice of force field. Two force fields have been tested in this work, the TraPPE-UA (united-atom) and the OPLS...

  14. Molecular design chemical structure generation from the properties of pure organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, AL

    1992-01-01

    This book is a systematic presentation of the methods that have been developed for the interpretation of molecular modeling to the design of new chemicals. The main feature of the compilation is the co-ordination of the various scientific disciplines required for the generation of new compounds. The five chapters deal with such areas as structure and properties of organic compounds, relationships between structure and properties, and models for structure generation. The subject is covered in sufficient depth to provide readers with the necessary background to understand the modeling

  15. A QSPR STUDY OF NORMAL BOILING POINT OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (ALIPHATIC ALKANES USING MOLECULAR DESCRIPTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Souyei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative structure–property relationship (QSPR study is carried out to develop correlations that relate the molecular structures of organic compounds (Aliphatic Alkanes to their normal boiling point (NBP and two correlations were proposed for constitutionals and connectivity indices Models. The correlations are simple in application with good accuracy, which provide an easy, direct and relatively accurate way to calculate NBP. Such calculation gives us a model that gives results in remarkable correlations with the descriptors of blokes constitutionals (CON, and connectivity indices (CI (R2 = 0.950, δ = 0.766 (R2 = 0.969, δ = 0.782 respectively.

  16. Molecular crowding of collagen: a pathway to produce highly-organized collagenous structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Nima; Karmelek, Kathryn P; Paten, Jeffrey A; Zareian, Ramin; DiMasi, Elaine; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2012-10-01

    Collagen in vertebrate animals is often arranged in alternating lamellae or in bundles of aligned fibrils which are designed to withstand in vivo mechanical loads. The formation of these organized structures is thought to result from a complex, large-area integration of individual cell motion and locally-controlled synthesis of fibrillar arrays via cell-surface fibripositors (direct matrix printing). The difficulty of reproducing such a process in vitro has prevented tissue engineers from constructing clinically useful load-bearing connective tissue directly from collagen. However, we and others have taken the view that long-range organizational information is potentially encoded into the structure of the collagen molecule itself, allowing the control of fibril organization to extend far from cell (or bounding) surfaces. We here demonstrate a simple, fast, cell-free method capable of producing highly-organized, anistropic collagen fibrillar lamellae de novo which persist over relatively long-distances (tens to hundreds of microns). Our approach to nanoscale organizational control takes advantage of the intrinsic physiochemical properties of collagen molecules by inducing collagen association through molecular crowding and geometric confinement. To mimic biological tissues which comprise planar, aligned collagen lamellae (e.g. cornea, lamellar bone or annulus fibrosus), type I collagen was confined to a thin, planar geometry, concentrated through molecular crowding and polymerized. The resulting fibrillar lamellae show a striking resemblance to native load-bearing lamellae in that the fibrils are small, generally aligned in the plane of the confining space and change direction en masse throughout the thickness of the construct. The process of organizational control is consistent with embryonic development where the bounded planar cell sheets produced by fibroblasts suggest a similar confinement/concentration strategy. Such a simple approach to nanoscale

  17. The Organic Matter Molecular Characteristics of Pyrogenic Solids and Their Aqueous Leachable Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, A. S.; Hatcher, P.; Mitra, S.; Bostick, K. W.; Zimmerman, A. R.

    2016-02-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter (Py-OM), or black carbon (BC), derives from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass and is recognized for its impacts on soil chemistry, pollutant transport, climate, and regional and global carbon cycling. In fact, Py-OM is commonly applied to agricultural plots, in the form of "biochars," with the intention of enhancing agricultural production and the expectation of a carbon sequestration side benefit due to Py-OM's refractory and immobile nature. However, several studies of riverine, estuarine, and oceanic waters have detected tracers of dissolved Py-OM in appreciable quantities suggesting that it is more mobile in the environment than previously expected. The quantities and impacts of Py-OM released to aqueous systems are likely dependent on Py-OM molecular characteristics which in turn likely depend on initial combustion conditions and environmental processing. Yet, very little is known about the detailed molecular composition of these materials, let alone their relationships with combustion and environmental processing. Here, pyrophosphate extractable and water leachable components of a range of Py-OM materials (natural charcoals aged in the environment for variable lengths of time, oak and grass combusted over a range of temperatures) are examined by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The molecular characteristics of the dissolved and pyrophosphate extractable Py-OM is then compared in the context of production conditions. Results of this study will greatly improve our understanding of Py-OM cycling between watersheds and the oceans.

  18. Short-term dynamics of North Sea bacterioplankton-dissolved organic matter coherence on molecular level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eLucas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Remineralisation and transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM by marine microbes shape the DOM composition and thus, have large impact on global carbon and nutrient cycling. However, information on bacterioplankton-DOM interactions on a molecular level is limited. We examined the variation of bacterial community composition at Helgoland Roads (North Sea in relation to variation of molecular DOM composition and various environmental parameters on short-time scales. Surface water samples were taken daily over a period of twenty days. Bacterial community and molecular DOM composition were assessed via 16S rRNA gene tag sequencing and ultrahigh resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS, respectively. Environmental conditions were driven by a coastal water influx during the first half of the sampling period and the onset of a summer phytoplankton bloom towards the end of the sampling period. These phenomena led to a distinct grouping of bacterial communities and DOM composition which was particularly influenced by total dissolved nitrogen concentration, temperature and salinity, as revealed by distance-based linear regression analyses. Bacterioplankton-DOM interaction was demonstrated in strong correlations between specific bacterial taxa and particular DOM molecules, thus, suggesting potential specialization on particular substrates. We propose that a combination of high resolution techniques, as used in this study, may provide substantial information on substrate generalists and specialists and thus, contribute to prediction of bacterial community composition variation.

  19. Organic molecular paleohypsometry: A new approach to reconstructing the paleoelevation history of an orogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hren, M. T.; Ouimet, W. B.

    2017-12-01

    Paleoelevation data is critical to understanding the links and feedbacks between rock-uplift and erosion yet few approaches have proved successful in quantifying changes in paleoelevation rapidly eroding, tropical landscapes. In addition, quantitative methods of reconstructing paleoelevation from marine sedimentary archives are lacking. Here we present a new approach to quantifying changes in paleoelevation that is based on the geochemical signature of organic matter exported via the main river networks of an orogen. This new approach builds on fundamentals of stable isotope paleoaltimetry and is akin to the theory behind cosmogenic isotope records of catchment-integrated erosion. Specifically, we utilize predictable patterns of precipitation and organic molecular biomarker stable isotopes to relate the hypsometry of organic matter in a catchment to the geochemical signal in exported organic carbon. We present data from two sites (the cold temperate White Mountains of New Hampshire, USA and the tropical, rapidly eroding landscape of Taiwan) to demonstrate this relationship between exported carbon geochemistry and catchment hypsometry and the validity of this approach.

  20. Molecular marker analysis as a guide to the sources of fine organic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogge, W.F.; Cass, G.R.; Hildemann, L.M.; Simoneit, B.R.T.

    1992-07-01

    The molecular composition of fine particulate (D p ≥ 2 μm) organic aerosol emissions from the most important sources in the Los Angeles area has been determined. Likewise, ambient concentration patterns for more than 80 single organic compounds have been measured at four urban sites (West Los Angeles, Downtown Los Angeles, Pasadena, and Rubidoux) and at one remote offshore site (San Nicolas Island). It has been found that cholesterol serves as a marker compound for emissions from charbroilers and other meat cooking operations. Vehicular exhaust being emitted from diesel and gasoline powered engines can be traced in the Los Angeles atmosphere using fossil petroleum marker compounds such as steranes and pentacyclic triterpanes (e.g., hopanes). Biogenic fine particle emission sources such as plant fragments abraded from leaf surfaces by wind and weather can be traced in the urban atmosphere. Using distinct and specific source organic tracers or assemblages of organic compounds characteristic for the sources considered it is possible to estimate the influence of different source types at any urban site where atmospheric data are available

  1. Atomic and molecular physics of plasma-based environmental technologies for abatement of volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B. M.; Hsiao, M. C.; Bardsley, J. N.; Merritt, B. T.; Vogtin, G. E.; Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C. P.; Bayless, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques represent a new generation of air emission control technology that potentially could treat large-volume emissions containing dilute concentrations of volatile organic compounds. In order to apply non-thermal plasmas in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process.There is a need for reliable data concerning the primary decomposition mechanisms and subsequent chemical kinetics associated with non- thermal plasma processing of volatile organic compounds. There are many basic atomic and molecular physics issues that are essential in evaluating the economic performance of non-thermal plasma reactors. These studies are important in understanding how the input electrical power is dissipated in the plasma and how efficiently it is converted to the production of the plasma species (radicals, ions or electrons) responsible for the decomposition of the volatile organic compounds. This paper will present results from basic experimental and theoretical studies aimed at identifying the reaction mechanisms responsible for the primary decomposition of various types of volatile organic compounds. (authors)

  2. Energy level alignment and electron transport through metal/organic contacts. From interfaces to molecular electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, Enrique

    2013-07-01

    A new calculational approach to describing metal/organic interfaces. A valuable step towards a better understanding of molecular electronics. Nominated as an outstanding contribution by the Autonomous University of Madrid. In recent years, ever more electronic devices have started to exploit the advantages of organic semiconductors. The work reported in this thesis focuses on analyzing theoretically the energy level alignment of different metal/organic interfaces, necessary to tailor devices with good performance. Traditional methods based on density functional theory (DFT), are not appropriate for analyzing them because they underestimate the organic energy gap and fail to correctly describe the van der Waals forces. Since the size of these systems prohibits the use of more accurate methods, corrections to those DFT drawbacks are desirable. In this work a combination of a standard DFT calculation with the inclusion of the charging energy (U) of the molecule, calculated from first principles, is presented. Regarding the dispersion forces, incorrect long range interaction is substituted by a van der Waals potential. With these corrections, the C60, benzene, pentacene, TTF and TCNQ/Au(111) interfaces are analyzed, both for single molecules and for a monolayer. The results validate the induced density of interface states model.

  3. The Role of Concentration and Solvent Character in the Molecular Organization of Humic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Klučáková

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular organization of humic acids in different aqueous solutions was studied over a wide concentration range (0.01–10 g·dm−3. Solutions of humic acids were prepared in three different media: NaOH, NaCl, and NaOH neutralized by HCl after dissolution of the humic sample. Potentiometry, conductometry, densitometry, and high resolution ultrasound spectrometry were used in order to investigate conformational changes in the humic systems. The molecular organization of humic acids in the studied systems could be divided into three concentration ranges. The rearrangements were observed at concentrations of ~0.02 g·dm−3 and ~1 g·dm−3. The first “switch-over point” was connected with changes in the hydration shells of humic particles resulting in changes in their elasticity. The compressibility of water in the hydration shells is less than the compressibility of bulk water. The transfer of hydration water into bulk water increased the total compressibility of the solution, reducing the ultrasonic velocity. The aggregation of humic particles and the formation of rigid structures in systems with concentrations higher than 1 g·dm−3 was detected.

  4. COBRA: A Computational Brewing Application for Predicting the Molecular Composition of Organic Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fooshee, David R.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Baldi, Pierre

    2012-05-08

    Atmospheric organic aerosols (OA) represent a significant fraction of airborne particulate matter and can impact climate, visibility, and human health. These mixtures are difficult to characterize experimentally due to the enormous complexity and dynamic nature of their chemical composition. We introduce a novel Computational Brewing Application (COBRA) and apply it to modeling oligomerization chemistry stemming from condensation and addition reactions of monomers pertinent to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by photooxidation of isoprene. COBRA uses two lists as input: a list of chemical structures comprising the molecular starting pool, and a list of rules defining potential reactions between molecules. Reactions are performed iteratively, with products of all previous iterations serving as reactants for the next one. The simulation generated thousands of molecular structures in the mass range of 120-500 Da, and correctly predicted ~70% of the individual SOA constituents observed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Selected predicted structures were confirmed with tandem mass spectrometry. Esterification and hemiacetal formation reactions were shown to play the most significant role in oligomer formation, whereas aldol condensation was shown to be insignificant. COBRA is not limited to atmospheric aerosol chemistry, but is broadly applicable to the prediction of reaction products in other complex mixtures for which reasonable reaction mechanisms and seed molecules can be supplied by experimental or theoretical methods.

  5. New Insights into Molecular Organization of Human Neuraminidase-1: Transmembrane Topology and Dimerization Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Pascal; Baud, Stéphanie; Bocharova, Olga V.; Bocharov, Eduard V.; Kuznetsov, Andrey S.; Kawecki, Charlotte; Bocquet, Olivier; Romier, Beatrice; Gorisse, Laetitia; Ghirardi, Maxime; Duca, Laurent; Blaise, Sébastien; Martiny, Laurent; Dauchez, Manuel; Efremov, Roman G.; Debelle, Laurent

    2016-12-01

    Neuraminidase 1 (NEU1) is a lysosomal sialidase catalyzing the removal of terminal sialic acids from sialyloconjugates. A plasma membrane-bound NEU1 modulating a plethora of receptors by desialylation, has been consistently documented from the last ten years. Despite a growing interest of the scientific community to NEU1, its membrane organization is not understood and current structural and biochemical data cannot account for such membrane localization. By combining molecular biology and biochemical analyses with structural biophysics and computational approaches, we identified here two regions in human NEU1 - segments 139-159 (TM1) and 316-333 (TM2) - as potential transmembrane (TM) domains. In membrane mimicking environments, the corresponding peptides form stable α-helices and TM2 is suited for self-association. This was confirmed with full-size NEU1 by co-immunoprecipitations from membrane preparations and split-ubiquitin yeast two hybrids. The TM2 region was shown to be critical for dimerization since introduction of point mutations within TM2 leads to disruption of NEU1 dimerization and decrease of sialidase activity in membrane. In conclusion, these results bring new insights in the molecular organization of membrane-bound NEU1 and demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of two potential TM domains that may anchor NEU1 in the membrane, control its dimerization and sialidase activity.

  6. Surface-directed molecular assembly of pentacene on monolayer graphene for high-performance organic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wi Hyoung; Park, Jaesung; Sim, Sung Hyun; Lim, Soojin; Kim, Kwang S; Hong, Byung Hee; Cho, Kilwon

    2011-03-30

    Organic electronic devices that use graphene electrodes have received considerable attention because graphene is regarded as an ideal candidate electrode material. Transfer and lithographic processes during fabrication of patterned graphene electrodes typically leave polymer residues on the graphene surfaces. However, the impact of these residues on the organic semiconductor growth mechanism on graphene surface has not been reported yet. Here, we demonstrate that polymer residues remaining on graphene surfaces induce a stand-up orientation of pentacene, thereby controlling pentacene growth such that the molecular assembly is optimal for charge transport. Thus, pentacene field-effect transistors (FETs) using source/drain monolayer graphene electrodes with polymer residues show a high field-effect mobility of 1.2 cm(2)/V s. In contrast, epitaxial growth of pentacene having molecular assembly of lying-down structure is facilitated by π-π interaction between pentacene and the clean graphene electrode without polymer residues, which adversely affects lateral charge transport at the interface between electrode and channel. Our studies provide that the obtained high field-effect mobility in pentacene FETs using monolayer graphene electrodes arises from the extrinsic effects of polymer residues as well as the intrinsic characteristics of the highly conductive, ultrathin two-dimensional monolayer graphene electrodes.

  7. Metal-organic molecular device for non-volatile memory storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radha, B.; Sagade, Abhay A.; Kulkarni, G. U.

    2014-01-01

    Non-volatile memory devices have been of immense research interest for their use in active memory storage in powered off-state of electronic chips. In literature, various molecules and metal compounds have been investigated in this regard. Molecular memory devices are particularly attractive as they offer the ease of storing multiple memory states in a unique way and also represent ubiquitous choice for miniaturized devices. However, molecules are fragile and thus the device breakdown at nominal voltages during repeated cycles hinders their practical applicability. Here, in this report, a synergetic combination of an organic molecule and an inorganic metal, i.e., a metal-organic complex, namely, palladium hexadecylthiolate is investigated for memory device characteristics. Palladium hexadecylthiolate following partial thermolysis is converted to a molecular nanocomposite of Pd(II), Pd(0), and long chain hydrocarbons, which is shown to exhibit non-volatile memory characteristics with exceptional stability and retention. The devices are all solution-processed and the memory action stems from filament formation across the pre-formed cracks in the nanocomposite film.

  8. A nanoscale study of charge extraction in organic solar cells: the impact of interfacial molecular configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fu-Ching; Wu, Fu-Chiao; Yen, Chia-Te; Chang, Jay; Chou, Wei-Yang; Gilbert Chang, Shih-Hui; Cheng, Horng-Long

    2015-01-07

    In the optimization of organic solar cells (OSCs), a key problem lies in the maximization of charge carriers from the active layer to the electrodes. Hence, this study focused on the interfacial molecular configurations in efficient OSC charge extraction by theoretical investigations and experiments, including small molecule-based bilayer-heterojunction (sm-BLHJ) and polymer-based bulk-heterojunction (p-BHJ) OSCs. We first examined a well-defined sm-BLHJ model system of OSC composed of p-type pentacene, an n-type perylene derivative, and a nanogroove-structured poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (NS-PEDOT) hole extraction layer. The OSC with NS-PEDOT shows a 230% increment in the short circuit current density compared with that of the conventional planar PEDOT layer. Our theoretical calculations indicated that small variations in the microscopic intermolecular interaction among these interfacial configurations could induce significant differences in charge extraction efficiency. Experimentally, different interfacial configurations were generated between the photo-active layer and the nanostructured charge extraction layer with periodic nanogroove structures. In addition to pentacene, poly(3-hexylthiophene), the most commonly used electron-donor material system in p-BHJ OSCs was also explored in terms of its possible use as a photo-active layer. Local conductive atomic force microscopy was used to measure the nanoscale charge extraction efficiency at different locations within the nanogroove, thus highlighting the importance of interfacial molecular configurations in efficient charge extraction. This study enriches understanding regarding the optimization of the photovoltaic properties of several types of OSCs by conducting appropriate interfacial engineering based on organic/polymer molecular orientations. The ultimate power conversion efficiency beyond at least 15% is highly expected when the best state-of-the-art p-BHJ OSCs are combined with present arguments.

  9. Validation of systems biology derived molecular markers of renal donor organ status associated with long term allograft function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perco, Paul; Heinzel, Andreas; Leierer, Johannes; Schneeberger, Stefan; Bösmüller, Claudia; Oberhuber, Rupert; Wagner, Silvia; Engler, Franziska; Mayer, Gert

    2018-05-03

    Donor organ quality affects long term outcome after renal transplantation. A variety of prognostic molecular markers is available, yet their validity often remains undetermined. A network-based molecular model reflecting donor kidney status based on transcriptomics data and molecular features reported in scientific literature to be associated with chronic allograft nephropathy was created. Significantly enriched biological processes were identified and representative markers were selected. An independent kidney pre-implantation transcriptomics dataset of 76 organs was used to predict estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values twelve months after transplantation using available clinical data and marker expression values. The best-performing regression model solely based on the clinical parameters donor age, donor gender, and recipient gender explained 17% of variance in post-transplant eGFR values. The five molecular markers EGF, CD2BP2, RALBP1, SF3B1, and DDX19B representing key molecular processes of the constructed renal donor organ status molecular model in addition to the clinical parameters significantly improved model performance (p-value = 0.0007) explaining around 33% of the variability of eGFR values twelve months after transplantation. Collectively, molecular markers reflecting donor organ status significantly add to prediction of post-transplant renal function when added to the clinical parameters donor age and gender.

  10. High-Performance Near-Infrared Phototransistor Based on n-Type Small-Molecular Organic Semiconductor

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Feng

    2016-12-13

    A solution-processed near-infrared (NIR) organic phototransistor (OPT) based on n-type organic small molecular material BODIPY-BF2 has been successfully fabricated. Its unprecedented performance, as well as its easy fabrication and good stability, mark this BODIPY-BF2 based OPT device as a very promising candidate for optoelectronic applications in the NIR regime.

  11. High-Performance Near-Infrared Phototransistor Based on n-Type Small-Molecular Organic Semiconductor

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Feng; Chen, Yin; Ma, Chun; Buttner, Ulrich; Leo, Karl; Wu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    A solution-processed near-infrared (NIR) organic phototransistor (OPT) based on n-type organic small molecular material BODIPY-BF2 has been successfully fabricated. Its unprecedented performance, as well as its easy fabrication and good stability, mark this BODIPY-BF2 based OPT device as a very promising candidate for optoelectronic applications in the NIR regime.

  12. Time-resolved molecular characterization of organic aerosols by PILS + UPLC/ESI-Q-TOFMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Dalleska, N. F.; Huang, D. D.; Bates, K. H.; Sorooshian, A.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Real-time and quantitative measurement of particulate matter chemical composition represents one of the most challenging problems in the field of atmospheric chemistry. In the present study, we integrate the Particle-into-Liquid Sampler (PILS) with Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/Electrospray ionization Quadrupole Time-of-Flight High-Resolution/Mass Spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-Q-TOFMS) for the time-resolved molecular speciation of chamber-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The unique aspect of the combination of these two well-proven techniques is to provide quantifiable molecular-level information of particle-phase organic compounds on timescales of minutes. We demonstrate that the application of the PILS + UPLC/ESI-Q-TOFMS method is not limited to water-soluble inorganic ions and organic carbon, but is extended to slightly water-soluble species through collection efficiency calibration together with sensitivity and linearity tests. By correlating the water solubility of individual species with their O:C ratio, a parameter that is available for aerosol ensembles as well, we define an average aerosol O:C ratio threshold of 0.3, above which the PILS overall particulate mass collection efficiency approaches ∼0.7. The PILS + UPLC/ESI-Q-TOFMS method can be potentially applied to probe the formation and evolution mechanism of a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic SOA systems in laboratory chamber experiments. We illustrate the application of this method to the reactive uptake of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) on hydrated and acidic ammonium sulfate aerosols.

  13. Effects of low molecular weight organic acids on 137Cs release from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Po Neng; Wang, Ming Kuang; Huang, Pan Ming; Wang, Jeng Jong

    2011-01-01

    Radio pollutant removal is one of several priority restoration strategies for the environment. This study assessed the effect of low molecular weight organic acid on the lability and mechanisms for release of 137 Cs from contaminated soils. The amount of 137 Cs radioactivity released from contaminated soils reacting with 0.02 M low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) specifically acetic, succinic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric acid over 48 h were 265, 370, 760, 850, and 1002 Bq kg -1 , respectively. The kinetic results indicate that 137 Cs exhibits a two-step parabolic diffusion equation and a good linear relationship, indicating that the parabolic diffusion equation describes the data quite well, as shown by low p and high r 2 values. The fast stage, which was found to occur within a short period of time (0.083-3 h), corresponds to the interaction of LMWOAs with the surface of clay minerals; meanwhile, during the slow stage, which occurs over a much longer time period (3-24 h), desorption primarily is attributed to inter-particle or intra-particle diffusion. After a fifth renewal of the LMWOAs, the total levels of 137 Cs radioactivity released by acetic, succinic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric acid were equivalent to 390, 520, 3949, 2061, and 4422 Bq kg -1 soil, respectively. H + can protonate the hydroxyl groups and oxygen atoms at the broken edges or surfaces of the minerals, thereby weakening Fe-O and Al-O bonds. After protonation of H + , organic ligands can attack the OH and OH 2 groups in the minerals easily, to form complexes with surface structure cations, such as Al and Fe. The amounts of 137 Cs released from contaminated soil treated with LMWOAs were substantially increased, indicating that the LMWOAs excreted by the roots of plants play a critical role in 137 Cs release.

  14. Crystal structures of seven molecular salts derived from benzylamine and organic acidic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xianhong; Jin, Xiunan; Lv, Chengcai; Jin, Shouwen; Zheng, Xiuqing; Liu, Bin; Wang, Daqi; Guo, Ming; Xu, Weiqiang

    2017-07-01

    Cocrystallization of the commonly available organic amine, benzylamine, with a series of organic acids gave a total of seven molecular salts with the compositions: (benzylamine): (p-toluenesulfonic acid) (1) [(HL)+ · (tsa-)], (benzylamine): (o-nitrobenzoic acid) (2) [(HL+) · (onba)-], (benzylamine): (3,4-methylenedioxybenzoic acid) (3) [(HL+) · (mdba-)], (benzylamine): (mandelic acid) (4) [(HL+) · (mda-)], (benzylamine): (5-bromosalicylic acid)2(5) [(HL+) · (bsac-) · (Hbsac)], (benzylamine): (m-phthalic acid) (6) [(HL+) · (Hmpta-)], and (benzylamine)2: (trimesic acid) (7) [(HL+)2 · (Htma2-)]. The seven salts have been characterised by X-ray diffraction technique, IR, and elemental analysis, and the melting points of all the salts were also reported. And their structural and supramolecular aspects are fully analyzed. The result reveals that among the seven investigated crystals the NH2 groups in the benzylamine moieties are protonated when the organic acids are deprotonated, and the crystal packing is interpreted in terms of the strong charge-assisted Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond formation between the ammonium and the deprotonated acidic groups. Except the Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond, the Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) were also found at the salts 4-7. Further analysis of the crystal packing of the salts indicated that a different family of additional CHsbnd O/CH2sbnd O, CHsbnd π/CH2sbnd π, Osbnd O, and Osbnd Cπ associations contribute to the stabilization and expansion of the total high-dimensional (2D-3D) framework structures. For the coexistence of the various weak nonbonding interactions these structures adopted homo or hetero supramolecular synthons or both. Some classical supramolecular synthons, such as R42(8), R43(10) and R44(12), usually observed in organic solids of organic acids with amine, were again shown to be involved in constructing most of these hydrogen bonding networks.

  15. An Electronic Structure Approach to Charge Transfer and Transport in Molecular Building Blocks for Organic Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Heidi Phillips

    A fundamental understanding of charge separation in organic materials is necessary for the rational design of optoelectronic devices suited for renewable energy applications and requires a combination of theoretical, computational, and experimental methods. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD)DFT are cost effective ab-initio approaches for calculating fundamental properties of large molecular systems, however conventional DFT methods have been known to fail in accurately characterizing frontier orbital gaps and charge transfer states in molecular systems. In this dissertation, these shortcomings are addressed by implementing an optimally-tuned range-separated hybrid (OT-RSH) functional approach within DFT and TDDFT. The first part of this thesis presents the way in which RSH-DFT addresses the shortcomings in conventional DFT. Environmentally-corrected RSH-DFT frontier orbital energies are shown to correspond to thin film measurements for a set of organic semiconducting molecules. Likewise, the improved RSH-TDDFT description of charge transfer excitations is benchmarked using a model ethene dimer and silsesquioxane molecules. In the second part of this thesis, RSH-DFT is applied to chromophore-functionalized silsesquioxanes, which are currently investigated as candidates for building blocks in optoelectronic applications. RSH-DFT provides insight into the nature of absorptive and emissive states in silsesquioxanes. While absorption primarily involves transitions localized on one chromophore, charge transfer between chromophores and between chromophore and silsesquioxane cage have been identified. The RSH-DFT approach, including a protocol accounting for complex environmental effects on charge transfer energies, was tested and validated against experimental measurements. The third part of this thesis addresses quantum transport through nano-scale junctions. The ability to quantify a molecular junction via spectroscopic methods is crucial to their

  16. The Electric and Optical Properties of Doped Small Molecular Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwang-Ohk Cheon

    2003-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) constitute a new and exciting emissive display technology. In general, the basic OLED structure consists of a stack of fluorescent organic layers sandwiched between a transparent conducting-anode and metallic cathode. When an appropriate bias is applied to the device, holes are injected from the anode and electrons from the cathode; some of the recombination events between the holes and electrons result in electroluminescence (EL). Until now, most of the efforts in developing OLEDs have focused on display applications, hence on devices within the visible range. However some organic devices have been developed for ultraviolet or infrared emission. Various aspects of the device physics of doped small molecular OLEDs were described and discussed. The doping layer thickness and concentration were varied systematically to study their effects on device performances, energy transfer, and turn-off dynamics. Low-energy-gap DCM2 guest molecules, in either α-NPD or DPVBi host layers, are optically efficient fluorophores but also generate deep carrier trap-sites. Since their traps reduce the carrier mobility, the current density decreases with increased doping concentration. At the same time, due to efficient energy transfer, the quantum efficiency of the devices is improved by light doping or thin doping thickness, in comparison with the undoped neat devices. However, heavy doping induces concentration quenching effects. Thus, the doping concentration and doping thickness may be optimized for best performance

  17. Ancient low-molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Travis W; Wickland, Kimberly P; Spencer, Robert G M; McKnight, Diane M; Striegl, Robert G

    2015-11-10

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high-temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters.

  18. Ancient low–molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Travis W.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; McKnight, Diane M.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high–temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low–molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters.

  19. [Effects of low molecular weight organic acids on redox reactions of mercury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shi-Bo; Sun, Rong-Guo; Wang, Ding-Yong; Wang, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Cheng

    2014-06-01

    To study the effects of the main component of vegetation root exudates-low molecular weight organic acids on the redox reactions of mercury, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the roles of tartaric, citric, and succinic acid in the redox reactions of mercury, and to analyze their interaction mechanism. The results indicated that tartaric acid significantly stimulated the mercury reduction reaction, while citric acid had inhibitory effect. Succinic acid improved the reduction rate at low concentration, and inhibited the reaction at high concentration. The mercury reduction rate by tartaric acid treatment was second-order with respect to Hg2+ concentration, ranging from 0.0014 L x (ng x min)(-1) to 0.005 6 L x (ng x min)(-1). All three organic acids showed a capacity for oxidating Hg(0) in the early stage, but the oxidized Hg(0) was subsequently reduced. The oxidation capacity of the three organic acids was in the order of citric acid > tartaric acid > succinic acid.

  20. The Electric and Optical Properties of Doped Small Molecular Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Kwang-Ohk [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) constitute a new and exciting emissive display technology. In general, the basic OLED structure consists of a stack of fluorescent organic layers sandwiched between a transparent conducting-anode and metallic cathode. When an appropriate bias is applied to the device, holes are injected from the anode and electrons from the cathode; some of the recombination events between the holes and electrons result in electroluminescence (EL). Until now, most of the efforts in developing OLEDs have focused on display applications, hence on devices within the visible range. However some organic devices have been developed for ultraviolet or infrared emission. Various aspects of the device physics of doped small molecular OLEDs were described and discussed. The doping layer thickness and concentration were varied systematically to study their effects on device performances, energy transfer, and turn-off dynamics. Low-energy-gap DCM2 guest molecules, in either α-NPD or DPVBi host layers, are optically efficient fluorophores but also generate deep carrier trap-sites. Since their traps reduce the carrier mobility, the current density decreases with increased doping concentration. At the same time, due to efficient energy transfer, the quantum efficiency of the devices is improved by light doping or thin doping thickness, in comparison with the undoped neat devices. However, heavy doping induces concentration quenching effects. Thus, the doping concentration and doping thickness may be optimized for best performance.

  1. Organic molecular composition of marine aerosols over the Arctic Ocean in summer: contributions of primary emission and secondary aerosol formation

    OpenAIRE

    P. Q. Fu; K. Kawamura; J. Chen; B. Charrière; R. Sempéré

    2013-01-01

    Organic molecular composition of marine aerosol samples collected during the MALINA cruise in the Arctic Ocean was investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. More than 110 individual organic compounds were determined in the samples and were grouped into different compound classes based on the functionality and sources. The concentrations of total quantified organics ranged from 7.3 to 185 ng m−3 (mean 47.6 ng m−3), accounting ...

  2. Combined-modality treatment and organ preservation in bladder cancer. Do molecular markers predict outcome?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, C.; Roedel, F.; Wolf, I.; Sauer, R.; Roedel, C.; Papadopoulos, T.; Engehausen, D.G.; Schrott, K.M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: in invasive bladder cancer, several groups have reported the value of organ preservation by a combined-treatment approach, including transurethral resection (TUR-BT) and radiochemotherapy (RCT). As more experience is acquired with this organ-sparing treatment, patient selection needs to be optimized. Clinical factors are limited in their potential to identify patients most likely to respond to RCT, thus, additional molecular markers for predicting treatment response of individual lesions are sorely needed. Patients and methods: the apoptotic index (AI) and Ki-67 index were evaluated by immunohistochemistry on pretreatment biopsies of 134 patients treated for bladder cancer by TUR-BT and RCT. Expression of each marker as well as clinicopathologic factors were then correlated with initial response, local control and cancer-specific survival with preserved bladder in univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: the median AI for all patients was 1.5% (range 0.2-7.4%). The percentage of Ki-67-positive cells in the tumors ranged from 0.2% to 85% with a median of 14.2%. A significant correlation was found for AI and tumor differentiation (G1/2: AI = 1.3% vs. G3/4: AI = 1.6%; p = 0.01). A complete response at restaging TUR-BT was achieved in 76% of patients. Factors predictive of complete response included T-category (p < 0.0001), resection status (p = 0.02), lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.01), and Ki-67 index (p = 0.02). For local control, AI (p = 0.04) and Ki-67 index (p = 0.05) as well as T-category (p = 0.005), R-status (p = 0.05), and lymphatic vessel invasion (p = 0.05) reached statistical significance. Out of the molecular markers only high Ki-67 levels were associated to cause-specific survival with preserved bladder. On multivariate analysis, T-category was the strongest independent factor for initial response, local control and cancer-specific survival with preserved bladder. Conclusion: The indices of pretreatment apoptosis and Ki-67 predict a

  3. Molecular transformation and degradation of refractory dissolved organic matter in the Atlantic and Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechtenfeld, Oliver J.; Kattner, Gerhard; Flerus, Ruth; McCallister, S. Leigh; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Koch, Boris P.

    2014-02-01

    More than 90% of the global ocean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is refractory, has an average age of 4000-6000 years and a lifespan from months to millennia. The fraction of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that is resistant to degradation is a long-term buffer in the global carbon cycle but its chemical composition, structure, and biochemical formation and degradation mechanisms are still unresolved. We have compiled the most comprehensive molecular dataset of 197 Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) analyses from solid-phase extracted marine DOM covering two major oceans, the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean and the East Atlantic Ocean (ranging from 50° N to 70° S). Molecular trends and radiocarbon dating of 34 DOM samples (comprising Δ14C values from -229‰ to -495‰) were combined to model an integrated degradation rate for bulk DOC resulting in a predicted age of >24 ka for the most persistent DOM fraction. First order kinetic degradation rates for 1557 mass peaks indicate that numerous DOM molecules cycle on timescales much longer than the turnover of the bulk DOC pool (estimated residence times of up to ~100 ka) and the range of validity of radiocarbon dating. Changes in elemental composition were determined by assigning molecular formulae to the detected mass peaks. The combination of residence times with molecular information enabled modelling of the average elemental composition of the slowest degrading fraction of the DOM pool. In our dataset, a group of 361 molecular formulae represented the most stable composition in the oceanic environment (“island of stability”). These most persistent compounds encompass only a narrow range of the molecular elemental ratios H/C (average of 1.17 ± 0.13), and O/C (average of 0.52 ± 0.10) and molecular masses (360 ± 28 and 497 ± 51 Da). In the Weddell Sea DOC concentrations in the surface waters were low (46.3 ± 3.3 μM) while the organic radiocarbon was significantly

  4. Heat impact caused molecular level changes in solid and dissolved soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Diana; Steffen, Bernhard; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe; Leinweber, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The ubiquitous abundance of pyrolysed, highly aromatic organic matter, called "Black Carbon" (BC), in all environmental compartments became increasingly important in different fields of research beyond intensive investigated atmospheric aerosol due to climatic relevance. Its predominant high resistance to abiotic and biotic degradation resulted in turnover times from less than a century to several millennia. This recalcitrance led to the enrichment of BC in soils, accounting for 1-6% (European forest soils) to 60% (Chernozems) of total soil organic matter (SOM). Hence, soil BC acts an important sink in the global carbon cycle. In contrast, consequences for the nitrogen cycle up to date are rather inconsistently discussed. Soil related dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a major controlling factor in soil formation, an important pathway of organic matter transport and one of the largest active carbon reservoirs on earth, if considering oceans and other bodies of water. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of artificially simulated wildfire by thermal treatment on the molecular composition of water extractable soil organic matter (DOM). Soils from two outdoor lysimeters with different management history were investigated. Soil samples, non-heated and heated up to 350°C were analyzed for elemental composition (carbon, nitrogen and sulfur) and for bulk molecular composition by Pyrolysis-Field Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Py-FIMS) and synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) at the C- and N K-edges. DOM-samples obtained by hot water extraction, desalting and concentration by solid phase extraction were subsequently analyzed by flow injection analysis in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FTICR-MS), equipped with an ESI source and a 7 T supra-conducting magnet (LTQ-FT Ultra, ThermoFisher Scientific). This technique is the key technique for the analysis of complex samples due to its outstanding mass

  5. Molecular characterization of urban organic aerosol in tropical India: contributions of primary emissions and secondary photooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Q. Fu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic molecular composition of PM10 samples, collected at Chennai in tropical India, was studied using capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Fourteen organic compound classes were detected in the aerosols, including aliphatic lipids, sugar compounds, lignin products, terpenoid biomarkers, sterols, aromatic acids, hydroxy-/polyacids, phthalate esters, hopanes, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs, and photooxidation products from biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs. At daytime, phthalate esters were found to be the most abundant compound class; however, at nighttime, fatty acids were the dominant one. Di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate, C16 fatty acid, and levoglucosan were identified as the most abundant single compounds. The nighttime maxima of most organics in the aerosols indicate a land/sea breeze effect in tropical India, although some other factors such as local emissions and long-range transport may also influence the composition of organic aerosols. However, biogenic VOC oxidation products (e.g., 2-methyltetrols, pinic acid, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid and β-caryophyllinic acid showed diurnal patterns with daytime maxima. Interestingly, terephthalic acid was maximized at nighttime, which is different from those of phthalic and isophthalic acids. A positive relation was found between 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene (a tracer for plastic burning and terephthalic acid, suggesting that the field burning of municipal solid wastes including plastics is a significant source of terephthalic acid. Organic compounds were further categorized into several groups to clarify their sources. Fossil fuel combustion (24–43% was recognized as the most significant source for the total identified compounds, followed by plastic emission (16–33%, secondary oxidation (8.6–23%, and microbial/marine sources (7.2–17%. In contrast, the contributions of terrestrial plant waxes (5.9–11% and biomass burning (4.2–6.4% were relatively

  6. Confinement of Aggregation-Induced Emission Molecular Rotors in Ultrathin Two-Dimensional Porous Organic Nanosheets for Enhanced Molecular Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinqiao; Li, Xu; Zhang, Kang; Di Yuan, Yi; Wang, Yuxiang; Zhai, Linzhi; Liu, Guoliang; Yuan, Daqiang; Jiang, Jianwen; Zhao, Dan

    2018-03-21

    Despite the rapid development of molecular rotors over the past decade, it still remains a huge challenge to understand their confined behavior in ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials for molecular recognition. Here, we report an all-carbon, 2D π-conjugated aromatic polymer, named NUS-25, containing flexible tetraphenylethylene (TPE) units as aggregation-induced emission (AIE) molecular rotors. NUS-25 bulk powder can be easily exfoliated into micrometer-sized lamellar freestanding nanosheets with a thickness of 2-5 nm. The dynamic behavior of the TPE rotors is partially restricted through noncovalent interactions in the ultrathin 2D nanosheets, which is proved by comparative experimental studies including AIE characteristics, size-selective molecular recognition, and theoretical calculations of rotary energy barrier. Because of the partially restricted TPE rotors, NUS-25 nanosheets are highly fluorescent. This property allows NUS-25 nanosheets to be used as a chemical sensor for the specific detection of acenaphthylene among a series of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) via fluorescent quenching mechanism. Further investigations show that NUS-25 nanosheets have much higher sensitivity and selectivity than their stacked bulk powder and other similar polymers containing dynamic TPE rotors. The highly efficient molecular recognition can be attributed to the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from NUS-25 nanosheets to acenaphthylene, which is investigated by time-resolved photoluminescence measurements (TRPL), excitation and emission spectra, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our findings demonstrate that confinement of AIE molecular rotors in 2D nanomaterials can enhance the molecular recognition. We anticipate that the material design strategy demonstrated in this study will inspire the development of other ultrathin 2D nanomaterials equipped with smart molecular machines for various applications.

  7. Self-organized molecular films with long-range quasiperiodic order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournée, Vincent; Gaudry, Émilie; Ledieu, Julian; de Weerd, Marie-Cécile; Wu, Dongmei; Lograsso, Thomas

    2014-04-22

    Self-organized molecular films with long-range quasiperiodic order have been grown by using the complex potential energy landscape of quasicrystalline surfaces as templates. The long-range order arises from a specific subset of quasilattice sites acting as preferred adsorption sites for the molecules, thus enforcing a quasiperiodic structure in the film. These adsorption sites exhibit a local 5-fold symmetry resulting from the cut by the surface plane through the cluster units identified in the bulk solid. Symmetry matching between the C60 fullerene and the substrate leads to a preferred adsorption configuration of the molecules with a pentagonal face down, a feature unique to quasicrystalline surfaces, enabling efficient chemical bonding at the molecule-substrate interface. This finding offers opportunities to investigate the physical properties of model 2D quasiperiodic systems, as the molecules can be functionalized to yield architectures with tailor-made properties.

  8. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter in freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X Q; Maie, N; Hanna, J V; Childers, D L; Jaffé, R

    2003-06-01

    In this study, the molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), collected from wetlands of the Southern Everglades, was examined using a variety of analytical techniques in order to characterize its sources and transformation in the environment. The methods applied for the characterization of DOM included fluorescence spectroscopy, solid state 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy, and pyrolysis-GC/MS. The relative abundance of protein-like components and carbohydrates increased from the canal site to more remote freshwater marsh sites suggesting that significant amounts of non-humic DOM are autochthonously produced within the freshwater marshes, and are not exclusively introduced through canal inputs. Such in situ DOM production is important when considering how DOM from canals is processed and transported to downstream estuaries of Florida Bay.

  9. Remote stabilization of copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks in metal-organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Wenyang

    2015-03-24

    Copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks (MBBs) are ubiquitous and have been widely employed for the construction of highly porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). However, most copper paddlewheel based MOFs fail to retain their structural integrity in the presence of water. This instability is directly correlated to the plausible displacement of coordinating carboxylates in the copper paddlewheel MBB, [Cu2(O2C-)4], by the strongly coordinating water molecules. In this comprehensive study, we illustrate the chemical stability control in the rht-MOF platform via strengthening the coordinating bonds within the triangular inorganic MBB, [Cu3O(N4-x(CH)xC-)3] (x = 0, 1, or 2). Remotely, the chemical stabilization propagated into the paddlewheel MBB to afford isoreticular rht-MOFs with remarkably enhanced water/chemical stabilities compared to the prototypal rht-MOF-1. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  10. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Kaname [Department of Electronics, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yamashita, Kenichi, E-mail: yamasita@kit.ac.jp [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yanagi, Hisao [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu [Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2016-08-08

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ∼100 meV even in the “half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing” microcavity structure.

  11. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Kaname; Yamashita, Kenichi; Yanagi, Hisao; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2016-08-01

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ˜100 meV even in the "half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing" microcavity structure.

  12. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Kaname; Yamashita, Kenichi; Yanagi, Hisao; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ∼100 meV even in the “half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing” microcavity structure.

  13. Remote stabilization of copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks in metal-organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Wenyang; Cai, Rong; Pham, Tony T.; Forrest, Katherine A.; Hogan, Adam; Nugent, Patrick S.; Williams, Kia R.; Wojtas, Łukasz; Luebke, Ryan; Weselinski, Lukasz Jan; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Space, Brian; Chen, Yusheng; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Shi, Xiaodong; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-01-01

    Copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks (MBBs) are ubiquitous and have been widely employed for the construction of highly porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). However, most copper paddlewheel based MOFs fail to retain their structural integrity in the presence of water. This instability is directly correlated to the plausible displacement of coordinating carboxylates in the copper paddlewheel MBB, [Cu2(O2C-)4], by the strongly coordinating water molecules. In this comprehensive study, we illustrate the chemical stability control in the rht-MOF platform via strengthening the coordinating bonds within the triangular inorganic MBB, [Cu3O(N4-x(CH)xC-)3] (x = 0, 1, or 2). Remotely, the chemical stabilization propagated into the paddlewheel MBB to afford isoreticular rht-MOFs with remarkably enhanced water/chemical stabilities compared to the prototypal rht-MOF-1. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  14. Molecular Design of Semiconducting Polymers for High-Performance Organic Electrochemical Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Nielsen, Christian B.

    2016-07-22

    The organic electrochemical transistor (OECT), capable of transducing small ionic fluxes into electronic signals in an aqueous envi-ronment, is an ideal device to utilize in bioelectronic applications. Currently, most OECTs are fabricated with commercially availa-ble conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-based suspensions and are therefore operated in depletion mode. Here, we present a series of semiconducting polymers designed to elucidate important structure-property guidelines required for accumulation mode OECT operation. We discuss key aspects relating to OECT performance such as ion and hole transport, elec-trochromic properties, operational voltage and stability. The demonstration of our molecular design strategy is the fabrication of accumulation mode OECTs that clearly outperform state-of-the-art PEDOT based devices, and show stability under aqueous oper-ation without the need for formulation additives and cross-linkers.

