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Sample records for spectroscopic thermodynamic microscopic

  1. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haw [Moraga, CA; Cang, Hu [Berkeley, CA; Xu, Cangshan [Berkeley, CA; Wong, Chung M [San Gabriel, CA

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  2. Quantitative Thermodynamic Analyses of Spectroscopic Titration Curves§

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    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of ligand - macromolecule interactions requires detailed knowledge of energetics of the formed complexes. Spectroscopic methods are most commonly used in characterizing molecular interactions in solution. The methods do not require large quantities of material and most importantly, do not perturb the studied reactions. However, spectroscopic methods absolutely require the determination of the relationship between the observed signal and the degree of binding in order to obtain meaningful interaction parameters. In other words, the meaningful, thermodynamic interaction parameters can be only determined if the relationship between the observed signal and the degree of binding is determined and not assumed, based on an ad hoc model of the relationship. The approaches discussed here allow an experimenter to quantitatively determine the degree of binding and the free ligand concentration, i.e., they enable to construct thermodynamic binding isotherms in a model-independent fashion. PMID:25284889

  3. On the Microscopic Perspective of Black Branes Thermodynamic Geometry

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    Stefano Bellucci

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We study thermodynamic state-space geometry of the black holes in string theory and M-theory. For a large number of microstates, we analyze the intrinsic state-space geometry for (i extremal and non-extremal black branes in string theory, (ii multi-centered black brane configurations, (iv small black holes with fractional branes, and (v fuzzy rings in the setup of Mathur’s fuzzballs and subensemble theory. We extend our analysis for the black brane foams and bubbling black brane solutions in M-theory. We discuss the nature of state-space correlations of various black brane configurations, and show that the notion of state-space manifolds describes the associated coarse-grained interactions of the corresponding microscopic CFT data.

  4. Biochemical activity of a fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G: Molecular modeling, electrochemical, spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Masum, Abdulla; Chakraborty, Maharudra; Ghosh, Soumen; Laha, Dipranjan; Karmakar, Parimal; Islam, Md Maidul; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2016-11-01

    Interaction of CT DNA with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) has been studied using molecular docking, electrochemical, spectroscopic and thermodynamic methods. From the study, it was illustrated that Rhodamine 6G binds to the minor groove of CT DNA. The binding was cooperative in nature. Circular voltametric study showed significant change in peak current and peak potential due to complexation. All the studies showed that the binding constant was in the order of 106M-1. Circular dichroic spectra showed significant conformational change on binding and DNA unwind during binding. Thermodynamic study showed that binding was favored by negative enthalpy and positive entropy change. From thermodynamic study it was also observed that several positive and negative free energies played significant role during binding and the unfavorable conformational free energy change was overcame by highly negative hydrophobic and salt dependent free energy changes. The experimental results were further validated using molecular docking study and the effect of structure on binding has been studied theoretically. From docking study it was found that the hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonds played a significant role during binding. The dye was absorbed by cell and this phenomenon was studied using fluorescent microscope. Cell survivability test showed that the dye active against Human Breast Cancer cells MDA-MB 468. ROS study showed that the activity is due to the production of reactive oxygen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Spectroscopic and Microscopic Study of Peroxyformic Pulping of Agave Waste.

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    Hernández-Hernández, Hilda M; Chanona-Pérez, Jorge J; Vega, Alberto; Ligero, Pablo; Farrera-Rebollo, Reynold R; Mendoza-Pérez, Jorge A; Calderón-Domínguez, Georgina; Vera, Norma Güemes

    2016-10-01

    The peroxyformic process is based on the action of a carboxylic acid (mainly formic acid) and the corresponding peroxyacid. The influences of processing time (60-180 min), formic acid concentration (80-95%), temperature (60-80°C), and hydrogen peroxide concentration (2-4%) on peroxyformic pulping of agave leaves were studied by surface response methodology using a face-centered factorial design. Empirical models were obtained for the prediction of yield, κ number (KN) and pulp viscosity as functions of the aforementioned variables. Mathematical optimization enabled us to select a set of operational variables that produced the best fractionation of the material with the following results: pulp yield (26.9%), KN (3.6), and pulp viscosity (777 mL/g). Furthermore, this work allowed the description and evaluation of changes to the agave fibers during the fractionation process using different microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, and provided a comprehensive and qualitative view of the phenomena occurring in the delignification of agave fibers. The use of confocal and scanning electron microscopy provided a detailed understanding of the microstructural changes to the lignin and cellulose in the fibers throughout the process, whereas Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that cellulose in the pulp after treatment was mainly of type I.

  6. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigation of an explanted opacified intraocular lens

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    Simon, V., E-mail: viosimon@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics and Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences, 400084 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Radu, T.; Vulpoi, A. [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics and Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences, 400084 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Rosca, C. [Optilens Clinic of Ophthalmology, 400604 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Eniu, D. [Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Molecular Sciences, 400349 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Changes on intraocular lens (IOL) surface after implantation. • Partial opacification of IOL central area. • Elemental composition on IOL surface prior to and after implantation. • First XPS depth profiling examination of the opacifying deposits. • Cell-mediated hydroxyapatite structuring. - Abstract: The investigated polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens explanted an year after implantation presented a fine granularity consisting of ring-like grains of about 15 μm in diameter. In order to evidence the changes occurred on intraocular lens relative to morphology, elemental composition and atomic environments, microscopic and spectroscopic analyses were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDS), and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopies. The results revealed that the grains contain hydroxyapatite mineral phase. A protein layer covers the lens both in opacified and transparent zones. The amide II band is like in basal epithelial cells. The shape and size of the grains, and the XPS depth profiling results indicate the possibility of a cell-mediated process involving lens epithelial cells which fagocitated apoptotic epithelial cells, and in which the debris derived from cell necrosis were calcified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on explanted intraocular lenses using XPS depth profiling in order to examine the inside of the opacifying deposits.

  7. Microscopic and thermodynamic properties of dense semiclassical partially ionized hydrogen plasma

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    Ramazanov, T S; Dzhumagulova, K N; Gabdullin, M T [IETP, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a, Tole Bi St, Almaty, 050012 (Kazakhstan)

    2006-04-28

    Microscopic and thermodynamic properties of dense semiclassical partially ionized hydrogen plasma were investigated on the basis of pseudopotential models. Radial distribution functions (RDF) of particles were obtained using a system of the Ornstein-Zernike integral equations. The corrections to internal energy and the equation of state were calculated using RDF.

  8. Calculation of the thermodynamic properties of fuel-vapor species from spectroscopic data

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    Green, D.W.

    1980-09-01

    Measured spectroscopic data, estimated molecular parameters, and a densty-of-states model for electronic structure have been used to calculate thermodynamic functions for gaseous ThO, ThO/sub 2/, UO, UO/sub 2/, UO/sub 3/, PuO, and PuO/sub 2/. Various methods for estimating parameters have been considered and numerically evaluated. The sensitivity of the calculated thermodynamic functions to molecular parameters has been examined quantitatively. New values of the standard enthalpies of formation at 298.15/sup 0/K have been derived from the best available ..delta..G/sup 0//sub f/ equations and the calculated thermodynamic functions. Estimates of the uncertainties have been made for measured and estimated data as well as for various mathematical and physical approximations. Tables of the thermodynamic functions to 6000/sup 0/K are recommended for gaseous thorium, uranium, and plutonium oxides.

  9. Microscopic and Spectroscopic Investigation of Poly(3-hexylthiophene Interaction with Carbon Nanotubes

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    Maurizio De Crescenzi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix has been proposed to enhance the polymer’s physical and electrical properties. In this study, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques are used to investigate the interaction between poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT and nanotubes and the reciprocal modification of physical properties. The presence of P3HT-covered nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix has been observed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Then, the modification of P3HT optical properties due to nanotube inclusion has been evidenced with spectroscopic techniques like absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The study is completed with detailed nanoscale analysis by scanning probe techniques. The ordered self assembly of polymer adhering on the nanotube is unveiled by showing an example of helical wrapping of P3HT. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy study provides information on the electronic structure of nanotube-polymer assembly, revealing the charge transfer from P3HT to the nanotube.

  10. Quantum thermodynamics: Microscopic foundations of entropy and of entropy generation by irreversibility

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    Beretta, Gian Paolo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available What is the physical significance of entropy? What is the physical origin of irreversibility? Do entropy and irreversibility exist only for complex and macroscopic systems? Most physicists still accept and teach that the rationalization of these fundamental questions is given by Statistical Mechanics. Indeed, for everyday laboratory physics, the mathematical formalism of Statistical Mechanics (canonical and grand-canonical, Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions allows a successful description of the thermodynamic equilibrium properties of matter, including entropy values. However, as already recognized by Schrodinger in 1936, Statistical Mechanics is impaired by conceptual ambiguities and logical inconsistencies, both in its explanation of the meaning of entropy and in its implications on the concept of state of a system. An alternative theory has been developed by Gyftopoulos, Hatsopoulos and the present author to eliminate these stumbling conceptual blocks while maintaining the mathematical formalism so successful in applications. To resolve both the problem of the meaning of entropy and that of the origin of irreversibility we have built entropy and irreversibility into the laws of microscopic physics. The result is a theory, that we call Quantum Thermodynamics, that has all the necessary features to combine Mechanics and Thermodynamics uniting all the successful results of both theories, eliminating the logical inconsistencies of Statistical Mechanics and the paradoxes on irreversibility, and providing an entirely new perspective on the microscopic origin of irreversibility, nonlinearity (therefore including chaotic behavior and maximal-entropy-generation nonequilibrium dynamics. In this paper we discuss the background and formalism of Quantum Thermodynamics including its nonlinear equation of motion and the main general results. Our objective is to show in a not-too-technical manner that this theory provides indeed a

  11. Laser apparatus and method for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells

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    Gourley, Paul L.; Gourley, Mark F.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for microscopic and spectroscopic analysis and processing of biological cells. The apparatus comprises a laser having an analysis region within the laser cavity for containing one or more biological cells to be analyzed. The presence of a cell within the analysis region in superposition with an activated portion of a gain medium of the laser acts to encode information about the cell upon the laser beam, the cell information being recoverable by an analysis means that preferably includes an array photodetector such as a CCD camera and a spectrometer. The apparatus and method may be used to analyze biomedical cells including blood cells and the like, and may include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis thereof.

  12. Uranium(VI) Binding Forms in Selected Human Body Fluids: Thermodynamic Calculations versus Spectroscopic Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Alfatih A A; Geipel, Gerhard; Barkleit, Astrid; Bernhard, Gert

    2015-02-16

    Human exposure to uranium increasingly becomes a subject of interest in many scientific disciplines such as environmental medicine, toxicology, and radiation protection. Knowledge about uranium chemical binding forms(speciation) in human body fluids can be of great importance to understand not only its biokinetics but also its relevance in risk assessment and in designing decorporation therapy in the case of accidental overexposure. In this study, thermodynamic calculations of uranium speciation in relevant simulated and original body fluids were compared with spectroscopic data after ex-situ uranium addition. For the first time, experimental data on U(VI) speciation in body fluids (saliva, sweat, urine) was obtained by means of cryogenic time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (cryo-TRLFS) at 153 K. By using the time dependency of fluorescence decay and the band positions of the emission spectra, various uranyl complexes were demonstrated in the studied samples. The variations of the body fluids in terms of chemical composition, pH, and ionic strength resulted in different binding forms of U(VI). The speciation of U(VI) in saliva and in urine was affected by the presence of bioorganic ligands, whereas in sweat, the distribution depends mainly on inorganic ligands. We also elucidated the role of biological buffers, i.e., phosphate (H(2)PO(4−)/HPO(4)(2−)) on U(VI) distribution, and the system Ca(2+)/UO(2)(2+)/PO(4)(3−) was discussed in detail in both saliva and urine. The theoretical speciation calculations of the main U(VI) species in the investigated body fluids were significantly consistent with the spectroscopic data. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy showed success and reliability for direct determination of U(VI) in such biological matrices with the possibility for further improvement.

  13. Development of Conductive Boron-Doped Diamond Electrode: A microscopic, Spectroscopic, and Voltammetric Study

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    Kevin E. Bennet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Building on diamond characteristics such as hardness, chemical inertness and low electron emission threshold voltage, the current microscopic, spectroscopic and voltammetric investigations are directed towards improving the properties of electrode coating materials for their future use in clinical studies of deep brain stimulation via fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV. In this study we combine the capabilities of confocal Raman mapping in providing detailed and accurate analysis of local distributions of material constituents in a series of boron-doped polycrystalline diamond films grown by chemical vapor deposition, with information from the more conventional techniques of scanning electron microscopy (SEM and infrared absorption spectroscopy. Although SEM images show a uniform distribution of film crystallites, they have the limitation of being unable to differentiate the distribution of boron in the diamond. Values of 1018–1021 atoms/cm3 of boron content have been estimated from the absorption coefficient of the 1290 cm−1 infrared absorption band and from the 500 cm−1 Raman vibration. The observed accumulation of boron atoms and carbon sp2 impurities at the grain boundaries suggests that very high doping levels do not necessarily contribute to improvement of the material’s conductivity, corroborating with voltammetric data. FSCV results also indicate an enhanced stability of analyte detection.

