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Sample records for sperm cells subcellular

  1. Delta opioid receptor on equine sperm cells: subcellular localization and involvement in sperm motility analyzed by computer assisted sperm analyzer (CASA

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    Lacalandra Giovanni M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides act not only in the control of nociceptive pathways, indeed several reports demonstrate the effects of opiates on sperm cell motility and morphology suggesting the importance of these receptors in the modulation of reproduction in mammals. In this study we investigated the expression of delta opioid receptors on equine spermatozoa by western blot/indirect immunofluorescence and its relationship with sperm cell physiology. Methods We analyzed viability, motility, capacitation, acrosome reaction and mitochondrial activity in the presence of naltrindole and DPDPE by means of a computer assisted sperm analyzer and a fluorescent confocal microscope. The evaluation of viability, capacitation and acrosome reaction was carried out by the double CTC/Hoechst staining, whereas mitochondrial activity was assessed by means of MitoTracker Orange dye. Results We showed that in equine sperm cells, delta opioid receptor is expressed as a doublet of 65 and 50 kDa molecular mass and is localized in the mid piece of tail; we also demonstrated that naltrindole, a delta opioid receptor antagonist, could be utilized in modulating several physiological parameters of the equine spermatozoon in a dose-dependent way. We also found that low concentrations of the antagonist increase sperm motility whereas high concentrations show the opposite effect. Moreover low concentrations hamper capacitation, acrosome reaction and viability even if the percentage of cells with active mitochondria seems to be increased; the opposite effect is exerted at high concentrations. We have also observed that the delta opioid receptor agonist DPDPE is scarcely involved in affecting the same parameters at the employed concentrations. Conclusions The results described in this paper add new important details in the comprehension of the mammalian sperm physiology and suggest new insights for improving reproduction and for

  2. Bovine sperm plasma membrane proteomics through biotinylation and subcellular enrichment.

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    Kasvandik, Sergo; Sillaste, Gerly; Velthut-Meikas, Agne; Mikelsaar, Aavo-Valdur; Hallap, Triin; Padrik, Peeter; Tenson, Tanel; Jaakma, Ülle; Kõks, Sulev; Salumets, Andres

    2015-06-01

    A significant proportion of mammalian fertilization is mediated through the proteomic composition of the sperm surface. These protein constituents can present as biomarkers to control and regulate breeding of agricultural animals. Previous studies have addressed the bovine sperm cell apical plasma membrane (PM) proteome with nitrogen cavitation enrichment. Alternative workflows would enable to expand the compositional data more globally around the entire sperm's surface. We used a cell surface biotin-labeling in combination with differential centrifugation to enrich sperm surface proteins. Using nano-LC MS/MS, 338 proteins were confidently identified in the PM-enriched proteome. Functional categories of sperm-egg interaction, protein turnover, metabolism as well as molecular transport, spermatogenesis, and signal transduction were represented by proteins with high quantitative signal in our study. A highly significant degree of enrichment was found for transmembrane and PM-targeted proteins. Among them, we also report proteins previously not described on bovine sperm (CPQ, CD58, CKLF, CPVL, GLB1L3, and LPCAT2B) of which CPQ and CPVL cell surface localization was further validated. A descriptive overview of the bovine sperm PM integral and peripheral proteins is provided to complement future studies on animal reproduction and its relation to sperm cell surface. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001096 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001096). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Lipidomics in tissues, cells and subcellular compartments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horn, Patrick J; Chapman, Kent D

    2012-01-01

    ...‐infusion MS, localization of lipids in tissues and cells by laser desorption/ionization MS, and even profiling of lipids in individual subcellular compartments by direct‐organelle MS. Applications of these approaches to achieve improved understanding of plant lipid metabolism, compartmentation and function are discussed.

  4. Differential subcellular targeting and activity-dependent subcellular localization of diacylglycerol kinase isozymes in transfected cells.

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    Kobayashi, Naoki; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ito, Tsukasa; Hosoya, Takaaki; Kondo, Hisatake; Goto, Kaoru

    2007-08-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) plays a pivotal role in cellular signal transduction through regulating levels of the second messenger diacylglycerol (DG). Previous studies have revealed that DGK is composed of a family of isozymes that show remarkable heterogeneity in terms of molecular structure, functional domains, tissue and cellular gene expression. Recently, it has been shown that DG is produced in various subcellular compartments including the plasma membrane, internal membranes, cytoskeleton, and nucleus. However, it remains unclear how DG is regulated at distinct subcellular sites. To address this point, we have used an epitope-tag expression system in cultured cells and investigated the subcellular localization of DGK isozymes under the same experimental conditions. We show here that DGK isozymes are targeted differentially to unique subcellular sites in transfected COS7 cells, including the cytoplasm, actin stress fibers, Golgi complex, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. It is also shown that among the isozymes overexpression of DGKbeta causes fragmentation of actin stress fibers while a kinase-dead mutant of DGKbeta abolishes its colocalization with actin stress fibers. These data strongly suggest that each isozyme may be responsible for the metabolism of DG that is produced upon stimulation at a different and specific subcellular site and that DGKbeta activity might have effects on the reorganization of actin stress fibers in transfected COS7 cells.

  5. SPE-44 implements sperm cell fate.

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    Madhura Kulkarni

    Full Text Available The sperm/oocyte decision in the hermaphrodite germline of Caenorhabditis elegans provides a powerful model for the characterization of stem cell fate specification and differentiation. The germline sex determination program that governs gamete fate has been well studied, but direct mediators of cell-type-specific transcription are largely unknown. We report the identification of spe-44 as a critical regulator of sperm gene expression. Deletion of spe-44 causes sperm-specific defects in cytokinesis, cell cycle progression, and organelle assembly resulting in sterility. Expression of spe-44 correlates precisely with spermatogenesis and is regulated by the germline sex determination pathway. spe-44 is required for the appropriate expression of several hundred sperm-enriched genes. The SPE-44 protein is restricted to the sperm-producing germline, where it localizes to the autosomes (which contain sperm genes but is excluded from the transcriptionally silent X chromosome (which does not. The orthologous gene in other Caenorhabditis species is similarly expressed in a sex-biased manner, and the protein likewise exhibits autosome-specific localization in developing sperm, strongly suggestive of an evolutionarily conserved role in sperm gene expression. Our analysis represents the first identification of a transcriptional regulator whose primary function is the control of gamete-type-specific transcription in this system.

  6. Programmed subcellular release to study the dynamics of cell detachment

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    Wildt, Bridget

    Cell detachment is central to a broad range of physio-pathological changes however there are no quantitative methods to study this process. Here we report programmed subcellular release, a method for spatially and temporally controlled cellular detachment and present the first quantitative results of the detachment dynamics of 3T3 fibroblasts at the subcellular level. Programmed subcellular release is an in vitro technique designed to trigger the detachment of distinct parts of a single cell from a patterned substrate with both spatial and temporal control. Subcellular release is achieved by plating cells on an array of patterned gold electrodes created by standard microfabrication techniques. The electrodes are biochemically functionalized with an adhesion-promoting RGD peptide sequence that is attached to the gold electrode via a thiol linkage. Each electrode is electrically isolated so that a subcellular section of a single cell spanning multiple electrodes can be released independently. Upon application of a voltage pulse to a single electrode, RGD-thiol molecules on an individual electrode undergo rapid electrochemical desorption that leads to subsequent cell contraction. The dynamics of cell contraction are found to have characteristic induction and contraction times. This thesis presents the first molecular inhibition studies conducted using programmed subcellular release verifying that this technique can be used to study complex signaling pathways critical to cell motility. Molecular level dynamics of focal adhesion proteins and actin stress fibers provide some insight into the complexities associated with triggered cell detachment. In addition to subcellular release, the programmed release of alkanethiols provides a tool for to study the spatially and temporally controlled release of small molecules or particles from individually addressable gold electrodes. Here we report on experiments which determine the dynamics of programmed release using fluorophore

  7. Endocannabinoids and Human Sperm Cells

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    Giovanna Zolese

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acylethanolamides (NAEs are naturally occurring signaling lipids consisting of amides and esters of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Usually they are present in a very small amounts in many mammalian tissues and cells, including human reproductive tracts and fluids. Recently, the presence of N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA, the most characterised member of endocannabinoids, and its congeners palmitoylethanolamide (PEA and oleylethanolamide (OEA in seminal plasma, oviductal fluid, and follicular fluids was demonstrated. AEA has been shown to bind not only type-1 (CB1 and type-2 (CB2 cannabinoid receptors, but also type-1 vanilloid receptor (TRPV1, while PEA and OEA are inactive with respect to classical cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 but activate TRPV1 or peroxisome proliferator activate receptors (PPARs. This review concerns the most recent experimental data on PEA and OEA, endocannabinoid-like molecules which appear to exert their action exclusively on sperm cells with altered features, such as membrane characteristics and kinematic parameters. Their beneficial effects on these cells could suggest a possible pharmacological use of PEA and OEA on patients affected by some forms of idiopathic infertility.

  8. Sperm Cells of a Primitive Strepsipteran.

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    Nardi, James B; Delgado, Juan A; Collantes, Francisco; Miller, Lou Ann; Bee, Charles M; Kathirithamby, Jeyaraney

    2013-09-04

    The unusual life style of Strepsiptera has presented a long-standing puzzle in establishing its affinity to other insects. Although Strepsiptera share few structural similarities with other insect orders, all members of this order share a parasitic life style with members of two distinctive families in the Coleoptera-the order now considered the most closely related to Strepsiptera based on recent genomic evidence. Among the structural features of several strepsipteran families and other insect families that have been surveyed are the organization of testes and ultrastructure of sperm cells. For comparison with existing information on insect sperm structure, this manuscript presents a description of testes and sperm of a representative of the most primitive extant strepsipteran family Mengenillidae, Eoxenos laboulbenei. We compare sperm structure of E. laboulbenei from this family with that of the three other families of Strepsiptera in the other strepsipteran suborder Stylopidia that have been studied as well as with members of the beetle families Meloidae and Rhipiphoridae that share similar life histories with Strepsiptera. Meloids, Rhipiphorids and Strepsipterans all begin larval life as active and viviparous first instar larvae. This study examines global features of these insects' sperm cells along with specific ultrastructural features of their organelles.

  9. Sperm Cells of a Primitive Strepsipteran

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    Charles M. Bee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The unusual life style of Strepsiptera has presented a long-standing puzzle in establishing its affinity to other insects. Although Strepsiptera share few structural similarities with other insect orders, all members of this order share a parasitic life style with members of two distinctive families in the Coleoptera—the order now considered the most closely related to Strepsiptera based on recent genomic evidence. Among the structural features of several strepsipteran families and other insect families that have been surveyed are the organization of testes and ultrastructure of sperm cells. For comparison with existing information on insect sperm structure, this manuscript presents a description of testes and sperm of a representative of the most primitive extant strepsipteran family Mengenillidae, Eoxenos laboulbenei. We compare sperm structure of E. laboulbenei from this family with that of the three other families of Strepsiptera in the other strepsipteran suborder Stylopidia that have been studied as well as with members of the beetle families Meloidae and Rhipiphoridae that share similar life histories with Strepsiptera. Meloids, Rhipiphorids and Strepsipterans all begin larval life as active and viviparous first instar larvae. This study examines global features of these insects’ sperm cells along with specific ultrastructural features of their organelles.

  10. Microscopic analysis of MTT stained boar sperm cells

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    B.M. van den Berg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of sperm cells to develop colored formazan by reduction of MTT was used earlier to develop a spectrophotometric assay to determine the viability of sperm cells for several mammalian species. It was the objective of the present study to visualize microscopically the location of the formazan in boar sperm cells. The MTT staining process of boar sperm cells can be divided into a series of morphological events. Incubation of the sperm cells in the presence of MTT resulted after a few min in a diffuse staining of the midpiece of the sperm cells. Upon further incubation the staining of the midpiece became more intense, and gradually the formation of packed formazan granules became more visible. At the same time, a small formazan stained granule appeared medially on the sperm head, which increased in size during further incubation. After incubation for about 1 h the midpiece granules were intensely stained and more clearly distinct as granules, while aggregation of sperm cells occurred. Around 90% of the sperm cells showed these staining events. At the end of the staining the formazan granules have disappeared from both the sperm cells and medium, whereas formazan crystals appeared as thin crystal threads, that became heavily aggregated in the incubation medium. It was concluded that formazan is taken up by lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Further, the use of the MTT assay to test for sperm viability should be regarded as a qualitative assay, whereas its practical use at artificial insemination (AI Stations is limited.

  11. The stochastic dance of circling sperm cells: sperm chemotaxis in the plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, B. M.; Jülicher, F.

    2008-12-01

    Biological systems such as single cells must function in the presence of fluctuations. It has been shown in a two-dimensional experimental setup that sea urchin sperm cells move toward a source of chemoattractant along planar trochoidal swimming paths, i.e. drifting circles. In these experiments, a pronounced variability of the swimming paths is observed. We present a theoretical description of sperm chemotaxis in two dimensions which takes fluctuations into account. We derive a coarse-grained theory of stochastic sperm swimming paths in a concentration field of chemoattractant. Fluctuations enter as multiplicative noise in the equations for the sperm swimming path. We discuss the stochastic properties of sperm swimming and predict a concentration-dependence of the effective diffusion constant of sperm swimming which could be tested in experiments.

  12. The stochastic dance of circling sperm cells: sperm chemotaxis in the plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, B M; Juelicher, F [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: ben@pks.mpg.de, E-mail: julicher@pks.mpg.de

    2008-12-15

    Biological systems such as single cells must function in the presence of fluctuations. It has been shown in a two-dimensional experimental setup that sea urchin sperm cells move toward a source of chemoattractant along planar trochoidal swimming paths, i.e. drifting circles. In these experiments, a pronounced variability of the swimming paths is observed. We present a theoretical description of sperm chemotaxis in two dimensions which takes fluctuations into account. We derive a coarse-grained theory of stochastic sperm swimming paths in a concentration field of chemoattractant. Fluctuations enter as multiplicative noise in the equations for the sperm swimming path. We discuss the stochastic properties of sperm swimming and predict a concentration-dependence of the effective diffusion constant of sperm swimming which could be tested in experiments.

  13. Sperm cell surface dynamics during activation and fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304822922

    2013-01-01

    Before the sperm cell can reach the oocyte it needs to be activated and to undergo a series of preparative steps. The sperm surface dynamics was studied in relation to this activation process and the modifications and removal of sperm surface components havebeen investigated. Bicarbonate-induced

  14. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

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    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  15. Sperm cells as vectors in the production of transgenic animals

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    Prince, R.M.

    1993-04-28

    Transgenic animals are used in industry and in biomedical research in order to provide in vivo experimental model systems. Sperm cells have been reported used as vectors in the production of transgenic animals before, however no approach has of yet proven to be successful. Fertilizing eggs with genetically modified sperm would be advantageous in that sperm are readily accessible and stable, and eggs can be fertilized by modified sperm cells in vivo. Recent elucidations regarding the unique manner of DNA packaging in sperm chromatin by protamines has provided us with the insight for developing a method of introducing foreign DNA into sperm which is likely to succeed where others have failed. We have developed a method for mimicking the in vivo system of sperm chromatin toroid subunits in vitro, concentrating these toroids, and fluorescent visualization. Our present work concerns development of a method to successfully deliver DNA across the cell membranes and into the nucleus.

  16. The effect of human papillomavirus infection on sperm cell motility.

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    Lai, Y M; Lee, J F; Huang, H Y; Soong, Y K; Yang, F P; Pao, C C

    1997-06-01

    To investigate the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in human sperm cells and to evaluate potential effects of HPV on the sperm functions. A descriptive clinical study. Specimens of semen were collected from 24 randomly selected patients who attended the fertility clinics at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The presence of HPV DNA and RNA were examined by polymerase chain reaction. Semen quality and sperm cell function were analyzed by computer-aided autoanalyzer. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA and RNA were found in 6 (25%) and 2 (8%) of the sperm cells specimens, respectively. Human papillomavirus type 18 DNA and RNA were present in 11 (46%) and 5 (21%) of the same sperm cells specimens, respectively. Incidence of asthenozoospermia among patients infected with either HPV was significantly higher than in those without HPV in their sperm cells (75% versus 8%). Although performance of curvilinear velocity, straight-line velocity, and mean amplitude of lateral head displacement was significantly lower in HPV-infected specimens, the differences of linearity, beat cross frequency, and straightness were not statistically significant. These results suggest that human papillomavirus can be found in human sperm cells and that certain HPV-specific genes are actively transcribed. Sperm motility parameters seem to be affected by the presence of HPV in the sperm cells, and also the incidence of asthenozoospermia may be associated with HPV infection.

  17. Subcellular targeting and biosynthesis of cyclotides in plant cells.

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    Conlan, Brendon F; Gillon, Amanda D; Barbeta, Barbara L; Anderson, Marilyn A

    2011-12-01

    The cyclotide kalata B1 is found in the leaves of Oldenlandia affinis and is a potent insecticidal and nematocidal molecule. This peptide is cleaved from a precursor protein, Oak1, and ligation of the N- and C-termini occurs to form a continuous peptide backbone. The subcellular location of the excision and cyclization reactions is unknown, and there is debate as to which enzyme catalyzes the event. To determine where in the plant cell Oak1 is processed, we prepared constructs encoding GFP (green fluorescent protein) linked to the cyclotide precursor Oak1. The GFP constructs were transiently expressed in the leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana, and GFP fluorescence was observed in living cells using confocal microscopy. A Fei Mao (FM) styryl dye was infiltrated into whole leaves that were still growing and expressing GFP constructs, enabling the plasma membrane and the tonoplast to be highlighted for visualization of the vacuole in living cells. The full length Oak1 precursor directed GFP to the vacuole, suggesting that excision and cyclization of the cyclotide domain occurs in the vacuole where the cyclotides are then stored. The N-terminal propeptide and N-terminal repeat of Oak1 were both sufficient to target GFP to the vacuole, although the C-terminal propeptide, which is essential for cyclization, was not a targeting signal. The vacuolar location of cyclotides supports our hypothesis that the vacuolar processing enzyme, asparaginyl endoproteinase, has a pivotal role in excision and cyclization from cyclotide precursors.

  18. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bench, G.S.; Balhorn, R.; Friz, A.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.

    1994-09-28

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  19. [Optimization of sperm alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis].

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    Deng, Shuang; Fan, Lang; Wu, Xi-yan; Zhu, Yan; Xu, Ke-qian

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the main factors that influence the results of sperm alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE), optimize the conditions, and standardize its procedures. Using alkaline SCGE, we detected the DNA fragments of sperm treated with different concentrations of H2O2 and determined the influences of the number of agarose gel layers, pH during DNA unwinding and electrophoresis, the time of DNA unwinding and electrophoresis, and cumulative sperm number on the results of sperm alkaline SCGE. Then we optimized the procedures, analyzed the repeatability of the optimized method, and examined 40 semen samples using the method. Three agarose gel layers could reduce the background. The optimal pH during DNA unwinding and electrophoresis was 10, and the best times for DNA unwinding and electrophoresis were 40 min and 30 min, respectively. Fifty sperm were adequate to ensure the reliability of the results. Based on the percentage of tail DNA, the intra- and inter-assay repeatabilities of the optimized sperm alkaline SCGE were 3.12% and 7.13%, and by the DNA damage score, they were 2.38% and 6.09%, respectively. Sperm DNA fragments were significantly increased in the infertile patients with oligoasthenoteratozoospermia as compared with healthy fertile males (P sperm alkaline SCGE, highly repeatable and easy to be standardized, can be applied to the clinical detection of sperm DNA fragmentation in infertile men.

  20. Hydrodynamics of Sperm Cells near Surfaces

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    Elgeti, Jens; Kaupp, U. Benjamin; Gompper, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Sperm are propelled by an actively beating tail, and display a wide variety of swimming patterns. When confined between two parallel walls, sperm swim either in circles or on curvilinear trajectories close to the walls. We employ mesoscale hydrodynamics simulations in combination with a mechanical sperm model to study the swimming behavior near walls. The simulations show that sperm become captured at the wall due to the hydrodynamic flow fields which are generated by the flagellar beat. The circular trajectories are determined by the chiral asymmetry of the sperm shape. For strong (weak) chirality, sperm swim in tight (wide) circles, with the beating plane of the flagellum oriented perpendicular (parallel) to the wall. For comparison, we also perform simulations based on a local anisotropic friction of the flagellum. In this resistive force approximation, surface adhesion and circular swimming patterns are obtained as well. However, the adhesion mechanism is now due to steric repulsion, and the orientation of the beating plane is different. Our model provides a theoretical framework that explains several distinct swimming behaviors of sperm near and far from a wall. Moreover, the model suggests a mechanism by which sperm navigate in a chemical gradient via a change of their shape. PMID:20712984

  1. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

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    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  2. Predicting the subcellular localization of viral proteins within a mammalian host cell

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    Thomas DY

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bioinformatic prediction of protein subcellular localization has been extensively studied for prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. However, this is not the case for viruses whose proteins are often involved in extensive interactions at various subcellular localizations with host proteins. Results Here, we investigate the extent of utilization of human cellular localization mechanisms by viral proteins and we demonstrate that appropriate eukaryotic subcellular localization predictors can be used to predict viral protein localization within the host cell. Conclusion Such predictions provide a method to rapidly annotate viral proteomes with subcellular localization information. They are likely to have widespread applications both in the study of the functions of viral proteins in the host cell and in the design of antiviral drugs.

  3. Shape and shear guide sperm cells spiraling upstream

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    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jorn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-11-01

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm determine and maintain the correct swimming direction during the various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Currently debated mechanisms for sperm long range travel vary from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing (thermotaxis) and direct response to fluid flow (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about their relative importance. Here, we report the first quantitative experimental study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis. Using microfluidic devices, we investigate systematically the swimming behavior of human and bull sperm over a wide range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to a stable upstream spiraling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilization. To rationalize these findings, we identify a minimal mathematical model that is capable of describing quantitatively the experimental observations.

  4. Distinct MicroRNA Subcellular Size and Expression Patterns in Human Cancer Cells

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    Beibei Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Small noncoding RNAs have important regulatory functions in different cell pathways. It is believed that most of them mainly play role in gene post-transcriptional regulation in the cytoplasm. Recent evidence suggests miRNA and siRNA activity in the nucleus. Here, we show distinct genome-wide sub-cellular localization distribution profiles of small noncoding RNAs in human breast cancer cells. Methods. We separated breast cancer cell nuclei from cytoplasm, and identified small RNA sequences using a high-throughput sequencing platform. To determine the relationship between miRNA sub-cellular distribution and cancer progression, we used microarray analysis to examine the miRNA expression levels in nucleus and cytoplasm of three human cell lines, one normal breast cell line and two breast cancer cell lines. Logistic regression and SVM were used for further analysis. Results. The sub-cellular distribution of small noncoding RNAs shows that numerous miRNAs and their isoforms (isomiR not only locate to the cytoplasm but also appeare in the nucleus. Subsequent microarray analyses indicated that the miRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic-ratio is a significant characteristic of different cancer cell lines. Conclusions. Our results indicate that the sub-cellular distribution is important for miRNA function, and that the characterization of the small RNAs sub-cellular localizome may contribute to cancer research and diagnosis.

  5. Radiolabelling of sperm cells with /sup 99m/Tc-HMPAO. In vivo visualization of sperm cell migration in rabbits

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    Bockisch, A.; Al-Hasani, S.; Ven, H.V.D.; Diedrich, K.; Krebs, D.; Posch, C.; Hotze, A.; Biersack, H.J.

    1989-04-01

    The present paper is the first descriptive radiolabeling of sperm cells in order to visualize their in vivo migration and imaging by scintigraphic technique, /sup 99m/Tc-HMPAO was used which combines favourable characteristics of both imaging modalities and radiation exposure. The radiolabeling yield was optimised for human sperm cells, and was increasing with the number of sperm cells, the amount of HMPAO, the /sup 99m/Tc-HMPAO concentration and the duration of the incubation. Incubation periods greater than 20 min, however, resulted only in a minor increase of labeling yield. A delay of more than 5 min between the labeling of the HMPAO with /sup 99m/Tc and initiation of the incubation of the sperm cells with the /sup 99m/Tc-HMPAO also decreased the maximum labeling yield. The radiolabeled cells were found to be stable and after 18 h > 93% of the activity was still bound to the sperm cells. After insemination of labeled sperm cells in ovulating rabbits the accumulation of the cells in the Fallopian tubes and their subsequent migration could be clearly visualized by scintigraphic techniques in vivo. (orig.).

  6. Evaluation of male germ cell toxicity in rats: correlation between sperm head morphology and sperm comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, P P; Kushwaha, S; Tripathi, D N; Jena, G B

    2010-12-21

    The present study was aimed to investigate the germ cell toxicity of doxorubicin and find out the possible correlation between sperm head morphological evaluation and sperm comet assay, which are used to assess male germ cell toxicity. The correlation between these two assays was validated using a potent germ cell toxicant, doxorubicin, in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Doxorubicin was administered intra-peritionally at the doses of 1.25, 2.5 and 5mg/kg weekly once for a period of 5 weeks and all the animals were sacrificed after 1 week of receiving the last dose. The germ cell toxicity of doxorubicin was assessed using oxidative stress parameters, sperm head morphology, sperm comet assay, halo assay and histology in testes as the end point of evaluation. A significant increase in the % abnormality in sperm head was found in the animals treated with 2.5 and 5mg/kg/week doxorubicin. Doxorubicin treatment significantly increased the DNA damage of sperm in a dose-dependent manner as observed by sperm comet assay parameters. A strong positive correlation was observed between the sperm head morphological evaluation and the sperm comet assay. Therefore, it can be concluded that the damage in genetic material of sperm may result into abnormalities in the sperm head morphology. The sperm head morphological evaluation is considered to be essential for the assessment of male germ cell toxicity by several regulatory bodies like the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH). However, acceptance of the sperm comet assay by regulatory authorities as a standard genotoxicity test for assessing male germ cell toxicity still requires further validation of the assay. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Towards microfluidic sperm refinement : impedance-based analysis and sorting of sperm cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wagenaar, B.; Dekker, Stefan; de Boer, Hans L.; Bomer, Johan G.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes Irene

    2016-01-01

    The use of high quality semen for artificial insemination in the livestock industry is essential for successful outcome. Insemination using semen with a high number of sperm cells containing morphological defects has a negative impact on fertilization outcome. Therefore, semen with a high number of

  8. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babahosseini, H; Carmichael, B; Strobl, J S; Mahmoodi, S N; Agah, M

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Modelling a tethered mammalian sperm cell undergoing hyperactivation

    KAUST Repository

    Curtis, M.P.

    2012-09-01

    The beat patterns of mammalian sperm flagella can be categorised into two different types. The first involves symmetric waves propagating down the flagellum with a net linear propulsion of the sperm cell. The second, hyperactive, waveform is classified by vigorous asymmetric waves of higher amplitude, lower wavenumber and frequency propagating down the flagellum resulting in highly curved trajectories. The latter beat pattern is part of the capacitation process whereby sperm prepare for the prospective penetration of the zona pellucida and fusion with the egg. Hyperactivation is often observed to initiate as sperm escape from epithelial and ciliary bindings formed within the isthmic regions of the female oviducts, leading to a conjecture in the literature that this waveform is mechanically important for sperm escape. Hence, we explore the mechanical effects of hyperactivation on a tethered sperm, focussing on a Newtonian fluid. Using a resistive force theory model we demonstrate that hyperactivation can indeed generate forces that pull the sperm away from a tethering point and consequently a hyperactivated sperm cell bound to an epithelial surface need not always be pushed by its flagellum. More generally, directions of the forces generated by tethered flagella are insensitive to reductions in beat frequency and the detailed flagellar responses depend on the nature of the binding at the tethering point. Furthermore, waveform asymmetry and amplitude increases enhance the tendency for a tethered flagellum to start tugging on its binding. The same is generally predicted to be true for reductions in the wavenumber of the flagellum beat, but not universally so, emphasising the dynamical complexity of flagellar force generation. Finally, qualitative observations drawn from experimental data of human sperm bound to excised female reproductive tract are also presented and are found to be consistent with the theoretical predictions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Sub-fertile sperm cells exemplify telomere dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biron-Shental, Tal; Wiser, Amir; Hershko-Klement, Anat; Markovitch, Ofer; Amiel, Aliza; Berkovitch, Arie

    2017-09-13

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate telomere homeostasis in sub-fertile compared to fertile human sperm. This observational, comparative study included 16 sub-fertile men who required intracytoplasmic sperm injection and 10 fertile men. At least 100 sperm cells from each participant were assessed. Main outcome measures were telomere length and telomere aggregates. Telomerase RNA component (TERC) copy number and telomere capture were assessed using fluorescence in situ hybridization technique and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) using immunohistochemistry. Clinical backgrounds were similar. The percentage of sperm cells with shorter telomeres was higher among the sub-fertile compared to the fertile participants (3.3 ± 3.1 vs. 0.6 ± 1.2%, respectively; P < 0.005). The percentage of cells with telomere aggregates was significantly higher in the sub-fertile group (15.12 ± 3.73 vs. 4.73 ± 3.73%; P < 0.005). TERC gene copy number was similar between groups. The percentage of cells that were positive for hTERT was lower in the sub-fertile group (3.81 ± 1.27 vs. 8.42 ± 1.80%; P < 0.005). Telomere capture rates were higher among the sub-fertile sperm cells (P < 0.005). Sub-fertile sperm cells have short telomeres that are elongated by the alternative pathway of telomere capture. Dysfunctional telomeres may affect sperm fertilizability.

  11. Hyaluronidase 2: a novel germ cell hyaluronidase with epididymal expression and functional roles in mammalian sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modelski, Mark J; Menlah, Gladys; Wang, Yipei; Dash, Soma; Wu, Kathie; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2014-11-01

    To initiate the crucial cell adhesion events necessary for fertilization, sperm must penetrate extracellular matrix barriers containing hyaluronic acid (HA), a task thought to be accomplished by neutral-active hyaluronidases. Here we report that the ~57 kDa hyaluronidase 2 (HYAL2) that in somatic tissues has been highly characterized to be acid-active is present in mouse and human sperm, as detected by Western blot, flow cytometric, and immunoprecipitation assays. Immunofluorescence revealed its presence on the plasma membrane over the acrosome, the midpiece, and proximal principal piece in mice where protein fractionation demonstrated a differential distribution in subcellular compartments. It is significantly more abundant in the acrosome-reacted (P = 0.04) and soluble acrosomal fractions (P = 0.006) (microenvironments where acid-active hyaluronidases function) compared to that of the plasma membrane where neutral hyaluronidases mediate cumulus penetration. Using HA substrate gel electrophoresis, immunoprecipitated HYAL 2 was shown to have catalytic activity at pH 4.0. Colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation assays reveal that HYAL2 is associated with its cofactor, CD44, consistent with CD44-dependent HYAL2 activity. HYAL2 is also present throughout the epididymis, where Hyal2 transcripts were detected, and in the epididymal luminal fluids. In vitro assays demonstrated that HYAL2 can be acquired on the sperm membrane from epididymal luminal fluids, suggesting that it plays a role in epididymal maturation. Because similar biphasic kinetics are seen for HYAL2 and SPAM1 (Sperm adhesion molecule 1), it is likely that HYAL2 plays a redundant role in the catalysis of megadalton HA to its 20 kDa intermediate during fertilization. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  12. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babahosseini, H. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Carmichael, B. [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Strobl, J.S. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Mahmoodi, S.N., E-mail: nmahmoodi@eng.ua.edu [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Agah, M., E-mail: agah@vt.edu [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain.

  13. Sperm cell granuloma in a gobbler ( Meleagris Gallopavo ) | Ajayi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microscopically, there was severe diffuse testicular degeneration and necrosis of the germinal epithelial cells, extravasation of spermatozoa into the epididymal interstitium, inciting a granulomatous reaction with arteritis. Based on these findings, sperm cell granuloma was diagnosed. This is probably the first reported case ...

  14. Exploring Nanostructure Arrays for Single-Cell and Subcellular Manipulation and Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Månson, Nina

    these, arrays of vertical nanostructures (NSs) with submicron diametersand microscale lengths are particularly promising and are currently being established as bothhighly sensitive protein arrays and as platforms for manipulations and investigations at thesingle-cell or even subcellular level.To date...

  15. Conserved roles of the prion protein domains on subcellular localization and cell-cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo P Solis

    Full Text Available Analyses of cultured cells and transgenic mice expressing prion protein (PrP deletion mutants have revealed that some properties of PrP -such as its ability to misfold, aggregate and trigger neurotoxicity- are controlled by discrete molecular determinants within its protein domains. Although the contributions of these determinants to PrP biosynthesis and turnover are relatively well characterized, it is still unclear how they modulate cellular functions of PrP. To address this question, we used two defined activities of PrP as functional readouts: 1 the recruitment of PrP to cell-cell contacts in Drosophila S2 and human MCF-7 epithelial cells, and 2 the induction of PrP embryonic loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes in zebrafish. Our results show that homologous mutations in mouse and zebrafish PrPs similarly affect their subcellular localization patterns as well as their in vitro and in vivo activities. Among PrP's essential features, the N-terminal leader peptide was sufficient to drive targeting of our constructs to cell contact sites, whereas lack of GPI-anchoring and N-glycosylation rendered them inactive by blocking their cell surface expression. Importantly, our data suggest that the ability of PrP to homophilically trans-interact and elicit intracellular signaling is primarily encoded in its globular domain, and modulated by its repetitive domain. Thus, while the latter induces the local accumulation of PrPs at discrete punctae along cell contacts, the former counteracts this effect by promoting the continuous distribution of PrP. In early zebrafish embryos, deletion of either domain significantly impaired PrP's ability to modulate E-cadherin cell adhesion. Altogether, these experiments relate structural features of PrP to its subcellular distribution and in vivo activity. Furthermore, they show that despite their large evolutionary history, the roles of PrP domains and posttranslational modifications are conserved between mouse and

  16. Glutathione content in sperm cells of infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Fafula

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperproduction of reactive oxygen species can damage sperm cells and is considered to be one of the mechanisms of male infertility. Cell protection from the damaging effects of free radicals and lipid peroxidation products is generally determined by the degree of antioxidant protection. Glutathione is non-enzymatic antioxidant which plays an important protective role against oxidative damages and lipid peroxidation. The aim of the present work is to determine the content of reduced and oxidized glutathione in sperm cells of infertile men. Semen samples from 20 fertile men (normozoospermics and 72 infertile patients (12 oligozoospermics, 17 asthenozoospermics, 10 oligoasthenozoosper­mics and 33 leucocytospermic were used. The total, oxidized (GSSG and reduced (GSH glutathione levels were measured spectrophotometrically. The levels of total glutathione were significantly lower in the spermatozoa of patients with oligozoo-, asthenozoo- and oligoasthenozoospermia than in the control. Infertile groups showed significantly decreased values of reduced glutathione in sperm cells vs. fertile men, indicating an alteration of oxidative status. The oxidized glutathione levels in sperm cells of infertile men did not differ from those of normozoospermic men with proven fertility. The GSH/GSSG ratio was significantly decreased in the oligo-, astheno- and oligoasthenozoospermic groups compared to the normozoospermic group. In patients with leucocytospermia the GSH/GSSG ratio was lower but these changes were not significant. In addition, glutathione peroxidase activity in sperm cells was decreased in patients with oligozoo-, astenozoo-, oligoastenozoospermia and with leucocytospermia. The most significant changes in glutathione peroxidase activity were observed in infertile men with leucocytospermia. Decreased GSH/GSSG ratio indicates a decline in redox-potential of the glutathione system in sperm cells of men with decreased fertilizing potential

  17. LVQ acrosome integrity assessment of boar sperm cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkov, Nicolai; Alegre, Enrique; Biehl, Michael; Sánchez, Lidia

    2006-01-01

    We consider images of boar spermatozoa obtained with an optical phase-contrast microscope. Our goal is to automatically classify single sperm cells as acrosome-intact (class 1) or acrosome-reacted (class 2). Such classification is important for the estimation of the fertilization potential of a

  18. LVQ acrosome integrity assessment of boar sperm cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkov, Nicolai; Alegre, Enrique; Biehl, Michael; Sánchez, Lidia; Tavares, JMRS; Jorge, RMN

    2007-01-01

    We consider images of boar spermatozoa obtained with an optical phase-contrast microscope. Our goal is to automatically classify single sperm cells as acrosome-intact (class 1) or acrosome-reacted (class 2). Such classification is important for the estimation of the fertilization potential of a

  19. Nanopipette-Based SERS Aptasensor for Subcellular Localization of Cancer Biomarker in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Sumaira; Liu, Hai-Ling; Ahmed, Saud Asif; Yang, Jin-Mei; Zhou, Yue; Pang, Jie; Ji, Li-Na; Xia, Xing-Hua; Wang, Kang

    2017-09-19

    Single cell analysis is essential for understanding the heterogeneity, behaviors of cells, and diversity of target analyte in different subcellular regions. Nucleolin (NCL) is a multifunctional protein that is markedly overexpressed in most of the cancer cells. The variant expression levels of NCL in subcellular regions have a marked influence on cancer proliferation and treatments. However, the specificity of available methods to identify the cancer biomarkers is limited because of the high level of subcellular matrix effect. Herein, we proposed a novel technique to increase both the molecular and spectral specificity of cancer diagnosis by using aptamers affinity based portable nanopipette with distinctive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activities. The aptamers-functionalized gold-coated nanopipette was used to capture target, while p-mercaptobenzonitrile (MBN) and complementary DNA modified Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) worked as Raman reporter to produce SERS signal. The SERS signal of Raman nanotag was lost upon NCL capturing via modified DNA aptamers on nanoprobe, which further helped to verify the specificity of nanoprobe. For proof of concept, NCL protein was specifically extracted from different cell lines by aptamers modified SERS active nanoprobe. The nanoprobes manifested specifically good affinity for NCL with a dissociation constant Kd of 36 nM and provided a 1000-fold higher specificity against other competing proteins. Furthermore, the Raman reporter moiety has a vibrational frequency in the spectroscopically silent region (1800-2300 cm-1) with a negligible matrix effect from cell analysis. The subcellular localization and spatial distribution of NCL were successfully achieved in various types of cells, including MCF-7A, HeLa, and MCF-10A cells. This type of probing technique for single cell analysis could lead to the development of a new perspective in cancer diagnosis and treatment at the cellular level.

  20. Subcellular localization of YKL-40 in normal and malignant epithelial cells of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roslind, A.; Balslev, E.; Kruse, H.

    2008-01-01

    . YKL-40 protein expression was redistributed in carcinoma versus normal glandular tissue of the breast. A reduced expression of YKL-40 in relation to intermediate filaments and desmosomes was found in tumor cells. Changes in YKL-40 expression suggest that the function of YKL-40 in cells of epithelial......YKL-40 is a new prognostic biomarker in cancer. The biological function is only poorly understood. This study aimed at determining the subcellular localization of YKL-40, using immunogold labeling, in normal epithelial cells and in malignant tumor cells of the breast by immunoelectron microscopy...

  1. Rheotaxis facilitates upstream navigation of mammalian sperm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jörn; Blayney, Martyn; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-05-27

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm maintain the correct swimming direction during various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Whilst chemotaxis may dominate near the ovum, it is unclear which cues guide spermatozoa on their long journey towards the egg. Hypothesized mechanisms range from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing and response to fluid flow variations (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about them. We report the first quantitative study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis, using microfluidic devices to investigate systematically swimming of human and bull sperm over a range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions, and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to stable upstream spiralling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilisation. A minimal mathematical model is presented that accounts quantitatively for the experimental observations.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02403.001. Copyright © 2014, Kantsler et al.

  2. The Salmonella effector SteA binds phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate for subcellular targeting within host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Lia; Ismail, Ahmad; Charro, Nuno; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Holden, David W; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J; Mota, Luís Jaime

    2016-07-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use specialized secretion systems to deliver virulence effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The function of these effectors depends on their localization within infected cells, but the mechanisms determining subcellular targeting of each effector are mostly elusive. Here, we show that the Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA binds specifically to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P]. Ectopically expressed SteA localized at the plasma membrane (PM) of eukaryotic cells. However, SteA was displaced from the PM of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mutants unable to synthesize the local pool of PI(4)P and from the PM of HeLa cells after localized depletion of PI(4)P. Moreover, in infected cells, bacterially translocated or ectopically expressed SteA localized at the membrane of the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) and to Salmonella-induced tubules; using the PI(4)P-binding domain of the Legionella type IV secretion effector SidC as probe, we found PI(4)P at the SCV membrane and associated tubules throughout Salmonella infection of HeLa cells. Both binding of SteA to PI(4)P and the subcellular localization of ectopically expressed or bacterially translocated SteA were dependent on a lysine residue near the N-terminus of the protein. Overall, this indicates that binding of SteA to PI(4)P is necessary for its localization within host cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. KCC2-dependent subcellular ECl difference of ON-OFF retinal ganglion cells in larval zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongwei eZhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Subcellular difference in the reversal potential of Cl- (ECl has been found in many types of neurons. As local ECl largely determines the action of nearby GABAergic/glycinergic synapses, subcellular ECl difference can effectively regulate neuronal computation. The ON-OFF retinal ganglion cell (RGC processes both ON and OFF visual signals via its ON and OFF dendrites, respectively. It is thus interesting to investigate whether the ON and OFF dendrites of single RGCs exhibit different local ECl. Here, using in vivo gramicidin-perforated patch recording in larval zebrafish ON-OFF RGCs, we examine local ECl at the ON and OFF dendrites, and soma through measuring light-evoked ON and OFF inhibitory responses, and GABA-induced response at the soma, respectively. We find there are subcellular ECl differences between the soma and dendrite, as well as between the ON and OFF dendrites of single RGCs. These somato-dendritic and inter-dendritic ECl differences are dependent on the Cl- extruder, K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2, because they are largely diminished by down-regulating kcc2 expression with morpholino oligonucleotides or by blocking KCC2 function with furosemide. Thus, our findings indicate that there exists KCC2-dependent ECl difference between the ON and OFF dendrites of individual ON-OFF RGCs that may differentially affect visual processing in the ON and OFF pathways.

  4. In situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around seeded stem cells at the subcellular length scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jae Song

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A major hurdle to understanding and exploiting interactions between the stem cell and its environment is the lack of a tool for precise delivery of mechanical cues concomitant to observing sub-cellular adaptation of structure. These studies demonstrate the use of microscale particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV for in situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around mesenchymal stem cells, i.e. murine embryonic multipotent cell line C3H10T1/2, at the subcellular length scale, providing a tool for real time observation and analysis of stem cell adaptation to the prevailing mechanical milieu. In the absence of cells, computational fluid dynamics (CFD predicts flow regimes within 12% of μ-PIV measures, achieving the technical specifications of the chamber and the flow rates necessary to deliver target shear stresses at a particular height from the base of the flow chamber. However, our μ-PIV studies show that the presence of cells per se as well as the density at which cells are seeded significantly influences local flow fields. Furthermore, for any given cell or cell seeding density, flow regimes vary significantly along the vertical profile of the cell. Hence, the mechanical milieu of the stem cell exposed to shape changing shear stresses, induced by fluid drag, varies with respect to proximity of surrounding cells as well as with respect to apical height. The current study addresses a previously unmet need to predict and observe both flow regimes as well as mechanoadaptation of cells in flow chambers designed to deliver precisely controlled mechanical signals to live cells. An understanding of interactions and adaptation in response to forces at the interface between the surface of the cell and its immediate local environment may be key for de novo engineering of functional tissues from stem cell templates as well as for unraveling the mechanisms underlying multiscale development, growth and adaptation of organisms.

  5. In Situ Spatiotemporal Mapping of Flow Fields around Seeded Stem Cells at the Subcellular Length Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min Jae; Dean, David; Knothe Tate, Melissa L.

    2010-01-01

    A major hurdle to understanding and exploiting interactions between the stem cell and its environment is the lack of a tool for precise delivery of mechanical cues concomitant to observing sub-cellular adaptation of structure. These studies demonstrate the use of microscale particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) for in situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around mesenchymal stem cells, i.e. murine embryonic multipotent cell line C3H10T1/2, at the subcellular length scale, providing a tool for real time observation and analysis of stem cell adaptation to the prevailing mechanical milieu. In the absence of cells, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predicts flow regimes within 12% of μ-PIV measures, achieving the technical specifications of the chamber and the flow rates necessary to deliver target shear stresses at a particular height from the base of the flow chamber. However, our μ-PIV studies show that the presence of cells per se as well as the density at which cells are seeded significantly influences local flow fields. Furthermore, for any given cell or cell seeding density, flow regimes vary significantly along the vertical profile of the cell. Hence, the mechanical milieu of the stem cell exposed to shape changing shear stresses, induced by fluid drag, varies with respect to proximity of surrounding cells as well as with respect to apical height. The current study addresses a previously unmet need to predict and observe both flow regimes as well as mechanoadaptation of cells in flow chambers designed to deliver precisely controlled mechanical signals to live cells. An understanding of interactions and adaptation in response to forces at the interface between the surface of the cell and its immediate local environment may be key for de novo engineering of functional tissues from stem cell templates as well as for unraveling the mechanisms underlying multiscale development, growth and adaptation of organisms. PMID:20862249

  6. An improved procedure for subcellular spatial alignment during live-cell CLEM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin S Padman

    Full Text Available Live-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM offers unique insights into the ultrastructure of dynamic cellular processes. A critical and technically challenging part of CLEM is the 3-dimensional relocation of the intracellular region of interest during sample processing. We have developed a simple CLEM procedure that uses toner particles from a laser printer as orientation marks. This facilitates easy tracking of a region of interest even by eye throughout the whole procedure. Combined with subcellular fluorescence markers for the plasma membrane and nucleus, the toner particles allow for precise subcellular spatial alignment of the optical and electron microscopy data sets. The toner-based reference grid is printed and transferred onto a polymer film using a standard office printer and laminator. We have also designed a polymer film holder that is compatible with most inverted microscopes, and have validated our strategy by following the ultrastructure of mitochondria that were selectively photo-irradiated during live-cell microscopy. In summary, our inexpensive and robust CLEM procedure simplifies optical imaging, without limiting the choice of optical microscope.

  7. An Improved Procedure for Subcellular Spatial Alignment during Live-Cell CLEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padman, Benjamin S.; Bach, Markus; Ramm, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Live-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) offers unique insights into the ultrastructure of dynamic cellular processes. A critical and technically challenging part of CLEM is the 3-dimensional relocation of the intracellular region of interest during sample processing. We have developed a simple CLEM procedure that uses toner particles from a laser printer as orientation marks. This facilitates easy tracking of a region of interest even by eye throughout the whole procedure. Combined with subcellular fluorescence markers for the plasma membrane and nucleus, the toner particles allow for precise subcellular spatial alignment of the optical and electron microscopy data sets. The toner-based reference grid is printed and transferred onto a polymer film using a standard office printer and laminator. We have also designed a polymer film holder that is compatible with most inverted microscopes, and have validated our strategy by following the ultrastructure of mitochondria that were selectively photo-irradiated during live-cell microscopy. In summary, our inexpensive and robust CLEM procedure simplifies optical imaging, without limiting the choice of optical microscope. PMID:24755651

  8. Temperature variable and the efficiency of sperm mediated transfection of HPV16 DNA into cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadze, Ruslana; Chan, Philip J; Jacobson, John D; Corselli, Johannah U; King, Alan

    2002-09-01

    To pretreat sperm at various temperatures before exposure to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA fragments and to assess the efficiency of HPV carrier sperm to transfect cumulus cells. Cumulus cells from follicular aspirates were obtained, pooled and divided into culture dishes containing Sybr Gold-stained HPV DNA carrying sperm that were either pretreated at 4 degree C, 37 degree C or 40 degree C (n = 5). The cells were incubated in 5% CO(2) in air mixture at 37 degree C for 24 hours. The efficiency of sperm to take up fluorescent HPV DNA was determined at hour 0. After incubation, cumulus cell viability was assessed using the eosin method and the percentages of fluorescent cumulus cells determined. Over half of all the cumulus cells became fluorescent with the highest percentage in the 37 degree C group. Sperm pretreated at 4 degree C had the greatest amount of HPV DNA fragments. Total sperm motility was similar for the 3 pretreatment groups. There were no differences in cumulus viability among the groups. Sperm pretreated at 37 degree C transferred the greatest amount of fluorescent HPV DNA fragments to the cumulus cells. The HPV DNA was observed in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. The data suggested the possibility of sperm as a vector for the transmission of HPV DNA to the cumulus cells surrounding ovulated oocytes, which might lead to early implantation failures.

  9. Isolating Sperm from Cell Mixtures Using Magnetic Beads Coupled with an Anti-PH-20 Antibody for Forensic DNA Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xing-Chun; Wang, Le; Sun, Jing; Jiang, Bo-Wei; Zhang, Er-Li; Ye, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal swabs taken in rape cases usually contain epithelial cells from the victim and sperm from the assailant and forensic DNA analysis requires separation of sperm from these cell mixtures. PH-20, which is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored hyaluronidase located on the head of sperm, has important functions in fertilization. Here we describe a newly developed method for sperm isolation using anti-PH-20 antibody-coupled immunomagnetic beads (anti-PH-20 IMBs). Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed the IMBs recognized the head of sperm specifically and exhibited a great capacity to capture sperm cells. However, we found it necessary to incubate the IMB-sperm complex with DNase I before sperm lysis in order to remove any female DNA completely. We compared the sensitivity of anti-PH-20 IMBs in sperm and epithelial cell discrimination to those coated with a different anti-sperm antibody (anti-SP-10, anti-ADAM2 or anti-JLP). Only the anti-PH-20 IMBs succeeded in isolating sperm from cell mixtures at a sperm/epithelial cell ratio of 103:105. Further, our method exhibited greater power and better stability for sperm isolation compared to the traditional differential lysis strategy. Taken together, the anti-PH-20 IMB method described here could be effective for the isolation of sperm needed to obtain a single-sourced DNA profile as an aid to identifying the perpetrator in sexual assault cases.

  10. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: Implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eKreis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, the mitochondria or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein-protein interactions or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease.

  11. rAAV-mediated subcellular targeting of optogenetic tools in retinal ganglion cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chaowen; Ivanova, Elena; Zhang, Yi; Pan, Zhuo-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Expression of optogenetic tools in surviving inner retinal neurons to impart retinal light sensitivity has been a new strategy for restoring vision after photoreceptor degeneration. One potential approach for restoring retinal light sensitivity after photoreceptor degeneration is to express optogenetic tools in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). For this approach, restoration of ON and OFF center-surround receptive fields in RGCs, a key feature of visual information processing, may be important. A possible solution is to differentially express depolarizing and hyperpolarizing optogenetic tools, such as channelrhodopsin-2 and halorhodopsin, to the center and peripheral regions of the RGC dendritic field by using protein targeting motifs. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have proven to be a powerful vehicle for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery, including in the retina. Therefore, the search for protein targeting motifs that can achieve rAAV-mediated subcellular targeted expression would be particularly valuable for developing therapeutic applications. In this study, we identified two protein motifs that are suitable for rAAV-mediated subcellular targeting for generating center-surround receptive fields while reducing the axonal expression in RGCs. Resulting morphological dendritic field and physiological response field by center-targeting were significantly smaller than those produced by surround-targeting. rAAV motif-mediated protein targeting could also be a valuable tool for studying physiological function and clinical applications in other areas of the central nervous system.

  12. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreis, Patricia; Leondaritis, George; Lieberam, Ivo; Eickholt, Britta J

    2014-01-01

    PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5)P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the mitochondria, or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein-protein interactions, or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i) recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii) current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease.

  13. Lipidomics: analysis of the lipid composition of cells and subcellular organelles by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brügger, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Lipidomics aims to quantitatively define lipid classes, including their molecular species, in biological systems. Lipidomics has experienced rapid progress, mainly because of continuous technical advances in instrumentation that are now enabling quantitative lipid analyses with an unprecedented level of sensitivity and precision. The still-growing category of lipids includes a broad diversity of chemical structures with a wide range of physicochemical properties. Reflecting this diversity, different methods and strategies are being applied to the quantification of lipids. Here, I review state-of-the-art electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric approaches and direct infusion to quantitatively assess lipid compositions of cells and subcellular fractions. Finally, I discuss a few examples of the power of mass spectrometry-based lipidomics in addressing cell biological questions.

  14. Prolactin-induced Subcellular Targeting of GLUT1 Glucose Transporter in Living Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskin, Arieh; Mond, Yehudit

    2015-10-26

    Studying the biological pathways involved in mammalian milk production during lactation could have many clinical implications. The mammary gland is unique in its requirement for transport of free glucose into the cell for the synthesis of lactose, the primary carbohydrate in milk. To study GLUT1 trafficking and subcellular targeting in living mammary epithelial cells (MEC) in culture. Immunocytochemistry was used to study GLUT1 hormonally regulated subcellular targeting in human MEC (HMEC). To study GLUT1 targeting and recycling in living mouse MEC (MMEC) in culture, we constructed fusion proteins of GLUT1 and green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed them in CIT3 MMEC. Cells were maintained in growth medium (GM), or exposed to secretion medium (SM), containing prolactin. GLUT1 in HMEC localized primarily to the plasma membrane in GM. After exposure to prolactin for 4 days, GLUT1 was targeted intracellularly and demonstrated a perinuclear distribution, co-localizing with lactose synthetase. The dynamic trafficking of GFP-GLUT1 fusion proteins in CIT3 MMEC suggested a basal constitutive GLUT1 recycling pathway between an intracellular pool and the cell surface that targets most GLUT1 to the plasma membrane in GM. Upon exposure to prolactin in SM, GLUT1 was specifically targeted intracellularly within 90-110 minutes. Our studies suggest intracellular targeting of GLUT1 to the central vesicular transport system upon exposure to prolactin. The existence of a dynamic prolactin-induced sorting machinery for GLUT1 could be important for transport of free glucose into the Golgi for lactose synthesis during lactation.

  15. Comparative profiling of the sperm proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Ashling; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2015-02-01

    The highly complex and species-selective mechanism of fertilization is a central theme of developmental biology. Gametogenesis, sperm activation, and egg-sperm recognition are fundamental biological processes, warranting detailed studies into the molecular composition of gametes. Biological MS has been instrumental for the comprehensive itemizing of gamete proteomes. The protein constellation of sperm cells and its subcellular structures has been established for a variety of animal species. Spermatogenesis and the crucial activation of sperm cells as a prerequisite of successful fertilization and physiological adaptations to external stressors was investigated using proteomics, as well as the underlying mechanisms of male infertility with respect to proteome-wide alterations. This review outlines recent achievements of sperm proteomics and exemplifies the usefulness of gel-based surveys by outlining the comparative analysis of abnormal spermatozoa in globozoospermia. Besides label-free MS techniques and cell-based labeling methodology, high-resolution fluorescence 2DE has been shown to be highly suitable as a proteomic biomarker discovery tool in sperm protein research. The appropriateness of novel protein markers for improving our understanding of normal spermatogenesis and sperm activation versus the molecular pathogenesis of male infertility will be discussed. New biomarker candidates might be useful to improve diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic aspects of infertility. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. [Solanum torvum, toxicological evaluation on microorganisms and sperm cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Odio, Aníbal; Puente-Zapata, Edgar; Pérez-Andrés, Irela Yolaine; Salas-Pérez, Hilario

    2012-01-01

    to evaluate the toxic effect of an aqueous extract of Solanum torvum on microorganisms responsible for genitourinary infections as well as the adverse effects on sperm cells. it was determined the microbial toxicity of a freeze-dried aqueous extract (obtained from the leaves and stems of Solanum torvum), against wild strains of Escherichia coli, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Candida albicans, using the test of poisoning in culture medium at concentrations of 50, 100 and 200 mg/mL. The response-was evaluated with the colony diameter (mm). Then, it was evaluated the toxicological potential on male reproductive system using the testing of morphology of the sperm head in NMRI mice. the Solanum torvum had bacteriostatic antibacterial activity. There were not observed alterations in quantity and quality characteristics in semen with the oral and doses used of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg of weight. the Solanum torvum described, inhibits the growth of bacteria and produces no disturbance on semen quality in the species studied.

  17. Subcellular and supracellular mechanical stress prescribes cytoskeleton behavior in Arabidopsis cotyledon pavement cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Krupinski, Pawel; Wightman, Raymond; Milani, Pascale; Berquand, Alexandre; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier; Jönsson, Henrik; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2014-01-01

    Although it is a central question in biology, how cell shape controls intracellular dynamics largely remains an open question. Here, we show that the shape of Arabidopsis pavement cells creates a stress pattern that controls microtubule orientation, which then guides cell wall reinforcement. Live-imaging, combined with modeling of cell mechanics, shows that microtubules align along the maximal tensile stress direction within the cells, and atomic force microscopy demonstrates that this leads to reinforcement of the cell wall parallel to the microtubules. This feedback loop is regulated: cell-shape derived stresses could be overridden by imposed tissue level stresses, showing how competition between subcellular and supracellular cues control microtubule behavior. Furthermore, at the microtubule level, we identified an amplification mechanism in which mechanical stress promotes the microtubule response to stress by increasing severing activity. These multiscale feedbacks likely contribute to the robustness of microtubule behavior in plant epidermis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01967.001 PMID:24740969

  18. Dielectric elastomer actuator for the measurement of cell traction forces with sub-cellular resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosset, Samuel; Poulin, Alexandre; Zollinger, Alicia; Smith, Michael; Shea, Herbert

    2017-04-01

    We report on the use of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) to measure the traction force field of cells with subcellular resolution. The study of cellular electrochemical and mechanical response to deformation is an important area of research, as mechanotransduction has been shown to be linked with fundamental cell functions, or the progression of diseases such as cancer or atherosclerosis. Experimental cell mechanics is based on two fundamental concepts: the ability to measure cell stiffness, and to apply controlled strains to small clusters of cells. However, there is a lack of tools capable of applying precise deformation to a small cell population while being compatible with an inverted microscope (stable focal plane, transparency, compactness, etc.). Here, we use an anisotropically prestretched silicone-based DEA to deform a soft (7.6kPa) polyacrylamide gel on which the cells are cultured. An array of micro-dots of fluorescent fibronectin is transferred on the gel by micro-contact printing and serves as attachment points for the cells. In addition, the fluorescent dots (which have a diameter of 2 μm with a spacing of 6 μm) are used during the experiment to monitor the traction forces of a single cell (or small cluster of cells). The cell locally exerts traction on the gel, thus deforming the matrix of dots. The position of dots versus time is monitored live when the cells are submitted to a uniaxial strain step. Our deformable bioreactor enables the measurement of the local stiffness of cells submitted to mechanical strain, and is fully compatible with an inverted microscope set-up.

  19. Weak mitochondrial targeting sequence determines tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase in liver and brain cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, G.D.; Gur, N.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Pines, O.; Vardimon, L.

    2010-01-01

    Evolution of the uricotelic system for ammonia detoxification required a mechanism for tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase (GS). In uricotelic vertebrates, GS is mitochondrial in liver cells and cytoplasmic in brain. Because these species contain a single copy of the GS

  20. Subcellular analysis of interaction between breast cancer cells and drug by digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Lin, Qiaowen; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Yunxin; Ouyang, Liting; Guo, Sha; Yao, Qian

    2017-10-01

    Digital holographic microscopy is a promising quantitative phase-contrast imaging technique, which exhibits the advantages of non-destruction, full field of view, quasi-real time, and don't need dye and external marker to the living biological sample. In this paper, the inverted off-axis image-plane digital holography with pre-magnification is built up to study the living MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The lateral resolution of the proposed experimental setup is 0.87μm, which is verified by the standard USAF test target. Then the system is used to visualize the interaction between living breast cancer cells and drug. The blebbing is observed after the cells are treated by paclitaxel drug, and the distribution of the paclitaxel inside the cells is detected, which is near the cytomembrane, or in other words the end of the microtubules. It will stop the mitosis and cause the death of the cells. It is helpful to reveal the anticancer mechanism of paclitaxel in the subcellular scale.

  1. Studying subcellular detail in fixed astrocytes: Dissociation of morphologically intact glial cells (DIMIGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eHaseleu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Studying the distribution of astrocytic antigens is particularly hard when they are localized in their fine, peripheral astrocyte processes (PAPs, since these processes often have a diameter comparable to vesicles and small organelles. The most appropriate technique is immunoelectron microscopy, which is, however, a time-consuming procedure. Even in high resolution light microscopy, antigen localization is difficult to detect due to the small dimensions of these processes, and overlay from antigen in surrounding non-glial cells. Yet, PAPs frequently display antigens related to motility and glia-synaptic interaction. Here, we describe the dissociation of morphologically intact glial cells (DIMIGs, permitting unambiguous antigen localization using epifluorescence microscopy. Astrocytes are dissociated from juvenile (p13-15 mouse cortex by applying papain treatment and cytospin centrifugation to attach the cells to a slide. The cells and their complete processes including the PAPs is thus projected in 2D. The entire procedure takes 2½-3 hours. We show by morphometry that the diameter of DIMIGs, including the PAPs is similar to that of astrocytes in situ. In contrast to cell culture, results derived from this procedure allow for direct conclusions relating to (i the presence of an antigen in cortical astrocytes, (ii subcellular antigen distribution, in particular when localized in the PAPs. The detailed resolution is shown in an exemplary study of the organization of the astrocytic cytoskeleton components actin, ezrin, tubulin, and GFAP. The distribution of connexin 43 in relation to a single astrocyte’s process tree is also investigated.

  2. Studying subcellular detail in fixed astrocytes: dissociation of morphologically intact glial cells (DIMIGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseleu, Julia; Anlauf, Enrico; Blaess, Sandra; Endl, Elmar; Derouiche, Amin

    2013-01-01

    Studying the distribution of astrocytic antigens is particularly hard when they are localized in their fine, peripheral astrocyte processes (PAPs), since these processes often have a diameter comparable to vesicles and small organelles. The most appropriate technique is immunoelectron microscopy, which is, however, a time-consuming procedure. Even in high resolution light microscopy, antigen localization is difficult to detect due to the small dimensions of these processes, and overlay from antigen in surrounding non-glial cells. Yet, PAPs frequently display antigens related to motility and glia-synaptic interaction. Here, we describe the dissociation of morphologically intact glial cells (DIMIGs), permitting unambiguous antigen localization using epifluorescence microscopy. Astrocytes are dissociated from juvenile (p13-15) mouse cortex by applying papain treatment and cytospin centrifugation to attach the cells to a slide. The cells and their complete processes including the PAPs is thus projected in 2D. The entire procedure takes 2.5-3 h. We show by morphometry that the diameter of DIMIGs, including the PAPs is similar to that of astrocytes in situ. In contrast to cell culture, results derived from this procedure allow for direct conclusions relating to (1) the presence of an antigen in cortical astrocytes, (2) subcellular antigen distribution, in particular when localized in the PAPs. The detailed resolution is shown in an exemplary study of the organization of the astrocytic cytoskeleton components actin, ezrin, tubulin, and GFAP. The distribution of connexin 43 in relation to a single astrocyte's process tree is also investigated.

  3. Subcellular distribution and expression of cofilin and ezrin in human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines with different metastatic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nowak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is regulated by a number of actin binding proteins (ABPs. Four human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines – parental and three selected sublines, which differ in motility and metastatic potential, were used to investigate the expression level and subcellular localization of selected ABPs. Our interest was focused on cofilin and ezrin. These proteins are essential for cell migration and adhesion. The data received for the three more motile adenocarcinoma sublines (EB3, 3LNLN, 5W were compared with those obtained for the parental LS180 adenocarcinoma cells and fibroblastic NRK cells. Quantitative densitometric analysis and confocal fluorescence microscopy were used to examine the expression levels and subcellular distribution of the selected ABPs. Our data show distinct increase in the level of cofilin in adenocarcinoma cells accompanied by the reduction of inactive phosphorylated form of cofilin. In more motile cells, cofilin was accumulated at cellular periphery in co-localization with actin filaments. Furthemore, we indicated translocation of ezrin towards the cell periphery within more motile cells in comparison with NRK and parental adenocarcinoma cells. In summary, our data indicate the correlation between migration ability of selected human colon adenocarcinoma sublines and subcellular distribution as well as the level of cofilin and ezrin. Therefore these proteins might be essential for the higher migratory activity of invasive tumor cells.

