WorldWideScience

Sample records for spi-ms molecular organic

  1. Organic and molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blundell, S J; Pratt, F L

    2004-01-01

    Historically most materials in magnetic applications are based on inorganic materials. Recently, however, organic and molecular materials have begun to show increasing promise. Purely organic ferromagnets, based upon nitronyl nitroxide radicals, show long range magnetic order at very low temperatures in the region of 1 K, while sulfur based radicals show weak ferromagnetism at temperatures up to 36 K. It is also possible to prepare molecule based magnets in which transition metal ions are used to provide the magnetic moment, but organic groups mediate the interactions. This strategy has produced magnetic materials with a large variety of structures, including chains, layered systems and three-dimensional networks, some of which show ordering at room temperature and some of which have very high coercivity. Even if long range magnetic order is not achieved, the spin crossover effect may be observed, which has important applications. Further magnetic materials may be obtained by constructing charge transfer salts, which can produce metallic molecular magnets. Another development is single-molecule magnets, formed by preparing small magnetic clusters. These materials can show macroscopic quantum tunnelling of the magnetization and may have uses as memory devices or in quantum computation applications. (topical review)

  2. Organic Molecular Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Schwoerer, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the physical aspects of organic solids. All phenomena which are necessary in order to understand modern technical applications are being dealt with in a way which makes the concepts of the topics accessible for students. The chapters - from the basics, production and characterization of organic solids and layers to organic semiconductors, superconductors and opto-electronical applications - have been arranged in a logical and well thought-out order.

  3. Soil Organic Matter (SOM): Molecular Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Amity

    2017-01-12

    Molecular simulation is a powerful tool used to gain an atomistic, molecular, and nanoscale level understanding of the structure, dynamics, and interactions from adsorption on minerals and assembly in aggregates of soil organic matter (SOM). Given the importance of SOM fate and persistence in soils and the current knowledge gaps, applications of atomistic scale simulations to study the complex compounds in SOM and their interactions in self-assembled aggregates composed of different organic matter compounds and with mineral surfaces of different types common in soils are few and far between. Here, we describe various molecular simulation methods that are currently in use in various areas and applicable to SOM research, followed by a brief survey of specific applications to SOM research and an illustration with our own recent efforts in this area. We conclude with an outlook and the challenges for future research in this area.

  4. Contorted Organic Semiconductors for Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu

    This thesis focuses on the synthesis, properties and applications of two types of contorted organic molecules: contorted molecular ribbons and conjugated corrals. We utilized the power of reaction chemistry to writing information into conjugated molecules with contorted structures and studied "structure-property" relationships. The unique properties of the molecules were expressed in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as field-effect transistors, solar cells, photodetectors, etc. In Chapter 2, I describe the design and synthesis of a new graphene ribbon architecture that consists of perylenediimide (PDI) subunits fused together by ethylene bridges. We created a prototype series of oligomers consisting of the dimer, trimer, and tetramer. The steric congestion at the fusion point between the PDI units creates helical junctions, and longer oligomers form helical ribbons. Thin films of these oligomers form the active layer in n-type field effect transistors. UV-vis spectroscopy reveals the emergence of an intense long-wavelength transition in the tetramer. From DFT calculations, we find that the HOMO-2 to LUMO transition is isoenergetic with the HOMO to LUMO transition in the tetramer. We probe these transitions directly using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The HOMO-2 to LUMO transition electronically connects the PDI subunits with the ethylene bridges, and its energy depends on the length of the oligomer. In Chapter 3, I describe an efficiency of 6.1% for a solution processed non-fullerene solar cell using a helical PDI dimer as the electron acceptor. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces, indicating that charge carriers are created from photogenerated excitons in both the electron donor and acceptor phases. Light-intensity-dependent current?voltage measurements suggested different recombination rates under short-circuit and open-circuit conditions. In

  5. Nonequilibrium emergent phenomena in organic molecular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrano, Matteo

    2015-07-15

    The manipulation of matter with ultrashort laser pulses is a relevant research field from both a fundamental and an applied perspective, owing to the efficient coupling to the electronic degrees of freedom on femtosecond timescales and the ability to induce transient phases that cannot be realized in equilibrium scenarios. Strongly correlated materials are a natural environment for the observation of such novel and emergent out-of-equilibrium physics because small modifications to the electron-electron interactions can induce transitions between remarkably different macroscopic phases. One of the most effective means of modifying the effective electron-electron interactions is to perturb the crystal structure through pressure, strain or even light. However, it remains largely unexplored how perturbing the structural degrees of freedom affects the electron dynamics of the transiently driven states and how the interplay of correlations and electron-lattice interactions determine the intrinsic timescales of these nonequilibrium states. This thesis investigates how to control the light-induced nonequilibrium electronic properties in strongly correlated organics, that are highly tunable with moderate variations of external parameters, by perturbing their structural degrees of freedom, either via static pressures or vibrational excitation. We study the role of correlations in determining the relaxation rate of holes (holons) and double occupancies (doublons) in a solid state Mott insulator, the ET-F{sub 2}TCNQ, driven across a transient insulator-to-metal transition. By mapping holon-doublon lifetimes onto the ground-state electronic interactions, we found that the decay rate of the photoinjected quasiparticles depends on the degree of correlation between carriers and is affected by the presence of a competition between local recombination and delocalization of holon-doublon pairs. By optically controlling the effective correlations in organic molecular crystals through

  6. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer/Metal Organic Framework Based Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhong Guo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review describes recent advances in the concept of molecular imprinting using metal organic frameworks (MOF for development of chemical sensors. Two main strategies regarding the fabrication, performance and applications of recent sensors based on molecularly imprinted polymers associated with MOF are presented: molecularly imprinted MOF films and molecularly imprinted core-shell nanoparticles using MOF as core. The associated transduction modes are also discussed. A brief conclusion and future expectations are described herein.

  7. Organically-bound sulphur in the geosphere : a molecular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the results of molecular organic geochemical investigations into the structure and origin of organic sulphur compounds (OSC) and sulphur-containing moieties in macromolecular organic matter (i.e. kerogen, coal and asphaltenes) occurring in the geosphere are described. In the

  8. Molecular organic networks: A step beyond flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Manfred

    2017-12-01

    Non-covalent interactions can organize planar molecules into two-dimensional arrays. It has now been shown that such arrays can be combined at the solid-liquid interface into bilayered heterostructures.

  9. Organically bound sulphur in coal: A molecular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1992-01-01

    A critical review of literature concerning the molecular characterization of low and high molecular weight organosulphur constitutents present in coal as well as a detailed analysis of organic sulphur compounds present in flash evaporates and pyrolysates of a suite of coals ranging in sulphur

  10. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemst, J.D.H. van

    2000-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle (chapter 1). However, not much is known about the molecular composition and the origin of DOM. The study described in this thesis was conducted to gain more knowledge on the molecular composition and the origin of

  11. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heemst, J.D.H.

    2000-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle (chapter 1). However, not much is known about the molecular composition and the origin of DOM. The study described in this thesis was conducted to gain more knowledge on the molecular composition and the origin of DOM.

  12. Metal Organic Framework: Crystalline Stacked Molecular Containers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 12. Metal Organic Framework: ... Ramanathan Vaidhyanathan. General Article Volume 19 Issue 12 December 2014 pp 1147-1157 ... Vaidhyanathan1. Department of Chemistry Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Pune, India.

  13. The molecular spin filter constructed from 1D organic chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Ning; Wang, Baolin; Bian, Baoan

    2014-01-01

    We proposed a molecular spin filter, which is constructed from the 1D metallic organic chain (Fe n+1 (C 6 H 4 ) n ). The spin-polarized transport properties of the molecular spin filter are explored by combining density functional theory with nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. Theoretical results reveal that Fe n+1 (C 6 H 4 ) n molecular chain exhibits robust spin filtering effect, and only the spin-down electrons can transmit through the molecular chain. At the given bias voltage window [−1 eV,1 eV], the calculated spin filter efficiency is close to 100% in the case of n≥3. We find that the effect of spin polarization origin from both Fe n+1 and (C 6 H 4 ) n . In addition, negative difference resistance behavior appears in Fe n+1 (C 6 H 4 ) n molecular chain. The results can help us understand the spin transport properties of organic molecular chain. - Highlights: • Theoretical results reveal that Fe n+1 (C 6 H 4 ) n molecular chain exhibits robust spin filtering effect. • The effect of spin polarization origin from both of Fe n+1 and (C 6 H 4 ) n . • Negative difference resistance behavior appears in Fe n+1 (C 6 H 4 ) n molecular chain

  14. The molecular nature of photovoltage losses in organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schlenker, Cody W.

    2011-01-01

    Since the inception of heterojunction organic photovoltaic research the organic/organic interface has been thought to play a crucial role in determining the magnitude of the open-circuit voltage. Yet, the task of defining the molecular properties dictating the photovoltage delivered by these devices, that employ mixed or neat layers of different organic molecules to convert incident photons to electricity, is still an active area of research. This will likely be a key step in designing the new materials required for improving future device efficiencies. With the intent to underscore the importance of considering both thermodynamic and kinetic factors, this article highlights recent progress in elucidating molecular characteristics dictating photovoltage losses in heterojunction organic photovoltaics. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Porous Organic Cage Thin Films and Molecular-Sieving Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qilei; Jiang, Shan; Hasell, Tom; Liu, Ming; Sun, Shijing; Cheetham, Anthony K; Sivaniah, Easan; Cooper, Andrew I

    2016-04-06

    Porous organic cage molecules are fabricated into thin films and molecular-sieving membranes. Cage molecules are solution cast on various substrates to form amorphous thin films, with the structures tuned by tailoring the cage chemistry and processing conditions. For the first time, uniform and pinhole-free microporous cage thin films are formed and demonstrated as molecular-sieving membranes for selective gas separation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Molecular evolution, intracellular organization, and the quinary structure of proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    McConkey, E H

    1982-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows that at least half of 370 denatured polypeptides from hamster cells and human cells are indistinguishable in terms of isoelectric points and molecular weights. Molecular evolution may have been more conservative for this set of proteins than sequence studies on soluble proteins have implied. This may be a consequence of complexities of intracellular organization and the numerous macromolecular interactions in which most ...

  17. Electronic properties of organic monolayers and molecular devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E-mail: dominique.vuillaume@iemn.univ-lille1.fr. Abstract. We review some of our recent experimental results on charge transport in or- ganic nanostructures such as self-assembled monolayer and monolayers of organic semicon- ductors. We describe a molecular rectifying junction made from a sequential self-assembly.

  18. Molecular transport behaviour of organic solvents through halloysite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    925–933. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Molecular transport behaviour of organic ... Micro and Nano Materials Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Institute of Technical Education and Research,. Siksha 'O' Anusandhan ... of the performance of polymers in the environment of hazardous solvents, vapours and tempera-.

  19. Molecular studies of organic residues preserved in ancient vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudemans, Tatiana Frederica Margreta

    2006-01-01

    This study is aimed at the molecular characterisation of solid organic (food) residues preserved in an assemblage of vessels recovered from an indigenous settlement dating back to the Iron Age and Roman period at Uitgeest – Groot Dorregeest (The Netherlands). Analytical thermal-fragmentation

  20. Promoting Representational Competence with Molecular Models in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Andrew T.; Gainer, Morgan; Padalkar, Shamin; Hegarty, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Mastering the many different diagrammatic representations of molecules used in organic chemistry is challenging for students. This article summarizes recent research showing that manipulating 3-D molecular models can facilitate the understanding and use of these representations. Results indicate that students are more successful in translating…

  1. Hydrothermally stable molecular separation membranes from organically linked silica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castricum, H.L.; Ashima sah, A.S.; Kreiter, Robert; Blank, David H.A.; Vente, Jaap F.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2008-01-01

    A highly hydrothermally stable microporous network material has been developed that can be applied in energy-efficient molecular sieving. The material was synthesized by employing organically bridged monomers in acid-catalysed sol–gel hydrolysis and condensation, and is composed of covalently bonded

  2. Hydrothermally stable molecular separation membranes from organically linked silica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castricum, H.L.; Sah, A.; Kreiter, R.; Blank, D.H.A.; Vente, J.F.; ten Elshof, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    A highly hydrothermally stable microporous network material has been developed that can be applied in energy-efficient molecular sieving. The material was synthesized by employing organically bridged monomers in acid-catalysed sol-gel hydrolysis and condensation, and is composed of covalently bonded

  3. Molecular and polymeric organic semiconductors for applications in photovoltaic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Meinhardt, G

    2000-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on molecular as well as polymeric semiconductors were investigated and characterized. The organic materials presented here exhibit the advantages of low price, low processing costs and the possibility of tuning their optical properties. The photovoltaic properties were investigated by photocurrent action spectroscopy and I/V-characterization and the electric field distribution in each layer by electroabsorption spectroscopy. Single layer devices of molecular semiconductors and semiconducting polymers like methyl-substituted polyparaphenylene, CN-Ether-PPV, copper-phthalocyanine, the terryleneimide DOTer, the perylene derivatives BBP-perylene and polyBBP-perylene show low photocurrents as well as a small photovoltaic effect in their pristine form. One way to enhance the performance is to blend the active layer with molecular dopands like a soluble form of titaniumoxophthalocyanine or the aromatic macromolecule RS19 or to combine two organic semiconductors in heterostructure devices. ...

  4. Molecular Sieving and Current Rectification Properties of Thin Organic Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceta, Yara; Bergamini, Jean-Francois; Lagrost, Corinne; Hapiot, Philippe; Leroux, Yann R

    2018-02-20

    For the purpose of preparing well-organized functional surfaces, carbon and gold substrates were modified using electroreduction of a tetrahedral-shape preorganized tetra-aryldiazonium salt, leading to the deposition of ultrathin organic films. Characterization of the modified surfaces has been performed using cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared absorption spectroscopy, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and contact angle measurements. The specific design of the tetra-aryldiazonium salts leads to an intrinsic structuring of the resulting organic films, allowing molecular sieving and current rectification properties toward redox probes in solution.

  5. Molecular and regulatory mechanisms controlling floral organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Darragh; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Wellmer, Frank

    2016-05-01

    The genetic and molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation of angiosperm flowers have been studied extensively for nearly three decades. This work has led to detailed insights into the gene regulatory networks that control this vital developmental process in plants. Here, we review some of the key findings in the field of flower development and discuss open questions that must be addressed in order to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of flower formation. In particular, we focus on the specification of the different types of floral organs and on how the morphogenesis of these organs is controlled to give rise to mature flowers. Central to this process are the floral organ identity genes, which encode members of the family of MADS-domain transcription factors. We summarize what is currently known about the functions of these master regulators and discuss a working model for the molecular mechanism that may underlie their activities. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Biomineralization-inspired synthesis of functional organic/inorganic hybrid materials: organic molecular control of self-organization of hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Atsushi; Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Oda, Mayumi; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Nishimura, Tatsuya; Kato, Takashi

    2015-01-28

    Organisms produce various organic/inorganic hybrid materials, which are called biominerals. They form through the self-organization of organic molecules and inorganic elements under ambient conditions. Biominerals often have highly organized and hierarchical structures from nanometer to macroscopic length scales, resulting in their remarkable physical and chemical properties that cannot be obtained by simple accumulation of their organic and inorganic constituents. These observations motivate us to create novel functional materials exhibiting properties superior to conventional materials--both synthetic and natural. Herein, we introduce recent progress in understanding biomineralization processes at the molecular level and the development of organic/inorganic hybrid materials by these processes. We specifically outline fundamental molecular studies on silica, iron oxide, and calcium carbonate biomineralization and describe material synthesis based on these mechanisms. These approaches allow us to design a variety of advanced hybrid materials with desired morphologies, sizes, compositions, and structures through environmentally friendly synthetic routes using functions of organic molecules.

  7. Molecular dynamic simulations of the sputtering of multilayer organic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Postawa, Z; Piaskowy, J; Krantzman, K; Winograd, N; Garrison, B J

    2003-01-01

    Sputtering of organic overlayers has been modeled using molecular dynamics computer simulations. The investigated systems are composed of benzene molecules condensed into one, two and three layers on an Ag left brace 1 1 1 right brace surface. The formed organic overlayers were bombarded with 4 keV Ar projectiles at normal incidence. The development of the collision cascade in the organic overlayer was investigated. The sputtering yield, mass, internal and kinetic energy distributions of ejected particles have been analyzed as a function of the thickness of the organic layer. The results show that all emission characteristics are sensitive to the variation of layer thickness. Although most of the ejected intact benzene molecules originate from the topmost layer, the emission of particles located initially in second and third layers is significant. The analysis indicates that the metallic substrate plays a dominant role in the ejection of intact organic molecules.

  8. From molecular design and materials construction to organic nanophotonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Nanophotonics has recently received broad research interest, since it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations in electronic circuits. Diverse optical materials down to the wavelength scale are required to develop nanophotonic devices, including functional components for light emission, transmission, and detection. During the past decade, the chemists have made their own contributions to this interdisciplinary field, especially from the controlled fabrication of nanophotonic molecules and materials. In this context, organic micro- or nanocrystals have been developed as a very promising kind of building block in the construction of novel units for integrated nanophotonics, mainly due to the great versatility in organic molecular structures and their flexibility for the subsequent processing. Following the pioneering works on organic nanolasers and optical waveguides, the organic nanophotonic materials and devices have attracted increasing interest and developed rapidly during the past few years. In this Account, we review our research on the photonic performance of molecular micro- or nanostructures and the latest breakthroughs toward organic nanophotonic devices. Overall, the versatile features of organic materials are highlighted, because they brings tunable optical properties based on molecular design, size-dependent light confinement in low-dimensional structures, and various device geometries for nanophotonic integration. The molecular diversity enables abundant optical transitions in conjugated π-electron systems, and thus brings specific photonic functions into molecular aggregates. The morphology of these micro- or nanostructures can be further controlled based on the weak intermolecular interactions during molecular assembly process, making the aggregates show photon confinement or light guiding properties as nanophotonic materials. By adoption of some active processes in the composite of two or more

  9. Organization of a radioisotope based molecular biology laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-12-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has revolutionized the application of molecular techniques to medicine. Together with other molecular biology techniques it is being increasingly applied to human health for identifying prognostic markers and drug resistant profiles, developing diagnostic tests and genotyping systems and for treatment follow-up of certain diseases in developed countries. Developing Member States have expressed their need to also benefit from the dissemination of molecular advances. The use of radioisotopes, as a step in the detection process or for increased sensitivity and specificity is well established, making it ideally suitable for technology transfer. Many molecular based projects using isotopes for detecting and studying micro organisms, hereditary and neoplastic diseases are received for approval every year. In keeping with the IAEA's programme, several training activities and seminars have been organized to enhance the capabilities of developing Member States to employ in vitro nuclear medicine technologies for managing their important health problems and for undertaking related basic and clinical research. The background material for this publication was collected at training activities and from feedback received from participants at research and coordination meetings. In addition, a consultants' meeting was held in June 2004 to compile the first draft of this report. Previous IAEA TECDOCS, namely IAEA-TECDOC-748 and IAEA-TECDOC-1001, focused on molecular techniques and their application to medicine while the present publication provides information on organization of the laboratory, quality assurance and radio-safety. The technology has specific requirements of the way the laboratory is organized (e.g. for avoiding contamination and false positives in PCR) and of quality assurance in order to provide accurate information to decision makers. In addition while users of the technology accept the scientific rationale of using radio

  10. Improving Molecular Level Chemical Speciation of Organic Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worton, D. R.; Decker, M.; Isaacman, G. A.; Chan, A.; Wilson, K. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    A substantial fraction of fine mode aerosols are organic with the majority formed in the atmosphere through oxidation of gas phase compounds emitted from a variety of natural and man-made sources. As a result, organic aerosols are comprised of thousands of individual organic species whose complexity increases exponentially with carbon number and degree of atmospheric oxidation. Chemical characterization of individual compounds present in this complex mixture provides information on sources and transformation processes that are critical for apportioning organic carbon from an often convoluted mixture of sources and to constrain oxidation mechanisms needed for atmospheric models. These compounds also affect the physical and optical properties of the aerosol but the vast majority remain unidentified and missing from published mass spectral libraries because of difficulties in separating and identifying them. We have developed improved methodologies for chemical identification in order to better understand complex environmental mixtures. Our approach has been to combine two-dimensional gas chromatography with high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-HRTOFMS) and both traditional electron ionization (EI) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization. GC×GC provides improved separation of individual compounds over traditional one dimensional GC and minimizes co-elution of peaks resulting in mass spectra that are virtually free of interferences. VUV ionization is a ';soft' ionization technique that reduces fragmentation and enhances the abundance of the parent or molecular ion, which when combined with high resolution mass spectrometry can provide molecular formulas for chromatographic peaks. We demonstrate our methodology by applying it to identify more than 500 individual compounds in aerosol filter samples collected at Blodgett Forest, a rural site in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Using the EI NIST mass spectral library and molecular formulas determined

  11. Organic Cocrystals: New Strategy for Molecular Collaborative Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zhu, Weigang; Dong, Huanli; Zhang, Xiaotao; Li, Rongjin; Hu, Wenping

    2016-12-01

    Organic cocrystals that are composed of two or more components usually exhibit novel, unpredictable, and even unique properties rather than a simple combination of the properties of their components, such as white-light emission, ambipolar charge transport, nonlinear optics, and ferroelectricity. Since cocrystal engineering represents a novel strategy for synthesizing multifunctional materials, which opens the door for molecular collaborative innovation, it has aroused much attention in recent years. However, as it is also a relatively new research field, it is only in its early stages of development. In order to provide readers with an understanding of the future design of cocrystals for potential applications, a brief review of organic cocrystals is presented here, including an introduction to organic cocrystals as well as discussions of cocrystal preparation, methods and techniques of characterization, and multifunctional applications of cocrystals. Moreover, the outlook for further studies and applications of cocrystal engineering is considered.

  12. Capture of organic iodides from nuclear waste by metal-organic framework-based molecular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baiyan; Dong, Xinglong; Wang, Hao; Ma, Dingxuan; Tan, Kui; Jensen, Stephanie; Deibert, Benjamin J; Butler, Joseph; Cure, Jeremy; Shi, Zhan; Thonhauser, Timo; Chabal, Yves J; Han, Yu; Li, Jing

    2017-09-07

    Effective capture of radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste remains a significant challenge due to the drawbacks of current adsorbents such as low uptake capacity, high cost, and non-recyclability. We report here a general approach to overcome this challenge by creating radioactive organic iodide molecular traps through functionalization of metal-organic framework materials with tertiary amine-binding sites. The molecular trap exhibits a high CH 3 I saturation uptake capacity of 71 wt% at 150 °C, which is more than 340% higher than the industrial adsorbent Ag 0 @MOR under identical conditions. These functionalized metal-organic frameworks also serve as good adsorbents at low temperatures. Furthermore, the resulting adsorbent can be recycled multiple times without loss of capacity, making recyclability a reality. In combination with its chemical and thermal stability, high capture efficiency and low cost, the adsorbent demonstrates promise for industrial radioactive organic iodides capture from nuclear waste. The capture mechanism was investigated by experimental and theoretical methods.Capturing radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste is important for safe nuclear energy usage, but remains a significant challenge. Here, Li and co-workers fabricate a stable metal-organic framework functionalized with tertiary amine groups that exhibits high capacities for radioactive organic iodides uptake.

  13. Capture of organic iodides from nuclear waste by metal-organic framework-based molecular traps

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Baiyan

    2017-09-01

    Effective capture of radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste remains a significant challenge due to the drawbacks of current adsorbents such as low uptake capacity, high cost, and non-recyclability. We report here a general approach to overcome this challenge by creating radioactive organic iodide molecular traps through functionalization of metal-organic framework materials with tertiary amine-binding sites. The molecular trap exhibits a high CH3I saturation uptake capacity of 71 wt% at 150 °C, which is more than 340% higher than the industrial adsorbent Ag0@MOR under identical conditions. These functionalized metal-organic frameworks also serve as good adsorbents at low temperatures. Furthermore, the resulting adsorbent can be recycled multiple times without loss of capacity, making recyclability a reality. In combination with its chemical and thermal stability, high capture efficiency and low cost, the adsorbent demonstrates promise for industrial radioactive organic iodides capture from nuclear waste. The capture mechanism was investigated by experimental and theoretical methods.Capturing radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste is important for safe nuclear energy usage, but remains a significant challenge. Here, Li and co-workers fabricate a stable metal-organic framework functionalized with tertiary amine groups that exhibits high capacities for radioactive organic iodides uptake.

  14. Characterisation of molecular thin films grown by organic molecular beam deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Bayliss, S M

    2000-01-01

    This work concerns the growth and characterisation of molecular thin films in an ultra high vacuum regime by organic molecular beam deposition (OMBD). Films of three different molecular materials are grown, namely free base phthalocyanine (H sub 2 Pc), perylene 3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) and aluminium tris-8-hydroxyquinoline (Alq sub 3). The relationship between the growth parameters such as film thickness, growth rate, and substrate temperature during and after growth, and the structural, optical and morphological properties of the film are investigated. These investigations are carried out using various ex-situ techniques. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and electronic absorption spectroscopy are used to probe the bulk film characteristics, whilst Nomarski microscopy and atomic force microscopy are used to study the surface morphology. Three different levels of influence of the growth parameters on the film properties are observed. In the case of H sub 2 Pc, two crystal phases are fo...

  15. Molecular Determinants of Dissolved Organic Matter Reactivity in Lake Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Mostovaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lakes in the boreal region have been recognized as the biogeochemical hotspots, yet many questions regarding the regulators of organic matter processing in these systems remain open. Molecular composition can be an important determinant of dissolved organic matter (DOM fate in freshwater systems, but many aspects of this relationship remain unclear due to the complexity of DOM and its interactions in the natural environment. Here, we combine ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS with kinetic modeling of decay of >1,300 individual DOM molecular formulae identified by mass spectrometry, to evaluate the role of specific molecular characteristics in decomposition of lake water DOM. Our data is derived from a 4 months microbial decomposition experiment, carried out on water from three Swedish lakes, with the set-up including natural lake water, as well as the lake water pretreated with UV light. The relative decay rate of every molecular formula was estimated by fitting a single exponential model to the change in FT-ICR-MS signal intensities over decomposition time. We found a continuous range of exponential decay coefficients (kexp within different groups of compounds and show that for highly unsaturated and phenolic compounds the distribution of kexp was shifted toward the lowest values. Contrary to this general trend, plant-derived polyphenols and polycondensed aromatics were on average more reactive than compounds with an intermediate aromaticity. The decay rate of aromatic compounds increased with increasing nominal oxidation state of carbon, and molecular mass in some cases showed an inverse relationship with kexp in the UV-manipulated treatment. Further, we observe an increase in formulae-specific kexp as a result of the UV pretreatment. General trends in reactivity identified among major compound groups emphasize the importance of the intrinsic controllers of lake water DOM decay. However, we additionally indicate that each

  16. Molecular Understanding of Organic Solar Cells: The Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2009-11-17

    (Figure presented) Our objective in this Account is 3-fold. First, we provide an overview of the optical and electronic processes that take place in a solid-state organic solar cell, which we define as a cell in which the semiconducting materials between the electrodes are organic, be them polymers, oligomers, or small molecules; this discussion is also meant to set the conceptual framework in which many of the contributions to this Special Issue on Photovoltaics can We viewed. We successively turn our attention to (i) optical absorption and exciton formation, (ii) exciton migration to the donor - acceptor interface, (iii) exciton dissociation into charge carriers, resulting in the appearance of holes in the donor and electrons in the acceptor, (iv) charge-carrier mobility, and (v) charge collection at the electrodes. For each of these processes, we also describe the theoretical challenges that need to be overcome to gain a comprehensive understanding at the molecular level. Finally, we highlight recent theoretical advances, in particular regarding the determination of the energetics and dynamics at organic - organic interfaces, and underline that the right balance needs to be found for the optimization of material parameters that often result in opposite effects on the photovoltaic performance. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  17. Reverse osmosis molecular differentiation of organic liquids using carbon molecular sieve membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dong-Yeun; McCool, Benjamin A.; Deckman, Harry W.; Lively, Ryan P.

    2016-08-01

    Liquid-phase separations of similarly sized organic molecules using membranes is a major challenge for energy-intensive industrial separation processes. We created free-standing carbon molecular sieve membranes that translate the advantages of reverse osmosis for aqueous separations to the separation of organic liquids. Polymer precursors were cross-linked with a one-pot technique that protected the porous morphology of the membranes from thermally induced structural rearrangement during carbonization. Permeation studies using benzene derivatives whose kinetic diameters differ by less than an angstrom show kinetically selective organic liquid reverse osmosis. Ratios of single-component fluxes for para- and ortho-xylene exceeding 25 were observed and para- and ortho- liquid mixtures were efficiently separated, with an equimolar feed enriched to 81 mole % para-xylene, without phase change and at ambient temperature.

  18. Electronic absorption spectra and geometry of organic molecules an application of molecular orbital theory

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Hiroshi

    1967-01-01

    Electronic Absorption Spectra and Geometry of Organic Molecules: An Application of Molecular Orbital Theory focuses on electronic absorption spectra of organic compounds and molecules. The book begins with the discussions on molecular spectra, electronic absorption spectra of organic compounds, and practical measures of absorption intensity. The text also focuses on molecular orbital theory and group theory. Molecular state functions; fundamental postulates of quantum theory; representation of symmetry groups; and symmetry operations and symmetry groups are described. The book also dis

  19. Molecular Analyzer for Complex Refractory Organic-Rich Surfaces (MACROS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Cook, Jamie E.; Balvin, Manuel; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Li, Xiang; Grubisic, Andrej; Cornish, Timothy; Ferrance, Jerome; Southard, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    The Molecular Analyzer for Complex Refractory Organic-rich Surfaces, MACROS, is a novel instrument package being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. MACROS enables the in situ characterization of a sample's composition by coupling two powerful techniques into one compact instrument package: (1) laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDMS) for broad detection of inorganic mineral composition and non-volatile organics, and (2) liquid-phase extraction methods to gently isolate the soluble organic and inorganic fraction of a planetary powder for enrichment and detailed analysis by liquid chromatographic separation coupled to LDMS. The LDMS is capable of positive and negative ion detection, precision mass selection, and fragment analysis. Two modes are included for LDMS: single laser LDMS as the broad survey mode and two step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS). The liquid-phase extraction will be done in a newly designed extraction module (EM) prototype, providing selectivity in the analysis of a complex sample. For the sample collection, a diamond drill front end will be used to collect rock/icy powder. With all these components and capabilities together, MACROS offers a versatile analytical instrument for a mission targeting an icy moon, carbonaceous asteroid, or comet, to fully characterize the surface composition and advance our understanding of the chemical inventory present on that body.

  20. Catchment scale molecular composition of hydrologically mobilized dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeke, Julia; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J.; Oosterwoud, Marieke R.; Bornmann, Katrin; Tittel, Jörg; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Increasing concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in rivers of temperate catchments in Europe and North Amerika impose new technical challenges for drinking water production. The driving factors for this decadal increase in DOM concentration are not conclusive and changes in annual temperatures, precipitation and atmospheric deposition are intensely discussed. It is known that the majority of DOM is released by few but large hydrologic events, mobilizing DOM from riparian wetlands for export by rivers and streams. The mechanisms of this mobilization and the resulting molecular composition of the released DOM may be used to infer long-term changes in the biogeochemistry of the respective catchment. Event-based samples collected over two years from streams in three temperate catchments in the German mid-range mountains were analyzed after solid-phase extraction of DOM for their molecular composition by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Hydrologic conditions, land use and water chemistry parameters were used to complement the molecular analysis. The molecular composition of the riverine DOM was strongly dependent on the magnitude of the hydrologic events, with unsaturated, oxygen-enriched compounds being preferentially mobilized by large events. This pattern is consistent with an increase in dissolved iron and aluminum concentrations. In contrast, the relative proportions of nitrogen and sulfur bearing compounds increased with an increased agricultural land use but were less affected by the mobilization events. Co-precipitation experiments with colloidal aluminum showed that unsaturated and oxygen-rich compounds are preferentially removed from the dissolved phase. The precipitated compounds thus had similar chemical characteristics as compared to the mobilized DOM from heavy rain events. Radiocarbon analyses also indicated that this precipitated fraction of DOM was of comparably young radiocarbon age. DOM radiocarbon from field samples

  1. Transformation of metal-organic frameworks for molecular sieving membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanbin; Zhang, Yufan; Zhang, Congyang; Meng, Qin; Xu, Zehai; Su, Pengcheng; Li, Qingbiao; Shen, Chong; Fan, Zheng; Qin, Lei; Zhang, Guoliang

    2016-04-19

    The development of simple, versatile strategies for the synthesis of metal-organic framework (MOF)-derived membranes are of increasing scientific interest, but challenges exist in understanding suitable fabrication mechanisms. Here we report a route for the complete transformation of a series of MOF membranes and particles, based on multivalent cation substitution. Through our approach, the effective pore size can be reduced through the immobilization of metal salt residues in the cavities, and appropriate MOF crystal facets can be exposed, to achieve competitive molecular sieving capabilities. The method can also be used more generally for the synthesis of a variety of MOF membranes and particles. Importantly, we design and synthesize promising MOF membranes candidates that are hard to achieve through conventional methods. For example, our CuBTC/MIL-100 membrane exhibits 89, 171, 241 and 336 times higher H2 permeance than that of CO2, O2, N2 and CH4, respectively.

  2. Molecular Design of Phenanthrenequinone Derivatives as Organic Cathode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liu-Bin; Gao, Shu-Ting; He, Rongxing; Shen, Wei; Li, Ming

    2018-01-29

    Conjugated carbonyl compounds have become the most promising type of organic electrode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries because only they can achieve simultaneously high energy density, high cycling stability, and high power density. In this work, we have performed first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations to explore the fundamental rules of how the electronic structure and redox properties of a typical conjugated carbonyl compound, phenanthrenequinone (PQ), are modified by adjusting the heteroaromatic building blocks. Such a molecular design strategy allows for the improvement in discharge potential while the specific capacity remains nearly unchanged. The correlation between the electronic structures and redox properties for the designed PQ derivatives is systematically discussed. It is demonstrated that the discharge potential of the PQ derivatives depends strongly on the frontier orbital levels, the electric potential, and the Li-bonding configurations. The electrostatic potential (ESP) maps show visible displays of molecular electric structures and can be applied to understand how the redox properties of the PQ derivatives are modified by the heteroaromatic building blocks. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Molecular bulk heterojunctions: an emerging approach to organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncali, Jean

    2009-11-17

    The predicted exhaustion of fossil energy resources and the pressure of environmental constraints are stimulating an intensification of research on renewable energy sources, in particular, on the photovoltaic conversion of solar energy. In this context, organic solar cells are attracting increasing interest that is motivated by the possibility of fabricating large-area, lightweight, and flexible devices using simple techniques with low environmental impact. Organic solar cells are based on a heterojunction resulting from the contact of a donor (D) and an acceptor (A) material. Absorption of solar photons creates excitons, Coulombically bound electron-hole pairs, which diffuse to the D/A interface, where they are dissociated into free holes and electrons by the electric field. D/A heterojunctions can be created with two types of architectures, namely, bilayer heterojunction and bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. BHJ cells combine the advantages of easier fabrication and higher conversion efficiency due to the considerably extended D/A interface. Until now, the development of BHJ solar cells has been essentially based on the use of soluble pi-conjugated polymers as donor material. Intensive interdisciplinary research carried out in the past 10 years has led to an increase in the conversion efficiency of BHJ cells from 0.10 to more than 5.0%. These investigations have progressively established regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the standard donor material for BHJ solar cells, owing to a useful combination of optical and charge-transport properties. However, besides the limit imposed to the maximum conversion efficiency by its intrinsic electronic properties, P3HT and more generally polymers pose several problems related to the control of their structure, molecular weight, polydispersity, and purification. In this context, recent years have seen the emergence of an alternative approach based on the replacement of polydisperse polymers by soluble

  4. Chemically engineered graphene-based 2D organic molecular magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jeongmin; Bekyarova, Elena; de Heer, Walt A; Haddon, Robert C; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2013-11-26

    Carbon-based magnetic materials and structures of mesoscopic dimensions may offer unique opportunities for future nanomagnetoelectronic/spintronic devices. To achieve their potential, carbon nanosystems must have controllable magnetic properties. We demonstrate that nitrophenyl functionalized graphene can act as a room-temperature 2D magnet. We report a comprehensive study of low-temperature magnetotransport, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), and superconducting quantum interference (SQUID) measurements before and after radical functionalization. Following nitrophenyl (NP) functionalization, epitaxially grown graphene systems can become organic molecular magnets with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic ordering that persists at temperatures above 400 K. The field-dependent, surface magnetoelectric properties were studied using scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques. The results indicate that the NP-functionalization orientation and degree of coverage directly affect the magnetic properties of the graphene surface. In addition, graphene-based organic magnetic nanostructures were found to demonstrate a pronounced magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). The results were consistent across different characterization techniques and indicate room-temperature magnetic ordering along preferred graphene orientations in the NP-functionalized samples. Chemically isolated graphene nanoribbons (CINs) were observed along the preferred functionality directions. These results pave the way for future magnetoelectronic/spintronic applications based on promising concepts such as current-induced magnetization switching, magnetoelectricity, half-metallicity, and quantum tunneling of magnetization.

  5. Molecular toolbox for the identification of unknown genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttink, Tom; Demeyer, Rolinde; Van Gulck, Elke; Van Droogenbroeck, Bart; Querci, Maddalena; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc

    2010-03-01

    Competent laboratories monitor genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and products derived thereof in the food and feed chain in the framework of labeling and traceability legislation. In addition, screening is performed to detect the unauthorized presence of GMOs including asynchronously authorized GMOs or GMOs that are not officially registered for commercialization (unknown GMOs). Currently, unauthorized or unknown events are detected by screening blind samples for commonly used transgenic elements, such as p35S or t-nos. If (1) positive detection of such screening elements shows the presence of transgenic material and (2) all known GMOs are tested by event-specific methods but are not detected, then the presence of an unknown GMO is inferred. However, such evidence is indirect because it is based on negative observations and inconclusive because the procedure does not identify the causative event per se. In addition, detection of unknown events is hampered in products that also contain known authorized events. Here, we outline alternative approaches for analytical detection and GMO identification and develop new methods to complement the existing routine screening procedure. We developed a fluorescent anchor-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for the identification of the sequences flanking the p35S and t-nos screening elements. Thus, anchor-PCR fingerprinting allows the detection of unique discriminative signals per event. In addition, we established a collection of in silico calculated fingerprints of known events to support interpretation of experimentally generated anchor-PCR GM fingerprints of blind samples. Here, we first describe the molecular characterization of a novel GMO, which expresses recombinant human intrinsic factor in Arabidopsis thaliana. Next, we purposefully treated the novel GMO as a blind sample to simulate how the new methods lead to the molecular identification of a novel unknown event without prior knowledge of its transgene

  6. Molecular structure and exciton dynamics in organic conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alan K.

    , quenchable, isolated singlet excitations. The structure of J aggregates which leads to isolated excitations, and the role which inter-chain contact sites play in triplet formation from these singlet excitations is revealed. New structure-function relationships were uncovered in poly (3-alkyl-thienylenevinylene) (P3ATV) derivatives using resonance Raman and photocurrent spectroscopies. Time-dependent spectroscopic theory was used to interpret experimental Raman and absorption spectra that revealed the presence of structural polymorphs. These polymorphs provide an explanation of the spectroscopic evidence without presumption of a deactivating dark state in this unusually non-fluorescence material. Photovoltaic devices constructed from blends of poly (2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT) and PCBM blends were examined using Raman and photocurrent imaging techniques. These techniques were used to identify different packing states in blended thin films and correlate photocurrent production with local order. Intensity modulated spectroscopic techniques (IMPS) were then used to locate regions of non-geminate charge recombination at interfaces between amorphous and crystalline regions in working devices. Next, P3HT/PCBM OPV devices were exposed to ionizing radiation in a vacuum chamber. These devices were characterized before and after exposure, using standardized solar cell tests, Raman imaging, wide-field IMPS, and IMVS spectroscopies. An analysis of the spectroscopic data determined that the donor polymer is highly resistant to radiation damage, and that the degradation of device performance is due to an effect (cross-linking or degradation) within aggregates of the acceptor. This dissertation concludes with an interpretation of the significance of the findings contained herein to organic electronics, followed by a brief outlook for future work in these fields. Potential theories to describe and predict molecular interactions for organic polymers in

  7. Molecular origins of scintillation in organic scintillators (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Patrick; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Myllenbeck, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    Organic-based scintillators are indispensable materials for radiation detection owing to their high sensitivity to fast neutrons, low cost, and tailorable properties. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in organic scintillators due to exciting discoveries related to neutron discrimination and gamma-ray spectroscopy, which represent capabilities previously thought not possible in these materials. I will discuss our development of crystalline and polymer-based scintillators for these applications. Structure-property relationships related to intermolecular interactions and host-guest electronic exchange will be discussed in the context of energy-transfer pathways relevant to scintillation. An emphasis will be placed on the rational design of these materials, as guided by first principles and DFT calculations. Two related topics will be discussed: 1) Incorporation of organometallic triplet-harvesting additives to plastic scintillator matrices to confer a 'two-state' (singlet and triplet) luminescence signature to different types of ionizing radiation. This approach relies upon energetic and spatial overlap between the donor and acceptor excited states for efficient electronic exchange. Key considerations also include synthetic modification of the luminescence spectra and kinetics, as well as the addition of secondary additives to increase the recombination efficiency. 2) Design of organotin-containing plastic scintillators as a route towards gamma-ray spectroscopy. Organometallic compounds were selected on the basis of distance-dependent quenching relationships, phase compatibility with the polymer matrix, and the gamma-ray cross sections. This approach is guided by molecular modeling and radiation transport modeling to achieve the highest possible detection sensitivity luminescence intensity.

  8. Complex Organic Molecules in Taurus Molecular Cloud-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Tatsuya; Sakai, Nami; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2018-02-01

    We have observed the millimeter-wave rotational spectral lines of CH3CHO, H2CCO, cyclopropenone, and H2CO toward the cyanoployyne peak of Taurus Molecular Cloud-1 (TMC-1 CP). The spectral line profile of CH3CHO is found to reveal a well-separated double peak. It is similar to the line profile of CH3OH, but is much different from those of carbon-chain molecules and C34S. The different line profiles mean different distributions along the line of sight. The similarity of the spectral line profiles between CH3CHO and CH3OH suggests that CH3CHO is mainly formed on dust grains as CH3OH or through gas-phase reactions starting from CH3OH. On the other hand, the spectral line profiles of H2CCO and cyclopropenone are rather similar to those of carbon-chain molecules and C34S, implying their gas-phase productions. H2CO shows a composite spectral line profile reflecting the contributions of both gas-phase and grain-surface productions. In addition, we have detected the spectral lines of CH3CHO and HCOOCH3 toward the methanol peak near TMC-1 CP. We have also tentatively detected one line of (CH3)2O. Considering the chemical youth of TMC-1, the present results indicate that fairly complex organic species have already been formed in the early evolutionary phase of starless cores. TMC-1 is thus recognized as a novel source where formation processes of complex organic molecules can be studied on the basis of the line profiles.

  9. The role of molecular markers and marker assisted selection in breeding for organic agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lammerts van Bueren, E.T.; Backes, G.; de Vriend, H.

    2010-01-01

    Plant geneticists consider molecular marker assisted selection a useful additional tool in plant breeding programs to make selection more efficient. Standards for organic agriculture do not exclude the use of molecular markers as such, however for the organic sector the appropriateness of molecular...... markers is not self-evident and is often debated. Organic and low-input farming conditions require breeding for robust and flexible varieties, which may be hampered by too much focus on the molecular level. Pros and contras for application of molecular markers in breeding for organic agriculture...... was the topic of a recent European plant breeding workshop. The participants evaluated strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of the use of molecular markers and we formalized their inputs into breeder’s perspectives and perspectives seen from the organic sector’s standpoint. Clear strengths were...

  10. Organic molecules as chemical fossils - The molecular fossil record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglinton, G.

    1983-01-01

    The study of biochemical clues to the early earth and the origin of life is discussed. The methods used in such investigation are described, including the extraction, fractionation, and analysis of geolipids and the analysis of kerogen. The occurrence of molecular fossils in the geological record is examined, discussing proposed precursor-product relationships and the molecular assessment of deep sea sediments, ancient sediments, and crude petroleums. Alterations in the molecular record due to diagenesis and catagenesis are considered, and the use of microbial lipids as molecular fossils is discussed. The results of searches for molecular fossils in Precambrian sediments are assessed.

  11. Nitrogen mineralization in a simulated rhizosphere as influenced by low molecular weight organic substances

    OpenAIRE

    Begum, Shamim Ara; Kader, MD Abdul; Sleutel, Steven; De Neve, Stefaan

    2012-01-01

    Rhizodeposits consist of over 200 organic compounds, mainly low-molecular-weight organic substances (LMWOS) such as amino acids (AA), carbohydrates (CH) and carboxylic acids (CA), lipids and phenols. Those LMWOS influence nutrient turnover, particularly N turnover. However, the exact influence of these organic substances on nitrogen mineralization is yet unknown. Therefore, the stimulatory effects of low molecular weight organic substances on nitrogen mineralization in the rhizosphere of a si...

  12. Molecular fossils from organically preserved Ediacara biota reveal cyanobacterial origin for Beltanelliformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovskiy, Ilya; Hope, Janet M; Krasnova, Anna; Ivantsov, Andrey; Brocks, Jochen J

    2018-03-01

    The Ediacara biota (~575-541 million years ago) mark the emergence of large, complex organisms in the palaeontological record, preluding the radiation of modern animal phyla. However, their phylogenetic relationships, even at the domain level, remain controversial. We report the discovery of molecular fossils from organically preserved specimens of Beltanelliformis, demonstrating that they represent large spherical colonies of cyanobacteria. The conservation of molecular remains in organically preserved Ediacaran organisms opens a new path for unravelling the natures of the Ediacara biota.

  13. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Luis R. Domingo

    2016-01-01

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through ...

  14. Organic Geochemistry of the Hamersley Province: Relationships Among Organic Carbon Isotopes, Molecular Fossils, and Lithology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular fossils are particularly valuable ancient biosignatures that can provide key insight about microbial sources and ecology in early Earth studies. In particular, hopanes carrying 2-methyl or 3-methyl substituents are proposed to be derived from cyanobacteria and oxygen-respiring methanotrophs, respectively, based on both their modem occurrences and their Proterozoic and Phanerozoic sedimentary distributions. Steranes are likely from ancestral eukaryotes. The distribution of methylhopanes, steranes, and other biomarkers in 2.72-2.56 billion-year-old rocks from the Hamersley Province, Western Australia show relationships to lithology, facies, and isotopes of macromolecular carbon, and other biomarkers. These observations support biomarker syngenicity and thermal maturity. Moreover, ecological signatures are revealed, including a surprising relationship between isotopic values for bulk macromolecular carbon and the biomarker for methanotrophs. The record suggests that cyanobacteria were likely key organisms of shallow-water microbial ecosystems providing molecular oxygen, fixed carbon, and possibly fixed nitrogen, and methanotrophs were not alone in recycling methane and other C-13-depleted substrates.

  15. Editorial: Molecular Organization of Membranes: Where Biology Meets Biophysics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cebecauer, Marek; Holowka, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 113 (2017), s. 1-3 ISSN 2296-634X Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : nanodomains * membrane properties * cell membrane Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology

  16. Influence of Molecular Shape on the Thermal Stability and Molecular Orientation of Vapor-Deposited Organic Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Diane M; Antony, Lucas; de Pablo, Juan J; Ediger, M D

    2017-07-20

    High thermal stability and anisotropic molecular orientation enhance the performance of vapor-deposited organic semiconductors, but controlling these properties is a challenge in amorphous materials. To understand the influence of molecular shape on these properties, vapor-deposited glasses of three disk-shaped molecules were prepared. For all three systems, enhanced thermal stability is observed for glasses prepared over a wide range of substrate temperatures and anisotropic molecular orientation is observed at lower substrate temperatures. For two of the disk-shaped molecules, atomistic simulations of thin films were also performed and anisotropic molecular orientation was observed at the equilibrium liquid surface. We find that the structure and thermal stability of these vapor-deposited glasses results from high surface mobility and partial equilibration toward the structure of the equilibrium liquid surface during the deposition process. For the three molecules studied, molecular shape is a dominant factor in determining the anisotropy of vapor-deposited glasses.

  17. Molecular complex formation between positronium and organic molecules in solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madia, W.J.; Nichols, A.L.; Ache, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    Evidence is presented which supports the reversible formation of molecular complexes between Ps atoms and a series of nitrobenzene derivatives and p-benzoquinone in solution. The activation energy for the forward reaction step I (Ps + M (II) reversible PsM (I)) is generally very small; E/sub A/ approximately 1 kcal/mol. ΔH/sub EQ/, the enthalpy of the overall process, ranges from almost zero, in the case of very unreactive substrates, such as toluene or heptane, to -8 kcal/mol for dinitrobenzene or p-benzoquinone. The reactivities of the various substrate molecules toward Ps follow trends as observed in conventional molecular complex formation. Furthermore an attempt was made to assess the role of the solvent upon the stability of the molecular complexes

  18. Electronic properties of organic monolayers and molecular devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Institut d'Electronique, de Micro-electronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS, Molecular Nanostructures and Devices Group, BP69, Avenue Poincaré, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex, France; Centre de Recherche en Sciences et Technologies de l'Information et de la Communication, Université de Reims, BP 1039, 51687 ...

  19. The Molecular Universe from Simple Diatomics to Complex Organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi-Pestellini, C.

    2007-08-01

    From distant galaxies to diffuse interstellar matter in our galaxy, from molecular clouds where stars are formed together with protoplanetary disks and planets to comets and meteorites the chemestry displays its whole richness and complexity. I shall present an outline of the ubiquitous presence of molecules in various astrophysical environments.

  20. Molecular approaches to detect and study the organisms causing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review will summarise the molecular approaches used to detect and analyse the genomes of Babesia bovis, B. bigemina and Anaplasma marginale which cause bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. These tick borne diseases are widely distributed in Africa, Asia, Australia, and Central and South America and for ...

  1. Low molecular weight organic acids in root exudates and cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The S. nigrum with higher concentrations of LMWOA in roots exudation accumulated more Cd in the plants. The results indicated tha LMWOA secretion by S. nigrum root, especially in Cd-contaminated soils, was likely to be an important role in Cd hyperaccumulation. Key words: Cadmium, Solanum nigrum L., low molecular ...

  2. Low molecular weight organic acids in root exudates and cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    –234. Cieslinski G, Van Rees KCJ, Szmigielska AM, Krishnamurti GSR,. Huang PM (1998). Lowmolecular-weight organic acids in rhizosphere soils of durum wheat and their effect on cadmium bioaccumulation. Plant Soil, 203: ...

  3. Inorganic-Organic Molecular Bonding in Porous Matrices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hench, L

    1997-01-01

    .... Large surface areas inherent in sol-gel derived silica increase the interaction area for surface mediated reactions while large pore volumes enhance the introduction of organic or inorganic modifiers...

  4. Particle Size Dependence of Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol Molecular Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Peijun; Johnston, Murray V.

    2017-01-01

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is initiated by the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the gas phase. Mass transfer to the particle phase is thought to occur primarily by a combination of condensation of non-volatile products and partitioning of semi-volatile products, though particle phase chemistry may also play a role if it transforms semi-volatile reactants into non-volatile products. In principle, changes in particle composition as a function of particle size...

  5. Ultrasonic Studies of Molecular Interactions in Organic Binary Liquid Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thirumaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity have been measured for the mixtures of 1-alkanols such as 1-propanol and 1-butanol with N-N dimethylformamide (DMF at 303 K. The experimental data have been used to calculate the acoustical parameters namely adiabatic compressibility (β, free length (Lf, free volume (Vf and internal pressure (πi. The excess values of the above parameters are also evaluated and discussed in the light of molecular interaction existing in the mixtures. It is obvious that there is a formation of hydrogen bonding between DMF and 1-alkanols. Further, the addition of DMF causes dissociation of hydrogen bonded structure of 1-alkanols. The evaluated excess values confirm that the molecular association is more pronounced in system-II comparing to the system-I.

  6. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  7. Molecular interaction maps as information organizers and simulation guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Kurt W.

    2001-03-01

    A graphical method for mapping bioregulatory networks is presented that is suited for the representation of multimolecular complexes, protein modifications, as well as actions at cell membranes and between protein domains. The symbol conventions defined for these molecular interaction maps are designed to accommodate multiprotein assemblies and protein modifications that can generate combinatorially large numbers of molecular species. Diagrams can either be "heuristic," meaning that detailed knowledge of all possible reaction paths is not required, or "explicit," meaning that the diagrams are totally unambiguous and suitable for simulation. Interaction maps are linked to annotation lists and indexes that provide ready access to pertinent data and references, and that allow any molecular species to be easily located. Illustrative interaction maps are included on the domain interactions of Src, transcription control of E2F-regulated genes, and signaling from receptor tyrosine kinase through phosphoinositides to Akt/PKB. A simple method of going from an explicit interaction diagram to an input file for a simulation program is outlined, in which the differential equations need not be written out. The role of interaction maps in selecting and defining systems for modeling is discussed. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Field-effect transistors based on self-organized molecular nanostripes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavallini, M.; Stoliare, P.; Moulin, J.-F.

    2005-01-01

    Charge transport properties in organic semiconductors depend strongly on molecular order. Here we demonstrate field-effect transistors where drain current flows through a precisely defined array of nanostripes made of crystalline and highly ordered molecules. The molecular stripes are fabricated ...... by the menisci once the critical concentration is reached and self-organizes into molecularly ordered stripes 100-200 nm wide and a few monolayers high. The charge mobility measured along the stripes is 2 orders of magnitude larger than the values measured for spin-coated thin films....

  9. Cambridge Structural Database as a tool for studies of general structural features of organic molecular crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuleshova, Lyudmila N; Antipin, Mikhail Yu

    1999-01-01

    The review surveys and generalises data on the use of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) for studying and revealing general structural features of organic molecular crystals. It is demonstrated that software and facilities of the CSD allow one to test the applicability of a number of known concepts of organic crystal chemistry (the principle of close packing, the frequency of occurrence of space groups, the preferred formation of centrosymmetrical molecular crystals, etc.) on the basis of abundant statistical data. Examples of the use of the Cambridge Structural Database in engineering of molecular crystals and in the systematic search for compounds with specified properties are given. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  10. Molecular Phylogenetic: Organism Taxonomy Method Based on Evolution History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.L.P Indi Dharmayanti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic is described as taxonomy classification of an organism based on its evolution history namely its phylogeny and as a part of systematic science that has objective to determine phylogeny of organism according to its characteristic. Phylogenetic analysis from amino acid and protein usually became important area in sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis can be used to follow the rapid change of a species such as virus. The phylogenetic evolution tree is a two dimensional of a species graphic that shows relationship among organisms or particularly among their gene sequences. The sequence separation are referred as taxa (singular taxon that is defined as phylogenetically distinct units on the tree. The tree consists of outer branches or leaves that represents taxa and nodes and branch represent correlation among taxa. When the nucleotide sequence from two different organism are similar, they were inferred to be descended from common ancestor. There were three methods which were used in phylogenetic, namely (1 Maximum parsimony, (2 Distance, and (3 Maximum likehoood. Those methods generally are applied to construct the evolutionary tree or the best tree for determine sequence variation in group. Every method is usually used for different analysis and data.

  11. Molecular physiology of weak organic acid stress in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, J.W.A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which weak organic acid (WOA) preservatives inhibit growth of microorganisms may differ between different WOAs and these differences are not well understood. The aim of this thesis has been to obtain a better understanding of the mode of action of these preservatives by which they

  12. Molecular Trickery in Soil Organic Matter: Hidden Lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernes, P.J.; Kaiser, K.; Dyda, R.Y.; Cerli, C.

    2013-01-01

    Binding to minerals is one mechanism crucial toward the accumulation and stabilization of organic matter (OM) in soils. Of the various biochemicals produced by plants, lignin-derived phenols are among the most surface-reactive compounds. However, it is not known to what extent mineral-bound

  13. Molecular transport behaviour of organic solvents through halloysite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... behaviour of three organic solvents was further validated by their crosslink density values. The thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy and free energy of sorption were evaluated. The positive values of free energy indicate the non-spontaneity of the sorption of HNTs filled EVA in aromatic solvents at 303 K.

  14. Application of molecular spectroscopy to the determination of organic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leicknam, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    Some brief accounts are presented followed by a discussion about various physico-chemical techniques: Raman spectrometry, infrared spectrometry, resonance Raman spectrometry, conformational analysis and polarized Rayleigh diffusion. Applications of the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to nucleotide structure in aqueous solution are described as well as some applications of neutron scattering to the study of organic structures [fr

  15. A new parallel molecular dynamics algorithm for organic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plimpton, S.; Hendrickson, B.; Heffelfinger, G.

    1993-01-01

    A new parallel algorithm for simulating bonded molecular systems such as polymers and proteins by molecular dynamics (MD) is presented. In contrast to methods that extract parallelism by breaking the spatial domain into sub-pieces, the new method does not require regular geometries or uniform particle densities to achieve high parallel efficiency. For very large, regular systems spatial methods are often the best choice, but in practice the new method is faster for systems with tens-of-thousands of atoms simulated on large numbers of processors. It is also several times faster than the techniques commonly used for parallelizing bonded MD that assign a subset of atoms to each processor and require all-to-all communication. Implementation of the algorithm in a CHARMm-like MD model with many body forces and constraint dynamics is discussed and timings on the Intel Delta and Paragon machines are given. Example calculations using the algorithm in simulations of polymers and liquid-crystal molecules will also be briefly discussed

  16. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Luis R

    2016-09-30

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through a rigorous quantum chemical analysis of the changes of the electron density as well as the energies associated with these changes along the reaction path in order to understand experimental outcomes. Studies performed using MEDT allow establishing a modern rationalisation and to gain insight into molecular mechanisms and reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

  17. A review of molecular organic proxies for examining modern and ancient lacustrine environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castañeda, I.S.; Schouten, S.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular organic geochemical proxies are increasingly being utilized to reconstruct past environmental conditions as new tools continue to be discovered and developed. To date, organic geochemical proxies have been developed mainly for use in marine systems and are widely used in

  18. A review of molecular organic proxies for examining modern and ancient lacustrine environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castañeda, I.S; Schouten, S.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular organic geochemical proxies are increasingly being utilized to reconstruct past environmental conditions as new tools continue to be discovered and developed. To date, organic geochemical proxies have been developed mainly for use in marine systems and are widely used in paleoceanography.

  19. Pilot-scale recovery of low molecular weight organic acids from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pilot-scale recovery of low molecular weight organic acids from anaerobically treated palm oil mill effluent (POME) with energy integrated system. ... The recovery of organic acids has a significant and economical impact, since around 50% cost of PHA production is believed to be associated with the substrate itself.

  20. An overview of molecular acceptors for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudhomme, Piétrick

    2013-07-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have gained serious attention during the last decade and are now considered as one of the future photovoltaic technologies for low-cost power production. The first dream of attaining 10% of power coefficient efficiency has now become a reality thanks to the development of new materials and an impressive work achieved to understand, control and optimize structure and morphology of the device. But most of the effort devoted to the development of new materials concerned the optimization of the donor material, with less attention for acceptors which to date remain dominated by fullerenes and their derivatives. This short review presents the progress in the use of non-fullerene small molecules and fullerene-based acceptors with the aim of evaluating the challenge for the next generation of acceptors in organic photovoltaics.

  1. An overview of molecular acceptors for organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudhomme Piétrick

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic solar cells (OSCs have gained serious attention during the last decade and are now considered as one of the future photovoltaic technologies for low-cost power production. The first dream of attaining 10% of power coefficient efficiency has now become a reality thanks to the development of new materials and an impressive work achieved to understand, control and optimize structure and morphology of the device. But most of the effort devoted to the development of new materials concerned the optimization of the donor material, with less attention for acceptors which to date remain dominated by fullerenes and their derivatives. This short review presents the progress in the use of non-fullerene small molecules and fullerene-based acceptors with the aim of evaluating the challenge for the next generation of acceptors in organic photovoltaics.

  2. Novel rhodanine based molecular acceptor for organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subianto Surya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A dirhodanine-substituted benzothiadiazole compound has been synthesised using Knoevenagel condensation of a dialdehyde-substituted benzothiadiazole and rhodanine. The resulting compound was deep orange red in colour and shows a HOMO and LUMO levels of −5.61 and −3.85 eV respectively, which makes it suitable for applications such as acceptor for organic solar cells.

  3. The Structural, Functional and Molecular Organization of the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eNieuwenhuys

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to Wilhelm His (1891, 1893 the brainstem consists of two longitudinal zones, the dorsal alar plate (sensory in nature and the ventral basal plate (motor in nature. Johnston and Herrick indicated that both plates can be subdivided into separate somatic and visceral zones, distinguishing somatosensory and viscerosensory zones within the alar plate, and visceromotor and somatomotor zones within the basal plate. To test the validity of this ‘four-functional-zones’ concept, I developed a topological procedure, surveying the spatial relationships of the various cell masses in the brainstem in a single figure. Brainstems of 16 different anamniote species were analyzed, and revealed that the brainstems are clearly divisible into four morphological zones, which correspond largely with the functional zones of Johnston and Herrick. Exceptions include (1 the magnocellular vestibular nucleus situated in the viscerosensory zone; (2 the basal plate containing a number of evidently non-motor centres (superior and inferior olives. Nevertheless the ‘functional zonal model’ has explanatory value. Thus, it is possible to interpret certain brain specializations related to particular behavioural profiles, as ‘local hypertrophies’ of one or two functional columns. Recent developmental molecular studies on brains of birds and mammals confirmed the presence of longitudinal zones, and also showed molecularly defined transverse bands or neuromeres throughout development. The intersecting boundaries of the longitudinal zones and the transverse bands appeared to delimit radially arranged histogenetic domains. Because neuromeres have been observed in embryonic and larval stages of numerous anamniote species, it may be hypothesized that the brainstems of all vertebrates share a basic organizational plan, in which intersecting longitudinal and transverse zones form fundamental histogenetic and genoarchitectonic units.

  4. Controllable Synthesis of Organic Microcrystals with Tunable Emission Color and Morphology Based on Molecular Packing Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Zhou; Liao, Liang-Sheng; Wang, Xue-Dong

    2018-01-01

    Organic microcrystals are of essential importance for high fluorescence efficiency, ordered molecular packing mode, minimized defects, and smooth shapes, which are extensively applied in organic optoelectronics. The molecular packing mode significantly influences the optical/electrical properties of organic microcrystals, which makes the controllable preparation of organic microcrystals with desired molecular packing mode extremely important. In the study, yellow-emissive α phase organic microcrystals with rectangular morphology and green-emissive β phase perylene microcrystals with rhombic morphology are separately prepared by simply controlling the solution concentration. The distinct molecular staking modes of the H/J-aggregate are found in these two types of perylene microcrystals, which contribute to the different emission color, morphology, and radiative decay rate. What is more interesting, the α-doped β phase and the β-doped α phase organic microcrystals can also be fabricated by modulating the evaporation rate from 100 to 10 µL min -1 . The findings can contribute to the future development of organic optoelectronics at the microscale. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Molecular depth profiling of organic and biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, John S. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: John.Fletcher@manchester.ac.uk; Conlan, Xavier A. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Lockyer, Nicholas P. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Vickerman, John C. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-30

    Atomic depth profiling using secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, is common in the field micro-electronics; however, the generation of molecular information as a function of sample depth is difficult due to the accumulation of damage both on and beneath the sample surface. The introduction of polyatomic ion beams such as SF{sub 5} and C{sub 60} have raised the possibility of overcoming this problem as they deposit the majority of their energy in the upper surface of the sample resulting in increased sputter yields but with a complimentary reduction in sub-surface damage accumulation. In this paper we report the depth profile analysis of the bio-polymer polycaprolactone, PCL, using the polyatomic ions Au{sub 3}{sup +} and C{sub 60}{sup +} and the monoatomic Au{sup +}. Results are compared to recent analysis of a similar sample using SF{sub 5}{sup +}. C{sub 60}{sup +} depth profiling of cellulose is also demonstrated, an experiment that has been reported as unsuccessful when attempted with SF{sub 5}{sup +} implications for biological analysis are discussed.

  6. Molecular Characterization of Organic Indicators of Petroleum Biosouring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, J.; Weber, R.; Loutey, D.; Coates, J. D.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    The production of sulfide in a petroleum reservoir by anaerobic sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) is environmentally, industrially, and epidemiologically hazardous. More knowledge is needed about the anaerobic respiration pathway of SRM in petroleum, and whether the activity of SRM could be effectively inhibited using nitrate or perchlorate treatments. In order to understand the molecular transformations and metabolic fingerprints of SRM in petroleum reservoirs, and how they are altered by nitrate or perchlorate treatments, the Coates and Goldstein Laboratories at UC-Berkeley have run controlled column incubation studies of petroleum from an oil reservoir. By using two dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) with high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled to vacuum ultraviolet radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), detailed chemical characterizations of hydrocarbons from approximately C9-C30 have been completed, separating the complete oil sample by number of carbon atoms and chemical classes (including normal alkanes, branched alkanes, number of alkyl rings, and number of aromatic rings) corresponding to petroleum transformations in sulfate, nitrate, and perchlorate reducing environments. Results demonstrate that the anaerobic pathway of SRM preferentially involves the transformation of heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and that a large number of products are created that contain either two or four oxygen atoms, suggesting fumarate additions initialize the anaerobic process.