  15. Molecular Understanding of Fullerene - Electron Donor Interactions in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-09-13

    Organic solar cells hold promise of providing low-cost, renewable power generation, with current devices providing up to 13% power conversion efficiency. The rational design of more performant systems requires an in-depth understanding of the interactions between the electron donating and electron accepting materials within the active layers of these devices. Here, we explore works that give insight into the intermolecular interactions between electron donors and electron acceptors, and the impact of molecular orientations and environment on these interactions. We highlight, from a theoretical standpoint, the effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of charge carriers at the donor/acceptor interface and in the bulk and how these interactions influence the nature of the charge transfer states as wells as the charge separation and charge transport processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Skin: Major target organ of allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, Hans F.; Baron, Jens M.; Neis, Mark M.; Obrigkeit, Daniela Hoeller; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2007-01-01

    Skin is a major target organ for allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds. Drug allergic reactions may be life-threatening such as in the case of anaphylactic reactions or bullous drug reactions and occur in about 5% of all hospitalized patients. Allergic contact dermatitis has an enormous influence on the social life of the patient because it is the most frequent reason for occupational skin diseases and the treatment and prevention of this disease cost approximately Euro 3 billion per year in Germany. The different proposed pathophysiological pathways leading to a drug eruption are discussed in this paper. All major enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotica were shown to be present in skin. Evidence supporting the role of metabolism in the development of drug allergy and allergic contact dermatitis is demonstrated in the example of sulphonamides and fragrances

  17. Chemical intermediate detection following corona discharge on volatile organic compounds: general method using molecular beam techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Luning; Sulkes, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Nonthermal plasma (NTP)-based treatments of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have potential for effective environmental remediation. Theory and experiment that consider the basic science pertaining to discharge events have helped improve NTP remediation outcomes. If direct information on early post-discharge chemical intermediates were also available, it would likely lead to additional improvement in NTP remediation outcomes. To this point, however, experiments yielding direct information on post-NTP VOC intermediates have been limited. An approach using supersonic expansion molecular beam methods offers general promise for detection of post-discharge VOC intermediates. To illustrate the potential utility of these methods, we present mass spectra showing the growth of early products formed when pulsed corona discharges were carried out on toluene in He and then in He with added O 2 . Good general detection of neutral post-discharge species was obtained using 800 nm 150 fs photoionization pulses.

  18. Molecular design and theoretical characterization of benzodithiophene based organic photovoltaic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Labanya; Sahu, Sridhar

    2018-05-01

    Two different oligomers, containing methyl substituted Benzodithiophene (BDT) as donor unit, fluorinated thiophene as the π-bridge unit and two different kinds of acceptors based on fluorinated benzothiadiazole, fluorinated benzoselenadiazole units are designed for bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cell (OSC). The ground and excited state properties of those donor-π-acceptor-π-donor (D-π-A-π-D) oligomeric configurations are characterized via density functional (DFT) and time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The parameters such as dipole moment (ρ), chemical potential (µ), electronegativity (χ), frontier molecular orbital (FMO) analysis, HOMO-LUMO gap, open circuit voltage (Voc) and driving force (ΔE) are calculated to analyze geometrical, electronic structural, quantum chemical and photovoltaic properties of the compounds. In addition, optical absorption spectra are also presented for the optical characterization of the compounds.

  19. Triplet-Based Codon Organization Optimizes the Impact of Synonymous Mutation on Nucleic Acid Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Gregory A; Coppola, Erin E; Mortensen, Jamie S; Ekeren, Patrick X; Viola, Cosmo; Goldblatt, Dallan; Hudson, André O

    2018-02-01

    Since the elucidation of the genetic code almost 50 years ago, many nonrandom aspects of its codon organization remain only partly resolved. Here, we investigate the recent hypothesis of 'dual-use' codons which proposes that in addition to allowing adjustment of codon optimization to tRNA abundance, the degeneracy in the triplet-based genetic code also multiplexes information regarding DNA's helical shape and protein-binding dynamics while avoiding interference with other protein-level characteristics determined by amino acid properties. How such structural optimization of the code within eukaryotic chromatin could have arisen from an RNA world is a mystery, but would imply some preadaptation in an RNA context. We analyzed synonymous (protein-silent) and nonsynonymous (protein-altering) mutational impacts on molecular dynamics in 13823 identically degenerate alternative codon reorganizations, defined by codon transitions in 7680 GPU-accelerated molecular dynamic simulations of implicitly and explicitly solvated double-stranded aRNA and bDNA structures. When compared to all possible alternative codon assignments, the standard genetic code minimized the impact of synonymous mutations on the random atomic fluctuations and correlations of carbon backbone vector trajectories while facilitating the specific movements that contribute to DNA polymer flexibility. This trend was notably stronger in the context of RNA supporting the idea that dual-use codon optimization and informational multiplexing in DNA resulted from the preadaptation of the RNA duplex to resist changes to thermostability. The nonrandom and divergent molecular dynamics of synonymous mutations also imply that the triplet-based code may have resulted from adaptive functional expansion enabling a primordial doublet code to multiplex gene regulatory information via the shape and charge of the minor groove.

  20. Mechanistic investigation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by low molecular weight organic sulfur species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Eryn M.; Taillefert, Martial

    2017-10-01

    Low molecular weight organic sulfur species, often referred to as thiols, are known to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments and represent important chemical reductants of Fe(III) oxides. Thiols are excellent electron shuttles used during dissimilatory iron reduction, and in this capacity could indirectly affect the redox state of sediments, release adsorbed contaminants via reductive dissolution, and influence the carbon cycle through alteration of bacterial respiration processes. Interestingly, the reduction of Fe(III) oxides by thiols has not been previously investigated in environmentally relevant conditions, likely due to analytical limitations associated with the detection of thiols and their oxidized products. In this study, a novel electrochemical method was developed to simultaneously determine thiol/disulfide pair concentrations in situ during the reduction of ferrihydrite in batch reactors. First order rate laws with respect to initial thiol concentration were confirmed for Fe(III) oxyhydroxide reduction by four common thiols: cysteine, homocysteine, cysteamine, and glutathione. Zero order was determined for both Fe(III) oxyhydroxide and proton concentration at circumneutral pH. A kinetic model detailing the molecular mechanism of the reaction was optimized with proposed intermediate surface structures. Although metal oxide overall reduction rate constants were inversely proportional to the complexity of the thiol structure, the extent of metal reduction increased with structure complexity, indicating that surface complexes play a significant role in the ability of these thiols to reduce iron. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of considering the molecular reaction mechanism at the iron oxide surface when investigating the potential for thiols to act as electron shuttles during dissimilatory iron reduction in natural environments.

  1. Organic molecular compositions and temporal variations of summertime mountain aerosols over Mt. Tai, North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Pingqing; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Okuzawa, Kazuhiro; Aggarwal, Shankar Gopala; Wang, Gehui; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2008-10-01

    Total suspended particles (TSP) were collected at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534 m above sea level) on a daytime and nighttime basis during a summertime campaign (May-June 2006) and were characterized for organic molecular compositions using solvent extraction/derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. The n-Alkanes, fatty acids, fatty alcohols, sugars, glycerol and polyacids, and phthalate esters were found as major organic compound classes, whereas lignin and resin products, sterols, aromatic acids, hopanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected as minor classes. Sugars (49.8-2115 ng m-3, average 640 ng m-3 in daytime; 18.1-4348 ng m-3, 799 ng m-3 in nighttime) were found to be the dominant compound class. Levoglucosan, a specific cellulose pyrolysis product, was detected as the most abundant single compound, followed by C28 fatty alcohol, diisobutyl and di-n-butyl phthalates, C29n-alkane, C16 and C28 fatty acids, and malic acid. By grouping organic compounds based on their sources, we found that emission of terrestrial plant waxes was the most significant source (30-34%) of the TSP, followed by biomass burning products (25-27%) (e.g., levoglucosan and lignin and resin products), soil resuspension (15-18%) due to agricultural activities, secondary oxidation products (8-10%), plastic emission (3-10%), marine/microbial sources (6%), and urban/industrial emissions from fossil fuel use (4%). However, low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids (such as oxalic acid) of photochemical origin were not included in this study. Malic acid was found to be much higher than those reported in the ground level, suggesting an enhanced photochemical production in the free troposphere over mountain areas. Temporal variations of biomass burning tracers (e.g., levoglucosan, galactosan, mannosan) and some higher plant wax derived compound classes suggested that there were two major (E1 and E2) and one minor (E3) biomass-burning events during this

  2. DNA barcoding and molecular systematics of the benthic and demersal organisms of the CEAMARC survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettai, Agnes; Adamowizc, Sarah J.; Allcock, Louise; Arango, Claudia P.; Barnes, David K. A.; Barratt, Iain; Chenuil, Anne; Couloux, Arnaud; Cruaud, Corinne; David, Bruno; Denis, Françoise; Denys, Gael; Díaz, Angie; Eléaume, Marc; Féral, Jean-Pierre; Froger, Aurélie; Gallut, Cyril; Grant, Rachel; Griffiths, Huw J.; Held, Christoph; Hemery, Lenaïg G.; Hosie, Graham; Kuklinski, Piotr; Lecointre, Guillaume; Linse, Katrin; Lozouet, Pierre; Mah, Christopher; Monniot, Françoise; Norman, Mark D.; O'Hara, Timothy; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; Piedallu, Claire; Pierrat, Benjamin; Poulin, Elie; Puillandre, Nicolas; Riddle, Martin; Samadi, Sarah; Saucède, Thomas; Schubart, Christoph; Smith, Peter J.; Stevens, Darren W.; Steinke, Dirk; Strugnell, Jan M.; Tarnowska, K.; Wadley, Victoria; Ameziane, Nadia

    2011-08-01

    The Dumont d’Urville Sea (East Antarctic region) has been less investigated for DNA barcoding and molecular taxonomy than other parts of the Southern Ocean, such as the Ross Sea and the Antarctic Peninsula. The Collaborative East Antarctic MARine Census (CEAMARC) took place in this area during the austral summer of 2007-2008. The Australian vessel RSV Aurora Australis collected very diverse samples of demersal and benthic organisms. The specimens were sorted centrally, and then distributed to taxonomic experts for molecular and morphological taxonomy and identification, especially barcoding. The COI sequences generated from CEAMARC material provide a sizeable proportion of the Census of Antarctic Marine Life barcodes although the studies are still ongoing, and represent the only source of sequences for a number of species. Barcoding appears to be a valuable method for identification within most groups, despite low divergences and haplotype sharing in a few species, and it is also useful as a preliminary taxonomic exploration method. Several new species are being described. CEAMARC samples have already provided new material for phylogeographic and phylogenetic studies in cephalopods, pycnogonids, teleost fish, crinoids and sea urchins, helping these studies to provide a better insight in the patterns of evolution in the Southern Ocean.

  3. Thermal stability and molecular ordering of organic semiconductor monolayers: effect of an anchor group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew O F; Knauer, Philipp; Resel, Roland; Ringk, Andreas; Strohriegl, Peter; Werzer, Oliver; Sferrazza, Michele

    2015-06-08

    The thermal stability and molecular order in monolayers of two organic semiconductors, PBI-PA and PBI-alkyl, based on perylene derivatives with an identical molecular structure except for an anchor group for attachment to the substrate in PBI-PA, are reported. In situ X-ray reflectivity measurements are used to follow the stability of these monolayers in terms of order and thickness as temperature is increased. Films have thicknesses corresponding approximately to the length of one molecule; molecules stand upright on the substrate with a defined structure. PBI-PA monolayers have a high degree of order at room temperature and a stable film exists up to 250 °C, but decomposes rapidly above 300 °C. In contrast, stable physisorbed PBI-alkyl monolayers only exist up to 100 °C. Above the bulk melting point at 200 °C no more order exists. The results encourage using anchor groups in monolayers for various applications as it allows enhanced stability at the interface with the substrate. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Relationships between Molecular Composition and Optical Properties of Dissolved Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, W. T.; Tfaily, M.; Osborne, D.; Paul, A.; Podgorski, D. C.; Corbett, J.; Chanton, J.

    2009-12-01

    Our focus is on the relationships between the optical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its molecular composition. For example, we demonstrated that changes in the absorption and fluorescence characteristics of DOM in outwelling from Brazilian mangrove forests correlated with decreases in highly unsaturated organic compounds as DOM was transported from mangrove porewaters to the continental shelf. In that work we combined ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) that provided detailed compositional information with absorption and Excitation/Emission Matrix (EEM) spectroscopy This presentation will highlight new results utilizing the combination of optical spectroscopy and FT-ICR mass spectrometry to illuminate the processes which control DOM cycling. Our focus will be on the contributions of the heteroatom components of DOM (i.e. organic sulfur and organic nitrogen) to its optical properties and how changes in optical properties correlate with important environmental processes like humification and bioavailability. Figure 1 below includes a narrow 0.20 Dalton window from a mass spectrum which demonstrates the ability of ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry to resolve and identify nitrogen heteroatom compounds in DOM. Our study sites include the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands (GLAP) in northern Minnesota and wetlands in the Caloosahatchee River basin in South Florida. Figure 1. Isolated 0.20 Da window of an ESI-FT-ICR mass spectrum of DOM from a GLAP bog. Labels identify N1 (d,e,f) and N3 classes of nitrogen heteroatoms. The 0.0031 Da mass spacing is used to confirm the N3 class.

  5. Molecular structure impacts on secondary organic aerosol formation from glycol ethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijie; Cocker, David R.

    2018-05-01

    Glycol ethers, a class of widely used solvents in consumer products, are often considered exempt as volatile organic compounds based on their vapor pressure or boiling points by regulatory agencies. However, recent studies found that glycol ethers volatilize at ambient conditions nearly as rapidly as the traditional high-volatility solvents indicating the potential of glycol ethers to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). This is the first work on SOA formation from glycol ethers. The impact of molecular structure, specifically -OH, on SOA formation from glycol ethers and related ethers are investigated in the work. Ethers with and without -OH, with methyl group hindrance on -OH and with -OH at different location are studied in the presence of NOX and under "NOX free" conditions. Photooxidation experiments under different oxidation conditions confirm that the processing of ethers is a combination of carbonyl formation, cyclization and fragmentation. Bulk SOA chemical composition analysis and oxidation products identified in both gas and particle phase suggests that the presence and location of -OH in the carbon bond of ethers determine the occurrence of cyclization mechanism during ether oxidation. The cyclization is proposed as a critical SOA formation mechanism to prevent the formation of volatile compounds from fragmentation during the oxidation of ethers. Glycol ethers with -CH2-O-CH2CH2OH structure is found to readily form cyclization products, especially with the presence of NOx, which is more relevant to urban atmospheric conditions than without NOx. Glycol ethers are evaluated as dominating SOA precursors among all ethers studied. It is estimated that the contribution of glycol ethers to anthropogenic SOA is roughly 1% of the current organic aerosol from mobile sources. The contribution of glycol ethers to anthropogenic SOA is roughly 1% of the current organic aerosol from mobile sources and will play a more important role in future anthropogenic SOA

  6. Self-prior strategy for organ reconstruction in fluorescence molecular tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Chen, Maomao; Su, Han; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to propose a strategy for organ reconstruction in fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) without prior information from other imaging modalities, and to overcome the high cost and ionizing radiation caused by the traditional structural prior strategy. The proposed strategy is designed as an iterative architecture to solve the inverse problem of FMT. In each iteration, a short time Fourier transform (STFT) based algorithm is used to extract the self-prior information in the space-frequency energy spectrum with the assumption that the regions with higher fluorescence concentration have larger energy intensity, then the cost function of the inverse problem is modified by the self-prior information, and lastly an iterative Laplacian regularization algorithm is conducted to solve the updated inverse problem and obtains the reconstruction results. Simulations and in vivo experiments on liver reconstruction are carried out to test the performance of the self-prior strategy on organ reconstruction. The organ reconstruction results obtained by the proposed self-prior strategy are closer to the ground truth than those obtained by the iterative Tikhonov regularization (ITKR) method (traditional non-prior strategy). Significant improvements are shown in the evaluation indexes of relative locational error (RLE), relative error (RE) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The self-prior strategy improves the organ reconstruction results compared with the non-prior strategy and also overcomes the shortcomings of the traditional structural prior strategy. Various applications such as metabolic imaging and pharmacokinetic study can be aided by this strategy.

  7. Volatile-organic molecular characterization of shale-oil produced water from the Permian Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naima A; Engle, Mark; Dungan, Barry; Holguin, F Omar; Xu, Pei; Carroll, Kenneth C

    2016-04-01

    Growth in unconventional oil and gas has spurred concerns on environmental impact and interest in beneficial uses of produced water (PW), especially in arid regions such as the Permian Basin, the largest U.S. tight-oil producer. To evaluate environmental impact, treatment, and reuse potential, there is a need to characterize the compositional variability of PW. Although hydraulic fracturing has caused a significant increase in shale-oil production, there are no high-resolution organic composition data for the shale-oil PW from the Permian Basin or other shale-oil plays (Eagle Ford, Bakken, etc.). PW was collected from shale-oil wells in the Midland sub-basin of the Permian Basin. Molecular characterization was conducted using high-resolution solid phase micro extraction gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Approximately 1400 compounds were identified, and 327 compounds had a >70% library match. PW contained alkane, cyclohexane, cyclopentane, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene), alkyl benzenes, propyl-benzene, and naphthalene. PW also contained heteroatomic compounds containing nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. 3D van Krevelen and double bond equivalence versus carbon number analyses were used to evaluate molecular variability. Source composition, as well as solubility, controlled the distribution of volatile compounds found in shale-oil PW. The salinity also increased with depth, ranging from 105 to 162 g/L total dissolved solids. These data fill a gap for shale-oil PW composition, the associated petroleomics plots provide a fingerprinting framework, and the results for the Permian shale-oil PW suggest that partial treatment of suspended solids and organics would support some beneficial uses such as onsite reuse and bio-energy production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of Molecular Orientation and Spontaneous Interfacial Mixing on the Performance of Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy Olivier; Graham, Kenneth; Li, Ruipeng; Conron, Sarah M; Erwin, Patrick; Chou, Kang Wei; Burkhard, George; Zhao, Kui; Hoke, Eric T.; Thompson, Mark E; McGehee, Michael D.; Amassian, Aram

    2015-01-01

    A critically important question that must be answered to understand how organic solar cells operate and should be improved is how the orientation of the donor and acceptor molecules at the interface influences exciton diffusion, exciton dissociation by electron transfer and recombination. It is exceedingly difficult to probe the orientation in bulk heterojunctions because there are many interfaces and they are arranged with varying angles with respect to the substrate. One of the best ways to study the interface is to make bilayer solar cells with just one donor-acceptor interface. Zinc phthalocyanine is particularly interesting to study because its orientation can be adjusted by using a 2-nm-thick copper iodide seed layer before it is deposited. Previous studies have claimed that solar cells in which fullerene acceptor molecules touch the face of zinc phthalocyanine have more current than ones in which the fullerenes touch the edge of zinc phthalocyanine because of suppressed recombination. We have more thoroughly characterized the system using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and found that the interfaces are not as sharp as previous studies claimed when formed at room temperature or above. Fullerenes have a much stronger tendency to mix into the face-on films than into the edge-on films. Moreover we show that almost all of the increase in the current with face-on films can be attributed to improved exciton diffusion and to the formation of a spontaneously mixed interface, not suppressed recombination. This work highlights the importance of spontaneous interfacial molecular mixing in organic solar cells, the extent of which depends on molecular orientation of frontier molecules in donor domains.

  9. Molecular Engineering with Organic Carbonyl Electrode Materials for Advanced Stationary and Redox Flow Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Organic carbonyl electrode materials that have the advantages of high capacity, low cost and being environmentally friendly, are regarded as powerful candidates for next-generation stationary and redox flow rechargeable batteries (RFBs). However, low carbonyl utilization, poor electronic conductivity and undesired dissolution in electrolyte are urgent issues to be solved. Here, we summarize a molecular engineering approach for tuning the capacity, working potential, concentration of active species, kinetics, and stability of stationary and redox flow batteries, which well resolves the problems of organic carbonyl electrode materials. As an example, in stationary batteries, 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) with two carbonyls delivers a capacity of 257 mAh g -1 (2.27 V vs Li + /Li), while increasing the number of carbonyls to four with the formation of 5,7,12,14-pentacenetetrone results in a higher capacity of 317 mAh g -1 (2.60 V vs Li + /Li). In RFBs, AQ, which is less soluble in aqueous electrolyte, reaches 1 M by grafting -SO 3 H with the formation of 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonic acid, resulting in a power density exceeding 0.6 W cm -2 with long cycling life. Therefore, through regulating substituent groups, conjugated structures, Coulomb interactions, and the molecular weight, the electrochemical performance of carbonyl electrode materials can be rationally optimized. This review offers fundamental principles and insight into designing advanced carbonyl materials for the electrodes of next-generation rechargeable batteries. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effect of molecular structure on fragmentation of isolated organic molecules in solid rare gas matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobrazenko, A.V.; Sukhov, F.F.; Orlov, A.Yu.; Kovalev, G.V.; Baranova, I.A.; Feldman, V.I.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Elucidation of high-energy reaction pathways in the condensed phase is an important issue for basic understanding of the radiation stability of complex organic molecules. As was shown previously, organic radical cations (RC) may undergo fragmentation or rearrangement in solid matrices due to excess energy. The probability of this process depends on both ionization potential (IP) of the molecule and molecular structure. In the present work we have studied the role of 'hot' ionic reaction channels for RC of some bifunctional compounds and alkynes. The effect of excess energy was simulated by matrix isolation method as described in detail earlier. The formation of fragmentation products was monitored by EPR and FTIR spectroscopy. In the present work it was shown that the RC of bifunctional compounds (CH 3 OCH 2 COCH 3 , CH 3 CO(CH 2 ) n COCH 3 , n 0/2) dissociated efficiently producing · CH 3 radicals upon irradiation in solid argon matrix at T ≤ 16 K. The probability of fragmentation decreases with decrease of excess energy by switching from Ar to Xe. It is worth noting that acetone RC does not show fragmentation under these conditions. Thus, bifunctional molecules were found to be less stable to 'hot' ionic fragmentation in low-temperature solids in comparison with simple prototype carbonyl compounds. In the case of alkynes of the R-C ≡ CH type, a noticeable yield of fragmentation products was observed when R = -C(CH 3 ) 3 , but it was negligible for R = -CH 3 . It means that the presence of triple bond stabilizes the molecular skeleton of linear alkynes toward 'hot' fragmentation, similarly as it was shown for alkenes. The mechanisms of 'hot' reactions and excess energy relaxation are discussed. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 09-03-00848a).

  11. Volatile-organic molecular characterization of shale-oil produced water from the Permian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naima A.; Engle, Mark A.; Dungan, Barry; Holguin, F. Omar; Xu, Pei; Carroll, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Growth in unconventional oil and gas has spurred concerns on environmental impact and interest in beneficial uses of produced water (PW), especially in arid regions such as the Permian Basin, the largest U.S. tight-oil producer. To evaluate environmental impact, treatment, and reuse potential, there is a need to characterize the compositional variability of PW. Although hydraulic fracturing has caused a significant increase in shale-oil production, there are no high-resolution organic composition data for the shale-oil PW from the Permian Basin or other shale-oil plays (Eagle Ford, Bakken, etc.). PW was collected from shale-oil wells in the Midland sub-basin of the Permian Basin. Molecular characterization was conducted using high-resolution solid phase micro extraction gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Approximately 1400 compounds were identified, and 327 compounds had a >70% library match. PW contained alkane, cyclohexane, cyclopentane, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene), alkyl benzenes, propyl-benzene, and naphthalene. PW also contained heteroatomic compounds containing nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. 3D van Krevelen and double bond equivalence versus carbon number analyses were used to evaluate molecular variability. Source composition, as well as solubility, controlled the distribution of volatile compounds found in shale-oil PW. The salinity also increased with depth, ranging from 105 to 162 g/L total dissolved solids. These data fill a gap for shale-oil PW composition, the associated petroleomics plots provide a fingerprinting framework, and the results for the Permian shale-oil PW suggest that partial treatment of suspended solids and organics would support some beneficial uses such as onsite reuse and bio-energy production.

  12. Impact of Molecular Orientation and Spontaneous Interfacial Mixing on the Performance of Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy Olivier

    2015-07-28

    A critically important question that must be answered to understand how organic solar cells operate and should be improved is how the orientation of the donor and acceptor molecules at the interface influences exciton diffusion, exciton dissociation by electron transfer and recombination. It is exceedingly difficult to probe the orientation in bulk heterojunctions because there are many interfaces and they are arranged with varying angles with respect to the substrate. One of the best ways to study the interface is to make bilayer solar cells with just one donor-acceptor interface. Zinc phthalocyanine is particularly interesting to study because its orientation can be adjusted by using a 2-nm-thick copper iodide seed layer before it is deposited. Previous studies have claimed that solar cells in which fullerene acceptor molecules touch the face of zinc phthalocyanine have more current than ones in which the fullerenes touch the edge of zinc phthalocyanine because of suppressed recombination. We have more thoroughly characterized the system using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and found that the interfaces are not as sharp as previous studies claimed when formed at room temperature or above. Fullerenes have a much stronger tendency to mix into the face-on films than into the edge-on films. Moreover we show that almost all of the increase in the current with face-on films can be attributed to improved exciton diffusion and to the formation of a spontaneously mixed interface, not suppressed recombination. This work highlights the importance of spontaneous interfacial molecular mixing in organic solar cells, the extent of which depends on molecular orientation of frontier molecules in donor domains.

  13. Correlation between inter-spin interaction and molecular dynamics of organic radicals in organic 1D nanochannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu [Department of Chemistry, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University 3-25-40, Sakura-jo-sui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8550 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    One-dimensional (1D) molecular chains of 4-substituted-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl (4-X-TEMPO) radicals were constructed in the crystalline 1D nanochannels of 2,4,6-tris(4-chlorophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (CLPOT) used as a template. The ESR spectra of CLPOT inclusion compounds (ICs) using 4-X-TEMPO were examined on the basis of spectral simulation using EasySpin program package for simulating and fitting ESR spectra. The ESR spectra of [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC were isotropic in the total range of temperatures. The peak-to-peak line width (ΔB{sub pp}) became monotonically narrower from 2.8 to 1.3 mT with increase in temperature in the range of 4.2–298 K. The effect of the rotational diffusion motion of TEMPO radicals in the CLPOT nanochannels for the inter-spin interaction of the [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC was found to be smaller than the case of [(TPP){sub 2}−(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC (TPP = tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene) reported in our previous study. The ΔB{sub pp} of the [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC in the whole range of temperatures was much narrower than the estimation to be based on the Van Vleck’s formula for the second moment of the rigid lattice model where the electron spin can be considered as fixed; 11 mT of Gaussian line-width component. This suggests the possibility of exchange narrowing in the 1D organic-radical chains of the [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC. On the other hand, the ESR spectra of [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(MeO-TEMPO){sub 0.41}] IC (MeO-TEMPO = 4-methoxy-TEMPO) were reproduced by a superposition of major broad isotropic adsorption line and minor temperature-dependent modulated triplet component. This suggests that the IC has the part of 1D organic-radical chains and MeO-TEMPO molecules isolated in the CLPOT nanochannels.

  14. The molecular characteristics of pyrogenic organic materials and their aqueous leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, A. S.; Hatcher, P.; Mitra, S.; Bostick, K. W.; Zimmerman, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter (Py-OM), or black carbon, is known to impact soil chemistry, pollutant transport, regional and global carbon cycling, and climate. Py-OM is incorporated into soils via atmospheric deposition (e.g., from biomass, fossil fuel combustion) or direct applications by humans (e.g., biochars applied for agricultural production). Due to its presumed refractory and immobile nature, soil Py-OM is thought to be efficiently buried, sequestering atmospheric CO2. However, tracers of dissolved Py-OM (Py-DOM) have been detected in appreciable quantities in riverine, estuarine, and oceanic waters suggesting that Py-OM is more mobile in the environment than expected. The molecular characteristics of Py-OM are likely to be a controlling factor in the quantities and impacts of Py-DOM released to aqueous systems. Yet, little is known about the detailed molecular composition of these materials, let alone how those molecular characteristics vary with combustion conditions or are altered by environmental processes. Here, we examine oak and grass Py-OM (combusted over a range of temperatures), natural Py-OM (chars aged in the environment for variable lengths of time), and their Py-DOM leachates via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Multi-CP 13C NMR analyses of Py-OM materials and 1H NMR analyses of corresponding Py-DOM leachates reveal that Py-OM combustion temperature, environmental exposure, and molecular characteristics are reflected in Py-DOM quantities and characteristics. The relative amounts of aromatic C in Py-OM 1) decreases with environmental exposure, the relative oxygen-content in both Py-OM and Py-DOM, and the amount of Py-DOC released per g of Py-OC but 2) is positively correlated with combustion temperature and the relative contributions of acetate and aliphatic hydrogens (CH2) in Py-DOM. Preliminary FTICR-MS analyses show Py-DOM produced from oak at 400 °C to

  15. Controllable Molecular Packing Motif and Overlap Type in Organic Nanomaterials for Advanced Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoyu Zou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of organic materials are very sensitive to subtle structural modification, and a proper understanding of the structure-property relationship is essential to improve the performance of organic electronic devices. The phase transitions of the η-CuPc to the α-CuPc, then to the β-CuPc were investigated using In situ X-ray diffraction and the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The five stages in the phase-transition process from low to high-temperature were observed, which consisted of (1 the η-CuPc; (2 a mixture of the η- and α-CuPc; (3 a mixture of the η-, α- and β-CuPc; (4 a mixture of the α- and β-CuPc; and (5 the β-CuPc. The vibrational and optical properties at different phase-transition stages were correlated to molecular packing motif and molecule overlap type through systematic analyses of the Fourier–transform infrared, Raman and UV-VIS spectra. Moreover, the mechanism for the morphology evolution was also discussed in detail.

  16. Risk organ preservation technique in reirradiation. Injection of native type high molecular weight hyaluronate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Kazushi; Noda, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    We developed a practical method of brachytherapy effective for reirradiation, using hyaluronate gel injection to separate the target to be intensively. We intended curative reirradiation with preserving organs at risk. Native-type high molecular weight hyaluronate that has an ideal biologic property to reduce inflammation via inhibitory activity to CD44 and other inflammation receptors was injected to create space during radiotherapy. Rectum, small intestines, skin, and various normal organs are effectively separated and thus eradicative re-irradiation was carried out in safe. We reviewed 55 patients who required the method. There were no complications related to the procedure. Prescribed dose to 100% of the planning target volume (PTV) was 77.93 Gy (range 54-92) equivalent at alpha/beta ratio of 3, with much higher subvolume effect, and the saving effects were enhanced at 3.35 times in the average of those without gel injection. In conclusion, the interventional brachytherapy with hyaluronate gel injection provided 3.35 times safer dose-escalated and eradicative treatment in reirradiation. (author)

  17. Molecular mechanisms controlling brain development: an overview of neuroepithelial secondary organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Claudia; Pombero, Ana; García-Lopez, Raquel; Gimeno, Lourdes; Echevarria, Diego; Martínez, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    The vertebrate Central Nervous System (CNS) originates from the embryonic dorsal ectoderm. Differentiation of the neural epithelium from the ectoderm and the formation of the neural plate constitute the first phase of a complex process called neurulation which culminates in the formation of the neural tube, the anlage of the CNS in sauropsids and mammals (for review see Smith and Schoenwolf, 1997; Colas and Schoenwolf, 2001). At neural plate and neural tube stages, local signaling centers in the neuroepithelium, known as secondary organizers, refine the antero-posterior specification of different neural territories (for review see Echevarria et al., 2003; Stern et al.,2006; Woltering and Durston, 2008). In this review, we will describe the principle aspects of CNS development in birds and mammals, starting from early stages of embryogenesis (gastrulation and neurulation) and culminating with the formation of a variety of different regions which contribute to the structural complexity of the brain (regionalization and morphogenesis). We will pay special attention to the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in neural tube regionalization and the key role played by localized secondary organizers in the patterning of neural primordia.

  18. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF KINETIC RESOLUTION OF RACEMIC ALCOHOL USING BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA LIPASE IN ORGANIC SOLVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Mathpati

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipases, a subclass of hydrolases, have gained a lot of importance as they can catalyze esterification, transesterification and hydrolysis reaction in non-aqueous media. Lipases are also widely used for kinetic resolution of racemic alcohols into enantiopure compounds. The lipase activity is affected by organic solvents due to changes in the conformational rigidity of enzymes, the active site, or altering the solvation of the transition state. The activity of lipases strongly depends on the logP value of solvents. Molecular dynamics (MD can help to understand the effect of solvents on lipase conformation as well as protein-ligand complex. In this work, MD simulations of Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL and complex between R and S conformation of acetylated form of 1-phenylethanol with BCL using gromacs have been carried in various organic solvents. The RMSD values were within the range of 0.15 to 0.20 nm and radius of gyration was found to be with 1.65 to 1.9 nm. Major changes in the B factor compared to reference structure were observed between residues 60 to 80, 120 to 150 and 240 to 260. Higher unfolding was observed in toluene and diethyl ether compared to hexane and acetonitrile. R acetylated complex was found to favorably bind BCL compared to S form. The predicted enantioselectivity were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Inorganic bromine in organic molecular crystals: Database survey and four case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Vinko; Lisac, Katarina; Stilinović, Vladimir; Cinčić, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    We present a Cambridge Structural Database and experimental study of multicomponent molecular crystals containing bromine. The CSD study covers supramolecular behaviour of bromide and tribromide anions as well as halogen bonded dibromine molecules in crystal structures of organic salts and cocrystals, and a study of the geometries and complexities in polybromide anion systems. In addition, we present four case studies of organic structures with bromide, tribromide and polybromide anions as well as the neutral dibromine molecule. These include the first observed crystal with diprotonated phenazine, a double salt of phenazinium bromide and tribromide, a cocrystal of 4-methoxypyridine with the neutral dibromine molecule as a halogen bond donor, as well as bis(4-methoxypyridine)bromonium polybromide. Structural features of the four case studies are in the most part consistent with the statistically prevalent behaviour indicated by the CSD study for given bromine species, although they do exhibit some unorthodox structural features and in that indicate possible supramolecular causes for aberrations from the statistically most abundant (and presumably most favourable) geometries.

  20. Higher molecular weight dissolved organic nitrogen turnover as affected by soil management history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønne Enggrob, Kirsten

    of different management histories on the turnover of high Mw DON. Further, we distinguished between several classes of high Mw DON, i.e., 1-10 kDa and >10 kDa. 3. Materials and methods With the use of micro-lysimeters, the turnover of triple-labeled (15N, 14C and 13C) high Mw DON was studied in a sandy soil......High molecular weight dissolved organic nitrogen turnover as affected by soil management history *Kirsten Lønne Enggrob,1 Lars Elsgaard,1 and Jim Rasmussen1 1Aarhus University, Dept. of Agroecology, Foulum, Denmark 1. Introduction Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) play an important role in soil N...... are presented for 14CO2 evolution during 14 days of incubation. 4. Results and conclusion Results showed that the turnover rate of high Mw DON was dependent on both the Mw size of DON and on the soil liming history. Evidence showing where in the DON Mw sizes the bottleneck lies will be presented....

  1. Low pressure drop filtration of airborne molecular organic contaminants using open-channel networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, Andrew J.; Joriman, Jon; Ding, Lefei; Weineck, Gerald; Seguin, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) continues to play a very decisive role in the performance of many microelectronic devices and manufacturing processes. Besides airborne acids and bases, airborne organic contaminants such as 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), trimethylsilanol (TMS), perfluoroalkylamines and condensables are of primary concern in these applications. Currently, the state of the filtration industry is such that optimum filter life and removal efficiency for organics is offered by granular carbon filter beds. However, the attributes that make packed beds of activated carbon extremely efficient also impart issues related to elevated filter weight and pressure drop. Most of the lower pressure drop AMC filters currently offered are quite expensive and are simply pleated combinations of various adsorptive and reactive media. On the other hand, low pressure drop filters, such as those designed as open-channel networks (OCN's), offer good filter life and removal efficiency with the additional benefits of significant reductions in overall filter weight and pressure drop. Equally important for many applications, the OCN filters can reconstruct the airflow so as to enhance the operation of a tool or process. For tool mount assemblies and fan filter units (FFUs) this can result in reduced fan and blower speeds, which subsequently can provide reduced vibration and energy costs. Additionally, these low pressure drop designs can provide a cost effective way of effectively removing AMC in full fab (or HVAC) filtration applications without significantly affecting air-handling requirements. Herein, we will present a new generation of low pressure drop OCN filters designed for the removal of airborne organics in a wide range of applications.

  2. Solution-Processed Molecular Organic Solar cell: Relationship between Morphology and Device Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Babics, Maxime

    2018-05-09

    In the last decade, organic photovoltaics (OPV) have gained considerable attention with a rapid improvement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 5% to more than 13%. At the origin of the gradual efficiency improvements are (i) the rationalization of material design and (ii) systematic optimization of film processing condition. OPV can have a key role in markets such as building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV). The main advantages of organic solar cells are semitransparency, low weight, good performance at low light intensity, flexibility and potential low-cost module manufacture through solution processed-based technologies. In solution processed OPV, the active layer that converts photons into electric charges is a composite of two organic compounds, a donor (D) and an acceptor (A) where the best morphology is achieved via the so-called bulk heterojunction (BHJ): an interpenetrating phase-separated D-A network. Historically, research has been focused on polymer donors and guidelines about morphology and film processing have been established. However recent studies have shown that small-molecule (SM) donors can rival their polymer counterparts in performance. The advantages of SM are a defined molecular weight, the ease of purification and a good batch-to-batch reproducibility. Using this class of material the existing guidelines have to be adjusted and refined. In this dissertation, using new SM synthesized in our laboratory, solution-processed organic solar cells are fabricated in which the morphology of the active layer is controlled by thermal annealing, the use of additive or solvent vapor annealing. In-depth analyses of the morphology are correlated to charge generation, recombination and extraction inferred from device physics. In the first part of the dissertation, using a small amount of 1,8-Diiodooctane additive that acts as a plasticizer, it is found that the D-A domains do not necessarily need to be pure and that mixed domains can also result in

  3. Impact of Low Molecular Weight Poly(3-hexylthiophene)s as Additives in Organic Photovoltaic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibers, Zach D; Le, Thinh P; Lee, Youngmin; Gomez, Enrique D; Kilbey, S Michael

    2018-01-24

    Despite tremendous progress in using additives to enhance the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic devices, significant challenges remain in controlling the microstructure of the active layer, such as at internal donor-acceptor interfaces. Here, we demonstrate that the addition of low molecular weight poly(3-hexylthiophene)s (low-MW P3HT) to the P3HT/fullerene active layer increases device performance up to 36% over an unmodified control device. Low MW P3HT chains ranging in size from 1.6 to 8.0 kg/mol are blended with 77.5 kg/mol P3HT chains and [6,6]-phenyl C 61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) fullerenes while keeping P3HT/PCBM ratio constant. Optimal photovoltaic device performance increases are obtained for each additive when incorporated into the bulk heterojunction blend at loading levels that are dependent upon additive MW. Small-angle X-ray scattering and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy imaging reveal that domain sizes are approximately invariant at low loading levels of the low-MW P3HT additive, and wide-angle X-ray scattering suggests that P3HT crystallinity is unaffected by these additives. These results suggest that oligomeric P3HTs compatibilize donor-acceptor interfaces at low loading levels but coarsen domain structures at higher loading levels and they are consistent with recent simulations results. Although results are specific to the P3HT/PCBM system, the notion that low molecular weight additives can enhance photovoltaic device performance generally provides a new opportunity for improving device performance and operating lifetimes.

  4. Molecular Hysteresis of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Connecticut River Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, S.; Hoyle, J. B.; Matt, S.; Raymond, P. A.; Saiers, J. E.; Dittmar, T.; Stubbins, A.

    2017-12-01

    Rainfall-runoff processes have emerged as key controllers of the quantity and quality of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported from the landscape to inland waters. Hydrological events result in increased river discharge and a concomitant release of large amounts of DOM into fluvial networks. This study is part of a Macrosystems project which aims to test the Pulse-Shunt Concept: where rivers are converted from active to passive pipes during high discharge events ("pulse"), transporting labile, terrestrial DOM downstream ("shunt"), and relocating biogeochemical hotspots for DOM from the upper to the lower reaches of the watershed. The primary objective of our study was to track hysteretic changes in riverine DOM molecular composition over the course of a storm event. Samples were collected from nested watersheds in the Passumpsic River catchment, a tributary of the Connecticut River (USA). High resolution monitoring (via in-situ sondes) and high frequency collection of discreet samples (for FT-ICR/MS and other analyses) was necessary to capture short-term, hydrologically-driven variations in DOM concentration and composition. At the onset of the discharge event, we observed a unique DOM signature, enriched in aliphatic, and potentially biolabile, DOM. During peak discharge, and along the falling limb of the hydrograph, an aromatic, terrestrial-type DOM signature was more prevalent. These initial findings support the pulse-shunt hypothesis, providing evidence for the release of labile forms of DOM into rivers during the onset of a storm event, which apparently persists across low-to-high stream orders. Insights into the molecular hysteresis of fluvial DOM spotlights the impact of watershed hydrology on biogeochemical cycling in river networks.

  5. Exploring the aqueous vertical ionization of organic molecules by molecular simulation and liquid microjet photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentscher, Peter R; Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Guerard, Jennifer J; Arey, J Samuel

    2015-01-08

    To study the influence of aqueous solvent on the electronic energy levels of dissolved organic molecules, we conducted liquid microjet photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) measurements of the aqueous vertical ionization energies (VIEaq) of aniline (7.49 eV), veratrole alcohol (7.68 eV), and imidazole (8.51 eV). We also reanalyzed previously reported experimental PES data for phenol, phenolate, thymidine, and protonated imidazolium cation. We then simulated PE spectra by means of QM/MM molecular dynamics and EOM-IP-CCSD calculations with effective fragment potentials, used to describe the aqueous vertical ionization energies for six molecules, including aniline, phenol, veratrole alcohol, imidazole, methoxybenzene, and dimethylsulfide. Experimental and computational data enable us to decompose the VIEaq into elementary processes. For neutral compounds, the shift in VIE upon solvation, ΔVIEaq, was found to range from ≈-0.5 to -0.91 eV. The ΔVIEaq was further explained in terms of the influence of deforming the gas phase solute into its solution phase conformation, the influence of solute hydrogen-bond donor and acceptor interactions with proximate solvent molecules, and the polarization of about 3000 outerlying solvent molecules. Among the neutral compounds, variability in ΔVIEaq appeared largely controlled by differences in solute-solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions. Detailed computational analysis of the flexible molecule veratrole alcohol reveals that the VIE is strongly dependent on molecular conformation in both gas and aqueous phases. Finally, aqueous reorganization energies of the oxidation half-cell ionization reaction were determined from experimental data or estimated from simulation for the six compounds aniline, phenol, phenolate, veratrole alcohol, dimethylsulfide, and methoxybenzene, revealing a surprising constancy of 2.06 to 2.35 eV.

  6. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for short-term decomposition. Factors

  7. Evidence of low molecular weight components in the organic matrix of the reef building coral, Stylophora pistillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puverel, S; Houlbrèque, F; Tambutté, E; Zoccola, D; Payan, P; Caminiti, N; Tambutté, S; Allemand, D

    2007-08-01

    Biominerals contain both inorganic and organic components. Organic components are collectively termed the organic matrix, and this matrix has been reported to play a crucial role in mineralization. Several matrix proteins have been characterized in vertebrates, but only a few in invertebrates, primarily in Molluscs and Echinoderms. Methods classically used to extract organic matrix proteins eliminate potential low molecular weight matrix components, since cut-offs ranging from 3.5 to 10 kDa are used to desalt matrix extracts. Consequently, the presence of such components remains unknown and these are never subjected to further analyses. In the present study, we have used microcolonies from the Scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata to study newly synthesized matrix components by labelling them with 14C-labelled amino acids. Radioactive matrix components were investigated by a method in which both total organic matrix and fractions of matrix below and above 5 kDa were analyzed. Using this method and SDS-PAGE analyses, we were able to detect the presence of low molecular mass matrix components (weight molecules, these probably form the bulk of newly synthesized organic matrix components. Our results suggest that these low molecular weight components may be peptides, which can be involved in the regulation of coral skeleton mineralization.