  4. Human cell structure-driven model construction for predicting protein subcellular location from biological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Liu, Mingxia; Zhang, Daoqiang

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of subcellular location pattern is very important for fully characterizing the human proteome. Nowadays, with the great advances in automated microscopic imaging, accurate bioimage-based classification methods to predict protein subcellular locations are highly desired. All existing models were constructed on the independent parallel hypothesis, where the cellular component classes are positioned independently in a multi-class classification engine. The important structural information of cellular compartments is missed. To deal with this problem for developing more accurate models, we proposed a novel cell structure-driven classifier construction approach (SC-PSorter) by employing the prior biological structural information in the learning model. Specifically, the structural relationship among the cellular components is reflected by a new codeword matrix under the error correcting output coding framework. Then, we construct multiple SC-PSorter-based classifiers corresponding to the columns of the error correcting output coding codeword matrix using a multi-kernel support vector machine classification approach. Finally, we perform the classifier ensemble by combining those multiple SC-PSorter-based classifiers via majority voting. We evaluate our method on a collection of 1636 immunohistochemistry images from the Human Protein Atlas database. The experimental results show that our method achieves an overall accuracy of 89.0%, which is 6.4% higher than the state-of-the-art method. The dataset and code can be downloaded from https://github.com/shaoweinuaa/. dqzhang@nuaa.edu.cn Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Defining the subcellular interface of nanoparticles by live-cell imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Hemmerich

    Full Text Available Understanding of nanoparticle-bio-interactions within living cells requires knowledge about the dynamic behavior of nanomaterials during their cellular uptake, intracellular traffic and mutual reactions with cell organelles. Here, we introduce a protocol of combined kinetic imaging techniques that enables investigation of exemplary fluorochrome-labelled nanoparticles concerning their intracellular fate. By time-lapse confocal microscopy we observe fast, dynamin-dependent uptake of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles via the cell membrane within seconds. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP experiments reveal fast and complete exchange of the investigated nanoparticles at mitochondria, cytoplasmic vesicles or the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation is observed within minutes by free diffusion and active transport. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS indicate diffusion coefficients of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles in the nucleus and the cytoplasm that are consistent with particle motion in living cells based on diffusion. Determination of the apparent hydrodynamic radii by FCS and RICS shows that nanoparticles exert their cytoplasmic and nuclear effects mainly as mobile, monodisperse entities. Thus, a complete toolkit of fluorescence fluctuation microscopy is presented for the investigation of nanomaterial biophysics in subcellular microenvironments that contributes to develop a framework of intracellular nanoparticle delivery routes.

  6. Identification of proteins enriched in rice egg or sperm cells by single-cell proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafumi Abiko

    Full Text Available In angiosperms, female gamete differentiation, fertilization, and subsequent zygotic development occur in embryo sacs deeply embedded in the ovaries. Despite their importance in plant reproduction and development, how the egg cell is specialized, fuses with the sperm cell, and converts into an active zygote for early embryogenesis remains unclear. This lack of knowledge is partly attributable to the difficulty of direct analyses of gametes in angiosperms. In the present study, proteins from egg and sperm cells obtained from rice flowers were separated by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and globally identified by highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectroscopy. Proteome analyses were also conducted for seedlings, callus, and pollen grains to compare their protein expression profiles to those of gametes. The proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000265. A total of 2,138 and 2,179 expressed proteins were detected in egg and sperm cells, respectively, and 102 and 77 proteins were identified as preferentially expressed in egg and sperm cells, respectively. Moreover, several rice or Arabidopsis lines with mutations in genes encoding the putative gamete-enriched proteins showed clear phenotypic defects in seed set or seed development. These results suggested that the proteomic data presented in this study are foundational information toward understanding the mechanisms of reproduction and early development in angiosperms.

  7. Microchip-based cell lysis and DNA extraction from sperm cells for application to forensic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienvenue, Joan M; Duncalf, Natalie; Marchiarullo, Daniel; Ferrance, Jerome P; Landers, James P

    2006-03-01

    The current backlog of casework is among the most significant challenges facing crime laboratories at this time. While the development of next-generation microchip-based technology for expedited forensic casework analysis offers one solution to this problem, this will require the adaptation of manual, large-volume, benchtop chemistry to small volume microfluidic devices. Analysis of evidentiary materials from rape kits where semen or sperm cells are commonly found represents a unique set of challenges for on-chip cell lysis and DNA extraction that must be addressed for successful application. The work presented here details the development of a microdevice capable of DNA extraction directly from sperm cells for application to the analysis of sexual assault evidence. A variety of chemical lysing agents are assessed for inclusion in the extraction protocol and a method for DNA purification from sperm cells is described. Suitability of the extracted DNA for short tandem repeat (STR) analysis is assessed and genetic profiles shown. Finally, on-chip cell lysis methods are evaluated, with results from fluorescence visualization of cell rupture and DNA extraction from an integrated cell lysis and purification with subsequent STR amplification presented. A method for on-chip cell lysis and DNA purification is described, with considerations toward inclusion in an integrated microdevice capable of both differential cell sorting and DNA extraction. The results of this work demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating microchip-based cell lysis and DNA extraction into forensic casework analysis.

  8. Sperm-mediated DNA transfer to cells of the uterus and embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, P J

    2000-06-01

    There is a paucity of information about sperm-mediated transmission of exogenous DNA to implanting embryos and cells of the reproductive tract. Preliminary experiments established that sperm has the capacity to actively take in exogenous DNA derived from HPV. In addition, blastocysts also take up exogenous HPV DNA, but in contrast to sperm, the process appears passive. DNA-carrying sperm migrating in an artificial glass tube or excised mouse bicornuate uteri transfected the blastocysts at the remote position using a flip-flop mechanism. There were preferential transmission of the types of HPV DNA but this was not attributed to the gene sequence or the size of the DNA fragments. The internalized DNA became undetectable unless continuous sperm bombardment or pricking took place. Mycoplasma vectors offer a novel way to enhance the transfection of blastocyst with exogenous DNA.

  9. High resolution DNA flow cytometry of boar sperm cells in identification of boars carrying cytogenetic aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob; Christensen, Knud; Larsen, Jørgen K

    2004-01-01

    -resolution DNA flow cytometry on DAPI-stained sperm cell nuclei (CV animals judged normal by their fertility statistics and a series of seven animals with known reciprocal translocations, a model...... for identifying sperm cells from cytogenetically aberrant animals was proposed. This model was applied to a series of 50 uncharacterized animals. The model successfully identified a mosaic or chimaeric carrier of an aberrant X chromosome. However, implementation of this technique for screening purposes would...

  10. Chemical UV Filters Mimic the Effect of Progesterone on Ca(2+) Signaling in Human Sperm Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, A; Dissing, S; Skakkebæk, N E

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone released by cumulus cells surrounding the egg induces a Ca(2+) influx into human sperm cells via the cationic channel of sperm (CatSper) Ca(2+) channel and controls multiple Ca(2+)-dependent responses essential for fertilization. We hypothesized that chemical UV filters may mimic...... competitively inhibited progesterone-induced Ca(2+) signals. In vivo exposure studies are needed to investigate whether UV filter exposure affects human fertility....

  11. Sub-cellular trafficking of phytochemicals explored using auto-fluorescent compounds in maize cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grotewold Erich

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known regarding the trafficking mechanisms of small molecules within plant cells. It remains to be established whether phytochemicals are transported by pathways similar to those used by proteins, or whether the expansion of metabolic pathways in plants was associated with the evolution of novel trafficking pathways. In this paper, we exploited the induction of green and yellow auto-fluorescent compounds in maize cultured cells by the P1 transcription factor to investigate their targeting to the cell wall and vacuole, respectively. Results We investigated the accumulation and sub-cellular localization of the green and yellow auto-fluorescent compounds in maize BMS cells expressing the P1 transcription factor from an estradiol inducible promoter. We established that the yellow fluorescent compounds accumulate inside the vacuole in YFBs that resemble AVIs. The green fluorescent compounds accumulate initially in the cytoplasm in large spherical GFBs. Cells accumulating GFBs also contain electron-dense structures that accumulate initially in the ER and which later appear to fuse with the plasma membrane. Structures resembling the GFBs were also observed in the periplasmic space of plasmolized cells. Ultimately, the green fluorescence accumulates in the cell wall, in a process that is insensitive to the Golgi-disturbing agents BFA and monensin. Conclusions Our results suggest the presence of at least two distinct trafficking pathways, one to the cell wall and the other to the vacuole, for different auto-fluorescent compounds induced by the same transcription factor in maize BMS cells. These compartments represent two of the major sites of accumulation of phenolic compounds characteristic of maize cells. The secretion of the green auto-fluorescent compounds occurs by a pathway that does not involve the TGN, suggesting that it is different from the secretion of most proteins, polysaccharides or epicuticular waxes. The

  12. Human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid in seminal plasma and sperm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Y M; Yang, F P; Pao, C C

    1996-05-01

    To investigate the possible presence and expression of human papillomavirus viruses (HPV) in human plasma and sperm cells. Controlled clinical study. A major medical center affiliated with a medical college. Twenty-four randomly selected patients who attended Fertility Clinics at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Specimens of semen were collected from volunteered patients The presence of HPV types 16 and 18 DNA and RNA sequences were examined by polymerase chain reaction. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 DNA and RNA sequences were found in two and zero seminal plasma specimens, respectively, and in six and two sperm cells specimens, respectively. Deoxyribonucleic acid and RNA sequences of HPV type 18 were found in eight and two seminal specimens and in 11 and 5 sperm cells specimens, respectively. These results seem to suggest that HPV cannot only infect human sperm cells, certain HPV genes are expressed actively in infected sperm cells. The virus-infected sperm cells conceivably can behave as vectors or carriers for the transmission of HPV, to sexual partner during sexual contact, to fetuses through fertilized eggs, or both.

  13. Precision automation of cell type classification and sub-cellular fluorescence quantification from laser scanning confocal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Craig Hall

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available While novel whole-plant phenotyping technologies have been successfully implemented into functional genomics and breeding programs, the potential of automated phenotyping with cellular resolution is largely unexploited. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has the potential to close this gap by providing spatially highly resolved images containing anatomic as well as chemical information on a subcellular basis. However, in the absence of automated methods, the assessment of the spatial patterns and abundance of fluorescent markers with subcellular resolution is still largely qualitative and time-consuming. Recent advances in image acquisition and analysis, coupled with improvements in microprocessor performance, have brought such automated methods within reach, so that information from thousands of cells per image for hundreds of images may be derived in an experimentally convenient time-frame. Here, we present a MATLAB-based analytical pipeline to 1 segment radial plant organs into individual cells, 2 classify cells into cell type categories based upon random forest classification, 3 divide each cell into sub-regions, and 4 quantify fluorescence intensity to a subcellular degree of precision for a separate fluorescence channel. In this research advance, we demonstrate the precision of this analytical process for the relatively complex tissues of Arabidopsis hypocotyls at various stages of development. High speed and robustness make our approach suitable for phenotyping of large collections of stem-like material and other tissue types.

  14. Novel Application of Fluorescence Lifetime and Fluorescence Microscopy Enables Quantitative Access to Subcellular Dynamics in Plant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgass, Kirstin; Caesar, Katharina; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Meixner, Alfred J.; Harter, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Background Optical and spectroscopic technologies working at subcellular resolution with quantitative output are required for a deeper understanding of molecular processes and mechanisms in living cells. Such technologies are prerequisite for the realisation of predictive biology at cellular and subcellular level. However, although established in the physical sciences, these techniques are rarely applied to cell biology in the plant sciences. Principal Findings Here, we present a combined application of one-chromophore fluorescence lifetime microscopy and wavelength-selective fluorescence microscopy to analyse the function of a GFP fusion of the Brassinosteroid Insensitive 1 Receptor (BRI1-GFP) with high spatial and temporal resolution in living Arabidopsis cells in their tissue environment. We show a rapid, brassinolide-induced cell wall expansion and a fast BR-regulated change in the BRI1-GFP fluorescence lifetime in the plasmamembrane in vivo. Both cell wall expansion and changes in fluorescence lifetime reflect early BR-induced and BRI1-dependent physiological or signalling processes. Our experiments also show the potential of one-chromophore fluorescence lifetime microscopy for the in vivo monitoring of the biochemical and biophysical subcellular environment using GFP fusion proteins as probes. Significance One-chromophore fluorescence lifetime microscopy, combined with wavelength-specific fluorescence microscopy, opens up new frontiers for in vivo dynamic and quantitative analysis of cellular processes at high resolution which are not addressable by pure imaging technologies or transmission electron microscopy. PMID:19492078

  15. Mathematical modeling of sub-cellular asymmetry of fat-dachsous heterodimer for generation of planar cell polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Kumar Jolly

    Full Text Available Planar Cell Polarity (PCP is an evolutionarily conserved characteristic of animal tissues marked by coordinated polarization of cells or structures in the plane of a tissue. In insect wing epithelium, for instance, PCP is characterized by en masse orientation of hairs orthogonal to its apical-basal axis and pointing along the proximal-distal axis of the organ. Directional cue for PCP has been proposed to be generated by complex sets of interactions amongst three proteins - Fat (Ft, Dachsous (Ds and Four-jointed (Fj. Ft and Ds are two atypical cadherins, which are phosphorylated by Fj, a Golgi kinase. Ft and Ds from adjacent cells bind heterophilically via their tandem cadherin repeats, and their binding affinities are regulated by Fj. Further, in the wing epithelium, sub-cellular levels of Ft-Ds heterodimers are seen to be elevated at the distal edges of individual cells, prefiguring their PCP. Mechanisms generating this sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer in proximal and distal edges of cells, however, have not been resolved yet. Using a mathematical modeling approach, here we provide a framework for generation of this sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. First, we explain how the known interactions within Ft-Ds-Fj system translate into sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. Second, we show that this asymmetric localization of Ft-Ds heterodimer is lost when tissue-level gradient of Fj is flattened, or when phosphorylation of Ft by Fj is abolished, but not when tissue-level gradient of Ds is flattened or when phosphorylation of Ds is abrogated. Finally, we show that distal enrichment of Ds also amplifies Ft-Ds asymmetry. These observations reveal that gradient of Fj expression, phosphorylation of Ft by Fj and sub-cellular distal accumulation of Ds are three critical elements required for generating sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. Our model integrates the known experimental data and presents testable predictions

  16. Biorecognition and Subcellular Trafficking of HPMA Copolymer - Anti-PMSA Antibody Conjugates by Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jihua; Kopečková, Pavla; Bühler, Patrick; Wolf, Philipp; Pan, Huaizhong; Bauer, Hillevi; Elsässer-Beile, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    A new generation of antibodies against the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been proven to bind specifically to PSMA molecules on the surface of living prostate cancer cells. To explore the potential of anti-PSMA antibodies as targeting moieties for macromolecular therapeutics for prostate cancer, fluorescently labeled HPMA (N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) copolymer - anti- PSMA antibody conjugates (P-anti-PSMA) were synthesized and the mechanisms of their endocytosis and subcellular trafficking in C4-2 prostate cancer cells were studied. Radioimmunoassays showed the dissociation constants of P-anti-PSMA for C4-2 prostate cancer cells in the low nanomolar range, close to values for free anti-PSMA. It indicated that conjugation of anti-PSMA to HPMA copolymers did not compromise their binding affinity. The rate of endocytosis of P-anti-PSMA was much faster than that of control HPMA copolymer conjugates containing non-specific IgG. Selective pathway inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and of macropinocytosis inhibited the internalization of P-anti-PMSA. Inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis was further evidenced by down-regulation of clathrin heavy chain expression by siRNA. Using a dominant-negative mutant of dynamin (Dyn K44A) to abolish the clathrin-, caveolae-independent endocytic pathway, we found that some of P-anti-PSMA adopted this pathway to be endocytosed into C4-2 cells. Thus multiple receptor-mediated endocytic pathways, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis, macropinocytosis, and dynamin-independent endocytosis, were involved in the internalization of P-anti-PSMA. The extent of the participation of each pathway in P-anti-PSMA endocytosis was estimated. Membrane vesicles containing P-anti-PSMA rapidly co-localized with membrane vesicles overexpressing Rab7, a late endosome localized protein, demonstrating that a part of P-anti-PSMA was transported to late endosomes. PMID:19344119

  17. Biorecognition and subcellular trafficking of HPMA copolymer-anti-PSMA antibody conjugates by prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jihua; Kopecková, Pavla; Bühler, Patrick; Wolf, Philipp; Pan, Huaizhong; Bauer, Hillevi; Elsässer-Beile, Ursula; Kopecek, Jindrich

    2009-01-01

    A new generation of antibodies against the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been proven to bind specifically to PSMA molecules on the surface of living prostate cancer cells. To explore the potential of anti-PSMA antibodies as targeting moieties for macromolecular therapeutics for prostate cancer, fluorescently labeled HPMA (N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) copolymer-anti-PSMA antibody conjugates (P-anti-PSMA) were synthesized and the mechanisms of their endocytosis and subcellular trafficking in C4-2 prostate cancer cells were studied. Radioimmunoassays showed the dissociation constants of P-anti-PSMA for C4-2 prostate cancer cells in the low nanomolar range, close to values for free anti-PSMA. It indicated that conjugation of anti-PSMA to HPMA copolymers did not compromise their binding affinity. The rate of endocytosis of P-anti-PSMA was much faster than that of control HPMA copolymer conjugates containing nonspecific IgG. Selective pathway inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and of macropinocytosis inhibited the internalization of P-anti-PSMA. Inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis was further evidenced by down-regulation of clathrin heavy chain expression by siRNA. Using a dominant-negative mutant of dynamin (Dyn K44A) to abolish the clathrin-, caveolae-independent endocytic pathway, we found that some of P-anti-PSMA adopted this pathway to be endocytosed into C4-2 cells. Thus multiple receptor-mediated endocytic pathways, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis, macropinocytosis, and clathrin-, caveolae-independent endocytosis, were involved in the internalization of P-anti-PSMA. The extent of the participation of each pathway in P-anti-PSMA endocytosis was estimated. Membrane vesicles containing P-anti-PSMA rapidly colocalized with membrane vesicles overexpressing Rab7, a late endosome localized protein, demonstrating that a part of P-anti-PSMA was transported to late endosomes.

  18. Neonatal anoxia in rats: hippocampal cellular and subcellular changes related to cell death and spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, S H; dos Santos Haemmerle, C A; Motta-Teixeira, L C; Machado-Nils, A V; Lee, V Y; Takase, L F; Cruz-Rizzolo, R J; Kihara, A H; Xavier, G F; Watanabe, I-S; Nogueira, M I

    2015-01-22

    Neonatal anoxia in rodents has been used to understand brain changes and cognitive dysfunction following asphyxia. This study investigated the time-course of cellular and subcellular changes and hippocampal cell death in a non-invasive model of anoxia in neonatal rats, using Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) to reveal DNA fragmentation, Fluoro-Jade® B (FJB) to show degenerating neurons, cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry (IHC) to detect cells undergoing apoptosis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to reveal fine ultrastructural changes related to cell death. Anoxia was induced by exposing postnatal day 1 (P1) pups to a flow of 100% gaseous nitrogen for 25 min in a chamber maintained at 37 °C. Control rats were similarly exposed to this chamber but with air flow instead of nitrogen. Brain changes following anoxia were evaluated at postnatal days 2, 14, 21 and 60 (P2, P14, P21 and P60). In addition, spatial reference memory following anoxia and control treatments was evaluated in the Morris water maze, starting at P60. Compared to their respective controls, P2 anoxic rats exhibited (1) higher TUNEL labeling in cornus ammonis (CA) 1 and the dentate gyrus (DG), (2) higher FJB-positive cells in the CA2-3, and (3) somato-dendritic swelling, mitochondrial injury and chromatin condensation in irregular bodies, as well as other subcellular features indicating apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and excitotoxicity in the CA1, CA2-3 and DG, as revealed by TEM. At P14, P21 and P60, both groups showed small numbers of TUNEL-positive and FJB-positive cells. Stereological analysis at P2, P14, P21 and P60 revealed a lack of significant differences in cleaved caspase-3 IHC between anoxic and control subjects. These results suggest that the type of hippocampal cell death following neonatal anoxia is likely independent of caspase-3 activation. Neonatal anoxia induced deficits in acquisition and performance of spatial reference

  19. Types, Causes, Detection and Repair of DNA Fragmentation in Animal and Human Sperm Cells

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    Rosa Roy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Concentration, motility and morphology are parameters commonly used to determine the fertilization potential of an ejaculate. These parameters give a general view on the quality of sperm but do not provide information about one of the most important components of the reproductive outcome: DNA. Either single or double DNA strand breaks can set the difference between fertile and infertile males. Sperm DNA fragmentation can be caused by intrinsic factors like abortive apoptosis, deficiencies in recombination, protamine imbalances or oxidative stress. Damage can also occur due to extrinsic factors such as storage temperatures, extenders, handling conditions, time after ejaculation, infections and reaction to medicines or post-testicular oxidative stress, among others. Two singular characteristics differentiate sperm from somatic cells: Protamination and absence of DNA repair. DNA repair in sperm is terminated as transcription and translation stops post-spermiogenesis, so these cells have no mechanism to repair the damage occurred during their transit through the epididymis and post-ejaculation. Oocytes and early embryos have been shown to repair sperm DNA damage, so the effect of sperm DNA fragmentation depends on the combined effects of sperm chromatin damage and the capacity of the oocyte to repair it. In this contribution we review some of these issues.

  20. In vitro exposure of bull sperm cells to DMSA-coated maghemite nanoparticles does not affect cell functionality or structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Denise Ferreira; Paulini, Fernanda; Silva, Renata Carvalho; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes de; Lucci, Carolina Madeira

    2017-06-28

    Magnetic nanoparticles can be used in different areas of biology. It is therefore important to know the effects of such nanomaterials on germline cells as they may traverse the blood-testis barrier. This work aimed to evaluate the response of bull sperm after exposure to a magnetic fluid containing DMSA-coated maghemite nanoparticles (MNP-DMSA) in order to determine nanotoxicity. Bull sperm was incubated with MNP-DMSA at final concentrations of 0.06, 0.03 or 0.015 mg Fe/mL. Sperm kinetics, plasma membrane integrity and acrosome reaction were evaluated over a 4 h incubation period. The sperm cells were also evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. Exposure of bull sperm to MNP-DMSA did not affect sperm kinetics or integrity. Neither ultrastructural damage of sperm cells nor uptake of nanoparticles by the spermatozoa was observed. In conclusion, MNP-DMSA does not affect sperm function or structure under the conditions tested.

  1. Freezing injury: the special case of the sperm cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Morris, G; Acton, Elizabeth; Murray, Benjamin J; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2012-04-01

    The cellular damage that spermatozoa encounter at rapid rates of cooling has often been attributed to the formation of intracellular ice although no convincing evidence of intracellular ice formation has ever been obtained. We demonstrate that the high intracellular protein content together with the osmotic shrinkage associated with extracellular ice formation leads to intracellular vitrification of spermatozoa during cooling. At rapid rates of cooling the cell damage to spermatozoa is a result of an osmotic imbalance encountered during thawing, not intracellular ice formation. The osmotic imbalance occurs at rapid cooling rates due to a diffusion limited ice crystallisation in the extracellular fluid, i.e. the amount of ice forming during the cooling is less than expected from the equilibrium phase diagram. This explanation allows insights into other aspects of the cryobiology of spermatozoa and it is anticipated that this understanding will lead to specific improved methods of conventional cryopreservation for mammalian spermatozoa. It is also likely that this model will be relevant to the development of novel technologies for sperm preservation including vitrification and freeze drying. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Progesterone from the cumulus cells is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the rabbit oocyte cumulus complex.

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    Héctor Alejandro Guidobaldi

    Full Text Available Sperm chemotaxis in mammals have been identified towards several female sources as follicular fluid (FF, oviduct fluid, and conditioned medium from the cumulus oophorus (CU and the oocyte (O. Though several substances were confirmed as sperm chemoattractant, Progesterone (P seems to be the best chemoattractant candidate, because: 1 spermatozoa express a cell surface P receptor, 2 capacitated spermatozoa are chemotactically attracted in vitro by gradients of low quantities of P; 3 the CU cells produce and secrete P after ovulation; 4 a gradient of P may be kept stable along the CU; and 5 the most probable site for sperm chemotaxis in vivo could be near and/or inside the CU. The aim of this study was to verify whether P is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the rabbit oocyte-cumulus complex (OCC in the rabbit, as a mammalian animal model. By means of videomicroscopy and computer image analysis we observed that only the CU are a stable source of sperm attractants. The CU produce and secrete P since the hormone was localized inside these cells by immunocytochemistry and in the conditioned medium by enzyme immunoassay. In addition, rabbit spermatozoa express a cell surface P receptor detected by western blot and localized over the acrosomal region by immunocytochemistry. To confirm that P is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the CU, the sperm chemotactic response towards the OCC conditioned medium was inhibited by three different approaches: P from the OCC conditioned medium was removed with an anti-P antibody, the attractant gradient of the OCC conditioned medium was disrupted by a P counter gradient, and the sperm P receptor was blocked with a specific antibody. We concluded that only the CU but not the oocyte secretes P, and the latter chemoattract spermatozoa by means of a cell surface receptor. Our findings may be of interest in assisted reproduction procedures in humans, animals of economic importance and endangered species.

  3. The impact of subcellular location on the near infrared-mediated thermal ablation of cells by targeted carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Vasanth S.; Wang, Ruhung; Mikoryak, Carole A.; Pantano, Paul; Draper, Rockford K.

    2016-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used in the near infrared (NIR)-mediated thermal ablation of tumor cells because they efficiently convert absorbed NIR light into heat. Despite the therapeutic potential of SWNTs, there have been no published studies that directly quantify how many SWNTs need be associated with a cell to achieve a desired efficiency of killing, or what is the most efficient subcellular location of SWNTs for killing cells. Herein we measured dose response curves for the efficiency of killing correlated to the measured amounts of folate-targeted SWNTs that were either on the surface or within the vacuolar compartment of normal rat kidney cells. Folate-targeted SWNTs on the cell surface were measured after different concentrations of SWNTs in medium were incubated with cells for 30 min at 4 °C. Folate-targeted SWNTs within the vacuolar compartments were measured after cells were incubated with different concentrations of SWNTs in medium for 6 h at 37 °C. It was observed that a SWNT load of ∼13 pg/cell when internalized was sufficient to kill 90% of the cells under standardized conditions of NIR light irradiation. When ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal compartments, ∼50% of the cells were killed, but when ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were confined to the cell surface only ∼5% of the cells were killed under the same NIR irradiation conditions. The SWNT subcellular locations were verified using Raman imaging of SWNTs merged with fluorescence images of known subcellular markers. To our knowledge, this is the first time that SWNT amounts at known subcellular locations have been correlated with a dose-normalized efficacy of thermal ablation and the results support the idea that SWNTs confined to the plasma membrane are not as effective in NIR-mediated cell killing as an equivalent amount of SWNTs when internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal vesicles.

  4. Variational modularity at the cell level: insights from the sperm head of the house mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medarde, Nuria; Muñoz-Muñoz, Francesc; López-Fuster, María José; Ventura, Jacint

    2013-09-03

    Modularity is an important feature in the evolvability of organisms, since it allows the occurrence of complex adaptations at every single level of biological systems. While at the cellular level the modular organization of molecular interactions has been analyzed in detail, the phenotypic modularity (or variational modularity) of cell shape remains unexplored. The mammalian spermatozoon constitutes one of the most complex and specialized cell types found in organisms. The structural heterogeneity found in the sperm head suggests an association between its inner composition, shape and specificity of function. However, little is known about the extent of the connections between these features. Taking advantage of the house mouse sperm morphology, we analyzed the variational modularity of the sperm head by testing several hypotheses related to its structural and functional organization. Because chromosomal rearrangements can affect the genotype-phenotype map of individuals and thus modify the patterns of covariation between traits, we also evaluate the effect of Robertsonian translocations on the modularity pattern of the sperm head. The results indicated that the house mouse sperm head is divided into three variational modules (the acrosomal, post-acrosomal and ventral spur module), which correspond to the main regions of the cytoskeletal mesh beneath the plasma membrane, i.e., the perinuclear theca. Most of the covariation is concentrated between the ventral spur and the acrosomal and post-acrosomal modules. Although the Rb fusions did not alter the main modularity pattern, they did affect the percentages of covariation between pairs of modules. The structural heterogeneity of the cytoskeleton is responsible for the modular organization of the sperm head shape, corroborating the role that this structure has in maintaining the cell shape. The reduction in percentages of shape covariation between pairs of modules in Rb sperms suggests that chromosomal rearrangements

  5. Weak mitochondrial targeting sequence determines tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase in liver and brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gideon D; Gur, Noa; Koopman, Werner J H; Pines, Ophry; Vardimon, Lily

    2010-02-01

    Evolution of the uricotelic system for ammonia detoxification required a mechanism for tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase (GS). In uricotelic vertebrates, GS is mitochondrial in liver cells and cytoplasmic in brain. Because these species contain a single copy of the GS gene, it is not clear how tissue-specific subcellular localization is achieved. Here we show that in chicken, which utilizes the uricotelic system, the GS transcripts of liver and brain cells are identical and, consistently, there is no difference in the amino acid sequence of the protein. The N-terminus of GS, which constitutes a 'weak' mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS), is sufficient to direct a chimeric protein to the mitochondria in hepatocytes and to the cytoplasm in astrocytes. Considering that a weak MTS is dependent on a highly negative mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi) for import, we examined the magnitude of DeltaPsi in hepatocytes and astrocytes. Our results unexpectedly revealed that DeltaPsi in hepatocytes is considerably more negative than that of astrocytes and that converting the targeting signal into 'strong' MTS abolished the capability to confer tissue-specific subcellular localization. We suggest that evolutional selection of weak MTS provided a tool for differential targeting of an identical protein by taking advantage of tissue-specific differences in DeltaPsi.

  6. Assessment of DNA integrity (COMET assay) in sperm cells of boron-exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duydu, Yalçin; Başaran, Nurşen; Ustündağ, Aylin; Aydin, Sevtap; Undeğer, Ulkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçin; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Britta Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann M

    2012-01-01

    An extension of a male reproductive study conducted in a boric acid/borate production zone at Bandırma, Turkey, is presented. The relation between DNA-strand breaks (COMET assay, neutral and alkaline version) in sperm cells and previously described sperm quality parameters was investigated in boron-exposed males. A correlation between blood boron levels and mean DNA-strand breaks in sperm was weak, and DNA-strand breaks in sperm were statistically not different between control and exposed groups. Therefore, increasing boron exposures had no additional contribution in addition to already pre-existing DNA-strand breaks in the sperm cells. Weak but statistically significant correlations between DNA-strand breaks and motility/morphology parameters of sperm samples were observed in the neutral version of the COMET assay, while correlations between the same variables were statistically not significant in the alkaline version. A likely reason for these negative results, even in highly exposed humans, is that experimental exposures that had led to reproductive toxicity in animals were significantly higher than any boron exposures, which may be reached under realistic human conditions.

  7. Partial formation of sperm dimorphism from spermatocytes of the cottoid fish, Hemilepidotus gilberti in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Y; Takayama-Watanabe, E; Watanabe, A; Kobayashi, M; Munehara, H; Onitake, K

    2007-11-01

    Polymorphism of sperm is considered to be significant for the reproductive strategy in some animal species. The phenomenon is thought to occur in the species-specific stage of spermatogenesis, but how the identical germ cells are differentiated towards polymorphic sperm remains unknown. We here performed a germ cell culture in the cottoid fish, Hemilepidotus gilberti, whose sperm exhibit dimorphism with fertilizable eusperm and unfertilizable parasperm. In the culture, germ cells, which were obtained with an identical morphology, a spherical shape of 5-7 microm in diameter, differentiated into smaller spherical cells with a single nucleus, a moving flagellum and localized mitochondria. In addition, large retroflex-shaped cells with two elongated nuclei were also observed in the cell culture. Germ cells that had each morphological feature were histologically also observed in some cysts of the spermatogenetic testis, suggesting that the former type of cell corresponded to developing eusperm and the latter corresponded to developing parasperm. When BrdU was incorporated into germ cells in the culture, it was detected in both cells with eusperm-like and those with parasperm-like morphologies. These findings suggest that DNA-duplicating spermatocytes are potent to autonomously progress a part of spermatogenesis to form dimorphic sperm.

  8. Nitric oxide measurements in hTERT-RPE cells and subcellular fractions exposed to low levels of red light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Castellanos, Cherry C.; Denton, Michael L.; Holwitt, Eric A.

    2014-02-01

    Cells in a tissue culture model for laser eye injury exhibit increased resistance to a lethal pulse of 2.0-μm laser radiation if the cells are first exposed to 2.88 J/cm2 of red light 24 hr prior to the lethal laser exposure. Changes in expression of various genes associated with apoptosis have been observed, but the biochemical link between light absorption and gene expression remains unknown. Cytochome c oxidase (CCOX), in the electron transport chain, is the currentlyhypothesized absorber. Absorption of the red light by CCOX is thought to facilitate displacement of nitric oxide (NO) by O2 in the active site, increasing cellular respiration and intracellular ATP. However, NO is also an important regulator and mediator of numerous physiological processes in a variety of cell and tissue types that is synthesized from l-arginine by NO synthases. In an effort to determine the relative NO contributions from these competing pathways, we measured NO levels in whole cells and subcellular fractions, with and without exposure to red light, using DAF-FM, a fluorescent dye that stoichiometrically reacts with NO. Red light induced a small, but consistently reproducible, increase in fluorescence intensity in whole cells and some subcellular fractions. Whole cells exhibited the highest overall fluorescence intensity followed by (in order) cytosolic proteins, microsomes, then nuclei and mitochondria.

  9. A graphical model approach to automated classification of protein subcellular location patterns in multi-cell images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Robert F

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the subcellular location of a protein is critical to understanding how that protein works in a cell. This location is frequently determined by the interpretation of fluorescence microscope images. In recent years, automated systems have been developed for consistent and objective interpretation of such images so that the protein pattern in a single cell can be assigned to a known location category. While these systems perform with nearly perfect accuracy for single cell images of all major subcellular structures, their ability to distinguish subpatterns of an organelle (such as two Golgi proteins is not perfect. Our goal in the work described here was to improve the ability of an automated system to decide which of two similar patterns is present in a field of cells by considering more than one cell at a time. Since cells displaying the same location pattern are often clustered together, considering multiple cells may be expected to improve discrimination between similar patterns. Results We describe how to take advantage of information on experimental conditions to construct a graphical representation for multiple cells in a field. Assuming that a field is composed of a small number of classes, the classification accuracy can be improved by allowing the computed probability of each pattern for each cell to be influenced by the probabilities of its neighboring cells in the model. We describe a novel way to allow this influence to occur, in which we adjust the prior probabilities of each class to reflect the patterns that are present. When this graphical model approach is used on synthetic multi-cell images in which the true class of each cell is known, we observe that the ability to distinguish similar classes is improved without suffering any degradation in ability to distinguish dissimilar classes. The computational complexity of the method is sufficiently low that improved assignments of classes can be

  10. Label-Free Imaging and Biochemical Characterization of Bovine Sperm Cells

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    Maria Antonietta Ferrara

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A full label-free morphological and biochemical characterization is desirable to select spermatozoa during preparation for artificial insemination. In order to study these fundamental parameters, we take advantage of two attractive techniques: digital holography (DH and Raman spectroscopy (RS. DH presents new opportunities for studying morphological aspect of cells and tissues non-invasively, quantitatively and without the need for staining or tagging, while RS is a very specific technique allowing the biochemical analysis of cellular components with a spatial resolution in the sub-micrometer range. In this paper, morphological and biochemical bovine sperm cell alterations were studied using these techniques. In addition, a complementary DH and RS study was performed to identify X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm cells. We demonstrate that the two techniques together are a powerful and highly efficient tool elucidating some important criterions for sperm morphological selection and sex-identification, overcoming many of the limitations associated with existing protocols.

  11. Self-organization of hydrodynamically entrained sperm cells into an array of vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Ingmar; Kruse, Karsten; Howard, Jonathon

    2005-03-01

    The emergence of spatiotemporal patterns is of great interest in many scientific disciplines. Here we report a new dynamically self-organized pattern formed by hydrodynamically entrained sperm cells at planar surfaces. The sperm cells form vortices resembling quantized rotating waves. These vortices form an array with local hexagonal order. Using a novel order parameter, we show that the array is only formed above a critical sperm density. Supported by numerical simulation we suggest a mechanism for the appearance of the array and we estimate the strength of the hydrodynamic coupling between the cells. The vortex array represents a new chiral active gel and may serve as an experimentally accessible model for the metachronal wave of ciliated epithelia and other non-equilibrium phenomena in general. Finally we discuss the biological implications of our work.

  12. Development of spermatogenic cells and sperm quality after administration of pegagan extract (Centella asiatica

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    Solihati M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the development of spermatogenic cells and sperm quality after administration extracts of pegagan (Centella asiatica in various doses and duration of administration. The research was carried out with complete randomized design (CRD, consist of 16 combinations of dose and duration of treatment. Parameters measured consist of population of spermatogenic cells (spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes, late spermatids and sperm quality (concentration, motility, abnormality. The data were processed using analysis of variance (ANOVA, and differences between treatments followed by Duncan test. The results show that both the dose and duration have very significantly (p < 0.01 affect on decreasing of late spermatid population, sperm motility and concentration, but not for population of spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes and sperm abnormalities. The decrease of population and quality may due to antifertility effect of pegagan, eventhough still in the normal range. It is concluded that spermatogenic cells development and sperm quality reduce after administration of pegagan extract, although infertility is not yet found up to the dose of 450 mg/kg BW for 49 days duration of administration.

  13. Functionalization of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with a cell-penetrating peptide to target mammalian sperm in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkalina, Natalia; Jones, Celine; Townley, Helen; Coward, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of actively targeting mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) toward mammalian sperm with a cell-penetrating peptide (C105Y), with subsequent analysis of binding rates and nano-safety profiles. Boar sperm were exposed in vitro to C105Y-functionalized MSNPs or free C105Y, in a series of increasing doses for up to 2 h, followed by the evaluation of sperm motility, kinematic parameters, acrosome morphology, MSNP-sperm binding and cell fluorescence levels. C105Y-functionalized MSNPs preserved their biocompatibility with sperm, and exhibited an approximately fourfold increase in affinity toward gametes, compared with unmodified MSNPs, during the early stages of incubation. Our findings support the application of MSNPs and active targeting to sperm as valuable tools for reproductive biology.

  14. Expression pattern, subcellular localization, and functional implications of ODAM in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, osteoblasts, and various cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Park, Su-Jin; Oh, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jung-Wook; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    During tooth development and tumorigenesis, the odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) is involved in cellular differentiation and matrix protein production. However, the precise function of ODAM remains largely unknown. To suggest new functional roles of ODAM, we investigated the cellular expression and subcellular localization of ODAM in tooth and cancer cells. ODAM was expressed in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, and osteoblasts in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, ODAM was localized in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of MMP-20 expressing ameloblasts and odontoblasts, but only in the cytoplasm of non-MMP-20 expressing osteoblasts. The extracellular secretion of ODAM was not observed in odontoblasts and osteoblasts, but was seen in ameloblasts. In addition, ODAM was discovered in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and extracellular matrix of various cancer cells. These results suggest that the expression pattern and subcellular localization of ODAM is highly variable and dependent on cell types and their differentiation states, and that functional correlations exist between ODAM and MMP-20. This study provides the first evidence for ODAM in multiple cellular compartments of differentiating odontogenic and cancer cell lines with important functional implications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of X-irradiation on mouse testicular cells and sperm chromatin structure

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    Sailer, B.L.; Jost, L.K.; Erickson, K.R.; Tajiran, M.A.; Evenson, D.P. [South Dakota State Univ., Sioux Falls, SD (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The testicular regions of male mice were exposed to x-ray doses ranging from 0 to 400 rads. Forty days after exposure the mice were killed and the testes and cauda epididymal sperm removed surgically. Flow cytometric measurements of acridine orange stained testicular samples indicated a repopulation of testicular samples indicated a repopulation of testicular cell types following x-ray killing of stem cells. Cauda epididymal sperm were analyzed by the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), a flow cytometric measurement of the susceptibility of the sperm nuclear DNA to in situ acid denaturation. The SCSA detected increased susceptibility to DNA denaturation in situ after 12.5 rads of x-ray exposure, with significant increases following 25 rads. Abnormal sperm head morphology was not significantly increased until the testes were exposed to 60 rads of x-rays. These data suggest that the SCSA is currently the most sensitive, noninvasive method of detecting x-ray damage to testicular stem spermatogonia. 47 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Choline dehydrogenase polymorphism rs12676 is a functional variation and is associated with changes in human sperm cell function.

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    Amy R Johnson

    Full Text Available Approximately 15% of couples are affected by infertility and up to half of these cases arise from male factor infertility. Unidentified genetic aberrations such as chromosomal deletions, translocations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs may be the underlying cause of many cases of idiopathic male infertility. Deletion of the choline dehydrogenase (Chdh gene in mice results in decreased male fertility due to diminished sperm motility; sperm from Chdh(-/- males have decreased ATP concentrations likely stemming from abnormal sperm mitochondrial morphology and function in these cells. Several SNPs have been identified in the human CHDH gene that may result in altered CHDH enzymatic activity. rs12676 (G233T, a non-synonymous SNP located in the CHDH coding region, is associated with increased susceptibility to dietary choline deficiency and risk of breast cancer. We now report evidence that this SNP is also associated with altered sperm motility patterns and dysmorphic mitochondrial structure in sperm. Sperm produced by men who are GT or TT for rs12676 have 40% and 73% lower ATP concentrations, respectively, in their sperm. rs12676 is associated with decreased CHDH protein in sperm and hepatocytes. A second SNP located in the coding region of IL17BR, rs1025689, is linked to altered sperm motility characteristics and changes in choline metabolite concentrations in sperm.

  17. Rapid and dynamic subcellular reorganization following mechanical stimulation of Arabidopsis epidermal cells mimics responses to fungal and oomycete attack

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    Takemoto Daigo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cells respond to the presence of potential fungal or oomycete pathogens by mounting a basal defence response that involves aggregation of cytoplasm, reorganization of cytoskeletal, endomembrane and other cell components and development of cell wall appositions beneath the infection site. This response is induced by non-adapted, avirulent and virulent pathogens alike, and in the majority of cases achieves penetration resistance against the microorganism on the plant surface. To explore the nature of signals that trigger this subcellular response and to determine the timing of its induction, we have monitored the reorganization of GFP-tagged actin, microtubules, endoplasmic reticulum (ER and peroxisomes in Arabidopsis plants – after touching the epidermal surface with a microneedle. Results Within 3 to 5 minutes of touching the surface of Arabidopsis cotyledon epidermal cells with fine glass or tungsten needles, actin microfilaments, ER and peroxisomes began to accumulate beneath the point of contact with the needle. Formation of a dense patch of actin was followed by focusing of actin cables on the site of contact. Touching the cell surface induced localized depolymerization of microtubules to form a microtubule-depleted zone surrounding a dense patch of GFP-tubulin beneath the needle tip. The concentration of actin, GFP-tubulin, ER and peroxisomes remained focused on the contact site as the needle moved across the cell surface and quickly dispersed when the needle was removed. Conclusion Our results show that plant cells can detect the gentle pressure of a microneedle on the epidermal cell surface and respond by reorganizing subcellular components in a manner similar to that induced during attack by potential fungal or oomycete pathogens. The results of our study indicate that during plant-pathogen interactions, the basal defence response may be induced by the plant's perception of the physical force exerted by the

  18. Changes in the expression and subcellular distribution of galectin-3 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straube Tamara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clear cell renal cell carcinoma, a solid growing tumor, is the most common tumor in human kidney. Evaluating the usefulness of β-galactoside binding galectin-3 as a diagnostic marker for this type of cancer could open avenues for preventive and therapeutic strategies by employing specific inhibitors of the lectin. To study a putative correlation between the extent of galectin-3 and the development of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, we monitored the quantity and distribution of this lectin in tissue samples from 39 patients. Methods Galectin-3 concentrations in normal, intermediate and tumor tissues were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and on immunoblots with antibodies directed against galectin-3 and renal control proteins. The cell nuclei were isolated to determine quantities of galectin-3 that were transferred into this compartment in normal or tumor samples. Results Immunofluorescence data revealed a mosaic pattern of galectin-3 expression in collecting ducts and distal tubules of normal kidney. Galectin-3 expression was significantly increased in 79% of tumor samples as compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, we observed an increase in nuclear translocation of the lectin in tumor tissues. Conclusions Our data indicate that changes in the cellular level of galectin-3 correlate with the development of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which is in line with previously published data on this specific type of tumor. In most of these studies the lectin tends to be highly expressed in tumor tissues. Furthermore, this study suggests that the increase in the proportion of galectin-3 affects the balance from a cytosolic distribution towards translocation into the nucleus.

  19. In search of epigenetic marks in testes and sperm cells of differentially fed boars.

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    Rémy Bruggmann

    Full Text Available In search of transmittable epigenetic marks we investigated gene expression in testes and sperm cells of differentially fed F0 boars from a three generation pig feeding experiment that showed phenotypic differences in the F2 generation. RNA samples from 8 testes of boars that received either a diet enriched in methylating micronutrients or a control diet were analyzed by microarray analysis. We found moderate differential expression between testes of differentially fed boars with a high FDR of 0.82 indicating that most of the differentially expressed genes were false positives. Nevertheless, we performed a pathway analysis and found disparate pathway maps of development_A2B receptor: action via G-protein alpha s, cell adhesion_Tight junctions and cell adhesion_Endothelial cell contacts by junctional mechanisms which show inconclusive relation to epigenetic inheritance. Four RNA samples from sperm cells of these differentially fed boars were analyzed by RNA-Seq methodology. We found no differential gene expression in sperm cells of the two groups (adjusted P-value>0.05. Nevertheless, we also explored gene expression in sperm by a pathway analysis showing that genes were enriched for the pathway maps of bacterial infections in cystic fibrosis (CF airways, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis p.3 and cell cycle_Initiation of mitosis. Again, these pathway maps are miscellaneous without an obvious relationship to epigenetic inheritance. It is concluded that the methylating micronutrients moderately if at all affects RNA expression in testes of differentially fed boars. Furthermore, gene expression in sperm cells is not significantly affected by extensive supplementation of methylating micronutrients and thus RNA molecules could not be established as the epigenetic mark in this feeding experiment.

  20. An ARID domain-containing protein within nuclear bodies is required for sperm cell formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binglian Zheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In plants, each male meiotic product undergoes mitosis, and then one of the resulting cells divides again, yielding a three-celled pollen grain comprised of a vegetative cell and two sperm cells. Several genes have been found to act in this process, and DUO1 (DUO POLLEN 1, a transcription factor, plays a key role in sperm cell formation by activating expression of several germline genes. But how DUO1 itself is activated and how sperm cell formation is initiated remain unknown. To expand our understanding of sperm cell formation, we characterized an ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain-containing protein, ARID1, that is specifically required for sperm cell formation in Arabidopsis. ARID1 localizes within nuclear bodies that are transiently present in the generative cell from which sperm cells arise, coincident with the timing of DUO1 activation. An arid1 mutant and antisense arid1 plants had an increased incidence of pollen with only a single sperm-like cell and exhibited reduced fertility as well as reduced expression of DUO1. In vitro and in vivo evidence showed that ARID1 binds to the DUO1 promoter. Lastly, we found that ARID1 physically associates with histone deacetylase 8 and that histone acetylation, which in wild type is evident only in sperm, expanded to the vegetative cell nucleus in the arid1 mutant. This study identifies a novel component required for sperm cell formation in plants and uncovers a direct positive regulatory role of ARID1 on DUO1 through association with histone acetylation.

  1. Phagocytosis of sperm by follicle cells of the carnivorous sponge Asbestopluma occidentalis (Porifera, Demospongiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesgo, Ana

    2010-06-01

    During spermatogenesis of the carnivorous sponge Asbestopluma occidentalis, follicle cells that lined the spermatocysts phagocytosed unreleased mature sperm. Such follicle cells are part of the complex envelope that limits spermatocysts of A. occidentalis, which is also comprised of a collagen layer, a thick layer of intertwined cells, and spicules. Follicle cells showed vesicles containing single phagocytosed spermatozoa within their cytoplasm. Additionally, lipids and other inclusions were observed within the cytoplasm of follicle cells. It is likely that follicle cells recapture nutrients by phagocytosing spermatozoa and use them to form lipids and other inclusions. Such sperm phagocytosis is usually performed in higher invertebrates and vertebrates by Sertoli cells that are located in the testis wall. While Sertoli cells develop a wide range of functions such as creating a blood-testis barrier, providing crucial factors to ensure correct progression of spermatogenesis, and phagocytosis of aberrant, degenerating, and unreleased sperm cells, sponge follicle cells may only display phagocytotic activity on spermatogenic cells. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High resolution DNA flow cytometry of boar sperm cells in identification of boars carrying cytogenetic aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob; Christensen, Knud; Larsen, Jørgen K

    2004-01-01

    The cytogenetic quality of boars used for breeding determines the litter outcome and thus has large economical consequences. Traditionally, quality controls based on the examination of simple karyograms are time consuming and sometimes give uncertain results. As an alternative, the use of high-re......-resolution DNA flow cytometry on DAPI-stained sperm cell nuclei (CV...

  3. Prequels to Synthetic Biology: From Candidate Gene Identification and Validation to Enzyme Subcellular Localization in Plant and Yeast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foureau, E; Carqueijeiro, I; Dugé de Bernonville, T; Melin, C; Lafontaine, F; Besseau, S; Lanoue, A; Papon, N; Oudin, A; Glévarec, G; Clastre, M; St-Pierre, B; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, N; Courdavault, V

    2016-01-01

    Natural compounds extracted from microorganisms or plants constitute an inexhaustible source of valuable molecules whose supply can be potentially challenged by limitations in biological sourcing. The recent progress in synthetic biology combined to the increasing access to extensive transcriptomics and genomics data now provide new alternatives to produce these molecules by transferring their whole biosynthetic pathway in heterologous production platforms such as yeasts or bacteria. While the generation of high titer producing strains remains per se an arduous field of investigation, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathways as well as characterization of their complex subcellular organization are essential prequels to the efficient development of such bioengineering approaches. Using examples from plants and yeasts as a framework, we describe potent methods to rationalize the study of partially characterized pathways, including the basics of computational applications to identify candidate genes in transcriptomics data and the validation of their function by an improved procedure of virus-induced gene silencing mediated by direct DNA transfer to get around possible resistance to Agrobacterium-delivery of viral vectors. To identify potential alterations of biosynthetic fluxes resulting from enzyme mislocalizations in reconstituted pathways, we also detail protocols aiming at characterizing subcellular localizations of protein in plant cells by expression of fluorescent protein fusions through biolistic-mediated transient transformation, and localization of transferred enzymes in yeast using similar fluorescence procedures. Albeit initially developed for the Madagascar periwinkle, these methods may be applied to other plant species or organisms in order to establish synthetic biology platform. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Study of acetowhitening mechanisms in live mammalian cells with label-free subcellular-level multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Teh, Sengkhoon; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-03-01

    The tissue acetowhitening effect in acetic acid instillation procedure is a simple and economic method for neoplasia detection and has been clinically utilized since 1925. It is suspected that the optical property (e.g. scattering) change in acetowhitening is due to coagulation of intracellular proteins, but no experimental proof has been reported yet. In this work, we use third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) to investigate the acetowhitening phenomenon induced by acidic acid in live mammalian cells without labeling. We studied the acetowhitening effect with different acetic acid concentrations and the co-localized TPEF and THG imaging on tryptophan and NADH at subcellular-level reveals that the acetowhitening phenomenon is highly related with proteins involved in metabolic pathways in the nucleus and cytoplasm in live cells.

  5. Combined Raman Spectroscopy and Digital Holographic Microscopy for Sperm Cell Quality Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. De Angelis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of male infertility is vastly complex. To date, morphology, motility, and concentration have been used as key parameters to establish the sperm normality and achieve pregnancy both in natural and in assisted fecundation. However, spermatozoa from infertile men could present a variety of alterations, such as DNA fragmentation, alterations of chromatin structure, and aneuploidy, which have been demonstrated to decrease reproductive capacity of men. Therefore, the ability to see detailed relationships between morphology and physiology in selected spermatozoa with submicrometric resolution in a nondestructive and noninvasive way and within a functional correlated context could be extremely important for the intracytoplasmic sperm injection procedure. In this review, we describe label-free optical spectroscopy and imaging techniques, based on the combination of Raman spectroscopy/imaging with holographic imaging, which are able to noninvasively measure the (biochemistry and morphology of sperm cells. We discuss the benefits and limitation of the proposed photonic techniques, with particular emphasis on applications in detection/characterization of sperm cell morphological defects and photodamage, and the identification/sorting of X- and Y-bearing bovine spermatozoa.

  6. Correlation of spermiogram profiles with DNA damage in sperm cells of infertile men: a comet assay study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tug, Niyazi; Sandal, Suleyman; Ozelgun, Berna; Yilmaz, Bayram

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated a relationship between DNA damage in sperm and spermiogram profiles in the infertile men. Twenty-one non-smoking infertile men Sperm samples were collected and evaluated according to WHO guidelines. DNA damage of sperm cells was assessed using neutral comet assay. Fifty cells per slide and two slides per sample were scored to evaluate DNA damage. The cells were visually classified into four categories based on DNA migration such as undamaged (UD), little damage (LD), moderate damage (MD) and significant damage (SD). Total comet scores (TCS) were calculated as: 1×UD + 2×LD + 3×MD + 4×SD. There was a negative correlation between the percentage of slow- and in situ-motion sperm cells in spermiograms and TCS (p sperm cells and TCS was negative (p sperm motility parameters are negatively correlated. We suggest that evaluation of sperm DNA by the neutral comet assay may be valuable to use in fertility research.

  7. Transformations of sperm nuclei incorporated into sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) embryos at different stages of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, F J

    1984-05-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that regulators of male pronuclear development may have a more general role, sharing some relation to factors involved with the cell cycle, Arbacia zygotes and 2- to 8-cell stage embryos were inseminated during different phases of the cell cycle and examined by light and electron microscopy. Differences in the development and morphology of fertilization cones and sperm asters were observed in embryos inseminated during different stages of the cell cycle. Extremely large fertilization cones, approximately four times the length of those found in fertilized eggs, formed in embryos inseminated during metaphase to telophase. Sperm asters developed only in embryos inseminated during prophase to anaphase. These variations are believed to reflect changes in the status of the cortex and cytoskeletal system of the embryo. Although sperm nuclei underwent morphological changes subsequent to incorporation, in general, they failed to develop into male pronuclei. There was a consistent correlation in sperm nuclear transformations and the cell cycle which was expressed in two patterns of morphogenesis: (1) sperm nuclei incorporated into embryos just prior to prophase and at telophase failed, for the most part, to disperse and transformed into aggregations of chromatin granules approximately 40 nm in diameter; and (2) sperm nuclei incorporated into prometaphase-anaphase embryos dispersed and then condensed into chromatin masses, morphologically similar to chromosomes of the embryo. Evidence is discussed which indicates that following the normal period of fertilization changes occur in the zygote, rendering it unable to fully support the transformation of sperm nuclei into male pronuclei.

  8. The spatial patterning of RGD and BMP-2 mimetic peptides at the subcellular scale modulates human mesenchymal stem cells osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilem, I; Plawinski, L; Chevallier, P; Ayela, C; Sone, E D; Laroche, G; Durrieu, M C

    2017-11-16

    Engineering artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs), based on the biomimicry of the spatial distribution of proteins and growth factors within their native microenvironment, is of great importance for understanding mechanisms of bone tissue regeneration. Herein, photolithography is used to decorate glass surfaces with subcellular patterns of RGD and BMP-2 ligands; two mimetic peptides recognized to be involved in stem cells osteogenesis. The biological relevance of well-defined RGD and BMP-2 patterned surfaces is evaluated by investigating the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into osteoblasts, in the absence of induction media. The extent of hMSCs differentiation is revealed to be dependent on both the pattern shape and the ligand type. Indeed, the spatial patterning of BMP-2, but not RGD peptide, significantly enhances the extent of hMSCs differentiation, suggesting that geometric cues guide stem cells specification into specialized cells in a ligand type dependent manner. Such cell culture models provide an interesting tool to investigate how stem cells perceive and respond to their microenvironment and may contribute to the development of next-generation biomaterials capable of producing clinically relevant volume of bone tissue. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Habits of cell phone usage and sperm quality - does it warrant attention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberlicht, Ariel; Wiener-Megnazi, Zofnat; Sheinfeld, Yulia; Grach, Bronislava; Lahav-Baratz, Shirly; Dirnfeld, Martha

    2015-09-01

    Male infertility constitutes 30-40% of all infertility cases. Some studies have shown a continuous decline in semen quality since the beginning of the 20th century. One postulated contributing factor is radio frequency electromagnetic radiation emitted from cell phones. This study investigates an association between characteristics of cell phone usage and semen quality. Questionnaires accessing demographic data and characteristics of cell phone usage were completed by 106 men referred for semen analysis. Results were analysed according to WHO 2010 criteria. Talking for ≥1 h/day and during device charging were associated with higher rates of abnormal semen concentration (60.9% versus 35.7%, P phones ≤50 cm from the groin, a non-significantly higher rate of abnormal sperm concentration was found (47.1% versus 11.1%). Multivariate analysis revealed that talking while charging the device and smoking were risk factors for abnormal sperm concentration (OR = 4.13 [95% CI 1.28-13.3], P cell phone usage may bear adverse effects on sperm concentration. Investigation using large-scale studies is thus needed. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Microfluidics and numerical simulation as methods for standardization of zebrafish sperm cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Thomas; Knapp, Gerald L; Guitreau, Amy; Park, Daniel Sang-Won; Tiersch, Terrence; Nandakumar, Krishnaswamy; Monroe, W Todd

    2015-01-01

    Sperm cell activation plays a critical role in a range of biological and engineering processes, from fertilization to cryopreservation protocol evaluation. Across a range of species, ionic and osmotic effects have been discovered that lead to activation. Sperm cells of zebrafish (Danio rerio) initiate motility in a hypoosmotic environment. In this study, we employ a microfluidic mixer for the purpose of rapidly diluting the extracellular medium to initiate the onset of cell motility. The use of a microchannel offers a rapid and reproducible mixing profile throughout the device. This greatly reduces variability from trial to trial relative to the current methods of analysis. Coupling these experiments with numerical simulations, we were able to investigate the dynamics of intracellular osmolality as each cell moves along its path through the micromixer. Our results suggest that intracellular osmolality, and hence intracellular ion concentration, only slightly decreases, contrary to the common thought that larger changes in these parameters are required for activation. Utilizing this framework, microfluidics for controlled extracellular environments and associated numerical modeling, has practical applicability in standardizing high-throughput aquatic sperm activation, and more fundamentally, investigations of the intracellular environment leading to motility.

  11. Determination of semen characteristics and sperm cell ultrastructure of captive coatis (Nasua nasua) collected by electroejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Gabriela L; Barros, Felipe F P C; Costa, Leonardo L M; Castelo, Thibério S; Fontenele-Neto, José D; Silva, Alexandre R

    2009-10-01

    Despite the wide geographical distribution of coati (Nasua nasua) from the south of Canada to the north of Argentina, studies regarding the reproductive characteristics of this species are extremely limited. The objective of this study was to describe the various characteristics of coati semen by morphometric and ultrastructural analysis. Five mature males were anesthetized and electroejaculated for the collection of semen. Semen was immediately evaluated for color, volume, pH, sperm motility, vigor, morphology, acrosomal integrity, percentage of live cells and hypo-osmotic response by light microscopy. Sperm cell morphometry and ultrastructural analyses were also performed. Observations of seminal characteristics determined by electroejaculation in captive coatis represent a valuable baseline dataset for establishing fertility standards and provide background information that may be useful for assisted breeding programmes in members of the Procyonidae family.

  12. Expression of uncharacterized male germ cell-specific genes and discovery of novel sperm-tail proteins in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jun Tae; Ham, Sera; Jeon, Suyeon; Kim, Youil; Oh, Seungmin; Cho, Chunghee

    2017-01-01

    The identification and characterization of germ cell-specific genes are essential if we hope to comprehensively understand the mechanisms of spermatogenesis and fertilization. Here, we searched the mouse UniGene databases and identified 13 novel genes as being putatively testis-specific or -predominant. Our in silico and in vitro analyses revealed that the expressions of these genes are testis- and germ cell-specific, and that they are regulated in a stage-specific manner during spermatogenesis. We generated antibodies against the proteins encoded by seven of the genes to facilitate their characterization in male germ cells. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that one of these proteins was expressed only in testicular germ cells, three were expressed in both testicular germ cells and testicular sperm, and the remaining three were expressed in sperm of the testicular stages and in mature sperm from the epididymis. Further analysis of the latter three proteins showed that they were all associated with cytoskeletal structures in the sperm flagellum. Among them, MORN5, which is predicted to contain three MORN motifs, is conserved between mouse and human sperm. In conclusion, we herein identify 13 authentic genes with male germ cell-specific expression, and provide comprehensive information about these genes and their encoded products. Our finding will facilitate future investigations into the functional roles of these novel genes in spermatogenesis and sperm functions.

  13. Biochemical and topological analysis of bovine sperm cells induced by low power laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, T. R.; Siqueira, A. F. P.; Magrini, T. D.; Fiorito, P. A.; Assumpção, M. E. O. A.; Nichi, M.; Martinho, H. S.; Milazzotto, M. P.

    2011-07-01

    Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) increases ATP production and energy supply to the cell which could increase sperm motility, acrossomal reaction and consequently the fertilizing potential. The aim of this study was to characterize the biochemical and topological changes induced by low power laser irradiation on bull sperm cells. Post-thawing sperm were irradiated with a 633nm laser with fluence rates of 30, 150 and 300mJ.cm-2 (power of 5mW for 1, 5 and 10minutes, respectively); 45, 230, and 450mJ.cm-2 (7.5mW for 1, 5 and 10 minutes); and 60, 300 and 600mJ.cm-2 (10mW for 1, 5 and 10 minutes). Biochemical and metabolical changes were analyzed by FTIR and flow cytometry; oxygen reactive species production was assessed by TBARS and the morphological changes were evaluated by AFM. Motility had no difference among times or powers of irradiation. Increasing in ROS generation was observed with power of 5mW compared to 7.5 and 10mW, and with 10min of irradiation in comparison with 5 and 1min of irradiation. This higher ROS generation was related to an increase in acrossomal and plasma membrane damage. FTIR results showed that the amount of lipids was inversely proportional to the quantity of ROS generated. AFM images showed morphological differences in plasma/acrossomal membrane, mainly on the equatorial region. We conclude that LLLI is an effective method to induce changes on sperm cell metabolism but more studies are necessary to establish an optimal dose to increase the fertility potential of these cells.

  14. Single-cell pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to detect the early stage of DNA fragmentation in human sperm nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Satoru; Yoshida, Joji; Ishikawa, Hiromichi; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Single-cell pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (SCPFGE) with dual electrode pairs was developed to detect the early stage of DNA fragmentation in human sperm. The motile sperm were purified by the commonly used density-gradient centrifugation technique and subsequent swim-up. The sperm were embedded in a thin film of agarose containing bovine trypsin (20 µg/mL) and were then lysed. Prior to SCPFGE, proteolysis of DNA-binding components, such as protamine and the nuclear matrix was essential to separate the long chain fibers from the fibrous and granular fragments derived from a single nucleus. The overall electrophoretic profiles elucidated the course of DNA fragmentation. A few large fibrous fragments were observed at the beginning of the process, however, as the fragmentation advanced, the long chain fibers decreased and shortened, and, conversely, the granular fragments increased until finally almost all the DNA was shredded. Although the ejaculate contained sperm with heterogeneous stages, the purified motile sperm exhibited several dozens of uniformly elongated fibers arising from the tangled DNA at the origin, whereas a part of these fibers gave rise to fibrous fragments beyond the tip of the elongated fibers, and their numbers and sizes varied among the sperm. Conventional intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) usually depends on intra-operative light microscopic observation to select a sperm for injection. The present results revealed that sperm motility could not give full assurance of DNA integrity. SCPFGE is likely to serve an important role in the preoperative differential diagnosis to determine the competence of the sperm population provided for injection.