  7. Molecular mechanism of acrylamide neurotoxicity: lessons learned from organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPachin, Richard M; Gavin, Terrence

    2012-12-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) produces cumulative neurotoxicity in exposed humans and laboratory animals through a direct inhibitory effect on presynaptic function. In this review, we delineate how knowledge of chemistry provided an unprecedented understanding of the ACR neurotoxic mechanism. We also show how application of the hard and soft, acids and bases (HSAB) theory led to the recognition that the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl structure of ACR is a soft electrophile that preferentially forms covalent bonds with soft nucleophiles. In vivo proteomic and in chemico studies demonstrated that ACR formed covalent adducts with highly nucleophilic cysteine thiolate groups located within active sites of presynaptic proteins. Additional research showed that resulting protein inactivation disrupted nerve terminal processes and impaired neurotransmission. ACR is a type-2 alkene, a chemical class that includes structurally related electrophilic environmental pollutants (e.g., acrolein) and endogenous mediators of cellular oxidative stress (e.g., 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal). Members of this chemical family produce toxicity via a common molecular mechanism. Although individual environmental concentrations might not be toxicologically relevant, exposure to an ambient mixture of type-2 alkene pollutants could pose a significant risk to human health. Furthermore, environmentally derived type-2 alkenes might act synergistically with endogenously generated unsaturated aldehydes to amplify cellular damage and thereby accelerate human disease/injury processes that involve oxidative stress. These possibilities have substantial implications for environmental risk assessment and were realized through an understanding of ACR adduct chemistry. The approach delineated here can be broadly applied because many toxicants of different chemical classes are electrophiles that produce toxicity by interacting with cellular proteins.

  8. The role of molecular markers and marker assisted selection in breeding for organic and low-input agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts Van Bueren, E.; Ostergard, H.; Vriend, H.; Backes, G.

    2010-01-01

    Plant geneticists consider molecular marker assisted selection a useful additional tool in plant breeding programs to make selection more efficient. Standards for organic agriculture do not exclude the use of molecular markers as such, however for the organic sector the appropriateness of molecular

  9. Molecular Intercalation and Cohesion of Organic Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bruner, Christopher

    2013-01-17

    The phase separated bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer in BHJ polymer:fullerene organic photovoltaic devices (OPV) are mechanically weak with low values of cohesion. Improved cohesion is important for OPV device thermomechanical reliability. BHJ devices are investigated and how fullerene intercalation within the active layer affects cohesive properties in the BHJ is shown. The intercalation of fullerenes between the side chains of the polymers poly(3,3″′-didocecyl quaterthiophene) (PQT-12) and poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (pBTTT) is shown to enhance BHJ layer cohesion. Cohesion values range from ≈1 to 5 J m -2, depending on the polymer:fullerene blend, processing conditions, and composition. Devices with non-intercalated BHJ layers are found to have significantly reduced values of cohesion. The resulting device power conversion efficiencies (PCE) are also investigated and correlated with the device cohesion. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Biogenic, urban, and wildfire influences on the molecular composition of dissolved organic compounds in cloud water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Cook

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic aerosol formation and transformation occurs within aqueous aerosol and cloud droplets, yet little is known about the composition of high molecular weight organic compounds in cloud water. Cloud water samples collected at Whiteface Mountain, New York, during August–September 2014 were analyzed by ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular composition of dissolved organic carbon, with a focus on sulfur- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Organic molecular composition was evaluated in the context of cloud water inorganic ion concentrations, pH, and total organic carbon concentrations to gain insights into the sources and aqueous-phase processes of the observed high molecular weight organic compounds. Cloud water acidity was positively correlated with the average oxygen : carbon ratio of the organic constituents, suggesting the possibility for aqueous acid-catalyzed (prior to cloud droplet activation or during/after cloud droplet evaporation and/or radical (within cloud droplets oxidation processes. Many tracer compounds recently identified in laboratory studies of bulk aqueous-phase reactions were identified in the cloud water. Organosulfate compounds, with both biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compound precursors, were detected for cloud water samples influenced by air masses that had traveled over forested and populated areas. Oxidation products of long-chain (C10−12 alkane precursors were detected during urban influence. Influence of Canadian wildfires resulted in increased numbers of identified sulfur-containing compounds and oligomeric species, including those formed through aqueous-phase reactions involving methylglyoxal. Light-absorbing aqueous-phase products of syringol and guaiacol oxidation were observed in the wildfire-influenced samples, and dinitroaromatic compounds were observed in all cloud water samples (wildfire, biogenic, and urban-influenced. Overall, the cloud water molecular

  11. Biogenic, urban, and wildfire influences on the molecular composition of dissolved organic compounds in cloud water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ryan D.; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Peng, Zhuoyu; Boone, Eric; Chu, Rosalie K.; Dukett, James E.; Gunsch, Matthew J.; Zhang, Wuliang; Tolic, Nikola; Laskin, Alexander; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2017-12-01

    Organic aerosol formation and transformation occurs within aqueous aerosol and cloud droplets, yet little is known about the composition of high molecular weight organic compounds in cloud water. Cloud water samples collected at Whiteface Mountain, New York, during August-September 2014 were analyzed by ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular composition of dissolved organic carbon, with a focus on sulfur- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Organic molecular composition was evaluated in the context of cloud water inorganic ion concentrations, pH, and total organic carbon concentrations to gain insights into the sources and aqueous-phase processes of the observed high molecular weight organic compounds. Cloud water acidity was positively correlated with the average oxygen : carbon ratio of the organic constituents, suggesting the possibility for aqueous acid-catalyzed (prior to cloud droplet activation or during/after cloud droplet evaporation) and/or radical (within cloud droplets) oxidation processes. Many tracer compounds recently identified in laboratory studies of bulk aqueous-phase reactions were identified in the cloud water. Organosulfate compounds, with both biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compound precursors, were detected for cloud water samples influenced by air masses that had traveled over forested and populated areas. Oxidation products of long-chain (C10-12) alkane precursors were detected during urban influence. Influence of Canadian wildfires resulted in increased numbers of identified sulfur-containing compounds and oligomeric species, including those formed through aqueous-phase reactions involving methylglyoxal. Light-absorbing aqueous-phase products of syringol and guaiacol oxidation were observed in the wildfire-influenced samples, and dinitroaromatic compounds were observed in all cloud water samples (wildfire, biogenic, and urban-influenced). Overall, the cloud water molecular composition depended on

  12. Self-organized patterns of macroscopic quantum tunneling in molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garanin, D A; Chudnovsky, E M

    2009-03-06

    We study low temperature resonant spin tunneling in molecular magnets induced by a field sweep with account of dipole-dipole interactions. Numerical simulations uncovered formation of self-organized patterns of the magnetization and of the ensuing dipolar field that provide resonant conditions inside a finite volume of the crystal. This effect is robust with respect to disorder and should be relevant to the dynamics of the magnetization steps observed in molecular magnets.

  13. Tissue organization by cadherin adhesion molecules: dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenetic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Carien M.; Leckband, Deborah; Yap, Alpha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cadherin-based tissue morphogenesis. Tissue physiology is profoundly influenced by the distinctive organizations of cells in organs and tissues. In metazoa, adhesion receptors of the classical cadherin family play important roles in establishing and maintaining such tissue organization. Indeed, it is apparent that cadherins participate in a range of morphogenetic events that range from support of tissue integrity to dynamic cellular rearrangements. A comprehensive understanding of cadherin-based morphogenesis must then define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that support these distinct cadherin biologies. Here we focus on four key mechanistic elements: the molecular basis for adhesion through cadherin ectodomains; the regulation of cadherin expression at the cell surface; cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulation by cell signaling. We discuss current progress and outline issues for further research in these fields. PMID:21527735

  14. Quantitative Determination of Organic Semiconductor Microstructure from the Molecular to Device Scale

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan

    2012-10-10

    A study was conducted to demonstrate quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale. The quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale was key to obtaining precise description of the molecular structure and microstructure of the materials of interest. This information combined with electrical characterization and modeling allowed for the establishment of general design rules to guide future rational design of materials and devices. Investigations revealed that a number and variety of defects were the largest contributors to the existence of disorder within a lattice, as organic semiconductor crystals were dominated by weak van der Waals bonding. Crystallite size, texture, and variations in structure due to spatial confinement and interfaces were also found to be relevant for transport of free charge carriers and bound excitonic species over distances that were important for device operation.

  15. Molecular markers for identifying municipal, domestic and agricultural sources of organic matter in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, John J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular markers can be used to determine the sources of organic pollution in water. This review summarizes progress made during the last two decades in identifying reliable molecular markers to distinguish pollution from sewage, animal production, and other sources. Two artificial sweeteners, sucralose and acesulfame-K, are sufficiently stable to be molecular markers and easily associated with domestic wastewater. Waste from different animal species may be distinguished by profiling fecal sterols and bile acids. Other markers which have been evaluated, including caffeine, detergent components, and compounds commonly leached from landfills are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Supramolecular chemistry: from molecular information towards self-organization and complex matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2004-01-01

    Molecular chemistry has developed a wide range of very powerful procedures for constructing ever more sophisticated molecules from atoms linked by covalent bonds. Beyond molecular chemistry lies supramolecular chemistry, which aims at developing highly complex chemical systems from components interacting via non-covalent intermolecular forces. By the appropriate manipulation of these interactions, supramolecular chemistry became progressively the chemistry of molecular information, involving the storage of information at the molecular level, in the structural features, and its retrieval, transfer, and processing at the supramolecular level, through molecular recognition processes operating via specific interactional algorithms. This has paved the way towards apprehending chemistry also as an information science. Numerous receptors capable of recognizing, i.e. selectively binding, specific substrates have been developed, based on the molecular information stored in the interacting species. Suitably functionalized receptors may perform supramolecular catalysis and selective transport processes. In combination with polymolecular organization, recognition opens ways towards the design of molecular and supramolecular devices based on functional (photoactive, electroactive, ionoactive, etc) components. A step beyond preorganization consists in the design of systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components. Self-organization processes, directed by the molecular information stored in the components and read out at the supramolecular level through specific interactions, represent the operation of programmed chemical systems. They have been implemented for the generation of a variety of discrete functional architectures of either organic or inorganic nature. Self-organization processes also give access to advanced supramolecular materials, such as

  17. Protein Dynamics in Organic Media at Varying Water Activity Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar; Abildskov, Jens; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2012-01-01

    relies on determining the water content of the bulk phase and uses a combination of Kirkwood−Buff theory and free energy calculations to determine corresponding activity coefficients. We apply the method in a molecular dynamics study of Candida antarctica lipase B in pure water and the organic solvents......In nonaqueous enzymology, control of enzyme hydration is commonly approached by fixing the thermodynamic water activity of the medium. In this work, we present a strategy for evaluating the water activity in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins in water/organic solvent mixtures. The method...

  18. Phosphorus release from phosphate rock and iron phosphate by low-molecular-weight organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren-kou; Zhu, Yong-guan; Chittleborough, David

    2004-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight(LMW) organic acids widely exist in soils, particularly in the rhizosphere. A series of batch experiments were carried out to investigate the phosphorus release from rock phosphate and iron phosphate by low-molecular-weight organic acids. Results showed that citric acid had the highest capacity to solubilize P from both rock and iron phosphate. P solubilization from rock phosphate and iron phosphate resulted in net proton consumption. P release from rock phosphate was positively correlated with the pKa values. P release from iron phosphate was positively correlated with Fe-organic acid stability constants except for aromatic acids, but was notcorrelated with pKa. Increase in the concentrations of organic acids enhanced P solubilization from both rock and iron phosphate almost linearly. Addition of phenolic compounds further increased the P release from iron phosphate. Initial solution pH had much more substantial effect on P release from rock phosphate than from iron phosphate.

  19. Molecular level structural analysis of natural organic matter and of humic substances by NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Hertkorn, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) represents an ubiquitous, very complex mixture of organic and (a few) inorganic constituents and occurs in terrestrial, limnic and marine ecosystems. NOM plays immensely important roles in the natural world, and it is a key refractory constituent of the global carbon and other element cycles. The characterization and structural analysis of NOM, which features a substantial extent of both polydispersity and molecular heterogeneity, is most demanding with respect of...

  20. Using Biocatalysis to Integrate Organic Chemistry into a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Mande; Archer, Crystal; Feske, Brent D.; Mateer, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Current cutting-edge biomedical investigation requires that the researcher have an operational understanding of several diverse disciplines. Biocatalysis is a field of science that operates at the crossroads of organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology, and provides an excellent model for interdisciplinary research. We…

  1. A molecular dynamics simulation of a homogeneous organic-inorganic hybrid silica membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai-Shiun; Yoshioka, Tomohisa; Kanezashi, Masakoto; Tsuru, Toshinori; Tung, Kuo-Lun

    2010-12-28

    A new molecular dynamics simulation method was successfully applied to construct a homogeneous organic-inorganic hybrid silica membrane using the hybrid-pcff (h-pcff) potential function. Analysis suggested that the hybrid BTESE silica membrane provided a looser network and larger cavity size for the enhancement of gas permeability and selectivity.

  2. Pilot-scale recovery of low molecular weight organic acids from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-05

    Nov 5, 2008 ... Low molecular weight organic acids such as acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acids generated from partial anaerobic ... nogenic phases would enhance the overall rate of waste stabilization if maintained in ..... from anaerobically treated palm oil mill effluent by ion exchange resins for the production of ...

  3. Molecular-scale simulation of electroluminescence in a multilayer white organic light-emitting diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mesta, Murat; Carvelli, Marco; de Vries, Rein J

    2013-01-01

    we show that it is feasible to carry out Monte Carlo simulations including all of these molecular-scale processes for a hybrid multilayer organic light-emitting diode combining red and green phosphorescent layers with a blue fluorescent layer. The simulated current density and emission profile...

  4. Exploiting large-pore metal-organic frameworks for separations through entropic molecular mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres-Knoop, A.; Dubbeldam, D.

    2015-01-01

    We review the molecular mechanisms behind adsorption and the separations of mixtures in metal-organic frameworks and zeolites. Separation mechanisms can be based on differences in the affinity of the adsorbate with the framework and on entropic effects. To develop next-generation adsorbents, the

  5. Using the Cambridge Structural Database to Teach Molecular Geometry Concepts in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackerly, Jay Wm.; Janowicz, Philip A.; Ritchey, Joshua A.; Caruso, Mary M.; Elliott, Erin L.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports a set of two homework assignments that can be used in a second-year undergraduate organic chemistry class. These assignments were designed to help reinforce concepts of molecular geometry and to give students the opportunity to use a technological database and data mining to analyze experimentally determined chemical…

  6. Molecular recognition of organic ammonium ions in solution using synthetic receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Späth

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium ions are ubiquitous in chemistry and molecular biology. Considerable efforts have been undertaken to develop synthetic receptors for their selective molecular recognition. The type of host compounds for organic ammonium ion binding span a wide range from crown ethers to calixarenes to metal complexes. Typical intermolecular interactions are hydrogen bonds, electrostatic and cation–π interactions, hydrophobic interactions or reversible covalent bond formation. In this review we discuss the different classes of synthetic receptors for organic ammonium ion recognition and illustrate the scope and limitations of each class with selected examples from the recent literature. The molecular recognition of ammonium ions in amino acids is included and the enantioselective binding of chiral ammonium ions by synthetic receptors is also covered. In our conclusion we compare the strengths and weaknesses of the different types of ammonium ion receptors which may help to select the best approach for specific applications.

  7. Investigation of a metal-organic interface. Realization and understanding of a molecular switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neucheva, Olga [Forschungszentrum Juelich (DE). Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN), Functional Nanostructures at Surfaces (IBN-3)

    2010-07-01

    The field of molecular organic electronics is an emerging and very dynamic area. The continued trend to miniaturisation, combined with increasing complexity and cost of production in conventional semiconductor electronics, forces companies to turn their attention to alternatives that promise the next levels of scale at significantly lower cost. After consumer electronic devices based on organic transistors, such as TVs and book readers, have already been presented, molecular electronics is expected to offer the next breakthrough in feature size. Unfortunately, most of the organic/metal interfaces contain intrinsic defects that break the homogeneity of the interface properties. In this thesis, the electronic and structural properties of such defects were examined in order to understand the influence of the inhomogeneities on the quality of the interface layer. However, the main focus of this work was the investigation of the local properties of a single molecule. Taking advantage of the Scanning Tunnelling Microscope's (STM's) ability to act as a local probe, a single molecular switch was realized and studied. Moreover, in close collaboration with theory groups, the underlying mechanism driving the switching process was identified and described. Besides the investigation of the switching process, the ability of the STM to build nanostructures of different shapes from large organic molecules was shown. Knowing the parameters for realization and control of the switching process and for building the molecular corrals, the results of this investigation enable the reconstruction of the studied molecular ensemble and its deployment in electric molecular circuits, constituting a next step towards further miniaturization of electronic devices. (orig.)

  8. The Role of Modifying Molecular Chains in the Formation of Organized Molecular Films of Organo-modified Inorganic Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iizuka Manami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of organo-modifying molecular chains in the formation of molecular films of organo-modified nanodiamond is discussed herein based on interfacial chemical particle-integration of organo-modified nanodiamond having a particle size of 5 nm. The surface of nanodiamond is known to be covered with a nano-layer of adsorbed water. This water nano-layer was exploited for organo-modification of nanodiamond with long-chain fatty acids via adsorption, leading to nano-dispersion of nanodiamond in general organic solvents as a mimic of solvency. The organo-modified nanodiamond dispersed “solution” was used as a spreading solution for depositing a mono-“particle” layer on the water surface, and a Langmuir particle layer was integrated at the air/water interface. Multi-“particle” layers were then formed via the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, and were subjected to fine structural analysis. The effect of organo-modification enabled integration and multilayer formation of inorganic nano-particles due to enhancement of the van der Waals interactions between the chains. That is to say, the “encounter” between the organo-modifying chain and the inorganic particles led to solubilization of the inorganic particles and enhanced interactions between the particles, which can be regarded as imparting new function to the organic molecules.

  9. Molecular and Cellular Organization of Taste Neurons in Adult Drosophila Pharynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chieh David Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The Drosophila pharyngeal taste organs are poorly characterized despite their location at important sites for monitoring food quality. Functional analysis of pharyngeal neurons has been hindered by the paucity of molecular tools to manipulate them, as well as their relative inaccessibility for neurophysiological investigations. Here, we generate receptor-to-neuron maps of all three pharyngeal taste organs by performing a comprehensive chemoreceptor-GAL4/LexA expression analysis. The organization of pharyngeal neurons reveals similarities and distinctions in receptor repertoires and neuronal groupings compared to external taste neurons. We validate the mapping results by pinpointing a single pharyngeal neuron required for feeding avoidance of L-canavanine. Inducible activation of pharyngeal taste neurons reveals functional differences between external and internal taste neurons and functional subdivision within pharyngeal sweet neurons. Our results provide roadmaps of pharyngeal taste organs in an insect model system for probing the role of these understudied neurons in controlling feeding behaviors. : Chen and Dahanukar carry out a large-scale, systematic analysis to understand the molecular organization of pharyngeal taste neurons. Taking advantage of the molecular genetic toolkit that arises from this map, they use genetic dissection strategies to probe the functional roles of selected pharyngeal neurons in food choice. Keywords: Drosophila, taste, pharynx, chemosensory receptors, gustatory receptors, ionotropic receptors, feeding

  10. Higher molecular weight dissolved organic nitrogen turnover as affected by soil management history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønne Enggrob, Kirsten

    High molecular weight dissolved organic nitrogen turnover as affected by soil management history *Kirsten Lønne Enggrob,1 Lars Elsgaard,1 and Jim Rasmussen1 1Aarhus University, Dept. of Agroecology, Foulum, Denmark 1. Introduction Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) play an important role in soil N...... cycling. DON, as a collective term, refers to a diversity of organic N compounds which can operationally be grouped into high molecular weight (Mw) DON (Mw > 1 kDa) and low Mw DON (... of different management histories on the turnover of high Mw DON. Further, we distinguished between several classes of high Mw DON, i.e., 1-10 kDa and >10 kDa. 3. Materials and methods With the use of micro-lysimeters, the turnover of triple-labeled (15N, 14C and 13C) high Mw DON was studied in a sandy soil...

  11. Correlating Molecular Structures with Transport Dynamics in High-Efficiency Small-Molecule Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiajun; Chen, Yani; Wu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Qian; Kan, Bin; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yongsheng; Huang, Jia; Liang, Ziqi

    2015-06-24

    Efficient charge transport is a key step toward high efficiency in small-molecule organic photovoltaics. Here we applied time-of-flight and organic field-effect transistor to complementarily study the influences of molecular structure, trap states, and molecular orientation on charge transport of small-molecule DRCN7T (D1) and its analogue DERHD7T (D2). It is revealed that, despite the subtle difference of the chemical structures, D1 exhibits higher charge mobility, the absence of shallow traps, and better photosensitivity than D2. Moreover, charge transport is favored in the out-of-plane structure within D1-based organic solar cells, while D2 prefers in-plane charge transport.

  12. Tracing of variabilities within a geological barrier by molecular organic geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautevelle, Yann; Michels, Raymond; Malartre, Fabrice; Elie, Marcel; Trouiller, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The Callovo-Oxfordian claystones located at 500 m depth at Bure (Meuse, France) are currently being investigated by Andra (the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency) for testing the feasibility of long-term and deep geological nuclear waste disposal. In order to evaluate its potential as a geological barrier, it is very important to study, assess and describe its physico-chemical variability. The molecular biomarker composition of 150 samples of these claystones and their surrounding limestones carry diverse information on the sources of the sedimentary organic matter, the chemistry of the depositional environment, the preservation and diagenesis conditions. It also allows assessing the degree of lateral and vertical variability of the organic matter within these sedimentary series. The abundance of unsaturated biomarkers, the distribution of steroids and hopanoids and CPI values >2 prove the thermal immaturity of the organic matter. The co-occurrence of plankton, bacteria and land plant biomarkers indicate that the organic matter is a mixture of marine and continental contributions. The data also reveal that the organic matter was deposited under oxic and open-sea conditions except for a brief event of photic zone anoxia at the beginning of the Middle Callovian. In the claystones, the geosynthesis of diasterenes is favored to the detriment of the formation of steranes, especially in smectite-rich levels, and the organic matter is rapidly isolated from oxidizing then reducing conditions after the deposition due to the protective effect of clays. On the scale investigated, the claystones are characterized by a unique molecular facies and are thus homogenous from their organic content point of view. Yet, detailed investigation of specific molecular families indicates changes related to major claystone-limestone transitions. The homogeneity of these claystones can be explained by the paleogeographic position of their depositional setting and the plane

  13. Understanding flocculation mechanism of graphene oxide for organic dyes from water: Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Flocculation treatment processes play an important role in water and wastewater pretreatment. Here we investigate experimentally and theoretically the possibility of using graphene oxide (GO as a flocculant to remove methylene blue (MB from water. Experimental results show that GO can remove almost all MB from aqueous solutions at its optimal dosages and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that MB cations quickly congregate around GO in water. Furthermore, PIXEL energy contribution analysis reveals that most of the strong interactions between GO and MB are of a van der Waals (London dispersion character. These results offer new insights for shedding light on the molecular mechanism of interaction between GO and organic pollutants.

  14. Electron dynamics in unoccupied molecular orbitals of two blue-light-emitting organic electroluminescent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, H. S.; Read, K.; Haight, R.

    2002-05-01

    The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) in the two blue-light-emitting organic luminescent materials bis(2-methyl-8-quinolinolato)(para-phenyl-phenolato)aluminum and 1,4-bis(2,2-diphenylvinyl)biphenyl was studied by femtosecond laser pump-and-probe photoemission and compared with tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum. We have determined the energy gap between the LUMO and the highest occupied molecular orbital and studied the LUMO decay dynamics in these materials. The differences in decay rates are shown to be related to the morphology of the evaporated films.

  15. Identification of the sources of primary organic aerosols at urban schools: A molecular marker approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crilley, Leigh R.; Qadir, Raeed M.; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Orasche, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    Children are particularly susceptible to air pollution and schools are examples of urban microenvironments that can account for a large portion of children's exposure to airborne particles. Thus this paper aimed to determine the sources of primary airborne particles that children are exposed to at school by analyzing selected organic molecular markers at 11 urban schools in Brisbane, Australia. Positive matrix factorization analysis identified four sources at the schools: vehicle emissions, biomass burning, meat cooking and plant wax emissions accounting for 45%, 29%, 16% and 7%, of the organic carbon respectively. Biomass burning peaked in winter due to prescribed burning of bushland around Brisbane. Overall, the results indicated that both local (traffic) and regional (biomass burning) sources of primary organic aerosols influence the levels of ambient particles that children are exposed at the schools. These results have implications for potential control strategies for mitigating exposure at schools. - Highlights: • Selected organic molecular markers at 11 urban schools were analyzed. • Four sources of primary organic aerosols were identified by PMF at the schools. • Both local and regional sources were found to influence exposure at the schools. • The results have implications for mitigation of children's exposure at schools. - The identification of the most important sources of primary organic aerosols at urban schools has implications for control strategies for mitigating children's exposure at schools

  16. Prediction of the Fate of Organic Compounds in the Environment From Their Molecular Properties: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamy, Laure; Patureau, Dominique; Barriuso, Enrique; Bedos, Carole; Bessac, Fabienne; Louchart, Xavier; Martin-laurent, Fabrice; Miege, Cecile; Benoit, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive review of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) allowing the prediction of the fate of organic compounds in the environment from their molecular properties was done. The considered processes were water dissolution, dissociation, volatilization, retention on soils and sediments (mainly adsorption and desorption), degradation (biotic and abiotic), and absorption by plants. A total of 790 equations involving 686 structural molecular descriptors are reported to estimate 90 environmental parameters related to these processes. A significant number of equations was found for dissociation process (pKa), water dissolution or hydrophobic behavior (especially through the KOW parameter), adsorption to soils and biodegradation. A lack of QSAR was observed to estimate desorption or potential of transfer to water. Among the 686 molecular descriptors, five were found to be dominant in the 790 collected equations and the most generic ones: four quantum-chemical descriptors, the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (EHOMO) and the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (ELUMO), polarizability (α) and dipole moment (μ), and one constitutional descriptor, the molecular weight. Keeping in mind that the combination of descriptors belonging to different categories (constitutional, topological, quantum-chemical) led to improve QSAR performances, these descriptors should be considered for the development of new QSAR, for further predictions of environmental parameters. This review also allows finding of the relevant QSAR equations to predict the fate of a wide diversity of compounds in the environment. PMID:25866458

  17. Linking the Molecular Signature of Heteroatomic Dissolved Organic Matter to Watershed Characteristics in World Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sasha; Riedel, Thomas; Niggemann, Jutta; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Dittmar, Thorsten; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2015-12-01

    Large world rivers are significant sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the oceans. Watershed geomorphology and land use can drive the quality and reactivity of DOM. Determining the molecular composition of riverine DOM is essential for understanding its source, mobility and fate across landscapes. In this study, DOM from the main stem of 10 global rivers covering a wide climatic range and land use features was molecularly characterized via ultrahigh-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). FT-ICR mass spectral data revealed an overall similarity in molecular components among the rivers. However, when focusing specifically on the contribution of nonoxygen heteroatomic molecular formulas (CHON, CHOS, CHOP, etc.) to the bulk molecular signature, patterns relating DOM composition and watershed land use became apparent. Greater abundances of N- and S-containing molecular formulas were identified as unique to rivers influenced by anthropogenic inputs, whereas rivers with primarily forested watersheds had DOM signatures relatively depleted in heteroatomic content. A strong correlation between cropland cover and dissolved black nitrogen was established when focusing specifically on the pyrogenic class of compounds. This study demonstrated how changes in land use directly affect downstream DOM quality and could impact C and nutrient cycling on a global scale.

  18. Heat-resistant organic molecular layer as a joint interface for metal reduction on plastics surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Jing [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Aisawa, Sumio, E-mail: aisawa@iwate-u.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Hirahara, Hidetoshi [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Kudo, Takahiro [Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan); Mori, Kunio [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In situ adsorption behaviors of TES on PA6 surface were clarified by QCM. • Highest adsorption of TES on PA6 was obtained in pH 3 and 0.1 M solution. • Molecular layers of TES with uniform structures were prepared on PA6 surface. • TES layer improved PA6 local heat resistance from 150 °C to 230 °C. • TES molecular layer successfully reduced Ag ion to Ag{sup 0}. - Abstract: Heat-resistant organic molecular layers have been fabricated by triazine-based silane coupling agent for metal reduction on plastic surfaces using adsorption method. These molecular layers were used as an interfacial layer between polyamide (PA6) and metal solution to reduce Ag{sup +} ion to Ag{sup 0}. The interfacial behaviors of triazine molecular layer at the interfaces between PA6 and Ag solution were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The kinetics of molecular adsorption on PA6 was investigated by using triazine-based silane coupling agent solutions at different pH and concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and local nano thermal analysis were employed to characterize the surfaces and interfaces. The nano thermal analysis results show that molecular layers of triazine-based silane coupling agent greatly improved heat resistance of PA6 resin from 170 °C up to 230 °C. This research developed an in-depth insight for molecular behaviors of triazine-based silane coupling agent at the PA6 and Ag solution interfaces and should be of significant value for interfacial research between plastics and metal solution in plating industry.

  19. Ultrafast Electron Transfer at Organic Semiconductor Interfaces: Importance of Molecular Orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Ayzner, Alexander L.

    2015-01-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  20. Antarctic snow: metals bound to high molecular weight dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calace, Nicoletta; Nardi, Elisa; Pietroletti, Marco; Bartolucci, Eugenia; Pietrantonio, Massimiliana; Cremisini, Carlo

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we studied some heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, As, U) probably associated to high molecular weight organic compounds present in the Antarctic snow. Snow-pit samples were collected and analysed for high molecular weight fraction and heavy metals bound to them by means of ultrafiltration treatment. High molecular weight dissolved organic matter (HMW-DOM) recovered by ultrafiltration showed a dissolved organic carbon concentration (HMW-DOC) of about 18-83% of the total dissolved organic carbon measured in Antarctic snow. The characterisation of HMW-DOM fraction evidenced an ageing of organic compounds going from surface layers to the deepest ones with a shift from aliphatic compounds and proteins/amino sugars to more high unsaturated character and less nitrogen content. The heavy metals associated to HMW-DOM fraction follows the order: Zn > Cu > Pb > Cd ∼ As ∼ U. The percentage fraction of metals bound to HMW-DOM respect to total metal content follows the order: Cu > Pb > Zn, Cd in agreement with humic substance binding ability (Irwing-William series). Going down to depth of trench, all metals except arsenic, showed a high concentration peak corresponding to 2.0-2.5 m layer. This result was attributed to particular structural characteristic of organic matter able to form different type of complexes (1:1, 1:2, 1:n) with metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MOLECULAR COMPLEXES OF SULPHUR DIOXIDE WITH N,O-CONTAINING ORGANIC BASES (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Khoma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The literature data on the synthesis, stoichiometry, structure and relative stability of molecular  complexes of sulphur dioxide with N,O-containing organic bases have been systematized and  generalized. It was shown that the yield of the reaction product of sulfur dioxide with organic  bases (such as amines are strongly influenced by the conditions of synthesis: the nature of  the solvent (basicity, polarity, the temperature and SO2:L ratio in the reaction medium. The stoichiometry of SO2*nL molecular complexes depends on ligand denticity, as well as its  ability to H-bonding. The reaction of the sulfur oxide (IV with organic bases can give S←N and S←O complexes. With the increase of the value of base proton affinity the decrease ΔrSN values has been marked. Characteristic parameter Δr SN = r SN – a1(rS+ rN (where rSNis the S←N donor-acceptor bond length has been determined by microwave spectroscopy and X-ray analysis, rSand rNwere the tabulated values of the homopolar covalent radii of sulphur and nitrogen heteroatoms. The dependence of formation enthalpy of molecular complexes of basic amines and spectral characteristics has been noted; enthalpy-entropy compensation for S←N and S←O complex-es has been stated. Despite the limited experimental data on the thermodynamics of complex formation and the lengths of donor-acceptor bonds for the same compounds it has been found bond S←N strength in SO2 molecular complexes to depend on the intrinsic value of ΔrSN. The contribution of van der Waals forces and charge transfer forces to the formation of molecular complexes of sulphur dioxide has been stated.

  2. Accurate lattice energies of organic molecular crystals from periodic turbomole calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Hannes Konrad; Stein, Matthias

    2018-03-05

    Accurate lattice energies of organic crystals are important i.e. for the pharmaceutical industry. Periodic DFT calculations with atom-centered Gaussian basis functions with the Turbomole program are used to calculate lattice energies for several non-covalently bound organic molecular crystals. The accuracy and convergence of results with basis set size and k-space sampling from periodic calculations is evaluated for the two reference molecules benzoic acid and naphthalene. For the X23 benchmark set of small molecular crystals accurate lattice energies are obtained using the PBE-D3 functional. In particular for hydrogen-bonded systems, a sufficiently large basis set is required. The calculated lattice energy differences between enantiopure and racemic crystal forms for a prototype set of chiral molecules are in good agreement with experimental results and allow the rationalization and computer-aided design of chiral separation processes. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Molecular motor-induced instabilities and cross linkers determine biopolymer organization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.; Ziebert, F.; Humphrey, D.; Duggan, C.; Steinbeck, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Kas, J.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Leipzig; Univ. of Texas at Austin; Univ. Bayreuth

    2007-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells rely on the active self-organization of protein filaments to form a responsive intracellular cytoskeleton. The necessity of motility and reaction to stimuli additionally requires pathways that quickly and reversibly change cytoskeletal organization. While thermally driven order-disorder transitions are, from the viewpoint of physics, the most obvious method for controlling states of organization, the timescales necessary for effective cellular dynamics would require temperatures exceeding the physiologically viable temperature range. We report a mechanism whereby the molecular motor myosin II can cause near-instantaneous order-disorder transitions in reconstituted cytoskeletal actin solutions. When motor-induced filament sliding diminishes, the actin network structure rapidly and reversibly self-organizes into various assemblies. Addition of stable cross linkers was found to alter the architectures of ordered assemblies. These isothermal transitions between dynamic disorder and self-assembled ordered states illustrate that the interplay between passive crosslinking and molecular motor activity plays a substantial role in dynamic cellular organization.

  4. Molecular signatures of biogeochemical transformations in dissolved organic matter from ten World Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Thomas; Zark, Maren; Vähätalo, Anssi; Niggemann, Jutta; Spencer, Robert; Hernes, Peter; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    Rivers carry large amounts of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the oceans thereby connecting terrestrial and marine element cycles. Photo-degradation in conjunction with microbial turnover is considered a major pathway by which terrigenous DOM is decomposed. To reveal globally relevant patterns behind this process, we performed photo-degradation experiments and year-long bio-assays on DOM from ten of the largest world rivers that collectively account for more than one-third of the fresh water discharge to the global ocean. We furthermore tested the hypothesis that the terrigenous component in deep ocean DOM may be far higher than biomarker studies suggest, because of the selective photochemical destruction of characteristic biomolecules from vascular plants. DOM was molecularly characterized by a combination of non-targeted ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry and quantitative molecular tracer analyses. We show that the reactivity of DOM is globally related to broad catchment properties. Basins that are dominated by forest and grassland export more photo-degradable DOM than other rivers. Chromophoric compounds are mainly vascular plant-derived polyphenols, and partially carry a pyrogenic signature from vegetation fires. These forest and grassland dominated rivers lost up to 50% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) during irradiation, and up to 85% of DOC was lost in total if subsequently bio-incubated for one year. Basins covered by cropland, on the other hand, export DOM with a higher proportion of photo-resistant and bio-available DOM which is enriched in nitrogen. In these rivers, 30% or less of DOC was photodegraded. Consistent with previous studies, we found that riverine DOM resembled marine DOM in its broad molecular composition after extensive degradation, mainly due to almost complete removal of aromatics. More detailed molecular fingerprinting analysis (based on the relative abundance of >4000 DOM molecular formulae), however, revealed clear differences

  5. Molecular Analysis and Genomic Organization of Major DNA Satellites in Banana (Musa spp.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čížková, Jana; Hřibová, Eva; Humplíková, Lenka; Christelová, Pavla; Suchánková, Pavla; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2013) E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500380901; GA MŠk(CZ) LG12021 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Program:ED Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : IN-SITU HYBRIDIZATION * LARGE-SCALE ORGANIZATION * RIBOSOMAL-RNA GENES Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  6. Functional Molecular Diversity of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter Is Reduced during Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mentges

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic matter (DOM is a highly diverse mixture of compounds, accounting for one of the world's largest active carbon pools. The surprising recalcitrance of some DOM compounds to bacterial degradation has recently been associated with its diversity. However, little is known about large-scale patterns of marine DOM diversity and its change through degradation, in particular considering the functional diversity of DOM. Here, we analyze the development of marine DOM diversity during degradation in two data sets comprising DOM of very different ages: a three-year mesocosm experiment and highly-resolved field samples from the Atlantic and Southern Ocean. The DOM molecular composition was determined using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. We quantify DOM diversity using three conceptually different diversity measures, namely richness of molecular formulas, abundance-based diversity, and functional molecular diversity. Using these measures we find stable molecular richness of DOM with age >1 year, systematic changes in the molecules' abundance distribution with degradation state, and increasing homogeneity with respect to chemical properties for more degraded DOM. Coinciding with differences in sea water density, the spatial field data separated clearly into regions of high and low diversity. The joint application of different diversity measures yields a comprehensive overview on temporal and spatial patterns of molecular diversity, valuable for general conclusions on drivers and consequences of marine DOM diversity.

  7. Energy level alignment at planar organic heterojunctions: influence of contact doping and molecular orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Planar organic heterojunctions are widely used in photovoltaic cells, light-emitting diodes, and bilayer field-effect transistors. The energy level alignment in the devices plays an important role in obtaining the aspired gap arrangement. Additionally, the π-orbital overlap between the involved molecules defines e.g. the charge-separation efficiency in solar cells due to charge-transfer effects. To account for both aspects, direct/inverse photoemission spectroscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy were used to determine the energy level landscape and the molecular orientation at prototypical planar organic heterojunctions. The combined experimental approach results in a comprehensive model for the electronic and morphological characteristics of the interface between the two investigated molecular semiconductors. Following an introduction on heterojunctions used in devices and on energy levels of organic materials, the energy level alignment of planar organic heterojunctions will be discussed. The observed energy landscape is always determined by the individual arrangement between the energy levels of the molecules and the work function of the electrode. This might result in contact doping due to Fermi level pinning at the electrode for donor/acceptor heterojunctions, which also improves the solar cell efficiency. This pinning behaviour can be observed across an unpinned interlayer and results in charge accumulation at the donor/acceptor interface, depending on the transport levels of the respective organic semiconductors. Moreover, molecular orientation will affect the energy levels because of the anisotropy in ionisation energy and electron affinity and is influenced by the structural compatibility of the involved molecules at the heterojunction. High structural compatibility leads to π-orbital stacking between different molecules at a heterojunction, which is of additional interest for photovoltaic active interfaces and for ground

  8. Production of High Molecular Weight Organic Compounds on the Surfaces of Amorphous Iron Silicate Catalysts: Implications for Organic Synthesis in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, I.; Hill, H. G. M.; Pearson, V. K.; Sephton, M. A.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2002-01-01

    The high molecular weight organic products of Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch syntheses on the surfaces of Fe-silicate catalysts have been studied by GCMS. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Immobilizing Organic-Based Molecular Switches into Metal-Organic Frameworks: A Promising Strategy for Switching in Solid State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Bo; Meng, Yi; Xie, Yang; Du, Ke; Sue, Andrew C-H; Wang, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Organic-based molecular switches (OMS) are essential components for the ultimate miniaturization of nanoscale electronics and devices. For practical applications, it is often necessary for OMS to be incorporated into functional solid-state materials. However, the switching characteristics of OMS in solution are usually not transferrable to the solid state, presumably because of spatial confinement or inefficient conversion in densely packed solid phase. A promising way to circumvent this issue is harboring the functional OMS within the robust and porous environment of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as their organic components. In this feature article, recent research progress of OMS-based MOFs is briefly summarized. The switching behaviors of OMS under different stimuli (e.g., light, redox, pH, etc.) in the MOF state are first introduced. After that, the technological applications of these OMS-based MOFs in different areas, including CO 2 adsorption, gas separation, drug delivery, photodynamic therapy, and sensing, are outlined. Finally, perspectives and future challenges are discussed in the conclusion. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Temperature effects on multiphase reactions of organic molecular markers: A modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Vikram; Chen, Ying; Yao, Guangming; Nakao, Shunsuke

    2018-04-01

    Various molecular markers are used in source apportionment studies. In early studies, molecular markers were assumed to be inert. However, recent studies suggest that molecular markers can decay rapidly through multiphase reactions, which makes interpretation of marker measurements challenging. This study presents a simplified model to account for the effects of temperature and relative humidity on the lifetime of molecular markers through a shift in gas-particle partitioning as well as a change in viscosity of the condensed phase. As a model case, this study examines the stability of levoglucosan, a key marker species of biomass burning, over a wide temperature range relevant to summertime and wintertime. Despite the importance of wood combustion for space heating in winter, the lifetime of levoglucosan in wintertime is not well understood. The model predicts that in low-temperature conditions, levoglucosan predominantly remains in the particle phase, and therefore its loss due to gas-phase oxidation reactions is significantly reduced. Furthermore, the movement of the levoglucosan from the bulk of the particle to the particle surface is reduced due to low diffusivity in the semi-solid state. The simplified model developed in this study reasonably reproduces upper and lower bounds of the lifetime of levoglucosan investigated in previous studies. The model results show that the levoglucosan depletion after seven days reduces significantly from ∼98% at 25 °C to 1 week) even at 60% relative humidity irrespective of the assumed fragility parameter D that controls estimated diffusivity. The model shows that lifetime of an organic molecular marker strongly depends on assumed D especially when a semi-volatile marker is in semi-solid organic aerosol.

  11. Molecular signatures in femtosecond laser-induced organic plasmas: comparison with nanosecond laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-01-28

    During the last few years, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has evolved significantly in the molecular sensing area through the optical monitoring of emissions from organic plasmas. Large efforts have been made to study the formation pathways of diatomic radicals as well as their connections with the bonding framework of molecular solids. Together with the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules, laser ablation parameters seem to be closely tied to the observed spectral signatures. This research focuses on evaluating the impact of laser pulse duration on the production of diatomic species that populate plasmas of organic materials. Differences in relative intensities of spectral signatures from the plasmas of several organic molecules induced in femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) ablation regimes have been studied. Beyond the abundance and origin of diatomic radicals that seed the plasma, findings reveal the crucial role of the ablation regime in the breakage pattern of the molecule. The laser pulse duration dictates the fragments and atoms resulting from the vaporized molecules, promoting some formation routes at the expense of other paths. The larger amount of fragments formed by fs pulses advocates a direct release of native bonds and a subsequent seeding of the plasma with diatomic species. In contrast, in the ns ablation regime, the atomic recombinations and single displacement processes dominate the contribution to diatomic radicals, as long as atomization of molecules prevails over their progressive decomposition. Consequently, fs-LIBS better reflects correlations between strengths of emissions from diatomic species and molecular structure as compared to ns-LIBS. These new results entail a further step towards the specificity in the analysis of molecular solids by fs-LIBS.

  12. Molecular Corridor Based Approach for Description of Evolution of Secondary Organic Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y., Sr.; Poeschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.

    2015-12-01

    Organic aerosol is ubiquitous in the atmosphere and its major component is secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Formation and evolution of SOA is a complex process involving coupled chemical reactions and mass transport in the gas and particle phases (Shiraiwa et al., 2014). Current air quality models do not embody the full spectrum of reaction and transport processes, nor do they identify the dominant rate-limiting steps in SOA formation, resulting in the significant underprediction of observed SOA concentrations, which precludes reliable quantitative predictions of aerosols and their environmental impacts. Recently, it has been suggested that the SOA chemical evolution can be represented well by "molecular corridor" with a tight inverse correlation between molar mass and volatility of SOA oxidation products (Shiraiwa et al., 2014). Here we further analyzed the structure, molar mass and volatility of 31,000 unique organic compounds. These compounds include oxygenated organic compounds as well as nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organics such as amines, organonitrates, and organosulfates. Results show that most of those compounds fall into this two-dimensional (2-D) space, which is constrained by two boundary lines corresponding to the volatility of n -alkanes CnH2n+2 and sugar alcohols CnH2n+2On. A method to predict the volatility of nitrogen- and sulfur- containing compounds is developed based on those 31,000 organic compounds. It is shown that the volatility can be well predicted as a function of chemical composition numbers, providing a way to apply this 2-D space to organic compounds observed in real atmosphere. A comprehensive set of observation data from laboratory experiments, field campaigns and indoor measurements is mapped to the molecular corridor. This 2-D space can successfully grasp the properties of organic compounds formed in different atmospheric conditions. The molecular corridor represents a new framework in which chemical and physical properties as

  13. The Electric and Optical Properties of Doped Small Molecular Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Kwang Ohk Cheo

    2003-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) constitute a new and exciting emissive display technology. In general, the basic OLED structure consists of a stack of fluorescent organic layers sandwiched between a transparent conducting-anode and metallic cathode. When an appropriate bias is applied to the device, holes are injected from the anode and electrons from the cathode; some of the recombination events between the holes and electrons result in electroluminescence (EL). Until now, most of the efforts in developing OLEDs have focused on display applications, hence on devices within the visible range. However some organic devices have been developed for ultraviolet or infrared emission. Various aspects of the device physics of doped small molecular OLEDs were described and discussed. The doping layer thickness and concentration were varied systematically to study their effects on device performances, energy transfer, and turn-off dynamics. Low-energy-gap DCM2 guest molecules, in either alpha-NPD or DPVBi host l...

  14. Organic chemistry of basal ice - presence of labile, low molecular weight compounds available for microbial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Grzegorz P.; Wadham, Jemma L.; Lawson, Emily; Stibal, Marek; Telling, Jon

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies show that subglacial environments previously thought to be devoid of life contain a host of active microbial organisms. Presence of liquid water due to overburden pressure, the release of nutrients from chemical erosion of bedrock, and the potential carbon sources in overridden sediments facilitate life in this extreme environment. However, little is still known of concentrations and diversity of labile organic compounds essential for sustaining microbial metabolism in subglacial environments. Three subglacial ecosystems that considerably differ in range and amount of available organic compounds were selected for this study 1-Engabreen, northern Norway, overlying high-grade metamorphic rocks with low organic carbon content; 2-Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, overriding ancient black shales with a relatively high carbon content yet recalcitrant to microbiological consumption; and 3-Russell Glacier in western Greenland with recently overridden quaternary organic rich paleosols. Basal and pressure ridge ice samples were collected and subsequently analysed for low molecular weight organic compounds, with the emphasis on volatile fatty acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. The highest concentration of labile organic compounds in Greenland basal ice suggest that recently overridden paleosols have the greatest potential for sustaining microbial populations present within and underneath basal ice. The high concentration of "ancient" organic carbon in basal ice from Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, doesn't correlate with the presence of labile organic compounds. This indicates the inability of microbes to digest recalcitrant kerogen carbon in cold temperatures. In all three investigated environments, concentrations of labile organic compounds are elevated in basal ice with a high debris content. Until recently, most models of the global carbon cycle tend to neglect the pool of subglacial organic carbon as little is known about the range and concentrations of

  15. Built-In Potentials Induced by Molecular Order in Amorphous Organic Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederich, Pascal; Rodin, Vadim; von Wrochem, Florian; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2018-01-17

    Many molecules used to fabricate organic semiconductor devices carry an intrinsic dipole moment. Anisotropic orientation of such molecules in amorphous organic thin films during the deposition process can lead to the spontaneous buildup of an electrostatic potential perpendicular to the film. This so-called giant surface potential (GSP) effect can be exploited in organic electronics applications and was extensively studied in experiment. However, presently, an understanding of the molecular mechanism driving the orientation is lacking. Here, we model the physical vapor deposition process of seven small organic molecules employed in organic light-emitting diode applications with atomistic simulations. We are able to reproduce experimental results for a wide range of strength of the GSP effect. We find that the electrostatic interaction between the dipole moments of the molecules limits the GSP strength and identify short-range van der Waals interactions between the molecule and the surface during deposition as the driving force behind the anisotropic orientation. We furthermore show how the GSP effect influences the energy levels responsible for charge transport, which is important for the design of organic semiconductors and devices.

  16. Interaction of polar and nonpolar organic pollutants with soil organic matter: sorption experiments and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashour A; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Aziz, Saadullah G; Hilal, Rifaat H; Elroby, Shaaban A; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O; Leinweber, Peter; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    The fate of organic pollutants in the environment is influenced by several factors including the type and strength of their interactions with soil components especially SOM. However, a molecular level answer to the question "How organic pollutants interact with SOM?" is still lacking. In order to explore mechanisms of this interaction, we have developed a new SOM model and carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in parallel with sorption experiments. The new SOM model comprises free SOM functional groups (carboxylic acid and naphthalene) as well as SOM cavities (with two different sizes), simulating the soil voids, containing the same SOM functional groups. To examine the effect of the hydrophobicity on the interaction, the organic pollutants hexachlorobenzene (HCB, non-polar) and sulfanilamide (SAA, polar) were considered. The experimental and theoretical investigations explored four major points regarding sorption of SAA and HCB on soil, yielding the following results. 1--The interaction depends on the SOM chemical composition more than the SOM content. 2--The interaction causes a site-specific adsorption on the soil surfaces. 3--Sorption hysteresis occurs, which can be explained by inclusion of these pollutants inside soil voids. 4--The hydrophobic HCB is adsorbed on soil stronger than the hydrophilic SAA. Moreover, the theoretical results showed that HCB forms stable complexes with all SOM models in the aqueous solution, while most of SAA-SOM complexes are accompanied by dissociation into SAA and the free SOM models. The SOM-cavity modeling had a significant effect on binding of organic pollutants to SOM. Both HCB and SAA bind to the SOM models in the order of models with a small cavity>a large cavity>no cavity. Although HCB binds to all SOM models stronger than SAA, the latter is more affected by the presence of the cavity. Finally, HCB and SAA bind to the hydrophobic functional group (naphthalene) stronger than to the hydrophilic one (carboxylic acid

  17. Nanostructured organic semiconductor films for molecular detection with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Babur, Esra; Ozdemir, Mehmet; Gieseking, Rebecca L.; Dede, Yavuz; Tamer, Ugur; Schatz, George C.; Facchetti, Antonio; Usta, Hakan; Demirel, Gokhan

    2017-09-01

    π-Conjugated organic semiconductors have been explored in several optoelectronic devices, yet their use in molecular detection as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-active platforms is unknown. Herein, we demonstrate that SERS-active, superhydrophobic and ivy-like nanostructured films of a molecular semiconductor, α,ω-diperfluorohexylquaterthiophene (DFH-4T), can be easily fabricated by vapour deposition. DFH-4T films without any additional plasmonic layer exhibit unprecedented Raman signal enhancements up to 3.4 × 103 for the probe molecule methylene blue. The combination of quantum mechanical computations, comparative experiments with a fluorocarbon-free α,ω-dihexylquaterthiophene (DH-4T), and thin-film microstructural analysis demonstrates the fundamental roles of the π-conjugated core fluorocarbon substitution and the unique DFH-4T film morphology governing the SERS response. Furthermore, Raman signal enhancements up to ~1010 and sub-zeptomole (films with a thin gold layer. Our results offer important guidance for the molecular design of SERS-active organic semiconductors and easily fabricable SERS platforms for ultrasensitive trace analysis.

  18. Role of Molecular Weight on the Mechanical Device Properties of Organic Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bruner, Christopher

    2014-02-11

    For semiconducting polymers, such as regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene-2, 5-diyl) (rr-P3HT), the molecular weight has been correlated to charge carrier field-effect mobilities, surface morphology, and gelation rates in solution and therefore has important implications for long-Term reliability, manufacturing, and future applications of electronic organic thin films. In this work, we show that the molecular weight rr-P3HT in organic solar cells can also significantly change the internal cohesion of the photoactive layer using micromechanical testing techniques. Cohesive values ranged from ∼0.5 to ∼17 J m -2, following the general trend of greater cohesion with increasing molecular weight. Using nanodynamic mechanical analysis, we attribute the increase in cohesion to increased plasticity which helps dissipate the applied energy. Finally, we correlate photovoltaic efficiency with cohesion to assess the device physics pertinent to optimizing device reliability. This research elucidates the fundamental parameters which affect both the mechanical stability and efficiency of polymer solar cells. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  19. Microporous Polyamide Membranes for Molecular Sieving of Nitrogen from Volatile Organic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haoli; Tao, Fei; Liu, Quan; Zong, Chunxin; Yang, Wenchao; Cao, Xingzhong; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping

    2017-05-15

    Microporous polymer membranes continue to receive tremendous attention for energy-efficient gas separation processes owing to their high separation performances. A new network microporous polyamide membrane with good molecular-sieving performance for the separation of N 2 from a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture is described. Triple-substituted triptycene was used as the main monomer to form a fisherman's net-shaped polymer, which readily forms a composite membrane by solution casting. This membrane exhibited outstanding separation performance and good stability for the molecular-sieving separation of N 2 over VOCs such as cyclohexane. The rejection rate of the membrane reached 99.2 % with 2098 Barrer N 2 permeability at 24 °C under 4 kPa. This approach promotes development of microporous membranes for separation of condensable gases. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. High-Throughput Molecular Simulations of Metal Organic Frameworks for CO2 Separation: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur Erucar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Metal organic frameworks (MOFs have emerged as great alternatives to traditional nanoporous materials for CO2 separation applications. MOFs are porous materials that are formed by self-assembly of transition metals and organic ligands. The most important advantage of MOFs over well-known porous materials is the possibility to generate multiple materials with varying structural properties and chemical functionalities by changing the combination of metal centers and organic linkers during the synthesis. This leads to a large diversity of materials with various pore sizes and shapes that can be efficiently used for CO2 separations. Since the number of synthesized MOFs has already reached to several thousand, experimental investigation of each MOF at the lab-scale is not practical. High-throughput computational screening of MOFs is a great opportunity to identify the best materials for CO2 separation and to gain molecular-level insights into the structure–performance relationships. This type of knowledge can be used to design new materials with the desired structural features that can lead to extraordinarily high CO2 selectivities. In this mini-review, we focused on developments in high-throughput molecular simulations of MOFs for CO2 separations. After reviewing the current studies on this topic, we discussed the opportunities and challenges in the field and addressed the potential future developments.

  1. Molecular and Cellular Toxicology of Nanomaterials with Related to Aquatic Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rather, Mohd Ashraf; Bhat, Irfan Ahmad; Sharma, Niti; Sharma, Rupam

    2018-01-01

    The increasing application of nanomaterials both in commercial and industrial products has led their accumulation in the aquatic ecosystem. The rapid development and large scale production of nanomaterials in the last few decades have stimulated concerns regarding their potential environmental health risks on aquatic biota. Inorganic nanoparticles, due to their unique properties and associated material characteristics resulted in toxicity of these nanomaterials in aquatic organisms. Understanding their novel properties at nanoscale has established to be a significant aspect of their toxicity. Unique properties such as size, surface area, surface coating, surface charge, aggregation of particles and dissolution may affect cellular uptake, molecular response, in vivo reactivity and delivery across tissues of living organism. Already lot of research in the past three or four decades within the nano-ecotoxicology field had been carried out. However, there is not any standard technique yet to assess toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) on different biological systems such as reproductive, respiratory, nervous, gastrointestinal systems, and development stages of aquatic organisms. Specific toxicological techniques and quantification of nanoparticles are vital to establish regulations to control their impact on the aquatic organism and their release in the aquatic environment. The main aim of this chapter is to critically evaluate the current literature on the toxicity of nanomaterials on aquatic organism.

  2. Anomalous Ambipolar Transport of Organic Semiconducting Crystals via Control of Molecular Packing Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Beomjin; Kim, Kyunghun; Park, Jaesung; Lim, Heeseon; Lanh, Phung Thi; Jang, A-Rang; Hyun, Chohee; Myung, Chang Woo; Park, Seungkyoo; Kim, Jeong Won; Kim, Kwang S; Shin, Hyeon Suk; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Se Hyun; Park, Chan Eon; Kim, Jin Kon

    2017-08-23

    Organic crystals deposited on 2-dimensional (2D) van der Waals substrates have been widely investigated due to their unprecedented crystal structures and electrical properties. van der Waals interaction between organic molecules and the substrate induces epitaxial growth of high quality organic crystals and their anomalous crystal morphologies. Here, we report on unique ambipolar charge transport of a "lying-down" pentacene crystal grown on a 2D hexagonal boron nitride van der Waals substrate. From in-depth analysis on crystal growth behavior and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurement, it is revealed that the pentacene crystal at the initial growth stage have a lattice-strained packing structure and unique energy band structure with a deep highest occupied molecular orbital level compared to conventional "standing-up" crystals. The lattice-strained pentacene few layers enable ambipolar charge transport in field-effect transistors with balanced hole and electron field-effect mobilities. Complementary logic circuits composed of the two identical transistors show clear inverting functionality with a high gain up to 15. The interesting crystal morphology of organic crystals on van der Waals substrates is expected to attract broad attentions on organic/2D interfaces for their electronic applications.

  3. Molecular biology of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome: injury, adaptation, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, J P; Buchman, T G; Karl, I E; Hotchkiss, R S

    2000-01-01

    Injury will equal or surpass communicable disease in the year 2020 as the number one cause of lost disability-adjusted life-years worldwide. The major cause of "late death" after trauma is organ dysfunction, commonly as a complication of shock or sepsis. The pathophysiology of injury-induced organ dysfunction is poorly characterized but has been linked to systemic inflammation as a result of infection (either obvious or occult) or massive tissue injury (systemic inflammatory response syndrome, SIRS). Subsequent complications of organ dysfunction, including death, may also stem from immunosuppression characteristic of what has been called the counter-regulatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS). At the cellular level, injurious stimuli trigger adaptive stress responses that include changes in gene expression. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is the summation of these stress responses to severe systemic injury, integrated at the cellular, organ, and host levels. We hypothesize that a complete understanding at the molecular level of the stress responses induced by injury will aid in the development of therapeutic strategies for treating MODS in the critically ill surgical patient. This paper reviews recent data from our Cellular Injury and Adaptation Laboratory relevant to our understanding of MODS pathophysiology, particularly as it relates to stress-induced cell death by apoptosis. Our data suggest that inhibition of stress-induced apoptosis may improve survival after severe injury.

  4. Molecular corridors and parameterizations of volatility in the chemical evolution of organic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation and aging of organic aerosols (OA proceed through multiple steps of chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases, which is challenging for the interpretation of field measurements and laboratory experiments as well as accurate representation of OA evolution in atmospheric aerosol models. Based on data from over 30 000 compounds, we show that organic compounds with a wide variety of functional groups fall into molecular corridors, characterized by a tight inverse correlation between molar mass and volatility. We developed parameterizations to predict the saturation mass concentration of organic compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur from the elemental composition that can be measured by soft-ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry. Field measurement data from new particle formation events, biomass burning, cloud/fog processing, and indoor environments were mapped into molecular corridors to characterize the chemical nature of the observed OA components. We found that less-oxidized indoor OA are constrained to a corridor of low molar mass and high volatility, whereas highly oxygenated compounds in atmospheric water extend to high molar mass and low volatility. Among the nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds identified in atmospheric aerosols, amines tend to exhibit low molar mass and high volatility, whereas organonitrates and organosulfates follow high O : C corridors extending to high molar mass and low volatility. We suggest that the consideration of molar mass and molecular corridors can help to constrain volatility and particle-phase state in the modeling of OA particularly for nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds.

  5. Molecular Alteration of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter under Experimental Hydrothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, J. A.; Hansen, C. T.; Goldhammer, T.; Bach, W.; Dittmar, T.

    2016-02-01

    Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a large (660 Pg) pool of reduced carbon that is subject to thermal alteration in hydrothermal systems and sedimentary basins. In natural hydrothermal systems, DOM is almost completely removed, but the mechanism, kinetics and temperature dependence of this removal have not been studied to date. We investigated molecular-level changes to DOM that was solid-phase extracted (SPE-DOM) from the deep ocean of the North Pacific Ocean. This complex molecular mixture was experimentally exposed to temperatures between 100-380 °C over the course of two weeks in artificial seawater, and was then characterized on a molecular level via ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry (FTICRMS & Orbitrap). Almost 93% of SPE-DOM was removed by the treatment at 380 °C, and this removal was accompanied by a consistent pattern of SPE-DOM alteration across the temperatures studied, which can likely be extrapolated down to temperatures around 68 °C. Higher molecular weight and more oxygen rich compounds were preferentially degraded, suggesting that decarboxylation and dehydration of carboxylic acid and alcohol groups are the most rapid degradation mechanisms. Nitrogen containing compounds followed the same overall trends as those containing just C, H and O up to 300 °C. Above this temperature, the most highly degraded samples contained very little of the original character of marine DOM, instead being mainly composed of very low intensity N- and S- containing molecules with a high H:C ratio (>1.5). Our experiments were conducted without a sedimentary or mineral phase, and demonstrate that profound molecular alteration and almost complete removal of marine SPE-DOM requires nothing more than heating in a seawater matrix.

  6. Dynamics of molecular impacts on soft materials: from fullerenes to organic nanodrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcorte, A; Garrison, B J; Hamraoui, K

    2009-08-15

    The present theoretical study explores the interaction of various energetic molecular projectiles and clusters with a model polymeric surface, with direct implications for surface analysis by mass spectrometry. The projectile sizes (up to 23 kDa) are intermediate between the polyatomic ions (SF(5), C(60)) used in secondary ion mass spectrometry and the large organic microdroplets generated, for example, in desorption electrospray ionization. The target is a model of amorphous polyethylene, already used in a previous study [Delcorte, A.; Garrison, B. J. J. Phys. Chem. C 2007, 111, 15312]. The chosen method relies on classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, using a coarse-grained description of polymeric samples for high energy or long time calculations (20-50 ps) and a full atomistic description for low energy or short time calculations (<1 ps). Two regions of sputtering or desorption are observed depending on the projectile energy per nucleon (i.e., effectively the velocity). The transition, occurring around 1 eV/nucleon, is identified by a change of slope in the curve of the sputtering yield per nucleon vs energy per nucleon. Beyond 1 eV/nucleon, the sputtering yield depends only on the total projectile energy and not on the projectile nuclearity. Below 1 eV/nucleon, i.e., around the sputtering threshold for small projectiles, yields are influenced by both the projectile energy and nuclearity. Deposition of intact molecular clusters is also observed at the lowest energies per nucleon. The transition in the sputtering curve is connected to a change of energy deposition mechanisms, from atomistic and mesoscopic processes to hydrodynamic flow. It also corresponds to a change in terms of fragmentation. Below 1 eV/nucleon, the projectiles are not able to induce bond scissions in the sample. This region of molecular emission with minimal fragmentation offers new analytical perspectives, out of reach of smaller molecular clusters such as fullerenes.

  7. Molecular simulation of dispersion and mechanical stability of organically modified layered silicates in polymer matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yao-Tsung

    The experimental analysis of nanometer-scale separation processes and mechanical properties at buried interfaces in nanocomposites has remained difficult. We have employed molecular dynamics simulation in relation to available experimental data to alleviate such limitations and gain insight into the dispersion and mechanical stability of organically modified layered silicates in hydrophobic polymer matrices. We analyzed cleavage energies of various organically modified silicates as a function of the cation exchange capacity, surfactant head group chemistry, and chain length using MD simulations with the PCFF-PHYLLOSILICATE force field. The range of the cleavage energy is between 25 and 210 mJ/m2 upon the molecular structures and packing of surfactants. As a function of chain length, the cleavage energy indicates local minima for interlayer structures comprised of loosely packed layers of alkyl chains and local maxima for interlayer structures comprised of densely packed layers of alkyl chains between the layers. In addition, the distribution of cationic head groups between the layers in the equilibrium state determines whether large increases in cleavage energy due to Coulomb attraction. We have also examined mechanical bending and failure mechanisms of layered silicates on the nanometer scale using molecular dynamics simulation in comparison to a library of TEM data of polymer nanocomposites. We investigated the energy of single clay lamellae as a function of bending radius and different cation density. The layer energy increases particularly for bending radii below 20 nm and is largely independent of cation exchange capacity. The analysis of TEM images of agglomerated and exfoliated aluminosilicates of different CEC in polymer matrices at small volume fractions showed bending radii in excess of 100 nm due to free volumes in the polymer matrix. At a volume fraction >5%, however, bent clay layers were found with bending radii <20 nm and kinks as a failure mechanism

  8. Molecular design chemical structure generation from the properties of pure organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, AL

    1992-01-01

    This book is a systematic presentation of the methods that have been developed for the interpretation of molecular modeling to the design of new chemicals. The main feature of the compilation is the co-ordination of the various scientific disciplines required for the generation of new compounds. The five chapters deal with such areas as structure and properties of organic compounds, relationships between structure and properties, and models for structure generation. The subject is covered in sufficient depth to provide readers with the necessary background to understand the modeling

  9. Hierarchical Structure and Molecular Dynamics of Metal-Organic Framework as Characterized by Solid State NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic framework (MOF stands out as a promising material with great potential in application areas, such as gas separation and catalysis, due to its extraordinary properties. In order to fully characterize the structure of MOFs, especially those without single crystal, Solid State NMR (SSNMR is an indispensable tool. As a complimentary analytical technique to X-ray diffraction, SSNMR could provide detailed atomic level structure information. Meanwhile, SSNMR can characterize molecular dynamics over a wide dynamics range. In this review, selected applications of SSNMR on various MOFs are summarized and discussed.