  8. Molecular effects and bioaccumulation of levonorgestrel in the non-target organism Dreissena polymorpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Lorenz, Claudia; Pflugmacher, Stephan; Nuetzmann, Gunnar; Kloas, Werner; Wiegand, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Bioaccumulation and effects of the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel were examined in the non-target organism Dreissena polymorpha. Molecular biomarkers of biotransformation, elimination, antioxidant defence and protein damage were analyzed after exposure to increasing concentrations of levonorgestrel in a flow-through system. The lowest concentration (0.312 μg L -1 ) was 100-fold bioconcentrated within four days. A decrease of the bioconcentration factor was observed within one week for the highest test concentrations (3.12 and 6.24 μg L -1 ) suggesting enhanced excretory processes. The immediate mRNA up-regulation of pi class glutathione S-transferase proved that phase II biotransformation processes were induced. Disturbance of fundamental cell functions was assumed since the aryl hydrocarbon receptor has been permanently down-regulated. mRNA up-regulation of P-glycoprotein, superoxide dismutase and metallothioneine suggested enhanced elimination processes and ongoing oxidative stress. mRNA up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 in mussels exposed to the two highest concentrations clearly indicated impacts on protein damage. - Fundamental cell processes as biotransformation, elimination and prevention from oxidative stress are influenced by exposure of the contraceptive levonorgestrel in non-target organisms. - Research highlights: → Bioaccumulation of levonorgestrel in mussels is higher than expected based on its lipophilicity. → Exposure to levonorgestrel causes oxidative stress and enhanced elimination processes. → Glutathione S-transferase (pi class) mRNA induction after one day hint on phase II biotransformation. → mRNA induction of heat shock protein 70 after one week prove protein damage.

  9. Towards a molecular level understanding of the sulfanilamide-soil organic matter-interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Ashour A., E-mail: ashour.ahmed@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Institute of Physics, Albert-Einstein-Str. 23-24, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Steinbeis GmbH & Co. KG für Technologietransfer, 70174 Stuttgart (Germany); University of Cairo, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 12613 Giza (Egypt); Thiele-Bruhn, Sören, E-mail: thiele@uni-trier.de [University of Trier, Soil Science, D-54286 Trier (Germany); Leinweber, Peter, E-mail: peter.leinweber@uni-rostock.de [Steinbeis GmbH & Co. KG für Technologietransfer, 70174 Stuttgart (Germany); University of Rostock, Soil Science, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Kühn, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.kuehn@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Institute of Physics, Albert-Einstein-Str. 23-24, D-18059 Rostock (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    Sorption experiments of sulfanilamide (SAA) on well-characterized samples of soil size-fractions were combined with the modeling of SAA-soil-interaction via quantum chemical calculations. Freundlich unit capacities were determined in batch experiments and it was found that they increase with the soil organic matter (SOM) content according to the order fine silt > medium silt > clay > whole soil > coarse silt > sand. The calculated binding energies for mass-spectrometrically quantified sorption sites followed the order ionic species > peptides > carbohydrates > phenols and lignin monomers > lignin dimers > heterocyclic compounds > fatty acids > sterols > aromatic compounds > lipids, alkanes, and alkenes. SAA forms H-bonds through its polar centers with the polar SOM sorption sites. In contrast dispersion and π-π-interactions predominate the interaction of the SAA aromatic ring with the non-polar moieties of SOM. Moreover, the dipole moment, partial atomic charges, and molecular volume of the SOM sorption sites are the main physical properties controlling the SAA-SOM-interaction. Further, reasonable estimates of the Freundlich unit capacities from the calculated binding energies have been established. Consequently, we suggest using this approach in forthcoming studies to disclose the interactions of a wide range of organic pollutants with SOM. - Highlights: • Experiment and theory showed that SAA obeys a site-specific sorption on soil surfaces. • SAA-SOM-interaction increases by increasing polarity of SOM sorption site. • H-bonds, dispersion, and π-π-interactions were observed for SAA-SOM-interaction. • Dipole moment and atomic charges of SOM sorption sites control SAA-SOM-interaction. • The Freundlich unit capacities were estimated from the calculated binding energies. • The current SOM model is flexible to describe interactions of SOM with other pollutants.

  10. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter associated with the Greenland ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Maya P.; Das, Sarah B.; Longnecker, Krista; Charette, Matthew A.; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B.

    2010-07-01

    Subsurface microbial oxidation of overridden soils and vegetation beneath glaciers and ice sheets may affect global carbon budgets on glacial-interglacial timescales. The likelihood and magnitude of this process depends on the chemical nature and reactivity of the subglacial organic carbon stores. We examined the composition of carbon pools associated with different regions of the Greenland ice sheet (subglacial, supraglacial, proglacial) in order to elucidate the type of dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in the subglacial discharge over a melt season. Electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry coupled to multivariate statistics permitted unprecedented molecular level characterization of this material and revealed that carbon pools associated with discrete glacial regions are comprised of different compound classes. Specifically, a larger proportion of protein-like compounds were observed in the supraglacial samples and in the early melt season (spring) subglacial discharge. In contrast, the late melt season (summer) subglacial discharge contained a greater fraction of lignin-like and other material presumably derived from underlying vegetation and soil. These results suggest (1) that the majority of supraglacial DOM originates from autochthonous microbial processes on the ice sheet surface, (2) that the subglacial DOM contains allochthonous carbon derived from overridden soils and vegetation as well as autochthonous carbon derived from in situ microbial metabolism, and (3) that the relative contribution of allochthonous and autochthonous material in subglacial discharge varies during the melt season. These conclusions are consistent with the hypothesis that, given sufficient time (e.g., overwinter storage), resident subglacial microbial communities may oxidize terrestrial material beneath the Greenland ice sheet.

  11. Toward Molecular Magnets of Organic Origin via Anion-π Interaction Involving m-Aminyl Diradical: A Theoretical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Debojit; Shil, Suranjan; Misra, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Here we study a set of novel magnetic organic molecular species with different halide ions (fluoride, chloride, bromide) absorbed ∼2 Å above or below the center of an aromatic π-ring in an m-aminyl diradical. Focus is on the nature of anion-π interaction and its impact on magnetic properties, spe...

  12. Influence of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids on Transport of Cadmium and Copper Ions across Model Phospholipid Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parisová, Martina; Navrátil, Tomáš; Šestáková, Ivana; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Mareček, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2013), s. 27-44 ISSN 1452-3981 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400806 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : cadmium * copper * low molecular weight organic acid Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.956, year: 2013

  13. CO 2 adsorption in mono-, di- and trivalent cation-exchanged metal-organic frameworks: A molecular simulation study

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yifei; Nalaparaju, Anjaiah; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; JIANG, Jianwen

    2012-01-01

    A molecular simulation study is reported for CO 2 adsorption in rho zeolite-like metal-organic framework (rho-ZMOF) exchanged with a series of cations (Na +, K +, Rb +, Cs +, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, and Al 3+). The isosteric heat and Henry's constant

  14. Effect of Molecular Packing and Charge Delocalization on the Nonradiative Recombination of Charge-Transfer States in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Xiankai

    2016-09-05

    In organic solar cells, a major source of energy loss is attributed to nonradiative recombination from the interfacial charge transfer states to the ground state. By taking pentacene–C60 complexes as model donor–acceptor systems, a comprehensive theoretical understanding of how molecular packing and charge delocalization impact these nonradiative recombination rates at donor–acceptor interfaces is provided.

  15. Reversed thermo-switchable molecular sieving membranes composed of two-dimensional metal-organic nanosheets for gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuerui; Chi, Chenglong; Zhang, Kang; Qian, Yuhong; Gupta, Krishna M.; Kang, Zixi; Jiang, Jianwen; Zhao, Dan

    2017-02-01

    It is highly desirable to reduce the membrane thickness in order to maximize the throughput and break the trade-off limitation for membrane-based gas separation. Two-dimensional membranes composed of atomic-thick graphene or graphene oxide nanosheets have gas transport pathways that are at least three orders of magnitude higher than the membrane thickness, leading to reduced gas permeation flux and impaired separation throughput. Here we present nm-thick molecular sieving membranes composed of porous two-dimensional metal-organic nanosheets. These membranes possess pore openings parallel to gas concentration gradient allowing high gas permeation flux and high selectivity, which are proven by both experiment and molecular dynamics simulation. Furthermore, the gas transport pathways of these membranes exhibit a reversed thermo-switchable feature, which is attributed to the molecular flexibility of the building metal-organic nanosheets.

  16. Synthesis of Sub-10 nm Two-Dimensional Covalent Organic Thin Film with Sharp Molecular Sieving Nanofiltration

    KAUST Repository

    Gadwal, Ikhlas

    2018-04-06

    We demonstrated here a novel and facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) covalent organic thin film with pore size around 1.5 nm using a planar, amphiphilic and substituted heptacyclic truxene based triamine and a simple dialdehyde as building blocks by dynamic imine bond formation at the air/water interface using Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) method. Optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), all unanimously showed the formation of large, molecularly thin and free-standing membrane that can be easily transferred on different substrate surfaces. The 2D membrane supported on a porous polysulfone showed a rejection rate of 64 and 71% for NaCl and MgSO4, respectively, and a clear molecular sieving at molecular size around 1.3 nm, which demonstrated a great potential in the application of pretreatment of seawater desalination and separation of organic molecules.

  17. Molecular biomarkers for sources of organic matter in lacustrine sediments in a subtropical lake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Hua; Yang, Hao; Chen, Xia; Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Ou, Jie; Xie, Biao; Huang, Chang-Chun

    2013-05-01

    N-alkanes distributions and stable isotopic compositions (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) in the lacustrine sediments of Shijiu lake were measured to assess whether biological source information was recorded in the molecular biomarker. Results showed regular unimodal n-alkanes distribution in range of C16-C33 with strong predominance of odd-numbered n-alkanes, maximizing at C29. The δ(15)N for SON were uniformly low, ranging from -6.7‰ to 3.8‰ and C/N ratios ranged from 6.6 to 10.0, suggesting that most of organic matter was influenced by terrestrial characteristics of the watershed. The δ(13)C for C27 to C31n-alkanes and for SOC varied from -32.9‰ to -26.6‰ and -23.4‰ to -21.6‰, respectively, falling within the range of corresponding n-alkanes in leaves mainly from C3 land plants. The values of C/N, CPI, OEP, ACL and C27/C31 exhibit similar temporal changes with the primary production, showing enhanced eutrophication resulted from increased anthropogenic activities in Shijiu lake from 1852 to 2010. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Stepwise transformation of the molecular building blocks in a porphyrin-encapsulating metal-organic material

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, ZhenJie

    2013-04-24

    When immersed in solutions containing Cu(II) cations, the microporous metal-organic material P11 ([Cd4(BPT)4]·[Cd(C 44H36N8)(S)]·[S], BPT = biphenyl-3,4′,5-tricarboxylate) undergoes a transformation of its [Cd 2(COO)6]2- molecular building blocks (MBBs) into novel tetranuclear [Cu4X2(COO)6(S) 2] MBBs to form P11-Cu. The transformation occurs in single-crystal to single-crystal fashion, and its stepwise mechanism was studied by varying the Cd2+/Cu2+ ratio of the solution in which crystals of P11 were immersed. P11-16/1 (Cd in framework retained, Cd in encapsulated porphyrins exchanged) and other intermediate phases were thereby isolated and structurally characterized. P11-16/1 and P11-Cu retain the microporosity of P11, and the relatively larger MBBs in P11-Cu permit a 20% unit cell expansion and afford a higher surface area and a larger pore size. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. Molecular organization of the 5S rDNA gene type II in elasmobranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Sergio I; Hleap, Jose S; Cárdenas, Heiber; Blouin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The 5S rDNA gene is a non-coding RNA that can be found in 2 copies (type I and type II) in bony and cartilaginous fish. Previous studies have pointed out that type II gene is a paralog derived from type I. We analyzed the molecular organization of 5S rDNA type II in elasmobranchs. Although the structure of the 5S rDNA is supposed to be highly conserved, our results show that the secondary structure in this group possesses some variability and is different than the consensus secondary structure. One of these differences in Selachii is an internal loop at nucleotides 7 and 112. These mutations observed in the transcribed region suggest an independent origin of the gene among Batoids and Selachii. All promoters were highly conserved with the exception of BoxA, possibly due to its affinity to polymerase III. This latter enzyme recognizes a dT4 sequence as stop signal, however in Rajiformes this signal was doubled in length to dT8. This could be an adaptation toward a higher efficiency in the termination process. Our results suggest that there is no TATA box in elasmobranchs in the NTS region. We also provide some evidence suggesting that the complexity of the microsatellites present in the NTS region play an important role in the 5S rRNA gene since it is significantly correlated with the length of the NTS.

  20. PDI Derivative through Fine-Tuning Molecular Structure for Fullerene-Free Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Hua

    2017-08-10

    A perylenediimide (PDI)-based small molecular (SM) acceptor with both an extended π-conjugation and a three dimensional structure concurrently is critical for achieving high performance PDI-based fullerene-free organic solar cells (OSCs). In this work, we designed and synthesized a novel PDI-based SM acceptor possessing both characteristics by fusing PDI units with a spiro core of 4,4’-spirobi[cyclopenta[2,1-b;3,4-b’]dithiophene(SCPDT) through the -position of the thiophene rings. An enhanced strong absorption in the range of 350–520 nm and arisen LUMO energy level of FSP was observed, compared with previous reported acceptor SCPDT-PDI4, in which the PDI units and SCPDT are not fused. OSCs based on PTB7-Th donor and FSP acceptor were fabricated and achieved a power conversion efficiency of up to 8.89% with DPE as an additive. Efficient and complementary photo absorption, favorable phase separation and balanced carrier mobilites in the blend film account for the high photovoltaic performance. This study offers an effective strategy to design high performance PDI-based acceptors.

  1. Molecular System Dynamics for Self-Organization in Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milner StuartD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have been looking at the properties of physical configurations that occur in nature in order to characterize, predict, and control network robustness in dynamic communication networks. Our framework is based on the definition of a potential energy function to characterize robustness in communication networks and the study of first- and second-order variations of the potential energy to provide prediction and control strategies for network-performance optimization. This paper describes novel investigations within this framework that draw from molecular system dynamics. The Morse potential, which governs the energy stored in bonds within molecules, is considered for the characterization of the potential energy of communication links in the presence of physical constraints such as the power available at the transmitters in a network. The inclusion of the Morse potential translates into improved control strategies, where forces on network nodes drive the release, retention, or reconfiguration of communication links based on their role within the network architecture. The performance of the proposed approach is measured in terms of the number of source-to-destination connections that have an end-to-end communications path. Simulation results show the effectiveness of our control mechanism, where the physical topology reorganizes to maximize the number of source-to-destination communicating pairs. The algorithms developed are completely distributed, show constant time complexity and produce optimal solutions from local interactions, thus preserving the system's self-organizing capability.

  2. Atomic and molecular physics of plasma-based environmental technologies for abatement of volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.; Merrit, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C.P.; Bayless, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques represent a new generation of air emission control technology that potentially could treat large-volume emissions containing dilute concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In order to apply non-thermal in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process. There is a need for reliable data concerning the primary decomposition mechanisms and subsequent chemical kinetics associated with non-thermal plasma processing of VOCs. There are many basic atomic and molecular physics issues that are essential in evaluating the economic performance of non-thermal plasma reactor. These studies are important in understanding how the input electrical power is dissipated in the plasma and how efficiency it is converted to the production of the plasma species (radicals, ions or electrons) responsible for the decomposition of the VOCs. This paper presents results from basic experimental and theoretical studied aimed at identifying the reaction mechanisms responsible for the primary decomposition of various types of VOCs. (Authors)

  3. Effect of molecular structure on fragmentation of isolated organic molecules in solid rare gas matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzarenko, A.V.; Sukhov, F.F.; Orlov, A.Yu.; Kovalev, G.V.; Baranova, I.A.; Feldman, V.I.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of excess energy on the primary radical cations of bifunctional carbonyl compounds and aliphatic alkynes was simulated by matrix isolation method using rare gas matrices with various ionization potentials. The formation of fragmentation products was monitored by EPR and FTIR spectroscopy. It was shown that the radical cations of bifunctional compounds (CH 3 OCH 2 COCH 3 and CH 3 COCOCH 3 ) dissociated effectively yielding · CH 3 radicals upon irradiation in solid argon matrix at T≤16 K. In addition to isolated methyl radicals, the radical pairs consisting of two methyl radicals separated by two CO molecules were detected in the case of diacetyl. The probability of fragmentation decreases with the decreasing excess energy by switching from Ar to Xe. In general, bifunctional molecules were found to be less stable to “hot” ionic fragmentation in low-temperature solids in comparison with simple prototype compounds. In the case of alkynes of the R--C≡CH type, a noticeable yield of fragmentation products was observed when R=–C(CH 3 ) 3 , but it was negligible for R=–CH 3 . The mechanisms of “hot” reactions and excess energy relaxation are discussed. - Highlights: ► Radiolysis of bifunctional organic compounds and alkynes. ► Dependence of “hot” fragmentation probability from molecular structure. ► Ions of bifunctional compounds are less stable than those of monofunctional ones. ► Alkynes are rather stable to “hot” fragmentation.

  4. Optical properties and molecular diversity of dissolved organic matter in the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsior, Michael; Luek, Jenna; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Cooper, Lee W.

    2017-10-01

    Changes in the molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its light absorbing chromophoric component (CDOM) are of particular interest in the Arctic region because of climate change effects that lead to warmer sea surface temperatures and longer exposure to sunlight. We used continuous UV-vis (UV-vis) spectroscopy, excitation emission matrix fluorescence and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry during a transect from the Aleutian Islands in the Bering Sea to the Chukchi Sea ice edge through Bering Strait to determine the variability of DOM and CDOM. These data were combined with discrete sampling for stable oxygen isotopes of seawater, in order to evaluate the contributions of melted sea ice versus runoff to the DOM and CDOM components. This study demonstrated that high geographical resolution of optical properties in conjunction with stable oxygen ratios and non-targeted ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry was able to distinguish between different DOM sources in the Arctic, including identification of labile DOM sources in Bering Strait associated with high algal blooms and sampling locations influenced by terrestrially-derived DOM, such as the terrestrial DOM signal originating from Arctic rivers and dirty/anchor sea ice. Results of this study also revealed the overall variability and chemodiversity of Arctic DOM present in the Bering and Chukchi Seas.

  5. A molecular investigation of soil organic carbon composition across a subalpine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Tieh; Lawrence, Corey R.; Winnick, Matthew J.; Bargar, John R.; Maher, Katharine

    2018-01-01

    The dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover are a critical component of the global carbon cycle. Mechanistic models seeking to represent these complex dynamics require detailed SOC compositions, which are currently difficult to characterize quantitatively. Here, we address this challenge by using a novel approach that combines Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and bulk carbon X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine the abundance of SOC functional groups, using elemental analysis (EA) to constrain the total amount of SOC. We used this SOC functional group abundance (SOC-fga) method to compare variability in SOC compositions as a function of depth across a subalpine watershed (East River, Colorado, USA) and found a large degree of variability in SOC functional group abundances between sites at different elevations. Soils at a lower elevation are predominantly composed of polysaccharides, while soils at a higher elevation have more substantial portions of carbonyl, phenolic, or aromatic carbon. We discuss the potential drivers of differences in SOC composition between these sites, including vegetation inputs, internal processing and losses, and elevation-driven environmental factors. Although numerical models would facilitate the understanding and evaluation of the observed SOC distributions, quantitative and meaningful measurements of SOC molecular compositions are required to guide such models. Comparison among commonly used characterization techniques on shared reference materials is a critical next step for advancing our understanding of the complex processes controlling SOC compositions.

  6. Attractive mechanical properties of a lightweight highly sensitive bi layer thermistor: polycarbonate/organic molecular conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laukhina, E; Lebedev, V; Rovira, C; Laukhin, V; Veciana, J

    2016-01-01

    The paper covers some of the basic mechanical characteristics of a recently developed bi layer thermistor: polycarbonate/(001) oriented layer of organic molecular conductor α’-(BEDT-TTF) 2 I x Br 3-x , were BEDT-TTF=bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalen. The nano and macro mechanical properties have been studied in order to use this flexible, low cost thermistor in sensing applications by proper way. The nano-mechanical properties of the temperature sensitive semiconducting layer of α’-(BEDT-TTF) 2 I x Br 3-x were tested using nanoindentation method. The value of Young's modulus in direction being perpendicular to the layer plan was found as 9.0 ±1.4 GPa. The macro mechanical properties of the thermistor were studied using a 5848 MicroTester. The tensile tests showed that basic mechanical characteristics of the thermistor are close to those of polycarbonate films. This indicates a good mechanical strength of the developed sensor. Therefore, the thermistor can be used in technologies that need to be instrumented with highly robustness lightweight low cost temperature sensors. The paper also reports synthetic details on fabricating temperature sensing e-textile. As the temperature control is becoming more and more important in biomedical technologies like healthcare monitoring, this work strongly contributes on the ongoing research on engineering sensitive conducting materials for biomedical applications. (paper)

  7. Molecular size evolution of oligomers in organic aerosols collected in urban atmospheres and generated in a smog chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberer, Markus; Sax, Mirjam; Samburova, Vera

    2006-10-01

    Only a minor fraction of the total organic aerosol mass can be resolved on a molecular level. High molecular weight compounds in organic aerosols have recently gained much attention because this class of compound potentially explains a major fraction of the unexplained organic aerosol mass. These compounds have been identified with different mass spectrometric methods, and compounds with molecular masses up to 1000 Da are found in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from aromatic and terpene precursors in smog chamber experiments. Here, we apply matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to SOA particles from two biogenic precursors, alpha-pinene and isoprene. Similar oligomer patterns are found in these two SOA systems, but also in SOA from trimethylbenzene, an anthropogenic SOA precursor. However, different maxima molecular sizes were measured for these three SOA systems. While oligomers in alpha-pinene and isoprene have sizes mostly below 600-700 Da, they grow up to about 1000 Da in trimethylbenzene-SOA. The final molecular size of the oligomers is reached early during the particle aging process, whereas other particle properties related to aging, such as the overall acid concentration or the oligomer concentration, increase continuously over a much longer time scale. This kinetic behavior of the oligomer molecular size growth can be explained by a chain growth kinetic regime. Similar oligomer mass patterns were measured in aqueous extracts of ambient aerosol samples (measured with the same technique). Distinct differences between summer and winter were observed. In summer a few single mass peaks were measured with much higher intensity than in winter, pointing to a possible difference in the formation processes of these compounds in winter and summer.

  8. Design of efficient molecular organic light-emitting diodes by a high-throughput virtual screening and experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Aguilera-Iparraguirre, Jorge; Hirzel, Timothy D.; Duvenaud, David; MacLaurin, Dougal; Blood-Forsythe, Martin A.; Chae, Hyun Sik; Einzinger, Markus; Ha, Dong-Gwang; Wu, Tony; Markopoulos, Georgios; Jeon, Soonok; Kang, Hosuk; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Numata, Masaki; Kim, Sunghan; Huang, Wenliang; Hong, Seong Ik; Baldo, Marc; Adams, Ryan P.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-10-01

    Virtual screening is becoming a ground-breaking tool for molecular discovery due to the exponential growth of available computer time and constant improvement of simulation and machine learning techniques. We report an integrated organic functional material design process that incorporates theoretical insight, quantum chemistry, cheminformatics, machine learning, industrial expertise, organic synthesis, molecular characterization, device fabrication and optoelectronic testing. After exploring a search space of 1.6 million molecules and screening over 400,000 of them using time-dependent density functional theory, we identified thousands of promising novel organic light-emitting diode molecules across the visible spectrum. Our team collaboratively selected the best candidates from this set. The experimentally determined external quantum efficiencies for these synthesized candidates were as large as 22%.

  9. High mobility n-type organic thin-film transistors deposited at room temperature by supersonic molecular beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarella, F., E-mail: fabio.chiarella@spin.cnr.it; Barra, M.; Ciccullo, F.; Cassinese, A. [CNR-SPIN and Physics Department, University of Naples, Piazzale Tecchio 80, I-80125 Naples (Italy); Toccoli, T.; Aversa, L.; Tatti, R.; Verucchi, R. [IMEM-CNR-FBK Division of Trento, Via alla Cascata 56/C, I-38123 Povo (Italy); Iannotta, S. [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, I-43124 Parma (Italy)

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication of N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutil dicyanoperylenediimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) organic thin-film transistors by Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition. The devices exhibit mobility up to 0.2 cm{sup 2}/V s even if the substrate is kept at room temperature during the organic film growth, exceeding by three orders of magnitude the electrical performance of those grown at the same temperature by conventional Organic Molecular Beam Deposition. The possibility to get high-mobility n-type transistors avoiding thermal treatments during or after the deposition could significantly extend the number of substrates suitable to the fabrication of flexible high-performance complementary circuits by using this compound.

  10. The strength of a calcified tissue depends in part on the molecular structure and organization of its constituent mineral crystals in their organic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    High-voltage electron-microscopic tomographic (3D) studies of the ultrastructural interaction between mineral and organic matrix in a variety of calcified tissues reveal different crystal structural and organizational features in association with their respective organic matrices. In brittle or weak pathologic or ectopic calcifications, including examples of osteogenesis imperfecta, calciphylaxis, calcergy, and dermatomyositis, hydroxyapatite crystals occur in various sizes and shapes and are oriented and aligned with respect to collagen in a manner which is distinct from that found in normal calcified tissues. A model of collagen-mineral interaction is proposed which may account for the observed crystal structures and organization. The results indicate that the ultimate strength, support, and other mechanical properties provided by a calcified tissue are dependent in part upon the molecular structure and arrangement of its constituent mineral crystals within their organic matrix.

  11. Molecular C dynamics downstream: the biochemical decomposition sequence and its impact on soil organic matter structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandy, A Stuart; Neff, Jason C

    2008-10-15

    Advances in spectroscopic and other chemical methods have greatly enhanced our ability to characterize soil organic matter chemistry. As a result, the molecular characteristics of soil C are now known for a range of ecosystems, soil types, and management intensities. Placing this knowledge into a broader ecological and management context is difficult, however, and remains one of the fundamental challenges of soil organic matter research. Here we present a conceptual model of molecular soil C dynamics to stimulate inter-disciplinary research into the ecological implications of molecular C turnover and its management- and process-level controls. Our model describes three properties of soil C dynamics: 1) soil size fractions have unique molecular patterns that reflect varying degrees of biological and physical control over decomposition; 2) there is a common decomposition sequence independent of plant inputs or other ecosystem properties; and 3) molecular decomposition sequences, although consistent, are not uniform and can be altered by processes that accelerate or slow the microbial transformation of specific molecules. The consequences of this model include several key points. First, lignin presents a constraint to decomposition of plant litter and particulate C (>53 microm) but exerts little influence on more stable mineral-associated soil fractions stabilized onto mineral fractions has a distinct composition related more to microbially processed organic matter than to plant-related compounds. Third, disturbances, such as N fertilization and tillage, which alter decomposition rates, can have "downstream effects"; that is, a disturbance that directly alters the molecular dynamics of particulate C may have a series of indirect effects on C stabilization in silt and clay fractions.

  12. Evolution of complex organic molecules in hot molecular cores. Synthetic spectra at (sub-)mm wavebands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, R.; Schilke, P.; Stéphan, G.; Bergin, E.; Möller, T.; Schmiedeke, A.; Zernickel, A.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Hot molecular cores (HMCs) are intermediate stages of high-mass star formation and are also known for their rich chemical reservoirs and emission line spectra at (sub-)mm wavebands. Complex organic molecules (COMs) such as methanol (CH3OH), ethanol (C2H5OH), dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3), and methyl formate (HCOOCH3) produce most of these observed lines. The observed spectral feature of HMCs such as total number of emission lines and associated line intensities are also found to vary with evolutionary stages. Aims: We aim to investigate the spectral evolution of these COMs to explore the initial evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation including HMCs. Methods: We developed various 3D models for HMCs guided by the evolutionary scenarios proposed by recent empirical and modeling studies. We then investigated the spatio-temporal variation of temperature and molecular abundances in HMCs by consistently coupling gas-grain chemical evolution with radiative transfer calculations. We explored the effects of varying physical conditions on molecular abundances including density distribution and luminosity evolution of the central protostar(s) among other parameters. Finally, we simulated the synthetic spectra for these models at different evolutionary timescales to compare with observations. Results: Temperature has a profound effect on the formation of COMs through the depletion and diffusion on grain surface to desorption and further gas-phase processing. The time-dependent temperature structure of the hot core models provides a realistic framework for investigating the spatial variation of ice mantle evaporation as a function of evolutionary timescales. We find that a slightly higher value (15 K) than the canonical dark cloud temperature (10 K) provides a more productive environment for COM formation on grain surface. With increasing protostellar luminosity, the water ice evaporation font (~100 K) expands and the spatial distribution of gas phase abundances of

  13. What Organizes the Molecular Ballet that Promotes the Movement of the Axoneme in Such a Way that its Molecular Machinery Seems to be a Whole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibert, Christian

    2005-03-01

    The axonemal machinery constitutes a highly organized structure whose mechanisms seem to be very simple but whose regulation remains unknown. This apparent simplicity is reinforced by the fact that many models are able to perfectly mimic the axonemal wave trains that propagate along cilia and flagella. However nobody knows what are the actual mechanisms that coordinate the molecular ballet that exist during the beat. Here we present some theoretical elements that show that if the radial spokes are one of the main elements that promote axonemal regulation, they must be involved in a complex mechanism that makes the axoneme a discrete structure whose regulation could depend on local entropy that promotes the emergence of new molecular properties.

  14. Microbial utilization of low molecular weight organic substrates in soil depends on their carbon oxidation state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna; Smith, Andrew; Jones, Davey; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    Removal of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), originating from plants and microorganisms, from soil solution is regulated by microbial uptake. In addition to the concentration of LMWOS in soil solution, the chemical properties of each substance (e.g. C oxidation state, number of C atoms, number of -COOH groups) can affect their uptake and subsequent partitioning of C within the soil microbial community. The aim of this study was to trace the initial fate of three dominant classes of LMWOS in soil (sugars, carboxylic and amino acids), including their removal from solution and utilization by microorganisms, and to reveal the effect of substance chemical properties on these processes. Soil solution, spiked at natural abundance levels with 14C-labelled glucose, fructose, malate, succinate, formate, alanine or glycine, was added to the soil and 14C was traced in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CO2, cytosol and soil organic carbon (SOC) over 24 hours. The half-life time of all LMWOS in the DOC (T1 /2-solution) varied between 0.6-5.0 min showing extremely fast initial uptake of LMWOS. The T1 /2-solution of substances was dependent on C oxidation state, indicating that less oxidized organic substances (with C oxidation state "0") were retained longer in soil solution than oxidized substances. The LMWOS-C T1 /2-fast, characterizing the half-life time of 14C in the fast mineralization pool, ranged between 30 and 80 min, with the T1 /2-fast of carboxylic acids (malic acid) being the fastest and the T1 /2-fast of amino acids (glycine) being the slowest. An absence of correlation between T1 /2-fast and either C oxidation state, number of C atoms, or number of -COOH groups suggests that intercellular metabolic pathways are more important for LMWOS transformation in soil than their basic chemical properties. The CO2 release during LMWOS mineralization accounted for 20-90% of 14C applied. Mineralization of LMWOS was the least for sugars and the greatest for

  15. The one-sample PARAFAC approach reveals molecular size distributions of fluorescent components in dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wünsch, Urban; Murphy, Kathleen R.; Stedmon, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Molecular size plays an important role in dissolved organic matter (DOM) biogeochemistry, but its relationship with the fluorescent fraction of DOM (FDOM) remains poorly resolved. Here high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was coupled to fluorescence emission-excitation (EEM...... but not their spectral properties. Thus, in contrast to absorption measurements, bulk fluorescence is unlikely to reliably indicate the average molecular size of DOM. The one-sample approach enables robust and independent cross-site comparisons without large-scale sampling efforts and introduces new analytical...... opportunities for elucidating the origins and biogeochemical properties of FDOM...

  16. Advances in quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations for organic and enzymatic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Orlando; Jorgensen, William L

    2010-01-19

    Application of combined quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods focuses on predicting activation barriers and the structures of stationary points for organic and enzymatic reactions. Characterization of the factors that stabilize transition structures in solution and in enzyme active sites provides a basis for design and optimization of catalysts. Continued technological advances allowed for expansion from prototypical cases to mechanistic studies featuring detailed enzyme and condensed-phase environments with full integration of the QM calculations and configurational sampling. This required improved algorithms featuring fast QM methods, advances in computing changes in free energies including free-energy perturbation (FEP) calculations, and enhanced configurational sampling. In particular, the present Account highlights development of the PDDG/PM3 semi-empirical QM method, computation of multi-dimensional potentials of mean force (PMF), incorporation of on-the-fly QM in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and a polynomial quadrature method for efficient modeling of proton-transfer reactions. The utility of this QM/MM/MC/FEP methodology is illustrated for a variety of organic reactions including substitution, decarboxylation, elimination, and pericyclic reactions. A comparison to experimental kinetic results on medium effects has verified the accuracy of the QM/MM approach in the full range of solvents from hydrocarbons to water to ionic liquids. Corresponding results from ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) methods with continuum-based treatments of solvation reveal deficiencies, particularly for protic solvents. Also summarized in this Account are three specific QM/MM applications to biomolecular systems: (1) a recent study that clarified the mechanism for the reaction of 2-pyrone derivatives catalyzed by macrophomate synthase as a tandem Michael-aldol sequence rather than a Diels-Alder reaction, (2) elucidation of the mechanism of action of fatty

  17. Molecular characterization of soil organic matter from native vegetation–pasture–sugarcane transitions in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Dener Márcio da Silva, E-mail: denermsoliveira@gmail.com [University of São Paulo, Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture, Department of Soil Science, 11 Páduas Dias Avenue, 13418-900 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Colorado State University, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, 1231 East Drive, 80523-1499 Fort Collins, CO (United States); Schellekens, Judith; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino [University of São Paulo, Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture, Department of Soil Science, 11 Páduas Dias Avenue, 13418-900 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2016-04-01

    Replacing pastures (PA) with sugarcane (SG) has been deemed an agronomically feasible strategy for sugarcane expansion in Brazil. However, there are some uncertainties about the environmental impacts regarding this land use change (LUC), mainly related to soil organic matter (SOM), a key factor of environmental sustainability of Brazilian ethanol. LUC-related losses of SOM can overcome the C savings from biofuels. The molecular composition of SOM was evaluated to understand the C dynamics regarding LUC from PA to SG, using native vegetation (NV) as reference. Our study area was located in the south-central region of Brazil. Soil sampling was performed at three depths (0–0.1 m, 0.2–0.3 m and 0.9–1 m) in three representative sites with known LUC history and management practice since 1970. Pyrolysis–gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py–GC/MS) was chosen to study SOM chemistry. Content and isotopic composition of soil organic C and N were also determined. The LUC caused decreases on C and N contents and on δ{sup 13}C isotopic values. Depth was the major factor that influenced SOM composition, while the influence of LUC was mainly evident in surface soils and diminished rapidly with depth. The main difference in SOM composition undergoing the conversion PA-SG was a higher contribution from compounds associated to fresh litter inputs. The high contribution from fresh litter, having a relatively low mean residence time and increasing decomposition rates, is probably a major factor that drives C losses in areas undergoing sugarcane expansion. - Graphical abstract: We chose 3 sites in Brazil (1) and collected soil samples in areas undergoing LUC pasture–sugarcane (2) to evaluate SOM composition using Py–GC/MS (3). The LUC causes shifts on SOM signature (4), highlighting the increase of fresh litter compounds in sugarcane areas (5). - Highlights: • Effect of land use change (LUC) on SOM composition in Brazilian soils • Py-GC/MS of NaOH extractable SOM

  18. A Molecular Investigation of Soil Organic Carbon Composition, Variability, and Spatial Distribution Across an Alpine Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H. T.; Lawrence, C. R.; Winnick, M.; Druhan, J. L.; Williams, K. H.; Maher, K.; Rainaldi, G. R.; McCormick, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    The cycling of carbon through soils is one of the least understood aspects of the global carbon cycle and represents a key uncertainty in the prediction of land-surface response to global warming. Thus, there is an urgent need for advanced characterization of soil organic carbon (SOC) to develop and evaluate a new generation of soil carbon models. We hypothesize that shifts in SOC composition and spatial distribution as a function of soil depth can be used to constrain rates of transformation between the litter layer and the deeper subsoil (extending to a depth of approximately 1 m). To evaluate the composition and distribution of SOC, we collected soil samples from East River, a shale-dominated watershed near Crested Butte, CO, and characterized relative changes in SOC species as a function of depth using elemental analysis (EA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and bulk C X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our results show that total organic carbon (TOC) decreases with depth, and high total inorganic carbon (TIC) content was found in deeper soils (after 75 cm), a characteristic of the bedrock (shale). The distribution of aliphatic C relative to the parent material generally decreases with depth and that polysaccharide can be a substantial component of SOC at various depths. On the other hand, the relative distribution of aromatic C, traditionally viewed as recalcitrant, only makes up a very small part of SOC regardless of depth. These observations confirm that molecular structure is not the only determinant of SOC turnover rate. To study other contributors to SOC decomposition, we studied changes in the spatial correlation of SOC and minerals using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). We found that aromatics mostly locate on the surface of small soil aggregates (1-10 μm). Polysaccharides and proteins, both viewed as labile traditionally, are more evenly distributed over the interior of the

  19. Molecular analysis and genomic organization of major DNA satellites in banana (Musa spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čížková, Jana; Hřibová, Eva; Humplíková, Lenka; Christelová, Pavla; Suchánková, Pavla; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2013-01-01

    Satellite DNA sequences consist of tandemly arranged repetitive units up to thousands nucleotides long in head-to-tail orientation. The evolutionary processes by which satellites arise and evolve include unequal crossing over, gene conversion, transposition and extra chromosomal circular DNA formation. Large blocks of satellite DNA are often observed in heterochromatic regions of chromosomes and are a typical component of centromeric and telomeric regions. Satellite-rich loci may show specific banding patterns and facilitate chromosome identification and analysis of structural chromosome changes. Unlike many other genomes, nuclear genomes of banana (Musa spp.) are poor in satellite DNA and the information on this class of DNA remains limited. The banana cultivars are seed sterile clones originating mostly from natural intra-specific crosses within M. acuminata (A genome) and inter-specific crosses between M. acuminata and M. balbisiana (B genome). Previous studies revealed the closely related nature of the A and B genomes, including similarities in repetitive DNA. In this study we focused on two main banana DNA satellites, which were previously identified in silico. Their genomic organization and molecular diversity was analyzed in a set of nineteen Musa accessions, including representatives of A, B and S (M. schizocarpa) genomes and their inter-specific hybrids. The two DNA satellites showed a high level of sequence conservation within, and a high homology between Musa species. FISH with probes for the satellite DNA sequences, rRNA genes and a single-copy BAC clone 2G17 resulted in characteristic chromosome banding patterns in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana which may aid in determining genomic constitution in interspecific hybrids. In addition to improving the knowledge on Musa satellite DNA, our study increases the number of cytogenetic markers and the number of individual chromosomes, which can be identified in Musa.

  20. Molecular evidence for an involvement of organic anion transporters (OATs) in aristolochic acid nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhiya, Nadiya; Arlt, Volker M.; Bahn, Andrew; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Phillips, David H.; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2009-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA), present in Aristolochia species, is the major causative agent in the development of severe renal failure and urothelial cancers in patients with AA nephropathy. It may also be a cause of Balkan endemic nephropathy. Epithelial cells of the proximal tubule are the primary cellular target of AA. To study whether organic anion transporters (OATs) expressed in proximal tubule cells are involved in uptake of AA, we used human epithelial kidney (HEK293) cells stably expressing human (h) OAT1, OAT3 or OAT4. AA potently inhibited the uptake of characteristic substrates, p-aminohippurate for hOAT1 and estrone sulfate for hOAT3 and hOAT4. Aristolochic acid I (AAI), the more cytotoxic and genotoxic AA congener, exhibited high affinity for hOAT1 (K i = 0.6 μM) as well as hOAT3 (K i = 0.5 μM), and lower affinity for hOAT4 (K i = 20.6 μM). Subsequently, AAI-DNA adduct formation (investigated by 32 P-postlabelling) was used as a measure of AAI uptake. Significantly higher levels of adducts occurred in hOAT-expressing cells than in control cells: this effect was abolished in the presence of the OAT inhibitor probenecid. In Xenopus laevis oocytes hOAT-mediated efflux of p-aminohippurate was trans-stimulated by extracellular AA, providing further molecular evidence for AA translocation by hOATs. Our study indicates that OATs can mediate the uptake of AA into proximal tubule cells and thereby participate in kidney cell damage by this toxin.

  1. Charge transport in organic molecular semiconductors from first principles: The bandlike hole mobility in a naphthalene crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nien-En; Zhou, Jin-Jian; Agapito, Luis A.; Bernardi, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Predicting charge transport in organic molecular crystals is notoriously challenging. Carrier mobility calculations in organic semiconductors are dominated by quantum chemistry methods based on charge hopping, which are laborious and only moderately accurate. We compute from first principles the electron-phonon scattering and the phonon-limited hole mobility of naphthalene crystal in the framework of ab initio band theory. Our calculations combine GW electronic bandstructures, ab initio electron-phonon scattering, and the Boltzmann transport equation. The calculated hole mobility is in very good agreement with experiment between 100 -300 K , and we can predict its temperature dependence with high accuracy. We show that scattering between intermolecular phonons and holes regulates the mobility, though intramolecular phonons possess the strongest coupling with holes. We revisit the common belief that only rigid molecular motions affect carrier dynamics in organic molecular crystals. Our paper provides a quantitative and rigorous framework to compute charge transport in organic crystals and is a first step toward reconciling band theory and carrier hopping computational methods.

  2. Molecular survey of Rickettsial organisms in ectoparasites from a dog shelter in Northern Mexico

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    González-Álvarez, V. H.; Fernández de Mera, I.G.; Cabezas Cruz, Alejandro; de la Fuente, J.; Ortega-Morales, A. I.; Almazán, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, December (2017), s. 143-148 E-ISSN 2405-9390 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Rhipicephalus sanguineus * Ctenocephalides felis * Heterodoxus spiniger * Rickettsia felis * Wolbachia pipientis * Dogs Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology

  3. Microbial utilization of low molecular weight organics in soil depends on the substances properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) in soil is regulated by microbial uptake from solution and following incorporation of into specific cell cycles. Various chemical properties of LMWOS, namely oxidation state, number of carbon (C) atoms, number of carboxylic (-COOH) groups, can affect their uptake from soil solution and further microbial utilization. The aim of the study was to trace the initial fate (including the uptake from soil solution and utilization by microorganisms) of three main classes of LMWOS, having contrast properties - sugars, carboxylic and amino acids. Top 10 cm of mineral soil were collected under Silver birch stands within the Bangor DIVERSE experiment, UK. Soil solution was extracted by centrifugation at 4000 rpm during 15 min. Soil was spiked with 14C glucose or fructose; malic, succinic or formic acids; alanine or glycine. No additional non-labeled LMWOS were added. 14C was traced in the dissolved organic matter (DOM), CO2, cytosol and soil organic matter (SOM) during one day. To estimate half-life times (T1 /2)of LMWOS in soil solution and in SOM pools, the single and double first order kinetic equations were fitted to the uptake and mineralization dynamics, respectively. The LMWOS T1 /2in DOM pool varied between 0.6-5 min, with the highest T1 /2for sugars (3.7 min) and the lowest for carboxylic acids (0.6-1.4 min). Thus, initial uptake of LMWOS is not a limiting step of microbial utilization. The T1 /2 of carboxylic and amino acids in DOM were closely related with oxidation state, showing that reduced substances remain in soil solution longer, than oxidized. The initial T1 /2 of LMWOS in SOM ranged between 30-80 min, with the longest T1 /2 for amino acids (50-80 min) and the shortest for carboxylic acids (30-48 min). These T1 /2values were in one-two orders of magnitude higher than LMWOS T1 /2 in soil solution, pointing that LMWOS mineralization occur with a delay after the uptake. Absence of correlations between

  4. Characteristics of OTFTs based on α-ω- Dihexyl-sexithiophene(DH6T) using Organic Molecular Beam Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Dae Hee; Park, Byung Eun

    2011-01-01

    We fabricated an organic thin film transistor using organic semiconductor material α-ω- Dihexyl-sexithiophene (DH6T). The organic semiconductor was deposited using organic molecular beam deposition (OMBD). The deposition rate was 0.3A/s and the final thickness was 100 nm. After deposition, we annealed at 40 deg. C, 60 deg. C, 80 deg. C. In present, DH6T was used as a p-type semiconductor, so we measured 0V∼-40V. We measured drain current versus drain voltage, drain current versus gate voltage, calculated mobility and On/Off ratio at 40 deg. C, 60 deg. C, 80 deg. C. The field-effect mobility was 8x10- 3 , 9x10- 3 , 1.2x10- 2 , and on/off ratio was 1.75x10- 2 , 1.85x10- 2 , 2.17x10- 2 , respectively.

  5. Different molecular organization of two carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, in human colon epithelial cells and colon adenocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudzinski, Wojciech; Piet, Mateusz; Luchowski, Rafal; Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Paduch, Roman; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I.