  14. Binding of phenazinium dye safranin T to polyriboadenylic acid: spectroscopic and thermodynamic study.

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    Ankur Bikash Pradhan

    Full Text Available Here, we report results from experiments designed to explore the association of the phenazinium dye safranin T (ST, 3,7-diamino-2,8-dimethyl-5-phenylphenazinium chloride with single and double stranded form of polyriboadenylic acid (hereafter poly-A using several spectroscopic techniques. We demonstrate that the dye binds to single stranded polyriboadenylic acid (hereafter ss poly-A with high affinity while it does not interact at all with the double stranded (ds form of the polynucleotide. Fluorescence and absorption spectral studies reveal the molecular aspects of binding of ST to single stranded form of the polynucleotide. This observation is also supported by the circular dichroism study. Thermodynamic data obtained from temperature dependence of binding constant reveals that association is driven by negative enthalpy change and opposed by negative entropy change. Ferrocyanide quenching studies have shown intercalative binding of ST to ss poly-A. Experiments on viscosity measurements confirm the binding mode of the dye to be intercalative. The effect of [Na⁺] ion concentration on the binding process suggests the role of electrostatic forces in the complexation. Present studies reveal the utility of the dye in probing nucleic acid structure.

  15. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies on ferulic acid - Alpha-2-macroglobulin interaction

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    Rehman, Ahmed Abdur; Sarwar, Tarique; Arif, Hussain; Ali, Syed Saqib; Ahsan, Haseeb; Tabish, Mohammad; Khan, Fahim Halim

    2017-09-01

    Ferulic acid is a major phenolic acid found in numerous plant species in conjugated form. It binds to enzymes and oligomeric proteins and modifies their structure and function. This study was designed to examine the interaction of ferulic acid, an active ingredient of some important medicines, with α2M, a key serum proteinase, under physiological conditions. The mechanism of interaction was studied by spectroscopic techniques such as, UV-visible absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism along with isothermal titration calorimetry. Fluorescence quenching of α2M by ferulic acid demonstrated the formation of α2M-ferulic acid complex by static quenching mechanism. Binding parameters calculated by Stern-Volmer method showed that ferulic acid binds to α2M with moderate affinity of the order of ∼104 M-1. The thermodynamic signatures reveal that binding was enthalpy driven and hydrogen bonding played a major role in ferulic acid-α2M binding. CD spectra analysis suggests very little conformational changes in α2M on ferulic acid binding.

  16. Spectroscopic and microscopic investigation of gold nanoparticle nucleation and growth mechanisms using gelatin as a stabilizer

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    Wang Yicheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram, E-mail: guna@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biological Systems Engineering (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A microscopic and spectroscopic investigation of the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) within gelatin is reported. The AuNPs were synthesized first by reducing tetrachloraurate ions (AuCl4{sup -}) by 2-[4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinyl] ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), mixing the HAuCl{sub 4}/HEPES solution with gelatin solution and heating at different temperatures. The polymeric structure of gelatin stabilized the HAuCl{sub 4}/HEPES/gelatin system and slowed the synthesis of AuNPs, enabling a time-dependent investigation. Based on the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis and UV-Vis spectra, we identified three distinct stages involved in the synthesis of AuNPs. First, during the initial stage, the reduction of gold precursor occurred along with nucleation and growth, which resulted in a red-shift phenomenon of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak of AuNPs in UV-Vis spectra (size and size dispersion increase). Second, the LSPR peaks showed red-shift first and then blue-shift during the growth of AuNPs. The blue-shift might result from the diffusion-limited Ostwald-ripening mechanism. Third, as the supply of the growth species became lower, during the growth of AuNPs, a diffusion-limited Ostwald-ripening mechanism along with a blue-shift only phenomenon in UV-Vis spectra was observed. We also determined that slowing the synthesis process during the nucleation stage can prolong the nucleation time, which can generate larger AuNPs. The TEM analysis showed that higher heating temperature and longer heating time can lead to larger particles. By controlling the reduction (nucleation) time, heating time and temperature, AuNPs of size ranging from 5 to 17 nm can be synthesized.

  17. Toxicity evaluations of nanoclays and thermally degraded byproducts through spectroscopical and microscopical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Alixandra; Eldawud, Reem; White, Andrew; Agarwal, Sushant; Stueckle, Todd A; Sierros, Konstantinos A; Rojanasakul, Yon; Gupta, Rakesh K; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2017-01-01

    Montmorillonite is a type of nanoclay that originates from the clay fraction of the soil and is incorporated into polymers to form nanocomposites with enhanced mechanical strength, barrier, and flammability properties used for food packaging, automotive, and medical devices. However, with implementation in such consumer applications, the interaction of montmorillonite-based composites or derived byproducts with biological systems needs to be investigated. Herein we examined the potential of Cloisite Na+ (pristine) and Cloisite 30B (organically modified montmorillonite nanoclay) and their thermally degraded byproducts' to induce toxicity in model human lung epithelial cells. The experimental set-up mimicked biological exposure in manufacturing and disposal areas and employed cellular treatments with occupationally relevant doses of nanoclays previously characterized using spectroscopical and microscopical approaches. For nanoclay-cellular interactions and for cellular analyses respectively, biosensorial-based analytical platforms were used, with induced cellular changes being confirmed via live cell counts, viability assays, and cell imaging. Our analysis of byproducts' chemical and physical properties revealed both structural and functional changes. Real-time high throughput analyses of exposed cellular systems confirmed that nanoclay induced significant toxic effects, with Cloisite 30B showing time-dependent decreases in live cell count and cellular viability relative to control and pristine nanoclay, respectively. Byproducts produced less toxic effects; all treatments caused alterations in the cell morphology upon exposure. Our morphological, behavioral, and viability cellular changes show that nanoclays have the potential to produce toxic effects when used both in manufacturing or disposal environments. The reported toxicological mechanisms prove the extensibility of a biosensorial-based platform for cellular behavior analysis upon treatment with a variety of

  18. Planetary Surface Analysis Using Fast Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Combined Microscopic Raman, LIBS, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

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    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman, G. R.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ exploration of planetary surfaces has to date required multiple techniques that, when used together, yield important information about their formation histories and evolution. We present a time-resolved laser spectroscopic technique that could potentially collect complementary sets of data providing information on mineral structure, composition, and hydration state. Using a picosecond-scale pulsed laser and a fast time-resolved detector we can simultaneously collect spectra from Raman, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and fluorescence emissions that are separated in time due to the unique decay times of each process. The use of a laser with high rep rate (40 KHz) and low pulse energy (1 μJ/pulse) allows us to rapidly collect high signal to noise Raman spectra while minimizing sample damage. Increasing the pulse energy by about an order of magnitude creates a microscopic plasma near the surface and enables the collection of LIBS spectra at an unusually high rep rate and low pulse energy. Simultaneously, broader fluorescence peaks can be detected with lifetimes varying from nanosecond to microsecond. We will present Raman, LIBS, and fluorescence spectra obtained on natural mineral samples such as sulfates, clays, pyroxenes and carbonates that are of interest for Mars mineralogy. We demonstrate this technique using a photocathode-based streak camera detector as well as a newly-developed solid state Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We will discuss the impact of system design and detector choice on science return of a potential planetary surface mission, with a specific focus on size, weight, power, and complexity. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  19. Mechanism of Arsenic Adsorption on Magnetite Nanoparticles from Water: Thermodynamic and Spectroscopic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng-Hua; Chuang, Ya-Hui; Chen, Tsan-Yao; Tian, Yuan; Li, Hui; Wang, Ming-Kuang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-07-07

    Removal of arsenic (As) from water supplies is needed to reduce As exposure through drinking water and food consumption in many regions of the world. Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) are promising and novel adsorbents for As removal because of their great adsorption capacity for As and easy separation. This study aimed to investigate the adsorption mechanism of arsenate, As(V), and arsenite, As(III), on MNPs by macroscopic adsorption experiments in combination with thermodynamic calculation and microspectroscopic characterization using synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adsorption reactions are favorable endothermic processes as evidenced by increased adsorption with increasing temperatures, and high positive enthalpy change. EXAFS spectra suggested predominant formation of bidentate binuclear corner-sharing complexes ((2)C) for As(V), and tridentate hexanuclear corner-sharing ((3)C) complexes for As(III) on MNP surfaces. The macroscopic and microscopic data conclusively identified the formation of inner-sphere complexes between As and MNP surfaces. More intriguingly, XANES and XPS results revealed complex redox transformation of the adsorbed As on MNPs exposed to air: Concomitant with the oxidation of MNPs, the oxidation of As(III) and MNPs was expected, but the observed As(V) reduction was surprising because of the role played by the reactive Fe(II).

  20. Study on the interaction between amphiphilic drug and bovine serum albumin: A thermodynamic and spectroscopic description

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    Rub, Malik Abdul, E-mail: malikrub@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah-21589 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Javed Masood [Interdisciplinary Biotechnology Unit, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Asiri, Abdullah M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah-21589 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah-21589 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Rizwan Hasan, E-mail: rizwanhkhan1@gmail.com [Interdisciplinary Biotechnology Unit, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Kabir-ud-Din [Department of Applied Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Herein we report the interaction of amphiphilic drug clomipramine hydrochloride (CLP—a tricyclic antidepressant) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) studied by fluorescence, UV–vis, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques. Clomipramine hydrochloride is used to treat a variety of mental health problems. The quenching rate constant (k{sub q}) values, calculated according to the fluorescence data, decrease with increase in temperature indicating the static quenching procedure for the CLP–BSA interaction. The association binding constants (K{sub A}), evaluated at different conditions, and the thermodynamic parameters (free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes) indicate that the hydrophobic forces play a major role in the binding interaction of drug. The interaction of BSA with CLP was further confirmed by UV absorption spectra. Blue shift of position was detected due to the complex formation between the BSA–CLP. The molecular distance, r{sub 0}, between donor (BSA) and acceptor (CLP) was estimated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) whose value (4.47 nm) suggests high probability of static quenching interaction. The CD results prove the conformational changes in the BSA on binding with the drug. Thus, the results supply qualitative and quantitative understanding of the binding of BSA to CLP, which is important in understanding their effect as therapeutic agents. - Highlights: • BSA can be considered as a good carrier for transportation of CLP in vivo. • The fluorescence results indicated the presence of static quenching mechanism in the binding process. • CD spectra showed the change in molecular conformation of BSA in the presence of CLP. • The results have applicability in model drug delivery.

  1. Quantum chemical calculations and spectroscopic measurements of spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of given uranyl complexes in aqueous solutions with possible environmental and industrial applications

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    Višňak Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief introduction into computational methodology and preliminary results for spectroscopic (excitation energies, vibrational frequencies in ground and excited electronic states and thermodynamic (stability constants, standard enthalpies and entropies of complexation reactions properties of some 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 uranyl sulphato- and selenato- complexes in aqueos solutions will be given. The relativistic effects are included via Effective Core Potential (ECP, electron correlation via (TDDFT/B3LYP (dispersion interaction corrected and solvation is described via explicit inclusion of one hydration sphere beyond the coordinated water molecules. We acknowledge limits of this approximate description – more accurate calculations (ranging from semi-phenomenological two-component spin-orbit coupling up to four-component Dirac-Coulomb-Breit hamiltonian and Molecular Dynamics simulations are in preparation. The computational results are compared with the experimental results from Time-resolved Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS and UV-VIS spectroscopic studies (including our original experimental research on this topic. In case of the TRLFS and UV-VIS speciation studies, the problem of complex solution spectra decomposition into individual components is ill-conditioned and hints from theoretical chemistry could be very important. Qualitative agreement between our quantum chemical calculations of the spectroscopic properties and experimental data was achieved. Possible applications for geochemical modelling (e.g. safety studies of nuclear waste repositories, modelling of a future mining site and analytical chemical studies (including natural samples are discussed.