  10. Molecular characterization of urban organic aerosol in tropical India: contributions of primary emissions and secondary photooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, P. Q.; Kawamura, K.; Pavuluri, C. M.; Swaminathan, T.; Chen, J.

    2010-03-01

    Organic molecular composition of PM10 samples, collected at Chennai in tropical India, was studied using capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Fourteen organic compound classes were detected in the aerosols, including aliphatic lipids, sugar compounds, lignin products, terpenoid biomarkers, sterols, aromatic acids, hydroxy-/polyacids, phthalate esters, hopanes, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), and photooxidation products from biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). At daytime, phthalate esters were found to be the most abundant compound class; however, at nighttime, fatty acids were the dominant one. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, C16 fatty acid, and levoglucosan were identified as the most abundant single compounds. The nighttime maxima of most organics in the aerosols indicate a land/sea breeze effect in tropical India, although some other factors such as local emissions and long-range transport may also influence the composition of organic aerosols. However, biogenic VOC oxidation products (e.g., 2-methyltetrols, pinic acid, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid and β-caryophyllinic acid) showed diurnal patterns with daytime maxima. Interestingly, terephthalic acid was maximized at nighttime, which is different from those of phthalic and isophthalic acids. A positive relation was found between 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene (a tracer for plastic burning) and terephthalic acid, suggesting that the field burning of municipal solid wastes including plastics is a significant source of terephthalic acid. Organic compounds were further categorized into several groups to clarify their sources. Fossil fuel combustion (24-43%) was recognized as the most significant source for the total identified compounds, followed by plastic emission (16-33%), secondary oxidation (8.6-23%), and microbial/marine sources (7.2-17%). In contrast, the contributions of terrestrial plant waxes (5.9-11%) and biomass burning (4.2-6.4%) were relatively small. This study demonstrates that, in

  11. Exploitation of molecular mobilities for advanced organic optoelectronic and photonic nano-materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Tomoko O.

    Electro-optically active organic materials have shown great potential in advanced technologies such as ultrafast electro-optical switches for broadband communication, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaic cells. Currently, the maturity of chemical synthesis enables a sophisticated integration of the active elements into complex macromolecules. Also, the structure-property relationships of the isolated single electrically/optically active elements are well established. Unfortunately, such correlations involving single molecule are not applicable to complex unstructured condensed systems, in which unique mesoscale properties and complex dynamics of super-/supra-molecular structures are present. Our current challenge arises, in particular, from a deficiency of appropriate characterization tools that close the gap between phenomenological measurements and theoretical models. This work addresses submolecular mobilities relevant for opto-electronic functionalities of photoluminescent polymers and non-linear optical (NLO) materials. Thereby, I will introduce novel nanoscale thermomechanical characterization tools that are based on scanning force microscopy. From nanoscale thermomechanical measurements sub-/super-molecular mobilities of novel optoelectronic materials can be inferred and to some degree controlled. For instance, we have explored interfacial constraints as a engineering tool to control molecular mobility. This will be illustrated with electroluminescent polymers, which are prone to undesired pi-pi aggregation due to the rod-like structure---intrinsic to all conjugated polymers. The nanoscale confinement is used to reduced chain mobility, and thus, hinders undesired aggregation, and consequently, yields superior spectral stability. From the nanomaterial design perspective, I will also address mobility control with targeted molecular designs. This involves two classes of novel NLO materials, side-chain dendronized polymers and self-assembling molecular

  12. Robust Organic Radical Molecular Junctions Using Acetylene Terminated Groups for C-Au Bond Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Francesc; Olavarria-Contreras, Ignacio Jose; Droghetti, Andrea; Rungger, Ivan; Rudnev, Alexander; Gutiérrez, Diego; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Veciana, Jaume; van der Zant, Herre S J; Rovira, Concepció; Burzurı, Enrique; Crivillers, Núria

    2018-02-07

    Organic paramagnetic and electroactive molecules are attracting interest as core components of molecular electronic and spintronic devices. Currently, further progress is hindered by the modest stability and reproducibility of the molecule/electrode contact. We report the synthesis of a persistent organic radical bearing one and two terminal alkyne groups to form Au-C σ bonds. The formation and stability of self-assembled monolayers and the electron transport through single-molecule junctions at room temperature have been studied. The combined analysis of both systems demonstrates that this linker forms a robust covalent bond with gold and a better-defined contact when compared to traditional sulfur-based linkers. Density functional theory and quantum transport calculations support the experimental observation highlighting a reduced variability of conductance values for the C-Au based junction. Our findings advance the quest for robustness and reproducibility of devices based on electroactive molecules.

  13. Modulating the electronic and optical properties of monolayer arsenene phases by organic molecular doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deobrat; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh; Sahoo, Satyaprakash

    2017-12-01

    Recently, arsenene monolayer structure of the arsenic with two phases has displayed semiconducting behavior. We have systematically investigated the electronic and optical properties of single-layer arsenene with two types of functionalized organic molecules; an electrophilic molecule [tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ)] and a nucleophilic molecule [tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)], as an electron acceptor and electron donor, respectively. The interfacial charge transfer between the arsenene monolayer and TCNQ/TTF molecules extensively reduces the band gap of arsenene and accordingly resulted in a p- or n-type semiconducting behavior, respectively. We have also performed the interfacial charge transfer from organic molecules to monolayer arsenene and vice versa. The interfacial surface molecular modification has established an efficient way to develop the light harvesting of arsenene in different polarization directions. Our theoretical investigation suggests that such n- and p-type arsenene semiconductors would broaden the applications in the field of nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices such as photodiodes and it is also useful for constructing functional electronic systems.

  14. Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskin, Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Laskin, Julia

    2009-05-13

    Although nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC) are important components of atmospheric aerosols, little is known about their chemical compositions. Here we present detailed characterization of the NOC constituents of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) samples using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurements combined with MS/MS fragmentation experiments of selected ions were used to assign molecular structures to individual NOC species. Our results indicate that N-heterocyclic alkaloid compounds - species naturally produced by plants and living organisms - comprise a substantial fraction of NOC in BBA samples collected from test burns of five biomass fuels. High abundance of alkaloids in test burns of ponderosa pine - a widespread tree in the western U.S. areas frequently affected by large scale fires - suggests that N-heterocyclic alkaloids in BBA can play a significant role in dry and wet deposition of fixed nitrogen in this region.

  15. Molecular manipulation of solid state structure: influences of organic components on vanadium oxide architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagrman, Pamela J.; Finn, Robert C.; Zubieta, Jon

    2001-11-01

    Among the inorganic materials enjoying widespread contemporary interest, the metal oxide based solid phases occupy a prominent position by virtue of their applications to catalysis, sorption, molecular electronics, energy storage, optical materials and ceramics. The diversity of properties associated with these materials reflects the chemical composition, which allows variations in covalency, geometry and oxidation states, and the crystalline architecture, which may provide different pore structures, coordination sites, or juxtapositions of functional groups. Despite such fundamental and practical significance, the design of the structure of such materials remains a challenge in solid state chemistry. While organic materials have been synthesized which self-assemble into ordered arrays at low temperature and which exhibit molecular recognition and biomimetic activity, the ability to synthesize inorganic materials by rational design remains elusive. Small, soluble molecular building blocks with well-defined reaction chemistries which allow their low-temperature assembly into crystalline solid state inorganic materials are not well known. However, the existence of naturally occurring, structurally complex minerals establishes that hydrothermal synthesis can provide a low temperature pathway to produce open-framework and layered metastable structures utilizing inorganic starting materials. Thus, hydrothermal conditions have been used to prepare microporous tetrahedral framework solids that are capable of shape-selective absorption, like zeolites and aluminophosphates, and more recently in the preparation of complex solid arrays of the M/O/PO 3-4 and M/O/RPO 2-3 systems (M=V and Mo). The hydrothermal technique may be combined with the introduction of organic components which may act as charge compensating groups, space-filling units, structure directing agents, templates, tethers between functional groups, or conventional ligands in the preparation of inorganic/organic

  16. Molecular crowding of collagen: a pathway to produce highly-organized collagenous structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Nima; Karmelek, Kathryn P; Paten, Jeffrey A; Zareian, Ramin; DiMasi, Elaine; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2012-10-01

    Collagen in vertebrate animals is often arranged in alternating lamellae or in bundles of aligned fibrils which are designed to withstand in vivo mechanical loads. The formation of these organized structures is thought to result from a complex, large-area integration of individual cell motion and locally-controlled synthesis of fibrillar arrays via cell-surface fibripositors (direct matrix printing). The difficulty of reproducing such a process in vitro has prevented tissue engineers from constructing clinically useful load-bearing connective tissue directly from collagen. However, we and others have taken the view that long-range organizational information is potentially encoded into the structure of the collagen molecule itself, allowing the control of fibril organization to extend far from cell (or bounding) surfaces. We here demonstrate a simple, fast, cell-free method capable of producing highly-organized, anistropic collagen fibrillar lamellae de novo which persist over relatively long-distances (tens to hundreds of microns). Our approach to nanoscale organizational control takes advantage of the intrinsic physiochemical properties of collagen molecules by inducing collagen association through molecular crowding and geometric confinement. To mimic biological tissues which comprise planar, aligned collagen lamellae (e.g. cornea, lamellar bone or annulus fibrosus), type I collagen was confined to a thin, planar geometry, concentrated through molecular crowding and polymerized. The resulting fibrillar lamellae show a striking resemblance to native load-bearing lamellae in that the fibrils are small, generally aligned in the plane of the confining space and change direction en masse throughout the thickness of the construct. The process of organizational control is consistent with embryonic development where the bounded planar cell sheets produced by fibroblasts suggest a similar confinement/concentration strategy. Such a simple approach to nanoscale

  17. Online molecular characterisation of organic aerosols in an atmospheric chamber using extractive electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Peter J.; Giorio, Chiara; Mahon, Brendan M.; Kalberer, Markus

    2017-12-01

    The oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) represents a substantial source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. In this study, we present online measurements of the molecular constituents formed in the gas and aerosol phases during α-pinene oxidation in the Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC). We focus on characterising the performance of extractive electrospray ionisation (EESI) mass spectrometry (MS) for particle analysis. A number of new aspects of EESI-MS performance are considered here. We show that relative quantification of organic analytes can be achieved in mixed organic-inorganic particles. A comprehensive assignment of mass spectra for α-pinene derived SOA in both positive and negative ion modes is obtained using an ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometer. We compare these online spectra to conventional offline ESI-MS spectra and find good agreement in terms of the compounds identified, without the need for complex sample work-up procedures. Under our experimental conditions, EESI-MS signals arise only from particle-phase analytes. High-time-resolution (7 min) EESI-MS spectra are compared with simulations from the near-explicit Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) for a range of reaction conditions. We show that MS peak abundances scale with modelled concentrations for condensable products (pinonic acid, pinic acid, OH-pinonic acid). Relative quantification is achieved throughout SOA formation as the composition, size and mass (5-2400 µg m-3) of particles is evolving. This work provides a robust demonstration of the advantages of EESI-MS for chamber studies over offline ESI-MS (time resolution, relative quantification) and over hard online techniques (molecular information).

  18. Speed up Ferroelectric Organic Transistor Memories by Using Two-Dimensional Molecular Crystalline Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei; Wang, Yu; Gao, Qian; Guo, Yu; Wang, Qijing; Qian, Jun; Jiang, Sai; Wu, Bing; Wang, Xinran; Shi, Yi; Zheng, Youdou; Li, Yun

    2017-05-31

    Ferroelectric organic field-effect transistors (Fe-OFETs) have attracted intensive attention because of their promising potential in nonvolatile memory devices. The quick switching between binary states is a significant fundamental feature in evaluating Fe-OFET memories. Here, we employ 2D molecular crystals via a solution-based process as the conducting channels in transistor devices, in which ferroelectric polymer acts as the gate dielectric. A high carrier mobility of up to 5.6 cm 2 V -1 s -1 and a high on/off ratio of 10 6 are obtained. In addition, the efficient charge injection by virtue of the ultrathin 2D molecular crystals is beneficial in achieving rapid operations in the Fe-OFETs; devices exhibit short switching time of ∼2.9 and ∼3.0 ms from the on- to the off-state and from the off- to the on-state, respectively. Consequently, the presented strategy is capable of speeding up Fe-OFET memory devices by using solution-processed 2D molecular crystals.

  19. Tuning Open-Circuit Voltage in Organic Solar Cells with Molecular Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Brent; Awartani, Omar; Kline, R Joseph; McAfee, Terry; Ade, Harald; O'Connor, Brendan T

    2015-06-24

    The role of molecular orientation of a polar conjugated polymer in polymer-fullerene organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells is investigated. A planar heterojunction (PHJ) OPV cell composed of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is used as a model system to isolate the effect of the interfacial orientation on the photovoltaic properties. The molecular orientation of the aggregate P3HT relative to the PCBM layer is varied from highly edge-on (conjugated ring plane perpendicular to the interface plane) to appreciably face-on (ring plane parallel to the interface). It is found that as the P3HT stacking becomes more face-on there is a positive correlation to the OPV open-circuit voltage (V(OC)), attributed to a shift in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level of P3HT. In addition, the PHJ OPV cell with a broad P3HT stacking orientation distribution has a V(OC) comparable to an archetypal bulk heterojunction (BHJ) device. These results suggest that, in the BHJ OPV cell, the hole energy level in the charge transfer state is defined in part by the orientation distribution of the P3HT at the interface with PCBM. Finally, the photoresponses of the devices are also shown to have a dependence on P3HT stacking orientation.

  20. MEASURING ORGANIC MOLECULAR EMISSION IN DISKS WITH LOW-RESOLUTION SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, Johanna K.; Najita, Joan R.; Carr, John S.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Daniel; Henning, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We explore the extent to which Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra taken at low spectral resolution can be used in quantitative studies of organic molecular emission from disks surrounding low-mass young stars. We use Spitzer IRS spectra taken in both the high- and low-resolution modules for the same sources to investigate whether it is possible to define line indices that can measure trends in the strength of the molecular features in low-resolution data. We find that trends in the HCN emission strength seen in the high-resolution data can be recovered in low-resolution data. In examining the factors that influence the HCN emission strength, we find that the low-resolution HCN flux is modestly correlated with stellar accretion rate and X-ray luminosity. Correlations of this kind are perhaps expected based on recent observational and theoretical studies of inner disk atmospheres. Our results demonstrate the potential of using the large number of low-resolution disk spectra that reside in the Spitzer archive to study the factors that influence the strength of molecular emission from disks. Such studies would complement results for the much smaller number of circumstellar disks that have been observed at high resolution with IRS.

  1. Short-term dynamics of North Sea bacterioplankton-dissolved organic matter coherence on molecular level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eLucas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Remineralisation and transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM by marine microbes shape the DOM composition and thus, have large impact on global carbon and nutrient cycling. However, information on bacterioplankton-DOM interactions on a molecular level is limited. We examined the variation of bacterial community composition at Helgoland Roads (North Sea in relation to variation of molecular DOM composition and various environmental parameters on short-time scales. Surface water samples were taken daily over a period of twenty days. Bacterial community and molecular DOM composition were assessed via 16S rRNA gene tag sequencing and ultrahigh resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS, respectively. Environmental conditions were driven by a coastal water influx during the first half of the sampling period and the onset of a summer phytoplankton bloom towards the end of the sampling period. These phenomena led to a distinct grouping of bacterial communities and DOM composition which was particularly influenced by total dissolved nitrogen concentration, temperature and salinity, as revealed by distance-based linear regression analyses. Bacterioplankton-DOM interaction was demonstrated in strong correlations between specific bacterial taxa and particular DOM molecules, thus, suggesting potential specialization on particular substrates. We propose that a combination of high resolution techniques, as used in this study, may provide substantial information on substrate generalists and specialists and thus, contribute to prediction of bacterial community composition variation.

  2. Short-Term Dynamics of North Sea Bacterioplankton-Dissolved Organic Matter Coherence on Molecular Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Judith; Koester, Irina; Wichels, Antje; Niggemann, Jutta; Dittmar, Thorsten; Callies, Ulrich; Wiltshire, Karen H; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Remineralization and transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by marine microbes shape the DOM composition and thus, have large impact on global carbon and nutrient cycling. However, information on bacterioplankton-DOM interactions on a molecular level is limited. We examined the variation of bacterial community composition (BCC) at Helgoland Roads (North Sea) in relation to variation of molecular DOM composition and various environmental parameters on short-time scales. Surface water samples were taken daily over a period of 20 days. Bacterial community and molecular DOM composition were assessed via 16S rRNA gene tag sequencing and ultrahigh resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS), respectively. Environmental conditions were driven by a coastal water influx during the first half of the sampling period and the onset of a summer phytoplankton bloom toward the end of the sampling period. These phenomena led to a distinct grouping of bacterial communities and DOM composition which was particularly influenced by total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration, temperature, and salinity, as revealed by distance-based linear regression analyses. Bacterioplankton-DOM interaction was demonstrated in strong correlations between specific bacterial taxa and particular DOM molecules, thus, suggesting potential specialization on particular substrates. We propose that a combination of high resolution techniques, as used in this study, may provide substantial information on substrate generalists and specialists and thus, contribute to prediction of BCC variation.

  3. Low-voltage electron microscopy of polymer and organic molecular thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummy, L.F.; Yang Junyan; Martin, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    We have demonstrated the capabilities of a novel low-voltage electron microscope (LVEM) for imaging polymer and organic molecular thin films. The LVEM can operate in transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron diffraction modes. The microscope operates at a nominal accelerating voltage of 5 kV and fits on a tabletop. A detailed discussion of the electron-sample interaction processes is presented, and the mean free path for total electron scattering was calculated to be 15 nm for organic samples at 5 kV. The total end point dose for the destruction of crystallinity at 5 kV was estimated at 5x10 -4 and 3.5x10 -2 C/cm 2 for polyethylene and pentacene, respectively. These values are significantly lower than those measured at voltages greater than 100 kV. A defocus series of colloidal gold particles allowed us to estimate the experimental contrast transfer function of the microscope. Images taken of several organic materials have shown high contrast for low atomic number elements and a resolution of 2.5 nm. The materials studied here include thin films of the organic semiconductor pentacene, triblock copolymer films, single-molecule dendrimers, electrospun polymer fibers and gold nanoparticles

  4. Atomic and molecular physics of plasma-based environmental technologies for abatement of volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B. M.; Hsiao, M. C.; Bardsley, J. N.; Merritt, B. T.; Vogtin, G. E.; Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C. P.; Bayless, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques represent a new generation of air emission control technology that potentially could treat large-volume emissions containing dilute concentrations of volatile organic compounds. In order to apply non-thermal plasmas in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process.There is a need for reliable data concerning the primary decomposition mechanisms and subsequent chemical kinetics associated with non- thermal plasma processing of volatile organic compounds. There are many basic atomic and molecular physics issues that are essential in evaluating the economic performance of non-thermal plasma reactors. These studies are important in understanding how the input electrical power is dissipated in the plasma and how efficiently it is converted to the production of the plasma species (radicals, ions or electrons) responsible for the decomposition of the volatile organic compounds. This paper will present results from basic experimental and theoretical studies aimed at identifying the reaction mechanisms responsible for the primary decomposition of various types of volatile organic compounds. (authors)

  5. Energy level alignment and electron transport through metal/organic contacts. From interfaces to molecular electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, Enrique

    2013-07-01

    A new calculational approach to describing metal/organic interfaces. A valuable step towards a better understanding of molecular electronics. Nominated as an outstanding contribution by the Autonomous University of Madrid. In recent years, ever more electronic devices have started to exploit the advantages of organic semiconductors. The work reported in this thesis focuses on analyzing theoretically the energy level alignment of different metal/organic interfaces, necessary to tailor devices with good performance. Traditional methods based on density functional theory (DFT), are not appropriate for analyzing them because they underestimate the organic energy gap and fail to correctly describe the van der Waals forces. Since the size of these systems prohibits the use of more accurate methods, corrections to those DFT drawbacks are desirable. In this work a combination of a standard DFT calculation with the inclusion of the charging energy (U) of the molecule, calculated from first principles, is presented. Regarding the dispersion forces, incorrect long range interaction is substituted by a van der Waals potential. With these corrections, the C60, benzene, pentacene, TTF and TCNQ/Au(111) interfaces are analyzed, both for single molecules and for a monolayer. The results validate the induced density of interface states model.

  6. Chemistry of Mesoporous Organosilica in Nanotechnology: Molecularly Organic-Inorganic Hybridization into Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials aiming to combine the individual advantages of organic and inorganic components while overcoming their intrinsic drawbacks have shown great potential for future applications in broad fields. In particular, the integration of functional organic fragments into the framework of mesoporous silica to fabricate mesoporous organosilica materials has attracted great attention in the scientific community for decades. The development of such mesoporous organosilica materials has shifted from bulk materials to nanosized mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (designated as MONs, in comparison with traditional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs)) and corresponding applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology. In this comprehensive review, the state-of-art progress of this important hybrid nanomaterial family is summarized, focusing on the structure/composition-performance relationship of MONs of well-defined morphology, nanostructure, and nanoparticulate dimension. The synthetic strategies and the corresponding mechanisms for the design and construction of MONs with varied morphologies, compositions, nanostructures, and functionalities are overviewed initially. Then, the following part specifically concentrates on their broad spectrum of applications in nanotechnology, mainly in nanomedicine, nanocatalysis, and nanofabrication. Finally, some critical issues, presenting challenges and the future development of MONs regarding the rational synthesis and applications in nanotechnology are summarized and discussed. It is highly expected that such a unique molecularly organic-inorganic nanohybrid family will find practical applications in nanotechnology, and promote the advances of this discipline regarding hybrid chemistry and materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Molecular marker analysis as a guide to the sources of fine organic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogge, W.F.; Cass, G.R.; Hildemann, L.M.; Simoneit, B.R.T.

    1992-07-01

    The molecular composition of fine particulate (D p ≥ 2 μm) organic aerosol emissions from the most important sources in the Los Angeles area has been determined. Likewise, ambient concentration patterns for more than 80 single organic compounds have been measured at four urban sites (West Los Angeles, Downtown Los Angeles, Pasadena, and Rubidoux) and at one remote offshore site (San Nicolas Island). It has been found that cholesterol serves as a marker compound for emissions from charbroilers and other meat cooking operations. Vehicular exhaust being emitted from diesel and gasoline powered engines can be traced in the Los Angeles atmosphere using fossil petroleum marker compounds such as steranes and pentacyclic triterpanes (e.g., hopanes). Biogenic fine particle emission sources such as plant fragments abraded from leaf surfaces by wind and weather can be traced in the urban atmosphere. Using distinct and specific source organic tracers or assemblages of organic compounds characteristic for the sources considered it is possible to estimate the influence of different source types at any urban site where atmospheric data are available

  8. Organic molecular paleohypsometry: A new approach to reconstructing the paleoelevation history of an orogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hren, M. T.; Ouimet, W. B.

    2017-12-01

    Paleoelevation data is critical to understanding the links and feedbacks between rock-uplift and erosion yet few approaches have proved successful in quantifying changes in paleoelevation rapidly eroding, tropical landscapes. In addition, quantitative methods of reconstructing paleoelevation from marine sedimentary archives are lacking. Here we present a new approach to quantifying changes in paleoelevation that is based on the geochemical signature of organic matter exported via the main river networks of an orogen. This new approach builds on fundamentals of stable isotope paleoaltimetry and is akin to the theory behind cosmogenic isotope records of catchment-integrated erosion. Specifically, we utilize predictable patterns of precipitation and organic molecular biomarker stable isotopes to relate the hypsometry of organic matter in a catchment to the geochemical signal in exported organic carbon. We present data from two sites (the cold temperate White Mountains of New Hampshire, USA and the tropical, rapidly eroding landscape of Taiwan) to demonstrate this relationship between exported carbon geochemistry and catchment hypsometry and the validity of this approach.

  9. Metal-organic molecular device for non-volatile memory storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radha, B.; Sagade, Abhay A.; Kulkarni, G. U.

    2014-01-01

    Non-volatile memory devices have been of immense research interest for their use in active memory storage in powered off-state of electronic chips. In literature, various molecules and metal compounds have been investigated in this regard. Molecular memory devices are particularly attractive as they offer the ease of storing multiple memory states in a unique way and also represent ubiquitous choice for miniaturized devices. However, molecules are fragile and thus the device breakdown at nominal voltages during repeated cycles hinders their practical applicability. Here, in this report, a synergetic combination of an organic molecule and an inorganic metal, i.e., a metal-organic complex, namely, palladium hexadecylthiolate is investigated for memory device characteristics. Palladium hexadecylthiolate following partial thermolysis is converted to a molecular nanocomposite of Pd(II), Pd(0), and long chain hydrocarbons, which is shown to exhibit non-volatile memory characteristics with exceptional stability and retention. The devices are all solution-processed and the memory action stems from filament formation across the pre-formed cracks in the nanocomposite film.

  10. Surface-directed molecular assembly of pentacene on monolayer graphene for high-performance organic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wi Hyoung; Park, Jaesung; Sim, Sung Hyun; Lim, Soojin; Kim, Kwang S; Hong, Byung Hee; Cho, Kilwon

    2011-03-30

    Organic electronic devices that use graphene electrodes have received considerable attention because graphene is regarded as an ideal candidate electrode material. Transfer and lithographic processes during fabrication of patterned graphene electrodes typically leave polymer residues on the graphene surfaces. However, the impact of these residues on the organic semiconductor growth mechanism on graphene surface has not been reported yet. Here, we demonstrate that polymer residues remaining on graphene surfaces induce a stand-up orientation of pentacene, thereby controlling pentacene growth such that the molecular assembly is optimal for charge transport. Thus, pentacene field-effect transistors (FETs) using source/drain monolayer graphene electrodes with polymer residues show a high field-effect mobility of 1.2 cm(2)/V s. In contrast, epitaxial growth of pentacene having molecular assembly of lying-down structure is facilitated by π-π interaction between pentacene and the clean graphene electrode without polymer residues, which adversely affects lateral charge transport at the interface between electrode and channel. Our studies provide that the obtained high field-effect mobility in pentacene FETs using monolayer graphene electrodes arises from the extrinsic effects of polymer residues as well as the intrinsic characteristics of the highly conductive, ultrathin two-dimensional monolayer graphene electrodes.

  11. Coherent spin manipulation in molecular semiconductors: getting a handle on organic spintronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, John M; McCamey, Dane R; Boehme, Christoph

    2010-10-04

    Organic semiconductors offer expansive grounds to explore fundamental questions of spin physics in condensed matter systems. With the emergence of organic spintronics and renewed interest in magnetoresistive effects, which exploit the electron spin degree of freedom to encode and transmit information, there is much need to illuminate the underlying properties of spins in molecular electronic materials. For example, one may wish to identify over what length of time a spin maintains its orientation with respect to an external reference field. In addition, it is crucial to understand how adjacent spins arising, for example, in electrostatically coupled charge-carrier pairs, interact with each other. A periodic perturbation of the field may cause the spins to precess or oscillate, akin to a spinning top experiencing a torque. The quantum mechanical characteristic of the spin is then defined as the coherence time, the time over which an oscillating spin, or spin pair, maintains a fixed phase with respect to the driving field. Electron spins in organic semiconductors provide a remarkable route to performing "hands-on" quantum mechanics since permutation symmetries are controlled directly. Herein, we review some of the recent advances in organic spintronics and organic magnetoresistance, and offer an introductory description of the concept of pulsed, electrically detected magnetic resonance as a technique to manipulate and thus characterize the fundamental properties of electron spins. Spin-dependent dissociation and recombination allow the observation of coherent spin motion in a working device, such as an organic light-emitting diode. Remarkably, it is possible to distinguish between electron and hole spin resonances. The ubiquitous presence of hydrogen nuclei gives rise to strong hyperfine interactions, which appear to provide the basis for many of the magnetoresistive effects observed in these materials. Since hyperfine coupling causes quantum spin beating in electron

  12. Molecular simulations of self-assembly processes in metal-organic frameworks: Model dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Debasmita; Kusalik, Peter G.

    2017-07-01

    Molecular simulation is a powerful tool for investigating microscopic behavior in various chemical systems, where the use of suitable models is critical to successfully reproduce the structural and dynamic properties of the real systems of interest. In this context, molecular dynamics simulation studies of self-assembly processes in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a well-known class of porous materials with interesting chemical and physical properties, are relatively challenging, where a reasonably accurate representation of metal-ligand interactions is anticipated to play an important role. In the current study, we both investigate the performance of some existing models and introduce and test new models to help explore the self-assembly in an archetypal Zn-carboxylate MOF system. To this end, the behavior of six different Zn-ion models, three solvent models, and two ligand models was examined and validated against key experimental structural parameters. To explore longer time scale ordering events during MOF self-assembly via explicit solvent simulations, it is necessary to identify a suitable combination of simplified model components representing metal ions, organic ligands, and solvent molecules. It was observed that an extended cationic dummy atom (ECDA) Zn-ion model combined with an all-atom carboxylate ligand model and a simple dipolar solvent model can reproduce characteristic experimental structures for the archetypal MOF system. The successful use of these models in extensive sets of molecular simulations, which provide key insights into the self-assembly mechanism of this archetypal MOF system occurring during the early stages of this process, has been very recently reported.

  13. A nanoscale study of charge extraction in organic solar cells: the impact of interfacial molecular configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fu-Ching; Wu, Fu-Chiao; Yen, Chia-Te; Chang, Jay; Chou, Wei-Yang; Gilbert Chang, Shih-Hui; Cheng, Horng-Long

    2015-01-07

    In the optimization of organic solar cells (OSCs), a key problem lies in the maximization of charge carriers from the active layer to the electrodes. Hence, this study focused on the interfacial molecular configurations in efficient OSC charge extraction by theoretical investigations and experiments, including small molecule-based bilayer-heterojunction (sm-BLHJ) and polymer-based bulk-heterojunction (p-BHJ) OSCs. We first examined a well-defined sm-BLHJ model system of OSC composed of p-type pentacene, an n-type perylene derivative, and a nanogroove-structured poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (NS-PEDOT) hole extraction layer. The OSC with NS-PEDOT shows a 230% increment in the short circuit current density compared with that of the conventional planar PEDOT layer. Our theoretical calculations indicated that small variations in the microscopic intermolecular interaction among these interfacial configurations could induce significant differences in charge extraction efficiency. Experimentally, different interfacial configurations were generated between the photo-active layer and the nanostructured charge extraction layer with periodic nanogroove structures. In addition to pentacene, poly(3-hexylthiophene), the most commonly used electron-donor material system in p-BHJ OSCs was also explored in terms of its possible use as a photo-active layer. Local conductive atomic force microscopy was used to measure the nanoscale charge extraction efficiency at different locations within the nanogroove, thus highlighting the importance of interfacial molecular configurations in efficient charge extraction. This study enriches understanding regarding the optimization of the photovoltaic properties of several types of OSCs by conducting appropriate interfacial engineering based on organic/polymer molecular orientations. The ultimate power conversion efficiency beyond at least 15% is highly expected when the best state-of-the-art p-BHJ OSCs are combined with present arguments.

  14. Characterization of Extractable Organic Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere of Houston and Source Apportionment Calculations Using Organic Molecular Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, M. P.; Yue, Z. W.; Buzco, B.

    2002-12-01

    Samples of atmospheric PM2.5 were collected in Houston, TX every second day during the summer of 2000 as part of the EPA sponsored Houston Fine Particle Matter Supersite program. Sampling occurred at three sites, including one industrial location (HRM-3), one suburban location (Aldine) and one coastal location (La Porte). Twenty samples collected over a 24 hour period have been analyzed to quantify the concentration of 95 individual organic compounds, including: n-alkanes (C20 to C36), aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), n-alkanoic acids (C5 to C34), n-alkenoic acids (C18:1 and C18:2), carboxylic diacids (C3 to C10), petroleum biomarkers and others. As a whole, the extractable compounds were dominated by acids, especially by octadecanoic acid and hexadecanoic acid. The measured concentration of n-alkanes exhibited a peak at C29, with carbon preference index (CPI) values in the range of 0.97 to 2.0. Using organic molecular markers, including seven alkanes, four petroleum biomarkers, seven PAH, one alkanoic acid, one alkenoic acid, levoglucosan, and three chemical components (Al, Si and Elemental Carbon), Chemical Mass Balancing (CMB) calculations have been performed on the ambient speciation data. These calculations are used to determine the contribution of seven different primary emission sources including: diesel powered vehicles, gasoline vehicles, wood combustion, fuel oil combustion, road dusts, meat cooking and vegetation waxes. The contribution of diesel powered vehicles and gasoline powered vehicles are the most important primary sources at all three sampling locations, with road dusts important at the industrial location. Meat cooking emissions were significant at all three locations. Wood combustion is an important contribution during a four-day period when uncontrolled wildfires in eastern Texas and Louisiana brought biomass combustion aerosols into the sampling region.

  15. High-Performance Near-Infrared Phototransistor Based on n-Type Small-Molecular Organic Semiconductor

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Feng

    2016-12-13

    A solution-processed near-infrared (NIR) organic phototransistor (OPT) based on n-type organic small molecular material BODIPY-BF2 has been successfully fabricated. Its unprecedented performance, as well as its easy fabrication and good stability, mark this BODIPY-BF2 based OPT device as a very promising candidate for optoelectronic applications in the NIR regime.

  16. Time-resolved molecular characterization of organic aerosols by PILS + UPLC/ESI-Q-TOFMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Dalleska, N. F.; Huang, D. D.; Bates, K. H.; Sorooshian, A.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Real-time and quantitative measurement of particulate matter chemical composition represents one of the most challenging problems in the field of atmospheric chemistry. In the present study, we integrate the Particle-into-Liquid Sampler (PILS) with Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/Electrospray ionization Quadrupole Time-of-Flight High-Resolution/Mass Spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-Q-TOFMS) for the time-resolved molecular speciation of chamber-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The unique aspect of the combination of these two well-proven techniques is to provide quantifiable molecular-level information of particle-phase organic compounds on timescales of minutes. We demonstrate that the application of the PILS + UPLC/ESI-Q-TOFMS method is not limited to water-soluble inorganic ions and organic carbon, but is extended to slightly water-soluble species through collection efficiency calibration together with sensitivity and linearity tests. By correlating the water solubility of individual species with their O:C ratio, a parameter that is available for aerosol ensembles as well, we define an average aerosol O:C ratio threshold of 0.3, above which the PILS overall particulate mass collection efficiency approaches ∼0.7. The PILS + UPLC/ESI-Q-TOFMS method can be potentially applied to probe the formation and evolution mechanism of a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic SOA systems in laboratory chamber experiments. We illustrate the application of this method to the reactive uptake of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) on hydrated and acidic ammonium sulfate aerosols.

  17. Molecular evolution constraints in the floral organ specification gene regulatory network module across 18 angiosperm genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila-Velderrain, Jose; Servin-Marquez, Andres; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2014-03-01

    The gene regulatory network of floral organ cell fate specification of Arabidopsis thaliana is a robust developmental regulatory module. Although such finding was proposed to explain the overall conservation of floral organ types and organization among angiosperms, it has not been confirmed that the network components are conserved at the molecular level among flowering plants. Using the genomic data that have accumulated, we address the conservation of the genes involved in this network and the forces that have shaped its evolution during the divergence of angiosperms. We recovered the network gene homologs for 18 species of flowering plants spanning nine families. We found that all the genes are highly conserved with no evidence of positive selection. We studied the sequence conservation features of the genes in the context of their known biological function and the strength of the purifying selection acting upon them in relation to their placement within the network. Our results suggest an association between protein length and sequence conservation, evolutionary rates, and functional category. On the other hand, we found no significant correlation between the strength of purifying selection and gene placement. Our results confirm that the studied robust developmental regulatory module has been subjected to strong functional constraints. However, unlike previous studies, our results do not support the notion that network topology plays a major role in constraining evolutionary rates. We speculate that the dynamical functional role of genes within the network and not just its connectivity could play an important role in constraining evolution.

  18. Cloning, molecular characterization and expression of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 from Torpedo electric organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Satué, Mireia; Torrejón-Escribano, Benjamín; Felipe, Antonio; de Aranda, Inmaculada Gómez; Elías, Marc; Marsal, Jordi; Blasi, Juan; Solsona, Carles

    2007-01-01

    During synaptic transmission large amounts of ATP are released from pre- and post-synaptic sources of Torpedo electric organ. A chain reaction sequentially hydrolyses ATP to adenosine, which inhibits acetylcholine secretion. The first enzyme implicated in this extracellular ATP hydrolysis is an ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) that dephosphorylates both ATP and ADP to AMP. This enzyme has been biochemically characterized in the synaptosomal fraction of Torpedo electric organ, having almost equal affinity for ATP as for ADP, a fact that pointed to the type-1 NTPDase enzyme. In the present work we describe the cloning and molecular characterization of the cDNA for an NTPDase from Torpedo marmorata electric organ. The clone, obtained using the RACE-PCR technique, contains and open-reading frame of 1506bp and encodes a 502 amino acids protein that exhibits high homology with other NTPDases1 from vertebrates previously identified, including those of zebrafish and Xenopus, as well as human, rat and mouse. Topology analyses revealed the existence of two transmembrane regions, two short cytoplasmic tails and a long extracellular domain containing five apyrase-conserved regions. Gene expression studies revealed that this gene is expressed in all the Torpedo tissues analyzed. Finally, activity and cellular localization of the protein encoded by this newly cloned cDNA was assessed by heterologous expression experiments involving COS-7 and HeLa cells.

  19. The Electric and Optical Properties of Doped Small Molecular Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Kwang-Ohk [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) constitute a new and exciting emissive display technology. In general, the basic OLED structure consists of a stack of fluorescent organic layers sandwiched between a transparent conducting-anode and metallic cathode. When an appropriate bias is applied to the device, holes are injected from the anode and electrons from the cathode; some of the recombination events between the holes and electrons result in electroluminescence (EL). Until now, most of the efforts in developing OLEDs have focused on display applications, hence on devices within the visible range. However some organic devices have been developed for ultraviolet or infrared emission. Various aspects of the device physics of doped small molecular OLEDs were described and discussed. The doping layer thickness and concentration were varied systematically to study their effects on device performances, energy transfer, and turn-off dynamics. Low-energy-gap DCM2 guest molecules, in either α-NPD or DPVBi host layers, are optically efficient fluorophores but also generate deep carrier trap-sites. Since their traps reduce the carrier mobility, the current density decreases with increased doping concentration. At the same time, due to efficient energy transfer, the quantum efficiency of the devices is improved by light doping or thin doping thickness, in comparison with the undoped neat devices. However, heavy doping induces concentration quenching effects. Thus, the doping concentration and doping thickness may be optimized for best performance.

  20. The Electric and Optical Properties of Doped Small Molecular Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwang-Ohk Cheon

    2003-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) constitute a new and exciting emissive display technology. In general, the basic OLED structure consists of a stack of fluorescent organic layers sandwiched between a transparent conducting-anode and metallic cathode. When an appropriate bias is applied to the device, holes are injected from the anode and electrons from the cathode; some of the recombination events between the holes and electrons result in electroluminescence (EL). Until now, most of the efforts in developing OLEDs have focused on display applications, hence on devices within the visible range. However some organic devices have been developed for ultraviolet or infrared emission. Various aspects of the device physics of doped small molecular OLEDs were described and discussed. The doping layer thickness and concentration were varied systematically to study their effects on device performances, energy transfer, and turn-off dynamics. Low-energy-gap DCM2 guest molecules, in either α-NPD or DPVBi host layers, are optically efficient fluorophores but also generate deep carrier trap-sites. Since their traps reduce the carrier mobility, the current density decreases with increased doping concentration. At the same time, due to efficient energy transfer, the quantum efficiency of the devices is improved by light doping or thin doping thickness, in comparison with the undoped neat devices. However, heavy doping induces concentration quenching effects. Thus, the doping concentration and doping thickness may be optimized for best performance

  1. Molecular transformation and degradation of refractory dissolved organic matter in the Atlantic and Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechtenfeld, Oliver J.; Kattner, Gerhard; Flerus, Ruth; McCallister, S. Leigh; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Koch, Boris P.

    2014-02-01

    More than 90% of the global ocean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is refractory, has an average age of 4000-6000 years and a lifespan from months to millennia. The fraction of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that is resistant to degradation is a long-term buffer in the global carbon cycle but its chemical composition, structure, and biochemical formation and degradation mechanisms are still unresolved. We have compiled the most comprehensive molecular dataset of 197 Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) analyses from solid-phase extracted marine DOM covering two major oceans, the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean and the East Atlantic Ocean (ranging from 50° N to 70° S). Molecular trends and radiocarbon dating of 34 DOM samples (comprising Δ14C values from -229‰ to -495‰) were combined to model an integrated degradation rate for bulk DOC resulting in a predicted age of >24 ka for the most persistent DOM fraction. First order kinetic degradation rates for 1557 mass peaks indicate that numerous DOM molecules cycle on timescales much longer than the turnover of the bulk DOC pool (estimated residence times of up to ~100 ka) and the range of validity of radiocarbon dating. Changes in elemental composition were determined by assigning molecular formulae to the detected mass peaks. The combination of residence times with molecular information enabled modelling of the average elemental composition of the slowest degrading fraction of the DOM pool. In our dataset, a group of 361 molecular formulae represented the most stable composition in the oceanic environment (“island of stability”). These most persistent compounds encompass only a narrow range of the molecular elemental ratios H/C (average of 1.17 ± 0.13), and O/C (average of 0.52 ± 0.10) and molecular masses (360 ± 28 and 497 ± 51 Da). In the Weddell Sea DOC concentrations in the surface waters were low (46.3 ± 3.3 μM) while the organic radiocarbon was significantly

  2. Heat impact caused molecular level changes in solid and dissolved soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Diana; Steffen, Bernhard; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe; Leinweber, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The ubiquitous abundance of pyrolysed, highly aromatic organic matter, called "Black Carbon" (BC), in all environmental compartments became increasingly important in different fields of research beyond intensive investigated atmospheric aerosol due to climatic relevance. Its predominant high resistance to abiotic and biotic degradation resulted in turnover times from less than a century to several millennia. This recalcitrance led to the enrichment of BC in soils, accounting for 1-6% (European forest soils) to 60% (Chernozems) of total soil organic matter (SOM). Hence, soil BC acts an important sink in the global carbon cycle. In contrast, consequences for the nitrogen cycle up to date are rather inconsistently discussed. Soil related dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a major controlling factor in soil formation, an important pathway of organic matter transport and one of the largest active carbon reservoirs on earth, if considering oceans and other bodies of water. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of artificially simulated wildfire by thermal treatment on the molecular composition of water extractable soil organic matter (DOM). Soils from two outdoor lysimeters with different management history were investigated. Soil samples, non-heated and heated up to 350°C were analyzed for elemental composition (carbon, nitrogen and sulfur) and for bulk molecular composition by Pyrolysis-Field Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Py-FIMS) and synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) at the C- and N K-edges. DOM-samples obtained by hot water extraction, desalting and concentration by solid phase extraction were subsequently analyzed by flow injection analysis in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FTICR-MS), equipped with an ESI source and a 7 T supra-conducting magnet (LTQ-FT Ultra, ThermoFisher Scientific). This technique is the key technique for the analysis of complex samples due to its outstanding mass

  3. Molecular characterization of urban organic aerosol in tropical India: contributions of primary emissions and secondary photooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Q. Fu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic molecular composition of PM10 samples, collected at Chennai in tropical India, was studied using capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Fourteen organic compound classes were detected in the aerosols, including aliphatic lipids, sugar compounds, lignin products, terpenoid biomarkers, sterols, aromatic acids, hydroxy-/polyacids, phthalate esters, hopanes, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs, and photooxidation products from biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs. At daytime, phthalate esters were found to be the most abundant compound class; however, at nighttime, fatty acids were the dominant one. Di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate, C16 fatty acid, and levoglucosan were identified as the most abundant single compounds. The nighttime maxima of most organics in the aerosols indicate a land/sea breeze effect in tropical India, although some other factors such as local emissions and long-range transport may also influence the composition of organic aerosols. However, biogenic VOC oxidation products (e.g., 2-methyltetrols, pinic acid, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid and β-caryophyllinic acid showed diurnal patterns with daytime maxima. Interestingly, terephthalic acid was maximized at nighttime, which is different from those of phthalic and isophthalic acids. A positive relation was found between 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene (a tracer for plastic burning and terephthalic acid, suggesting that the field burning of municipal solid wastes including plastics is a significant source of terephthalic acid. Organic compounds were further categorized into several groups to clarify their sources. Fossil fuel combustion (24–43% was recognized as the most significant source for the total identified compounds, followed by plastic emission (16–33%, secondary oxidation (8.6–23%, and microbial/marine sources (7.2–17%. In contrast, the contributions of terrestrial plant waxes (5.9–11% and biomass burning (4.2–6.4% were relatively

  4. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Kaname [Department of Electronics, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yamashita, Kenichi, E-mail: yamasita@kit.ac.jp [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yanagi, Hisao [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu [Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2016-08-08

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ∼100 meV even in the “half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing” microcavity structure.

  5. Remote stabilization of copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks in metal-organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Wenyang

    2015-03-24

    Copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks (MBBs) are ubiquitous and have been widely employed for the construction of highly porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). However, most copper paddlewheel based MOFs fail to retain their structural integrity in the presence of water. This instability is directly correlated to the plausible displacement of coordinating carboxylates in the copper paddlewheel MBB, [Cu2(O2C-)4], by the strongly coordinating water molecules. In this comprehensive study, we illustrate the chemical stability control in the rht-MOF platform via strengthening the coordinating bonds within the triangular inorganic MBB, [Cu3O(N4-x(CH)xC-)3] (x = 0, 1, or 2). Remotely, the chemical stabilization propagated into the paddlewheel MBB to afford isoreticular rht-MOFs with remarkably enhanced water/chemical stabilities compared to the prototypal rht-MOF-1. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  6. Skin: Major target organ of allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, Hans F.; Baron, Jens M.; Neis, Mark M.; Obrigkeit, Daniela Hoeller; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2007-01-01

    Skin is a major target organ for allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds. Drug allergic reactions may be life-threatening such as in the case of anaphylactic reactions or bullous drug reactions and occur in about 5% of all hospitalized patients. Allergic contact dermatitis has an enormous influence on the social life of the patient because it is the most frequent reason for occupational skin diseases and the treatment and prevention of this disease cost approximately Euro 3 billion per year in Germany. The different proposed pathophysiological pathways leading to a drug eruption are discussed in this paper. All major enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotica were shown to be present in skin. Evidence supporting the role of metabolism in the development of drug allergy and allergic contact dermatitis is demonstrated in the example of sulphonamides and fragrances

  7. Towards bridging the gap from molecular forces to the movement of organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2004-01-01

    -scale simulations of muscle, which may accommodate macroscopic properties of muscles, e.g. the catch-like effect, the Henneman principle and accurate twitch force and motor unit size distributions. As a test of the underlying principles, a model of the biceps caput breve muscle is presented and compared......Muscles are responsible for generating the forces required for the movement of multicellular organisms. Microscopically, these forces arise as a consequence of motor proteins (myosin) pulling and sliding along actin filaments. Current knowledge states that the molecular forces between actin...... [Nielsen (2002) J. Theor. Biol. 219, 99-119], inspired by results from protein pulling experiments showing that proteins often have non-linear entropic force-extension profiles. Irrespective of the case, the present study aims at integrating such basic force-producing properties into large...

  8. Optimization of molecular organization and nanoscale morphology for high performance low bandgap polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Wang, Mengye; Lin, Changjian; Lin, Zhiqun

    2014-04-21

    Rational design and synthesis of low bandgap (LBG) polymers with judiciously tailored HOMO and LUMO levels have emerged as a viable route to high performance polymer solar cells with power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) exceeding 10%. In addition to engineering the energy-level of LBG polymers, the photovoltaic performance of LBG polymer-based solar cells also relies on the device architecture, in particular the fine morphology of the photoactive layer. The nanoscale interpenetrating networks composed of nanostructured donor and acceptor phases are the key to providing a large donor-acceptor interfacial area for maximizing the exciton dissociation and offering a continuous pathway for charge transport. In this Review Article, we summarize recent strategies for tuning the molecular organization and nanoscale morphology toward an enhanced photovoltaic performance of LBG polymer-based solar cells.

  9. Molecular Understanding of Fullerene - Electron Donor Interactions in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-09-13

    Organic solar cells hold promise of providing low-cost, renewable power generation, with current devices providing up to 13% power conversion efficiency. The rational design of more performant systems requires an in-depth understanding of the interactions between the electron donating and electron accepting materials within the active layers of these devices. Here, we explore works that give insight into the intermolecular interactions between electron donors and electron acceptors, and the impact of molecular orientations and environment on these interactions. We highlight, from a theoretical standpoint, the effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of charge carriers at the donor/acceptor interface and in the bulk and how these interactions influence the nature of the charge transfer states as wells as the charge separation and charge transport processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Molecular Design of Semiconducting Polymers for High-Performance Organic Electrochemical Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Nielsen, Christian B.

    2016-07-22

    The organic electrochemical transistor (OECT), capable of transducing small ionic fluxes into electronic signals in an aqueous envi-ronment, is an ideal device to utilize in bioelectronic applications. Currently, most OECTs are fabricated with commercially availa-ble conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-based suspensions and are therefore operated in depletion mode. Here, we present a series of semiconducting polymers designed to elucidate important structure-property guidelines required for accumulation mode OECT operation. We discuss key aspects relating to OECT performance such as ion and hole transport, elec-trochromic properties, operational voltage and stability. The demonstration of our molecular design strategy is the fabrication of accumulation mode OECTs that clearly outperform state-of-the-art PEDOT based devices, and show stability under aqueous oper-ation without the need for formulation additives and cross-linkers.

  11. Ab initio NMR Confirmed Evolutionary Structure Prediction for Organic Molecular Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Cong-Huy; Kucukbenli, Emine; de Gironcoli, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio crystal structure prediction of even small organic compounds is extremely challenging due to polymorphism, molecular flexibility and difficulties in addressing the dispersion interaction from first principles. We recently implemented vdW-aware density functionals and demonstrated their success in energy ordering of aminoacid crystals. In this work we combine this development with the evolutionary structure prediction method to study cholesterol polymorphs. Cholesterol crystals have paramount importance in various diseases, from cancer to atherosclerosis. The structure of some polymorphs (e.g. ChM, ChAl, ChAh) have already been resolved while some others, which display distinct NMR spectra and are involved in disease formation, are yet to be determined. Here we thoroughly assess the applicability of evolutionary structure prediction to address such real world problems. We validate the newly predicted structures with ab initio NMR chemical shift data using secondary referencing for an improved comparison with experiments.

  12. Multi-study integration of brain cancer transcriptomes reveals organ-level molecular signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyun Sung

    Full Text Available We utilized abundant transcriptomic data for the primary classes of brain cancers to study the feasibility of separating all of these diseases simultaneously based on molecular data alone. These signatures were based on a new method reported herein--Identification of Structured Signatures and Classifiers (ISSAC--that resulted in a brain cancer marker panel of 44 unique genes. Many of these genes have established relevance to the brain cancers examined herein, with others having known roles in cancer biology. Analyses on large-scale data from multiple sources must deal with significant challenges associated with heterogeneity between different published studies, for it was observed that the variation among individual studies often had a larger effect on the transcriptome than did phenotype differences, as is typical. For this reason, we restricted ourselves to studying only cases where we had at least two independent studies performed for each phenotype, and also reprocessed all the raw data from the studies using a unified pre-processing pipeline. We found that learning signatures across multiple datasets greatly enhanced reproducibility and accuracy in predictive performance on truly independent validation sets, even when keeping the size of the training set the same. This was most likely due to the meta-signature encompassing more of the heterogeneity across different sources and conditions, while amplifying signal from the repeated global characteristics of the phenotype. When molecular signatures of brain cancers were constructed from all currently available microarray data, 90% phenotype prediction accuracy, or the accuracy of identifying a particular brain cancer from the background of all phenotypes, was found. Looking forward, we discuss our approach in the context of the eventual development of organ-specific molecular signatures from peripheral fluids such as the blood.

  13. Mechanistic investigation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by low molecular weight organic sulfur species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Eryn M.; Taillefert, Martial

    2017-10-01

    Low molecular weight organic sulfur species, often referred to as thiols, are known to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments and represent important chemical reductants of Fe(III) oxides. Thiols are excellent electron shuttles used during dissimilatory iron reduction, and in this capacity could indirectly affect the redox state of sediments, release adsorbed contaminants via reductive dissolution, and influence the carbon cycle through alteration of bacterial respiration processes. Interestingly, the reduction of Fe(III) oxides by thiols has not been previously investigated in environmentally relevant conditions, likely due to analytical limitations associated with the detection of thiols and their oxidized products. In this study, a novel electrochemical method was developed to simultaneously determine thiol/disulfide pair concentrations in situ during the reduction of ferrihydrite in batch reactors. First order rate laws with respect to initial thiol concentration were confirmed for Fe(III) oxyhydroxide reduction by four common thiols: cysteine, homocysteine, cysteamine, and glutathione. Zero order was determined for both Fe(III) oxyhydroxide and proton concentration at circumneutral pH. A kinetic model detailing the molecular mechanism of the reaction was optimized with proposed intermediate surface structures. Although metal oxide overall reduction rate constants were inversely proportional to the complexity of the thiol structure, the extent of metal reduction increased with structure complexity, indicating that surface complexes play a significant role in the ability of these thiols to reduce iron. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of considering the molecular reaction mechanism at the iron oxide surface when investigating the potential for thiols to act as electron shuttles during dissimilatory iron reduction in natural environments.

  14. Organic molecular compositions and temporal variations of summertime mountain aerosols over Mt. Tai, North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Pingqing; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Okuzawa, Kazuhiro; Aggarwal, Shankar Gopala; Wang, Gehui; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2008-10-01

    Total suspended particles (TSP) were collected at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534 m above sea level) on a daytime and nighttime basis during a summertime campaign (May-June 2006) and were characterized for organic molecular compositions using solvent extraction/derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. The n-Alkanes, fatty acids, fatty alcohols, sugars, glycerol and polyacids, and phthalate esters were found as major organic compound classes, whereas lignin and resin products, sterols, aromatic acids, hopanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected as minor classes. Sugars (49.8-2115 ng m-3, average 640 ng m-3 in daytime; 18.1-4348 ng m-3, 799 ng m-3 in nighttime) were found to be the dominant compound class. Levoglucosan, a specific cellulose pyrolysis product, was detected as the most abundant single compound, followed by C28 fatty alcohol, diisobutyl and di-n-butyl phthalates, C29n-alkane, C16 and C28 fatty acids, and malic acid. By grouping organic compounds based on their sources, we found that emission of terrestrial plant waxes was the most significant source (30-34%) of the TSP, followed by biomass burning products (25-27%) (e.g., levoglucosan and lignin and resin products), soil resuspension (15-18%) due to agricultural activities, secondary oxidation products (8-10%), plastic emission (3-10%), marine/microbial sources (6%), and urban/industrial emissions from fossil fuel use (4%). However, low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids (such as oxalic acid) of photochemical origin were not included in this study. Malic acid was found to be much higher than those reported in the ground level, suggesting an enhanced photochemical production in the free troposphere over mountain areas. Temporal variations of biomass burning tracers (e.g., levoglucosan, galactosan, mannosan) and some higher plant wax derived compound classes suggested that there were two major (E1 and E2) and one minor (E3) biomass-burning events during this

  15. Molecular structure impacts on secondary organic aerosol formation from glycol ethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijie; Cocker, David R.

    2018-05-01

    Glycol ethers, a class of widely used solvents in consumer products, are often considered exempt as volatile organic compounds based on their vapor pressure or boiling points by regulatory agencies. However, recent studies found that glycol ethers volatilize at ambient conditions nearly as rapidly as the traditional high-volatility solvents indicating the potential of glycol ethers to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). This is the first work on SOA formation from glycol ethers. The impact of molecular structure, specifically -OH, on SOA formation from glycol ethers and related ethers are investigated in the work. Ethers with and without -OH, with methyl group hindrance on -OH and with -OH at different location are studied in the presence of NOX and under "NOX free" conditions. Photooxidation experiments under different oxidation conditions confirm that the processing of ethers is a combination of carbonyl formation, cyclization and fragmentation. Bulk SOA chemical composition analysis and oxidation products identified in both gas and particle phase suggests that the presence and location of -OH in the carbon bond of ethers determine the occurrence of cyclization mechanism during ether oxidation. The cyclization is proposed as a critical SOA formation mechanism to prevent the formation of volatile compounds from fragmentation during the oxidation of ethers. Glycol ethers with -CH2-O-CH2CH2OH structure is found to readily form cyclization products, especially with the presence of NOx, which is more relevant to urban atmospheric conditions than without NOx. Glycol ethers are evaluated as dominating SOA precursors among all ethers studied. It is estimated that the contribution of glycol ethers to anthropogenic SOA is roughly 1% of the current organic aerosol from mobile sources. The contribution of glycol ethers to anthropogenic SOA is roughly 1% of the current organic aerosol from mobile sources and will play a more important role in future anthropogenic SOA

  16. Self-prior strategy for organ reconstruction in fluorescence molecular tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Chen, Maomao; Su, Han; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to propose a strategy for organ reconstruction in fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) without prior information from other imaging modalities, and to overcome the high cost and ionizing radiation caused by the traditional structural prior strategy. The proposed strategy is designed as an iterative architecture to solve the inverse problem of FMT. In each iteration, a short time Fourier transform (STFT) based algorithm is used to extract the self-prior information in the space-frequency energy spectrum with the assumption that the regions with higher fluorescence concentration have larger energy intensity, then the cost function of the inverse problem is modified by the self-prior information, and lastly an iterative Laplacian regularization algorithm is conducted to solve the updated inverse problem and obtains the reconstruction results. Simulations and in vivo experiments on liver reconstruction are carried out to test the performance of the self-prior strategy on organ reconstruction. The organ reconstruction results obtained by the proposed self-prior strategy are closer to the ground truth than those obtained by the iterative Tikhonov regularization (ITKR) method (traditional non-prior strategy). Significant improvements are shown in the evaluation indexes of relative locational error (RLE), relative error (RE) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The self-prior strategy improves the organ reconstruction results compared with the non-prior strategy and also overcomes the shortcomings of the traditional structural prior strategy. Various applications such as metabolic imaging and pharmacokinetic study can be aided by this strategy.

  17. New molecular insights into the pools and mechanisms of Arctic soil organic matter decomposition under warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, B.

    2017-12-01

    It is estimated that Arctic permafrost soils store approximately half of the global belowground organic carbon, which is susceptible to microbial decomposition under warming climate. Studies have shown that rates of soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition are controlled not only by temperature but also SOC substrate quality or chemical composition. However, detailed molecular-scale characterization of SOC and its susceptibility to degradation are lacking, due to extremely complex nature of SOC. Here, ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) was utilized to determine compositional changes of SOC during a microcosm warming experiment using tundra soils that were collected from the Barrow Environmental Observatory in Alaska, USA. Soil microcosm incubation was conducted with both organic and mineral active layer soils at two temperatures (-2°C and 8°C) up to 122 days, and water-extractable SOC was analyzed. Results indicate that peptides, amino sugars, and carbohydrate-like compounds are among the most labile SOC compounds to be degraded, with nitrogen-containing compounds degrading at a much faster rate than those containing no nitrogen. Refractory SOC components are dominated by the lignin- or tannin-like compounds and, to a less extent, the aliphatic compounds. Additionally, elemental ratios of O:C, H:C, and N:C were found to decrease with incubation time, and SOC in the mineral soil exhibited lower O:C and N:C ratios than those of the organic-rich soil. A biodegradation index is proposed to facilitate the incorporation of mass spectrometry data into mechanistic models of SOC degradation and thus improved prediction model of climate feedbacks in the Arctic.

  18. Probing molecular orientation of P3HT nanofibers in fiber-based organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangcheol; Han, Yaeeun; Hwang, Inchan

    2018-01-01

    Molecular orientation of conjugated polymers plays a key role in exciton generation/separation and charge transport, and thus significantly influence photovoltaic devices. Herein, we fabricated fiber-based organic solar cells and investigated the photovoltaic parameters with different diameters of fibers and PCBM diffusion. The open-circuit voltage that varies with molecular orientation whether it is face-on or edge-on was observed to differ. The investigation of the open-circuit voltage dependence reveals that thick fibers have core/shell like structures with different orientations. Thick fibers have face-on in the core and edge-on orientations in the shell. The face-on orientations are not preferentially formed in thin fibers, but the PCBM diffusion can induce face-on orientations that exist within the intermixed phase. Our results may shed a light on better understanding on fiber-based solar cells and suggest a way toward improving photovoltaic efficiency. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Enhanced Photochemical Hydrogen Production by a Molecular Diiron Catalyst Incorporated into a Metal-Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullen, Sonja; Fei, Honghan; Orthaber, Andreas; Cohen, Seth M.; Ott, Sascha [Uppsala; (UCSD)

    2013-12-04

    A molecular proton reduction catalyst [FeFe](dcbdt)(CO)6 (1, dcbdt = 1,4-dicarboxylbenzene-2,3-dithiolate) with structural similarities to [FeFe]-hydrogenase active sites has been incorporated into a highly robust Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework (MOF) by postsynthetic exchange (PSE). The PSE protocol is crucial as direct solvothermal synthesis fails to produce the functionalized MOF. The molecular integrity of the organometallic site within the MOF is demonstrated by a variety of techniques, including X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In conjunction with [Ru(bpy)3]2+ as a photosensitizer and ascorbate as an electron donor, MOF-[FeFe](dcbdt)(CO)6 catalyzes photochemical hydrogen evolution in water at pH 5. The immobilized catalyst shows substantially improved initial rates and overall hydrogen production when compared to a reference system of complex 1 in solution. Improved catalytic performance is ascribed to structural stabilization of the complex when incorporated in the MOF as well as the protection of reduced catalysts 1 and 12– from undesirable charge recombination with oxidized ascorbate.

  20. Impact of Molecular Orientation and Spontaneous Interfacial Mixing on the Performance of Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy Olivier

    2015-07-28

    A critically important question that must be answered to understand how organic solar cells operate and should be improved is how the orientation of the donor and acceptor molecules at the interface influences exciton diffusion, exciton dissociation by electron transfer and recombination. It is exceedingly difficult to probe the orientation in bulk heterojunctions because there are many interfaces and they are arranged with varying angles with respect to the substrate. One of the best ways to study the interface is to make bilayer solar cells with just one donor-acceptor interface. Zinc phthalocyanine is particularly interesting to study because its orientation can be adjusted by using a 2-nm-thick copper iodide seed layer before it is deposited. Previous studies have claimed that solar cells in which fullerene acceptor molecules touch the face of zinc phthalocyanine have more current than ones in which the fullerenes touch the edge of zinc phthalocyanine because of suppressed recombination. We have more thoroughly characterized the system using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and found that the interfaces are not as sharp as previous studies claimed when formed at room temperature or above. Fullerenes have a much stronger tendency to mix into the face-on films than into the edge-on films. Moreover we show that almost all of the increase in the current with face-on films can be attributed to improved exciton diffusion and to the formation of a spontaneously mixed interface, not suppressed recombination. This work highlights the importance of spontaneous interfacial molecular mixing in organic solar cells, the extent of which depends on molecular orientation of frontier molecules in donor domains.

  1. Volatile-organic molecular characterization of shale-oil produced water from the Permian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naima A.; Engle, Mark A.; Dungan, Barry; Holguin, F. Omar; Xu, Pei; Carroll, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Growth in unconventional oil and gas has spurred concerns on environmental impact and interest in beneficial uses of produced water (PW), especially in arid regions such as the Permian Basin, the largest U.S. tight-oil producer. To evaluate environmental impact, treatment, and reuse potential, there is a need to characterize the compositional variability of PW. Although hydraulic fracturing has caused a significant increase in shale-oil production, there are no high-resolution organic composition data for the shale-oil PW from the Permian Basin or other shale-oil plays (Eagle Ford, Bakken, etc.). PW was collected from shale-oil wells in the Midland sub-basin of the Permian Basin. Molecular characterization was conducted using high-resolution solid phase micro extraction gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Approximately 1400 compounds were identified, and 327 compounds had a >70% library match. PW contained alkane, cyclohexane, cyclopentane, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene), alkyl benzenes, propyl-benzene, and naphthalene. PW also contained heteroatomic compounds containing nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. 3D van Krevelen and double bond equivalence versus carbon number analyses were used to evaluate molecular variability. Source composition, as well as solubility, controlled the distribution of volatile compounds found in shale-oil PW. The salinity also increased with depth, ranging from 105 to 162 g/L total dissolved solids. These data fill a gap for shale-oil PW composition, the associated petroleomics plots provide a fingerprinting framework, and the results for the Permian shale-oil PW suggest that partial treatment of suspended solids and organics would support some beneficial uses such as onsite reuse and bio-energy production.