    2018-01-01

    Two cell lines, human normal colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) and human colon adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29) were cultured in the presence of exogenous carotenoids, either zeaxanthin or lutein. Both carotenoids demonstrated cytotoxicity with respect to cancer cells but not to normal cells. Cells from both the cell lines were analyzed with application of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and Raman scattering microscopy. Both imaging techniques show effective incorporation of carotenoid molecules into growing cells. Comparison of the Raman scattering and fluorescence lifetime characteristics reveals different molecular organization of carotenoids in the carcinoma and normal cells. The main difference consists in a carotenoid aggregation level which is substantially lower in the carcinoma cells as compared to the normal cells. Different molecular organization of carotenoids was interpreted in terms of a different metabolism of normal and carcinoma cells and has been concluded to provide a possibility of cancer diagnosis based on spectroscopic analyses.

  6. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-10-30

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π-conjugated molecules, oligomers, and polymers. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of noncovalent intermolecular interactions and briefly discuss the computational chemistry approaches used to understand the magnitude of these interactions. These methodologies are then exploited to illustrate how noncovalent intermolecular interactions impact important electronic properties-such as the electronic coupling between adjacent molecules, a key parameter for charge-carrier transport-through a comparison between the prototype organic semiconductor pentacene with a series of N-substituted heteropentacenes. Incorporating an understanding of these interactions into the design of organic semiconductors can assist in developing novel materials systems from this fascinating molecular class. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  7. Photocatalytic oxidation of organic compounds in a hybrid system composed of a molecular catalyst and visible light-absorbing semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Li, Fei; Li, Xiaona; Li, Hua; Wang, Yong; Sun, Licheng

    2015-01-14

    Photocatalytic oxidation of organic compounds proceeded efficiently in a hybrid system with ruthenium aqua complexes as catalysts, BiVO4 as a light absorber, [Co(NH3)5Cl](2+) as a sacrificial electron acceptor and water as an oxygen source. The photogenerated holes in the semiconductor are used to oxidize molecular catalysts into the high-valent Ru(IV)=O intermediates for 2e(-) oxidation.

  8. Application of Homochiral Alkylated Organic Cages as Chiral Stationary Phases for Molecular Separations by Capillary Gas Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shengming; Zhang, Junhui; Fu, Nan; Wang, Bangjin; Hu, Cong; Yuan, Liming

    2016-11-08

    Molecular organic cage compounds have attracted considerable attention due to their potential applications in gas storage, catalysis, chemical sensing, molecular separations, etc. In this study, a homochiral pentyl cage compound was synthesized from a condensation reaction of ( S , S )-1,2-pentyl-1,2-diaminoethane and 1,3,5-triformylbenzene. The imine-linked pentyl cage diluted with a polysiloxane (OV-1701) was explored as a novel stationary phase for high-resolution gas chromatographic separation of organic compounds. Some positional isomers were baseline separated on the pentyl cage-coated capillary column. In particular, various types of enantiomers including chiral alcohols, esters, ethers and epoxides can be resolved without derivatization on the pentyl cage-coated capillary column. The reproducibility of the pentyl cage-coated capillary column for separation was investigated using nitrochlorobenzene and styrene oxide as analytes. The results indicate that the column has good stability and separation reproducibility after being repeatedly used. This work demonstrates that molecular organic cage compounds could become a novel class of chiral separation media in the near future.

  9. Application of Homochiral Alkylated Organic Cages as Chiral Stationary Phases for Molecular Separations by Capillary Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengming Xie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular organic cage compounds have attracted considerable attention due to their potential applications in gas storage, catalysis, chemical sensing, molecular separations, etc. In this study, a homochiral pentyl cage compound was synthesized from a condensation reaction of (S,S-1,2-pentyl-1,2-diaminoethane and 1,3,5-triformylbenzene. The imine-linked pentyl cage diluted with a polysiloxane (OV-1701 was explored as a novel stationary phase for high-resolution gas chromatographic separation of organic compounds. Some positional isomers were baseline separated on the pentyl cage-coated capillary column. In particular, various types of enantiomers including chiral alcohols, esters, ethers and epoxides can be resolved without derivatization on the pentyl cage-coated capillary column. The reproducibility of the pentyl cage-coated capillary column for separation was investigated using nitrochlorobenzene and styrene oxide as analytes. The results indicate that the column has good stability and separation reproducibility after being repeatedly used. This work demonstrates that molecular organic cage compounds could become a novel class of chiral separation media in the near future.

  10. Marsh plant response to metals: Exudation of aliphatic low molecular weight organic acids (ALMWOAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, A. Cristina S.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Basto, M. Clara P.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2016-03-01

    Metal exposure is known to induce the production and secretion of substances, such as aliphatic low molecular weight organic acids (ALMWOAs), into the rhizosphere by plant roots. Knowledge on this matter is extensive for soil plants but still considerably scarce regarding marsh plants roots adapted to high salinity media. Phragmites australis and Halimione portulacoides, two marsh plants commonly distributed in European estuarine salt marshes, were used to assess the response of roots of both species, in terms of ALMWOAs exudation, to Cu, Ni and Cd exposure (isolated and in mixture since in natural environment, they are exposed to mixture of metals). As previous studies were carried out in unrealistic and synthetic media, here a more natural medium was selected. Therefore, in vitro experiments were carried out, with specimens of both marsh plants, and in freshwater contaminated with two different Cu, Ni and Cd concentrations (individual metal and in mixture). Both marsh plants were capable of liberating ALMWOAs into the surrounding medium. Oxalic, citric and maleic acids were found in P. australis root exudate solutions and oxalic and maleic acids in H. portulacoides root exudate solutions. ALMWOA liberation by both plants was plant species and metal-dependent. For instance, Cu affected the exudation of oxalic acid by H. portulacoides and of oxalic and citric acids by P. australis roots. In contrast, Ni and Cd did not stimulate any specific response. Regarding the combination of all metals, H. portulacoides showed a similar response to that observed for Cu individually. However, in the P. australis case, at high metal concentration mixture, a synergetic effect led to the increase of oxalic acid levels in root exudate solution and to a decrease of citric acid liberation. A correlation between ALMWOAs exudation and metal accumulation could not be established. P. australis and H. portulacoides are considered suitable metal phytoremediators of estuarine impacted areas

  11. Associations between the molecular and optical properties of dissolved organic matter in the Florida Everglades, a model coastal wetland system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sasha; Jaffe, Rudolf; Cawley, Kaelin; Dittmar, Thorsten; Stubbins, Aron

    2015-11-01

    Optical properties are easy-to-measure proxies for dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition, source and reactivity. However, the molecular signature of DOM associated with such optical parameters remains poorly defined. The Florida coastal Everglades is a subtropical wetland with diverse vegetation (e.g., sawgrass prairies, mangrove forests, seagrass meadows) and DOM sources (e.g., terrestrial, microbial and marine). As such, the Everglades is an excellent model system from which to draw samples of diverse origin and composition to allow classically-defined optical properties to be linked to molecular properties of the DOM pool. We characterized a suite of seasonally- and spatially-collected DOM samples using optical measurements (EEM-PARAFAC, SUVA254, S275-295, S350-400, SR, FI, freshness index and HIX) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Spearman’s rank correlations between FTICR-MS signal intensities of individual molecular formulae and optical properties determined which molecular formulae were associated with each PARAFAC component and optical index. The molecular families that tracked with the optical indices were generally in agreement with conventional biogeochemical interpretations. Therefore, although they represent only a small portion of the bulk DOM pool, absorbance and fluorescence measurements appear to be appropriate proxies for the aquatic cycling of both optically-active and associated optically-inactive DOM in coastal wetlands.

  12. Associations between the molecular and optical properties of dissolved organic matter in the Florida Everglades, a model coastal wetland system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha eWagner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Optical properties are easy-to-measure proxies for dissolved organic matter (DOM composition, source and reactivity. However, the molecular signature of DOM associated with such optical parameters remains poorly defined. The Florida coastal Everglades is a subtropical wetland with diverse vegetation (e.g., sawgrass prairies, mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and DOM sources (e.g., terrestrial, microbial and marine. As such, the Everglades is an excellent model system from which to draw samples of diverse origin and composition to allow classically-defined optical properties to be linked to molecular properties of the DOM pool. We characterized a suite of seasonally- and spatially-collected DOM samples using optical measurements (EEM-PARAFAC, SUVA254, S275-295, S350-400, SR, FI, freshness index and HIX and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS. Spearman’s rank correlations between FTICR-MS signal intensities of individual molecular formulae and optical properties determined which molecular formulae were associated with each PARAFAC component and optical index. The molecular families that tracked with the optical indices were generally in agreement with conventional biogeochemical interpretations. Therefore, although they represent only a small portion of the bulk DOM pool, absorbance and fluorescence measurements appear to be appropriate proxies for the aquatic cycling of both optically-active and associated optically-inactive DOM in coastal wetlands.

  13. Detailed Source-Specific Molecular Composition of Ambient Aerosol Organic Matter Using Ultrahigh Resolution Mass Spectrometry and 1H NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda S. Willoughby

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic aerosols (OA are universally regarded as an important component of the atmosphere that have far-ranging impacts on climate forcing and human health. Many of these impacts are related to OA molecular characteristics. Despite the acknowledged importance, current uncertainties related to the source apportionment of molecular properties and environmental impacts make it difficult to confidently predict the net impacts of OA. Here we evaluate the specific molecular compounds as well as bulk structural properties of total suspended particulates in ambient OA collected from key emission sources (marine, biomass burning, and urban using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (UHR-MS and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR. UHR-MS and 1H NMR show that OA within each source is structurally diverse, and the molecular characteristics are described in detail. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed that (1 aromatic nitrogen species are distinguishing components for these biomass burning aerosols; (2 these urban aerosols are distinguished by having formulas with high O/C ratios and lesser aromatic and condensed aromatic formulas; and (3 these marine aerosols are distinguished by lipid-like compounds of likely marine biological origin. This study provides a unique qualitative approach for enhancing the chemical characterization of OA necessary for molecular source apportionment.

  14. Assessment of the impact of xenobiotic pollutants on the marine organisms: Molecular biomarker approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    of the organisms to xenobiotic compounds being transformed into reactive oxygen species. Most importantly, the occurrence of DNA strand breaks in marine organisms leading to the loss of DNA integrity is a significant biomarker of marine pollution. The measurement...

  15. Pilot-scale recovery of low molecular weight organic acids from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-05

    Nov 5, 2008 ... 2Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 2-4 Hibiniko, Wakamatsu- ... 2000) as well as for the recovery of organic acids from ..... Fellowship from Third World Organization for.

  16. Molecular characterization of macrophyte-derived dissolved organic matters and their implications for lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical properties of whole organic matter (OM) and its dissolved organic matter (DOM) fraction from six dominant macrophytes in Lake Dianchi were comparatively characterized, and their environmental implications were discussed. Significant differences in chemical composition of the OM samples were...

  17. Molecular Design of Semiconducting Polymers for High-Performance Organic Electrochemical Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Nielsen, Christian B.; Giovannitti, Alexander; Sbircea, Dan-Tiberiu; Bandiello, Enrico; Niazi, Muhammad Rizwan; Hanifi, David A.; Sessolo, Michele; Amassian, Aram; Malliaras, George G.; Rivnay, Jonathan; McCulloch, Iain

    2016-01-01

    required for accumulation mode OECT operation. We discuss key aspects relating to OECT performance such as ion and hole transport, elec-trochromic properties, operational voltage and stability. The demonstration of our molecular design strategy

  18. Role of intrinsic molecular dipole in energy level alignment at organic interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindell, L.; Cakir, Deniz; Brocks, G.; Fahlman, M.; Braun, S.

    2013-01-01

    The energy level alignment in metal-organic and organic-organic junctions of the widely used materials tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3) and 1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (NTCDA) is investigated. The measured alignment schemes for single and bilayer films of Alq3 and NTCDA

  19. Interface modification of organic photovoltaics by combining molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub x}) and molecular template layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Haichao [Institute of Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Yang, Junliang, E-mail: junliang.yang@csu.edu.cn [Institute of Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Fu, Lin; Xiong, Jian; Yang, Bingchu; Ouyang, Jun; Zhou, Conghua; Huang, Han [Institute of Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Gao, Yongli [Institute of Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We report discrete heterojunction small molecular organic photovoltaics (OPVs) with enhanced performance by modifying the interface using molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub x}) and molecular template layer perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic-3,4,9,10-dianhydride (PTCDA). A large increase in open-circuit voltage was obtained in copper phthalocyanine/fullerene, i.e., CuPc/C{sub 60} and CuPc/PCBM, discrete planar heterojunction photovoltaics with an insertion of 5 nm MoO{sub x} hole transport layer at the interface between the anode electrode and the CuPc donor layer. It results from the band bending at the interface and the pinning of the highest occupied molecular orbital level of CuPc to the Fermi level of MoO{sub x} due to the defect states (oxygen vacancies) in MoO{sub x} thin films. Moreover, the short-circuit current showed an efficient improvement by inserting a 1 nm PTCDA layer at the interface between the MoO{sub x} layer and the CuPc layer. The PTCDA layer induces the growth of CuPc thin film with lying-down molecular arrangement, supporting the charge transports along the vertical direction. The power conversion efficiencies of CuPc/C{sub 60} and CuPc/PCBM discrete planar heterojunction photovoltaic devices were improved from about 0.80% to 1.50% with inserting both MoO{sub x} and PTCDA layers. The results suggest that the performance of organic discrete planar heterojunction photovoltaics could be optimized by interface modification with combining hole transport layer and molecular template layer, which are potentially suitable for other highly efficient OPVs, such as small molecular tandem OPVs. - Highlights: • Organic small molecule photovoltaics were fabricated by interface modification. • An inserted molybdenum oxide layer largely enhances open-circuit voltage. • An inserted molecular template layer dramatically improves short-circuit current. • The power conversion efficiencies are almost doubled with interface modification.

  20. Water interactions with condensed organic phases: a combined experimental and theoretical study of molecular-level processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Sofia M.; Kong, Xiangrui; Thomson, Erik S.; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Pettersson, Jan B. C.; Lovrić, Josip; Toubin, Céline

    2016-04-01

    Water uptake on aerosol particles modifies their chemistry and microphysics with important implications for air quality and climate. A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol consists of organic aerosol particles or inorganic particles with condensed organic components. Here, we combine laboratory studies using the environmental molecular beam (EMB) method1 with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize water interactions with organic surfaces in detail. The over-arching aim is to characterize the mechanisms that govern water uptake, in order to guide the development of physics-based models to be used in atmospheric modelling. The EMB method enables molecular level studies of interactions between gases and volatile surfaces at near ambient pressure,1 and the technique may provide information about collision dynamics, surface and bulk accommodation, desorption and diffusion kinetics. Molecular dynamics simulations provide complementary information about the collision dynamics and initial interactions between gas molecules and the condensed phase. Here, we focus on water interactions with condensed alcohol phases that serve as highly simplified proxies for systems in the environment. Gas-surface collisions are in general found to be highly inelastic and result in efficient surface accommodation of water molecules. As a consequence, surface accommodation of water can be safely assumed to be close to unity under typical ambient conditions. Bulk accommodation is inefficient on solid alcohol and the condensed materials appear to produce hydrophobic surface structures, with limited opportunities for adsorbed water to form hydrogen bonds with surface molecules. Accommodation is significantly more efficient on the dynamic liquid alcohol surfaces. The results for n-butanol (BuOH) are particularly intriguing where substantial changes in water accommodation taking place over a 10 K interval below and above the BuOH melting point.2 The governing mechanisms for the

  1. Molecular formulae of marine and terrigenous dissolved organic matter detected by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Boris P.; Witt, Matthias; Engbrodt, Ralph; Dittmar, Thorsten; Kattner, Gerhard

    2005-07-01

    The chemical structure of refractory marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is still largely unknown. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR-MS) was used to resolve the complex mixtures of DOM and provide valuable information on elemental compositions on a molecular scale. We characterized and compared DOM from two sharply contrasting aquatic environments, algal-derived DOM from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica) and terrigenous DOM from pore water of a tropical mangrove area in northern Brazil. Several thousand molecular formulas in the mass range of 300-600 Da were identified and reproduced in element ratio plots. On the basis of molecular elemental composition and double-bond equivalents (DBE) we calculated an average composition for marine DOM. O/C ratios in the marine samples were lower (0.36 ± 0.01) than in the mangrove pore-water sample (0.42). A small proportion of chemical formulas with higher molecular mass in the marine samples were characterized by very low O/C and H/C ratios probably reflecting amphiphilic properties. The average number of unsaturations in the marine samples was surprisingly high (DBE = 9.9; mangrove pore water: DBE = 9.4) most likely due to a significant contribution of carbonyl carbon. There was no significant difference in elemental composition between surface and deep-water DOM in the Weddell Sea. Although there were some molecules with unique marine elemental composition, there was a conspicuous degree of similarity between the terrigenous and algal-derived end members. Approximately one third of the molecular formulas were present in all marine as well as in the mangrove samples. We infer that different forms of microbial degradation ultimately lead to similar structural features that are intrinsically refractory, independent of the source of the organic matter and the environmental conditions where degradation took place.

  2. Molecular Studies of Complex Soil Organic Matter Interactions with Metal Ions and Mineral Surfaces using Classical Molecular Dynamics and Quantum Chemistry Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, A.; Govind, N.; Laskin, A.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral surfaces have been implicated as potential protectors of soil organic matter (SOM) against decomposition and ultimate mineralization to small molecules which can provide nutrients for plants and soil microbes and can also contribute to the Earth's elemental cycles. SOM is a complex mixture of organic molecules of biological origin at varying degrees of decomposition and can, itself, self-assemble in such a way as to expose some biomolecule types to biotic and abiotic attack while protecting other biomolecule types. The organization of SOM and SOM with mineral surfaces and solvated metal ions is driven by an interplay of van der Waals and electrostatic interactions leading to partitioning of hydrophilic (e.g. sugars) and hydrophobic (e.g., lipids) SOM components that can be bridged with amphiphilic molecules (e.g., proteins). Classical molecular dynamics simulations can shed light on assemblies of organic molecules alone or complexation with mineral surfaces. The role of chemical reactions is also an important consideration in potential chemical changes of the organic species such as oxidation/reduction, degradation, chemisorption to mineral surfaces, and complexation with solvated metal ions to form organometallic systems. For the study of chemical reactivity, quantum chemistry methods can be employed and combined with structural insight provided by classical MD simulations. Moreover, quantum chemistry can also simulate spectroscopic signatures based on chemical structure and is a valuable tool in interpreting spectra from, notably, x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). In this presentation, we will discuss our classical MD and quantum chemistry findings on a model SOM system interacting with mineral surfaces and solvated metal ions.

  3. Radiotracer measurements as a sensitive tool for the detection of metal penetration in molecular-based organic electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharnberg, M.; Hu, J.; Kanzow, J.; Raetzke, K.; Adelung, R.; Faupel, F.; Pannemann, C.; Hilleringmann, U.; Meyer, S.; Pflaum, J.

    2005-01-01

    The metallization of organic thin films is a crucial point in the development of molecular electronics. However, there is no method established yet to detect trace amounts of metal atoms in those thin films. Radiotracer measurements can quantify even very small amounts of material penetrating into the bulk, in our case less than 0.01% of a monolayer. Here, the application of this technique on two different well-characterized organic thin film systems (diindenoperylene and pentacene) is demonstrated. The results show that Ag is mainly adsorbed on the surface, but indicate that already at moderate deposition temperatures Ag can penetrate into the organic thin films and agglomerate at the film/substrate interface

  4. Water extraction of coals - potential for estimating low molecular weight organic acids as carbon feedstock for the deep terrestrial biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieth, A.; Mangelsdorf, K.; Sykes, R.; Horsfield, B. [Geoforschungszentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    With the recent increasing interest in the deep biosphere, the question arises as to where the carbon sources that support deep microbial communities are derived from. Our research was focussed on the water-soluble, low molecular weight (LMW) organic acids that are potentially available from different sedimentary lithologies to serve as a carbon source to feed the deep biosphere. A series of Eocene-Pleistocene coals, mudstones and sandstones of varying rank (maturity) and total organic carbon (TOC) content from the Waikato Basin, New Zealand, has been Soxhlet-extracted using water. The combined concentration of recovered formate, acetate and oxalate range from 366 to 2499 {mu} g/g sediment and appear to be dependent on rank, organofacies and TOC. The yields indicate the potential of carbonaceous sediments to feed the local deep terrestrial biosphere over geological periods of time. The existence of living microbial organisms in the mudstones and sandstones was proved by the identification of intact phospholipids (PLs).

  5. Integrating molecular markers into the World Health Organization classification of CNS tumors: a survey of the neuro-oncology community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldape, Kenneth; Nejad, Romina; Louis, David N; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2017-03-01

    Molecular markers provide important biological and clinical information related to the classification of brain tumors, and the integration of relevant molecular parameters into brain tumor classification systems has been a widely discussed topic in neuro-oncology over the past decade. With recent advances in the development of clinically relevant molecular signatures and the 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) update, the views of the neuro-oncology community on such changes would be informative for implementing this process. A survey with 8 questions regarding molecular markers in tumor classification was sent to an email list of Society for Neuro-Oncology members and attendees of prior meetings (n=5065). There were 403 respondents. Analysis was performed using whole group response, based on self-reported subspecialty. The survey results show overall strong support for incorporating molecular knowledge into the classification and clinical management of brain tumors. Across all 7 subspecialty groups, ≥70% of respondents agreed to this integration. Interestingly, some variability is seen among subspecialties, notably with lowest support from neuropathologists, which may reflect their roles in implementing such diagnostic technologies. Based on a survey provided to the neuro-oncology community, we report strong support for the integration of molecular markers into the WHO classification of brain tumors, as well as for using an integrated "layered" diagnostic format. While membership from each specialty showed support, there was variation by specialty in enthusiasm regarding proposed changes. The initial results of this survey influenced the deliberations underlying the 2016 WHO classification of tumors of the central nervous system. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology.

  6. Multi-scale calculation of the electric properties of organic-based devices from the molecular structure

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Haoyuan

    2016-03-24

    A method is proposed to calculate the electric properties of organic-based devices from the molecular structure. The charge transfer rate is obtained using non-adiabatic molecular dynamics. The organic film in the device is modeled using the snapshots from the dynamic trajectory of the simulated molecular system. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are carried out to calculate the current characteristics. A widely used hole-transporting material, N,N′-diphenyl-N,N′-bis(1-naphthyl)-1,1′-biphenyl-4,4′-diamine (NPB) is studied as an application of this method, and the properties of its hole-only device are investigated. The calculated current densities and dependence on the applied voltage without an injection barrier are close to those obtained by the Mott-Gurney equation. The results with injection barriers are also in good agreement with experiment. This method can be used to aid the design of molecules and guide the optimization of devices. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Spintronics: The molecular way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornia, Andrea; Seneor, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    Molecular spintronics is an interdisciplinary field at the interface between organic spintronics, molecular magnetism, molecular electronics and quantum computing, which is advancing fast and promises large technological payoffs.

  8. Spatial and dynamic organization of molecular structures in the cell nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Anne-Kee

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we attempt to provide a better understanding of the principles that underlie the spatial dynamic organization of the cell nucleus. Chapter 1 reviews the current status of knowledge about the structural and functional organization of the cell nucleus. In chapter 2, the development of a

  9. Carbon and nitrogen molecular composition of soil organic matter fractions resistant to oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine Heckman; Dorisel Torres; Christopher Swanston; Johannes Lehmann

    2017-01-01

    The methods used to isolate and characterise pyrogenic organic carbon (PyC) from soils vary widely, and there is little agreement in the literature as to which method truly isolates the most chemically recalcitrant (inferred from oxidative resistance) and persistent (inferred from radiocarbon abundance) fraction of soil organic matter. In addition, the roles of fire,...

  10. Binary molecular layers of C-60 and copper phthalocyanine on Au(111) : Self-organized nanostructuring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stöhr, Meike; Wagner, Thorsten; Gabriel, Markus; Weyers, Bastian; Möller, Rolf

    The binary molecular system of C-60 and copper phthalocyanine(CuPc) molecules has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at room temperature and at 50 K. As substrate Au(111) was chosen. When C-60 and CuPc molecules are sequentially deposited, it is found that well-ordered domains

  11. Surface enhanced raman scattering on tardigrada - Towards monitoring and imaging molecular structures in live cryptobiotic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Harald; Møbjerg, Nadja; Jørgensen, Aslak

    2013-01-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic metazoans which are able to survive extreme physical and chemical conditions by entering a stress tolerant state called cryptobiosis. At present, the molecular mechanisms behind cryptobiosis are still poorly understood. We show that surface enhanced Raman scattering su...

  12. Molecular organization and comparative analysis of chromosome 5B of the wild wheat ancestor Triticum dicoccoides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Akpinar, B.A.; Yuce, M.; Lucas, S.; Vrána, Jan; Burešová, Veronika; Doležel, Jaroslav; Budak, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, JUN 18 (2015) ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : TURGIDUM VAR. DICOCCOIDES * MARKER DEVELOPMENT * GENOME SEQUENCE Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2015

  13. Reduced Charge Transfer Exciton Recombination in Organic Semiconductor Heterojunctions by Molecular Doping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deschler, Felix; Da Como, Enrico; Limmer, Thomas; Tautz, Raphael; Godde, Tillmann; Bayer, Manfred; von Hauff, Elizabeth; Yilmaz, Seyfullah; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich; Feldmann, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of molecular doping on the recombination of electrons and holes localized at conjugated-polymer–fullerene interfaces. We demonstrate that a low concentration of p-type dopant molecules (<4% weight) reduces the interfacial recombination via charge transfer excitons and

  14. Comparison of extractable soil carbon and dissolved organic carbon by their molecular characteristics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šestauberová, Martina; Novák, František

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 6 (2011), 337-342 ISSN 1211-8516 Grant - others:Evropská unie(XE) 100018967 Cíl 3 - ČR-Sasko Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : DOC * humic substances * molecular weight Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  15. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molec...

  16. Organic molecular composition of marine aerosols over the Arctic Ocean in summer: contributions of primary emission and secondary aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Q. Fu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Organic molecular composition of marine aerosol samples collected during the MALINA cruise in the Arctic Ocean was investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. More than 110 individual organic compounds were determined in the samples and were grouped into different compound classes based on the functionality and sources. The concentrations of total quantified organics ranged from 7.3 to 185 ng m−3 (mean 47.6 ng m−3, accounting for 1.8–11.0% (4.8% of organic carbon in the marine aerosols. Primary saccharides were found to be dominant organic compound class, followed by secondary organic aerosol (SOA tracers formed from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs such as isoprene, α-pinene and β-caryophyllene. Mannitol, the specific tracer for airborne fungal spores, was detected as the most abundant organic species in the samples with a concentration range of 0.052–53.3 ng m−3 (9.2 ng m−3, followed by glucose, arabitol, and the isoprene oxidation products of 2-methyltetrols. Biomass burning tracers such as levoglucosan are evident in all samples with trace levels. On the basis of the tracer-based method for the estimation of fungal-spore OC and biogenic secondary organic carbon (SOC, we estimate that an average of 10.7% (up to 26.2% of the OC in the marine aerosols was due to the contribution of fungal spores, followed by the contribution of isoprene SOC (mean 3.8% and α-pinene SOC (2.9%. In contrast, only 0.19% of the OC was due to the photooxidation of β-caryophyllene. This study indicates that primary organic aerosols from biogenic emissions, both from long-range transport of mid-latitude aerosols and from sea-to-air emission of marine organics, as well as secondary organic aerosols formed from the photooxidation of biogenic VOCs are important factors controlling the organic chemical composition of marine aerosols in the Arctic Ocean.

  17. Molecular speciation of phosphorus in organic amendments and amended soils using nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajibove, B.

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of phosphorus (P) in organic amendments is essential for environmentally sustainable fertilization of agricultural soils. The sequential chemical extraction (SCE) technique commonly used for P characterization does not provide any direct molecular information about P species. Studies were conducted to characterize P species in organic amendments and amended soils at a molecular level. The SCE was used to fractionate P in organic amendments including biosolids, hog, dairy and beef cattle manures, and poultry litter. The extracts were analyzed for total P and P species using inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and solution 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, respectively. The relative proportions of P species in intact organic amendments and residues after each extraction, and calcareous soils amended with organic amendments and monoammonium phosphate (MAP) were estimated using the synchrotron-based P 1s X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The solution 31 P NMR provided a detailed characterization of organic P in the non-labile NaOH and HCl fractions of organic amendments, but was limited in characterizing the labile fractions of most of these organic amendments due to their proneness to alkaline hydrolysis. The XANES analysis, however, identified the actual chemical species constituting the labile P that was only characterized as inorganic P or orthophosphates by sequential extraction and solution 31 P NMR. In the amended Vertisolic and Chernozemic soils, XANES analysis estimated 'soluble and adsorbed P' as the dominant P species. For the Vertisolic soil, both the unamended and soil amended with biosolids and MAP contained hydroxyapatite (HAP). In addition, soil amended with biosolids, hog and dairy manures contained β-tricalcium phosphate (TRICAL), a more soluble CaP than HAP. TRICAL was found in all amended soils except in that amended with hog manure, while HAP was present

  18. Ethers on Si(001): A prime example for the common ground between surface science and molecular organic chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Pecher, Lisa

    2017-09-15

    Using computational chemistry, we show that the adsorption of ether molecules on Si(001) under ultra-high vacuum conditions can be understood with textbook organic chemistry. The two-step reaction mechanism of (1) dative bond formation between the ether oxygen and a Lewis acidic surface atom and (2) a nucleophilic attack of a nearby Lewis basic surface atom is analysed in detail and found to mirror the acid-catalysed ether cleavage in solution. The O-Si dative bond is found to be the strongest of its kind and reactivity from this state defies the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle. Electron rearrangement during the C-O bond cleavage is visualized using a newly developed bonding analysis method, which shows that the mechanism of nucleophilic substitutions on semiconductor surfaces is identical to molecular chemistry SN2 reactions. Our findings thus illustrate how the fields of surface science and molecular chemistry can mutually benefit and unexpected insight can be gained.

  19. Ethers on Si(001): A prime example for the common ground between surface science and molecular organic chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Pecher, Lisa; Laref, Slimane; Raupach, Marc; Tonner, Ralf Ewald

    2017-01-01

    Using computational chemistry, we show that the adsorption of ether molecules on Si(001) under ultra-high vacuum conditions can be understood with textbook organic chemistry. The two-step reaction mechanism of (1) dative bond formation between the ether oxygen and a Lewis acidic surface atom and (2) a nucleophilic attack of a nearby Lewis basic surface atom is analysed in detail and found to mirror the acid-catalysed ether cleavage in solution. The O-Si dative bond is found to be the strongest of its kind and reactivity from this state defies the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle. Electron rearrangement during the C-O bond cleavage is visualized using a newly developed bonding analysis method, which shows that the mechanism of nucleophilic substitutions on semiconductor surfaces is identical to molecular chemistry SN2 reactions. Our findings thus illustrate how the fields of surface science and molecular chemistry can mutually benefit and unexpected insight can be gained.

  20. MICMOC/MICMOS: Photochemistry of van der Waals solids and the rise of the organic molecular complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeant d’Hendecourt L. Le

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ices of well-known composition are widely observed in molecular clouds out of which stars, planets and debris (asteroids, comets will form. These ices are naturally subjected to energy input in the form of UV photons and charged cosmic particles which are able to start a very rich radical chemistry in the solid state. These phenomena are simulated in the MICMOC experiment which focuses on the possible prebiotic significance of the organic residues that are formed at room temperature. Further than MICMOC, we propose a general prospective of the evolution of this experiment toward the concept of non-directed experiments that may allow simulating the very first steps from the inanimate molecular world to selective pathways toward self-replicating autocatalytic and heterotrophic molecules that could be considered, for a physicist a template for “minimal” life.

  1. Effects of Organics on the Adsorption and Mobility of Metal Cations in Clay Systems: Computational Molecular Modeling Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Ngouana Wakou, Brice F.; Loganathan, Narasimhan

    2013-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of many natural and anthropogenic environmental processes ultimately depend on a fundamental understanding of the chemistry occurring at the mineral-fluid inter-faces. Clay-related minerals and natural organic matter (NOM) are ubiquitous in the environment, and metal-NOM complexation induces strong correlations between the NOM concentration in water and the capacity of clay particles to bind metals, thus affecting their speciation, solubility and toxicity in the environment. Despite significant geochemical, environmental and technological interest, the molecular-level mechanisms and dynamics of the physical and chemical processes involving NOM are not yet well understood. In this presentation we compare three different molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations of metal-NOM complexation in aqueous solutions. The simulation results indicate that despite some obvious quantitative variations in the computed values depending on the size of the simulated system and on the parameters of the force field models used, all three simulations are quite robust and consistent. In particular, approximately 35-50% of Ca 2+ ions in all simulations are associated with the carboxylic groups of NOM at near-neutral pH. The stability of bidentate-coordinated contact ion pair complexes is also always strongly preferred. Easy association of metal cations with negatively charged NOM functional groups and negatively charged clay surfaces allows us to predict that cationic bridging could be the most probable mechanism of NOM association with clays in natural environments. New MD simulations are currently in progress to quantitatively assess these predictions on a molecular scale for nuclear waste disposal applications. New larger-scale clay models incorporate a more realistic representation of the structural and compositional disorder of natural illites and smectites and employ CLAYFF - a fully flexible general force field suitable for the molecular simulations

  2. Laminar and dorsoventral molecular organization of the medial entorhinal cortex revealed by large-scale anatomical analysis of gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen L Ramsden

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC encode an animal's position and orientation in space. Within the MEC spatial representations, including grid and directional firing fields, have a laminar and dorsoventral organization that corresponds to a similar topography of neuronal connectivity and cellular properties. Yet, in part due to the challenges of integrating anatomical data at the resolution of cortical layers and borders, we know little about the molecular components underlying this organization. To address this we develop a new computational pipeline for high-throughput analysis and comparison of in situ hybridization (ISH images at laminar resolution. We apply this pipeline to ISH data for over 16,000 genes in the Allen Brain Atlas and validate our analysis with RNA sequencing of MEC tissue from adult mice. We find that differential gene expression delineates the borders of the MEC with neighboring brain structures and reveals its laminar and dorsoventral organization. We propose a new molecular basis for distinguishing the deep layers of the MEC and show that their similarity to corresponding layers of neocortex is greater than that of superficial layers. Our analysis identifies ion channel-, cell adhesion- and synapse-related genes as candidates for functional differentiation of MEC layers and for encoding of spatial information at different scales along the dorsoventral axis of the MEC. We also reveal laminar organization of genes related to disease pathology and suggest that a high metabolic demand predisposes layer II to neurodegenerative pathology. In principle, our computational pipeline can be applied to high-throughput analysis of many forms of neuroanatomical data. Our results support the hypothesis that differences in gene expression contribute to functional specialization of superficial layers of the MEC and dorsoventral organization of the scale of spatial representations.

  3. Molecular Speciation of Trace Metal Organic Complexes in the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repeta, D.; Boiteau, R. M.; Bundy, R. M.; Babcock-Adams, L.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial production across approximately one third of the surface ocean is limited by extraordinarily low (picomolar) concentrations of dissolved iron, essentially all of which is complexed to strong organic ligands of unknown composition. Other biologically important trace metals (cobalt, copper, zinc, nickel) are also complexed to strong organic ligands, which again have not been extensively characterized. Nevertheless, organic ligands exert a strong influence on metal bioavailability and toxicity. For example, amendment experiments using commercially available siderophores, organic compounds synthesized by microbes to facilitate iron uptake, show these ligands can both facilitate or impede iron uptake depending on the siderophore composition and available uptake pathways. Over the past few years we have developed analytical techniques using high pressure liquid chromatography interfaced with inductively coupled plasma and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to identify and quantify trace metal organic complexes in laboratory cultures of marine microbes and in seawater. We found siderophores to be widely distributed in the ocean, particularly in regions characterized by low iron concentrations. We also find chemically distinct complexes of copper, zinc, colbalt and nickel that we have yet to fully characterize. We will discuss some of our recent work on trace metal organic speciation in seawater and laboratory cultures, and outline future efforts to better understand the microbial cycling of trace metal organic complexes in the sea.

  4. Coupling effects of abiotic and biotic factors on molecular composition of dissolved organic matter in a freshwater wetland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Wei [Department of Environment and Energy, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ilhwan [Water Analysis and Research Center, K-water, 560 Sintanjin-ro, Daedeok-gu, Daejeon 307-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Joon [Department of Biological Education, Daegu University, Gyungbuk 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Jin, E-mail: jinhur@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Environment and Energy, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    In this study, temporal and spatial variations in five defined molecular size fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were examined for a well preserved wetland (Upo Wetland) and its surrounding areas, and the influencing factors were explored with many biotic and abioic parameters. For each DOM sample, the five size fractions were determined by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with organic carbon detector (SEC-OCD). For 2-year long monthly monitoring, bio-polymers (BP), humic substances (HS), building blocks (BB), low molecular-weight (LMW) neutrals, and LMW acids displayed the median values of 264, 1884, 1070, 1090, and 11 μg-C L{sup −1}, respectively, accounting for 6.2%, 41.7%, 24.5%, 26.4%, and 0.4% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The dominant presence of HS indicated that terrestrial input played important roles in DOM composition of the freshwater ecosystem, which contrasted with coastal wetlands in other reports. Both seasonal and periodic patterns in the variations were found only for HS and BB among the size fractions. It was also notable that the sources of HS were seasonally shifted from aquagenic origin in winter to pedogenic origin in summer. The correlations among the size fractions revealed that BB and LMW neutrals might be degradation products from HS and humic-like substances (HS + BB), respectively, while LMW acids, from LMW neutrals. Principle component analysis revealed that the humic-like substances and the aromaticity of DOM were associated with temperature, chlorophyll a, phosphorous, and rainfall, whereas the other fractions and the molecular weight of HS were primarily affected by solar irradiation. Significant correlations between DOM composition and some biotic factors further suggested that DOM may even affect the biological communities, which provides an insight into the potential coupling effects of biotic and abiotic factors on DOM molecular composition in freshwater wetlands. - Highlights: • Humic fractions varied

  5. Coupling effects of abiotic and biotic factors on molecular composition of dissolved organic matter in a freshwater wetland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Wei; Choi, Ilhwan; Lee, Jung-Joon; Hur, Jin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, temporal and spatial variations in five defined molecular size fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were examined for a well preserved wetland (Upo Wetland) and its surrounding areas, and the influencing factors were explored with many biotic and abioic parameters. For each DOM sample, the five size fractions were determined by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with organic carbon detector (SEC-OCD). For 2-year long monthly monitoring, bio-polymers (BP), humic substances (HS), building blocks (BB), low molecular-weight (LMW) neutrals, and LMW acids displayed the median values of 264, 1884, 1070, 1090, and 11 μg-C L"−"1, respectively, accounting for 6.2%, 41.7%, 24.5%, 26.4%, and 0.4% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The dominant presence of HS indicated that terrestrial input played important roles in DOM composition of the freshwater ecosystem, which contrasted with coastal wetlands in other reports. Both seasonal and periodic patterns in the variations were found only for HS and BB among the size fractions. It was also notable that the sources of HS were seasonally shifted from aquagenic origin in winter to pedogenic origin in summer. The correlations among the size fractions revealed that BB and LMW neutrals might be degradation products from HS and humic-like substances (HS + BB), respectively, while LMW acids, from LMW neutrals. Principle component analysis revealed that the humic-like substances and the aromaticity of DOM were associated with temperature, chlorophyll a, phosphorous, and rainfall, whereas the other fractions and the molecular weight of HS were primarily affected by solar irradiation. Significant correlations between DOM composition and some biotic factors further suggested that DOM may even affect the biological communities, which provides an insight into the potential coupling effects of biotic and abiotic factors on DOM molecular composition in freshwater wetlands. - Highlights: • Humic fractions varied

  6. On the Peculiar Molecular Shape and Size Dependence of the Dynamics of Fluids confined in a Small-Pore Metal-Organic Framework

    KAUST Repository

    Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Maurin, Guillaume

    2018-01-01

    .e. the Metal-Organic Framework SIFSIX-2-Cu-i. These computations unveil an unprecedented molecular symmetry dependence of the translational and rotational dynamics of fluids confined in channel-like nanoporous materials. In particular this peculiar behaviour

  7. Ionization Energies, Electron Affinities, and Polarization Energies of Organic Molecular Crystals: Quantitative Estimations from a Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM)–Tuned Range-Separated Density Functional Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haitao; Ryno, Sean; Zhong, Cheng; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Sun, Zhenrong; Kö rzdö rfer, Thomas; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new methodology for the first-principles description of the electronic properties relevant for charge transport in organic molecular crystals. This methodology, which is based on the combination of a non-empirical, optimally tuned range

  8. Nitrogen-rich higher-molecular soil organic compounds patterned by lignin degradation products: Considerations on the nature of soil organic nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebner, Falk; Bertoli, Luca; Pour, Georg; Klinger, Karl; Ragab, Tamer; Rosenau, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The pathways leading to accumulation of covalently bonded nitrogen in higher-molecular soil organic matter (SOM) are still a controversial issue in soil science and geochemistry. Similarly, structural elucidation of the variety of the types of nitrogenous moieties present in SOM is still in its infancy even though recent NMR studies suggest amide-type nitrogen to form the majority of organically bonded nitrogen which is, however, frequently not in accordance with the results of wet-chemical analyses. Following the modified polyphenol theory of Flaig and Kononova but fully aware of the imperfection of a semi-abiotic simulation approach, this work communicates the results of a study that investigated some potential nitrogen accumulation pathways occurring in the re-condensation branch of the theory following the reactions between well-known low-molecular lignin and carbohydrate degradation products with nitrogenous nucleophiles occurring in soils under aerobic conditions. Different low-molecular degradation products of lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose, such as hydroquinone, methoxyhydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, 2,5-dihydroxy-[1,4]benzoquinone, glucose, xylose, and the respective polysaccharides, i.e. cellulose, xylan as well as various types of lignin were subjected to a joint treatment with oxygen and low-molecular N-nucleophiles, such as ammonia, amines, and amino acids in aqueous conditions, partly using respective 15N labeled compounds for further 15N CPMAS NMR studies. Product mixtures derived from mono- and polysaccharides have been comprehensively fractionated and analyzed by GC/MS after derivatization. Some of ammoxidized polyphenols and quinones have been analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Some products, such as those obtained from ammoxidation of methoxy hydroquinone using 15N labeled ammonia were fractionated following the IHSS protocol. Individual humin (H), humic acid (HA), and fulvic acid (FA) fractions were subjected to elemental analyses

  9. Organic Semiconductor-Containing Supramolecules: Effect of Small Molecule Crystallization and Molecular Packing

    KAUST Repository

    Rancatore, Benjamin J.; Kim, BongSoo; Mauldin, Clayton E.; Frechet, Jean; Xu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    on these highly crystalline molecules differs from their less crystalline counterparts. Here, two families of organic semiconductor SMs are investigated, where the composition of the crystalline core, the location (side- vs end-functionalization) of the alkyl

  10. Solution-Processed Molecular Organic Solar cell: Relationship between Morphology and Device Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Babics, Maxime

    2018-01-01

    ) the rationalization of material design and (ii) systematic optimization of film processing condition. OPV can have a key role in markets such as building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV). The main advantages of organic solar cells are semitransparency, low weight, good

  11. Elucidation of the structure of organic solutions in solvent extraction by combining molecular dynamics and X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferru, G.; Gomes Rodrigues, D.; Berthon, L.; Guilbaud, P.; Diat, O.; Bauduin, P.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the supramolecular structure of the organic phase containing amphiphilic ligand molecules is mandatory for full comprehension of ionic separation during solvent extraction. Existing structural models are based on simple geometric aggregates, but no consensus exists on the interaction potentials. Herein, we show that molecular dynamics crossed with scattering techniques offers key insight into the complex fluid involving weak interactions without any long range ordering. Two systems containing mono- or diamide extractants in heptane and contacted with an aqueous phase were selected as examples to demonstrate the advantages of coupling the two approaches for furthering fundamental studies on solvent extraction. (authors)

  12. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated

  13. Characterization of organic materials by LIBS for exploration of correlation between molecular and elemental LIBS signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Rai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study is performed for the preparation of a database by accumulating LIBS spectra of 4-nitroaniline and 4-nitrotoluene in air and argon. Changes in the behavior of the molecular bands of the C2 Swan system and CN violet system as well as of atomic lines of C, H and N in the LIBS signal are appreciable in argon. In order to explore the correlation between observed LIBS signal and molecular composition of these materials, normalized intensities of the emission lines have been estimated for each compound. It has been found that the relative rates of increase/decrease in the normalized intensities for all sets are higher for 4-nitrotoluene in argon. The cause of the higher rate for 4-nitrotoluene might be due to the possession of a distinctive functional group. The ultimate goal behind the whole study is to use this data-base as input for the discrimination of energetic materials.