  2. Comparative thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of water interaction with human stratum corneum.

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    Yadav, Santosh; Wickett, R Randall; Pinto, Neville G; Kasting, Gerald B; Thiel, Stephen W

    2009-05-01

    The water content of skin has a significant impact on skin properties; sufficient hydration is necessary to keep the skin supple, flexible, and smooth. To understand more completely the water retention properties of the human skin barrier, physical macroscopic properties must be related to the structural organization of the stratum corneum (SC). Water, lipids, and natural moisturizing factor (NMF) influence the molecular structures that affect the properties of SC, including water sorption and binding enthalpy. In the research reported here, isothermal microcalorimetry was used to study the interaction of water vapor with isolated human SC in intact, delipidized, and water-washed delipidized forms to identify the influences of the principal components of SC on water sorption. The calorimetric data are interpreted in conjunction with spectroscopic results to identify the conformational changes in keratins induced by lipid and NMF removal and to assess the influence of these changes on water binding in SC. Isothermal calorimetry was used to measure the integral heat of water vapor sorption on intact, delipidized, and water-washed delipidized human SC at 32 degrees C as a function of relative humidity using back and thigh skin from three donors. Calorimetric measurements were combined with water vapor sorption measurements to determine the differential thermodynamic properties of these systems. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate effects of extraction on protein secondary structure. The magnitudes of the differential enthalpy, entropy, and free energy were greatest for intact SC and least for water-washed delipidized SC. Water sorption followed a similar trend. Delipidization led to a significantly reduced binding enthalpy at low water content; water washing the delipidized SC had only a small additional effect on binding enthalpy. Delipidization converts a fraction of keratin alpha-helixes to turns and random

  3. Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fermi, Enrico

    1956-01-01

    Indisputably, this is a modern classic of science. Based on a course of lectures delivered by the author at Columbia University, the text is elementary in treatment and remarkable for its clarity and organization. Although it is assumed that the reader is familiar with the fundamental facts of thermometry and calorimetry, no advanced mathematics beyond calculus is assumed.Partial contents: thermodynamic systems, the first law of thermodynamics (application, adiabatic transformations), the second law of thermodynamics (Carnot cycle, absolute thermodynamic temperature, thermal engines), the entr

  4. A microscopic insight from conformational thermodynamics to functional ligand binding in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Samapan; Chakrabarti, J; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-12-01

    We show that the thermodynamics of metal ion-induced conformational changes aid to understand the functions of protein complexes. This is illustrated in the case of a metalloprotein, alpha-lactalbumin (aLA), a divalent metal ion binding protein. We use the histograms of dihedral angles of the protein, generated from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, to calculate conformational thermodynamics. The thermodynamically destabilized and disordered residues in different conformational states of a protein are proposed to serve as binding sites for ligands. This is tested for β-1,4-galactosyltransferase (β4GalT) binding to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex, in which the binding residues are known. Among the binding residues, the C-terminal residues like aspartate (D) 116, glutamine (Q) 117, tryptophan (W) 118 and leucine (L) 119 are destabilized and disordered and can dock β4GalT onto Ca(2+)-aLA. No such thermodynamically favourable binding residues can be identified in the case of the Mg(2+)-aLA complex. We apply similar analysis to oleic acid binding and predict that the Ca(2+)-aLA complex can bind to oleic acid through the basic histidine (H) 32 of the A2 helix and the hydrophobic residues, namely, isoleucine (I) 59, W60 and I95, of the interfacial cleft. However, the number of destabilized and disordered residues in Mg(2+)-aLA are few, and hence, the oleic acid binding to Mg(2+)-bound aLA is less stable than that to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex. Our analysis can be generalized to understand the functionality of other ligand bound proteins.

  5. Probing the inhibitory potency of epigallocatechin gallate against human γB-crystallin aggregation: Spectroscopic, microscopic and simulation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Susmitnarayan; Dutta, Anirudha; Bag, Sudipta; Biswas, Pranandita; Das, Amit Kumar; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2018-03-01

    Aggregation of human ocular lens proteins, the crystallins is believed to be one of the key reasons for age-onset cataract. Previous studies have shown that human γD-crystallin forms amyloid like fibres under conditions of low pH and elevated temperature. In this article, we have investigated the aggregation propensity of human γB-crystallin in absence and presence of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), in vitro, when exposed to stressful conditions. We have used different spectroscopic and microscopic techniques to elucidate the inhibitory effect of EGCG towards aggregation. The experimental results have been substantiated by molecular dynamics simulation studies. We have shown that EGCG possesses inhibitory potency against the aggregation of human γB-crystallin at low pH and elevated temperature.

  6. A comparison of microscopic and spectroscopic identification methods for analysis of microplastics in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee; Jang, Mi; Han, Gi Myung; Rani, Manviri; Lee, Jongmyoung; Shim, Won Joon

    2015-04-15

    The analysis of microplastics in various environmental samples requires the identification of microplastics from natural materials. The identification technique lacks a standardized protocol. Herein, stereomicroscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FT-IR) identification methods for microplastics (microplastics were significantly (p0.05) different. Depending on the number of samples and the microplastic size range of interest, the appropriate identification method should be determined; selecting a suitable identification method for microplastics is crucial for evaluating microplastic pollution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Microscopic insight into thermodynamics of conformational changes of SAP-SLAM complex in signal transduction cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2017-04-01

    The signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors, expressed by an array of immune cells, associate with SLAM-associated protein (SAP)-related molecules, composed of single SH2 domain architecture. SAP activates Src-family kinase Fyn after SLAM ligation, resulting in a SLAM-SAP-Fyn complex, where, SAP binds the Fyn SH3 domain that does not involve canonical SH3 or SH2 interactions. This demands insight into this SAP mediated signalling cascade. Thermodynamics of the conformational changes are extracted from the histograms of dihedral angles obtained from the all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of this structurally well characterized SAP-SLAM complex. The results incorporate the binding induced thermodynamic changes of individual amino acid as well as the secondary structural elements of the protein and the solvent. Stabilization of the peptide partially comes through a strong hydrogen bonding network with the protein, while hydrophobic interactions also play a significant role where the peptide inserts itself into a hydrophobic cavity of the protein. SLAM binding widens SAP's second binding site for Fyn, which is the next step in the signal transduction cascade. The higher stabilization and less fluctuation of specific residues of SAP in the Fyn binding site, induced by SAP-SLAM complexation, emerge as the key structural elements to trigger the recognition of SAP by the SH3 domain of Fyn. The thermodynamic quantification of the protein due to complexation not only throws deeper understanding in the established mode of SAP-SLAM interaction but also assists in the recognition of the relevant residues of the protein responsible for alterations in its activity.

  8. Macromolecular Competition Titration Method: Accessing Thermodynamics of the Unmodified Macromolecule–Ligand Interactions Through Spectroscopic Titrations of Fluorescent Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of thermodynamically rigorous binding isotherms provides fundamental information about the energetics of the ligand–macromolecule interactions and often an invaluable insight about the structure of the formed complexes. The Macromolecular Competition Titration (MCT) method enables one to quantitatively obtain interaction parameters of protein–nucleic acid interactions, which may not be available by other methods, particularly for the unmodified long polymer lattices and specific nucleic acid substrates, if the binding is not accompanied by adequate spectroscopic signal changes. The method can be applied using different fluorescent nucleic acids or fluorophores, although the etheno-derivatives of nucleic acid are especially suitable as they are relatively easy to prepare, have significant blue fluorescence, their excitation band lies far from the protein absorption spectrum, and the modification eliminates the possibility of base pairing with other nucleic acids. The MCT method is not limited to the specific size of the reference nucleic acid. Particularly, a simple analysis of the competition titration experiments is described in which the fluorescent, short fragment of nucleic acid, spanning the exact site-size of the protein–nucleic acid complex, and binding with only a 1:1 stoichiometry to the protein, is used as a reference macromolecule. Although the MCT method is predominantly discussed as applied to studying protein–nucleic acid interactions, it can generally be applied to any ligand–macromolecule system by monitoring the association reaction using the spectroscopic signal originating from the reference macromolecule in the presence of the competing macromolecule, whose interaction parameters with the ligand are to be determined. PMID:21195223

  9. Characterization of titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) thin films by microscopic and spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skonieczny, R.; Makowiecki, J.; Bursa, B.; Krzykowski, A.; Szybowicz, M.

    2018-02-01

    The titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) thin film deposited on glass, silicon and gold substrate have been studied using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), absorption and profilometry measurements. The TiOPc thin layers have been deposited at room temperature by the quasi-molecular beam evaporation technique. The Raman spectra have been recorded using micro Raman system equipped with a confocal microscope. Using surface Raman mapping techni que with polarized Raman spectra the polymorphic forms of the TiOPc thin films distribution have been obtained. The AFM height and phase image were examined in order to find surface features and morphology of the thin films. Additionally to compare experimental results, structure optimization and vibrational spectra calculation of single TiOPc molecule were performed using DFT calculations. The received results showed that the parameters like polymorphic form, grain size, roughness of the surface in TiOPc thin films can well characterize the obtained organic thin films structures in terms of their use in optoelectronics and photovoltaics devices.

  10. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysow, Jacek; del Rosso, Leonardo; Celli, Milva; Moraldi, Massimo; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2014-04-28

    We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

  11. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borysow, Jacek, E-mail: jborysow@mtu.edu; Rosso, Leonardo del; Celli, Milva; Ulivi, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.ulivi@isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Moraldi, Massimo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-04-28

    We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

  12. Thermodynamic and spectroscopic study of Al3+interaction with glycine, l-cysteine and tranexamic acid in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiano, Paola; Giacobello, Fausta; Giuffrè, Ottavia; Sammartano, Silvio

    2017-11-01

    In this paper a thermodynamic and spectroscopic study on the interaction between Al 3+ and glycine (Gly), l-cysteine (Cys), tranexamic acid (Tranex) is reported. Speciation models have been obtained by processing potentiometric titration data to determine stability constants of the species formed in aqueous solution at T=298.15K, 0.15≤I/molL -1 ≤1 in NaCl. Thermodynamic formation parameters have been obtained from calorimetric titration data, at T=298.15K, I=0.15molL -1 using NaCl as ionic medium. Al 3+ -Cys system was also investigated by spectrophotometric and 1 H NMR measurements. 1 H NMR experiments were performed on Al 3+ -Tranex system as well. Different speciation models have been observed for the three systems. The results showed the formation of MLH, ML and M 2 L 2 (OH) 2 species for Gly, ML, M 2 L and MLOH for Cys, MLH and MLOH for Tranex. The formed species are quite stable, i.e. for ML, logβ=7.18, 11.91 for Gly and Cys, respectively, at I=0.15molL -1 and T=298.15K. For all the systems the dependence of formation constants on ionic strength over the range 0.1-1molL -1 is reported. The sequestering ability of the ligands under study was also evaluated by pL 0.5 empiric parameter. For Gly, Cys and Tranex, pL 0.5 =2.51, 3.74, 3.91 respectively, at pH=5, I=0.15molL -1 and T=298.15K. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultra-High Resolution Spectroscopic Remote Sensing: A Microscope on Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, Theodor

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing of planetary atmospheres is not complete without studies of all levels of the atmosphere, including the dense cloudy- and haze filled troposphere, relatively clear and important stratosphere and the upper atmosphere, which are the first levels to experience the effects of solar radiation. High-resolution spectroscopy can provide valuable information on these regions of the atmosphere. Ultra-high spectral resolution studies can directly measure atmospheric winds, composition, temperature and non-thermal phenomena, which describe the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere. Spectroscopy in the middle to long infrared wavelengths can also probe levels where dust of haze limit measurements at shorter wavelength or can provide ambiguous results on atmospheric species abundances or winds. A spectroscopic technique in the middle infrared wavelengths analogous to a radio receiver. infrared heterodyne spectroscopy [1], will be describe and used to illustrate the detailed study of atmospheric phenomena not readily possible with other methods. The heterodyne spectral resolution with resolving power greater than 1,000.000 measures the true line shapes of emission and absorption lines in planetary atmospheres. The information on the region of line formation is contained in the line shapes. The absolute frequency of the lines can be measured to I part in 100 ,000,000 and can be used to accurately measure the Doppler frequency shift of the lines, directly measuring the line-of-sight velocity of the gas to --Im/s precision (winds). The technical and analytical methods developed and used to measure and analyze infrared heterodyne measurements will be described. Examples of studies on Titan, Venus, Mars, Earth, and Jupiter will be presented. 'These include atmospheric dynamics on slowly rotating bodies (Titan [2] and Venus [3] and temperature, composition and chemistry on Mars 141, Venus and Earth. The discovery and studies of unique atmospheric phenomena will also be

  14. Concentration dependent switch in the kinetic pathway of lysozyme fibrillation: Spectroscopic and microscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran Kumar, E.; Prasad, Deepak Kumar; Prakash Prabhu, N.

    2017-08-01

    Formation of amyloid fibrils is found to be a general tendency of many proteins. Investigating the kinetic mechanisms and structural features of the intermediates and the final fibrillar state is essential to understand their role in amyloid diseases. Lysozyme, a notable model protein for amyloidogenic studies, readily formed fibrils in vitro at neutral pH in the presence of urea. It, however, showed two different kinetic pathways under varying urea concentrations when probed with thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence. In 2 M urea, lysozyme followed a nucleation-dependent fibril formation pathway which was not altered by varying the protein concentration from 2 mg/ml to 8 mg/ml. In 4 M urea, the protein exhibited concentration dependent change in the mechanism. At lower protein concentrations, lysozyme formed fibrils without any detectable nuclei (nucleation-independent polymerization pathway). When the concentration of the protein was increased above 3 mg/ml, the protein followed nucleation-dependent polymerization pathway as observed in the case of 2 M urea condition. This was further verified using microscopic images of the fibrils. The kinetic parameters such as lag time, elongation rate, and fibrillation half-time, which were derived from ThT fluorescence changes, showed linear dependency against the initial protein concentration suggested that under the nucleation-dependent pathway conditions, the protein followed primary-nucleation mechanism without any significant secondary nucleation events. The results also suggested that the differences in the initial protein conformation might alter the mechanism of fibrillation; however, at the higher protein concentrations lysozyme shifted to nucleation-dependent pathway.