  2. Volatile-organic molecular characterization of shale-oil produced water from the Permian Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naima A; Engle, Mark; Dungan, Barry; Holguin, F Omar; Xu, Pei; Carroll, Kenneth C

    2016-04-01

    Growth in unconventional oil and gas has spurred concerns on environmental impact and interest in beneficial uses of produced water (PW), especially in arid regions such as the Permian Basin, the largest U.S. tight-oil producer. To evaluate environmental impact, treatment, and reuse potential, there is a need to characterize the compositional variability of PW. Although hydraulic fracturing has caused a significant increase in shale-oil production, there are no high-resolution organic composition data for the shale-oil PW from the Permian Basin or other shale-oil plays (Eagle Ford, Bakken, etc.). PW was collected from shale-oil wells in the Midland sub-basin of the Permian Basin. Molecular characterization was conducted using high-resolution solid phase micro extraction gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Approximately 1400 compounds were identified, and 327 compounds had a >70% library match. PW contained alkane, cyclohexane, cyclopentane, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene), alkyl benzenes, propyl-benzene, and naphthalene. PW also contained heteroatomic compounds containing nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. 3D van Krevelen and double bond equivalence versus carbon number analyses were used to evaluate molecular variability. Source composition, as well as solubility, controlled the distribution of volatile compounds found in shale-oil PW. The salinity also increased with depth, ranging from 105 to 162 g/L total dissolved solids. These data fill a gap for shale-oil PW composition, the associated petroleomics plots provide a fingerprinting framework, and the results for the Permian shale-oil PW suggest that partial treatment of suspended solids and organics would support some beneficial uses such as onsite reuse and bio-energy production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. TBP assisted uranyl extraction from water to water/organic interface to organic phase: molecular dynamics of uranyl complex with water, acid and TBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, P.; Ali, Sk. M.; Shenoy, K.T.

    2016-01-01

    Reprocessing of the used fuel, not only diminishes the volume and toxicity of high level waste but is also required to produce the new fuel for nuclear reactors. It has been observed that the extraction of uranyl ions from dissolver solution to the organic phase is influenced by co extraction of other species, such as water and nitric acid and it is assumed that the presence of water or acid droplets in the organic phase intensifies the coordination mechanism of TBP. Present study is dedicated to revisit the molecular process of uranyl extraction from aqueous phase to organic phase, using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Here, we consider the biphasic systems to gain insights into the characteristics of the interface and humidity of organic phase under different acidic and neutral conditions. The consequences regarding the interfacial landscape, in the extraction process are considered by comparing the MD results of interfacial systems with various TBP and acid concentration. Further, the importance of charge transferability during uranyl-TBP complexation have been investigated with NO 3 - counter ions. Overall, this study aims at improving the description of molecular composition of various species and the structure of interface, in order to better understand the molecular-level complexation reaction occurring at the interface in different neutral and acidic environment

  4. Controllable Molecular Packing Motif and Overlap Type in Organic Nanomaterials for Advanced Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoyu Zou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of organic materials are very sensitive to subtle structural modification, and a proper understanding of the structure-property relationship is essential to improve the performance of organic electronic devices. The phase transitions of the η-CuPc to the α-CuPc, then to the β-CuPc were investigated using In situ X-ray diffraction and the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The five stages in the phase-transition process from low to high-temperature were observed, which consisted of (1 the η-CuPc; (2 a mixture of the η- and α-CuPc; (3 a mixture of the η-, α- and β-CuPc; (4 a mixture of the α- and β-CuPc; and (5 the β-CuPc. The vibrational and optical properties at different phase-transition stages were correlated to molecular packing motif and molecule overlap type through systematic analyses of the Fourier–transform infrared, Raman and UV-VIS spectra. Moreover, the mechanism for the morphology evolution was also discussed in detail.

  5. Molecular basis for the specification of floral organs by APETALA3 and PISTILLATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Samuel E; O'Maoileidigh, Diarmuid S; Rae, Liina; Kwasniewska, Kamila; Raganelli, Andrea; Hanczaryk, Katarzyna; Lohan, Amanda J; Loftus, Brendan; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Wellmer, Frank

    2012-08-14

    How different organs are formed from small sets of undifferentiated precursor cells is a key question in developmental biology. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying organ specification in plants, we studied the function of the homeotic selector genes APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI), which control the formation of petals and stamens during Arabidopsis flower development. To this end, we characterized the activities of the transcription factors that AP3 and PI encode throughout flower development by using perturbation assays as well as transcript profiling and genomewide localization studies, in combination with a floral induction system that allows a stage-specific analysis of flower development by genomic technologies. We discovered considerable spatial and temporal differences in the requirement for AP3/PI activity during flower formation and show that they control different sets of genes at distinct phases of flower development. The genomewide identification of target genes revealed that AP3/PI act as bifunctional transcription factors: they activate genes involved in the control of numerous developmental processes required for organogenesis and repress key regulators of carpel formation. Our results imply considerable changes in the composition and topology of the gene network controlled by AP3/PI during the course of flower development. We discuss our results in light of a model for the mechanism underlying sex-determination in seed plants, in which AP3/PI orthologues might act as a switch between the activation of male and the repression of female development.

  6. Risk organ preservation technique in reirradiation. Injection of native type high molecular weight hyaluronate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Kazushi; Noda, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    We developed a practical method of brachytherapy effective for reirradiation, using hyaluronate gel injection to separate the target to be intensively. We intended curative reirradiation with preserving organs at risk. Native-type high molecular weight hyaluronate that has an ideal biologic property to reduce inflammation via inhibitory activity to CD44 and other inflammation receptors was injected to create space during radiotherapy. Rectum, small intestines, skin, and various normal organs are effectively separated and thus eradicative re-irradiation was carried out in safe. We reviewed 55 patients who required the method. There were no complications related to the procedure. Prescribed dose to 100% of the planning target volume (PTV) was 77.93 Gy (range 54-92) equivalent at alpha/beta ratio of 3, with much higher subvolume effect, and the saving effects were enhanced at 3.35 times in the average of those without gel injection. In conclusion, the interventional brachytherapy with hyaluronate gel injection provided 3.35 times safer dose-escalated and eradicative treatment in reirradiation. (author)

  7. Self-assembly of molecular dumbbells into organized bundles with tunable size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myongsoo; Jeong, Yang-Seung; Cho, Byoung-Ki; Oh, Nam-Keun; Zin, Wang-Cheol

    2002-02-15

    Dumbbell-shaped molecules consisting of three biphenyls connected through vinyl linkages as a conjugated rod segment and aliphatic polyether dendritic wedges with different cross-sections (i.e., dibranch (1), tetrabranch (2) and hexabranch (3)) were synthesized and characterized. The molecular dumbbells self-assemble into discrete bundles that organize into three-dimensional superlattices. Molecule 1, based on a dibranched dendritic wedge, organizes into primitive monoclinic-crystalline and body-centered, tetragonal liquid crystalline structures, while molecules 2 and 3, based on tetra- and hexabranched dendritic wedges, respectively, form only body-centered, tetragonal liquid crystalline structures. X-ray diffraction experiments and density measurements showed that the rod-bundle cross-sectional area decreases with increasing cross-section of the dendritic wedges. The influences of supramolecular structure on the bulk-state optical properties were investigated by measuring the UV/Vis absorption and steady state fluorescence spectroscopies. As the cross-section of the dendritic wedge of the molecule increases, the absorption and emission maxima shift to higher energy. This can be attributed to a quantum size effect of the three-dimensionally confined nanostructure.

  8. Towards a molecular level understanding of the sulfanilamide-soil organic matter-interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashour A; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Leinweber, Peter; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-07-15

    Sorption experiments of sulfanilamide (SAA) on well-characterized samples of soil size-fractions were combined with the modeling of SAA-soil-interaction via quantum chemical calculations. Freundlich unit capacities were determined in batch experiments and it was found that they increase with the soil organic matter (SOM) content according to the order fine silt > medium silt > clay > whole soil > coarse silt > sand. The calculated binding energies for mass-spectrometrically quantified sorption sites followed the order ionic species > peptides > carbohydrates > phenols and lignin monomers > lignin dimers > heterocyclic compounds > fatty acids > sterols > aromatic compounds > lipids, alkanes, and alkenes. SAA forms H-bonds through its polar centers with the polar SOM sorption sites. In contrast dispersion and π-π-interactions predominate the interaction of the SAA aromatic ring with the non-polar moieties of SOM. Moreover, the dipole moment, partial atomic charges, and molecular volume of the SOM sorption sites are the main physical properties controlling the SAA-SOM-interaction. Further, reasonable estimates of the Freundlich unit capacities from the calculated binding energies have been established. Consequently, we suggest using this approach in forthcoming studies to disclose the interactions of a wide range of organic pollutants with SOM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Low pressure drop filtration of airborne molecular organic contaminants using open-channel networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, Andrew J.; Joriman, Jon; Ding, Lefei; Weineck, Gerald; Seguin, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) continues to play a very decisive role in the performance of many microelectronic devices and manufacturing processes. Besides airborne acids and bases, airborne organic contaminants such as 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), trimethylsilanol (TMS), perfluoroalkylamines and condensables are of primary concern in these applications. Currently, the state of the filtration industry is such that optimum filter life and removal efficiency for organics is offered by granular carbon filter beds. However, the attributes that make packed beds of activated carbon extremely efficient also impart issues related to elevated filter weight and pressure drop. Most of the lower pressure drop AMC filters currently offered are quite expensive and are simply pleated combinations of various adsorptive and reactive media. On the other hand, low pressure drop filters, such as those designed as open-channel networks (OCN's), offer good filter life and removal efficiency with the additional benefits of significant reductions in overall filter weight and pressure drop. Equally important for many applications, the OCN filters can reconstruct the airflow so as to enhance the operation of a tool or process. For tool mount assemblies and fan filter units (FFUs) this can result in reduced fan and blower speeds, which subsequently can provide reduced vibration and energy costs. Additionally, these low pressure drop designs can provide a cost effective way of effectively removing AMC in full fab (or HVAC) filtration applications without significantly affecting air-handling requirements. Herein, we will present a new generation of low pressure drop OCN filters designed for the removal of airborne organics in a wide range of applications.

  10. Molecular composition of organic aerosols in central Amazonia: an ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kourtchev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Amazon Basin plays key role in atmospheric chemistry, biodiversity and climate change. In this study we applied nanoelectrospray (nanoESI ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHRMS for the analysis of the organic fraction of PM2.5 aerosol samples collected during dry and wet seasons at a site in central Amazonia receiving background air masses, biomass burning and urban pollution. Comprehensive mass spectral data evaluation methods (e.g. Kendrick mass defect, Van Krevelen diagrams, carbon oxidation state and aromaticity equivalent were used to identify compound classes and mass distributions of the detected species. Nitrogen- and/or sulfur-containing organic species contributed up to 60 % of the total identified number of formulae. A large number of molecular formulae in organic aerosol (OA were attributed to later-generation nitrogen- and sulfur-containing oxidation products, suggesting that OA composition is affected by biomass burning and other, potentially anthropogenic, sources. Isoprene-derived organosulfate (IEPOX-OS was found to be the most dominant ion in most of the analysed samples and strongly followed the concentration trends of the gas-phase anthropogenic tracers confirming its mixed anthropogenic–biogenic origin. The presence of oxidised aromatic and nitro-aromatic compounds in the samples suggested a strong influence from biomass burning especially during the dry period. Aerosol samples from the dry period and under enhanced biomass burning conditions contained a large number of molecules with high carbon oxidation state and an increased number of aromatic compounds compared to that from the wet period. The results of this work demonstrate that the studied site is influenced not only by biogenic emissions from the forest but also by biomass burning and potentially other anthropogenic emissions from the neighbouring urban environments.

  11. Low molecular weight heparin attenuates multiple organ failure in a murine model of disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slofstra, Sjoukje H; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Buurman, Wim A; Reitsma, Pieter H; ten Cate, Hugo; Spek, C Arnold

    2005-06-01

    Bacterial sepsis causes widespread vascular inflammation that frequently leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Although intravascular coagulation contributes to organ failure, it is often debated whether anticoagulant therapy produces any beneficial effects in patients with DIC. The aim of this study was to document potential beneficial effects of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) in a lipopolysaccharide-induced DIC model. Controlled animal experiment combined with an in vitro laboratory study. Academic research laboratory. C57BL/6 mice subjected to two injections of Serratia Marcescens lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulting in the generalized Shwartzman's reaction as a model for DIC. LMWH (5 IU of anti-Xa activity) or saline was administered before both LPS injections and 10 hrs after the first exposure to LPS. To test the effect of LMWH on LPS-driven monocyte inflammatory responses, a human monocyte-human umbilical vein endothelial cell co-culture was used to determine E-selectin expression as a marker of monocyte adherence. In our murine DIC model, LMWH had no effect on markers of inflammation. In addition, no effect of LMWH was detected on monocyte adherence in the human monocyte-human umbilical vein endothelial cell co-culture. Organ damage, contrarily, was significantly reduced as determined by hepatic necrosis (p < .05), lung epithelial protein leakage (p < .05), and creatinine release from kidneys into plasma (p < .01). LMWH protection from organ failure resulted in an increase in survival (p = .06) in this model for DIC. These results demonstrate the significance of blood coagulation in the progression of DIC and hint at a beneficial role for LMWH anticoagulation in the management of DIC.

  12. Advanced solvent based methods for molecular characterization of soil organic matter by high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfaily, Malak M; Chu, Rosalie K; Tolić, Nikola; Roscioli, Kristyn M; Anderton, Christopher R; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Robinson, Errol W; Hess, Nancy J

    2015-01-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM), a complex, heterogeneous mixture of above and belowground plant litter and animal and microbial residues at various degrees of decomposition, is a key reservoir for carbon (C) and nutrient biogeochemical cycling in soil based ecosystems. A limited understanding of the molecular composition of SOM limits the ability to routinely decipher chemical processes within soil and accurately predict how terrestrial carbon fluxes will respond to changing climatic conditions and land use. To elucidate the molecular-level structure of SOM, we selectively extracted a broad range of intact SOM compounds by a combination of different organic solvents from soils with a wide range of C content. Our use of electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and a suite of solvents with varying polarity significantly expands the inventory of the types of organic molecules present in soils. Specifically, we found that hexane is selective for lipid-like compounds with very low O/C ratios ( 0.5; methanol (MeOH) has higher selectivity toward compounds characterized with low O/C organic molecules extracted from soil for a broader range of chemically diverse soil types. Our study of SOM molecules by ESI FTICR MS revealed new insight into the molecular-level complexity of organics contained in soils. We present the first comparative study of the molecular composition of SOM from different ecosystems using ultra high-resolution mass spectrometry.

  13. Impact of Low Molecular Weight Poly(3-hexylthiophene)s as Additives in Organic Photovoltaic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibers, Zach D; Le, Thinh P; Lee, Youngmin; Gomez, Enrique D; Kilbey, S Michael

    2018-01-24

    Despite tremendous progress in using additives to enhance the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic devices, significant challenges remain in controlling the microstructure of the active layer, such as at internal donor-acceptor interfaces. Here, we demonstrate that the addition of low molecular weight poly(3-hexylthiophene)s (low-MW P3HT) to the P3HT/fullerene active layer increases device performance up to 36% over an unmodified control device. Low MW P3HT chains ranging in size from 1.6 to 8.0 kg/mol are blended with 77.5 kg/mol P3HT chains and [6,6]-phenyl C 61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) fullerenes while keeping P3HT/PCBM ratio constant. Optimal photovoltaic device performance increases are obtained for each additive when incorporated into the bulk heterojunction blend at loading levels that are dependent upon additive MW. Small-angle X-ray scattering and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy imaging reveal that domain sizes are approximately invariant at low loading levels of the low-MW P3HT additive, and wide-angle X-ray scattering suggests that P3HT crystallinity is unaffected by these additives. These results suggest that oligomeric P3HTs compatibilize donor-acceptor interfaces at low loading levels but coarsen domain structures at higher loading levels and they are consistent with recent simulations results. Although results are specific to the P3HT/PCBM system, the notion that low molecular weight additives can enhance photovoltaic device performance generally provides a new opportunity for improving device performance and operating lifetimes.

  14. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for short-term decomposition. Factors

  15. Comparison of cryoconite organic matter composition from Arctic and Antarctic glaciers at the molecular-level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautler, Brent G.; Dubnick, Ashley; Sharp, Martin J.; Simpson, André J.; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2013-03-01

    Glacier surfaces are reservoirs that contain organic and inorganic debris referred to as cryoconite. Solar heating of this material results in the formation of water-filled depressions that are colonized by a variety of microbes and are hypothesized to play a role in carbon cycling in glacier ecosystems. Recent studies on cryoconite deposits have focused on their contribution to carbon fluxes to determine whether they are a net source or sink for atmospheric CO2. To better understand carbon cycling in these unique ecosystems, the molecular constituents of cryoconite organic matter (COM) require further elucidation. COM samples from four glaciers were analyzed by targeted extraction of plant- and microbial-derived biomarkers in conjunction with non-targeted NMR experiments to determine the COM composition and potential sources. Several molecular proxies were applied to assess COM degradation and microbial activity using samples from Greenland, the Canadian Arctic, and Antarctica. COM from Canadian (John Evans glacier) and Greenlandic (Leverett glacier) locations was more chemically heterogeneous than that from the Antarctic likely due to inputs from higher plants, mosses and Sphagnum as suggested by the solvent-extractable alkyl lipids and sterols and the detection of lignin- and Sphagnum-derived phenols after cupric oxide chemolysis. Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments highlighted the bulk chemical functional groups of COM allowing for a general assessment of its degradation stage from the alkyl/O-alkyl proxy whereas solution-state 1H NMR highlighted both microbial and plant contributions to base-soluble extracts from these COM samples. The dominance of 1H NMR signals from microbial protein/peptides in base-soluble extracts of COM from Antarctica (Joyce glacier and Garwood glacier), phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarker detection and the absence of plant-derived biomarkers in both the solvent and cupric oxide extracts suggests that this

  16. Change of soil organic matter quality and quantity by deep-rooting plants - a molecular approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocke, Martina; Derenne, Sylvie; Anquetil, Christelle; Huguet, Arnaud; Dignac, Marie-France; Rumpel, Cornelia; Wiesenberg, Guido L. B.

    2015-04-01

    Under predicted rising atmospheric CO2 concentration, soils are discussed to potentially act as C sinks. Stability and long-term storage of soil OM are affected by both molecular structure of incorporated organic remains and environmental factors. It is increasingly accepted that roots contribute to significant portions of topsoil OM, whereas their role for C cycling is less known for depths >> 1 m, i.e. the deep subsoil and underlying soil parent material like terrestrial sediments. To trace root-related features and organic remains, transects were sampled from ancient (3-10 ky) and recent calcified roots (rhizoliths) via surrounding sediment towards sediment free of visible root remains, at two sites. At the Nussloch loess-paleosol sequence (SW Germany), transects were collected as intact cores and scanned by X-ray microtomography for visualization of rhizoliths and rhizosphere. Afterwards, cores were cut into concentric slices and, similar to rhizolith and sediment samples from the sandy deep subsoil at Sopron (NW Hungary), analyzed for suberin molecular markers. Suberin biomarkers were found in both recent and ancient root systems, demonstrating their suitability to identify root-derived OM in terrestrial sediments with ages of several tens of ky. Varying relative portions of the respective suberin markers enabled the attribution of Sopron rhizoliths to oak origin, and assessment of the rhizosphere, which extended up to several cm. This confirms recent studies which demonstrated the possible postsedimentary incorporation of considerable amounts of root and rhizomicrobial remains in loess, based on biomarkers deriving either from plants and microorganisms (alkanes, fatty acids) or solely from microorganisms (GDGTs). 3D scanning of Nussloch rhizoliths and surrounding loess showed large channels of former root growth, whereas the root tissue was commonly degraded. Additionally, microtomography enabled assessment of abundant fine calcified roots as well as biopores

  17. A molecular perspective on the ageing of marine dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Flerus

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic matter (DOM was extracted by solid-phase extraction (SPE from 137 water samples from different climate zones and different depths along an eastern Atlantic Ocean transect. The extracts were analyzed with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS with electrospray ionization (ESI. Δ14C analyses were performed on subsamples of the SPE-DOM. In addition, the amount of dissolved organic carbon was determined for all water and SPE-DOM samples as well as the yield of amino sugars for selected samples. Linear correlations were observed between the magnitudes of 43 % of the FT-ICR mass peaks and the extract Δ14C values. Decreasing SPE-DOM Δ14C values went along with a shift in the molecular composition to higher average masses (m/z and lower hydrogen/carbon (H/C ratios. The correlation was used to model the SPE-DOM Δ14C distribution for all 137 samples. Based on single mass peaks, a degradation index (IDEG was developed to compare the degradation state of marine SPE-DOM samples analyzed with FT-ICR MS. A correlation between Δ14C, IDEG, DOC values and amino sugar yield supports that SPE-DOM analyzed with FT-ICR MS reflects trends of bulk DOM. DOM weighted normalized mass peak magnitudes were used to compare aged and recent SPE-DOM on a semi-quantitative molecular basis. The magnitude comparison showed a continuum of different degradation rates for the detected compounds. A high proportion of the compounds should persist, possibly modified by partial degradation, in the course of thermohaline circulation. Prokaryotic (bacterial production, transformation and accumulation of this very stable DOM occur primarily in the upper ocean. This DOM is an important contribution to very old DOM, showing that production and degradation are dynamic processes.

  18. Lability of High Molecular Weight Dissolved Organic Matter Polysaccharides Increases with Mild Acid or Base Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedler Sherwood, B.; Sosa, O.; Nelson, C. E.; Repeta, D.; DeLong, E.

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 662 Pg of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has accumulated in the global ocean, yet the biological and chemical constraints on DOC turnover remain poorly understood. High molecular weight dissolved organic matter (HMWDOM) is largely comprised of semi-labile polysaccharides. These polysaccharides resist degradation even in the presence of nutrient amendments, suggesting unknown factors of polysaccharide composition affect microbial degradation. In a series of microcosm incubations conducted at station ALOHA in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, we tested the affect of mild base (KOH-DOM) and acid (HCl-DOM) treatments on polysaccharide lability. KOH-DOM, HCl-DOM, and untreated HMWDOM was added to seawater from the deep chlorophyll maximum and 200m. Microcosms amended with KOH-DOM and HCl-DOM yielded higher bacterial abundance and greater carbon drawdown relative to untreated HMWDOM and unamended controls. Microcosms amended with KOH-DOM and HCl-DOM also showed significant production of fluorescent DOM (fDOM), whereas untreated HMWDOM and unamended controls showed a net decrease in fDOM as measured by parallel factor analysis of DOM excitation-emission spectra. Metagenomic analyses revealed that microcosms amended with untreated HMWDOM and controls became dominated by Alteromonas genera ( 60% total sequence reads). In contrast, KOH-DOM and HCl-DOM amended microcosms yielded greater bacterial diversity; Alteromonas genera comprised 25% of sequence reads, with differences primarily accounted for by proportional increases in vibrio, roseobacter, rugeria and marinomonas clades. Transcriptomic analyses identified differential gene expression during growth on each DOM fraction. This study provides new insight into specific chemical moieties that may limit the bacterial degradation rate of semi-labile HMWDOM in the ocean.

  19. Towards a molecular level understanding of the sulfanilamide-soil organic matter-interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Ashour A., E-mail: ashour.ahmed@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Institute of Physics, Albert-Einstein-Str. 23-24, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Steinbeis GmbH & Co. KG für Technologietransfer, 70174 Stuttgart (Germany); University of Cairo, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 12613 Giza (Egypt); Thiele-Bruhn, Sören, E-mail: thiele@uni-trier.de [University of Trier, Soil Science, D-54286 Trier (Germany); Leinweber, Peter, E-mail: peter.leinweber@uni-rostock.de [Steinbeis GmbH & Co. KG für Technologietransfer, 70174 Stuttgart (Germany); University of Rostock, Soil Science, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Kühn, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.kuehn@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Institute of Physics, Albert-Einstein-Str. 23-24, D-18059 Rostock (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    Sorption experiments of sulfanilamide (SAA) on well-characterized samples of soil size-fractions were combined with the modeling of SAA-soil-interaction via quantum chemical calculations. Freundlich unit capacities were determined in batch experiments and it was found that they increase with the soil organic matter (SOM) content according to the order fine silt > medium silt > clay > whole soil > coarse silt > sand. The calculated binding energies for mass-spectrometrically quantified sorption sites followed the order ionic species > peptides > carbohydrates > phenols and lignin monomers > lignin dimers > heterocyclic compounds > fatty acids > sterols > aromatic compounds > lipids, alkanes, and alkenes. SAA forms H-bonds through its polar centers with the polar SOM sorption sites. In contrast dispersion and π-π-interactions predominate the interaction of the SAA aromatic ring with the non-polar moieties of SOM. Moreover, the dipole moment, partial atomic charges, and molecular volume of the SOM sorption sites are the main physical properties controlling the SAA-SOM-interaction. Further, reasonable estimates of the Freundlich unit capacities from the calculated binding energies have been established. Consequently, we suggest using this approach in forthcoming studies to disclose the interactions of a wide range of organic pollutants with SOM. - Highlights: • Experiment and theory showed that SAA obeys a site-specific sorption on soil surfaces. • SAA-SOM-interaction increases by increasing polarity of SOM sorption site. • H-bonds, dispersion, and π-π-interactions were observed for SAA-SOM-interaction. • Dipole moment and atomic charges of SOM sorption sites control SAA-SOM-interaction. • The Freundlich unit capacities were estimated from the calculated binding energies. • The current SOM model is flexible to describe interactions of SOM with other pollutants.

  20. Molecular effects and bioaccumulation of levonorgestrel in the non-target organism Dreissena polymorpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contardo-Jara, Valeska, E-mail: contardo@igb-berlin.d [Department of Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Lorenz, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.lorenz@igb-berlin.d [Department of Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Pflugmacher, Stephan, E-mail: pflugmacher@igb-berlin.d [Department of Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Nuetzmann, Gunnar, E-mail: nuetzmann@igb-berlin.d [Department of Ecohydrology, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Kloas, Werner, E-mail: werner.kloas@igb-berlin.d [Department of Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Wiegand, Claudia, E-mail: wiegand@biology.sdu.d [University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Biology, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2011-01-15

    Bioaccumulation and effects of the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel were examined in the non-target organism Dreissena polymorpha. Molecular biomarkers of biotransformation, elimination, antioxidant defence and protein damage were analyzed after exposure to increasing concentrations of levonorgestrel in a flow-through system. The lowest concentration (0.312 {mu}g L{sup -1}) was 100-fold bioconcentrated within four days. A decrease of the bioconcentration factor was observed within one week for the highest test concentrations (3.12 and 6.24 {mu}g L{sup -1}) suggesting enhanced excretory processes. The immediate mRNA up-regulation of pi class glutathione S-transferase proved that phase II biotransformation processes were induced. Disturbance of fundamental cell functions was assumed since the aryl hydrocarbon receptor has been permanently down-regulated. mRNA up-regulation of P-glycoprotein, superoxide dismutase and metallothioneine suggested enhanced elimination processes and ongoing oxidative stress. mRNA up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 in mussels exposed to the two highest concentrations clearly indicated impacts on protein damage. - Fundamental cell processes as biotransformation, elimination and prevention from oxidative stress are influenced by exposure of the contraceptive levonorgestrel in non-target organisms. - Research highlights: Bioaccumulation of levonorgestrel in mussels is higher than expected based on its lipophilicity. Exposure to levonorgestrel causes oxidative stress and enhanced elimination processes. Glutathione S-transferase (pi class) mRNA induction after one day hint on phase II biotransformation. mRNA induction of heat shock protein 70 after one week prove protein damage.

  1. Influence of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids on Transport of Cadmium and Copper Ions across Model Phospholipid Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parisová, Martina; Navrátil, Tomáš; Šestáková, Ivana; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Mareček, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2013), s. 27-44 ISSN 1452-3981 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400806 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : cadmium * copper * low molecular weight organic acid Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.956, year: 2013

  2. Enhanced adsorption selectivity of hydrogen/methane mixtures in metal-organic frameworks with interpenetration: A molecular simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, B.; Yang, Q.; Xue, C.; Zhong, C.; Chen, B.; Smit, B.

    2008-01-01

    In this work a systematic molecular simulation study was performed to study the effect of interpenetration on gas mixture separation in metal−organic frameworks (MOFs). To do this, three pairs of isoreticular MOFs (IRMOFs) with and without interpenetration were adopted to compare their adsorption

  3. Covalent organic frameworks as supports for a molecular Ni based ethylene oligomerization catalyst for the synthesis of long chain olefins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozhko, E.; Bavykina, A.V.; Osadchii, D.; Makkee, M.; Gascon Sabate, J.

    2017-01-01

    The use of two different classes of covalent organic frameworks (covalent triazine and imine linked frameworks) as supports for molecular Ni2+ catalysts is presented. For COFs, a large concentration of N heteroatoms, either in the form of quasi bipyridine or as diiminopyridine

  4. Effect of Molecular Packing and Charge Delocalization on the Nonradiative Recombination of Charge-Transfer States in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Xiankai

    2016-09-05

    In organic solar cells, a major source of energy loss is attributed to nonradiative recombination from the interfacial charge transfer states to the ground state. By taking pentacene–C60 complexes as model donor–acceptor systems, a comprehensive theoretical understanding of how molecular packing and charge delocalization impact these nonradiative recombination rates at donor–acceptor interfaces is provided.

  5. Reversed thermo-switchable molecular sieving membranes composed of two-dimensional metal-organic nanosheets for gas separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuerui; Chi, Chenglong; Zhang, Kang; Qian, Yuhong; Gupta, Krishna M; Kang, Zixi; Jiang, Jianwen; Zhao, Dan

    2017-02-16

    It is highly desirable to reduce the membrane thickness in order to maximize the throughput and break the trade-off limitation for membrane-based gas separation. Two-dimensional membranes composed of atomic-thick graphene or graphene oxide nanosheets have gas transport pathways that are at least three orders of magnitude higher than the membrane thickness, leading to reduced gas permeation flux and impaired separation throughput. Here we present nm-thick molecular sieving membranes composed of porous two-dimensional metal-organic nanosheets. These membranes possess pore openings parallel to gas concentration gradient allowing high gas permeation flux and high selectivity, which are proven by both experiment and molecular dynamics simulation. Furthermore, the gas transport pathways of these membranes exhibit a reversed thermo-switchable feature, which is attributed to the molecular flexibility of the building metal-organic nanosheets.

  6. Synthesis of Sub-10 nm Two-Dimensional Covalent Organic Thin Film with Sharp Molecular Sieving Nanofiltration

    KAUST Repository

    Gadwal, Ikhlas

    2018-04-06

    We demonstrated here a novel and facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) covalent organic thin film with pore size around 1.5 nm using a planar, amphiphilic and substituted heptacyclic truxene based triamine and a simple dialdehyde as building blocks by dynamic imine bond formation at the air/water interface using Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) method. Optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), all unanimously showed the formation of large, molecularly thin and free-standing membrane that can be easily transferred on different substrate surfaces. The 2D membrane supported on a porous polysulfone showed a rejection rate of 64 and 71% for NaCl and MgSO4, respectively, and a clear molecular sieving at molecular size around 1.3 nm, which demonstrated a great potential in the application of pretreatment of seawater desalination and separation of organic molecules.

  7. Reversed thermo-switchable molecular sieving membranes composed of two-dimensional metal-organic nanosheets for gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuerui; Chi, Chenglong; Zhang, Kang; Qian, Yuhong; Gupta, Krishna M.; Kang, Zixi; Jiang, Jianwen; Zhao, Dan

    2017-02-01

    It is highly desirable to reduce the membrane thickness in order to maximize the throughput and break the trade-off limitation for membrane-based gas separation. Two-dimensional membranes composed of atomic-thick graphene or graphene oxide nanosheets have gas transport pathways that are at least three orders of magnitude higher than the membrane thickness, leading to reduced gas permeation flux and impaired separation throughput. Here we present nm-thick molecular sieving membranes composed of porous two-dimensional metal-organic nanosheets. These membranes possess pore openings parallel to gas concentration gradient allowing high gas permeation flux and high selectivity, which are proven by both experiment and molecular dynamics simulation. Furthermore, the gas transport pathways of these membranes exhibit a reversed thermo-switchable feature, which is attributed to the molecular flexibility of the building metal-organic nanosheets.

  8. Atomic and molecular physics of plasma-based environmental technologies for abatement of volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.; Merrit, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C.P.; Bayless, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques represent a new generation of air emission control technology that potentially could treat large-volume emissions containing dilute concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In order to apply non-thermal in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process. There is a need for reliable data concerning the primary decomposition mechanisms and subsequent chemical kinetics associated with non-thermal plasma processing of VOCs. There are many basic atomic and molecular physics issues that are essential in evaluating the economic performance of non-thermal plasma reactor. These studies are important in understanding how the input electrical power is dissipated in the plasma and how efficiency it is converted to the production of the plasma species (radicals, ions or electrons) responsible for the decomposition of the VOCs. This paper presents results from basic experimental and theoretical studied aimed at identifying the reaction mechanisms responsible for the primary decomposition of various types of VOCs. (Authors)

  9. Molecular organization of the nanoscale surface structures of the dragonfly Hemianax papuensis wing epicuticle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Ivanova

    Full Text Available The molecular organization of the epicuticle (the outermost layer of insect wings is vital in the formation of the nanoscale surface patterns that are responsible for bestowing remarkable functional properties. Using a combination of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques, including Synchrotron-sourced Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS depth profiling and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS, we have identified the chemical components that constitute the nanoscale structures on the surface of the wings of the dragonfly, Hemianax papuensis. The major components were identified to be fatty acids, predominantly hexadecanoic acid and octadecanoic acid, and n-alkanes with even numbered carbon chains ranging from C14 to C30. The data obtained from XPS depth profiling, in conjunction with that obtained from GCMS analyses, enabled the location of particular classes of compounds to different regions within the epicuticle. Hexadecanoic acid was found to be a major component of the outer region of the epicuticle, which forms the surface nanostructures, and was also detected in deeper layers along with octadecanoic acid. Aliphatic compounds were detected throughout the epicuticle, and these appeared to form a third discrete layer that was separate from both the inner and outer epicuticles, which has never previously been reported.

  10. Molecular Dependence of the Large Seebeck Effect in τ-Type Organic Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Hirohito; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Yoshino, Harukazu; Mousdis, George A.; Papavassiliou, George C.; Murata, Keizo

    2014-10-01

    We study the Seebeck effect in the τ-type organic conductors, τ-(EDO-S,S-DMEDT-TTF)2(AuBr2)1+y and τ-(P-S,S-DMEDT-TTF)2(AuBr2)1+y, where EDO-S,S-DMEDT-TTF and P-S,S-DMEDT-TTF are abbreviated as OOSS and NNSS, respectively, both experimentally and theoretically. Theoretically in particular, we perform first-principles band calculation for the two materials and construct a two-orbital model, on the basis of which we calculate the Seebeck coefficient. We show that the calculated temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient S is semi-quantitatively consistent with the experimental observation. In both materials, the absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient is maximum at a certain temperature, and this temperature is lower for NNSS than for OOSS. From a band structure viewpoint, we find that this can be traced back to the narrowness of the band gap between the upper and the lower pudding-mold type bands. On the other hand, the Seebeck coefficient of NNSS in the low temperature regime steeply increases with increasing temperature, which is due to the narrowness of the upper band. These differences in thermoelectric properties demonstrate the effectiveness of controlling the band structure through molecular modification.

  11. Optical properties and molecular diversity of dissolved organic matter in the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsior, Michael; Luek, Jenna; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Cooper, Lee W.

    2017-10-01

    Changes in the molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its light absorbing chromophoric component (CDOM) are of particular interest in the Arctic region because of climate change effects that lead to warmer sea surface temperatures and longer exposure to sunlight. We used continuous UV-vis (UV-vis) spectroscopy, excitation emission matrix fluorescence and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry during a transect from the Aleutian Islands in the Bering Sea to the Chukchi Sea ice edge through Bering Strait to determine the variability of DOM and CDOM. These data were combined with discrete sampling for stable oxygen isotopes of seawater, in order to evaluate the contributions of melted sea ice versus runoff to the DOM and CDOM components. This study demonstrated that high geographical resolution of optical properties in conjunction with stable oxygen ratios and non-targeted ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry was able to distinguish between different DOM sources in the Arctic, including identification of labile DOM sources in Bering Strait associated with high algal blooms and sampling locations influenced by terrestrially-derived DOM, such as the terrestrial DOM signal originating from Arctic rivers and dirty/anchor sea ice. Results of this study also revealed the overall variability and chemodiversity of Arctic DOM present in the Bering and Chukchi Seas.

  12. PDI Derivative through Fine-Tuning Molecular Structure for Fullerene-Free Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Hua

    2017-08-10

    A perylenediimide (PDI)-based small molecular (SM) acceptor with both an extended π-conjugation and a three dimensional structure concurrently is critical for achieving high performance PDI-based fullerene-free organic solar cells (OSCs). In this work, we designed and synthesized a novel PDI-based SM acceptor possessing both characteristics by fusing PDI units with a spiro core of 4,4’-spirobi[cyclopenta[2,1-b;3,4-b’]dithiophene(SCPDT) through the -position of the thiophene rings. An enhanced strong absorption in the range of 350–520 nm and arisen LUMO energy level of FSP was observed, compared with previous reported acceptor SCPDT-PDI4, in which the PDI units and SCPDT are not fused. OSCs based on PTB7-Th donor and FSP acceptor were fabricated and achieved a power conversion efficiency of up to 8.89% with DPE as an additive. Efficient and complementary photo absorption, favorable phase separation and balanced carrier mobilites in the blend film account for the high photovoltaic performance. This study offers an effective strategy to design high performance PDI-based acceptors.

  13. Stepwise transformation of the molecular building blocks in a porphyrin-encapsulating metal-organic material

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, ZhenJie

    2013-04-24

    When immersed in solutions containing Cu(II) cations, the microporous metal-organic material P11 ([Cd4(BPT)4]·[Cd(C 44H36N8)(S)]·[S], BPT = biphenyl-3,4′,5-tricarboxylate) undergoes a transformation of its [Cd 2(COO)6]2- molecular building blocks (MBBs) into novel tetranuclear [Cu4X2(COO)6(S) 2] MBBs to form P11-Cu. The transformation occurs in single-crystal to single-crystal fashion, and its stepwise mechanism was studied by varying the Cd2+/Cu2+ ratio of the solution in which crystals of P11 were immersed. P11-16/1 (Cd in framework retained, Cd in encapsulated porphyrins exchanged) and other intermediate phases were thereby isolated and structurally characterized. P11-16/1 and P11-Cu retain the microporosity of P11, and the relatively larger MBBs in P11-Cu permit a 20% unit cell expansion and afford a higher surface area and a larger pore size. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. A molecular investigation of soil organic carbon composition across a subalpine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Tieh; Lawrence, Corey R.; Winnick, Matthew J.; Bargar, John R.; Maher, Katharine

    2018-01-01

    The dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover are a critical component of the global carbon cycle. Mechanistic models seeking to represent these complex dynamics require detailed SOC compositions, which are currently difficult to characterize quantitatively. Here, we address this challenge by using a novel approach that combines Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and bulk carbon X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine the abundance of SOC functional groups, using elemental analysis (EA) to constrain the total amount of SOC. We used this SOC functional group abundance (SOC-fga) method to compare variability in SOC compositions as a function of depth across a subalpine watershed (East River, Colorado, USA) and found a large degree of variability in SOC functional group abundances between sites at different elevations. Soils at a lower elevation are predominantly composed of polysaccharides, while soils at a higher elevation have more substantial portions of carbonyl, phenolic, or aromatic carbon. We discuss the potential drivers of differences in SOC composition between these sites, including vegetation inputs, internal processing and losses, and elevation-driven environmental factors. Although numerical models would facilitate the understanding and evaluation of the observed SOC distributions, quantitative and meaningful measurements of SOC molecular compositions are required to guide such models. Comparison among commonly used characterization techniques on shared reference materials is a critical next step for advancing our understanding of the complex processes controlling SOC compositions.

  15. Molecular modeling of interactions between heavy crude oil and the soil organic matter coated quartz surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guozhong; Zhu, Xinzhe; Ji, Haoqing; Chen, Daoyi

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation was applied to evaluate the mobility, diffusivity and partitioning of SARA (saturates, aromatics, resins, asphaltenes) fractions of heavy crude oil on soil organic matter (SOM) coated quartz surface. Four types of SOM were investigated including Leonardite humic acid, Temple-Northeastern-Birmingham humic acid, Chelsea soil humic acid and Suwannee river fulvic acid. The SOM aggregation at oil-quartz interface decreased the adsorption of SARA on the quartz surface by 13-83%. Although the SOM tended to promote asphaltenes aggregation, the overall mobility of SARA was significantly greater on SOM-quartz complex than on pure quartz. Particularly, the diffusion coefficient of asphaltenes and resins increased by up to one-order of magnitude after SOM addition. The SOM increased the overall oil adsorption capacity but also mobilized SARA by driving them from the viscous oil phase and rigid quartz to the elastic SOM. This highlighted the potential of SOM addition for increasing the bioavailability of heavy crude oil without necessarily increasing the environmental risks. The MD simulation was demonstrated to be helpful for interpreting the role of SOM and the host oil phase for the adsorption and partitioning of SARA molecules, which is the key for developing more realistic remediation appraisal for heavy crude oil in soils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Attractive mechanical properties of a lightweight highly sensitive bi layer thermistor: polycarbonate/organic molecular conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laukhina, E; Lebedev, V; Rovira, C; Laukhin, V; Veciana, J

    2016-01-01

    The paper covers some of the basic mechanical characteristics of a recently developed bi layer thermistor: polycarbonate/(001) oriented layer of organic molecular conductor α’-(BEDT-TTF) 2 I x Br 3-x , were BEDT-TTF=bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalen. The nano and macro mechanical properties have been studied in order to use this flexible, low cost thermistor in sensing applications by proper way. The nano-mechanical properties of the temperature sensitive semiconducting layer of α’-(BEDT-TTF) 2 I x Br 3-x were tested using nanoindentation method. The value of Young's modulus in direction being perpendicular to the layer plan was found as 9.0 ±1.4 GPa. The macro mechanical properties of the thermistor were studied using a 5848 MicroTester. The tensile tests showed that basic mechanical characteristics of the thermistor are close to those of polycarbonate films. This indicates a good mechanical strength of the developed sensor. Therefore, the thermistor can be used in technologies that need to be instrumented with highly robustness lightweight low cost temperature sensors. The paper also reports synthetic details on fabricating temperature sensing e-textile. As the temperature control is becoming more and more important in biomedical technologies like healthcare monitoring, this work strongly contributes on the ongoing research on engineering sensitive conducting materials for biomedical applications. (paper)

  17. Molecular size evolution of oligomers in organic aerosols collected in urban atmospheres and generated in a smog chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberer, Markus; Sax, Mirjam; Samburova, Vera

    2006-10-01

    Only a minor fraction of the total organic aerosol mass can be resolved on a molecular level. High molecular weight compounds in organic aerosols have recently gained much attention because this class of compound potentially explains a major fraction of the unexplained organic aerosol mass. These compounds have been identified with different mass spectrometric methods, and compounds with molecular masses up to 1000 Da are found in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from aromatic and terpene precursors in smog chamber experiments. Here, we apply matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to SOA particles from two biogenic precursors, alpha-pinene and isoprene. Similar oligomer patterns are found in these two SOA systems, but also in SOA from trimethylbenzene, an anthropogenic SOA precursor. However, different maxima molecular sizes were measured for these three SOA systems. While oligomers in alpha-pinene and isoprene have sizes mostly below 600-700 Da, they grow up to about 1000 Da in trimethylbenzene-SOA. The final molecular size of the oligomers is reached early during the particle aging process, whereas other particle properties related to aging, such as the overall acid concentration or the oligomer concentration, increase continuously over a much longer time scale. This kinetic behavior of the oligomer molecular size growth can be explained by a chain growth kinetic regime. Similar oligomer mass patterns were measured in aqueous extracts of ambient aerosol samples (measured with the same technique). Distinct differences between summer and winter were observed. In summer a few single mass peaks were measured with much higher intensity than in winter, pointing to a possible difference in the formation processes of these compounds in winter and summer.

  18. Nanoscale insight into the exfoliation mechanism of graphene with organic dyes: effect of charge, dipole and molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlierf, Andrea; Yang, Huafeng; Gebremedhn, Elias; Treossi, Emanuele; Ortolani, Luca; Chen, Liping; Minoia, Andrea; Morandi, Vittorio; Samorì, Paolo; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Beljonne, David; Palermo, Vincenzo

    2013-05-21

    We study the mechanism of surface adsorption of organic dyes on graphene, and successive exfoliation in water of these dye-functionalized graphene sheets. A systematic, comparative study is performed on pyrenes functionalized with an increasing number of sulfonic groups. By combining experimental and modeling investigations, we find an unambiguous correlation between the graphene-dye interaction energy, the molecular structure and the amount of graphene flakes solubilized. The results obtained indicate that the molecular dipole is not important per se, but because it facilitates adsorption on graphene by a "sliding" mechanism of the molecule into the solvent layer, facilitating the lateral displacement of the water molecules collocated between the aromatic cores of the dye and graphene. While a large dipole and molecular asymmetry promote the adsorption of the molecule on graphene, the stability and pH response of the suspensions obtained depend on colloidal stabilization, with no significant influence of molecular charging and dipole.

  19. Tuning the color emission of thin film molecular organic light emitting devices by the solid state solvation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulović, V.; Deshpande, R.; Thompson, M. E.; Forrest, S. R.

    1999-07-01

    We demonstrate a general method for tuning the luminescent emission spectrum of dipolar molecules by adjusting the strength of intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions using a doped guest-host molecular organic thin film system. Spectral shifting is achieved by introducing dopants that change the local electric field in the film. This `solid state solvation effect' is used to continuously tune, by up to 75 nm, the peak emission wavelength of organic light emitting devices consisting of triarylamine host materials doped with polar luminescent dyes DCM2, aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline), or both. Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and white emission is demonstrated with the same set of organic molecules.

  20. Molecular Composition and Volatility of Organic Aerosol in the Southeastern U.S.: Implications for IEPOX Derived SOA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F D; Mohr, C; D'Ambro, E L; Lutz, A; Riedel, T P; Gaston, C J; Iyer, S; Zhang, Z; Gold, A; Surratt, J D; Lee, B H; Kurten, T; Hu, W W; Jimenez, J; Hallquist, M; Thornton, J A

    2016-03-01

    We present measurements as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) during which atmospheric aerosol particles were comprehensively characterized. We present results utilizing a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsol coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). We focus on the volatility and composition of isoprene derived organic aerosol tracers and of the bulk organic aerosol. By utilizing the online volatility and molecular composition information provided by the FIGAERO-CIMS, we show that the vast majority of commonly reported molecular tracers of isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is derived from thermal decomposition of accretion products or other low volatility organics having effective saturation vapor concentrations SOA has a higher volatility than the remaining bulk. That IEPOX-SOA, and more generally bulk organic aerosol in the Southeastern U.S. is comprised of effectively nonvolatile material has important implications for modeling SOA derived from isoprene, and for mechanistic interpretations of molecular tracer measurements. Our results show that partitioning theory performs well for 2-methyltetrols, once accretion product decomposition is taken into account. No significant partitioning delays due to aerosol phase or viscosity are observed, and no partitioning to particle-phase water or other unexplained mechanisms are needed to explain our results.

  1. The strength of a calcified tissue depends in part on the molecular structure and organization of its constituent mineral crystals in their organic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    High-voltage electron-microscopic tomographic (3D) studies of the ultrastructural interaction between mineral and organic matrix in a variety of calcified tissues reveal different crystal structural and organizational features in association with their respective organic matrices. In brittle or weak pathologic or ectopic calcifications, including examples of osteogenesis imperfecta, calciphylaxis, calcergy, and dermatomyositis, hydroxyapatite crystals occur in various sizes and shapes and are oriented and aligned with respect to collagen in a manner which is distinct from that found in normal calcified tissues. A model of collagen-mineral interaction is proposed which may account for the observed crystal structures and organization. The results indicate that the ultimate strength, support, and other mechanical properties provided by a calcified tissue are dependent in part upon the molecular structure and arrangement of its constituent mineral crystals within their organic matrix.

  2. Spatial variability of organic matter molecular composition and elemental geochemistry in surface sediments of a small boreal Swedish lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolu, Julie; Rydberg, Johan; Meyer-Jacob, Carsten; Gerber, Lorenz; Bindler, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The composition of sediment organic matter (OM) exerts a strong control on biogeochemical processes in lakes, such as those involved in the fate of carbon, nutrients and trace metals. While between-lake spatial variability of OM quality is increasingly investigated, we explored in this study how the molecular composition of sediment OM varies spatially within a single lake and related this variability to physical parameters and elemental geochemistry. Surface sediment samples (0-10 cm) from 42 locations in Härsvatten - a small boreal forest lake with a complex basin morphometry - were analyzed for OM molecular composition using pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry for the contents of 23 major and trace elements and biogenic silica. We identified 162 organic compounds belonging to different biochemical classes of OM (e.g., carbohydrates, lignin and lipids). Close relationships were found between the spatial patterns of sediment OM molecular composition and elemental geochemistry. Differences in the source types of OM (i.e., terrestrial, aquatic plant and algal) were linked to the individual basin morphometries and chemical status of the lake. The variability in OM molecular composition was further driven by the degradation status of these different source pools, which appeared to be related to sedimentary physicochemical parameters (e.g., redox conditions) and to the molecular structure of the organic compounds. Given the high spatial variation in OM molecular composition within Härsvatten and its close relationship with elemental geochemistry, the potential for large spatial variability across lakes should be considered when studying biogeochemical processes involved in the cycling of carbon, nutrients and trace elements or when assessing lake budgets.

  3. Evolution of complex organic molecules in hot molecular cores. Synthetic spectra at (sub-)mm wavebands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, R.; Schilke, P.; Stéphan, G.; Bergin, E.; Möller, T.; Schmiedeke, A.; Zernickel, A.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Hot molecular cores (HMCs) are intermediate stages of high-mass star formation and are also known for their rich chemical reservoirs and emission line spectra at (sub-)mm wavebands. Complex organic molecules (COMs) such as methanol (CH3OH), ethanol (C2H5OH), dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3), and methyl formate (HCOOCH3) produce most of these observed lines. The observed spectral feature of HMCs such as total number of emission lines and associated line intensities are also found to vary with evolutionary stages. Aims: We aim to investigate the spectral evolution of these COMs to explore the initial evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation including HMCs. Methods: We developed various 3D models for HMCs guided by the evolutionary scenarios proposed by recent empirical and modeling studies. We then investigated the spatio-temporal variation of temperature and molecular abundances in HMCs by consistently coupling gas-grain chemical evolution with radiative transfer calculations. We explored the effects of varying physical conditions on molecular abundances including density distribution and luminosity evolution of the central protostar(s) among other parameters. Finally, we simulated the synthetic spectra for these models at different evolutionary timescales to compare with observations. Results: Temperature has a profound effect on the formation of COMs through the depletion and diffusion on grain surface to desorption and further gas-phase processing. The time-dependent temperature structure of the hot core models provides a realistic framework for investigating the spatial variation of ice mantle evaporation as a function of evolutionary timescales. We find that a slightly higher value (15 K) than the canonical dark cloud temperature (10 K) provides a more productive environment for COM formation on grain surface. With increasing protostellar luminosity, the water ice evaporation font (~100 K) expands and the spatial distribution of gas phase abundances of

  4. Microbial utilization of low molecular weight organic substrates in soil depends on their carbon oxidation state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna; Smith, Andrew; Jones, Davey; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    Removal of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), originating from plants and microorganisms, from soil solution is regulated by microbial uptake. In addition to the concentration of LMWOS in soil solution, the chemical properties of each substance (e.g. C oxidation state, number of C atoms, number of -COOH groups) can affect their uptake and subsequent partitioning of C within the soil microbial community. The aim of this study was to trace the initial fate of three dominant classes of LMWOS in soil (sugars, carboxylic and amino acids), including their removal from solution and utilization by microorganisms, and to reveal the effect of substance chemical properties on these processes. Soil solution, spiked at natural abundance levels with 14C-labelled glucose, fructose, malate, succinate, formate, alanine or glycine, was added to the soil and 14C was traced in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CO2, cytosol and soil organic carbon (SOC) over 24 hours. The half-life time of all LMWOS in the DOC (T1 /2-solution) varied between 0.6-5.0 min showing extremely fast initial uptake of LMWOS. The T1 /2-solution of substances was dependent on C oxidation state, indicating that less oxidized organic substances (with C oxidation state "0") were retained longer in soil solution than oxidized substances. The LMWOS-C T1 /2-fast, characterizing the half-life time of 14C in the fast mineralization pool, ranged between 30 and 80 min, with the T1 /2-fast of carboxylic acids (malic acid) being the fastest and the T1 /2-fast of amino acids (glycine) being the slowest. An absence of correlation between T1 /2-fast and either C oxidation state, number of C atoms, or number of -COOH groups suggests that intercellular metabolic pathways are more important for LMWOS transformation in soil than their basic chemical properties. The CO2 release during LMWOS mineralization accounted for 20-90% of 14C applied. Mineralization of LMWOS was the least for sugars and the greatest for

  5. Atomically-thin molecular layers for electrode modification of organic transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Yuseong; Kang, Boseok; Kim, Bongsoo; Kim, Sun-Guk; Lee, Joong-Hee; Cho, Kilwon; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-08-01

    Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically enhanced the electrical performances of both p-type and n-type OFETs relative to the performances of OFETs prepared without the GO modification layer. Among the functionalized rGOs, CH3O-Ph-rGO yielded the highest hole mobility of 0.55 cm2 V-1 s-1 and electron mobility of 0.17 cm2 V-1 s-1 in p-type and n-type FETs, respectively. Two governing factors: (1) the work function of the modified electrodes and (2) the crystalline microstructures of the benchmark semiconductors grown on the modified electrode surface were systematically investigated to reveal the origin of the performance improvements. Our simple, inexpensive, and scalable electrode modification technique provides a significant step toward optimizing the device performance by engineering the semiconductor-electrode interfaces in OFETs.Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically

  6. Molecular characterization of soil organic matter from native vegetation–pasture–sugarcane transitions in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Dener Márcio da Silva, E-mail: denermsoliveira@gmail.com [University of São Paulo, Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture, Department of Soil Science, 11 Páduas Dias Avenue, 13418-900 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Colorado State University, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, 1231 East Drive, 80523-1499 Fort Collins, CO (United States); Schellekens, Judith; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino [University of São Paulo, Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture, Department of Soil Science, 11 Páduas Dias Avenue, 13418-900 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2016-04-01

    Replacing pastures (PA) with sugarcane (SG) has been deemed an agronomically feasible strategy for sugarcane expansion in Brazil. However, there are some uncertainties about the environmental impacts regarding this land use change (LUC), mainly related to soil organic matter (SOM), a key factor of environmental sustainability of Brazilian ethanol. LUC-related losses of SOM can overcome the C savings from biofuels. The molecular composition of SOM was evaluated to understand the C dynamics regarding LUC from PA to SG, using native vegetation (NV) as reference. Our study area was located in the south-central region of Brazil. Soil sampling was performed at three depths (0–0.1 m, 0.2–0.3 m and 0.9–1 m) in three representative sites with known LUC history and management practice since 1970. Pyrolysis–gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py–GC/MS) was chosen to study SOM chemistry. Content and isotopic composition of soil organic C and N were also determined. The LUC caused decreases on C and N contents and on δ{sup 13}C isotopic values. Depth was the major factor that influenced SOM composition, while the influence of LUC was mainly evident in surface soils and diminished rapidly with depth. The main difference in SOM composition undergoing the conversion PA-SG was a higher contribution from compounds associated to fresh litter inputs. The high contribution from fresh litter, having a relatively low mean residence time and increasing decomposition rates, is probably a major factor that drives C losses in areas undergoing sugarcane expansion. - Graphical abstract: We chose 3 sites in Brazil (1) and collected soil samples in areas undergoing LUC pasture–sugarcane (2) to evaluate SOM composition using Py–GC/MS (3). The LUC causes shifts on SOM signature (4), highlighting the increase of fresh litter compounds in sugarcane areas (5). - Highlights: • Effect of land use change (LUC) on SOM composition in Brazilian soils • Py-GC/MS of NaOH extractable SOM

  7. A Molecular Investigation of Soil Organic Carbon Composition, Variability, and Spatial Distribution Across an Alpine Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H. T.; Lawrence, C. R.; Winnick, M.; Druhan, J. L.; Williams, K. H.; Maher, K.; Rainaldi, G. R.; McCormick, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    The cycling of carbon through soils is one of the least understood aspects of the global carbon cycle and represents a key uncertainty in the prediction of land-surface response to global warming. Thus, there is an urgent need for advanced characterization of soil organic carbon (SOC) to develop and evaluate a new generation of soil carbon models. We hypothesize that shifts in SOC composition and spatial distribution as a function of soil depth can be used to constrain rates of transformation between the litter layer and the deeper subsoil (extending to a depth of approximately 1 m). To evaluate the composition and distribution of SOC, we collected soil samples from East River, a shale-dominated watershed near Crested Butte, CO, and characterized relative changes in SOC species as a function of depth using elemental analysis (EA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and bulk C X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our results show that total organic carbon (TOC) decreases with depth, and high total inorganic carbon (TIC) content was found in deeper soils (after 75 cm), a characteristic of the bedrock (shale). The distribution of aliphatic C relative to the parent material generally decreases with depth and that polysaccharide can be a substantial component of SOC at various depths. On the other hand, the relative distribution of aromatic C, traditionally viewed as recalcitrant, only makes up a very small part of SOC regardless of depth. These observations confirm that molecular structure is not the only determinant of SOC turnover rate. To study other contributors to SOC decomposition, we studied changes in the spatial correlation of SOC and minerals using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). We found that aromatics mostly locate on the surface of small soil aggregates (1-10 μm). Polysaccharides and proteins, both viewed as labile traditionally, are more evenly distributed over the interior of the

  8. What Organizes the Molecular Ballet that Promotes the Movement of the Axoneme in Such a Way that its Molecular Machinery Seems to be a Whole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibert, Christian

    2005-03-01

    The axonemal machinery constitutes a highly organized structure whose mechanisms seem to be very simple but whose regulation remains unknown. This apparent simplicity is reinforced by the fact that many models are able to perfectly mimic the axonemal wave trains that propagate along cilia and flagella. However nobody knows what are the actual mechanisms that coordinate the molecular ballet that exist during the beat. Here we present some theoretical elements that show that if the radial spokes are one of the main elements that promote axonemal regulation, they must be involved in a complex mechanism that makes the axoneme a discrete structure whose regulation could depend on local entropy that promotes the emergence of new molecular properties.

  9. Molecular evidence for an involvement of organic anion transporters (OATs) in aristolochic acid nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhiya, Nadiya; Arlt, Volker M.; Bahn, Andrew; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Phillips, David H.; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2009-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA), present in Aristolochia species, is the major causative agent in the development of severe renal failure and urothelial cancers in patients with AA nephropathy. It may also be a cause of Balkan endemic nephropathy. Epithelial cells of the proximal tubule are the primary cellular target of AA. To study whether organic anion transporters (OATs) expressed in proximal tubule cells are involved in uptake of AA, we used human epithelial kidney (HEK293) cells stably expressing human (h) OAT1, OAT3 or OAT4. AA potently inhibited the uptake of characteristic substrates, p-aminohippurate for hOAT1 and estrone sulfate for hOAT3 and hOAT4. Aristolochic acid I (AAI), the more cytotoxic and genotoxic AA congener, exhibited high affinity for hOAT1 (K i = 0.6 μM) as well as hOAT3 (K i = 0.5 μM), and lower affinity for hOAT4 (K i = 20.6 μM). Subsequently, AAI-DNA adduct formation (investigated by 32 P-postlabelling) was used as a measure of AAI uptake. Significantly higher levels of adducts occurred in hOAT-expressing cells than in control cells: this effect was abolished in the presence of the OAT inhibitor probenecid. In Xenopus laevis oocytes hOAT-mediated efflux of p-aminohippurate was trans-stimulated by extracellular AA, providing further molecular evidence for AA translocation by hOATs. Our study indicates that OATs can mediate the uptake of AA into proximal tubule cells and thereby participate in kidney cell damage by this toxin.

  10. Photoionization of N-Alkyl N, N', - in Organized Molecular Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenland, Christopher John

    The electron donors N-Alkyl N,N^ ',N^' -trimethylbenzidines (C_{rm n }TMB with n = 1 to 16) were synthesized then photoionized in rapidly frozen micellar, vesicular and reversed micellar solutions. The N-alkyl functionalization of these electron donors alters the solubilization location of C_{rm n}TMB with respect to the aqueous interface in these organized molecular assemblies. The alteration of the solubilization location affects the, relative photoyield. Electron spin resonance is used to quantify and identify the photoproduced radicals in these rapidly frozen solution. Electron spin echo modulation spectroscopy is used to monitor the distance of the cation radical of C_{rm n}TMB to the deuterated aqueous interface. In micelles, longer N-alkyl chains on C _{rm n}TMB push the benzidine moiety towards the aqueous interface. However the photoyield remains constant versus the C_{rm n}TMB alkyl chain length. The lack of a photoyield trend is interpreted in terms of the solubilization geometry which determines the paths of electron escape to form charge separated products. In vesicles, the longer the alkyl chain on C _{rm n}TMB, the deeper the benzidine moiety is located, and the lower the photoyield. The relative photoyield in bilayer vesicles depends on the proximity of the electron donor to the interface. In Aerosol dioctyl reversed micelles in isooctane, a negligible C_{rm n}TMB alkyl chain length effect is observed. Instead the water pool size, which can be manipulated by altering the mole ratio of water to surfactant, is the dominant factor which controls the net photoyield.

  11. A bio-metal-organic framework for highly selective CO(2) capture: A molecular simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifei; Jiang, Jianwen

    2010-08-23

    A recently synthesized bio-metal-organic framework (bio-MOF-11) is investigated for CO(2) capture by molecular simulation. The adenine biomolecular linkers in bio-MOF-11 contain Lewis basic amino and pyrimidine groups as the preferential adsorption sites. The simulated and experimental adsorption isotherms of pure CO(2), H(2), and N(2) are in perfect agreement. Bio-MOF-11 exhibits larger adsorption capacities compared to numerous zeolites, activated carbons, and MOFs, which is attributed to the presence of multiple Lewis basic sites and nano-sized channels. The results for the adsorption of CO(2)/H(2) and CO(2)/N(2) mixtures in bio-MOF-11 show that CO(2) is more dominantly adsorbed than H(2) and N(2). With increasing pressure, the selectivity of CO(2)/H(2) initially increases owing to the strong interactions between CO(2) and the framework, and then decreases as a consequence of the entropy effect. However, the selectivity of CO(2)/N(2) monotonically increases with increasing pressure and finally reaches a constant. The selectivities in bio-MOF-11 are higher than in many nanoporous materials. The simulation results also reveal that a small amount of H(2)O has a negligible effect on the separation of CO(2)/H(2) and CO(2)/N(2) mixtures. The simulation study provides quantitative microscopic insight into the adsorption mechanism in bio-MOF-11 and suggests that bio-MOF-11 may be interesting for pre- and post-combustion CO(2) capture.

  12. Molecular analysis and genomic organization of major DNA satellites in banana (Musa spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čížková, Jana; Hřibová, Eva; Humplíková, Lenka; Christelová, Pavla; Suchánková, Pavla; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2013-01-01

    Satellite DNA sequences consist of tandemly arranged repetitive units up to thousands nucleotides long in head-to-tail orientation. The evolutionary processes by which satellites arise and evolve include unequal crossing over, gene conversion, transposition and extra chromosomal circular DNA formation. Large blocks of satellite DNA are often observed in heterochromatic regions of chromosomes and are a typical component of centromeric and telomeric regions. Satellite-rich loci may show specific banding patterns and facilitate chromosome identification and analysis of structural chromosome changes. Unlike many other genomes, nuclear genomes of banana (Musa spp.) are poor in satellite DNA and the information on this class of DNA remains limited. The banana cultivars are seed sterile clones originating mostly from natural intra-specific crosses within M. acuminata (A genome) and inter-specific crosses between M. acuminata and M. balbisiana (B genome). Previous studies revealed the closely related nature of the A and B genomes, including similarities in repetitive DNA. In this study we focused on two main banana DNA satellites, which were previously identified in silico. Their genomic organization and molecular diversity was analyzed in a set of nineteen Musa accessions, including representatives of A, B and S (M. schizocarpa) genomes and their inter-specific hybrids. The two DNA satellites showed a high level of sequence conservation within, and a high homology between Musa species. FISH with probes for the satellite DNA sequences, rRNA genes and a single-copy BAC clone 2G17 resulted in characteristic chromosome banding patterns in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana which may aid in determining genomic constitution in interspecific hybrids. In addition to improving the knowledge on Musa satellite DNA, our study increases the number of cytogenetic markers and the number of individual chromosomes, which can be identified in Musa.