  15. Single-cell pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to detect the early stage of DNA fragmentation in human sperm nuclei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Kaneko

    Full Text Available Single-cell pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (SCPFGE with dual electrode pairs was developed to detect the early stage of DNA fragmentation in human sperm. The motile sperm were purified by the commonly used density-gradient centrifugation technique and subsequent swim-up. The sperm were embedded in a thin film of agarose containing bovine trypsin (20 µg/mL and were then lysed. Prior to SCPFGE, proteolysis of DNA-binding components, such as protamine and the nuclear matrix was essential to separate the long chain fibers from the fibrous and granular fragments derived from a single nucleus. The overall electrophoretic profiles elucidated the course of DNA fragmentation. A few large fibrous fragments were observed at the beginning of the process, however, as the fragmentation advanced, the long chain fibers decreased and shortened, and, conversely, the granular fragments increased until finally almost all the DNA was shredded. Although the ejaculate contained sperm with heterogeneous stages, the purified motile sperm exhibited several dozens of uniformly elongated fibers arising from the tangled DNA at the origin, whereas a part of these fibers gave rise to fibrous fragments beyond the tip of the elongated fibers, and their numbers and sizes varied among the sperm. Conventional intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI usually depends on intra-operative light microscopic observation to select a sperm for injection. The present results revealed that sperm motility could not give full assurance of DNA integrity. SCPFGE is likely to serve an important role in the preoperative differential diagnosis to determine the competence of the sperm population provided for injection.

  16. Applying the erythrocyte Pig-a assay concept to rat epididymal sperm for germ cell mutagenicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhiying; LeBaron, Matthew J

    2017-08-01

    The Pig-a assay, a recently developed in vivo somatic gene mutation assay, is based on the identification of mutant erythrocytes that have an altered repertoire of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell surface markers. We hypothesized that the erythrocyte Pig-a assay concept could be applied to rat cauda epididymal spermatozoa (sperm) for germ cell mutagenicity evaluation. We used GPI-anchored CD59 as the Pig-a mutation marker and examined the frequency of CD59-negative sperm using flow cytometry. A reconstruction experiment that spiked un-labeled sperm (mutant-mimic) into labeled sperm at specific ratios yielded good agreement between the detected and expected frequencies of mutant-mimic sperm, demonstrating the analytical ability for CD59-negative sperm detection. Furthermore, this methodology was assessed in F344/DuCrl rats administered N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), a prototypical mutagen, or clofibrate, a lipid-lowering drug. Rats treated with 1, 10, or 20 mg/kg body weight/day (mkd) ENU via daily oral garage for five consecutive days showed a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of CD59-negative sperm on study day 63 (i.e., 58 days after the last ENU dose). This ENU dosing regimen also increased the frequency of CD59-negative erythrocytes. In rats treated with 300 mkd clofibrate via daily oral garage for consecutive 28 days, no treatment-related changes were detected in the frequency of CD59-negative sperm on study day 85 (i.e., 57 days after the last dose) or in the frequency of CD59-negative erythrocytes on study day 29. In conclusion, these data suggest that the epidiymal sperm Pig-a assay in rats is a promising method for evaluating germ cell mutagenicity. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:485-493, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. In Vitro Effect of Cell Phone Radiation on Motility, DNA Fragmentation and Clusterin Gene Expression in Human Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Zalata

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of cellular phones emitting radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF has been increased exponentially and become a part of everyday life. This study aimed to investigate the effects of in vitro RF-EMF exposure emitted from cellular phones on sperm motility index, sperm DNA fragmentation and seminal clusterin (CLU gene expression. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, a total of 124 semen samples were grouped into the following main categories: i. normozoospermia (N, n=26, ii. asthenozoospermia (A, n=32, iii. asthenoteratozoospermia (AT, n=31 and iv. oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT, n=35. The same semen samples were then divided into two portions non-exposed and exposed samples to cell phone radiation for 1 hour. Before and immediately after exposure, both aliquots were subjected to different assessments for sperm motility, acrosin activity, sperm DNA fragmentation and CLU gene expression. Statistical differences were analyzed using paired t student test for comparisons between two sub-groups where pAT>A>N groups, respectively (p<0.05. Conclusion: Cell phone emissions have a negative impact on exposed sperm motility index, sperm acrosin activity, sperm DNA fragmentation and seminal CLU gene expression, especially in OAT cases.

  18. The Effects of Cell Phone Waves (900 MHz-GSM Band) on Sperm Parameters and Total Antioxidant Capacity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Masoud; Mortazavi, Seyed Bagher; Khavanin, Ali; Khazaei, Mozafar

    2013-04-01

    There is tremendous concern regarding the possible adverse effects of cell phone microwaves. Contradictory results, however, have been reported for the effects of these waves on the body. In the present study, the effect of cell phone microwaves on sperm parameters and total antioxidant capacity was investigated with regard to the duration of exposure and the frequency of these waves. This experimental study was performed on 28 adult male Wistar rats (200-250 g). The animals were randomly assigned to four groups (n=7): i. control; ii. two-week exposure to cell phone-simulated waves; iii. three-week exposure to cell phonesimulated waves; and iv. two-week exposure to cell phone antenna waves. In all groups, sperm analysis was performed based on standard methods and we determined the mean sperm total antioxidant capacity according to the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) method. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test using SPSS version 16 software. The results indicated that sperm viability, motility, and total antioxidant capacity in all exposure groups decreased significantly compared to the control group (pcell phone waves can decrease sperm viability and motility in rats. These waves can also decrease sperm total antioxidant capacity in rats and result in oxidative stress.

  19. Single-Cell Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis to Detect the Early Stage of DNA Fragmentation in Human Sperm Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Satoru Kaneko; Joji Yoshida; Hiromichi Ishikawa; Kiyoshi Takamatsu

    2012-01-01

    Single-cell pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (SCPFGE) with dual electrode pairs was developed to detect the early stage of DNA fragmentation in human sperm. The motile sperm were purified by the commonly used density-gradient centrifugation technique and subsequent swim-up. The sperm were embedded in a thin film of agarose containing bovine trypsin (20 µg/mL) and were then lysed. Prior to SCPFGE, proteolysis of DNA-binding components, such as protamine and the nuclear matrix was essential to ...

  20. Role of ER stress response in photodynamic therapy: ROS generated in different subcellular compartments trigger diverse cell death pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Moserova

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the molecular mechanisms of photoinduced cell death using porphyrins with similar structure differing only in the position of the ethylene glycol (EG chain on the phenyl ring. Meta- and para-positioned EG chains targeted porphyrins to different subcellular compartments. After photoactivation, both types of derivatives induced death of tumor cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS. Para derivatives pTPP(EG4 and pTPPF(EG4 primarily accumulated in lysosomes activated the p38 MAP kinase cascade, which in turn induced the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In contrast, meta porphyrin derivative mTPP(EG4 localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER induced dramatic changes in Ca(2+ homeostasis manifested by Ca(2+ rise in the cytoplasm, activation of calpains and stress caspase-12 or caspase-4. ER stress developed into unfolded protein response. Immediately after irradiation the PERK pathway was activated through phosphorylation of PERK, eIF2α and induction of transcription factors ATF4 and CHOP, which regulate stress response genes. PERK knockdown and PERK deficiency protected cells against mTPP(EG4-mediated apoptosis, confirming the causative role of the PERK pathway.

  1. Is sperm banking of interest to patients with nongerm cell urological cancer before potentially fertility damaging treatments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonia, Andrea; Gallina, Andrea; Matloob, Rayan; Rocchini, Lorenzo; Saccà, Antonino; Abdollah, Firas; Colombo, Renzo; Suardi, Nazareno; Briganti, Alberto; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Rigatti, Patrizio; Montorsi, Francesco

    2009-09-01

    We assessed the opinions of patients with nongerm cell urological cancer on sperm banking before undergoing surgical or nonsurgical therapy that could potentially endanger subsequent fertility. Between April 2007 and July 2008, 753 patients visited a urological office and were invited to complete a brief self-administered questionnaire to assess opinions on sperm banking before undergoing any eventual therapy potentially dangerous for male fertility. Logistic regression models tested the association between predictors (age, educational level, relationship status, previous fatherhood and benign disorder vs nongerm cell urological cancer) and patient wishes for sperm banking. Median patient age was 65 years (mean 61.6, range 18 to 76). Overall 522 patients (69.3%) had nongerm cell urological cancer and only 242 (32.1%) were in favor of pretreatment sperm banking. On univariate analysis age (OR 0.961, p banking, whereas having cancer and educational status were not significantly correlated. Multivariate analysis indicated that aging (OR 0.966, p = 0.001) and previous fatherhood (OR 0.587, p = 0.029) maintained inverse associations. Having urological cancer was positively (OR 1.494, p = 0.045) associated with the wish for sperm banking. In urological patients there is a low rate of willingness to bank sperm before any potential fertility damaging therapeutic approach. Having nongerm cell urological cancer is an independent predictor that is positively associated with the wish to bank sperm. It is vitally important to provide comprehensive information about pretreatment sperm banking to young adults with nongerm cell urological cancer.

  2. Ion channels in small cells and subcellular structures can be studied with a smart patch-clamp system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, Julia; Gu, Yuchun; Spohr, Hilmar A; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Lab, Max J; Harding, Sian E; Edwards, Christopher R W; Whitaker, Michael; Moss, Guy W J; Benton, David C H; Sánchez, Daniel; Darszon, Alberto; Vodyanoy, Igor; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E

    2002-12-01

    We have developed a scanning patch-clamp technique that facilitates single-channel recording from small cells and submicron cellular structures that are inaccessible by conventional methods. The scanning patch-clamp technique combines scanning ion conductance microscopy and patch-clamp recording through a single glass nanopipette probe. In this method the nanopipette is first scanned over a cell surface, using current feedback, to obtain a high-resolution topographic image. This same pipette is then used to make the patch-clamp recording. Because image information is obtained via the patch electrode it can be used to position the pipette onto a cell with nanometer precision. The utility of this technique is demonstrated by obtaining ion channel recordings from the top of epithelial microvilli and openings of cardiomyocyte T-tubules. Furthermore, for the first time we have demonstrated that it is possible to record ion channels from very small cells, such as sperm cells, under physiological conditions as well as record from cellular microstructures such as submicron neuronal processes.

  3. Expression of temperature-sensitive ion channel TRPM8 in sperm cells correlates with vertebrate evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Majhi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily Melastatin, member 8 (TRPM8 is involved in detection of cold temperature, different noxious compounds and in execution of thermo- as well as chemo-sensitive responses at cellular levels. Here we explored the molecular evolution of TRPM8 by analyzing sequences from various species. We elucidate that several regions of TRPM8 had different levels of selection pressure but the 4th–5th transmembrane regions remain highly conserved. Analysis of synteny suggests that since vertebrate origin, TRPM8 gene is linked with SPP2, a bone morphogen. TRPM8, especially the N-terminal region of it, seems to be highly variable in human population. We found 16,656 TRPM8 variants in 1092 human genomes with top variations being SNPs, insertions and deletions. A total of 692 missense mutations are also mapped to human TRPM8 protein of which 509 seem to be delateroiours in nature as supported by Polyphen V2, SIFT and Grantham deviation score. Using a highly specific antibody, we demonstrate that TRPM8 is expressed endogenously in the testis of rat and sperm cells of different vertebrates ranging from fish to higher mammals. We hypothesize that TRPM8 had emerged during vertebrate evolution (ca 450 MYA. We propose that expression of TRPM8 in sperm cell and its role in regulating sperm function are important factors that have guided its molecular evolution, and that these understandings may have medical importance.

  4. An ARID domain-containing protein within nuclear bodies is required for sperm cell formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    In plants, each male meiotic product undergoes mitosis, and then one of the resulting cells divides again, yielding a three-celled pollen grain comprised of a vegetative cell and two sperm cells. Several genes have been found to act in this process, and DUO1 (DUO POLLEN 1), a transcription factor, p...

  5. In vitro effect of cell phone radiation on motility, DNA fragmentation and clusterin gene expression in human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalata, Adel; El-Samanoudy, Ayman Z; Shaalan, Dalia; El-Baiomy, Youssef; Mostafa, Taymour

    2015-01-01

    Use of cellular phones emitting radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) has been increased exponentially and become a part of everyday life. This study aimed to investigate the effects of in vitro RF-EMF exposure emitted from cellular phones on sperm motility index, sperm DNA fragmentation and seminal clusterin (CLU) gene expression. In this prospective study, a total of 124 semen samples were grouped into the following main categories: i. normozoospermia (N, n=26), ii. asthenozoospermia (A, n=32), iii. asthenoteratozoospermia (AT, n=31) and iv. oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT, n=35). The same semen samples were then divided into two portions non-exposed and exposed samples to cell phone radiation for 1 hour. Before and immediately after exposure, both aliquots were subjected to different assessments for sperm motility, acrosin activity, sperm DNA fragmentation and CLU gene expression. Statistical differences were analyzed using paired t student test for comparisons between two sub-groups where pAT>A>N groups, respectively (pnegative impact on exposed sperm motility index, sperm acrosin activity, sperm DNA fragmentation and seminal CLU gene expression, especially in OAT cases.

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF ACROSOME AS THE MAIN ANTIGEN OF THE SPERM CELLS PROVOKING AUTOANTIBODIES IN VASECTOMIZED IRANIAN MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Nowroozi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nVasectomy is one of the extensively used methods of contraception in family planning programs. Antisperm antibodies (ASA develop after vasectomy which can result in auto-immune male infertility. The precise sperm antigens involved in the autoimmune response are still poorly defined, therefore we determined the circulating ASA and identified relevant sperm antigens based on localization of binding sites of ASA to sperm cell antigens, using a rapid, inexpensive and clinically relevant assay in vasectomized men. Results showed that 2.5% of men had ASA at the time of vasectomy, whereas 53.5% of the study population subsequently developed ASA. The numbers of men with circulating ASA increased significantly for the first three months after vasectomy. These antibodies were distinguishable into three groups based on their bindings to different sites of sperm cell antigens including against acrosome and tail in 67.56% and 10.8%, respectively; 21.6% of subjects had antibody to the other parts of the sperm cell antigens. The results of this study are discussed in terms of an autoimmune response against sperm antigens and development of ASA.

  7. Effects of exposure to cadmium in sperm cells of zebrafish, Danio rerio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izani Bonel Acosta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a natural element found in the earth’s crust; it is usually associated with other metals, but due to the impacts caused by human activity, its concentration has increased in the aquatic environment. This metal may damage aquatic animal reproduction, decreasing the rate of fertilization of organisms such as fish. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the in vitro toxicity of different concentrations of cadmium (0 (control, 0.5, 5, and 10 μg/L using sperm cells of model organism zebrafish, Danio rerio. Structural parameters, including integrity and fluidity of the plasma membrane, concentration of oxygen species, mitochondrial function and DNA fragmentation were measured by flow cytometry. The following sperm movement parameters were also measured using the computer assisted sperm analysis (CASA system: motility, time of motility, curvilinear velocity, average path velocity and straight line velocity in μm/s. Significant effects were observed on path speed, straight speed, curvilinear velocity, motility time, progressive and total motility, and plasma and DNA integrity. The results showed that cadmium can negatively affect some reproductive parameters in D. rerio, which may reduce the fertility rate of these animals.

  8. Using Femtosecond Laser Subcellular Surgery as a Tool to Study Cell Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, N; Colvin, M E; Huser, T

    2007-02-27

    Research on cellular function and regulation would be greatly advanced by new instrumentation using methods to alter cellular processes with spatial discrimination on the nanometer-scale. We present a novel technique for targeting submicrometer sized organelles or other biologically important regions in living cells using femtosecond laser pulses. By tightly focusing these pulses beneath the cell membrane, we can vaporize cellular material inside the cell through nonlinear optical processes. This technique enables non-invasive manipulation of the physical structure of a cell with sub-micrometer resolution. We propose to study the role mitochondria play in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our technique provides a unique tool for the study of cell biology.

  9. Effects of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark oil on testicular antioxidant values, apoptotic germ cell and sperm quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüce, A; Türk, G; Çeribaşi, S; Sönmez, M; Çiftçi, M; Güvenç, M

    2013-08-01

    Cinnamon and its contents have multifactorial properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic. Male infertility is one of the major health problems in life. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term cinnamon bark oil (CBO) ingestion on testicular antioxidant values, apoptotic germ cell and sperm quality of adult rats. Twelve male healthy Wistar rats were divided into two groups, each group containing six rats. While olive oil was given to control group, 100 mg kg(-1)  CBO was administered to the other group by gavage daily for 10 weeks. Body and reproductive organ weights, sperm characteristics, testicular lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities, and testicular apoptosis via terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) method were examined. A significant decrease in malondialdehyde level and marked increases in reduced glutathione level, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities were observed in rats treated with CBO compared with the control group. CBO consumption provided a significant increase in weights of testes and epididymides, epididymal sperm concentration, sperm motility and diameter of seminiferous tubules when compared with the control group. However, CBO consumption tended to decrease the abnormal sperm rate and apoptotic germ cell count, but it did not reach statistical significance. It is concluded that CBO has improvement effect on testicular oxidant-antioxidant balance and sperm quality, and its consumption may be useful for asthenozoospermic men. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Sertoli cell specific knockdown of RAR-related orphan receptor (ROR) alpha at puberty reduces sperm count in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Kamal; Sarkar, Rajesh K; Sen Sharma, Souvik; Jain, Ayushi; Majumdar, Subeer S

    2018-01-30

    Globally, there is an alarming decline in sperm count. Very often hormonal supplementation fails to restore normal sperm count. Sertoli cells (Sc) present within seminiferous tubules provide appropriate niche and factors required for the differentiation of germ cells (Gc) into mature sperm (spermatogenesis). Functionally compromised Sc may be one of the reasons for failure of hormones to facilitate normal spermatogenesis. Although role of secretory proteins and signaling molecules of Sc has been studied well, role of transcription factors regulating sperm count has not been addressed appropriately. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)-alpha is one of such transcription factors reported in testis but its role in testicular function is not yet known. In a separate study, we found abundant ROR-alpha binding sites on promoter regions of several genes upregulated in pubertal rat Sc as compared to infant Sc. Immunostaining studies also revealed presence of ROR alpha in nucleus of pubertal Sc. We generated a transgenic knockdown rat model expressing shRNA targeted to ROR-alpha under Sc specific promoter, which is transcriptionally active only at and after puberty. ROR-alpha knockdown animals were found to have abnormal association of Sc and Gc, including Gc sloughing and restricted release of sperm. The knockdown animals displayed compromised spermatogenesis leading to significant reduction in sperm count. This is the first report describing the Sc specific role of ROR-alpha in maintaining quantitatively normal sperm output. Identification of various such molecules can generate avenues to limit or reverse an alarmingly declining sperm count witnessed globally in men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Doxorubicin delivered to MCF-7 cancer cells by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: effects on subcellular distribution and cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munnier, E.; Cohen-Jonathan, S.; Hervé, K.; Linassier, C.; Soucé, M.; Dubois, P.; Chourpa, I.

    2011-03-01

    The clinical use of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is limited by strong side effects and phenomena of cell resistance. Drug targeting by binding DOX to nanoparticles could overcome these limitations. We recently described a method to associate DOX to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in view of magnetic drug targeting (Munnier et al. in Int J Pharm 363:170-176, 2008). DOX is bound to the nanoparticle surface through a pre-formed DOX-Fe2+ complex. The DOX-loaded SPION present interesting properties in terms of drug loading and biological activity in vitro. The purpose of this study is to explore the possible mechanisms of the in vitro cytotoxicity of DOX-loaded SPION. The uptake of SPION was followed qualitatively by conventional optical microscopy after Prussian blue staining and quantitatively by iron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The subcellular distribution of intrinsically fluorescent DOX was followed by confocal spectral imaging (CSI) and the subsequent cytotoxicity by the MTT method. We reveal modifications of DOX intracellular interactions for SPION-delivered drug and increased cytotoxicity. These results are discussed in terms of internalization route of the drug and of a potential role of iron oxide nanoparticles in the observed cytotoxicity.

  12. The Effects of Cell Phone Waves (900 MHz-GSM Band on Sperm Parameters and Total Antioxidant Capacity in Rats

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    Masoud Ghanbari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is tremendous concern regarding the possible adverse effects of cellphone microwaves. Contradictory results, however, have been reported for the effectsof these waves on the body. In the present study, the effect of cell phone microwaves onsperm parameters and total antioxidant capacity was investigated with regard to the durationof exposure and the frequency of these waves.Materials and Methods: This experimental study was performed on 28 adult male Wistarrats (200-250 g. The animals were randomly assigned to four groups (n=7: i. control; ii.two-week exposure to cell phone-simulated waves; iii. three-week exposure to cell phonesimulatedwaves; and iv. two-week exposure to cell phone antenna waves. In all groups,sperm analysis was performed based on standard methods and we determined the meansperm total antioxidant capacity according to the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAPmethod. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test using SPSSversion 16 software.Results: The results indicated that sperm viability, motility, and total antioxidant capacityin all exposure groups decreased significantly compared to the control group (p<0.05.Increasing the duration of exposure from 2 to 3 weeks caused a statistically significantdecrease in sperm viability and motility (p<0.05.Conclusion: Exposure to cell phone waves can decrease sperm viability and motility inrats. These waves can also decrease sperm total antioxidant capacity in rats and result inoxidative stress.

  13. Red Raspberry Phenols Inhibit Angiogenesis: A Morphological and Subcellular Analysis Upon Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, M; Machado, V; Costa, R; Figueira, M E; Sepodes, B; Barata, P; Ribeiro, L; Soares, R

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenols are a class of natural compounds whose potential as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenesis has been reported in many pathological conditions. Red raspberry extract, rich in polyphenols, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects and prevent cell proliferation in distinct animal models. However, the signaling pathways involved remain unknown. Herein, we used human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) to determine the influence of red raspberry phenolic compound extract concentrations, ranging from 10 to 250 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL, on endothelium viability (MTS assay), proliferation (BrdU incorporation), migration (injury assay), and capillary-like structures formation (Matrigel assay). Protein expression in cell lysates was determined by Western blot analysis. We showed that red raspberry extracts reduced cell viability (GI50  = 87,64 ± 6,59 μg GAE/mL) and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. A significant abrogation of cells ability to migrate to injured areas, even at low concentrations, was observed by injury assay. Cell assembly into capillary-like structures on Matrigel also decreased in a dose dependent-manner for higher extract concentrations, as well as the number of branching points per unit of area. Protein expression analysis showed a dose-dependent decrease in Phospho-VEGFR2 expression, implying abrogation of VEGF signaling activity. We also showed for the first time that red raspberry phenolic compounds induce the rearrangement of filamentous actin cytoskeleton, with an isotropy increase found for higher testing concentrations. Taken together, our findings corroborate the anti-angiogenic potential of red raspberry phenolic compounds and provide new insights into their mode of action upon endothelium. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1604-1612, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Holographic imaging of unlabelled sperm cells for semen analysis: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Memmolo, Pasquale; Ferraro, Pietro; Coppola, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Male reproductive health in both humans and animals is an important research field in biological study. In order to characterize the morphology, the motility and the concentration of the sperm cells, which are the most important parameters to feature them, digital holography demonstrated to be an attractive technique. Indeed, it is a labelfree, non-invasive and high-resolution method that enables the characterization of live specimen. The review is intended both for summarize the state-of-art on the semen analysis and recent achievement obtained by means of digital holography and for exploring new possible applications of digital holography in this field.

  15. Subcellular localization of Cd in the root cells of Allium sativum by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ultrastructural investigation of the root cells of Allium sativum L. exposed to three different concentrations of Cd (100 M, 1 mM and 10 mM) for 9 days was carried out. The results showed that Cd induced several significant ultrastructural changes – high vacuolization in cytoplasm, deposition of electron-dense material in ...

  16. Subcellular localization of cadmium in the root cells of Allium cepa ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results indicated that Cd induced several obvious ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolation, condensed cytoplasm with increased density of the matrix, reduction of mitochondrial cristae, severe plasmolysis and highly condensed nuclear chromatin. Electron dense granules appeared between the cell wall ...

  17. Predictive Factors of Successful Microdissection Testicular Sperm Extraction in Patients with Presumed Sertoli Cell-Only Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Modarresi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate predictive factors of successful microdissection-testicular sperm extraction (MD-TESE in patients with presumed Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective analysis, 874 men with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA, among whom 148 individuals with diagnosis of SCOS in prior biopsy, underwent MD-TESE at Department of Andrology, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. The predictive values of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, and testosterone (T levels, testicular volume, as well as male age for retrieving testicular sperm by MD-TESE were analyzed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: Testicular sperm were successfully retrieved in 23.6% men with presumed SCOS. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis, it was shown that sperm retrieval rate in the group of men with FSH values >15.25% was 28.9%. This was higher than the group of men with FSH ≤15.25 (11.8%. Conclusion: Sperm retrieval rate (SRR was 23.6% in men with presumed SCOS and FSH level can be a fair predictor for SPR at MD-TESE. MD-TESE appears to be recommendable in such cases (SCOS with high FSH concentration with reasonable results. Keywords: Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Luteinizing Hormone, Sperm Retrieval, Azoospermia, Nonobstructive

  18. Sperm antigens in fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saling, P M

    1990-02-01

    A review of sperm antigens involved in fertilization includes a description of sperm differentiation, seminal fluid components that coat sperm, sperm antigens involved in binding to the zona pellucida (ZP), antigens involved in the acrosome reaction, in zona pellucida penetration, and those active in fusion with the ova membrane. Sperm antigens are located in certain domains of the cell, and they are altered during capacitation and passage through the female tract. Caltrin and acrosome-stabilizing factor are applied by seminal fluid. At least 2 antigens have been studied that occur in sterile women, although one cross reacts with milk proteins. Some antigens active in ZP binding are trypsin, proacrosin, acrosin, PH-20 from guinea pigs, and rabbit sperm autoantigen I. Antigens involved in the acrosome reaction, such as M42, are likely to cross react with other body proteins that also entail exocytosis. A mouse antigen involved in ZP penetration, MS 207 is well characterized. PH-30 from guinea pigs and M29 from mouse participate in sperm-egg membrane fusion, as does fertilization antigen I from human and mouse sperm which is know to cause infertility. Oddly, patients' sera react with polymers but not monomers of this antigen. Studies with antisperm antibodies suggest that it will not be necessary to agglutinate all sperm to block fertility, only to inhibit a single sperm epitope and function. It will probably be feasible to inhibit multiple successive events, and possibly to induce temporary immunity.

  19. Sperm design and sperm function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aurelio F Malo; Montserrat Gomendio; Julian Garde; Barbara Lang-Lenton; Ana J Soler; Eduardo R.S Roldan

    2006-01-01

    .... Sperm swimming velocity is a key determinant of male fertilization success, but previous efforts to identity which sperm phenotypic traits are associated with swimming velocity have been unsuccessful...

  20. Abnormal sperm morphology in mouse germ cells after short-term exposures to acetamiprid, propineb, and their mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasgele, Pinar Göç

    2014-03-01

    Pesticides are one of the most potent environmental contaminants, which accumulate in biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems. Acetamiprid (Acm), a neonicotinoid insecticide, and Propineb (Pro), a dithiocarbamate fungicide, are widely used to control sucking insects and fungal infections on crops, respectively. The present study was undertaken to investigate the genotoxic effects of these compounds, individually and in mixtures, in mouse germ cells by using the sperm morphology assay. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with 0.625, 1.25, and 2.50 μg mL⁻¹ of Acm, 12.5, 25, and 50 μg mL⁻¹ of Pro, and their mixture at the same concentrations over 24 and 48 h. Acm did not significantly increase the percentage of abnormal sperm at any concentration. The frequency of abnormal sperm significantly increased after 24 and 48 h of exposure to 50 μg mL⁻¹ of Pro. The mixtures of 2.50 μg mL⁻¹ of Acm and 50 μg mL⁻¹ of Pro induced sperm abnormalities antagonistically both after 24 and 48 h of exposure. Results suggest that Acm was non-genotoxic for mouse germ cells, while Pro may have been a germ cell mutagen due to the observed increase in the frequency of sperm abnormalities. However, to gain better insight into the mutagenicity and DNA damaging potential of both of these pesticides, further studies at molecular level should be done.

  1. Quantitative single cell monitoring of protein synthesis at subcellular resolution using fluorescently labeled tRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoom, Sima; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cooperman, Barry S.; Smorodinsky, Nechama I.; Smilansky, Zeev; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique of using fluorescent tRNA for translation monitoring (FtTM). FtTM enables the identification and monitoring of active protein synthesis sites within live cells at submicron resolution through quantitative microscopy of transfected bulk uncharged tRNA, fluorescently labeled in the D-loop (fl-tRNA). The localization of fl-tRNA to active translation sites was confirmed through its co-localization with cellular factors and its dynamic alterations upon inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals, generated when fl-tRNAs, separately labeled as a FRET pair occupy adjacent sites on the ribosome, quantitatively reflect levels of protein synthesis in defined cellular regions. In addition, FRET signals enable detection of intra-populational variability in protein synthesis activity. We demonstrate that FtTM allows quantitative comparison of protein synthesis between different cell types, monitoring effects of antibiotics and stress agents, and characterization of changes in spatial compartmentalization of protein synthesis upon viral infection. PMID:21795382

  2. A neural network classifier capable of recognizing the patterns of all major subcellular structures in fluorescence microscope images of HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, M V; Murphy, R F

    2001-12-01

    Assessment of protein subcellular location is crucial to proteomics efforts since localization information provides a context for a protein's sequence, structure, and function. The work described below is the first to address the subcellular localization of proteins in a quantitative, comprehensive manner. Images for ten different subcellular patterns (including all major organelles) were collected using fluorescence microscopy. The patterns were described using a variety of numeric features, including Zernike moments, Haralick texture features, and a set of new features developed specifically for this purpose. To test the usefulness of these features, they were used to train a neural network classifier. The classifier was able to correctly recognize an average of 83% of previously unseen cells showing one of the ten patterns. The same classifier was then used to recognize previously unseen sets of homogeneously prepared cells with 98% accuracy. Algorithms were implemented using the commercial products Matlab, S-Plus, and SAS, as well as some functions written in C. The scripts and source code generated for this work are available at http://murphylab.web.cmu.edu/software. murphy@cmu.edu

  3. Beholding the subcellular world in your PALM: nanometer resolution optical measurements of protein assemblies in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Hari

    2012-02-01

    Key to understanding a protein's biological function is the accurate determination of its spatial distribution inside a cell. Although fluorescent protein markers enable specific targeting with molecular precision, much of this utility is lost when the resultant fusions are imaged with conventional, diffraction-limited optics. In response, several imaging modalities that rely on the stochastic activation and bleaching of single molecules, and that are capable of resolution 10x below the diffraction limit (250 nm for visible wavelengths), have emerged. This talk will cover superresolution imaging of biological structures using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). In addition to covering the theory, we will also discuss the use of the technique in understanding biological phenomena on the nanoscale, including the organization of bacterial chemoreceptors, the movement of actin in neuronal spines, and the stratification of focal adhesions.

  4. Static magnetic fields inhibit proliferation and disperse subcellular localization of gamma complex protein3 in cultured C2C12 myoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SeungChan; Im, Wooseok

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic fields may delay the rate of cell cycle progression, and there are reports that magnetic fields induce neurite outgrowth in cultured neuronal cells. To demonstrate whether magnetic field also effects on myoblast cells in cell growth, C2C12 cell lines were cultured and 2000G static magnetic field was applied. After 48 h of incubation, both the WST-1 assay (0.01 magnetic fields inhibit the proliferation of cultured C2C12 cells. Immunocytochemistry for alpha and tubulin gamma complex protein (TUBA and GCP3) was made and applying a static magnetic field-dispersed tubulin GCP3 formation, a intracellular apparatus for tubulin structuring in cell division. This protein expression was not altered by western blot. This study indicates that applying a static magnetic field alters the subcellular localizing of GCP3, and may delay the cell growth in cultured C2C12 myoblast cells.

  5. Efficient Subcellular Targeting to the Cell Nucleus of Quantum Dots Densely Decorated with a Nuclear Localization Sequence Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-27

    development of subcellularly targeted DDSs that will deliver specific drugs to the nuclei of the target cells and will enhance efficacy and reduce toxicity of these drugs.

  6. Prognostic and Predictive Values of Subcellular Localisation of RET in Renal Clear-Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC presents a poor prognosis and an unpredictable course. To date, no validated biomarkers can predict the outcome of RCC. Ongoing efforts are conducted to identify the molecular markers of RCC progression, as well as the targets for novel therapeutic approaches. RET is a tyrosine kinase receptor which has been investigated as a possible target in other cancers because it is involved in oncogenic activation. To evaluate the predictive and prognostic functions of RET in ccRCC, a tissue microarray study was conducted on 273 ccRCC patients. Results showed that both RET cytoplasmic and nuclear expression were independently associated with PFS and OS, and the combined RET cytoplasmic and nuclear statuses demonstrated that the ratio of high nuclear RET and cytoplasmic RET was the strongest predictor of both PFS and OS. The high cytoplasmic RET expression retained its independent poor prognostic value in targeted drug treated patients. The RET nuclear expression was associated with distant metastasis. Moreover, the RET nuclear expression was an independent predictor of ccRCC postoperative metastasis. In conclusion, RET may be useful in prognostication and can be used at initial diagnosis to identify patients with high potential to develop metastasis.

  7. Effect of Content of Sulfate Groups in Seaweed Polysaccharides on Antioxidant Activity and Repair Effect of Subcellular Organelles in Injured HK-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Tao Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the repair effect of subcellular structure injuries of the HK-2 cells of four degraded seaweed polysaccharides (DSPs, namely, the degraded Porphyra yezoensis, Gracilaria lemaneiformis, Sargassum fusiform, and Undaria pinnatifida polysaccharides. The four DSPs have similar molecular weight, but with different content of sulfate groups (i.e., 17.9%, 13.3%, 8.2%, and 5.5%, resp.. The damaged model was established using 2.8 mmol/L oxalate to injure HK-2 cells, and 60 μg/mL of various DSPs was used to repair the damaged cells. With the increase of sulfate group content in DSPs, the scavenging activity of radicals and their reducing power were all improved. Four kinds of DSPs have repair effect on the subcellular organelles of damaged HK-2 cells. After being repaired by DSPs, the release amount of lactate dehydrogenase was decreased, the integrity of cell membrane and lysosome increased, the Δψm increased, the cell of G1 phase arrest was inhibited, the proportion of S phase increased, and cell apoptotic and necrosis rates were significantly reduced. The greater the content of sulfate group is, the stronger is the repair ability of the polysaccharide. These DSPs, particularly the polysaccharide with higher sulfate group content, may be a potential drug for the prevention and cure of kidney stones.

  8. Changes in subcellular distribution of n-octanoyl or n-decanoyl ghrelin in ghrelin-producing cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro eNishi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT catalyzes the acylation of ghrelin. The molecular form of GOAT, together with its reaction in vitro, has been reported previously. However, the sub-cellular processes governing the acylation of ghrelin remain to be elucidated.Methods: Double immunoelectron microscopy was used to examine changes in the relative proportions of secretory granules containing n-octanoyl ghrelin (C8-ghrelin or n-decanoyl ghrelin (C10-ghrelin in ghrelin-producing cells of mouse stomachs. The dynamics of C8-type (possessing C8-ghrelin exclusively, C10-type (possessing C10-ghrelin only and mixed-type secretory granules (possessing both C8- and C10-ghrelin were investigated after fasting for 48h or after two weeks’ feeding with chow containing glyceryl-tri-octanoate (C8-MCT or glyceryl-tri-decanoate (C10-MCT. The dynamics of C8- or C10-ghrelin immunoreactivity (ir-C8- or ir-C10-ghrelin within the mixed-type granules were also investigated.Results: Immunoelectron microscopic analysis revealed the co-existence of C8- and C10-ghrelin within the same secretory granules (mixed-type in ghrelin-producing cells. Compared to control mice fed standard chow, the ratio of C10-type secretory granules increased significantly after ingestion of C10-MCT, whereas that of C8-type granules declined significantly under the same treatment. After ingestion of C8-MCT, the proportion of C8-type secretory granules increased significantly. Within the mixed-type granules the ratio of ir-C10-ghrelin increased significantly and that of ir-C8-ghrelin decreased significantly upon fasting. Conclusions: These findings confirmed that C10-ghrelin, another acyl-form of active ghrelin, is stored within the same secretory granules as C8-ghrelin, and suggested that the types of medium-chain acyl-molecules surrounding and available to the ghrelin-GOAT system may affect the physiological processes of ghrelin acylation.

  9. Clinical and prognostic significance of human papillomavirus DNA in the sperm or exfoliated cells of infertile patients and subjects with risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresta, Carlo; Pizzol, Damiano; Moretti, Afra; Barzon, Luisa; Palù, Giorgio; Garolla, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate human papillomavirus (HPV) sperm infection and its correlation with sperm parameters in infertile patients and subjects with risk factors. Cross-sectional clinical study. Andrology and microbiology sections at a university hospital. A cohort of 290 subjects: 26 with genital warts, 66 with HPV positive partners, 108 infertile patients, and 90 fertile controls. Semen analysis, sperm culture, polymerase chain reaction, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for HPV detection. Statistical analysis was performed with a two-tailed Student's t-test. The prevalence of HPV semen infection found in all groups was as follows: patients with genital warts, 53.8%; infected partners, 40.9%; infertile patients, 10.2%, fertile controls, 2.2%. Infertile patients had a higher HPV DNA prevalence in sperm cells than the other groups. The results of HPV investigation were compared with sperm parameters and the results of FISH analysis. Sperm motility was more frequently reduced in infected samples and in particular when the infection was present in the sperm. This study demonstrated a very high prevalence of infection in the semen of patients with risk factors for HPV. In each group of subjects, HPV seems to be preferentially located in sperm or exfoliated cells, with different effects on sperm motility. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transfection of the inner cell mass and lack of a unique DNA sequence affecting the uptake of exogenous DNA by sperm as shown by dideoxy sequencing analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, M; Chan, P J; Kalugdan, T H; King, A

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exogenous DNA internalized into blastocysts after transference from DNA-carrier sperm are localized at the inner cell mass or trophoblast cells and to identify differences in uptake of exogenous DNA fragments by sperm due to unique DNA sequences. Mouse blastocysts at the hatching stage were exposed to migrating human sperm cells carrying exogenous DNA fragments synthesized from the E6-E7 conserved gene regions of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18. After an interaction period of 2 hr, the transfected blastocysts were washed several times to remove extraneous sperm and the blastocysts were dissected into groups of cells derived from the inner cell mass and trophoblasts. The cells were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of HPV DNA fragments. In the second part of the experiment, thawed donor (N = 10) sperm cells were pooled, washed, and divided into two fractions. The first (control) fraction was added with formalin and further divided and added with a 35S-radiolabeled G, A, T, or C sequencing mixture. The second fraction was similarly treated but the formalin step was omitted from the treatment. After an hour of incubation at 37 degrees C, the sperm specimens were washed several times by centrifugation and DNA extracted by the GeneReleaser method. The extracted DNA were processed on sequence gels, and the autoradiographs analyzed. Mouse blastocysts transfected by carrier sperm with DNA from HPV types 16 and 18 showed localization of the HPV DNA to both the inner cell mass and trophoblast cells. Negative controls consisting of untreated human sperm and untreated mouse blastocysts did not reveal any evidence of HPV DNA. The positive sperm control generated expected DNA fragments from HPV types 16 and 18. In the second experiment, the intensities of the DNA fragments in the G, A, T, and C columns from low to high molecular weights were not different from the positive control bands

  11. Effects of silver nano-particles on sperm parameters, number of Leydig cells and sex hormones in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baki, Mohammad Ebrahim; Miresmaili, Sayyed Mohsen; Pourentezari, Majid; Amraii, Esmail; Yousefi, Vahid; Spenani, Hamid Reza; Talebi, Ali Reza; Anvari, Morteza; Fazilati, Mohammad; Fallah, Ali Asghar; Mangoli, Esmat

    2014-02-01

    Nano-particles are extensively employed in most industries. Several studies have been started to explore the probable detrimental effects of nano-particles on human reproduction. However, there is insufficient and controversially evident of effects of silver nano-particles on sperm parameters and other reproductive indices. Investigation of the effects of silver nano-particles on sperm parameters, sex hormones and Leydig cells in rat as an experimental model. In this experimental study, 75 male prepubertal Wistar rats were categorized in five groups including control group and 4 experimental groups (n=15 in each group). The rats in the experimental groups were fed silver nano-particles (60 nm in dimension) with concentrations of 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day. After 45 days (about one duration of spermatogenesis in rat), samples of blood were taken from the rats for testosterone, leuteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) assessments. Afterwards, the epididymis and the testis of each rat were dissected for analyzing sperm parameters and Leydig cells. The results demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in number of Leydig cells in experimental groups compared to control one. In addition, the data showed a reduction in testosterone and a rise in LH level which was more obvious in high doses (pnano-particles, in addition to interruption in functions of sex hormones, can diminish the number of Leydig cells and sperm parameter indices. It should be noted that the effects of nano-particles on reproductive indices are dose-dependent.

  12. ANTIGEN PROCESSING BY ENDOSOMAL PROTEASES DETERMINES WHICH SITES OF SPERM-WHALE MYOGLOBIN ARE EVENTUALLY RECOGNIZED BY T-CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANNOORT, JM; BOON, J; VANDERDRIFT, ACM; WAGENAAR, JPA; BOOTS, AMH; BOOG, CJP; Boots, Annemieke

    This study reports an identification of the major processing products of an exogenous protein antigen, viz. sperm-whale myoglobin, as obtained after cell-free processing with partially purified macrophage endosomes. It is demonstrated that such a system yields fragments that are indistinguishable by

  13. The nature of X-ray-induced mutations in mature sperm and spermatogonial cells of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eeken, J.C.J.; de Jong, A.W.M.; Loos, M.; Vreeken, C.; Romeyn, R.; Pastink, A.; Lohman, P.H.M. (J.A. Cohen Institute, Interuniversity Research Institute for Radiopathology and Radiation Protection, Leiden (Netherlands))

    1994-05-01

    Mutations at four X-linked visible loci (yellow, white, vermilion and forked) induced by X-irradiation of mature sperm and spermatogonial cells were analysed genetically and cytogenetically. In addition, a fraction of the intragenic vermilion mutations was analysed molecularly. Males of two wild-type strains (Amherst M56i and Berlin-K) were used. A total of 332,651 chromosomes of irradiated mature sperm and 311,567 of irradiated spermatogonial cells were scored. The ratio of F[sub 1] female sterile, F[sub 2] male lethal and F[sub 2] male viable mutations in mature sperm and spermatogonial cells is very similar. The cytogenetic analysis shows equal fractions of multilocus deletions and translocations among the mutations recovered from both stages of spermatogenesis. These data strongly suggest that the spectrum of X-ray mutations is similar in mature sperm and spermatogonial cells, including multilocus deletions and chromosome rearrangements. The molecular analysis of a number of intragenic vermilion mutations showed the presence of three small deletions (1-10 bp), one insertion of two nucleotides and seven single nucleotide changes.

  14. Sperm-cell ultrastructure of North American sturgeons. IV. The pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus Forbes and Richardson, 1905)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLauro, M.N.; Walsh, R.A.; Peiffer, M.; Bennett, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    Sperm-cell morphology and ultrastructure in the pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) were examined using transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Metrics and structure were compared with similar metrics obtained from other published descriptions of sturgeon sperm cells. General morphology was found to be similar to that of sperm cells of the white (Acipenser transmontanus), lake (A. fulvescens), stellate (A. stellatus), Chinese (A. sinensis), Russian (A. gueldenstaedti colchicus), and shortnose (A. brevirostrum) sturgeons, which all shared a gradual tapering of the nuclear diameter from posterior to anterior, unlike that of the Atlantic sturgeon (A. oxyrhynchus). The sperm cell of the pallid sturgeon was similar in size to that of the Atlantic sturgeon, being only slightly larger. The sperm cell of the pallid sturgeon differed from those of other sturgeons chiefly in the acrosomal region, where the posterolateral projections (PLP) have the shape of an acute triangle and are arranged in a spiral about the longitudinal axis of the cell. The PLP were longer than those of other sturgeons, being twice the length of those of the Atlantic sturgeon and 58% longer than those of the lake sturgeon. Also, in cross section the acrosome had the shape of a hollow cone rather than the cap of an oak tree acorn, as was found in ultrastructural studies of other sturgeons. In addition, we were able to confirm that the structural arrangement of the distal centriole of the midpiece is identical with that of the proximal centriole: nine sets of microtubular triplets around the periphery of the centriole. This information is of potential use to fishery biologists, forensic biologists, zoologists, reproductive physiologists, taxonomists, evolutionary biologists, and aquaculturists.

  15. Tenacity of Exogenous Human Papillomavirus DNA in Sperm Washing

    OpenAIRE

    Brossfield, Jeralyn E.; Philip J. Chan; Patton, William C.; King, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:Sperm cells have been shown to take up exogenous DNA readily. The hypothesis was that sperm washing would remove exogenous viral DNA infecting sperm cells. The objective was to compare three types of sperm washing procedures for their capacity to remove exogenous human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from infected sperm.

  16. Changes in Subcellular Distribution of n-Octanoyl or n-Decanoyl Ghrelin in Ghrelin-Producing Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nishi, Yoshihiro; Mifune, Hiroharu; Yabuki, Akira; Tajiri, Yuji; Hirata, Rumiko; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kangawa, Kenji; Kojima, Masayasu

    2013-01-01

    Background: The enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) catalyzes the acylation of ghrelin. The molecular form of GOAT, together with its reaction in vitro, has been reported previously. However, the sub-cellular processes governing the acylation of ghrelin remain to be elucidated.Methods: Double immunoelectron microscopy was used to examine changes in the relative proportions of secretory granules containing n-octanoyl ghrelin (C8-ghrelin) or n-decanoyl ghrelin (C10-ghrelin) in ghrelin-pro...

  17. Reversible G Protein βγ9 Distribution-Based Assay Reveals Molecular Underpinnings in Subcellular, Single-Cell, and Multicellular GPCR and G Protein Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarath, Kanishka; Ratnayake, Kasun; Siripurapu, Praneeth; Payton, John L; Karunarathne, Ajith

    2016-12-06

    Current assays to measure the activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and G proteins are time-consuming, indirect, and expensive. Therefore, an efficient method which directly measures the ability of a ligand to govern GPCR-G protein interactions can help to understand the molecular underpinnings of the associated signaling. A live cell imaging-based approach is presented here to directly measure ligand-induced GPCR and G protein activity in real time. The number of active GPCRs governs G protein heterotrimer (αβγ) dissociation, thereby controlling the concentration of free βγ subunits. The described γ9 assay measures the GPCR activation-induced extent of the reversible βγ9 subunit exchange between the plasma membrane (PM) and internal membranes (IMs). Confocal microscopy-based γ9 assay quantitatively determines the concentration dependency of ligands on GPCR activation. Demonstrating the high-throughput screening (HTS) adaptability, the γ9 assay performed using an imaging plate reader measures the ligand-induced GPCR activation. This suggests that the γ9 assay can be employed to screen libraries of compounds for their ability to activate GPCRs. Together with subcellular optogenetics, the spatiotemporal sensitivity of the γ9 assay permits experimental determination of the limits of spatially restricted activation of GPCRs and G proteins in subcellular regions of single cells. This assay works effectively for GPCRs coupled to αi/o and αs heterotrimers, including light-sensitive GPCRs. In addition, computational modeling of experimental data from the assay is used to decipher intricate molecular details of the GPCR-G protein activation process. Overall, the γ9 assay provides a robust strategy for quantitative as well as qualitative determination of GPCR and G protein function on a single-cell, multicell, and subcellular level. This assay not only provides information about the inner workings of the signaling pathway, but it also strengthens

  18. Holographic imaging of unlabelled sperm cells for semen analysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Memmolo, Pasquale; Ferraro, Pietro; Coppola, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Male reproductive health in both humans and animals is an important research field in biological study. In order to characterize the morphology, the motility and the concentration of the sperm cells, which are the most important parameters to feature them, digital holography demonstrated to be an attractive technique. Indeed, it is a label-free, non-invasive and high-resolution method that enables the characterization of live specimen. The review is intended both for summarizing the state-of-art on the semen analysis and recent achievement obtained by means of digital holography and for exploring new possible applications of digital holography in this field. Quantitative phase maps of living swimming spermatozoa. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The spectrum of DNA damage in human sperm assessed by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) and its relationship to fertilization and embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, I D; Ilott, S; Dixon, L; Brison, D R

    2002-04-01

    The integrity of sperm DNA is important for the success of natural or assisted fertilization, as well as normal development of the embryo, fetus and child. ICSI, by bypassing sperm selection mechanisms, increases the risk of transmitting damaged DNA and the significance of this requires investigation. DNA damage in sperm from an unselected group of 60 men undergoing IVF treatment was measured by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) and correlated with semen and treatment cycle parameters. Wide spectra of sperm DNA damage were found both within and between men but no specific subgroups were identified. Semen and treatment cycle parameters were not different in men grouped according to high or low sperm DNA damage. However, regression analysis showed that DNA damage was positively associated with age (29-44 years), abnormal sperm and motility and negatively associated with sperm concentration. In ICSI cycles DNA damage was positively associated with impairment of post-fertilization embryo cleavage. This study contributes to the evidence of DNA damage within sperm. High loads of DNA damage measured by the Comet assay were predictive of failure of embryo development after ICSI. As it is likely that sperm with DNA damage contributed to successful fertilization and in-vitro development, potential adverse effects remain to be clarified.

  20. Optogenetic Tools for Subcellular Applications in Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Benjamin R; Schneider-Warme, Franziska; Schmitz, Dietmar; Hegemann, Peter

    2017-11-01

    The ability to study cellular physiology using photosensitive, genetically encoded molecules has profoundly transformed neuroscience. The modern optogenetic toolbox includes fluorescent sensors to visualize signaling events in living cells and optogenetic actuators enabling manipulation of numerous cellular activities. Most optogenetic tools are not targeted to specific subcellular compartments but are localized with limited discrimination throughout the cell. Therefore, optogenetic activation often does not reflect context-dependent effects of highly localized intracellular signaling events. Subcellular targeting is required to achieve more specific optogenetic readouts and photomanipulation. Here we first provide a detailed overview of the available optogenetic tools with a focus on optogenetic actuators. Second, we review established strategies for targeting these tools to specific subcellular compartments. Finally, we discuss useful tools and targeting strategies that are currently missing from the optogenetics repertoire and provide suggestions for novel subcellular optogenetic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrastructure and lipid composition of detergent-resistant membranes derived from mammalian sperm and two types of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Renske A; Brouwers, Jos F; Ultee, Anton; Helms, J Bernd; Gadella, Bart M

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are micro-domains of ordered lipids (Lo phase) in biological membranes. The Lo phase of cellular membranes can be isolated from disordered lipids (Ld phase) after treatment with 1 % Triton  X-100 at 4 °C in which the Lo phase forms the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) fraction. The lipid composition of DRM derived from Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, McArdle cells and porcine sperm is compared with that of the whole cell. Remarkably, the unsaturation and chain length degree of aliphatic chains attached to phospholipids is virtually the same between DRM and whole cells. Cholesterol and sphingomyelin were enriched in DRMs but to a cell-specific molar ratio. Sulfatides (sphingolipids from MDCK cells) were enriched in the DRM while a seminolipid (an alkylacylglycerolipid from sperm) was depleted from the DRM. Treatment with lipid rafts in biological membranes are more fluid and dynamic than previously anticipated. Using negative staining, ultrastructural features of DRM were monitored and in all three cell types the DRMs appeared as multi-lamellar vesicular structures with a similar morphology. The detergent resistance is a result of protein-cholesterol and sphingolipid interactions allowing a relatively passive attraction of phospholipids to maintain the Lo phase. For this special issue, the relevance of our findings is discussed in a sperm physiological context.

  2. Assessment of viability of sperm cells of Litopenaeus vannamei on cryopreservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Fornari Uberti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at assessing the cryopreservation potential of Litopenaeus vannamei sperm cells, 74 spermatophores were manually extracted from the sexually mature individuals. After the toxicity test to define the cryoprotectant concentration, suspensions of spermatic cells were cryopreserved in the groups in freezing solutions comprising different cryoprotectants such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and ethylene glycol (EG at 10% concentration. Each treatment was divided in subgroups for storage in liquid nitrogen during 0, 30, 60 and 90 days, in triplicate. After thawing at 25ºC for 40 seconds, cell viability in the suspensions was analyzed under the microscope in eosin-nigrosin stain and flow cytometry. There were no significant differences between the cryoprotectants used. For all the treatments, lower and higher mortalities occurred in the 0 and 90 days, respectively. By applying the eosin-nigrosin technique, lower and higher mortalities were 23.17 and 82.11% for DMSO and 29.94 and 83.72% for EG, while the flow cytometry registered mortalities of 2.42 and 55.13% for DMSO and 0.90 and 55.56% for EG. The Spearman correlation coefficient indicated a positive correlation (R=0.91 between the two techniques used. It was concluded that there was a decrease in cell viability within a longer cryopreservation time.

  3. Sperm associated antigen 9 plays an important role in bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Kanojia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Majority of bladder cancer deaths are caused due to transitional cell carcinoma (TCC which is the most prevalent and chemoresistant malignancy of urinary bladder. Therefore, we analyzed the role of Sperm associated antigen 9 (SPAG9 in bladder TCC. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We examined SPAG9 expression and humoral response in 125 bladder TCC patients. Four bladder cancer cell lines were assessed for SPAG9 expression. In addition, we investigated the effect of SPAG9 ablation on cellular proliferation, cell cycle, migration and invasion in UM-UC-3 bladder cancer cells by employing gene silencing approach. Our SPAG9 gene and protein expression analysis revealed SPAG9 expression in 81% of bladder TCC tissue specimens. High SPAG9 expression (>60% SPAG9 positive cells was found to be significantly associated with superficial non-muscle invasive stage (P = 0.042 and low grade tumors (P = 0.002 suggesting SPAG9 putative role in early spread and tumorigenesis. Humoral response against SPAG9 was observed in 95% of patients found positive for SPAG9 expression. All four bladder cancer cell lines revealed SPAG9 expression. In addition, SPAG9 gene silencing in UM-UC-3 cells resulted in induction of G0-G1 arrest characterized by up-regulation of p16 and p21 and consequent down-regulation of cyclin E, cyclin D and cyclin B, CDK4 and CDK1. Further, SPAG9 gene silencing also resulted in reduction in cellular growth, and migration and invasion ability of cancer cells in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our data in clinical specimens indicated that SPAG9 is potential biomarker and therapeutic target for bladder TCC.

  4. Subcellular compartmentalization of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium with catecholamines in adrenal medullary chromaffin vesicles may explain the lack of toxicity to adrenal chromaffin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhard, J.F. Jr.; Diliberto, E.J. Jr.; Viveros, O.H.; Daniels, A.J.

    1987-11-01

    Cultures of bovine adrenomedullary chromaffin cells accumulated 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP/sup +/) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by a process that was prevented by desmethylimipramine. The subcellular localization of the incorporated (methyl-/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ was examined by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient fractionation and was found to be predominantly colocalized with catecholamines in chromaffin vesicles, and negligible amounts were detected within the mitochondrial fraction. When chromaffin cell membranes were made permeable with the detergent digitonin the absence of calcium, there was no increase in the release of (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/, indicating that there is negligible accumulation of the neurotoxin in the cytosol. Simultaneous exposure to digitonin and calcium induced cosecretion of MPP/sup +/ and catecholamines. Stimulation of the cells with nicotine released both catecholamines and MPP/sup +/ at identical rates and percentages of cellular content in a calcium-dependent manner. Last, when cells were incubated with MPP/sup +/ in the presence of tetrabenazine (an inhibitor of vesicular uptake), the chromaffin cell toxicity of MPP/sup +/ was potentiated. The authors submit that the ability of the chromaffin cells to take up and store MPP/sup +/ in the chromaffin vesicle prevents the toxin's interaction with other structures and, thus, prevents cell damage. As an extension of this hypothesis, the relative resistance of some brain monoaminergic neurons to the toxic actions of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine may result from the subcellular sequestration of MPP/sup +/ in the storage vesicle.

  5. A novel BAT3 sequence generated by alternative RNA splicing of exon 11B displays cell type-specific expression and impacts on subcellular localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Kämper

    Full Text Available The human lymphocyte antigen (HLA encoded BAT3/BAG6 recently attracted interest as a regulator of protein targeting and degradation, a function that could be exerted in the cytosol and in the nucleus. The BAT3 gene was described to consist of 25 exons. Diversity of transcripts can be generated by alternative RNA splicing, which may control subcellular distribution of BAT3.By cDNA sequencing we identified a novel alternatively spliced sequence of the BAT3 gene located between exons 11 and 12, which was designated as exon 11B. Using PCR and colony hybridization we identified six cDNA variants, which were produced by RNA splicing of BAT3 exons 5, 11B and 24. In four examined cell types the content of BAT3 splice variants was examined. Most of the cDNA clones from monocyte-derived dendritic cells contain exon 11B, whereas this sequence was almost absent in the B lymphoma Raji. Exon 5 was detected in most and exon 24 in approximately half of the cDNA clones. The subcellular distribution of endogenous BAT3 largely correlates with a cell type specific splicing pattern. In cells transfected with BAT3 variants, full-length and Δ24 BAT3 displayed nearly exclusive nuclear staining, whereas variants deleted of exon 11B showed substantial cytosolic expression. We show here that BAT3 is mainly expressed in the cytosol of Raji cells, while other cell types displayed both cytosolic and nuclear staining. Export of BAT3 from the nucleus to the cytosol is inhibited by treatment with leptomycin B, indicating that the Crm1 pathway is involved. Nuclear expression of BAT3 containing exon 11B suggests that this sequence plays a role for nuclear retention of the protein.Cell type-specific subcellular expression of BAT3 suggests distinct functions in the cytosol and in the nucleus. Differential expression of BAT3 variants may reconcile the multiple roles described for BAT3.

  6. Podophyllotoxin Extracted from Juniperus sabina Fruit Inhibits Rat Sperm Maturation and Fertility by Promoting Epididymal Epithelial Cell Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuwu Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the antifertility effect of Juniperus sabina fruit on male rats and its possible mechanism, and hence it might be developed as a potential nonhormonal male contraceptive. Male rats were intragastrically fed for consecutive 8-week and 4-week recovery with the fruit of J. Sabina, and sperm maturation, serum testosterone level, and histopathology were analyzed. Epididymal epithelial cell culture was prepared for detection of podophyllotoxin activities. Furthermore, cell proliferation, transmission electron microscopy, Annexin V/Propidium iodide, TUNEL, RT-PCR, ELISA, and western blotting were examined. The results showed that rat sperm motility and fertility were remarkably declined after feeding the fruit. Moreover, the fruit targeted the epididymis rather than the testis. After 4-week recovery, more than half of the male rats resumed normal fertility. It was found that podophyllotoxin significantly inhibited epididymal epithelial cell proliferation, promoted cell apoptosis, and increased the mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α and the expression levels of cytochrome c, caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3. Our findings suggest that the fruit of J. sabina could inhibit male rat sperm maturation and fertility. The potential mechanism might be related to podophyllotoxin, inducing epididymal epithelial cell apoptosis through TNF-α and caspase signaling pathway.

  7. DNA integrity in sexed bull sperm assessed by neutral Comet assay and sperm chromatin structure assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boe-Hansen, Gry B; Morris, Ian D; Ersbøll, Annette K; Greve, Torben; Christensen, Preben

    2005-04-01

    During the production of sex-sorted spermatozoa from bull semen, the cells are exposed to a number of potential hazards including: dilution, centrifugation, incubation, exposure to DNA stains and laser light. These factors may affect the survival capacity and fertilization potential of the sperm. The objective of this study was to determine whether sex-sorted bull spermatozoa have more DNA damage than sperm from conventional processed bull semen. Two methods were used to determine DNA integrity: the neutral Comet assay (NCA) and the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The NCA showed that the conventional samples had a higher tail moment (TM) (P sperm and that cell sorting by flow cytometry improves the integrity of the sperm cell population. Additionally the results from the SCSA indicated that the sex-sorted sperm had less homogenous sperm chromatin. In the future assessment of sperm DNA integrity may be used to select bulls for sperm sex sorting and optimizing sperm sex sorting procedures.

  8. Sperm Cell Population Dynamics in Ram Semen during the Cryopreservation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón, Manuel; Pérez-Guzmán, M. Dolores; Jiménez-Rabadán, Pilar; Esteso, Milagros C.; García-Álvarez, Olga; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; Anel-López, Luis; Soler, Ana J.; Fernández-Santos, M. Rocío; Garde, J. Julián

    2013-01-01

    Background Sperm cryopreservation has become an indispensable tool in biology. Initially, studies were aimed towards the development of efficient freezing protocols in different species that would allow for an efficient storage of semen samples for long periods of time, ensuring its viability. Nowadays, it is widely known that an important individual component exists in the cryoresistance of semen, and efforts are aimed at identifying those sperm characteristics that may allow us to predict this cryoresistance. This knowledge would lead, ultimately, to the design of optimized freezing protocols for the sperm characteristics of each male. Methodology/Principal Findings We have evaluated the changes that occur in the sperm head dimensions throughout the cryopreservation process. We have found three different patterns of response, each of one related to a different sperm quality at thawing. We have been able to characterize males based on these patterns. For each male, its pattern remained constant among different ejaculates. This latter would imply that males always respond in the same way to freezing, giving even more importance to this sperm feature. Conclusions/Significance Changes in the sperm head during cryopreservation process have resulted useful to identify the ability of semen of males for freezing. We suggest that analyses of these response patterns would represent an important tool to characterize the cryoresistance of males when implemented within breeding programs. We also propose follow-up experiments to examine the outcomes of the use of different freezing protocols depending on the pattern of response of males. PMID:23544054

  9. Sperm cell population dynamics in ram semen during the cryopreservation process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ramón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sperm cryopreservation has become an indispensable tool in biology. Initially, studies were aimed towards the development of efficient freezing protocols in different species that would allow for an efficient storage of semen samples for long periods of time, ensuring its viability. Nowadays, it is widely known that an important individual component exists in the cryoresistance of semen, and efforts are aimed at identifying those sperm characteristics that may allow us to predict this cryoresistance. This knowledge would lead, ultimately, to the design of optimized freezing protocols for the sperm characteristics of each male. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have evaluated the changes that occur in the sperm head dimensions throughout the cryopreservation process. We have found three different patterns of response, each of one related to a different sperm quality at thawing. We have been able to characterize males based on these patterns. For each male, its pattern remained constant among different ejaculates. This latter would imply that males always respond in the same way to freezing, giving even more importance to this sperm feature. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Changes in the sperm head during cryopreservation process have resulted useful to identify the ability of semen of males for freezing. We suggest that analyses of these response patterns would represent an important tool to characterize the cryoresistance of males when implemented within breeding programs. We also propose follow-up experiments to examine the outcomes of the use of different freezing protocols depending on the pattern of response of males.

  10. Predictive Factors of Successful Microdissection Testicular Sperm Extraction in Patients with Presumed Sertoli Cell-Only Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tahereh Modarresi; Hani Hosseinifar; Ali Daliri Hampa; Mohammad Chehrazi; Jalil Hosseini; Faramarz Farrahi; Farid Dadkhah; Marjan Sabbaghian; Mohammad Ali Sadighi Gilani

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate predictive factors of successful microdissection-testicular sperm extraction (MD-TESE) in patients with presumed Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective analysis, 874 men with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA), among whom 148 individuals with diagnosis of SCOS in prior biopsy, underwent MD-TESE at Department of Andrology, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. The predictive values of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH),...