  15. Thermodynamic and Spectroscopic Investigation of Interactions between Reactive Red 223 and Reactive Orange 122 Anionic Dyes and Cetyltrimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB Cationic Surfactant in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the conductometric and spectroscopic study of the interaction of reactive anionic dyes, namely, reactive red 223 and reactive orange 122 with the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB. In a systematic investigation, the electrical conductivity data was used to calculate various thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (ΔG, enthalpy (ΔH, and the entropy (ΔS of solubilization. The trend of change in these thermodynamic quantities indicates toward the entropy driven solubilization process. Moreover, the results from spectroscopic data reveal high degree of solubilization, with strong interactions observed in the cases of both dyes and the CTAB. The spontaneous nature of solubilization and binding was evident from the observed negative values of free energies (ΔGp and ΔGb.

  16. Molecular spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies on the interaction of anti-platelet drug ticlopidine with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Shumaila; Rahman, Yusra; Sarwar, Tarique; Husain, Mohammed Amir; Ali, Abad; Shamsuzzaman; Tabish, Mohammad

    2017-11-01

    Ticlopidine is an anti-platelet drug which belongs to the thienopyridine structural family and exerts its effect by functioning as an ADP receptor inhibitor. Ticlopidine inhibits the expression of TarO gene in S. aureus and may provide protection against MRSA. Groove binding agents are known to disrupt the transcription factor DNA complex and consequently inhibit gene expression. Understanding the mechanism of interaction of ticlopidine with DNA can prove useful in the development of a rational drug designing system. At present, there is no such study on the interaction of anti-platelet drugs with nucleic acids. A series of biophysical experiments were performed to ascertain the binding mode between ticlopidine and calf thymus DNA. UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments confirmed the formation of a complex between ticlopidine and calf thymus DNA. Moreover, the values of binding constant were found to be in the range of 103 M- 1, which is indicative of groove binding between ticlopidine and calf thymus DNA. These results were further confirmed by studying the effect of denaturation on double stranded DNA, iodide quenching, viscometric studies, thermal melting profile as well as CD spectral analysis. The thermodynamic profile of the interaction was also determined using isothermal titration calorimetric studies. The reaction was found to be endothermic and the parameters obtained were found to be consistent with those of known groove binders. In silico molecular docking studies further corroborated well with the experimental results.

  17. Hydrogen adsorption on the faujasite-type zeolite Mg-X: An IR spectroscopic and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnes Palomino, G., E-mail: g.turnes@uib.es [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de las Islas Baleares, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Otero Arean, C.; Llop Carayol, M.R. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de las Islas Baleares, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    Hydrogen adsorption (physisorption) on the faujasite-type zeolite Mg-X was studied by means of variable-temperature (80-140 K) FT-IR spectroscopy. Perturbation of the adsorbed H{sub 2} molecules by the cationic adsorbing centres of the zeolite renders the H-H stretching mode IR active, at 4065 cm{sup -1}. Simultaneous measurement of IR absorbance and hydrogen equilibrium pressure, for a series of spectra recorded at the increasing temperature, allowed standard adsorption enthalpy and entropy to be determined. They resulted to be {Delta}H{sup 0} = -13 kJ mol{sup -1} and {Delta}S{sup 0} = -114 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}, respectively. Both, spectroscopic and thermodynamic results are discussed in the broader context of corresponding data for hydrogen adsorption on other alkali and alkaline-earth cation exchanged zeolites, showing that, while an approximate correlation exists between {Delta}H{sup 0} and H-H stretching frequency, deviations can be expected for the case of zeolites containing small metal cations.

  18. Thermodynamic and spectroscopic studies of alanine and phenylalanine in aqueous β-cyclodextrin solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic speed, u and density, ρ have been measured for dl-alanine (Ala and l-phenylalanine (Phe in aqueous β-cyclodextrin (β-CD at 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15 K. The complexation of Ala and Phe with β-CD has been studied by means of UV–vis and thermodynamic (ultrasonic speed and density studies. Using the measured ultrasonic speed and density data the apparent molar compressibility (κS,φ, apparent molar volume (Vφ, limiting apparent molar compressibility (κS,φ0, limiting apparent molar volume (Vφ0, their constants (SK and Sv, and hydration number (nH have been obtained. The positive values of transfer properties at infinite dilution for Ala and Phe in β-CD is the outcome of the balance between released water molecules from β-CD cavity and hydrophobic groups of Ala and Phe that enter into the macrocycle β-CD cavity. The experimental results have also been discussed on the basis of UV–vis absorbance. The results indicate the formation of a more stable host–guest complex between Phe-β-CD than between Ala-β-CD.

  19. Human serum albumin unfolding pathway upon drug binding: A thermodynamic and spectroscopic description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheema, Mohammad Arif [Grupo de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Taboada, Pablo [Grupo de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)], E-mail: pablo.taboada@usc.es; Barbosa, Silvia; Juarez, Josue; Gutierrez-Pichel, Manuel [Grupo de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Siddiq, Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Mosquera, Victor [Grupo de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2009-04-15

    The interest on phenothiazine drugs has been increased during last years due to their proved utility in the treatment of several diseases and biomolecular processes. In the present work, the binding of the amphiphilic phenothiazines promazine and thioridazine hydrochlorides to the carrier protein human serum albumin (HSA) has been examined by {zeta}-potential, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), fluorescence and circular dichorism (CD) spectroscopies, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) at physiological pH with the aim of analyzing the role of the different interactions in the drug complexation process with this protein. The {zeta}-potential results were used to check the existence of complexation. This is confirmed by a progressive screening of the protein charge up to a reversal point as a consequence of drug binding. On the other hand, binding causes alterations on the tertiary and secondary structures of the protein, which were observed by fluorescence and CD spectroscopies, involving a two-step, three-state transition. The thermodynamics of the binding process was derived from ITC results. The binding enthalpies were negative, which reveal the existence of electrostatic interactions between protein and drug molecules. In addition, increases in entropy are consistent with the predominance of hydrophobic interactions. Two different classes of binding sites were detected, viz. Binding to the first class of binding sites is dominated by an enthalpic contribution due to electrostatic interactions whereas binding to a second class of binding sites is dominated by hydrophobic bonding. In the light of these results, protein conformational change resembles the acid-induced denaturation of HSA with accumulation of an intermediate state. Binding isotherms were derived from microcalorimetric results by using a theoretical model based on the Langmuir isotherm. On the other hand, the population distribution of the different species in solution and their sizes were

  20. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies of light harvesting perylenediimide derivative - zinc porphyrin complex in aqueous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Refaey, Ahmed; Shaban, Shaban Y.; El-Kemary, Maged; El-Khouly, Mohamed E.

    2017-11-01

    Self-assembly of perylene derivative such as N,N‧-bis(2(trimethylammonium iodide) ethylene)perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxyldiimide (TAIPDI) can produce one-dimensional form (1D) in an aqueous media. The ability of one-dimensional TAIPDI to form light harvesting complex with water-soluble zinc porphyrin (ZnTPPS4) via the π-π and electrostatic interactions has been described. Owing to electronic interactions between the π-systems, the complex formation is accompanied by pronounced absorption spectral changes in the UV/Vis absorption bands. The formation constant of the ZnTPPS4-TAIPDI complex has been determined as 2.60 × 104 M- 1 suggests a moderately stable complex. The steady-state fluorescence measurements exhibited fluorescence quenching of both the singlet TAIPDI and ZnTPPS4 because of the electron transfer process from the electron-donating ZnTPPS4 to the electron-accepting TAIPDI. Based on the picosecond time-resolved fluorescence, the rate and quantum yield of the electron transfer were found to be 2.47 × 1010 s- 1 and 0.99, respectively, indicating fast and efficient electron transfer. The thermodynamic parameters of the complex formation have been determined from the stopped-flow measurements. The interaction between ZnTPPS4 and TAIPDI occurs in two steps, a fast and reversible step followed by a slow and irreversible one. The activation parameters for the complex formation (ΔH# = 22 ± 5 kJ mol- 1 and ΔS# = - 123 ± 18 J K- 1 mol- 1), (ΔH# = 133 ± 4 kJ mol- 1 and ΔS# = 167 ± 13 J mol- 1 K- 1) were determined from variable temperature studies for the ;on; and the ;off; of the first step and ΔS# = 246 ± 37.89 J mol- 1 K- 1 and ΔH# = 130 ± 11 kJ mol- 1 for the second step. The negative and positive ΔS# values found for the interaction reactions are consistent with an associative interaction for the first step followed by dissociative mechanism for both the ;off; and the second step.

  1. Thermodynamic characteristics of there-dimensional Ising-like systems as functions of microscopic parameters, the rho sup 6 model approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Pylyuk, I V

    2001-01-01

    The microscopic approach to calculating and investigating the three-dimensional (3D) Ising-like system thermodynamics above and below the phase transition temperature T sub c is developed using the collective variables method. Mathematical description is performed within the framework of the higher non-Gaussian approximation (rho sup 6 model) taking into account the corrections to scaling. A nonuniversal factor depending on microscopic parameters of the system is singled out in the expressions for leading critical amplitudes and correction-to-scaling amplitudes. Numerical estimates of the critical region size, phase transition temperature as well as the graphs of temperature dependences of entropy and other thermodynamic characteristics near T sub c are given for various values of effective radius of the exponentially decreasing interaction potential. The variation of the free energy of the system at the phase transition point,average spin moment,and specific heat with increasing ratio of the potential effect...

  2. Multistage bioassociation of uranium onto an extremely halophilic archaeon revealed by a unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, Miriam; Müller, Katharina; Foerstendorf, Harald; Drobot, Björn [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Matthias; Musat, Niculina [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZ, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Swanson, Juliet S.; Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Repository Science and Operations, 1400 University Drive, Carlsbad, NM, 88220 (United States); Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Cherkouk, Andrea, E-mail: a.cherkouk@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • First prolonged kinetics study of uranium to halophilic archaea was performed. • An atypical time-dependent bioassociation behavior of uranium was observed. • Unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods was used. • In situ ATR FT-IR showed association of U(VI) to phosphoryl and carboxylate groups. • Time-dependent changes of U(VI) localization could be monitored by SEM/EDX. - Abstract: The interactions of two extremely halophilic archaea with uranium were investigated at high ionic strength as a function of time, pH and uranium concentration. Halobacterium noricense DSM-15987 and Halobacterium sp. putatively noricense, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository, were used for these investigations. The kinetics of U(VI) bioassociation with both strains showed an atypical multistage behavior, meaning that after an initial phase of U(VI) sorption, an unexpected interim period of U(VI) release was observed, followed by a slow reassociation of uranium with the cells. By applying in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the involvement of phosphoryl and carboxylate groups in U(VI) complexation during the first biosorption phase was shown. Differences in cell morphology and uranium localization become visible at different stages of the bioassociation process, as shown with scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate for the first time that association of uranium with the extremely halophilic archaeon is a multistage process, beginning with sorption and followed by another process, probably biomineralization.

  3. Binary iron-chromium oxide as negative electrode for lithium-ion micro-batteries – spectroscopic and microscopic characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Bingbing; Światowska, Jolanta, E-mail: jolanta.swiatowska@chimie-paristech.fr; Maurice, Vincent; Zanna, Sandrine; Seyeux, Antoine; Marcus, Philippe

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Conversion/deconversion mechanism of (Fe,Cr)-binary oxide thin film is reported. • Influence of substituting iron by chromium (Cr{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 3} phase) is evaluated. • Inferior electrochemical conversion activity of chromium vs iron oxide is shown. • Decreased lithium transport caused by presence of chromium oxide is evidenced. • SEI layer uptake and thin film electrode volume expansion upon cycling are shown. - Abstract: (Fe,Cr)-binary oxide thin film electrodes were prepared as negative electrode material for lithium-ion micro-batteries by thermal growth on a stainless steel (AISI 410, FeCr{sub 12.5}) current collector. The mechanisms of lithiation/delithiation were investigated by means of electrochemical (CV, galvanostatic cycling), spectroscopic (XPS, ToF-SIMS) and microscopic (SEM, AFM) analytical techniques. The as-prepared (Fe, Cr)-binary oxide electrodes exhibit a good cycling performance except the first discharge/charge cycle where a high irreversible capacity is observed due to formation of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer. The influence of substituting an oxidized iron by an oxidized chromium (Cr{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 3} phase) was evaluated. The data show that the inferior electrochemical conversion activity of substituted oxidized chromium results in hindering lithium transport in the bulk thin film electrode. It was observed that the irreversible morphology modifications together with SEI evolution are critical to capacity degradation while retaining good coulombic efficiency.