  13. Molecular analysis and genomic organization of major DNA satellites in banana (Musa spp..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Čížková

    Full Text Available Satellite DNA sequences consist of tandemly arranged repetitive units up to thousands nucleotides long in head-to-tail orientation. The evolutionary processes by which satellites arise and evolve include unequal crossing over, gene conversion, transposition and extra chromosomal circular DNA formation. Large blocks of satellite DNA are often observed in heterochromatic regions of chromosomes and are a typical component of centromeric and telomeric regions. Satellite-rich loci may show specific banding patterns and facilitate chromosome identification and analysis of structural chromosome changes. Unlike many other genomes, nuclear genomes of banana (Musa spp. are poor in satellite DNA and the information on this class of DNA remains limited. The banana cultivars are seed sterile clones originating mostly from natural intra-specific crosses within M. acuminata (A genome and inter-specific crosses between M. acuminata and M. balbisiana (B genome. Previous studies revealed the closely related nature of the A and B genomes, including similarities in repetitive DNA. In this study we focused on two main banana DNA satellites, which were previously identified in silico. Their genomic organization and molecular diversity was analyzed in a set of nineteen Musa accessions, including representatives of A, B and S (M. schizocarpa genomes and their inter-specific hybrids. The two DNA satellites showed a high level of sequence conservation within, and a high homology between Musa species. FISH with probes for the satellite DNA sequences, rRNA genes and a single-copy BAC clone 2G17 resulted in characteristic chromosome banding patterns in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana which may aid in determining genomic constitution in interspecific hybrids. In addition to improving the knowledge on Musa satellite DNA, our study increases the number of cytogenetic markers and the number of individual chromosomes, which can be identified in Musa.

  14. Comparative Analyses of the β-Tubulin Gene and Molecular Modeling Reveal Molecular Insight into the Colchicine Resistance in Kinetoplastids Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Luis; Serrano, María Luisa; Hidalgo, Mariana; Mendoza-León, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Differential susceptibility to microtubule agents has been demonstrated between mammalian cells and kinetoplastid organisms such as Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma spp. The aims of this study were to identify and characterize the architecture of the putative colchicine binding site of Leishmania spp. and investigate the molecular basis of colchicine resistance. We cloned and sequenced the β-tubulin gene of Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis and established the theoretical 3D model of the protein, using the crystallographic structure of the bovine protein as template. We identified mutations on the Leishmania   β-tubulin gene sequences on regions related to the putative colchicine-binding pocket, which generate amino acid substitutions and changes in the topology of this region, blocking the access of colchicine. The same mutations were found in the β-tubulin sequence of kinetoplastid organisms such as Trypanosoma cruzi, T. brucei, and T. evansi. Using molecular modelling approaches, we demonstrated that conformational changes include an elongation and torsion of an α-helix structure and displacement to the inside of the pocket of one β-sheet that hinders access of colchicine. We propose that kinetoplastid organisms show resistance to colchicine due to amino acids substitutions that generate structural changes in the putative colchicine-binding domain, which prevent colchicine access. PMID:24083244

  15. The one-sample PARAFAC approach reveals molecular size distributions of fluorescent components in dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wünsch, Urban; Murphy, Kathleen R.; Stedmon, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Molecular size plays an important role in dissolved organic matter (DOM) biogeochemistry, but its relationship with the fluorescent fraction of DOM (FDOM) remains poorly resolved. Here high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was coupled to fluorescence emission-excitation (EEM......) spectroscopy in full spectral (60 emission and 34 excitation wavelengths) and chromatographic resolution (... distributions for individual fluorescence components obtained from independent data sets. Spectra extracted from allochthonous DOM were highly similar. Allochthonous and autochthonous DOM shared some spectra, but included unique components. In agreement with the supramolecular assembly hypothesis, molecular...

  16. A metallocene molecular complex as visible-light absorber for high-voltage organic-inorganic hybrid photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Ayumi; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2014-04-14

    A thin solid-state dye-sensitized photovoltaic cell is fabricated by composing organic and inorganic heterojunctions in which the visible-light sensitizers are cyclopentadiene derivatives (Cp*) coordinated to a metal oxide, typically TiO2. The coordination bonds of the metallocene molecular complex (Ti-Cp*) create a new LMCT (ligand-to-metal charge transfer) absorption band and induce a rectified charge transfer from the organic ligands to TiO2, leading to photocurrent generation. Photovoltaic junctions are completed by coating crystalline organic molecules (perylene) as a hole-transport layer on the Cp*-coordinated TiO2 surface by using the vapor deposition method. The molecular plane of Cp* on the TiO2 surfaces seems to help the hole-transport layer to form ordered structures, which effectively improve carrier conductivities and minimize interfacial resistance. The organic-inorganic hybrid thin-film photocell with metallocene molecular complexes is capable of generating high open-circuit voltages exceeding 1.2 V. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Molecular survey of Rickettsial organisms in ectoparasites from a dog shelter in Northern Mexico

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    González-Álvarez, V. H.; Fernández de Mera, I.G.; Cabezas Cruz, Alejandro; de la Fuente, J.; Ortega-Morales, A. I.; Almazán, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, December (2017), s. 143-148 E-ISSN 2405-9390 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Rhipicephalus sanguineus * Ctenocephalides felis * Heterodoxus spiniger * Rickettsia felis * Wolbachia pipientis * Dogs Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology

  18. Microbial utilization of low molecular weight organics in soil depends on the substances properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) in soil is regulated by microbial uptake from solution and following incorporation of into specific cell cycles. Various chemical properties of LMWOS, namely oxidation state, number of carbon (C) atoms, number of carboxylic (-COOH) groups, can affect their uptake from soil solution and further microbial utilization. The aim of the study was to trace the initial fate (including the uptake from soil solution and utilization by microorganisms) of three main classes of LMWOS, having contrast properties - sugars, carboxylic and amino acids. Top 10 cm of mineral soil were collected under Silver birch stands within the Bangor DIVERSE experiment, UK. Soil solution was extracted by centrifugation at 4000 rpm during 15 min. Soil was spiked with 14C glucose or fructose; malic, succinic or formic acids; alanine or glycine. No additional non-labeled LMWOS were added. 14C was traced in the dissolved organic matter (DOM), CO2, cytosol and soil organic matter (SOM) during one day. To estimate half-life times (T1 /2)of LMWOS in soil solution and in SOM pools, the single and double first order kinetic equations were fitted to the uptake and mineralization dynamics, respectively. The LMWOS T1 /2in DOM pool varied between 0.6-5 min, with the highest T1 /2for sugars (3.7 min) and the lowest for carboxylic acids (0.6-1.4 min). Thus, initial uptake of LMWOS is not a limiting step of microbial utilization. The T1 /2 of carboxylic and amino acids in DOM were closely related with oxidation state, showing that reduced substances remain in soil solution longer, than oxidized. The initial T1 /2 of LMWOS in SOM ranged between 30-80 min, with the longest T1 /2 for amino acids (50-80 min) and the shortest for carboxylic acids (30-48 min). These T1 /2values were in one-two orders of magnitude higher than LMWOS T1 /2 in soil solution, pointing that LMWOS mineralization occur with a delay after the uptake. Absence of correlations between

  19. Continuously Adjustable, Molecular-Sieving “Gate” on 5A Zeolite for Distinguishing Small Organic Molecules by Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences were effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. This novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation. PMID:26358480

  20. Continuously Adjustable, Molecular-Sieving "Gate" on 5A Zeolite for Distinguishing Small Organic Molecules by Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-09-11

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving "gate" at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences were effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. This novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation.

  1. Glass transition and phase state of organic compounds: dependency on molecular properties and implications for secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Thomas; Bookhold, Johannes; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2011-11-21

    Recently, it has been proposed that organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere can exist in an amorphous semi-solid or solid (i.e. glassy) state. In this perspective, we analyse and discuss the formation and properties of amorphous semi-solids and glasses from organic liquids. Based on a systematic survey of a wide range of organic compounds, we present estimates for the glass forming properties of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In particular we investigate the dependence of the glass transition temperature T(g) upon various molecular properties such as the compounds' melting temperature, their molar mass, and their atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratios (O:C ratios). Also the effects of mixing different compounds and the effects of hygroscopic water uptake depending on ambient relative humidity are investigated. In addition to the effects of temperature, we suggest that molar mass and water content are much more important than the O:C ratio for characterizing whether an organic aerosol particle is in a liquid, semi-solid, or glassy state. Moreover, we show how the viscosity in liquid, semi-solid and glassy states affect the diffusivity of those molecules constituting the organic matrix as well as that of guest molecules such as water or oxidants, and we discuss the implications for atmospheric multi-phase processes. Finally, we assess the current state of knowledge and the level of scientific understanding, and we propose avenues for future studies to resolve existing uncertainties. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  2. Different molecular organization of two carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, in human colon epithelial cells and colon adenocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudzinski, Wojciech; Piet, Mateusz; Luchowski, Rafal; Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Paduch, Roman; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I.

    2018-01-01

    Two cell lines, human normal colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) and human colon adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29) were cultured in the presence of exogenous carotenoids, either zeaxanthin or lutein. Both carotenoids demonstrated cytotoxicity with respect to cancer cells but not to normal cells. Cells from both the cell lines were analyzed with application of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and Raman scattering microscopy. Both imaging techniques show effective incorporation of carotenoid molecules into growing cells. Comparison of the Raman scattering and fluorescence lifetime characteristics reveals different molecular organization of carotenoids in the carcinoma and normal cells. The main difference consists in a carotenoid aggregation level which is substantially lower in the carcinoma cells as compared to the normal cells. Different molecular organization of carotenoids was interpreted in terms of a different metabolism of normal and carcinoma cells and has been concluded to provide a possibility of cancer diagnosis based on spectroscopic analyses.

  3. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-10-30

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π-conjugated molecules, oligomers, and polymers. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of noncovalent intermolecular interactions and briefly discuss the computational chemistry approaches used to understand the magnitude of these interactions. These methodologies are then exploited to illustrate how noncovalent intermolecular interactions impact important electronic properties-such as the electronic coupling between adjacent molecules, a key parameter for charge-carrier transport-through a comparison between the prototype organic semiconductor pentacene with a series of N-substituted heteropentacenes. Incorporating an understanding of these interactions into the design of organic semiconductors can assist in developing novel materials systems from this fascinating molecular class. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  4. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in pore water of Arctic Ocean sediments: linking DOM molecular composition with microbial community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossel, P. E.; Bienhold, C.; Boetius, A.; Dittmar, T.

    2016-02-01

    Marine organic matter (OM) that sinks from surface waters to the seafloor is the energy and carbon source for benthic communities. These communities produce dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the process of remineralization, enriching the sediment porewater with fresh DOM compounds. In the Arctic Ocean, primary production is limited by nutrients and light and is thus strongly influenced by sea ice cover. Ice cover is expected to further decrease due to global warming, which may have important consequences for primary production and the quantity and quality of OM exported to the seafloor. This study focused on: 1) the molecular composition of the DOM in sediment pore waters of the deep Eurasian Arctic basins, 2) whether there is any relation between Arctic Ocean ice cover and DOM composition and 3) whether the DOM composition correlates with microbial community structure. Molecular data, obtained via 15 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, were statistically correlated with environmental parameters. The productive ice margin stations showed higher abundances of molecular formulae of peptides, unsaturated aliphatics and saturated fatty acids. This molecular trend is indicative of fresh OM and phytodetritus deposition, compared to the northernmost, ice-covered stations which had stronger aromatic signals. Benthic bacterial community structure, as assessed with the fingerprinting method ARISA, was significantly correlated with DOM molecular composition. Further analyses using Illumina next-generation sequencing will enable the taxonomic identification of specific bacterial groups and their interdependence with DOM compounds. This study contributes to the understanding of the coupling between Arctic Ocean productivity and its depositional regime, and provides first insights into potential links between microbial community structure and DOM molecular composition in Arctic sediments

  5. Defect-Controlled Preparation of UiO-66 Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films with Molecular Sieving Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caiqin; Zhao, Yajing; Li, Yali; Zhang, Xuetong; Chi, Lifeng; Lu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) UiO-66 thin films are solvothermally grown on conducting substrates. The as-synthesized MOF thin films are subsequently dried by a supercritical process or treated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The obtained UiO-66 thin films show excellent molecular sieving capability as confirmed by the electrochemical studies for redox-active species with different sizes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Semi-volatile organic compounds as molecular markers for atmospheric and ecosystem transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genualdi, Susan

    The use of semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) as molecular markers to identify the contributions of regional and long-range atmospheric transport, as well as current and historic sources, and contaminant deposition in remote ecosystems of the Western U.S. was investigated. Trans-Pacific air masses influenced by Siberian biomass burning events had elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the historic use pesticides dieldrin and alpha-HCH, while air masses influenced by regional fires in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. had enhanced concentrations of PAHs and the current-use pesticides dacthal and endosulfan. This suggests that previously deposited SOCs, such as pesticides, revolatilize to the atmosphere during forest fires. In addition, forest soils collected from a burned area in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. had significantly lower SOC concentrations (34 to 100 %) than soils collected from an unburned area separated only by a two lane road. This confirms that SOCs re-volatilize and/or degrade from soils and vegetation during the burning process. The chiral signatures of alpha-HCH in air masses at three sites in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. indicated that the boundary layer has a non-racemic alpha-HCH signature likely due to re-volatilization of alpha-HCH from the Pacific Ocean and that the free troposphere is a source of racemic alpha-HCH. Racemic alpha-HCH was also associated with Asian and trans-Pacific air masses. Racemic cis and trans-chlordane in Pacific Northwestern U.S. air masses indicated that U.S. urban areas continue to be a source of chlordane to the atmosphere. The deposition of non-racemic alpha-HCH in seasonal snowpack in continental Western U.S. national park high elevation ecosystems reflected regional transport, while the high latitude, Alaskan national parks were influenced by long-range atmospheric transport of racemic alpha-HCH. The chiral signature of alpha-HCH in fish collected from high elevation and high

  7. Molecular profiling of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and actinic keratoses from organ transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameetman Liesbeth

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is markedly increased in organ transplant recipients (OTRs compared to the normal population. Next to sun exposure, the immunosuppressive regimen is an important risk factor for the development of SCC in OTRs. Various gene mutations (e.g. TP53 and genetic alterations (e.g. loss of CDKN2A, amplification of RAS have been found in SCCs. The aim of this genome-wide study was to identify pathways and genomic alterations that are consistently involved in the formation of SCCs and their precursor lesions, actinic keratoses (AKs. Methods To perform the analysis in an isogenic background, RNA and DNA were isolated from SCC, AK and normal (unexposed epidermis (NS from each of 13 OTRs. Samples were subjected to genome-wide expression analysis and genome SNP analysis using Illumina’s HumanWG-6 BeadChips and Infinium II HumanHap550 Genotyping BeadChips, respectively. mRNA expression results were verified by quantitative PCR. Results Hierarchical cluster analysis of mRNA expression profiles showed SCC, AK and NS samples to separate into three distinct groups. Several thousand genes were differentially expressed between epidermis, AK and SCC; most upregulated in SCCs were hyperproliferation related genes and stress markers, such as keratin 6 (KRT6, KRT16 and KRT17. Matching to oncogenic pathways revealed activation of downstream targets of RAS and cMYC in SCCs and of NFκB and TNF already in AKs. In contrast to what has been reported previously, genome-wide SNP analysis showed very few copy number variations in AKs and SCCs, and these variations had no apparent relationship with observed changes in mRNA expression profiles. Conclusion Vast differences in gene expression profiles exist between SCC, AK and NS from immunosuppressed OTRs. Moreover, several pathways activated in SCCs were already activated in AKs, confirming the assumption that AKs are the precursor lesions of SCCs

  8. Transient electroluminescence spikes in small molecular organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Gan, Zhengqing; Shinar, Ruth; Shinar, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    We present a comprehensive study of transient nanosecond electroluminescence (EL) spikes that exceed the dc level and microseconds-long EL tails following a bias pulse in guest-host small molecular organic light-emitting diodes (SMOLEDs), including relatively efficient devices, which elucidates carrier and exciton dynamics in such devices. The transient EL is strongly dependent, among other parameters, on device materials and structure. At low temperatures, all measured devices, with the exception of Pt octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP)-doped tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Al (Alq3) SMOLEDs, exhibit the spikes at ˜70-300 ns. At room temperature (RT), however, only those with a hole injection barrier, carrier-trapping guest-host emitting layer, and no strong electron-transporting and hole-blocking layer [such as 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen)] exhibit strong spikes. These narrow and appear earlier under postpulse reverse bias. To further elucidate the origin of the spikes, we monitored their dependence on the pulsed bias width and voltage, the doped layer thickness, and its location within the OLED structure. The characteristics of the microseconds-long tails were also evaluated through the effect of the postpulse voltage. A model based on the recombination of correlated charge pairs (CCPs) and on charge detrapping is presented; the model agrees well with the experimental data. The results suggest that reduced electric-field-induced dissociative quenching of singlet excitons is responsible for the spikes’ amplitude exceeding the on-pulse dc EL level. The long tails are attributed to recombination of charges detrapped from a distribution of shallow, mostly host, sites, reminiscent of the detrapping and recombination processes that yield the thermally stimulated luminescence of such materials. The comprehensive transient EL measurements in guest-host devices demonstrate the generality of the strong spike phenomenon in devices with charge trapping in the emitting guest

  9. Geochemical characterization of organic ligands for copper(II) in different molecular size fractions in Lake Biwa, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fengchang Wu [Chinese Academy of Science, Guiyang (China). Inst. of Geochemistry; Eiichiro Tanoue [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan). Graduate School of Environmental Studies

    2001-07-01

    In a previous study, we reported the isolation of organic ligands for copper(II), their mass distribution and fluorescence properties in different molecular size fractions of the waters in Lake Biwa by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) and three dimensional excitation/emission matrix spectroscopy (3DEEM) (Wu, F., Tanoue, E., 2001. Molecular mass distributions and fluorescence characteristics of organic ligands for copper (II) in Lake Biwa, Japan. Org. Geochem. 32, 11-20). In this continuous study, geochemical properties of these isolated ligand fractions were characterized in terms of binding complexation, functional groups and amino acid composition. The results show that two ligand classes (L{sub 1} and L{sub 2}) were recovered from all molecular size ligand fractions, L{sub 1} with a conditional stability constant (LogK'{sub CuL}) of 7.82-9.56, and L{sub 2} with a LogK'{sub CuL} value of 7.05-8.78. The stronger ligands with protein-like fluorescence were of recent biogenic origin, and the weaker ligands with humic-like fluorescence were related to refractory humic substances. Functional groups responsible for the fluorescence in the ligand fractions are also discussed. The results presented here would have significance for understanding the nature of natural organic ligands and their biogeochemical role in aquatic systems. (author)

  10. Associations between the molecular and optical properties of dissolved organic matter in the Florida Everglades, a model coastal wetland system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha eWagner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Optical properties are easy-to-measure proxies for dissolved organic matter (DOM composition, source and reactivity. However, the molecular signature of DOM associated with such optical parameters remains poorly defined. The Florida coastal Everglades is a subtropical wetland with diverse vegetation (e.g., sawgrass prairies, mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and DOM sources (e.g., terrestrial, microbial and marine. As such, the Everglades is an excellent model system from which to draw samples of diverse origin and composition to allow classically-defined optical properties to be linked to molecular properties of the DOM pool. We characterized a suite of seasonally- and spatially-collected DOM samples using optical measurements (EEM-PARAFAC, SUVA254, S275-295, S350-400, SR, FI, freshness index and HIX and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS. Spearman’s rank correlations between FTICR-MS signal intensities of individual molecular formulae and optical properties determined which molecular formulae were associated with each PARAFAC component and optical index. The molecular families that tracked with the optical indices were generally in agreement with conventional biogeochemical interpretations. Therefore, although they represent only a small portion of the bulk DOM pool, absorbance and fluorescence measurements appear to be appropriate proxies for the aquatic cycling of both optically-active and associated optically-inactive DOM in coastal wetlands.

  11. Molecular Techniques for the Detection of Organisms in Aquatic Environments, with Emphasis on Harmful Algal Bloom Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlin, Linda K; Orozco, Jahir

    2017-05-22

    Molecular techniques to detect organisms in aquatic ecosystems are being gradually considered as an attractive alternative to standard laboratory methods. They offer faster and more accurate means of detecting and monitoring species, with respect to their traditional homologues based on culture and microscopic counting. Molecular techniques are particularly attractive when multiple species need to be detected and/or are in very low abundance. This paper reviews molecular techniques based on whole cells, such as microscope-based enumeration and Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) and molecular cell-free formats, such as sandwich hybridization assay (SHA), biosensors, microarrays, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and real time PCR (RT-PCR). Those that combine one or several laboratory functions into a single integrated system (lab-on-a-chip) and techniques that generate a much higher throughput data, such as next-generation systems (NGS), were also reviewed. We also included some other approaches that enhance the performance of molecular techniques. For instance, nano-bioengineered probes and platforms, pre-concentration and magnetic separation systems, and solid-phase hybridization offer highly pre-concentration capabilities. Isothermal amplification and hybridization chain reaction (HCR) improve hybridization and amplification techniques. Finally, we presented a study case of field remote sensing of harmful algal blooms (HABs), the only example of real time monitoring, and close the discussion with future directions and concluding remarks.

  12. Advanced solvent based methods for molecular characterization of soil organic matter by high-resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tfaily, Malak M.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Tolic, Nikola; Roscioli, Kristyn M.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Robinson, Errol W.; Hess, Nancy J.

    2015-05-19

    Soil organic matter (SOM) a complex, heterogeneous mixture of above and belowground plant litter and animal and microbial residues at various degrees of decomposition, is a key reservoir for carbon (C) and nutrient biogeochemical cycling in soil based ecosystems. A limited understanding of the molecular composition of SOM limits the ability to routinely decipher chemical processes within soil and predict accurately how terrestrial carbon fluxes will response to changing climatic conditions and land use. To elucidate the molecular-level structure of SOM, we selectively extracted a broad range of intact SOM compounds by a combination of different organic solvents from soils with a wide range of C content. Our use of Electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and a suite of solvents with varying polarity significantly expands the inventory of the types of organic molecules present in soils. Specifically, we found that hexane is selective for lipid-like compounds with very low O:C ratios; water was selective for carbohydrates with high O:C ratios; acetonitrile preferentially extracts lignin, condensed structures, and tannin poly phenolic compounds with O:C > 0.5; methanol has higher selectivity towards compounds characterized with low O:C < 0.5; and hexane, MeOH, ACN and water solvents increase the number and types of organic molecules extracted from soil for a broader range of chemically diverse soil types. Our study of SOM molecules by ESI-FTICR MS revealed new insight into the molecular-level complexity of organics contained in soils.

  13. Water interactions with condensed organic phases: a combined experimental and theoretical study of molecular-level processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Sofia M.; Kong, Xiangrui; Thomson, Erik S.; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Pettersson, Jan B. C.; Lovrić, Josip; Toubin, Céline

    2016-04-01

    Water uptake on aerosol particles modifies their chemistry and microphysics with important implications for air quality and climate. A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol consists of organic aerosol particles or inorganic particles with condensed organic components. Here, we combine laboratory studies using the environmental molecular beam (EMB) method1 with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize water interactions with organic surfaces in detail. The over-arching aim is to characterize the mechanisms that govern water uptake, in order to guide the development of physics-based models to be used in atmospheric modelling. The EMB method enables molecular level studies of interactions between gases and volatile surfaces at near ambient pressure,1 and the technique may provide information about collision dynamics, surface and bulk accommodation, desorption and diffusion kinetics. Molecular dynamics simulations provide complementary information about the collision dynamics and initial interactions between gas molecules and the condensed phase. Here, we focus on water interactions with condensed alcohol phases that serve as highly simplified proxies for systems in the environment. Gas-surface collisions are in general found to be highly inelastic and result in efficient surface accommodation of water molecules. As a consequence, surface accommodation of water can be safely assumed to be close to unity under typical ambient conditions. Bulk accommodation is inefficient on solid alcohol and the condensed materials appear to produce hydrophobic surface structures, with limited opportunities for adsorbed water to form hydrogen bonds with surface molecules. Accommodation is significantly more efficient on the dynamic liquid alcohol surfaces. The results for n-butanol (BuOH) are particularly intriguing where substantial changes in water accommodation taking place over a 10 K interval below and above the BuOH melting point.2 The governing mechanisms for the

  14. Single-particle characterization of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA: evidence for non-uniform mixing of high molecular weight organics and potassium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Y. Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA can be emitted from natural forest fires and human activities such as agricultural burning and domestic energy generation. BBOA is strongly associated with atmospheric brown carbon (BrC that absorbs near-ultraviolet and visible light, resulting in significant impacts on regional visibility degradation and radiative forcing. The mixing state of BBOA can play a critical role in the prediction of aerosol optical properties. In this work, single-particle measurements from a Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer coupled with a light scattering module (LS-SP-AMS were performed to examine the mixing state of BBOA, refractory black carbon (rBC, and potassium (K, a tracer for biomass burning aerosol in an air mass influenced by wildfire emissions transported from northern Québec to Toronto, representing aged biomass burning plumes. Cluster analysis of single-particle measurements identified five BBOA-related particle types. rBC accounted for 3–14 wt % of these particle types on average. Only one particle type exhibited a strong ion signal for K+, with mass spectra characterized by low molecular weight organic species. The remaining four particle types were classified based on the apparent molecular weight of the BBOA constituents. Two particle types were associated with low potassium content and significant amounts of high molecular weight (HMW organic compounds. Our observations indicate non-uniform mixing of particles within a biomass burning plume in terms of molecular weight and illustrate that HMW BBOA can be a key contributor to low-volatility BrC observed in BBOA particles. The average mass absorption efficiency of low-volatility BBOA is about 0.8–1.1 m2 g−1 based on a theoretical closure calculation. Our estimates indicate that low-volatility BBOA contributes ∼ 33–44 % of thermo-processed particle absorption at 405 nm; and almost all of the BBOA absorption was associated with low

  15. Linking the mobilization of dissolved organic matter in catchments and its removal in drinking water treatment to its molecular characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeke, Julia; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J; Tittel, Jörg; Oosterwoud, Marieke R; Bornmann, Katrin; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2017-04-15

    Drinking water reservoirs in the Northern Hemisphere are largely affected by the decadal-long increase in riverine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. The removal of DOC in drinking water treatment is costly and predictions are needed to link DOC removal efficiency to its mobilization in catchments, both of which are determined by the molecular composition. To study the effect of hydrological events and land use on the molecular characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM), 36 samples from three different catchment areas in the German low mountain ranges, with DOC concentrations ranging from 3 to 32 mg L -1 , were examined. Additionally, nine pairs of samples from downstream drinking water reservoirs were analyzed before and after flocculation. The molecular composition and the age of DOM were analyzed using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and radiocarbon ( 14 C) analysis. At elevated discharge in a forested catchment comparatively younger, more oxygenated and unsaturated molecules of higher molecular weight were preferentially mobilized, likely linked to the reductive mobilization of iron. DOM with highly similar molecular characteristics (O/C ratio > 0.5, m/z > 500) could also be efficiently removed through flocculation in drinking water treatment. The proportion of DOM removed through flocculation ranged between 43% and 73% of DOC and was highest at elevated discharge. In catchment areas with a higher percentage of grassland and agriculture a higher proportion of DOM molecules containing sulfur and nitrogen was detected, which in turn could be less efficiently flocculated. Altogether, it was shown that DOM that is released during large hydrological events can be efficiently flocculated again, suggesting a reversal of similar chemical mechanisms in both processes. Since the occurrence of heavy rainfall events is predicted to increase in the future, event-driven mobilization of DOC

  16. Coupling effects of abiotic and biotic factors on molecular composition of dissolved organic matter in a freshwater wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Choi, Ilhwan; Lee, Jung-Joon; Hur, Jin

    2016-02-15

    In this study, temporal and spatial variations in five defined molecular size fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were examined for a well preserved wetland (Upo Wetland) and its surrounding areas, and the influencing factors were explored with many biotic and abioic parameters. For each DOM sample, the five size fractions were determined by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with organic carbon detector (SEC-OCD). For 2-year long monthly monitoring, bio-polymers (BP), humic substances (HS), building blocks (BB), low molecular-weight (LMW) neutrals, and LMW acids displayed the median values of 264, 1884, 1070, 1090, and 11 μg-CL(-1), respectively, accounting for 6.2%, 41.7%, 24.5%, 26.4%, and 0.4% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The dominant presence of HS indicated that terrestrial input played important roles in DOM composition of the freshwater ecosystem, which contrasted with coastal wetlands in other reports. Both seasonal and periodic patterns in the variations were found only for HS and BB among the size fractions. It was also notable that the sources of HS were seasonally shifted from aquagenic origin in winter to pedogenic origin in summer. The correlations among the size fractions revealed that BB and LMW neutrals might be degradation products from HS and humic-like substances (HS+BB), respectively, while LMW acids, from LMW neutrals. Principle component analysis revealed that the humic-like substances and the aromaticity of DOM were associated with temperature, chlorophyll a, phosphorous, and rainfall, whereas the other fractions and the molecular weight of HS were primarily affected by solar irradiation. Significant correlations between DOM composition and some biotic factors further suggested that DOM may even affect the biological communities, which provides an insight into the potential coupling effects of biotic and abiotic factors on DOM molecular composition in freshwater wetlands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-10-22

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions.

  18. Radiotracer measurements as a sensitive tool for the detection of metal penetration in molecular-based organic electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharnberg, M.; Hu, J.; Kanzow, J.; Raetzke, K.; Adelung, R.; Faupel, F.; Pannemann, C.; Hilleringmann, U.; Meyer, S.; Pflaum, J.

    2005-01-01

    The metallization of organic thin films is a crucial point in the development of molecular electronics. However, there is no method established yet to detect trace amounts of metal atoms in those thin films. Radiotracer measurements can quantify even very small amounts of material penetrating into the bulk, in our case less than 0.01% of a monolayer. Here, the application of this technique on two different well-characterized organic thin film systems (diindenoperylene and pentacene) is demonstrated. The results show that Ag is mainly adsorbed on the surface, but indicate that already at moderate deposition temperatures Ag can penetrate into the organic thin films and agglomerate at the film/substrate interface

  19. Adsorption and Molecular Fractionation of Dissolved Organic Matter on Iron-Bearing Mineral Matrices of Varying Crystallinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Elizabeth K; Ohno, Tsutomu; Plante, Alain F

    2018-02-06

    Iron (Fe)-bearing mineral phases contribute disproportionately to adsorption of soil organic matter (SOM) due to their elevated chemical reactivity and specific surface area (SSA). However, the spectrum of Fe solid-phase speciation present in oxidation-reduction-active soils challenges analysis of SOM-mineral interactions and may induce differential molecular fractionation of dissolved organic matter (DOM). This work used paired selective dissolution experiments and batch sorption of postextraction residues to (1) quantify the contributions of Fe-bearing minerals of varying crystallinity to DOM sorption, and (2) characterize molecular fractionation using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). A substantial proportion of soil SSA was derived from extracted Fe-bearing phases, and FT-ICR-MS analysis of extracted DOM revealed distinct chemical signatures across Fe-OM associations. Sorbed carbon (C) was highly correlated with Fe concentrations, suggesting that Fe-bearing phases are strong drivers of sorption in these soils. Molecular fractionation was observed across treatments, particularly those dominated by short-range-order (SRO) mineral phases, which preferentially adsorbed aromatic and lignin-like formulas, and higher-crystallinity phases, associated with aliphatic DOM. These findings suggest Fe speciation-mediated complexation acts as a physicochemical filter of DOM moving through the critical zone, an important observation as predicted changes in precipitation may dynamically alter Fe crystallinity and C stability.

  20. Multi-scale calculation of the electric properties of organic-based devices from the molecular structure

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Haoyuan

    2016-03-24

    A method is proposed to calculate the electric properties of organic-based devices from the molecular structure. The charge transfer rate is obtained using non-adiabatic molecular dynamics. The organic film in the device is modeled using the snapshots from the dynamic trajectory of the simulated molecular system. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are carried out to calculate the current characteristics. A widely used hole-transporting material, N,N′-diphenyl-N,N′-bis(1-naphthyl)-1,1′-biphenyl-4,4′-diamine (NPB) is studied as an application of this method, and the properties of its hole-only device are investigated. The calculated current densities and dependence on the applied voltage without an injection barrier are close to those obtained by the Mott-Gurney equation. The results with injection barriers are also in good agreement with experiment. This method can be used to aid the design of molecules and guide the optimization of devices. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Carbon and nitrogen molecular composition of soil organic matter fractions resistant to oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine Heckman; Dorisel Torres; Christopher Swanston; Johannes Lehmann

    2017-01-01

    The methods used to isolate and characterise pyrogenic organic carbon (PyC) from soils vary widely, and there is little agreement in the literature as to which method truly isolates the most chemically recalcitrant (inferred from oxidative resistance) and persistent (inferred from radiocarbon abundance) fraction of soil organic matter. In addition, the roles of fire,...

  2. Spatial and dynamic organization of molecular structures in the cell nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Anne-Kee

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we attempt to provide a better understanding of the principles that underlie the spatial dynamic organization of the cell nucleus. Chapter 1 reviews the current status of knowledge about the structural and functional organization of the cell nucleus. In chapter 2, the development of a

  3. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molec...

  4. Molecular organization and comparative analysis of chromosome 5B of the wild wheat ancestor Triticum dicoccoides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Akpinar, B.A.; Yuce, M.; Lucas, S.; Vrána, Jan; Burešová, Veronika; Doležel, Jaroslav; Budak, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, JUN 18 (2015) ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : TURGIDUM VAR . DICOCCOIDES * MARKER DEVELOPMENT * GENOME SEQUENCE Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2015

  5. Binary molecular layers of C-60 and copper phthalocyanine on Au(111) : Self-organized nanostructuring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stöhr, Meike; Wagner, Thorsten; Gabriel, Markus; Weyers, Bastian; Möller, Rolf

    The binary molecular system of C-60 and copper phthalocyanine(CuPc) molecules has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at room temperature and at 50 K. As substrate Au(111) was chosen. When C-60 and CuPc molecules are sequentially deposited, it is found that well-ordered domains

  6. Molecular speciation of phosphorus in organic amendments and amended soils using nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajibove, B.

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of phosphorus (P) in organic amendments is essential for environmentally sustainable fertilization of agricultural soils. The sequential chemical extraction (SCE) technique commonly used for P characterization does not provide any direct molecular information about P species. Studies were conducted to characterize P species in organic amendments and amended soils at a molecular level. The SCE was used to fractionate P in organic amendments including biosolids, hog, dairy and beef cattle manures, and poultry litter. The extracts were analyzed for total P and P species using inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and solution 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, respectively. The relative proportions of P species in intact organic amendments and residues after each extraction, and calcareous soils amended with organic amendments and monoammonium phosphate (MAP) were estimated using the synchrotron-based P 1s X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The solution 31 P NMR provided a detailed characterization of organic P in the non-labile NaOH and HCl fractions of organic amendments, but was limited in characterizing the labile fractions of most of these organic amendments due to their proneness to alkaline hydrolysis. The XANES analysis, however, identified the actual chemical species constituting the labile P that was only characterized as inorganic P or orthophosphates by sequential extraction and solution 31 P NMR. In the amended Vertisolic and Chernozemic soils, XANES analysis estimated 'soluble and adsorbed P' as the dominant P species. For the Vertisolic soil, both the unamended and soil amended with biosolids and MAP contained hydroxyapatite (HAP). In addition, soil amended with biosolids, hog and dairy manures contained β-tricalcium phosphate (TRICAL), a more soluble CaP than HAP. TRICAL was found in all amended soils except in that amended with hog manure, while HAP was present

  7. Ethers on Si(001): A prime example for the common ground between surface science and molecular organic chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Pecher, Lisa

    2017-09-15

    Using computational chemistry, we show that the adsorption of ether molecules on Si(001) under ultra-high vacuum conditions can be understood with textbook organic chemistry. The two-step reaction mechanism of (1) dative bond formation between the ether oxygen and a Lewis acidic surface atom and (2) a nucleophilic attack of a nearby Lewis basic surface atom is analysed in detail and found to mirror the acid-catalysed ether cleavage in solution. The O-Si dative bond is found to be the strongest of its kind and reactivity from this state defies the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle. Electron rearrangement during the C-O bond cleavage is visualized using a newly developed bonding analysis method, which shows that the mechanism of nucleophilic substitutions on semiconductor surfaces is identical to molecular chemistry SN2 reactions. Our findings thus illustrate how the fields of surface science and molecular chemistry can mutually benefit and unexpected insight can be gained.

  8. MICMOC/MICMOS: Photochemistry of van der Waals solids and the rise of the organic molecular complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeant d’Hendecourt L. Le

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ices of well-known composition are widely observed in molecular clouds out of which stars, planets and debris (asteroids, comets will form. These ices are naturally subjected to energy input in the form of UV photons and charged cosmic particles which are able to start a very rich radical chemistry in the solid state. These phenomena are simulated in the MICMOC experiment which focuses on the possible prebiotic significance of the organic residues that are formed at room temperature. Further than MICMOC, we propose a general prospective of the evolution of this experiment toward the concept of non-directed experiments that may allow simulating the very first steps from the inanimate molecular world to selective pathways toward self-replicating autocatalytic and heterotrophic molecules that could be considered, for a physicist a template for “minimal” life.

  9. 3D NIR-II Molecular Imaging Distinguishes Targeted Organs with High-Performance NIR-II Bioconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shoujun; Herraiz, Sonia; Yue, Jingying; Zhang, Mingxi; Wan, Hao; Yang, Qinglai; Ma, Zhuoran; Wang, Yan; He, Jiahuan; Antaris, Alexander L; Zhong, Yeteng; Diao, Shuo; Feng, Yi; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Kuai; Hong, Guosong; Liang, Yongye; Hsueh, Aaron J; Dai, Hongjie

    2018-02-15

    Greatly reduced scattering in the second near-infrared (NIR-II) region (1000-1700 nm) opens up many new exciting avenues of bioimaging research, yet NIR-II fluorescence imaging is mostly implemented by using nontargeted fluorophores or wide-field imaging setups, limiting the signal-to-background ratio and imaging penetration depth due to poor specific binding and out-of-focus signals. A newly developed high-performance NIR-II bioconjugate enables targeted imaging of a specific organ in the living body with high quality. Combined with a home-built NIR-II confocal set-up, the enhanced imaging technique allows 900 µm-deep 3D organ imaging without tissue clearing techniques. Bioconjugation of two hormones to nonoverlapping NIR-II fluorophores facilitates two-color imaging of different receptors, demonstrating unprecedented multicolor live molecular imaging across the NIR-II window. This deep tissue imaging of specific receptors in live animals allows development of noninvasive molecular imaging of multifarious models of normal and neoplastic organs in vivo, beyond the traditional visible to NIR-I range. The developed NIR-II fluorescence microscopy will become a powerful imaging technique for deep tissue imaging without any physical sectioning or clearing treatment of the tissue. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Molecular Speciation of Trace Metal Organic Complexes in the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repeta, D.; Boiteau, R. M.; Bundy, R. M.; Babcock-Adams, L.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial production across approximately one third of the surface ocean is limited by extraordinarily low (picomolar) concentrations of dissolved iron, essentially all of which is complexed to strong organic ligands of unknown composition. Other biologically important trace metals (cobalt, copper, zinc, nickel) are also complexed to strong organic ligands, which again have not been extensively characterized. Nevertheless, organic ligands exert a strong influence on metal bioavailability and toxicity. For example, amendment experiments using commercially available siderophores, organic compounds synthesized by microbes to facilitate iron uptake, show these ligands can both facilitate or impede iron uptake depending on the siderophore composition and available uptake pathways. Over the past few years we have developed analytical techniques using high pressure liquid chromatography interfaced with inductively coupled plasma and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to identify and quantify trace metal organic complexes in laboratory cultures of marine microbes and in seawater. We found siderophores to be widely distributed in the ocean, particularly in regions characterized by low iron concentrations. We also find chemically distinct complexes of copper, zinc, colbalt and nickel that we have yet to fully characterize. We will discuss some of our recent work on trace metal organic speciation in seawater and laboratory cultures, and outline future efforts to better understand the microbial cycling of trace metal organic complexes in the sea.

  11. Synthesis of organic-inorganic hybrid fillers at the molecular level and their application to composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Misaki; Ishikawa, Youichi; Yoshihashi, Kazue; Hirose, Hideharu; Nishiyama, Minoru

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this study was to synthesize a hybrid type filler composed of an organic component with inorganic component at the molecular level and to examine the properties of the filler. The composite resin was prepared by mixing synthesized filler with monomer and its physical properties were also examined. An organic-inorganic hybrid filler was synthesized by using 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (3-MPTS), methyltriethyoxysilane (MTES) and methanol silica sol. Firstly, poly3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (poly3-MPTS) was synthesized by polymerization of 3-MPTS. A gelation product was obtained by graft-polymerization of poly3-MPTS with condensed organopolysiloxane after the hydrolysis of 3-MPTS, MTES and methanol silica sol. The gelation product was dried and ground to a filler. From the results of thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), the organic-inorganic hybrid filler was found to be composed of 16.5 wt% organic component, 83.1 wt% inorganic component and 0.4 wt% residual water. A trial composite resin was prepared by mixing 55 wt% dimethacryloxyethyl 2,2,4-trimethylhexamethylene diurethane (UDMA), 15 wt% triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), 30 wt% 1-fluoro-1,3,3,5,5-penta (methacryloxyethyleneoxy) cyclotriphosphazene [P3N3(F)1 (EMA)5] as a base monomer and then 32.0 wt% of this monomer was mixed with 68.0 wt % of synthesized filler and a photo initiator, comphorquinone (CQ), was added. Compressive strength of the trial visible-light cured composite resin showed 397.0 MPa, and flexural strength and elastic modulus showed 142.5 MPa and 11.5 GPa, respectively. From the results, it was demonstrated that the present organic-inorganic hybrid filler at the molecular level can be used as a composite resin filler.

  12. Laminar and dorsoventral molecular organization of the medial entorhinal cortex revealed by large-scale anatomical analysis of gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen L Ramsden

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC encode an animal's position and orientation in space. Within the MEC spatial representations, including grid and directional firing fields, have a laminar and dorsoventral organization that corresponds to a similar topography of neuronal connectivity and cellular properties. Yet, in part due to the challenges of integrating anatomical data at the resolution of cortical layers and borders, we know little about the molecular components underlying this organization. To address this we develop a new computational pipeline for high-throughput analysis and comparison of in situ hybridization (ISH images at laminar resolution. We apply this pipeline to ISH data for over 16,000 genes in the Allen Brain Atlas and validate our analysis with RNA sequencing of MEC tissue from adult mice. We find that differential gene expression delineates the borders of the MEC with neighboring brain structures and reveals its laminar and dorsoventral organization. We propose a new molecular basis for distinguishing the deep layers of the MEC and show that their similarity to corresponding layers of neocortex is greater than that of superficial layers. Our analysis identifies ion channel-, cell adhesion- and synapse-related genes as candidates for functional differentiation of MEC layers and for encoding of spatial information at different scales along the dorsoventral axis of the MEC. We also reveal laminar organization of genes related to disease pathology and suggest that a high metabolic demand predisposes layer II to neurodegenerative pathology. In principle, our computational pipeline can be applied to high-throughput analysis of many forms of neuroanatomical data. Our results support the hypothesis that differences in gene expression contribute to functional specialization of superficial layers of the MEC and dorsoventral organization of the scale of spatial representations.

  13. Effects of Organics on the Adsorption and Mobility of Metal Cations in Clay Systems: Computational Molecular Modeling Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Ngouana Wakou, Brice F.; Loganathan, Narasimhan

    2013-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of many natural and anthropogenic environmental processes ultimately depend on a fundamental understanding of the chemistry occurring at the mineral-fluid inter-faces. Clay-related minerals and natural organic matter (NOM) are ubiquitous in the environment, and metal-NOM complexation induces strong correlations between the NOM concentration in water and the capacity of clay particles to bind metals, thus affecting their speciation, solubility and toxicity in the environment. Despite significant geochemical, environmental and technological interest, the molecular-level mechanisms and dynamics of the physical and chemical processes involving NOM are not yet well understood. In this presentation we compare three different molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations of metal-NOM complexation in aqueous solutions. The simulation results indicate that despite some obvious quantitative variations in the computed values depending on the size of the simulated system and on the parameters of the force field models used, all three simulations are quite robust and consistent. In particular, approximately 35-50% of Ca 2+ ions in all simulations are associated with the carboxylic groups of NOM at near-neutral pH. The stability of bidentate-coordinated contact ion pair complexes is also always strongly preferred. Easy association of metal cations with negatively charged NOM functional groups and negatively charged clay surfaces allows us to predict that cationic bridging could be the most probable mechanism of NOM association with clays in natural environments. New MD simulations are currently in progress to quantitatively assess these predictions on a molecular scale for nuclear waste disposal applications. New larger-scale clay models incorporate a more realistic representation of the structural and compositional disorder of natural illites and smectites and employ CLAYFF - a fully flexible general force field suitable for the molecular simulations

  14. An Investigation Into the Molecular and Isotopic Composition of Diatom Frustule-Bound Organic Matter: Method Development for New Proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridoux, M. C.; Ingalls, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    Diatoms are single cell phytoplankton that are ubiquitous in marine ecosystems and are responsible for up to 40% of the carbon fixed annually in the ocean. Their intricately nanopatterned siliceous frustules are formed under the control of template organic molecules, some of which are incorporated into the frustule during growth. Several diatom frustule-based paleoproxies have been developed to exploit these microfossils because they are from a known phytoplankton source that is relatively unaltered from diagenesis. Among these proxies, diatom frustule-bound organic matter (OM) is recognized as a potentially important material for use in paleoreconstructions of past productivity (13C/12C), nutrient utilization (15N/14N) as well as to determine the radiocarbon age of sedimentary frustules (Δ14C). Despite numerous advances, diatom frustule-bound OM remains poorly characterized. Here we focus on the chemical characterization of diatom frustule-bound OM with the goal of developing molecular and compound-specific isotope methods to better reconstruct the past environments of diatom rich regions such as the Southern Ocean and the North Pacific. To do this, we 1) chemically cleaned diatom frustules, 2) dissolve them in HF to release organic compounds embedded in the frustules and 3) unambiguously characterized this organic matter by ion pairing reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled to diode array, electrospray ionization - ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI/IT-MSn) and accurate mass quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF). These analyses reveal the presence of low molecular weight, UV light absorbing compounds called mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and a series of long chain polyamines (LCPAs) consisting of N-methylated derivatives of polypropyleneimine units attached to putrescine. LCPAs are known to direct silicification, while MAAs are thought to provide sunscreen to many marine organisms. The presence of these specific biomarkers in sediment

  15. Coupling effects of abiotic and biotic factors on molecular composition of dissolved organic matter in a freshwater wetland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Wei [Department of Environment and Energy, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ilhwan [Water Analysis and Research Center, K-water, 560 Sintanjin-ro, Daedeok-gu, Daejeon 307-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Joon [Department of Biological Education, Daegu University, Gyungbuk 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Jin, E-mail: jinhur@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Environment and Energy, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    In this study, temporal and spatial variations in five defined molecular size fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were examined for a well preserved wetland (Upo Wetland) and its surrounding areas, and the influencing factors were explored with many biotic and abioic parameters. For each DOM sample, the five size fractions were determined by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with organic carbon detector (SEC-OCD). For 2-year long monthly monitoring, bio-polymers (BP), humic substances (HS), building blocks (BB), low molecular-weight (LMW) neutrals, and LMW acids displayed the median values of 264, 1884, 1070, 1090, and 11 μg-C L{sup −1}, respectively, accounting for 6.2%, 41.7%, 24.5%, 26.4%, and 0.4% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The dominant presence of HS indicated that terrestrial input played important roles in DOM composition of the freshwater ecosystem, which contrasted with coastal wetlands in other reports. Both seasonal and periodic patterns in the variations were found only for HS and BB among the size fractions. It was also notable that the sources of HS were seasonally shifted from aquagenic origin in winter to pedogenic origin in summer. The correlations among the size fractions revealed that BB and LMW neutrals might be degradation products from HS and humic-like substances (HS + BB), respectively, while LMW acids, from LMW neutrals. Principle component analysis revealed that the humic-like substances and the aromaticity of DOM were associated with temperature, chlorophyll a, phosphorous, and rainfall, whereas the other fractions and the molecular weight of HS were primarily affected by solar irradiation. Significant correlations between DOM composition and some biotic factors further suggested that DOM may even affect the biological communities, which provides an insight into the potential coupling effects of biotic and abiotic factors on DOM molecular composition in freshwater wetlands. - Highlights: • Humic fractions varied

  16. Direct gravimetric sensing of GBL by a molecular recognition process in organic cage compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutschy, Malte; Schneider, Markus W; Mastalerz, Michael; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2013-09-28

    Organic cages were identified as highly potent affinity materials for the tracing of γ-butyrolactone. The selectivity over ethanol and water is based on the interior functional groups which allow preferential hydrogen bonding to the target analyte.

  17. Low molecular weight heparin attenuates multiple organ failure in a murine model of disseminated intravascular coagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slofstra, Sjoukje H.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Buurman, Wim A.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; ten Cate, Hugo; Spek, C. Arnold

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bacterial sepsis causes widespread vascular inflammation that frequently leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Although intravascular coagulation contributes to organ failure, it is often debated whether anticoagulant therapy produces any beneficial effects in patients

  18. Nitrogen-rich higher-molecular soil organic compounds patterned by lignin degradation products: Considerations on the nature of soil organic nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebner, Falk; Bertoli, Luca; Pour, Georg; Klinger, Karl; Ragab, Tamer; Rosenau, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The pathways leading to accumulation of covalently bonded nitrogen in higher-molecular soil organic matter (SOM) are still a controversial issue in soil science and geochemistry. Similarly, structural elucidation of the variety of the types of nitrogenous moieties present in SOM is still in its infancy even though recent NMR studies suggest amide-type nitrogen to form the majority of organically bonded nitrogen which is, however, frequently not in accordance with the results of wet-chemical analyses. Following the modified polyphenol theory of Flaig and Kononova but fully aware of the imperfection of a semi-abiotic simulation approach, this work communicates the results of a study that investigated some potential nitrogen accumulation pathways occurring in the re-condensation branch of the theory following the reactions between well-known low-molecular lignin and carbohydrate degradation products with nitrogenous nucleophiles occurring in soils under aerobic conditions. Different low-molecular degradation products of lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose, such as hydroquinone, methoxyhydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, 2,5-dihydroxy-[1,4]benzoquinone, glucose, xylose, and the respective polysaccharides, i.e. cellulose, xylan as well as various types of lignin were subjected to a joint treatment with oxygen and low-molecular N-nucleophiles, such as ammonia, amines, and amino acids in aqueous conditions, partly using respective 15N labeled compounds for further 15N CPMAS NMR studies. Product mixtures derived from mono- and polysaccharides have been comprehensively fractionated and analyzed by GC/MS after derivatization. Some of ammoxidized polyphenols and quinones have been analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Some products, such as those obtained from ammoxidation of methoxy hydroquinone using 15N labeled ammonia were fractionated following the IHSS protocol. Individual humin (H), humic acid (HA), and fulvic acid (FA) fractions were subjected to elemental analyses

  19. The Distribution of Complex Organic Molecules in the Orion KL Molecular Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Hsu, Yu-Sen; Charnley, Steven B.; Wang, Kuo-Song

    2011-01-01

    We conducted high angular-resolution observations toward the massive star-forming region Orion KL at 1.3 mm using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). Spectral emission from twelve complex organic molecules was simultaneously imaged. We discuss the distinct chemical characteristics among four sub- regions in Orion KL by comparing the spatial distributions and fractional abundances of these complex molecules. These observations will allow us to test and constrain chemical models of interstellar organic synthesis.

  20. Evaluation of RTV as a Moldable Matrix When Combined With Molecular Sieve and Organic Hydrogen Getter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    This work was undertaken in an effort to develop a combined RTV 615/3Å molecular sieve/DEB molded component. A molded RTV 615/3Å molecular sieve component is currently in production, and an RTV 615/DEB component was produced in the past. However, all three materials have never before been combined in a single production part, and this is an opportunity to create a new component capable of being molded to shape, performing desiccation, and hydrogen gettering. This analysis looked at weapons system parameters and how they might influence part design. It also looked at material processing and how it related to mixing, activating a dessicant, and hydrogen uptake testing.

  1. Elucidation of the structure of organic solutions in solvent extraction by combining molecular dynamics and X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferru, G.; Gomes Rodrigues, D.; Berthon, L.; Guilbaud, P.; Diat, O.; Bauduin, P.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the supramolecular structure of the organic phase containing amphiphilic ligand molecules is mandatory for full comprehension of ionic separation during solvent extraction. Existing structural models are based on simple geometric aggregates, but no consensus exists on the interaction potentials. Herein, we show that molecular dynamics crossed with scattering techniques offers key insight into the complex fluid involving weak interactions without any long range ordering. Two systems containing mono- or diamide extractants in heptane and contacted with an aqueous phase were selected as examples to demonstrate the advantages of coupling the two approaches for furthering fundamental studies on solvent extraction. (authors)

  2. Next-Generation Survey Sequencing and the Molecular Organization of Wheat Chromosome 6B

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tanaka, T.; Kobayashi, F.; Joshi, G.P.; Šimková, Hana; Nasuda, S.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Handa, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 2 (2014), s. 103-114 ISSN 1340-2838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Program:ED Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : wheat * chromosome 6B * genome sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.477, year: 2014

  3. Charge transport in organic materials: From molecular wire to 3D systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nešpůrek, Stanislav; Toman, Petr; Menšík, Miroslav; Kratochvílová, Irena; Sworakowski, J.; Mallouk, T. E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 9, č.1 (2007), s. 134-140 ISSN 1454-4164 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN401770651; GA AV ČR IAA401770601 Grant - others:Polish Ministry of Science(PL) 3T08E 08430 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : charge transport * molecular wire * polaron Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.827, year: 2007

  4. Organ distribution and molecular forms of human xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnesto, A; Linder, N; Raivio, K O

    1996-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) is a major cytoplasmic source of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide, and it is considered important in the pathogenesis of ischemia-reperfusion damage. Because little is known about the enzyme in human tissues, the aims of this study were to purify human XDH/XO and to produce Ab for detection of the protein in Western blots and for quantification by ELISA. We purified human milk XDH/XO, produced Ab for Western blotting and ELISA of the protein, and evaluated the molecular forms and activity-protein relationships in human tissues. The molecular size of the purified protein under nondenaturing conditions was approximately 300 kd. On SDS-PAGE, it was fragmented into four main bands of 143, 125, 87, and 59 kd. Ab recognized bands of similar size in Western blots of the purified preparation and human milk. In fresh liver homogenates treated with anti-proteases, the three largest bands were observed; in the intestine, only the two largest were observed. Serum, brain, heart, and skeletal muscle were negative, whereas some lung and kidney samples showed one faint band of 143 kd. Trypsin treatment of the enzyme converted the large molecular-weight bands into smaller bands, as did incubation of a liver homogenate without anti-proteases. XDH/XO protein concentrations (ng/mg total protein) were 146 +/- 70 in liver and 556 +/- 320 in intestine and less than 5 ng/ml in serum. The relationship of activity to protein (2.7-3.0 mumol/min/mg XDH/XO protein) was constant in liver and intestine during development. We conclude that 1) human XDH/XO has molecular size and subunit structure similar to other mammalian enzymes; 2) the polypeptide chain is unstable, also in the intact cell, despite retained activity; and 3) the amount of inactive XDH/XO in human liver and intestine is apparently small.

  5. Assessment of the impact of xenobiotic pollutants on the marine organisms: Molecular biomarker approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    ., 2005) which are very specific to the exposure to certain type of pollutants and more precisely whose application would benefit from commercial and biotechnological development point of view. Molecular Biomarkers Biomarker can be defined as ‘the... of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) family are composed of many cytosolic, mitochondrial, and microsomal proteins. They catalyze a variety of reactions and accept endogenous and xenobiotic substrates. GSTs catalyse the conjugation of reduced glutathione via...

  6. Spatial Organization and Molecular Correlation of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Using Deep Learning on Pathology Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Saltz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Beyond sample curation and basic pathologic characterization, the digitized H&E-stained images of TCGA samples remain underutilized. To highlight this resource, we present mappings of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs based on H&E images from 13 TCGA tumor types. These TIL maps are derived through computational staining using a convolutional neural network trained to classify patches of images. Affinity propagation revealed local spatial structure in TIL patterns and correlation with overall survival. TIL map structural patterns were grouped using standard histopathological parameters. These patterns are enriched in particular T cell subpopulations derived from molecular measures. TIL densities and spatial structure were differentially enriched among tumor types, immune subtypes, and tumor molecular subtypes, implying that spatial infiltrate state could reflect particular tumor cell aberration states. Obtaining spatial lymphocytic patterns linked to the rich genomic characterization of TCGA samples demonstrates one use for the TCGA image archives with insights into the tumor-immune microenvironment. : Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs were identified from standard pathology cancer images by a deep-learning-derived “computational stain” developed by Saltz et al. They processed 5,202 digital images from 13 cancer types. Resulting TIL maps were correlated with TCGA molecular data, relating TIL content to survival, tumor subtypes, and immune profiles. Keywords: digital pathology, immuno-oncology, machine learning, lymphocytes, tumor microenvironment, deep learning, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, computer vision

  7. Intra-molecular Charge Transfer and Electron Delocalization in Non-Fullerene Organic Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qinghe; Zhao, Donglin; Goldey, Matthew B.; Filatov, Alexander S.; Sharapov, Valerii; Colon, Yamil; Cai, Zhengxu; Jiang, Xuanfeng; Wang, Junpeng; Chen, Wei; de Pablo, Juan; Galli, Giulia; Yu, Luping

    2018-03-28

    Two types of electron acceptors were synthesized by coupling two kinds of electron-rich cores with four equivalent perylene diimides (PDIs) at the a position. With fully aromatic cores, TPB and TPSe have pi-orbitals spread continuously over the whole aromatic conjugated backbone, unlike TPC and TPSi, which contain isolated PDI units due to the use of a tetrahedron carbon or silicon linker. Density functional theory calculations of the projected density of states showed that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) for TPB are localized in separate regions of space. Further, the LUMO of TPB shows a greater contribution from the orbitals belonging to the connective core of the molecules than that of TPC. Overall, the properties of the HOMO and LUMO point at increased intra-molecular delocalization of negative charge carriers for TPB and TPSe than for TPC and TPSi and hence at a more facile intra-molecular charge transfer for the former. The film absorption and emission spectra showed evidences for the inter -molecular electron delocalization in TPB and TPSe, which is consistent with the network structure revealed by X-ray diffraction studies on single crystals of TPB. These features benefit the formation of charge transfer states and/or facilitate charge transport. Thus, higher electron mobility and higher charge dissociation probabilities under J(sc) condition were observed in blend films of TPB:PTB7-Th and TPSe:PTB7-Th than those in TPC:PTB7Th and TPSi:PTB7-Th blend films. As a result, the J(sc) and fill factor values of 15.02 mA/cm(2), 0.58 and 14.36 mA/cm(2), 0.55 for TPB- and TPSe-based solar cell are observed, whereas those for TPC and TPSi are 11.55 mA/cm2, 0.47 and 10.35 mA/cm(2), 0.42, respectively.

  8. The flux of organic matter through a peatland ecosystem - a molecular budget of C in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Fred; Moody, Catherine; Clay, Gareth

    2017-04-01

    Carbon budgets of peatlands are now common and studies have considered nitrogen, oxygen and energy budgets, but no study has considered the whole composition of the organic matter as it transfers through a peatland. Organic matter samples were taken from each organic matter reservoir and fluvial transfer pathway and analysed the samples by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and thermogravimetric analysis. The samples analysed were: aboveground, belowground, heather, mosses and sedges, litter layer, a peat core, and monthly samples of particulate and dissolved organic matter. All organic matter samples were taken from a 100% peat catchment within Moor House National Nature Reserve in the North Pennines, UK, and collected samples were compared to standards of lignin, cellulose, humic acid and plant protein. Results showed that the thermogravimetric trace of the sampled organic matter were distinctive with the DOM traces being marked out by very low thermal stability relative other organic matter types. The peat profile shows a significant trend with depth from vegetation- to lignin-like composition. A principal component analysis (PCA) of the NMR data shows that the DOM was a mixture of plant and peat compositions reacting to form a highly evolved composition that perhaps represents autochthonous stream processes. When all traces are weighted according to the observed dry matter and carbon budgets for the catchment then it is possible to judge what has been lost in the transition through and into the ecosystem. By plotting this "lost" trace it possible to assess its composition which is either 97% cellulose and 3% humic acid or 92% and 8% lignin. The "lost" composition shows that peatland processes preferentially remove carbohydrates and retaining lignin compounds reflected. Similarly the NMR traces show that while O-alkyl functional groups were selectively lost in the transition while alkyl groups were selectively enriched.

  9. Impact of Interfacial Molecular Conformation and Aggregation State on the Energetic Landscape and Performance in Organic Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy Olivier

    2016-11-25

    In organic photovoltaics (OPVs) the key processes relevant to device operation such as exciton dissociation and free carriers recombination occur at the donor-acceptor (D-A) interface. OPV devices require the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) architecture to function efficiently. In these BHJs, D-A interfaces are arranged in three dimensions, which makes molecular arrangements at these interfaces ill defined and hard to characterize. In addition, molecular materials used in OPVs are inherently disordered and may exhibit variable degrees of structural order in the same BHJ. Yet, D-A molecular arrangements and structure are crucial because they shape the energy landscape and photovoltaic (PV) performance in OPVs. Studies that use well-defined model systems to look in details at the interfacial molecular structure in OPVs and link it to interfacial energy landscape and device operation are critically lacking. We have used in situ photoelectron spectroscopy and ex situ x-ray scattering to study D-A interfaces in tailored bilayers and BHJs based on small molecule donors. We show preferential miscibility at the D-A interface depending on molecular conformation in zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/ C60 bilayers and we derive implications for exciton dissociation. Using sexithiophene (6T), a crystalline donor, we show that the energy landscape at the D-A interface varies markedly depending on the molecular composition of the BHJ. Both the ionization energies of sexithiophene and C60 shift by over ~0.4 eV while the energy of the charge transfer state shifts by ~0.5 eV depending on composition. Such shifts create a downward energy landscape that helps interfacial excitons to overcome their binding energies. Finally, we demonstrate that when both disordered and ordered phases of D coexist at the interface, low-lying energy states form in ordered phases and significantly limit the Voc in devices. Overall our work underlines the importance of the aggregation and conformation states of

  10. Interaction mechanisms between organic UV filters and bovine serum albumin as determined by comprehensive spectroscopy exploration and molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Junjie; Gao, Li; Yuan, Tao; Jiang, Gaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Organic UV filters are a group of emerging PPCP (pharmaceuticals and personal care products) contaminants. Current information is insufficient to understand the in vivo processes and health risks of organic UV filters in humans. The interaction mechanism of UV filters with serum albumin provides critical information for the health risk assessment of these active ingredients in sunscreen products. This study investigates the interaction mechanisms of five commonly used UV filters (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, BP-3; 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate, EHMC; 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, 4-MBC; methoxydibenzoylmethane, BDM; homosalate, HMS) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) by spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), competitive binding experiments and molecular docking. Our results indicated that the fluorescence of BSA was quenched by these UV filters through a static quenching mechanism. The values of the binding constant (Ka) ranged from (0.78±0.02)×10(3) to (1.29±0.01)×10(5) L mol(-1). Further exploration by synchronous fluorescence and CD showed that the conformation of BSA was demonstrably changed in the presence of these organic UV filters. It was confirmed that the UV filters can disrupt the α-helical stability of BSA. Moreover, the results of molecular docking revealed that the UV filter molecule is located in site II (sub-domain IIIA) of BSA, which was further confirmed by the results of competitive binding experiments. In addition, binding occurred mainly through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction. This study raises critical concerns regarding the transportation, distribution and toxicity effects of organic UV filters in human body. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 'Who's who' in two different flower types of Calluna vulgaris (Ericaceae: morphological and molecular analyses of flower organ identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krüger Katja

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ornamental crop Calluna vulgaris is of increasing importance to the horticultural industry in the northern hemisphere due to a flower organ mutation: the flowers of the 'bud-flowering' phenotype remain closed i.e. as buds throughout the total flowering period and thereby maintain more colorful flowers for a longer period of time than the wild-type. This feature is accompanied and presumably caused by the complete lack of stamens. Descriptions of this botanical particularity are inconsistent and partially conflicting. In order to clarify basic questions of flower organ identity in general and stamen loss in detail, a study of the wild-type and the 'bud-flowering' flower type of C. vulgaris was initiated. Results Flowers were examined by macro- and microscopic techniques. Organ development was investigated comparatively in both the wild-type and the 'bud-flowering' type by histological analyses. Analysis of epidermal cell surface structure of vegetative tissues and perianth organs using scanning electron microscopy revealed that in wild-type flowers the outer whorls of colored organs may be identified as sepals, while the inner ones may be identified as petals. In the 'bud-flowering' type, two whorls of sepals are directly followed by the gynoecium. Both, petals and stamens, are completely missing in this flower type. The uppermost whorl of green leaves represents bracts in both flower types. In addition, two MADS-box genes (homologs of AP3/DEF and SEP1/2 were identified in C. vulgaris using RACE-PCR. Expression analysis by qRT-PCR was conducted for both genes in leaves, bracts, sepals and petals. These experiments revealed an expression pattern supporting the organ classification based on morphological characteristics. Conclusions Organ identity in both wild-type and 'bud-flowering' C. vulgaris was clarified using a combination of microscopic and molecular methods. Our results for bract, sepal and petal organ identity are

  12. Regulation of assimilate import into sink organs: Update on molecular drivers of sink strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadia eBihmidine

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments have altered our view of molecular mechanisms that determine sink strength, defined here as the capacity of non-photosynthetic structures to compete for import of photoassimilates. We review new findings from diverse systems, including stems, seeds, flowers, and fruits. An important advance has been the identification of new transporters and facilitators with major roles in the accumulation and equilibration of sugars at a cellular level. Exactly where each exerts its effect varies among systems. Sugarcane and sweet sorghum stems, for example, both accumulate high levels of sucrose, but may do so via different paths. The distinction is central to strategies for targeted manipulation of sink strength using transporter genes, and shows the importance of system-specific analyses. Another major advance has been the identification of deep hypoxia as a feature of normal grain development. This means that molecular drivers of sink strength in endosperm operate in very low oxygen levels, and under metabolic conditions quite different than previously assumed. Successful enhancement of sink strength has nonetheless been achieved in grains by up-regulating genes for starch biosynthesis. Additionally, our understanding of sink strength is enhanced by awareness of the dual roles played by invertases (INV, not only in sucrose metabolism, but also in production of the hexose sugar signals that regulate cell-cycle and cell-division programs. These contributions of INV to cell expansion and division prove to be vital for establishment of young sinks ranging from flowers to fruit. Since INV genes are themselves sugar-responsive feast genes, they can mediate a feed-forward enhancement of sink strength when assimilates are abundant. Greater overall productivity and yield have thus been attained in key instances, indicating that even broader enhancements may be achievable as we discover the detailed molecular mechanisms that drive sink strength

  13. Large modulation of carrier transport by grain-boundary molecular packing and microstructure in organic thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan

    2009-11-08

    Solution-processable organic semiconductors are central to developing viable printed electronics, and performance comparable to that of amorphous silicon has been reported for films grown from soluble semiconductors. However, the seemingly desirable formation of large crystalline domains introduces grain boundaries, resulting in substantial device-to-device performance variations. Indeed, for films where the grain-boundary structure is random, a few unfavourable grain boundaries may dominate device performance. Here we isolate the effects of molecular-level structure at grain boundaries by engineering the microstructure of the high-performance n-type perylenediimide semiconductor PDI8-CN 2 and analyse their consequences for charge transport. A combination of advanced X-ray scattering, first-principles computation and transistor characterization applied to PDI8-CN 2 films reveals that grain-boundary orientation modulates carrier mobility by approximately two orders of magnitude. For PDI8-CN 2 we show that the molecular packing motif (that is, herringbone versus slip-stacked) plays a decisive part in grain-boundary-induced transport anisotropy. The results of this study provide important guidelines for designing device-optimized molecular semiconductors. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Prediction of complexes of uranyl and organic substances by molecular orbital calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, S.; Tsushima, S.; Todoriki, M.; Tanaka, S.; Suzuki, A.