  11. Autophagosome Proteins LC3A, LC3B and LC3C Have Distinct Subcellular Distribution Kinetics and Expression in Cancer Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Koukourakis

    Full Text Available LC3s (MAP1-LC3A, B and C are structural proteins of autophagosomal membranes, widely used as biomarkers of autophagy. Whether these three LC3 proteins have a similar biological role in autophagy remains obscure. We examine in parallel the subcellular expression patterns of the three LC3 proteins in a panel of human cancer cell lines, as well as in normal MRC5 fibroblasts and HUVEC, using confocal microscopy and western blot analysis of cell fractions. In the cytoplasm, there was a minimal co-localization between LC3A, B and C staining, suggesting that the relevant autophagosomes are formed by only one out of the three LC3 proteins. LC3A showed a perinuclear and nuclear localization, while LC3B was equally distributed throughout the cytoplasm and localized in the nucleolar regions. LC3C was located in the cytoplasm and strongly in the nuclei (excluding nucleoli, where it extensively co-localized with the LC3A and the Beclin-1 autophagy initiating protein. Beclin 1 is known to contain a nuclear trafficking signal. Blocking nuclear export function by Leptomycin B resulted in nuclear accumulation of all LC3 and Beclin-1 proteins, while Ivermectin that blocks nuclear import showed reduction of accumulation, but not in all cell lines. Since endogenous LC3 proteins are used as major markers of autophagy in clinical studies and cell lines, it is essential to check the specificity of the antibodies used, as the kinetics of these molecules are not identical and may have distinct biological roles. The distinct subcellular expression patterns of LC3s provide a basis for further studies.

  12. Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble hexavalent chromium in human and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Chen, Tânia; LaCerte, Carolyne; Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie; Martino, Julieta; Wise, John Pierce; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2012-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a global marine pollutant, present in marine mammal tissues. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known human carcinogen. In this study, we compare the cytotoxic and clastogenic effects of Cr(VI) in human (Homo sapiens) and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that increasing concentrations of both particulate and soluble Cr(VI) induce increasing amounts of cytotoxicity and clastogenicity in human and sperm whale skin cells. Furthermore, the data show that sperm whale cells are resistant to these effects exhibiting less cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than the human cells. Differences in Cr uptake accounted for some but not all of the differences in particulate and soluble Cr(VI) genotoxicity, although it did explain the differences in particulate Cr(VI) cytotoxicity. Altogether, the data indicate that Cr(VI) is a genotoxic threat to whales, but also suggest that whales have evolved cellular mechanisms to protect them against the genotoxicity of environmental agents such as Cr(VI). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. DGCR8 Localizes to the Nucleus as well as Cytoplasmic Structures in Mammalian Spermatogenic Cells and Epididymal Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akane Nakano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The localization of DGCR8 in spermatogenic cells and sperm from rat and mouse was studied by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Spermatogenic cells from these species yielded similar DGCR8 localization pattern. Immunofluorescence microscopy results showed that DGCR8 localized to both the cytoplasm and nucleus. In the cytoplasm, diffuse cytosolic and discrete granular staining was observed. Dual staining showed that DGCR8 colocalized to the granules with MAEL (a nuage marker. In the nucleus of spermatocytes, both the nucleoli and nucleoplasm were stained, whereas in the nucleus of early spermatids small spots were stained. In late spermatids, DGCR8 localized to the tip of their head and to small granules (neck granules of the neck cytoplasm. The neck granules were also observed in the neck of epididymal sperm. Immunoelectron microscopy results showed that DGCR8 localized to nuage structures. Moreover, DGCR8 localized to nonnuage structures in late spermatids. DGCR8 also localized to the nucleolus and euchromatin in spermatocytes and round spermatids and to small granules in the nucleus of late spermatids. The results suggest that in spermatogenic cells DGCR8 localizes not only to the nuclei but also to the cytoplasmic structures such as nuage and nonnuage structures. Furthermore, DGCR8 seems to be imported into the egg with neck granules in sperm during fertilization.

  14. Sperm integrity pre- and post-chemotherapy in men with testicular germ cell cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spermon, J.R.; Ramos, L.; Wetzels, A.M.M.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Braat, D.D.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While (partial) recovery of spermatogenesis, observed by means of standard semen analysis, has been seen in testicular cancer patients after chemotherapy with cisplatin, sperm genomic integrity and its implication for the patient's fertility are poorly understood. METHODS: Semen and

  15. Combined thermotherapy and cryotherapy for efficient virus eradication: relation of virus distribution, subcellular changes, cell survival and viral RNA degradation in shoot tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiaochun; Cuellar, Wilmer J; Rajamäki, Minna-Liisa; Hirata, Yukimasa; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2008-03-01

    Accumulation of viruses in vegetatively propagated plants causes heavy yield losses. Therefore, supply of virus-free planting materials is pivotal to sustainable crop production. In previous studies, Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) was difficult to eradicate from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) using the conventional means of meristem tip culture. As shown in the present study, it was probably because this pollen-transmitted virus efficiently invades leaf primordia and all meristematic tissues except the least differentiated cells of the apical dome. Subjecting plants to thermotherapy prior to meristem tip culture heavily reduced viral RNA2, RNA3 and the coat protein in the shoot tips, but no virus-free plants were obtained. Therefore, a novel method including thermotherapy followed by cryotherapy was developed for efficient virus eradication. Heat treatment caused subcellular alterations such as enlargement of vacuoles in the more developed, virus-infected cells, which were largely eliminated following subsequent cryotherapy. Using this protocol, 20-36% of the treated shoot tips survived, 30-40% regenerated and up to 35% of the regenerated plants were virus-free, as tested by ELISA and reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification. Novel cellular and molecular insights into RBDV-host interactions and the factors influencing virus eradication were obtained, including invasion of shoot tips and meristematic tissues by RBDV, enhanced viral RNA degradation and increased sensitivity to freezing caused by thermotherapy, and subcellular changes and subsequent death of cells caused by cryotherapy. This novel procedure should be helpful with many virus-host combinations in which virus eradication by conventional means has proven difficult.

  16. Chemically dispersed oil is cytotoxic and genotoxic to sperm whale skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Catherine F; Wise, James T F; Wise, Sandra S; Wise, John Pierce

    2017-11-08

    Two major oil crises in United States history, the 1989 Exxon-Valdez oil spill in Alaska and the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico, drew attention to the need for toxicological experiments on oil and chemically dispersed oil. We are still learning the effects these spills had on wildlife. However, little data is known about the toxicity of these substances in marine mammals. The objective of this study is to determine the toxicity of Alaskan oil, as well as chemically dispersed oil. Oil experiments were performed using the water accommodated fraction of Alaskan oil (WAF) and the chemically enhanced water accommodated fraction of Alaskan oil (CEWAF). The Alaskan WAF is not cytotoxic to sperm whale skin cells though it did induce chromosome damage; S9-mediated metabolism did not affect the cytotoxicity of WAF but did increase the levels of chromosome damage. Alaskan CEWAF is more cytotoxic and genotoxic than the WAF; S9 mediated metabolism increased both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of CEWAF. Analysis of the PAH content of Alaskan WAF and CEWAF revealed a forty-fold increase in the total levels of PAHs in CEWAF compared to WAF. These findings show that chemically dispersed oil leads to higher levels of PAH exposure which are more toxic and likely to lead to longer and more persistent health effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of the mechanisms by which the molecular chaperone HSPA2 regulates the expression of sperm surface receptors involved in human sperm-oocyte recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redgrove, Kate A; Anderson, Amanda L; McLaughlin, Eileen A; O'Bryan, Moira K; Aitken, R John; Nixon, Brett

    2013-03-01

    A unique characteristic of mammalian spermatozoa is that, upon ejaculation, they are unable to recognize and bind to an ovulated oocyte. These functional attributes are only realized following the cells' ascent of the female reproductive tract whereupon they undergo a myriad of biochemical and biophysical changes collectively referred to as 'capacitation'. We have previously shown that this functional transformation is, in part, engineered by the modification of the sperm surface architecture leading to the assembly and/or presentation of multimeric sperm-oocyte receptor complexes. In this study, we have extended our findings through the characterization of one such complex containing arylsulfatase A (ARSA), sperm adhesion molecule 1 (SPAM1) and the molecular chaperone, heat shock 70kDa protein 2 (HSPA2). Through the application of flow cytometry we revealed that this complex undergoes a capacitation-associated translocation to facilitate the repositioning of ARSA to the apical region of the human sperm head, a location compatible with a role in the mediation of sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) interactions. Conversely, SPAM1 appears to reorient away from the sperm surface, possibly reflecting its primary role in cumulus matrix dispersal preceding sperm-ZP recognition. The dramatic relocation of the complex was completely abolished by incubation of capacitating spermatozoa in exogenous cholesterol or broad spectrum protein kinase A (PKA) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors suggesting that it may be driven by alterations in membrane fluidity characteristics and concurrently by the activation of a capacitation-associated signal transduction pathway. Collectively these data afford novel insights into the sub-cellular localization and potential functions of multimeric protein complexes in human spermatozoa.

  18. Nuclear reconstitution of plant (Orychophragmus violaceus) demembranated sperm in cell-free extracts from animal (Xenopus laevis) eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, P; Ren, M; Zhai, Z H

    2001-11-01

    Cell-free extracts from animal Xenopus laevis egg could induce chromatin decondensation and pronuclear formation from demembranated plant (Orychophragmus violaceus) sperm. When incubated with Xenopus egg extracts, the demembranated sperm began to swell and then gradually decondensed. The assembly of the nuclear envelope in the reconstituted nuclei was visualized by means of electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Membrane vesicles fused to form the double envelope around the periphery of the decondensed chromatin. The morphology of the newly formed nuclei, with a double membrane, was similar to that of nuclei after fertilization. The electron micrograph of the whole-mount prepared nuclear matrix--lamina showed the reconstituted nucleus to be filled with a dense network. (C)2001 Elsevier Science (USA).

  19. Mitochondria functionality and sperm quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Alexandra; Lourenço, Bárbara; Marques, Mónica; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2013-01-01

    Although mitochondria are best known for being the eukaryotic cell powerhouses, these organelles participate in various cellular functions besides ATP production, such as calcium homoeostasis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and steroid hormone biosynthesis. The aim of this review was to discuss the putative roles of mitochondria in mammalian sperm function and how they may relate to sperm quality and fertilisation ability, particularly in humans. Although paternal mitochondria are degraded inside the zygote, sperm mitochondrial functionality seems to be critical for fertilisation. Indeed, changes in mitochondrial integrity/functionality, namely defects in mitochondrial ultrastructure or in the mitochondrial genome, transcriptome or proteome, as well as low mitochondrial membrane potential or altered oxygen consumption, have been correlated with loss of sperm function (particularly with decreased motility). Results from genetically engineered mouse models also confirmed this trend. On the other hand, increasing evidence suggests that mitochondria derived ATP is not crucial for sperm motility and that glycolysis may be the main ATP supplier for this particular aspect of sperm function. However, there are contradictory data in the literature regarding sperm bioenergetics. The relevance of sperm mitochondria may thus be associated with their role in other physiological features, particularly with the production of ROS, which in controlled levels are needed for proper sperm function. Sperm mitochondria may also serve as intracellular Ca²⁺ stores, although their role in signalling is still unclear.

  20. Studies on the mechanism of capacitation: albumin-mediated changes in plasma membrane lipids during in vitro incubation of rat sperm cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, B K; R. Byrne; Bedigian, K

    1980-01-01

    Plasma membrane isolated from rat sperm cells after incubation in vitro had a significantly lower cholesterol/phospholipid mole ratio when the medium contained serum albumin. Transfer of albumin-bound phospholipids to the membrane can largely account for this effect. The result is broadly consistent with a previously proposed model for albumin-induced destabilization of sperm membrane (capacitation) and its reversal by seminal plasma membrane vesicles. Albumin also decreased sialic acid and, ...

  1. Current status and potential of morphometric sperm analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; García-Álvarez, Olga; Ramón, Manuel; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Fernández-Santos, M. Rocío; Soler, Ana J.; Garde, José Julián

    2016-01-01

    The spermatozoon is the most diverse cell type known and this diversity is considered to reflect differences in sperm function. How the diversity in sperm morphology arose during speciation and what role the different specializations play in sperm function, however, remain incompletely characterized. This work reviews the hypotheses proposed to explain sperm morphological evolution, with a focus on some aspects of sperm morphometric evaluation; the ability of morphometrics to predict sperm cr...

  2. The presence of centrioles and centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells suggests human parthenotes developed in vitro can differentiate into mature cells without a sperm centriole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo Yon, E-mail: boyonlee@gmail.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Sang Woo; Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Seung Bo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sperm centriole is the progenitor of centrosomes in all somatic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Centrioles and centrosomes exist in parthenogenetic ovarian teratoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without a sperm centriole, parthenogenetic oocytes produce centrioles and centrosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parthenogenetic human oocytes can develop and differentiate into mature cells. -- Abstract: In most animals, somatic cell centrosomes are inherited from the centriole of the fertilizing spermatozoa. The oocyte centriole degenerates during oogenesis, and completely disappears in metaphase II. Therefore, the embryos generated by in vitro parthenogenesis are supposed to develop without any centrioles. Exceptional acentriolar and/or acentrosomal developments are possible in mice and in some experimental cells; however, in most animals, the full developmental potential of parthenogenetic cells in vitro and the fate of their centrioles/centrosomes are not clearly understood. To predict the future of in vitro human parthenogenesis, we explored the centrioles/centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells by immunofluorescent staining and transmission electron microscopy. We confirmed the presence of centrioles and centrosomes in these well-known parthenogenetic ovarian tumor cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate that, even without a sperm centriole, parthenotes that develop from activated oocytes can produce their own centrioles/centrosomes, and can even develop into the well-differentiated mature tissue.

  3. Date Seeds Steeping (Phoenix Dactylifera Strengthen Sperm Cells Membrane and Reduce Malondialdehyde Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saryono Saryono

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infertility in men is becoming more frequent and are usually caused by high levels of free radicals as a result of diet, smoking or pollution. Oxidative stress can be reduced by antioxidants, but a source of exogenous antioxidants are generally expensive. Date seed known contain a lot of antioxidants. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of date seed steeping against MDA levels and sperm counts in rats model induced of monosodium glutamate (MSG. Method: This study was a pure experimental method using a post-test only with control group design. The treatments were grouped into 4 groups. Deglet Noor of date seed were used, washed and dried before roasting and smoothed. Sperm count is calculated in accordance research of Rahmanisa and Maisuri, (2013 and MDA examination with the C-18 method of TBARS (Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA and continued with post hoc test. Results: There were differences in MDA levels and sperm counts between various groups. Giving date seed steeping 10.5 mg/gBW can decrease malondialdehyde levels in experimental animals after MSG induced significantly. The number of sperm increased significantly after the experimental animals were given a dose of date seed steeping 10.5 mg / g. Discussion: Keywords: free radicals, date seeds, malondialdehyde, sperm count, infertility.

  4. Itm2a expression in the developing mouse first lower molar, and the subcellular localization of Itm2a in mouse dental epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Kihara

    Full Text Available Itm2a is a type II transmembrane protein with a BRICHOS domain. We investigated the temporospatial mRNA and protein expression patterns of Itm2a in the developing lower first molar, and examined the subcellular localization of Itm2a in murine dental epithelial (mDE6 cells. From the initiation to the bud stage, the in situ and protein signals of Itm2a were not detected in either the dental epithelial or mesenchymal cells surrounding the tooth bud. However, at the bell stage, these signals of Itm2a were primarily observed in the inner enamel epithelium of the enamel organ. After the initiation of the matrix formation, strong signals were detected in ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Itm2a showed a punctate pattern in the cytoplasm of the mDE6 cells. The perinuclear-localized Itm2a displayed a frequent overlap with the Golgi apparatus marker, GM130. A tiny amount of Itm2a was colocalized with lysosomes and endoplasmic reticulum. Minimal or no overlap between the Itm2a-EGFP signals with the other organelle markers for endoplasmic reticulum, lysosome and mitochondria used in this study noted in the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that Itm2a may play a role in cell differentiation during odontogenesis, rather than during the initiation of tooth germ formation, and may be related to the targeting of proteins associated with enamel and dentin matrices in the secretory pathway.

  5. Itm2a Expression in the Developing Mouse First Lower Molar, and the Subcellular Localization of Itm2a in Mouse Dental Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Makiko; Kiyoshima, Tamotsu; Nagata, Kengo; Wada, Hiroko; Fujiwara, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Kana; Someya, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Ichiro; Sakai, Hidetaka

    2014-01-01

    Itm2a is a type II transmembrane protein with a BRICHOS domain. We investigated the temporospatial mRNA and protein expression patterns of Itm2a in the developing lower first molar, and examined the subcellular localization of Itm2a in murine dental epithelial (mDE6) cells. From the initiation to the bud stage, the in situ and protein signals of Itm2a were not detected in either the dental epithelial or mesenchymal cells surrounding the tooth bud. However, at the bell stage, these signals of Itm2a were primarily observed in the inner enamel epithelium of the enamel organ. After the initiation of the matrix formation, strong signals were detected in ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Itm2a showed a punctate pattern in the cytoplasm of the mDE6 cells. The perinuclear-localized Itm2a displayed a frequent overlap with the Golgi apparatus marker, GM130. A tiny amount of Itm2a was colocalized with lysosomes and endoplasmic reticulum. Minimal or no overlap between the Itm2a-EGFP signals with the other organelle markers for endoplasmic reticulum, lysosome and mitochondria used in this study noted in the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that Itm2a may play a role in cell differentiation during odontogenesis, rather than during the initiation of tooth germ formation, and may be related to the targeting of proteins associated with enamel and dentin matrices in the secretory pathway. PMID:25079563

  6. Domains involved in TAF15 subcellular localisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marko, Marija; Vlassis, Arsenios; Guialis, Apostolia

    2012-01-01

    to play important roles in the onset of specific tumours, certain forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). In this study we identified the domains of TAF15 responsible for its subcellular localisation in human (HeLa) cells and experimentally confirmed...

  7. Tris-egg yolk-glycerol (TEY) extender developed for freezing dog semen is a good option to cryopreserve bovine epididymal sperm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, G; Soares, L; Ferreira, P; Rocha, A

    2015-02-01

    Cryopreservation of epididymal spermatozoa is often performed after shipping the excised testis-epididymis complexes, under refrigeration, to a specialized laboratory. However, epididymal spermatozoa can be collected immediately after excision of the epididymis and sent extended and refrigerated to a laboratory for cryopreservation. In this experiment, we evaluated the effect of both methods of cold storage bovine epididymal spermatozoa as well as of two different extenders on spermatozoa characteristics after freeze-thawing. For that, spermatozoa collected from the caudae epididymis of 19 bulls were extended and cryopreserved in either AndroMed(®) or a Tris-egg yolk (TEY)-based extender. Cryopreservation of sperm cells was performed immediately after castration (Group A, n = 9) or after cold storage for 24 h diluted in the two extenders and (Group B, n = 9) and also after cold storage for 24 h within the whole epididymis (Group C, n = 10). Sperm subjective progressive motility (light microscopy), plasma membrane integrity (hypoosmotic swelling test) and sperm viability (eosin-nigrosin) were evaluated. In vitro fertilization and culture (IVF) was performed to assess the blastocyst rate. No differences (p > 0.05) were observed on post-thaw sperm parameters between samples from Group A, B and C. TEY extended samples presented a higher (p sperm, than those extended in AndroMed(®) . Blastocyst rate after IVF differed only (p epididymal sperm can be shipped chilled overnight either within the epididymal tail or after dilution without deleterious effect on post-thaw sperm quality. TEY extender was more suitable for cold storage and freezing bovine epididymal sperm, than the commercial extender AndroMed®. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Two birds, one stone: dual targeting of the cancer cell surface and subcellular mitochondria by the galectin-3-binding peptide G3-C12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Li, Lian; Li, Li-Jia; Yang, Qing-Qing; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; Huang, Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Active tumor-targeting approaches using specific ligands have drawn considerable attention over the years. However, a single ligand often fails to simultaneously target the cancer cell surface and subcellular organelles, which limits the maximum therapeutic efficacy of delivered drugs. We describe a polymeric delivery system modified with the G3-C12 peptide for sequential dual targeting. In this study, galectin-3-targeted G3-C12 peptide was conjugated onto the N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer for the delivery of D(KLAKLAK)2 (KLA) peptide. G3-C12-HPMA-KLA exhibited increased receptor-mediated internalization into galectin-3-overexpressing PC-3 cells. Furthermore, G3-C12 peptide also directed HPMA-KLA conjugates to mitochondria. This occurred because the apoptosis signal triggered the accumulation of galectin-3 in mitochondria, and the G3-C12 peptide that specifically bound to galectin-3 was trafficked along with its receptor intracellularly. As a result, G3-C12-HPMA-KLA disrupted the mitochondrial membrane, increased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced cytochrome c release, which ultimately resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity. An in vivo study revealed that the G3-C12 peptide significantly enhanced the tumor accumulation of the KLA conjugate. In addition, G3-C12-HPMA-KLA exhibited the best therapeutic efficacy and greatly improved the animal survival rate. Our work demonstrates that G3-C12 is a promising ligand with dual-targeting functionality.

  9. In vivo subcellular localization of Mal de Rio Cuarto virus (MRCV) non-structural proteins in insect cells reveals their putative functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroniche, Guillermo A.; Mongelli, Vanesa C.; Llauger, Gabriela; Alfonso, Victoria; Taboga, Oscar [Instituto de Biotecnologia, CICVyA, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria (IB-INTA), Las cabanas y Los Reseros s/n. Hurlingham Cp 1686, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Vas, Mariana del, E-mail: mdelvas@cnia.inta.gov.ar [Instituto de Biotecnologia, CICVyA, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria (IB-INTA), Las cabanas y Los Reseros s/n. Hurlingham Cp 1686, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-09-01

    The in vivo subcellular localization of Mal de Rio Cuarto virus (MRCV, Fijivirus, Reoviridae) non-structural proteins fused to GFP was analyzed by confocal microscopy. P5-1 showed a cytoplasmic vesicular-like distribution that was lost upon deleting its PDZ binding TKF motif, suggesting that P5-1 interacts with cellular PDZ proteins. P5-2 located at the nucleus and its nuclear import was affected by the deletion of its basic C-termini. P7-1 and P7-2 also entered the nucleus and therefore, along with P5-2, could function as regulators of host gene expression. P6 located in the cytoplasm and in perinuclear cloud-like inclusions, was driven to P9-1 viroplasm-like structures and co-localized with P7-2, P10 and {alpha}-tubulin, suggesting its involvement in viroplasm formation and viral intracellular movement. Finally, P9-2 was N-glycosylated and located at the plasma membrane in association with filopodia-like protrusions containing actin, suggesting a possible role in virus cell-to-cell movement and spread.

  10. Current status and potential of morphometric sperm analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Maroto-Morales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The spermatozoon is the most diverse cell type known and this diversity is considered to reflect differences in sperm function. How the diversity in sperm morphology arose during speciation and what role the different specializations play in sperm function, however, remain incompletely characterized. This work reviews the hypotheses proposed to explain sperm morphological evolution, with a focus on some aspects of sperm morphometric evaluation; the ability of morphometrics to predict sperm cryoresistance and male fertility is also discussed. For this, the evaluation of patterns of change of sperm head morphometry throughout a process, instead of the study of the morphometric characteristics of the sperm head at different stages, allows a better identification of the males with different sperm cryoconservation ability. These new approaches, together with more studies employing a greater number of individuals, are needed to obtain novel results concerning the role of sperm morphometry on sperm function. Future studies should aim at understanding the causes of sperm design diversity and the mechanisms that generate them, giving increased attention to other sperm structures besides the sperm head. The implementation of scientific and technological advances could benefit the simultaneous examination of sperm phenotype and sperm function, demonstrating that sperm morphometry could be a useful tool for sperm assessment.

  11. Current status and potential of morphometric sperm analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; García-Álvarez, Olga; Ramón, Manuel; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Fernández-Santos, M Rocío; Soler, A Josefa; Garde, José Julián

    2016-01-01

    The spermatozoon is the most diverse cell type known and this diversity is considered to reflect differences in sperm function. How the diversity in sperm morphology arose during speciation and what role the different specializations play in sperm function, however, remain incompletely characterized. This work reviews the hypotheses proposed to explain sperm morphological evolution, with a focus on some aspects of sperm morphometric evaluation; the ability of morphometrics to predict sperm cryoresistance and male fertility is also discussed. For this, the evaluation of patterns of change of sperm head morphometry throughout a process, instead of the study of the morphometric characteristics of the sperm head at different stages, allows a better identification of the males with different sperm cryoconservation ability. These new approaches, together with more studies employing a greater number of individuals, are needed to obtain novel results concerning the role of sperm morphometry on sperm function. Future studies should aim at understanding the causes of sperm design diversity and the mechanisms that generate them, giving increased attention to other sperm structures besides the sperm head. The implementation of scientific and technological advances could benefit the simultaneous examination of sperm phenotype and sperm function, demonstrating that sperm morphometry could be a useful tool for sperm assessment.

  12. Characterization of eight novel proteins with male germ cell-specific expression in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Edward M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spermatogenesis and fertilization are highly unique processes. Discovery and characterization of germ cell-specific genes are important for the understanding of these reproductive processes. We investigated eight proteins encoded by novel spermatogenic cell-specific genes previously identified from the mouse round spermatid UniGene library. Methods Polyclonal antibodies were generated against the novel proteins and western blot analysis was performed with various protein samples. Germ cell specificity was investigated using testes from germ cell-less mutant mice. Developmental expression pattern was examined in testicular germ cells, testicular sperm and mature sperm. Subcellular localization was assessed by cell surface biotin labeling and trypsinization. Protein localization and properties in sperm were investigated by separation of head and tail fractions, and extractabilities by a non-ionic detergent and urea. Results The authenticity of the eight novel proteins and their specificity to spermatogenic cells were confirmed. In examining the developmental expression patterns, we found the presence of four proteins only in testicular germ cells, a single protein in testicular germ cells and testicular sperm, and three proteins in the testicular stages and mature sperm from the epididymis. Further analysis of the three proteins present in sperm disclosed that one is located at the surface of the acrosomal region and the other two are associated with cytoskeletal structures in the sperm flagellum. We name the genes for these sperm proteins Shsp1 (Sperm head surface protein 1, Sfap1 (Sperm flagellum associated protein 1 and Sfap2 (Sperm flagellum associated protein 2. Conclusion We analyzed eight novel germ cell-specific proteins, providing new and inclusive information about their developmental and cellular characteristics. Our findings will facilitate future investigation into the biological roles of these novel proteins in

  13. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  14. Sperm motility of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, R K; Kaurova, S A; Uteshev, V K; Shishova, N V; McGinnity, D; Figiel, C R; Mansour, N; Agney, D; Wu, M; Gakhova, E N; Dzyuba, B; Cosson, J

    2015-01-01

    We review the phylogeny, sperm competition, morphology, physiology, and fertilization environments of the sperm of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians. Increased sperm competition in both fish and anurans generally increases sperm numbers, sperm length, and energy reserves. The difference between the internal osmolarity and iconicity of sperm cells and those of the aquatic medium control the activation, longevity, and velocity of sperm motility. Hypo-osmolarity of the aquatic medium activates the motility of freshwater fish and amphibian sperm and hyperosmolarity activates the motility of marine fish sperm. The average longevity of the motility of marine fish sperm (~550 seconds) was significantly (P amphibian sperm in general and anurans reversion from internal to external fertilization. Our findings provide a greater understanding of the reproductive biology of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians, and a biological foundation for the further development of reproduction technologies for their sustainable management.

  15. In-situ second harmonic generation by cancer cell targeting ZnO nanocrystals to effect photodynamic action in subcellular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bobo; Pliss, Artem; Kuzmin, Andrey N; Baev, Alexander; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Damasco, Jossana A; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shuangchun; Prasad, Paras N

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces the concept of in-situ upconversion of deep penetrating near infrared light via second harmonic generation from ZnO nanocrystals delivered into cells to effect photo activated therapies, such as photodynamic therapy, which usually require activation by visible light with limited penetration through biological tissues. We demonstrated this concept by subcellular activation of a photodynamic therapy drug, Chlorin e6, excited within its strong absorption Soret band by the second harmonic (SH) light, generated at 409 nm by ZnO nanocrystals, which were targeted to cancer cells and internalized through the folate-receptor mediated endocytosis. By a combination of theoretical modeling and experimental measurements, we show that SH light, generated in-situ by ZnO nanocrystals significantly contributes to activation of photosensitizer, leading to cell death through both apoptotic and necrotic pathways initiated in the cytoplasm. This targeted photodynamic action was studied using label-free Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering imaging of the treated cells to monitor changes in the distribution of native cellular proteins and lipids. We found that initiation of photodynamic therapy with upconverted light led to global reduction in the intracellular concentration of macromolecules, likely due to suppression of proteins and lipids synthesis, which could be considered as a real-time indicator of cellular damage from photodynamic treatment. In prospective applications this in-situ photon upconversion could be further extended using ZnO nanocrystals surface functionalized with a specific organelle targeting group, provided a powerful approach to identify and consequently maximize a cellular response to phototherapy, selectively initiated in a specific cellular organelle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interaction between the moss Physcomitrella patens and Phytophthora : a novel pathosystem for live-cell imaging of subcellular defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overdijk, Elysa J R; DE Keijzer, Jeroen; DE Groot, Deborah; Schoina, Charikleia; Bouwmeester, K.; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine

    Live-cell imaging of plant-pathogen interactions is often hampered by the tissue complexity and multicell layered nature of the host. Here, we established a novel pathosystem with the moss Physcomitrella patens as host for Phytophthora. The tip-growing protonema cells of this moss are ideal for

  17. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-02-26

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24h in the presence or absence of LPA. We identified 932 transcripts that displayed statistically significant changes in abundance of at least 1.25-fold in response to LPA treatment. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the regulated gene products were linked to diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, response to unfolded protein, ossification, protein-RNA complex assembly, and amine biosynthesis. Gene products associated with the regulation of actin microfilament dynamics displayed the most robust expression changes, and LPA-induced dendritogenesis in vitro was blocked by the stress fiber inhibitor cytochalasin D. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of MLO-Y4 cells revealed significant LPA-induced changes in the abundance of 284 proteins at 6h and 844 proteins at 24h. GO analysis of the proteomic data linked the effects of LPA to cell processes that control of protein distribution and membrane outgrowth, including protein localization, protein complex assembly, Golgi vesicle transport, cytoskeleton-dependent transport, and membrane invagination/endocytosis. Dendrites were isolated from LPA-treated MLO-Y4 cells and subjected to proteomic analysis to quantitatively assess the subcellular distribution of proteins. Sets of 129 and 36 proteins were enriched in the dendrite fraction as compared to whole cells after 6h and 24h of LPA exposure, respectively. Protein markers indicated that membranous organelles were largely excluded from the dendrites. Highly represented among

  18. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Katrina M; Jacobs, Jon M; Gritsenko, Marina A; Karin, Norman J

    2011-06-01

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24h in the presence or absence of LPA. We identified 932 transcripts that displayed statistically significant changes in abundance of at least 1.25-fold in response to LPA treatment. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the regulated gene products were linked to diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, response to unfolded protein, ossification, protein-RNA complex assembly, and amine biosynthesis. Gene products associated with the regulation of actin microfilament dynamics displayed the most robust expression changes, and LPA-induced dendritogenesis in vitro was blocked by the stress fiber inhibitor cytochalasin D. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of MLO-Y4 cells revealed significant LPA-induced changes in the abundance of 284 proteins at 6h and 844 proteins at 24h. GO analysis of the proteomic data linked the effects of LPA to cell processes that control of protein distribution and membrane outgrowth, including protein localization, protein complex assembly, Golgi vesicle transport, cytoskeleton-dependent transport, and membrane invagination/endocytosis. Dendrites were isolated from LPA-treated MLO-Y4 cells and subjected to proteomic analysis to quantitatively assess the subcellular distribution of proteins. Sets of 129 and 36 proteins were enriched in the dendrite fraction as compared to whole cells after 6h and 24h of LPA exposure, respectively. Protein markers indicated that membranous organelles were largely excluded from the dendrites. Highly represented among

  19. Subcellular Organization of GPCR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichel, Kelsie; von Zastrow, Mark

    2018-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large and diverse class of signal-transducing receptors that undergo dynamic and isoform-specific membrane trafficking. GPCRs thus have an inherent potential to initiate or regulate signaling reactions from multiple membrane locations. This review discusses emerging insights into the subcellular organization of GPCR function in mammalian cells, focusing on signaling transduced by heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestins. We summarize recent evidence indicating that GPCR-mediated activation of G proteins occurs not only from the plasma membrane (PM) but also from endosomes and Golgi membranes and that β-arrestin-dependent signaling can be transduced from the PM by β-arrestin trafficking to clathrin-coated pits (CCPs) after dissociation from a ligand-activated GPCR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fungal lectin MpL enables entry of protein drugs into cancer cells and their subcellular targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Å Urga, Simon; Nanut, Milica Perišić; Kos, Janko; Sabotič, Jerica

    2017-04-18

    Lectins have been recognized as promising carrier molecules for targeted drug delivery. They specifically bind carbohydrate moieties on cell membranes and trigger cell internalization. Fungal lectin MpL (Macrolepiota procera lectin) does not provoke cancer cell cytotoxicity but is able to bind aminopeptidase N (CD13) and integrin α3β1, two glycoproteins that are overexpressed on the membrane of tumor cells. Upon binding, MpL is endocytosed in a clathrin-dependent manner and accumulates initially in the Golgi apparatus and, finally, in the lysosomes. For effective binding and internalization a functional binding site on the α-repeat is needed. To test the potential of MpL as a carrier for delivering protein drugs to cancer cells we constructed fusion proteins consisting of MpL and the cysteine peptidase inhibitors cystatin C and clitocypin. The fused proteins followed the same endocytic route as the unlinked MpL. Peptidase inhibitor-MpL fusions impaired both the intracellular degradation of extracellular matrix and the invasiveness of cancer cells. MpL is thus shown in vitro to be a lectin that can enable protein drugs to enter cancer cells, enhance their internalization and sort them to lysosomes and the Golgi apparatus.

  1. Different subcellular localization and glycosylation for a functional antibody expressed in Nicotiana tabacum plants and suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Muynck, Benoit; Navarre, Catherine; Nizet, Yannick; Stadlmann, Johannes; Boutry, Marc

    2009-06-01

    Genes encoding the heavy and light chains of LO-BM2, a therapeutic IgG antibody, were assembled in the tandem or inverted convergent orientation and expressed in Nicotiana tabacum plants and BY-2 suspension cells. The tandem construct allowed higher expression in both expression systems. A similar degradation pattern was observed for the secreted antibody recovered from the leaf intercellular fluid and BY-2 culture medium. Degradation increased with leaf age or culture time. Antibodies purified from leaf tissues and BY-2 cells were both functional. However, MS analysis of the N-glycosylation showed complex plant-type glycans to be the major type in the antibody purified from plants, whereas, oligomannosidic was the major glycosylation type in that purified from BY-2 cells. LO-BM2 was observed mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum of BY-2 cells while, in leaf cells, it was localized mostly to vesicles resembling prevacuolar compartments. These results and those from endoglycosidase H studies suggest that LO-BM2 is secreted from BY-2 cells more readily than from leaf cells where it accumulates in a post-Golgi compartment.

  2. Fluorescent probe based subcellular distribution of Cu(II) ions in living electrotrophs isolated from Cu(II)-reduced biocathodes of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Xue, Hua; Huang, Liping; Zhou, Peng; Yang, Wei; Quan, Xie; Yuan, Jinxiu

    2017-02-01

    Based on the four indigenous electrotrophs (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia JY1, Citrobacter sp. JY3, Pseudomonas aeruginosa JY5 and Stenotrophomonas sp. JY6) isolated from well adapted Cu(II)-reduced biocathodes of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), a rhodamine based Cu(II) fluorescent probe was used to imaginably and quantitatively track subcellular Cu(II) ions in these electrotrophs. Cathodic electrons led to more Cu(II) ions (14.3-30.1%) in the intracellular sites at operation time of 2-3h with Cu(II) removal rates of 2.90-3.64mg/Lh whereas the absence of cathodic electrons prolonged the appearance of more Cu(II) ions (16.6-22.5%) to 5h with Cu(II) removal rates of 1.96-2.28mg/Lh. This study illustrates that cathodic electrons directed more Cu(II) ions for quicker entrance into the electrotrophic cytoplasm, and gives an alternative approach for developing imaging and functionally tracking Cu(II) ions in the electrotrophs of MFCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ion channels in small cells and subcellular structures can be studied with a smart patch-clamp system.

    OpenAIRE

    Gorelik, Julia; Gu, Yuchun; Spohr, Hilmar A; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Lab, Max J; Harding, Sian E; Edwards, Christopher R W; Whitaker, Michael; Moss, Guy W J; Benton, David C H; Sánchez, Daniel; Darszon, Alberto; Vodyanoy, Igor; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a scanning patch-clamp technique that facilitates single-channel recording from small cells and submicron cellular structures that are inaccessible by conventional methods. The scanning patch-clamp technique combines scanning ion conductance microscopy and patch-clamp recording through a single glass nanopipette probe. In this method the nanopipette is first scanned over a cell surface, using current feedback, to obtain a high-resolution topographic image. This same pipette ...

  4. Phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p27Kip1 regulated by hydrogen peroxide modulation in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene L Ibañez

    Full Text Available The Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1 is a key protein in the decision between proliferation and cell cycle exit. Quiescent cells show nuclear p27Kip1, but this protein is exported to the cytoplasm in response to proliferating signals. We recently reported that catalase treatment increases the levels of p27Kip1 in vitro and in vivo in a murine model. In order to characterize and broaden these findings, we evaluated the regulation of p27Kip1 by hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 in human melanoma cells and melanocytes. We observed a high percentage of p27Kip1 positive nuclei in melanoma cells overexpressing or treated with exogenous catalase, while non-treated controls showed a cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. Then we studied the levels of p27Kip1 phosphorylated (p27p at serine 10 (S10 and at threonine 198 (T198 because phosphorylation at these sites enables nuclear exportation of this protein, leading to accumulation and stabilization of p27pT198 in the cytoplasm. We demonstrated by western blot a decrease in p27pS10 and p27pT198 levels in response to H(2O(2 removal in melanoma cells, associated with nuclear p27Kip1. Melanocytes also exhibited nuclear p27Kip1 and lower levels of p27pS10 and p27pT198 than melanoma cells, which showed cytoplasmic p27Kip1. We also showed that the addition of H(2O(2 (0.1 µM to melanoma cells arrested in G1 by serum starvation induces proliferation and increases the levels of p27pS10 and p27pT198 leading to cytoplasmic localization of p27Kip1. Nuclear localization and post-translational modifications of p27Kip1 were also demonstrated by catalase treatment of colorectal carcinoma and neuroblastoma cells, extending our findings to these other human cancer types. In conclusion, we showed in the present work that H(2O(2 scavenging prevents nuclear exportation of p27Kip1, allowing cell cycle arrest, suggesting that cancer cells take advantage of their intrinsic pro-oxidant state to favor cytoplasmic localization

  5. Subcellular Distribution of S-Nitrosylated H-Ras in Differentiated and Undifferentiated PC12 Cells during Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbakadze, Tamar; Goloshvili, Galina; Narmania, Nana; Zhuravliova, Elene; Mikeladze, David

    2017-10-01

    Hypoxia or exposure to excessive reactive oxygen or nitrogen species could induce S-nitrosylation of various target proteins, including GTPases of the Ras-superfamily. Under hypoxic conditions, the Ras-protein is translocated to the cytosol and interacts with the Golgi complex, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria. The mobility/translocation of Ras depend on the cells oxidative status. However, the importance of relocated Snitrosylated- H-Ras (NO-H-Ras) in proliferation/differentiation processes is not completely understood. We have determined the content of soluble- and membrane-bound-NO-HRas in differentiated (D) and undifferentiated (ND) rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. In our experimental study, we analyzed NO-H-Ras levels under hypoxic/normoxic conditions in membrane and soluble fractions of ND and D PC12 cells with/without nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) treatment. Cells were analyzed by the S-nitrosylated kit, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot. We assessed the action of NO-H-Ras on oxidative metabolism of isolated mitochondria by determining mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide generation via the scopoletin oxidation method and ATPproduction as estimated by the luminometric method. Hypoxia did not influence nitrosylation of soluble H-Ras in ND PC12 cells. Under hypoxic conditions, the nitrosylation of soluble-H-Ras greatly decreased in D PC12 cells. SNP didn't change the levels of nitrosylation of soluble-H-Ras, in either hypoxic or normoxic conditions. On the other hand, hypoxia, per se, did not affect the nitrosylation of membrane-bound-H-Ras in D and ND PC12 cells. SNP-dependent nitrosylation of membrane-bound-H-Ras greatly increased in D PC12 cells. Both unmodified normal and mutated H-Ras enhanced the mitochondrial synthesis of ATP, whereas the stimulatory effects on ATP synthesis were eliminated after S-nitrosylation of H-Ras. According to the results, it may be proposed that hypoxia can decrease S

  6. Dipeptidyl peptidase 9 subcellular localization and a role in cell adhesion involving focal adhesion kinase and paxillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Chen, Yiqian; Wadham, Carol; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Keane, Fiona M; Gorrell, Mark D

    2015-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 9 (DPP9) is a ubiquitously expressed member of the DPP4 gene and protease family. Deciphering the biological functions of DPP9 and its roles in pathogenesis has implicated DPP9 in tumor biology, the immune response, apoptosis, intracellular epidermal growth factor-dependent signaling and cell adhesion and migration. We investigated the intracellular distribution of DPP9 chimeric fluorescent proteins and consequent functions of DPP9. We showed that while some DPP9 is associated with mitochondria, the strongest co-localization was with microtubules. Under steady state conditions, DPP9 was not seen at the plasma membrane, but upon stimulation with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or epidermal growth factor, some DPP9 re-distributed towards the ruffling membrane. DPP9 was seen at the leading edge of the migrating cell and co-localized with the focal adhesion proteins, integrin-β1 and talin. DPP9 gene silencing and treatment with a DPP8/DPP9 specific inhibitor both reduced cell adhesion and migration. Expression of integrin-β1 and talin was decreased in DPP9-deficient and DPP9-enzyme-inactive cells. There was a concomitant decrease in the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin, indicating that DPP9 knockdown or enzyme inhibition suppressed the associated adhesion signaling pathway, causing impaired cell movement. These novel findings provide mechanistic insights into the regulatory role of DPP9 in cell movement, and may thus implicate DPP9 in tissue and tumor growth and metastasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a one-tube extraction and amplification method for DNA analysis of sperm and epithelial cells recovered from forensic samples by laser microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Melanie; Bright, Jo-Anne; Cockerton, Sarah; Vintiner, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Laser microdissection can be used in forensic casework to isolate specific cell types from mixtures of biological samples. Extraction of DNA from selected cells is still required prior to STR amplification. Because of the relatively pristine nature of the recovered cells, laser microdissection is more sensitive than more traditional methods of DNA analysis, theoretically resulting in DNA profiles from less cellular material. A one-tube extraction and amplification method minimises loss of DNA through liquid transfers and reduces the potential for contamination events occurring. In this paper, the development of a one-tube method for the effective extraction of DNA from laser microdissected sperm and epithelial cells is described. The performance of the in-house method was compared to that of a commercial DNA extraction kit for extraction of DNA from sperm and the downstream compatibility with STR amplification was determined for both sperm and epithelial samples. Full Identifiler™ profiles after 28 amplification cycles were obtained from as few as 15 epithelial cells and 30 sperm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The inflammatory mediator leukotriene D{sub 4} induces subcellular β-catenin translocation and migration of colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salim, Tavga [Division of Cell and Experimental Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Center, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Sand-Dejmek, Janna [Division of Cell and Experimental Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Center, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Section of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Bayer HealthCare, Pharmaceuticals Medical Affairs, Solna (Sweden); Sjölander, Anita, E-mail: anita.sjolander@med.lu.se [Division of Cell and Experimental Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Center, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden)

    2014-02-15

    The abnormal activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway frequently occurs in colorectal cancer. The nuclear translocation of β-catenin activates the transcription of target genes that promote cell proliferation, survival, and invasion. The pro-inflammatory mediator leukotriene D{sub 4} (LTD{sub 4}) exerts its effects through the CysLT{sub 1} receptor. We previously reported an upregulation of CysLT{sub 1}R in patients with colon cancer, suggesting the importance of leukotrienes in colon cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of LTD{sub 4} on Wnt/β-catenin signaling and its effects on proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells. LTD{sub 4} stimulation led to an increase in β-catenin expression, β-catenin nuclear translocation and the subsequent transcription of MYC and CCND1. Furthermore, LTD{sub 4} significantly reduced the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin at the plasma membrane and increased the migration and proliferation of HCT116 colon cancer cells. The effects of LTD{sub 4} can be blocked by the inhibition of CysLT{sub 1}R. Furthermore, LTD{sub 4} induced the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK)-3β activity, indicating a crosstalk between the G-protein-coupled receptor CysLT{sub 1} and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In conclusion, LTD{sub 4}, which can be secreted from macrophages and leukocytes in the tumor microenvironment, induces β-catenin translocation and the activation of β-catenin target genes, resulting in the increased proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells. - Highlights: • Leukotriene D{sub 4} (LTD{sub 4}) lowers membrane β-catenin but increases nuclear β-catenin levels in colon cancer cells. • In agreement, LTD{sub 4} triggers inactivation of GSK-3β, activation of TCF/LEF and increased expression of Cyclin D1 and c-Myc. • LTD{sub 4} also caused a significant reduction in the expression of E-cadherin and an increased migration of colon cancer cells.

  9. Ameliorating effects of fennel and cumin extracts on sperm quality and spermatogenic cells apoptosis by inducing weight loss and reducing leptin concentration in diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejatbakhsh, R; Riyahi, S; Farrokhi, A; Rostamkhani, S; Mahmazi, S; Yazdinezhad, A; Kazemi, M; Shokri, S

    2017-10-01

    This study was established a model of obesity to estimate the impact of fennel and cumin as anti-obesity extracts on body weight, body mass index (BMI), food consumption, leptin concentration, sperm quality and testis architecture to determine the reversibility of reproductive function of obese animals. Male rats were randomly assigned to either a normal or high-fat diet for 8 weeks. Then, we divided 56 adult rats into seven groups: control (CO); obesity (OB); fennel 100 and 200 mg/kg; cumin 50 and 100 mg/kg; and fennel 100 mg/kg plus cumin 50 mg/kg. From weeks 9-16, the animals treated extracts by gavages daily. We analysed leptin concentration, sperm quality and apoptosis of testis along with evaluating changes in body weight. Body weight of animals increased 25% at week 8. However, body weight, BMI, leptin concentration and apoptosis indices of OB rats increased at the end of study. However, the relative sperm parameters decreased. Nevertheless, fennel and cumin treatment improved sperm quality, and spermatogenic cells apoptosis following weight loss. Concomitant with weight loss, leptin concentration and food consumption decreased. In conclusion, fennel and cumin as supplements may ameliorate sperm quality of obese animals following weight loss and reduction in leptin concentration. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Sperm Production Rate, Gonadal and Extragonadal Sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five healthy West African Dwarf (WAD) rams, 1.5 to 2.5 years of age and weighing between 15 kg to 20 kg were used to determine daily sperm production, gonadal and exragonadal sperm reserves. Gonadal and extragonadal sperm reserves were estimated by the haemocytometric method, while the daily sperm production ...

  11. Characteristics of stallion epididymal spermatozoa at collection and effect of two refrigeration protocols on the quality of the frozen/thawed sperm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, T; Lopes, G; Ferreira, P; Leal, I; Rocha, A

    2012-12-01

    Cryopreservation of epididymal spermatozoa is a useful tool to preserve genetic material of valuable stallions after emergency castration or unexpected death. For that, testicles and epididymides are generally sent refrigerated to the laboratory. Collection of epididymal spermatozoa is a simple procedure that reduces the volume of the material to be shipped, and may improve the quality of the chilled epididymal sperm cells. In the present study we compared the characteristics of frozen/thawed epididymal spermatozoa after refrigeration of the epididymis or after direct refrigeration of the extended epididymal sperm cells. Ejaculated sperm samples were obtained from 10 healthy stallions with at least 15 days of sexual rest, before routine orchiectomies. Spermatozoa were recovered from the epididymal tail immediately after castration (EPI), after refrigeration of the epididymis for 24h at 4°C (EPI R) and recovered from epididymal tail immediately after castration and stored for 24h at 4°C (EPI RR). Total motility, straight-line velocity, percentage of rapid cells, viability and morphological defects were similar (p>0.05) among different treatments, and post-thaw viability was higher (psperm. The similarity of post-thaw parameters led us to conclude that immediate collection and refrigeration of the epididymal sperm cells or refrigeration of the whole epididymis are equally efficient as a means of transporting material for 24h before cryopreservation of epididymal spermatozoa. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Beneficial value of testicular sperm extraction-AgarCyto in addition to the standard testicular biopsy for diagnosis of testicular germ cell tumors in nonobstructive azoospermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessel, M.L.; Ramos, L.; D'Hauwers, K.W.M.; Braat, D.D.M.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether immunohistochemical detection of germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS) in AgarCytos, made of the remnants of the testicular sperm extraction (TESE) specimen, is equally accurate as in a standard testicular biopsy. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study performed between January

  13. Overexpression of human sperm protein 17 increases migration and decreases the chemosensitivity of human epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Wen-bin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most deaths from ovarian cancer are due to metastases that are resistant to conventional therapies. But the factors that regulate the metastatic process and chemoresistance of ovarian cancer are poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the aberrant expression of human sperm protein 17 (HSp17 in human epithelial ovarian cancer cells and tried to analyze its influences on the cell behaviors like migration and chemoresistance. Methods Immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry were used to identify HSp17 in paraffin embedded ovarian malignant tumor specimens and peritoneal metastatic malignant cells. Then we examined the effect of HSp17 overexpression on the proliferation, migration, and chemoresistance of ovarian cancer cells to carboplatin and cisplatin in a human ovarian carcinoma cell line, HO8910. Results We found that HSp17 was aberrantly expressed in 43% (30/70 of the patients with primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas, and in all of the metastatic cancer cells of ascites from 8 patients. The Sp17 expression was also detected in the metastatic lesions the same as in ovarian lesions. None of the 7 non-epithelial tumors primarily developed in the ovaries was immunopositive for HSp17. Overexpression of HSp17 increased the migration but decreased the chemosensitivity of ovarian carcinoma cells to carboplatin and cisplatin. Conclusion HSp17 is aberrantly expressed in a significant proportion of epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Our results strongly suggest that HSp17 plays a role in metastatic disease and resistance of epithelial ovarian carcinoma to chemotherapy.

  14. Human-specific subcellular compartmentalization of P-element induced wimpy testis-like (PIWIL) granules during germ cell development and spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Fernandes, Maria; He, Nannan; Wang, Fang; Van Iperen, Liesbeth; Eguizabal, Cristina; Matorras, Roberto; Roelen, Bernard A J; Chuva De Sousa Lopes, Susana M

    2018-02-01

    What is the dynamics of expression of P-element induced wimpy testis-like (PIWIL) proteins in the germline during human fetal development and spermatogenesis? PIWIL1, PIWIL2, PIWIL3 and PIWIL4 were expressed in a sex-specific fashion in human germ cells (GC) during development and adulthood. PIWILs showed a mutually exclusive pattern of subcellular localization. PIWILs were present in the intermitochondrial cement and a single large granule in meiotic GC and their expression was different from that observed in mice, highlighting species-differences. In mice, PIWIL proteins play prominent roles in male infertility. PIWIL mouse mutants show either post-meiotic arrest at the round spermatid stage (PIWIL1) or arrest at the zygotene-pachytene stage of meiosis I (PIWIL2 and PIWIL4) in males, while females remain fertile. Recent studies have reported a robust piRNA pool in human fetal ovary. This is a qualitative analysis of PIWILs expression in paraffin-embedded fetal human male (N = 8), female gonads (N = 6) and adult testes (N = 5), and bioinformatics analysis of online available single-cell transcriptomics data of human fetal germ cells (n = 242). Human fetal gonads from elective abortion without medical indication and adult testes biopsies were donated for research with informed consent. Samples were fixed, paraffin-embedded and analyzed by immunofluorescence to study the temporal and cellular localization of PIWIL1, PIWIL2, PIWIL3 and PIWIL4. PIWIL1, PIWIL2 and PIWIL4 showed a mutually exclusive pattern of subcellular localization, particularly in female oocytes. To our surprise, PIWIL1 immunostaining revealed the presence of a single dense paranuclear body, resembling the chromatoid body of haploid spermatocytes, in meiotic oocytes. Moreover, in contrast to mice, PIWIL4, but not PIWIL2, localized to the intermitochondrial cement. PIWIL3 was not expressed in GC during development. The upregulation of PIWIL transcripts correlated with the transcription of markers

  15. Tenacity of exogenous human papillomavirus DNA in sperm washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossfield, J E; Chan, P J; Patton, W C; King, A

    1999-07-01

    Sperm cells have been shown to take up exogenous DNA readily. The hypothesis was that sperm washing would remove exogenous viral DNA infecting sperm cells. The objective was to compare three types of sperm washing procedures for their capacity to remove exogenous human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from infected sperm. Prewashed sperm were equally divided and sperm in one portion were exposed to L1 HPV DNA fragments for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Untreated washed sperm served as the control. After transfection, the sperm were washed by either centrifuge, two-layer Isolate colloid wash, or test-yolk buffer procedures. Sperm parameters were measured on a Hamilton Thorn HTM-C analyzer. Sperm DNA were extracted and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out targeting the L1 consensus gene of HPV and the designated sentinel gene, 17q21 spanning the D17S855 gene. Amplified products were analyzed in 2% agarose gel electrophoresis. PCR analyses detected the consensus L1 HPV gene in sperm after they were processed through either of the three procedures. Controls were negative for the L1 gene. Extracted DNA were verified by PCR amplification of 17q21 spanning the D17S855 gene. Transfected sperm had higher percentages of total motility and progression compared with the control. Centrifuged, washed, transfected sperm exhibited a greater curvilinear velocity and hyperactivation. The data showed that washing would not remove exogenous HPV DNA from sperm cells. The viral DNA was tenaciously bound to the sperm, suggesting an internalization into the sperm. The viral DNA also increased the motility of the sperm by affecting the velocity and progression of the sperm, which suggested either an increase in metabolism, an enhancement of the calcium-regulated motility mechanism, or an artifact of PCR reagents. More studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of DNA stimulated sperm motility.

  16. Effects of dilution and centrifugation on the survival of spermatozoa and the structure of motile sperm cell subpopulations in refrigerated Catalonian donkey semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, J; Taberner, E; Rivera, M; Peña, A; Medrano, A; Rigau, T; Peñalba, A

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effects of dilution and centrifugation (i.e., two methods of reducing the influence of the seminal plasma) on the survival of spermatozoa and the structure of motile sperm cell subpopulations in refrigerated Catalonian donkey (Equus asinus) semen. Fifty ejaculates from nine Catalonian jackasses were collected. Gel-free semen was diluted 1:1, 1:5 or 1:10 with Kenney extender. Another sample of semen was diluted 1:5, centrifuged, and then resuspended with Kenney extender until a final dilution of 25x10(6) sperm/ml was achieved (C). After 24 h, 48 h or 72 h of refrigerated storage at 5 degrees C, aliquots of these semen samples were incubated at 37 degrees C for 5 min. The percentage of viable sperm was determined by staining with eosin-nigrosin. The motility characteristics of the spermatozoa were examined using the CASA system (Microptic, Barcelona, Spain). At 24h, more surviving spermatozoa were seen in the more diluted and in the centrifuged semen samples (1:1 48.71%; 1:5 56.58%, 1:10 62.65%; C 72.40%). These differences were maintained at 48 h (1:1 34.31%, 1:5 40.56%, 1:10 48.52%, C 66.30%). After 72 h, only the C samples showed a survival rate of above 25%. The four known donkey motile sperm subpopulations were maintained by refrigeration. However, the percentage of motile sperms in each subpopulation changed with dilution. Only the centrifuged samples, and only at 24h, showed exactly the same motile sperm subpopulation proportions as recorded for fresh sperm. However, the 1:10 dilutions at 24 and 48 h, and the centrifuged semen at 48 h, showed few variations compared to fresh sperm. These results show that the elimination of seminal plasma increases the survival of spermatozoa and the maintenance of motility patterns. The initial sperm concentration had a significant (P<0.05) influence on centrifugation efficacy, but did not influence the number of spermatozoa damaged by centrifugation. In contrast, the percentage of live

  17. Semi-automatized segmentation method using image-based flow cytometry to study sperm physiology: the case of capacitation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros-Volante, Arturo; Moreno-Irusta, Ayelen; Torres-Rodriguez, Paulina; Giojalas, Laura; Gervasi, María G; Visconti, Pablo E; Treviño, Claudia L

    2017-11-25

    Is image-based flow cytometry a useful tool to study intracellular events in human sperm such as protein tyrosine phosphorylation or signaling processes? Image-based flow cytometry is a powerful tool to study intracellular events in a relevant number of sperm cells, which enables a robust statistical analysis providing spatial resolution in terms of the specific subcellular localization of the labeling. Sperm capacitation is required for fertilization. During this process, spermatozoa undergo numerous physiological changes, via activation of different signaling pathways, which are not completely understood. Classical approaches for studying sperm physiology include conventional microscopy, flow cytometry and Western blotting. These techniques present disadvantages for obtaining detailed subcellular information of signaling pathways in a relevant number of cells. This work describes a new semi-automatized analysis using image-based flow cytometry which enables the study, at the subcellular and population levels, of different sperm parameters associated with signaling. The increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation is presented as an example. Sperm cells were isolated from seminal plasma by the swim-up technique. We evaluated the intensity and distribution of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated in non-capacitation and capacitation supporting media for 1 and 18 hours under different experimental conditions. We used an antibody against FER kinase and the pharmacological inhibitors in an attempt to identify the kinases involved in protein tyrosine phosphorylation during human sperm capacitation. Semen samples from normospermic donors were obtained by masturbation after 2-3 days of sexual abstinence. We used the innovative technique image-based flow cytometry and image analysis tools to segment individual images of spermatozoa. We evaluated and quantified the regions of sperm where protein tyrosine phosphorylation takes place at

  18. The single sperm curling test, a modified hypo-osmotic swelling test, as a potential technique for the selection of viable sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, A; Ng, S C

    1997-08-01

    To develop a technique for the selection of viable sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), based on the phenomenon of sperm tail curling in a hypo-osmotic environment, through modification of the hypo-osmotic swelling test. Individual sperm were exposed to single sperm curling (SSC) medium and then injected into hamster oocytes to study the effect of SSC medium on fertilization. All materials were collected from the National University Hospital in Singapore. Semen of proven donors and hamster oocytes with intact zonae were used. ICSI and the SSC test. Sperm head decondensation and male pronucleus formation. Sperm head decondensation and male pronucleus formation were present in 59.4% and 42.4%, respectively, of the oocytes injected with sperm that had been exposed to SSC medium. These rates were 70% and 48.8%, respectively, when the sperm were washed thoroughly after exposure to SSC medium. In the control group (sperm that were not exposed to SSC medium), these rates were 68.8% and 46.2%, respectively. The SSC test is useful for the selection of viable sperm for ICSI. It allows the behavioral study of a single sperm in hypo-osmotic conditions. Thorough washing of the exposed sperm is important. This procedure would be of benefit especially in testicular biopsies or very severe cases of low sperm count in which only a few sperm are found among many other cells and artifact.

  19. Sperm structure and sperm transfer in Pseudopythina subsinuata (Bivalvia, Galeommatoidea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Åse

    2009-01-01

    to the elongate cells. Most females contain one to three "sperm trees", structures consisting of a short stem and numerous branches. They are firmly implanted in the abfrontal part of the gill filament and protrude into the posterior part of the suprabranchial (brooding) chamber. Implantation of the trees causes...... the receptacle and thereupon fuse. A similar process is known in the allied P. tsurumaru, but the resulting structure ("sperm-carrying body") is not attached to the gills....

  20. Determination of DNA damage after exposure to inhalation anesthetics in human peripheral lymphocytes and sperm cells in vitro by comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymak, C; Kadioglu, E; Coskun, E; Basar, H; Basar, M

    2012-12-01

    In this study, genotoxic activities of four halogenated anesthetics (halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane) were investigated in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and sperm cells in vitro by alkaline comet assay. For this purpose, sperm or lymphocyte suspension was exposed to different concentrations (0.1 mM, 1 mM, 10 mM and 100 mM) of anesthetic agents and 1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as controls. The DNA strand breaks as well as alkali-labile sites were measured as percentage tail intensity with comet assay. The results of this study demonstrate that all analyzed drugs were capable of inducing DNA damage on PBLs in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. However, the results in sperm cells were slightly different since we did not observe any genotoxic effect for desflurane in any of the exposure doses, and the genotoxic effect of halothane was not dose dependent. This experimental study points out to the presence of DNA damage after exposure to halogenated anesthetics in both PBLs and sperm cells, although this effect seems to be higher in PBLs.

  1. Preferential retention of the E6 and E7 regions of the human papilloma virus type 18 genome by human sperm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, C C; Yang, F P; Lai, Y M

    1996-10-01

    To determine if sperm cells differentially take up or retain different regions of human papilloma virus (HPV) type 18 genome. A descriptive clinical study. A major medical center affiliated with a medical college. Twenty-three randomly selected patients who attended Fertility Clinics at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Semen specimens were obtained from volunteered patients who attended fertility clinics at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The presence of various regions of HPV type 18 genome in sperm cells was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Among 23 sperm specimens that were positive for HPV type 18 DNA by polymerase chain reaction, the upstream regulatory region, E6, E7, E1, and L1 regions or open region frames were detected in 4 (17%), 7 (30%), 19 (83%), 5 (22%), and 1 (4%) specimens, respectively. The differential display of the presence of various regions of the HPV type 18 genome was not the result of different amplification and detection efficiencies of these DNA fragments. These results suggest that the oncogenic portion of HPV DNA is present in spermatozoa. Furthermore, the E6 and E7 regions of the viral genome preferentially were taken up and/or retained by the human sperm cells.

  2. The application of alkaline lysis and pressure cycling technology in the differential extraction of DNA from sperm and epithelial cells recovered from cotton swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Deepthi V; McCord, Bruce R

    2015-09-01

    This study reports the development of a two-step protocol using pressure cycling technology (PCT) and alkaline lysis for differential extraction of DNA from mixtures of sperm and vaginal epithelial cells recovered from cotton swabs. In controlled experiments, in which equal quantities of sperm and female epithelial cells were added to cotton swabs, 5 min of pressure pulsing in the presence of 0.4 M NaOH resulted in 104 ± 6% recovery of female epithelial DNA present on the swab. Following the pressure treatment, exposing the swabs to a second 5-min alkaline treatment at 95 °C without pressure resulted in the selective recovery of 69 ± 6% of the sperm DNA. The recovery of the vaginal epithelia and sperm DNA was optimized by examining the effect of sodium hydroxide concentration, incubation temperature, and time. Following the alkaline lysis steps, the samples were neutralized with 2 M Tris (pH 7.5) and purified with phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol to permit downstream analysis. The total processing time to remove both fractions from the swab was less than 20 min. Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis of these fractions obtained from PCT treatment and alkaline lysis generated clean profiles of female epithelial DNA and male sperm DNA for 1:1 mixtures of female and male cells and predominant male profiles for mixtures up to 5:1 female to male cells. By reducing the time and increasing the recovery of DNA from cotton swabs, this new method presents a novel and potentially useful procedure for forensic differential extractions.

  3. Subcellular targeting strategies for drug design and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Lawrence; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Simons, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Many drug targets are localized to particular subcellular compartments, yet current drug design strategies are focused on bioavailability and tissue targeting and rarely address drug delivery to specific intracellular compartments. Insights into how the cell traffics its constituents to these different cellular locations could improve drug design. In this Review, we explore the fundamentals of membrane trafficking and subcellular organization, as well as strategies used by pathogens to appropriate these mechanisms and the implications for drug design and delivery.