  14. Next-Generation Survey Sequencing and the Molecular Organization of Wheat Chromosome 6B

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tanaka, T.; Kobayashi, F.; Joshi, G.P.; Šimková, Hana; Nasuda, S.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Handa, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 2 (2014), s. 103-114 ISSN 1340-2838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Program:ED Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : wheat * chromosome 6B * genome sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.477, year: 2014

  15. Spatial Organization and Molecular Correlation of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Using Deep Learning on Pathology Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Saltz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Beyond sample curation and basic pathologic characterization, the digitized H&E-stained images of TCGA samples remain underutilized. To highlight this resource, we present mappings of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs based on H&E images from 13 TCGA tumor types. These TIL maps are derived through computational staining using a convolutional neural network trained to classify patches of images. Affinity propagation revealed local spatial structure in TIL patterns and correlation with overall survival. TIL map structural patterns were grouped using standard histopathological parameters. These patterns are enriched in particular T cell subpopulations derived from molecular measures. TIL densities and spatial structure were differentially enriched among tumor types, immune subtypes, and tumor molecular subtypes, implying that spatial infiltrate state could reflect particular tumor cell aberration states. Obtaining spatial lymphocytic patterns linked to the rich genomic characterization of TCGA samples demonstrates one use for the TCGA image archives with insights into the tumor-immune microenvironment. : Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs were identified from standard pathology cancer images by a deep-learning-derived “computational stain” developed by Saltz et al. They processed 5,202 digital images from 13 cancer types. Resulting TIL maps were correlated with TCGA molecular data, relating TIL content to survival, tumor subtypes, and immune profiles. Keywords: digital pathology, immuno-oncology, machine learning, lymphocytes, tumor microenvironment, deep learning, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, computer vision

  16. Intra-molecular Charge Transfer and Electron Delocalization in Non-fullerene Organic Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qinghe [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory for Preparation and Application of Ordered Structural Materials of Guangdong Province, Shantou University, Guangdong 515063, P. R. China; Zhao, Donglin [Department of Chemistry, The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, 929 E 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Goldey, Matthew B. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, The University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Filatov, Alexander S. [Department of Chemistry, The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, 929 E 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Sharapov, Valerii [Department of Chemistry, The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, 929 E 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Colón, Yamil J. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Avenue, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Institute for Molecular Engineering, The University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Cai, Zhengxu [Department of Chemistry, The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, 929 E 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Chen, Wei [Institute for Molecular Engineering, Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Avenue, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Institute for Molecular Engineering, The University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; de Pablo, Juan [Institute for Molecular Engineering, Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Avenue, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Institute for Molecular Engineering, The University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Galli, Giulia [Institute for Molecular Engineering, Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Avenue, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Institute for Molecular Engineering, The University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Yu, Luping [Department of Chemistry, The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, 929 E 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States

    2018-03-02

    Two types of electron acceptors were synthesized by coupling two kinds of electron-rich cores with four equivalent perylene diimides (PDIs) at the a position. With fully aromatic cores, TPB and TPSe have pi-orbitals spread continuously over the whole aromatic conjugated backbone, unlike TPC and TPSi, which contain isolated PDI units due to the use of a tetrahedron carbon or silicon linker. Density functional theory calculations of the projected density of states showed that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) for TPB are localized in separate regions of space. Further, the LUMO of TPB shows a greater contribution from the orbitals belonging to the connective core of the molecules than that of TPC. Overall, the properties of the HOMO and LUMO point at increased intra-molecular delocalization of negative charge carriers for TPB and TPSe than for TPC and TPSi and hence at a more facile intra-molecular charge transfer for the former. The film absorption and emission spectra showed evidences for the inter -molecular electron delocalization in TPB and TPSe, which is consistent with the network structure revealed by X-ray diffraction studies on single crystals of TPB. These features benefit the formation of charge transfer states and/or facilitate charge transport. Thus, higher electron mobility and higher charge dissociation probabilities under J(sc) condition were observed in blend films of TPB:PTB7-Th and TPSe:PTB7-Th than those in TPC:PTB7Th and TPSi:PTB7-Th blend films. As a result, the J(sc) and fill factor values of 15.02 mA/cm(2), 0.58 and 14.36 mA/cm(2), 0.55 for TPB- and TPSe-based solar cell are observed, whereas those for TPC and TPSi are 11.55 mA/cm2, 0.47 and 10.35 mA/cm(2), 0.42, respectively.

  17. Impact of Interfacial Molecular Conformation and Aggregation State on the Energetic Landscape and Performance in Organic Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy Olivier

    2016-11-25

    In organic photovoltaics (OPVs) the key processes relevant to device operation such as exciton dissociation and free carriers recombination occur at the donor-acceptor (D-A) interface. OPV devices require the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) architecture to function efficiently. In these BHJs, D-A interfaces are arranged in three dimensions, which makes molecular arrangements at these interfaces ill defined and hard to characterize. In addition, molecular materials used in OPVs are inherently disordered and may exhibit variable degrees of structural order in the same BHJ. Yet, D-A molecular arrangements and structure are crucial because they shape the energy landscape and photovoltaic (PV) performance in OPVs. Studies that use well-defined model systems to look in details at the interfacial molecular structure in OPVs and link it to interfacial energy landscape and device operation are critically lacking. We have used in situ photoelectron spectroscopy and ex situ x-ray scattering to study D-A interfaces in tailored bilayers and BHJs based on small molecule donors. We show preferential miscibility at the D-A interface depending on molecular conformation in zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/ C60 bilayers and we derive implications for exciton dissociation. Using sexithiophene (6T), a crystalline donor, we show that the energy landscape at the D-A interface varies markedly depending on the molecular composition of the BHJ. Both the ionization energies of sexithiophene and C60 shift by over ~0.4 eV while the energy of the charge transfer state shifts by ~0.5 eV depending on composition. Such shifts create a downward energy landscape that helps interfacial excitons to overcome their binding energies. Finally, we demonstrate that when both disordered and ordered phases of D coexist at the interface, low-lying energy states form in ordered phases and significantly limit the Voc in devices. Overall our work underlines the importance of the aggregation and conformation states of

  18. MOlecular MAterials Property Prediction Package (MOMAP) 1.0: a software package for predicting the luminescent properties and mobility of organic functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yingli; Li, Wenqiang; Peng, Qian; Geng, Hua; Yi, Yuanping; Wang, Linjun; Nan, Guangjun; Wang, Dong; Shuai, Zhigang

    2018-04-01

    MOlecular MAterials Property Prediction Package (MOMAP) is a software toolkit for molecular materials property prediction. It focuses on luminescent properties and charge mobility properties. This article contains a brief descriptive introduction of key features, theoretical models and algorithms of the software, together with examples that illustrate the performance. First, we present the theoretical models and algorithms for molecular luminescent properties calculation, which includes the excited-state radiative/non-radiative decay rate constant and the optical spectra. Then, a multi-scale simulation approach and its algorithm for the molecular charge mobility are described. This approach is based on hopping model and combines with Kinetic Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations, and it is especially applicable for describing a large category of organic semiconductors, whose inter-molecular electronic coupling is much smaller than intra-molecular charge reorganisation energy.

  19. Recent advances in small molecular, non-polymeric organic hole transporting materials for solid-state DSSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui Thanh-Tuan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Issue from thin-film technologies, dye-sensitized solar cells have become one of the most promising technologies in the field of renewable energies. Their success is not only due to their low weight, the possibility of making large flexible surfaces, but also to their photovoltaic efficiency which are found to be more and more significant (>12% with a liquid electrolyte, >7% with a solid organic hole conductor. This short review highlights recent advances in the characteristics and use of low-molecular-weight glass-forming organic materials as hole transporters in all solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. These materials must feature specific physical and chemical properties that will ensure both the operation of a photovoltaic cell and the easy implementation. This review is an english extended version based on our recent article published in Matériaux & Techniques 101, 102 (2013.

  20. Interaction mechanisms between organic UV filters and bovine serum albumin as determined by comprehensive spectroscopy exploration and molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Junjie; Gao, Li; Yuan, Tao; Jiang, Gaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Organic UV filters are a group of emerging PPCP (pharmaceuticals and personal care products) contaminants. Current information is insufficient to understand the in vivo processes and health risks of organic UV filters in humans. The interaction mechanism of UV filters with serum albumin provides critical information for the health risk assessment of these active ingredients in sunscreen products. This study investigates the interaction mechanisms of five commonly used UV filters (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, BP-3; 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate, EHMC; 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, 4-MBC; methoxydibenzoylmethane, BDM; homosalate, HMS) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) by spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), competitive binding experiments and molecular docking. Our results indicated that the fluorescence of BSA was quenched by these UV filters through a static quenching mechanism. The values of the binding constant (Ka) ranged from (0.78±0.02)×10(3) to (1.29±0.01)×10(5) L mol(-1). Further exploration by synchronous fluorescence and CD showed that the conformation of BSA was demonstrably changed in the presence of these organic UV filters. It was confirmed that the UV filters can disrupt the α-helical stability of BSA. Moreover, the results of molecular docking revealed that the UV filter molecule is located in site II (sub-domain IIIA) of BSA, which was further confirmed by the results of competitive binding experiments. In addition, binding occurred mainly through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction. This study raises critical concerns regarding the transportation, distribution and toxicity effects of organic UV filters in human body. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Large modulation of carrier transport by grain-boundary molecular packing and microstructure in organic thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan

    2009-11-08

    Solution-processable organic semiconductors are central to developing viable printed electronics, and performance comparable to that of amorphous silicon has been reported for films grown from soluble semiconductors. However, the seemingly desirable formation of large crystalline domains introduces grain boundaries, resulting in substantial device-to-device performance variations. Indeed, for films where the grain-boundary structure is random, a few unfavourable grain boundaries may dominate device performance. Here we isolate the effects of molecular-level structure at grain boundaries by engineering the microstructure of the high-performance n-type perylenediimide semiconductor PDI8-CN 2 and analyse their consequences for charge transport. A combination of advanced X-ray scattering, first-principles computation and transistor characterization applied to PDI8-CN 2 films reveals that grain-boundary orientation modulates carrier mobility by approximately two orders of magnitude. For PDI8-CN 2 we show that the molecular packing motif (that is, herringbone versus slip-stacked) plays a decisive part in grain-boundary-induced transport anisotropy. The results of this study provide important guidelines for designing device-optimized molecular semiconductors. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of assimilate import into sink organs: Update on molecular drivers of sink strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadia eBihmidine

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments have altered our view of molecular mechanisms that determine sink strength, defined here as the capacity of non-photosynthetic structures to compete for import of photoassimilates. We review new findings from diverse systems, including stems, seeds, flowers, and fruits. An important advance has been the identification of new transporters and facilitators with major roles in the accumulation and equilibration of sugars at a cellular level. Exactly where each exerts its effect varies among systems. Sugarcane and sweet sorghum stems, for example, both accumulate high levels of sucrose, but may do so via different paths. The distinction is central to strategies for targeted manipulation of sink strength using transporter genes, and shows the importance of system-specific analyses. Another major advance has been the identification of deep hypoxia as a feature of normal grain development. This means that molecular drivers of sink strength in endosperm operate in very low oxygen levels, and under metabolic conditions quite different than previously assumed. Successful enhancement of sink strength has nonetheless been achieved in grains by up-regulating genes for starch biosynthesis. Additionally, our understanding of sink strength is enhanced by awareness of the dual roles played by invertases (INV, not only in sucrose metabolism, but also in production of the hexose sugar signals that regulate cell-cycle and cell-division programs. These contributions of INV to cell expansion and division prove to be vital for establishment of young sinks ranging from flowers to fruit. Since INV genes are themselves sugar-responsive feast genes, they can mediate a feed-forward enhancement of sink strength when assimilates are abundant. Greater overall productivity and yield have thus been attained in key instances, indicating that even broader enhancements may be achievable as we discover the detailed molecular mechanisms that drive sink strength

  3. Molecular motions in a viscous organic liquid: ferrocene in cold butyl phthalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruby, S.L.; Zabransky, B.J.; Flinn, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    The two main purposes of this work were to learn (a) if rotational diffusion can be seen along with translational, and (b) is [x(T) 2 ] unusual as the sample is heated from a glass to a liquid. Our observations show that (a) rotational molecular diffusion is not likely ever to be observed by quadrupole relaxation and (b) that there is indeed a fast increase in [x 2 ] above T/sub g/. This increase is correlated with a rapid and linear increase of the number of ''soft modes'' for the liquid above the glass transition temperature

  4. Prediction of complexes of uranyl and organic substances by molecular orbital calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, S.; Tsushima, S.; Todoriki, M.; Tanaka, S.; Suzuki, A.

    1999-01-01

    Structure of UO 2 2+ complexes with salicylic acid was optimized by using molecular orbital calculation (ab initio method). The bond distances between U and O atoms (O eq ) of carboxyl group and phenyl group in salicylic acid were evaluated and compared with those measured experimentally by Denecke et al. The calculated distance relatively agrees with the experimental one. The frontier electron densities in the complexes were also calculated. Strong localization of frontier electron density in the complexes was not observed, suggesting that the complexes are subject to only weak interactions with rocks, minerals and other compounds in the geosphere. (author)

  5. Reduced Charge Transfer Exciton Recombination in Organic Semiconductor Heterojunctions by Molecular Doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschler, Felix; da Como, Enrico; Limmer, Thomas; Tautz, Raphael; Godde, Tillmann; Bayer, Manfred; von Hauff, Elizabeth; Yilmaz, Seyfullah; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich; Feldmann, Jochen

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the effect of molecular doping on the recombination of electrons and holes localized at conjugated-polymer-fullerene interfaces. We demonstrate that a low concentration of p-type dopant molecules (<4% weight) reduces the interfacial recombination via charge transfer excitons and results in a favored formation of separated carriers. This is observed by the ultrafast quenching of photoluminescence from charge transfer excitons and the increase in photoinduced polaron density by ˜70%. The results are consistent with a reduced formation of emissive charge transfer excitons, induced by state filling of tail states.

  6. Generation of thermodynamic data for organic liquid mixtures from molecular simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; Peters, Günther H.j.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2007-01-01

    Fluctuation solution theory (FST) is employed to analyze results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid mixtures. The objective is to generate parameters for macroscopic thermodynamic property models. Two benchmark systems, benzene-methyl acetate at 303.15 K and benzene-ethanol at 298.......15 K, are used. MD simulations are performed in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble (NPT) at the respective temperatures and at a pressure of 1 atm. We use the CHARMM27 force field at different mixing ratios. We sample positions to determine the binary (between the centers-of-mass of molecules of a pair...

  7. Distinct high molecular weight organic compound (HMW-OC) types in aerosol particles collected at a coastal urban site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Healy, R. M.; Wenger, J. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Ceburnis, D.; Harrison, Roy M.; Beddows, D. C. S.

    2017-12-01

    Organic oligomers were discovered in laboratory-generated atmospheric aerosol over a decade ago. However, evidence for the presence of oligomers in ambient aerosols is scarce and mechanisms for their formation have yet to be fully elucidated. In this work, three unique aerosol particle types internally mixed with High molecular weight organic compounds (HMW-OC) species - likely oligomers - were detected in ambient air using single particle Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS) in Cork (Ireland) during winter 2009. These particle types can be described as follows: (1) HMW-OCs rich in organic nitrogen - possibly containing nitrocatechols and nitroguaiacols - originating from primary emissions of biomass burning particles during evening times; (2) HMW-OCs internally mixed with nitric acid, occurring in stagnant conditions during night time; and (3) HMW-OCs internally mixed with sea salt, likely formed via photochemical reactions during day time. The study exemplifies the power of methodologies capable of monitoring the simultaneous formation of organic and inorganic particle-phase reaction products. Primary emissions and atmospheric aging of different types of HMW-OC contributes to aerosol with a range of acidity, hygroscopic and optical properties, which can have different impacts on climate and health.

  8. Differential Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids on the Mobilization of Soil-Borne Arsenic and Trace Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nworie, Obinna Elijah; Qin, Junhao; Lin, Chuxia

    2017-08-21

    A batch experiment was conducted to examine the effects of six low-molecular-weight organic acids on the mobilization of arsenic and trace metals from a range of contaminated soils. The results showed that the organic acids behaved differently when reacting with soil-borne As and trace metals. Oxalic acid and acetic acid had the strongest and weakest capacity to mobilize the investigated elements, respectively. The solubilisation of iron oxides by the organic acids appears to play a critical role in mobilizing other trace metals and As. Apart from acidification and complexation, reductive dissolution played a dominant role in the dissolution of iron oxides in the presence of oxalic acid, while acidification tended to be more important for dissolving iron oxides in the presence of other organic acids. The unique capacity of oxalic acid to solubilize iron oxides tended to affect the mobilization of other elements in different ways. For Cu, Mn, and Zn, acidification-driven mobilization was likely to be dominant while complexation might play a major role in Pb mobilization. The formation of soluble Fe and Pb oxalate complexes could effectively prevent arsenate or arsenite from combining with these metals to form solid phases of Fe or Pb arsenate or arsenite.

  9. Confocal imaging of whole vertebrate embryos reveals novel insights into molecular and cellular mechanisms of organ development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadel, Diana M.; Keller, Bradley B.; Sandell, Lisa L.

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy has been an invaluable tool for studying cellular or sub-cellular biological processes. The study of vertebrate embryology is based largely on examination of whole embryos and organs. The application of confocal microscopy to immunostained whole mount embryos, combined with three dimensional (3D) image reconstruction technologies, opens new avenues for synthesizing molecular, cellular and anatomical analysis of vertebrate development. Optical cropping of the region of interest enables visualization of structures that are morphologically complex or obscured, and solid surface rendering of fluorescent signal facilitates understanding of 3D structures. We have applied these technologies to whole mount immunostained mouse embryos to visualize developmental morphogenesis of the mammalian inner ear and heart. Using molecular markers of neuron development and transgenic reporters of neural crest cell lineage we have examined development of inner ear neurons that originate from the otic vesicle, along with the supporting glial cells that derive from the neural crest. The image analysis reveals a previously unrecognized coordinated spatial organization between migratory neural crest cells and neurons of the cochleovestibular nerve. The images also enable visualization of early cochlear spiral nerve morphogenesis relative to the developing cochlea, demonstrating a heretofore unknown association of neural crest cells with extending peripheral neurite projections. We performed similar analysis of embryonic hearts in mouse and chick, documenting the distribution of adhesion molecules during septation of the outflow tract and remodeling of aortic arches. Surface rendering of lumen space defines the morphology in a manner similar to resin injection casting and micro-CT.

  10. Stable Organic Monolayers on Oxide-Free Silicon/Germanium in a Supercritical Medium: A New Route to Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Yeong, Sai Hooi; Troadec, Cedric; Srinivasan, M P

    2013-05-02

    Oxide-free Si and Ge surfaces have been passivated and modified with organic molecules by forming covalent bonds between the surfaces and reactive end groups of linear alkanes and aromatic species using single-step deposition in supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2). The process is suitable for large-scale manufacturing due to short processing times, simplicity, and high resistance to oxidation. It also allows the formation of monolayers with varying reactive terminal groups, thus enabling formation of nanostructures engineered at the molecular level. Ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) spectra performed on the organic monolayer on oxide-free silicon capped by a thin gold layer reveals for the first time an increase in transmission of the ballistic current through the interface of up to three times compared to a control device, in contrast to similar studies reported in the literature suggestive of oxide-free passivation in SCCO2. The SCCO2 process combined with the preliminary BEEM results opens up new avenues for interface engineering, leading to molecular electronic devices.

  11. DOMINO: development of informative molecular markers for phylogenetic and genome-wide population genetic studies in non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías-López, Cristina; Sánchez-Herrero, José F; Guirao-Rico, Sara; Mora, Elisa; Arnedo, Miquel A; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio

    2016-12-15

    The development of molecular markers is one of the most important challenges in phylogenetic and genome wide population genetics studies, especially in studies with non-model organisms. A highly promising approach for obtaining suitable markers is the utilization of genomic partitioning strategies for the simultaneous discovery and genotyping of a large number of markers. Unfortunately, not all markers obtained from these strategies provide enough information for solving multiple evolutionary questions at a reasonable taxonomic resolution. We have developed Development Of Molecular markers In Non-model Organisms (DOMINO), a bioinformatics tool for informative marker development from both next generation sequencing (NGS) data and pre-computed sequence alignments. The application implements popular NGS tools with new utilities in a highly versatile pipeline specifically designed to discover or select personalized markers at different levels of taxonomic resolution. These markers can be directly used to study the taxa surveyed for their design, utilized for further downstream PCR amplification in a broader set taxonomic scope, or exploited as suitable templates to bait design for target DNA enrichment techniques. We conducted an exhaustive evaluation of the performance of DOMINO via computer simulations and illustrate its utility to find informative markers in an empirical dataset. DOMINO is freely available from www.ub.edu/softevol/domino CONTACT: elsanchez@ub.edu or jrozas@ub.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Spatio-temporal variability of the molecular fingerprint of soil dissolved organic matter in a headwater agricultural catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneau, Laurent; Pierson-Wickmann, Anne-Catherine; Jaffrezic, Anne; Lambert, Thibault; Gruau, Gérard

    2013-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is implied in (i) ecosystem services such as the support of biodiversity, (ii) the alteration of the drinkable water quality by formation of trihalomethane and (iii) the transfer of micropollutants from soils to rivers. Moreover, since DOM connects soils and oceans that are interacting with the atmosphere, understanding its biogeochemistry will help in investigating the carbon cycle and in creating strategies to mitigate climate change. DOM in headwater stream ecosystems is mainly inherited from allochtonous inputs with different reservoirs being mobilized during storm and interstorm events at the scale of an hydrological year. Those changes in DOM reservoirs, if accompanied by composition and reactivity changes, may impact DOM ecosystem services and drinking water production processes. Elucidating the compositional changes due to changes in the source of DOM in rivers has thus become a important axis of DOM research. The aim of this study is to test the ability of the molecular tools of the organic geochemistry and more specifically the combination of thermochemiolysis and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (THM-GC-MS) to (i) link the variability of the river DOM composition to different DOM reservoirs in catchment soils and (ii) provide hypothesis on the nature and the mechanisms of formation (microbial growth, litter decomposition) of those reservoirs. This analytical method seems particularly adapted since it allows the differentiation between vegetal and microbial inputs and the determination of the extent of the biodegradation process of biomolecules such as lignin. To test this method, the molecular fingerprint of soil DOM has been investigated in the wetland area of a small (500 ha) agricultural catchment (the so-called Kervidy-Naizin catchment) located in Brittany, western France. The soil DOM was sampled fortnightly at three depths using zero-tension lysimeters during the hydrological year 2010-2011. The samples were

  13. Aging changes of molecular synthesis in the respiratory organs as revealed by microscopic radioautography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, T.

    2001-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidating the aging changes of macromolecular synthesis such as DNA, RNA, proteins, glycoproteins, glycides and lipids in various organ systems of experimental animals and men, we have studied respiratory organs of aging mice as a series of systematic studies using light and electron microscopic radioautography in various organ systems after incorporations with macromolecular precursors. The experimental animals mainly used were dd Y strain mice at various aging groups from embryo to postnatal day 1 and 3, weeks 1 and 2, months 1, 2, 6, 12 up to 2 year senescent stages. The animals were injected with such macromolecular precursors as 3 H - thymidine for DNA, 3 H-uridine for RNA, 3 H-leucine for proteins, 35 SO 4 for glycoproteins. The results demonstrated that these precursors were incorporated into various cell types in the lungs and tracheas at various ages from perinatal to juvenile, mature and senescent stages showing specific patterns of macromolecular synthesis. It is concluded that these specific pattern of macromolecular synthesis in respective cell types demonstrated the organ specificity of aging. (author)

  14. Intermolecula transfer and elimination of molecular hydrogen in thermal reactions of unsaturated organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suria, Sabartanty [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-02-10

    Two reactions which are important to coal liquefaction include intermolecular transfer and the elimination of two hydrogen atoms. We have designed several model reactions to probe the viability of several hydrogen transfer and elimination pathways. This report described studies on these reactions using organic model compounds.

  15. Controlling morphology and molecular order of solution-processed organic semiconductors for transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.

    2012-01-01

    As a potential low-cost alternative to traditional amorphous-silicon based devices, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are expected to be incorporated into all-plastic integrated circuits and flexible display backplanes. More recently, breakthroughs have been made in the performance of OFETs

  16. Which Molecular Features Affect the Intrinsic Hepatic Clearance Rate of Ionizable Organic Chemicals in Fish?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yi; Hermens, Joop L M; Jonker, Michiel T O; Arnot, Jon A; Armitage, James M; Brown, Trevor; Nichols, John W; Fay, Kellie A; Droge, Steven T J

    2016-01-01

    Greater knowledge of biotransformation rates for ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) in fish is required to properly assess the bioaccumulation potential of many environmentally relevant contaminants. In this study, we measured in vitro hepatic clearance rates for 50 IOCs using a pooled batch of

  17. Visualizing Molecular Chirality in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory Using Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Maia; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Hartley, C. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Although stereochemistry is an important topic in second-year undergraduate organic chemistry, there are limited options for laboratory activities that allow direct visualization of macroscopic chiral phenomena. A novel, guided-inquiry experiment was developed that allows students to explore chirality in the context of cholesteric liquid crystals.…

  18. The Supramolecular Organization of a Peptide-Based Nanocarrier at High Molecular Detail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rad-Malekshahi, Mazda; Visscher, Koen M.; Rodrigues, João P.G.L.M.; De Vries, Renko; Hennink, Wim E.; Baldus, Marc; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J.; Mastrobattista, Enrico; Weingarth, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Nanovesicles self-assembled from amphiphilic peptides are promising candidates for applications in drug delivery. However, complete high-resolution data on the local and supramolecular organization of such materials has been elusive thus far, which is a substantial obstacle to their rational design.

  19. Functional genomics for food microbiology: Molecular mechanisms of weak organic acid preservative adaptation in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brul, S.; Kallemeijn, W.; Smits, G.

    2008-01-01

    The recent era of genomics has offered tremendous possibilities to biology. This concise review describes the possibilities of applying (functional) genomics studies to the field of microbial food stability. In doing so, the studies on weak-organic-acid stress response in yeast are discussed by way

  20. Adsorption of Organic Electron Acceptors on Graphene-like Molecules: Quantum Chemical and Molecular Mechanical Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haldar, Susanta; Kolář, Michal; Sedlák, Robert; Hobza, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 48 (2012), s. 25328-25336 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : graphene * organic electron acceptors * interaction energies * base-pairs * hydrophobic association Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; The oretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.814, year: 2012

  1. Organic solvent and temperature-enhanced ion chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry for the determination of low molecular weight organic and inorganic anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilchrist, Elizabeth S.; Nesterenko, Pavel N.; Smith, Norman W.; Barron, Leon P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • IC selectivity at high contents of organic solvent in eluent and elevated temperature is studied. • Solvent-enhanced IC coupled to high resolution MS is beneficial for sensitive detection of ions. • The first application of IC-HRMS to the detection of low explosives in fingermarks is shown. - Abstract: There has recently been increased interest in coupling ion chromatography (IC) to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) to enable highly sensitive and selective analysis. Herein, the first comprehensive study focusing on the direct coupling of suppressed IC to HRMS without the need for post-suppressor organic solvent modification is presented. Chromatographic selectivity and added HRMS sensitivity offered by organic solvent-modified IC eluents on a modern hyper-crosslinked polymeric anion-exchange resin (IonPac AS18) are shown using isocratic eluents containing 5–50 mM hydroxide with 0–80% methanol or acetonitrile for a range of low molecular weight anions (<165 Da). Comprehensive experiments on IC thermodynamics over a temperature range between 20–45 °C with the eluent containing up to 60% of acetonitrile or methanol revealed markedly different retention behaviour and selectivity for the selected analytes on the same polymer based ion-exchange resin. Optimised sensitivity with HRMS was achieved with as low as 30–40% organic eluent content. Analytical performance characteristics are presented and compared with other IC-MS based works. This study also presents the first application of IC-HRMS to forensic detection of trace low-order anionic explosive residues in latent human fingermarks

  2. Organic solvent and temperature-enhanced ion chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry for the determination of low molecular weight organic and inorganic anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilchrist, Elizabeth S. [Analytical & Environmental Science Division, Department of Forensic & Analytical Science, King’s College London, 150 Stamford Street, London, SE1 9NH (United Kingdom); Nesterenko, Pavel N. [Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart 7001 (Australia); Smith, Norman W. [Analytical & Environmental Science Division, Department of Forensic & Analytical Science, King’s College London, 150 Stamford Street, London, SE1 9NH (United Kingdom); Barron, Leon P., E-mail: leon.barron@kcl.ac.uk [Analytical & Environmental Science Division, Department of Forensic & Analytical Science, King’s College London, 150 Stamford Street, London, SE1 9NH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-20

    Highlights: • IC selectivity at high contents of organic solvent in eluent and elevated temperature is studied. • Solvent-enhanced IC coupled to high resolution MS is beneficial for sensitive detection of ions. • The first application of IC-HRMS to the detection of low explosives in fingermarks is shown. - Abstract: There has recently been increased interest in coupling ion chromatography (IC) to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) to enable highly sensitive and selective analysis. Herein, the first comprehensive study focusing on the direct coupling of suppressed IC to HRMS without the need for post-suppressor organic solvent modification is presented. Chromatographic selectivity and added HRMS sensitivity offered by organic solvent-modified IC eluents on a modern hyper-crosslinked polymeric anion-exchange resin (IonPac AS18) are shown using isocratic eluents containing 5–50 mM hydroxide with 0–80% methanol or acetonitrile for a range of low molecular weight anions (<165 Da). Comprehensive experiments on IC thermodynamics over a temperature range between 20–45 °C with the eluent containing up to 60% of acetonitrile or methanol revealed markedly different retention behaviour and selectivity for the selected analytes on the same polymer based ion-exchange resin. Optimised sensitivity with HRMS was achieved with as low as 30–40% organic eluent content. Analytical performance characteristics are presented and compared with other IC-MS based works. This study also presents the first application of IC-HRMS to forensic detection of trace low-order anionic explosive residues in latent human fingermarks.

  3. The 5S rDNA in two Abracris grasshoppers (Ommatolampidinae: Acrididae): molecular and chromosomal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Danilo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Mariguela, Tatiane Casagrande; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2016-08-01

    The 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are subject of dynamic evolution at chromosomal and molecular levels, evolving through concerted and/or birth-and-death fashion. Among grasshoppers, the chromosomal location for this sequence was established for some species, but little molecular information was obtained to infer evolutionary patterns. Here, we integrated data from chromosomal and nucleotide sequence analysis for 5S rDNA in two Abracris species aiming to identify evolutionary dynamics. For both species, two arrays were identified, a larger sequence (named type-I) that consisted of the entire 5S rDNA gene plus NTS (non-transcribed spacer) and a smaller (named type-II) with truncated 5S rDNA gene plus short NTS that was considered a pseudogene. For type-I sequences, the gene corresponding region contained the internal control region and poly-T motif and the NTS presented partial transposable elements. Between the species, nucleotide differences for type-I were noticed, while type-II was identical, suggesting pseudogenization in a common ancestor. At chromosomal point to view, the type-II was placed in one bivalent, while type-I occurred in multiple copies in distinct chromosomes. In Abracris, the evolution of 5S rDNA was apparently influenced by the chromosomal distribution of clusters (single or multiple location), resulting in a mixed mechanism integrating concerted and birth-and-death evolution depending on the unit.

  4. The influence of molecular mobility on the properties of networks of gold nanoparticles and organic ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin J. Devid

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We prepare and investigate two-dimensional (2D single-layer arrays and multilayered networks of gold nanoparticles derivatized with conjugated hetero-aromatic molecules, i.e., S-(4-{[2,6-bipyrazol-1-ylpyrid-4-yl]ethynyl}phenylthiolate (herein S-BPP, as capping ligands. These structures are fabricated by a combination of self-assembly and microcontact printing techniques, and are characterized by electron microscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Selective binding of the S-BPP molecules to the gold nanoparticles through Au–S bonds is found, with no evidence for the formation of N–Au bonds between the pyridine or pyrazole groups of BPP and the gold surface. Subtle, but significant shifts with temperature of specific Raman S-BPP modes are also observed. We attribute these to dynamic changes in the orientation and/or increased mobility of the molecules on the gold nanoparticle facets. As for their conductance, the temperature-dependence for S-BPP networks differs significantly from standard alkanethiol-capped networks, especially above 220 K. Relating the latter two observations, we propose that dynamic changes in the molecular layers effectively lower the molecular tunnel barrier for BPP-based arrays at higher temperatures.

  5. The influence of molecular mobility on the properties of networks of gold nanoparticles and organic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devid, Edwin J; Martinho, Paulo N; Kamalakar, M Venkata; Prendergast, Úna; Kübel, Christian; Lemma, Tibebe; Dayen, Jean-François; Keyes, Tia E; Doudin, Bernard; Ruben, Mario; van der Molen, Sense Jan

    2014-01-01

    We prepare and investigate two-dimensional (2D) single-layer arrays and multilayered networks of gold nanoparticles derivatized with conjugated hetero-aromatic molecules, i.e., S-(4-{[2,6-bipyrazol-1-yl)pyrid-4-yl]ethynyl}phenyl)thiolate (herein S-BPP), as capping ligands. These structures are fabricated by a combination of self-assembly and microcontact printing techniques, and are characterized by electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Selective binding of the S-BPP molecules to the gold nanoparticles through Au-S bonds is found, with no evidence for the formation of N-Au bonds between the pyridine or pyrazole groups of BPP and the gold surface. Subtle, but significant shifts with temperature of specific Raman S-BPP modes are also observed. We attribute these to dynamic changes in the orientation and/or increased mobility of the molecules on the gold nanoparticle facets. As for their conductance, the temperature-dependence for S-BPP networks differs significantly from standard alkanethiol-capped networks, especially above 220 K. Relating the latter two observations, we propose that dynamic changes in the molecular layers effectively lower the molecular tunnel barrier for BPP-based arrays at higher temperatures.

  6. Organization of lipids in the tear film: a molecular-level view.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Wizert

    Full Text Available Biophysical properties of the tear film lipid layer are studied at the molecular level employing coarse grain molecular dynamics (MD simulations with a realistic model of the human tear film. In this model, polar lipids are chosen to reflect the current knowledge on the lipidome of the tear film whereas typical Meibomian-origin lipids are included in the thick non-polar lipids subphase. Simulation conditions mimic those experienced by the real human tear film during blinks. Namely, thermodynamic equilibrium simulations at different lateral compressions are performed to model varying surface pressure, and the dynamics of the system during a blink is studied by non-equilibrium MD simulations. Polar lipids separate their non-polar counterparts from water by forming a monomolecular layer whereas the non-polar molecules establish a thick outermost lipid layer. Under lateral compression, the polar layer undulates and a sorting of polar lipids occurs. Moreover, formation of three-dimensional aggregates of polar lipids in both non-polar and water subphases is observed. We suggest that these three-dimensional structures are abundant under dynamic conditions caused by the action of eye lids and that they act as reservoirs of polar lipids, thus increasing stability of the tear film.

  7. Large Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Organic Molecular Tunnel Junctions with Nonmagnetic Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zuoti; Shi, Sha; Liu, Feilong; Smith, Darryl L; Ruden, P Paul; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2016-09-27

    We report room-temperature resistance changes of up to 30% under weak magnetic fields (0.1 T) for molecular tunnel junctions composed of oligophenylene thiol molecules, 1-2 nm in length, sandwiched between gold contacts. The magnetoresistance (MR) is independent of field orientation and the length of the molecule; it appears to be an interface effect. Theoretical analysis suggests that the source of the MR is a two-carrier (two-hole) interaction at the interface, resulting in spin coupling between the tunneling hole and a localized hole at the Au/molecule contact. Such coupling leads to significantly different singlet and triplet transmission barriers at the interface. Even weak magnetic fields impede spin relaxation processes and thus modify the ratio of holes tunneling via the singlet state versus the triplet state, which leads to the large MR. Overall, the experiments and analysis suggest significant opportunities to explore large MR effects in molecular tunnel junctions based on widely available molecules.

  8. Titan's organic aerosols: Molecular composition and structure of laboratory analogues inferred from pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisson, Marietta; Szopa, Cyril; Carrasco, Nathalie; Buch, Arnaud; Gautier, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    samples even if the number of released compounds can significantly differ. The hydrocarbon chain content increases in tholins when the CH4 ratio increases. A semi-quantitative study of the nitriles (most abundant chemical family in our chromatograms) released during the pyrolysis shows the existence of a correlation between the amount of a nitrile released and its molecular mass, similarly to the previous quantification of nitriles in the plasma gas-phase. Moreover, numerous nitriles are present both in tholins and in the gas phase, confirming their suspected role in the gas phase as precursors of the solid organic particles.

  9. Comparing molecular composition of dissolved organic matter in soil and stream water: Influence of land use and chemical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Anne-Gret; Roth, Vanessa-Nina; Dittmar, Thorsten; Gleixner, Gerd; Breuer, Lutz; Houska, Tobias; Marxsen, Jürgen

    2016-11-15

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR-MS) was used to examine the molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils under different land use regimes and how the DOM composition in the catchment is reflected in adjacent streams. The study was carried out in a small area of the Schwingbach catchment, an anthropogenic-influenced landscape in central Germany. We investigated 30 different soil water samples from 4 sites and different depths (managed meadow (0-5cm, 40-50cm), deciduous forest (0-5cm), mixed-coniferous forest (0-5cm) and agricultural land (0-5cm, 40-50cm)) and 8 stream samples. 6194 molecular formulae and their magnitude-weighted parameters ((O/C)w, (H/C)w, (N/C)w, (AI-mod)w, (DBE/C)w, (DBE/O)w, (DBE-O)w, (C#)w, (MW)w) were used to describe the molecular composition of the samples. The samples can be roughly divided in three groups. Group 1 contains samples from managed meadow 40-50cm and stream water, which are characterized by high saturation compared to samples from group 2 including agricultural samples and samples from the surface meadow (0-5cm), which held more nitrogen containing and aromatic compounds. Samples from both forested sites (group 3) are characterized by higher molecular weight and O/C ratio. Environmental parameters vary between sites and among these parameters pH and nitrate significantly affect chemical composition of DOM. Results indicate that most DOM in streams is of terrestrial origin. However, 120 molecular formulae were detected only in streams and not in any of the soil samples. These compounds share molecular formulae with peptides, unsaturated aliphatics and saturated FA-CHO/FA-CHOX. Compounds only found in soil samples are much more aromatic, have more double bonds and a much lower H/C ratio but higher oxygen content, which indicates the availability of fresh plant material and less microbial processed material compared to stream samples. Copyright

  10. High-Resolution Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Enables Large Scale Molecular Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Petras

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic matter (DOM is arguably one of the most complex exometabolomes on earth, and is comprised of thousands of compounds, that together contribute more than 600 × 1015 g carbon. This reservoir is primarily the product of interactions between the upper ocean's microbial food web, yet abiotic processes that occur over millennia have also modified many of its molecules. The compounds within this reservoir play important roles in determining the rate and extent of element exchange between inorganic reservoirs and the marine biosphere, while also mediating microbe-microbe interactions. As such, there has been a widespread effort to characterize DOM using high-resolution analytical methods including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR and mass spectrometry (MS. To date, molecular information in DOM has been primarily obtained through calculated molecular formulas from exact mass. This approach has the advantage of being non-targeted, accessing the inherent complexity of DOM. Molecular structures are however still elusive and the most commonly used instruments are costly. More recently, tandem mass spectrometry has been employed to more precisely identify DOM components through comparison to library mass spectra. Here we describe a data acquisition and analysis workflow that expands the repertoire of high-resolution analytical approaches available to access the complexity of DOM molecules that are amenable to electrospray ionization (ESI MS. We couple liquid chromatographic separation with tandem MS (LC-MS/MS and a data analysis pipeline, that integrates peak extraction from extracted ion chromatograms (XIC, molecular formula calculation and molecular networking. This provides more precise structural characterization. Although only around 1% of detectable DOM compounds can be annotated through publicly available spectral libraries, community-wide participation in populating and annotating DOM datasets could rapidly increase the

  11. Use of molecular beams for the analysis of liquid and solid organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devienne, F.M.; Giroud, Josiane.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical composition of every solid can be determined by the M.B.S.A. method (Molecular Beam Surface Analysis). The method was used to analyze deposits on a filter paper, obtained by evaporation of a liquid solution, as well a liquid films with very low evaporation rate (dioctyl-azelate for instance). The S.C.I.C. method (Separation of Ions by Collision) was used to know exactly the composition of ions of fixed mass, separated by an electromagnet. The separated ions collide a target gas (helium or argon); apart of them are dissociated and the composition and structure of the primary ions can be deduced from the kinetic energy of the dissociated ions. Results obtained from such analysis of a thin film of baryum acetate on a platinum substrate are given [fr

  12. Molecular composition of organic aerosols in central Amazonia: an ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry study

    OpenAIRE

    Kourtchev, I; Godoi, RHM; Connors, S; Levine, JG; Archibald, AT; Godoi, AFL; Paralovo, SL; Barbosa, CGG; Souza, RAF; Manzi, AO; Seco, R; Sjostedt, S; Park, J-H; Guenther, A; Kim, S

    2016-01-01

    The Amazon Basin plays key role in atmospheric chemistry, biodiversity and climate change. In this study we applied nanoelectrospray (nanoESI) ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHRMS) for the analysis of the organic fraction of PM$_{2.5}$ aerosol samples collected during dry and wet seasons at a site in central Amazonia receiving background air masses, biomass burning and urban pollution. Comprehensive mass spectral data evaluation methods (e.g. Kendrick mass defect, Van Krevelen diagr...

  13. On the Effect of Confinement on the Structure and Properties of Small-Molecular Organic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Martin, Jaime; Dyson, Matthew; Reid, Obadiah G.; Li, Ruipeng; Nogales, Aurora; Smilgies, Detlef-M.; Silva, Carlos; Rumbles, Garry; Amassian, Aram; Stingelin, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Many typical organic optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, and photovoltaic cells, use an ultrathin active layer where the organic semiconductor is confined within nanoscale dimensions. However, the question of how this spatial constraint impacts the active material is rarely addressed, although it may have a drastic influence on the phase behavior and microstructure of the active layer and hence the final performance. Here, the small-molecule semiconductor p-DTS(FBTTh) is used as a model system to illustrate how sensitive this class of material can be to spatial confinement on device-relevant length scales. It is also shown that this effect can be exploited; it is demonstrated, for instance, that spatial confinement is an efficient tool to direct the crystal orientation and overall texture of p-DTS(FBTTh) structures in a controlled manner, allowing for the manipulation of properties including photoluminescence and charge transport characteristics. This insight should be widely applicable as the temperature/confinement phase diagrams established via differential scanning calorimetry and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction are used to identify specific processing routes that can be directly extrapolated to other functional organic materials, such as polymeric semiconductors, ferroelectrics or high-refractive-index polymers, to induce desired crystal textures or specific (potentially new) polymorphs.

  14. Molecular Packing and Arrangement Govern the Photo-Oxidative Stability of Organic Photovoltaic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Mateker, William R.

    2015-08-19

    For long-term performance chemically robust materials are desired for organic solar cells (OSCs). Illuminating neat films of OSC materials in air and tracking the rate of absorption loss, or photobleaching, can quickly screen a material’s photo-chemical stability. In this report, we photobleach neat films of OSC materials including polymers, solution-processed oligomers, solution-processed small molecules, and vacuum-deposited small molecules. Across the materials we test, we observe photobleaching rates that span seven orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we find that the film morphology of any particular material impacts the observed photobleaching rate, and that amorphous films photobleach faster than crystalline ones. In an extreme case, films of amorphous rubrene photobleach at a rate 2500 times faster than polycrystalline films. When we compare density to photobleaching rate, we find that stability increases with density. We also investigate the relationship between backbone planarity and chemical reactivity. The polymer PBDTTPD is more photostable than it’s more twisted and less ordered furan derivitative, PBDFTPD. Finally, we relate our work to what is known about the chemical stability of structural polymers, organic pigments, and organic light emitting diode materials. For the highest chemical stability, planar materials that form dense, crystalline film morphologies should be designed for OSCs.

  15. Molecular Packing and Arrangement Govern the Photo-Oxidative Stability of Organic Photovoltaic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Mateker, William R.; Heumueller, Thomas; Cheacharoen, Rongrong; Sachs-Quintana, I. T.; Warnan, Julien; Liu, Xiaofeng; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Beaujuge, Pierre; McGehee, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    For long-term performance chemically robust materials are desired for organic solar cells (OSCs). Illuminating neat films of OSC materials in air and tracking the rate of absorption loss, or photobleaching, can quickly screen a material’s photo-chemical stability. In this report, we photobleach neat films of OSC materials including polymers, solution-processed oligomers, solution-processed small molecules, and vacuum-deposited small molecules. Across the materials we test, we observe photobleaching rates that span seven orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we find that the film morphology of any particular material impacts the observed photobleaching rate, and that amorphous films photobleach faster than crystalline ones. In an extreme case, films of amorphous rubrene photobleach at a rate 2500 times faster than polycrystalline films. When we compare density to photobleaching rate, we find that stability increases with density. We also investigate the relationship between backbone planarity and chemical reactivity. The polymer PBDTTPD is more photostable than it’s more twisted and less ordered furan derivitative, PBDFTPD. Finally, we relate our work to what is known about the chemical stability of structural polymers, organic pigments, and organic light emitting diode materials. For the highest chemical stability, planar materials that form dense, crystalline film morphologies should be designed for OSCs.