    1999-01-01

    Structure of UO 2 2+ complexes with salicylic acid was optimized by using molecular orbital calculation (ab initio method). The bond distances between U and O atoms (O eq ) of carboxyl group and phenyl group in salicylic acid were evaluated and compared with those measured experimentally by Denecke et al. The calculated distance relatively agrees with the experimental one. The frontier electron densities in the complexes were also calculated. Strong localization of frontier electron density in the complexes was not observed, suggesting that the complexes are subject to only weak interactions with rocks, minerals and other compounds in the geosphere. (author)

  15. Molecular motions in a viscous organic liquid: ferrocene in cold butyl phthalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruby, S.L.; Zabransky, B.J.; Flinn, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    The two main purposes of this work were to learn (a) if rotational diffusion can be seen along with translational, and (b) is [x(T) 2 ] unusual as the sample is heated from a glass to a liquid. Our observations show that (a) rotational molecular diffusion is not likely ever to be observed by quadrupole relaxation and (b) that there is indeed a fast increase in [x 2 ] above T/sub g/. This increase is correlated with a rapid and linear increase of the number of ''soft modes'' for the liquid above the glass transition temperature

  16. Distinct high molecular weight organic compound (HMW-OC) types in aerosol particles collected at a coastal urban site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Healy, R. M.; Wenger, J. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Ceburnis, D.; Harrison, Roy M.; Beddows, D. C. S.

    2017-12-01

    Organic oligomers were discovered in laboratory-generated atmospheric aerosol over a decade ago. However, evidence for the presence of oligomers in ambient aerosols is scarce and mechanisms for their formation have yet to be fully elucidated. In this work, three unique aerosol particle types internally mixed with High molecular weight organic compounds (HMW-OC) species - likely oligomers - were detected in ambient air using single particle Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS) in Cork (Ireland) during winter 2009. These particle types can be described as follows: (1) HMW-OCs rich in organic nitrogen - possibly containing nitrocatechols and nitroguaiacols - originating from primary emissions of biomass burning particles during evening times; (2) HMW-OCs internally mixed with nitric acid, occurring in stagnant conditions during night time; and (3) HMW-OCs internally mixed with sea salt, likely formed via photochemical reactions during day time. The study exemplifies the power of methodologies capable of monitoring the simultaneous formation of organic and inorganic particle-phase reaction products. Primary emissions and atmospheric aging of different types of HMW-OC contributes to aerosol with a range of acidity, hygroscopic and optical properties, which can have different impacts on climate and health.

  17. A multi-array competitive immunoassay for the detection of broad-range molecular size organic compounds relevant for astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Näke, Christian; Rivas, Luis A.; García-Villadangos, Miriam; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Parro, Víctor

    2006-12-01

    We have developed antibodies and a multi-array competitive immunoassay (MACIA) for the detection of a wide range of molecular size compounds, from single aromatic ring derivatives or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), through small peptides, proteins or whole cells (spores). Multiple microarrays containing target molecules are used simultaneously to run several competitive immunoassays. The sensitivity of the MACIA for small organic compounds like naphthalene, 4-phenilphenol or 4-tertbutilphenol is in the range of 100-500 ppb (ng ml -1), for others like the insecticide terbutryn it is at the ppt (ng l -1) level, while for small peptides, as well as for more complex molecules like the protein thioredoxin, the sensitivity is approximately 1-2 ppb, or 10 4-10 5 spores of Bacillus subtilis per milliliter. For organic compounds, a water-methanol solution was used in order to achieve a better dissolution of the organics without compromising the antibody-antigen interaction. The above-mentioned compounds were detected by MACIA in water-(10%) methanol extracts from spiked pyrite and hematite-containing rock powder samples, as well as from a spiked-sand sample subjected to organic extraction with dichloromethane-methanol (1/1).

  18. Stimuli-Directed Dynamic Reconfiguration in Self-Organized Helical Superstructures Enabled by Chemical Kinetics of Chiral Molecular Motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Lan, Ruochen; Gao, Yanzi; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Wanshu; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Lanying; Yang, Zhou; Yang, Huai

    2018-02-01

    Dynamic controllability of self-organized helical superstructures in spatial dimensions is a key step to promote bottom-up artificial nanoarchitectures and functional devices for diverse applications in a variety of areas. Here, a light-driven chiral overcrowded alkene molecular motor with rod-like substituent is designed and synthesized, and its thermal isomerization reaction exhibits an increasing structural entropy effect on chemical kinetic analysis in anisotropic achiral liquid crystal host than that in isotropic organic liquid. Interestingly, the stimuli-directed angular orientation motion of helical axes in the self-organized helical superstructures doped with the chiral motors enables the dynamic reconfiguration between the planar (thermostationary) and focal conic (photostationary) states. The reversible micromorphology deformation processes are compatible with the free energy fluctuation of self-organized helical superstructures and the chemical kinetics of chiral motors under different conditions. Furthermore, stimuli-directed reversible nonmechanical beam steering is achieved in dynamic hidden periodic photopatterns with reconfigurable attributes prerecorded with a corresponding photomask and photoinduced polymerization.

  19. The Optical, Chemical, and Molecular Dissolved Organic Matter Succession Along a Boreal Soil-Stream-River Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Ryan H. S.; Aukes, Pieter; Schiff, Sherry L.; Dittmar, Thorsten; Prairie, Yves T.; del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2017-11-01

    Soils export large amounts of organic matter to rivers, and there are still major uncertainties concerning the composition and reactivity of this material and its fate within the fluvial network. Here we reconstructed the pattern of movement and processing of dissolved organic matter (DOM) along a soil-stream-river continuum under summer baseflow conditions in a boreal region of Québec (Canada), using a combination of fluorescence spectra, size exclusion chromatography and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry. Our results show that there is a clear sequence of selective DOM degradation along the soil-stream-river continuum, which results in pronounced compositional shifts downstream. The soil-stream interface was a hot spot of DOM degradation, where biopolymers and low molecular weight (LMW) compounds were selectively removed. In contrast, processing in the stream channel was dominated by the degradation of humic-like aromatic DOM, likely driven by photolysis, with little further degradation of either biopolymers or LMW compounds. Overall, there was a high degree of coherence between the patterns observed in DOM chemical composition, optical properties, and molecular profiles, and none of these approaches pointed to measurable production of new DOM components, suggesting that the DOM pools removed during transit were likely mineralized to CO2. Our first order estimates suggest that rates of soil-derived DOM mineralization could potentially sustain over half of the measured CO2 emissions from this stream network, with mineralization of biopolymers and humic substances contributing roughly equally to these fluvial emissions.

  20. Confocal imaging of whole vertebrate embryos reveals novel insights into molecular and cellular mechanisms of organ development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadel, Diana M.; Keller, Bradley B.; Sandell, Lisa L.

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy has been an invaluable tool for studying cellular or sub-cellular biological processes. The study of vertebrate embryology is based largely on examination of whole embryos and organs. The application of confocal microscopy to immunostained whole mount embryos, combined with three dimensional (3D) image reconstruction technologies, opens new avenues for synthesizing molecular, cellular and anatomical analysis of vertebrate development. Optical cropping of the region of interest enables visualization of structures that are morphologically complex or obscured, and solid surface rendering of fluorescent signal facilitates understanding of 3D structures. We have applied these technologies to whole mount immunostained mouse embryos to visualize developmental morphogenesis of the mammalian inner ear and heart. Using molecular markers of neuron development and transgenic reporters of neural crest cell lineage we have examined development of inner ear neurons that originate from the otic vesicle, along with the supporting glial cells that derive from the neural crest. The image analysis reveals a previously unrecognized coordinated spatial organization between migratory neural crest cells and neurons of the cochleovestibular nerve. The images also enable visualization of early cochlear spiral nerve morphogenesis relative to the developing cochlea, demonstrating a heretofore unknown association of neural crest cells with extending peripheral neurite projections. We performed similar analysis of embryonic hearts in mouse and chick, documenting the distribution of adhesion molecules during septation of the outflow tract and remodeling of aortic arches. Surface rendering of lumen space defines the morphology in a manner similar to resin injection casting and micro-CT.

  1. Organic solvent and temperature-enhanced ion chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry for the determination of low molecular weight organic and inorganic anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilchrist, Elizabeth S.; Nesterenko, Pavel N.; Smith, Norman W.; Barron, Leon P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • IC selectivity at high contents of organic solvent in eluent and elevated temperature is studied. • Solvent-enhanced IC coupled to high resolution MS is beneficial for sensitive detection of ions. • The first application of IC-HRMS to the detection of low explosives in fingermarks is shown. - Abstract: There has recently been increased interest in coupling ion chromatography (IC) to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) to enable highly sensitive and selective analysis. Herein, the first comprehensive study focusing on the direct coupling of suppressed IC to HRMS without the need for post-suppressor organic solvent modification is presented. Chromatographic selectivity and added HRMS sensitivity offered by organic solvent-modified IC eluents on a modern hyper-crosslinked polymeric anion-exchange resin (IonPac AS18) are shown using isocratic eluents containing 5–50 mM hydroxide with 0–80% methanol or acetonitrile for a range of low molecular weight anions (<165 Da). Comprehensive experiments on IC thermodynamics over a temperature range between 20–45 °C with the eluent containing up to 60% of acetonitrile or methanol revealed markedly different retention behaviour and selectivity for the selected analytes on the same polymer based ion-exchange resin. Optimised sensitivity with HRMS was achieved with as low as 30–40% organic eluent content. Analytical performance characteristics are presented and compared with other IC-MS based works. This study also presents the first application of IC-HRMS to forensic detection of trace low-order anionic explosive residues in latent human fingermarks

  2. Visualizing Molecular Chirality in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory Using Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Maia; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Hartley, C. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Although stereochemistry is an important topic in second-year undergraduate organic chemistry, there are limited options for laboratory activities that allow direct visualization of macroscopic chiral phenomena. A novel, guided-inquiry experiment was developed that allows students to explore chirality in the context of cholesteric liquid crystals.…

  3. Aging changes of molecular synthesis in the respiratory organs as revealed by microscopic radioautography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, T.

    2001-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidating the aging changes of macromolecular synthesis such as DNA, RNA, proteins, glycoproteins, glycides and lipids in various organ systems of experimental animals and men, we have studied respiratory organs of aging mice as a series of systematic studies using light and electron microscopic radioautography in various organ systems after incorporations with macromolecular precursors. The experimental animals mainly used were dd Y strain mice at various aging groups from embryo to postnatal day 1 and 3, weeks 1 and 2, months 1, 2, 6, 12 up to 2 year senescent stages. The animals were injected with such macromolecular precursors as 3 H - thymidine for DNA, 3 H-uridine for RNA, 3 H-leucine for proteins, 35 SO 4 for glycoproteins. The results demonstrated that these precursors were incorporated into various cell types in the lungs and tracheas at various ages from perinatal to juvenile, mature and senescent stages showing specific patterns of macromolecular synthesis. It is concluded that these specific pattern of macromolecular synthesis in respective cell types demonstrated the organ specificity of aging. (author)

  4. Functional genomics for food microbiology: Molecular mechanisms of weak organic acid preservative adaptation in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brul, S.; Kallemeijn, W.; Smits, G.

    2008-01-01

    The recent era of genomics has offered tremendous possibilities to biology. This concise review describes the possibilities of applying (functional) genomics studies to the field of microbial food stability. In doing so, the studies on weak-organic-acid stress response in yeast are discussed by way

  5. Organization of lipids in the tear film: a molecular-level view.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Wizert

    Full Text Available Biophysical properties of the tear film lipid layer are studied at the molecular level employing coarse grain molecular dynamics (MD simulations with a realistic model of the human tear film. In this model, polar lipids are chosen to reflect the current knowledge on the lipidome of the tear film whereas typical Meibomian-origin lipids are included in the thick non-polar lipids subphase. Simulation conditions mimic those experienced by the real human tear film during blinks. Namely, thermodynamic equilibrium simulations at different lateral compressions are performed to model varying surface pressure, and the dynamics of the system during a blink is studied by non-equilibrium MD simulations. Polar lipids separate their non-polar counterparts from water by forming a monomolecular layer whereas the non-polar molecules establish a thick outermost lipid layer. Under lateral compression, the polar layer undulates and a sorting of polar lipids occurs. Moreover, formation of three-dimensional aggregates of polar lipids in both non-polar and water subphases is observed. We suggest that these three-dimensional structures are abundant under dynamic conditions caused by the action of eye lids and that they act as reservoirs of polar lipids, thus increasing stability of the tear film.

  6. The 5S rDNA in two Abracris grasshoppers (Ommatolampidinae: Acrididae): molecular and chromosomal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Danilo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Mariguela, Tatiane Casagrande; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2016-08-01

    The 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are subject of dynamic evolution at chromosomal and molecular levels, evolving through concerted and/or birth-and-death fashion. Among grasshoppers, the chromosomal location for this sequence was established for some species, but little molecular information was obtained to infer evolutionary patterns. Here, we integrated data from chromosomal and nucleotide sequence analysis for 5S rDNA in two Abracris species aiming to identify evolutionary dynamics. For both species, two arrays were identified, a larger sequence (named type-I) that consisted of the entire 5S rDNA gene plus NTS (non-transcribed spacer) and a smaller (named type-II) with truncated 5S rDNA gene plus short NTS that was considered a pseudogene. For type-I sequences, the gene corresponding region contained the internal control region and poly-T motif and the NTS presented partial transposable elements. Between the species, nucleotide differences for type-I were noticed, while type-II was identical, suggesting pseudogenization in a common ancestor. At chromosomal point to view, the type-II was placed in one bivalent, while type-I occurred in multiple copies in distinct chromosomes. In Abracris, the evolution of 5S rDNA was apparently influenced by the chromosomal distribution of clusters (single or multiple location), resulting in a mixed mechanism integrating concerted and birth-and-death evolution depending on the unit.

  7. Large Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Organic Molecular Tunnel Junctions with Nonmagnetic Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zuoti; Shi, Sha; Liu, Feilong; Smith, Darryl L; Ruden, P Paul; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2016-09-27

    We report room-temperature resistance changes of up to 30% under weak magnetic fields (0.1 T) for molecular tunnel junctions composed of oligophenylene thiol molecules, 1-2 nm in length, sandwiched between gold contacts. The magnetoresistance (MR) is independent of field orientation and the length of the molecule; it appears to be an interface effect. Theoretical analysis suggests that the source of the MR is a two-carrier (two-hole) interaction at the interface, resulting in spin coupling between the tunneling hole and a localized hole at the Au/molecule contact. Such coupling leads to significantly different singlet and triplet transmission barriers at the interface. Even weak magnetic fields impede spin relaxation processes and thus modify the ratio of holes tunneling via the singlet state versus the triplet state, which leads to the large MR. Overall, the experiments and analysis suggest significant opportunities to explore large MR effects in molecular tunnel junctions based on widely available molecules.

  8. Organization of Lipids in the Tear Film: A Molecular-Level View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizert, Alicja; Iskander, D. Robert; Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    Biophysical properties of the tear film lipid layer are studied at the molecular level employing coarse grain molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a realistic model of the human tear film. In this model, polar lipids are chosen to reflect the current knowledge on the lipidome of the tear film whereas typical Meibomian-origin lipids are included in the thick non-polar lipids subphase. Simulation conditions mimic those experienced by the real human tear film during blinks. Namely, thermodynamic equilibrium simulations at different lateral compressions are performed to model varying surface pressure, and the dynamics of the system during a blink is studied by non-equilibrium MD simulations. Polar lipids separate their non-polar counterparts from water by forming a monomolecular layer whereas the non-polar molecules establish a thick outermost lipid layer. Under lateral compression, the polar layer undulates and a sorting of polar lipids occurs. Moreover, formation of three-dimensional aggregates of polar lipids in both non-polar and water subphases is observed. We suggest that these three-dimensional structures are abundant under dynamic conditions caused by the action of eye lids and that they act as reservoirs of polar lipids, thus increasing stability of the tear film. PMID:24651175

  9. Spatial Organization and Molecular Correlation of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Using Deep Learning on Pathology Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltz, Joel; Gupta, Rajarsi; Hou, Le; Kurc, Tahsin; Singh, Pankaj; Nguyen, Vu; Samaras, Dimitris; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Zhao, Tianhao; Batiste, Rebecca; Van Arnam, John; Shmulevich, Ilya; Rao, Arvind U K; Lazar, Alexander J; Sharma, Ashish; Thorsson, Vésteinn

    2018-04-03

    Beyond sample curation and basic pathologic characterization, the digitized H&E-stained images of TCGA samples remain underutilized. To highlight this resource, we present mappings of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) based on H&E images from 13 TCGA tumor types. These TIL maps are derived through computational staining using a convolutional neural network trained to classify patches of images. Affinity propagation revealed local spatial structure in TIL patterns and correlation with overall survival. TIL map structural patterns were grouped using standard histopathological parameters. These patterns are enriched in particular T cell subpopulations derived from molecular measures. TIL densities and spatial structure were differentially enriched among tumor types, immune subtypes, and tumor molecular subtypes, implying that spatial infiltrate state could reflect particular tumor cell aberration states. Obtaining spatial lymphocytic patterns linked to the rich genomic characterization of TCGA samples demonstrates one use for the TCGA image archives with insights into the tumor-immune microenvironment. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Self-organization of waves and pulse trains by molecular motors in cellular protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yochelis, A.; Ebrahim, S.; Millis, B.; Cui, R.; Kachar, B.; Naoz, M.; Gov, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Actin-based cellular protrusions are an ubiquitous feature of cells, performing a variety of critical functions ranging from cell-cell communication to cell motility. The formation and maintenance of these protrusions relies on the transport of proteins via myosin motors, to the protrusion tip. While tip-directed motion leads to accumulation of motors (and their molecular cargo) at the protrusion tip, it is observed that motors also form rearward moving, periodic and isolated aggregates. The origins and mechanisms of these aggregates, and whether they are important for the recycling of motors, remain open puzzles. Motivated by novel myosin-XV experiments, a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model is proposed. The model incorporates a non-linear cooperative interaction between motors, which converts them between an active and an inactive state. Specifically, the type of aggregate formed (traveling waves or pulse-trains) is linked to the kinetics of motors at the protrusion tip which is introduced by a boundary condition. These pattern selection mechanisms are found not only to qualitatively agree with empirical observations but open new vistas to the transport phenomena by molecular motors in general. PMID:26335545

  11. Spatio-temporal variability of the molecular fingerprint of soil dissolved organic matter in a headwater agricultural catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneau, Laurent; Pierson-Wickmann, Anne-Catherine; Jaffrezic, Anne; Lambert, Thibault; Gruau, Gérard

    2013-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is implied in (i) ecosystem services such as the support of biodiversity, (ii) the alteration of the drinkable water quality by formation of trihalomethane and (iii) the transfer of micropollutants from soils to rivers. Moreover, since DOM connects soils and oceans that are interacting with the atmosphere, understanding its biogeochemistry will help in investigating the carbon cycle and in creating strategies to mitigate climate change. DOM in headwater stream ecosystems is mainly inherited from allochtonous inputs with different reservoirs being mobilized during storm and interstorm events at the scale of an hydrological year. Those changes in DOM reservoirs, if accompanied by composition and reactivity changes, may impact DOM ecosystem services and drinking water production processes. Elucidating the compositional changes due to changes in the source of DOM in rivers has thus become a important axis of DOM research. The aim of this study is to test the ability of the molecular tools of the organic geochemistry and more specifically the combination of thermochemiolysis and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (THM-GC-MS) to (i) link the variability of the river DOM composition to different DOM reservoirs in catchment soils and (ii) provide hypothesis on the nature and the mechanisms of formation (microbial growth, litter decomposition) of those reservoirs. This analytical method seems particularly adapted since it allows the differentiation between vegetal and microbial inputs and the determination of the extent of the biodegradation process of biomolecules such as lignin. To test this method, the molecular fingerprint of soil DOM has been investigated in the wetland area of a small (500 ha) agricultural catchment (the so-called Kervidy-Naizin catchment) located in Brittany, western France. The soil DOM was sampled fortnightly at three depths using zero-tension lysimeters during the hydrological year 2010-2011. The samples were

  12. High-Resolution Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Enables Large Scale Molecular Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Petras

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic matter (DOM is arguably one of the most complex exometabolomes on earth, and is comprised of thousands of compounds, that together contribute more than 600 × 1015 g carbon. This reservoir is primarily the product of interactions between the upper ocean's microbial food web, yet abiotic processes that occur over millennia have also modified many of its molecules. The compounds within this reservoir play important roles in determining the rate and extent of element exchange between inorganic reservoirs and the marine biosphere, while also mediating microbe-microbe interactions. As such, there has been a widespread effort to characterize DOM using high-resolution analytical methods including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR and mass spectrometry (MS. To date, molecular information in DOM has been primarily obtained through calculated molecular formulas from exact mass. This approach has the advantage of being non-targeted, accessing the inherent complexity of DOM. Molecular structures are however still elusive and the most commonly used instruments are costly. More recently, tandem mass spectrometry has been employed to more precisely identify DOM components through comparison to library mass spectra. Here we describe a data acquisition and analysis workflow that expands the repertoire of high-resolution analytical approaches available to access the complexity of DOM molecules that are amenable to electrospray ionization (ESI MS. We couple liquid chromatographic separation with tandem MS (LC-MS/MS and a data analysis pipeline, that integrates peak extraction from extracted ion chromatograms (XIC, molecular formula calculation and molecular networking. This provides more precise structural characterization. Although only around 1% of detectable DOM compounds can be annotated through publicly available spectral libraries, community-wide participation in populating and annotating DOM datasets could rapidly increase the

  13. Molecular Biological basis for statin resistance in naturally statin-producing organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rems, Ana; Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand

    Secondary metabolites can be toxic to the organism producing them; therefore gene clusters for biosynthesis of secondary metabolites often include genes responsible for the organism’s self-resistance to the toxic compounds. One such gene cluster is the compactin (ML-236B) cluster in Penicillium...... secretion [1]. The mlcD gene encodes a putative ‘HMG-CoA reductase-like protein’, and mlcE encodes a putative efflux pump. However, the function of these two putative proteins has not yet been confirmed. We aim to elucidate the biological basis for compactin resistance in the compactin-producing organism......, which leads to the synthesis of ergosterol. Following deletion of HMG1 and HMG2 genes in S. cerevisiae, we inserted the mlcD gene into the knockout mutants, and tested the resulted strains for sensitivity to lovastatin. The HMG1 and HMG2 knockout mutants were unable to grow on minimal media and had...

  14. Excitonic singlet-triplet ratios in molecular and polymeric organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, Marc; Agashe, Shashank; Forrest, Stephen

    2002-03-01

    A simple technique is described for the determination of the internal efficiency and excitonic singlet-triplet formation statistics of electroluminescent organic thin films. The internal efficiency is measured by optically exciting a luminescent film within an electroluminescent device under reverse bias. This gives minimum singlet fractions of (0.20+/-0.03) and (0.19+/-0.04) for tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), respectively. These results are discussed in terms of the current understanding of exciton formation within organic materials. We also present measurements of the out-coupling fraction, or the fraction of photons emitted in the forward direction, as a function of the position of the emitting layer within a microcavity.

  15. Molecular composition of organic aerosols in central Amazonia: an ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry study

    OpenAIRE

    Kourtchev, I; Godoi, RHM; Connors, S; Levine, JG; Archibald, AT; Godoi, AFL; Paralovo, SL; Barbosa, CGG; Souza, RAF; Manzi, AO; Seco, R; Sjostedt, S; Park, J-H; Guenther, A; Kim, S

    2016-01-01

    The Amazon Basin plays key role in atmospheric chemistry, biodiversity and climate change. In this study we applied nanoelectrospray (nanoESI) ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHRMS) for the analysis of the organic fraction of PM$_{2.5}$ aerosol samples collected during dry and wet seasons at a site in central Amazonia receiving background air masses, biomass burning and urban pollution. Comprehensive mass spectral data evaluation methods (e.g. Kendrick mass defect, Van Krevelen diagr...

  16. Molecular Sensing Ability of Layered Inorganic/Luminous Organic Nano Hybrid Solid Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasai, Ryo, E-mail: rsasai@riko.shimane-u.ac.jp [1060 Nishi-Kawatsu-cho, Matue, 690-8504, Japan. Interdisciplinary Faculty of Science and Engineering, Shimane University (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    To apply titanate nanosheet/decyltrimethlammonium/rhodamine 3B (TNS/C10TMA/R3B) hybrid material with highly luminescent ability to high performance sensor or indicator, spectroscopic properties in the absence and presence of water and/or NH{sub 3} vapors were investigated. The TNS/C10TMA/R3B hybrid material exhibited tone change of photoadsorption and photoluminescence in the presence of water vapor. Moreover, this material exhibited remarkable quenching in the presence of NH{sub 3} vapor under humid condition. It was found that this quenching was caused by an intramolecular cyclization reaction of incorporated R3B. This photoluminescence intensity decreased with an increase in NH{sub 3} concentration. This fact is that the present hybrid material has a high potential for molecular sensor or indicator.

  17. Growth, physiological and molecular traits in Salicaceae trees investigated for phytoremediation of heavy metals and organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmiroli, Marta; Pietrini, Fabrizio; Maestri, Elena; Zacchini, Massimo; Marmiroli, Nelson; Massacci, Angelo

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide, there are many large areas moderately contaminated with heavy metals and/or organics that have not been remediated due to the high cost and technical drawbacks of currently available technologies. Methods with a good potential for coping with these limitations are emerging from phytoremediation techniques, using, for example, specific amendments and/or plants selected from various candidates proven in several investigations to be reasonably efficient in extracting heavy metals from soil or water, or in co-metabolizing organics with bacteria flourishing or inoculated in their rhizospheres. Populus and Salix spp., two genera belonging to the Salicaceae family, include genotypes that can be considered among the candidates for this phytoremediation approach. This review shows the recent improvements in analytical tools based on the identification of useful genetic diversity associated with classical growth, physiological and biochemical traits, and the importance of plant genotype selection for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency. Particularly interesting are studies on the application of the phytoremediation of heavy metals and of chlorinated organics, in which microorganisms selected for their degradation capabilities were bioaugmented in the rhizosphere of Salicaceae planted at a high density for biomass and bioenergy production.

  18. Molecular Packing and Arrangement Govern the Photo-Oxidative Stability of Organic Photovoltaic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Mateker, William R.

    2015-08-19

    For long-term performance chemically robust materials are desired for organic solar cells (OSCs). Illuminating neat films of OSC materials in air and tracking the rate of absorption loss, or photobleaching, can quickly screen a material’s photo-chemical stability. In this report, we photobleach neat films of OSC materials including polymers, solution-processed oligomers, solution-processed small molecules, and vacuum-deposited small molecules. Across the materials we test, we observe photobleaching rates that span seven orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we find that the film morphology of any particular material impacts the observed photobleaching rate, and that amorphous films photobleach faster than crystalline ones. In an extreme case, films of amorphous rubrene photobleach at a rate 2500 times faster than polycrystalline films. When we compare density to photobleaching rate, we find that stability increases with density. We also investigate the relationship between backbone planarity and chemical reactivity. The polymer PBDTTPD is more photostable than it’s more twisted and less ordered furan derivitative, PBDFTPD. Finally, we relate our work to what is known about the chemical stability of structural polymers, organic pigments, and organic light emitting diode materials. For the highest chemical stability, planar materials that form dense, crystalline film morphologies should be designed for OSCs.

  19. On the Effect of Confinement on the Structure and Properties of Small-Molecular Organic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Martín, Jaime

    2017-12-11

    Many typical organic optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, and photovoltaic cells, use an ultrathin active layer where the organic semiconductor is confined within nanoscale dimensions. However, the question of how this spatial constraint impacts the active material is rarely addressed, although it may have a drastic influence on the phase behavior and microstructure of the active layer and hence the final performance. Here, the small-molecule semiconductor p-DTS(FBTTh) is used as a model system to illustrate how sensitive this class of material can be to spatial confinement on device-relevant length scales. It is also shown that this effect can be exploited; it is demonstrated, for instance, that spatial confinement is an efficient tool to direct the crystal orientation and overall texture of p-DTS(FBTTh) structures in a controlled manner, allowing for the manipulation of properties including photoluminescence and charge transport characteristics. This insight should be widely applicable as the temperature/confinement phase diagrams established via differential scanning calorimetry and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction are used to identify specific processing routes that can be directly extrapolated to other functional organic materials, such as polymeric semiconductors, ferroelectrics or high-refractive-index polymers, to induce desired crystal textures or specific (potentially new) polymorphs.

  20. On the Effect of Confinement on the Structure and Properties of Small-Molecular Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martín, Jaime [Centre for Plastic Electronics and Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road London SW7 2AZ UK; POLYMAT, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU Avenida de Tolosa 72, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián Spain; Dyson, Matthew [Centre for Plastic Electronics and Department of Physics, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road London SW7 2AZ UK; Reid, Obadiah G. [Chemical and Materials Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder CO 80309 USA; Li, Ruipeng [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Wilson Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 USA; Nogales, Aurora [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia IEM-CSIC, C/Serrano 121 Madrid 28006 Spain; Smilgies, Detlef-M. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Wilson Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 USA; Silva, Carlos [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta GA 30332 USA; Rumbles, Garry [Chemical and Materials Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder CO 80309 USA; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder CL 80309 USA; Amassian, Aram [KAUST Solar Center (KSC), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900 Saudi Arabia; Stingelin, Natalie [Centre for Plastic Electronics and Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road London SW7 2AZ UK; School of Materials Science and Engineering and School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive Atlanta GA 30332 USA

    2017-12-11

    Many typical organic optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, and photovoltaic cells, use an ultrathin active layer where the organic semiconductor is confined within nanoscale dimensions. However, the question of how this spatial constraint impacts the active material is rarely addressed, although it may have a drastic influence on the phase behavior and microstructure of the active layer and hence the final performance. Here, the small-molecule semiconductor p-DTS(FBTTh2)2 is used as a model system to illustrate how sensitive this class of material can be to spatial confinement on device-relevant length scales. It is also shown that this effect can be exploited; it is demonstrated, for instance, that spatial confinement is an efficient tool to direct the crystal orientation and overall texture of p-DTS(FBTTh2)2 structures in a controlled manner, allowing for the manipulation of properties including photoluminescence and charge transport characteristics. This insight should be widely applicable as the temperature/confinement phase diagrams established via differential scanning calorimetry and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction are used to identify specific processing routes that can be directly extrapolated to other functional organic materials, such as polymeric semiconductors, ferroelectrics or high-refractive-index polymers, to induce desired crystal textures or specific (potentially new) polymorphs.

  1. Research on the electronic and optical properties of polymer and other organic molecular thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The main goal of the work is to find materials and methods of optimization of organic layered electroluminescent cells and to study such properties of polymers and other organic materials that can be used in various opto-electronic devices. The summary of results obtained during the first year of work is presented. They are: (1) the possibility to produce electroluminescent cells using a vacuum deposition photoresist technology for commercial photoresists has been demonstrated; (2) the idea to replace the polyaryl polymers by other polymers with weaker hole conductivity for optimization of electroluminescent cells with ITO-Al electrodes has been suggested. The goal is to obtain amorphous processable thin films of radiative recombination layers in electroluminescent devices; (3) procedures of preparation of high-quality vacuum-deposited poly (p-phenylene) (PPP) films on various substrates have been developed; (4) it was found for the first time that the fluorescence intensity of PPP films depends on the degree of polymerization; (5) the role of interfaces between organic compounds, on one side, and metals or semiconductors, on the other side, has been studied and quenching of the fluorescence caused by semiconductor layer in thin sandwiches has been observed; (6) studies of the dynamics of photoexcitations revealed the exciton self-trapping in quasi-one-dimensional aggregates; and (7) conditions for preparation of highly crystalline fullerene C{sub 60} films by vacuum deposition have been found. Composites of C{sub 60} with conjugated polymers have been prepared.

  2. Effective rate constants and uptake coefficients for the reactions of organic molecular markers (n-alkanes, hopanes, and steranes) in motor oil and diesel primary organic aerosols with hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Andrew T; Miracolo, Marissa A; Hennigan, Christopher J; Robinson, Allen L; Donahue, Neil M

    2009-12-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) uptake by organic aerosols, followed by heterogeneous oxidation, happens nearly at the collision frequency. Oxidation complicates the use of organic molecular markers such as hopanes for source apportionment, since receptor models assume markers are stable during transport. We report the oxidation kinetics of organic molecular markers (C(25)-C(32) n-alkanes, hopanes and steranes) in motor oil and primary organic aerosol emitted from a diesel engine at atmospherically relevant conditions inside a smog chamber. A thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (TAG) and Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) were used to measure the changes in molecular comosition and bulk primary organic aerosol. From the measured changes in molecular composition, we calculated effective OH rate constants, effective relative rate constants, and effective uptake coefficients for molecular markers. Oxidation rates varied with marker volatility, with more volatile markers being oxidized at rates much faster than could be explained from heterogeneous oxidation. This rapid oxidation can be explained by significant gas-phase OH oxidation that dominates heterogeneous oxidation, resulting in overall oxidation lifetimes of 1 day or less. Based on our results, neglecting oxidation of molecular markers used for source apportionment could introduce significant error, since many common markers such as norhopane appear to be semivolatile under atmospheric conditions.

  3. Molecular characterization of organic matter mobilized from Bangladeshi aquifer sediment: tracking carbon compositional change during microbial utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Pracht

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioavailable organic carbon in aquifer recharge waters and sediments can fuel microbial reactions with implications for groundwater quality. A previous incubation experiment showed that sedimentary organic carbon (SOC mobilized off sandy sediment collected from an arsenic-contaminated and methanogenic aquifer in Bangladesh was bioavailable; it was transformed into methane. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to molecularly characterize this mobilized SOC, reference its composition against dissolved organic carbon (DOC in surface recharge water, track compositional changes during incubation, and advance understanding of microbial processing of organic carbon in anaerobic environments. Organic carbon mobilized off aquifer sediment was more diverse, proportionately larger, more aromatic, and more oxidized than DOC in surface recharge. Mobilized SOC was predominately composed of terrestrially derived organic matter and had characteristics signifying that it evaded microbial processing within the aquifer. Approximately 50 % of identified compounds in mobilized SOC and in DOC from surface recharge water contained sulfur. During incubation, after mobilized SOC was converted into methane, new organosulfur compounds with high S-to-C ratios and a high nominal oxidation state of carbon (NOSC were detected. We reason that these detected compounds formed abiotically following microbial reduction of sulfate to sulfide, which could have occurred during incubation but was not directly measured or that they were microbially synthesized. Most notably, microbes transformed all carbon types during incubation, including those currently considered thermodynamically unviable for microbes to degrade in anaerobic conditions (i.e., those with a low NOSC. In anaerobic environments, energy yields from redox reactions are small and the amount of energy required to remove electrons from highly reduced carbon substrates during oxidation decreases the thermodynamic

  4. Molecular characterization of organic matter mobilized from Bangladeshi aquifer sediment: tracking carbon compositional change during microbial utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracht, Lara E.; Tfaily, Malak M.; Ardissono, Robert J.; Neumann, Rebecca B.

    2018-03-01

    Bioavailable organic carbon in aquifer recharge waters and sediments can fuel microbial reactions with implications for groundwater quality. A previous incubation experiment showed that sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) mobilized off sandy sediment collected from an arsenic-contaminated and methanogenic aquifer in Bangladesh was bioavailable; it was transformed into methane. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to molecularly characterize this mobilized SOC, reference its composition against dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface recharge water, track compositional changes during incubation, and advance understanding of microbial processing of organic carbon in anaerobic environments. Organic carbon mobilized off aquifer sediment was more diverse, proportionately larger, more aromatic, and more oxidized than DOC in surface recharge. Mobilized SOC was predominately composed of terrestrially derived organic matter and had characteristics signifying that it evaded microbial processing within the aquifer. Approximately 50 % of identified compounds in mobilized SOC and in DOC from surface recharge water contained sulfur. During incubation, after mobilized SOC was converted into methane, new organosulfur compounds with high S-to-C ratios and a high nominal oxidation state of carbon (NOSC) were detected. We reason that these detected compounds formed abiotically following microbial reduction of sulfate to sulfide, which could have occurred during incubation but was not directly measured or that they were microbially synthesized. Most notably, microbes transformed all carbon types during incubation, including those currently considered thermodynamically unviable for microbes to degrade in anaerobic conditions (i.e., those with a low NOSC). In anaerobic environments, energy yields from redox reactions are small and the amount of energy required to remove electrons from highly reduced carbon substrates during oxidation decreases the thermodynamic favorability of

  5. Towards Molecular Characterization of Mineral-Organic Matter Interface Using In Situ Liquid Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Yu, X. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Organo-Mineral-Microbe interactions in terrestrial ecosystems are of great interest. Quite a few models have been developed through extensive efforts in this field. However, predictions from current models are far from being accurate, and many debates still exist. One of the major reasons is that most experimental data generated from bulk analysis, and the information of molecular dynamics occurring at mineral-organic matter interface is rare. Such information has been difficult to obtain, due to lack of suitable in situ analysis tools. Recently, we have developed in situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory1, and it has shown promise to provide both elemental and molecular information at vacuum-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces.2 In this presentation, we demonstrate that in situ liquid SIMS can provide critical molecular information at solid substrate-live biofilm interface.3 Shewanella oneidensis is used as a model micro-organism and silicon nitride as a model mineral surface. Of particular interest, biologically relevant water clusters have been first observed in the living biofilms. Characteristic fragments of biofilm matrix components such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids can be molecularly examined. Furthermore, characteristic fatty acids (e.g., palmitic acid), quinolone signal, and riboflavin fragments were found to respond after the biofilm is treated with Cr(VI), leading to biofilm dispersal. Significant changes in water clusters and quorum sensing signals indicative of intercellular communication in the aqueous environment were observed, suggesting that they might result in fatty acid synthesis and inhibition of riboflavin production. The Cr(VI) reduction seems to follow the Mtr pathway leading to Cr(III) formation. Our approach potentially opens a new avenue for in-situ understanding of mineral-organo or mineral-microbe interfaces using in situ liquid SIMS and super resolution fluorescence

  6. Molecularly organic/inorganic hybrid hollow mesoporous organosilica nanocapsules with tumor-specific biodegradability and enhanced chemotherapeutic functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Chen, Yu; Lin, Han; Yu, Luodan; Zhang, Linlin; Wang, Liying; Zhu, Yufang; Shi, Jianlin

    2017-05-01

    Based on the intrinsic features of high stability and unique multifunctionality, inorganic nanoparticles have shown remarkable potentials in combating cancer, but their biodegradability and biocompatibility are still under debate. As a paradigm, this work successfully demonstrates that framework organic-inorganic hybridization can endow the inorganic mesoporous silica nanocarriers with unique tumor-sensitive biodegradability and high biocompatibility. Based on a "chemical homology" mechanism, molecularly organic-inorganic hybridized hollow mesoporous organosilica nanocapsules (HMONs) with high dispersity and sub-50 nm particle dimension were constructed in mass production. A physiologically active disulfide bond (SS) was directly incorporated into the silica framework, which could break up upon contacting the reducing microenvironment of tumor tissue and biodegrade accordingly. Such a tumor-specific biodegradability is also responsible for the tumor-responsive drug releasing by the fast biodegradation and disintegration of the framework. The ultrasmall particle size of HMONs guarantees their high accumulation into tumor tissue, thus causing the high chemotherapeutic outcome. This research provides a paradigm that framework organic-inorganic hybridization can endow the inorganic nanocarrier with unique biological effects suitable for biomedical application, benefiting the development of novel nanosystems with the unique bio-functionality and performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Complex Formation of Selected Radionuclides with Ligands Commonly Found in Ground Water: Low Molecular Organic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bror Skytte; Jensen, H.

    1985-01-01

    A general approach to the analysis of potentiometric data on complex formation between cations and polybasic amphoteric acids is described. The method is used for the characterisation of complex formation between Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, La 3+, and Eu3+ with a α-hydroxy acids, tartaric acid and citric acid......, and with the α-amino acids, aspartic acid and L-cysteine. The cations have been chosen as typical components of reactor waste, and the acids because they are often found as products of microbial activity in pits or wherever organic material decays...

  8. A Redox-Active Bistable Molecular Switch Mounted inside a Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qishui; Sun, Junling; Li, Peng; Hod, Idan; Moghadam, Peyman Z; Kean, Zachary S; Snurr, Randall Q; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-11-02

    We describe the incorporation of a bistable mechanically interlocked molecule (MIM) into a robust Zr-based metal-organic framework (MOF), NU-1000, by employing a post-synthetic functionalization protocol. On average, close to two bistable [2]catenanes can be incorporated per repeating unit of the hexagonal channels of NU-1000. The reversible redox-switching of the bistable [2]catenanes is retained inside the MOF, as evidenced by solid-state UV-vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. This research demonstrates that bistable MIMs are capable of exhibiting robust dynamics inside the nanopores of a MOF.

  9. Molecular Dependence of the Large Seebeck Effect in \\tau-type Organic Conductors

    OpenAIRE

    Aizawa, Hirohito; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Yoshino, Harukazu; Mousdis, George A.; Papavassiliou, George C.; Murata, Keizo

    2014-01-01

    We study the Seebeck effect in the $\\tau$-type organic conductors, $\\tau$-(EDO-$S$,$S$-DMEDT-TTF)$_{2}$(AuBr$_{2}$)$_{1+y}$ and $\\tau$-(P-$S$,$S$-DMEDT-TTF)$_{2}$(AuBr$_{2}$)$_{1+y}$, where EDO-$S$,$S$-DMEDT-TTF and P-$S$,$S$-DMEDT-TTF are abbreviated as OOSS and NNSS, respectively, both experimentally and theoretically. Theoretically in particular, we perform first-principles band calculation for the two materials and construct a two-orbital model, on the basis of which we calculate the Seeb...

  10. Highly simplified small molecular phosphorescent organic light emitting devices with a solution-processed single layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaokui Wang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A highly simplified single layer solution-processed phosphorescent organic light emitting device (PHOLED with the maximum ηP 11.5 lm/W corresponding to EQE 9.6% has been demonstrated. The solution-processed device is shown having comparable even exceeding device performance to vacuum-processed PHOLED. The simplified device design strategy represents a pathway toward large area, low cost and high efficiency OLEDs in the future. The charge injection and conduction mechanisms in two solution- and vacuum-processed devices are also investigated by evaluating the temperature dependence of current density – voltage characteristics.

  11. Enhanced mechanical stability of interlayer dielectrics with self-organized molecular pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Akanksha

    final product. It has been shown in this thesis that the pores introduced through structural arrangement of atoms can provide much better mechanical and chemical reliability during the fabrication process as compared to the pores introduced through removal of large segments of material from the sample. Electrical properties of the material are measured using ellipsometer and changes in properties with processes like annealing and plasma exposure are discussed in detail. Mechanical properties of the material are measured using nano-indentation and ball indentation tests. To study the molecular structure and changes in molecular structure with processes like annealing, FTIR and XPS techniques are used. An alternative curing method for traditional subtractive films has also been proposed to enhance the material's resistance to viscoplastic deformation.

  12. Organic Semiconductor-Containing Supramolecules: Effect of Small Molecule Crystallization and Molecular Packing

    KAUST Repository

    Rancatore, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-21

    © 2016 American Chemical Society. Small molecules (SMs) with unique optical or electronic properties provide an opportunity to incorporate functionality into block copolymer (BCP)-based supramolecules. However, the assembly of supramolecules based on these highly crystalline molecules differs from their less crystalline counterparts. Here, two families of organic semiconductor SMs are investigated, where the composition of the crystalline core, the location (side- vs end-functionalization) of the alkyl solubilizing groups, and the constitution (branched vs linear) of the alkyl groups are varied. With these SMs, we present a systematic study of how the phase behavior of the SMs affects the overall assembly of these organic semiconductor-based supramolecules. The incorporation of SMs has a large effect on the interfacial curvature, the supramolecular periodicity, and the overall supramolecular morphology. The crystal packing of the SM within the supramolecule does not necessarily lead to the assembly of the comb block within the BCP microdomains, as is normally observed for alkyl-containing supramolecules. An unusual lamellar morphology with a wavy interface between the microdomains is observed due to changes in the packing structure of the small molecule within BCP microdomains. Since the supramolecular approach is modular and small molecules can be readily switched out, present studies provide useful guidance toward access supramolecular assemblies over several length scales using optically active and semiconducting small molecules.

  13. Molecular Characterization of Organosulfur Compounds in Biodiesel and Diesel Fuel Secondary Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, Sandra L.; Macmillan, Amanda C.; Drozd, Greg T.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana; Shaw, Jared B.; Tolic, Nikola; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2017-01-03

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA), formed in a process of photooxidization of diesel fuel, biodiesel fuel, and 20% biodiesel fuel/80% diesel fuel mixture, are prepared under high-NOx conditions in the presence and absence of sulfur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), and relative humidity (RH). The composition of condensed-phase organic compounds in SOA is measured using several analytical techniques including aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), high-resolution nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI/HRMS), and ultra high resolution and mass accuracy 21T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (21T FT-ICR MS). Results demonstrate that sulfuric acid and condensed organosulfur species formed in photooxidation experiments with SO2 are present in the SOA particles. Fewer organosulfur species are formed in the high humidity experiments, performed at RH 90%, in comparison with experiments done under dry conditions. There is a strong overlap of organosulfur species observed in this study with previous field and chamber studies of SOA. Many mass spectrometry peaks of organosulfates (R–OS(O)2OH) in field studies previously designated as biogenic or of unknown origin might have originated from anthropogenic sources, such as photooxidation of hydrocarbons present in diesel and biodiesel fuel.

  14. The quest for rationalizing the magnetism in purely organic semiquinone-bridged bisdithiazolyl molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumanal, Maria; Deumal, Mercè

    2016-07-27

    Semiquinone-bridged bisdithiazolyl-based radicals (XBBO) are appealing purely organic magnetic building blocks for the synthesis of new functional materials. Remarkably, for the phenyl-derivative PhBBO, the rationalization of its magnetism becomes a proof of concept that DFT can dramatically fail to evaluate JAB magnetic interactions between purely organic radical pairs. Instead, wavefunction-based methods are required. Once JAB's are fully characterized, the magnetic topology of PhBBO is disclosed to consist of ferromagnetic FM π-stacks that are very weakly coupled (by FM and AFM JAB interactions). The magnetic susceptibility χT(T) and magnetization M(H) of PhBBO are then calculated using a first-principles bottom-up approach. The study of the unit cell contraction upon cooling from room temperature to zero-Kelvin is relevant to propose a suitable model for the phase transition that occurs at 4.5 K. A simplistic picture tells us that the antiparallel-aligned 1D-FM-chains convert into domains of weakly either FM- or AFM-coupled 1D-FM-chains. Accordingly, the presence of these domains may introduce geometrical spin frustration below 4.5 K.

  15. Molecular cloning and organization of two leghaemoglobin genomic sequences of soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D.; Brisson, N.; Goodchild, B.; Verma, D. P. S.

    1981-02-01

    The leghaemoglobins (Lb) are myoglobin-like proteins found in all nitrogen-fixing root nodules of legumes1-3. They are encoded by plant nuclear genes4 which are specifically induced and form the predominant protein in nodules developed in symbiosis with the appropriate species of Rhizobium. The Lb is located in the host-cell cytoplasm of the infected cell5 and is thought to facilitate oxygen diffusion6,7. Amino acid sequencing of the soybean Lbs has revealed at least four primary structures differing only in a few amino acids8-10. We have previously estimated about 40 copies of Lb sequences in the soybean (Glycine max L.) genome by cDNA hybridization4. To investigate Lb gene organization and function, we prepared and characterized a Lb cDNA recombinant molecule, pLb1, and used it to isolate two genomic Lb sequences from a library constructed in Charon 4. We report here that the organization of the two genomic Lb sequences is quite distinct and one of them seems to have an intervening sequence(s). Hybridization of pLb1 with genomic DNA from various tissues showed that Lb sequences are dispersed through more than 30 kilobases of genomic DNA and that there is no apparent sequence rearrangement or methylation changes following induction of Lb genes.

  16. Organic matter source and degradation as revealed by molecular biomarkers in agricultural soils of Yuanyang terrace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangfang; Pan, Bo; Zhang, Di; Yang, Xiaolei; Li, Hao; Liao, Shaohua; Ghaffar, Abdul; Peng, Hongbo; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-06-05

    Three soils with different tillage activities were collected and compared for their organic matter sources and degradation. Two soils (TD and TP) with human activities showed more diverse of chemicals in both free lipids and CuO oxidation products than the one (NS) without human activities. Branched alkanoic acids only accounted for less than 5% of lipids, indicating limited microbial inputs in all three investigated soils. The degradation of lignin in NS and TD was relatively higher than TP, probably because of the chemical degradation, most likely UV light-involved photodegradation. Lignin parameters obtained from CuO oxidation products confirmed that woody gymnosperm tissue (such as pine trees) may be the main source for NS, while angiosperm tissues from vascular plant may be the predominant source for the lignins in TD and TP. Analysis of BPCAs illustrated that BC in NS may be mainly originated from soot or other fossil carbon sources, whereas BC in TD and TP may be produced during corn stalk and straw burning. BC was involved in mineral interactions for TD and TP. The dynamics of organic matter needs to be extensively examined for their nonideal interactions with contaminants.

  17. Organic matter source and degradation as revealed by molecular biomarkers in agricultural soils of Yuanyang terrace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangfang; Pan, Bo; Zhang, Di; Yang, Xiaolei; Li, Hao; Liao, Shaohua; Ghaffar, Abdul; Peng, Hongbo; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-06-01

    Three soils with different tillage activities were collected and compared for their organic matter sources and degradation. Two soils (TD and TP) with human activities showed more diverse of chemicals in both free lipids and CuO oxidation products than the one (NS) without human activities. Branched alkanoic acids only accounted for less than 5% of lipids, indicating limited microbial inputs in all three investigated soils. The degradation of lignin in NS and TD was relatively higher than TP, probably because of the chemical degradation, most likely UV light-involved photodegradation. Lignin parameters obtained from CuO oxidation products confirmed that woody gymnosperm tissue (such as pine trees) may be the main source for NS, while angiosperm tissues from vascular plant may be the predominant source for the lignins in TD and TP. Analysis of BPCAs illustrated that BC in NS may be mainly originated from soot or other fossil carbon sources, whereas BC in TD and TP may be produced during corn stalk and straw burning. BC was involved in mineral interactions for TD and TP. The dynamics of organic matter needs to be extensively examined for their nonideal interactions with contaminants.

  18. Molecular and structural organization of lipids in foods: their fate during digestion and impact in nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meynier Anne

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipids are basic constituents of our diet. They play an active part in the acceptability, flavour and perception of our foods. At the same time, they are also regarded as beneficial for health or as sources to various pathologies. Until now, the nutritional impact of the various dietary lipid structures beyond the amounts of ingested lipids and selected fatty acids has been marginally taken into account in nutritional studies and thus in food application. This review gathers first our current knowledge on the diversity of molecular and supramolecular structures of dietary lipids, and then based on the scientific studies carried out on the human model, tempts to sum up the current knowledge and the latest hypotheses concerning the metabolic and nutritional effects of these multiscale structures. It is shown that the perception of lipids in the mouth during oral processing modulates the production of digestive fluids and food intake. Then, during the stomach and intestine phases of lipid digestion, the kinetics of release of the fatty acids are modulated by the multiscale structures of lipids influencing the fatty acid bioaccessibility and rate of absorption. In turn this may impair the post-absorption metabolism and nutritional effects. Future trends of research are evoked as concluding remarks.

  19. CD151 accelerates breast cancer by regulating alpha 6 integrin function, signaling, and molecular organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuwei H; Richardson, Andrea L; Torres-Arzayus, Maria I; Zhou, Pengcheng; Sharma, Chandan; Kazarov, Alexander R; Andzelm, Milena M; Strominger, Jack L; Brown, Myles; Hemler, Martin E

    2008-05-01

    CD151, a master regulator of laminin-binding integrins (alpha(6)beta(4), alpha(6)beta(1), and alpha(3)beta(1)), assembles these integrins into complexes called tetraspanin-enriched microdomains. CD151 protein expression is elevated in 31% of human breast cancers and is even more elevated in high-grade (40%) and estrogen receptor-negative (45%) subtypes. The latter includes triple-negative (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 negative) basal-like tumors. CD151 ablation markedly reduced basal-like mammary cell migration, invasion, spreading, and signaling (through FAK, Rac1, and lck) while disrupting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-alpha(6) integrin collaboration. Underlying these defects, CD151 ablation redistributed alpha(6)beta(4) integrins subcellularly and severed molecular links between integrins and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains. In a prototypical basal-like mammary tumor line, CD151 ablation notably delayed tumor progression in ectopic and orthotopic xenograft models. These results (a) establish that CD151-alpha(6) integrin complexes play a functional role in basal-like mammary tumor progression; (b) emphasize that alpha(6) integrins function via CD151 linkage in the context of tetraspanin-enriched microdomains; and (c) point to potential relevance of CD151 as a high-priority therapeutic target, with relative selectivity (compared with laminin-binding integrins) for pathologic rather than normal physiology.

  20. Hydrophilicity and Microsolvation of an Organic Molecule Resolved on the Sub-molecular Level by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucht, Karsten; Loose, Dirk; Ruschmeier, Maximilian; Strotkötter, Valerie; Dyker, Gerald; Morgenstern, Karina

    2018-01-26

    Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy was used to follow the formation of a solvation shell around an adsorbed functionalized azo dye from the attachment of the first water molecule to a fully solvated molecule. Specific functional groups bind initially one water molecule each, which act as anchor points for additional water molecules. Further water attachment occurs in areas close to these functional groups even when the functional groups themselves are already saturated. In contrast, water molecules surround the hydrophobic parts of the molecule only when the two-dimensional solvation shell closes around them. This study thus traces hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of an organic molecule down to a sub-molecular length scale. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Volatile organic compound and formaldehyde emissions from Populus davidiana wood treated with low molecular weight urea-formaldehyde resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Xian; Shen, Jun; Lei, Cheng-Shuai; Feng, Qi

    2014-09-01

    Populus davidiana wood was usually impregnated with low molecular weight thermosetting resins to improve its physical and mechanical properties. However, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde emitted from treated wood have lead to poor indoor air quality (IAQ). The trends of VOC and formaldehyde emissions as a function of the weight percent gain (WPG) factor were mainly investigated in this work. Aldehydes and alkanes were the predominant compositions indentified in the VOC emissions, although low amount of ketones, terpenes and alcohols were also found. With the increase in WPG, VOC and formaldehyde concentrations improved. However, their concentration began to decrease when WPG was over 44.06% (VOC) and 36.35% (formaldehyde), respectively. The modulus of elasticity (MOE) of untreated and treated wood at different WPG levels was detected. It showed that treatment of wood with UF resin significantly improved the mechanical properties. Therefore, it is probably helpful to comprehensively analyze correlations among environmental performance, mechanical performance and processing costs.

  2. Fireball as the result of self-organization of an ensemble of diamagnetic electron-ion nanoparticles in molecular gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopasov, V. P., E-mail: lopas@iao.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Zuev Institute for Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    The conditions for dissipative self-organization of a fireball (FB) is a molecular gas by means of a regular correction of an elastic collision of water and nitrogen molecules by the field of a coherent bi-harmonic light wave (BLW) are presented. The BWL field is generated due to conversion of energy of a linear lightning discharge into light energy. A FB consists of two components: an ensemble of optically active diamagnetic electron-ion nanoparticles and a standing wave of elliptical polarization (SWEP). It is shown that the FB lifetime depends on the energies accumulated by nanoparticles and the SWEP field and on the stability of self-oscillations of the energy between nanoparticles and SWEP.

  3. Molecular Theory of Detonation Initiation: Insight from First Principles Modeling of the Decomposition Mechanisms of Organic Nitro Energetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V. Tsyshevsky

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a concept, which assumes that thermal decomposition processes play a major role in defining the sensitivity of organic energetic materials to detonation initiation. As a science and engineering community we are still far away from having a comprehensive molecular detonation initiation theory in a widely agreed upon form. However, recent advances in experimental and theoretical methods allow for a constructive and rigorous approach to design and test the theory or at least some of its fundamental building blocks. In this review, we analyzed a set of select experimental and theoretical articles, which were augmented by our own first principles modeling and simulations, to reveal new trends in energetic materials and to refine known existing correlations between their structures, properties, and functions. Our consideration is intentionally limited to the processes of thermally stimulated chemical reactions at the earliest stage of decomposition of molecules and materials containing defects.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a helicene-based imidazolium salt and its application in organic molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Jan; Zadny, Jaroslav; Strasak, Tomas; Kubala, Martin; Sykora, Jan; Dusek, Michal; Cirkva, Vladimir; Matejka, Pavel; Krbal, Milos; Vacek, Jan

    2015-02-02

    Herein we demonstrate the synthesis of a helicene-based imidazolium salt. The salt was prepared by starting from racemic 2-methyl[6]helicene, which undergoes radical bromination to yield 2-(bromomethyl)[6]helicene. Subsequent treatment with 1-butylimidazole leads to the corresponding salt 1-butyl-3-(2-methyl[6]helicenyl)-imidazolium bromide. The prepared salt was subsequently characterized by using NMR spectroscopy and X-ray analysis, various optical spectrometric techniques, and computational chemistry tools. Finally, the imidazolium salt was immobilized onto a SiO2 substrate as a crystalline or amorphous deposit. The deposited layers were used for the development of organic molecular semiconductor devices and the construction of a fully reversible humidity sensor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Preparation, characterization and application of organic-inorganic hybrid ractopamine multi-template molecularly imprinted capillary monolithic column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinxing; Fang, Guozhen; Deng, Qiliang; Wang, Shuo

    2011-04-29

    Four isomers of ractopamine used as multi-template molecule, a molecularly imprinted capillary monolithic column was prepared by organic-inorganic hybrid method. The prepared imprinting capillary monolithic columns were characterized by SEM and FTIR, evaluated under capillary electrochromatograhy and the effect of electroosmotic flow and selectivity were studied in detail. It was found that the prepared imprinted monolithic column had good flow-through property when the ratio of methanol and toluene was 3:2. The result indicated that the imprinted monolithic column has good selectivity for four isomers of ractopamine, and under the conditions of pH value of buffer solution was 7 and 10% acetonitrile content in buffer, four isomers of ractopamine could be separated completely. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Biological Parameters and Molecular Markers of Clone CL Brener - The Reference Organism of the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Zingales

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Clone CL Brener is the reference organism used in the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Project. Some biological parameters of CL Brener were determined: (a the doubling time of epimastigote forms cultured in liver infusion-tryptose (LIT medium at 28oC is 58±13 hr; (b differentiation of epimastigotes to metacyclic trypomastigotes is obtained by incubation in LIT-20% Grace´s medium; (c trypomastigotes infect mammalian cultured cells and perform the complete intracellular cycle at 33 and 37oC; (d blood forms are highly infective to mice; (e blood forms are susceptible to nifurtimox and benznidazole. The molecular typing of CL Brener has been determined: (a isoenzymatic profiles are characteristic of zymodeme ZB; (b PCR amplification of a 24Sa ribosomal RNA sequence indicates it belongs to T. cruzi lineage 1; (c schizodeme, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and DNA fingerprinting analyses were performed

  7. Toward Molecular Magnets of Organic Origin via Anion-π Interaction Involving m-Aminyl Diradical: A Theoretical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Debojit; Shil, Suranjan; Misra, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Here we study a set of novel magnetic organic molecular species with different halide ions (fluoride, chloride, bromide) absorbed ∼2 Å above or below the center of an aromatic π-ring in an m-aminyl diradical. Focus is on the nature of anion-π interaction and its impact on magnetic properties......, specifically on magnetic anisotropy and on intramolecular magnetic exchange coupling. In the development of single molecule magnets, magnetic anisotropy is considered to be the most influential factor. A new insight regarding the magnetic anisotropy that determines the barrier height for relaxation...... of magnetization of m-aminyl diradical-derived anionic complexes is obtained from calculations of the axial zero-field-splitting (ZFS) parameter D. The noncovalent anion-π interaction strongly influences magnetic anisotropy in m-aminyl-halide diradical complexes. In particular, the change of D values from positive...

  8. Chemical oxidative and solid state synthesis of low molecular weight polymers for organic field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, Rajashree Y.; Dharmapurikar, Satej S.; Chini, Mrinmoy Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Solution processability of the precursor molecules is a major issue owing to their limited solubility for the synthesis of conjugated polymers. Therefore, we favour the solvent free solid state chemical oxidative polymerization route for the synthesis of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) based donor-acceptor (D-A) type conjugated polymers. D-A type polymer Poly(S-OD-EDOT) which contains DPP coupled with EDOT donor units is synthesized via solid state polymerization method. The polymer is employed as an active layer for organic field-effect transistors to measure charge transport properties. The Polymer shows good hole mobility 3.1 × 10-2 cm2 V-1 s-1, with a on/off ratio of 1.1 × 103.

  9. Control of ozonolysis kinetics and aerosol yield by nuances in the molecular structure of volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Rebecca M.; Petrucci, Giuseppe A.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) plays integral roles in climate and human health, yet there remains a limited understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation and ultimate fate, as evidenced by a disparity between modeled atmospheric SOA loadings and field measurements. This disparity highlights the need for a more accurate representation of the molecular-level interactions between SOA sources and oxidative pathways. Due to the paucity of detailed chemical data for most SOA precursors of atmospheric relevance, models generally predict SOA loadings using structure activity relationships generalized to classes of SOA precursors. However, the kinetics and SOA forming potential of molecules are nuanced by seemingly minor structural differences in parent molecules that may be neglected in models. Laboratory chamber studies were used to measure SOA yields and rate constants for the ozonolysis of several linear, cyclic and oxygenated C5-C7 alkenes whose molecular structure vary in the site of unsaturation and/or the presence/position of functional groups and that represent atmospherically relevant classes of molecules. For the alkenes studied in this work, we found greater SOA yields for cyclic compounds compared to their linear analogs. For 1-alkenes, SOA yield increased with carbon number but was also dependent on the position of the double bond (internal vs terminal). Both the identity and position of oxygenated functional groups influenced SOA yield and kinetics through steric and electronic effects. Additionally, terminal alkenes generally resulted in a greater SOA yield than analogous internal alkenes, indicating that the position of the double bond in alkenes plays an important role in its atmospheric fate. Herein, we demonstrate the nuanced behavior of these ozonolysis reactions and discuss relationships between parent compound molecular structure and SOA yield and kinetics.