  4. Analytical Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Titan 80-300 is a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with spectroscopic detectors to allow chemical, elemental, and other analytical measurements to...

  5. M-line spectroscopic, spectroscopic ellipsometric and microscopic measurements of optical waveguides fabricated by MeV-energy N{sup +} ion irradiation for telecom applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bányász, I., E-mail: banyasz@sunserv.kfki.hu [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O.B. 49, H-1525, Budapest (Hungary); Berneschi, S. [“Enrico Fermi” Center for Study and Research, Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy); MDF-Lab, “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, IFAC-CNR, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Fried, M.; Lohner, T. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O.B. 49, H-1525, Budapest (Hungary); Conti, G. Nunzi; Righini, G.C.; Pelli, S. [MDF-Lab, “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, IFAC-CNR, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Zolnai, Z. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O.B. 49, H-1525, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-08-31

    Irradiation with N{sup +} ions of the 1.5–3.5 MeV energy range was applied to optical waveguide formation. Planar and channel waveguides have been fabricated in an Er-doped tungsten–tellurite glass, and in both types of bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals: Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (eulytine) and Bi{sub 12}GeO{sub 20} (sillenite). Multi-wavelength m-line spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry were used for the characterisation of the ion beam irradiated waveguides. Planar waveguides fabricated in the Er-doped tungsten–tellurite glass using irradiation with N{sup +} ions at 3.5 MeV worked even at the 1550 nm telecommunication wavelength. 3.5 MeV N{sup +} ion irradiated planar waveguides in eulytine-type BGO worked up to 1550 nm and those in sillenite-type BGO worked up to 1330 nm. - Highlights: ► Waveguides were fabricated in glass and crystals using MeV energy N{sup +} ions. ► SRIM simulation and spectroscopic ellipsometry yielded similar waveguide structures. ► Multi-wavelength m-line spectroscopy was used to study the waveguides. ► Waveguides fabricated in an Er-doped tungsten–tellurite glass worked up to 1.5 μm. ► Waveguides in Bi{sub 12}GeO{sub 20} remained operative up to 1.5 μm.

  6. Microscopic structure and thermodynamics of a core-softened model fluid from the second-order integral equations theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sokołowski

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the structure and thermodynamic properties of isotropic three-dimensional core-softened fluid by using the second-order Ornstein-Zernike integral equations completed by the hypernetted chain and Percus-Yevick closures. The radial distribution functions are compared with those from singlet integral equations and with computer simulation data. The limits of the region of density anomaly resulting from different approximate theories are established. The obtained results show that the second-order hypernetted chain approximation can be used to describe both the structure and the density anomaly of this model fluid. Moreover, we present the results of calculations of the bridge functions.

  7. Quest for Environmentally-Benign Ligands for Actinide Separations: Thermodynamic, Spectroscopic, and Structural Characterization of U(VI) Complexes with Oxa-Diamide and Related Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Advanced Light Source; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Teat, Simon J.; Liu, Guokui

    2009-01-05

    Complexation of U(VI) with N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide (TMOGA) and N,N-dimethyl-3-oxa-glutaramic acid (DMOGA) was studied in comparison with their dicarboxylate analog, oxydiacetic acid (ODA). Thermodynamic parameters, including stability constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation, were determined by spectrophotometry, potentiometry and calorimetry. Single-crystal X-ray diffractometry, EXAFS spectroscopy, FT-IR absorption and laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy were used to obtain structural information on the U(VI) complexes. Like ODA, TMOGA and DMOGA form tridentate U(VI) complexes, with three oxygen atoms (the amide, ether and/or carboxylate oxygen) coordinating to the linear UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} cation via the equatorial plane. The stability constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation all decrease in the order ODA > DMOGA > TMOGA, showing that the complexation is entropy driven and the substitution of a carboxylate group with an amide group reduces the strength of complexation with U(VI) due to the decrease in the entropy of complexation. The trend in the thermodynamic stability of the complexes correlates very well with the structural and spectroscopic data obtained by single crystal XRD, FT-IR and laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy.

  8. Comparative study of microscopic, spectroscopic and magneto-optic response of ferrofluids subjected to γ-radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, M.; Mohanta, D.; Saha, A.

    2015-02-01

    Present work reports a comparative study of spectroscopic and magneto-optic properties of Fe3O4 based ferrofluids prepared with two different carrier fluid namely milli-Q-water and kerosene. The ferrofluids are labelled as FFW and FFK respectively. Both ferrofluids are subjected to γ-irradiation of dose: 2,635 Gy. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering studies reveal that γ-photon interaction could lead to substantial growth of the dispersed nanoparticles of ferrofluids. In case of FFW, particle sizes are 9 nm (pristine) and 48 nm (irradiated) whereas, in FFK unirradiated particles of size 9 nm show growth to 18 nm after the irradiation. The role of different physical parameters (viz. viscosity, density) of carrier fluid on the growth process is considered in this regard. Viscosity of the carrier fluid is found noteworthy in the measurement of Faraday rotation response of the ferrofluids. In addition to low viscosity of water, irradiation induced particle growth as well as improved size distribution with larger particles leads to a comparatively larger enhancement of Faraday rotation of FFW than that of FFK. Consequently, as a result of γ-irradiation, Verdet constant is modified by 70 % in the former case and by 60 % in the latter case.

  9. Macroscopic, thermodynamic, kinetic and microscopic study of nitric acid pickling of Elektron 21 (EV31A magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Mouls

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of pickling of the EL21T6 substrate in a nitric acid bath firstly provided knowledge of the influence of the different experimental parameters (concentration of acid, temperature and stirring of the solution in relation to the etching rate. This experimental part led to the choice of standard pickling (Tbath = 25 °C, moderate stirring (250 rpm, [HNO3] = 1.20 mol/L, duration of 2 min so as to obtain constant removal of material, even after several uses of the pickling bath. SEM observations also confirmed that in these operating conditions, pickling concerns both the grains of the matrix and the precipitates of type Mg3(Nd, Gd, leading to uniform removal of material from the surface. Working from a number of assumptions, thermodynamic and chemical kinetic studies then allowed a pickling mechanism to be proposed and led to obtaining values for the corresponding kinetic parameters (order of reaction, constant of mean rate, activation energy to be obtained.

  10. Influence of galloyl moiety in interaction of epicatechin with bovine serum albumin: a spectroscopic and thermodynamic characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Pal

    Full Text Available The health benefits stemming from green tea are well known, but the exact mechanism of its biological activity is not elucidated. Epicatechin (EC and epicatechin gallate (ECG are two dietary catechins ubiquitously present in green tea. Serum albumins functionally carry these catechins through the circulatory system and eliminate reactive oxygen species (ROS induced injury. In the present study ECG is observed to have higher antioxidant activity; which is attributed to the presence of galloyl moiety. The binding affinity of these catechins to bovine serum albumin (BSA will govern the efficacy of their biological activity. EC and ECG bind with BSA with binding constants 1.0 × 10(6 M(-1 and 6.6 × 10(7 M(-1, respectively. Changes in secondary structure of BSA on interaction with EC and ECG have been identified by circular dichroism (CD and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy. Thermodynamic characterization reveals the binding process to be exothermic, spontaneous and entropy driven. Mixed binding forces (hydrophobic, electrostatic and hydrogen bonding exist between ECG and BSA. Binding site for EC is primarily site-II in sub-domain IIIA of BSA and for ECG; it is site-I in sub-domain IIA. ECG with its high antioxidant activity accompanied by high affinity for BSA could be a model in drug designing.

  11. Binding of λ-carrageenan (a food additive) to almond cystatin: An insight involving spectroscopic and thermodynamic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Azad Alam; Feroz, Anna; Khaki, Peerzada Shariq Shaheen; Bano, Bilqees

    2017-05-01

    Carrageenan is a high molecular weight linear sulphated polysaccharide, primarily used in food industry as gelling, thickening, and stabilizing agent. Almond milk prepared from almonds is low in fat, but high in antioxidants, energy, proteins, lipids and fibre. Purified almond cystatin was incubated with increasing concentrations of carrageenan at 25°C for different time interval and significant loss in inhibitory activity was observed. Interaction between carrageenan and cystatin resulted in complex formation as depicted by the decrease in fluorescence intensity with increase in the concentration of carrageenan. Stern-volmer analysis of fluorescence quenching data showed binding constant to be 1.84±0.20×104M-1 and number of binding sites close to unity. These results were further confirmed by supporting results obtained in UV-vis spectroscopy. FTIR analysis shows significant shift in the peak intensity and this change clearly depict change in the structure of cystatin from that of α helix to β-sheet. CD spectra further confirmed the structural transition of the cystatin from α helix to β-sheet structure on interaction with increased concentrations of carrageenan. The contributing thermodynamic parameters were determined by ITC. The negative ΔH° and positive TΔS° values suggest involvement of electrostatic forces and hydrophobic interaction in the formation of the λ-carrageenan-cystatin complex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of galloyl moiety in interaction of epicatechin with bovine serum albumin: a spectroscopic and thermodynamic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sandip; Saha, Chabita; Hossain, Maidul; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2012-01-01

    The health benefits stemming from green tea are well known, but the exact mechanism of its biological activity is not elucidated. Epicatechin (EC) and epicatechin gallate (ECG) are two dietary catechins ubiquitously present in green tea. Serum albumins functionally carry these catechins through the circulatory system and eliminate reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced injury. In the present study ECG is observed to have higher antioxidant activity; which is attributed to the presence of galloyl moiety. The binding affinity of these catechins to bovine serum albumin (BSA) will govern the efficacy of their biological activity. EC and ECG bind with BSA with binding constants 1.0 × 10(6) M(-1) and 6.6 × 10(7) M(-1), respectively. Changes in secondary structure of BSA on interaction with EC and ECG have been identified by circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Thermodynamic characterization reveals the binding process to be exothermic, spontaneous and entropy driven. Mixed binding forces (hydrophobic, electrostatic and hydrogen bonding) exist between ECG and BSA. Binding site for EC is primarily site-II in sub-domain IIIA of BSA and for ECG; it is site-I in sub-domain IIA. ECG with its high antioxidant activity accompanied by high affinity for BSA could be a model in drug designing.

  13. Arsenic removal by Japanese oak wood biochar in aqueous solutions and well water: Investigating arsenic fate using integrated spectroscopic and microscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Bibi, Irshad; Shahid, Muhammad; Ok, Yong Sik; Shaheen, Sabry M; Rinklebe, Jörg; Wang, Hailong; Murtaza, Behzad; Islam, Ejazul; Farrakh Nawaz, M; Lüttge, Andreas

    2017-10-17

    In this study, we examined the sorption of arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) to Japanese oak wood-derived biochar (OW-BC) in aqueous solutions, and determined its efficiency to remove As from As-contaminated well water. Results revealed that, among the four sorption isotherm models, Langmuir model showed the best fit to describe As(III) and As(V) sorption on OW-BC, with slightly greater sorption affinity for As(V) compared to As(III) (QL=3.89 and 3.16mgg-1; R2=0.91 and 0.85, respectively). Sorption edge experiments indicated that the maximum As removal was 81% and 84% for As(III)- and As(V)-OW-BC systems at pH7 and 6, respectively, which decreased above these pH values (76-69% and 80-58%). Surface functional groups, notably OH, COOH, CO, CH3, were involved in As sequestration by OW-BC, suggesting the surface complexation/precipitation and/or electrostatic interaction of As on OW-BC surface. Arsenic K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy indicated that 36% of the added As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the As(III) sorption experiment, and in As(V) sorption experiment, 48% of As(V) was, albeit incompletely, reduced to As(III) on OW-BC surface. Application of OW-BC to As-contaminated well water (As: 27-144μgL-1; n=10) displayed that 92 to 100% of As was depleted despite in the presence of co-occurring competing anions (e.g., SO42-, CO32-, PO43-). This study shows that OW-BC has a great potential to remove As from solution and drinking (well) water. Overall, the combination of macroscopic sorption data and integrated spectroscopic and microscopic techniques highlight that the fate of As on biochar involves complex redox transformation and association with surface functional moieties in aquatic systems, thereby providing crucial information required for implication of biochar in environmental remediation programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Observation of the origin of d0 magnetism in ZnO nanostructures using X-ray-based microscopic and spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shashi B.; Wang, Yu-Fu; Shao, Yu-Cheng; Lai, Hsuan-Yu; Hsieh, Shang-Hsien; Limaye, Mukta V.; Chuang, Chen-Hao; Hsueh, Hung-Chung; Wang, Hsaiotsu; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Hung-Ming; Pao, Chih-Wen; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Wu, Chun-Te; Wu, Jih-Jen; Pong, Way-Faung; Ohigashi, Takuji; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Jigang; Regier, Tom; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2014-07-01