  4. Sperm preparation for fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadella, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Description This book contains 19 chapters that discuss theoretical and applied andrology for domestic, zoo and wild animals. Topics include semen and its constituents; sperm production and harvest; determinants of sperm morphology; sperm preparation for fertilization; practical aspects of semen

  5. Subcellular distribution of the V-ATPase complex in plant cells, and in vivo localisation of the 100 kDa subunit VHA-a within the complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluge Christoph

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vacuolar H+-ATPases are large protein complexes of more than 700 kDa that acidify endomembrane compartments and are part of the secretory system of eukaryotic cells. They are built from 14 different (VHA-subunits. The paper addresses the question of sub-cellular localisation and subunit composition of plant V-ATPase in vivo and in vitro mainly by using colocalization and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques (FRET. Focus is placed on the examination and function of the 95 kDa membrane spanning subunit VHA-a. Showing similarities to the already described Vph1 and Stv1 vacuolar ATPase subunits from yeast, VHA-a revealed a bipartite structure with (i a less conserved cytoplasmically orientated N-terminus and (ii a membrane-spanning C-terminus with a higher extent of conservation including all amino acids shown to be essential for proton translocation in the yeast. On the basis of sequence data VHA-a appears to be an essential structural and functional element of V-ATPase, although previously a sole function in assembly has been proposed. Results To elucidate the presence and function of VHA-a in the plant complex, three approaches were undertaken: (i co-immunoprecipitation with antibodies directed to epitopes in the N- and C-terminal part of VHA-a, respectively, (ii immunocytochemistry approach including co-localisation studies with known plant endomembrane markers, and (iii in vivo-FRET between subunits fused to variants of green fluorescence protein (CFP, YFP in transfected cells. Conclusions All three sets of results show that V-ATPase contains VHA-a protein that interacts in a specific manner with other subunits. The genomes of plants encode three genes of the 95 kDa subunit (VHA-a of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase. Immuno-localisation of VHA-a shows that the recognized subunit is exclusively located on the endoplasmic reticulum. This result is in agreement with the hypothesis that the different isoforms of VHA

  6. Identification of increased amounts of eppin protein complex components in sperm cells of diabetic and obese individuals by difference gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasch, Uwe; Heidenreich, Falk; Pursche, Theresia; Kuhlisch, Eberhard; Kettner, Karina; Grunewald, Sonja; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Dittmar, Gunnar; Glander, Hans-Jürgen; Hoflack, Bernard; Kriegel, Thomas M

    2011-08-01

    Metabolic disorders like diabetes mellitus and obesity may compromise the fertility of men and women. To unveil disease-associated proteomic changes potentially affecting male fertility, the proteomes of sperm cells from type-1 diabetic, type-2 diabetic, non-diabetic obese and clinically healthy individuals were comparatively analyzed by difference gel electrophoresis. The adaptation of a general protein extraction procedure to the solubilization of proteins from sperm cells allowed for the resolution of 3187 fluorescent spots in the difference gel electrophoresis image of the master gel, which contained the entirety of solubilized sperm proteins. Comparison of the pathological and reference proteomes by applying an average abundance ratio setting of 1.6 and a p ≤ 0.05 criterion resulted in the identification of 79 fluorescent spots containing proteins that were present at significantly changed levels in the sperm cells. Biometric evaluation of the fluorescence data followed by mass spectrometric protein identification revealed altered levels of 12, 71, and 13 protein species in the proteomes of the type-1 diabetic, type-2 diabetic, and non-diabetic obese patients, respectively, with considerably enhanced amounts of the same set of one molecular form of semenogelin-1, one form of clusterin, and two forms of lactotransferrin in each group of pathologic samples. Remarkably, β-galactosidase-1-like protein was the only protein that was detected at decreased levels in all three pathologic situations. The former three proteins are part of the eppin (epididymal proteinase inhibitor) protein complex, which is thought to fulfill fertilization-related functions, such as ejaculate sperm protection, motility regulation and gain of competence for acrosome reaction, whereas the putative role of the latter protein to function as a glycosyl hydrolase during sperm maturation remains to be explored at the protein/enzyme level. The strikingly similar differences detected in the

  7. Cryopreservation and in vitro culture of primary cell types from lung tissue of a stranded pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annalaura Mancia; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; McFee, Wayne E; Newton, Danforth A; Baatz, John E

    2012-01-01

    Current models for in vitro studies of tissue function and physiology, including responses to hypoxia or environmental toxins, are limited and rely heavily on standard 2-dimensional (2-D) cultures with immortalized murine or human cell lines. To develop a new more powerful model system, we have pursued methods to establish and expand cultures of primary lung cell types and reconstituted tissues from marine mammals. What little is known about the physiology of the deep-sea diving pygmy sperm whale (PSW), Kogia breviceps, comes primarily from stranding events that occur along the coast of the southeastern United States. Thus, development of a method for preserving live tissues and retrieving live cells from deceased stranded individuals was initiated. This report documents successful cryopreservation of PSW lung tissue. We established in vitro cultures of primary lung cell types from tissue fragments that had been cryopreserved several months earlier at the stranding event. Dissociation of cryopreserved lung tissues readily provides a variety of primary cell types that, to varying degrees, can be expanded and further studied/manipulated in cell culture. In addition, PSW-specific molecular markers have been developed that permitted the monitoring of fibroblast, alveolar type II, and vascular endothelial cell types. Reconstitution of 3-D cultures of lung tissues with these cell types is now underway. This novel system may facilitate the development of rare or disease-specific lung tissue models (e.g., to test causes of PSW stranding events and lead to improved treatments for pulmonary hypertension or reperfusion injury in humans). Also, the establishment of a "living" tissue bank biorepository for rare/endangered species could serve multiple purposes as surrogates for freshly isolated samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. EFFECT OF REDUCING THE NUMBER OF SPERM CELLS (PER INSEMINATION, INCREASING ENERGY AND CRYOPROTECTING CONCENTRATIONS ON MOTION CHARACTERISTICS AND MEMBRANE INTEGRITY IN FROZEN THAWED BUFFALO SPERMATOZOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Abbas, S. M. H. Andrabiand N. Ahmad

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to find out the minimum number of sperm cells per dose of insemination that will not affect the conception rate, if levels of egg yolk and glycerol are increased. For this purpose, sperm motion characteristics and plasma membrane integrity in three concentrations of sperm cells per dose, each with two levels of egg yolk and glycerol were compared. Semen was collected from buffalo bulls using an artificial vagina. Split pool ejaculates possessing more than 60% visual sperm motility were diluted in Tris-citric acid (TCA extender at 37°C, either in (1 30-6-20 (Number of sperm cells in millions/0.5 ml insemi1:1ation dose-Glycerol%-Egg yolk %,(2 15-6-20, (3 7.5-6-20, (4 30-10- 20, (5 15-10-20, (6 7.5-10-20, (7 30-6-30, (8 15-6-30, (9 7.5-6-30, (10 30-10-30, (11 15-10-30 and (12 7.5-10-30. Semen was cooled to 4°C in 2 hours, equilibrated at 4aC for 4 hours, filled in 0.5 ml straws and frozen in a programmable cell freezer ( + 4 to -15°C @ -3°C/minute and then to -80°C@ -10°C/minute before plunging them into liquid nitrogen (-196°C. Thawing of frozen semen was performed after 24 hours at 37°C for 15 seconds. Sperm motion characteristics, including motilities (computer-assisted, linear and circular, velocities (straight-line, average path and curvilinear, and lateral head displacement (LHD were assessed using computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA. Plasma membrane integrity was determined by using Hypo-Osmotic Swelling assay (HOS. Analysis of variance revealed that visual motility, computer-assisted motility, linear motility, circular motility, and plasma membrane integrity did not vary significantly when cell number was reduced from 30x106/dose to 15x106/dose. However, visual motility, computer-assisted motility and plasma membrane integrity were reduced significantly (P<0.05 when cell number was decreased to 7.5x106/dose. The velocities (straight- line, average path, curvilinear and LHD did not vary

  9. Germ-cell hub position in a heteropteran testis correlates with the sequence and location of spermatogenesis and production of elaborate sperm bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, George J; Shirkey, Nicholas J; Haimo, Leah T; Cardullo, Richard A; Thaler, Catherine D

    2015-04-01

    In insects, spermatogonial cells undergo several mitotic divisions with incomplete cytokinesis, and then proceed through meiosis and spermatogenesis in synchrony. The cells derived from a single spermatogonial cell are referred to as a cyst. In the water strider Aquarius remigis, spermiogenesis occurs within two bi-lobed testes. In contrast to most insects, in which the germ-cell hub is located apically and sequential stages of spermatogenesis can be seen moving toward the base of the testis, each lobe of the water strider testis contains a single germ-cell hub located medially opposite to the efferent duct of the lobe; the developing cysts are displaced toward the distal ends of the lobe as spermiogenesis proceeds. Water strider sperm have both a long flagellum and an unusually long acrosome. The water strider spermatids elongate most of the flagellum prior to morphogenesis of the acrosome, and exhibit several stages of nuclear remodeling before the final, mature sperm nucleus is formed. The maturing sperm are aligned in register in the cyst, and the flagella fold into a coiled bundle while their acrosomes form a rigid helical process that extends from the cyst toward the efferent duct. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Control of sperm concentration is necessary for standardization of sperm cryopreservation in aquatic species: evidence from sperm agglutination in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qiaoxiang; Huang, Changjiang; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2007-02-01

    A lack of standardization in sperm cryopreservation of aquatic organisms is one of the main reasons for inconsistency observed among various studies. In particular, there have been few attempts to standardize sperm concentration during procedural optimization. This study was intended to call attention to sperm concentration standardization through research of sperm agglutination in Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. Sperm agglutination after thawing is a relatively frequent phenomenon observed for various aquatic species, especially when sub-optimal cryopreservation protocols are used; however, no systematic attempts have been made to explain this phenomenon. The present study evaluated various factors affecting sperm agglutination of thawed samples from diploid and tetraploid Pacific oysters, and is the first detailed report addressing the sperm agglutination phenomenon of thawed samples from any aquatic organism. Agglutination of oyster sperm was classified into six levels with a scale ranging from 0 (homogenous suspension) to 5 (well-developed "noodles"). It was found that agglutination in thawed samples was mainly due to the lack of sufficient cryoprotectant for a specific sperm concentration. Interestingly, high levels of agglutination did not necessarily lead to low fertilization. On the contrary, some sperm cells appeared to gain protection from the formation of peripheral agglutination within 0.5-ml French straws. The exact mechanism of sperm agglutination remains unclear. However, morphological examination of cross sections of the noodles (agglutination level 5) indicated at least two forms of agglutination (formed with and without cryoprotectant) which could be used as a tool to understand the cryopreservation process within the micro-environment of the straw. Furthermore, the fact that the level of sperm agglutination was directly determined by sperm concentration, in addition to the type of cryoprotectant, cryoprotectant concentration, and cooling and

  11. Ophiobolin A from Bipolaris oryzae Perturbs Motility and Membrane Integrities of Porcine Sperm and Induces Cell Death on Mammalian Somatic Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottó Bencsik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bipolaris oryzae is a phytopathogenic fungus causing a brown spot disease in rice, and produces substance that strongly perturbs motility and membrane integrities of boar spermatozoa. The substance was isolated from the liquid culture of the fungal strain using extraction and a multi-step semi-preparative HPLC procedures. Based on the results of mass spectrometric and 2D NMR techniques, the bioactive molecule was identified as ophiobolin A, a previously described sesterterpene-type compound. The purified ophiobolin A exhibited strong motility inhibition and viability reduction on boar spermatozoa. Furthermore, it damaged the sperm mitochondria significantly at sublethal concentration by the dissipation of transmembrane potential in the mitochondrial inner membrane, while the plasma membrane permeability barrier remained intact. The study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of ophiobolin A toward somatic cell lines is higher by 1–2 orders of magnitude compared to other mitochondriotoxic mycotoxins, and towards sperm cells unique by replacing the progressive motility by shivering tail beating at low exposure concentration.

  12. Importance of sperm gluthatione treatment in ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meybodi, A Mohseni; Mozdarani, H; Moradi, Sh Zari; Akhoond, M R

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether treatment of sperm from infertile patients would gluthatione could reduce sperm premature chromosome condensation (PCC). To reach the goals of this study, the frequency of sperm PCC formation in sperm of normal and sub-fertile men with/without glutathione treatment were compared and analyzed. Hamster oocytes were retrieved after super ovulation by PMSG and HCG injection. Following treatment with hyaluronidase, zonae was removed by trypsin digestion. Sperm were classified into 3 groups according to morphology, movement and counts, treated with glutathione(10 μg/ml) and then processed by swim up method. After capacitation, zona-free oocytes were incubated with sperm then transferred to fresh media containing colcemid. Cells were fixed and slides prepared using Tarkowskie's standard air drying technique and after staining in 5% Giemsa, oocytes were analyzed at high magnification. Sperm penetration rate was higher and the rate of intact sperm head and PCC was lower in GSH treated samples compared to non treated groups. Sperm penetration rate was significantly higher in treated astheno sperm samples compared to non-treated ones (66.4% and 50. 97% respectively) (P ART outcome.

  13. A novel cell-processing method 'AgarCytos' in conjunction with OCT3/4 and PLAP to detect intratubular germ cell neoplasia in non-obstructive azoospermia using remnants of testicular sperm extraction specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessel, M.; Ramos, L.; Hulsbergen, A.F.C.; D'Hauwers, K.W.M.; Braat, D.D.M.; Kaa, C.A. van de

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Can we diagnose intratubular germ cell neoplasia (IGCN) using the immunohistochemical markers placental-like alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) and OCT3/4 using a novel cell-processing method 'AgarCytos', applied to the remnants of testicular sperm extraction (TESE) specimens and what is

  14. Multitask learning for protein subcellular location prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Pan, Sinno Jialin; Xue, Hannah Hong; Yang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization is concerned with predicting the location of a protein within a cell using computational methods. The location information can indicate key functionalities of proteins. Thus, accurate prediction of subcellular localizations of proteins can help the prediction of protein functions and genome annotations, as well as the identification of drug targets. Machine learning methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs) have been used in the past for the problem of protein subcellular localization, but have been shown to suffer from a lack of annotated training data in each species under study. To overcome this data sparsity problem, we observe that because some of the organisms may be related to each other, there may be some commonalities across different organisms that can be discovered and used to help boost the data in each localization task. In this paper, we formulate protein subcellular localization problem as one of multitask learning across different organisms. We adapt and compare two specializations of the multitask learning algorithms on 20 different organisms. Our experimental results show that multitask learning performs much better than the traditional single-task methods. Among the different multitask learning methods, we found that the multitask kernels and supertype kernels under multitask learning that share parameters perform slightly better than multitask learning by sharing latent features. The most significant improvement in terms of localization accuracy is about 25 percent. We find that if the organisms are very different or are remotely related from a biological point of view, then jointly training the multiple models cannot lead to significant improvement. However, if they are closely related biologically, the multitask learning can do much better than individual learning.

  15. Cytometry of mammalian sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-11

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. The accessibility of male cells makes them well suited for analytical cytology. We might automate the process of determining sperm morphology but should not do so solely for increased speed. Rather, richer tangible benefits will derive from cytometric evaluation through increased sensitivity, reduced subjectivity, standardization between investigators and laboratories, enhanced archival systems, and the benefits of easily exchanged standardized data. Inroads on the standardization of assays for motility and functional integrity are being made. Flow cytometric analysis of total DNA content of individual sperm is an insensitive means to detect exposure to reproductive toxins because of the small size and low frequency of the DNA content errors. Flow cytometry can be applied to determine the proportions of X- and Y-sperm in semen samples.

  16. Sperm motility under exposure of hydrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evdokimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains research data on the effect of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide on human sperm motility and specific enzyme activity of sperms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It is shown that incubation of sperms with hydrogen dioxide in a low concentration leads to a change and motility in sperm and activity of sperm enzyme. Intensity of observed effect depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide: active mobility increased by 17–19 % and the total mobility – 11 %. Motility changes in sperms were accompanied by increased activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by 24 %, in normozoospermia response was higher than in pathozoospermia and also depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide. The use of sperm analyzer enabled revealing changes in the diapason of different speeds of the active fraction of sperm, which have been observed in the first 15 min of incubation with hydrogen dioxide. A possible mechanism of action of the detected effect is discussed. Reactive oxygen species easily oxidize enzyme for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of sperms, which leads to a loss of sperm motility, for example, in varicocele. Initially low enzyme activity in varicocele (pathozoospermia may be associated with the suppression of sperm antioxidant defense. Addition of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide into sperm samples leads to an increase in the concentration of reduced glutathione in a cell. Increase of sperm motility in this case can serve as an indicator of normal operation of the cellular antioxidant defense system. Obtained experimental results provide a background for their introduction into clinical practice in the program of assisted reproductive technologies. 

  17. Sperm motility under exposure of hydrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evdokimov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains research data on the effect of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide on human sperm motility and specific enzyme activity of sperms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It is shown that incubation of sperms with hydrogen dioxide in a low concentration leads to a change and motility in sperm and activity of sperm enzyme. Intensity of observed effect depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide: active mobility increased by 17–19 % and the total mobility – 11 %. Motility changes in sperms were accompanied by increased activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by 24 %, in normozoospermia response was higher than in pathozoospermia and also depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide. The use of sperm analyzer enabled revealing changes in the diapason of different speeds of the active fraction of sperm, which have been observed in the first 15 min of incubation with hydrogen dioxide. A possible mechanism of action of the detected effect is discussed. Reactive oxygen species easily oxidize enzyme for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of sperms, which leads to a loss of sperm motility, for example, in varicocele. Initially low enzyme activity in varicocele (pathozoospermia may be associated with the suppression of sperm antioxidant defense. Addition of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide into sperm samples leads to an increase in the concentration of reduced glutathione in a cell. Increase of sperm motility in this case can serve as an indicator of normal operation of the cellular antioxidant defense system. Obtained experimental results provide a background for their introduction into clinical practice in the program of assisted reproductive technologies. 

  18. Sperm viability - Determination of sperm viability using fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine the percentage of viable sperm in a semen sample using stains that differentiates viable (live) sperm from nonviable (dead) sperm. Viable sperm are detected by SYBR-14, which stains the sperm nuclei green. Nonviable sperm are detected by propidium iodide (PI), which stains the sperm red...

  19. Time-Dependent Measure of a Nano-Scale Force-Pulse Driven by the Axonemal Dynein Motors in Individual Live Sperm Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M J; Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M W; Balhorn, R

    2009-04-23

    Nano-scale mechanical forces generated by motor proteins are crucial to normal cellular and organismal functioning. The ability to measure and exploit such forces would be important to developing motile biomimetic nanodevices powered by biological motors for Nanomedicine. Axonemal dynein motors positioned inside the sperm flagellum drive microtubule sliding giving rise to rhythmic beating of the flagellum. This force-generating action makes it possible for the sperm cell to move through viscous media. Here we report new nano-scale information on how the propulsive force is generated by the sperm flagellum and how this force varies over time. Single cell recordings reveal discrete {approx}50 ms pulses oscillating with amplitude 9.8 {+-} 2.6 nN independent of pulse frequency (3.5-19.5 Hz). The average work carried out by each cell is 4.6 x 10{sup -16} J per pulse, equivalent to the hydrolysis of {approx}5,500 ATP molecules. The mechanochemical coupling at each active dynein head is {approx}2.2 pN/ATP, and {approx}3.9 pN per dynein arm, in agreement with previously published values obtained using different methods.

  20. Subcellular compartmentation of glutathione in dicotyledonous plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the subcellular distribution of glutathione in roots and leaves of different plant species (Arabidopsis, Cucurbita, and Nicotiana). Glutathione is an important antioxidant and redox buffer which is involved in many metabolic processes including plant defense. Thus information on the subcellular distribution in these model plants especially during stress situations provides a deeper insight into compartment specific defense reactions and reflects the occurrence of compartment specific oxidative stress. With immunogold cytochemistry and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy glutathione could be localized in highest contents in mitochondria, followed by nuclei, peroxisomes, the cytosol, and plastids. Within chloroplasts and mitochondria, glutathione was restricted to the stroma and matrix, respectively, and did not occur in the lumen of cristae and thylakoids. Glutathione was also found at the membrane and in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. It was also associated with the trans and cis side of dictyosomes. None or only very little glutathione was detected in vacuoles and the apoplast of mesophyll and root cells. Additionally, glutathione was found in all cell compartments of phloem vessels, vascular parenchyma cells (including vacuoles) but was absent in xylem vessels. The specificity of this method was supported by the reduction of glutathione labeling in all cell compartments (up to 98%) of the glutathione-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana rml1 mutant. Additionally, we found a similar distribution of glutathione in samples after conventional fixation and rapid microwave-supported fixation. Thus, indicating that a redistribution of glutathione does not occur during sample preparation. Summing up, this study gives a detailed insight into the subcellular distribution of glutathione in plants and presents solid evidence for the accuracy and specificity of the applied method. PMID:20186447

  1. Sperm function test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Talwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation. They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation. Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count, structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology. Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test, should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test. They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test. Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test to the oocyte during fertilization.

  2. Liver X receptor ligand cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells and not in normal colon epithelial cells depends on LXRβ subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtaut, Flavie; Derangère, Valentin; Chevriaux, Angélique; Ladoire, Sylvain; Cotte, Alexia K; Arnould, Laurent; Boidot, Romain; Rialland, Mickaël; Ghiringhelli, François; Rébé, Cédric

    2015-09-29

    Increasing evidence indicates that Liver X Receptors (LXRs) have some anticancer properties. We recently demonstrated that LXR ligands induce colon cancer cell pyroptosis through an LXRβ-dependent pathway. In the present study, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines presented differential cytoplasmic localizations of LXRβ. This localization correlated with caspase-1 activation and cell death induction under treatment with LXR ligand. The association of LXRβ with the truncated form of RXRα (t-RXRα) was responsible for the sequestration of LXRβ in the cytoplasm in colon cancer cells. Moreover t-RXRα was not expressed in normal colon epithelial cells. These cells presented a predominantly nuclear localization of LXRβ and were resistant to LXR ligand cytotoxicity. Our results showed that predominant cytoplasmic localization of LXRβ, which occurs in colon cancer cells but not in normal colon epithelial cells, allowed LXR ligand-induced pyroptosis. This study strengthens the hypothesis that LXRβ could be a promising target in cancer therapy.

  3. Individual sperm selection by microfluidics integrated with interferometric phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eravuchira, Pinkie J; Mirsky, Simcha K; Barnea, Itay; Levi, Mattan; Balberg, Michal; Shaked, Natan T

    2017-09-27

    The selection of sperm cells possessing normal morphology and motility is crucial for many assisted reproductive technologies (ART), especially for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), as sperm quality directly affects the probability of inducing healthy pregnancy. We present a novel platform for real-time quantitative analysis and selection of individual sperm cells without staining. Towards this end, we developed an integrated approach, combining interferometric phase microscopy (IPM), for stain-free sperm imaging and real-time automatic analysis based on the sperm cell 3D morphology and contents, with a disposable microfluidic device, for sperm selection and enrichment. On testing the capabilities of the microfluidic device, we obtained successful selection of sperm cells with a selectivity of 89.5±3.5%, with no negative-decision sperm cells being inadvertently selected. In addition, we demonstrate the accuracy of sperm cell analysis using IPM by comparing the quantitative analysis produced by our IPM-based algorithm to the qualitative visual analysis performed independently by an experienced embryologist, which resulted in precision and specificity of 100%. We believe that the presented integrated approach has the potential to dramatically change the way sperm cells are selected for ICSI and other ART procedures, making the selection process more objective, quantitative and automatic, and thereby increasing success rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of RNA interference on the mitochondrial subcellular localization of alpha-synuclein and on the formation of Lewy body-like inclusions in the cytoplasm of human embryonic kidney 293 cells induced by the overexpression of alpha-synuclein☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Liao, Xiaoping; Wen, Guoqiang; Deng, Yidong; Guo, Min; Long, Zhigang; Ouyang, Feng

    2012-01-01

    The specific and effective α-synuclein RNA interference (RNAi) plasmids, and the α-synuclein-pEGFP recombinant plasmids were co-transfected into human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells using the lipofectamine method. Using an inverted fluorescence microscope, α-synuclein proteins were observed to aggregate in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Wild-type α-synuclein proteins co-localized with mitochondria. Hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed round eosinophilic bodies (Lewy body-like inclusions) in the cytoplasm of some cells transfected with α-synuclein-pEGFP plasmid. However, the formation of Lewy body-like inclusions was not observed following transfection with the RNAi pSYN-1 plasmid. RNAi blocked Lewy body-like inclusions in the cytoplasm of HEK293 cells induced by wild-type α-synuclein overexpression, but RNAi did not affect the subcellular localization of wild-type α-synuclein in mitochondria. PMID:25767480

  5. Analysis of epididymal sperm maturation by MALDI profiling and top-down mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labas, Valérie; Spina, Lucie; Belleannee, Clémence; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Gargaros, Audrey; Dacheux, Françoise; Dacheux, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-15

    The fertilization ability of male gametes is achieved after their transit through the epididymis where important post-gonadal differentiation occurs in different cellular compartments. Most of these maturational modifications occur at the protein level. The epididymal sperm maturation process was investigated using the ICM-MS (Intact Cell MALDI-TOF MS) approach on boar spermatozoa isolated from four different epididymal regions (immature to mature stage). Differential and quantitative MALDI-TOF profiling for whole cells or sub-cellular fractions was combined with targeted top-down MS in order to identify endogenous biomolecules. Using this approach, 172m/z peaks ranging between 2 and 20kDa were found to be modified during maturation of sperm. Using top-down MS, 62m/z were identified corresponding to peptidoforms/proteoforms with post-translational modifications (MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001303). Many of the endogenous peptides were characterized as N-, C-terminal sequences or internal fragments of proteins presenting specific cleavages, suggesting the presence of sequential protease activities in the spermatozoa. This is the first time that such proteolytic activities could be evidenced for various sperm proteins through quantification of their proteolytic products. ICM-MS/top-down MS thus proved to be a valid approach for peptidome/degradome studies and provided new contributions to understanding of the maturation process of the male gamete involved in the development of male fertility. This peptidomic study (i) characterized the peptidome of epididymal spermatozoa from boar (Sus scrofa); (ii) established characteristic molecular phenotypes distinguishing degrees of maturation of spermatozoa during epididymal transit, and (iii) revealed that protease activities were at the origin of numerous peptides from known and unknown proteins involved in sperm maturation and/or fertility processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  6. Biomechanics of subcellular structures by non-invasive Brillouin microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Braakman, Sietse

    2016-11-01

    Cellular biomechanics play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of several diseases. Unfortunately, current methods to measure biomechanical properties are invasive and mostly limited to the surface of a cell. As a result, the mechanical behaviour of subcellular structures and organelles remains poorly characterised. Here, we show three-dimensional biomechanical images of single cells obtained with non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin microscopy with an unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results quantify the longitudinal elastic modulus of subcellular structures. In particular, we found the nucleoli to be stiffer than both the nuclear envelope (p biomechanics and its role in pathophysiology.

  7. Intracellular pH (pHin) and cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) regulation via ATPases: studies in cell populations, single cells, and subcellular compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Jose D.; Sanka, Shankar C.; Gyorke, Sandor; Wesson, Donald E.; Minta, Akwasi; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    1999-07-01

    Changes in pHin and (Ca2+)cyt are important in the signal transduction mechanisms leading to many physiological responses including cell growth, motility, secretion/exocytosis, etc. The concentrations of these ions are regulated via primary and secondary ion transporting mechanisms. In diabetes, specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory mechanism might be altered. To study these ions, we employ fluorescence spectroscopy, and cell imagin spectroscopy/confocal microscopy. pH and Ca2+ indicators are loaded in the cytosol with acetoxymethyl ester forms of dyes, and in endosomal/lysosomal (E/L) compartments by overnight incubation of cells with dextran- conjugated ion fluorescent probes. We focus on specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory systems: plasmalemmal vacuolar- type H+-ATPases (pm V-ATPases) and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA). As experimental models, we employ vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and microvascular endothelial cells. We have chosen these cells because they are important in blood flow regulation and in angiogenesis. These processes are altered in diabetes. In many cell types, ion transport processes are dependent on metabolism of glucose for maximal activity. Our main findings are: (a) glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA is required for cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis in both VSM and microvascular endothelial cells; (b) E/L compartments are important for pH and Ca2+ regulation via H+-ATPases and SERCA, respectively; and (c) pm-V- ATPases are important for pHin regulation in microvascular endothelial cells.

  8. GAR22β regulates cell migration, sperm motility, and axoneme structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamper, Ivonne; Fleck, David; Barlin, Meltem; Spehr, Marc; El Sayad, Sara; Kleine, Henning; Maxeiner, Sebastian; Schalla, Carmen; Aydin, Gülcan; Hoss, Mareike; Litchfield, David W; Lüscher, Bernhard; Zenke, Martin; Sechi, Antonio

    2016-01-15

    Spatiotemporal cytoskeleton remodeling is pivotal for cell adhesion and migration. Here we investigated the function of Gas2-related protein on chromosome 22 (GAR22β), a poorly characterized protein that interacts with actin and microtubules. Primary and immortalized GAR22β(-/-) Sertoli cells moved faster than wild-type cells. In addition, GAR22β(-/-) cells showed a more prominent focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β overexpression or its reexpression in GAR22β(-/-) cells reduced cell motility and focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β-actin interaction was stronger than GAR22β-microtubule interaction, resulting in GAR22β localization and dynamics that mirrored those of the actin cytoskeleton. Mechanistically, GAR22β interacted with the regulator of microtubule dynamics end-binding protein 1 (EB1) via a novel noncanonical amino acid sequence, and this GAR22β-EB1 interaction was required for the ability of GAR22β to modulate cell motility. We found that GAR22β is highly expressed in mouse testes, and its absence resulted in reduced spermatozoa generation, lower actin levels in testes, and impaired motility and ultrastructural disorganization of spermatozoa. Collectively our findings identify GAR22β as a novel regulator of cell adhesion and migration and provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of diverse cytoskeleton-dependent processes. © 2016 Gamper et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Cabantous, Stephanie [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  10. Toxigenic diversity of two different RAPD groups of Stachybotrys chartarum isolates analyzed by potential for trichothecene production and for boar sperm cell motility inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltola, J.; Niessen, L.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-one isolates of Stachybotrys chartarum from indoor and outdoor environments were analyzed for the presence of the trichodiene synthase (Tri5) gene, trichothecenes, boar sperm cell motility inhibition, and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA banding patterns (RAPDs). Twenty-two S. chartarum...... satratoxins or trichodermol. Nineteen S. chartarum isolates, distributed among the Tri5 gene negative and positive groups, inhibited boar spermatozoan motility at concentrations of less than or equal to60 mug of crude cell extract/mL. The inhibition of motility was independent of satratoxins or atranones...

  11. Direct binding of boar ejaculate and epididymal spermatozoa to porcine epididymal epithelial cells is also needed to maintain sperm survival in in vitro co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeste, Marc; Castillo-Martín, Míriam; Bonet, Sergi; Briz, Maria Dolors

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of cultured epididymal epithelial cells (EEC) from corpus, caput or cauda, oviductal epithelial cells (OEC) and non-reproductive epithelial cells (LLC-PK1) on function and survival of epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa, in the latter case to determine whether such influence differed between morphologically normal and abnormal spermatozoa. For this purpose, either spermatozoa were directly co-cultured with EEC from caput, corpus, or cauda, OEC and LLC-PK1 cells (experiment 1) or a membrane-diffusible insert was included in these co-cultures (experiment 2). EEC cultured from the three epididymal regions did not differently affect the sperm parameters. Morphologically normal spermatozoa presented a higher ability to bind EEC, OEC, and LLC-PK1 than abnormal spermatozoa with cytoplasmic droplets or with tail/head malformations. Epididymal spermatozoa were more able to bind EEC during the first 24 h of co-culture, while ejaculated spermatozoa presented a higher capacity to bind OEC between 30 min and 3 h of co-incubation. In all cases, the ability to bind to epithelial cells was higher when they were co-cultured with EEC and OEC than with LLC-PK1. After 2 h of co-culture, the viability of epididymal spermatozoa was better maintained when they bound EEC than when they bound OEC. Conversely, the viability of ejaculated spermatozoa was better maintained when bound OEC than when bound EEC after 24 and 48 h of co-culture. Our work, apart from corroborating the involvement of morphologically normal spermatozoa in the formation of sperm reservoir, highlights the importance of direct contact spermatozoa-EEC in maintaining the sperm survival in in vitro co-culture, and also suggests that a specific binding between EEC and epididymal spermatozoa exists. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Importance of sperm morphology during sperm transport and fertilization in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vázquez, Francisco A; Gadea, Joaquín; Matás, Carmen; Holt, William V

    2016-01-01

    After natural or artificial insemination, the spermatozoon starts a journey from the site of deposition to the place of fertilization. However, only a small subset of the spermatozoa deposited achieves their goal: to reach and fertilize the egg. Factors involved in controlling sperm transport and fertilization include the female reproductive tract environment, cell-cell interactions, gene expression, and phenotypic sperm traits. Some of the significant determinants of fertilization are known (i.e., motility or DNA status), but many sperm traits are still indecipherable. One example is the influence of sperm dimensions and shape upon transport within the female genital tract towards the oocyte. Biophysical associations between sperm size and motility may influence the progression of spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract, but uncertainties remain concerning how sperm morphology influences the fertilization process, and whether only the sperm dimensions per se are involved. Moreover, such explanations do not allow the possibility that the female tract is capable of distinguishing fertile spermatozoa on the basis of their morphology, as seems to be the case with biochemical, molecular, and genetic properties. This review focuses on the influence of sperm size and shape in evolution and their putative role in sperm transport and selection within the uterus and the ability to fertilize the oocyte.

  13. Sperm preparation for ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schill Wolf-Bernhard

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The onset of clinical assisted reproduction, a quarter of a century ago, required the isolation of motile spermatozoa. As the indication of assisted reproduction shifted from mere gynaecological indications to andrological indications during the years, this urged andrological research to understand the physiology of male germ cell better and develop more sophisticated techniques to separate functional spermatozoa from those that are immotile, have poor morphology or are not capable to fertilize oocytes. Initially, starting from simple washing of spermatozoa, separation techniques, based on different principles like migration, filtration or density gradient centrifugation evolved. The most simple and cheapest is the conventional swim-up procedure. A more sophisticated and most gentle migration method is migration-sedimentation. However, its yield is relatively small and the technique is therefore normally only limited to ejaculates with a high number of motile spermatozoa. Recently, however, the method was also successfully used to isolate spermatozoa for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Sperm separation methods that yield a higher number of motile spermatozoa are glass wool filtration or density gradient centrifugation with different media. Since Percoll® as a density medium was removed from the market in 1996 for clinical use in the human because of its risk of contamination with endotoxins, other media like IxaPrep®, Nycodenz, SilSelect®, PureSperm® or Isolate® were developed in order to replace Percoll®. Today, an array of different methods is available and the selection depends on the quality of the ejaculates, which also includes production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by spermatozoa and leukocytes. Ejaculates with ROS production should not be separated by means of conventional swim-up, as this can severely damage the spermatozoa. In order to protect the male germ cells from the influence of ROS and to stimulate

  14. Subcellular localization of SV2 and other secretory vesicle components in PC12 cells by an efficient method of preembedding EM immunocytochemistry for cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, V A; Ploug, Thorkil; Tao-Cheng, J H

    1996-01-01

    substantially improved the efficiency of the preembedding EM ICC procedures for cell cultures. The advantages and related caveats of this method are discussed. SV2 was distinctly localized on dusters of synaptic vesicles and large dense-cored vesicles (LDCV). The distribution of SV2 on these two types...... membranes. Furthermore, whereas SV2 is localized on the membranes of the LDCVs, chromogranin A, an acidic protein in secretory granules, is clearly in the core of the LDCVs. This is the first demonstration of these two antigens in such dose (approximately 20 nm) yet distinct compartments within a single...

  15. Capacitation dependent changes in the sperm plasma membrane influence porcine gamete interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Flesch, F.M.

    2000-01-01

    Although the sperm cell was first seen through Van Leeuwenhoek’s microscope in the late seventieth century and despite much effort in the last 40 years in particular, we still do not know a great deal of the sperm cell and its interaction with the oocyte. Mammalian sperm-oocyte interaction is a complex process requiring the activation of the sperm cell (called capacitation), recognition and binding between the oocyte and the sperm cell, induction of the sperm acrosome reaction (excretion of e...

  16. Chemical UV filters can affect human sperm function in a progesterone-like manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Anders; Egeberg, Dorte; Almstrup, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    Human sperm cell function must be precisely regulated to achieve natural fertilization. Progesterone released by the cumulus cells surrounding the egg induces a Ca2+-influx into human sperm cells via the CatSper Ca2+-channel and thereby controls sperm function. Multiple chemical UV filters have...... the effect of progesterone on Ca2+-signaling in human sperm cells, can similarly mimic the effect of progesterone on acrosome reaction and sperm penetration. Human exposure to these chemical UV filters may impair fertility by interfering with sperm function, e.g. through induction of premature acrosome...

  17. Sperm competition in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhead, T R

    1998-05-01

    Sperm competition in birds occurs when a female is inseminated by more than one male during a single breeding cycle. Despite most birds being socially monogamous, sperm competition is widespread and results in frequent extra-pair paternity. Sperm competition is a fundamental part of sexual selection since it results in differential reproductive success among males. Male adaptations to sperm competition include relatively large testes, large sperm stores and long spermatozoa, mate guarding and frequent pair copulations. Females show no obvious morphological adaptations to sperm competition but, by controlling whether copulations are successful, they probably determine its frequency and extent. Despite this, the evolutionary benefits females acquire from extra-pair fertilizations are poorly understood. Experiments in which females are inseminated with equal numbers of spermatozoa from two males usually show last male sperm precedence. Understanding the mechanism of sperm competition requires understanding of why the last male to inseminate a female fertilizes a disproportionate number of eggs. The data from sperm competition studies on the domestic fowl, turkeys and zebra finches are consistent only with a passive sperm loss model of sperm competition. The mechanism is as follows: after insemination, spermatozoa enter the sperm storage tubules located in the oviduct, from which they are lost at a constant rate over days or weeks. All else being equal, the interval between two inseminations determines the probability of fertilization: the second of two inseminations fertilizes most eggs simply because, by the time fertilization occurs, fewer of these spermatozoa have been lost. Other factors also affect the outcome of sperm competition: the timing of insemination relative to oviposition, the differential fertilizing capacity of males and differences in the numbers of spermatozoa inseminated; as a consequence, last male sperm precedence is not automatic. On the basis

  18. Differences in the fatty-acid composition of rodent spermatozoa are associated to levels of sperm competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; Mateo, Rafael; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Sperm competition is a prevalent phenomenon that drives the evolution of sperm function. High levels of sperm competition lead to increased metabolism to fuel higher sperm velocities. This enhanced metabolism can result in oxidative damage (including lipid peroxidation) and damage to the membrane. We hypothesized that in those species experiencing high levels of sperm competition there are changes in the fatty-acid composition of the sperm membrane that makes the membrane more resistant to oxidative damage. Given that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are the most prone to lipid peroxidation, we predicted that higher sperm competition leads to a reduction in the proportion of sperm PUFAs. In contrast, we predicted that levels of sperm competition should not affect the proportion of PUFAs in somatic cells. To test these predictions, we quantified the fatty-acid composition of sperm, testis and liver cells in four mouse species (genus Mus) that differ in their levels of sperm competition. Fatty-acid composition in testis and liver cells was not associated to sperm competition levels. However, in sperm cells, as predicted, an increase in sperm competition levels was associated with an increase in the proportion of saturated fatty-acids (the most resistant to lipid peroxidation) and by a concomitant decrease in the proportion of PUFAs. Two particular fatty acids were most responsible for this pattern (arachidonic acid and palmitic acid). Our findings thus indicate that sperm competition has a pervasive influence in the composition of sperm cells that ultimately may have important effects in sperm function. PMID:25795911

  19. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Sabeti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions

  20. Sperm dimorphism in terms of nuclear shape and microtubule accumulation in Cyrtanthus mackenii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Tomonari; Hoshino, Yoichiro

    2010-06-01

    Pollen tubes of Cyrtanthus mackenii, a species with bicellular pollen, were cultured in vitro to investigate nuclear phase changes during generative cell division and male germ unit (MGU) formation, using flow cytometric analysis. Results revealed that sperm cells were formed after 12 h of culture. During sperm maturation, the nuclei of sperm cells were not associated with the vegetative nucleus (unassociated sperm cells; Sua) and became longer than those of sperm cells associated with the vegetative nucleus (Svn). These findings indicate that the pair of sperm cells in the C. mackenii MGU is dimorphic in terms of nuclear shape. Dimorphism coincides with anti-alpha-tubulin antibody immunofluorescence, which was higher in the Sua than in Svn. Following treatment with oryzalin, triggering microtubule depolymerization, differences between nuclear shapes in the two sperm nuclei disappeared, suggesting that microtubule accumulation between sperm cells in the MGU correlates with differences in the nuclear shape.

  1. Fluid viscoelasticity promotes collective swimming of sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Lin, Chungwei; Harvey, Benedict; Fiore, Alyssa G; Ardon, Florencia; Wu, Mingming; Suarez, Susan S

    2017-06-09

    From flocking birds to swarming insects, interactions of organisms large and small lead to the emergence of collective dynamics. Here, we report striking collective swimming of bovine sperm in dynamic clusters, enabled by the viscoelasticity of the fluid. Sperm oriented in the same direction within each cluster, and cluster size and cell-cell alignment strength increased with viscoelasticity of the fluid. In contrast, sperm swam randomly and individually in Newtonian (nonelastic) fluids of low and high viscosity. Analysis of the fluid motion surrounding individual swimming sperm indicated that sperm-fluid interaction was facilitated by the elastic component of the fluid. In humans, as well as cattle, sperm are naturally deposited at the entrance to the cervix and must swim through viscoelastic cervical mucus and other mucoid secretions to reach the site of fertilization. Collective swimming induced by elasticity may thus facilitate sperm migration and contribute to successful fertilization. We note that almost all biological fluids (e.g. mucus and blood) are viscoelastic in nature, and this finding highlights the importance of fluid elasticity in biological function.

  2. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.

  3. Solea senegalensis sperm cryopreservation: New insights on sperm quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta F Riesco

    Full Text Available Cryopreservation of Senegalese sole sperm can represent an alternative to overcome some reproductive problems of this species. However, it is important to guarantee the safe use of cryopreserved sperm by selecting an appropriate protocol according to a high demand quality need to be ensured. It has been demonstrated that traditional assays such as motility and viability do not provide enough information to identify specific damage caused by cryopreservation process (freezing and thawing. Specific tests, including lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, should be performed. In the present study, motility and lipid peroxidation were performed as specific tests allowing us to discard cryopreservation conditions such as methanol as internal cryoprotectant and bovine serum albumin as external cryoprotectant. In addition, a caspase 3/7 detection by flow cytometry was performed to analyze apoptosis activity in the best selected conditions. Moreover, new highly sensitive tests based on transcript number detection have recently been described in fish sperm cryopreservation. For this reason, a transcript level detection assay was performed on certain oxidative and chaperone genes related to fertilization ability and embryo development (hsp70, hsp90BB, hsp90AA, gpx to select the best cryopreservation conditions. DMSO+ egg yolk proved to be the best cryoprotectant combination in terms of transcript level. This study describes an optimized cryopreservation protocol for Solea senegalensis sperm demonstrating for the first time that transcript degradation is the most sensitive predictor of cell status in this species after cryopreservation.

  4. Not all sperm are equal: functional mitochondria characterize a subpopulation of human sperm with better fertilization potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Sousa

    Full Text Available Human sperm samples are very heterogeneous and include a low amount of truly functional gametes. Distinct strategies have been developed to characterize and isolate this specific subpopulation. In this study we have used fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to determine if mitochondrial function, as assessed using mitochondrial-sensitive probes, could be employed as a criterion to obtain more functional sperm from a given ejaculate. We first determined that mitochondrial activity correlated with the quality of distinct human samples, from healthy donors to patients with decreased semen quality. Furthermore, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to separate sperm with active and inactive mitochondria we found that this was also true within samples. Indeed, sperm with active mitochondria defined a more functional subpopulation, which contained more capacitated and acrosome intact cells, sperm with lower chromatin damage, and, crucially, sperm more able to decondense and participate in early development using both chemical induction and injection into mature bovine oocytes. Furthermore, cell sorting using mitochondrial activity produced a more functional sperm subpopulation than classic swim-up, both in terms of improvement in a variety of functional sperm parameters and in statistical significance. In conclusion, whatever the true biological role of sperm mitochondria in fertilization, mitochondrial activity is a clear hallmark of human sperm functionality.

  5. Chemical dispersants used in the Gulf of Mexico oil crisis are cytotoxic and genotoxic to sperm whale skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Catherine F; Wise, James T F; Wise, Sandra S; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-07-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico drew attention to the need for toxicological studies of chemical dispersants. We are still learning the effects these spills had on wildlife. Little is known about the toxicity of these substances in marine mammals. The objective of this study was to determine the toxicity of the two dispersants (Corexit 9500 and 9527). Corexit 9500 and 9527 were both cytotoxic to sperm whale skin fibroblasts. Corexit 9527 was less cytotoxic than 9500. S9 mediated metabolism did not alter cytotoxicity of either dispersant. Both dispersants were genotoxic to sperm whale skin fibroblasts; S9 mediated metabolism increased Corexit 9527 genotoxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ca2+-stores in sperm: their identities and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Sarah; Michelangeli, Francesco; Nash, Kate; Lefievre, Linda; Morris, Jennifer; Machado-Oliveira, Gisela; Barratt, Christopher; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson; Publicover, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ stores play a central role in the regulation of cellular [Ca2+]i and the generation of complex [Ca2+] signals such as oscillations and waves. Ca2+ signalling is of particular significance in sperm cells, where it is a central regulator in many key activities (including capacitation, hyperactivation, chemotaxis and acrosome reaction) yet mature sperm lack endoplasmic reticulum and several other organelles which serve as Ca2+ stores in somatic cells. Here we review (i) the evidence for the expression in sperm of the molecular components (pumps and channels) which are functionally significant in the activity of Ca2+ stores of somatic cells and (ii) the evidence for the existence of functional Ca2+ stores in sperm. This evidence supports the existence of at least two storage organelles in mammalian sperm, one in the acrosomal region and another in the region of the sperm neck and midpiece. We then go on to discuss the likely identity of these organelles and their discrete functions: regulation by the acrosome of its own secretion and regulation by membranous organelles at the sperm neck (and possibly by the mitochondria) of flagellar activity and hyperactivation. Finally we consider the ability of the sperm discretely to control mobilisation of these stores and the functional interaction of stored Ca2+ at the sperm neck/midpiece with CatSper channels in the principal piece in regulation of the activities of mammalian sperm. PMID:19542252

  7. Artificial Sperm: New Horizons in Procreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabataev, Valentin; Tal, Raanan

    2017-10-16

    Azoospermia, the absence of any sperm cells from the ejaculated semen, poses a real challenge to the fertility urologist. While there are options to create happy families for azoospermic couples, such as the use of donor sperm and adoption, most couples still want to have genetically related offspring. Advances in urology, gynecology, and fertility laboratory technologies allow surgical sperm retrieval in azoospermic men and achievement of live births for many, but not all azoospermic couples. At present, there are extensive research efforts in several directions to create new fertility options by creating "artificial sperm cells." While these new horizons are exciting, there are significant obstacles that must be overcome before such innovative solutions can be offered to azoospermic couples. The present review article defines the problem, describes the theoretical basis for creation of artificial genetically related sperm cells, and provides an update on current successes and challenges in the long tortuous path to achieve the ultimate goal: enabling every azoospermic couple to have their own genetically related offspring. Hopefully, these research efforts will ripen in the foreseeable future, resulting in the ability to create artificial sperm cells and provide such couples with off-the-shelf solutions and fulfilling their desire to parent genetically related healthy babies.

  8. Function of the sperm nuclear matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, Jeffrey A; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Ward, W Steven

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa contain some of the most highly compact chromatin. This is due to the DNA binding proteins, the protamines, which replace most of the histones during spermiogenesis. This chromatin, however, shares some features with somatic cell chromatin. One of these is the organization of DNA into loop domains attached at their bases to a proteinaceous nuclear matrix. Several groups have shown that the sites at which DNA associates with the sperm nuclear matrix contain chromatin structures that are linked with specific functions. Recent data also suggest that the sperm nuclear matrix plays essential roles in the paternal pronucleus of the newly fertilized oocyte, suggesting that the sperm cell provides more information to the new embryo than solely the genetic material it delivers. Here, we will review these data which together give insight into the functional significance and requirements of sperm nuclear structure.

  9. The dynamics of sperm cooperation in a competitive environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Heidi S; Giomi, Luca; Hoekstra, Hopi E; Mahadevan, L

    2014-09-07

    Sperm cooperation has evolved in a variety of taxa and is often considered a response to sperm competition, yet the benefit of this form of collective movement remains unclear. Here, we use fine-scale imaging and a minimal mathematical model to study sperm aggregation in the rodent genus Peromyscus. We demonstrate that as the number of sperm cells in an aggregate increase, the group moves with more persistent linearity but without increasing speed. This benefit, however, is offset in larger aggregates as the geometry of the group forces sperm to swim against one another. The result is a non-monotonic relationship between aggregate size and average velocity with both a theoretically predicted and empirically observed optimum of six to seven sperm per aggregate. To understand the role of sexual selection in driving these sperm group dynamics, we compared two sister-species with divergent mating systems. We find that sperm of Peromyscus maniculatus (highly promiscuous), which have evolved under intense competition, form optimal-sized aggregates more often than sperm of Peromyscus polionotus (strictly monogamous), which lack competition. Our combined mathematical and experimental study of coordinated sperm movement reveals the importance of geometry, motion and group size on sperm velocity and suggests how these physical variables interact with evolutionary selective pressures to regulate cooperation in competitive environments.

  10. Prudent sperm use by leaf-cutter ant queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Den Boer, Susanne Petronella A; Baer, Boris; Dreier, Stéphanie Agnès Jeanine

    2009-01-01

    In many species, females store sperm between copulation and egg fertilization, but the consequences of sperm storage and patterns of sperm use for female life history and reproductive success have not been investigated in great detail. In hymenopteran insect societies (ants, bees, wasps), reprodu......In many species, females store sperm between copulation and egg fertilization, but the consequences of sperm storage and patterns of sperm use for female life history and reproductive success have not been investigated in great detail. In hymenopteran insect societies (ants, bees, wasps......), reproduction is usually monopolized by one or relatively few queens, who mate only during a brief period early in life and store sperm for later use. The queens of some ants are particularly long-lived and have the potential to produce millions of offspring during their life. To do so, queens store many sperm...... cells, and this sperm must remain viable throughout the years of storage. Queens should also be under strong selection to use stored sperm prudently when fertilizing eggs. We used the leaf-cutter ant Atta colombica to investigate the dynamics of sperm use during egg fertilization. We show that queens...

  11. Retinol improves in vitro differentiation of pre-pubertal mouse spermatogonial stem cells into sperm during the first wave of spermatogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim Arkoun

    Full Text Available Testicular tissue freezing has been proposed for fertility preservation in pre-pubertal boys. Thawed frozen testicular tissue must undergo a maturation process to restore sperm production. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the ability of retinol to improve the in vitro differentiation of pre-pubertal mouse spermatogonial stem cells into sperm. Testes from pre-pubertal mice, aged 2.5 and 6.5 days post-partum, were cultured on agarose gel at a gas-liquid interphase for 34, 38 and 60 days (D and for 16, 30 and 36 D respectively. Assessment of basal medium (BM supplemented with retinol (RE alone, FSH/LH alone or a combination of both, was performed. Stereological analyses and tissue lesion scoring were performed at the culture time points indicated above. Sperm production was quantified at D30 and D34 after mechanical dissection of the testicular tissues. FSH/LH significantly increased the percentage of round spermatids at D30 and D38, when compared to BM alone. However, RE significantly increased the percentages of round but also elongated spermatids at D30 and D34. Moreover, RE significantly increased the number of spermatozoa per milligram of tissue at D30 and D34 when compared to BM. Therefore, RE improved the in vitro production of spermatids and spermatozoa from pre-pubertal SSCs during the first wave of spermatogenesis. The use of RE could be a useful tool for in vitro spermatogenesis from pre-pubertal human testicular tissue.

  12. Arabidopsis myosin XI sub-domains homologous to the yeast myo2p organelle inheritance sub-domain target subcellular structures in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirali eSattarzadeh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Myosin XI motor proteins transport plant organelles on the actin cytoskeleton. The Arabidopsis gene family that encodes myosin XI has 13 members, 12 of which have sub-domains within the tail region that are homologous to well-characterized cargo-binding domains in the yeast myosin V myo2p. Little is presently known about the cargo-binding domains of plant myosin XIs. Prior experiments in which most or all of the tail regions of myosin XIs have been fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP and transiently expressed have often not resulted in fluorescent labeling of plant organelles. We identified 42 amino-acid regions within 12 Arabidopsis myosin XIs that are homologous to the yeast myo2p tail region known to be essential for vacuole and mitochondrial inheritance. A YFP fusion of the yeast region expressed in plants did not label tonoplasts or mitochondria. We investigated whether the homologous Arabidopsis regions, termed by us the PAL sub-domain, could associate with subcellular structures following transient expression of fusions with YFP in Nicotiana benthamiana. Seven YFP::PAL sub-domain fusions decorated Golgi and six were localized to mitochondria. In general, the myosin XI PAL sub-domains labeled organelles whose motility had previously been observed to be affected by mutagenesis or dominant negative assays with the respective myosins. Simultaneous transient expression of the PAL sub-domains of myosin XI-H, XI-I, and XI-K resulted in inhibition of movement of mitochondria and Golgi.

  13. Automatic classification of human sperm head morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Violeta; Heutte, Laurent; Petitjean, Caroline; Härtel, Steffen; Hitschfeld, Nancy

    2017-05-01

    Infertility is a problem that affects up to 15% of couples worldwide with emotional and physiological implications and semen analysis is the first step in the evaluation of an infertile couple. Indeed the morphology of human sperm cells is considered to be a clinical tool dedicated to the fertility prognosis and serves, mainly, for making decisions regarding the options of assisted reproduction technologies. Therefore, a complete analysis of not only normal sperm but also abnormal sperm turns out to be critical in this context. This paper sets out to develop, implement and calibrate a novel methodology to characterize and classify sperm heads towards morphological sperm analysis. Our work is aimed at focusing on a depth analysis of abnormal sperm heads for fertility diagnosis, prognosis, reproductive toxicology, basic research or public health studies. We introduce a morphological characterization for human sperm heads based on shape measures. We also present a pipeline for sperm head classification, according to the last Laboratory Manual for the Examination and Processing of Human Semen of the World Health Organization (WHO). In this sense, we propose a two-stage classification scheme that permits to classify sperm heads among five different classes (one class for normal sperm heads and four classes for abnormal sperm heads) combining an ensemble strategy for feature selection and a cascade approach with several support vector machines dedicated to the verification of each class. We use Fisher's exact test to demonstrate that there is no statistically significant differences between our results and those achieved by domain experts. Experimental evaluation shows that our two-stage classification scheme outperforms some state-of-the-art monolithic classifiers, exhibiting 58% of average accuracy. More interestingly, on the subset of data for which there is a total agreement between experts for the label of the samples, our system is able to provide 73% of average

  14. Robust classification of subcellular location patterns in high resolution 3D fluorescence microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Murphy, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of a protein's subcellular location is essential to a complete understanding of its functions. Automated interpretation methods for protein location patterns are needed for proteomics projects, and we have previously described systems for classifying the major subcellular patterns in cultured mammalian cells. We describe here the calculation of improved 3D Haralick texture features, which yielded a near-perfect classification accuracy when combined with 3D morphological and edge features. In particular, a set of 7 features achieved 98% overall accuracy for classifying 10 major subcellular location patterns in HeLa cells.

  15. Sperm competition and the evolution of sperm design in mammals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Gomendio, Montserrat; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2011-01-01

    .... The hypothesis that, when ejaculates compete with rival males, an increase in sperm size would make sperm more competitive because it would increase sperm swimming speed, has generated contradictory...

  16. Seminal plasma removal by density-gradient centrifugation is superior for goat sperm preservation compared with classical sperm washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Moreno, J; Esteso, M C; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; Delgadillo, J A; López-Sebastián, A

    2017-06-01

    Seminal plasma removal is routine in goat sperm cryopreservation protocols. The classical washing procedure designed to accomplish this usually leaves the pellet resulting from use of this procedure contaminated with dead sperm, debris, and cells other than sperm. This contamination negatively affects viability of sperm after cryopreservation. The present research was conducted to compare the effect on chilled and frozen-thawed goat sperm of the classical washing method to that of a selective washing method involving density gradient centrifugation (DGC). In the first experiment, sperm variables were measured in freshly collected sperm, and again after its washing with both methods and chilling at 5°C for 0, 3, 24, 48, 72 or 96h. The DGC-washed sperm had greater (Pexperiment involving the freezing-thawing of sperm washed by using either method, aliquots were post-wash diluted with a Tris-citric acid/glucose/egg yolk/glycerol-based medium and frozen in liquid nitrogen for 5days. After thawing, neither the VCL, VSL nor VAP of the DGC-washed samples were affected, whereas the traditionally washed samples had less motility. In conclusion, the use of DGC was associated with enhanced sperm motility variables after chilling and freezing-thawing. This procedure would, therefore, be a useful means of removing seminal plasma from goat semen and obtaining greater quality sperm for insemination purposes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Assessment of sperm DNA fragmentation in stallion (Equus caballus) and donkey (Equus asinus) using the sperm chromatin dispersion test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, E I; Crespo, F; Serres-Dalmau, C; Gutiérrez de las Rozas, A L; Dávila-Rodríguez, M I; López-Fernández, C; Gósalvez, J

    2009-10-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation (sDF) is an important parameter to assessing sperm quality. Information about sperm quality is not available for donkeys, especially in some breeds at risk of extinction. The objectives of this research were to test the four commercial variants of sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCD; sperm Halomax test), originally developed to assess sDF in boars, bulls, rams and stallions, in order to scrutinize their applicability in the study of sDF in a donkey breed at risk of extinction (Zamorano-Leonesa), for which there is no specific test available to analyze sperm at present. Only the SCD test, originally developed for stallions, produced stable and consistent results, and was deemed suitable to assess DNA fragmentation in sperm samples from donkeys. Image analysis was used to compare differences between the SCD methodology applied to stallion and donkey semen samples processed under the same experimental conditions. The extent of SCD in the SCD test was approximately 20% lower in donkey sperm than in stallion sperm. Yet, the ratio of chromatin sperm dispersion achieved in fragmented and unfragmented nuclei did not differ significantly between species. These data suggest that a similar protein depletion treatment can cause differences in protein removal in equivalent cells from different species and that sperm chromatin may be organized differently in stallions and donkeys.

  18. Magnetic hyperthermia and pH-responsive effective drug delivery to the sub-cellular level of human breast cancer cells by modified CoFe2O4 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yunok; Moorthy, Madhappan Santha; Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Bharathiraja, Subramaniyan; Oh, Junghwan

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) have been extensively utilized in a wide range of biomedical applications including magnetic hyperthermia agent. To improve the efficiency of the MNPs in therapeutic applications, in this study, we have synthesized CoFe2O4 nanoparticles and its surface was further functionalized with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). The anticancer agent, Doxorubucin (DOX) was conjugated with CoFe2O4@DMSA nanoparticle to evaluate the combined effects of thermotherapy and chemotherapy. The drug delivery efficiency of the DOX loaded CoFe2O4@DMSA nanoparticles were examined based on magnetically triggered delivery of DOX into the subcellular level of cancer cells by using MDA-MB-231 cell line. The amine part of the DOX molecules were effectively attached through an electrostatic interactions and/or hydrogen bonding interactions with the carboxylic acid groups of the DMSA functionalities present onto the surface of the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles. The DOX loaded CoFe2O4@DMSA nanoparticles can effectively uptake with cancer cells via typical endocytosis process. After endocytosis, DOX release from CoFe2O4 nanoparticles was triggered by intracellular endosomal/lysosomal acidic environments and the localized heat can be generated under an alternating magnetic field (AMF). In the presence of AMF, the released DOX molecules were accumulated with high concentrations into the subcellular level at a desired sites and exhibited a synergistic effect of an enhanced cell cytotoxicity by the combined effects of thermal-chemotherapy. Importantly, pH- and thermal-responsive Dox-loaded CoFe2O4 nanoparticles induced significant cellular apoptosis more efficiently mediated by active mitochondrial membrane and ROS generation than the free Dox. Thus, the Dox-loaded CoFe2O4@DMSA nanoparticles can be used as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer therapy by combining the thermo-chemotherapy techniques. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Do "sperm trading" simultaneous hermaphrodites always trade sperm?

    OpenAIRE

    Nils Anthes; Michiels, Nico K.

    2005-01-01

    Sperm trading can be a mechanism to solve the conflict over sex roles in hermaphrodites with copulation, sperm competition, and sperm digestion. If present, sperm donation depends on sperm receipt, resulting in conditional reciprocal inseminations. Conditional reciprocity can involve three traded commodities: penis intromissions on a yes-or-no basis, intromission durations (indicating ejaculate size), or sperm transfer. If present, animals that refuse to donate (cheaters) should be deserted b...

  20. The application of in vitro sperm competition test to evaluate the impact of ZP-derived peptides on fertilization capacity of cat sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yuyu; Greube, Alexa; Ji, Weizhi; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2006-09-01

    The present study aimed to establish a sensitive in vitro assay to assess the binding capacity of cat spermatozoa. Cat oocytes and epididymal sperm cells were isolated from gonads and cultured for in vitro fertilization. Before fertilization, the sperm cells were incubated either in 10 microM green dye Fluo-3-AM or 10 microM orange dye CellTracker Orange CMTMR (Molecular Probes), respectively. After removing the dyes by washing, sperm cells stained with each dye were added to medium drops containing oocytes in various proportions and cultured for 16 h at 37 degrees C, 5% CO(2). The oocytes were examined using fluorescence microscopy. Sperm bound to oocytes, and stained with different colors, were counted. When fresh epididymal sperm were mixed in at a specific proportion, the number of sperm bound to the zona pellucida (ZP) of oocytes reflected the proportion of differently colored sperm in the medium. This indicated that neither dye influenced the binding capacity of cat sperm. Mixing fresh and cryopreserved sperm, however, resulted in a higher number of fresh sperm bound to the oocyte surface in comparison to frozen-thawed sperm. Also, the pre-incubation of cat sperm cells with ZP derived peptide reduced the sperm binding capacity by 40%. In conclusion, the presented sperm competition assay allows assessment of fertilizing capacity of cat spermatozoa in vitro when a mixture of two different populations is used. The applied supravital fluorescence dyes do not affect motility and binding capacity of sperm cells and were clearly distinguishable under fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that the assay can be used to study the impact of sperm treatment, such as cryopreservation or pre-incubation in bioactive peptides, on fertilizing capacity.

  1. Sperm preparation for fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Gadella, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Description This book contains 19 chapters that discuss theoretical and applied andrology for domestic, zoo and wild animals. Topics include semen and its constituents; sperm production and harvest; determinants of sperm morphology; sperm preparation for fertilization; practical aspects of semen cryopreservation; evaluation of semen in the andrology laboratory; genetic aspects of male reproduction; emerging techniques and future development of semen evaluation and handling and applied androlo...