  16. Molecular structures of five adducts assembled from p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde and organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Lanqing; Liu, Hui; Liu, Li; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Daqi; Li, Minghui; Guo, Jianzhong; Guo, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Five adducts 1-5 derived from p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde have been prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. Of the five adducts two are organic salts (1, and 2) and the other three (3-5) are cocrystals. In salts 1, and 2, the L molecules are protonated. The supramolecular architectures of the adducts 1-5 involve extensive intermolecular N-H⋯O, O-H⋯O, O-H⋯S, and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds as well as other non-covalent interactions. The role of weak and strong non-covalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. The complexes displayed 2D/3D framework structure for the synergistic effect of the various non-covalent interactions. The results presented herein tell that the strength and directionality of the N-H⋯O, O-H⋯O, and O-H⋯S hydrogen bonds between organic acids and p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde are sufficient to bring about the formation of binary cocrystals or organic salts.

  17. On the Effect of Confinement on the Structure and Properties of Small-Molecular Organic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Martín, Jaime

    2017-12-11

    Many typical organic optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, and photovoltaic cells, use an ultrathin active layer where the organic semiconductor is confined within nanoscale dimensions. However, the question of how this spatial constraint impacts the active material is rarely addressed, although it may have a drastic influence on the phase behavior and microstructure of the active layer and hence the final performance. Here, the small-molecule semiconductor p-DTS(FBTTh) is used as a model system to illustrate how sensitive this class of material can be to spatial confinement on device-relevant length scales. It is also shown that this effect can be exploited; it is demonstrated, for instance, that spatial confinement is an efficient tool to direct the crystal orientation and overall texture of p-DTS(FBTTh) structures in a controlled manner, allowing for the manipulation of properties including photoluminescence and charge transport characteristics. This insight should be widely applicable as the temperature/confinement phase diagrams established via differential scanning calorimetry and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction are used to identify specific processing routes that can be directly extrapolated to other functional organic materials, such as polymeric semiconductors, ferroelectrics or high-refractive-index polymers, to induce desired crystal textures or specific (potentially new) polymorphs.

  18. Molecular characterization of organic matter mobilized from Bangladeshi aquifer sediment: tracking carbon compositional change during microbial utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Pracht

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioavailable organic carbon in aquifer recharge waters and sediments can fuel microbial reactions with implications for groundwater quality. A previous incubation experiment showed that sedimentary organic carbon (SOC mobilized off sandy sediment collected from an arsenic-contaminated and methanogenic aquifer in Bangladesh was bioavailable; it was transformed into methane. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to molecularly characterize this mobilized SOC, reference its composition against dissolved organic carbon (DOC in surface recharge water, track compositional changes during incubation, and advance understanding of microbial processing of organic carbon in anaerobic environments. Organic carbon mobilized off aquifer sediment was more diverse, proportionately larger, more aromatic, and more oxidized than DOC in surface recharge. Mobilized SOC was predominately composed of terrestrially derived organic matter and had characteristics signifying that it evaded microbial processing within the aquifer. Approximately 50 % of identified compounds in mobilized SOC and in DOC from surface recharge water contained sulfur. During incubation, after mobilized SOC was converted into methane, new organosulfur compounds with high S-to-C ratios and a high nominal oxidation state of carbon (NOSC were detected. We reason that these detected compounds formed abiotically following microbial reduction of sulfate to sulfide, which could have occurred during incubation but was not directly measured or that they were microbially synthesized. Most notably, microbes transformed all carbon types during incubation, including those currently considered thermodynamically unviable for microbes to degrade in anaerobic conditions (i.e., those with a low NOSC. In anaerobic environments, energy yields from redox reactions are small and the amount of energy required to remove electrons from highly reduced carbon substrates during oxidation decreases the thermodynamic

  19. Molecular characterization of organic matter mobilized from Bangladeshi aquifer sediment: tracking carbon compositional change during microbial utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracht, Lara E.; Tfaily, Malak M.; Ardissono, Robert J.; Neumann, Rebecca B.

    2018-03-01

    Bioavailable organic carbon in aquifer recharge waters and sediments can fuel microbial reactions with implications for groundwater quality. A previous incubation experiment showed that sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) mobilized off sandy sediment collected from an arsenic-contaminated and methanogenic aquifer in Bangladesh was bioavailable; it was transformed into methane. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to molecularly characterize this mobilized SOC, reference its composition against dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface recharge water, track compositional changes during incubation, and advance understanding of microbial processing of organic carbon in anaerobic environments. Organic carbon mobilized off aquifer sediment was more diverse, proportionately larger, more aromatic, and more oxidized than DOC in surface recharge. Mobilized SOC was predominately composed of terrestrially derived organic matter and had characteristics signifying that it evaded microbial processing within the aquifer. Approximately 50 % of identified compounds in mobilized SOC and in DOC from surface recharge water contained sulfur. During incubation, after mobilized SOC was converted into methane, new organosulfur compounds with high S-to-C ratios and a high nominal oxidation state of carbon (NOSC) were detected. We reason that these detected compounds formed abiotically following microbial reduction of sulfate to sulfide, which could have occurred during incubation but was not directly measured or that they were microbially synthesized. Most notably, microbes transformed all carbon types during incubation, including those currently considered thermodynamically unviable for microbes to degrade in anaerobic conditions (i.e., those with a low NOSC). In anaerobic environments, energy yields from redox reactions are small and the amount of energy required to remove electrons from highly reduced carbon substrates during oxidation decreases the thermodynamic favorability of

  20. Linear and nonlinear relationships between biodegradation potential and molecular descriptors/fragments for organic pollutants and a theoretical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Jia; Qin, Weichao; Zhang, Xujia; Wen, Yang; Su, Limin; Zhao, Yuanhui

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of the biodegradability of organic pollutants is an ecologically desirable and economically feasible tool for estimating the environmental fate of chemicals. In this paper, linear and nonlinear relationships between biological oxygen demand (BOD) and molecular descriptors/fragments have been investigated for 1130 organic chemicals. Significant relationships have been observed between the simple molecular descriptors and %BOD for some homologous compounds, but not for the whole set of compounds. Electronic parameters, such as E HOMO and E LUMO , are the dominant factors affecting the biodegradability for some homologous chemicals. However, other descriptors, such as molecular weight, acid dissociation constant and polarity still have a significant impact on the biodegradation. The best global model for %BOD prediction is that developed from a chain-based fragmentation scheme. At the same time, the theoretical relationship between %BOD and molecular descriptors/fragments has been investigated, based on a first-order kinetic process. The %BOD is nonlinearly, rather than linearly, related to the descriptors. The coefficients of determination can be significantly improved by using nonlinear models for the homologous compounds and the whole data set. After analysing 1130 ready and not ready biodegradable compounds using 23 simple descriptors and various fragmentation schemes, it was revealed that biodegradation could be well predicted from a chain-based fragmentation scheme, a decision tree and a %BOD model. The models were capable of separating NRB and RB with an overall accuracy of 87.2%, 83.0% and 82.5%, respectively. The best classification model developed was a chain-based model but it used 155 fragments. The simplest model was a decision tree which only used 10 structural fragments. The effect of structures on the biodegradation has been analysed and the biodegradation pathway and mechanisms have been discussed based on activating and inactivating

  1. Towards Molecular Characterization of Mineral-Organic Matter Interface Using In Situ Liquid Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Yu, X. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Organo-Mineral-Microbe interactions in terrestrial ecosystems are of great interest. Quite a few models have been developed through extensive efforts in this field. However, predictions from current models are far from being accurate, and many debates still exist. One of the major reasons is that most experimental data generated from bulk analysis, and the information of molecular dynamics occurring at mineral-organic matter interface is rare. Such information has been difficult to obtain, due to lack of suitable in situ analysis tools. Recently, we have developed in situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory1, and it has shown promise to provide both elemental and molecular information at vacuum-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces.2 In this presentation, we demonstrate that in situ liquid SIMS can provide critical molecular information at solid substrate-live biofilm interface.3 Shewanella oneidensis is used as a model micro-organism and silicon nitride as a model mineral surface. Of particular interest, biologically relevant water clusters have been first observed in the living biofilms. Characteristic fragments of biofilm matrix components such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids can be molecularly examined. Furthermore, characteristic fatty acids (e.g., palmitic acid), quinolone signal, and riboflavin fragments were found to respond after the biofilm is treated with Cr(VI), leading to biofilm dispersal. Significant changes in water clusters and quorum sensing signals indicative of intercellular communication in the aqueous environment were observed, suggesting that they might result in fatty acid synthesis and inhibition of riboflavin production. The Cr(VI) reduction seems to follow the Mtr pathway leading to Cr(III) formation. Our approach potentially opens a new avenue for in-situ understanding of mineral-organo or mineral-microbe interfaces using in situ liquid SIMS and super resolution fluorescence

  2. Uncovering the molecular organization of unusual highly scattered 5S rDNA: The case of Chariesterus armatus (Heteroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardella, Vanessa Bellini; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2018-03-10

    One cluster of 5S rDNA per haploid genome is the most common pattern among Heteroptera. However, in Chariesterus armatus, highly scattered signals were noticed. We isolated and characterized the entire 5S rDNA unit of C. armatus aiming to a deeper knowledge of molecular organization of the 5S rDNA among Heteroptera and to understand possible causes and consequences of 5S rDNA chromosomal spreading. For a comparative analysis, we performed the same approach in Holymenia histrio with 5S rDNA restricted to one bivalent. Multiple 5S rDNA variants were observed in both species, though they were more variable in C. armatus, with some of variants corresponding to pseudogenes. These pseudogenes suggest birth-and-death mechanism, though homogenization was also observed (concerted evolution), indicating evolution through mixed model. Association between transposable elements and 5S rDNA was not observed, suggesting spreading of 5S rDNA through other mechanisms, like ectopic recombination. Scattered organization is a rare example for 5S rDNA, and such organization in C. armatus genome could have led to the high diversification of sequences favoring their pseudogenization. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Complex Formation of Selected Radionuclides with Ligands Commonly Found in Ground Water: Low Molecular Organic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bror Skytte; Jensen, H.

    1985-01-01

    A general approach to the analysis of potentiometric data on complex formation between cations and polybasic amphoteric acids is described. The method is used for the characterisation of complex formation between Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, La 3+, and Eu3+ with a α-hydroxy acids, tartaric acid and citric ac......, and with the α-amino acids, aspartic acid and L-cysteine. The cations have been chosen as typical components of reactor waste, and the acids because they are often found as products of microbial activity in pits or wherever organic material decays...

  4. Search for a molecular mechanism of action of the potentized homeopathic drugs in living organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the potentized homeopathic drugs, particularly those diluted beyond Avogadro’s limit, is still a debatable issue and various hypotheses in this regard have been advocated by many. In our studies since 1980, we found that certain ultra-highly diluted homeopathic remedies could produce ameliorative effects in various model test organisms like bacteria, fungus, mice and human beings, while the succussed alcohol (placebo) could not. These drugs could antagonize/a...

  5. Fundamental molecular design for precise control of thermoresponsiveness of organic polymers by using ternary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemori, Shogo; Kokado, Kenta; Sada, Kazuki

    2012-05-23

    The de novo design of thermosensitive polymers in solution has been achieved by using the addition of small organic molecules (or "effectors"). Hydrogen bonding as an attractive polymer-polymer or polymer-effector interaction substantially dominates the responsivity, causing facile switching between LCST-type and UCST-type phase transitions, control of the transition temperature, and further coincidence of the two transitions. Small molecules having a high affinity for the polymer induce UCST-type phase behavior, whereas those having a low affinity for the polymer showed LCST-type phase behavior.

  6. A Redox-Active Bistable Molecular Switch Mounted inside a Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qishui; Sun, Junling; Li, Peng; Hod, Idan; Moghadam, Peyman Z; Kean, Zachary S; Snurr, Randall Q; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-11-02

    We describe the incorporation of a bistable mechanically interlocked molecule (MIM) into a robust Zr-based metal-organic framework (MOF), NU-1000, by employing a post-synthetic functionalization protocol. On average, close to two bistable [2]catenanes can be incorporated per repeating unit of the hexagonal channels of NU-1000. The reversible redox-switching of the bistable [2]catenanes is retained inside the MOF, as evidenced by solid-state UV-vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. This research demonstrates that bistable MIMs are capable of exhibiting robust dynamics inside the nanopores of a MOF.

  7. Organic Semiconductor-Containing Supramolecules: Effect of Small Molecule Crystallization and Molecular Packing

    KAUST Repository

    Rancatore, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-21

    © 2016 American Chemical Society. Small molecules (SMs) with unique optical or electronic properties provide an opportunity to incorporate functionality into block copolymer (BCP)-based supramolecules. However, the assembly of supramolecules based on these highly crystalline molecules differs from their less crystalline counterparts. Here, two families of organic semiconductor SMs are investigated, where the composition of the crystalline core, the location (side- vs end-functionalization) of the alkyl solubilizing groups, and the constitution (branched vs linear) of the alkyl groups are varied. With these SMs, we present a systematic study of how the phase behavior of the SMs affects the overall assembly of these organic semiconductor-based supramolecules. The incorporation of SMs has a large effect on the interfacial curvature, the supramolecular periodicity, and the overall supramolecular morphology. The crystal packing of the SM within the supramolecule does not necessarily lead to the assembly of the comb block within the BCP microdomains, as is normally observed for alkyl-containing supramolecules. An unusual lamellar morphology with a wavy interface between the microdomains is observed due to changes in the packing structure of the small molecule within BCP microdomains. Since the supramolecular approach is modular and small molecules can be readily switched out, present studies provide useful guidance toward access supramolecular assemblies over several length scales using optically active and semiconducting small molecules.

  8. Linear solvation energy relationships: 36. Molecular properties governing solubilities of organic nonelectrolytes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamlet, M J; Doherty, R M; Abboud, J L; Abraham, M H; Taft, R W

    1986-04-01

    Molar solubilities of non-hydrogen bond donor and weak hydrogen bond donor liquid aliphatic solutes in water, or the nearly equivalent quantities, Sg/Kgw, where Kgw is the gas-water partition coefficient and Sg is the solute concentration in the solute saturated vapor (Sg = Patm/24.5) are well correlated by the equation: log Sw congruent to log (Sg/Kgw) = 0.54 - 3.32V/100 + 0.46 pi* + 5.17 (beta or beta m) (at 25 degrees C) n = 105, r = 0.9954, SD = 0.137 V is the solute molar volume (the molecular weight divided by the liquid density at 20 degrees C), and pi* and beta are the solvatochromic parameters that are measures of solute dipolarity-polarizability and hydrogen bond acceptor basicity. The equation, which applies to liquid monofunctional aliphatic solutes is used to calculate additional new beta and beta m values. The beta m values, which are intended to apply to self-associated compounds when acting as "monomer" solutes, are: methanol, 0.42; all primary alkanols, 0.45; all secondary alkanols, 0.51; and all tertiary alkanols, 0.57.

  9. Predicting the glass transition temperature and viscosity of secondary organic material using molecular composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-S. W. DeRieux

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA accounts for a large fraction of submicron particles in the atmosphere. SOA can occur in amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states depending on chemical composition, relative humidity (RH, and temperature. The phase transition between amorphous solid and semi-solid states occurs at the glass transition temperature (Tg. We have recently developed a method to estimate Tg of pure compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms (CHO compounds with molar mass less than 450 g mol−1 based on their molar mass and atomic O : C ratio. In this study, we refine and extend this method for CH and CHO compounds with molar mass up to ∼ 1100 g mol−1 using the number of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. We predict viscosity from the Tg-scaled Arrhenius plot of fragility (viscosity vs. Tg∕T as a function of the fragility parameter D. We compiled D values of organic compounds from the literature and found that D approaches a lower limit of ∼ 10 (±1.7 as the molar mass increases. We estimated the viscosity of α-pinene and isoprene SOA as a function of RH by accounting for the hygroscopic growth of SOA and applying the Gordon–Taylor mixing rule, reproducing previously published experimental measurements very well. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate impacts of Tg, D, the hygroscopicity parameter (κ, and the Gordon–Taylor constant on viscosity predictions. The viscosity of toluene SOA was predicted using the elemental composition obtained by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS, resulting in a good agreement with the measured viscosity. We also estimated the viscosity of biomass burning particles using the chemical composition measured by HRMS with two different ionization techniques: electrospray ionization (ESI and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI. Due to differences in detected organic compounds and signal intensity, predicted viscosities at low RH based on ESI and

  10. Predicting the glass transition temperature and viscosity of secondary organic material using molecular composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong DeRieux, Wing-Sy; Li, Ying; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Bertram, Allan K.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2018-05-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a large fraction of submicron particles in the atmosphere. SOA can occur in amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states depending on chemical composition, relative humidity (RH), and temperature. The phase transition between amorphous solid and semi-solid states occurs at the glass transition temperature (Tg). We have recently developed a method to estimate Tg of pure compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms (CHO compounds) with molar mass less than 450 g mol-1 based on their molar mass and atomic O : C ratio. In this study, we refine and extend this method for CH and CHO compounds with molar mass up to ˜ 1100 g mol-1 using the number of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. We predict viscosity from the Tg-scaled Arrhenius plot of fragility (viscosity vs. Tg/T) as a function of the fragility parameter D. We compiled D values of organic compounds from the literature and found that D approaches a lower limit of ˜ 10 (±1.7) as the molar mass increases. We estimated the viscosity of α-pinene and isoprene SOA as a function of RH by accounting for the hygroscopic growth of SOA and applying the Gordon-Taylor mixing rule, reproducing previously published experimental measurements very well. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate impacts of Tg, D, the hygroscopicity parameter (κ), and the Gordon-Taylor constant on viscosity predictions. The viscosity of toluene SOA was predicted using the elemental composition obtained by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), resulting in a good agreement with the measured viscosity. We also estimated the viscosity of biomass burning particles using the chemical composition measured by HRMS with two different ionization techniques: electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Due to differences in detected organic compounds and signal intensity, predicted viscosities at low RH based on ESI and APPI measurements differ by 2-5 orders

  11. Molecular Theory of Detonation Initiation: Insight from First Principles Modeling of the Decomposition Mechanisms of Organic Nitro Energetic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyshevsky, Roman V; Sharia, Onise; Kuklja, Maija M

    2016-02-19

    This review presents a concept, which assumes that thermal decomposition processes play a major role in defining the sensitivity of organic energetic materials to detonation initiation. As a science and engineering community we are still far away from having a comprehensive molecular detonation initiation theory in a widely agreed upon form. However, recent advances in experimental and theoretical methods allow for a constructive and rigorous approach to design and test the theory or at least some of its fundamental building blocks. In this review, we analyzed a set of select experimental and theoretical articles, which were augmented by our own first principles modeling and simulations, to reveal new trends in energetic materials and to refine known existing correlations between their structures, properties, and functions. Our consideration is intentionally limited to the processes of thermally stimulated chemical reactions at the earliest stage of decomposition of molecules and materials containing defects.

  12. Introduction of Molecular Building Blocks to Improve the Stability of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Efficient Mercury Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Yi; He, Wen-Wen; Li, Shun-Li; Su, Zhong-Min; Lan, Ya-Qian

    2018-05-08

    With expanding human needs, many heavy metals were mined, smelted, processed, and manufactured for commercialization, which caused serious environmental pollutions. Currently, many adsorption materials are applied in the field of adsorption of heavy metals. Among them, the principle of many mercury adsorbents is based on the interaction between mercury and sulfur. Here, a S-containing metal-organic framework NENU-400 was synthesized for effective mercury extraction. Unfortunately, the skeleton of NENU-400 collapsed easily when exposed to the mercury liquid solution. To improve the stability, a synthetic strategy installing molecular building blocks (MBBs) into the channels was used. Modified by the MBBs, a more stable nanoporous framework was synthesized, which not only exhibits a high capacity of saturation mercury uptake but also shows high selectivity and efficient recyclability.

  13. Assessing the regional impact of indonesian biomass burning emissions based on organic molecular tracers and chemical mass balance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engling, G.; He, J.; Betha, R.; Balasubramanian, R.

    2014-08-01

    Biomass burning activities commonly occur in Southeast Asia (SEA), and are particularly intense in Indonesia during the dry seasons. The effect of biomass smoke emissions on air quality in the city state of Singapore was investigated during a haze episode in October 2006. Substantially increased levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) and associated chemical species were observed during the haze period. Specifically, the enhancement in the concentration of molecular tracers for biomass combustion such as levoglucosan by as much as two orders of magnitude and the diagnostic ratios of individual organic compounds indicated that biomass burning emissions caused a regional smoke haze episode due to their long-range transport by prevailing winds. With the aid of air mass backward trajectories and chemical mass balance modeling, large-scale forest and peat fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan were identified as the sources of the smoke aerosol, exerting a significant impact on air quality in downwind areas, such as Singapore.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a helicene-based imidazolium salt and its application in organic molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Jan; Zadny, Jaroslav; Strasak, Tomas; Kubala, Martin; Sykora, Jan; Dusek, Michal; Cirkva, Vladimir; Matejka, Pavel; Krbal, Milos; Vacek, Jan

    2015-02-02

    Herein we demonstrate the synthesis of a helicene-based imidazolium salt. The salt was prepared by starting from racemic 2-methyl[6]helicene, which undergoes radical bromination to yield 2-(bromomethyl)[6]helicene. Subsequent treatment with 1-butylimidazole leads to the corresponding salt 1-butyl-3-(2-methyl[6]helicenyl)-imidazolium bromide. The prepared salt was subsequently characterized by using NMR spectroscopy and X-ray analysis, various optical spectrometric techniques, and computational chemistry tools. Finally, the imidazolium salt was immobilized onto a SiO2 substrate as a crystalline or amorphous deposit. The deposited layers were used for the development of organic molecular semiconductor devices and the construction of a fully reversible humidity sensor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Molecular Theory of Detonation Initiation: Insight from First Principles Modeling of the Decomposition Mechanisms of Organic Nitro Energetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V. Tsyshevsky

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a concept, which assumes that thermal decomposition processes play a major role in defining the sensitivity of organic energetic materials to detonation initiation. As a science and engineering community we are still far away from having a comprehensive molecular detonation initiation theory in a widely agreed upon form. However, recent advances in experimental and theoretical methods allow for a constructive and rigorous approach to design and test the theory or at least some of its fundamental building blocks. In this review, we analyzed a set of select experimental and theoretical articles, which were augmented by our own first principles modeling and simulations, to reveal new trends in energetic materials and to refine known existing correlations between their structures, properties, and functions. Our consideration is intentionally limited to the processes of thermally stimulated chemical reactions at the earliest stage of decomposition of molecules and materials containing defects.

  16. Hydrophilicity and Microsolvation of an Organic Molecule Resolved on the Sub-molecular Level by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucht, Karsten; Loose, Dirk; Ruschmeier, Maximilian; Strotkötter, Valerie; Dyker, Gerald; Morgenstern, Karina

    2018-01-26

    Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy was used to follow the formation of a solvation shell around an adsorbed functionalized azo dye from the attachment of the first water molecule to a fully solvated molecule. Specific functional groups bind initially one water molecule each, which act as anchor points for additional water molecules. Further water attachment occurs in areas close to these functional groups even when the functional groups themselves are already saturated. In contrast, water molecules surround the hydrophobic parts of the molecule only when the two-dimensional solvation shell closes around them. This study thus traces hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of an organic molecule down to a sub-molecular length scale. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Biological Parameters and Molecular Markers of Clone CL Brener - The Reference Organism of the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Zingales

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Clone CL Brener is the reference organism used in the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Project. Some biological parameters of CL Brener were determined: (a the doubling time of epimastigote forms cultured in liver infusion-tryptose (LIT medium at 28oC is 58±13 hr; (b differentiation of epimastigotes to metacyclic trypomastigotes is obtained by incubation in LIT-20% Grace´s medium; (c trypomastigotes infect mammalian cultured cells and perform the complete intracellular cycle at 33 and 37oC; (d blood forms are highly infective to mice; (e blood forms are susceptible to nifurtimox and benznidazole. The molecular typing of CL Brener has been determined: (a isoenzymatic profiles are characteristic of zymodeme ZB; (b PCR amplification of a 24Sa ribosomal RNA sequence indicates it belongs to T. cruzi lineage 1; (c schizodeme, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and DNA fingerprinting analyses were performed

  18. Absorption spectroscopy of colored dissolved organic carbon in Georgia (USA rivers: the impact of molecular size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle McELVAINE

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic carbon (DOC was collected in six rivers that transect the coastal plain of Georgia in July 1999 and February 2000. DOC concentrations ranged from 4.9 to 40.7 g m-3 and from 7.1 to 40.5 g m-3, respectively. The absorption coefficient at 440 nm was highly correlated with DOC concentration, suggesting that the optical parameter may be utilized for rapid estimation of DOC in these waters. The isolated DOC was separated into fractions of operationally defined molecular size, using an ultrafiltration technique that yielded three fractions: 50 ("large" kilodalton. The smallest fraction was the most abundant (>50% in 4 rivers in July and in all rivers in February, and considerably more abundant than in previous years. The wavelength-dependent absorption of the total DOC and its fractions showed approximately uniform shape of a curve declining exponentially with the increase of wavelength. The average slope of logarithmically transformed curves was 0.0151 and 0.0159 nm-1, for the material collected in July and February, respectively and showed a dependence on DOC molecular size. In unfractionated DOC samples, the mass-specific light absorption determined at 440 nm was on average 0.33 m2 g-1 in July, and 0.26 m2 g-1 in February. The mass-specific absorption coefficient in all fractions ranged between 0.085 and 1.347 m2 g-1 in July and between 0.085 and 1.877 m2 g-1 in February, and was positively correlated with the molecular size of the measured samples. The results of the reported study clearly suggest that the specific absorption coefficient of the yellow substance is an outcome of the relative contribution of its different size fractions.

  19. Cytomegalovirus infection management in solid organ transplant recipients across European centers in the time of molecular diagnostics: An ESGICH survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, David; San-Juan, Rafael; Manuel, Oriol; Giménez, Estela; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Hirsch, Hans H; Grossi, Paolo Antonio; Aguado, José María

    2017-12-01

    Scant information is available about how transplant centers are managing their use of quantitative molecular testing (QNAT) assays for active cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection monitoring in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. The current study was aimed at gathering information on current practices in the management of CMV infection across European centers in the era of molecular testing assays. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey study was conducted by the European Study Group of Infections in Immunocompromised Hosts (ESGICH) of the Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID). The invitation and a weekly reminder with a personal link to an Internet service provider (https://es.surveymonkey.com/) was sent to transplant physicians, transplant infectious diseases specialists, and clinical virologists working at 340 European transplant centers. Of the 1181 specialists surveyed, a total of 173 responded (14.8%): 73 transplant physicians, 57 transplant infectious diseases specialists, and 43 virologists from 173 institutions located at 23 different countries. The majority of centers used QNAT assays for active CMV infection monitoring. Most centers preferred commercially available real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays over laboratory-developed procedures for quantifying CMV DNA load in whole blood or plasma. Use of a wide variety of DNA extraction platforms and RT-PCR assays was reported. All programs used antiviral prophylaxis, preemptive therapy, or both, according to current guidelines. However, the centers used different criteria for starting preemptive antiviral treatment, for monitoring systemic CMV DNA load, and for requesting genotypic assays to detect emerging CMV-resistant variants. Significant variation in CMV infection management in SOT recipients still remains across European centers in the era of molecular testing. International multicenter studies are required to achieve commutability of CMV testing and

  20. Organic solution-processible electroluminescent molecular glasses for non-doped standard red OLEDs with electrically stable chromaticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Xiaoman; Zuo, Weiwei; Liu, Yingliang, E-mail: liuylxn@sohu.com; Zhang, Zhenru; Zeng, Cen; Xu, Shengang; Cao, Shaokui, E-mail: caoshaokui@zzu.edu.cn

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The D–A–D electroluminescent molecular glasses are synthesized. • Non-doped red electroluminescent film is fabricated by spin-coating. • Red OLED shows stable wavelength, luminous efficiency and chromaticity. • CIE1931 coordinate is in accord with standard red light in PAL system. - Abstract: Organic light-emitting molecular glasses (OEMGs) are synthesized through the introduction of nonplanar donor and branched aliphatic chain into electroluminescent emitters. The target OEMGs are characterized by {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR, IR, UV–vis and fluorescent spectra as well as elemental analysis, TG and DSC. The results indicated that the optical, electrochemical and electroluminescent properties of OEMGs are adjusted successfully by the replacement of electron-donating group. The non-doped OLED device with a standard red electroluminescent emission is achieved by spin-coating the THF solution of OEMG with a triphenylamine moiety. This non-doped red OLED device takes on an electrically stable electroluminescent performance, including the stable maximum electroluminescent wavelength of 640 nm, the stable luminous efficiency of 2.4 cd/A and the stable CIE1931 coordinate of (x, y) = (0.64, 0.35), which is basically in accord with the CIE1931 coordinate (x, y) = (0.64, 0.33) of standard red light in PAL system.

  1. Impact of molecular packing on electronic polarization in organic crystals: the case of pentacene vs TIPS-pentacene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryno, Sean M; Risko, Chad; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2014-04-30

    Polarization energy corresponds to the stabilization of the cation or anion state of an atom or molecule when going from the gas phase to the solid state. The decrease in ionization energy and increase in electron affinity in the solid state are related to the (electronic and nuclear) polarization of the surrounding atoms and molecules in the presence of a charged entity. Here, through a combination of molecular mechanics and quantum mechanics calculations, we evaluate the polarization energies in two prototypical organic semiconductors, pentacene and 6,13-bis(2-(tri-isopropylsilyl)ethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene). Comparison of the results for the two systems reveals the critical role played by the molecular packing configurations in the determination of the polarization energies and provides physical insight into the experimental data reported by Lichtenberger and co-workers (J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 580; J. Phys. Chem. C 2010, 114, 13838). Our results underline that the impact of packing configurations, well established in the case of the charge-transport properties, also extends to the polarization properties of π-conjugated materials.

  2. Ethers on Si(001): A Prime Example for the Common Ground between Surface Science and Molecular Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, Lisa; Laref, Slimane; Raupach, Marc; Tonner, Ralf

    2017-11-20

    By using computational chemistry it has been shown that the adsorption of ether molecules on Si(001) under ultrahigh vacuum conditions can be understood with classical concepts of organic chemistry. Detailed analysis of the two-step reaction mechanism-1) formation of a dative bond between the ether oxygen atom and a Lewis acidic surface atom and 2) nucleophilic attack of a nearby Lewis basic surface atom-shows that it mirrors acid-catalyzed ether cleavage in solution. The O-Si dative bond is the strongest of its kind, and the reactivity in step 2 defies the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle. Electron rearrangement during C-O bond cleavage has been visualized with a newly developed method for analyzing bonding, which shows that the mechanism of nucleophilic substitutions on semiconductor surfaces is identical to molecular S N 2 reactions. Our findings illustrate how surface science and molecular chemistry can mutually benefit from each other and unexpected insight can be gained. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Different low-molecular-mass organic acids specifically control leaching of arsenic and lead from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Christopher; Tejnecký, Václav; Borůvka, Luboš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2016-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass organic acids (LMMOA) are of key importance for mobilisation and fate of metals in soil, by functioning as ligands that increase the amount of dissolved metal in solution or by dissociation of metal binding minerals. Column leaching experiments were performed on soil polluted with As and Pb, in order to determine the specificity of LMMOA related release for individual elements, at varying organic acid concentrations. Acetic, citric and oxalic acids were applied in 12h leaching experiments over a concentration range (0.5-25 mM) to soil samples that represent organic and mineral horizons. The leaching of As followed the order: oxalic>citric>acetic acid in both soils. Arsenic leaching was attributed primarily to ligand-enhanced dissolution of mineral oxides followed by As released into solution, as shown by significant correlation between oxalic and citric acids and content of Al and Fe in leaching solutions. Results suggest that subsurface mineral soil layers are more vulnerable to As toxicity. Leaching of Pb from both soils followed the order: citric>oxalic>acetic acid. Mineral soil samples were shown to be more susceptible to leaching of Pb than samples characterised by a high content of organic matter. The leaching efficiency of citric acid was attributed to formation of stable complexes with Pb ions, which other acids are not capable of. Results obtained in the study are evidence that the extent of As and Pb leaching in contaminated surface and subsurface soil depends significantly on the types of carboxylic acid involved. The implications of the type of acid and the specific element that can be mobilised become increasingly significant where LMMOA concentrations are highest, such as in rhizosphere soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The potential of flow-through microdialysis for probing low-molecular weight organic anions in rhizosphere soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulyok, Michael; Miró, Manuel; Stingeder, Gerhard; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, flow-through microdialysis is presented as a novel analytical tool for automatic sampling of low molecular weight organic anions (LMWOA), such as oxalate and citrate, in solid samples of environmental concern. The microsampling methodology involves the implantation of dedicated capillary-type probes offering unrivalled spatial resolution (ca. 200μm) in definite soil sites. These passive samplers are aimed at monitoring local processes, such as the release of organic acids occurring in the rhizosphere environment, in nearly real-time. The influence of chemical and physical variables (composition and flow rate of the perfusion liquid, ionic strength and pH of the outer medium and presence of metal ions therein) was assessed in vitro using liquid-phase assays. On the other hand, the resistance of the external solid medium to mass transfer, and the actual applicability of in vivo calibration methods were investigated using quartz sand as an inert model soil. Microdialysers furnished with 3cm long semipermeable tubular membranes were perfused with 0.01M NaNO 3 at a flow rate of 2.0μl/min, yielding dialysis recoveries ≥45% for both assayed LMWOAs in simulated background soil electrolyte solutions, and ≥24% in the interstitial liquid of complex solid samples. Full knowledge of the fate of LMWOAs in soils was obtained through the application of stimulus-response approaches that mimic the discrete exudation pulses of roots. Highly time-resolved microdialysates were used to discern readily available species such as free carboxylic anions and LMW metal-organic acid complexes from adsorbed, precipitated or mineralised analyte species in a variety of soil samples containing variable amounts of organic matter, exchangeable cations and different levels of metal pollution.

  5. Identification and analysis of low molecular weight dissolved organic carbon in subglacial basal ice ecosystems by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, E. C.; Wadham, J. L.; Lis, G. P.; Tranter, M.; Pickard, A. E.; Stibal, M.; Dewsbury, P.; Fitzsimons, S.

    2015-08-01

    Glacial runoff is an important source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) for downstream heterotrophic activity, despite the low overall DOC concentrations. This is because of the abundance of bioavailable, low molecular weight (LMW) DOC species. However, the provenance and character of LMW-DOC is not fully understood. We investigated the abundance and composition of DOC in subglacial environments via a molecular level DOC analysis of basal ice, which forms by water/sediment freeze-on to the glacier sole. Spectrofluorometry and a novel ion chromatographic method, which has been little utilised in glacial science for LMW-DOC determinations, were employed to identify and quantify the major LMW fractions (free amino acids, carbohydrates and carboxylic acids) in basal ice from four glaciers, each with a different basal debris type. Basal ice from Joyce Glacier (Antarctica) was unique in that 98 % of the LMW-DOC was derived from the extremely diverse FAA pool, comprising 14 FAAs. LMW-DOC concentrations in basal ice were dependent on the bioavailability of the overridden organic carbon (OC), which in turn, was influenced by the type of overridden material. Mean LMW-DOC concentrations in basal ice from Russell Glacier (Greenland), Finsterwalderbreen (Svalbard) and Engabreen (Norway) were low (0-417 nM C), attributed to the relatively refractory nature of the OC in the overridden paleosols and bedrock. In contrast, mean LMW-DOC concentrations were an order of magnitude higher (4430 nM C) in basal ice from Joyce Glacier, a reflection of the high bioavailability of the overridden lacustrine material (>17 % of the sediment OC comprised extractable carbohydrates, a proxy for bioavailable OC). We find that the overridden material may act as a direct (via abiotic leaching) and indirect (via microbial cycling) source of DOC to the subglacial environment and provides a range of LMW-DOC compounds that may stimulate microbial activity in wet sediments in current subglacial

  6. RESEARCH ON THE ELECTRONIC AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYMER AND OTHER ORGANIC MOLECULAR THIN FILMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALEXEI G. VITUKHNOVSKY; IGOR I. SOBELMAN - RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

    1995-09-06

    Optical properties of highly ordered films of poly(p-phenylene) (PPP) on different substrates, thin films of mixtures of conjugated polymers, of fullerene and its composition with polymers, molecular J-aggregates of cyanine dyes in frozen matrices have been studied within the framework of the Agreement. Procedures of preparation of high-quality vacuum deposited PPP films on different substrates (ITO, Si, GaAs and etc.) were developed. Using time-correlated single photon counting technique and fluorescence spectroscopy the high quality of PPP films has been confirmed. Dependence of structure and optical properties on the conditions of preparation were investigated. The fluorescence lifetime and spectra of highly oriented vacuum deposited PPP films were studied as a function of the degree of polymerization. It was shown for the first time that the maximum fluorescence quantum yield is achieved for the chain length approximately equal to 35 monomer units. The selective excitation of luminescence of thin films of PPP was performed in the temperature range from 5 to 300 K. The total intensity of luminescence monotonically decreases with decreasing temperature. Conditions of preparation of highly cristallyne fullerene C{sub 60} films by the method of vacuum deposition were found. Composites of C{sub 60} with conjugated polymers PPV and polyacetylene (PA) were prepared. The results on fluorescence quenching, IR and resonant Raman spectroscopy are consistent with earlier reported ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer from PPV to C{sub 60} and show that the electron transfer is absent in the case of the PA-C{sub 60} composition. Strong quenching of PPV fluorescence was observed in the PPV-PA blends. The electron transfer from PPV to PA can be considered as one of the possible mechanisms of this quenching. The dynamics of photoexcitations in different types of J-aggregates of the carbocyanine dye was studied at different temperatures in frozen matrices. The optical

  7. Study of the emission of low molecular weight organic compounds of various plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrecher, R.; Stahl, K.; Slemr, J.; Hahn, J.

    1992-01-01

    Biogenic hydrocarbons are known to act as important precursors in tropospheric photochemical ozone formation. Large uncertainties exist about the composition of the mix of volatile organic compounds, emitted by various plant species and the respective emission rates. The emission and deposition behavior of wheat plants, as far as C 2 to C 9 hydrocarbons (NMHC), formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde are concerned, was studied both in the field (BIATEX experimental site, Manndorf, Bavaria) and in the laboratory. Vertical flux rates of the different compounds ranged from -4 to +4 nmol C m -2 surface area s -1 . Aldehydeemission showed a seasonal trend with high rates in spring and lower towards the end of the vegetation period. Ambient temperature appears to control only the flux of ethane, ethene, propane and propene, whereas acetaldehyde emission by wheat plants as well as by Norway spruce is controlled by light. Over a spruce canopy (BIATEX experimental site Schachtenau, Bayerischer Wald, national park, FRG) the 12 most abundant NMHC exhibited no distinct diurnal cycle, and only small differences in mixing ratios were detected between two heights (31 and 51 m) revealing that the impact of the canopy on the abundances of the non-terpenoid NMHCs present in the air above the canopy was small. Aldehyde mixing ratios above a spruce canopy, however, may significantly be influenced either by direct emission of aldehydes from spruce or by production of aldehydes during photochemical degradation of precursors. (orig.). 87 refs., 4 tabs., 25 figs [de

  8. Molecular marker study of extractable organic matter in aerosols from urban areas of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Sheng, Guoying; Chen, Xiaojing; Fu, Jiamo; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Yuping

    The solvent-extractable compounds (lipids) of aerosol samples, which were collected from a western suburb of Beijing, in the city of Guiyang and on the outskirts of Guangzhou, P.R. China, using a standard high volume air sampler, were investigated to determine the distributions of homologous compounds and biomarkers. These preliminary results show that all samples contain aliphatic hydrocarbons including n-alkanes, steranes and triterpanes, derived from both biogenic sources (vascular plant wax input) and fossil fuel contamination (coal, crude oil, etc.). Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, which are considered to be combustion products from fossil fuels such as petroleum and, especially in this case, coal burning, are also widely distributed in all samples. Oxygenated compounds (e.g. alkanoic acids, alkanones and alkanols) are present as major fractions and are derived from mainly natural sources. Furthermore, some compositional differences are observed for the organic compounds in samples from different heights above ground. This is interpreted to be due to dilution at higher levels of locally generated aerosol with upper air aerosol transported over longer distances.

  9. Mid-infrared study of the molecular structure variability of insoluble organic matter from primitive chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Quirico, E.; Beck, P.; Brissaud, O.; Dartois, E.; Pino, T.; Schmitt, B.

    2013-03-01

    Insoluble Organic Matter (IOM) found in primitive meteorites was formed in the Early Solar System and subsequently processed on the parent asteroids. The location, temporal sequence and processes of formation of this IOM are still a matter of debate. In particular, there is no consensus on the actual effect of post-accretional aqueous alteration processes on the chemical composition and structure of IOM. In the most primitive chondrites (types 1 and 2), these alterations have so far been either neglected or generically assigned to oxidation processes induced by fluid circulation. A series of IOM samples extracted from 14 chondrites with extensively documented post-accretional histories have been studied by infrared spectroscopy. Aqueous alteration shows no detectable effect on the chemical composition and structure of IOM within or across chondrite classes. Indeed, the most effective post-accretional process appears to be a high-temperature short-duration heating event and concerns essentially type 2 chondrites. In any case, post-accretional processes cannot account for all the chemical and structural variations of IOM. Chondrites from the CI, CR and CM classes accreted IOM precursors with moderately variable compositions, suggesting a chemical heterogeneity of the protosolar disk. The 3.4 μm band, and possibly its overtones and combinations in the near-infrared range, appear to be tracer(s) of the chemical class and possibly of surface heating processes triggered by impacts.

  10. Modeling of enhanced catalysis in multienzyme nanostructures: effect of molecular scaffolds, spatial organization, and concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christopher C; Chang, Chia-en A

    2015-01-13

    Colocalized multistep enzymatic reaction pathways within biological catabolic and metabolic processes occur with high yield and specificity. Spatial organization on membranes or surfaces may be associated with increased efficiency of intermediate substrate transfer. Using a new Brownian dynamics package, GeomBD, we explored the geometric features of a surface-anchored enzyme system by parallel coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations of substrate diffusion over microsecond (μs) to millisecond (ms) time scales. We focused on a recently developed glucose oxidase (GOx), horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and DNA origami-scaffold enzyme system, where the H2O2 substrate of HRP is produced by GOx. The results revealed and explained a significant advantage in catalytic enhancement by optimizing interenzyme distance and orientation in the presence of the scaffold model. The planar scaffold colocalized the enzymes and provided a diffusive barrier that enhanced substrate transfer probability, becoming more relevant with increasing interenzyme distance. The results highlight the importance of protein geometry in the proper assessment of distance and orientation dependence on the probability of substrate transfer. They shed light on strategies for engineering multienzyme complexes and further investigation of enhanced catalytic efficiency for substrate diffusion between membrane-anchoring proteins.

  11. Metal organic framework Cu9Cl2(cpa)6 as tunable molecular magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Heather S. C.; Farmer, William M.; Skinner, Samuel F.; ter Haar, Leonard W.

    2018-05-01

    Chemical modifications of the magnetic metal organic framework (MOF) Cu9X2(cpa)6.42H2O (X = F, Cl, Br; cpa = anion of 2-carboxypentonicacid) have been investigated as a means of modifying, in a tunable manner, the magnetism of this 2-D material best described as a triangles-in-triangles (TIT) or triangulated-Kagomé-latttice (TKL). Since numerous theoretical studies have already attempted to describe the enigmatic ground state of this Heisenberg lattice, tunable chemical modifications should provide an excellent opportunity to expand this class of materials for studies concerning fundamental physics of frustrated spins, and applications such as adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration (ADR) that depend on the magnetocaloric effect (MCE). The chemical modification investigated is the intercalation of d- and f-orbital ions into the voids of the framework (channels of nearly 20 Å diameter). Magnetic measurements in the temperature range 1.8 - 300 K confirm signature features of TKL magnetism in intercalated samples persist, specifically: i) large negative Weiss constant (θCW); ii) absence of a phase transition down to 1.8 K; iii) minimum in χMT; iv) low temperature χMT values increasingly divergent at low fields indicating net ferromagnetic correlations; and, v) increasing field dependence of magnetization at low temperatures suggestive of intermediate plateaus, or ferrimagnetism, not saturation.