    Efforts have been made to elucidate the origin of d0 magnetism in ZnO nanocactuses (NCs) and nanowires (NWs) using X-ray-based microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. The photoluminescence and O K-edge and Zn L3,2-edge X-ray-excited optical luminescence spectra showed that ZnO NCs contain more defects than NWs do and that in ZnO NCs, more defects are present at the O sites than at the Zn sites. Specifically, the results of O K-edge scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and the corresponding X-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy demonstrated that the impurity (non-stoichiometric) region in ZnO NCs contains a greater defect population than the thick region. The intensity of O K-edge STXM-XANES in the impurity region is more predominant in ZnO NCs than in NWs. The increase in the unoccupied (occupied) density of states at/above (at/below) the conduction-band minimum (valence-band maximum) or the Fermi level is related to the population of defects at the O sites, as revealed by comparing the ZnO NCs to the NWs. The results of O K-edge and Zn L3,2-edge X-ray magnetic circular dichroism demonstrated that the origin of magnetization is attributable to the O 2p orbitals rather than the Zn d orbitals. Further, the local density approximation (LDA) + U verified that vacancies in the form of dangling or unpaired 2p states (due to Zn vacancies) induced a significant local spin moment in the nearest-neighboring O atoms to the defect center, which was determined from the uneven local spin density by analyzing the partial density of states of O 2p in ZnO.Efforts have been made to elucidate the origin of d0 magnetism in ZnO nanocactuses (NCs) and nanowires (NWs) using X-ray-based microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. The photoluminescence and O K-edge and Zn L3,2-edge X-ray-excited optical luminescence spectra showed that ZnO NCs contain more defects than NWs do and that in ZnO NCs, more defects are present at the O sites than at the Zn sites

  15. Generalization of Gibbs Entropy and Thermodynamic Relation

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jun Chul

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we extend Gibbs's approach of quasi-equilibrium thermodynamic processes, and calculate the microscopic expression of entropy for general non-equilibrium thermodynamic processes. Also, we analyze the formal structure of thermodynamic relation in non-equilibrium thermodynamic processes.

  16. Stochastic thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Ralf; Aurell, Erik

    2014-04-01

    theory for small deviations from equilibrium, in which a general framework is constructed from the analysis of non-equilibrium states close to equilibrium. In a next step, Prigogine and others developed linear irreversible thermodynamics, which establishes relations between transport coefficients and entropy production on a phenomenological level in terms of thermodynamic forces and fluxes. However, beyond the realm of linear response no general theoretical results were available for quite a long time. This situation has changed drastically over the last 20 years with the development of stochastic thermodynamics, revealing that the range of validity of thermodynamic statements can indeed be extended deep into the non-equilibrium regime. Early developments in that direction trace back to the observations of symmetry relations between the probabilities for entropy production and entropy annihilation in non-equilibrium steady states [5-8] (nowadays categorized in the class of so-called detailed fluctuation theorems), and the derivations of the Bochkov-Kuzovlev [9, 10] and Jarzynski relations [11] (which are now classified as so-called integral fluctuation theorems). Apart from its fundamental theoretical interest, the developments in stochastic thermodynamics have experienced an additional boost from the recent experimental progress in fabricating, manipulating, controlling and observing systems on the micro- and nano-scale. These advances are not only of formidable use for probing and monitoring biological processes on the cellular, sub-cellular and molecular level, but even include the realization of a microscopic thermodynamic heat engine [12] or the experimental verification of Landauer's principle in a colloidal system [13]. The scientific program Stochastic Thermodynamics held between 4 and 15 March 2013, and hosted by The Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita), was attended by more than 50 scientists from the Nordic countries and elsewhere, amongst them

  17. Advanced thermodynamics engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Annamalai, Kalyan; Jog, Milind A

    2011-01-01

    Thermolab Excel-Based Software for Thermodynamic Properties and Flame Temperatures of Fuels IntroductionImportance, Significance and LimitationsReview of ThermodynamicsMathematical BackgroundOverview of Microscopic/NanothermodynamicsSummaryAppendix: Stokes and Gauss Theorems First Law of ThermodynamicsZeroth LawFirst Law for a Closed SystemQuasi Equilibrium (QE) and Nonquasi-equilibrium (NQE) ProcessesEnthalpy and First LawAdiabatic Reversible Process for Ideal Gas with Constant Specific HeatsFirst Law for an Open SystemApplications of First Law for an Open SystemIntegral and Differential Form

  18. On the composition dependence of the microscopic structure, thermodynamic, dynamic and dielectric properties of water-dimethyl formamide model mixtures. Molecular dynamics simulation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dominguez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Isothermal-isobaric molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to examine an ample set of properties of the model water-N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF mixture as a function of composition. The SPC-E and TIP4P-Ew water models together with two united atom models for DMF [Chalaris M., Samios J., J. Chem. Phys., 2000, 112, 8581; Cordeiro J., Int. J. Quantum Chem., 1997, 65, 709] were used. Our principal analyses concern the behaviour of structural properties in terms of radial distribution functions, and the number of hydrogen bonds between molecules of different species as well as thermodynamic properties. Namely, we explore the density, excess mixing molar volume and enthalpy, the heat capacity and excess mixing heat capacity. Finally, the self-diffusion coefficients of species and the dielectric constant of the system are discussed. In addition, surface tension of water-DMF mixtures has been calculated and analyzed.

  19. Thermodynamic and spectroscopic speciation to explain the blackening process of hematite formed by atmospheric SO2 impact: the case of Marcus Lucretius House (Pompeii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguregui, Maite; Knuutinen, Ulla; Martínez-Arkarazo, Irantzu; Castro, Kepa; Madariaga, Juan M

    2011-05-01

    After many decades exposed to a polluted environment, in some areas of Marcus Lucretius House, there are clear signs that plasters and hematite pigments are suffering deterioration. In the exhaustive analysis of the black layer covering the red pigment hematite it was possible to identify magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) as responsible for the black colour, which always appears in combination with gypsum. Thermodynamic modelling stated that the presence of gypsum as well as the transformation of hematite into magnetite is a consequence of the attack of atmospheric SO(2).

  20. Interactions fulvate-metal (Zn²⁺, Cu²⁺ and Fe²⁺): theoretical investigation of thermodynamic, structural and spectroscopic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, Alexandre C; Garcia, Jerusa S; Trevisan, Marcello G; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Freitas, Matheus P

    2016-04-01

    The use of theoretical calculation to determine structural properties of fulvate-metal complex (zinc, copper and iron) is here related. The species were proposed in the ratio 1:1 and 2:1 for which the molecular structure was obtained through the semi-empirical method PM6. The calculation of thermodynamic stability ([Formula: see text]) predicted that the iron complex were more exo-energetic. Metallic ions were coordinated to the phtalate groups of the model-structure of fulvic acid Suwannee River and the calculations of vibrational frequencies suggested that hydrogen bonds may help on the stability of the complex formation.

  1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide protects the myocardium from ischemia induced by endothelin-1: intravital microscopic observation and (31)P-MR spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Satoshi; Kimura, Taizo; Sakai, Satoshi; Yanagi, Ken-ichi; Miyauchi, Yumi; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Miyauchi, Takashi

    2014-11-24

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent vasodilator neuropeptide. We investigated the ameliorating effect of CGRP in myocardial ischemia induced by endothelin-1 (ET-1), with special emphasis on myocardial microvascular hemodynamics and levels of energy-related metabolites. The Langendorff preparations of rat isolated heart were perfused at a constant flow rate. Microvascular blood flow was also visualized in the anterior epicardium of the left ventricle by means of an intravital fluorescence microscope system. Energy-related metabolite contents in the myocardium were measured by means of (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS). Intracoronary bolus injections of CGRP caused dose-dependent decreases in coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) in the hearts exposed to ET-1 (30 pmol). The vasodilator potency of CGRP was about 10,000-fold greater than that of nitroglycerin and 1,000-fold greater than that of isobutylmethylxanthine. Vasodilation of the small-sized arterioles (10-40 μm in diameter) in response to CGRP (100 pmol) was confirmed by direct microscopic observation. After ET-1 (30 pmol) plus vehicle administration, high energy phosphates (phosphocreatine (PCr), ATP) were markedly reduced (pchanges in the myocardium (decrease in PCr) and macrohemodynamic alterations (increase in CPP, decrease in dP/dt etc.) induced by ET-1. We conclude that CGRP effectively confers hemodynamic and metabolic protections to isolated beating hearts against ET-1-induced myocardial ischemia. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Thermodynamic magnon recoil for domain wall motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, P.; Cao, Y.; Sinova, J.

    2015-01-01

    We predict a thermodynamic magnon recoil effect for domain wall motions in the presence of temperature gradients. All current thermodynamic theories assert that a magnetic domain wall must move toward the hotter side, based on equilibrium thermodynamic arguments. Microscopic calculations, on the

  3. Characterization of the deterioration of bone black in the 17 th century Oranjezaal paintings using electron-microscopic and micro-spectroscopic imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Annelies; Boon, Jaap J.

    2004-10-01

    A whitish deterioration product was observed on the dark paint in a number of large-scale oil paintings that are part of the Oranjezaal interior decoration in the Royal Palace Huis ten Bosch (The Hague). The whitened areas of a painting by Pieter Soutman dating from 1648 were micro-sampled and compared with "healthy" black paint using different analytical imaging techniques. The dark paint was identified as bone black in linseed oil with a lead drier added. Microscopic images of the cross-section revealed a white top layer of 10-20 μm in the black paint layer. Imaging the cross-section surface with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) and specular reflection Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) showed homogeneous distributions of phosphate, phosphorus and calcium over the black and the white degraded bone black. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the presence of calcium phosphate hydrate (Ca 3(PO 4) 2· xH 2O), monetite (CaHPO 4) with possibly some poorly crystalline or amorphous hydroxyapatite (Ca 5(OH)(PO 4) 3). The EDX maps of lead and carbon, however, showed some discontinuity between the degraded and non-degraded bone black. There was an increase in the lead concentration in the white top layer, and a slight decrease of carbon. Transmission FTIR demonstrated that aromatic network polymers from the carbon black are markedly diminished in the white deterioration product. It is proposed that the carbonized organic matter in the bone black is vulnerable to photo bleaching in the presence of a lead catalyst under these circumstances.

  4. Spectroscopic investigation (FTIR spectrum), NBO, HOMO-LUMO energies, NLO and thermodynamic properties of 8-Methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamideby DFT methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherin Percy Prema Leela, J.; Hemamalini, R.; Muthu, S.; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2015-07-01

    Capsicum a hill grown vegetable is also known as red pepper or chili pepper. Capsaicin(8-Methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the active component in chili peppers, which is currently used in the treatment of osteoarthritis, psoriasis and cancer. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of Capsaicin in the solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and analyzed. The vibrational frequencies of the title compound were obtained theoretically by DFT/B3LYP calculations employing the standard 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and were compared with Fourier transform infrared spectrum. Complete vibrational assignment analysis and correlation of the fundamental modes for the title compound were carried out. The vibrational harmonic frequencies were scaled using scale factor, yielding a good agreement between the experimentally recorded and the theoretically calculated values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization and intra molecular hydrogen bond-like weak interaction has been analyzed using Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. The results show that electron density (ED) in the σ∗ and π∗ antibonding orbitals and second-order delocalization energies E (2) confirm the occurrence of intra molecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α) and the hyperpolarizability (β) values of the molecule has been computed. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated.

  5. FT-IR spectroscopic and thermodynamic study on the adsorption of carbon dioxide and dinitrogen in the alkaline zeolite K-L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arean, C.O.; Bibiloni, G.F. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Delgado, M.R., E-mail: montserrat.rodriguez@uib.es [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variable temperature IR spectroscopy is used to study adsorption of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} in the alkaline zeolite K-L. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By simultaneously recording IR absorbance, temperature and equilibrium pressure, standard adsorption enthalpy and entropy for each gas was determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results are discussed in the broader context of gas separation using zeolites; focusing on carbon dioxide capture. - Abstract: The thermodynamics of carbon dioxide and dinitrogen adsorption on the zeolite K-L was investigated by means of variable temperature IR spectroscopy, a technique that affords determination of standard adsorption enthalpy ({Delta}H Degree-Sign ) and entropy ({Delta}S Degree-Sign ) from analysis of IR spectra recorded over a temperature range while simultaneously measuring equilibrium pressure inside a closed IR cell. {Delta}H Degree-Sign resulted to be -42.5 and -20.6 kJ mol{sup -1} for CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, respectively. Corresponding values of {Delta}S Degree-Sign were found to be -182 and -151 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}. The obtained adsorption enthalpy values are discussed in the context of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.