  10. Absorption spectroscopy of colored dissolved organic carbon in Georgia (USA rivers: the impact of molecular size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle McELVAINE

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic carbon (DOC was collected in six rivers that transect the coastal plain of Georgia in July 1999 and February 2000. DOC concentrations ranged from 4.9 to 40.7 g m-3 and from 7.1 to 40.5 g m-3, respectively. The absorption coefficient at 440 nm was highly correlated with DOC concentration, suggesting that the optical parameter may be utilized for rapid estimation of DOC in these waters. The isolated DOC was separated into fractions of operationally defined molecular size, using an ultrafiltration technique that yielded three fractions: 50 ("large" kilodalton. The smallest fraction was the most abundant (>50% in 4 rivers in July and in all rivers in February, and considerably more abundant than in previous years. The wavelength-dependent absorption of the total DOC and its fractions showed approximately uniform shape of a curve declining exponentially with the increase of wavelength. The average slope of logarithmically transformed curves was 0.0151 and 0.0159 nm-1, for the material collected in July and February, respectively and showed a dependence on DOC molecular size. In unfractionated DOC samples, the mass-specific light absorption determined at 440 nm was on average 0.33 m2 g-1 in July, and 0.26 m2 g-1 in February. The mass-specific absorption coefficient in all fractions ranged between 0.085 and 1.347 m2 g-1 in July and between 0.085 and 1.877 m2 g-1 in February, and was positively correlated with the molecular size of the measured samples. The results of the reported study clearly suggest that the specific absorption coefficient of the yellow substance is an outcome of the relative contribution of its different size fractions.

  11. Design of perylene diimides for organic solar cell: Effect of molecular steric hindrance and extended conjugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozma, Erika, E-mail: erika.kozma@ismac.cnr.it [Istituto per lo Studio delle Macromolecole, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 20133 Milano (Italy); Kotowski, Dariusz; Catellani, Marinella; Luzzati, Silvia [Istituto per lo Studio delle Macromolecole, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cavazzini, Marco; Bossi, Alberto; Orlandi, Simonetta [Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 20133 Milano (Italy); Bertini, Fabio [Istituto per lo Studio delle Macromolecole, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-08-01

    Core-substituted perylene diimides (PDI) are promising candidates as n-type semiconductor materials for organic photovoltaics. The chemical functionalization of perylene diimides in the bay positions is a versatile tool to obtain a series of electron acceptor materials with tunable electron affinity. These materials usually feature a donor-acceptor D-A structure in which the electron withdrawing PDI core is covalently linked with different electron donating chemical groups. The structural and electronic properties of the substituents define and modulate the optical/electrical properties of the semiconductor and the performance as photovoltaic material. In this work we designed two PDI molecules with D-A-D structure using spirobifluorene group as substituent directly linked to the perylene core (PDI-SF) and with insertion of a bithiophene moiety (PDI-BSF). In both molecules we found a reduced tendency to form aggregates in the solid state thanks to the cross-shaped rigid structure and strong steric hindrance of the spirobifluorene group. Additionally, in the case of PDI-BSF the presence of the bithiophene linker contributes significantly to extend the conjugation, resulting in a panchromatic absorption in the whole visible to NIR region. We present the synthesis of these materials and their characterisation in terms of absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and computational calculations. Finally we show preliminary results of their use as active components in P3HT/PDIs bulk heterojunction solar cells. - Highlights: • New D-A-D n-type materials have been synthesized. • PDI-SF and PDI-BSF were used as acceptors in organic solar cells. • Performances of 1.32% were achieved in blend with P3HT in a BHJ conventional architecture.

  12. Genetic and molecular analyses of PEG10 reveal new aspects of genomic organization, transcription and translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Lux

    Full Text Available The paternally expressed gene PEG10 is a retrotransposon derived gene adapted through mammalian evolution located on human chromosome 7q21. PEG10 codes for at least two proteins, PEG10-RF1 and PEG10-RF1/2, by -1 frameshift translation. Overexpression or reinduced PEG10 expression was seen in malignancies, like hepatocellular carcinoma or B-cell acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PEG10 was also shown to promote adipocyte differentiation. Experimental evidence suggests that the PEG10-RF1 protein is an inhibitor of apoptosis and mediates cell proliferation. Here we present new data on the genomic organization of PEG10 by identifying the major transcription start site, a new splice variant and report the cloning and analysis of 1.9 kb of the PEG10 promoter. Furthermore, we show for the first time that PEG10 translation is initiated at a non-AUG start codon upstream of the previously predicted AUG codon as well as at the AUG codon. The finding that PEG10 translation is initiated at different sides adds a new aspect to the already interesting feature of PEG10's -1 frameshift translation mechanism. It is now important to unravel the cellular functions of the PEG10 protein variants and how they are related to normal or pathological conditions. The generated promoter-reporter constructs can be used for future studies to investigate how PEG10 expression is regulated. In summary, our study provides new data on the genomic organization as well as expression and translation of PEG10, a prerequisite in order to study and understand the role of PEG10 in cancer, embryonic development and normal cell homeostasis.

  13. Wastewater contamination in Antarctic melt-water streams evidenced by virological and organic molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tort, L F L; Iglesias, K; Bueno, C; Lizasoain, A; Salvo, M; Cristina, J; Kandratavicius, N; Pérez, L; Figueira, R; Bícego, M C; Taniguchi, S; Venturini, N; Brugnoli, E; Colina, R; Victoria, M

    2017-12-31

    Human activities in the Antarctica including tourism and scientific research have been raised substantially in the last century with the concomitant impact on the Antarctic ecosystems through the release of wastewater mainly from different scientific stations activities. The aim of this study was to assess the wastewater contamination of surface waters and sediments of three melt-water streams (11 sites) by leaking septic tanks located in the vicinity of the Uruguayan Scientific Station in the Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica, during summer 2015. For this purpose, we combined the analysis of fecal steroids in sediments by using gas chromatography and six enteric viruses in surface waters by quantitative and qualitative PCR. Coprostanol concentrations (from 0.03 to 3.31μgg -1 ) and fecal steroids diagnostic ratios indicated that stations C7 and C8 located in the kitchen stream presented sewage contamination. Rotavirus was the only enteric virus detected in five sites with concentration ranging from 1.2×10 5 gcL - 1 to 5.1×10 5 gcL - 1 being three of them located downstream from the leaking AINA and Kitchen septic tanks. This study shows for the first time the presence of both virological and molecular biomarkers of wastewater pollution in surface waters and sediments of three melt-water streams in the vicinity of a scientific station in the Antarctica. These results highlight the importance of the complementation of these biomarkers in two different matrices (surface waters and sediments) to assess wastewater pollution in an Antarctic environment related to anthropogenic activities in the area. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Organic solution-processible electroluminescent molecular glasses for non-doped standard red OLEDs with electrically stable chromaticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Xiaoman; Zuo, Weiwei; Liu, Yingliang, E-mail: liuylxn@sohu.com; Zhang, Zhenru; Zeng, Cen; Xu, Shengang; Cao, Shaokui, E-mail: caoshaokui@zzu.edu.cn

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The D–A–D electroluminescent molecular glasses are synthesized. • Non-doped red electroluminescent film is fabricated by spin-coating. • Red OLED shows stable wavelength, luminous efficiency and chromaticity. • CIE1931 coordinate is in accord with standard red light in PAL system. - Abstract: Organic light-emitting molecular glasses (OEMGs) are synthesized through the introduction of nonplanar donor and branched aliphatic chain into electroluminescent emitters. The target OEMGs are characterized by {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR, IR, UV–vis and fluorescent spectra as well as elemental analysis, TG and DSC. The results indicated that the optical, electrochemical and electroluminescent properties of OEMGs are adjusted successfully by the replacement of electron-donating group. The non-doped OLED device with a standard red electroluminescent emission is achieved by spin-coating the THF solution of OEMG with a triphenylamine moiety. This non-doped red OLED device takes on an electrically stable electroluminescent performance, including the stable maximum electroluminescent wavelength of 640 nm, the stable luminous efficiency of 2.4 cd/A and the stable CIE1931 coordinate of (x, y) = (0.64, 0.35), which is basically in accord with the CIE1931 coordinate (x, y) = (0.64, 0.33) of standard red light in PAL system.

  15. Identification and analysis of low molecular weight dissolved organic carbon in subglacial basal ice ecosystems by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, E. C.; Wadham, J. L.; Lis, G. P.; Tranter, M.; Pickard, A. E.; Stibal, M.; Dewsbury, P.; Fitzsimons, S.

    2015-08-01

    Glacial runoff is an important source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) for downstream heterotrophic activity, despite the low overall DOC concentrations. This is because of the abundance of bioavailable, low molecular weight (LMW) DOC species. However, the provenance and character of LMW-DOC is not fully understood. We investigated the abundance and composition of DOC in subglacial environments via a molecular level DOC analysis of basal ice, which forms by water/sediment freeze-on to the glacier sole. Spectrofluorometry and a novel ion chromatographic method, which has been little utilised in glacial science for LMW-DOC determinations, were employed to identify and quantify the major LMW fractions (free amino acids, carbohydrates and carboxylic acids) in basal ice from four glaciers, each with a different basal debris type. Basal ice from Joyce Glacier (Antarctica) was unique in that 98 % of the LMW-DOC was derived from the extremely diverse FAA pool, comprising 14 FAAs. LMW-DOC concentrations in basal ice were dependent on the bioavailability of the overridden organic carbon (OC), which in turn, was influenced by the type of overridden material. Mean LMW-DOC concentrations in basal ice from Russell Glacier (Greenland), Finsterwalderbreen (Svalbard) and Engabreen (Norway) were low (0-417 nM C), attributed to the relatively refractory nature of the OC in the overridden paleosols and bedrock. In contrast, mean LMW-DOC concentrations were an order of magnitude higher (4430 nM C) in basal ice from Joyce Glacier, a reflection of the high bioavailability of the overridden lacustrine material (>17 % of the sediment OC comprised extractable carbohydrates, a proxy for bioavailable OC). We find that the overridden material may act as a direct (via abiotic leaching) and indirect (via microbial cycling) source of DOC to the subglacial environment and provides a range of LMW-DOC compounds that may stimulate microbial activity in wet sediments in current subglacial

  16. Detection of human adenoviruses in organic fresh produce using molecular and cell culture-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Elisabet; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte

    2016-08-02

    The consumption of organic fresh produce has increased in recent years due to consumer demand for healthy foods without chemical additives. However, the number of foodborne outbreaks associated with fresh produce has also increased. Contamination of food with enteric viruses is a major concern because the viruses have a low infectious dose and high persistence in the environment. Human adenovirus (HAdV) has been proposed as a good marker of faecal contamination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the plaque assay (PA), real time PCR (qPCR) and integrated cell culture-RT-qPCR (ICC-RT-qPCR) for the recovery of HAdV from artificially and naturally contaminated fresh produce. Organic lettuce, strawberries and green onions were selected because these fresh products are frequently associated with foodborne outbreaks. The virus extraction efficiencies from artificially contaminated samples varied from 2.8% to 32.8% depending on the food matrix and the quantification method used. Although the HAdV recoveries determined by qPCR were higher than those determined by PA and ICC-RT-qPCR, PA was defined as the most reproducible method. The qPCR assays were more sensitive than the PA and ICC-RT-qPCR assays; however, this technique alone did not provide information about the viability of the pathogen. ICC-RT-qPCR was more sensitive than PA for detecting infectious particles in fresh produce samples. HAdV genome copies were detected in 93.3% of the analysed naturally contaminated samples, attesting to the common faecal contamination of the fresh produce tested. However, only 33.3% of the total samples were positive for infectious HAdV particles based on ICC-RT-qPCR. In conclusion, this study reported that HAdV can be an efficient viral marker for fresh produce contamination. Good detection of infectious HAdV was obtained with the ICC-RT-qPCR and PA assays. Thus, we suggest that the ICC-RT-qPCR and PA assays should be considered when quantitative

  17. RESEARCH ON THE ELECTRONIC AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYMER AND OTHER ORGANIC MOLECULAR THIN FILMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALEXEI G. VITUKHNOVSKY; IGOR I. SOBELMAN - RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

    1995-09-06

    Optical properties of highly ordered films of poly(p-phenylene) (PPP) on different substrates, thin films of mixtures of conjugated polymers, of fullerene and its composition with polymers, molecular J-aggregates of cyanine dyes in frozen matrices have been studied within the framework of the Agreement. Procedures of preparation of high-quality vacuum deposited PPP films on different substrates (ITO, Si, GaAs and etc.) were developed. Using time-correlated single photon counting technique and fluorescence spectroscopy the high quality of PPP films has been confirmed. Dependence of structure and optical properties on the conditions of preparation were investigated. The fluorescence lifetime and spectra of highly oriented vacuum deposited PPP films were studied as a function of the degree of polymerization. It was shown for the first time that the maximum fluorescence quantum yield is achieved for the chain length approximately equal to 35 monomer units. The selective excitation of luminescence of thin films of PPP was performed in the temperature range from 5 to 300 K. The total intensity of luminescence monotonically decreases with decreasing temperature. Conditions of preparation of highly cristallyne fullerene C{sub 60} films by the method of vacuum deposition were found. Composites of C{sub 60} with conjugated polymers PPV and polyacetylene (PA) were prepared. The results on fluorescence quenching, IR and resonant Raman spectroscopy are consistent with earlier reported ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer from PPV to C{sub 60} and show that the electron transfer is absent in the case of the PA-C{sub 60} composition. Strong quenching of PPV fluorescence was observed in the PPV-PA blends. The electron transfer from PPV to PA can be considered as one of the possible mechanisms of this quenching. The dynamics of photoexcitations in different types of J-aggregates of the carbocyanine dye was studied at different temperatures in frozen matrices. The optical

  18. Fe(III) photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) by low-molecular-weight organic acids with α-OH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jun; Mao, J.-D.; Gong Hui; Lan Yeqing

    2009-01-01

    The photochemical reduction of Cr(VI) by four low-molecular-weight organic acids (tartaric acid, citric acid, malic acid, and n-butyric acid) in the presence of either dissolved Fe(III) in dilute aqueous solution or adsorbed Fe(III) on clay mineral surfaces (kaolinite, montmorillonite and illite) was investigated using batch reactors at a pH range from 3.5 to 4.5 at 25 deg. C. The results indicate that Fe(III) photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) by organic acids with α-OH is extremely fast. During a reaction period when less than 80% initial Cr(VI) was consumed, the reaction can be described as pseudo-first-order with respect to Cr(VI) when organic acid in excess. By plotting ln[Cr(VI)] as a function of reaction time, rate constants of Cr(VI) reduction by organic acids are obtained. The rate constants involving the four acids are in the order: tartaric acid (with 2 carboxylic groups and 2 α-OH groups) > citric acid (with 3 carboxylic groups and 1 α-OH group) ∼ malic acid (with 2 carboxylic groups and 1 α-OH group) >> n-butyric acid (with 1 carboxylic group and no α-OH group). This order suggests that the number of α-OH but not the number of carboxylic groups is an important determinant of kinetics. With light, the reduction of Cr(VI) by citric acid is accelerated by clay minerals. The enhancement of Cr(VI) reduction is attributed to the catalysis of Fe(III) adsorbed on clay mineral surfaces. However, such an acceleration is markedly suppressed by introducing NaF into the reaction system since NaF forms a complex with Fe(III). It is concluded that the complex formation between Fe(III) and organic acid is a key step for the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of Fe(III) and organic acids with α-OH.

  19. Molecular composition of soil organic matter with land-use change along a bi-continental mean annual temperature gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Oliva; Haddix, Michelle L; Conant, Richard T; Paul, Eldor A; Simpson, Myrna J

    2016-12-15

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is critical for maintaining soil fertility and long-term agricultural sustainability. The molecular composition of SOM is likely altered due to global climate and land-use change; but rarely are these two aspects studied in tandem. Here we used molecular-level techniques to examine SOM composition along a bi-continental (from North to South America) mean annual temperature (MAT) gradient from seven native grassland/forest and cultivated/pasture sites. Biomarker methods included solvent extraction, base hydrolysis and cupric (II) oxide oxidation for the analysis of free lipids of plant and microbial origin, ester-bound lipids from cutin and suberin, and lignin-derived phenols, respectively. Solid-state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to examine the overall composition of SOM. Soil cultivation was found to increase the amount of microbial-derived compounds at warmer temperatures (up to 17% increase). The cultivated soils were characterized by much lower contributions of plant-derived SOM components compared to the native soils (up to 64% lower at the coldest site). In addition, cultivation caused an increase in lignin and cutin degradation (up to 68 and 15% increase, respectively), and an increase in the amount of suberin-derived inputs (up to 54% increase). Clear differences in the molecular composition of SOM due to soil cultivation were observed in soils of varying mineral composition and were attributed to disturbance, different vegetation inputs, soil aggregate destruction and MAT. A high organic allophanic tropical soil was characterized by its protection of carbohydrates and nitrogen-containing compounds. The conversion of native to cultivated land shows significant shifts in the degradation stage of SOM. In particular, cutin-derived compounds which are believed to be part of the stable SOM pool may undergo enhanced degradation with long-term cultivation and disruption of soil aggregates. On a per year basis, the total

  20. Quantification of contributions of molecular fragments for eye irritation of organic chemicals using QSAR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Supratik; Roy, Kunal

    2014-05-01

    The eye irritation potential of chemicals has largely been evaluated using the Draize rabbit-eye test for a very long time. The Draize eye-irritation data on 38 compounds established by the European Center for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) has been used in the present quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis in order to predict molar-adjusted eye scores (MES) and determine possible structural requisites and attributes that are primarily responsible for the eye irritation caused by the studied solutes. The developed model was rigorously validated internally as well as externally by applying principles of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The test for applicability domain was also carried out in order to check the reliability of the predictions. Important fragments contributing to higher MES values of the solutes were identified through critical analysis and interpretation of the developed model. Considering all the identified structural attributes, one can choose or design safe solutes with low eye irritant properties. The presented approach suggests a model for use in the context of virtual screening of relevant solute libraries. The developed QSAR model can be used to predict existing as well as future chemicals falling within the applicability domain of the model in order to reduce the use of animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multidimensional Nature of Molecular Organic Conductors Revealed by Angular Magnetoresistance Oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashupati Dhakal, Harukazu Yoshino, Jeong-Il Oh, Koichi Kikuchi, Michael J. Naughton

    2012-09-01

    Angle-dependent magnetoresistance experiments on organic conductors exhibit a wide range of angular oscillations associated with the dimensionality and symmetry of the crystal structure and electron energy dispersion. In particular, characteristics associated with 1, 2, and 3-dimensional electronic motion are separately revealed when a sample is rotated through different crystal planes in a magnetic field. Originally discovered in the TMTSF-based conductors, these effects are particularly pronounced in the related system (DMET){sub 2}I{sub 3}. Here, experimental and computational results for magnetoresistance oscillations in this material, over a wide range of magnetic field orientations, are presented in such a manner as to uniquely highlight this multidimensional behavior. The calculations employ the Boltzmann transport equation that incorporates the system's triclinic crystal structure, which allows for accurate estimates of the transfer integrals along the crystallographic axes, verifying the 1D, 2D and 3D nature of (DMET){sub 2}I{sub 3}, as well as crossovers between dimensions in the electronic behavior.

  2. Molecular marker study of extractable organic matter in aerosols from urban areas of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Sheng, Guoying; Chen, Xiaojing; Fu, Jiamo; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Yuping

    The solvent-extractable compounds (lipids) of aerosol samples, which were collected from a western suburb of Beijing, in the city of Guiyang and on the outskirts of Guangzhou, P.R. China, using a standard high volume air sampler, were investigated to determine the distributions of homologous compounds and biomarkers. These preliminary results show that all samples contain aliphatic hydrocarbons including n-alkanes, steranes and triterpanes, derived from both biogenic sources (vascular plant wax input) and fossil fuel contamination (coal, crude oil, etc.). Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, which are considered to be combustion products from fossil fuels such as petroleum and, especially in this case, coal burning, are also widely distributed in all samples. Oxygenated compounds (e.g. alkanoic acids, alkanones and alkanols) are present as major fractions and are derived from mainly natural sources. Furthermore, some compositional differences are observed for the organic compounds in samples from different heights above ground. This is interpreted to be due to dilution at higher levels of locally generated aerosol with upper air aerosol transported over longer distances.

  3. Detecting aphid predation by earwigs in organic citrus orchards using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeu-Dalmau, C; Piñol, J; Agustí, N

    2012-10-01

    Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphidoidea) can damage citrus trees via direct damage to leaves and flowers or via the indirect transmission of viruses. Predators such as the European earwig, Forficula auricularia Linnaeus (Dermaptera: Forficulidae), may assist in keeping aphid populations under control in citrus orchards. Group-specific primers were developed to detect aphid DNA in earwigs, in order to determine earwig predation rates in aphids in Mediterranean organic citrus trees. These primers were designed in accordance with the alignment of comparable sequences of aphids and earwigs, and they amplified a 224 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) region. Following the consumption of three to five Aphis spiraecola Patch, aphid DNA was still detectable in 50% of earwigs one day after the ingestion. When predation was evaluated in the field, aphid DNA was detected in earwigs in May, June and July but not in April and August. The most interesting result is that of May, when aphid abundance was very low but 30% of the earwigs tested positive for aphid DNA. This finding suggests that earwigs are important aphid predators in citrus orchards, as they probably alter aphid dynamics as a result of early seasonal pressure on this pest.

  4. Physiological and Molecular Changes in Various Biological Organisms Cultured under Simulated Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udave, Ceasar

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity is one of the most import factors in space flight where its impact on living biological organisms is concerned. Many different ailments have been reported in astronauts such as spaceflight related osteopenia, cardiovascular concerns, and loss of eye sight. In order to understand why µg causes these issues we must understand what is happening at the most basic of biological structures, the cell. The work done in this report is a culmination of contributions made to a much larger project. The project seeks to understand how cellular physiology is changing in SMG conditions and use this knowledge to feed into a follow-up study on the genetic changes that are seen in SMG environments. Cells were imaged using confocal microscopy after 20hrs and 48hrs in a 3D clinostat called the Gravite. Lengths, widths, heights, and total cell areas were measured using an image analysis software package ImageJ. There were significant differences in lengths and widths of cell nuclei, and total area of cell coverage. The report then discusses some of the problems with the testing apparatus and how 3D printing technology may be used to create better sample holders for the 3D clinostat.

  5. Theory of magnetoresistance of organic molecular tunnel junctions with nonmagnetic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sha; Xie, Zuoti; Liu, Feilong; Smith, Darryl L.; Frisbie, C. Daniel; Ruden, P. Paul

    2017-04-01

    Large room-temperature magnetoresistance observed for devices composed of self-assembled monolayers of different oligophenylene thiols sandwiched between gold contacts has recently been reported [Z. Xie, S. Shi, F. Liu, D. L. Smith, P. P. Ruden, and C. D. Frisbie, ACS Nano 10, 8571 (2016), 10.1021/acsnano.6b03853]. The transport mechanism through the organic molecules was determined to be nonresonant tunneling. To explain this kind of magnetoresistance, we develop an analytical model based on the interaction of the tunneling charge carrier with an unpaired charge carrier populating a contact-molecule interface state. The Coulomb interaction between carriers causes the transmission coefficients to depend on their relative spin orientation. Singlet and triplet pairing of the tunneling and the interface carriers thus correspond to separate conduction channels with different transmission probabilities. Spin relaxation enabling transitions between the different channels, and therefore tending to maximize the tunneling current for a given applied bias, can be suppressed by relatively small magnetic fields, leading to large magnetoresistance. Our model elucidates how the Coulomb interaction gives rise to transmission probabilities that depend on spin and how an applied magnetic field can inhibit transitions between different spin configurations.

  6. A multi-molecular marker assessment of organic pollution in shore sediments from the Río de la Plata Estuary, SW Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Natalia; Bícego, Márcia C; Taniguchi, Satie; Sasaki, Silvio T; García-Rodríguez, Felipe; Brugnoli, Ernesto; Muniz, Pablo

    2015-02-28

    Organic pollution was evaluated in surface sediments along the middle portion of the Río de la Plata Estuary, SW Atlantic. A multi-molecular marker approach was performed to identify major sources of organic compounds using diagnostic indices. The relative contribution of different sources of hydrocarbons was quantified by source apportionment employing Principal Component Analysis/Multiple Linear Regression (PCA/MLR) as chemometric technique. All molecular markers indicated high chronic organic pollution in the stations of Montevideo Bay. Main sources of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were petroleum inputs and combustion, due to oil transport and refinement, harbour activities and vehicular emissions. Major sources of linear alkylbenzenes and steroids were industrial and domestic sewage. Although, significant anthropogenic inputs, a natural footprint of terrestrial higher plants contribution was recognized. Multi-molecular marker and comprehensive assessments can improve the establishment of more precise regulation actions to reduce pollution levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of low molecular weight organic acids on controlling pH in coastal sea water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, H.

    2015-12-01

    Series investigation of the Jiaozhou Bay, China, observed existences of three low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs), including lactic acid, acetic acid and formic acid, with high concentration in the sea water. Generally, their amount accounted for about 20% of DOC in the sea water of the bay. Human activities around the bay were considered as the major source of the LMWOAs. Also, long term detection showed that the pH value in the Jiaozhou Bay was lower than that in the adjacent Yellow Sea. On average, the difference of pH values between the bay and the Yellow was about 0.2. Due to higher concentrations of the LMWOAs, their contribution to lower pH value of the bay should not be ignored. To validate the effect of LMWOAs on the pH value of the bay, a new software was developed to calculate the pH value in the sea water samples based on alkalinity by adding three items of the three organic acids in the expression. Compared to the traditional pH calculating software, the new software could improve the calculating results significantly. Our results confirmed that LMWOAs was an important control factor to adjust pH values in coastal area.

  8. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature.

  9. Effect of low-molecular-weight organic acids on the adsorption of norfloxacin in typical variable charge soils of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-qiang; Dong, Yuan-hua

    2008-03-01

    Batch equilibrium experiments were used to study the adsorption of norfloxacin (NOR) onto three kinds of variable charge soils in China, namely Rho-Udic Ferralisols collected from Yunnan, Ali-Perudic Ferrisols collected from Jiangxi and Typ-Hap-Udic Ferralisols collected from Guangdong. Results show that NOR is strongly adsorbed by the soils, with lg Kd-values (linear model) of 4.41+/-0.01, 4.50+/-0.02, 4.44+/-0.01 and lg Kf-values (Freundlich model) of 4.32, 4.45, 3.08 for the three tested soils, respectively. Both curves of the Freundlich equation and Langmuir equation for the three soils were in excellent linear correlation. Low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids, including citric acid, malic acid and salicylic acid were added in the presence of acetate buffer (pH 4.5) to test their effects on NOR adsorption. It was observed that the addition of LMW organic acids inhibited the NOR adsorption process. It was assumed that several effects, including soil pH, solid surface charge and competitive adsorption of co-existing cations, dominated the NOR sorption processes onto variable charge soils. Further studies should be performed to reveal the mechanism of the adsorption.

  10. Investigating the composition of organic aerosol resulting from cyclohexene ozonolysis: low molecular weight and heterogeneous reaction products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Hamilton

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of organic aerosol formed from the gas phase ozonolysis of cyclohexene has been investigated in a smog chamber experiment. Comprehensive gas chromatography with time of flight mass spectrometric detection was used to determine that dicarboxylic acids and corresponding cyclic anhydrides dominated the small gas phase reaction products found in aerosol sampled during the first hour after initial aerosol formation. Structural analysis of larger more polar molecules was performed using liquid chromatography with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry. This indicated that the majority of identified organic mass was in dimer form, built up from combinations of the most abundant small acid molecules, with frequent indication of the inclusion of adipic acid. Trimers and tetramers potentially formed via similar acid combinations were also observed in lower abundances. Tandem mass spectral data indicated dimers with either acid anhydride or ester functionalities as the linkage between monomers. High-resolution mass spectrometry identified the molecular formulae of the most abundant dimer species to be C10H16O6, C11H18O6, C10H14O8 and C11H16O8 and could be used in some cases to reduce uncertainty in exact chemical structure determination by tandem MS.

  11. Molecular and isotopic characterization of the particulate organic matter from an eutrophic coastal bay in SE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalas, Francine A.; Carreira, Renato S.; Macko, Stephen A.; Wagener, Angela L. R.

    2009-10-01

    The present work aimed at studying the origin of particulate organic matter in Guanabara Bay and in some rivers of the Guanabara basin by using elemental composition, isotopic ratios (δ13C and δ15N) and molecular markers (sterols) in samples collected in two periods (winter and summer). Elemental and isotopic compositions were determined by dry combustion and mass spectrometry, respectively, while sterols were investigated by GC-FID and GC-MS. Higher sterol concentrations were present in the north-western part of the bay in winter (5.10-23.5 μg L-1). The high abundance of algal sterols (26-57% of total sterols), the elemental composition (C/N=6-8) and the isotopic signatures (δ13C=-21.3‰ to -15.1‰ and δ15N=+7.3‰ to +11.1‰) suggested the predominance of autochthonous organic matter, as expected for an eutrophic bay, although seasonal variation in phytoplankton activity was observed. Coprostanol concentration (fecal sterol) was at least one order of magnitude higher in the particulate material from fluvial samples (4.65-55.98 μg L-1) than in the bay waters (<0.33 μg L-1). This could be ascribed to a combination of factors including efficient particle removal to sediments in the estuarine transition zone, dilution with bay water and bacterial degradation during particle transport in the water column.

  12. Organic layers at metal/electrolyte interfaces: molecular structure and reactivity of viologen monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, Stephan; Pham, Duc T; Huemann, Sascha; Gentz, Knud; Zoerlein, Caroline; Wandelt, Klaus; Broekmann, Peter; Hunger, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of viologens (1,1'-disubstituted-4,4'-bipyridinium molecules) on a chloride-modified copper electrode has been studied using a combination of cyclic voltammetry (CV), in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and ex-situ photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Two prototypes of viologens could be identified with respect to their redox behavior upon adsorption, namely those which retain (non-reactive adsorption) and those which change their redox state (reactive adsorption) upon interaction with the chloride-modified copper surface at given potential. The first class of viologens represented by 1,1'-dibenzyl-4,4'-bipyridinium molecules (dibenzyl-viologens, abbreviated as DBV) can be adsorbed and stabilized on this electrode surface in their di-cationic state at potentials more positive than the reduction potential of the solution species. XPS N1s core level shifts verify that the adsorbed DBV molecules on the electrode are in their oxidized di-cationic state. Electrostatic attraction between the partially solvated viologen di-cations and the anionic chloride layer is discussed as the main driving force for the DBV stabilization on the electrode surface. Analysis of the N1s and O1s core level shifts points to a non-reactive DBV adsorption leaving the DBV ads 2+ solvation shell partly intact. The laterally ordered DBV ads 2+ monolayer turns out to be hydrophilic with at least four water molecules per viologen present within this cationic organic film. The analysis of the Cl2p core level reveals that no further chloride species are present at the surface besides those which are specifically adsorbed, i.e. which are in direct contact with the metallic copper surface underneath the organic layer. The reduction of these adsorbed DBV ads 2+ surface species takes place only in the same potential regime where the solvated DBV aq 2+ bulk solution species react and is accompanied by a pronounced structural change from the di-cationic 'cavitand'-structure to a

  13. Organic layers at metal/electrolyte interfaces: molecular structure and reactivity of viologen monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, Stephan; Pham, Duc T; Huemann, Sascha; Gentz, Knud; Zoerlein, Caroline; Wandelt, Klaus; Broekmann, Peter [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Bonn, Wegelerstreet 14, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Hunger, Ralf [Department of Material Science, Technical University of Darmstadt, Petersenstreet 43, 64484 Darmstadt (Germany)], E-mail: k.wandelt@pc.uni-bonn.de

    2008-12-15

    The adsorption of viologens (1,1'-disubstituted-4,4'-bipyridinium molecules) on a chloride-modified copper electrode has been studied using a combination of cyclic voltammetry (CV), in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and ex-situ photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Two prototypes of viologens could be identified with respect to their redox behavior upon adsorption, namely those which retain (non-reactive adsorption) and those which change their redox state (reactive adsorption) upon interaction with the chloride-modified copper surface at given potential. The first class of viologens represented by 1,1'-dibenzyl-4,4'-bipyridinium molecules (dibenzyl-viologens, abbreviated as DBV) can be adsorbed and stabilized on this electrode surface in their di-cationic state at potentials more positive than the reduction potential of the solution species. XPS N1s core level shifts verify that the adsorbed DBV molecules on the electrode are in their oxidized di-cationic state. Electrostatic attraction between the partially solvated viologen di-cations and the anionic chloride layer is discussed as the main driving force for the DBV stabilization on the electrode surface. Analysis of the N1s and O1s core level shifts points to a non-reactive DBV adsorption leaving the DBV{sub ads}{sup 2+} solvation shell partly intact. The laterally ordered DBV{sub ads}{sup 2+} monolayer turns out to be hydrophilic with at least four water molecules per viologen present within this cationic organic film. The analysis of the Cl2p core level reveals that no further chloride species are present at the surface besides those which are specifically adsorbed, i.e. which are in direct contact with the metallic copper surface underneath the organic layer. The reduction of these adsorbed DBV{sub ads}{sup 2+} surface species takes place only in the same potential regime where the solvated DBV{sub aq}{sup 2+} bulk solution species react and is accompanied by a pronounced structural

  14. [Water homeostasis in the living: molecular organization, osmoregulatory reflexes and evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acher, R

    2002-06-01

    Human body weight is about 70% water; 55% of the water are in cells and 45% in extracellular compartments, mainly body fluids. Each compartment has its own osmoregulatory system. The mechanisms of intracellular osmoregulation likely appeared with the cell itself, i.e. in primitive prokaryotes, some 3.8 billions years ago. Osmotic stress responses observed in present-day bacteria, yeast, plant and animals cells in culture are very similar. Variations in the cell volume entail an extension or retraction of plasma membrane that activates mechanically-gated ion channels or mechanoreceptors. Some of them have been cloned from E. coli, the nematode C. elegans, the drosophila. Osmotic stress determines an intracellular cascade of transactivations, the last transcription factor binding to a Tonicity response element (TonE) of osmoprotective genes. These genes encode enzymes synthesizing compatible osmolytes that reequilibrate the osmotic pressure. Volume and osmolality of the biological fluids (le milieu intérieur) are regulated by neuroendocrine reflexes involving an afferent neural limb from baro- and osmo-receptors to hypothalamus and an efferent endocrine limb from neurosecretory cells to target cells, the hydroosmotic cells localized in osmoregulatory organs. Afferent signals trigger the biosynthesis and the processing of neurohypophyseal preprohormones in magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of hypothalamus. Vasopressin in mammais and vasotocin in other vertebrates, endowed with antidiuretic and antinatriuretic properties, act on hydroosmotic cells localized in the nephron collecting duct. A specific vasopressin receptor, the V2 type receptor, located in the basolateral membrane of the principal cells, is coupled with an heterotridimeric protein Gs that activates adenylate cyclase. The cAMP product, in turn, stimulates the protein kinase A (PKA). The latter mobilizes 5 effectors located in the apical membrane: 1) the water channel

  15. THE MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF EPSTEINBARR VIRUS PERSISTENCE IN THE HUMAN ORGANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volyanskiy A.Yu.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review describes advances in molecular aspects of EBV infection and disease. We discuss the spectrum of clinical illness due to EBV persistent infection. The main characteristic of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is that initial infection results in lifelong persistence. EBV infects nearly all humans by the time they reach adulthood. Healthy humans have approximately 1 to 50 infected cells per million leukocytes. EBV is one of the eight known human herpesviruses. EBV virions have a doublestranded linear DNA and 100 genes had been described in virus genome. Initial infection is thought to occur in the oral compartment. The host cells of EBV are mainly lymphocytes and epithelial cells. EBV attaches to B cells via binding of the viral gp350 protein to CD21 receptor. The consequence of EBV infection is cells proliferation and differentiation into memory B lymphocyte in the germinal center. Infected memory B cells are released into the peripheral circulation. EBV persists mostly in the memory B cell. Latency is the state of persistent viral infection without active viral production. In latently infected B cells EBV virus exist as episomes. During the latent phase episomal replication occurs via host DNA polymerase. Genes of the nuclear antigens (EBNA and latent membrane proteins (LMP are transcribed during latency. These include EBNA1, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3B, EBNA3C, EBNA leader protein (EBNALP, LMP1 and LMP2 genes. All nuclear antigens are transcription transactivators which bind to cis-regulatory DNA elements of cell or virus genomes directly or in complex with other proteins. LMP2A and LMP1 can function to coordinately mimic B-cell receptor and CD40 coreceptor signaling in latently infected B cells. LMP proteins activate cell signaling systems and as the consequence different gene expression programs. Characterization of gene expression patterns in different cell lines and pathologic conditions has revealed that there are at least three different

  16. Electrical and Nonlinear Optical Studies of Specific Organic Molecular and Nonconjugated Conductive Polymeric Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ananthakrishnan

    film of poly(beta-pinene) on bare multi-mode optical fiber and doping it with iodine. The doped fibers were of excellent optical quality. Two-photon absorption experiments were conducted using these waveguides and large changes in transmission upto 28% was observed in 15cm long fiber. More work needs to be done to confirm this result. This is a significant step in the direction of making these materials a viable choice for ultrafast (femtosecond time-scale) optical devices. To summarize, these works included detailed investigations of structural, electrical and nonlinear optical characteristics of specific molecular crystal films and nonconjugated conducting polymers.

  17. Organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  18. Organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  19. Influence of the highest occupied molecular orbital energy level of the donor material on the effectiveness of the anode buffer layer in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernede, J.C.; Leriche, P.; Roncali, J. [UNAM, Moltech Anjou, CNRS, UMR 6200, Groupe Systemes Conjugues Lineaires, Angers (France); Cattin, L. [UNAM, Institut Jean Rouxel (IMN), UMR 6502, Nantes (France); Djobo, S. Ouro; Morsli, M. [Universite de Nantes, LAMP, EA 3825, Faculte des Sciences et des Techniques, Nantes (France); Kanth, S.R.B.; Patil, S. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India); Godoy, A. [University San Sebastian, Prog. Bachiller, Cs. Biolog. Qcas, Bellavista (Chile); Diaz, F.R.; Del Valle, M.A. [University Catolica Chile, Fac. Quimica, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-08-15

    Efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells based on organic electron donor/organic electron acceptor junctions can be strongly improved when the transparent conductive Anode is coated with a Buffer Layer (ABL). Here, the effects of a metal (gold) or oxide (molybdenum oxide) ABL are reported, as a function of the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) of different electron donors. The results indicate that a good matching between the work function of the anode and the highest occupied molecular orbital of the donor material is the major factor limiting the hole transfer efficiency. Indeed, gold is efficient as ABL only when the HOMO of the organic donor is close to its work function {phi}{sub Au}. Therefore we show that the MoO{sub 3} oxide has a wider field of application as ABL than gold. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Pyrolysis-Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Soil Organic Matter Composition in Chemically Isolated Fractions from Differing Land Uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plante, A. F.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Vigil, M.; Paul, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    Today's questions concerning the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in soil fertility, ecosystem functioning and global change can only be addressed through knowledge of the controls on SOM stabilization and their interactions. Pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS) provides a powerful and rapid means of assessing the biochemical composition of SOM. However, characterization of SOM composition alone is insufficient to predict its dynamic behavior. Chemical fractionation is frequently used to isolate more homogeneous SOM components, but the composition of fractions is frequently unknown. We characterized biochemical SOM composition in two previously studied soils from the USA, under contrasting land uses: cultivated agriculture and native vegetation. Bulk soils, as well as chemically isolated SOM fractions (humic acid, humin and non-acid hydrolysable), were analyzed using py-MBMS. Principal components analysis (PCA) showed distinct differences in the SOM composition of isolated fractions. Py-MBMS spectra and PCA loadings were dominated by low molecular weight fragments associated with peptides and other N-containing compounds. The py-MBMS spectra were similar for native whole-soil samples under different vegetation, while cultivation increased heterogeneity. An approach based on previously published data on marker signals also suggests the importance of peptides in distinguishing samples. While the approach described here represents significant progress in the characterization of changing SOM composition, a truly quantitative analysis will only be achieved using multiple internal standards and by correcting for inorganic interference during py-MBMS analysis. Overall, we have provided proof of principle that py-MBMS can be a powerful tool to understand the controls on SOM dynamics, and further method development is underway.

  1. Development of a novel molecular detection method for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) in Taylorella organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yasushi; Nakajima, Takuya; Akamatsu, Marie; Yahiro, Motoki; Kagawa, Shizuko; Petry, Sandrine; Matsuda, Motoo; Moore, John E

    2015-07-01

    Contagious equine metritis is a bacterial infectious disease of horses caused by Taylorella equigenitalis, a Gram-negative eubacterium. The disease has been described in several continents, including Europe, North America and Asia. A novel molecular method was developed to detect clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), which were separated by non-repetitive unique spacer regions (NRUSRs) of similar length, in the Taylorella equigenitalis EQ59 strain using a primer pair, f-/r-TeCRISPR-ladder, by PCR amplification. In total, 31 Taylorella isolates (17 T. equigenitalis and 14 Taylorella asinigenitalis) were examined. The T. equigenitalis isolates came from thoroughbred and cold-blooded horses from nine countries during 1980-1996, whilst the T. asinigenitalis isolates all originated from donkey jacks in France and the USA during 1997-2006. PAGE fractionated all of the 13 CRISPRs separated by 12 NRUSRs in T. equigenitalis EQ59. Permutation examples of CRISPRs, which were separated by NRUSRs for small-sized ladders, consisting of two doublet bands were shown. Putative CRISPRs separated by NRUSRs were amplified with 14/17 (82.4 %) geographically disparate T. equigenitalis isolates using the newly designed primer pair. Approximately 82.4 % of the T. equigenitalis isolates had CRISPRs separated by NRUSRs. The CRISPR locus was also found in the French T. asinigenitalis strain MCE3. Putative CRISPRs separated by NRUSRs were detected similarly in 4/14 (28.6 %) T. asinigenitalis isolates. Overall, a more detailed understanding of the molecular biology of CRISPRs within Taylorella organisms may help elucidate the pathogenic virulence and transmission mechanisms associated with this important equine pathogen.

  2. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S; Soeller, Christian

    2014-10-06

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of the Organic Component of Low-Molecular-Weight Chromium-Binding Substance and Its Binding of Chromium123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Watson, Heather M.; Gao, Junjie; Sinha, Sarmistha Halder; Cassady, Carolyn J.; Vincent, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Chromium was proposed to be an essential element over 50 y ago and was shown to have therapeutic potential in treating the symptoms of type 2 diabetes; however, its mechanism of action at a molecular level is unknown. One chromium-binding biomolecule, low-molecular weight chromium-binding substance (LMWCr or chromodulin), has been found to be biologically active in in vitro assays and proposed as a potential candidate for the in vivo biologically active form of chromium. Characterization of the organic component of LMWCr has proven difficult. Treating bovine LMWCr with trifluoroacetic acid followed by purification on a graphite powder micro-column generates a heptapeptide fragment of LMWCr. The peptide sequence of the fragment was analyzed by MS and tandem MS (MS/MS and MS/MS/MS) using collision-induced dissociation and post-source decay. Two candidate sequences, pEEEEGDD and pEEEGEDD (where pE is pyroglutamate), were identified from the MS/MS experiments; additional tandem MS suggests the sequence is pEEEEGDD. The N-terminal glutamate residues explain the inability to sequence LMWCr by the Edman method. Langmuir isotherms and Hill plots were used to analyze the binding constants of chromic ions to synthetic peptides similar in composition to apoLMWCr. The sequence pEEEEGDD was found to bind 4 chromic ions per peptide with nearly identical cooperativity and binding constants to those of apoLMWCr. This work should lead to further studies elucidating or eliminating a potential role for LMWCr in treating the symptoms of type 2 diabetes and other conditions resulting from improper carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. PMID:21593351

  4. A novel framework for molecular characterization of atmospherically relevant organic compounds based on collision cross section and mass-to-charge ratio

    OpenAIRE

    X. Zhang; J. E. Krechmer; J. E. Krechmer; M. Groessl; W. Xu; S. Graf; M. Cubison; J. T. Jayne; J. L. Jimenez; J. L. Jimenez; D. R. Worsnop; M. R. Canagaratna

    2016-01-01

    A new metric is introduced for representing the molecular signature of atmospherically relevant organic compounds, the collision cross section (Ω), a quantity that is related to the structure and geometry of molecules and is derived from ion mobility measurements. By combination with the mass-to-charge ratio (m∕z), a two-dimensional Ω − m∕z space is developed to facilitate the comprehensive investigation of the complex organic mixtures. A unique distribution pattern of ch...

  5. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Molecular Characterization of Aqueous Photochemistry Products of Common Types of Secondary Organic Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romonosky, Dian E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2015-03-19

    A significant fraction of atmospheric organic compounds is predominantly found in condensed phases, such as aerosol particles and cloud droplets. Many of these compounds are photolabile and can degrade through direct photolysis or indirect photooxidation processes on time scales that are comparable to the typical lifetimes of aqueous droplets (hours) and particles (days). This paper presents a systematic investigation of the molecular level composition and the extent of aqueous photochemical processing in different types of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors including α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d- limonene, α-humulene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, and guaiacol, oxidized by ozone (to simulate a remote atmosphere) or by OH in the presence of NOx (to simulate an urban atmosphere). Chamber- and flow tube-generated SOA samples were collected, extracted in a methanol/water solution, and photolyzed for 1 h under identical irradiation conditions. In these experiments, the irradiation was equivalent to about 3-8 h of exposure to the sun in its zenith. The molecular level composition of the dissolved SOA was probed before and after photolysis with direct-infusion electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HR-MS). The mass spectra of unphotolyzed SOA generated by ozone oxidation of monoterpenes showed qualitatively similar features, and contained largely overlapping subsets of identified compounds. The mass spectra of OH/NOx generated SOA had more unique visual appearance, and indicated a lower extent of products overlap. Furthermore, the fraction of nitrogen containing species (organonitrates and nitroaromatics) was highly sensitive to the SOA precursor. These observations suggest that attribution of high-resolution mass spectra in field SOA samples to specific SOA precursors should be more straightforward under OH/NOx oxidation conditions compared to the ozone driven oxidation. Comparison of the SOA constituents

  6. Photonic metal-organic framework composite spheres: a new kind of optical material with self-reporting molecular recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiecheng; Gao, Ning; Wang, Chen; Zhu, Wei; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Seidel, Philipp; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Li, Guangtao

    2014-09-01

    Exploiting metal-organic framework (MOF) materials as novel building blocks to construct superstructures with extended and enhanced functions represents a big challenge. In biological systems, the ordering of many components is not achieved by interaction of the components with each other, but by interaction of each component with the host protein which provides a matrix to support the entire assembly. Inspired by biological systems, in this work, a general strategy for efficient spatial arrangement of MOF materials was developed by using spherical colloidal crystals as host matrices, affording a new class of highly tunable MOF composite spheres with a series of distinctive properties. It was found that the synergetic combination of the unique features of both MOF and photonic colloidal crystal imparted these hierarchically structured spheres intrinsic optical properties, specific molecular recognition with self-reporting signalling, derivatization capability, and anisotropy. More importantly, the unique photonic band-gap structure integrated in these composite spheres provides a more convenient means to manipulate the photophysical and photochemical behaviour of the trapped guest molecules in MOF nanocavities.Exploiting metal-organic framework (MOF) materials as novel building blocks to construct superstructures with extended and enhanced functions represents a big challenge. In biological systems, the ordering of many components is not achieved by interaction of the components with each other, but by interaction of each component with the host protein which provides a matrix to support the entire assembly. Inspired by biological systems, in this work, a general strategy for efficient spatial arrangement of MOF materials was developed by using spherical colloidal crystals as host matrices, affording a new class of highly tunable MOF composite spheres with a series of distinctive properties. It was found that the synergetic combination of the unique features of

  7. Characterising low molecular weight dissolved organic carbon compounds in subglacial systems; implications for subglacial metabolic activity and potential downstream export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Emily; Wadham, Jemma; Lis, Grzegorz; Telling, Jon

    2010-05-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets represent ~10% of the contemporary global surface coverage, yet remain one of the least explored sectors of the Earth's biosphere. The basal regions of these ice masses, known as subglacial environments, are capable of harbouring a diverse range of microorganisms that are often metabolically active despite the lack of sunlight, the cold temperatures and nutrient scarcity. Here, we consider the potential for such environments to be active components of the Earth's biogeochemical cycles. Subglacial environments have traditionally been excluded from global carbon budgets because they were assumed to be predominantly abiotic. Organic carbon (OC) reservoirs and transformations were also believed to be limited. However, significant stores of bioavailable carbon are thought to be present in glacially-overridden material, providing a potential substrate for in situ microbial metabolism. We examine the molecular characteristics of dissolved OC in basal ice and subglacial runoff from two glacier/ice-sheet systems with contrasting organic carbon substrates; Russell/Leverett Glacier, Greenland ice sheet, and Engabreen, Norway, to determine the range of dissolved low molecular weight OC (LMWOC) compounds and their relative bioavailability. Overridden material beneath the Greenland ice sheet is relatively young and organic-rich, contrasting with the older crystalline bedrock/continental shield that was overridden during glaciation at Engabreen. We first utilise a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy and ion chromatography to identify and quantify volatile fatty acids, carbohydrates and amino acids in basal ice. Volatile fatty acids are key metabolic substrates and their provision is thought to be a primary control on subglacial metabolic activity. We then provide a temporal record of amino acids and carbohydrates in subglacial runoff from Leverett Glacier (June 23rd - August 18th 2009), and compare this with subglacial runoff from Engabreen (2008 melt

  8. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  9. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from......Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  10. Particle coating-dependent interaction of molecular weight fractionated natural organic matter: impacts on the aggregation of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yongguang; Shen, Mohai; Tan, Zhiqiang; Yu, Sujuan; Liu, Jingfu; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-06-02

    Ubiquitous natural organic matter (NOM) plays an important role in the aggregation state of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aquatic environment, which determines the transport, transformation, and toxicity of AgNPs. As various capping agents are used as coatings for nanoparticles and NOM are natural polymer mixture with wide molecular weight (MW) distribution, probing the particle coating-dependent interaction of MW fractionated natural organic matter (Mf-NOM) with various coatings is helpful for understanding the differential aggregation and transport behavior of engineered AgNPs as well as other metal nanoparticles. In this study, we investigated the role of pristine and Mf-NOM on the aggregation of AgNPs with Bare, citrate, and PVP coating (Bare-, Cit-, and PVP-AgNP) in mono- and divalent electrolyte solutions. We observed that the enhanced aggregation or dispersion of AgNPs in NOM solution highly depends on the coating of AgNPs. Pristine NOM inhibited the aggregation of Bare-AgNPs but enhanced the aggregation of PVP-AgNPs. In addition, Mf-NOM fractions have distinguishing roles on the aggregation and dispersion of AgNPs, which also highly depend on the AgNPs coating as well as the MW of Mf-NOM. Higher MW Mf-NOM (>100 kDa and 30-100 kDa) enhanced the aggregation of PVP-AgNPs in mono- and divalent electrolyte solutions, whereas lower MW Mf-NOM (10-30 kDa, 3-10 kDa and coating are important for better understanding of the transport and subsequent transformation of AgNPs in aquatic environment.

  11. Degradation of natural organic matter by UV/chlorine oxidation: Molecular decomposition, formation of oxidation byproducts and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Long; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Du, Ye; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2017-11-01

    The degradation of natural organic matters (NOMs) by the combination of UV and chlorine (UV/chlorine) was investigated in this study. UV/chlorine oxidation can effectively degrade NOMs, with the degradation of chromophores (∼80%) and fluorophores (76.4-80.8%) being more efficient than that of DOC (15.1-18.6%). This effect was attributed to the chromophores and fluorophores (double bonds, aromatic groups and phenolic groups) being preferentially degraded by UV/chlorine oxidation, particularly reactive groups with high electron donating capacity. Radical species •OH and •Cl were generated during UV/chlorine oxidation, with the contribution of •OH 1.4 times as high as that of •Cl. The degradation kinetics of different molecular weight (MW) fractions suggests that UV/chlorine oxidation degrades high MW fractions into low MW fractions, with the degradation rates of high MW fractions (>3000 Da) 4.5 times of those of medium MW fractions (1000-3000 Da). In comparison with chlorination alone, UV/chlorine oxidation did not increase the formation (30 min) and formation potential (24 h) of trihalomethanes, but instead promoted the formation and formation potential of haloacetic acids and chloral hydrate. Adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) formed from UV/chlorine oxidation of NOM were 0.8 times higher than those formed from chlorination. Cytotoxicity studies indicated that the cytotoxicity of NOM increased after both chlorination and UV/chlorine oxidation, which may be due to the formation of AOX. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A thermodynamic study of 1-propanol-glycerol-H2O at 25 degrees C: Effect of glycerol on molecular organization of H2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parsons, M.T.; Westh, Peter; Davies, J.V.

    2001-01-01

    The excess chemical potential, partial molar enthalpy, and volume of 1-propanol were determined in ternary mixtures of 1-propanol-glycerol-H2O at 25degreesC. The mole fraction dependence of all these thermodynamic functions was used to elucidate the effect of glycerol on the molecular organization...

  13. A novel framework for molecular characterization of atmospherically relevant organic compounds based on collision cross section and mass-to-charge ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Xu, Wen; Graf, Stephan; Cubison, Michael; Jayne, John T.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2016-10-01

    A new metric is introduced for representing the molecular signature of atmospherically relevant organic compounds, the collision cross section (Ω), a quantity that is related to the structure and geometry of molecules and is derived from ion mobility measurements. By combination with the mass-to-charge ratio (m/z), a two-dimensional Ω - m/z space is developed to facilitate the comprehensive investigation of the complex organic mixtures. A unique distribution pattern of chemical classes, characterized by functional groups including amine, alcohol, carbonyl, carboxylic acid, ester, and organic sulfate, is developed on the 2-D Ω - m/z space. Species of the same chemical class, despite variations in the molecular structures, tend to situate as a narrow band on the space and follow a trend line. Reactions involving changes in functionalization and fragmentation can be represented by the directionalities along or across these trend lines, thus allowing for the interpretation of atmospheric transformation mechanisms of organic species. The characteristics of trend lines for a variety of functionalities that are commonly present in the atmosphere can be predicted by the core model simulations, which provide a useful tool to identify the chemical class to which an unknown species belongs on the Ω - m/z space. Within the band produced by each chemical class on the space, molecular structural assignment can be achieved by utilizing collision-induced dissociation as well as by comparing the measured collision cross sections in the context of those obtained via molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Molecular characterization of fossil organic matter in Glyptostrobus europaeus remains from the Orawa basin (Poland). Comparison of pyrolytic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almendros, G.; Dorado, J.; Gonzalez-Vila, F.J.; Martin, F.; Sanz, J.; Alvarez-Ramis, C.; Stuchlik, L. [CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales

    1999-05-01

    Pyrolytic methods (standard Curie-point pyrolysis and pyrolysis in the presence of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), were used to analyze the organic composition of Glyptostrobus (Taxodiaceae) remains from the Miocene deposits of Lipnica Mala (Poland), consisting of branches with their leaves. The pyrolytic analysis revealed a series of aromatic compounds with a large proportion of guaiacyl-type lignin markers (including intact C{sub 3}-methoxyphenols), and small quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The alkyl compounds included fatty acid series where the C{sub 14}-C{sub 18} homologues dominated as well as additional amounts of alkanes and alkenes (maximum ca. C{sub 21}). The results suggest that lignin as well as protective epicuticular lipid polymers (including cutin and other long chain-based polyalkyl structures) selectively show the greatest degree of molecular preservation in the Glyptostrobus remains. The comparison between pyrolytic methods shows that the lignin-derived aromatic assemblages predominate in the chromatograms after conventional pyrolysis whereas thermochemolysis with TMAH leads to an `aliphatic enhancement`. This latter technique was found to be the best for analysis of the lipid signature in fossil samples with condensed polymethylene networks. 44 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. CO 2 adsorption in mono-, di- and trivalent cation-exchanged metal-organic frameworks: A molecular simulation study

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yifei

    2012-02-28

    A molecular simulation study is reported for CO 2 adsorption in rho zeolite-like metal-organic framework (rho-ZMOF) exchanged with a series of cations (Na +, K +, Rb +, Cs +, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, and Al 3+). The isosteric heat and Henry\\'s constant at infinite dilution increase monotonically with increasing charge-to-diameter ratio of cation (Cs + < Rb + < K + < Na + < Ca 2+ < Mg 2+ < Al 3+). At low pressures, cations act as preferential adsorption sites for CO 2 and the capacity follows the charge-to-diameter ratio. However, the free volume of framework becomes predominant with increasing pressure and Mg-rho-ZMOF appears to possess the highest saturation capacity. The equilibrium locations of cations are observed to shift slightly upon CO 2 adsorption. Furthermore, the adsorption selectivity of CO 2/H 2 mixture increases as Cs + < Rb + < K + < Na + < Ca 2+ < Mg 2+ ≈ Al 3+. At ambient conditions, the selectivity is in the range of 800-3000 and significantly higher than in other nanoporous materials. In the presence of 0.1% H 2O, the selectivity decreases drastically because of the competitive adsorption between H 2O and CO 2, and shows a similar value in all of the cation-exchanged rho-ZMOFs. This simulation study provides microscopic insight into the important role of cations in governing gas adsorption and separation, and suggests that the performance of ionic rho-ZMOF can be tailored by cations. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. Molecular Fractionation of Dissolved Organic Matter in a Shallow Subterranean Estuary: The Role of the Iron Curtain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkhorst, Annika; Dittmar, Thorsten; Waska, Hannelore

    2017-02-07

    Iron that precipitates under aerobic conditions in natural aquatic systems scavenges dissolved organic matter (DOM) from solution. Subterranean estuaries (STEs) are of major importance for land-ocean biogeochemical fluxes. Their specific redox boundaries, coined the "iron curtain" due to the abundance of precipitated iron(III) (oxy)hydroxides, are hot spots for the removal and redissolution of iron, associated nutrients, and DOM. We used ultra-high-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to molecularly characterize the iron-coagulating fractions of 32 groundwater and seawater DOM samples along a salinity gradient from a shallow STE on Spiekeroog Island, North Sea, Germany, and linked our findings to trace metal and nutrient concentrations. We found systematic iron coagulation of large (>450 Da), oxygen-rich, and highly aromatic DOM molecules of terrestrial origin. The extent of coagulation increased with growing terrestrial influence along the salinity gradient. Our study is the first to show that the iron curtain may be capable of retaining terrigenous DOM fractions in marine sediments. We hypothesize that the iron curtain serves as an inorganic modulator for the supply of DOM from groundwaters to the sea, and that the STE has the potential to act as a temporal storage or even sink for terrigenous aromatic DOM compounds.

  17. Photonic metal-organic framework composite spheres: a new kind of optical material with self-reporting molecular recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiecheng; Gao, Ning; Wang, Chen; Zhu, Wei; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Seidel, Philipp; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Li, Guangtao

    2014-10-21

    Exploiting metal-organic framework (MOF) materials as novel building blocks to construct superstructures with extended and enhanced functions represents a big challenge. In biological systems, the ordering of many components is not achieved by interaction of the components with each other, but by interaction of each component with the host protein which provides a matrix to support the entire assembly. Inspired by biological systems, in this work, a general strategy for efficient spatial arrangement of MOF materials was developed by using spherical colloidal crystals as host matrices, affording a new class of highly tunable MOF composite spheres with a series of distinctive properties. It was found that the synergetic combination of the unique features of both MOF and photonic colloidal crystal imparted these hierarchically structured spheres intrinsic optical properties, specific molecular recognition with self-reporting signalling, derivatization capability, and anisotropy. More importantly, the unique photonic band-gap structure integrated in these composite spheres provides a more convenient means to manipulate the photophysical and photochemical behaviour of the trapped guest molecules in MOF nanocavities.

  18. The effect of low-molecular-weight organic acids on copper toxicity in E. fetida in an acute exposure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuifan; Huang, Meiying; Yu, Jiaoda; Li, Ying; Liu, Aiqin

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, the effects of low-molecular-weight organic acids (OAs) on the toxicity of copper (Cu) to the earthworm Eisenia fetida (E. fetida) were investigated in a simulated soil solution. We exposed E. fetida to soil solution containing Cu and a variety of OAs (acetic acid, oxalic acid, citric acid, and EDTA). We found that the addition of OAs reduced the toxicity of Cu to E. fetida, where the reduction was strongest in EDTA and weakest in acetic acid. These compounds decreased the mortality rate of E. fetida that were exposed to Cu and reduced levels of antioxidant enzymes and malondialdehyde to unexposed control levels. E. fetida were exposed to Cu with OAs had reduced Cu 2+ , which were likely caused by Cu forming complexes with the OAs, reducing the availability of Cu. The presence of OAs also reduced Cu-induced damage on earthworm cellular ultrastructures and changed the subcellular distribution of Cu. These results demonstrated that OAs could reduce the toxicity, as well as the bioavailability, of heavy metals in soil solutions where both OAs and heavy metals often coexist.

  19. Metaproteomic characterization of high molecular weight dissolved organic matter in surface seawaters in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hong-Po; Wang, Da-Zhi; Xie, Zhang-Xian; Dai, Min-Han; Hong, Hua-Sheng

    2013-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important reservoir of carbon and energy in the marine environment and plays a key role in regulating the global carbon cycle. This study characterized proteins of high-molecular-weight DOM (size between 5 kDa and classification and function dominated the dissolved protein pool (43-53%) while the remaining proteins presented close similarity in biological origin among the four sampling sites. Rhodospirillaceae, Prochlorococcus, SAR11 clade and viruses were the major contributors to dissolved proteins in the HMW-DOM from surface seawaters while very few proteins were from the eukaryotic phytoplankton and no archaeal proteins were detected. Transporters with substrate specificities for nitrogen- and carbon-containing compounds (1.5% of the total spectra for each) were highly detected while no phosphate transporters were found, suggesting that carbon and nitrogen might be more limiting than phosphorus in the surface seawater. Viral proteins were assigned into three families: Myoviridae, Podoviridae and Siphoviridae, and the Myoviridae proteins were the most abundant. Among them, structure proteins were the most abundant viral proteins. This study indicated that the dissolved proteins of HMW-DOM presented compositional and biologically original homogeneity in the surface seawaters of the South China Sea, and bacteria and viruses dominated the dissolved protein pool.

  20. Glucose recovery from aqueous solutions by adsorption in metal-organic framework MIL-101: a molecular simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Krishna M.; Zhang, Kang; Jiang, Jianwen

    2015-08-01

    A molecular simulation study is reported on glucose recovery from aqueous solutions by adsorption in metal-organic framework MIL-101. The F atom of MIL-101 is identified to be the most favorable adsorption site. Among three MIL-101-X (X = H, NH2 or CH3), the parent MIL-101 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity and recovery efficacy. Upon functionalization by -NH2 or -CH3 group, the steric hindrance in MIL-101 increases; consequently, the interactions between glucose and framework become less attractive, thus reducing the capacity and mobility of glucose. The presence of ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate, as an impurity reduces the strength of hydrogen-bonding between glucose and MIL-101, and leads to lower capacity and mobility. Upon adding anti-solvent (ethanol or acetone), a similar adverse effect is observed. The simulation study provides useful structural and dynamic properties of glucose in MIL-101, and it suggests that MIL-101 might be a potential candidate for glucose recovery.

  1. Efficient Construction of Free Energy Profiles of Breathing Metal–Organic Frameworks Using Advanced Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In order to reliably predict and understand the breathing behavior of highly flexible metal–organic frameworks from thermodynamic considerations, an accurate estimation of the free energy difference between their different metastable states is a prerequisite. Herein, a variety of free energy estimation methods are thoroughly tested for their ability to construct the free energy profile as a function of the unit cell volume of MIL-53(Al). The methods comprise free energy perturbation, thermodynamic integration, umbrella sampling, metadynamics, and variationally enhanced sampling. A series of molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in the frame of each of the five methods to describe structural transformations in flexible materials with the volume as the collective variable, which offers a unique opportunity to assess their computational efficiency. Subsequently, the most efficient method, umbrella sampling, is used to construct an accurate free energy profile at different temperatures for MIL-53(Al) from first principles at the PBE+D3(BJ) level of theory. This study yields insight into the importance of the different aspects such as entropy contributions and anharmonic contributions on the resulting free energy profile. As such, this thorough study provides unparalleled insight in the thermodynamics of the large structural deformations of flexible materials. PMID:29131647

  2. Efficient Construction of Free Energy Profiles of Breathing Metal-Organic Frameworks Using Advanced Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuynck, Ruben; Rogge, Sven M J; Vanduyfhuys, Louis; Wieme, Jelle; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2017-12-12

    In order to reliably predict and understand the breathing behavior of highly flexible metal-organic frameworks from thermodynamic considerations, an accurate estimation of the free energy difference between their different metastable states is a prerequisite. Herein, a variety of free energy estimation methods are thoroughly tested for their ability to construct the free energy profile as a function of the unit cell volume of MIL-53(Al). The methods comprise free energy perturbation, thermodynamic integration, umbrella sampling, metadynamics, and variationally enhanced sampling. A series of molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in the frame of each of the five methods to describe structural transformations in flexible materials with the volume as the collective variable, which offers a unique opportunity to assess their computational efficiency. Subsequently, the most efficient method, umbrella sampling, is used to construct an accurate free energy profile at different temperatures for MIL-53(Al) from first principles at the PBE+D3(BJ) level of theory. This study yields insight into the importance of the different aspects such as entropy contributions and anharmonic contributions on the resulting free energy profile. As such, this thorough study provides unparalleled insight in the thermodynamics of the large structural deformations of flexible materials.