  2. Lipid composition of the canine sperm plasma membrane as markers of sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio, C F; Brito, M M; Angrimani, Dsr; Belaz, Kra; Morais, D; Zampieri, D; Losano, Jda; Assumpção, Meoa; Nichi, M; Eberlin, M N; Vannucchi, C I

    2017-04-01

    The fatty acid composition of the sperm membrane is an important factor involved in the overall sperm quality, including motility. However, in the canine species, the exact composition of the plasma membrane is still unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the plasma membrane lipid composition of motile sperm cells and to compare it with asthenospermic samples, as an attempt to determine possible involvements of membrane lipids in dog sperm cell motility. The sperm-rich fraction of ten mature dogs was collected, and samples were subjected to density gradient centrifugation by Percoll(®) , in order to separate motile and asthenospermic samples. Processed semen samples were evaluated for sperm motility, plasma and acrosome membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity and susceptibility to oxidative stress. Lipid plasma membrane composition was identified by mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The motile sperm samples presented the following phospholipids in a high frequency in the plasma membrane: phosphatidylcholine 38:4 (composed of stearic and arachidonic fatty acids), phosphatidylcholine 36:1 (stearic and oleic fatty acids), phosphatidylethanolamine 34:4 (myristic and arachidonic fatty acids), glycerophosphatidic acid 36:4 (palmitic and arachidonic fatty acids), phosphatidylcholine 40:4 plasmanyl and phosphatidylcholine 40:5 plasmenyl. Furthermore, no lipid markers were found in the asthenospermic samples. Results also indicate that differences on plasma membrane composition between motile and asthenospermic samples are crucial factors for determining sperm motility, sperm functionality and susceptibility to oxidative stress. In conclusion, plasma membrane lipid composition varies considerable between motile and asthenospermic samples. Therefore, lipid markers of sperm motility can be considered, such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine plasmanyl, phosphatidylcholine plasmenyl and phosphatidic acid. © 2016

  3. Fluid flow and sperm guidance: a simulation study of hydrodynamic sperm rheotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Kenta; Gaffney, Eamonn A

    2015-05-06

    How does a sperm find its way? The study of guidance cues has fascinated sperm biologists and in particular the prospect of rheotaxis, that is a fluid flow orienting the direction of sperm swimming, has been the subject of extensive recent study, as readily motivated by the prospect that such guidance may be active in the mammalian female reproductive tract. For instance, it has been hypothesized that helical sperm flagellar beating is necessary for such guidance, whereas there is an extensive diversity of flagellar beating patterns, with planar sperm beating readily observed in human cells for example. In particular, such cells will not be guided by fluid flow according to hypothesized mechanisms for rheotaxis presented thus far. Here, using simulation methods, we investigate rheotaxis for a wide range of flagellar beat patterns. Providing the virtual sperm firstly does not possess a tightly circling trajectory in the absence of a background flow and secondly, remains within a region of low shear to prevent being washed away by the background flow, rheotaxis is generally observed with the sperm swimming into the flow together with a possible transverse velocity. Tight circling sperm motility, as observed in select hyperactivated sperm and CatSper mutants, is predicted to disrupt the rheotactic response, whereas confinement to low shear regions generally requires boundary accumulation, thus introducing subtleties in the relationship between rheotactic behaviours and the flagellar waveform and sperm characteristics. Nonetheless, such predictions suggest such rheotactic guidance may be more common and robust than previously thought, and we document simple criteria for the presence of rheotaxis that are consistent with our simulations and understanding, as well as reported observations to date. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Sperm traits in farmed and wild Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarillo-Sepulveda, N; Hamoutene, D; Lush, L; Burt, K; Volkoff, H; Fleming, I A

    2016-02-01

    Differences in sperm metabolism and morphology between wild and non-local farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar were assessed by measuring metabolic enzyme activities and length of sperm flagella. No differences were observed between wild and farmed S. salar sperm with regards to cell counts or any of the biochemical variables assessed. Flagella of sperm cells were significantly longer in wild than farmed S. salar; however, this did not result in higher energy levels or different fertilization rates. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  5. Protein Subcellular Relocalization of Duplicated Genes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shao-Lun; Pan, An Qi; Adams, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplications during eukaroytic evolution, by successive rounds of polyploidy and by smaller scale duplications, have provided an enormous reservoir of new genes for the evolution of new functions. Preservation of many duplicated genes can be ascribed to changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. Protein subcellular relocalization (protein targeting to a new location within the cell) is another way that duplicated genes can diverge. We studied subcellular relocalization of gene pairs duplicated during the evolution of the Brassicaceae including gene pairs from the alpha whole genome duplication that occurred at the base of the family. We analyzed experimental localization data from green fluorescent protein experiments for 128 duplicate pairs in Arabidopsis thaliana, revealing 19 pairs with subcellular relocalization. Many more of the duplicate pairs with relocalization than with the same localization showed an accelerated rate of amino acid sequence evolution in one duplicate, and one gene showed evidence for positive selection. We studied six duplicate gene pairs in more detail. We used gene family analysis with several pairs to infer which gene shows relocalization. We identified potential sequence mutations through comparative analysis that likely result in relocalization of two duplicated gene products. We show that four cases of relocalization have new expression patterns, compared with orthologs in outgroup species, including two with novel expression in pollen. This study provides insights into subcellular relocalization of evolutionarily recent gene duplicates and features of genes whose products have been relocalized. PMID:25193306

  6. Flow cytometric sexing of spider sperm reveals an equal sperm production ratio in a female-biased species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanthournout, Bram; Deswarte, K; Hammad, H

    2014-01-01

    that other factors influence sex ratio variation. In this paper, we investigate whether this additional variation can be explained by the unequal production of male- and female-determining sperm cells during sperm production. Using flow cytometry, we show that males produce equal amounts of male- and female......-determining sperm cells; thus bias in sperm production does not contribute to the sex ratio bias observed in this species. This demonstrates that other factors such as parental genes suppressing endosymbiont effects and cryptic female choice might play a role in sex allocation in this species....

  7. Capacitation dependent changes in the sperm plasma membrane influence porcine gamete interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flesch, F.M.

    2000-01-01

    Although the sperm cell was first seen through Van Leeuwenhoek’s microscope in the late seventieth century and despite much effort in the last 40 years in particular, we still do not know a great deal of the sperm cell and its interaction with the oocyte. Mammalian sperm-oocyte interaction is a

  8. New insights into the distribution, protein abundance and subcellular localisation of the endogenous peroxisomal biogenesis proteins PEX3 and PEX19 in different organs and cell types of the adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasante, Claudia; Chen, Jiangping; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Bonilla-Martinez, Rocio; Karnati, Srikanth; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles mainly involved in ROS and lipid metabolism. Their abundance, protein composition and metabolic function vary depending on the cell type and adjust to different intracellular and environmental factors such as oxidative stress or nutrition. The biogenesis and proliferation of these important organelles are regulated by proteins belonging to the peroxin (PEX) family. PEX3, an integral peroxisomal membrane protein, and the cytosolic shuttling receptor PEX19 are thought to be responsible for the early steps of peroxisome biogenesis and assembly of their matrix protein import machinery. Recently, both peroxins were suggested to be also involved in the autophagy of peroxisomes (pexophagy). Despite the fact that distribution and intracellular abundance of these proteins might regulate the turnover of the peroxisomal compartment in a cell type-specific manner, a comprehensive analysis of the endogenous PEX3 and PEX19 distribution in different organs is still missing. In this study, we have therefore generated antibodies against endogenous mouse PEX3 and PEX19 and analysed their abundance and subcellular localisation in various mouse organs, tissues and cell types and compared it to the one of three commonly used peroxisomal markers (PEX14, ABCD3 and catalase). Our results revealed that the abundance of PEX3, PEX19, PEX14, ABCD3 and catalase strongly varies in the analysed organs and cell types, suggesting that peroxisome abundance, biogenesis and matrix protein import are independently regulated. We further found that in some organs, such as heart and skeletal muscle, the majority of the shuttling receptor PEX19 is bound to the peroxisomal membrane and that a strong variability exists in the cell type-specific ratio of cytosol- and peroxisome-associated PEX19. In conclusion, our results indicate that peroxisomes in various cell types are heterogeneous with regards to their matrix, membrane and biogenesis proteins.

  9. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Gaffney, E.A.

    2011-01-21

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  10. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Is lithium essential for epididymal sperm maturation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Tanmoy; Datta, Uttam; Basu, Siddhartha; Mukherjee, Prasenjit

    2016-11-01

    A wider biological role of ultratrace element lithium in the mammalian reproduction has been reported, however, presence of lithium in the epididymal luminal fluid (ELF) and its influence on sperm during maturation events in the epididymal regions are still unknown. A pilot study was carried out in Jamunapari buck which revealed that levels of lithium in the ELF diminished gradually and significantly (Psperm were observed, except spermatozoan motility that was found absent in the caput epididymis. Therefore, we hypothesize that levels of lithium in the epididymal regions is one of the motility initiation and/or regulatory factor for epididymal sperm maturation essential for acquiring fertilizing competence of sperm cells, hence, lithium could also be considered as one of the biomarker of sperm maturation in any species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploitation of eukaryotic subcellular targeting mechanisms by bacterial effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Stuart W; Galán, Jorge E

    2013-05-01

    Several bacterial species have evolved specialized secretion systems to deliver bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. These effectors have the capacity to modulate host cell pathways in order to promote bacterial survival and replication. The spatial and temporal context in which the effectors exert their biochemical activities is crucial for their function. To fully understand effector function in the context of infection, we need to understand the mechanisms that lead to the precise subcellular localization of effectors following their delivery into host cells. Recent studies have shown that bacterial effectors exploit host cell machinery to accurately target their biochemical activities within the host cell.

  13. Subcellular spectroscopic markers, topography and nanomechanics of human lung cancer and breast cancer cells examined by combined confocal Raman microspectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Gerald D; Wu, Yangzhe; Tang, Mingjie; Qi, Xiaojun; Xiao, Zhongmiao; Baker, Sherry M; Yu, Tian; Gilbertson, Timothy A; DeWald, Daryll B; Zhou, Anhong

    2013-02-21

    The nanostructures and hydrophobic properties of cancer cell membranes are important for membrane fusion and cell adhesion. They are directly related to cancer cell biophysical properties, including aggressive growth and migration. Additionally, chemical component analysis of the cancer cell membrane could potentially be applied in clinical diagnosis of cancer by identification of specific biomarker receptors expressed on cancer cell surfaces. In the present work, a combined Raman microspectroscopy (RM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique was applied to detect the difference in membrane chemical components and nanomechanics of three cancer cell lines: human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549), and human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-435 with and without BRMS1 metastasis suppressor). Raman spectral analysis indicated similar bands between the A549, 435 and 435/BRMS1 including ~720 cm(-1) (guanine band of DNA), 940 cm(-1) (skeletal mode polysaccharide), 1006 cm(-1) (symmetric ring breathing phenylalanine), and 1451 cm(-1) (CH deformation). The membrane surface adhesion forces for these cancer cells were measured by AFM in culture medium: 0.478 ± 0.091 nN for A549 cells, 0.253 ± 0.070 nN for 435 cells, and 1.114 ± 0.281 nN for 435/BRMS1 cells, and the cell spring constant was measured at 2.62 ± 0.682 mN m(-1) for A549 cells, 2.105 ± 0.691 mN m(-1) for 435 cells, and 5.448 ± 1.081 mN m(-1) for 435/BRMS1 cells.

  14. Human papillomavirus gene sequences in washed human sperm deoxyribonucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, P J; Su, B C; Kalugdan, T; Seraj, I M; Tredway, D R; King, A

    1994-05-01

    The present study demonstrated the presence of HPV gene sequences in Percoll-washed sperm cells using polymerase chain reaction primers targeting smaller gene regions. Up to 64% of the sperm specimens were shown to contain gene sequences indicative of the presence of HPV. Human papillomavirus type 16 was detected about twice as often as HPV type 18. The results suggest the possible role of sperm as a vector for HPV.

  15. Sperm preparation: state-of-the-art--physiological aspects and application of advanced sperm preparation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Ralf

    2012-03-01

    For assisted reproduction technologies (ART), numerous techniques were developed to isolate spermatozoa capable of fertilizing oocytes. While early methodologies only focused on isolating viable, motile spermatozoa, with progress of ART, particularly intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), it became clear that these parameters are insufficient for the identification of the most suitable spermatozoon for fertilization. Conventional sperm preparation techniques, namely, swim-up, density gradient centrifugation and glass wool filtration, are not efficient enough to produce sperm populations free of DNA damage, because these techniques are not physiological and not modeled on the stringent sperm selection processes taking place in the female genital tract. These processes only allow one male germ cell out of tens of millions to fuse with the oocyte. Sites of sperm selection in the female genital tract are the cervix, uterus, uterotubal junction, oviduct, cumulus oophorus and the zona pellucida. Newer strategies of sperm preparation are founded on: (i) morphological assessment by means of 'motile sperm organelle morphological examination (MSOME)'; (ii) electrical charge; and (iii) molecular binding characteristics of the sperm cell. Whereas separation methods based on electrical charge take advantage of the sperm's adherence to a test tube surface or separate in an electrophoresis, molecular binding techniques use Annexin V or hyaluronic acid (HA) as substrates. Techniques in this category are magnet-activated cell sorting, Annexin V-activated glass wool filtration, flow cytometry and picked spermatozoa for ICSI (PICSI) from HA-coated dishes and HA-containing media. Future developments may include Raman microspectrometry, confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic microscopy and polarization microscopy.

  16. Improving sperm banking efficiency in endangered species through the use of a sperm selection method in brown bear (Ursus arctos) thawed sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anel-Lopez, L; Ortega-Ferrusola, C; Álvarez, M; Borragán, S; Chamorro, C; Peña, F J; Morrell, J; Anel, L; de Paz, P

    2017-06-26

    Sperm selection methods such as Single Layer Centrifugation (SLC) have been demonstrated to be a useful tool to improve the quality of sperm samples and therefore to increase the efficiency of other artificial reproductive techniques in several species. This procedure could help to improve the quality of genetic resource banks, which is essential for endangered species. In contrast, these sperm selection methods are optimized and focused on farm animals, where the recovery task is not as important as in endangered species because of their higher sperm availability. The aim of this study was to evaluate two centrifugation methods (300 x g/20 min and 600 x g/10 min) and three concentrations of SLC media (Androcoll-Bear -80, 65 and 50%) to optimise the procedure in order to recover as many sperm with the highest quality as possible. Sperm morphology could be important in the hydrodynamic relationship between the cell and centrifugation medium and thus the effect of sperm head morphometry on sperm yield and its hydrodynamic relationship were studied. The samples selected with Androcoll-Bear 65% showed a very good yield (53.1 ± 2.9) although the yield from Androcoll-Bear 80% was lower (19.3 ± 3.3). The latter showed higher values of motility than the control immediately after post-thawing selection. However, both concentrations of colloid (65 and 80%) showed higher values of viable sperm and viable sperm with intact acrosome than the control. After an incubation of 2 h at 37 °C, the samples from Androcoll-Bear 80% had higher kinematics and proportion of viable sperm with intact acrosome. In the morphometric analysis, the sperm selected by the Androcoll-Bear 80% showed a head with a bigger area which was more elongated than the sperm from other treatments. We conclude that sperm selection with Androcoll-Bear at either 65% or 80% is a suitable technique that allows a sperm population with better quality than the initial sample to be obtained. We recommend the

  17. Microscale integrated sperm sorter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yaokuang; Zhu, Xiaoyue; Gu, Wei; Smith, Gary D; Takayama, Shuichi

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes the design and fabrication of a passively driven microfluidic sperm sorter using soft lithographic microfabrication techniques. This self-contained device can separate motile sperm from nonmotile sperm and other cellular debris. The sorting system is small (coin sized) and structurally simple. It comprises two inlets; two outlets; a sorting channel; and arrays of horizontally oriented reservoirs that function as passively driven, constant-flow-rate pumps. Sperm with higher motility are sorted out from the rest of the semen samples based on their ability to swim through interfaces between adjacent laminar streams into separate streamlines, whereas the nonmotile sperm and debris remain in their initial streamlines. The device, which we call a microscale integrated sperm sorter, does not rely on any external power sources or controllers and incorporates all sample loading and sorting functions necessary to prepare high-quality sperm for in vitro fertilization. This self-contained, inexpensive, and portable device may also be useful for developing convenient sperm motility assays that can be used at the point of care or at home.

  18. Subcellular co-localization of aluminum (III) phthalocyanine chloride tetrasulphonate with fluorescent markers in the human melanoma cell-line HT-144

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndhundhuma, I

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available , and bladder cancer. Methyl- tetrahydroxyphenyl chlorin (Temoporfin) is approved in the European Union, Norway and Iceland for palliative treatment of head and neck cancer [8]. Other approved photosensitizers are 5-aminolevulinic acid (approved in USA..., NR) was purchased from Biochrom AG (Berlin, Germany) and used according to the manufacturer's instructions. Cell culture Cultures of human metastatic melanoma cell line (HT-144 cells, ATCC No HTB-63TM, LGC Standards GmbH, Wesel, Germany) were...

  19. Human sperm swimming in a high viscosity mucus analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Kenta; Gadêlha, Hermes; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Smith, David J; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson

    2018-02-17

    Remarkably, mammalian sperm maintain a substantive proportion of their progressive swimming speed within highly viscous fluids, including those of the female reproductive tract. Here, we analyse the digital microscopy of a human sperm swimming in a highly viscous, weakly elastic mucus analogue. We exploit principal component analysis to simplify its flagellar beat pattern, from which boundary element calculations are used to determine the time-dependent flow field around the sperm cell. The sperm flow field is further approximated in terms of regularized point forces, and estimates of the mechanical power consumption are determined, for comparison with analogous low viscosity media studies. This highlights extensive differences in the structure of the flows surrounding human sperm in different media, indicating how the cell-cell and cell-boundary hydrodynamic interactions significantly differ with the physical microenvironment. The regularized point force decomposition also provides cell-level information that may ultimately be incorporated into sperm population models. We further observe indications that the core feature in explaining the effectiveness of sperm swimming in high viscosity media is the loss of cell yawing, which is related with a greater density of regularized point force singularities along the axis of symmetry of the flagellar beat to represent the flow field. In turn this implicates a reduction of the wavelength of the distal beat pattern - and hence dynamical wavelength selection of the flagellar beat - as the dominant feature governing the effectiveness of sperm swimming in highly viscous media. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A formal ontology of subcellular neuroanatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Larson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the nervous system requires high-resolution microscopy to resolve the detailed 3D structure of nerve cells and supracellular domains. The analysis of such imaging data to extract cellular surfaces and cell components often requires the combination of expert human knowledge with carefully engineered software tools. In an effort to make better tools to assist humans in this endeavor, create a more accessible and permanent record of their data, and to aid the process of constructing complex and detailed computational models, we have created a core of formalized knowledge about the structure of the nervous system and have integrated that core into several software applications. In this paper, we describe the structure and content of a formal ontology whose scope is the subcellular anatomy of the nervous system (SAO, covering nerve cells, their parts, and interactions between these parts. Many applications of this ontology to image annotation, content-based retrieval of structural data, and integration of shared data across scales and researchers are also described.

  1. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins from flow cytometrically sorted ram sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, T; Marti, J I; Crossett, B; Evan, G; Maxwell, W M C

    2011-03-15

    Membrane proteins orchestrate key events required for participation of sperm in fertilisation. These proteins may be removed or altered due to the mechanical and dilution stressors associated with sex-sorting of sperm. Ram sperm were incubated with Hoechst 33342 and flow-sorted. Sex-selected (viable, orientated) and waste (separated into non-viable or non-orientated) sperm populations were collected, or sperm were not sorted. Sperm membrane proteins were extracted and characterised by one- and two-dimensional PAGE. Densiometric analysis of protein bands separated by one-dimensional PAGE showed proteins of 30 and 28 kDa as doublet bands on non-sorted sperm, and single bands on sex-sorted sperm, and the proportion of a 14 kDa protein was 3-fold higher in non-sorted compared to sorted sperm. Proteins in the 14 kDa band were identified by mass spectroscopy as a bovine Fibronectin type-2 protein (Fn-2), cytochrome oxidase 5a (Cox5a) and a sperm membrane associated protein (SLLP1). The abundance of these proteins in the two-dimensional gels was lowest in the sorted sperm population identified as viable during sorting (orientated and non-orientated sperm) and highest in the non-viable sperm population (P sperm, due to the selection of plasma membrane-intact cells in the flow-sorted population. This provided further evidence that sex-sorting selected a homogenous population of sperm with superior function to non-sorted sperm. Furthermore, this was apparently the first time sperm membrane acrosome associated protein was reported in ram sperm, and it was demonstrated that seminal plasma proteins remained on the sperm membrane after sex-sorting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sperm storage potential and daily sperm production of brown male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Testes and epididymis were homogenised separately in 0.154M NaCl. Sperm reserves in the homogenates were determined. Sperm production efficiency and daily sperm production were also determined from testicular homogenates and epididymal sperm reserves from epididymal homogenate. The results showed that ...

  3. An immunological approach of sperm sexing and different methods for identification of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv Kumar Yadav

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Separation of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm has been practiced for selection of desired sex of offspring to increase the profit in livestock industries. At present, fluorescence-activated cell sorter is the only successful method for separation of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm. This technology is based on the differences in DNA content between these two types of sperm and has been commercialized for bovine sperm. However, this technology still has problems in terms of high economic cost, sperm damage, and lower pregnancy rates compared to unsorted semen. Therefore, an inexpensive, convenient, and non-invasive approach for sperm sexing would be of benefit to agricultural sector. Within this perspective, immunological sperm sexing method is one of the attractive choices to separate X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm. This article reviews the current knowledge about immunological approaches, viz., H-Y antigen, sex-specific antigens, and differentially expressed proteins for sperm sexing. Moreover, this review also highlighted the different methods for identification of X- and Y-sperm.

  4. Quantitative evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) drugs for boron delivery and retention at subcellular scale resolution in human glioblastoma cells with imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, S.; Ahmad, T.; Barth, R. F.; Kabalka, G. W.

    2014-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer depends on the selective delivery of a sufficient number of boron-10 (10B) atoms to individual tumor cells. Cell killing results from the 10B (n, α)7Li neutron capture and fission reactions that occur if a sufficient number of 10B atoms are localized in the tumor cells. Intranuclear 10B localization enhances the efficiency of cell killing via damage to the DNA. The net cellular content of 10B atoms reflects both bound and free pools of boron in individual tumor cells. The assessment of these pools, delivered by a boron delivery agent, currently cannot be made at subcellular scale resolution by clinically applicable techniques such as PET and MRI. In this study, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging instrument, a CAMECA IMS 3f ion microscope, capable of 500 nm spatial resolution was employed. Cryogenically prepared cultured human T98G glioblastoma cells were evaluated for boron uptake and retention of two delivery agents. The first, L-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), has been used clinically for BNCT of high grade gliomas, recurrent tumors of the head and neck region and melanomas. The second, a boron analogue of an unnatural amino acid, 1-amino-3-borono-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid (cis-ABCPC), has been studied in rodent glioma and melanoma models by quantification of boron in the nucleus and cytoplasm of individual tumor cells. The bound and free pools of boron were assessed by exposure of cells to boron-free nutrient medium. Both BPA and cis-ABCPC delivered almost 70% of the pool of boron in the free or loosely bound form to the nucleus and cytoplasm of human glioblastoma cells. This free pool of boron could be easily mobilized out of the cell and was in some sort of equilibrium with extracellular boron. In the case of BPA, the intracellular free pool of boron also was affected by the presence of phenylalanine in the nutrient medium. This suggests that it might be advantageous if patients were placed on a

  5. Quantitative evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) drugs for boron delivery and retention at subcellular-scale resolution in human glioblastoma cells with imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, S; Ahmad, T; Barth, R F; Kabalka, G W

    2014-06-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer depends on the selective delivery of a sufficient number of boron-10 ((10)B) atoms to individual tumour cells. Cell killing results from the (10)B (n, α)(7) Li neutron capture and fission reactions that occur if a sufficient number of (10)B atoms are localized in the tumour cells. Intranuclear (10)B localization enhances the efficiency of cell killing via damage to the DNA. The net cellular content of (10)B atoms reflects both bound and free pools of boron in individual tumour cells. The assessment of these pools, delivered by a boron delivery agent, currently cannot be made at subcellular-scale resolution by clinically applicable techniques such as positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this study, a secondary ion mass spectrometry based imaging instrument, a CAMECA IMS 3f ion microscope, capable of 500 nm spatial resolution was employed. Cryogenically prepared cultured human T98G glioblastoma cells were evaluated for boron uptake and retention of two delivery agents. The first, L-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), has been used clinically for BNCT of high-grade gliomas, recurrent tumours of the head and neck region and melanomas. The second, a boron analogue of an unnatural amino acid, 1-amino-3-borono-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid (cis-ABCPC), has been studied in rodent glioma and melanoma models by quantification of boron in the nucleus and cytoplasm of individual tumour cells. The bound and free pools of boron were assessed by exposure of cells to boron-free nutrient medium. Both BPA and cis-ABCPC delivered almost 70% of the pool of boron in the free or loosely bound form to the nucleus and cytoplasm of human glioblastoma cells. This free pool of boron could be easily mobilized out of the cell and was in some sort of equilibrium with extracellular boron. In the case of BPA, the intracellular free pool of boron also was affected by the presence of phenylalanine in the nutrient medium. This

  6. OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) interacts with Homo sapiens sperm associated antigen 5 (SPAG5) and mediates oxysterol interference of HepG2 cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Wenbin [Department of Biotechnology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhou, You [Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki (Finland); Li, Jiwei [Department of Biotechnology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Mysore, Raghavendra [Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki (Finland); Luo, Wei; Li, Shiqian [Department of Biotechnology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Chang, Mau-Sun [Institute of Biochemical Sciences, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Olkkonen, Vesa M. [Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki (Finland); Yan, Daoguang, E-mail: tydg@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Biotechnology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2014-04-01

    We earlier identified OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) as an endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope oxysterol-binding protein implicated in cellular lipid homeostasis, migration, and organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, a yeast two-hybrid screen identified Homo sapiens sperm associated antigen 5 (SPAG5)/Astrin as interaction partner of ORP8. The putative interaction was further confirmed by pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays. ORP8 did not colocalize with kinetochore-associated SPAG5 in mitotic HepG2 or HuH7 cells, but overexpressed ORP8 was capable of recruiting SPAG5 onto endoplasmic reticulum membranes in interphase cells. In our experiments, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25OHC) retarded the HepG2 cell cycle, causing accumulation in G2/M phase; ORP8 overexpression resulted in the same phenotype. Importantly, ORP8 knock-down dramatically inhibited the oxysterol effect on HepG2 cell cycle, suggesting a mediating role of ORP8. Furthermore, knock-down of SPAG5 significantly reduced the effects of both ORP8 overexpression and 25OHC on the cell cycle, placing SPAG5 downstream of the two cell-cycle interfering factors. Taken together, the present results suggest that ORP8 may via SPAG5 mediate oxysterol interference of the HepG2 cell cycle. - Highlights: • The oxysterol-binding protein ORP8 was found to interact with the mitotic regulator SPAG5/Astrin. • Treatment of HepG2 cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol caused cell cycle retardation in G2/M. • ORP8 overexpression caused a similar G2/M accumulation, and ORP8 knock-down reversed the 25-hydroxycholesterol effect. • Reduction of cellular of SPAG5/Astrin reversed the cell cycle effects of both 25-hydroxycholesterol and ORP8 overexpression. • Our results suggest that ORP8 mediates via SPAG5/Astrin the oxysterol interference of HepG2 cell cycle.

  7. Effect of saffron on rat sperm chromatin integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, Mohammad; Vaez, Ahmad; Razavi, Shahnaz

    2014-05-01

    Currently, relation between reactive oxygen species (ROS) ROS concentration and semen quality was indicated. Saffron has traditionally been not only considered as a food additive but also as a medicinal herb, which has a good antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection potency of saffron and vitamin E on sperm chromatin integrity. Thirty adult male Wistar rats divided equally into saffron (100 mg/kg), vitamin E (100 mg/kg) and control (0.5cc distilled water /day) groups. After 60 days, cauda epididymis dissected and sperm cells were used for analysis of sperm chromatin packaging by chromomycin A3 (CMA3) staining, and sperm chromatin susceptibility to acid denaturation by acridine orange (AO) staining. The mean percentage of CMA3 positive sperm was significantly decreased in saffron and vitamin E groups relative to control group (psaffron and vitamin E groups as compared with control group (psaffron can protect sperm against DNA damage and chromatin anomalies.

  8. Subcellular preconditioning of stem cells: mito-Cx43 gene targeting is cytoprotective via shift of mitochondrial Bak and Bcl-xL balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gang; Jiang, Shujia; Ashraf, Muhammad; Haider, Khawaja Husnain

    2012-05-01

    To achieve mitochondria-specific expression of connexin-43 (Cx43) transgene for mitochondrial preconditioning in stem cells to improve their survival post-transplantation during heart cell therapy. Cx43- or GFP-encoding adenoviral vectors with a mitochondrial targeting sequence were constructed for transduction of bone marrow Sca-1(+) cells (>90% transduction efficiency). Double-fluorescence immunostaining for cytochrome-c and Cx43 supported by western blotting confirmed mitochondria-specific Cx43 expression in adenoviral-mito-Cx43-transduced cells ((Cx43)Sca-1(+)). (Cx43)Sca-1(+) showed improved survival under lethal oxygen-glucose deprivation culture conditions. (Cx43)Sca-1(+) showed an increased mitochondrial Bcl-xL:Bak ratio and reduced cytochrome-c release into cytosol with concomitantly abolished caspase-3 activity. An in vivo study was performed such that 2 × 10(6) male (Cx43)Sca-1(+) or (GFP)Sca-1(+) cells were injected into a female rat model of acute myocardial infarction. DMEM-injected rats served as controls. On day 7 post-transplantation, 4.3-fold higher survival of (Cx43)Sca-1(+) cells (p targeted Cx43 expression is a novel approach to improve stem cell survival in the infarcted heart.

  9. Haematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP) phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase in T-cells: dynamics and subcellular location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nika, Konstantina; Hyunh, Huong; Williams, Scott; Paul, Surojit; Bottini, Nunzio; Taskén, Kjetil; Lombroso, Paul J; Mustelin, Tomas

    2004-01-01

    The HePTP (haematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase) is a negative regulator of the ERK2 (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 2) and p38 MAP kinases (mitogen-activated protein kinases) in T-cells. This inhibitory function requires a physical association of HePTP through an N-terminal KIM (kinase-interaction motif) with ERK and p38. We previously reported that PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) phosphorylates Ser-23 within the KIM of HePTP, resulting in dissociation of HePTP from ERK2. Here we follow the phosphorylation of this site in intact T-cells. We find that HePTP is phosphorylated at Ser-23 in resting T-cells and that this phosphorylation increases upon treatment of the cells with agents that elevate intracellular cAMP, such as prostaglandin E2. HePTP phosphorylation occurred at discrete regions at the cell surface. Phosphorylation was reduced by inhibitors of PKA and increased by inhibitors of protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A, but not by inhibitors of calcineurin. In vitro, PP1 efficiently dephosphorylated HePTP at Ser-23, while PP2A was much less efficient. Activation of PP1 by treatment of the cells with ceramide suppressed Ser-23 phosphorylation, as did transfection of the catalytic subunit of PP1. Phosphorylation at Ser-23 is also increased in a transient manner upon T-cell antigen receptor ligation. In contrast, treatment of cells with phorbol ester had no effect on HePTP phosphorylation at Ser-23. We conclude from these results that HePTP is under continuous control by PKA and a serine-specific phosphatase, probably PP1, in T-cells and that this basal phosphorylation at Ser-23 can rapidly change in response to external stimuli. This, in turn, will affect the ability of HePTP to inhibit the ERK and p38 MAP kinases. PMID:14613483

  10. The sperm epigenome: implications for the embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, John R; Emery, Benjamin R; Jenkins, Timothy G; Carrell, Douglas T

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances, including the human genome project and numerous studies of cancer and other diseases, have shown that the genetic code is not simply limited to the sequence of the four bases of DNA but also includes epigenetic programming, heritable changes that affect gene expression [Riggs A, Martinssen R, Russo V (2007) Introduction. In: Riggs A, Martinssen R, Russo V (eds) Epigenetics mechanisms of gene regulation. Cold Spring Harbor Press, New York]. The science of epigenetics is important in understanding many diseases and biological processes, including in identifying the causes of disease and better understanding the mechanisms by which the environment can affect gene expression [Carrell Fertil Steril 97 (2):267-274, 2012]. This chapter will focus on the epigenome of sperm and particularly highlight the potential role of the sperm epigenome in embryogenesis.The sperm epigenome is unique and highly specialized because of the unique nature and function of sperm and because of the diverse requirements for successful fertilization. Due to the need for motility, sperm chromatin must be compacted and highly organized. During spermiogenesis the chromatin is packaged tightly into the sperm head by the replacement of most histones with protamines. This allows for protection of the DNA from the hostile environment in the female reproductive tract. Remaining histones can have chemical modifications to the tails of the protein that either facilitate or repress gene transcription. Sperm, like embryonic stem cells, have a unique pattern of histone modifications that includes both activating and silencing marks in the promoters of genes associated with development. These bivalent marks, along with DNA hypomethylation, comprise a unique state in which the key genes are "poised" for possible activation in embryogenesis. Sperm epigenetic abnormalities have been linked with multiple diseases including male factor infertility and poor embryogenesis.

  11. Subcellular distribution of daunorubicin in P-glycoprotein-positive and -negative drug-resistant cell lines using laser-assisted confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasoni, J E; Fields, S Z; Krishna, S; Baker, M A; Rosado, M; Thuraisamy, K; Hindenburg, A A; Taub, R N

    1991-09-15

    Four well defined multidrug-resistant cell lines and their drug-sensitive counterparts were examined for intracellular distribution of daunorubicin (DNR) by laser-assisted confocal fluorescence microscopy: P-glycoprotein-negative HL-60/AR cells, and P-glycoprotein-positive P388/ADR, KBV-1, and MCF-7/ADR cells. Both drug sensitive cell lines (HL-60/S, P388/S, KB3-1, and MCF-7/S) and drug-resistant cell lines (HL-60/AR, P388/ADR, KBV-1, and MCF-7/ADR) exposed to DNR showed a similar rapid distribution of drug from the plasma membrane to the perinuclear region within the first 2 min. From 2-10 min, the drug sensitive HL-60/S, P388/S, and MCF-7/S cells redistributed drug to the nucleus and to the cytoplasm in a diffuse pattern. In contrast, drug-resistant HL-60/AR, P388/ADR, and MCF-7/ADR redistributed DNR from the perinuclear region into vesicles distinct from nuclear structures, thereby assuming a "punctate" pattern. This latter redistribution could be inhibited by glucose deprivation (indicating energy dependence), or by lowering the temperature of the medium below 18 degrees C. The differences in distribution between sensitive and resistant cells did not appear to be a function of intracellular DNR content, nor the result of drug cytotoxicity. Drug-sensitive KB3-1 and -resistant KBV-1 cells did not fully follow this pattern in that they demonstrated an intracellular DNR distribution intermediate between HL-60/S and HL-60/AR cells with both "punctate" and nuclear/cytoplasmic uptake sometimes in the same cell. These data indicate that the intracellular distribution of DNR is an important determinant of drug resistance regardless of the overexpression of P-glycoprotein. The intracellular movement of drug requires the presence of glucose and a temperature above 18 degrees C, implicating energy-dependent processes and vesicle fusion in the distribution process. This intracellular transport of DNR away from the nucleus in multidrug-resistant cells may protect putative

  12. Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) is differentially regulated in subcellular compartments by 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Studies using H9c2 cells overexpressing MCD and AMPK by adenoviral gene transfer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Nandakumar; Steinmetz, Michael; Chu, Angel; Altarejos, Judith Y; Dyck, Jason R B; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2004-07-01

    Malonyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of carnitine pamitoyl transferase-I (CPT-I), plays a pivotal role in fuel selection in cardiac muscle. Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) catalyzes the degradation of malonyl-CoA, removes a potent allosteric inhibition on CPT-I and thereby increases fatty acid oxidation in the heart. Although MCD has several Ser/Thr phosphorylation sites, whether it is regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been controversial. We therefore overexpressed MCD (Ad.MCD) and constitutively active AMPK (Ad.CA-AMPK) in H9c2 cells, using an adenoviral gene delivery approach in order to examine if MCD is regulated by AMPK. Cells infected with Ad.CA-AMPK demonstrated a fourfold increase in AMPK activity as compared with control cells expressing green fluorescent protein (Ad.GFP). MCD activity increased 40- to 50-fold in Ad.MCD + Ad.GFP cells when compared with Ad.GFP control. Co-expressing AMPK with MCD further augmented MCD expression and activity in Ad.MCD + Ad.CA-AMPK cells compared with the Ad.MCD + Ad.GFP control. Subcellular fractionation further revealed that 54.7 kDa isoform of MCD expression was significantly higher in cytosolic fractions of Ad.MCD + Ad.CA-AMPK cells than of the Ad.MCD +Ad.GFP control. However, the MCD activities in cytosolic fractions were not different between the two groups. Interestingly, in the mitochondrial fractions, MCD activity significantly increased in Ad.MCD + Ad.CA-AMPK cells when compared with Ad.MCD + Ad.GFP cells. Using phosphoserine and phosphothreonine antibodies, no phosphorylation of MCD by AMPK was observed. The increase in MCD activity in mitochondria-rich fractions of Ad.MCD + Ad.CA-AMPK cells was accompanied by an increase in the level of the 50.7 kDa isoform of MCD protein in the mitochondria. This differential regulation of MCD expression and activity in the mitochondria by AMPK may potentially regulate malonyl-CoA levels at sites nearby CPT-I on the mitochondria.

  13. ERBB2 influences the subcellular localization of the estrogen receptor in tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 cells leading to the activation of AKT and RPS6KA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancholi, Sunil; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Hilmi, Caroline; Banerjee, Susana; Leary, Alexandra; Drury, Suzanne; Johnston, Stephen; Dowsett, Mitch; Martin, Lesley-Ann

    2008-12-01

    Acquired resistance to endocrine therapies remains a major clinical obstacle in hormone-sensitive breast tumors. We used an MCF-7 breast tumor cell line (Tam(R)-1) resistant to tamoxifen to investigate this mechanism. We demonstrate that Tam(R)-1 express elevated levels of phosphorylated AKT and MAPK3/1-activated RPS6KA2 compared with the parental MCF-7 cell line (MCF-7). There was no change in the level of total ESR between the two cell lines; however, the Tam(R)-1 cells had increased phosphorylation of ESR1 ser(167). SiRNA blockade of AKT or MAPK3/1 had little effect on ESR1 ser(167) phosphorylation, but a combination of the two siRNAs abrogated this. Co-localization studies revealed an association between ERBB2 and ESR1 in the Tam(R)-1 but not MCF-7 cells. ESR1 was redistributed to extranuclear sites in Tam(R)-1 and was less transcriptionally competent compared with MCF-7 suggesting that nuclear ESR1 activity was suppressed in Tam(R)-1. Tamoxifen resistance in the Tam(R)-1 cells could be partially overcome by the ERBB2 inhibitor AG825 in combination with tamoxifen, and this was associated with re-localization of ESR1 to the nucleus. These data demonstrate that tamoxifen-resistant cells have the ability to switch between ERBB2 or ESR1 pathways promoting cell growth and that pharmacological inhibition of ERBB2 may be a therapeutic strategy for overcoming tamoxifen resistance.

  14. Interaction of Leukotriene C4 and Chinese Hamster Lung Fibroblasts (V79A03 Cells). 2. Subcellular Distribution of Binding and Unlikely Role of Glutathione-s-Transferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    cell culture, Ms. Yvonne Caicedo for technical manipulations, and Mrs. Jane Koeser for secretarial help, are gratefully acknowledged. This work was...F.F., L.Y. Chau, and K.F. Austen . Binding of Leukotriene C. by Glutathione Transferase: A Reassessment of Biochemical and Functional Criteria for...Krillis, S., R.A. Lewis, E.J. Corey, and K.F. Austen . Specific Receptors for Laukotriene C4 on a Smooth Muscle Cell Line. J. Clin. Invest. 72:1516

  15. Photothermal-triggered control of sub-cellular drug accumulation using doxorubicin-loaded single-walled carbon nanotubes for the effective killing of human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yunok; Jin, Jun-O.; Oh, Junghwan

    2017-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are often the subject of investigation as effective photothermal therapy (PTT) agents owing to their unique strong optical absorption. Doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded SWNTs (SWNTs-DOX) can be used as an efficient therapeutic agent for combined near infrared (NIR) cancer photothermal and chemotherapy. However, SWNTs-DOX-mediated induction of cancer cell death has not been fully investigated, particularly the reaction of DOX inside cancer cells by PTT. In this study, we examined how the SWNTs-DOX promoted effective MDA-MB-231 cell death compared to DOX and PTT alone. We successfully synthesized the SWNTs-DOX. The SWNTs-DOX exhibited a slow DOX release, which was accelerated by NIR irradiation. Furthermore, DOX released from the SWNTs-DOX accumulated inside the cells at high concentration and effectively localized into the MDA-MB-231 cell nucleus. A combination of SWNTs-DOX and PTT promoted an effective MDA-MB-231 cell death by mitochondrial disruption and ROS generation. Thus, SWNTs-DOX can be utilized as an excellent anticancer agent for early breast cancer treatment.

  16. Mass spectrometry profiling of oxysterols in human sperm identifies 25-hydroxycholesterol as a marker of sperm function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Zerbinati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a main lipid component of sperm cell that is essential for sperm membrane fluidity, capacitation, and acrosomal reaction. Recent data obtained in bovine sperm showed that sperm capacitation is associated to the formation of oxysterols, oxidized products of cholesterol. The aim of this study was to profile oxysterol content in human semen, and to investigate their potential role in sperm pathophysiology. Among the 12 oxysterols analyzed, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC resulted the most represented in normozoospermic samples, and its concentration positively correlated with spermatozoa number. We detected Cholesterol 25-hydroxylase, the enzyme responsible for 25-HC production, in human spermatozoa at the level of the neck and the post acrosomal area. Upon incubation with spermatozoa, 25-HC induced calcium and cholesterol transients in connection with the acrosomal reaction. Our results support a role for 25-HC in sperm function.

  17. A role for the WH-30 protein in sperm-sperm adhesion during rouleaux formation in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, S P; Swann, N J; Primakoff, P; Myles, D G

    1993-03-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa participate in specific cell adhesion phenomena during their development and functional lifespan; this includes interaction with Sertoli cells, the zona pellucida, and the oolemma. In some species such as the guinea pig, an additional sperm-sperm adhesion occurs during epididymal maturation which results in the formation of rouleaux in which the sperm heads are stacked one upon the other and the periacrosomal plasma membranes of adjacent sperm are linked by periodic cross-bridges. In this study, we have used a monoclonal antibody to investigate the role of the WH-30 protein on the sperm surface in the formation of the junctional zones between adjacent guinea pig sperm in rouleaux. WH-30 monoclonal antibodies caused a dose- and time-dependent dissociation of rouleaux and an increase in the percentage of single, acrosome-intact sperm; there were no effects on sperm motility (maintained at 80-90%) or ultrastructure during the 120-min incubations. The maximal effect of about 80% single sperm was obtained with a 1:4 dilution of the WH-30 hybridoma supernatant or 5-50 micrograms/ml of purified WH-30 IgG. In contrast, incubation of sperm in AH-20 IgG, myeloma cell supernatants, or purified, nonspecific mouse IgG1 had no effect on rouleaux. Treatment of sperm with a WH-30 Fab fragment resulted in almost complete dissociation of rouleaux without any observed effect on sperm motility or acrosomal status. Surface labeling of sperm followed by immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE revealed that the WH-30 antibody recognizes a single polypeptide of 43-45 kDa. Using immunofluorescence, the WH-30 protein was localized over the entire surface of the sperm head (whole-head pattern), and immunogold labeling showed that WH-30 is localized in the glycocalyx on both the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the periacrosomal and postacrosomal plasma membranes. These results indicate that the WH-30 protein on the sperm surface is a cell adhesion protein which is involved in

  18. cAMP signaling in subcellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2014-09-01

    In the complex microcosm of a cell, information security and its faithful transmission are critical for maintaining internal stability. To achieve a coordinated response of all its parts to any stimulus the cell must protect the information received from potentially confounding signals. Physical segregation of the information transmission chain ensures that only the entities able to perform the encoded task have access to the relevant information. The cAMP intracellular signaling pathway is an important system for signal transmission responsible for the ancestral 'flight or fight' response and involved in the control of critical functions including frequency and strength of heart contraction, energy metabolism and gene transcription. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the cAMP signaling pathway uses compartmentalization as a strategy for coordinating the large number of key cellular functions under its control. Spatial confinement allows the formation of cAMP signaling "hot spots" at discrete subcellular domains in response to specific stimuli, bringing the information in proximity to the relevant effectors and their recipients, thus achieving specificity of action. In this report we discuss how the different constituents of the cAMP pathway are targeted and participate in the formation of cAMP compartmentalized signaling events. We illustrate a few examples of localized cAMP signaling, with a particular focus on the nucleus, the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of interventions designed to perturb specific cAMP cascades locally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' , CSIC/UAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Avila, Jesus, E-mail: javila@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' , CSIC/UAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, 28031 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  20. Multimodal subcellular imaging with microcavity photoacoustic transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhiliang; Tang, Zhilie; Wu, Yongbo; Liao, Yanfei; Dong, Wei; Guo, Lina

    2011-01-31

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is dominantly sensitive to the endogenous optical absorption compared with the confocal microscopy which images with scattering photons. PAM has similar structure such as optical transportation system, the optical scanning, and light source with the laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). In order to match the PAM with LSCM, a special design microcavity photoacoustic (PA) transducer with high sensitivity is developed to detect the photoacoustic signals induced by modulated continuous wave (CW) laser. By employing a microcavity PA transducer, a PAM can be integrated with LSCM. Thus a simultaneous multimodal imaging can be obtained with the same laser source and optical system. The lateral resolutions of the PAM and the LSCM are both tested to be better than 1.25 μm. Then subcellular multimodal imaging can be achieved. Images from the two modes are corresponding with each other but functionally complementary. Combining PAM and LSCM provides more comprehensive information for the cytological test. This technique is demonstrated for imaging red-blood cells and meristematic cells.

  1. [Lipids in the sperm plasma membrane and their role in fertilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Dong-Mei; Wang, Jun-Jun

    2009-07-01

    Sexual reproduction is marked by the fusion of the sperm cell with the oocyte during fertilization to produce the diploid zygote, in which the lipids in the sperm plasma membrane play an important role. Due to the loss of most cell organelles and DNA transcription, spermatozoa lack protein expression and vesicular transport. However, the lipids of the sperm plasma membrane undergo complicated dynamic changes, which may facilitate the capacitation, binding with zona pellucida, acrosome reaction and fusion of the sperm cell with the oocyte. This paper summarizes the progress in the studies of the lipids in the sperm plasma membrane, their composition, structure, peroxidation, metabolism and role in fertilization.

  2. Reproductive tract modifications of the boar sperm surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadella, Bart M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/115389873

    2017-01-01

    The sperm cell has a unique, polarized and segregated surface that is modified extensively by the changing environments in both the male and the female reproductive tracts. The sperm cannot refresh its surface, as protein translation and membrane recycling by intracellular vesicular transport have

  3. Ultrastructural analysis of testicular tissue and sperm by transmission and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemes, Hector E

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have provided the basis for an in-depth understanding of the cell biology and normal functioning of the testis and male gametes and have opened the way to characterize the functional role played by specific organelles in spermatogenesis and sperm function. The development of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) extended these boundaries to the recognition of cell and organ surface features and the architectural array of cells and tissues. The merging of immunocytochemical and histochemical approaches with electron microscopy has completed a series of technical improvements that integrate structural and functional features to provide a broad understanding of cell biology in health and disease. With these advances the detailed study of the intricate structural and molecular organization as well as the chemical composition of cellular organelles is now possible. Immunocytochemistry is used to identify proteins or other components and localize them in specific cells or organelles with high specificity and sensitivity, and histochemistry can be used to understand their function (i.e., enzyme activity). When these techniques are used in conjunction with electron microscopy their resolving power is further increased to subcellular levels. In the present chapter we will describe in detail various ultrastructural techniques that are now available for basic or translational research in reproductive biology and reproductive medicine. These include TEM, ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, ultrastructural histochemistry, and SEM.

  4. Monoterpene biosynthesis potential of plant subcellular compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, L.; Jongedijk, E.J.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Krol, van der A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular monoterpene biosynthesis capacity based on local geranyl diphosphate (GDP) availability or locally boosted GDP production was determined for plastids, cytosol and mitochondria. A geraniol synthase (GES) was targeted to plastids, cytosol, or mitochondria. Transient expression in Nicotiana

  5. Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating protein OsARP in rice induced by submergence, salt and drought stresses. Md Imtiaz Uddin, Maki Kihara, Lina Yin, Mst Farida Perveen, Kiyoshi Tanaka ...

  6. Objective Clustering of Proteins Based on Subcellular Location Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Chen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of proteomics is the complete characterization of all proteins. Efforts to characterize subcellular location have been limited to assigning proteins to general categories of organelles. We have previously designed numerical features to describe location patterns in microscope images and developed automated classifiers that distinguish major subcellular patterns with high accuracy (including patterns not distinguishable by visual examination. The results suggest the feasibility of automatically determining which proteins share a single location pattern in a given cell type. We describe an automated method that selects the best feature set to describe images for a given collection of proteins and constructs an effective partitioning of the proteins by location. An example for a limited protein set is presented. As additional data become available, this approach can produce for the first time an objective systematics for protein location and provide an important starting point for discovering sequence motifs that determine localization.

  7. Sperm macrocephaly syndrome in a patient without AURKC mutations and with a history of recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Emanuela; Mirabelli, Marzia; Raimondo, Stefania; Brussino, Alessandro; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Bongioanni, Francesca; Revelli, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    This paper reports a case of recurrent miscarriage in a patient affected by a variant phenotype of sperm macrocephaly syndrome (SMS). SMS is usually related to specific sperm characteristics (large head, multiple tail) and homozygous mutations in the aurora kinase C gene (AURKC). However, the present case observed large-headed spermatozoa with no flagellar abnormalities and no mutations detectable by AURKC sequencing. Furthermore, the patient had repeatedly conceived by intracytoplasmic sperm injection, but pregnancy always aborted. This study performed morphological analysis (Papanicolau staining), annexin V/propidium iodide staining, sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and transmission electron microscopy. This study observed large-headed, mono-tailed, mono-centriolar spermatozoa characterized by abnormal chromatin and swollen mitochondria. SCSA revealed a high ratio of late apoptotic cells with fairly intact amount of DNA. The FISH analysis showed 100% disomy rate. As far as is known, this is the first study to include gene sequencing, TEM, cytogenetic analysis and sperm DNA fragmentation in a case of SMS and also to report recurrent miscarriage related to this specific condition. SMS may be associated with important abnormalities of the sperm subcellular structure and with disomy even in the absence of mutations in the AURKC coding sequence. Sperm macrocephaly syndrome (SMS) is a rare condition that affects spermatozoa and is related to infertility. It is characterized by a specific phenotype of large-headed, multi-tailed spermatozoa with an abnormal chromosomal status. A very few pregnancies have been obtained so far in SMS patients by means of IVF procedures. We present a case of SMS that differs from the classical syndrome as we observed large-headed spermatozoa without tail abnormalities. The affected patient had achieved three pregnancies following IVF, but all aborted. We carried out a detailed examination of

  8. An update on post-ejaculatory remodeling of the sperm surface before mammalian fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadella, B. M.; Boerke, A.

    2016-01-01

    The fusion of a sperm with an oocyte to form new life is a highly regulated event. The activation-also termed capacitation-of the sperm cell is one of the key preparative steps required for this process. Ejaculated sperm has to make a journey through the female uterus and oviduct before it can

  9. Sperm quality of male rats treated with aqueous extract of Enantia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-03

    Apr 3, 2008 ... The caudal epididymis was then dissect- ed. An incision (about 1 mm) was made in the caudal epididymis and drops of sperm fluid were squeezed onto the microscope slide and 2 drops of normal saline were added to mobilize the sperm cells. Epididymal sperm motility was then assessed by calculating.

  10. Effect of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Devadasa Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of male germ line mutagenesis and the effects on developmental defects in the next generation has become increasingly high profile over recent years. Mutagenic substance affects germinal cells in the testis. Since the cells are undergoing different phases of cell division and maturation, it is an ideal system to study the effect of chemotherapeutic agents. There are lacunae in the literature on the effect of sorafenib on gonadal function. With background, a study was planned to evaluate the effects of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice. Male Swiss albino mice were used for the study. The animals were segregated into control, positive control (PC and three treatment groups. PC received oral imatinib (100 mg/kg body weight and treatment groups received 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg body weight of sorafenib orally for 7 consecutive days at intervals of 24 h between two administrations. The control group remained in the home cage for an equal duration of time to match their corresponding treatment groups. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 1 st , 2 nd , 4 th , 5 th , 7 th , and 10 th weeks after the last exposure to drug, respectively. Sperm suspensions were prepared and introduced into a counting chamber. Total sperm count and motility were recorded. There was a significant decrease in sperm count and sperm motility by sorafenib which was comparable with the effect of PC imatinib. Sorafenib adversely affects sperm count and sperm motility which are reversible after discontinuation of treatment.

  11. Subcellular proteomic approach for identifying the signaling effectors of protein kinase C-?2 under high glucose conditions in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Min; Sun, Fang; Chen, Fangfang; Zhou, Bo; DUAN, YAQIAN; SU, HONG; LIN, XUEBO

    2015-01-01

    The high glucose-induced activation of protein kinase C-?2 (PKC-?2) has an essential role in the pathophysiology of diabetes-associated vascular disease. In the present study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured in high and normal glucose conditions prior to being infected with a recombinant adenovirus to induce the overexpression of PKC-?2. The activity of PKC-?2 was also decreased using a selective PKC-?2 inhibitor. A series of two-dimensional electrophoresis image...

  12. Clathrin-dependent mechanisms modulate the subcellular distribution of class C Vps/HOPS tether subunits in polarized and nonpolarized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatic, Stephanie A; Tornieri, Karine; L'Hernault, Steven W; Faundez, Victor

    2011-05-15

    Coats define the composition of carriers budding from organelles. In addition, coats interact with membrane tethers required for vesicular fusion. The yeast AP-3 (Adaptor Protein Complex 3) coat and the class C Vps/HOPS (HOmotypic fusion and Protein Sorting) tether follow this model as their interaction occurs at the carrier fusion step. Here we show that mammalian Vps class C/HOPS subunits and clathrin interact and that acute perturbation of clathrin function disrupts the endosomal distribution of Vps class C/HOPS tethers in HEK293T and polarized neuronal cells. Vps class C/HOPS subunits and clathrin exist in complex with either AP-3 or hepatocyte growth factor receptor substrate (Hrs). Moreover, Vps class C/HOPS proteins cofractionate with clathrin-coated vesicles, which are devoid of Hrs. Expression of FK506 binding protein (FKBP)-clathrin light chain chimeras, to inhibit clathrin membrane association dynamics, increased Vps class C/HOPS subunit content in rab5 endosomal compartments. Additionally, Vps class C/HOPS subunits were concentrated at tips of neuronal processes, and their delivery was impaired by expression of FKBP-clathrin chimeras and AP20187 incubation. These data support a model in which Vps class C/HOPS subunits incorporate into clathrin-coated endosomal domains and carriers in mammalian cells. We propose that vesicular (AP-3) and nonvesicular (Hrs) clathrin mechanisms segregate class C Vps/HOPS tethers to organelles and domains of mammalian cells bearing complex architectures.

  13. The Subcellular Localisation of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV 16 E7 Protein in Cervical Cancer Cells and Its Perturbation by RNA Aptamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Cesur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract, affecting both men and women. High-risk oncogenic types are responsible for almost 90% of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers including cervical cancer. Some of the HPV “early” genes, particularly E6 and E7, are known to act as oncogenes that promote tumour growth and malignant transformation. Most notably, HPV-16 E7 interacts with the tumour suppressor protein pRb, promoting its degradation, leading to cell cycle dysregulation in infected cells. We have previously shown that an RNA aptamer (termed A2 selectively binds to HPV16 E7 and is able to induce apoptosis in HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma cell lines (SiHa through reduction of E7 levels. In this study, we investigated the effects of the A2 aptamer on E7 localisation in order to define its effects on E7 activity. We demonstrate for the first time that E7 localised to the plasma membrane. In addition, we show that A2 enhanced E7 localisation in the ER and that the A2-mediated reduction of E7 was not associated with proteasomal degradation. These data suggest that A2 perturbs normal E7 trafficking through promoting E7 ER retention.

  14. Subcellular redistribution of the mitochondrial PG2 epitope during development from cleavage to primordial germ cell formation in the rabbit embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckelmann, A; Viebahn, C; Püschel, B

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria are central players in diverse cellular functions and their efficient functioning has dramatic impact on embryonic development. Apparently, proliferation and transmission of well functioning mitochondria to the next generation require ingeniously adapted mechanisms, one of which, the 'mitochondrial bottleneck', is thought to occur early in mammalian development during primordial germ cell (PGC) specification. We used an antibody directed against the mitochondrial PG2 epitope, a reliable marker of primordial and adult female germ cells to monitor mitochondrial differentiation in the early rabbit embryo. Early development shows the PG2 epitope either tightly mitochondria-associated (zygote) or diffusely distributed throughout cytoplasm (cleavage stages). Mitochondrial colocalization of the PG2 epitope is regained in the early blastocyst but expression is then retained by the hypoblast and epiblast only, with the epiblast, although the forerunner of PGCs, showing weak and diffuse labeling only. At gastrulation, hypoblast cells lose PG2 expression but intensive PG2 labeling is found again on all mitochondria in the first PGCs and reveals the number of mitochondria to be in the range of 50 to 100 per PGC at this stage. The results highlight the dynamics of PG2 expression during early development and the usefulness of the epitope for testing the bottleneck theory. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Comparative Sperm Proteomics in Mouse Species with Divergent Mating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicens, Alberto; Borziak, Kirill; Karr, Timothy L.; Roldan, Eduardo R.S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Sexual selection is the pervasive force underlying the dramatic divergence of sperm form and function. Although it has been demonstrated that testis gene expression evolves rapidly, exploration of the proteomic basis of sperm diversity is in its infancy. We have employed a whole-cell proteomics approach to characterize sperm divergence among closely related Mus species that experience different sperm competition regimes and exhibit pronounced variation in sperm energetics, motility and fertilization capacity. Interspecific comparisons revealed significant abundance differences amongst proteins involved in fertilization capacity, including those that govern sperm-zona pellucida interactions, axoneme components and metabolic proteins. Ancestral reconstruction of relative testis size suggests that the reduction of zona pellucida binding proteins and heavy-chain dyneins was associated with a relaxation in sperm competition in the M. musculus lineage. Additionally, the decreased reliance on ATP derived from glycolysis in high sperm competition species was reflected in abundance decreases in glycolytic proteins of the principle piece in M. spretus and M. spicilegus. Comparison of protein abundance and stage-specific testis expression revealed a significant correlation during spermatid development when dynamic morphological changes occur. Proteins underlying sperm diversification were also more likely to be subject to translational repression, suggesting that sperm composition is influenced by the evolution of translation control mechanisms. The identification of functionally coherent classes of proteins relating to sperm competition highlights the utility of evolutionary proteomic analyses and reveals that both intensified and relaxed sperm competition can have a pronounced impact on the molecular composition of the male gamete. PMID:28333336

  16. Low Sperm Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lump or swelling in the testicle area A history of testicle, prostate or sexual problems Groin, testicle, penis or scrotum surgery Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic Causes The production of sperm is a complex ...

  17. Bombyx mori DNA/RNA non-specific nuclease: expression of isoforms in insect culture cells, subcellular localization and functional assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jisheng; Swevers, Luc; Iatrou, Kostas; Huvenne, Hanneke; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-08-01

    A DNA/RNA non-specific alkaline nuclease (BmdsRNase) was isolated from the digestive juice of Bombyx mori. While originally reported to be produced by the midgut only, in this project it was found that the mRNA of this enzyme was also expressed in the epidermis, fat body, gut, thoracic muscles, Malpighian tubules, brain, and silk glands of 5th instar larvae, indicating additional functions to its reported role in nucleic acid digestion in the midgut. In order to study the functional properties of BmdsRNase, three pEA-BmdsRNase expression constructs were generated, characterized by presence or absence of a signal peptide and a propeptide, and used for expression in lepidopteran Hi5 tissue culture cells. Western blot indicated that these different forms of BmdsRNase protein were not secreted into the growth medium, while they were detected in the pellets and supernatants of Hi5 cell extracts. Nucleic acids cleavage experiments indicated that full-length BmdsRNase could digest dsRNA and that the processed form (absence of signal peptide and propeptide) of BmdsRNase could degrade both DNA and dsRNA in Hi5 cell culture. Using a reporter assay targeted by transfected homologous dsRNA, it was shown that the digestive property of the processed form could interfere with the RNAi response. Immunostaining of processed BmdsRNase protein showed asymmetric localization in the cellular cytoplasm and co-localization with Flag-tagged Dicer-2 was also observed. In conclusion, our in vitro studies indicated that intracellular protein isoforms of BmdsRNase can be functional and involved in the regulation of nucleic acid metabolism in the cytoplasm. In particular, because of its propensity to degrade dsRNA, the enzyme might be involved in the innate immune response against invading nucleic acids such as RNA viruses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamics of the subcellular localization of RalBP1/RLIP through the cell cycle: the role of targeting signals and of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillatre, Jonathan; Delacour, Delphine; Van Hove, Lucie; Bagarre, Thomas; Houssin, Nathalie; Soulika, Marina; Veitia, Reiner A; Moreau, Jacques

    2012-05-01

    The small G protein Ras regulates many cell processes, such as gene expression, proliferation, apoptosis, and cell differentiation. Its mutations are associated with one-third of all cancers. Ras functions are mediated, at least in part, by Ral proteins and their downstream effector the Ral-binding protein 1 (RalBP1). RalBP1 is involved in endocytosis and in regulating the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton. It also regulates early development since it is required for the completion of gastrulation in Xenopus laevis. RalBP1 has also been reported to be the main transporter of glutathione electrophiles, and it is involved in multidrug resistance. Such a variety of functions could be explained by a differential regulation of RalBP1 localization. In this study, we have detected endogenous RalBP1 in the nucleus of interphasic cells. This nuclear targeting is mediated by nuclear localization sequences that map to the N-terminal third of the protein. Moreover, in X. laevis embryos, a C-terminal coiled-coil sequence mediates RalBP1 retention in the nucleus. We have also observed RalBP1 at the level of the actin cytoskeleton, a localization that depends on interaction of the protein with active Ral. During mitosis RalBP1 also associates with the mitotic spindle and the centrosome, a localization that could be negatively regulated by active Ral. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of post-transcriptional and post-translational isoforms of RalBP1 lacking the Ral-binding domain, which opens new possibilities for the existence of Ral-independent functions.

  19. Dynamic changes in subcellular localization of cattle XLF during cell cycle, and focus formation of cattle XLF at DNA damage sites immediately after irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Koike, Manabu; YUTOKU, Yasutomo; KOIKE, Aki

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, many chemotherapeutics and ionizing radiation (IR) have been applied for the treatment of various types of human and animal malignancies. These treatments kill tumor cells by causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Core factors of classical nonhomologous DNA-end joining (C-NHEJ) play a vital role in DSB repair. Thus, it is indispensable to clarify the mechanisms of C-NHEJ in order to develop next-generation chemotherapeutics for cancer. The XRCC4-like factor (XLF; also called Cer...

  20. High resolution DNA content measurements of mammalian sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkel, D.; Lake, S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Stephenson, D.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The high condensation and flat shape of the mammalian sperm nucleus present unique difficulties to flow cytometric measurement of DNA content. Chromatin compactness makes quantitative fluorescent staining for DNA difficult and causes a high index of refraction. The refractive index makes optical measurements sensitive to sperm head orientation. We demonstrate that the optical problems can be overcome using the commercial ICP22 epiillumination flow cytometer (Ortho Instruments, Westwood, MA) or a specially built cell orientating flow cytometer (OFCM). The design and operation of the OFCM are described. Measurements of the angular dependence of fluorescence from acriflavine stained rabbit sperm show that it is capable of orienting flat sperm with a tolerance of +-7/sup 0/. Differences in the angular dependence for the similarly shaped bull and rabbit sperm allow discrimination of these cells. We show that DNA staining with 4-6 diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or an ethidium bromide mithramycin combination allows resolution of the X and Y populations in mouse sperm. They have also been successful with sperm from the bull, ram, rabbit, and boar. Reliable results with human sperm are not obtained. The accuracy of the staining and measurement techniques are verified by the correct determination of the relative content of these two populations in sperm from normal mice and those with the Cattanach (7 to X) translocation. Among the potential uses of these techniques are measurement of DNA content errors induced in sperm due to mutagen exposure, and assessment of the fractions of X and Y sperm in semen that may have one population artifically enriched.