  6. Spectroscopic investigation (FTIR spectrum), NBO, HOMO-LUMO energies, NLO and thermodynamic properties of 8-Methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamideby DFT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leela, J Sherin Percy Prema; Hemamalini, R; Muthu, S; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A

    2015-07-05

    Capsicum a hill grown vegetable is also known as red pepper or chili pepper. Capsaicin(8-Methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the active component in chili peppers, which is currently used in the treatment of osteoarthritis, psoriasis and cancer. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of Capsaicin in the solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and analyzed. The vibrational frequencies of the title compound were obtained theoretically by DFT/B3LYP calculations employing the standard 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and were compared with Fourier transform infrared spectrum. Complete vibrational assignment analysis and correlation of the fundamental modes for the title compound were carried out. The vibrational harmonic frequencies were scaled using scale factor, yielding a good agreement between the experimentally recorded and the theoretically calculated values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization and intra molecular hydrogen bond-like weak interaction has been analyzed using Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. The results show that electron density (ED) in the σ∗ and π∗ antibonding orbitals and second-order delocalization energies E (2) confirm the occurrence of intra molecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α) and the hyperpolarizability (β) values of the molecule has been computed. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermodynamic and spectroscopic investigations of TMPyP4 association with guanine- and cytosine-rich DNA and RNA repeats of C9orf72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alniss, Hasan; Zamiri, Bita; Khalaj, Melisa; Pearson, Christopher E; Macgregor, Robert B

    2018-01-22

    An expansion of the hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC)n·(GGCCCC)n in the C9orf72 promoter has been shown to be the cause of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD). The C9orf72 repeat can form four-stranded structures; the cationic porphyrin (TMPyP4) binds and distorts these structures. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and circular dichroism (CD) were used to study the binding of TMPyP4 to the C-rich and G-rich DNA and RNA oligos containing the hexanucleotide repeat at pH 7.5 and 0.1 M K + . The CD spectra of G-rich DNA and RNA TMPyP4 complexes showed features of antiparallel and parallel G-quadruplexes, respectively. The shoulder at 260 nm in the CD spectrum becomes more intense upon formation of complexes between TMPyP4 and the C-rich DNA. The peak at 290 nm becomes more intense in the c-rich RNA molecules, suggesting induction of an i-motif structure. The ITC data showed that TMPyP4 binds at two independent sites for all DNA and RNA molecules. For DNA, the data are consistent with TMPyP4 stacking on the terminal tetrads and intercalation. For RNA, the thermodynamics of the two binding modes are consistent with groove binding and intercalation. In both cases, intercalation is the weaker binding mode. These findings are considered with respect to the structural differences of the folded DNA and RNA molecules and the energetics of the processes that drive site-specific recognition by TMPyP4; these data will be helpful in efforts to optimize the specificity and affinity of the binding of porphyrin-like molecules. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies on the complexation of trivalent curium with inorganic ligands at increased temperatures; Spektroskopische und thermodynamische Untersuchungen zur Komplexierung von trivalentem Curium mit anorganischen Liganden bei erhoehten Temperaturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skerencak, Andrej

    2010-05-11

    The subject of the present investigation is the complexation of trivalent actinides at elevated temperatures. The objective of this work is to broaden the comprehension of the geochemical processes relevant for the migration of radionuclides in the near-field of a nuclear waste repository. Depending on the disposed nuclear waste, the temperature in the direct vicinity of a nuclear waste repository may reach up to 200 C. The result is a distinct change of the geochemistry of the actinides. Many of these processes have already been studied in detail at room temperature. Yet, data at elevated temperature are rare. However, a comprehensive long term safety analysis of a nuclear waste repository requires the precise thermodynamic description of the relevant geochemical processes at room as well as at elevated temperatures. The present work is focused on the investigation of the complexation of trivalent curium (Cm(III)) with different inorganic ligands at elevated temperatures. Due to its outstanding spectroscopic properties, Cm(III) is chosen as a representative for trivalent actinides. The studied ligand systems are nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}), fluoride (F{sup -}), sulphate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) and chloride (Cl{sup -}). The main analytical method employed is the ''time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy'' (TRLFS). The experiments with nitrate, sulphate and chloride were carried out in a custom-built high temperature cell, enabling spectroscopic studies at temperatures up to 200 C. The Cm(III)-fluoride-system was studied in a cuvette (quartz glass) in the temperature range from 20 to 90 C. Supplementary structural studies were performed using EXAFS (Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure) spectroscopy and supported by quantum chemical calculations at DFT (Density Functional Theory) level. The results of the TRLFS studies show a general shift of the chemical equilibrium towards the complexed species with increasing temperature. For instance

  9. [Microscopic colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukáš, Karel; Mandys, Václav

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic colitis is characterized by chronic or intermittent watery diarrhoea. Microscopic colitis is a common cause of chronic diarrhoea in predominantly older adults. The underlying mechanism in the pathogenesis of microscopic colitis remains unspecified. Microscopic colitis including colitis collagenous, lymphocytic, microscopic colitis with incomplete findings, minimal change colitis, eosinophilic colitis, Brainerd´s diarrhoea, graft-versus-host disease, mastocytic enterocolitis and postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. Careful consideration of the clinical features and colonic mucosal biopsies usually lead to correct diagnosis. Treatments of microscopic colitis were based primarily on case reports and personal experience. Many medications have been proposed that either offer symptomatic relief (loperamide, cholestyramine) or had anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive properties (aminosalicylates, steroids, adalimumab, azathioprine).

  10. Extended thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Ingo

    1993-01-01

    Physicists firmly believe that the differential equations of nature should be hyperbolic so as to exclude action at a distance; yet the equations of irreversible thermodynamics - those of Navier-Stokes and Fourier - are parabolic. This incompatibility between the expectation of physicists and the classical laws of thermodynamics has prompted the formulation of extended thermodynamics. After describing the motifs and early evolution of this new branch of irreversible thermodynamics, the authors apply the theory to mon-atomic gases, mixtures of gases, relativistic gases, and "gases" of phonons and photons. The discussion brings into perspective the various phenomena called second sound, such as heat propagation, propagation of shear stress and concentration, and the second sound in liquid helium. The formal mathematical structure of extended thermodynamics is exposed and the theory is shown to be fully compatible with the kinetic theory of gases. The study closes with the testing of extended thermodynamics thro...

  11. Microwave Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Makes ultra-high-resolution field measurements. The Microwave Microscope (MWM) has been used in support of several NRL experimental programs involving sea...

  12. General thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Olander, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The book’s methodology is unified, concise, and multidisciplinary, allowing students to understand how the principles of thermodynamics apply to all technical fields that touch upon this most fundamental of scientific theories. It also offers a rigorous approach to the quantitative aspects of thermodynamics, accompanied by clear explanations to help students transition smoothly from the physical concepts to their mathematical representations

  13. An apertureless near-field microscope for fluorescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, T. J.; Lessard, Guillaume A.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2000-01-01

    We describe an apertureless near field microscope for imaging fluorescent samples. Optical contrast is generated by exploiting fluorescent quenching near a metallized atomic force microscope tip. This microscope has been used to image fluorescent latex beads with subdiffraction limit resolution. The use of fluorescence allows us to prove that the contrast mechanism is indeed spectroscopic in origin.

  14. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  15. Green thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cengel, Y.A. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Green components of thermodynamics were identified and general aspects of green practices associated with thermodynamics were assessed. Energy uses associated with fossil fuels were reviewed. Green energy sources such as solar, wind, geothermal and hydropower were discussed, as well as biomass plantations. Ethanol production practices were reviewed. Conservation practices in the United States were outlined. Energy efficiency and exergy analyses were discussed. Energy intensity measurements and insulation products for houses were also reviewed. Five case studies were presented to illustrate aspects of green thermodynamics: (1) light in a classroom; (2) fuel saved by low-resistance tires; and (3) savings with high-efficiency motors; (4) renewable energy; and (5) replacing a valve with a turbine at a cryogenic manufacturing facility. It was concluded that the main principles of green thermodynamics are to ensure that all material and energy inputs minimize the depletion of energy resources; prevent waste; and improve or innovate technologies that achieve sustainability. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  16. Martian Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic imager (circular device in center) is in clear view above the surface at Meridiani Planum, Mars, in this approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The image was taken on the 9th sol of the rover's journey. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm. The arrow is pointing to the lens of the instrument. Note the dust cover, which flips out to the left of the lens, is open. This approximated color image was created using the camera's violet and infrared filters as blue and red.

  17. Microscopic colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münch, A; Aust, D; Bohr, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is an inflammatory bowel disease presenting with chronic, non-bloody watery diarrhoea and few or no endoscopic abnormalities. The histological examination reveals mainly two subtypes of MC, lymphocytic or collagenous colitis. Despite the fact that the incidence in MC has...

  18. Microscopic Polyangiitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... share a variety of features but possess sufficient differences as to justify separate classifications. Who gets Microscopic Polyangiitis? A typical patient MPA can affect individuals from all ethnic backgrounds and any age group. In the United States, the typical MPA patient ...

  19. Modern thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2017-01-01

    This textbook introduces thermodynamics with a modern approach, starting from four fundamental physical facts (the atomic nature of matter, the indistinguishability of atoms and molecules of the same species, the uncertainty principle, and the existence of equilibrium states) and analyzing the behavior of complex systems with the tools of information theory, in particular with Shannon's measure of information (or SMI), which can be defined on any probability distribution. SMI is defined and its properties and time evolution are illustrated, and it is shown that the entropy is a particular type of SMI, i.e. the SMI related to the phase-space distribution for a macroscopic system at equilibrium. The connection to SMI allows the reader to understand what entropy is and why isolated systems follow the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The Second Llaw is also formulated for other systems, not thermally isolated and even open with respect to the transfer of particles. All the fundamental aspects of thermodynamics are d...

  20. Microscopic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Cammarota, Giovanni; Valerio, Luca; Annicchiarico, Brigida Eleonora; Milani, Alessandro; Siciliano, Massimo; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2012-11-21

    Microscopic colitis may be defined as a clinical syndrome, of unknown etiology, consisting of chronic watery diarrhea, with no alterations in the large bowel at the endoscopic and radiologic evaluation. Therefore, a definitive diagnosis is only possible by histological analysis. The epidemiological impact of this disease has become increasingly clear in the last years, with most data coming from Western countries. Microscopic colitis includes two histological subtypes [collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC)] with no differences in clinical presentation and management. Collagenous colitis is characterized by a thickening of the subepithelial collagen layer that is absent in LC. The main feature of LC is an increase of the density of intra-epithelial lymphocytes in the surface epithelium. A number of pathogenetic theories have been proposed over the years, involving the role of luminal agents, autoimmunity, eosinophils, genetics (human leukocyte antigen), biliary acids, infections, alterations of pericryptal fibroblasts, and drug intake; drugs like ticlopidine, carbamazepine or ranitidine are especially associated with the development of LC, while CC is more frequently linked to cimetidine, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and lansoprazole. Microscopic colitis typically presents as chronic or intermittent watery diarrhea, that may be accompanied by symptoms such as abdominal pain, weight loss and incontinence. Recent evidence has added new pharmacological options for the treatment of microscopic colitis: the role of steroidal therapy, especially oral budesonide, has gained relevance, as well as immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine. The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents, infliximab and adalimumab, constitutes a new, interesting tool for the treatment of microscopic colitis, but larger, adequately designed studies are needed to confirm existing data.

  1. Using the Antenna Effect as a Spectroscopic Tool; Photophysics and Solution Thermodynamics of the Model Luminescent Hydroxypyridonate Complex [EuIII(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))]-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abergel, Rebecca J.; D' Aleo, Anthony; Ng Pak Leung, Clara; Shuh, David; Raymond, Kenneth

    2009-11-20

    While widely used in bioassays, the spectrofluorimetric method described here uses the antenna effect as a tool to probe the thermodynamic parameters of ligands that sensitize lanthanide luminescence. The Eu3+ coordination chemistry, solution thermodynamic stability and photophysical properties of the spermine-based hydroxypyridonate octadentate chelator 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) are reported. The complex [EuIII(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))]- luminesces with a long lifetime (805 mu s) and a quantum yield of 7.0percent in aqueous solution, at pH 7.4. These remarkable optical properties were exploited to determine the high (and proton-independent) stability of the complex (log beta 110 = 20.2(2)) and to define the influence of the ligand scaffold on the stability and photophysical properties.

  2. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Spectroscopic investigation of thermodynamic parameters of a plasma plume formed by the action of cw CO2 laser radiation on a metal substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'chenko, Zh V.; Azharonok, V. V.; Filatova, I. I.; Shimanovich, V. D.; Golubev, V. S.; Zabelin, A. M.

    1996-09-01

    Emission spectroscopy methods were used in an investigation of thermodynamic parameters of a surface plasma formed by the action of cw CO2 laser radiation of (2-5)×106 W cm-2 intensity on stainless steel in a protective He or Ar atmosphere. The spatiotemporal structure and pulsation characteristics of the plasma plume were used to determine the fields of the plasma electron density and temperature.