  12. Molecular Retrofitting Adapts a Metal–Organic Framework to Extreme Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapustin, Eugene A.; Lee, Seungkyu

    2017-01-01

    Despite numerous studies on chemical and thermal stability of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), mechanical stability remains largely undeveloped. No strategy exists to control the mechanical deformation of MOFs under ultrahigh pressure, to date. We show that the mechanically unstable MOF-520 can be retrofitted by precise placement of a rigid 4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylate (BPDC) linker as a "girder" to afford a mechanically robust framework: MOF-520-BPDC. This retrofitting alters how the structure deforms under ultrahigh pressure and thus leads to a drastic enhancement of its mechanical robustness. While in the parent MOF-520 the pressure transmitting medium molecules diffuse into the pore and expand the structure from the inside upon compression, the girder in the new retrofitted MOF-520-BPDC prevents the framework from expansion by linking two adjacent secondary building units together. As a result, the modified MOF is stable under hydrostatic compression in a diamond-anvil cell up to 5.5 gigapascal. The increased mechanical stability of MOF-520-BPDC prohibits the typical amorphization observed for MOFs in this pressure range. Direct correlation between the orientation of these girders within the framework and its linear strain was estimated, providing new insights for the design of MOFs with optimized mechanical properties.

  13. The Role of FRET in Non-Fullerene Organic Solar Cells: Implications for Molecular Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Bhoj R; Younts, Robert; Carpenter, Joshua; Ade, Harald; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2018-04-19

    Non-fullerene acceptors (NFAs) have been demonstrated to be promising candidates for highly efficient organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. The tunability of absorption characteristics of NFAs can be used to make OPVs with complementary donor-acceptor absorption to cover a broad range of the solar spectrum. However, both charge transfer from donor to acceptor moieties and energy (energy) transfer from high-bandgap to low-bandgap materials are possible in such structures. Here, we show that when charge transfer and exciton transfer processes are both present, the coexistence of excitons in both domains can cause a loss mechanism. Charge separation of excitons in a low-bandgap material is hindered due to exciton population in the larger bandgap acceptor domains. Our results further show that excitons in low-bandgap material should have a relatively long lifetime compared to the transfer time of excitons from higher bandgap material in order to contribute to the charge separation. These observations provide significant guidance for design and development of new materials in OPV applications.

  14. Theory of magnetoresistance of organic molecular tunnel junctions with nonmagnetic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sha; Xie, Zuoti; Liu, Feilong; Smith, Darryl L.; Frisbie, C. Daniel; Ruden, P. Paul

    2017-04-01

    Large room-temperature magnetoresistance observed for devices composed of self-assembled monolayers of different oligophenylene thiols sandwiched between gold contacts has recently been reported [Z. Xie, S. Shi, F. Liu, D. L. Smith, P. P. Ruden, and C. D. Frisbie, ACS Nano 10, 8571 (2016), 10.1021/acsnano.6b03853]. The transport mechanism through the organic molecules was determined to be nonresonant tunneling. To explain this kind of magnetoresistance, we develop an analytical model based on the interaction of the tunneling charge carrier with an unpaired charge carrier populating a contact-molecule interface state. The Coulomb interaction between carriers causes the transmission coefficients to depend on their relative spin orientation. Singlet and triplet pairing of the tunneling and the interface carriers thus correspond to separate conduction channels with different transmission probabilities. Spin relaxation enabling transitions between the different channels, and therefore tending to maximize the tunneling current for a given applied bias, can be suppressed by relatively small magnetic fields, leading to large magnetoresistance. Our model elucidates how the Coulomb interaction gives rise to transmission probabilities that depend on spin and how an applied magnetic field can inhibit transitions between different spin configurations.

  15. Investigating the composition of organic aerosol resulting from cyclohexene ozonolysis: low molecular weight and heterogeneous reaction products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Hamilton

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of organic aerosol formed from the gas phase ozonolysis of cyclohexene has been investigated in a smog chamber experiment. Comprehensive gas chromatography with time of flight mass spectrometric detection was used to determine that dicarboxylic acids and corresponding cyclic anhydrides dominated the small gas phase reaction products found in aerosol sampled during the first hour after initial aerosol formation. Structural analysis of larger more polar molecules was performed using liquid chromatography with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry. This indicated that the majority of identified organic mass was in dimer form, built up from combinations of the most abundant small acid molecules, with frequent indication of the inclusion of adipic acid. Trimers and tetramers potentially formed via similar acid combinations were also observed in lower abundances. Tandem mass spectral data indicated dimers with either acid anhydride or ester functionalities as the linkage between monomers. High-resolution mass spectrometry identified the molecular formulae of the most abundant dimer species to be C10H16O6, C11H18O6, C10H14O8 and C11H16O8 and could be used in some cases to reduce uncertainty in exact chemical structure determination by tandem MS.

  16. Biochar immobilizes soil-borne arsenic but not cationic metals in the presence of low-molecular-weight organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alozie, Nneka; Heaney, Natalie; Lin, Chuxia

    2018-07-15

    A batch experiment was conducted to examine the effects of biochar on the behaviour of soil-borne arsenic and metals that were mobilized by three low-molecular-weight organic acids. In the presence of citric acid, oxalic acid and malic acid at a molar concentration of 0.01M, the surface of biochar was protonated, which disfavours adsorption of the cationic metals released from the soil by organic acid-driven mobilization. In contrast, the oxyanionic As species were re-immobilized by the protonated biochar effectively. Biochar could also immobilize oxyanionic Cr species but not cationic Cr species. The addition of biochar increased the level of metals in the solution due to the release of the biochar-borne metals under attack by LMWOAs via cation exchange. Biochar could also have the potential to enhance reductive dissolution of iron and manganese oxides in the soil, leading to enhanced release of trace elements bound to these oxides. The findings obtained from this study have implications for evaluating the role of biochar in immobilizing trace elements in rhizosphere. Adsorption of cationic heavy metals on biochar in the presence of LMWOAs is unlikely to be a mechanism responsible for the impeded uptake of heavy metals by plants growing in heavy metal-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of EDTA and low molecular weight organic acids on soil solution properties of a heavy metal polluted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L H; Luo, Y M; Christie, P; Wong, M H

    2003-02-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of EDTA and low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) on the pH, total organic carbon (TOC) and heavy metals in the soil solution in the rhizosphere of Brassica juncea grown in a paddy soil contaminated with Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd. The results show that EDTA and LMWOA have no effect on the soil solution pH. EDTA addition significantly increased the TOC concentrations in the soil solution. The TOC concentrations in treatments with EDTA were significantly higher than those in treatments with LMWOA. Adding 3 mmol kg(-1) EDTA to the soil markedly increased the total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd in the soil solution. Compared to EDTA, LMWOA had a very small effect on the metal concentrations. Total concentrations in the soil solution followed the sequence: EDTA > citric acid (CA) approximately oxalic acid (OA) approximately malic acid (MA) for Cu and Pb; EDTA > MA > CA approximately OA for Zn; and EDTA > MA > CA > OA for Cd. The labile concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd showed similar trends to the total concentrations.

  18. Organic layers at metal/electrolyte interfaces: molecular structure and reactivity of viologen monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, Stephan; Pham, Duc T; Huemann, Sascha; Gentz, Knud; Zoerlein, Caroline; Wandelt, Klaus; Broekmann, Peter; Hunger, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of viologens (1,1'-disubstituted-4,4'-bipyridinium molecules) on a chloride-modified copper electrode has been studied using a combination of cyclic voltammetry (CV), in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and ex-situ photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Two prototypes of viologens could be identified with respect to their redox behavior upon adsorption, namely those which retain (non-reactive adsorption) and those which change their redox state (reactive adsorption) upon interaction with the chloride-modified copper surface at given potential. The first class of viologens represented by 1,1'-dibenzyl-4,4'-bipyridinium molecules (dibenzyl-viologens, abbreviated as DBV) can be adsorbed and stabilized on this electrode surface in their di-cationic state at potentials more positive than the reduction potential of the solution species. XPS N1s core level shifts verify that the adsorbed DBV molecules on the electrode are in their oxidized di-cationic state. Electrostatic attraction between the partially solvated viologen di-cations and the anionic chloride layer is discussed as the main driving force for the DBV stabilization on the electrode surface. Analysis of the N1s and O1s core level shifts points to a non-reactive DBV adsorption leaving the DBV ads 2+ solvation shell partly intact. The laterally ordered DBV ads 2+ monolayer turns out to be hydrophilic with at least four water molecules per viologen present within this cationic organic film. The analysis of the Cl2p core level reveals that no further chloride species are present at the surface besides those which are specifically adsorbed, i.e. which are in direct contact with the metallic copper surface underneath the organic layer. The reduction of these adsorbed DBV ads 2+ surface species takes place only in the same potential regime where the solvated DBV aq 2+ bulk solution species react and is accompanied by a pronounced structural change from the di-cationic 'cavitand'-structure to a

  19. The molecular distribution of fine particulate organic matter emitted from Western-style fast food cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunliang; Hu, Min; Slanina, Sjaak; Zhang, Yuanhang

    The emissions from food cooking could be a significant contributor to atmospheric particulate organic matter (POM) and its chemical composition would vary with different cooking styles. In this study, the chemical composition of POM emitted from Western-style fast food cooking was investigated. A total of six PM 2.5 samples was collected from a commercial restaurant and determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). It is found that the total amount of quantified compounds of per mg POM in Western-style fast food cooking is much higher than that in Chinese cooking. The predominant homologue is fatty acids, accounting for 78% of total quantified POM, with the predominant one being palmitic acid. Dicarboxylic acids display the second highest concentration in the quantified homologues with hexanedioic acid being predominant, followed by nonanedioic acid. Cmax of n-alkanes occurs at C25, but they still appear relative higher concentrations at C29 and C31. In addition, both levoglucosan and cholesterol are quantified. The relationship of concentrations of unsaturated fatty acids (C16 and C18) with a double bond at C9 position and C9 acids indicates the reduction of the unsaturated fatty acids in the emissions could form the C9 acids. Moreover, the nonlinear fit indicates that other C9 species or other compounds are also produced, except for the C9 acids. The potential candidates of tracers for the emissions from Western-fast food cooking could be: tetradecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, octadecanoic acid, 9-octadecenoic acid, nonanal, lactones, levoglucosan, hexanedioic acid and nonanedioic acid.

  20. Tracking changes in the optical properties and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter during drinking water production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavonen, E E; Kothawala, D N; Tranvik, L J; Gonsior, M; Schmitt-Kopplin, P; Köhler, S J

    2015-11-15

    Absorbance, 3D fluorescence and ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR-MS) were used to explain patterns in the removal of chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (CDOM and FDOM) at the molecular level during drinking water production at four large drinking water treatment plants in Sweden. When dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal was low, shifts in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition could not be detected with commonly used DOC-normalized parameters (e.g. specific UV254 absorbance - SUVA), but was clearly observed by using differential absorbance and fluorescence or ESI-FT-ICR-MS. In addition, we took a novel approach by identifying how optical parameters were correlated to the elemental composition of DOM by using rank correlation to connect optical properties to chemical formulas assigned to mass peaks from FT-ICR-MS analyses. Coagulation treatment selectively removed FDOM at longer emission wavelengths (450-600 nm), which significantly correlated with chemical formulas containing oxidized carbon (average carbon oxidation state ≥ 0), low hydrogen to carbon ratios (H/C: average ± SD = 0.83 ± 0.13), and abundant oxygen-containing functional groups (O/C = 0.62 ± 0.10). Slow sand filtration was less efficient in removing DOM, yet selectively targeted FDOM at shorter emission wavelengths (between 300 and 450 nm), which commonly represents algal rather than terrestrial sources. This shorter wavelength FDOM correlated with chemical formulas containing reduced carbon (average carbon oxidation state ≤ 0), with relatively few carbon-carbon double bonds (H/C = 1.32 ± 0.16) and less oxygen per carbon (O/C = 0.43 ± 0.10) than those removed during coagulation. By coupling optical approaches with FT-ICR-MS to characterize DOM, we were for the first time able to confirm the molecular composition of absorbing and fluorescing DOM selectively targeted during drinking

  1. Characterization of sorbent properties of soil organic matter and carbonaceous geosorbents using n-alkanes and cycloalkanes as molecular probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoshi; Grathwohl, Peter; Haderlein, Stefan B; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2009-01-15

    Nonspecific interactions and modes (i.e., adsorption vs absorption) of sorption by noncondensed, amorphous organic phases (here termed organic matter; OM) in soils and by rigid, aromatic, and condensed phases (termed carbonaceous geosorbents; CGs) were investigated using n-alkanes and cycloalkanes as molecular probes. Sorption isotherms of n- and cyclooctane from water for seven CGs (charcoal, lignite coke, activated carbon, graphite, partially oxidized graphite, diesel soot, bituminous coal), four sorbents with a predominance of OM (lignite, peat, two sapric soils), and two soils containing OM and high amounts of CGs were measured in batch systems. The peat and the sapric soils showed extensively linear sorption, while the CGs exhibited highly nonlinear (Freundlich exponents 0.2-0.7) and strong (Koc values being up to 10(5) times those for the OM-rich materials at low concentrations) sorption for the alkanes studied, showing that enhanced sorption by CGs can occur to completely apolar sorbates that do not undergo any specific interaction. Sorption by CGs was generally stronger and more nonlinear for n-octane than for cyclooctane, which suggests a strong dependence of sorption on the 3-D structure of sorbate molecules. The n-octane-to-cyclooctane sorption coefficient ratios (Kn/Kc) for adsorption to CGs were > or = 1, being distinctly different from those for absorption to the OM-rich materials (Kn/Kc soils determined by quantitative petrography analysis suggest, however, that CGs occurring in soils may be far less effective sorbents than the reference CGs used in the sorption experiments at least for nonspecifically interacting sorbates, probably because of competitive sorption and/or pore blocking by natural OM. The presented approaches and results offer a basis for interpreting sorption data for other organic compounds, as nonspecific interactions and sorption modes are relevant for any compound.

  2. LMWOA (low molecular weight organic acid) exudation by salt marsh plants: Natural variation and response to Cu contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, Ana P.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Bordalo, Adriano A.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2010-06-01

    This work aimed to evaluate, in vitro, the capability of roots of two salt marsh plants to release low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) and to ascertain whether Cu contamination would stimulate or not organic acids exudation. The sea rush Juncus maritimus and the sea-club rush Scirpus maritimus, both from the lower Douro river estuary (NW Portugal), were used. Plants were collected seasonally, four times a year in 2004, during low tide. After sampling, plant roots were washed for removal of adherent particles and immersed for 2 h in a solution that matched salinity (3) and pH (7.5) of the pore water from the same location to obtain plant exudates. In one of the seasons, similar experiments were carried out but spiking the solution with different amounts of Cu in order to embrace the range between 0 and 1600 nM. In the final solutions as well as in sediment pore water LMWOAs were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Plants were able to release, in a short period of time, relatively high amounts of LMWOAs (oxalate, citrate, malate, malonate, and succinate). In the sediment pore water oxalate, succinate and acetate were also detected. Therefore, plant roots probably contributed to the presence of some of these organic compounds in pore water. Exudation differed between the plant species and also showed some seasonally variation, particularly for S. maritimus. The release of oxalate by J. maritimus increased with Cu increase in the media. However, exudation of the other LMWOAs did not seem to be stimulated by Cu contamination in the media. This fact is compatible with the existence of alternative internal mechanisms for Cu detoxification, as denoted by the fact that in media contaminated with Cu both plant species accumulated relatively high amounts (29-83%) of the initially dissolved Cu. This study expands our knowledge on the contribution of globally dominant salt marsh plants to the release of LMWOAs into the environment.

  3. Molecular organization and chromosomal localization of 5S rDNA in Amazonian Engystomops (Anura, Leiuperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Débora Silva; Rivera, Miryan; Lourenço, Luciana Bolsoni

    2012-03-20

    For anurans, knowledge of 5S rDNA is scarce. For Engystomops species, chromosomal homeologies are difficult to recognize due to the high level of inter- and intraspecific cytogenetic variation. In an attempt to better compare the karyotypes of the Amazonian species Engystomops freibergi and Engystomops petersi, and to extend the knowledge of 5S rDNA organization in anurans, the 5S rDNA sequences of Amazonian Engystomops species were isolated, characterized, and mapped. Two types of 5S rDNA, which were readily differentiated by their NTS (non-transcribed spacer) sizes and compositions, were isolated from specimens of E. freibergi from Brazil and E. petersi from two Ecuadorian localities (Puyo and Yasuní). In the E. freibergi karyotypes, the entire type I 5S rDNA repeating unit hybridized to the pericentromeric region of 3p, whereas the entire type II 5S rDNA repeating unit mapped to the distal region of 6q, suggesting a differential localization of these sequences. The type I NTS probe clearly detected the 3p pericentromeric region in the karyotypes of E. freibergi and E. petersi from Puyo and the 5p pericentromeric region in the karyotype of E. petersi from Yasuní, but no distal or interstitial signals were observed. Interestingly, this probe also detected many centromeric regions in the three karyotypes, suggesting the presence of a satellite DNA family derived from 5S rDNA. The type II NTS probe detected only distal 6q regions in the three karyotypes, corroborating the differential distribution of the two types of 5S rDNA. Because the 5S rDNA types found in Engystomops are related to those of Physalaemus with respect to their nucleotide sequences and chromosomal locations, their origin likely preceded the evolutionary divergence of these genera. In addition, our data indicated homeology between Chromosome 5 in E. petersi from Yasuní and Chromosomes 3 in E. freibergi and E. petersi from Puyo. In addition, the chromosomal location of the type II 5S r

  4. Molecular distribution and degradation status of combined aldoses in sinking particulate organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulos, C.; Sempéré, R.

    2003-04-01

    Polar Front and Sub-Antarctic Zones indicated that ribose seems to be a labile sugar, rapidly degraded especially in Polar Front Zone whereas it was below the detection limit in Sub-Antarctic zone where a high bacterial activity was recorded in surface waters. Our results also showed that the relative abundance of deoxysugars (fucose + rhamnose) increased overtime in Sub-Antarctic Zone (deoxyinitial = 18%, deoxyfinal = 23%) and Polar Front Zone (deoxyinitial = 6%, deoxyfinal = 21%) indicating that these sugars are preserved during organic matter decomposition.

  5. THE MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF EPSTEINBARR VIRUS PERSISTENCE IN THE HUMAN ORGANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volyanskiy A.Yu.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review describes advances in molecular aspects of EBV infection and disease. We discuss the spectrum of clinical illness due to EBV persistent infection. The main characteristic of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is that initial infection results in lifelong persistence. EBV infects nearly all humans by the time they reach adulthood. Healthy humans have approximately 1 to 50 infected cells per million leukocytes. EBV is one of the eight known human herpesviruses. EBV virions have a doublestranded linear DNA and 100 genes had been described in virus genome. Initial infection is thought to occur in the oral compartment. The host cells of EBV are mainly lymphocytes and epithelial cells. EBV attaches to B cells via binding of the viral gp350 protein to CD21 receptor. The consequence of EBV infection is cells proliferation and differentiation into memory B lymphocyte in the germinal center. Infected memory B cells are released into the peripheral circulation. EBV persists mostly in the memory B cell. Latency is the state of persistent viral infection without active viral production. In latently infected B cells EBV virus exist as episomes. During the latent phase episomal replication occurs via host DNA polymerase. Genes of the nuclear antigens (EBNA and latent membrane proteins (LMP are transcribed during latency. These include EBNA1, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3B, EBNA3C, EBNA leader protein (EBNALP, LMP1 and LMP2 genes. All nuclear antigens are transcription transactivators which bind to cis-regulatory DNA elements of cell or virus genomes directly or in complex with other proteins. LMP2A and LMP1 can function to coordinately mimic B-cell receptor and CD40 coreceptor signaling in latently infected B cells. LMP proteins activate cell signaling systems and as the consequence different gene expression programs. Characterization of gene expression patterns in different cell lines and pathologic conditions has revealed that there are at least three different

  6. Apportioning sources of organic matter in streambed sediments: An integrated molecular and compound-specific stable isotope approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Richard J., E-mail: Richard.J.Cooper@uea.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Hiscock, Kevin M.; Disdle, Paul [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Krueger, Tobias [IRI THESys, Humboldt University, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Rawlins, Barry G. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    We present a novel application for quantitatively apportioning sources of organic matter in streambed sediments via a coupled molecular and compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of long-chain leaf wax n-alkane biomarkers using a Bayesian mixing model. Leaf wax extracts of 13 plant species were collected from across two environments (aquatic and terrestrial) and four plant functional types (trees, herbaceous perennials, and C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} graminoids) from the agricultural River Wensum catchment, UK. Seven isotopic (δ{sup 13}C{sub 27}, δ{sup 13}C{sub 29}, δ{sup 13}C{sub 31}, δ{sup 13}C{sub 27–31}, δ{sup 2}H{sub 27}, δ{sup 2}H{sub 29}, and δ{sup 2}H{sub 27–29}) and two n-alkane ratio (average chain length (ACL), carbon preference index (CPI)) fingerprints were derived, which successfully differentiated 93% of individual plant specimens by plant functional type. The δ{sup 2}H values were the strongest discriminators of plants originating from different functional groups, with trees (δ{sup 2}H{sub 27–29} = − 208‰ to − 164‰) and C{sub 3} graminoids (δ{sup 2}H{sub 27–29} = − 259‰ to − 221‰) providing the largest contrasts. The δ{sup 13}C values provided strong discrimination between C{sub 3} (δ{sup 13}C{sub 27–31} = − 37.5‰ to − 33.8‰) and C{sub 4} (δ{sup 13}C{sub 27–31} = − 23.5‰ to − 23.1‰) plants, but neither δ{sup 13}C nor δ{sup 2}H values could uniquely differentiate aquatic and terrestrial species, emphasizing a stronger plant physiological/biochemical rather than environmental control over isotopic differences. ACL and CPI complemented isotopic discrimination, with significantly longer chain lengths recorded for trees and terrestrial plants compared with herbaceous perennials and aquatic species, respectively. Application of a comprehensive Bayesian mixing model for 18 streambed sediments collected between September 2013 and March 2014 revealed considerable temporal variability in the

  7. Characterization of the Organic Component of Low-Molecular-Weight Chromium-Binding Substance and Its Binding of Chromium123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Watson, Heather M.; Gao, Junjie; Sinha, Sarmistha Halder; Cassady, Carolyn J.; Vincent, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Chromium was proposed to be an essential element over 50 y ago and was shown to have therapeutic potential in treating the symptoms of type 2 diabetes; however, its mechanism of action at a molecular level is unknown. One chromium-binding biomolecule, low-molecular weight chromium-binding substance (LMWCr or chromodulin), has been found to be biologically active in in vitro assays and proposed as a potential candidate for the in vivo biologically active form of chromium. Characterization of the organic component of LMWCr has proven difficult. Treating bovine LMWCr with trifluoroacetic acid followed by purification on a graphite powder micro-column generates a heptapeptide fragment of LMWCr. The peptide sequence of the fragment was analyzed by MS and tandem MS (MS/MS and MS/MS/MS) using collision-induced dissociation and post-source decay. Two candidate sequences, pEEEEGDD and pEEEGEDD (where pE is pyroglutamate), were identified from the MS/MS experiments; additional tandem MS suggests the sequence is pEEEEGDD. The N-terminal glutamate residues explain the inability to sequence LMWCr by the Edman method. Langmuir isotherms and Hill plots were used to analyze the binding constants of chromic ions to synthetic peptides similar in composition to apoLMWCr. The sequence pEEEEGDD was found to bind 4 chromic ions per peptide with nearly identical cooperativity and binding constants to those of apoLMWCr. This work should lead to further studies elucidating or eliminating a potential role for LMWCr in treating the symptoms of type 2 diabetes and other conditions resulting from improper carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. PMID:21593351

  8. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S; Soeller, Christian

    2014-10-06

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term variation in above and belowground plant inputs alters soil organic matter biogeochemistry at the molecular-level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, M. J.; Pisani, O.; Lin, L.; Lun, O.; Simpson, A.; Lajtha, K.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The long-term fate of soil carbon reserves with global environmental change remains uncertain. Shifts in moisture, altered nutrient cycles, species composition, or rising temperatures may alter the proportions of above and belowground biomass entering soil. However, it is unclear how long-term changes in plant inputs may alter the composition of soil organic matter (SOM) and soil carbon storage. Advanced molecular techniques were used to assess SOM composition in mineral soil horizons (0-10 cm) after 20 years of Detrital Input and Removal Treatment (DIRT) at the Harvard Forest. SOM biomarkers (solvent extraction, base hydrolysis and cupric (II) oxide oxidation) and both solid-state and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to identify changes in SOM composition and stage of degradation. Microbial activity and community composition were assessed using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Doubling aboveground litter inputs decreased soil carbon content, increased the degradation of labile SOM and enhanced the sequestration of aliphatic compounds in soil. The exclusion of belowground inputs (No roots and No inputs) resulted in a decrease in root-derived components and enhanced the degradation of leaf-derived aliphatic structures (cutin). Cutin-derived SOM has been hypothesized to be recalcitrant but our results show that even this complex biopolymer is susceptible to degradation when inputs entering soil are altered. The PLFA data indicate that changes in soil microbial community structure favored the accelerated processing of specific SOM components with littler manipulation. These results collectively reveal that the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs alters the molecular-level composition of SOM and in some cases, enhances the degradation of recalcitrant SOM. Our study also suggests that increased litterfall is unlikely to enhance soil carbon storage over the long-term in temperate forests.

  10. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Molecular Characterization of Aqueous Photochemistry Products of Common Types of Secondary Organic Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romonosky, Dian E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2015-03-19

    A significant fraction of atmospheric organic compounds is predominantly found in condensed phases, such as aerosol particles and cloud droplets. Many of these compounds are photolabile and can degrade through direct photolysis or indirect photooxidation processes on time scales that are comparable to the typical lifetimes of aqueous droplets (hours) and particles (days). This paper presents a systematic investigation of the molecular level composition and the extent of aqueous photochemical processing in different types of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors including α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d- limonene, α-humulene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, and guaiacol, oxidized by ozone (to simulate a remote atmosphere) or by OH in the presence of NOx (to simulate an urban atmosphere). Chamber- and flow tube-generated SOA samples were collected, extracted in a methanol/water solution, and photolyzed for 1 h under identical irradiation conditions. In these experiments, the irradiation was equivalent to about 3-8 h of exposure to the sun in its zenith. The molecular level composition of the dissolved SOA was probed before and after photolysis with direct-infusion electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HR-MS). The mass spectra of unphotolyzed SOA generated by ozone oxidation of monoterpenes showed qualitatively similar features, and contained largely overlapping subsets of identified compounds. The mass spectra of OH/NOx generated SOA had more unique visual appearance, and indicated a lower extent of products overlap. Furthermore, the fraction of nitrogen containing species (organonitrates and nitroaromatics) was highly sensitive to the SOA precursor. These observations suggest that attribution of high-resolution mass spectra in field SOA samples to specific SOA precursors should be more straightforward under OH/NOx oxidation conditions compared to the ozone driven oxidation. Comparison of the SOA constituents

  11. Organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  12. Organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  13. Physicochemical properties and ecotoxicological effects of yttrium oxide nanoparticles in aquatic media: Role of low molecular weight natural organic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan; Wang, Zhuang; Wang, Se; Fang, Hao; Chen, Mindong; Xu, Defu; Tang, Lili; Wang, Degao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) interact with natural organic acids is important to ecological risk assessment of ENPs, but this interaction remains poorly studied. Here, we investigate the dispersion stability, ion release, and toxicity of yttrium oxide nanoparticles (nY_2O_3) suspensions after exposure to two low molecular weight natural organic acids (LOAs), namely benzoic acid and gallic acid. We find that in the presence of LOAs the nY_2O_3 suspensions become more stable with surface zeta potential more positive or negative, accompanied by small agglomerated size. LOA interaction with nY_2O_3 is shown to promote the release of dissolved yttrium from the nanoparticles, depending on the concentrations of LOAs. Toxic effects of the nY_2O_3 suspensions incubated with LOAs on Scenedesmus obliquus as a function of their mixture levels show three types of signs: stimulation, inhibition, and alleviation. The mechanism of the effects of LOAs on the nY_2O_3 toxicity may be mainly associated with the degree of agglomeration, particle-induced oxidative stress, and dissolved yttrium. Our results stressed the importance of LOA impacts on the fate and toxicity of ENPs in the aquatic environment. - Highlights: • LOAs significantly increased aqueous stability of nY2O3 in a dose-dependent manner. • The presence of LOAs promoted dissolution of nY2O3 in a dose-dependent manner. • Toxicity of nY2O3 with LOAs to Scenedesmus obliquus varied with mixture levels. • Stimulation, inhibition, and alleviation effects of nY2O3 with LOAs were observed. • Mechanism may be driven by agglomeration, oxidative stress, and dissolved yttrium. - LOAs elevate the dispersion stability of nano-Y_2O_3, promote the release of dissolved yttrium, and alter the algal toxicity of nano-Y_2O_3.

  14. Molecular and compound-specific hydrogen isotope analyses of insoluble organic matter from different carbonaceous chondrite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Huang, Yongsong; Alexander, Conel M. O.'D.; Fogel, Marilyn; Cody, George

    2005-07-01

    We have conducted the first systematic analyses of molecular distribution and δD values of individual compounds in pyrolysates of insoluble organic matter (IOM) from different carbonaceous chondrite groups, using flash pyrolysis coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compound-specific D/H analysis. IOM samples from six meteorites of different classifications, Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042 (CR2), Orgueil (CI1), Allan Hills (ALH) 83100 (CM1/2), Murchison (CM2), ALH 85013 (CM2), and Tagish Lake (C2) were isolated and studied. Except for the pyrolysate of Tagish Lake IOM, pyrolysates of all five meteorite IOM samples were dominated by an extensive series of aromatic (C 1 to C 7 alkyl-substituted benzenes, C 0 to C 2 alkyl-substituted naphthalenes), with aliphatic (straight chain and branched C 10 to C 15 alkanes) hydrocarbons and several S- and O- containing compounds (C 1 to C 2 alkylthiophenes, benzothiophene, benzaldehyde) being also present. The strong similarity in the pyrolysates of different carbonaceous chondrites suggests certain common characteristics in the formation mechanisms of IOM from different meteorites. The Tagish Lake IOM sample is unique in that its pyrolysate lacks most of the alkyl-substituted aromatic hydrocarbons detected in other meteorite IOM samples, suggesting distinctively different formation processes. Both bulk δD values of meteorite IOMs and weighted-average δD values of individual compounds in pyrolysates show a decreasing trend: CR2 > CI1 > CM2 > C2 (Tagish Lake), with the EET 92042 (CR2) IOM having the highest δD values (˜2000‰ higher than other samples). We attribute the high D contents in the IOM to primitive interstellar organic sources.

  15. Degradation of natural organic matter by UV/chlorine oxidation: Molecular decomposition, formation of oxidation byproducts and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Long; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Du, Ye; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2017-11-01

    The degradation of natural organic matters (NOMs) by the combination of UV and chlorine (UV/chlorine) was investigated in this study. UV/chlorine oxidation can effectively degrade NOMs, with the degradation of chromophores (∼80%) and fluorophores (76.4-80.8%) being more efficient than that of DOC (15.1-18.6%). This effect was attributed to the chromophores and fluorophores (double bonds, aromatic groups and phenolic groups) being preferentially degraded by UV/chlorine oxidation, particularly reactive groups with high electron donating capacity. Radical species •OH and •Cl were generated during UV/chlorine oxidation, with the contribution of •OH 1.4 times as high as that of •Cl. The degradation kinetics of different molecular weight (MW) fractions suggests that UV/chlorine oxidation degrades high MW fractions into low MW fractions, with the degradation rates of high MW fractions (>3000 Da) 4.5 times of those of medium MW fractions (1000-3000 Da). In comparison with chlorination alone, UV/chlorine oxidation did not increase the formation (30 min) and formation potential (24 h) of trihalomethanes, but instead promoted the formation and formation potential of haloacetic acids and chloral hydrate. Adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) formed from UV/chlorine oxidation of NOM were 0.8 times higher than those formed from chlorination. Cytotoxicity studies indicated that the cytotoxicity of NOM increased after both chlorination and UV/chlorine oxidation, which may be due to the formation of AOX. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Stabilization by hydrophobic protection as a molecular mechanism for organic carbon sequestration in maize-amended rice paddy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X Y; Spaccini, R; Pan, G; Piccolo, A

    2013-08-01

    The hydrophobic components of soil organic matter (SOM) are reckoned to play an important role in the stabilization of soil organic carbon (SOC). The contribution of hydrophobic substances to SOC sequestration was evaluated in four different paddy soils in the South of China, following a 6-month incubation experiment with maize straw amendments. Soil samples included: a well developed paddy soil (TP) derived from clayey lacustrine deposits in the Tai Lake plain of Jiangsu; an acid clayey paddy soil (RP) derived from red earth in the rolling red soil area of Jiangxi; a weakly developed neutral paddy soil (PP) formed on Jurassic purple shale from Chongq; and a calcic Fluvisol (MS) derived from riverine sediments from a wetland along the Yangtze valley of Anhui, China. The SOC molecular composition after 30 and 180 days of incubation, was determined by off-line thermochemolysis followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Lignin, lipids and carbohydrates were the predominant thermochemolysis products released from the treated soils. A selective preservation of hydrophobic OM, including lignin and lipids, was shown in maize amended soils with prolonged incubation. The decomposition of lignin and lipids was significantly slower in the TP and RP soils characterized by a larger content of extractable iron oxyhydrates (Fed) and lower pH. The overall increase in hydrophobic substances in maize incubated samples was correlated, positively, with total content of clay and Fed, and, negatively, with soil pH. Moreover, yields of both lignin and lipid components showed a significant relationship with SOC increase after incubation. These findings showed that the larger the lipid and lignin content of SOM, the greater was the stability of SOC, thereby suggesting that OM hydrophobic components may have an essential role in controlling the processes of OC sequestration in paddy soils of South China. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pronounced Effects of a Triazine Core on Photovoltaic Performance-Efficient Organic Solar Cells Enabled by a PDI Trimer-Based Small Molecular Acceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuwei; Xu, Xiaopeng; Yan, He; Wu, Wenlin; Li, Zuojia; Peng, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    A novel-small molecular acceptor with electron-deficient 1,3,5-triazine as the core and perylene diimides as the arms is developed as the acceptor material for efficient bulk heterojunction organic solar cells with an efficiency of 9.15%. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Efficient Construction of Free Energy Profiles of Breathing Metal-Organic Frameworks Using Advanced Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuynck, Ruben; Rogge, Sven M J; Vanduyfhuys, Louis; Wieme, Jelle; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2017-12-12

    In order to reliably predict and understand the breathing behavior of highly flexible metal-organic frameworks from thermodynamic considerations, an accurate estimation of the free energy difference between their different metastable states is a prerequisite. Herein, a variety of free energy estimation methods are thoroughly tested for their ability to construct the free energy profile as a function of the unit cell volume of MIL-53(Al). The methods comprise free energy perturbation, thermodynamic integration, umbrella sampling, metadynamics, and variationally enhanced sampling. A series of molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in the frame of each of the five methods to describe structural transformations in flexible materials with the volume as the collective variable, which offers a unique opportunity to assess their computational efficiency. Subsequently, the most efficient method, umbrella sampling, is used to construct an accurate free energy profile at different temperatures for MIL-53(Al) from first principles at the PBE+D3(BJ) level of theory. This study yields insight into the importance of the different aspects such as entropy contributions and anharmonic contributions on the resulting free energy profile. As such, this thorough study provides unparalleled insight in the thermodynamics of the large structural deformations of flexible materials.

  19. Efficient Construction of Free Energy Profiles of Breathing Metal–Organic Frameworks Using Advanced Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In order to reliably predict and understand the breathing behavior of highly flexible metal–organic frameworks from thermodynamic considerations, an accurate estimation of the free energy difference between their different metastable states is a prerequisite. Herein, a variety of free energy estimation methods are thoroughly tested for their ability to construct the free energy profile as a function of the unit cell volume of MIL-53(Al). The methods comprise free energy perturbation, thermodynamic integration, umbrella sampling, metadynamics, and variationally enhanced sampling. A series of molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in the frame of each of the five methods to describe structural transformations in flexible materials with the volume as the collective variable, which offers a unique opportunity to assess their computational efficiency. Subsequently, the most efficient method, umbrella sampling, is used to construct an accurate free energy profile at different temperatures for MIL-53(Al) from first principles at the PBE+D3(BJ) level of theory. This study yields insight into the importance of the different aspects such as entropy contributions and anharmonic contributions on the resulting free energy profile. As such, this thorough study provides unparalleled insight in the thermodynamics of the large structural deformations of flexible materials. PMID:29131647

  20. Molecular characterization of brown carbon (BrC) chromophores in secondary organic aerosol generated from photo-oxidation of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E; Kathmann, Shawn M; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    Atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) is a significant contributor to light absorption and climate forcing. However, little is known about a fundamental relationship between the chemical composition of BrC and its optical properties. In this work, light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated in the PNNL chamber from toluene photo-oxidation in the presence of NOx (Tol-SOA). Molecular structures of BrC components were examined using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and liquid chromatography (LC) combined with UV/Vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The chemical composition of BrC chromophores and the light absorption properties of toluene SOA (Tol-SOA) depend strongly on the initial NOx concentration. Specifically, Tol-SOA generated under high-NOx conditions (defined here as initial NOx/toluene of 5/1) appears yellow and mass absorption coefficient of the bulk sample (MACbulk@365 nm = 0.78 m(2) g(-1)) is nearly 80 fold higher than that measured for the Tol-SOA sample generated under low-NOx conditions (NOx/toluene atmosphere.

  1. CO 2 adsorption in mono-, di- and trivalent cation-exchanged metal-organic frameworks: A molecular simulation study

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yifei

    2012-02-28

    A molecular simulation study is reported for CO 2 adsorption in rho zeolite-like metal-organic framework (rho-ZMOF) exchanged with a series of cations (Na +, K +, Rb +, Cs +, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, and Al 3+). The isosteric heat and Henry\\'s constant at infinite dilution increase monotonically with increasing charge-to-diameter ratio of cation (Cs + < Rb + < K + < Na + < Ca 2+ < Mg 2+ < Al 3+). At low pressures, cations act as preferential adsorption sites for CO 2 and the capacity follows the charge-to-diameter ratio. However, the free volume of framework becomes predominant with increasing pressure and Mg-rho-ZMOF appears to possess the highest saturation capacity. The equilibrium locations of cations are observed to shift slightly upon CO 2 adsorption. Furthermore, the adsorption selectivity of CO 2/H 2 mixture increases as Cs + < Rb + < K + < Na + < Ca 2+ < Mg 2+ ≈ Al 3+. At ambient conditions, the selectivity is in the range of 800-3000 and significantly higher than in other nanoporous materials. In the presence of 0.1% H 2O, the selectivity decreases drastically because of the competitive adsorption between H 2O and CO 2, and shows a similar value in all of the cation-exchanged rho-ZMOFs. This simulation study provides microscopic insight into the important role of cations in governing gas adsorption and separation, and suggests that the performance of ionic rho-ZMOF can be tailored by cations. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  2. Low-molecular-weight organic acids correlate with cultivar variation in ciprofloxacin accumulation in Brassica parachinensis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Ming; Xiang, Lei; Wu, Xiao-Lian; Jiang, Yuan-Neng; Li, Hui; Li, Yan-Wen; Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2017-08-31

    To understand the mechanism controlling cultivar differences in the accumulation of ciprofloxacin (CIP) in Chinese flowering cabbage (Brassica parachinensis L.), low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) secreted from the roots of high- and low-CIP cultivars (Sijiu and Cutai, respectively) and their effects on the bioavailability of CIP in soil were investigated. Significant differences in the content of LMWOAs (especially maleic acid) between the two cultivars played a key role in the variation in CIP accumulation. Based on the Freundlich sorption coefficient (K f ) and distribution coefficient (K d ), the presence of LMWOAs reduced the CIP sorption onto soil particles, and higher concentrations of LMWOAs led to less CIP sorption onto soil. On the other hand, LMWOAs enhanced CIP desorption by lowering the solution pH, which changed the surface charge of soil particles and the degree of CIP ionization. LMWOAs promoted CIP desorption from soil by breaking cation bridges and dissolving metal cations, particularly Cu 2+ . These results implied that the LMWOAs (mainly maleic acid) secreted from Sijiu inhibited CIP sorption onto soil and improved CIP desorption from soil to a greater extent than those secreted from Cutai, resulting in higher bioavailability of CIP and more uptake and accumulation of CIP in the former.

  3. Gradual crossover in molecular organization of stable liquid H2O at moderately high pressure and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koga, Yoshikata; Westh, Peter; Yoshida, Koh

    2014-01-01

    temperature. The extrapolated temperature to zero p seems to be about 70 – 80 °C for points X and 90 – 110 °C for Y. Furthermore, the mid-points of X and Y seem to extrapolate to the triple point of liquid, ice Ih and ice III. Recalling that the zero x Gly extrapolation of point X and Y for binary aqueous...... of the step named point X and its end point Y. In analogy with another third and fourth derivative pair in binary aqueous solutions of glycerol, dα p /dx Gly and d2 α p /dx Gly 2, at 0.1 MPa (α p is the thermal expansivity and x Gly the mole fraction of solute glycerol) in our recent publication [J. Solution...... Chem. 43, 663-674 (2014); DOI:10.1007/s10953-013-0122-7], we argue that there is a gradual crossover in the molecular organization of pure H2O from a low to a high p-regions starting at point X and ending at Y at a fixed T. The crossover takes place gradually spanning for about 100 MPa at a fixed...

  4. Glucose recovery from aqueous solutions by adsorption in metal–organic framework MIL-101: a molecular simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Krishna M.; Zhang, Kang; Jiang, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    A molecular simulation study is reported on glucose recovery from aqueous solutions by adsorption in metal-organic framework MIL-101. The F atom of MIL-101 is identified to be the most favorable adsorption site. Among three MIL-101-X (X = H, NH2 or CH3), the parent MIL-101 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity and recovery efficacy. Upon functionalization by -NH2 or -CH3 group, the steric hindrance in MIL-101 increases; consequently, the interactions between glucose and framework become less attractive, thus reducing the capacity and mobility of glucose. The presence of ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate, as an impurity reduces the strength of hydrogen-bonding between glucose and MIL-101, and leads to lower capacity and mobility. Upon adding anti-solvent (ethanol or acetone), a similar adverse effect is observed. The simulation study provides useful structural and dynamic properties of glucose in MIL-101, and it suggests that MIL-101 might be a potential candidate for glucose recovery. PMID:26242874

  5. Glucose recovery from aqueous solutions by adsorption in metal-organic framework MIL-101: a molecular simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Krishna M; Zhang, Kang; Jiang, Jianwen

    2015-08-05

    A molecular simulation study is reported on glucose recovery from aqueous solutions by adsorption in metal-organic framework MIL-101. The F atom of MIL-101 is identified to be the most favorable adsorption site. Among three MIL-101-X (X = H, NH2 or CH3), the parent MIL-101 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity and recovery efficacy. Upon functionalization by -NH2 or -CH3 group, the steric hindrance in MIL-101 increases; consequently, the interactions between glucose and framework become less attractive, thus reducing the capacity and mobility of glucose. The presence of ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate, as an impurity reduces the strength of hydrogen-bonding between glucose and MIL-101, and leads to lower capacity and mobility. Upon adding anti-solvent (ethanol or acetone), a similar adverse effect is observed. The simulation study provides useful structural and dynamic properties of glucose in MIL-101, and it suggests that MIL-101 might be a potential candidate for glucose recovery.

  6. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from......Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  7. High Pressure Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC) Determination of Dissolved Organic Matter Molecular Weight Revisited: Accounting for Changes in Stationary Phases, Analytical Standards, and Isolation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Brandon C; Aiken, George R; McKnight, Diane M; Arnold, William A; Chin, Yu-Ping

    2018-01-16

    We reassessed the molecular weight of dissolved organic matter (DOM) determined by high pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) using measurements made with different columns and various generations of polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) molecular weight standards. Molecular weight measurements made with a newer generation HPSEC column and PSS standards from more recent lots are roughly 200 to 400 Da lower than initial measurements made in the early 1990s. These updated numbers match DOM molecular weights measured by colligative methods and fall within a range of values calculated from hydroxyl radical kinetics. These changes suggest improved accuracy of HPSEC molecular weight measurements that we attribute to improved accuracy of PSS standards and changes in the column packing. We also isolated DOM from wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) using XAD-8, a cation exchange resin, and PPL, a styrene-divinylbenzene media, and observed little difference in molecular weight and specific UV absorbance at 280 nm (SUVA 280 ) between the two solid phase extraction resins, suggesting they capture similar DOM moieties. PPR DOM also showed lower SUVA 280 at similar weights compared to DOM isolates from a global range of environments, which we attribute to oxidized sulfur in PPR DOM that would increase molecular weight without affecting SUVA 280 .

  8. High pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) determination of dissolved organic matter molecular weight revisited: Accounting for changes in stationary phases, analytical standards, and isolation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Brandon C.; Aiken, George R.; McKnight, Diane M.; Arnold, William A.; Chin, Yu-Ping

    2018-01-01

    We reassessed the molecular weight of dissolved organic matter (DOM) determined by high pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) using measurements made with different columns and various generations of polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) molecular weight standards. Molecular weight measurements made with a newer generation HPSEC column and PSS standards from more recent lots are roughly 200 to 400 Da lower than initial measurements made in the early 1990s. These updated numbers match DOM molecular weights measured by colligative methods and fall within a range of values calculated from hydroxyl radical kinetics. These changes suggest improved accuracy of HPSEC molecular weight measurements that we attribute to improved accuracy of PSS standards and changes in the column packing. We also isolated DOM from wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) using XAD-8, a cation exchange resin, and PPL, a styrene-divinylbenzene media, and observed little difference in molecular weight and specific UV absorbance at 280 nm (SUVA280) between the two solid phase extraction resins, suggesting they capture similar DOM moieties. PPR DOM also showed lower SUVA280 at similar weights compared to DOM isolates from a global range of environments, which we attribute to oxidized sulfur in PPR DOM that would increase molecular weight without affecting SUVA280.