  1. Equine sperm membrane phase behavior: the effects of lipid-based cryoprotectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, J V; Linfor, J J; Delfino, W J; Kysar, P; Scholtz, E L; Tablin, F; Crowe, J H; Ball, B A; Meyers, S A

    2006-02-01

    The plasma membrane of sperm can undergo lipid phase separation during freezing, resulting in irreversible damage to the cell. The objective of our study was to examine the membrane phase behavior of equine spermatozoa in the absence and presence of lipid-based cryoprotectants. Biophysical properties of sperm membranes were investigated with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Compared to fresh untreated sperm, postthaw untreated sperm showed extensive lipid phase separation and rearrangement. In contrast, postthaw sperm that were cryopreserved in egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC)- or soy phosphatidylcholine (soy PC)-based diluents showed similar lipid phase behavior to that of fresh, untreated sperm. Studies with a deuterium-labeled PC lipid (POPCd-31) suggest that exogenous lipid from the diluents are strongly associated with the sperm membrane, and scanning electron microscopy images of treated sperm show the presence of lipid aggregates on the membrane surface. Thus, the exogenous lipid does not appear to be integrated into the sperm membrane after cryopreservation. When compared to a standard egg-yolk-based diluent (INRA 82), the soy and egg PC media preserved viability and motility equally well in postthaw sperm. A preliminary fertility study determined that sperm cryopreserved in the soy PC-based medium were capable of fertilization at the same rate as sperm frozen in the conventional INRA 82 medium. Our results show that pure lipid-based diluents can prevent membrane damage during cryopreservation and perform as well as a standard egg-yolk-based diluent in preserving sperm viability, motility, and fertility.

  2. Sub-cellular localisation of fukutin related protein in different cell lines and in the muscle of patients with MDC1C and LGMD2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torelli, Silvia; Brown, Susan C; Brockington, Martin

    2005-01-01

    MDC1C and LGMD2I are two allelic forms of muscular dystrophies caused by mutations in the gene encoding for fukutin related protein (FKRP). FKRP encodes for a putative glycosyltransferase, the precise function of which is unknown. However, the marked reduction of alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation...... in the muscle of MDC1C and LGMD2I patients suggests a role for FKRP in dystroglycan processing. Using a polyclonal antibody raised against FKRP we now show that endogenous FKRP locates to the Golgi apparatus of neuronal, oligodendroglial, and the cardiac muscle cell line H9c2. In differentiated C2C12 myotubes...... and in transverse sections of normal skeletal and cardiac muscle, endogenous FKRP surrounded the myonuclei. This localisation was unaffected in the skeletal muscle of patients with MDC1C and LGMD2I carrying various FKRP mutations. These observations imply a specific role for FKRP during striated muscle, neuronal...

  3. Dynamic changes in subcellular localization of cattle XLF during cell cycle, and focus formation of cattle XLF at DNA damage sites immediately after irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2015-09-01

    Clinically, many chemotherapeutics and ionizing radiation (IR) have been applied for the treatment of various types of human and animal malignancies. These treatments kill tumor cells by causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Core factors of classical nonhomologous DNA-end joining (C-NHEJ) play a vital role in DSB repair. Thus, it is indispensable to clarify the mechanisms of C-NHEJ in order to develop next-generation chemotherapeutics for cancer. The XRCC4-like factor (XLF; also called Cernunnos or NHEJ1) is the lastly identified core NHEJ factor. The localization of core NHEJ factors might play a critical role in regulating NHEJ activity. The localization and function of XLF have not been elucidated in animal species other than mice and humans. Domestic cattle (Bos taurus) are the most common and vital domestic animals in many countries. Here, we show that the localization of cattle XLF changes dynamically during the cell cycle. Furthermore, EYFP-cattle XLF accumulates quickly at microirradiated sites and colocalizes with the DSB marker γH2AX. Moreover, nuclear localization and accumulation of cattle XLF at DSB sites are dependent on 12 amino acids (288-299) of the C-terminal region of XLF (XLF CTR). Furthermore, basic amino acids on the XLF CTR are highly conserved among domestic animals including cattle, goat and horses, suggesting that the CTR is essential for the function of XLF in domestic animals. These findings might be useful to develop the molecular-targeting therapeutic drug taking XLF as a target molecule for human and domestic animals.

  4. Gold-standard for computer-assisted morphological sperm analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Violeta; Garcia, Alejandra; Hitschfeld, Nancy; Härtel, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    heads. By using the Fourier descriptor and SVM, we achieved the best mean correct classification: only 49%. We conclude that the SCIAN-MorphoSpermGS will provide a standard tool for evaluation of characterization and classification approaches for human sperm heads. Indeed, there is a clear need for a specific shape-based descriptor for human sperm heads and a specific classification approach to tackle the problem of high variability within subcategories of abnormal sperm cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Predicting subcellular location of proteins using integrated-algorithm method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yu-Dong; Lu, Lin; Chen, Lei; He, Jian-Feng

    2010-08-01

    Protein's subcellular location, which indicates where a protein resides in a cell, is an important characteristic of protein. Correctly assigning proteins to their subcellular locations would be of great help to the prediction of proteins' function, genome annotation, and drug design. Yet, in spite of great technical advance in the past decades, it is still time-consuming and laborious to experimentally determine protein subcellular locations on a high throughput scale. Hence, four integrated-algorithm methods were developed to fulfill such high throughput prediction in this article. Two data sets taken from the literature (Chou and Elrod, Protein Eng 12:107-118, 1999) were used as training set and test set, which consisted of 2,391 and 2,598 proteins, respectively. Amino acid composition was applied to represent the protein sequences. The jackknife cross-validation was used to test the training set. The final best integrated-algorithm predictor was constructed by integrating 10 algorithms in Weka (a software tool for tackling data mining tasks, http://www.cs.waikato.ac.nz/ml/weka/ ) based on an mRMR (Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance, http://research.janelia.org/peng/proj/mRMR/ ) method. It can achieve correct rate of 77.83 and 80.56% for the training set and test set, respectively, which is better than all of the 60 algorithms collected in Weka. This predicting software is available upon request.

  6. Intracellular And Subcellular Partitioning Of Nickel In Aureococcus Anophagefferens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Axe, L.; Wei, L.; Bagheri, S.; Michalopoulou, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Brown tides are caused by Aureococcus anophagefferens, a species of Pelagophyceae, and have been observed in NY/NJ waterways effecting ecosystems by attenuating light, changing water color, reducing eelgrass beds, decreasing shellfisheries, and further impacting the food web by reducing phytoplankton. Although the impact of macronutrients and iron on A. anophagefferens has been well studied, contaminants, and specifically trace metals have not. In long-term experiments designed to investigate the growth and toxicity, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn exposure was evaluated over 10-13 to 10-7 M for the free metal ion. While growth was inhibited or terminated from exposure to Cd and Cu, nickel addition ([Ni2+]: 10-11.23 to 10-10.23 M) promoted A. anophagefferens growth. Short-term experiments are being conducted to better understand mechanistically nickel speciation and distribution. Both total intracellular and subcellular metal concentrations are being assessed with radio-labeled 63Ni. Subcellular fractions are defined as metal-sensitive fractions (MSF) constituting organelles, cell debris, and heat-denatured protein [HDP] and biologically detoxified metal comprising heat-stabilized protein [HSP] and metal-rich granules [MRG]. Based on subcellular distribution, aqueous [Ni2+] concentrations, and A. anophagefferens growth rates, potential reaction pathways promoting A. anophagefferens growth can be addressed.

  7. Proteomics: a subcellular look at spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Satya P

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male-factor infertility presents a vexing problem for many reproductively active couples. Many studies have focused on abnormal sperm parameters. Recent advances in proteomic techniques, especially in mass spectrometry, have aided in the study of sperm and more specifically, sperm proteins. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on the various proteomic techniques, and their usefulness in diagnosing sperm dysfunction and potential applications in the clinical setting. Methods Review of PubMed database. Key words: spermatozoa, proteomics, protein, proteome, 2D-PAGE, mass spectrometry. Results Recently employed proteomic methods, such as two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, and differential in gel electrophoresis, have identified numerous sperm-specific proteins. They also have provided a further understanding of protein function involved in sperm processes and for the differentiation between normal and abnormal states. In addition, studies on the sperm proteome have demonstrated the importance of post-translational modifications, and their ability to bring about physiological changes in sperm function. No longer do researchers believe that in order for them to elucidate the biochemical functions of genes, mere knowledge of the human genome sequence is sufficient. Moreover, a greater understanding of the physiological function of every protein in the tissue-specific proteome is essential in order to unravel the biological display of the human genome. Conclusion Recent advances in proteomic techniques have provided insight into sperm function and dysfunction. Several multidimensional separation techniques can be utilized to identify and characterize spermatozoa. Future developments in bioinformatics can further assist researchers in understanding the vast amount of data collected in proteomic studies. Moreover, such advances in proteomics may help to decipher metabolites

  8. Proteomics: a subcellular look at spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Stefan S; Kashou, Anthony H; Benjamin, David J; Yadav, Satya P; Agarwal, Ashok

    2011-03-22

    Male-factor infertility presents a vexing problem for many reproductively active couples. Many studies have focused on abnormal sperm parameters. Recent advances in proteomic techniques, especially in mass spectrometry, have aided in the study of sperm and more specifically, sperm proteins. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on the various proteomic techniques, and their usefulness in diagnosing sperm dysfunction and potential applications in the clinical setting. Review of PubMed database. Key words: spermatozoa, proteomics, protein, proteome, 2D-PAGE, mass spectrometry. Recently employed proteomic methods, such as two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, and differential in gel electrophoresis, have identified numerous sperm-specific proteins. They also have provided a further understanding of protein function involved in sperm processes and for the differentiation between normal and abnormal states. In addition, studies on the sperm proteome have demonstrated the importance of post-translational modifications, and their ability to bring about physiological changes in sperm function. No longer do researchers believe that in order for them to elucidate the biochemical functions of genes, mere knowledge of the human genome sequence is sufficient. Moreover, a greater understanding of the physiological function of every protein in the tissue-specific proteome is essential in order to unravel the biological display of the human genome. Recent advances in proteomic techniques have provided insight into sperm function and dysfunction. Several multidimensional separation techniques can be utilized to identify and characterize spermatozoa. Future developments in bioinformatics can further assist researchers in understanding the vast amount of data collected in proteomic studies. Moreover, such advances in proteomics may help to decipher metabolites which can act as biomarkers in the detection of sperm impairments and

  9. Characterization and possible function of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-spermatogenic protein GAPDHS in mammalian sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaryan, Hasmik; Dorosh, Andriy; Capkova, Jana; Manaskova-Postlerova, Pavla; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozak, Pavel; Peknicova, Jana

    2015-03-08

    Sperm proteins are important for the sperm cell function in fertilization. Some of them are involved in the binding of sperm to the egg. We characterized the acrosomal sperm protein detected by a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (Hs-8) that was prepared in our laboratory by immunization of BALB/c mice with human ejaculated sperms and we tested the possible role of this protein in the binding assay. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold labelling, gel electrophoresis, Western blotting and protein sequencing were used for Hs-8 antigen characterization. Functional analysis of GAPDHS from the sperm acrosome was performed in the boar model using sperm/zona pellucida binding assay. Monoclonal antibody Hs-8 is an anti-human sperm antibody that cross-reacts with the Hs-8-related protein in spermatozoa of other mammalian species (boar, mouse). In the immunofluorescence test, Hs-8 antibody recognized the protein localized in the acrosomal part of the sperm head and in the principal piece of the sperm flagellum. In immunoblotting test, MoAb Hs-8 labelled a protein of 45 kDa in the extract of human sperm. Sequence analysis identified protein Hs-8 as GAPDHS (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrohenase-spermatogenic). For this reason, commercial mouse anti-GAPDHS MoAb was applied in control tests. Both antibodies showed similar staining patterns in immunofluorescence tests, in electron microscopy and in immunoblot analysis. Moreover, both Hs-8 and anti-GAPDHS antibodies blocked sperm/zona pellucida binding. GAPDHS is a sperm-specific glycolytic enzyme involved in energy production during spermatogenesis and sperm motility; its role in the sperm head is unknown. In this study, we identified the antigen with Hs8 antibody and confirmed its localization in the apical part of the sperm head in addition to the principal piece of the flagellum. In an indirect binding assay, we confirmed the potential role of GAPDHS as a binding protein that is involved in the secondary sperm

  10. Effect of Astaxanthin on Human Sperm Capacitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Bordin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to be able to fertilize oocytes, human sperm must undergo a series of morphological and structural alterations, known as capacitation. It has been shown that the production of endogenous sperm reactive oxygen species (ROS plays a key role in causing cells to undergo a massive acrosome reaction (AR. Astaxanthin (Asta, a photo-protective red pigment belonging to the carotenoid family, is recognized as having anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory properties and is present in many dietary supplements. This study evaluates the effect of Asta in a capacitating buffer which induces low ROS production and low percentages of acrosome-reacted cells (ARC. Sperm cells were incubated in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of Asta or diamide (Diam and analyzed for their ROS production, Tyr-phosphorylation (Tyr-P pattern and percentages of ARC and non-viable cells (NVC. Results show that Asta ameliorated both sperm head Tyr-P and ARC values without affecting the ROS generation curve, whereas Diam succeeded in enhancing the Tyr-P level but only of the flagellum without increasing ARC values. It is suggested that Asta can be inserted in the membrane and therefore create capacitation-like membrane alteration which allow Tyr-P of the head. Once this has occurred, AR can take place and involves a higher numbers of cells.

  11. Effect of astaxanthin on human sperm capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donà, Gabriella; Kožuh, Ivana; Brunati, Anna Maria; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Armanini, Decio; Clari, Giulio; Bordin, Luciana

    2013-06-03

    In order to be able to fertilize oocytes, human sperm must undergo a series of morphological and structural alterations, known as capacitation. It has been shown that the production of endogenous sperm reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in causing cells to undergo a massive acrosome reaction (AR). Astaxanthin (Asta), a photo-protective red pigment belonging to the carotenoid family, is recognized as having anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory properties and is present in many dietary supplements. This study evaluates the effect of Asta in a capacitating buffer which induces low ROS production and low percentages of acrosome-reacted cells (ARC). Sperm cells were incubated in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of Asta or diamide (Diam) and analyzed for their ROS production, Tyr-phosphorylation (Tyr-P) pattern and percentages of ARC and non-viable cells (NVC). Results show that Asta ameliorated both sperm head Tyr-P and ARC values without affecting the ROS generation curve, whereas Diam succeeded in enhancing the Tyr-P level but only of the flagellum without increasing ARC values. It is suggested that Asta can be inserted in the membrane and therefore create capacitation-like membrane alteration which allow Tyr-P of the head. Once this has occurred, AR can take place and involves a higher numbers of cells.

  12. Complexin I is required for mammalian sperm acrosomal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Longmei; Burkin, Heather R; Shi, Xudong; Li, Lingjun; Reim, Kerstin; Miller, David J

    2007-09-15

    Regulated exocytosis in many cells is controlled by the SNARE complex, whose core includes three proteins that promote membrane fusion. Complexins I and II are highly related cytosolic proteins that bind tightly to the assembled SNARE complex and regulate neuronal exocytosis. Like somatic cells, sperm undergo regulated exocytosis; however, sperm release a single large vesicle, the acrosome, whose release has different characteristics than neuronal exocytosis. Acrosomal release is triggered upon sperm adhesion to the mammalian egg extracellular matrix (zona pellucida) to allow penetration of the egg coat. Membrane fusion occurs at multiple points within the acrosome but how fusion is activated and the formation and progression of fusion points is synchronized is unclear. We show that complexins I and II are found in acrosome-intact mature sperm, bind to SNARE complex proteins, and are not detected in sperm after acrosomal exocytosis (acrosome reaction). Although complexin-I-deficient sperm acrosome-react in response to calcium ionophore, they do not acrosome-react in response to egg zona pellucida proteins and have reduced fertilizing ability, in vitro. Complexin II is present in the complexin-I-deficient sperm and its expression is increased in complexin-I-deficient testes. Therefore, complexin I functions in exocytosis in two related but morphologically distinct secretory processes. Sperm are unusual because they express both complexins I and II but have a unique and specific requirement for complexin I.

  13. Chemotactic behavior of the sperm of chitons (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R L

    1977-11-01

    Observations of sperm behavior in the vicinity of gradients of egg-water or alcohol extracts of whole freshly-spawned eggs of several chitons reveal what appear to be directed movements of sperm up the gradient, resulting in the aggregation of motile sperm at the gradient source. Plots of the tracks of the sperm approaching the gradient source show that the cells increase the time during which they move toward the source and decrease the time spent moving away. Although this resembles the kinesis behavior shown by bacteria in a gradient, the path directions are markedly non-random. The reorientation behavior of thigmotactic sperm involves enlargement of the normal circular path diameter in the direction of the source and an alternation of tight loops and wide circular arcs, with the latter made in the direction of the source. The form of the path of attracted chiton sperm is like that observed during chemotaxis of the sperm of the hydroid Tubularia and the tunicate Ciona and resembles the behavior of Ciona sperm in that there is no increase in velocity as the cells move up the gradient. However, unlike the cnidarian and urochordate cases, the attracting substances extracted from chiton eggs do not act species-specifically.

  14. Sperm length, sperm storage and mating system characteristics in bumblebees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Boris; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2003-01-01

    Multiple insemination induces sperm competition and may select for longer, faster moving sperm in species where sperm is short-lived and egg fertilization takes place almost immediately after ejaculation. Here we report the first detailed analysis of sperm length in social insects with long......-term storage of sperm, using three bumblebee species with different mating systems as models. We show that individual males produce only one size-class of sperm, but that sperm length is highly variable among brothers, among unrelated conspecific males, and among males of different species. Males of Bombus...... hypnorum, a species with multiple-mating queens, have longer sperm than males of B. terrestris and B. lucorum whose queens are single mated. Although the sample size on the species level was too small to perform a phylogenetic analysis, this finding supports the hypothesis that, all other things being...

  15. Validation of a spectrophotometer-based method for estimating daily sperm production and deferent duct transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froman, D P; Rhoads, D D

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of the present work were 3-fold. First, a new method for estimating daily sperm production was validated. This method, in turn, was used to evaluate testis output as well as deferent duct throughput. Next, this analytical approach was evaluated in 2 experiments. The first experiment compared left and right reproductive tracts within roosters. The second experiment compared reproductive tract throughput in roosters from low and high sperm mobility lines. Standard curves were constructed from which unknown concentrations of sperm cells and sperm nuclei could be predicted from observed absorbance. In each case, the independent variable was based upon hemacytometer counts, and absorbance was a linear function of concentration. Reproductive tracts were excised, semen recovered from each duct, and the extragonadal sperm reserve determined by multiplying volume by sperm cell concentration. Testicular sperm nuclei were procured by homogenization of a whole testis, overlaying a 20-mL volume of homogenate upon 15% (wt/vol) Accudenz (Accurate Chemical and Scientific Corporation, Westbury, NY), and then washing nuclei by centrifugation through the Accudenz layer. Daily sperm production was determined by dividing the predicted number of sperm nuclei within the homogenate by 4.5 d (i.e., the time sperm with elongated nuclei spend within the testis). Sperm transit through the deferent duct was estimated by dividing the extragonadal reserve by daily sperm production. Neither the efficiency of sperm production (sperm per gram of testicular parenchyma per day) nor deferent duct transit differed between left and right reproductive tracts (P > 0.05). Whereas efficiency of sperm production did not differ (P > 0.05) between low and high sperm mobility lines, deferent duct transit differed between lines (P < 0.001). On average, this process required 2.2 and 1.0 d for low and high lines, respectively. In summary, we developed and then tested a method for quantifying male

  16. The Subcellular Distribution of Small Molecules: from Pharmacokinetics to Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan; Tsai, Hobart Ng; Zhang, Xinyuan; Rosania, Gus R.

    2011-01-01

    The systemic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of small molecules are determined by subcellular transport phenomena. Although approaches used to study the subcellular distribution of small molecules have gradually evolved over the past several decades, experimental analysis and prediction of cellular pharmacokinetics remains a challenge. In this article, we surveyed the progress of subcellular distribution research since the 1960s, with a focus on the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of the various experimental techniques. Critical review of the existing body of knowledge pointed to many opportunities to advance the rational design of organelle-targeted chemical agents. These opportunities include: 1) development of quantitative, nonfluorescence-based, whole cell methods and techniques to measure the subcellular distribution of chemical agents in multiple compartments; 2) exploratory experimentation with nonspecific transport probes that have not been enriched with putative, organelle-targeting features; 3) elaboration of hypothesis-driven, mechanistic and modeling-based approaches to guide experiments aimed at elucidating subcellular distribution and transport; and 4) introduction of revolutionary conceptual approaches borrowed from the field of synthetic biology combined with cutting edge experimental strategies. In our laboratory, state-of-the-art subcellular transport studies are now being aimed at understanding the formation of new intracellular membrane structures in response to drug therapy, exploring the function of drug-membrane complexes as intracellular drug depots, and synthesizing new organelles with extraordinary physical and chemical properties. PMID:21805990

  17. Linking Subcellular Disturbance to Physiological Behavior and Toxicity Induced by Quantum Dots in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Zhou, Yanfeng; Song, Bin; Zhong, Yiling; Wu, Sicong; Cui, Rongrong; Cong, Haixia; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Huimin; He, Yao

    2016-06-01

    The wide-ranging applications of fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have triggered increasing concerns about their biosafety. Most QD-related toxicity studies focus on the subcellular processes in cultured cells or global physiological effects on whole animals. However, it is unclear how QDs affect subcellular processes in living organisms, or how the subcellular disturbance contributes to the overall toxicity. Here the behavior and toxicity of QDs of three different sizes in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) are systematically investigated at both the systemic and the subcellular level. Specifically, clear size-dependent distribution and toxicity of the QDs in the digestive tract are observed. Short-term exposure of QDs leads to acute toxicity on C. elegans, yet incurring no lasting, irreversible damage. In contrast, chronic exposure of QDs severely inhibits development and shortens lifespan. Subcellular analysis reveals that endocytosis and nutrition storage are disrupted by QDs, which likely accounts for the severe deterioration in growth and longevity. This work reveals that QDs invasion disrupts key subcellular processes in living organisms, and may cause permanent damage to the tissues and organs over long-term retention. The findings provide invaluable information for safety evaluations of QD-based applications and offer new opportunities for design of novel nontoxic nanoprobes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Localization of cathepsin D in mouse reproductive tissues and its acquisition onto sperm surface during epididymal sperm maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuvapongpatana, Somluk; Saewu, Arpornrad; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Vanichviriyakit, Rapeepun; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana

    2013-06-01

    Sperm maturation in the epididymis involves multiple complex events, that include the adsorption of epididymal secretory proteins, re-organization and removal of sperm surface ligands. In this study, we investigated the existence and distribution of cathepsin D (CAT-D) transcripts and proteins in mouse reproductive tissues and proposed a transfer mechanism of CAT-D to the sperm surface. CAT-D transcripts were highly expressed in cultured Sertoli cells, but not in germ cells. The transcriptional level was relatively higher in the caput epididymis (CP) than in the cauda epididymis (CD). At the translational level, CAT-D was detected in testicular somatic cells and in the principal and basal cells in the CP. The expression of CAT-D was fairly specific to the clear cells in the CD. All forms of CAT-D were detected in ultracentrifuged epididymosomes. In conjunction with the expression levels in epididymal epithelium and epididymosomes, CAT-D expression level on the sperm surface was relatively high in CP sperm, but gradually declined toward the CD. Overall, our results indicated that CAT-D was not inherent to sperm themselves, but rather of epididymal origin and was presumably transported to the sperm surface via epididymosomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. On the relative effect of spawning asynchrony, sperm quantity and sperm quality on paternity under sperm competition in an external fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torvald Blikra Egeland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available How much of a fitness benefit is obtained by dominant males of external fertilizers from releasing ejaculates in synchrony with female egg-release when engaging in sperm competition, and what is the most important sperm trait for paternity in these situations? The Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus is an external fertilizer experiencing intense male-male competition over reproductive opportunities including sperm competition. To compensate for their disadvantage the sneaker males, which often spawn out of synchrony with the female, produce more and faster sperm than the guarding males. We used controlled in vitro fertilization trials with experimentally produced dominant and subordinate, sneaker males to test what effect relative synchrony in gamete release, sperm quality (i.e., motility and velocity and sperm quantity have on a male’s fertilization success in pair-wise sperm competitions. When the sneaker males released ejaculates after the guarding male there was no overall difference in fertilization success. The quality (i.e., motility and velocity of a male’s sperm relative to that of the competing male was the best predictor of male fertilization success regardless of their mating tactic and spawning synchrony. The relative number of sperm cells also had an effect on fertilization success, but mainly when the dominant and sneaker male ejaculated synchronously. Our close imitation of natural sperm competition in charr shows that the sneaker males of external fertilizing species may fully compensate for their disadvantaged mating role by producing ejaculates of higher quality - an adjustment strangely not met by dominants.

  20. Effect of various commercial buffers on sperm viability and capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrisani, Alessandra; Donà, Gabriella; Ambrosini, Guido; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Bragadin, Marcantonio; Cosmi, Erich; Clari, Giulio; Armanini, Decio; Bordin, Luciana

    2014-08-01

    A wide variety of sperm preparation protocols are currently available for assisted conception. They include density gradient separation and washing methods. Both aim at isolating and capacitating as much motile sperm as possible for subsequent oocyte fertilization. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of four commercial sperm washing buffers on sperm viability and capacitation. Semen samples from 48 healthy donors (normal values of sperm count, motility, morphology, and volume) were analyzed. After separation (density gradient 40/80%), sperm were incubated in various buffers then analysed for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, viability, tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr-P), cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) labeling, and the acrosome reaction (AR). The buffers affected ROS generation in various ways resulting either in rapid cell degeneration (when the amount of ROS was too high for cell survival) or the inability of the cells to maintain correct functioning (when ROS were too few). Only when the correct ROS generation curve was maintained, suitable membrane reorganization, evidenced by CTB labeling was achieved, leading to the highest percentages of both Tyr-P- and acrosome-reacted-cells. Distinguishing each particular pathological state of the sperm sample would be helpful to select the preferred buffer treatment since both ROS production and membrane reorganization can be significantly altered by commercial buffers.

  1. Particle bombardment and subcellular protein localization analysis in the aquatic plant Egeria densa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhide Osaki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle bombardment is a powerful and relatively easy method for transient expression of genes of interest in plant cells, especially those that are recalcitrant to other transformation methods. This method has facilitated numerous analyses of subcellular localization of fluorescent fusion protein constructs. Particle bombardment delivers genes to the first layer of plant tissue. In leaves of higher plants, epidermal cells are the first cell layer. Many studies have used the epidermal cell layer of onion bulb (Allium cepa as the experimental tissue, because these cells are relatively large. However, onion epidermal cells lack developed plastids (i.e., chloroplasts, thereby precluding subcellular localization analysis of chloroplastic proteins. In this study, we developed a protocol for particle bombardment of the aquatic plant Egeria densa, and showed that it is a useful system for subcellular localization analysis of higher plant proteins. E. densa leaflets contain only two cell layers, and cells in the adaxial layer are sufficiently large for observation. The cells in both layers contain well-developed chloroplasts. We fused fluorescent proteins to conventional plant localization signals for the nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, peroxisome, and chloroplast, and used particle bombardment to transiently express these fusion constructs in E. densa leaves. The plant subcellular localization signals functioned normally and displayed the expected distributions in transiently transformed E. densa cells, and even chloroplastic structures could be clearly visualized.

  2. Healthy Sperm: Improving Your Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and what you can do to improve your fertility. By Mayo Clinic Staff Do your sperm pass ... understanding the various factors that can affect male fertility — then consider steps to help your sperm become ...

  3. Differences in the fatty-acid composition of rodent spermatozoa are associated to levels of sperm competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier delBarco-Trillo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sperm competition is a prevalent phenomenon that drives the evolution of sperm function. High levels of sperm competition lead to increased metabolism to fuel higher sperm velocities. This enhanced metabolism can result in oxidative damage (including lipid peroxidation and damage to the membrane. We hypothesized that in those species experiencing high levels of sperm competition there are changes in the fatty-acid composition of the sperm membrane that makes the membrane more resistant to oxidative damage. Given that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs are the most prone to lipid peroxidation, we predicted that higher sperm competition leads to a reduction in the proportion of sperm PUFAs. In contrast, we predicted that levels of sperm competition should not affect the proportion of PUFAs in somatic cells. To test these predictions, we quantified the fatty-acid composition of sperm, testis and liver cells in four mouse species (genus Mus that differ in their levels of sperm competition. Fatty-acid composition in testis and liver cells was not associated to sperm competition levels. However, in sperm cells, as predicted, an increase in sperm competition levels was associated with an increase in the proportion of saturated fatty-acids (the most resistant to lipid peroxidation and by a concomitant decrease in the proportion of PUFAs. Two particular fatty acids were most responsible for this pattern (arachidonic acid and palmitic acid. Our findings thus indicate that sperm competition has a pervasive influence in the composition of sperm cells that ultimately may have important effects in sperm function.

  4. Sperm-associated antigen 11A is expressed exclusively in the principal cells of the mouse caput epididymis in an androgen-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Epididymal sperm maturation occurs via interactions between sperm and proteins secreted by the epididymal epithelium. Although this is an important process, the genes that encode the involved proteins remain largely uncharacterized. Previous studies have demonstrated that the genes involved in sperm maturation are regulated by androgen. Spag11a is an epididymal gene that is influenced by androgen. However, little is known about the putative role of this gene in the sperm maturation process. The objective of this study was to characterize Spag11a in the mouse epididymis. Methods In silico analyses were performed to predict signal peptides and functional domains. Spag11a expression was measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Western blots and immunocytochemistry were performed to determine protein expression. Results SPAG11A is a member of the beta defensin protein family and constitutes a secretory protein. Spag11a was expressed exclusively in the epididymis. Moreover, it exhibited region-specific expression in the caput, which is typical for genes that are involved in creating a suitable microenvironment for sperm maturation. Mouse Spag11a was regulated by androgen. A significant decrease of Spag11a expression was observed at third day following a gonadectomy (P epididymal luminal fluid and spermatozoa. Conclusions Based on the characteristics of Spag11a, it is likely that this gene has a specific role in epididymal sperm maturation. Further studies using functional assays are necessary to confirm this finding. PMID:23815807

  5. Role of Membrane Lipid Fatty Acids in Sperm Cryopreservation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mandal, Rajes; Badyakar, Damodar; Chakrabarty, Jitamanyu

    2014-01-01

    ... is not. Therefore, sperm cells are not programmed for such change and undergo stress. So the change in membrane lipid composition due to cold shock or cryopreservation may be looked upon as response of spermatozoa to a certain stressed condition...

  6. Human papilloma virus in the sperm cryobank: an emerging problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresta, C; Ferlin, A; Bertoldo, A; Patassini, C; Zuccarello, D; Garolla, A

    2011-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is very common worldwide, but the actual incidence and significance of HPV infection in sperm are poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the presence of HPV in spermatozoa from thawed semen samples previously stored in our sperm bank. We performed polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization for HPV detection in cryovials belonging to 98 oncology patients and in 60 semen samples from healthy controls. Statistical analysis was performed by two-tailed Student's t-test and Fisher's exact test. The frequency of HPV semen infection was 6.1% in thawed cryovials from patients and 3.3% in semen samples from controls. Among the patients, four were found positive for high-risk HPV, one for medium-risk HPV and another for low-risk HPV. Patients had a significantly higher percentage of infected sperm than controls. In conclusion, this report shows the presence of HPV in sperm cells from cryovials of a sperm bank. It is still unclear if HPV-infected sperm are able to cross-contaminate cryovials and impair the outcome of assisted reproduction techniques or to infect partners. Further studies are needed to understand whether screening for HPV should be performed in all semen samples before sperm banking or before intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection procedures. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2011 European Academy of Andrology.

  7. Global targeting of subcellular heat shock protein-90 networks for therapy of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegelin, Markus D; Plescia, Janet; Raskett, Christopher M; Gilbert, Candace A; Ross, Alonzo H; Altieri, Dario C

    2010-06-01

    Drug discovery for complex and heterogeneous tumors now aims at dismantling global networks of disease maintenance, but the subcellular requirements of this approach are not understood. Here, we simultaneously targeted the multiple subcellular compartments of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) in a model of glioblastoma, a highly lethal human malignancy in urgent need of fresh therapeutic strategies. Treatment of cultured or patient-derived glioblastoma cells with Shepherdin, a dual peptidomimetic inhibitor of mitochondrial and cytosolic Hsp90, caused irreversible collapse of mitochondria, degradation of Hsp90 client proteins in the cytosol, and tumor cell killing by apoptosis and autophagy. Stereotactic or systemic delivery of Shepherdin was well tolerated and suppressed intracranial glioma growth via inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and reduction of angiogenesis in vivo. These data show that disabling Hsp90 cancer networks in their multiple subcellular compartments improves strategies for drug discovery and may provide novel molecular therapy for highly recalcitrant human tumors.

  8. TRPM8, a versatile channel in human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo A De Blas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The transient receptor potential channel (TRP family includes more than 30 proteins; they participate in various Ca(2+ dependent processes. TRPs are functionally diverse involving thermal, chemical and mechanical transducers which modulate the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+]i. Ca(2+ triggers and/or regulates principal sperm functions during fertilization such as motility, capacitation and the acrosome reaction. Nevertheless, the presence of the TRPM subfamily in sperm has not been explored.Here we document with RT-PCR, western blot and immunocitochemistry analysis the presence of TRPM8 in human sperm. We also examined the participation of this channel in sperm function using specific agonists (menthol and temperature and antagonists (BCTC and capsazepine. Computer-aided sperm analysis revealed that menthol did not significantly alter human sperm motility. In contrast, menthol induced the acrosome reaction in human sperm. This induction was inhibited about 70% by capsazepine (20 microM and 80% by BCTC (1.6 microM. Activation of TRPM8 either by temperature or menthol induced [Ca(2+]i increases in human sperm measured by fluorescence in populations or individual sperm cells, effect that was also inhibited by capsazepine (20 microM and BCTC (1.6 microM. However, the progesterone and ZP3-induced acrosome reaction was not inhibited by capsazepine or BCTC, suggesting that TRPM8 activation triggers this process by a different signaling pathway.This is the first report dealing with the presence of a thermo sensitive channel (TRPM8 in human sperm. This channel could be involved in cell signaling events such as thermotaxis or chemotaxis.

  9. Why mammalian lineages respond differently to sexual selection: metabolic rate constrains the evolution of sperm size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomendio, Montserrat; Tourmente, Maximiliano; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2011-10-22

    The hypothesis that sperm competition should favour increases in sperm size, because it results in faster swimming speeds, has received support from studies on many taxa, but remains contentious for mammals. We suggest that this may be because mammalian lineages respond differently to sexual selection, owing to major differences in body size, which are associated with differences in mass-specific metabolic rate. Recent evidence suggests that cellular metabolic rate also scales with body size, so that small mammals have cells that process energy and resources from the environment at a faster rate. We develop the 'metabolic rate constraint hypothesis' which proposes that low mass-specific metabolic rate among large mammals may limit their ability to respond to sexual selection by increasing sperm size, while this constraint does not exist among small mammals. Here we show that among rodents, which have high mass-specific metabolic rates, sperm size increases under sperm competition, reaching the longest sperm sizes found in eutherian mammals. By contrast, mammalian lineages with large body sizes have small sperm, and while metabolic rate (corrected for body size) influences sperm size, sperm competition levels do not. When all eutherian mammals are analysed jointly, our results suggest that as mass-specific metabolic rate increases, so does maximum sperm size. In addition, species with low mass-specific metabolic rates produce uniformly small sperm, while species with high mass-specific metabolic rates produce a wide range of sperm sizes. These findings support the hypothesis that mass-specific metabolic rates determine the budget available for sperm production: at high levels, sperm size increases in response to sexual selection, while low levels constrain the ability to respond to sexual selection by increasing sperm size. Thus, adaptive and costly traits, such as sperm size, may only evolve under sexual selection when metabolic rate does not constrain cellular

  10. Sterols in spermatogenesis and sperm maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keber, Rok; Rozman, Damjana; Horvat, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a complex developmental program in which a diploid progenitor germ cell transforms into highly specialized spermatozoa. One intriguing aspect of sperm production is the dynamic change in membrane lipid composition that occurs throughout spermatogenesis. Cholesterol content, as well as its intermediates, differs vastly between the male reproductive system and nongonadal tissues. Accumulation of cholesterol precursors such as testis meiosis-activating sterol and desmosterol is observed in testes and spermatozoa from several mammalian species. Moreover, cholesterogenic genes, especially meiosis-activating sterol-producing enzyme cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14α-demethylase, display stage-specific expression patterns during spermatogenesis. Discrepancies in gene expression patterns suggest a complex temporal and cell-type specific regulation of sterol compounds during spermatogenesis, which also involves dynamic interactions between germ and Sertoli cells. The functional importance of sterol compounds in sperm production is further supported by the modulation of sterol composition in spermatozoal membranes during epididymal transit and in the female reproductive tract, which is a prerequisite for successful fertilization. However, the exact role of sterols in male reproduction is unknown. This review discusses sterol dynamics in sperm maturation and describes recent methodological advances that will help to illuminate the complexity of sperm formation and function. PMID:23093550

  11. Induction of ultra-morphological features of apoptosis in mature and immature sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Grunewald

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a fundamental body of evidence suggesting that activated apoptosis signaling in ejaculated human sperm negatively influences their fertilization potential. However, it is still controversial whether this apoptotic signaling is a relic of an abortive apoptosis related to spermatogenesis or if it should be regarded as a functional preformed pathway in mature sperm leading to stereotypical morphological changes reflecting nuclear disassembly. To address this question, apoptosis was induced using betulinic acid in mature and immature ejaculated human sperm enriched by density gradient centrifugation. Execution of apoptosis was monitored by observing ultra-morphological changes via transmission electron microscopy. Typical morphological signs of apoptosis in somatic cells include plasma membrane blebbing with the formation of apoptotic bodies, impaired mitochondrial integrity, defects of the nuclear envelope, and nuclear fragmentation; these morphologies have also been observed in human sperm. In addition, these apoptotic characteristics were more frequent in immature sperm compared to mature sperm. Following betulinic acid treatment, apoptosis-related morphological changes were induced in mature sperm from healthy donors. This effect was much less pronounced in immature sperm. Moreover, in both fractions, the betulinic acid treatment increased the percentage of acrosome-reacted sperm. The results of our ultra-morphological study prove the functional competence of apoptosis in mature ejaculated human sperm. The theory of a sole abortive process may be valid only for immature sperm. The induction of the acrosome reaction by stimulating apoptosis might shed light on the biological relevance of sperm apoptosis.

  12. Sperm traits differ between winged and wingless males of the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrempf, Alexandra; Moser, Astrid; Delabie, Jacques; Heinze, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    Size and shape of sperm cells vary tremendously throughout the animal kingdom. The adaptive significance of this variation is not fully understood. In addition to sperm-female interactions and the environmental conditions, the risk of sperm competition might affect number, morphology and other "quality" traits of sperm. In the male-diphenic ant Cardiocondyla obscurior, winged sneaker males have limited sperm number, because their testes degenerate shortly after adult emergence, as is typical for males of social Hymenoptera. In contrast, wingless fighter males continuously replenish their sperm supply due to their exceptional lifelong spermatogenesis. While winged males usually have to compete with several other winged males for virgin queens, wingless males are able to monopolize queens by killing all other rivals. Hence, this presents a unique system to investigate how alternative reproductive tactics and associated physiology affect sperm morphology and viability. We found that sperm-limited males invest into sperm number instead of sperm size. Variance in sperm length is smaller in winged males, probably reflecting that they have to compete with several other males. Finally, sperm viability is equally high in both male phenotypes. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Subcellular Distribution of Glutathione Precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffler, Barbara Eva; Maier, Romana; Zechmann, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glutathione is an important antioxidant and has many important functions in plant development, growth and defense. Glutathione synthesis and degradation is highly compartment-specific and relies on the subcellular availability of its precursors, cysteine, glutamate, glycine and γ-glutamylcysteine especially in plastids and the cytosol which are considered as the main centers for glutathione synthesis. The availability of glutathione precursors within these cell compartments is therefore of great importance for successful plant development and defense. The aim of this study was to investigate the compartment-specific importance of glutathione precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The subcellular distribution was compared between wild type plants (Col-0), plants with impaired glutathione synthesis (glutathione deficient pad2-1 mutant, wild type plants treated with buthionine sulfoximine), and one complemented line (OE3) with restored glutathione synthesis. Immunocytohistochemistry revealed that the inhibition of glutathione synthesis induced the accumulation of the glutathione precursors cysteine, glutamate and glycine in most cell compartments including plastids and the cytosol. A strong decrease could be observed in γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) contents in these cell compartments. These experiments demonstrated that the inhibition of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) – the first enzyme of glutathione synthesis – causes a reduction of γ-EC levels and an accumulation of all other glutathione precursors within the cells. PMID:22050910

  14. On mammalian sperm dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, J M; Woodall, P F

    1985-09-01

    Data on linear sperm dimensions in mammals are presented. There is information on a total of 284 species, representing 6.2% of all species; 17.2% of all genera and 49.2% of all families have some representation, with quantitative information missing only from the orders Dermoptera, Pholidota, Sirenia and Tubulidentata. In general, sperm size is inverse to body mass (except for the Chiroptera), so that the smallest known spermatozoa are amongst those of artiodactyls and the largest are amongst those of marsupials. Most variations are due to differences in the lengths of midpiece and principal piece, with head lengths relatively uniform throughout the mammals.

  15. Signaling in sperm: toward a molecular understanding of the acquisition of sperm motility in the mouse epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadnais, Melissa L; Aghajanian, Haig K; Lin, Angel; Gerton, George L

    2013-11-01

    Sperm motility encompasses a wide range of events involving epididymal maturation and activation of biochemical pathways, most notably cyclic AMP (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) activation. Following the discovery of guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (RAPGEFs), also known as exchange proteins activated by cAMP, we investigated the separate roles of PKA and RAPGEFs in sperm motility. RT-PCR showed the presence of Rapgef3, Rapgef4, and Rapgef5, as well as several known RAPGEF partner mRNAs, in spermatogenic cells. However, Rapgef3 and Rapgef4 appeared to be less abundant in condensing spermatids versus pachytene spermatocytes. Similarly, many of these proteins were detected by immunoblotting. RAPGEF5 was detected in germ cells and murine epididymal sperm. Indirect immunofluorescence localized SGK1, SGK3, AKT1 pT(308), and RAPGEF5 to the acrosome, while PDPK1 was found in the postacrosomal region. SGK3 was present throughout the tail, while PDPK1 and AKT1 pT(308) were in the midpiece. When motility was assessed in demembranated cauda epididymal sperm, addition of ATP and the selective ligand for RAPGEFs, 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, resulted in motility, but the sperm were unable to undergo hyperactivated-like motility. In contrast, when demembranated cauda epididymal sperm were incubated with ATP plus dibutyryl cAMP, sperm became motile and progressed to hyperactivated-like motility. However, no significant difference was observed when intact sperm were examined. GSK3 phosphorylation was altered in the presence of H89, a PKA inhibitor. Significantly, intact caput epididymal sperm became motile when incubated in the presence of extracellular ATP. These results provide evidence for a new pathway involved in endowing sperm with the capacity to swim.

  16. Signaling in Sperm: Toward a Molecular Understanding of the Acquisition of Sperm Motility in the Mouse Epididymis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadnais, Melissa L.; Aghajanian, Haig K.; Lin, Angel; Gerton, George L.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sperm motility encompasses a wide range of events involving epididymal maturation and activation of biochemical pathways, most notably cyclic AMP (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) activation. Following the discovery of guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (RAPGEFs), also known as exchange proteins activated by cAMP, we investigated the separate roles of PKA and RAPGEFs in sperm motility. RT-PCR showed the presence of Rapgef3, Rapgef4, and Rapgef5, as well as several known RAPGEF partner mRNAs, in spermatogenic cells. However, Rapgef3 and Rapgef4 appeared to be less abundant in condensing spermatids versus pachytene spermatocytes. Similarly, many of these proteins were detected by immunoblotting. RAPGEF5 was detected in germ cells and murine epididymal sperm. Indirect immunofluorescence localized SGK1, SGK3, AKT1 pT308, and RAPGEF5 to the acrosome, while PDPK1 was found in the postacrosomal region. SGK3 was present throughout the tail, while PDPK1 and AKT1 pT308 were in the midpiece. When motility was assessed in demembranated cauda epididymal sperm, addition of ATP and the selective ligand for RAPGEFs, 8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP, resulted in motility, but the sperm were unable to undergo hyperactivated-like motility. In contrast, when demembranated cauda epididymal sperm were incubated with ATP plus dibutyryl cAMP, sperm became motile and progressed to hyperactivated-like motility. However, no significant difference was observed when intact sperm were examined. GSK3 phosphorylation was altered in the presence of H89, a PKA inhibitor. Significantly, intact caput epididymal sperm became motile when incubated in the presence of extracellular ATP. These results provide evidence for a new pathway involved in endowing sperm with the capacity to swim. PMID:24006282

  17. Distribution profiles of transient receptor potential melastatin- and vanilloid-related channels in rat spermatogenic cells and sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shilin; Wang, Xinghuan; Ye, Haixia; Gao, Weicheng; Pu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Zhonghua

    2010-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the expression and distribution of transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM)- and vanilloid (TRPV)- related channels in rat spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa. Spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa were obtained from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to detect the expression of all TRPM and TRPV channel members with specific primers. Western blot analysis was applied for detecting the expression of TRPM and TRPV channel proteins. Immunohistochemistry staining for TRPM4, TRPM7 and TRPV5 was also performed in rat testis. The mRNAs of TRPM3, TRPM4, TRPM7 and TRPV5 were detected in the spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa in rat. Western blot analysis verified the expression of TRPM4, TRPM7 and TRPV5 in the rat spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa. Immunocytochemistry staining for TRPM and TRPV channel families indicated that TRPM4 and TRPM7 proteins were highly expressed in different stages of spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa, while TRPV5 protein was lowly expressed in these cells. Our results demonstrate that mRNAs or proteins for TRPM3, TRPM4, TRPM7 and TRPV5 exist in rat spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa. These data presented here may assist in elucidating the possible physiological function of TRPM and TRPV channels in spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa.

  18. Computer-Aided Sperm Analysis (CASA) of sperm motility and hyperactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, David; Mortimer, Sharon T

    2013-01-01

    Progressive motility is a vital functional characteristic of ejaculated human spermatozoa that governs their ability to penetrate into, and migrate through, both cervical mucus and the oocyte vestments, and ultimately fertilize the oocyte. A detailed protocol, based on the most common computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) system with phase contrast microscope optics, is provided for performing reliable assessments of sperm movement pattern characteristics ("kinematics") in semen. The protocol can also be used with washed sperm suspensions where, in addition, the percentages of motile and progressively motile spermatozoa can also be derived. Using CASA technology it is also possible to identify biologically, and hence clinically, important subpopulations of spermatozoa (e.g., those in semen with good mucus-penetrating characteristics, or those showing hyperactivation when incubated under capacitating conditions) by applying multi-parametric definitions on a cell-by-cell basis.

  19. Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Md. Imtiaz Uddin

    2012-02-14

    Feb 14, 2012 ... We examined the expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating protein OsARP in a submergence tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivar FR13A. In the public databases, this protein was designated as putative Os02g0465900 protein. The cDNA containing the full-length sequence of OsARP.

  20. Sperm DNA damage measured by comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Luke; Carrell, Douglas T

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of sperm DNA damage is a useful tool in the evaluation of male infertility, as the sperm nucleus lacks protection against oxidative stress and is vulnerable to oxidation-mediated DNA damage. The Comet assay or single-cell gel electrophoresis is a relatively simple and sensitive method for measuring strand breaks in DNA in individual sperm. During this procedure, sperm cells are embedded in a thin layer of agarose on a microscope slide and lysed with detergent under high salt conditions. This process removes protamines and histones allowing the nucleus to form a nucleoid-like structure containing supercoiled loops of DNA. Alkaline pH conditions result in unwinding of double-stranded DNA, and subsequent electrophoresis results in the migration of broken strands towards the anode, forming a comet tail, when observed under fluorescence microscope. The amount of DNA in the head and tail is reflected by its fluorescent intensity. The relative fluorescence in the tail compared with its head serves as a measure of the level of DNA damage. In this chapter, we describe the alkaline version of the Comet assay, which is highly sensitive for measuring single- and double-strand DNA breaks.

  1. Geary autocorrelation and DCCA coefficient: Application to predict apoptosis protein subcellular localization via PSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2017-02-01

    Apoptosis is a fundamental process controlling normal tissue homeostasis by regulating a balance between cell proliferation and death. Predicting subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding its mechanism of programmed cell death. Prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular location is still a challenging and complicated task, and existing methods mainly based on protein primary sequences. In this paper, we propose a new position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based model by using Geary autocorrelation function and detrended cross-correlation coefficient (DCCA coefficient). Then a 270-dimensional (270D) feature vector is constructed on three widely used datasets: ZD98, ZW225 and CL317, and support vector machine is adopted as classifier. The overall prediction accuracies are significantly improved by rigorous jackknife test. The results show that our model offers a reliable and effective PSSM-based tool for prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

  2. Equine sperm-neutrophil binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Abdorrahman S; Madill, Scott; Foster, Douglas N; Troedsson, Mats H T

    2015-04-01

    When mares are inseminated repeatedly, protein molecules from the seminal plasma (SP) prevent sperm-neutrophil binding and reduced fertility. The molecule(s) responsible for sperm-neutrophil binding is not known and the identification of beneficial SP proteins is complicated by their large numbers and abundant variation. We examined several important aspects of sperm-neutrophil binding to ultimately facilitate the identification and isolation of the molecule(s) responsible. First, we raised anti-equine P-selectin antibodies to determine the involvement of this adhesion molecule in sperm-neutrophil binding. While these antibodies identified equine P-selectin, they did not inhibit sperm-neutrophil binding. However, acrosome-reacted equine sperm expressed a molecule similar to the ligand recognition unit of P-selectin. Second, we attempted to characterize SP protein binding to equine sperm and gauge their affinity. Biotinylated SP proteins were incubated with fresh sperm, washed over a viscous medium, electrophoresed, and probed with avidin. Several SP proteins bound to sperm with a strong affinity to withstand these treatments. This finding may prove valuable for future attempts to identify and characterize specific SP molecules. Lastly, we compared the secretions from male sex organs/glands on sperm motility, sperm-neutrophil binding, and their protein profile. We expected fewer proteins from individual organs/glands, which would facilitate isolation and identification of target molecules. While each secretion had a varying effect on motility and sperm-neutrophil binding, the protein profile was as complex as that seen in whole SP, indicating that collection of proteins from individual sources will not facilitate this work. Together, these experiments answer several important questions related to sperm-neutrophil binding, sperm-SP proteins interaction, and the complexity of the SP proteome. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  3. A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

    2012-12-21

    Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

  4. Regulation of human sperm motility by opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirregoitia, E; Subiran, N; Valdivia, A; Gil, J; Zubero, J; Irazusta, J

    2012-05-01

    The endogenous opioid system has been reported to have important functions in human reproduction. Practically all the components of this peptide system have been discovered in human sperm cells, but their functions in these cells are far from being well understood. In the present work, we report the effects of opioid agonism and antagonism on human sperm motility, a parameter which is crucially associated with male fertility. Morphine (10(-7) M), a μ- opioid receptor agonist, decreased both the percentage of motile progressive sperm and three measured velocities without altering the linearity, straightness or vigour of sperm cells. This effect was reversed by naloxone. Higher doses of morphine did not have further effects on the measured parameters. The incubation of sperm cells with the δ-opioid receptor agonist D-penicillamine (2,5)-enkephalin did not affect sperm cell motility. However, naltrindole, a specific δ-receptor antagonist, reduced the linear and curvilinear velocities, as well as linearity, straightness and the amplitude of head displacement, and beat frequency. In summary, our results indicate that the endogenous opioid system may regulate opioid motility in vitro. These finding suggest that the endogenous opioid system could be useful as a biochemical tool for the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. The effects of male age on sperm analysis by motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Liliane FI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to investigate the influence of age on sperm quality, as analysed by motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME. Methods Semen samples were collected from 975 men undergoing evaluation or treatment for infertility. Sperm cells were evaluated at 8400× magnification using an inverted microscope equipped with Nomarski (differential interference contrast optics. Two forms of spermatozoa were considered: normal spermatozoa and spermatozoa with large nuclear vacuoles (LNV, defined as vacuoles occupying > 50% of the sperm nuclear area. At least 200 spermatozoa per sample were evaluated, and the percentages of normal and LNV spermatozoa were determined. The subjects were divided into three groups according to age: Group I, less than or equal to 35 years; Group II, 36-40 years; and Group III, greater than or equal to 41 years. Results There was no difference in the percentages of normal sperm between the two younger (I and II groups (P >0.05. The percentage of normal sperm in the older group (III was significantly lower than that in the younger (I and II groups (P P >0.05. The percentage of LNV spermatozoa was significantly higher in the older group (III than in the younger (I and II groups (P P P Conclusion The results demonstrated a consistent decline in semen quality, as reflected by morphological evaluation by MSOME, with increased age. Considering the relationship between nuclear vacuoles and DNA damage, these age-related changes predict that increased paternal age should be associated with unsuccessful or abnormal pregnancy as a consequence of fertilisation with damaged spermatozoa. Given that sperm nuclear vacuoles can be evaluated more precisely at high magnification, these results support the routine use of MSOME for ICSI as a criterion for semen analysis.

  6. Aggregation of human sperm at higher temperature is due to hyperactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, E L; Chan, P J; Patton, W C; King, A

    1999-01-01

    Chemotaxis of sperm cells to chemicals and hormones, such as progesterone, helps us to understand the concept of sperm transport. Here, the hypothesis was that heat increased sperm hyperactive motility, which caused the sperm to aggregate at the higher temperature. The objectives were (1) to determine the concentration of sperm at both halves of an artificial female reproductive tract made from a hermetically sealed cryopreservation straw filled with culture medium and placed with each end at different temperatures, and (2) to analyze the motility or kinematic parameters and hyperactivation of sperm found at the different temperatures. Cryopreserved-thawed human donor sperm (N = 6) were pooled and processed through 2-layer colloid solution. Analyses of the motile sperm were carried out and the washed sperm were homogeneously mixed and pipetted into several 0.5-mL French cryopreservation straws and heat-sealed. The control substance, consisting of acid-treated sperm, was also placed in several straws. The plastic straws of sperm were placed half at 23 degrees C and half was at either 37 or 40 degrees C. After 4 h, sperm at different sections of the straws were analyzed using the Hamilton Thorn motility analyzer (HTM-C). After 4 h of incubation, the concentration of sperm was doubled at the 40 degrees C heated half of the straw when compared with the other half of the straw at 23 degrees C. There were no differences in sperm concentration in the straw kept half at 37 degrees C and half at 23 degrees C. There were significantly higher percent motility, mean average path velocity, straight line velocity, lateral head displacement, and percent hyperactivation in sperm at the 40 degrees C temperature. The aggregation of sperm at the higher temperature of 40 degrees C may be due to enhanced motility, increased sperm velocities, and a 10-fold increase in hyperactivation at that temperature. The 37 degrees C temperature was not sufficient to attract sperm. Sperm cells

  7. Immunogold labeling reveals subcellular localisation of silica nanoparticles in a human blood-brain barrier model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dong; Anguissola, Sergio; O'Neill, Tiina; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2015-05-01

    Subcellular location of nanoparticles has been widely investigated with fluorescence microscopy, via fluorescently labeled antibodies to visualise target antigens in cells. However, fluorescence microscopy, such as confocal or live cell imaging, has generally limited 3D spatial resolution. Conventional electron microscopy can be useful in bridging resolution gap, but still not ideal in resolving subcellular organelle identities. Using the pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopic imaging, we performed accurate examination of the intracellular trafficking and gathered further evidence of transport mechanisms of silica nanoparticles across a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Our approach can effectively immunolocalise a variety of intracellular compartments and provide new insights into the uptake and subcellular transport of nanoparticles.Subcellular location of nanoparticles has been widely investigated with fluorescence microscopy, via fluorescently labeled antibodies to visualise target antigens in cells. However, fluorescence microscopy, such as confocal or live cell imaging, has generally limited 3D spatial resolution. Conventional electron microscopy can be useful in bridging resolution gap, but still not ideal in resolving subcellular organelle identities. Using the pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopic imaging, we performed accurate examination of the intracellular trafficking and gathered further evidence of transport mechanisms of silica nanoparticles across a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Our approach can effectively immunolocalise a variety of intracellular compartments and provide new insights into the uptake and subcellular transport of nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle characterisation data, preservation of cellular structures, staining controls, optimisation of size amplification via the silver enhancement, and more imaging results from anti-clathrin and anti-caveolin 1

  8. Interpreting sperm DNA damage in a diverse range of mammalian sperm by means of the two-tailed comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Elva I eCortes-Gutierrez; Carmen eLopez-Fernandez; Jose Luis Fernandez; Martha I Davila-Rodriguez; Stephen eJohnston; Jaime eGosalvez

    2014-01-01

    Key Concepts The two-dimensional Two-Tailed Comet assay (TT-comet) protocol is a valuable technique to differentiate between single-stranded (SSBs) and double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) on the same sperm cell. Protein lysis inherent with the TT-comet protocol accounts for differences in sperm protamine composition at a species-specific level to produce reliable visualization of sperm DNA damage. Alkaline treatment may break the sugar–phosphate backbone in abasic sites or at sites wi...

  9. Adsorption of human papillomavirus 16 to live human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Andino, Julio; Buck, Christopher B; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2009-06-09

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a diverse group of viruses that infect the skin and mucosal tissues of humans. A high-risk subgroup of HPVs is associated with virtually all cases of cervical cancer [1]-[3]. High-risk HPVs are transmitted sexually; however, the exact mechanisms by which sexual contact promotes virus infection remain uncertain. To study this question we asked whether capsids of HPV type 16 (a high-risk HPV) specifically interact with sperm cells. We tested if purified HPV16 virions directly adsorb to live human sperm cells in native semen and in conditions that resemble the female genital tract. We found that HPV16 capsids bind efficiently to two distinct sites at the equatorial region of the sperm head surface. Moreover, we observed that the interaction of virus with sperm can be reduced by two HPV infection inhibitors, heparin and carrageenan. Our findings suggest that 1) sperm cells may serve as motile carriers that promote virus dispersal and mucosal penetration, and 2) blocking interactions between HPV16 and sperm cells may be an important strategy for the development of antiviral therapies.

  10. Adsorption of human papillomavirus 16 to live human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Pérez-Andino

    Full Text Available Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs are a diverse group of viruses that infect the skin and mucosal tissues of humans. A high-risk subgroup of HPVs is associated with virtually all cases of cervical cancer [1]-[3]. High-risk HPVs are transmitted sexually; however, the exact mechanisms by which sexual contact promotes virus infection remain uncertain. To study this question we asked whether capsids of HPV type 16 (a high-risk HPV specifically interact with sperm cells. We tested if purified HPV16 virions directly adsorb to live human sperm cells in native semen and in conditions that resemble the female genital tract. We found that HPV16 capsids bind efficiently to two distinct sites at the equatorial region of the sperm head surface. Moreover, we observed that the interaction of virus with sperm can be reduced by two HPV infection inhibitors, heparin and carrageenan. Our findings suggest that 1 sperm cells may serve as motile carriers that promote virus dispersal and mucosal penetration, and 2 blocking interactions between HPV16 and sperm cells may be an important strategy for the development of antiviral therapies.

  11. Role of Actin Cytoskeleton During Mammalian Sperm Acrosomal Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romarowski, Ana; Luque, Guillermina M; La Spina, Florenza A; Krapf, Dario; Buffone, Mariano G

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian sperm require to undergo an exocytotic process called acrosomal exocytosis in order to be able to fuse with the oocyte. This ability is acquired during the course of sperm capacitation. This review is focused on one aspect related to this acquisition: the role of the actin cytoskeleton. Evidence from different laboratories indicates that actin polymerization occurs during capacitation, and the detection of several actin-related proteins suggests that the cytoskeleton is involved in important sperm functions. In other mammalian cells, the cortical actin network acts as a dominant negative clamp which blocks constitutive exocytosis but, at the same time, is necessary to prepare the cell to undergo regulated exocytosis. Thus, F-actin stabilizes structures generated by exocytosis and supports the physiological progression of this process. Is this also the case in mammalian sperm? This review summarizes what is currently known about actin and its related proteins in the male gamete, with particular emphasis on their role in acrosomal exocytosis.

  12. Chromosome distribution in human sperm – a 3D multicolor banding-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrasek Kristin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear architecture studies in human sperm are sparse. By now performed ones were practically all done on flattened nuclei. Thus, studies close at the in vivo state of sperm, i.e. on three-dimensionally conserved interphase cells, are lacking by now. Only the position of 14 chromosomes in human sperm was studied. Results Here for the first time a combination of multicolor banding (MCB and three-dimensional analysis of interphase cells was used to characterize the position and orientation of all human chromosomes in sperm cells of a healthy donor. The interphase nuclei of human sperm are organized in a non-random way, driven by the gene density and chromosome size. Conclusion Here we present the first comprehensive results on the nuclear architecture of normal human sperm. Future studies in this tissue type, e.g. also in male patients with unexplained fertility problems, may characterize yet unknown mechanisms of infertility.

  13. Cryptic choice of conspecific sperm controlled by the impact of ovarian fluid on sperm swimming behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Sarah E; Diamond, Sian E; Einum, Sigurd; Emerson, Brent C; Holt, William V; Gage, Matthew J G

    2013-12-01

    Despite evidence that variation in male-female reproductive compatibility exists in many fertilization systems, identifying mechanisms of cryptic female choice at the gamete level has been a challenge. Here, under risks of genetic incompatibility through hybridization, we show how salmon and trout eggs promote fertilization by conspecific sperm. Using in vitro fertilization experiments that replicate the gametic microenvironment, we find complete interfertility between both species. However, if either species' ova were presented with equivalent numbers of both sperm types, conspecific sperm gained fertilization precedence. Surprisingly, the species' identity of the eggs did not explain this cryptic female choice, which instead was primarily controlled by conspecific ovarian fluid, a semiviscous, protein-rich solution that bathes the eggs and is released at spawning. Video analyses revealed that ovarian fluid doubled sperm motile life span and straightened swimming trajectory, behaviors allowing chemoattraction up a concentration gradient. To confirm chemoattraction, cell migration tests through membranes containing pores that approximated to the egg micropyle showed that conspecific ovarian fluid attracted many more spermatozoa through the membrane, compared with heterospecific fluid or water. These combined findings together identify how cryptic female choice can evolve at the gamete level and promote reproductive isolation, mediated by a specific chemoattractive influence of ovarian fluid on sperm swimming behavior. © 2013 The Authors. Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  14. Cinética de espermatozoides criopreservados de bovinos após sexagem por citometria de fluxo Kinetics of bovine cryopreserved sperm cells after sexing by flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Oliveira Carvalho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar a cinética de sêmen bovino criopreservado não sexado, sexado X e sexado Y antes e depois da seleção espermática por gradiente de Percoll. Amostras criopreservadas de sêmen não sexado (grupo NS e sexado X (grupo SX e Y (grupo SY por citometria de fluxo, de quatro touros, foram avaliadas quanto à motilidade e à cinética espermática com o "computer-assisted semen analysis" (CASA e o restante da amostra de cada grupo foi submetido à seleção espermática em gradiente de Percoll (45:60%. Após a seleção, foram realizadas as mesmas avaliações que antes da passagem pelo Percoll. A motilidade do grupo NS foi superior à dos grupos SX e SY e não foi observada diferença entre os grupos SX e SY nos parâmetros de cinética espermática obtidos pelo CASA, antes ou após a passagem pelo Percoll. Foi observado aumento na motilidade para todos os grupos como efeito da seleção pelo Percoll. O processo de sexagem por citometria de fluxo afeta a cinética espermática, e a passagem pelo Percoll aumenta a motilidade do sêmen sexado e não sexado sem alterar a cinética do sêmen não sexado.The objective of this study was to compare the kinetics of bovine cryopreserved nonsexed, sexed for X and sexed for Y sperm cells before and after selection using Percoll gradient. Cryopreserved nonsexed (NS group semen samples and sexed for X (SX group and for Y (SY group by flow cytometry, from four different sires, were analyzed for motility by computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA, and the remainder of the sperm samples for each group was submitted to Percoll (45:60% gradient selection. After Percoll selection, the same sperm analyses done before the passing through Percoll gradient were performed. Sperm motility was higher in the NS group than in the SX and SY groups, and no differences were observed between these last two groups for any of the sperm parameters evaluated by CASA, either before or after Percoll

  15. Sperm and spermatids contain different proteins and bind distinct egg factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperek, Marta; Miyamoto, Kei; Simeone, Angela; Feret, Renata; Deery, Michael J; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2014-09-19

    Spermatozoa are more efficient at supporting normal embryonic development than spermatids, their immature, immediate precursors. This suggests that the sperm acquires the ability to support embryonic development during spermiogenesis (spermatid to sperm maturation). Here, using Xenopus laevis as a model organism, we performed 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially expressed proteins between sperm and spermatids in order to identify factors that could be responsible for the efficiency of the sperm to support embryonic development. Furthermore, benefiting from the availability of egg extracts in Xenopus, we also tested whether the chromatin of sperm could attract different egg factors compared to the chromatin of spermatids. Our analysis identified: (1) several proteins which were present exclusively in sperm; but not in spermatid nuclei and (2) numerous egg proteins binding to the sperm (but not to the spermatid chromatin) after incubation in egg extracts. Amongst these factors we identified many chromatin-associated proteins and transcriptional repressors. Presence of transcriptional repressors binding specifically to sperm chromatin could suggest its preparation for the early embryonic cell cycles, during which no transcription is observed and suggests that sperm chromatin has a unique protein composition, which facilitates the recruitment of egg chromatin remodelling factors. It is therefore likely that the acquisition of these sperm-specific factors during spermiogenesis makes the sperm chromatin suitable to interact with the maternal factors and, as a consequence, to support efficient embryonic development.