  3. Quantitative Fermi level tuning in amorphous organic semiconductor by molecular doping: Toward full understanding of the doping mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jin-Peng, E-mail: yangjp@yzu.edu.cn, E-mail: uenon@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Wang, Wen-Qing; Cheng, Li-Wen; Zeng, Xiang-Hua [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangzhou University, Jiangsu 225009 (China); Bussolotti, Fabio [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Li, Yan-Qing; Tang, Jian-Xin [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Kera, Satoshi [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263–8522 (Japan); Ueno, Nobuo, E-mail: yangjp@yzu.edu.cn, E-mail: uenon@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263–8522 (Japan)

    2016-08-29

    The doping mechanism in organic-semiconductor films has been quantitatively studied via ultrahigh-sensitivity ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of N,N-bis(1-naphthyl)-N,N-diphenyl-1,1-biphenyl-4,4-diamine (α-NPD) films doped with hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile [HAT(CN){sub 6}]. We observed that HOMO of α-NPD shifts to the Fermi level (E{sub F}) in two different rates with the doping concentration of HAT(CN){sub 6}, but HOMO distributions of both pristine and doped amorphous α-NPD films are excellently approximated with a same Gaussian distribution without exponential tail states over ∼5 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} eV{sup −1}. From the theoretical simulation of the HAT(CN){sub 6}-concentration dependence of the HOMO in doped films, we show that the passivation of Gaussian-distributed hole traps, which peak at 1.1 eV above the HOMO onset, occurs at ultralow doping [HAT(CN){sub 6} molecular ratio (MR) < 0.01], leading to a strong HOMO shift of ∼0.40 eV towards E{sub F}, and MR dependence of HOMO changes abruptly at MR ∼ 0.01 to a weaker dependence for MR > 0.01 due to future of the dopant acceptor level.

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of an Hsp90/70 organizing protein gene from Frankliniella occidentalis (Insecta: Thysanoptera, Thripidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Bo; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2013-05-15

    The heat shock 90/70 organizing protein (Hop), also known as Sti-1 (stress-induced protein-1), is a co-chaperone that usually mediates the interaction of Hsp90 and Hsp70 and has been extensively characterized in mammals and plants. However, its role in insects remains unknown. In the present study, we isolated and characterized a Hop homologue gene from Frankliniella occidentalis (Fohop). The Fohop contains a 1659bp ORF encoding a protein of 552 amino acids with a caculated molecular mass of approximately 62.25kDa, which displays a reasonable degree of identity with the known Hops and shares several canonical motifs, including three tetratricopeptide repeated motif domains (TPR1, TPR2A and TPR2B) and two aspartic acid-proline (DP) repeat motifs (DP1 and DP2). As in other hops, Fohop contains introns, but the number and the position are quite variable. The mRNA expression patterns indicated that Fohop was constitutively expressed throughout the developmental stages, but was obviously upregulated by heat stress both in larvae and adults. Our studies imply that Hop, as in other Hsps, may play an important role in heat shock response of F. occidentalis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular-Scale Characterization of Natural Organic Matter From A Uranium Contaminated Aquifer and its Utilization by Native Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouser, P. J.; Wilkins, M. J.; Williams, K. H.; Smith, D. F.; Paša-Tolić, L.

    2011-12-01

    The availability and form of natural organic matter (NOM) strongly influences rates of microbial metabolism and associated redox processes in subsurface environments. This is an important consideration in metal-contaminated aquifers, such as the DOE's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site, where naturally occurring suboxic conditions in groundwater may play an important function in controlling uranium mobility, and therefore the long-term stewardship of the site. Currently, the biophysiochemical processes surrounding the nature of the aquifer and its role in controlling the fate and transport of uranium are poorly understood. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI), we characterized dissolved organic matter (DOM) chemistry for three surface and groundwater sources at Rifle and assessed microbial utilization in batch incubation experiments. FT-ICR-MS uniquely offers ultrahigh mass measurement accuracy and resolving power for polar organics, in addition to enabling elemental composition assignments of these compounds. Samples were collected from the Colorado River, a shallow groundwater aquifer adjacent to the river, and a spring/seep discharge point upgradient from the aquifer. DOM was concentrated and purified from each source and analyzed using FT-ICR-MS with ESI. We identified between 6,000 and 7,000 formulae at each location, with the river sample having the smallest and the spring sample having the largest number of identified peaks. The groundwater and spring samples contained DOM with a large percentage of formulae containing nitrogen and sulfur species, while the river sample was dominated by carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen species. Less than 38% of the formulae were shared between any two samples, indicating a significant level of uniqueness across the samples. Unsaturated hydrocarbons, cellulose, and lipids were rapidly utilized by indigenous bacteria during a 24-day

  6. Digging a Little Deeper: Microbial Communities, Molecular Composition and Soil Organic Matter Turnover along Tropical Forest Soil Depth Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; McFarlane, K. J.; Heckman, K. A.; Reed, S.; Green, E. A.; Nico, P. S.; Tfaily, M. M.; Wood, T. E.; Plante, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store more carbon (C) than any other terrestrial ecosystem and exchange vast amounts of CO2, water, and energy with the atmosphere. Much of this C is leached and stored in deep soil layers where we know little about its fate or the microbial communities that drive deep soil biogeochemistry. Organic matter (OM) in tropical soils appears to be associated with mineral particles, suggesting deep soils may provide greater C stabilization. However, few studies have evaluated sub-surface soils in tropical ecosystems, including estimates of the turnover times of deep soil C, the sensitivity of this C to global environmental change, and the microorganisms involved. We quantified bulk C pools, microbial communities, molecular composition of soil organic matter, and soil radiocarbon turnover times from surface soils to 1.5m depths in multiple soil pits across the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Soil C, nitrogen, and root and microbial biomass all declined exponentially with depth; total C concentrations dropped from 5.5% at the surface to soils (Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria) versus those below the active rooting zone (Verrucomicrobia and Thaumarchaea). High resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) analyses suggest a shift in the composition of OM with depth (especially in the water soluble fraction), an increase in oxidation, and decreasing H/C with depth (indicating higher aromaticity). Additionally, surface samples were rich in lignin-like compounds of plant origin that were absent with depth. Soil OM 14C and mean turnover times were variable across replicate horizons, ranging from 3-1500 years at the surface, to 5000-40,000 years at depth. In comparison to temperate deciduous forests, these 14C values reflect far older soil C. Particulate organic matter (free light fraction), with a relatively modern 14C was found in low but measureable concentration in even the deepest soil horizons. Our results indicate these tropical subsoils contain

  7. Bulk and molecular-level characterization of laboratory-aged biomass burning organic aerosol from oak leaf and heartwood fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Fortenberry

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemical complexity of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA greatly increases with photochemical aging in the atmosphere, necessitating controlled laboratory studies to inform field observations. In these experiments, BBOA from American white oak (Quercus alba leaf and heartwood samples was generated in a custom-built emissions and combustion chamber and photochemically aged in a potential aerosol mass (PAM flow reactor. A thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG was used in parallel with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS to analyze BBOA chemical composition at different levels of photochemical aging. Individual compounds were identified and integrated to obtain relative decay rates for key molecules. A recently developed chromatogram binning positive matrix factorization (PMF technique was used to obtain mass spectral profiles for factors in TAG BBOA chromatograms, improving analysis efficiency and providing a more complete determination of unresolved complex mixture (UCM components. Additionally, the recently characterized TAG decomposition window was used to track molecular fragments created by the decomposition of thermally labile BBOA during sample desorption. We demonstrate that although most primary (freshly emitted BBOA compounds deplete with photochemical aging, certain components eluting within the TAG thermal decomposition window are instead enhanced. Specifically, the increasing trend in the decomposition m∕z 44 signal (CO2+ indicates formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in the PAM reactor. Sources of m∕z 60 (C2H4O2+, typically attributed to freshly emitted BBOA in AMS field measurements, were also investigated. From the TAG chemical speciation and decomposition window data, we observed a decrease in m∕z 60 with photochemical aging due to the decay of anhydrosugars (including levoglucosan and other compounds, as well as an increase in m∕z 60 due to the formation of

  8. Bulk and molecular-level characterization of laboratory-aged biomass burning organic aerosol from oak leaf and heartwood fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortenberry, Claire F.; Walker, Michael J.; Zhang, Yaping; Mitroo, Dhruv; Brune, William H.; Williams, Brent J.

    2018-02-01

    The chemical complexity of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) greatly increases with photochemical aging in the atmosphere, necessitating controlled laboratory studies to inform field observations. In these experiments, BBOA from American white oak (Quercus alba) leaf and heartwood samples was generated in a custom-built emissions and combustion chamber and photochemically aged in a potential aerosol mass (PAM) flow reactor. A thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) was used in parallel with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to analyze BBOA chemical composition at different levels of photochemical aging. Individual compounds were identified and integrated to obtain relative decay rates for key molecules. A recently developed chromatogram binning positive matrix factorization (PMF) technique was used to obtain mass spectral profiles for factors in TAG BBOA chromatograms, improving analysis efficiency and providing a more complete determination of unresolved complex mixture (UCM) components. Additionally, the recently characterized TAG decomposition window was used to track molecular fragments created by the decomposition of thermally labile BBOA during sample desorption. We demonstrate that although most primary (freshly emitted) BBOA compounds deplete with photochemical aging, certain components eluting within the TAG thermal decomposition window are instead enhanced. Specifically, the increasing trend in the decomposition m/z 44 signal (CO2+) indicates formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the PAM reactor. Sources of m/z 60 (C2H4O2+), typically attributed to freshly emitted BBOA in AMS field measurements, were also investigated. From the TAG chemical speciation and decomposition window data, we observed a decrease in m/z 60 with photochemical aging due to the decay of anhydrosugars (including levoglucosan) and other compounds, as well as an increase in m/z 60 due to the formation of thermally labile organic

  9. High pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) determination of dissolved organic matter molecular weight revisited: Accounting for changes in stationary phases, analytical standards, and isolation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Brandon C.; Aiken, George R.; McKnight, Diane M.; Arnold, William A.; Chin, Yu-Ping

    2018-01-01

    We reassessed the molecular weight of dissolved organic matter (DOM) determined by high pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) using measurements made with different columns and various generations of polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) molecular weight standards. Molecular weight measurements made with a newer generation HPSEC column and PSS standards from more recent lots are roughly 200 to 400 Da lower than initial measurements made in the early 1990s. These updated numbers match DOM molecular weights measured by colligative methods and fall within a range of values calculated from hydroxyl radical kinetics. These changes suggest improved accuracy of HPSEC molecular weight measurements that we attribute to improved accuracy of PSS standards and changes in the column packing. We also isolated DOM from wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) using XAD-8, a cation exchange resin, and PPL, a styrene-divinylbenzene media, and observed little difference in molecular weight and specific UV absorbance at 280 nm (SUVA280) between the two solid phase extraction resins, suggesting they capture similar DOM moieties. PPR DOM also showed lower SUVA280 at similar weights compared to DOM isolates from a global range of environments, which we attribute to oxidized sulfur in PPR DOM that would increase molecular weight without affecting SUVA280.

  10. High Pressure Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC) Determination of Dissolved Organic Matter Molecular Weight Revisited: Accounting for Changes in Stationary Phases, Analytical Standards, and Isolation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Brandon C; Aiken, George R; McKnight, Diane M; Arnold, William A; Chin, Yu-Ping

    2018-01-16

    We reassessed the molecular weight of dissolved organic matter (DOM) determined by high pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) using measurements made with different columns and various generations of polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) molecular weight standards. Molecular weight measurements made with a newer generation HPSEC column and PSS standards from more recent lots are roughly 200 to 400 Da lower than initial measurements made in the early 1990s. These updated numbers match DOM molecular weights measured by colligative methods and fall within a range of values calculated from hydroxyl radical kinetics. These changes suggest improved accuracy of HPSEC molecular weight measurements that we attribute to improved accuracy of PSS standards and changes in the column packing. We also isolated DOM from wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) using XAD-8, a cation exchange resin, and PPL, a styrene-divinylbenzene media, and observed little difference in molecular weight and specific UV absorbance at 280 nm (SUVA 280 ) between the two solid phase extraction resins, suggesting they capture similar DOM moieties. PPR DOM also showed lower SUVA 280 at similar weights compared to DOM isolates from a global range of environments, which we attribute to oxidized sulfur in PPR DOM that would increase molecular weight without affecting SUVA 280 .

  11. Investigation of hydrogenase molecular marker to optimize hydrogen production from organic wastes and effluents of agro-food industries [abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton, C.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years policy makers have started looking for alternatives to fossil fuels, not only to counter the threat of global warming, but also to reduce the risk of overdependence on imported oil and gas supplies. By contrast with hydrocarbon fuels, hydrogen (H2, whether burned directly or used in fuel cells, is intrinsically a clean energy vector with near zero emission. However the main current method of producing hydrogen, steam reforming of methane, involves the release of large quantities of greenhouse gases. So although hydrogen already accounts for around 2% of world consumption of energy, its more widespread adoption is limited by several challenges. Therefore new processes are investigated, especially those using renewable raw material, e.g. woods and organic wastes, and/or involving microorganisms. Indeed, for some algae and bacteria, the generation of molecular hydrogen is an essential part of their energy metabolism. The approach with the greatest commercial potential is fermentative hydrogen generation (dark fermentation by bacteria from the Clostridium genus. This biological process, as a part of the methane-producing anaerobic digestion process, is very promising since it allows the production of hydrogen from a wide variety of renewable resources such as carbohydrate waste from the agricultural and agro-food industries or processed urban waste and sewage. To date most publications on hydrogen production by Clostridium strains have focused on the effects of operating parameters (such as temperature, pH, dilution rate, etc.. We now need to extend this knowledge by identifying and monitoring the various different metabolic agents involved in high H2 activity. Consequently the aim of this research at the CWBI in the University of Liege is to investigate the role of [Fe] hydrogenases, the key enzymes that remove excess electrons accumulating during fermentation. Clostridium butyricum CWBI1009, the strain used for these investigations

  12. Titanium(IV) in the organic-structure-directing-agent-free synthesis of hydrophobic and large-pore molecular sieves as redox catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingui; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Junko N; Tatsumi, Takashi; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-08-10

    Titanium(IV) incorporated into the framework of molecular sieves can be used as a highly active and sustainable catalyst for the oxidation of industrially important organic molecules. Unfortunately, the current process for the incorporation of titanium(IV) requires a large amount of expensive organic molecules used as organic-structure-directing agents (OSDAs), and this significantly increases the production costs and causes environmental problems owing to the removal of OSDAs by pyrolysis. Herein, an OSDA-free process was developed to incorporate titanium(IV) into BEA-type molecular sieves for the first time. More importantly, the hydrophobic environment and the robust, 3 D, and large pore structure of the titanium(IV)-incorporated molecular sieves fabricated from the OSDA-free process created a catalyst that was extremely active and selective for the epoxidation of bulky cyclooctene in comparison to Ti-incorporated BEA-type molecular sieves synthesized with OSDAs and commercial titanosilicate TS-1. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A Unique Cellular and Molecular Microenvironment Is Present in Tertiary Lymphoid Organs of Patients with Spontaneous Prostate Cancer Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de la Luz García-Hernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveMultiple solid cancers contain tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO. However, it is unclear whether they promote tumor rejection, facilitate tumor evasion, or simply whether they are a byproduct of chronic inflammation. We hypothesize that although chronic inflammation induces TLO formation, the tumor milieu can modulate TLO organization and functions in prostate cancer. Therefore, our study seeks to elucidate the cellular and molecular signatures in unique prostatectomy specimens from evanescent carcinoma patients to identify markers of cancer regression, which could be harnessed to modulate local immunosuppression or potentially enhance TLO function.MethodsWe used multicolor immunofluorescence to stain prostate tissues, collected at different stages of cancer progression (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intermediate and advanced cancer or from patients with evanescent prostate carcinoma. Tissues were stained with antibodies specific for pro-inflammatory molecules (cyclooxygenase 2, CXCL10, IL17, tumor-infiltrating immune cells (mature DC-LAMP+ dendritic cells, CD3+ T cells, CD3+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg, T bet+ Th1 cells, granzyme B+ cytotoxic cells, and stromal cell populations (lymphatic vessels, tumor neovessels, high endothelial venules (HEV, stromal cells, which promote prostate tumor growth or are critical components of tumor-associated TLO.ResultsGenerally, inflammatory cells are located at the margins of tumors. Unexpectedly, we found TLO within prostate tumors from patients at different stages of cancer and in unique samples from patients with spontaneous cancer remission. In evanescent prostate carcinomas, accumulation of Treg was compromised, while Tbet+ T cells and CD8 T cells were abundant in tumor-associated TLO. In addition, we found a global decrease in tumor neovascularization and the coverage by cells positive for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2. Finally, consistent with tumor regression, prostate stem cell antigen was

  14. Influence of molecular structure and adsorbent properties on sorption of organic compounds to a temperature series of wood chars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattao, Charisma; Cao, Xiaoyan; Mao, Jingdong; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Pignatello, Joseph J

    2014-05-06

    Chars from wildfires and soil amendments (biochars) are strong adsorbents that can impact the fate of organic compounds in soil, yet the effects of solute and adsorbent properties on sorption are poorly understood. We studied sorption of benzene, naphthalene, and 1,4-dinitrobenzene from water to a series of wood chars made anaerobically at different heat treatment temperatures (HTT) from 300 to 700 °C, and to graphite as a nonporous, unfunctionalized reference adsorbent. Peak suppression in the NMR spectrum by sorption of the paramagnetic relaxation probe TEMPO indicated that only a small fraction of char C atoms lie near sorption sites. Sorption intensity for all solutes maximized with the 500 °C char, but failed to trend regularly with N2 or CO2 surface area, micropore volume, mesopore volume, H/C ratio, O/C ratio, aromatic fused ring size, or HTT. A model relating sorption intensity to a weighted sum of microporosity and mesoporosity was more successful. Sorption isotherm linearity declined progressively with carbonization of the char. Application of a thermodynamic model incorporating solvent-water and char-graphite partition coefficients permitted for the first time quantification of steric (size exclusion in pores) and π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) free energy contributions, relative to benzene. Steric hindrance for naphthalene increases exponentially from 9 to 16 kJ/mol (∼ 1.6-2.9 log units of sorption coefficient) with the fraction of porosity in small micropores. π-π EDA interactions of dinitrobenzene contribute -17 to -19 kJ/mol (3-3.4 log units of sorption coefficient) to sorption on graphite, but less on chars. π-π EDA interaction of naphthalene on graphite is small (-2 to 2 kJ/mol). The results show that sorption is a complex function of char properties and solute molecular structure, and not very predictable on the basis of readily determined char properties.

  15. Intramolecular deactivation processes of electronically excited Lanthanide(III) complexes with organic acids of low molecular weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burek, Katja; Eidner, Sascha; Kuke, Stefanie; Kumke, Michael U.

    2018-02-01

    The luminescence of Lanthanide(III) complexes with different model ligands was studied under direct as well as sensitized excitation conditions. The research was performed in the context of studies dealing with deep-underground storages for high-level nuclear waste. Here, Lanthanide(III) ions served as natural analogues for Actinide(III) ions and the low-molecular weight organic ligands are present in clay minerals and furthermore, they were employed as proxies for building blocks of humic substances, which are important complexing molecules in the natural environment, e.g., in the far field of a repository site. Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy was applied for a detailed characterization of Eu(III), Tb(III), Sm(III) and Dy(III) complexes in aqueous solutions. Based on the observed luminescence the ligands were tentatively divided into two groups (A, B). The luminescence of Lanthanide(III) complexes of group A was mainly influenced by an energy transfer to OH-vibrations. Lanthanide(III) complexes of group B showed ligand-related luminescence quenching, which was further investigated. To gain more information on the underlying quenching processes of group A and B ligands, measurements at different temperatures (77 K ≤ T ≤ 353 K) were performed and activation energies were determined based on an Arrhenius analysis. Moreover, the influence of the ionic strength between 0 M ≤ I ≤ 4 M on the Lanthanide(III) luminescence was monitored for different complexes, in order to evaluate the influence of specific conditions encountered in host rocks foreseen as potential repository sites.

  16. Use of self-organizing maps and molecular descriptors to predict the cytotoxic activity of sesquiterpene lactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Mariane B; Scotti, Marcus T; Ferreira, Marcelo J P; Emerenciano, Vicente P

    2008-10-01

    Some sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active compounds of a great number of traditionally medicinal plants from the Asteraceae family and possess considerable cytotoxic activity. Several studies in vitro have shown the inhibitory activity against cells derived from human carcinoma of the nasopharynx (KB). Chemical studies showed that the cytotoxic activity is due to the reaction of alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl structures of the SLs with thiols, such as cysteine. These studies support the view that SLs inhibit tumour growth by selective alkylation of growth-regulatory biological macromolecules, such as key enzymes, which control cell division, thereby inhibiting a variety of cellular functions, which directs the cells into apoptosis. In this study we investigated a set of 55 different sesquiterpene lactones, represented by 5 skeletons (22 germacranolides, 6 elemanolides, 2 eudesmanolides, 16 guaianolides and nor-derivatives and 9 pseudoguaianolides), in respect to their cytotoxic properties. The experimental results and 3D molecular descriptors were submitted to Kohonen self-organizing map (SOM) to classify (training set) and predict (test set) the cytotoxic activity. From the obtained results, it was concluded that only the geometrical descriptors showed satisfactory values. The Kohonen map obtained after training set using 25 geometrical descriptors shows a very significant match, mainly among the inactive compounds (approximately 84%). Analyzing both groups, the percentage seen is high (83%). The test set shows the highest match, where 89% of the substances had their cytotoxic activity correctly predicted. From these results, important properties for the inhibition potency are discussed for the whole dataset and for subsets of the different structural skeletons.

  17. [Determination of the distribution of relative molecular mass of organic matter by high pressure size exclusion chromatography with UV and TOC detectors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Dong, Bing-Zhi

    2012-09-01

    An on-line high pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) with UV and TOC detectors was adapted to examine the distribution of relative molecular mass of natural organic matter (NOM). Through synchronous determination of UV254 and TOC responses in a wide range of relative molecular mass, it was possible to accurately characterize the structure of NOM, especially for some non-aromatic and non-conjugated double bond organics which have low response to UV. It was found that, TOC detector was capable of detecting all kinds of organic matters, including sucrose, sodium alginate and other hydrophilic organic compounds. The sample volume had a positively linear correlation with the TOC response, indicating that the larger volume would produce stronger responses. The effect of ion strength was relatively low, shown by the small decrease of peak area (1.2% ) from none to 0.2 mol x L(-1) NaCl. The pH value of tested samples should be adjusted to neutral or acidic because when the samples were alkaline, the results might be inaccurate. Compared to the sample solvents adopted as ultrapure water, the samples prepared by mobile phase solvents had less interference to salt boundary peak. The on-line HPSEC-UV-TOC can be used accurately to characterize the distribution of relative molecular mass and its four fractions in River Xiang.

  18. Molecular sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The research in molecular sciences summarized includes photochemistry, radiation chemistry, geophysics, electromechanics, heavy-element oxidizers , heavy element chemistry collisions, atoms, organic solids. A list of publications is included

  19. Ionization Energies, Electron Affinities, and Polarization Energies of Organic Molecular Crystals: Quantitative Estimations from a Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM)–Tuned Range-Separated Density Functional Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haitao

    2016-05-16

    We propose a new methodology for the first-principles description of the electronic properties relevant for charge transport in organic molecular crystals. This methodology, which is based on the combination of a non-empirical, optimally tuned range-separated hybrid functional with the polarizable continuum model, is applied to a series of eight representative molecular semiconductor crystals. We show that it provides ionization energies, electron affinities, and transport gaps in very good agreement with experimental values as well as with the results of many-body perturbation theory within the GW approximation at a fraction of the computational costs. Hence, this approach represents an easily applicable and computationally efficient tool to estimate the gas-to-crystal-phase shifts of the frontier-orbital quasiparticle energies in organic electronic materials.

  20. The roles of bulk and interfacial molecular orientations in determining the performance of organic bilayer solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy O.

    2014-09-09

    Molecular orientation plays a significant role in determining the performance of small molecule solar cells. Key photovoltaic processes in these cells are strongly dependent on how the molecules are oriented in the active layer. We isolate contributions arising from the bulk molecular orientations vs. those from interfacial orientations in ZnPc/C60 bilayer systems and we probe these contributions by comparing device pairs in which only the bulk or the interface differ. By controlling the orientation in the bulk the current can be strongly modulated, whereas controlling the interfacial molecular orientation and degree of intermixing mediate the voltage.

  1. Analysis of Molecular Geochemistry of Soil Organic Matter from 17-year Reciprocal Transplant Experiment in Arid Ecosystem: Simulated Climate Pertubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, N. J.; Tfaily, M.; Bailey, V. L.; McCue, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Successful development of chemical profiles that link soil carbon vulnerability and resilience to climate change would greatly facilitate assessment of soil ecosystems response to global climate change. Additionally these signatures could be used to support the design of sustainable agricultural and food/energy crop security practices. We test this possibility using soils obtained from a 17-year reciprocal soil transplant experiment between two elevations in the arid environment of eastern Washington [1]. 30-cm diameter soil cores were reciprocally transplanted between the upper and lower sites. Cores were also transplanted in place to control for disturbance. Extracted subcores were incubated in environmental chambers and measured microbial respiration revealed statically a significant decrease in respiratory response as a function of temperature in cores transferred from low elevation to high elevation. We use ultra high resolution mass spectrometry to identify thousands of organic molecules and changes in geochemistry that would indicate the vulnerability of the soil ecosystem to climate perturbation. In our experiments we used methanol extraction followed by direct injection to 12 T ESI FT-ICR MS to identify about 4000 of individual compounds in about 200 mg soils at sub ppm mass accuracy. Chemical formulae were assigned to approximately 65% of the measured peaks using a modified Kujawinski pipeline and second order Kendrick transformations [2] resulted in approximately 75% assigned peaks. Our preliminary analysis finds that while the bulk C content of soils from the cooler, wetter conditions at the upper elevation is approximately twice that of the warmer, drier conditions at lower elevation, the molecular soil geochemistry is remarkably similar. Detailed analysis reveals subtle differences in the lipid, carbohydrate, and condensed hydrocarbon compositional makeup of the soil. Additionally, of the more than 17,000 individual compounds identified approximately

  2. Submicron particulate organic matter in the urban atmosphere: a new method for real-time measurement, molecular-level characterization and source apportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; D'Anna, Barbara; Tan, Wen; Wisthaler, Armin

    2017-04-01

    We used a novel chemical analytical method for measuring submicron particulate organic matter in the atmosphere of three European cities (Innsbruck, Lyon, Valencia). Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) was used in combination with the "chemical analysis of aerosol online" (CHARON) inlet for detecting particulate organic compounds on-line (i.e. without filter pre-collection), in real-time (1-min time resolution), at ng m-3 concentrations, with molecular-level resolution (i.e. obtaining molecular weight and elemental composition information). The CHARON-PTR-ToF-MS system monitored molecular tracers associated with different particle sources including levoglucosan from biomass combustion, PAHs from vehicular traffic, nicotine from cigarette smoking, and monoterpene oxidation products secondarily formed from biogenic emissions. The tracer information was used for interpreting positive matrix factorization (PMF) data which allowed us to apportion the sources of submicron particulate organic matter in the different urban environments. This work was funded through the PIMMS ITN, which was supported by the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme under grant agreement number 287382.

  3. Probing the emitter site of Renilla luciferase using small organic molecules; an attempt to understand the molecular architecture of the emitter site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Farajollah; Emamzadeh, Rahman; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Rasa, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Renilla luciferase is a sensitive enzyme and has wide applications in biotechnology such as drug screening. Previous studies have tried to show the catalytic residues, nevertheless, the accurate architecture and molecular behavior of its emitter site remains uncharacterized. In this study, the activity of Renilla luciferase, in the presence of two small organic molecules including dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and isopropanol was considered and the structure was studied by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, the interaction of small organic molecules with the Renilla luciferase was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetics studies showed that at low concentration of DMSO (16.6-66mM) and isopropanol (19.3-76mM) the K m changed and a competitive inhibition pattern was observed. Moreover, spectroscopy studies reveled that the changes of activity of Renilla luciferase in the presence of low concentrations of small organic molecules was not associated with structural collapse or severe changes in the enzyme conformation. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that DMSO and isopropanol, as probing molecules, were both able to bind to the emitter site and remained with the residues of the emitter site. Based on the probing data, the architecture of the emitter site in the "non-binding" model was proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Highly-Oriented Molecular Assembly on Monolayer Graphene for Boosting Photon Harvesting in Bilayer Organic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kilwon

    2015-03-01

    A novel approach to dramatically enhance the photon harvesting in organic solar cells was demonstrated by utilizing a graphene-organic heterointerface. A large area, residue-free monolayer graphene was inserted at anodic interface to serve as an atomically thin, transparent and highly conductive epitaxial template for organic crystal growth with specific orientation. The anisotropic nature of optoelectronic properties of organic semiconductor molecules provided a significant enhancement in exciton diffusion length, optical absorption, charge carrier lifetime as well as the energy level alignment at metal-organic and organic-organic interfaces. Especially, the exciton diffusion length increases up to nearly 100 nm, which allows the device thickness to be doubled to yield 5 times higher power conversion efficiency in comparison to conventional planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells. Theoretical simulations as well as systematic studies on the film structure and optoelectrical properties were performed to corroborate our new findings.

  5. Utilization of low molecular weight organics by soil microorganisms: combination of 13C-labelling with PLFA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna; Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Microbial metabolisation is the main transformation pathway of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), but detailed knowledge concerning the fate of LMWOS in soils is strongly limited. Considering that various LMWOS classes enter biochemical cycles at different steps, we hypothesise that the percentage of their LMWOS-Carbon (C) used for microbial biomass (MB) production and consequently medium-term stabilisation in soil is different. We traced the three main groups of LMWOS: amino acids, sugars and carboxylic acids, by uniformly labelled 13C-alanine, -glutamate, -glucose, -ribose, -acetate and -palmitate. Incorporation of 13C from these LMWOS into MB (fumigation-extraction method) and into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) (Bligh-Dyer extraction, purification and GC-C-IRMS measurement) was investigated under field conditions 3 d and 10 d after LMWOS application. The activity of microbial utilization of LMWOS for cell membrane construction was estimated by replacement of PLFA-C with 13C. Decomposition of LMWOS-C comprised 20-65% of the total label, whereas incorporation of 13C into MB amounted to 20-50% of initially applied 13C on day three and was reduced to 5-30% on day 10. Incorporation of 13C-labelled LMWOS into MB followed the trend sugars > carboxylic acids > amino acids. Differences in microbial utilisation between LMWOS were observed mainly at day 10. Thus, instead of initial rapid uptake, further metabolism within microbial cells accounts for the individual fate of C from different LMWOS in soils. Incorporation of 13C from each LMWOS into each PLFA occurred, which reflects the ubiquitous ability of all functional microbial groups for LMWOS utilization. The preferential incorporation of palmitate can be attributed to its role as a direct precursor for many fatty acids (FAs) and PLFA formation. Higher incorporation of alanine and glucose compared to glutamate, ribose and acetate reflect the preferential use of glycolysis-derived substances in the FAs

  6. The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model: a unified model with different ranges of complexity based on the molecular surrogate approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, F.; Sartelet, K.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper the Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model is presented. This model determines the partitioning of organic compounds between the gas and particle phases. It is designed to be modular with different user options depending on the computation time and the complexity required by the user. This model is based on the molecular surrogate approach, in which each surrogate compound is associated with a molecular structure to estimate some properties and parameters (hygroscopicity, absorption into the aqueous phase of particles, activity coefficients and phase separation). Each surrogate can be hydrophilic (condenses only into the aqueous phase of particles), hydrophobic (condenses only into the organic phases of particles) or both (condenses into both the aqueous and the organic phases of particles). Activity coefficients are computed with the UNIFAC (UNIversal Functional group Activity Coefficient; Fredenslund et al., 1975) thermodynamic model for short-range interactions and with the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) parameterization for medium- and long-range interactions between electrolytes and organic compounds. Phase separation is determined by Gibbs energy minimization. The user can choose between an equilibrium representation and a dynamic representation of organic aerosols (OAs). In the equilibrium representation, compounds in the particle phase are assumed to be at equilibrium with the gas phase. However, recent studies show that the organic aerosol is not at equilibrium with the gas phase because the organic phases could be semi-solid (very viscous liquid phase). The condensation-evaporation of organic compounds could then be limited by the diffusion in the organic phases due to the high viscosity. An implicit dynamic representation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) is available in SOAP with OAs divided into layers, the first layer being at the center of the particle (slowly

  7. Molecular and optical properties of tree-derived dissolved organic matter in throughfall and stemflow from live oaks and eastern red cedar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbins, Aron; Silva, Leticia M.; Dittmar, Thorsten; Van Stan, John T.

    2017-03-01

    Studies of dissolved organic matter (DOM) transport through terrestrial aquatic systems usually start at the stream. However, the interception of rainwater by vegetation marks the beginning of the terrestrial hydrological cycle making trees the headwaters of aquatic carbon cycling. Rainwater interacts with trees picking up tree-DOM, which is then exported from the tree in stemflow and throughfall. Stemflow denotes water flowing down the tree trunk, while throughfall is the water that drips through the leaves of the canopy. We report the concentrations, optical properties (light absorbance) and molecular signatures (ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry) of tree-DOM in throughfall and stemflow from two tree species (live oak and eastern red cedar) with varying epiphyte cover on Skidaway Island, Savannah, Georgia, USA. Both stemflow and throughfall were enriched in DOM compared to rainwater, indicating trees were a significant source of DOM. The optical and molecular properties of tree-DOM were broadly consistent with those of DOM in other aquatic ecosystems. Stemflow was enriched in highly colored DOM compared to throughfall. Elemental formulas identified clustered the samples into three groups: oak stemflow, oak throughfall and cedar. The molecular properties of each cluster are consistent with an autochthonous aromatic-rich source associated with the trees, their epiphytes and the microhabitats they support. Elemental formulas enriched in oak stemflow were more diverse, enriched in aromatic formulas, and of higher molecular mass than for other tree-DOM classes, suggesting greater contributions from fresh and partially modified plant-derived organics. Oak throughfall was enriched in lower molecular weight, aliphatic and sugar formulas, suggesting greater contributions from foliar surfaces. While the optical properties and the majority of the elemental formulas within tree-DOM were consistent with vascular plant-derived organics, condensed aromatic formulas were

  8. Technical Note: Molecular characterization of aerosol-derived water soluble organic carbon using ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Dickhut

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the acknowledged relevance of aerosol-derived water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC to climate and biogeochemical cycling, characterization of aerosol WSOC has been limited. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS was utilized in this study to provide detailed molecular level characterization of the high molecular weight (HMW; m/z>223 component of aerosol-derived WSOC collected from rural sites in Virginia and New York, USA. More than 3000 peaks were detected by ESI FT-ICR MS within a m/z range of 223–600 for each sample. Approximately 86% (Virginia and 78% (New York of these peaks were assigned molecular formulas using only carbon (C, hydrogen (H, oxygen (O, nitrogen (N, and sulfur (S as elemental constituents. H/C and O/C molar ratios were plotted on van Krevelen diagrams and indicated a strong contribution of lignin-like and lipid-like compounds to the aerosol-derived WSOC samples. Approximately 1–4% of the peaks in the aerosol-derived WSOC mass spectra were classified as black carbon (BC on the basis of double bond equivalents calculated from the assigned molecular formulas. In addition, several high-magnitude peaks in the mass spectra of samples from both sites corresponded to molecular formulas proposed in previous secondary organic aerosol (SOA laboratory investigations indicating that SOAs are important constituents of the WSOC. Overall, ESI FT-ICR MS provides a level of resolution adequate for detailed compositional and source information of the HMW constituents of aerosol-derived WSOC.

  9. Identification of organ-autonomous constituents of the molecular memory conferred by thyroid hormone exposure in cold temperature-arrested metamorphosing Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Hammond, S; Jackman, Kevin W; Partovi, Shireen H; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C

    2016-03-01

    Environmental temperature modulates thyroid hormone (TH)-dependent metamorphosis in some amphibian species. The North American bullfrog--Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana - tadpole is naturally adapted to a wide range of temperatures over multiple seasons. Cold temperatures delay while warmer temperatures accelerate metamorphosis. Exogenous TH exposure of premetamorphic tadpoles results in a rapid precocious induction of metamorphosis at warm temperatures (20-25 °C). The same exposure at cold temperatures (4-5 °C) does not elicit an overt metamorphic response. However, a molecular memory of TH exposure is established such that cold, TH-exposed tadpoles returned to permissive warm temperatures will rapidly execute TH-induced genetic programs. Previous mRNA profiling has identified TH-regulated transcription factors encoded by thra, thrb, thibz, klf9, and cebp1 as components of the molecular memory after one week post-exposure. However, a further hierarchy may exist within the initiation phase since many gene transcripts demonstrated tissue-specific patterns. Whether the molecular memory is organ autonomous or requires additional modulating factors is unknown. Herein we examine tail fin and back skin and determine that thibz is the only transcript that is TH-responsive after 2 days post-exposure at low temperature in both tissues in the intact animal. In back skin, cebp1 is also TH-responsive under these conditions. Serum-free tail fin organ culture (C-Fin) reveals that the thibz response is organ autonomous whereas cultured back skin (C-Skin) results suggest that thibz and cebp1 require an additional factor for induction from elsewhere within the intact animal. Subsequent investigations are now possible to identify endogenous factors that modulate the molecular memory in intact animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gemcitabine-(5'-phosphoramidate)-[anti-IGF-1R]: molecular design, synthetic organic chemistry reactions, and antineoplastic cytotoxic potency in populations of pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Cody P; Narayanan, Lakshmi

    2017-03-01

    One molecular-based approach that increases potency and reduces dose-limited sequela is the implementation of selective 'targeted' delivery strategies for conventional small molecular weight chemotherapeutic agents. Descriptions of the molecular design and organic chemistry reactions that are applicable for synthesis of covalent gemcitabine-monophosphate immunochemotherapeutics have to date not been reported. The covalent immunopharmaceutical, gemcitabine-(5'-phosphoramidate)-[anti-IGF-1R] was synthesized by reacting gemcitabine with a carbodiimide reagent to form a gemcitabine carbodiimide phosphate ester intermediate which was subsequently reacted with imidazole to create amine-reactive gemcitabine-(5'-phosphorylimidazolide) intermediate. Monoclonal anti-IGF-1R immunoglobulin was combined with gemcitabine-(5'-phosphorylimidazolide) resulting in the synthetic formation of gemcitabine-(5'-phosphoramidate)-[anti-IGF-1R]. The gemcitabine molar incorporation index for gemcitabine-(5'-phosphoramidate)-[anti-IGF-R1] was 2.67:1. Cytotoxicity Analysis - dramatic increases in antineoplastic cytotoxicity were observed at and between the gemcitabine-equivalent concentrations of 10 -9  M and 10 -7  M where lethal cancer cell death increased from 0.0% to a 93.1% maximum (100.% to 6.93% residual survival), respectively. Advantages of the organic chemistry reactions in the multistage synthesis scheme for gemcitabine-(5'-phosphoramidate)-[anti-IGF-1R] include their capacity to achieve high chemotherapeutic molar incorporation ratios; option of producing an amine-reactive chemotherapeutic intermediate that can be preserved for future synthesis applications; and non-dedicated organic chemistry reaction scheme that allows substitutions of either or both therapeutic moieties, and molecular delivery platforms. © 2016 The Authors Chemical Biology & Drug Design Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Organosilica: Chemistry of Mesoporous Organosilica in Nanotechnology: Molecularly Organic-Inorganic Hybridization into Frameworks (Adv. Mater. 17/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials can combine the advantages of organic and inorganic materials, and overcome their drawbacks accordingly. On page 3235, Y. Chen and J. L. Shi review and discuss research progress on the design, synthesis, structure, and composition control of organic-inorganic hybrid mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (MONs). Extensive applications of MONs in nanotechnology, mainly in nanomedicine, nanocatalysis and nanofabrication are discussed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Determination of average molecular weights on organic reactor coolants. I.- Freezing-point depression method for benzene solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreira, M.

    1965-01-01

    As a working method for determination of changes in molecular mass that may occur by irradiation (pyrolytic-radiolytic decomposition) of polyphenyl reactor coolants, a cryoscopic technique has been developed which associated the basic simplicity of Beckman's method with some experimental refinements taken out of the equilibrium methods. A total of 18 runs were made on samples of napthalene, biphenyl, and the commercial mixtures OM-2 (Progil) and Santowax-R (Monsanto), with an average deviation from the theoretical molecular mass of 0.6%. (Author) 7 refs

  13. Influence of water chemistry and dissolved organic matter (DOM) molecular size on copper and mercury binding determined by multiresponse fluorescence quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W B; Smith, D S; Guéguen, C

    2013-07-01

    The effects of water chemistry (i.e. pH and Ca(2+) concentration) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration) and DOM quality (i.e. composition and molecular weight) on metal complexation were successfully investigated by a combination of tangential flow filtration, excitation-emission matrix fluorescence, parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), and fluorescence quenching on four freshwater samples and one extracted Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). Two terrestrial and one microbial humic-like components were found in this study. Despite strong correlation between the Ryan-Weber model and the multiresponse model, the latter is more appropriate for the calculation of binding parameters in multiple-ligand DOM system. Decreasing pH from 6 to 4 significantly reduced logK-Cu(2+) from 5.22±0.24 to 4.60±0.30 at pH 6 and 4, respectively (pHigh molecular weight (>1kDa) DOM generally had higher logK and binding fluorophore abundance than bulk (unfractionated) and low molecular weight (<1kDa) DOM for both metals. This trend however was not always true for Hg(2+) where the binding parameters were quite variable. Overall the combined results provide evidence that binding parameters are not only affected by water chemistry, but also depend on DOM molecular weight. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of a Helicene-Based Imidazolium Salt and Its Application in Organic Molecular Electronics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Storch, Jan; Žádný, Jaroslav; Strašák, Tomáš; Kubala, M.; Sýkora, Jan; Dušek, Michal; Církva, Vladimír; Matějka, P.; Krbal, M.; Vacek, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6 (2015), s. 2343-2347 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI3/628; GA TA ČR TA04010082 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : helicene * imidazolium salt * organic electronics Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.771, year: 2015

  15. Predicting the influence of a p2-symmetric substrate on molecular self-organization with an interaction-site model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Carsten; Balbás Gambra, Marta; Gruber, Kathrin; Höhl, Cornelia; Malarek, Michael S; Scherer, Lukas J; Constable, Edwin C; Franosch, Thomas; Hermann, Bianca A

    2011-02-14

    An interaction-site model can a priori predict molecular self-organisation on a new substrate in Monte Carlo simulations. This is experimentally confirmed with scanning tunnelling microscopy on Fréchet dendrons of a pentacontane template. Local and global ordering motifs, inclusion molecules and a rotated unit cell are correctly predicted.

  16. Three-Dimensional Printing of a Scalable Molecular Model and Orbital Kit for Organic Chemistry Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Matthew R.; Cao, Zi Jing; Patel, Bhaven; dos Santos, Bruno Sil; Asquith, Christopher R. M.; Szulc, Blanka R.; Rao, Zenobia X.; Muwaffak, Zaid; Malkinson, John P.; Hilton, Stephen T.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) chemical models are a well-established learning tool used to enhance the understanding of chemical structures by converting two-dimensional paper or screen outputs into realistic three-dimensional objects. While commercial atom model kits are readily available, there is a surprising lack of large molecular and orbital models…

  17. New inorganic-organic hybrid materials based on SBA-15 molecular sieves involved in the quinolines synthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    López-Sanz, J.; Pérez-Mayoral, E.; Soriano, E.; Sturm, M.; Martín-Aranda, R. M.; López-Peinado, A. J.; Čejka, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 187, č. 1 (2012), s. 97-103 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100400701 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : mesoporous molecular sieves * heterogeneous catalysis * quinolines Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2012

  18. A molecular organic geochemical study of black shales associated with diatomites from the Oligocene Meinilite Shale (Flysch Carpathians, SE Poland)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Koster, J.; Rospondek, M.; Zubrzycki, A.; Kolouba, M.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1995-01-01

    Black shales of the Menilite Formation, the source rock for oils in the Carpathian overthrust belt, display a large variability in their bulk and molecular geochemical parameters. Biomarker and stable carbon isotope analyses indicate a variable contribution from different algae (particularly

  19. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, and expression of a B-type (cricket-type) allatostatin preprohormone from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, M; Lenz, C; Winther, A M

    2001-01-01

    and nonamidated C terminus. We have previously reported the structure of an A-type allatostatin preprohormone from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Here we describe the molecular cloning of a B-type prepro-allatostatin from Drosophila (DAP-B). DAP-B is 211 amino acid residues long and contains one copy each...

  20. Transformation of molecular weight distributions of dissolved organic carbon and UV-absorbing compounds at full-scale wastewater-treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Soto, Mario; Fox, Peter; Westerhoff, Paul

    2006-03-01

    The molecular-weight distribution (MWD) of wastewater dissolved-organic carbon (DOC) was determined in samples from seven full-scale wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) that use different biological treatments (air activated sludge [air-AS], pure-oxygen AS [O2-AS], and trickling filters). The research objective was to determine how different biological treatments influenced the MWD of wastewater DOC. Primary sedimentation effluent DOC from most of the WWTPs exhibited a skewed distribution toward the low-molecular-weight fraction (MWF) (40 to 50%, distribution, with the majority of DOC in the intermediate MWF (0.5 to 3 KDa). The O2-AS effluent DOC exhibited a skewed distribution toward the high MWF (> 3 KDa). The removal of DOC by air- and O2-AS bacteria followed trends predicted by a macromolecule degradation model. Trickling-filter effluent DOC exhibited a skewed distribution toward the high MWF (50% DOC, > 3 KDa).

  1. The Impact of Molecular p-Doping on Charge Transport in High-Mobility Small-Molecule/Polymer Blend Organic Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Paterson, Alexandra F.

    2017-12-27

    Molecular doping is a powerful tool with the potential to resolve many of the issues currently preventing organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) commercialization. However, the addition of dopant molecules into organic semiconductors often disrupts the host lattice, introducing defects and harming electrical transport. New dopant-based systems that overcome practical utilization issues, while still reaping the electrical performance benefits, would therefore be extremely valuable. Here, the impact of p-doping on the charge transport in blends consisting of the small-molecule 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT), the polymer indacenodithiophene-benzothiadiazole (C16IDT-BT), and the molecular dopant C60F48 is investigated. Electrical field-effect measurements indicate that p-doping not only enhances the average saturation mobility from 1.4 to 7.8 cm2 V−1 s−1 over 50 devices (maximum values from around 4 to 13 cm2 V−1 s−1), but also improves bias–stress stability, contact resistance, threshold voltage, and the overall device-to-device performance variation. Importantly, materials characterization using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, combined with charge transport modeling, reveal that effective doping is achieved without perturbing the microstructure of the polycrystalline semiconductor film. This work highlights the remarkable potential of ternary organic blends as a simple platform for OTFTs to achieve all the benefits of doping, with none of the drawbacks.

  2. Influence of heteroatom pre-selection on the molecular formula assignment of soil organic matter components determined by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Tsutomu; Ohno, Paul E

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is involved in many important ecosystem processes. Ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry has become a powerful technique in the chemical characterization of SOM, allowing assignment of elemental formulae for thousands of peaks resolved in a typical mass spectrum. We investigated how the addition of N, S, and P heteroatoms in the formula calculation stage of the mass spectra processing workflow affected the formula assignments of mass spectra peaks. Dissolved organic matter extracted from plant biomass and soil as well as the soil humic acid fraction was studied. We show that the addition of S and P into the molecular formula calculation increased peak assignments on average by 17.3 % and 10.7 %, respectively, over the assignments based on the CHON elements frequently reported by SOM researchers using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry. The organic matter chemical characteristics as represented by van Krevelen diagrams were appreciably affected by differences in the heteroatom pre-selection for the three organic matter samples investigated, especially so for the wheat-derived dissolved organic matter. These results show that inclusion of both S and P heteroatoms into the formula calculation step, which is not routinely done, is important to obtain a more chemically complete interpretation of the ultrahigh resolution mass spectra of SOM.

  3. Reconstructions of Climatic and Topographic Gradients in the Sierra Nevada during the early Eocene using compound-specific stable isotopes and organic molecular temperature proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hren, M. T.; Pagani, M.; Brandon, M.; Erwin, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Terrestrial sediments from the early Cenozoic provide important records of continental temperature gradients during periods of high global temperatures and PCO2, yet these records are often interpreted in terms of either climatic or orographic effects. As a result, linking models of past global climate with terrestrial temperature information is hampered by a lack of detailed information on paleoelevation. Organic molecular proxies provide new tools to help distinguish between climatic and orographic information in terrestrial sediments. For this study, we used organic molecular proxies to determine paleoelevation and paleotemperature gradients in the Sierra Nevada during the early Eocene warm period. Specifically, we analyzed the hydrogen and carbon isotopes of n-alkanes in bulk sediments and fossil angiosperm leaf cuticle in overbank deposits of major drainages of the Eocene Sierra Nevada to quantify the changes in the isotopic composition of leaf water that potentially reflect changes in paleoelevation. We coupled this data with paleotemperature measurements across this landscape using the MBT/CBT organic molecular temperature proxy, as well as thermodynamic models of the isotopic evolution of rainwater during orographic ascent. Hydrogen isotopes of n-alkanes systematically decrease by more than 30 per mil with distance from the Eocene shoreline and temperature data show a decrease of more than 8 degrees across this ancient range, with temperatures near the ocean margin exceeding 22 degrees. Isotopic and temperature data provide evidence for steep topography and high temperature lapse rates at the California margin during the early Eocene. These results support model estimates of temperature and relative humidity for the early Eocene based on a four time doubling of atmospheric CO2.

  4. Genomic organization and molecular phylogenies of the beta (β keratin multigene family in the chicken (Gallus gallus and zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata: implications for feather evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer Roger H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal appendages of reptiles and birds are constructed of beta (β keratins. The molecular phylogeny of these keratins is important to understanding the evolutionary origin of these appendages, especially feathers. Knowing that the crocodilian β-keratin genes are closely related to those of birds, the published genomes of the chicken and zebra finch provide an opportunity not only to compare the genomic organization of their β-keratins, but to study their molecular evolution in archosaurians. Results The subfamilies (claw, feather, feather-like, and scale of β-keratin genes are clustered in the same 5' to 3' order on microchromosome 25 in chicken and zebra finch, although the number of claw and feather genes differs between the species. Molecular phylogenies show that the monophyletic scale genes are the basal group within birds and that the monophyletic avian claw genes form the basal group to all feather and feather-like genes. Both species have a number of feather clades on microchromosome 27 that form monophyletic groups. An additional monophyletic cluster of feather genes exist on macrochromosome 2 for each species. Expression sequence tag analysis for the chicken demonstrates that all feather β-keratin clades are expressed. Conclusions Similarity in the overall genomic organization of β-keratins in Galliformes and Passeriformes suggests similar organization in all Neognathae birds, and perhaps in the ancestral lineages leading to modern birds, such as the paravian Anchiornis huxleyi. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that evolution of archosaurian epidermal appendages in the lineage leading to birds was accompanied by duplication and divergence of an ancestral β-keratin gene cluster. As morphological diversification of epidermal appendages occurred and the β-keratin multigene family expanded, novel β-keratin genes were selected for novel functions within appendages such as feathers.

  5. Probing adsorption sites of carbon dioxide in metal organic framework of [Zn(bdc)(dpds)]n: A molecular simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shih-I.; Liao, Jian-Min; Huang, Xiao-Zhuang; Lin, Chia-Hsun; Ke, Szu-Yu; Wang, Chih-Chieh

    2017-11-01

    We used force-field based grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulation method and density functional theory to study adsorption characteristics of carbon dioxide (CO2) molecules in a metal-organic framework (MOF) compound, [Zn(bdc)(dpds)]n. The studied MOF include a metal ion (Zn(II)), an anion organic linker (dianion of benzene dicarboxylicacid, bdc2-) and a neutral organic linker (4,4‧-dipyridyldisulfide, dpds). Results from calculated adsorption isotherms and enthalpies of adsorption agree with the experimental data. The interactions between the adsorbed CO2 and the organic linkers were examined in simulations. Calculated results show available absorption sites are surrounded by two dpds ligands in which an S-S bond as an N-N‧ spacer connect two pyridines. In contrast, the bdc2- ligand does not give a significant contribution to the substantial adsorption amount even though it contains the carboxylate group that provides available bonding site to CO2.

  6. Method for characterization of low molecular weight organic acids in atmospheric aerosols using ion chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Lacey C; Reiner, Jessica L; Dickerson, Russell R; Sander, Lane C

    2014-08-05

    The structural composition of PM2.5 monitored in the atmosphere is usually divided by the analysis of organic carbon, black (also called elemental) carbon, and inorganic salts. The characterization of the chemical composition of aerosols represents a significant challenge to analysts, and studies are frequently limited to determination of aerosol bulk properties. To better understand the potential health effects and combined interactions of components in aerosols, a variety of measurement techniques for individual analytes in PM2.5 need to be implemented. The method developed here for the measurement of organic acids achieves class separation of aliphatic monoacids, aliphatic diacids, aromatic acids, and polyacids. The selective ion monitoring capability of a triple quadropole mass analyzer was frequently capable of overcoming instances of incomplete separations. Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1649b Urban Dust was characterized; 34 organic acids were qualitatively identified, and 6 organic acids were quantified.

  7. Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Karsten Stein

    This thesis includes the synthesis and characterisation of organic compounds designed for molecular electronics. The synthesised organic molecules are mainly based on two motifs, the obigo(phenyleneethynylenes) (OPE)s and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as shown below. These two scaffolds (OPE and TTF......) are chemically merged together to form cruciform-like structures that are an essential part of the thesis. The cruciform molecules were subjected to molecular conductance measurements to explore their capability towards single-crystal field-effect transistors (Part 1), molecular wires, and single electron...... transistors (Part 2). The synthetic protocols rely on stepwise Sonogashira coupling reactions. Conductivity studies on various OPE-based molecular wires reveal that mere OPE compounds have a higher electrical resistance compared to the cruciform based wires (up to 9 times higher). The most spectacular result...

  8. Fast calculation of molecular total energy with ABEEMσπ/MM method - For some series of organic molecules and peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Zhi; Lin, Xiao-Ting; Zhao, Dong-Xia

    2016-06-01

    A new ABEEMσπ/MM method for fast calculation of molecular total energy is established by combining ABEEMσπ model with force field representation, where ABEEMσπ is the atom-bond electronegativity equalization model at the σπ level. The calibrated parameters are suitable and transferable. This paper demonstrates that the total molecular energies for series of alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and peptides calculated by ABEEMσπ/MM method are in fair agreement with those obtained from calculations of ab initio MP2/6-311++G(d, p) method with mean absolute deviation (MAD) being 1.45 kcal/mol and their linear correlation coefficients being 1.0000. Thus it opens good prospects for wide applications to chemical and biological systems.

  9. Lack of correlation between turnover of low-molecular-weight dissolved organic carbon and differences in microbial community composition or growth across a soil pH gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousk, Johannes; Brookes, Philip C; Glanville, Helen C; Jones, David L

    2011-04-01

    We studied how soil pH (pHs 4 to 8) influenced the mineralization of low-molecular-weight (LMW)-dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compounds, and how this compared with differences in microbial community structure. The mineralization of LMW-DOC compounds was not systematically connected to differences in soil pH, consistent with soil respiration. In contrast, the microbial community compositions differed dramatically. This suggests that microbial community composition data will be of limited use in improving the predictive power of soil C models.

  10. Dependency of Nanodiamond Particle Size and Outermost-Surface Composition on Organo-Modification: Evaluation by Formation of Organized Molecular Films and Nanohybridization with Organic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaki, Taira; Guo, Yifei; Meng, Qi; Mamun, Muhammad Abdullah Al; Kasahara, Yusuke; Akasaka, Shuichi; Fujimori, Atsuhiro

    2017-04-26

    The formation behavior of organized organo-modified nanodiamond films and polymer nanocomposites has been investigated using nanodiamonds of several different particle sizes and outermost-surface compositions. The nanodiamond particle sizes used in this study were 3 and 5 nm, and the outermost surface contained -OH and/or -COOH groups. The nanodiamond was organo-modified to prepare -OH 2 + cations and -COO - anions on the outermost surface by carboxylic anion of fatty acid and long-chain phosphonium cation, respectively. The surface of nanodiamond is known to be covered with a nanolayer of adsorbed water, which was exploited here for the organo-modification of nanodiamond with long-chain fatty acids via adsorption, leading to nanodispersions of nanodiamond in general organic solvents as a mimic of solvency. Particle multilayers were then formed via the Langmuir-Blodgett technique and subjected to fine structural analysis. The organo-modification enabled integration and multilayer formation of inorganic nanoparticles due to enhancement of the van der Waals interactions between the chains. Therefore, "encounters" between the organo-modifying chain and the inorganic particles led to solubilization of the inorganic particles and enhanced interactions between the particles; this can be regarded as imparting a new functionality to the organic molecules. Nanocomposites with a transparent crystalline polymer were fabricated by nanodispersing the nanodiamond into the polymer matrix, which was achievable due to the organo-modification. The resulting transparent nanocomposites displayed enhanced degrees of crystallization and improved crystallization temperatures, compared with the neat polymer, due to a nucleation effect.

  11. Improvement of the Koradi parallel algorithm for molecular dynamics and application to the economic organization and optimization of recycling costs of waste electrical and electronic equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabria, I.; Queiruga, D.

    2005-09-01

    A parallel algorithm for molecular dynamics, MD, the Koradi point-centered decomposition algorithm, especially designed for inhomogeneous systems, is improved and applied to the organization and optimization of recycling costs of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment, WEEE, and also to systems of atoms. This organization requires the numbers and locations of storage centers and recycling plants of the WEEE that minimize the recycling cost. The Koradi algorithm finds these optimal numbers and locations, dealing very fast with large numbers of data, in contrast with other methods. The changes of the original algorithm (different ways of generating the initial centers and especially the requirement of location convergence) improve its performance for this economic problem and also for MD simulations.

  12. Effect of heavy metals and organic matter on root exudates (low molecular weight organic acids) of herbaceous species: An assessment in sand and soil conditions under different levels of contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Rozas, M M; Madejón, E; Madejón, P

    2016-09-01

    Bioavailability of heavy metals can be modified by different root exudates. Among them, low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) play an important role in this process. Three plant species (Poa annua, Medicago polymorpha and Malva sylvestris), potentially used for phytoremediation, have been assessed for both metal uptake and LMWOAs excretion in contaminated environments with different concentrations of Cd, Cu and Zn. The experiments have been carried out in washed sand and in three contaminated soils where two organic amendments were added (biosolid compost and alperujo compost). The most abundant LMWOAs excreted by all studied plants were oxalic and malic acids, although citric and fumaric acids were also detected. The general tendency was that plants responded to an increase of heavy metal stress releasing higher amounts of LMWOAs. This is an efficient exclusion mechanism reducing the metal uptake and allowing the plant growth at high levels of contamination. In the experiment using wash sand as substrate, the organic acids composition and quantity depended mainly on plant species and metal contamination. M. polymorpha was the species that released the highest concentrations of LMWOAs, both in sand and in soils with no amendment addition, whereas a decrease of these acids was observed with the addition of amendments. Our results established a clear effect of organic matter on the composition and total amount of LMWOAs released. The increase of organic matter and nutrients, through amendments, improved the soil quality reducing phytotoxicity. As a result, organic acids exudates decreased and were solely composed of oxalic acid (except for M. polymorpha). The release of LMWOAs has proved to be an important mechanism against heavy metal stress, unique to each species and modifiable by means of organic amendment addition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Zero-dipole molecular organic cations in mixed organic-inorganic halide perovskites: possible chemical solution for the reported anomalous hysteresis in the current-voltage curve measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Giacomo; Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-11-06

    Starting from a brief description of the main architectures characterizing the novel solar technology of perovskite-based solar cells, we focus our attention on the anomalous hysteresis experimentally found to affect the measurement of the current-voltage curve of such devices. This detrimental effect, associated with slow dynamic reorganization processes, depends on several parameters; among them, the scan rate of the measurements, the architecture of the cell, and the perovskite deposition rate are crucial. Even if a conclusive explanation of the origin of the hysteresis has not been provided so far, several experimental findings ascribe its origin to ionic migration at an applied bias and dielectric polarization that occurs in the perovskite layer. Consistently, a dipole-moment-reduced cation such as formamidinium ion is experimentally reported to quantitatively reduce the hysteresis from perovskite-based devices. By means of a density-functional theory-based set of calculations, we have predicted and characterized guanidinium ion (GA = (+)[C(NH2)3], a zero-dipole moment cation by symmetry)-based organic-inorganic halide perovskite's structural and electronic properties, speculating that such a cation and the alloys it may form with other organic cations can represent a possible chemical solution for the puzzling issue of the hysteresis.

  14. Critical review of the molecular design progress in non-fullerene electron acceptors towards commercially viable organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wadsworth, Andrew

    2018-04-26

    Fullerenes have formed an integral part of high performance organic solar cells over the last 20 years, however their inherent limitations in terms of synthetic flexibility, cost and stability have acted as a motivation to develop replacements; the so-called non-fullerene electron acceptors. A rapid evolution of such materials has taken place over the last few years, yielding a number of promising candidates that can exceed the device performance of fullerenes and provide opportunities to improve upon the stability and processability of organic solar cells. In this review we explore the structure-property relationships of a library of non-fullerene acceptors, highlighting the important chemical modifications that have led to progress in the field and provide an outlook for future innovations in electron acceptors for use in organic photovoltaics.

  15. Advances in porcine genomics and proteomics - a toolbox for developing the pig as a model organism for molecular biomedical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Emøke; Danielsen, Marianne; Larsen, Knud

    2010-01-01

    Our current knowledge of human biology is often based on studying a wide range of animal species. In particular, for understanding human diseases, the development of adequate animal models is of immediate importance. Although genetic strains and transgenic animal model organisms like fruit fly...... the pig into a novel model organism for biomedical research. This toolbox includes the near completion of the pig genome, catalogues of genes and genetic variation in pigs, extensive characterization of pig proteomes and transcriptomes, as well as the development of transgenic disease models. The aim...

  16. Influence of mineral characteristics on the retention of low molecular weight organic compounds: a batch sorption-desorption and ATR-FTIR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeasmin, Sabina; Singh, Balwant; Kookana, Rai S; Farrell, Mark; Sparks, Donald L; Johnston, Cliff T

    2014-10-15

    Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the sorption-desorption behaviour of (14)C-labelled carboxylic acids (citric and oxalic) and amino acids (glutamic, alanine, phenylalanine and lysine) on pure minerals (kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, ferrihydrite and goethite). The sorption experiments were complemented by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to gain possible mechanistic insight into the organic acids-mineral interactions. In terms of charge, the organic solutes ranged from strongly negative (i.e., citric) to positively charged solutes (i.e., lysine); similarly the mineral phases also ranged from positively to negatively charged surfaces. In general, sorption of anionic carboxylic and glutamic acids was higher compared to the other compounds (except lysine). Cationic lysine showed a stronger affinity to permanently charged phyllosilicates than Fe oxides. The sorption of alanine and phenylalanine was consistently low for all minerals, with relatively higher sorption and lower desorption of phenylalanine than alanine. Overall, the role of carboxylic functional groups for the sorption and retention of these carboxylic and amino acids on Fe oxides (and kaolinite) and of amino group on 2:1 phyllosilicates was noticeable. Mineral properties (surface chemistry, specific surface area), chemistry of the organic compounds (pKa value, functional groups) and the equilibrium pH of the system together controlled the differences in sorption-desorption patterns. The results of this study aid to understand the effects of mineralogical and chemical factors that affect naturally occurring low molecular weight organic compounds sorption under field conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Elucidating the Common Generalist Predators of Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in an Organic Apple Orchard Using Molecular Gut-Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jason M.; Szendrei, Zsofia; Grieshop, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), plum curculio, is a serious direct pest of North American tree fruit including, apples, cherries, peaches and plums. Historically, organophosphate insecticides were used for control, but this tool is no longer registered for use in tree fruit. In addition, few organically approved insecticides are available for organic pest control and none have proven efficacy as this time. Therefore, promoting biological control in these systems is the next step, however, little is known about the biological control pathways in this system and how these are influenced by current mechanical and cultural practices required in organic systems. We used molecular gut-content analysis for testing field caught predators for feeding on plum curculio. During the study we monitored populations of plum curculio and the predator community in a production organic apple orchard. Predator populations varied over the season and contained a diverse assemblage of spiders and beetles. A total of 8% of all predators (eight Araneae, two Hemiptera, and six Coleoptera species) assayed for plum curculio predation were observed positive for the presence of plum curculio DNA in their guts, indicating that these species fed on plum curculio prior to collec