  9. Exploring molecular complexity with ALMA (EMoCA): Deuterated complex organic molecules in Sagittarius B2(N2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloche, A.; Müller, H. S. P.; Garrod, R. T.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Deuteration is a powerful tracer of the history of the cold prestellar phase in star-forming regions. Apart from methanol, little is known about deuterium fractionation of complex organic molecules in the interstellar medium, especially in regions forming high-mass stars. Aims: Our goal is to detect deuterated complex organic molecules toward the high mass star-forming region Sagittarius B2 (Sgr B2) and derive the level of deuteration for these molecules. Methods: We use a complete 3-mm spectral line survey performed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to search for deuterated complex organic molecules toward the hot molecular core Sgr B2(N2). We constructed population diagrams and integrated intensity maps to fit rotational temperatures and emission sizes for each molecule. Column densities are derived by modeling the full spectrum under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We compare the results to predictions of two astrochemical models that treat the deuteration process. Results: We report the detection of CH2DCN toward Sgr B2(N2) with a deuteration level of 0.4%, and tentative detections of CH2DOH, CH2DCH2CN, the chiral molecule CH3CHDCN, and DC3N with levels in the range 0.05%-0.12%. A stringent deuteration upper limit is obtained for CH3OD (cyanide, the four deuterated species of ethanol, and CH2DOCHO. Ethyl cyanide is less deuterated than methyl cyanide by at least a factor five. The [CH2DOH]/[CH3OD] abundance ratio is higher than 1.8. It may still be consistent with the value obtained in Orion KL. Except for methyl cyanide, the measured deuteration levels lie at least a factor four below the predictions of current astrochemical models. The deuteration levels in Sgr B2(N2) are also lower than in Orion KL by a factor of a few up to a factor ten. Conclusions: The discrepancy between the deuteration levels of Sgr B2(N2) and the predictions of chemical models, and the difference between Sgr B2(N2) and Orion KL may

  10. Bulk and molecular-level characterization of laboratory-aged biomass burning organic aerosol from oak leaf and heartwood fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Fortenberry

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemical complexity of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA greatly increases with photochemical aging in the atmosphere, necessitating controlled laboratory studies to inform field observations. In these experiments, BBOA from American white oak (Quercus alba leaf and heartwood samples was generated in a custom-built emissions and combustion chamber and photochemically aged in a potential aerosol mass (PAM flow reactor. A thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG was used in parallel with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS to analyze BBOA chemical composition at different levels of photochemical aging. Individual compounds were identified and integrated to obtain relative decay rates for key molecules. A recently developed chromatogram binning positive matrix factorization (PMF technique was used to obtain mass spectral profiles for factors in TAG BBOA chromatograms, improving analysis efficiency and providing a more complete determination of unresolved complex mixture (UCM components. Additionally, the recently characterized TAG decomposition window was used to track molecular fragments created by the decomposition of thermally labile BBOA during sample desorption. We demonstrate that although most primary (freshly emitted BBOA compounds deplete with photochemical aging, certain components eluting within the TAG thermal decomposition window are instead enhanced. Specifically, the increasing trend in the decomposition m∕z 44 signal (CO2+ indicates formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in the PAM reactor. Sources of m∕z 60 (C2H4O2+, typically attributed to freshly emitted BBOA in AMS field measurements, were also investigated. From the TAG chemical speciation and decomposition window data, we observed a decrease in m∕z 60 with photochemical aging due to the decay of anhydrosugars (including levoglucosan and other compounds, as well as an increase in m∕z 60 due to the formation of

  11. Digging a Little Deeper: Microbial Communities, Molecular Composition and Soil Organic Matter Turnover along Tropical Forest Soil Depth Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; McFarlane, K. J.; Heckman, K. A.; Reed, S.; Green, E. A.; Nico, P. S.; Tfaily, M. M.; Wood, T. E.; Plante, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store more carbon (C) than any other terrestrial ecosystem and exchange vast amounts of CO2, water, and energy with the atmosphere. Much of this C is leached and stored in deep soil layers where we know little about its fate or the microbial communities that drive deep soil biogeochemistry. Organic matter (OM) in tropical soils appears to be associated with mineral particles, suggesting deep soils may provide greater C stabilization. However, few studies have evaluated sub-surface soils in tropical ecosystems, including estimates of the turnover times of deep soil C, the sensitivity of this C to global environmental change, and the microorganisms involved. We quantified bulk C pools, microbial communities, molecular composition of soil organic matter, and soil radiocarbon turnover times from surface soils to 1.5m depths in multiple soil pits across the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Soil C, nitrogen, and root and microbial biomass all declined exponentially with depth; total C concentrations dropped from 5.5% at the surface to communities in surface soils (Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria) versus those below the active rooting zone (Verrucomicrobia and Thaumarchaea). High resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) analyses suggest a shift in the composition of OM with depth (especially in the water soluble fraction), an increase in oxidation, and decreasing H/C with depth (indicating higher aromaticity). Additionally, surface samples were rich in lignin-like compounds of plant origin that were absent with depth. Soil OM 14C and mean turnover times were variable across replicate horizons, ranging from 3-1500 years at the surface, to 5000-40,000 years at depth. In comparison to temperate deciduous forests, these 14C values reflect far older soil C. Particulate organic matter (free light fraction), with a relatively modern 14C was found in low but measureable concentration in even the deepest soil horizons. Our results indicate these

  12. [Inhibition of Low Molecular Organic Acids on the Activity of Acidithiobacillus Species and Its Effect on the Removal of Heavy Metals from Contaminated Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-wei; Wang, He-rul; Cao, Yan-xiao; Li, Fei; Cui, Chun-hong; Zhou, Li

    2016-05-15

    Application of organic fertilizer can reduce the solubility and bioavailability of heavy metals in contaminated soil, but in the flooded anaerobic environment, organic fertilizer will be decomposed to produce a large number of low molecular organic acids, which can inhibit the biological activity of Acidithiobacillus species. Batch cultures studies showed that the monocarboxylic organic acids including formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid exhibited a marked toxicity to Acidithiobacillus species, as indicated by that 90% of inhibitory rate for Fe2 and So oxidation in 72 h were achieved at extremely low concentrations of 41.2 mg · L⁻¹, 78.3 mg · L⁻¹, 43.2 mg · L⁻¹, 123.4 mg · L⁻¹ and 81.9 mg 230. 4 mg · L⁻¹, 170.1 mg · L⁻¹, 123.4 mg · L⁻¹ respectively. Of these organic acids, formic acid was the most toxic one as indicated by that Fe2 and So oxidation was almost entirely inhibited at a low concentration. In addition, it was found that Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was more sensitive to low molecular organic acids than Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. What's more, there was little effect on biological acidification process of heavy metal contaminated soil when organic acids were added at initial stage (Oh), but it was completely inhibited when these acids were added after 12 h of conventional biological acidification, thus decreasing the efficiency of heavy metals dissolution from soil.

  13. Effects of cement organic additives on the adsorption of uranyl ions on calcium silicate hydrate phases: experimental determination and computational molecular modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androniuk, Iuliia

    2017-01-01

    Cementitious materials are extensively used in the design and construction of radioactive waste repositories. One of the ways to enhance their performance is to introduce organic admixtures into the cement structure. However, the presence of organics in the pore water may affect the radionuclide mobility: organic molecules can form water-soluble complexes and compete for sorption sites. This work was designed to get detailed understanding of the mechanisms of such interactions on the molecular level. The model system has three components. First, pure C-S-H phases with different Ca/Si ratios were chosen as a cement model. Secondly, gluconate (a simple well-described molecule) is selected as a good starting organic additive model to probe the interaction mechanisms on the molecular scale. A more complex system involving poly-carboxylate super-plasticizer (PCE) was also tested. The third, U(VI), is a representative of the actinide radionuclide series. The development of description of the effects of organics for radioactive waste disposal applications was the primary objective of this work. The study of binary systems provides reference data for the investigation of more complex ternary (C-S-H/organic/U(VI)). The interactions are studied by means of both experimental and computational molecular modelling techniques. Data on sorption and desorption kinetics and isotherms for additives and for U(VI) on C-S-H are acquired in this work. In parallel, atomistic models are developed for the interfaces of interest. Structural, energetic, and dynamic aspects of the sorption processes on surface of cement are quantitatively modeled by molecular dynamics technique. (author)

  14. Investigation of hydrogenase molecular marker to optimize hydrogen production from organic wastes and effluents of agro-food industries [abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton, C.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years policy makers have started looking for alternatives to fossil fuels, not only to counter the threat of global warming, but also to reduce the risk of overdependence on imported oil and gas supplies. By contrast with hydrocarbon fuels, hydrogen (H2, whether burned directly or used in fuel cells, is intrinsically a clean energy vector with near zero emission. However the main current method of producing hydrogen, steam reforming of methane, involves the release of large quantities of greenhouse gases. So although hydrogen already accounts for around 2% of world consumption of energy, its more widespread adoption is limited by several challenges. Therefore new processes are investigated, especially those using renewable raw material, e.g. woods and organic wastes, and/or involving microorganisms. Indeed, for some algae and bacteria, the generation of molecular hydrogen is an essential part of their energy metabolism. The approach with the greatest commercial potential is fermentative hydrogen generation (dark fermentation by bacteria from the Clostridium genus. This biological process, as a part of the methane-producing anaerobic digestion process, is very promising since it allows the production of hydrogen from a wide variety of renewable resources such as carbohydrate waste from the agricultural and agro-food industries or processed urban waste and sewage. To date most publications on hydrogen production by Clostridium strains have focused on the effects of operating parameters (such as temperature, pH, dilution rate, etc.. We now need to extend this knowledge by identifying and monitoring the various different metabolic agents involved in high H2 activity. Consequently the aim of this research at the CWBI in the University of Liege is to investigate the role of [Fe] hydrogenases, the key enzymes that remove excess electrons accumulating during fermentation. Clostridium butyricum CWBI1009, the strain used for these investigations

  15. Static liquid permeation cell method for determining the migration parameters of low molecular weight organic compounds in polyethylene terephthalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yoon S; Koontz, John L; Juskelis, Rima O; Zhao, Yang

    2013-01-01

    The migration of low molecular weight organic compounds through polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films was determined by using a custom permeation cell assembly. Fatty food simulant (Miglyol 812) was added to the receptor chamber, while the donor chamber was filled with 1% and 10% (v/v) migrant compounds spiked in simulant. The permeation cell was maintained at 40°C, 66°C, 100°C or 121°C for up to 25 days of polymer film exposure time. Migrants in Miglyol were directly quantified without a liquid-liquid extraction step by headspace-GC-MS analysis. Experimental diffusion coefficients (DP) of toluene, benzyl alcohol, ethyl butyrate and methyl salicylate through PET film were determined. Results from Limm's diffusion model showed that the predicted DP values for PET were all greater than the experimental values. DP values predicted by Piringer's diffusion model were also greater than those determined experimentally at 66°C, 100°C and 121°C. However, Piringer's model led to the underestimation of benzyl alcohol (Áp = 3.7) and methyl salicylate (Áp = 4.0) diffusion at 40°C with its revised "upper-bound" Áp value of 3.1 at temperatures below the glass transition temperature (Tg) of PET (<70°C). This implies that input parameters of Piringer's model may need to be revised to ensure a margin of safety for consumers. On the other hand, at temperatures greater than the Tg, both models appear too conservative and unrealistic. The highest estimated Áp value from Piringer's model was 2.6 for methyl salicylate, which was much lower than the "upper-bound" Áp value of 6.4 for PET. Therefore, it may be necessary further to refine "upper-bound" Áp values for PET such that Piringer's model does not significantly underestimate or overestimate the migration of organic compounds dependent upon the temperature condition of the food contact material.

  16. A Unique Cellular and Molecular Microenvironment Is Present in Tertiary Lymphoid Organs of Patients with Spontaneous Prostate Cancer Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de la Luz García-Hernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveMultiple solid cancers contain tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO. However, it is unclear whether they promote tumor rejection, facilitate tumor evasion, or simply whether they are a byproduct of chronic inflammation. We hypothesize that although chronic inflammation induces TLO formation, the tumor milieu can modulate TLO organization and functions in prostate cancer. Therefore, our study seeks to elucidate the cellular and molecular signatures in unique prostatectomy specimens from evanescent carcinoma patients to identify markers of cancer regression, which could be harnessed to modulate local immunosuppression or potentially enhance TLO function.MethodsWe used multicolor immunofluorescence to stain prostate tissues, collected at different stages of cancer progression (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intermediate and advanced cancer or from patients with evanescent prostate carcinoma. Tissues were stained with antibodies specific for pro-inflammatory molecules (cyclooxygenase 2, CXCL10, IL17, tumor-infiltrating immune cells (mature DC-LAMP+ dendritic cells, CD3+ T cells, CD3+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg, T bet+ Th1 cells, granzyme B+ cytotoxic cells, and stromal cell populations (lymphatic vessels, tumor neovessels, high endothelial venules (HEV, stromal cells, which promote prostate tumor growth or are critical components of tumor-associated TLO.ResultsGenerally, inflammatory cells are located at the margins of tumors. Unexpectedly, we found TLO within prostate tumors from patients at different stages of cancer and in unique samples from patients with spontaneous cancer remission. In evanescent prostate carcinomas, accumulation of Treg was compromised, while Tbet+ T cells and CD8 T cells were abundant in tumor-associated TLO. In addition, we found a global decrease in tumor neovascularization and the coverage by cells positive for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2. Finally, consistent with tumor regression, prostate stem cell antigen was

  17. Combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical method for metal-organic frameworks: proton topologies of NU-1000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin-Ping; Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G

    2018-01-17

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are materials with applications in catalysis, gas separations, and storage. Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations can provide valuable guidance to understand and predict their properties. In order to make the calculations faster, rather than modeling these materials as periodic (infinite) systems, it is useful to construct finite models (called cluster models) and use subsystem methods such as fragment methods or combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods. Here we employ a QM/MM methodology to study one particular MOF that has been of widespread interest because of its wide pores and good solvent and thermal stability, namely NU-1000, which contains hexanuclear zirconium nodes and 1,3,6,8-tetrakis(p-benzoic acid)pyrene (TBAPy 4- ) linkers. A modified version of the Bristow-Tiana-Walsh transferable force field has been developed to allow QM/MM calculations on NU-1000; we call the new parametrization the NU1T force field. We consider isomeric structures corresponding to various proton topologies of the [Zr 6 (μ 3 -O) 8 O 8 H 16 ] 8+ node of NU-1000, and we compute their relative energies using a QM/MM scheme designed for the present kind of problem. We compared the results to full quantum mechanical (QM) energy calculations and found that the QM/MM models can reproduce the full QM relative energetics (which span a range of 334 kJ mol -1 ) with a mean unsigned deviation (MUD) of only 2 kJ mol -1 . Furthermore, we found that the structures optimized by QM/MM are nearly identical to their full QM optimized counterparts.

  18. Intramolecular deactivation processes of electronically excited Lanthanide(III) complexes with organic acids of low molecular weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burek, Katja; Eidner, Sascha; Kuke, Stefanie; Kumke, Michael U.

    2018-02-01

    The luminescence of Lanthanide(III) complexes with different model ligands was studied under direct as well as sensitized excitation conditions. The research was performed in the context of studies dealing with deep-underground storages for high-level nuclear waste. Here, Lanthanide(III) ions served as natural analogues for Actinide(III) ions and the low-molecular weight organic ligands are present in clay minerals and furthermore, they were employed as proxies for building blocks of humic substances, which are important complexing molecules in the natural environment, e.g., in the far field of a repository site. Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy was applied for a detailed characterization of Eu(III), Tb(III), Sm(III) and Dy(III) complexes in aqueous solutions. Based on the observed luminescence the ligands were tentatively divided into two groups (A, B). The luminescence of Lanthanide(III) complexes of group A was mainly influenced by an energy transfer to OH-vibrations. Lanthanide(III) complexes of group B showed ligand-related luminescence quenching, which was further investigated. To gain more information on the underlying quenching processes of group A and B ligands, measurements at different temperatures (77 K ≤ T ≤ 353 K) were performed and activation energies were determined based on an Arrhenius analysis. Moreover, the influence of the ionic strength between 0 M ≤ I ≤ 4 M on the Lanthanide(III) luminescence was monitored for different complexes, in order to evaluate the influence of specific conditions encountered in host rocks foreseen as potential repository sites.

  19. Growth of Pb(Ti,Zr)O 3 thin films by metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrutin, V.; Liu, H. Y.; Izyumskaya, N.; Xiao, B.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.

    2009-02-01

    Single-crystal Pb(Zr xTi 1-x)O 3 thin films have been grown on (0 0 1) SrTiO 3 and SrTiO 3:Nb substrates by molecular beam epitaxy using metal-organic source of Zr and two different sources of reactive oxygen—RF plasma and hydrogen-peroxide sources. The same growth modes and comparable structural properties were observed for the films grown with both oxygen sources, while the plasma source allowed higher growth rates. The films with x up to 0.4 were single phase, while attempts to increase x beyond gave rise to the ZrO 2 second phase. The effects of growth conditions on growth modes, Zr incorporation, and phase composition of the Pb(Zr xTi 1-x)O 3 films are discussed. Electrical and ferroelectric properties of the Pb(Zr xTi 1-x)O 3 films of ~100 nm in thickness grown on SrTiO 3:Nb were studied using current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, and polarization-field measurements. The single-phase films show low leakage currents and large breakdown fields, while the values of remanent polarization are low (around 5 μC/cm 2). It was found that, at high sweep fields, the contribution of the leakage current to the apparent values of remanent polarization can be large, even for the films with large electrical resistivity (˜10 8-10 9 Ω cm at an electric filed of 1 MV/cm). The measured dielectric constant ranges from 410 to 260 for Pb(Zr 0.33Ti 0.67)O 3 and from 313 to 213 for Pb(Zr 0.2Ti 0.8)O 3 in the frequency range from 100 to 1 MHz.

  20. Theoretical study of molecular hydrogen and spiltover hydrogen storage on two-dimensional covalent-organic frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiu-Ying; He Jie; Yu Jing-Xin; Fan Zhi-Qin; Li Zheng-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen and spiltover hydrogen storages on five two-dimensional (2D) covalent-organic frameworks (COFs) (PPy-COF, TP-COF, BTP-COF, COF-18 Å, and HHTP-DPB COF) are investigated using the grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations and the density functional theory (DFT), respectively. The GCMC simulated results show that HHTP-DPB COF has the best performance for hydrogen storage, followed by BTP-COF, TP-COF, COF-18 Å, and PPy-COF. However, their adsorption amounts at room temperature are all too low to meet the uptake target set by US Department of Energy (US-DOE) and enable practical applications. The effects of pore size, surface area, and isosteric heat of hydrogen on adsorption amount are considered, which indicate that these three factors are all the important factors for determining the H 2 adsorption amount. The chemisorptions of spiltover hydrogen atoms on these five COFs represented by the cluster models are investigated using the DFT method. The saturation cluster models are constructed by considering all possible adsorption sites for these cluster models. The average binding energy of a hydrogen atom and the saturation hydrogen storage density are calculated. The large average binding energy indicates that the spillover process may proceed smoothly and reversibly. The saturation hydrogen storage density is much larger than the physisorption uptake of H 2 molecules at 298 K and 100 bar (1 bar = 10 5 Pa), and is close to or exceeds the 2010 US-DOE target of 6 wt% for hydrogen storage. This suggests that the hydrogen storage capacities of these COFs by spillover may be significantly enhanced. Thus 2D COFs studied in this paper are suitable hydrogen storage media by spillover

  1. Large-scale Patterns of 14C Age of Bulk Organic Carbon and Various Molecular Components in Grassland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, J.; Liu, Z.; Cao, Z.; Chen, L.; He, J. S.; Haghipour, N.; Wacker, L.; Eglinton, T. I.; Feng, X.

    2017-12-01

    Unraveling the fate of organic carbon (OC) in soils is essential to understanding the impact of global changes on the global carbon cycle. Previous studies have shown that while various soil OC components have different decomposability, chemically labile OC can have old 14C ages. However, few studies have compared the 14C age of various soil OC components on a large scale, which may provide important information on the link between the age or turnover of soil OC components to their sources, molecular structures as well as environmental variables. In this project, a suite of soil profiles were sampled along a large-scale transect of temperate and alpine grasslands across the Tibetan and Mongolian Plateaus in China with contrasting climatic, vegetation and soil properties. Bulk OC and source-specific compounds (including fatty acids (FAs), diacids (DAs) and lignin phenols) were radiocarbon-dated to investigate the age and turnover dynamics of different OC pools and the mechanisms controlling their stability. Our results show that lignin phenols displayed a large 14C variability. Short-chain (C16, 18) FAs sourced from vascular plants as well as microorganisms were younger than plant-derived long-chain FAs and DAs, indicating that short-chain FAs were easier to be decomposed or newly synthesized. In the temperate grasslands, long-chain DAs were younger than FAs, while the opposite trend was observed in the alpine grasslands. Preliminary correlation analysis suggests that the age of short-chain FAs were mainly influenced by clay contents and climate, while reactive minerals, clay or silt particles were important factors in the stabilization of long-chain FAs, DAs and lignin phenols. Overall, our study provided a unique 14 C dataset of soil OC components in grasslands, which will provide important constraints on soil carbon turnover in future investigations.

  2. Effects of cadmium amendments on low-molecular-weight organic acid exudates in rhizosphere soils of tobacco and sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Neng; Wang, Ming Kuang; Chiu, Chih Yu; Chou, Shu-Yen

    2006-10-01

    To recognize physiological response of plants to cadmium (Cd) toxicity in rhizosphere of plants, the pot experiments were employed to investigate how low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) were exudated from tobacco and sunflower roots of Cd-amended soils. The aims of this study were to assess the effect of LMWOAs on uptake of Cd by tobacco and sunflower under pot experiments, thus comparing the ability of tobacco and sunflower for phytoremediation. Surface soils (0-20 cm) were collected from Taichung Experiment Station (TC) (silty loam). Cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)) was amended into TC soil, giving Cd concentrations of 1, 5, 10 mg kg(-1) soil. Soils with different concentrations of Cd were put into 12 cm (i.d.) pots for incubation, and then 2-week-old tobacco and sunflower seedlings were transplanted into the pots. Tobacco and sunflower were grown in greenhouse for 50 days, respectively. The rhizosphere and bulk soils, and fresh plant tissues were collected after harvest. The Cd concentrations in the plant and transfer factor values in the sunflower were higher than that in the tobacco. No LMWOAs were detected by gas chromatograph in bulk soils, and low amounts of LMWOAs were found in uncontaminated rhizosphere soils. Acetic, lactic, glycolic, malic, maleic, and succinic acids were found in the tobacco and sunflower rhizosphere soils. Concentrations of LMWOAs increased with increasing amendment of Cd concentrations in tobacco and sunflower rhizosphere soils. Correlation coefficient (r) of concentrations of Cd amendment versus LMWOAs exudates of tobacco and sunflower were 0.85 and 0.98, respectively. These results suggest that the different levels of LMWOAs present in the rhizosphere soil play an important role in the solubilization of Cd that bound with soil particle into soil solution and then uptake by plants.

  3. [Determination of the distribution of relative molecular mass of organic matter by high pressure size exclusion chromatography with UV and TOC detectors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Dong, Bing-Zhi

    2012-09-01

    An on-line high pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) with UV and TOC detectors was adapted to examine the distribution of relative molecular mass of natural organic matter (NOM). Through synchronous determination of UV254 and TOC responses in a wide range of relative molecular mass, it was possible to accurately characterize the structure of NOM, especially for some non-aromatic and non-conjugated double bond organics which have low response to UV. It was found that, TOC detector was capable of detecting all kinds of organic matters, including sucrose, sodium alginate and other hydrophilic organic compounds. The sample volume had a positively linear correlation with the TOC response, indicating that the larger volume would produce stronger responses. The effect of ion strength was relatively low, shown by the small decrease of peak area (1.2% ) from none to 0.2 mol x L(-1) NaCl. The pH value of tested samples should be adjusted to neutral or acidic because when the samples were alkaline, the results might be inaccurate. Compared to the sample solvents adopted as ultrapure water, the samples prepared by mobile phase solvents had less interference to salt boundary peak. The on-line HPSEC-UV-TOC can be used accurately to characterize the distribution of relative molecular mass and its four fractions in River Xiang.

  4. Molecular sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The research in molecular sciences summarized includes photochemistry, radiation chemistry, geophysics, electromechanics, heavy-element oxidizers , heavy element chemistry collisions, atoms, organic solids. A list of publications is included

  5. Molecular Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Hyonmin; Deirmengian, Carl A.; Hickok, Noreen J.; Morrison, Tiffany N.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic infections are complex conditions that require immediate diagnosis and accurate identification of the causative organisms to facilitate appropriate management. Conventional methodologies for diagnosis of these infections sometimes lack accuracy or sufficient rapidity. Current molecular diagnostics are an emerging area of bench-to-bedside research in orthopaedic infections. Examples of promising molecular diagnostics include measurement of a specific biomarker in the synovial fluid...

  6. Crystal structures of eight 3D molecular adducts derived from bis-imidazole, bis(benzimidazole), and organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aihua; Jin, Shouwen; Jin, Shide; Hu, KaiKai; Lin, Zhihao; Liu, Hui; Wang, Daqi

    2018-01-01

    Cocrystallization of the bis(imidazole)/bis(benzimidazole) with a series of organic acids gave a total of eight molecular adducts with the compositions: (3,6-bis(imidazole-1-yl)pyridazine): (trichloroacetic acid)2(1) [(H2L1)2+ · (tca-)2, L1 = 3,6-bis(imidazole-1-yl)pyridazine, tca- = trichloroacetate], (bis(N-imidazolyl)methane): (suberic acid) (2) [(L2) · (H2suba), L2 = bis(N-imidazolyl)methane, H2suba = suberic acid], bis(N-imidazolyl)methane: (3-nitrophthalic acid): 3H2O (3) [(H2L2)2+ · (3-Hnpa-)2 · 3H2O, 3-Hnpa- = 3-nitro hydrogenphthalate], (bis(N-imidazolyl)butane)0.5: (4-nitrophthalic acid): H2O (4) [(H2L3)0.5+ · (4-Hnpa-)- · H2O, L3 = bis(N-imidazolyl)butane, 4-Hnpa- = 4-nitro hydrogenphthalate], (1-(3-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)propyl)-1H-benzimidazole): (3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid) (5) [(HL4) · (3,5-dns-), L4 = 1-(3-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)propyl)-1H-benzimidazole, 3,5-dns- = 3,5-dinitrosalicylate], (1-(3-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)propyl)-1H-benzimidazole): (3-nitrophthalic acid) (6) [(H2L4) · (3-npa2-), L4 = 1-(3-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)propyl)-1H-benzimidazole, 3-npa2-=3-nitrogenphthalate], (bis(N-imidazolyl)butane): (pamoic acid) (7) [(H2L3) · (pam), pam = pamoate], and (3,6-bis(imidazole-1-yl)pyridazine): (1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid) [(H2L1)2+ · (npda)2- = 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonate] (8). The eight adducts have been characterized by X-ray diffraction technique, infrared spectrum, and elemental analysis, and the melting points of all adducts were also reported. And their structural and supramolecular aspects are fully analyzed. The result reveals that among the eight investigated crystals both the end ring N in the bis(imidazole) moieties are protonated when the organic acids are deprotonated except 2, and 5, and the crystal packing is interpreted in terms of the strong ionic Nsbnd H⋯O H-bond between the imidazolium and the deprotonated acidic groups. Except the Nsbnd H⋯O H-bond, the Osbnd H⋯O H-bonds were also found at the salts 3, 4

  7. Ionization Energies, Electron Affinities, and Polarization Energies of Organic Molecular Crystals: Quantitative Estimations from a Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM)–Tuned Range-Separated Density Functional Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haitao

    2016-05-16

    We propose a new methodology for the first-principles description of the electronic properties relevant for charge transport in organic molecular crystals. This methodology, which is based on the combination of a non-empirical, optimally tuned range-separated hybrid functional with the polarizable continuum model, is applied to a series of eight representative molecular semiconductor crystals. We show that it provides ionization energies, electron affinities, and transport gaps in very good agreement with experimental values as well as with the results of many-body perturbation theory within the GW approximation at a fraction of the computational costs. Hence, this approach represents an easily applicable and computationally efficient tool to estimate the gas-to-crystal-phase shifts of the frontier-orbital quasiparticle energies in organic electronic materials.

  8. High-performance n-type organic semiconductors: incorporating specific electron-withdrawing motifs to achieve tight molecular stacking and optimized energy levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sun Woo; Kim, Jong H; Shin, Seunghoon; Yang, Hoichang; An, Byeong-Kwan; Yang, Lin; Park, Soo Young

    2012-02-14

    Novel π–conjugated cyanostilbene-based semiconductors (Hex-3,5-TFPTA and Hex-4-TFPTA) with tight molecular stacking and optimized energy levels are synthesized. Hex-4-TFPTA exhibits high-performance n-type organic field-effect transistor (OFET) properties with electron mobilities as high as 2.14 cm2 V−1s−1 and on-off current ratios Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The roles of bulk and interfacial molecular orientations in determining the performance of organic bilayer solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy O.

    2014-09-09

    Molecular orientation plays a significant role in determining the performance of small molecule solar cells. Key photovoltaic processes in these cells are strongly dependent on how the molecules are oriented in the active layer. We isolate contributions arising from the bulk molecular orientations vs. those from interfacial orientations in ZnPc/C60 bilayer systems and we probe these contributions by comparing device pairs in which only the bulk or the interface differ. By controlling the orientation in the bulk the current can be strongly modulated, whereas controlling the interfacial molecular orientation and degree of intermixing mediate the voltage.

  10. The roles of bulk and interfacial molecular orientations in determining the performance of organic bilayer solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy O.; Graham, Kenneth R.; Conron, Sarah; Erwin, Patrick; Li, Ruipeng; Chou, Kang Wei; Burkhard, George; Krishnan Jagadamma, Lethy; Hoke, Eric T.; McGehee, Michael D.; Thompson, Mark E.; Amassian, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Molecular orientation plays a significant role in determining the performance of small molecule solar cells. Key photovoltaic processes in these cells are strongly dependent on how the molecules are oriented in the active layer. We isolate contributions arising from the bulk molecular orientations vs. those from interfacial orientations in ZnPc/C60 bilayer systems and we probe these contributions by comparing device pairs in which only the bulk or the interface differ. By controlling the orientation in the bulk the current can be strongly modulated, whereas controlling the interfacial molecular orientation and degree of intermixing mediate the voltage.

  11. Submicron particulate organic matter in the urban atmosphere: a new method for real-time measurement, molecular-level characterization and source apportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; D'Anna, Barbara; Tan, Wen; Wisthaler, Armin

    2017-04-01

    We used a novel chemical analytical method for measuring submicron particulate organic matter in the atmosphere of three European cities (Innsbruck, Lyon, Valencia). Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) was used in combination with the "chemical analysis of aerosol online" (CHARON) inlet for detecting particulate organic compounds on-line (i.e. without filter pre-collection), in real-time (1-min time resolution), at ng m-3 concentrations, with molecular-level resolution (i.e. obtaining molecular weight and elemental composition information). The CHARON-PTR-ToF-MS system monitored molecular tracers associated with different particle sources including levoglucosan from biomass combustion, PAHs from vehicular traffic, nicotine from cigarette smoking, and monoterpene oxidation products secondarily formed from biogenic emissions. The tracer information was used for interpreting positive matrix factorization (PMF) data which allowed us to apportion the sources of submicron particulate organic matter in the different urban environments. This work was funded through the PIMMS ITN, which was supported by the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme under grant agreement number 287382.

  12. Probing the emitter site of Renilla luciferase using small organic molecules; an attempt to understand the molecular architecture of the emitter site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Farajollah; Emamzadeh, Rahman; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Rasa, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Renilla luciferase is a sensitive enzyme and has wide applications in biotechnology such as drug screening. Previous studies have tried to show the catalytic residues, nevertheless, the accurate architecture and molecular behavior of its emitter site remains uncharacterized. In this study, the activity of Renilla luciferase, in the presence of two small organic molecules including dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and isopropanol was considered and the structure was studied by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, the interaction of small organic molecules with the Renilla luciferase was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetics studies showed that at low concentration of DMSO (16.6-66mM) and isopropanol (19.3-76mM) the K m changed and a competitive inhibition pattern was observed. Moreover, spectroscopy studies reveled that the changes of activity of Renilla luciferase in the presence of low concentrations of small organic molecules was not associated with structural collapse or severe changes in the enzyme conformation. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that DMSO and isopropanol, as probing molecules, were both able to bind to the emitter site and remained with the residues of the emitter site. Based on the probing data, the architecture of the emitter site in the "non-binding" model was proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gradual crossover in molecular organization of stable liquid H2O at moderately high pressure and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikata Koga

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Using the literature raw data of the speed of sound and the specific volume, the isothermal compressibility, κT, a second derivative thermodynamic quantity of G, was evaluated for liquid H2O in the pressure range up to 350 MPa and the temperature to 50 ºC. We then obtained its pressure derivative, dκT/dp, a third derivative numerically without using a fitting function to the κT data. On taking yet another p-derivative at a fixed T graphically without resorting to any fitting function, the resulting d2κT/dp2, a fourth derivative, showed a weak but clear step anomaly, with the onset of the step named point X and its end point Y. In analogy with another third and fourth derivative pair in binary aqueous solutions of glycerol, dαp/dxGly and d2αp/dxGly2, at 0.1 MPa (αp is the thermal expansivity and xGly the mole fraction of solute glycerol in our recent publication [J. Solution Chem. 43, 663-674 (2014; DOI:10.1007/s10953-013-0122-7], we argue that there is a gradual crossover in the molecular organization of pure H2O from a low to a high p-regions starting at point X and ending at Y at a fixed T. The crossover takes place gradually spanning for about 100 MPa at a fixed temperature. The extrapolated temperature to zero p seems to be about 70 – 80 °C for points X and 90 – 110 °C for Y. Furthermore, the mid-points of X and Y seem to extrapolate to the triple point of liquid, ice Ih and ice III. Recalling that the zero xGly extrapolation of point X and Y for binary aqueous glycerol at 0.1 MPa gives about the same T values respectively, we suggest that at zero pressure the region below about 70 °C the hydrogen bond network is bond-percolated, while above about 90 ºC there is no hydrogen bond network. Implication of these findings is discussed.

  14. The kinetic and thermodynamic sorption and stabilization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in natural organic matter surrogate solutions: The effect of surrogate molecular weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tingting; Lin, Daohui; Li, Lu; Wang, Zhengyu; Wu, Fengchang

    2014-01-01

    Styrene sulfonate (SS) and polystyrene sulfonates (PSSs) were used as surrogates of natural organic matter to study the effect of molecular weight (from 206.2 to 70,000 Da) on their sorption by a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and an activated carbon (AC) and on their stabilization of MWCNT suspension. Results indicate that surface-diffusion through the liquid-sorbent boundary was the rate-controlling step of the kinetic sorption of both MWCNTs and AC, and surface-occupying and pore-filling mechanisms respectively dominated the thermodynamic sorption of MWCNTs and AC. Sorption rates and capacities of MWCNTs and AC in molecular concentration of SS and PSS decreased with increasing molecular weight. The PSSs but not SS facilitated the stabilization of MWCNT suspension because of the increased electrosteric repulsion. The PSSs with more monomers had greater capabilities to stabilize the MWCNT suspension, but the capabilities were comparable after being normalized by the total monomer number. -- Highlights: • Surface-diffusion controlled the kinetic sorption of NOM surrogates to MWCNTs and AC. • Surface-occupying mechanism dominates the thermodynamic sorption of MWCNTs. • The sorption in molecular concentration decreased with increasing M w of the PSSs. • PSS but not SS stabilized MWCNT suspension through electrosteric repulsion. • Stabilization capabilities normalized by monomer number of the PSSs were comparable. -- Molecular weight of NOM influences its sorption on and stabilizing MWCNTs

  15. Doping-free white organic light-emitting diodes without blue molecular emitter: An unexplored approach to achieve high performance via exciplex emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dongxiang; Xiao, Ye; Hao, Mingming; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Yibin; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Baiquan

    2017-02-01

    Doping-free white organic light-emitting diodes (DF-WOLEDs) are promising for the low-cost commercialization because of their simplified device structures. However, DF-WOLEDs reported thus far in the literature are based on the use of blue single molecular emitters, whose processing can represent a crucial point in device manufacture. Herein, DF-WOLEDs without the blue single molecular emitter have been demonstrated by managing a blue exciplex system. For the single-molecular-emitter (orange or yellow emitter) DF-WOLEDs, (i) a color rendering index (CRI) of 81 at 1000 cd/m2 can be obtained, which is one of the highest for the single-molecular-emitter WOLEDs, or (ii) a high efficiency of 35.4 lm/W can be yielded. For the dual-molecular-emitter (yellow/red emitters) DF-WOLED, a high CRI of 85 and low correlated color temperature of 2376 K at 1000 cd/m2 have been simultaneously achieved, which has not been reported by previous DF-WOLEDs. Such presented findings may unlock an alternative avenue to the simplified but high-performance WOLEDs.

  16. Impact of Molecular Orientation and Packing Density on Electronic Polarization in the Bulk and at Surfaces of Organic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The polarizable environment surrounding charge carriers in organic semiconductors impacts the efficiency of the charge transport process. Here, we consider two representative organic semiconductors, tetracene and rubrene, and evaluate

  17. Utilization of low molecular weight organics by soil microorganisms: combination of 13C-labelling with PLFA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna; Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Microbial metabolisation is the main transformation pathway of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), but detailed knowledge concerning the fate of LMWOS in soils is strongly limited. Considering that various LMWOS classes enter biochemical cycles at different steps, we hypothesise that the percentage of their LMWOS-Carbon (C) used for microbial biomass (MB) production and consequently medium-term stabilisation in soil is different. We traced the three main groups of LMWOS: amino acids, sugars and carboxylic acids, by uniformly labelled 13C-alanine, -glutamate, -glucose, -ribose, -acetate and -palmitate. Incorporation of 13C from these LMWOS into MB (fumigation-extraction method) and into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) (Bligh-Dyer extraction, purification and GC-C-IRMS measurement) was investigated under field conditions 3 d and 10 d after LMWOS application. The activity of microbial utilization of LMWOS for cell membrane construction was estimated by replacement of PLFA-C with 13C. Decomposition of LMWOS-C comprised 20-65% of the total label, whereas incorporation of 13C into MB amounted to 20-50% of initially applied 13C on day three and was reduced to 5-30% on day 10. Incorporation of 13C-labelled LMWOS into MB followed the trend sugars > carboxylic acids > amino acids. Differences in microbial utilisation between LMWOS were observed mainly at day 10. Thus, instead of initial rapid uptake, further metabolism within microbial cells accounts for the individual fate of C from different LMWOS in soils. Incorporation of 13C from each LMWOS into each PLFA occurred, which reflects the ubiquitous ability of all functional microbial groups for LMWOS utilization. The preferential incorporation of palmitate can be attributed to its role as a direct precursor for many fatty acids (FAs) and PLFA formation. Higher incorporation of alanine and glucose compared to glutamate, ribose and acetate reflect the preferential use of glycolysis-derived substances in the FAs

  18. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π

  19. The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model: a unified model with different ranges of complexity based on the molecular surrogate approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, F.; Sartelet, K.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper the Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model is presented. This model determines the partitioning of organic compounds between the gas and particle phases. It is designed to be modular with different user options depending on the computation time and the complexity required by the user. This model is based on the molecular surrogate approach, in which each surrogate compound is associated with a molecular structure to estimate some properties and parameters (hygroscopicity, absorption into the aqueous phase of particles, activity coefficients and phase separation). Each surrogate can be hydrophilic (condenses only into the aqueous phase of particles), hydrophobic (condenses only into the organic phases of particles) or both (condenses into both the aqueous and the organic phases of particles). Activity coefficients are computed with the UNIFAC (UNIversal Functional group Activity Coefficient; Fredenslund et al., 1975) thermodynamic model for short-range interactions and with the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) parameterization for medium- and long-range interactions between electrolytes and organic compounds. Phase separation is determined by Gibbs energy minimization. The user can choose between an equilibrium representation and a dynamic representation of organic aerosols (OAs). In the equilibrium representation, compounds in the particle phase are assumed to be at equilibrium with the gas phase. However, recent studies show that the organic aerosol is not at equilibrium with the gas phase because the organic phases could be semi-solid (very viscous liquid phase). The condensation-evaporation of organic compounds could then be limited by the diffusion in the organic phases due to the high viscosity. An implicit dynamic representation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) is available in SOAP with OAs divided into layers, the first layer being at the center of the particle (slowly

  20. Molecular and optical properties of tree-derived dissolved organic matter in throughfall and stemflow from live oaks and eastern red cedar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbins, Aron; Silva, Leticia M.; Dittmar, Thorsten; Van Stan, John T.

    2017-03-01

    Studies of dissolved organic matter (DOM) transport through terrestrial aquatic systems usually start at the stream. However, the interception of rainwater by vegetation marks the beginning of the terrestrial hydrological cycle making trees the headwaters of aquatic carbon cycling. Rainwater interacts with trees picking up tree-DOM, which is then exported from the tree in stemflow and throughfall. Stemflow denotes water flowing down the tree trunk, while throughfall is the water that drips through the leaves of the canopy. We report the concentrations, optical properties (light absorbance) and molecular signatures (ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry) of tree-DOM in throughfall and stemflow from two tree species (live oak and eastern red cedar) with varying epiphyte cover on Skidaway Island, Savannah, Georgia, USA. Both stemflow and throughfall were enriched in DOM compared to rainwater, indicating trees were a significant source of DOM. The optical and molecular properties of tree-DOM were broadly consistent with those of DOM in other aquatic ecosystems. Stemflow was enriched in highly colored DOM compared to throughfall. Elemental formulas identified clustered the samples into three groups: oak stemflow, oak throughfall and cedar. The molecular properties of each cluster are consistent with an autochthonous aromatic-rich source associated with the trees, their epiphytes and the microhabitats they support. Elemental formulas enriched in oak stemflow were more diverse, enriched in aromatic formulas, and of higher molecular mass than for other tree-DOM classes, suggesting greater contributions from fresh and partially modified plant-derived organics. Oak throughfall was enriched in lower molecular weight, aliphatic and sugar formulas, suggesting greater contributions from foliar surfaces. While the optical properties and the majority of the elemental formulas within tree-DOM were consistent with vascular plant-derived organics, condensed aromatic formulas were

  1. Technical Note: Molecular characterization of aerosol-derived water soluble organic carbon using ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Dickhut

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the acknowledged relevance of aerosol-derived water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC to climate and biogeochemical cycling, characterization of aerosol WSOC has been limited. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS was utilized in this study to provide detailed molecular level characterization of the high molecular weight (HMW; m/z>223 component of aerosol-derived WSOC collected from rural sites in Virginia and New York, USA. More than 3000 peaks were detected by ESI FT-ICR MS within a m/z range of 223–600 for each sample. Approximately 86% (Virginia and 78% (New York of these peaks were assigned molecular formulas using only carbon (C, hydrogen (H, oxygen (O, nitrogen (N, and sulfur (S as elemental constituents. H/C and O/C molar ratios were plotted on van Krevelen diagrams and indicated a strong contribution of lignin-like and lipid-like compounds to the aerosol-derived WSOC samples. Approximately 1–4% of the peaks in the aerosol-derived WSOC mass spectra were classified as black carbon (BC on the basis of double bond equivalents calculated from the assigned molecular formulas. In addition, several high-magnitude peaks in the mass spectra of samples from both sites corresponded to molecular formulas proposed in previous secondary organic aerosol (SOA laboratory investigations indicating that SOAs are important constituents of the WSOC. Overall, ESI FT-ICR MS provides a level of resolution adequate for detailed compositional and source information of the HMW constituents of aerosol-derived WSOC.

  2. Gemcitabine-(5'-phosphoramidate)-[anti-IGF-1R]: molecular design, synthetic organic chemistry reactions, and antineoplastic cytotoxic potency in populations of pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Cody P; Narayanan, Lakshmi

    2017-03-01

    One molecular-based approach that increases potency and reduces dose-limited sequela is the implementation of selective 'targeted' delivery strategies for conventional small molecular weight chemotherapeutic agents. Descriptions of the molecular design and organic chemistry reactions that are applicable for synthesis of covalent gemcitabine-monophosphate immunochemotherapeutics have to date not been reported. The covalent immunopharmaceutical, gemcitabine-(5'-phosphoramidate)-[