  16. Sperm and Spermatids Contain Different Proteins and Bind Distinct Egg Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Teperek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spermatozoa are more efficient at supporting normal embryonic development than spermatids, their immature, immediate precursors. This suggests that the sperm acquires the ability to support embryonic development during spermiogenesis (spermatid to sperm maturation. Here, using Xenopus laevis as a model organism, we performed 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially expressed proteins between sperm and spermatids in order to identify factors that could be responsible for the efficiency of the sperm to support embryonic development. Furthermore, benefiting from the availability of egg extracts in Xenopus, we also tested whether the chromatin of sperm could attract different egg factors compared to the chromatin of spermatids. Our analysis identified: (1 several proteins which were present exclusively in sperm; but not in spermatid nuclei and (2 numerous egg proteins binding to the sperm (but not to the spermatid chromatin after incubation in egg extracts. Amongst these factors we identified many chromatin-associated proteins and transcriptional repressors. Presence of transcriptional repressors binding specifically to sperm chromatin could suggest its preparation for the early embryonic cell cycles, during which no transcription is observed and suggests that sperm chromatin has a unique protein composition, which facilitates the recruitment of egg chromatin remodelling factors. It is therefore likely that the acquisition of these sperm-specific factors during spermiogenesis makes the sperm chromatin suitable to interact with the maternal factors and, as a consequence, to support efficient embryonic development.

  17. Comparative evidence for the evolution of sperm swimming speed by sperm competition and female sperm storage duration in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleven, Oddmund; Fossøy, Frode; Laskemoen, Terje; Robertson, Raleigh J; Rudolfsen, Geir; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2009-09-01

    Sperm swimming speed is an important determinant of male fertility and sperm competitiveness. Despite its fundamental biological importance, the underlying evolutionary processes affecting this male reproductive trait are poorly understood. Using a comparative approach in a phylogenetic framework, we tested the predictions that sperm swim faster with (1) increased risk of sperm competition, (2) shorter duration of female sperm storage, and (3) increased sperm length. We recorded sperm swimming speed in 42 North American and European free-living passerine bird species, representing 35 genera and 16 families. We found that sperm swimming speed was positively related to the frequency of extrapair paternity (a proxy for the risk of sperm competition) and negatively associated with clutch size (a proxy for the duration of female sperm storage). Sperm swimming speed was unrelated to sperm length, although sperm length also increased with the frequency of extrapair paternity. These results suggest that sperm swimming speed and sperm length are not closely associated traits and evolve independently in response to sperm competition in passerine birds. Our findings emphasize the significance of both sperm competition and female sperm storage duration as evolutionary forces driving sperm swimming speed.

  18. Melatonin ameliorates the adverse effects of leptin on sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayez A Almabhouh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of melatonin on leptin-induced changes in sperm parameters in adult rats. Five groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either leptin or leptin and melatonin or melatonin for 6 weeks. Leptin was given daily via the intraperitoneal route (60 μg kg−1 body weight and melatonin was given in drinking water (10 mg kg−1 or 20 mg kg−1 body weight per day. Upon completion, sperm count, sperm morphology, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine, Comet assay, TUNEL assay, gene expression profiles of antioxidant enzymes, respiratory chain reaction enzymes, DNA damage, and apoptosis genes were estimated. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Sperm count was significantly lower whereas the fraction of sperm with abnormal morphology, the level of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine, and sperm DNA fragmentation were significantly higher in rats treated with leptin only. Microarray analysis revealed significant upregulation of apoptosis-inducing factor, histone acetyl transferase, respiratory chain reaction enzyme, cell necrosis and DNA repair genes, and downregulation of antioxidant enzyme genes in leptin-treated rats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction showed significant decreases in glutathione peroxidase 1 expression with increases in the expression of apoptosis-inducing factor and histone acetyl transferase in leptin-treated rats. There was no change in the gene expression of caspase-3 (CASP-3. In conclusion, the adverse effects of leptin on sperm can be prevented by concurrent melatonin administration.

  19. A novel cell-processing method 'AgarCytos' in conjunction with OCT3/4 and PLAP to detect intratubular germ cell neoplasia in non-obstructive azoospermia using remnants of testicular sperm extraction specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, M; Ramos, L; Hulsbergen, A F C; D'Hauwers, K W M; Braat, D D M; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C A

    2013-10-01

    Can we diagnose intratubular germ cell neoplasia (IGCN) using the immunohistochemical markers placental-like alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) and OCT3/4 using a novel cell-processing method 'AgarCytos', applied to the remnants of testicular sperm extraction (TESE) specimens and what is the prevalence of a testicular germ cell (pre)malignancy in men with a non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) undergoing TESE for fertility treatment? IGCN can be successfully detected by immunohistochemical evaluation of AgarCytos, made of the remnants of TESE biopsies. The observed prevalence of a germ cell (pre)malignancy in this specific population was found to be 4.4%. Infertile men are at higher risk for testicular cancer than the general population. IGCN can be detected by immunohistochemistry using PLAP and OCT3/4 in standard testicular biopsies and, with less accuracy, in semen. Between January 2011 and April 2012 a prospective cohort study was conducted at a Dutch tertiary care academic training hospital. All males with NOA (n = 182) undergoing a urological work-up followed by a diagnostic TESE for fertility treatment (n = 251) were included. After cryopreservation of sperm, if present, an AgarCyto was made of the remnants of the TESE biopsies. Sections were stained with haematoxylin-eosin for pathological examination as well as PLAP and OCT3/4 for immunohistochemistry to detect IGCN. Eight men (4.4%) were diagnosed with a germ cell (pre)malignancy: six of them had seminoma, two without and four with concomitant IGCN, and two of them had IGCN only. Microscopic evaluation including immunohistochemical analysis of the AgarCytos diagnosed three (1.6%) more cases of a germ cell (pre)malignancy compared with scrotal ultrasound alone (one case of bilateral seminoma with concomitant IGCN and two cases of IGCN alone). No false-positive cytology results were found upon conventional histological evaluation. The main limitation of this study is lack of a simultaneously taken standard testicular

  20. Morphology, Structure of Dimorphic Sperm, and Reproduction in the Hermaphroditic Commensal Bivalve Pseudopythina tsurumaru (Galeommatoidea: Kellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Jespersen, Åse; Takahashi, Tohru

    2004-01-01

    Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma......Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma...

  1. Detrended cross-correlation coefficient: Application to predict apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-12-01

    Apoptosis, or programed cell death, plays a central role in the development and homeostasis of an organism. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding the apoptosis mechanism. The prediction of subcellular localization of an apoptosis protein is still a challenging task, and existing methods mainly based on protein primary sequences. In this paper, we introduce a new position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based method by using detrended cross-correlation (DCCA) coefficient of non-overlapping windows. Then a 190-dimensional (190D) feature vector is constructed on two widely used datasets: CL317 and ZD98, and support vector machine is adopted as classifier. To evaluate the proposed method, objective and rigorous jackknife cross-validation tests are performed on the two datasets. The results show that our approach offers a novel and reliable PSSM-based tool for prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular localization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sperm whale clicks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Bertel; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter T.

    2000-01-01

    . A sound generator weighing upward of 10 tons and with a cross-section of 1 m is expected to generate high-intensity, directional sounds. This prediction from the Norris and Harvey theory is not supported by published data for sperm whale clicks ~source levels of 180 dB re 1 mPa and little, if any...... of the continental shelf off Andenes, Norway, in the summers of 1997 and 1998. With this system, source levels up to 223 dB re 1 mPa peRMS were recorded. Also, source level differences of 35 dB for the same click at different directions were seen, which are interpreted as evidence for high directionality....... This implicates sonar as a possible function of the clicks. Thus, previously published properties of sperm whale clicks underestimate the capabilities of the sound generator and therefore cannot falsify the Norris and Harvey theory....

  3. Cryopreservation of Fish Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokura, Hisashi

    Present status of research activities in cryopreservation of fish gamete in aquaculture field was introduced. More than 59 fish species have been reported in the research histories and nearly half of them were studied during recent 10 years. This means that the research activities are increasing, though commercial profit have not obtained yet. Fish species of which sperm can successfully cryopreserved is still limited comparing to numerous species in telost. One of the major obstacle for improvement of the technique is existence of wide specie specific variance in the freezing tolerance of fish sperm. The varianc can possibly be explaind thorugh the informations obtained by the studies in comparative spermatology, which is recently activated field in fish biology.

  4. Subcellular Localization of Cadmium in Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck Strain Bt-09

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B. Lintongan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Growth response curves of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck strain Bt-09 to sublethal concentrations of cadmium were evaluated. The growth responses of this microalgal isolate was determined through analysis of chlorophyll a levels. Cadmium was effectively taken up by the cells as determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (F-AAS. Subcellular fractionation was undertaken to locate sites that accumulate cadmium.

  5. Cryopreservation of microencapsulated canine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shambhu; Otsuki, Tsubasa; Fujimura, Chika; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamashita, Yasuhisa; Higaki, Shogo; Hishinuma, Mitsugu

    2011-03-01

    The objective was to develop a method for cryopreserving microencapsulated canine sperm. Pooled ejaculates from three beagle dogs were extended in egg yolk tris extender and encapsulated using alginate and poly-L-lysine at room temperature. The microcapsules were cooled at 4 °C, immersed in pre-cooled extender (equivalent in volume to the microcapsules) to reach final concentration of 7% (v/v) glycerol and 0.75% (v/v) Equex STM paste, and equilibrated for 5, 30 and 60 min at 4 °C. Thereafter, microcapsules were loaded into 0.5 mL plastic straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen. In Experiment 1, characteristics of microencapsulated canine sperm were evaluated after glycerol addition at 4 °C. Glycerol exposure for 5, 30 and 60 min did not significantly affect progressive motility, viability, or acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm compared with pre-cooled unencapsulated sperm (control). In Experiment 2, characteristics of frozen-thawed canine microencapsulated sperm were evaluated at 0, 3, 6, and 9 h of culture at 38.5 °C. Pre-freeze glycerol exposure for 5, 30, and 60 min at 4 °C did not influence post-thaw quality in unencapsulated sperm. Post-thaw motility and acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm decreased more than those of unencapsulated sperm (P < 0.05) following glycerol exposure for 5 min. However, motility, viability and acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm after 30 and 60 min glycerol exposure were higher than unencapsulated sperm cultured for 6 or 9 h (P < 0.05). In conclusion, since microencapsulated canine sperm were successfully cryopreserved, this could be a viable alternative to convention sperm cryopreservation in this species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulation of sperm gene expression by the GATA factor ELT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo-Olivares, Antonio; Kulkarni, Madhura; Smith, Harold E

    2009-09-15

    Cell fate specification is mediated primarily through the expression of cell-type-specific genes. The regulatory pathway that governs the sperm/egg decision in the hermaphrodite germ line of Caenorhabditis elegans has been well characterized, but the transcription factors that drive these developmental programs remain unknown. We report the identification of ELT-1, a GATA transcription factor that specifies hypodermal fate in the embryo, as a regulator of sperm-specific transcription in the germ line. Computational analysis identified a conserved bipartite sequence element that is found almost exclusively in the promoters of a number of sperm genes. ELT-1 was recovered in a yeast one-hybrid screen for factors that bind to that sperm consensus site. In vitro assays defined the sperm consensus sequence as an optimal binding site for ELT-1. We determined that expression of elt-1 is elevated in the sperm-producing germ line, and that ELT-1 is required for sperm function. Deletion of the ELT-1 binding site from a sperm promoter abrogates sperm-specific expression of a reporter transgene. This work demonstrates a role for the ELT-1 transcription factor in sperm, and provides a critical link between the germ line sex determination program and gamete-specific gene expression.

  7. Ion channels in sperm physiology and male fertility and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Kamla Kant; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Rajender, Singh

    2012-01-01

    Ion channels regulate the membrane potential and intracellular ionic concentration and thus serve a central role in various cellular processes. Several ion channels have been identified in the germ cells, including sperm, emphasizing their importance in male fertility and reproduction. The molecular mechanism of ion transport and the nature of the ion channels involved have begun to emerge only recently despite the fact that several ligand-gated and voltage-gated channels have been identified and localized on sperm. The presence of the sperm-associated cation channel (CatSper1-4) gene family, proton voltage-gated ion channel (Hv1), potassium voltage-gated ion channel (SLO3/KCNU1), sodium voltage-gated channel (NaV1.1-1.9), and the members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family suggest an indispensable role for ion channels in sperm physiology and fertility potential. Ion channels are the key players in very important processes such as capacitation and the acrosome reaction, which are critical steps in sperm physiology preparing for fertilization. For example, CatSper, Hv1, SLO3, and TRP channel family members have been proposed to participate in the acrosome reaction, thereby making them most important for sperm fertility. Similarly, NaV channels could play a crucial role in noncapacitated sperm and in the initial capacitation steps. The role of ion channels seems indispensable for sperm fertility as evidenced by studies on animal models; however, the functional defects in infertile human males await further exploration. This article represents an update on the role of ion channels in sperm physiology, male fertility, and infertility.

  8. The role of human papillomavirus on sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garolla, Andrea; Pizzol, Damiano; Foresta, Carlo

    2011-08-01

    To review the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) on sperm parameters, fertility and implication of the use of infected sperm cells in assisted reproduction. HPVs are agents of the most common sexually transmitted disease and can lead to warts and cancers both in men and women.A high incidence of HPV infection has been demonstrated in sperm from sexually active men with and without risk factors for HPV and from infertile patients. Semen infection is associated to an impairment of sperm parameters suggesting a possible role in male infertility. Interestingly, it has been demonstrated that when HPV is present in semen only a percentage of total cells are infected and the virus can be localized in sperm or in exfoliated cells with different impact on sperm motility. Moreover, infected sperm are able to penetrate the oocyte, to deliver HPV genome in the oocyte and HPV genes can be actively transcribed by the fertilized oocyte. Recently an increased risk of pregnancy loss has been demonstrated in couples undergoing in-vitro fertilization and particularly when HPV DNA was present in semen samples of male partners. To date, no effective treatment, control strategy and prevention is provided for men despite the reported high incidence of HPV semen infection. Because this infection in men is also a problem for partners, and because growing evidence suggests that semen infection may cause infertility and early miscarriage, more attention should be paid to male HPV infection. This study reviews the more recent literature about the role of HPV infection on sperm function and human reproduction.

  9. Cryopreservation of epididymal stallion sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaciregui, M; Gil, L; Montón, A; Luño, V; Jerez, R A; Martí, J I

    2014-02-01

    Any event that makes semen collection or mating impossible, such as death, castration, or injury, may terminate a stallion's breeding career. Fortunately, stallion sperm which are capable of fertilization can be harvested from the epididymis, and frozen for future use. However, the fertility of frozen-thawed epididymal sperm has been found to be lower than that of ejaculated sperm. Therefore, this study aimed to optimize the fertility of frozen epididymal stallion sperm by investigating the effects of different cryoprotectants and freezing protocols on sperm quality. Dimethylformamide was tested alone or combination with pasteurized egg yolk as substitute of fresh egg yolk. In addition, the effect of the pre-freeze stabilization on sperm quality was analyzed. Heterospermic samples obtained from stallion epididymis were collected and cryopreserved in lactose-egg-yolk extender or in the same extender with varying content of cryoprotectant and content of egg yolk, stabilized and no-stabilized. Sperm motility, viability, hypoosmotic swelling test (HOST) and acrosome integrity were evaluated post-thawing. No improvement was observed on the replacement of fresh yolk by pasteurized egg yolk, whereas the results suggest that dimethylformamide is a cryoprotectant suitable for cryopreservation of equine epididymal semen, even better than glycerol. In addition, we found that the stabilization before freezing on epididymal stallion sperm, can improve sperm quality parameters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetically targeted fluorogenic macromolecules for subcellular imaging and cellular perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenau, Andrew J D; Saurabh, Saumya; Andreko, Susan K; Telmer, Cheryl A; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Waggoner, Alan S; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2015-10-01

    The alteration of cellular functions by anchoring macromolecules to specified organelles may reveal a new area of therapeutic potential and clinical treatment. In this work, a unique phenotype was evoked by influencing cellular behavior through the modification of subcellular structures with genetically targetable macromolecules. These fluorogen-functionalized polymers, prepared via controlled radical polymerization, were capable of exclusively decorating actin, cytoplasmic, or nuclear compartments of living cells expressing localized fluorgen-activating proteins. The macromolecular fluorogens were optimized by establishing critical polymer architecture-biophysical property relationships which impacted binding rates, binding affinities, and the level of internalization. Specific labeling of subcellular structures was realized at nanomolar concentrations of polymer, in the absence of membrane permeabilization or transduction domains, and fluorogen-modified polymers were found to bind to protein intact after delivery to the cytosol. Cellular motility was found to be dependent on binding of macromolecular fluorogens to actin structures causing rapid cellular ruffling without migration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Studies on the subcellular localization of the porphycene CPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David; Conley, Mary; Vicente, M Graça H; Reiners, John J

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to provide more detailed information on the subcellular sites of binding of the porphycene, termed 9-capronyloxytetrakis (methoxyethyl) porphycene (CPO), with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. The proximity of CPO to two fluorescent probes was determined: nonyl acridine orange (NAO), a dye with specific affinity for the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and dihexa-oxacarbocyanine iodide (DiOC6), an agent that labels the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). FRET spectra indicated energy transfer between DiOC6 and CPO but no significant transfer between NAO and CPO. These results confirm data obtained by fluorescence microscopy, suggesting a similar pattern of subcellular localization by CPO and DiOC6 but not by CPO and NAO. However, when cells containing CPO were irradiated and then loaded with NAO, FRET between the two fluorophores was observed. Hence, a relocalization of CPO can occur during irradiation. These data provide an explanation for recent studies on CPO-catalyzed photodamage to both ER and mitochondrial Bcl-2.

  12. Studies on the Subcellular Localization of the Porphycene CPO¶

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David; Conley, Mary; Vicente, M. Graça H.; Reiners, John J.

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to provide more detailed information on the subcellular sites of binding of the porphycene, termed 9-capronyloxytetrakis (methoxyethyl) porphycene (CPO), with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. The proximity of CPO to two fluorescent probes was determined: nonyl acridine orange (NAO), a dye with specific affinity for the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and dihexaoxacarbocyanine iodide (DiOC6), an agent that labels the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). FRET spectra indicated energy transfer between DiOC6 and CPO but no significant transfer between NAO and CPO. These results confirm data obtained by fluorescence microscopy, suggesting a similar pattern of subcellular localization by CPO and DiOC6 but not by CPO and NAO. However, when cells containing CPO were irradiated and then loaded with NAO, FRET between the two fluorophores was observed. Hence, a relocalization of CPO can occur during irradiation. These data provide an explanation for recent studies on CPO-catalyzed photodamage to both ER and mitochondrial Bcl-2. PMID:15745423

  13. Phospholipase B is activated in response to sterol removal and stimulates acrosome exocytosis in murine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Atsushi; Nelson-Harrington, Jacquelyn L; Travis, Alexander J

    2013-09-27

    Despite a strict requirement for sterol removal for sperm to undergo acrosome exocytosis (AE), the mechanisms by which changes in membrane sterols are transduced into changes in sperm fertilization competence are poorly understood. We have previously shown in live murine sperm that the plasma membrane overlying the acrosome (APM) contains several types of microdomains known as membrane rafts. When characterizing the membrane raft-associated proteomes, we identified phospholipase B (PLB), a calcium-independent enzyme exhibiting multiple activities. Here, we show that sperm surface PLB is activated in response to sterol removal. Both biochemical activity assays and immunoblots of subcellular fractions of sperm incubated with the sterol acceptor 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (2-OHCD) confirmed the release of an active PLB fragment. Specific protease inhibitors prevented PLB activation, revealing a mechanistic requirement for proteolytic cleavage. Competitive inhibitors of PLB reduced the ability of sperm both to undergo AE and to fertilize oocytes in vitro, suggesting an important role in fertilization. This was reinforced by our finding that incubation either with protein concentrate released from 2-OHCD-treated sperm or with recombinant PLB peptide corresponding to the catalytic domain was able to induce AE in the absence of other stimuli. Together, these results lead us to propose a novel mechanism by which sterol removal promotes membrane fusogenicity and AE, helping confer fertilization competence. Importantly, this mechanism provides a basis for the newly emerging model of AE in which membrane fusions occur during capacitation/transit through the cumulus, prior to any physical contact between the sperm and the oocyte's zona pellucida.

  14. Characterization of fucosyltransferase activity during mouse spermatogenesis: Evidence for a cell surface fucosyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardullo, R.A.; Armant, D.R.; Millette, C.F. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1989-02-21

    Fucosyltransferase activity was quantified in mouse germ cells at different stages of spermatogenesis. Specifically, fucosyltransferase activities of pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids, and cauda epididymal sperm were compared. Fucosyltranferase activity of mixed germ cells displayed an apparent V{sub max} of 17 pmol (mg of protein){sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} and an apparent K{sub m} of approximately 13 {mu}M for GDP-L-({sup 14}C)fucose in the presence of saturating amounts of asialofetuin at 33{degree}C. Under these conditions, cellular fucosyltransferase activity was found to increase during spermatogenesis. In agreement with assays of intact cells, examination of subcellular fractions indicated that a large fraction of fucosyltransferase activity was associated with the cell surface. The fraction of fucosyltransferase activity that was associated with the cell surface progressively increased throughout spermatogenesis and epididymal maturation so that nearly all of the fucosyltransferase in epididymal sperm was on the cell surface. Specifically, by comparison of activities in the presence and absence of the detergent NP-40, the fraction of fucosyltransferase activity that was associated with the cell surface in pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids, and epididymal sperm was 0.36, 0.5, and 0.85, respectively. These results suggest that a cell surface fucosyltransferase may be important during differentiation of spermatogenic cells in the testis as well as during epididymal maturation and fertilization.

  15. Generation of Transgenic Xenopus laevis: II. Sperm Nuclei Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Shoko; Kroll, Kristin L; Amaya, Enrique

    2007-09-01

    INTRODUCTIONManipulating genes specifically during later stages of amphibian embryonic development requires fine control over the time and place of expression. These protocols describe an efficient nuclear-transplantation-based method of transgenesis developed for Xenopus laevis. The approach enables stable expression of cloned gene products in Xenopus embryos. Because the transgene integrates into the genome prior to fertilization, the resulting embryos are not chimeric, eliminating the need to breed to the next generation to obtain nonmosaic transgenic animals. The procedure is based on restriction-enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) and can be divided into three parts: (I) high-speed preparation of egg extracts, (II) sperm nuclei preparation, and (III) nuclear transplantation. This protocol describes a method for the preparation of sperm nuclei from Xenopus laevis. Sperm suspensions are prepared by filtration and centrifugation, and then treated with lysolecithin to disrupt the plasma membrane of the cells. Sperm nuclei can be stored frozen in small aliquots at -80°C.

  16. Analysis of sperm karyotypes in a patient treated with griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Evelyn M; Lowry, R Brian; Martin, Renée H

    2007-01-01

    Griseofulvin is known to interfere with chromosome segregation by binding to microtubule-associated proteins. Studies in mouse germ cells have demonstrated that griseofulvin can induce aneuploidy (numerical chromosome abnormalities) at therapeutic concentrations. The aim of this study was to determine if chronic griseofulvin treatment led to an increased frequency of sperm chromosome abnormalities in one male subject. We analyzed 290 full sperm karyotypes using the human sperm-hamster oocyte fusion system. The frequency of X- and Y-bearing sperm was equal. There was no increase in the frequency of numerical (1.7%) or structural (9.3%) abnormalities in the subject compared to unexposed controls. Although reassuring, this is the first report on this subject and future studies are needed to assess the risk of griseofulvin.

  17. Cytometric analysis of shape and DNA content in mammalian sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-10

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. Sperm were analyzed by flow cytometry and slit-scan flow analysis for injury following the exposure of testes to mutagens. The utility of flow cytometry in genotoxin screening and monitoring of occupational exposure was evaluated. The technique proved valuable in separation of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm and the potential applicability of this technique in artificial insemination and a solution, of accurately assessing the DNA content of sperm were evaluated-with reference to determination of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm.

  18. Improving the resolution of cryopreserved X- and Y-sperm during DNA flow cytometric analysis with the addition of Percoll to quench the fluorescence of dead sperm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stap, J.; Hoebe, R. A.; Merton, J. S.; Haring, R. M.; Bakker, P. J.; Aten, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    The most effective method to control the sex of offspring is by separating X- from Y-bearing sperm on the basis of their DNA content. Sperm can be stained with Hoechst 33342 and efficiently sexed using a flow cytometer/cell sorter. However, applying this established assay to cryopreserved bovine

  19. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašić, Ana; Horvat, Lucija; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione plays numerous important functions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Whereas it can be found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, its production in prokaryotes is restricted to cyanobacteria and proteobacteria and a few strains of gram-positive bacteria. In bacteria, it is involved in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), osmotic shock, acidic conditions, toxic chemicals, and heavy metals. Glutathione synthesis in bacteria takes place in two steps out of cysteine, glutamate, and glycine. Cysteine is the limiting factor for glutathione biosynthesis which can be especially crucial for cyanobacteria, which rely on both the sufficient sulfur supply from the growth media and on the protection of glutathione against ROS that are produced during photosynthesis. In this study, we report a method that allows detection and visualization of the subcellular distribution of glutathione in Synechocystis sp. This method is based on immunogold cytochemistry with glutathione and cysteine antisera and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy. Labeling of glutathione and cysteine was restricted to the cytosol and interthylakoidal spaces. Glutathione and cysteine could not be detected in carboxysomes, cyanophycin granules, cell walls, intrathylakoidal spaces, periplasm, and vacuoles. The accuracy of the glutathione and cysteine labeling is supported by two observations. First, preadsorption of the antiglutathione and anticysteine antisera with glutathione and cysteine, respectively, reduced the density of the gold particles to background levels. Second, labeling of glutathione and cysteine was strongly decreased by 98.5% and 100%, respectively, in Synechocystis sp. cells grown on media without sulfur. This study indicates a strong similarity of the subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria and plastids of plants and provides a deeper insight into glutathione metabolism in bacteria. PMID:20349253

  20. Subversive practices of sperm donation - globalizing Danish sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    into how the bending of boundaries by “inappropriate parents”, fertility travellers, private sperm banks and fertility clinics have been part in negotiating the changes of the legislation in practice, and thus been part of developing a Danish industry of sperm banking. The presentation is based on a multi...

  1. Subversive practices of sperm donation - globalizing Danish sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    as the use of donated sperm continuously has been debated as an ethical issue, and increasingly been regulated. In this presentation I will discuss how Denmark became a destination for fertility travelling (sperm donation) as a result of various subversive strategies of family making. The article inquires...

  2. cSrc is necessary for epididymal development and is incorporated into sperm during epididymal transit

    OpenAIRE

    Krapf, Dario; Ruan, Ye Chun; Wertheimer, Eva V.; Battistone, Maria A.; Pawlak, John B.; Sanjay, Archana; Pilder, Stephen H.; Cuasnicu, Patricia; Breton, Sylvie; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2012-01-01

    Changes that occur to mammalian sperm upon epididymal transit and maturation render these cells capable of moving progressively and capacitating. Signaling events leading to mammalian sperm capacitation depend on the modulation of proteins by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation cascades. Recent experiments have demonstrated that the Src family of kinases plays an important role in the regulation of these events. However, sperm from cSrc null mice display normal tyrosine phosphorylation asso...

  3. Identification of Multiple HPV Types on Spermatozoa from Human Sperm Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Kaspersen, Maja D; Peter B Larsen; Hans Jakob Ingerslev; Jens Fedder; Gert Bruun Petersen; Jesper Bonde; Per Höllsberg

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) may cause sexually transmitted disease. High-risk types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cell dysplasia, whereas low-risk types may cause genital condyloma. Despite the association between HPV and cancer, donor sperm need not be tested for HPV according to European regulations. Consequently, the potential health risk of HPV transmission by donor bank sperm has not been elucidated, nor is it known how HPV is associated with sperm. The presence of ...

  4. Fusion of Boar Sperm with Nanoliposomes Prepared from Synthetic Phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimanickam, V R; Buhr, M M

    2016-08-01

    Liposomes are artificial membrane vesicles that can be used to test and model the functions and interactions of various biological membranes, or as a carrier system to deliver biologically active substances into the cells, or to incorporate lipids into the plasma membrane of target cells to modify membrane structure-function relationships. Sperm plasma membrane undergoes lipid modification during maturation in epididymis and during capacitation in the female reproductive tract to facilitate fertilization. Natural variation in the amounts and composition of lipids in the sperm plasma membrane may also contribute to the species-specific sperm sensitivities to handling and storage conditions. Boar sperm are notoriously susceptible to membrane damage and are resistant to compositional alteration by artificial liposomes. This study used flow cytometry to demonstrate stable incorporation of nanoliposomes prepared from a complex mixture of various phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine : phosphatidylethanolamine : sphingomyelin : phosphatidylserine : phosphatidylinositol) with high fusion efficiency. Over 90% of sperm rapidly took up fluorescently labelled liposomes and retained the lipids for at least 60 min, in a significant time- and concentration-dependent manner. This unique fusion efficacy could be used to alter sperm plasma membrane composition and hence membrane-based functional responses. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Sperm Proteomics: Road to Male Fertility and Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Saidur Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that can be easily obtained and purified. Mature spermatozoa are transcriptionally and translationally inactive and incapable of protein synthesis. In addition, spermatozoa contain relatively higher amounts of membrane proteins compared to other cells; therefore, they are very suitable for proteomic studies. Recently, the application of proteomic approaches such as the two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, and differential in-gel electrophoresis has identified several sperm-specific proteins. These findings have provided a further understanding of protein functions involved in different sperm processes as well as of the differentiation of normal state from an abnormal one. In addition, studies on the sperm proteome have demonstrated the importance of spermatozoal posttranslational modifications and their ability to induce physiological changes responsible for fertilization. Large-scale proteomic studies to identify hundreds to thousands of sperm proteins will ultimately result in the development of novel biomarkers that may help to detect fertility, the state of complete contraception, and beyond. Eventually, these protein biomarkers will allow for a better diagnosis of sperm dysfunctions and aid in drug development. This paper reviews the recent scientific publications available from the PubMed database to address sperm proteomics and its potential application to characterize male fertility and contraception.

  6. Factors influencing boar sperm cryosurvival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, J; Hernández, M; Carvajal, G; Vázquez, J M; Martínez, E A

    2006-10-01

    Optimal sperm cryopreservation is a prerequisite for the sustainable commercial application of frozen-thawed boar semen for AI. Three experiments were performed to identify factors influencing variability of postthaw sperm survival among 464 boar ejaculates. Sperm-rich ejaculate fractions were cryopre-served using a standard freezing-thawing procedure for 0.5-mL plastic straws and computer-controlled freezing equipment. Postthaw sperm motility (assessed with a computer-assisted semen analysis system) and viability (simultaneously probed by flow cytometry analysis after triple-fluorescent stain), evaluated 30 and 150 min postthaw, were used to estimate the success of cryopreservation. In the first experiment, 168 unselected ejaculates (1 ejaculate/boar), from boars of 6 breeds with a wide age range (8 to 48 mo), were cryopreserved over a 12-mo period to evaluate the predictive value of boar (breed and age), semen collection, transport variables (season of ejaculate collection, interval between collections, and ejaculate temperature exposure), initial semen traits, and sperm quality before freezing on sperm survival after freezing-thawing. In Exp. 2, 4 ejaculates from each of 29 boars, preselected according to their initial semen traits and sperm quality before freezing, were collected and frozen over a 6-mo period to evaluate the influence of interboar and intraboar ejaculate variability in the survival of sperm after cryopreservation. In Exp. 3, 12 ejaculates preselected as for Exp. 2, from each of 15 boars with known good sperm cryosurvival, were collected and frozen over a 12-mo period to estimate the sustainability of sperm cryosurvival between ejaculates over time. Boar and semen collection and transport variables were not predictive of sperm cryosurvival among ejaculates. Initial semen traits and sperm quality variables observed before freezing explained 23.2 and 10.9%, respectively, of the variation in postthaw sperm motility and viability. However, more that

  7. Probing the subcellular localization of hopanoid lipids in bacteria using NanoSIMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Doughty

    Full Text Available The organization of lipids within biological membranes is poorly understood. Some studies have suggested lipids group into microdomains within cells, but the evidence remains controversial due to non-native imaging techniques. A recently developed NanoSIMS technique indicated that sphingolipids group into microdomains within membranes of human fibroblast cells. We extended this NanoSIMS approach to study the localization of hopanoid lipids in bacterial cells by developing a stable isotope labeling method to directly detect subcellular localization of specific lipids in bacteria with ca. 60 nm resolution. Because of the relatively small size of bacterial cells and the relative abundance of hopanoid lipids in membranes, we employed a primary (2H-label to maximize our limit of detection. This approach permitted the analysis of multiple stable isotope labels within the same sample, enabling visualization of subcellular lipid microdomains within different cell types using a secondary label to mark the growing end of the cell. Using this technique, we demonstrate subcellular localization of hopanoid lipids within alpha-proteobacterial and cyanobacterial cells. Further, we provide evidence of hopanoid lipid domains in between cells of the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme. More broadly, our method provides a means to image lipid microdomains in a wide range of cell types and test hypotheses for their functions in membranes.

  8. Determination of sperm concentration using flow cytometry with simultaneous analysis of sperm plasma membrane integrity in zebrafish Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiping; Daly, Jonathan; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2016-04-01

    Control of sperm concentration is required to ensure consistent and reproducible results for cryopreservation and in vitro fertilization protocols. Determination of sperm concentration is traditionally performed with a counting chamber (e.g., hemocytometer), or more recently with a spectrophotometer. For small-sized biomedical model fishes, the availability of sperm sample is limited to microliters, so it is desirable to develop fast and accurate approaches for concentration determination that also minimize sample use. In this study, a new approach was developed for sperm concentration determination using a flow cytometer (Accuri C6, BD Biosciences, San Jose, CA) with simultaneous measurement of sperm membrane integrity after fluorescent staining with SYBR(®) -14 and propidium iodide (PI) in sperm from Zebrafish Danio rerio. The goal was to develop a protocol for simultaneous determination of sperm quality and quantity by flow cytometry. The objectives were to (1) determine the effects of sample volume (250 and 500 µl) and analysis volume (10 and 50 µl) on the accuracy of particle counting using standard volumetric validation beads; (2) identify the effective range of sperm concentrations that flow cytometry can measure; (3) test the precision and reproducibility of the sperm concentration measurements; and (4) verify the flow cytometry approach by comparison with measurement with a hemocytometer and a microspectrophotometer. Sample volumes of 250 and 500 µl and analysis volumes of 10 and 50 µl did not affect bead count with the factory-set flow rates of "medium" or "fast," and the precision and accuracy was retained across a concentration range of 1 × 10(3) -1 × 10(7) cells/ml. The approach developed in this study was comparable to traditional methodologies such as hemocytometer or microspectrophotometer. This study provides an efficient, accurate, and rapid method for determination of sperm concentration using flow cytometry while providing

  9. Fertility Assessment in Sorraia Stallions by Sperm-Fish and Fkbp6 Genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjöllerström, H J; do Mar Oom, M; Chowdhary, B P; Raudsepp, T

    2016-06-01

    The Sorraia, a critically endangered indigenous Iberian horse breed, is characterized by low genetic variability, high rate of inbreeding, bad sperm quality and subfertility. Here, we studied 11 phenotypically normal but subfertile Sorraia stallions by karyotyping, sex chromosome sperm-FISH and molecular analysis of FKBP6 - a susceptibility locus for impaired acrosome reaction (IAR). The stallions had normal sperm concentration (>300 million cells/ml), but the numbers of progressively motile sperm (21%) and morphologically normal sperm (28%) were invariably low. All stallions had a normal 64,XY karyotype. The majority of sperm (89%) had normal haploid sex chromosome content, although 11% of sperm carried various sex chromosome aneuploidies. No correlation was found between the percentage of sperm sex chromosome abnormalities and inbreeding, sperm morphology or stallion age. Direct sequencing of FKBP6 exon 4 for SNPs g.11040315G>A and g.11040379C>A revealed that none of the stallions had the susceptibility genotype (A/A-A/A) for IAR. Instead, all animals had a G/G-A/A genotype - a testimony of low genetic variability. The findings ruled out chromosomal abnormalities and genetic predisposition for IAR as contributing factors for subfertility. However, low fertility of the Sorraia stallions could be partly attributed to relatively higher rate of sex chromosome aneuploidies in the sperm. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Carbonic anhydrases and their functional differences in human and mouse sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, O; Torres-Rodríguez, P; Forero-Quintero, L S; Chávez, J C; De la Vega-Beltrán, J L; Carta, F; Supuran, C T; Deitmer, J W; Treviño, C L

    2015-12-25

    Fertilization is a key reproductive event in which sperm and egg fuse to generate a new individual. Proper regulation of certain parameters (such as intracellular pH) is crucial for this process. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are among the molecular entities that control intracellular pH dynamics in most cells. Unfortunately, little is known about the function of CAs in mammalian sperm physiology. For this reason, we re-explored the expression of CAI, II, IV and XIII in human and mouse sperm. We also measured the level of CA activity, determined by mass spectrometry, and found that it is similar in non-capacitated and capacitated mouse sperm. Importantly, we found that CAII activity accounts for half of the total CA activity in capacitated mouse sperm. Using the general CA inhibitor ethoxyzolamide, we studied how CAs participate in fundamental sperm physiological processes such as motility and acrosome reaction in both species. We found that capacitated human sperm depend strongly on CA activity to support normal motility, while capacitated mouse sperm do not. Finally, we found that CA inhibition increases the acrosome reaction in capacitated human sperm, but not in capacitated mouse sperm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fertilization is not a new beginning: the relationship between sperm longevity and offspring performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela J Crean

    Full Text Available Sperm are the most diverse cell type known: varying not only among- and within- species, but also among- and within-ejaculates of a single male. Recently, the causes and consequences of variability in sperm phenotypes have received much attention, but the importance of within-ejaculate variability remains largely unknown. Correlative evidence suggests that reduced within-ejaculate variation in sperm phenotype increases a male's fertilization success in competitive conditions; but the transgenerational consequences of within-ejaculate variation in sperm phenotype remain relatively unexplored. Here we examine the relationship between sperm longevity and offspring performance in a marine invertebrate with external fertilization, Styela plicata. Offspring sired by longer-lived sperm had higher performance compared to offspring sired by freshly-extracted sperm of the same ejaculate, both in the laboratory and the field. This indicates that within-ejaculate differences in sperm longevity can influence offspring fitness - a source of variability in offspring phenotypes that has not previously been considered. Links between sperm phenotype and offspring performance may constrain responses to selection on either sperm or offspring traits, with broad ecological and evolutionary implications.

  12. Human papillomavirus found in sperm head of young adult males affects the progressive motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresta, Carlo; Garolla, Andrea; Zuccarello, Daniela; Pizzol, Damiano; Moretti, Afra; Barzon, Luisa; Palù, Giorgio

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) sperm infection and its correlation with sperm parameters in a cohort of young adult males. Cross-sectional clinical study. Andrology and Microbiology sections at a university hospital. A cohort of 200 young adult male volunteers (18 years old), 100 with previous sexual intercourse and 100 without previous sexual intercourse. Seminal parameters, sperm culture for HPV and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for HPV detection in the sperm head. Statistical analysis was performed with a two-tailed Student's t-test. Results of HPV investigation were compared to sperm parameters and results of FISH analysis. HPV infection was present in sperm cells of 10 subjects among those 100 young adults who already had unprotected intercourse and its presence was associated with reduced sperm motility. Furthermore, infected samples showed that about 25% of sperm had an HPV DNA positivity at the head site, but it is unclear whether it was integrated in the nucleus or not. This is the first report estimating the percentage of HPV-positive sperm in infected subjects and the association between HPV infection and sperm motility. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel sorting technology allows for highly efficient selection of sperm without chromatin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funaro, Michael G; Kim, Howard H; Mazel, Svetlana; Bolyakov, Alexander; Goldstein, Marc; Schlegel, Peter N; Paduch, Darius A

    2013-06-01

    Sperm chromatin damage has been associated with male infertility, increased risk for spontaneous abortion, and poor embryo development. Available methods for detecting chromatin damage render the sperm no longer suitable for clinical use. Early apoptotic events resulting in chromatin damage are associated with increased permeability of the cell membrane to large ions. We propose the use of a large fluorescent organic cation, proprietary fluorochrome (PF-1), for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) for negative selection of sperm without chromatin damage. Sperm with chromatin damage are PF-1 positive. Performance of cell sorting by PF-1 was verified with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) after FACS on PF-1(+) and PF-1(-) subpopulations. Whereas 19.5% of PF-1 positive sperm were TUNEL positive only 1.5% sperm in the PF-1(-) fraction were TUNEL positive (p positive sperm without adverse effects on viability, providing a new therapeutic avenue for men with a high percentage of TUNEL positive sperm. Further research is needed to determine if the reduction in TUNEL positive sperm using PF-1 will improve in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes.

  14. Responses of testis, epididymis, and sperm of pubertal rats exposed to functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farombi, Ebenezer O; Adedara, Isaac A; Forcados, Gilead E; Anao, Osemudiamen O; Agbowo, Agatha; Patlolla, Anita K

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the response of testes, epididymides and sperm in pubertal Wistar rats following exposure to 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 mg kg(-1) functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) for 5 days. The results showed that administration of (f-MWCNTs) significantly increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in a dose-dependent manner in both testes and sperm compared with control group. Moreover, the significant decrease in the activity of glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione level was accompanied with significant elevation in the levels of hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde in both testes and sperm of (f-MWCNTs)-treated rats. The spermiogram of (f-MWCNTs)-treated rats indicated significant decrease in epididymal sperm number, sperm progressive motility, testicular sperm number and daily sperm production with elevated sperm abnormalities when compared with the control. Exposure to (f-MWCNTs) decreased plasma testosterone level and produced marked morphological changes including decreased geminal epithelium, edema, congestion, reduced spermatogenic cells and focal areas of tubular degeneration in the testes. The lumen of the epididymides contained reduced sperm cells and there was mild to severe hyperplasia epithelial cells lining the duct of the epididymis. Collectively, pubertal exposure of male rats to (f-MWCNTs) elicited oxidative stress response resulting in marked testicular and epididymides dysfunction. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Social imaginaries, sperm and whiteness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses narratives about so-called Viking babies and Viking sperm. Over the last few years an increasing number of British single women and lesbian couples have been creating families by becoming pregnant with Danish donor sperm, termed ‘Viking sperm’. Through analyses of British...

  16. Recent advances in bird sperm morphometric analysis and its role in male gamete characterization and reproduction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Moreno, Julian; Esteso, Milagros Cristina; Villaverde-Morcillo, Silvia; Toledano-Díaz, Adolfo; Castaño, Cristina; Velázquez, Rosario; López-Sebastián, Antonio; Goya, Agustín López; Martínez, Javier Gimeno

    2016-01-01

    Postcopulatory sexual selection through sperm competition may be an important evolutionary force affecting many reproductive traits, including sperm morphometrics. Environmental factors such as pollutants, pesticides, and climate change may affect different sperm traits, and thus reproduction, in sensitive bird species. Many sperm-handling processes used in assisted reproductive techniques may also affect the size of sperm cells. The accurately measured dimensions of sperm cell structures (especially the head) can thus be used as indicators of environmental influences, in improving our understanding of reproductive and evolutionary strategies, and for optimizing assisted reproductive techniques (e.g., sperm cryopreservation) for use with birds. Computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASA-Morph) provides an accurate and reliable method for assessing sperm morphometry, reducing the problem of subjectivity associated with human visual assessment. Computerized systems have been standardized for use with semen from different mammalian species. Avian spermatozoa, however, are filiform, limiting their analysis with such systems, which were developed to examine the approximately spherical heads of mammalian sperm cells. To help overcome this, the standardization of staining techniques to be used in computer-assessed light microscopical methods is a priority. The present review discusses these points and describes the sperm morphometric characteristics of several wild and domestic bird species. PMID:27678467

  17. Recent advances in bird sperm morphometric analysis and its role in male gamete characterization and reproduction technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Santiago-Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcopulatory sexual selection through sperm competition may be an important evolutionary force affecting many reproductive traits, including sperm morphometrics. Environmental factors such as pollutants, pesticides, and climate change may affect different sperm traits, and thus reproduction, in sensitive bird species. Many sperm-handling processes used in assisted reproductive techniques may also affect the size of sperm cells. The accurately measured dimensions of sperm cell structures (especially the head can thus be used as indicators of environmental influences, in improving our understanding of reproductive and evolutionary strategies, and for optimizing assisted reproductive techniques (e.g., sperm cryopreservation for use with birds. Computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASA-Morph provides an accurate and reliable method for assessing sperm morphometry, reducing the problem of subjectivity associated with human visual assessment. Computerized systems have been standardized for use with semen from different mammalian species. Avian spermatozoa, however, are filiform, limiting their analysis with such systems, which were developed to examine the approximately spherical heads of mammalian sperm cells. To help overcome this, the standardization of staining techniques to be used in computer-assessed light microscopical methods is a priority. The present review discusses these points and describes the sperm morphometric characteristics of several wild and domestic bird species.

  18. Functional role of hepatocyte growth factor receptor during sperm maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catizone, A; Ricci, G; Galdieri, M

    2002-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa acquire motility and fertilizing capacity during their transit through the epididymis. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine with potent motogenic capacities that has been identified in different organs, including the mammalian male genital tract. In mice, HGF is present in the testis and, in large amounts, in the distal part of the epididymis. In prepuberal rats, we have demonstrated that HGF is synthesized by the peritubular myoid cells and in men, HGF is present in significant quantities in seminal plasma. It has been suggested that in mice, HGF has a role in initiating sperm motility, whereas in men, no significant correlations between HGF concentration and sperm motility have been found. In the present paper we report that in rats, HGF receptor, c-met, is expressed in testicular and epididymal spermatozoa. Through immunocytochemistry, we have found that c-met is exclusively localized on the head in testicular sperm. A different localization of c-met has been found in sperm isolated from caput and cauda epididymidis. Cells isolated from epididymal caput show a c-met localization exclusively restricted to the head in most cells. In a minority of caput epididymis spermatozoa the receptor is localized both in the cell head and along the flagellum. Spermatozoa isolated from the epididymal cauda were quite homogeneous, showing the receptor localized along the entire cell surface. We also report that HGF is synthesized and secreted by the rat epididymis as indicated by the scatter effect of epididymal cell homogenate and culture medium on MDCK cells. To clarify whether HGF is involved in the acquisition of sperm motility in the epididymis, its maintenance, or both, spermatozoa isolated from caput epididymidis have been cultured in medium alone or supplemented with HGF. The results obtained indicated that HGF has a positive effect on the maintenance of sperm motility which, in the absence of HGF, significantly decreases during

  19. Internalization and subcellular fate of aptamer and peptide dual-functioned nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huile; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Shuang; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the internalization and subcellular fate of AS1411 aptamer (for glioma targeting) and TGN peptide (for blood-brain barrier targeting)-modified nanoparticles (AsTNPs), which was important for optimizing targeted delivery systems and realizing the potential toxicity to cells. Organelles were labelled with specific markers. Several uptake inhibitors were used to determine the endocytosis pathways. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was utilized to directly observe the endocytosis procedure and subcellular fate of AsTNPs. Subcellular localization demonstrated that endosomes and mitochondria were involved in the uptake of AsTNPs by both C6 and bEnd.3 cells, however, lysosomes and Golgi apparatus were only involved in the internalization by C6 cells rather than bEnd.3 cells. Uptake mechanism study demonstrated the clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis were the main pathways in the uptake of AsTNPs by C6 and bEnd.3 cells. However, other pathways, including clathrin- and caveolae-independent endocytosis and macropinocytosis are also involved in the uptake by C6 cells and not by bEnd.3 cells. TEM directly demonstrated the involvement of these pathways. Particles could be found mostly in endosomes. Compared to unmodified nanoparticles, AsTNPs displayed different internalization pathways involved in several cell organelles.

  20. Multivalency Effect of TAT-Peptide-Functionalized Nanoparticle in Cellular Endocytosis and Subcellular Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Chumki; Jana, Nikhil R

    2017-04-13

    Although trans-activating transcription (TAT) peptide-functionalized nanoparticle/polymer/liposome is widely used for cellular transfection applications, the multivalency (number of attached peptide per particle) effect on cell uptake mechanism and subcellular targeting performance is largely unexplored. Here we show that multivalency of nanoparticle controls the cellular interaction, cellular entry/exit mechanism, and subcellular targeting performance. We have synthesized TAT-peptide functionalized quantum dot (QD) of 30-35 nm hydrodynamic diameter with varied multivalency from 10 to 75 (e.g., QD(TAT)10, QD(TAT)20, QD(TAT)40, QD(TAT)75) and studied the role of multivalency in endocytosis and subcellular trafficking. We found that both low and high multivalent nanoparticles enter into cell predominantly via lipid-raft mediated endocytosis but the higher multivalency of 40 and 75 induces vesicular trapping followed by exocytosis within 12 h. In contrast, lower multivalency of 10 and 20 offers efficient trafficking toward perinuclear region and Golgi apparatus. This work shows the functional role of nanoparticle multivalency in cellular uptake mechanism and importance of lower multivalency for efficient subcellular targeting.

  1. Organelle-targeting surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanosensors for subcellular pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanting; Liang, Lijia; Zhang, Shuqin; Huang, Dianshuai; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Shuping; Liang, Chongyang; Xu, Weiqing

    2018-01-25

    The pH value of subcellular organelles in living cells is a significant parameter in the physiological activities of cells. Its abnormal fluctuations are commonly believed to be associated with cancers and other diseases. Herein, a series of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanosensors with high sensitivity and targeting function was prepared for the quantification and monitoring of pH values in mitochondria, nucleus, and lysosome. The nanosensors were composed of gold nanorods (AuNRs) functionalized with a pH-responsive molecule (4-mercaptopyridine, MPy) and peptides that could specifically deliver the AuNRs to the targeting subcellular organelles. The localization of our prepared nanoprobes in specific organelles was confirmed by super-high resolution fluorescence imaging and bio-transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. By the targeting ability, the pH values of the specific organelles can be determined by monitoring the vibrational spectral changes of MPy with different pH values. Compared to the cases of reported lysosome and cytoplasm SERS pH sensors, more accurate pH values of mitochondria and nucleus, which could be two additional intracellular tracers for subcellular microenvironments, were disclosed by this SERS approach, further improving the accuracy of discrimination of related diseases. Our sensitive SERS strategy can also be employed to explore crucial physiological and biological processes that are related to subcellular pH fluctuations.

  2. Numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities detected in human sperm with a combination of multicolor FISH assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, A; Van Hummelen, P; Lowe, X R; Adler, I D; Wyrobek, A J

    1999-01-01

    A pair of multicolor FISH assays (X-Y-21 and A-M-16) was developed for human sperm to simultaneously measure sex ratios; aneuploidies involving chromosomes 1, 16, 21, X, and Y; meiotic diploidies; and structural aberrations involving chromosome 1p. Sex ratios in sperm were not significantly different from unity among healthy men. Baseline frequencies of disomic sperm for chromosomes 1, 8, and 21 were similar (6.7 per 10(4) sperm, 95% CI of 5.6-8.1), suggesting that among these three chromosomes, chromosome 21 was not especially prone to nondisjunction. Frequencies of disomy 16 sperm were significantly lower, however (3.5 per 10(4) sperm, 95% CI of 2.0-6.2; P chromosomes 16 and 21 were validated against aneuploidy data obtained by the hamster-egg technique for human sperm cytogenetics. The frequencies of X-X, Y-Y, X-Y ("Klinefelter") sperm and sex-null ("Turner") sperm were 5.5, 5.1, 5.5, and 7.8 per 10(4) sperm, respectively. For chromosomes 16 and 21, the frequencies of nullisomic and disomic sperm were similar, suggesting that gain and loss events occurred symmetrically. However, more gain than loss was reported for chromosomes 1, X, and Y. The frequency of MI and MII diploid sperm (with flagella) was approximately 12 per 10(4) (range 8.3-16.7 per 10(4) sperm). Based on flagella data, the frequency of somatic cells in the semen was estimated to be approximately 1.8 per 10(4) sperm. Loss or gain of a portion of chromosome-arm 1p occurred in 5.5 per 10(4) sperm, and the percentage of sperm carrying structural aberrations within the haploid genome as calculated from FISH (1.4%), was similar to that obtained with the hamster-egg technique. These complementary sperm FISH assays have promising applications in studies of chromosomally abnormal sperm after exposure to occupational, medical, and environmental toxicants.

  3. Antioxidant treatment in the absence of exogenous lipids and proteins protects rhesus macaque sperm from cryopreservation-induced cell membrane damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Megan J; Meyers, Stuart A

    2011-07-01

    Osmotic stress caused oxidative stress in rhesus macaque sperm, which was alleviated by antioxidant supplementation. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate that cryopreservation of rhesus macaque sperm also induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and to determine whether ROS have an important role in cryopreservation-induced membrane. Additionally, we evaluated the antioxidant capacity of TEST (N-Tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid-Tris) buffer (with 20% egg yolk and 13% skim milk) and supplementation with antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and α-tocopherol. There was a substantial level of ROS production in both the presence (15% increase in superoxide, P membrane protection against ROS, but increased postthaw total and progressive motility by 10% (P lipid peroxidation by 61% (P sperm induced a significant increase in ROS and that antioxidant supplementation (N-Tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid-Tris) can significantly decrease the extent of ROS-induced membrane damage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function after repeated freezing and thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Moreno, J; Esteso, M C; Pradiee, J; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; O'Brien, E; Lopez-Sebastián, A; Martínez-Nevado, E; Delclaux, M; Fernández-Morán, J; Zhihe, Z

    2016-05-01

    This work examines the effects of subsequent cycles of freezing-thawing on giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function, and assesses whether density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) can increase the number of freezing-thawing cycles this sperm can withstand. A sperm sample was collected by electroejaculation from a mature giant panda and subjected to five freezing-thawing cycles. Although repeated freezing-thawing negatively affected (P 60% of the sperm cells in both treatments showed acrosome integrity even after the fifth freezing cycle. In fresh semen, the sperm head length was 4.7 μm, the head width 3.6 μm, area 14.3 μm(2) and perimeter length 14.1 μm. The present results suggest that giant panda sperm trends to be resistant to repeated freezing-thawing, even without DGC selection. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Vacuoles in mammals: a subcellular structure indispensable for early embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoh

    2013-01-01

    A vacuole is a membrane-bound subcellular structure involved in intracellular digestion. Instead of the large "vacuolar" organelles that are found in plants and fungi, animal cells possess lysosomes that are smaller in size and are enriched with hydrolytic enzymes similar to those found in the vacuoles. Large vacuolar structures are often observed in highly differentiated mammalian tissues such as embryonic visceral endoderm and absorbing epithelium. Vacuoles/lysosomes share a conserved mechanism of biogenesis, and they are at the terminal of the endocytic pathways, Recent genetic studies of the mammalian orthologs of Vam/Vps genes, which have essential functions for vacuole assembly, revealed that the dynamics of vacuoles/lysosomes are important for tissue differentiation and patterning through regulation of various molecular signaling events in mammals.

  6. Validation of the FACSCount AF system for determination of sperm concentration in boar semen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.; Christensen, P.; Stryhn, H.

    2002-01-01

    A flow cytometric method has been developed for rapid determination of sperm concentration in semen from various mammalian species.* All cells containing DNA are stained with SYBR-14 or propidium iodide (PI) and sperm concentration is determined in relation to an internal standard of fluorescent...... with the spectrophotometric method ( CV = 6.3%). These results indicate that the FACSCount AF System is a valuable tool for precise and accurate assessment of sperm concentration in boar semen and that use of this system may lead to production of more uniform insemination doses containing a specific number of sperm per dose....

  7. Identification of multiple HPV types on spermatozoa from human sperm donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Maja D; Larsen, Peter B; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) may cause sexually transmitted disease. High-risk types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cell dysplasia, whereas low-risk types may cause genital condyloma. Despite the association between HPV and cancer, donor sperm need not be tested for HPV...... according to European regulations. Consequently, the potential health risk of HPV transmission by donor bank sperm has not been elucidated, nor is it known how HPV is associated with sperm. The presence of 35 types of HPV was examined on DNA from semen samples of 188 Danish sperm donors using a sensitive...

  8. Sperm membrane modulation by Sapindus mukorossi during sperm maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivsarkar, Manish; Shrivastava, Neeta; Patel, Manoj; Padh, Harish; Bapu, Cherian

    2002-09-01

    To observe the alterations in the biochemical and biophysical changes in the sperm membrane during sperm maturation in male rats treated with the water extract of the fruit pericarp of S. mukorossi. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged the aqueous extract of the fruit pericarp of S. mukorossi at a dose of 50 mg/kg/d for 45 days. On day 46, the sperm parameters were observed in different sections of the epididymis and the sperm superoxide dismutase and the lipid peroxidation was determined and compared with the controls. The testis and epididymis were routinely prepared for histological examination under the light microscope. No significant differences in the sperm number and morphology were observed between the control and treated groups. However, a significant inhibition (P<0.05-0.01) of sperm motility in the caput, corpus and cauda regions of the epididymis was seen in the treated group. No significant histopathological changes were found in the testis and epididymis. The important finding was that in the treated animals, the spermatozoa showed an abnormal distribution of the superoxide dismutase activity, being minimum in the caput and maximum in the corpus, which was just opposite to that of the controls. The study provides a unique observation where the plant extract alters the sperm membrane physiology without change the testicular and epididymal morphology.

  9. Relationship between sperm parameters and intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Chaichian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: With the adventure of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI technique, great progresses have developed in the treatment of infertility. Concentration on the properties of male’s gamete has been encouraged by the increasing concerns about the causes of ICSI failure. We hence conducted this study to investigate the probable association of sperm parameters with ISCI outcome. Methods: A total of 523 couples referred to Isfahan Fertility and Sterility Center from January 2007 to June 2008 for ICSI. Semen analysis was performed before ICSI procedure according to the WHO criteria. Patients were assigned into successful ICSI (case and failed ICSI (control groups. Sperm parameters were then compared between the 2 groups. Results: One hundred and six patients (20% had successful ICSI results (case group compared with 417 couples (80% with undesirable ICSI outcomes (control group. Among evaluated factors, sperm agglutination (p = 0.007, sperm concentration (p = 0.043, leukocytospermia (p = 0.026 and head abnormality of sperm (p = 0.019 showed statistically significant differences between two groups with differing ICSI results. None of the other semen parameters revealed significant differences between these two groups. Conclusion: Our study showed that some sperm parameters are associated with desirable ICSI outcome. However, it is unclear whether these associations are causal.

  10. Sperm production and sperm morphology of Swedish Warmblood stallions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsson, S; Dalin, A-M; Lundeheim, N

    2009-02-01

    The present study investigated daily sperm output and sperm morphology of fresh semen in eight Swedish Warmblood stallions aged 5-8 years. They were used for artificial insemination, and their fertility during the breeding season of semen collection exceeded 60% per cycle. One ejaculate of semen was collected daily for 10 consecutive days from each stallion. The gel-free volume was measured, and the sperm concentration was assessed with a Bürker chamber. The volume of gel-free fraction was multiplied by the sperm concentration to give the total number of spermatozoa (TSN). Sperm morphology was examined in ejaculates collected on days 2, 5 and 10. An aliquot from each ejaculate was fixed in 1 ml formol-saline immediately after collection and examined under a phase-contrast microscope (magnification 1000x) to assess morphological abnormalities. Furthermore smears were prepared and stained according to Williams (carbolfuchsin-eosin) for a more detailed examination of the sperm heads under a light microscope (magnification 1000x). Analysis of variance was applied to data. Total spermatozoa number decreased progressively during the first 8 days of collection, and daily sperm output (DSO) was calculated as mean TSN of collections on days 8-10, being 6.4 x 10(9) spermatozoa. The overall percentages of morphologically normal spermatozoa in ejaculates collected on days 2, 5 and 10 were above 70%, being significantly lower in ejaculate 2 (68.6%) compared with ejaculates 5 and 10 (72.9% respectively 75.3%).

  11. Orientation of sea urchin sperms in static magnetic fields: Compared to human sperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhnini, Lama; Dairi, Maheen

    In this study we report on magnetic orientation of sea urchin and human sperms. The sea urchin and human sperms became oriented parallel to the magnetic field (1 T maximum). The human sperms were totally oriented with magnetic field at about 600 mT. However, the sea urchin sperms show different behavior due to morphological differences between them and the human sperms.

  12. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of antimony in Ficus tikoua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Chai, Liyuan; Yang, Zhihui; Mubarak, Hussani; Xiao, Ruiyang; Tang, Chongjian

    2017-02-01

    Ficus tikoua (F. tikoua) was a potential species for antimony (Sb) phytoremediation due to its wide growth in the mining area. However, little was known about its tolerance mechanisms toward Sb. The determination of the distribution and chemical speciation of Sb in F. tikoua is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in Sb accumulation, transportation, and detoxification. The present study investigated the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Sb in F. tikoua. The plant was exposed to different Sb concentrations (0, 30, 90, and 180 μmol/L) for 30 days. The results showed that F. tikoua possessed a marked ability to tolerate and accumulate Sb. The proportional Sb increased with increasing Sb concentration in the solution, and the highest Sb concentration occurred in roots (1274.5-1580.9 mg/kg), followed by stems (133.5-498.9 mg/kg) and leaves (4.1-15.7 mg/kg). In the subcellular sequestration of Sb in F. tikoua, the largest accumulation of Sb occurred in cell walls (72.4-87.5%) followed by cytoplasmic organelles (8.2-18.6%) and cytoplasmic supernatant. The results suggested that cell walls act as important protective barriers against Sb toxicity in F. tikoua. Although Sb in all plant tissues found primarily in the fractions extracted by ethanol and distilled water, the current study found that the Sb amounts in the HAc-extractable fraction, HCl-extractable fraction, and residue fraction increased at the highest Sb level (180 μmol/L) compared to that under lower Sb levels. These results indicate that excessive Sb accumulated in F. tikoua under Sb stress is bound to non-dissolved or low-bioavailable compounds, a biochemical mechanism that benefits F. tikoua because it helps alleviate Sb toxicity.

  13. Subc