  3. Solvation thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    1987-01-01

    This book deals with a subject that has been studied since the beginning of physical chemistry. Despite the thousands of articles and scores of books devoted to solvation thermodynamics, I feel that some fundamen­ tal and well-established concepts underlying the traditional approach to this subject are not satisfactory and need revision. The main reason for this need is that solvation thermodynamics has traditionally been treated in the context of classical (macroscopic) ther­ modynamics alone. However, solvation is inherently a molecular pro­ cess, dependent upon local rather than macroscopic properties of the system. Therefore, the starting point should be based on statistical mechanical methods. For many years it has been believed that certain thermodynamic quantities, such as the standard free energy (or enthalpy or entropy) of solution, may be used as measures of the corresponding functions of solvation of a given solute in a given solvent. I first challenged this notion in a paper published in 1978 b...

  4. Spectroscopic data

    CERN Document Server

    Melzer, J

    1976-01-01

    During the preparation of this compilation, many people contributed; the compilers wish to thank all of them. In particular they appreciate the efforts of V. Gilbertson, the manuscript typist, and those of K. C. Bregand, J. A. Kiley, and W. H. McPherson, who gave editorial assistance. They would like to thank Dr. J. R. Schwartz for his cooperation and encouragement. In addition, they extend their grati­ tude to Dr. L. Wilson of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, who gave the initial impetus to this project. v Contents I. I ntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. Organization ofthe Spectroscopic Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Methods of Production and Experimental Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Band Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2...

  5. Thermodynamics and energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Struchtrup, Henning

    2014-01-01

    This textbook gives a thorough treatment of engineering thermodynamics with applications to classical and modern energy conversion devices.   Some emphasis lies on the description of irreversible processes, such as friction, heat transfer and mixing, and the evaluation of the related work losses. Better use of resources requires high efficiencies, therefore the reduction of irreversible losses should be seen as one of the main goals of a thermal engineer. This book provides the necessary tools.   Topics include: car and aircraft engines,  including Otto, Diesel and Atkinson cycles, by-pass turbofan engines, ramjet and scramjet;  steam and gas power plants, including advanced regenerative systems, solar tower, and compressed air energy storage; mixing and separation, including reverse osmosis, osmotic powerplants, and carbon sequestration; phase equilibrium and chemical equilibrium, distillation, chemical reactors, combustion processes, and fuel cells; the microscopic definition of entropy.    The book i...

  6. Phantom thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F. [Colina de los Chopos, Centro de Fisica ' Miguel A. Catalan' , Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: p.gonzalezdiaz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es; Sigueenza, Carmen L. [Colina de los Chopos, Centro de Fisica ' Miguel A. Catalan' , Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-10-04

    This paper deals with the thermodynamic properties of a phantom field in a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. General expressions for the temperature and entropy of a general dark-energy field with equation of state p={omega}{rho} are derived from which we have deduced that, whereas the temperature of a cosmic phantom fluid ({omega}-1) is definite negative, its entropy is always positive. We interpret that result in terms of the intrinsic quantum nature of the phantom field and apply it to (i) attain a consistent explanation for some recent results concerning the evolution of black holes which,induced by accreting phantom energy, gradually loss their mass to finally vanish exactly at the big rip, and (ii) introduce the concept of cosmological information and its relation with life and the anthropic principle. Some quantum statistical-thermodynamic properties of the quantum field are also considered that include a generalized Wien law and the prediction of some novel phenomena such as the stimulated absorption of phantom energy and the anti-laser effect.

  7. Equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Mário J

    2013-01-01

    This textbook provides an exposition of equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to several areas of physics with particular attention to phase transitions and critical phenomena. The applications include several areas of condensed matter physics and include also a chapter on thermochemistry. Phase transitions and critical phenomena are treated according to the modern development of the field, based on the ideas of universality and on the Widom scaling theory. For each topic, a mean-field or Landau theory is presented to describe qualitatively the phase transitions.  These theories include the van der Waals theory of the liquid-vapor transition, the Hildebrand-Heitler theory of regular mixtures, the Griffiths-Landau theory for multicritical points in multicomponent systems, the Bragg-Williams theory of order-disorder in alloys, the Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, the Néel theory of antiferromagnetism, the Devonshire theory for ferroelectrics and Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals. This textbo...

  8. Equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Mário J

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides an exposition of equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to several areas of physics with particular attention to phase transitions and critical phenomena. The applications include several areas of condensed matter physics and include also a chapter on thermochemistry. Phase transitions and critical phenomena are treated according to the modern development of the field, based on the ideas of universality and on the Widom scaling theory. For each topic, a mean-field or Landau theory is presented to describe qualitatively the phase transitions. These theories include the van der Waals theory of the liquid-vapor transition, the Hildebrand-Heitler theory of regular mixtures, the Griffiths-Landau theory for multicritical points in multicomponent systems, the Bragg-Williams theory of order-disorder in alloys, the Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, the Néel theory of antiferromagnetism, the Devonshire theory for ferroelectrics and Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals. This new edit...

  9. Metal complexes of triazine - Schiff bases: Spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies of complexation of some divalent metal ions with 3-(a-acetylethylidenehydrazino-5,6-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. TAHA

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal complexes of some divalent metal ions (Co, Ni, Cu and Zn with 3-(a-acetylethylidenehydrazino-5,6-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazine (AHDT as a Schiff-base have been investigated potentiometrically and spectrophotometrically and found to have the stoichiometric formulae 1:1 and 1:2 (M:L. The formation constants of the proton-ligand and metal-ligand complexes have been determined potentiometrically at different temperatures (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50°C at an ionic strength of 0.1 M KNO3 in 75% (v/v dioxane-water solution. The standard thermodynamic parameters, viz. DG°, DH°, and DS°, for the proton-ligand and the stepwise metal-ligand complexes have been evaluated.

  10. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Molecular Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golubeva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    to their microscopic size, molecular motors are governed by principles fundamentally different from those describing the operation of man-made motors such as car engines. In this dissertation the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of molecular machines are studied using the tools of nonequilibrium statistical...

  11. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroney, O. J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  12. Atomic force microscopical and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopical investigation of sub-micrometer metal gratings generated by UV laser-based two-beam interference in Au-Ag bimetallic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csete, M. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary)]. E-mail: mcsete@physx.u-szeged.hu; Kohazi-Kis, A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Kecskemet College, H-6000 Kecskemet, Izsaki str. 10 (Hungary); Vass, Cs. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Sipos, A. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Szekeres, G. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Deli, M. [Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Institute of Biophysics, Biological Research Centre of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Temesvari Krt. 62, H-6726 Szeged (Hungary); Osvay, K. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Bor, Zs. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary)

    2007-07-31

    Metal films containing silver and gold layers having different thicknesses were evaporated on glass substrates. Two-beam interference technique was applied to irradiate the surfaces by the fourth harmonic of a pulsed mode Nd:YAG laser. The atomic force microscopical study showed that surface relief grating having a period of 900 nm corresponding to the interference pattern was developed on the metallic films. The modulation amplitude of the laser-induced gratings was increasable by enhancing the number of laser pulses at constant fluence, and a groove depth commensurable with the film thicknesses was generated at the average fluence of 39.5 mJ/cm{sup 2} on bimetallic layers. The surface structure was more regular, and the modulation amplitude was larger in case of bimetallic films containing thicker gold layers. The threshold fluences of the phase transitions were determined by numerical temperature model calculations for different metal layer compositions, and a good agreement was found between the calculated and experimentally observed threshold values. The division of the metal stripes into droplets and the development of holes were explained by the melting of the entire metal layers and by the vaporization of silver at higher fluences. The angle-dependent surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy realized in Kretschmann arrangement proved that the laser-induced grating formation was accompanied by the change in the optical thickness and by the modification of the structure of the bimetallic films. Broad side wings appeared on the resonance curves caused by grating-coupling in case of appropriate rotation angle and sufficiently large modulation depth of the grating's grooves, according to our calculations. The coupling on deep gratings developed on bimetallic films containing the thinnest gold layer and on monometallic silver films resulted in separated secondary resonance minimum development. The periodic adherence of native streptavidin on the metallic

  13. Thermodynamics of Radiation Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Eduardo; de la Selva, Sara Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium thermodynamics of the electromagnetic radiation in a cavity of a given volume and temperature. We found three levels of description, the thermodynamics of one mode, the thermodynamics of the distribution of frequencies in a band by summing over the frequencies in it and the global thermodynamics by summing over all the…

  14. Mathematical foundations of thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Giles, R; Stark, M; Ulam, S

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical Foundations of Thermodynamics details the core concepts of the mathematical principles employed in thermodynamics. The book discusses the topics in a way that physical meanings are assigned to the theoretical terms. The coverage of the text includes the mechanical systems and adiabatic processes; topological considerations; and equilibrium states and potentials. The book also covers Galilean thermodynamics; symmetry in thermodynamics; and special relativistic thermodynamics. The book will be of great interest to practitioners and researchers of disciplines that deal with thermodyn

  15. Thermodynamic tables to accompany Modern engineering thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Balmer, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    This booklet is provided at no extra charge with new copies of Balmer's Modern Engineering Thermodynamics. It contains two appendices. Appendix C contains 40 thermodynamic tables, and Appendix D consists of 6 thermodynamic charts. These charts and tables are provided in a separate booklet to give instructors the flexibility of allowing students to bring the tables into exams. The booklet may be purchased separately if needed.

  16. Classical and statistical thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rizk, Hanna A

    2016-01-01

    This is a text book of thermodynamics for the student who seeks thorough training in science or engineering. Systematic and thorough treatment of the fundamental principles rather than presenting the large mass of facts has been stressed. The book includes some of the historical and humanistic background of thermodynamics, but without affecting the continuity of the analytical treatment. For a clearer and more profound understanding of thermodynamics this book is highly recommended. In this respect, the author believes that a sound grounding in classical thermodynamics is an essential prerequisite for the understanding of statistical thermodynamics. Such a book comprising the two wide branches of thermodynamics is in fact unprecedented. Being a written work dealing systematically with the two main branches of thermodynamics, namely classical thermodynamics and statistical thermodynamics, together with some important indexes under only one cover, this treatise is so eminently useful.

  17. Black Hole Thermodynamics and Lorentz Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Ted; Wall, Aron C.

    2010-08-01

    Recent developments point to a breakdown in the generalized second law of thermodynamics for theories with Lorentz symmetry violation. It appears possible to construct a perpetual motion machine of the second kind in such theories, using a black hole to catalyze the conversion of heat to work. Here we describe and extend the arguments leading to that conclusion. We suggest the inference that local Lorentz symmetry may be an emergent property of the macroscopic world with origins in a microscopic second law of causal horizon thermodynamics.

  18. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics an integrated approach

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    This textbook brings together the fundamentals of the macroscopic and microscopic aspects of thermal physics by presenting thermodynamics and statistical mechanics as complementary theories based on small numbers of postulates. The book is designed to give the instructor flexibility in structuring courses for advanced undergraduates and/or beginning graduate students and is written on the principle that a good text should also be a good reference. The presentation of thermodynamics follows the logic of Clausius and Kelvin while relating the concepts involved to familiar phenomena and the mod

  19. Thermodynamics of molecular recognitions between antineoplastic drug taxol and phosphatidylcholine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Süleymanoglu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to study the basic features of Taxol recognition with phospholipids by applying the thermodynamic and spectroscopic measurements. The obtained information could be used further for deductions on its precise cellular and pharmacological mechanisms of action, on improvements of its solubility properties by phospholipids, as well as for designing the novel lipidic carriers for drug delivery.

  20. Treatise on thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Planck, Max Karl Ernst Ludwig

    Great classic, still one of the best introductions to thermodynamics. Fundamentals, first and second principles of thermodynamics, applications to special states of equilibrium, more. Numerous worked examples. 1917 edition.

  1. Transmission positron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyama, Masao [Teikyo University of Science and Technology, Uenohara, Yamanashi 409-0193 (Japan)]. E-mail: doyama@ntu.ac.jp; Kogure, Yoshiaki [Teikyo University of Science and Technology, Uenohara, Yamanashi 409-0193 (Japan); Inoue, Miyoshi [Teikyo University of Science and Technology, Uenohara, Yamanashi 409-0193 (Japan); Kurihara, Toshikazu [Institute of Materials Structure Science (IMSS), High Energy Accelerator, Research Organization (KEK), Ohno 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yoshiie, Toshimasa [Reactor Research Institute, Kyoto University, Noda, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0451 (Japan); Oshima, Ryuichiro [Research Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Osaka Prefecture University (Japan); Matsuya, Miyuki [Electron Optics Laboratory (JEOL) Ltd., Musashino 3-1-2, Akishima 196-0021 (Japan)

    2006-02-28

    Immediate and near-future plans for transmission positron microscopes being built at KEK, Tsukuba, Japan, are described. The characteristic feature of this project is remolding a commercial electron microscope to a positron microscope. A point source of electrons kept at a negative high voltage is changed to a point source of positrons kept at a high positive voltage. Positional resolution of transmission microscopes should be theoretically the same as electron microscopes. Positron microscopes utilizing trapping of positrons have always positional ambiguity due to the diffusion of positrons.

  2. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  3. Gravity and Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics of Classical Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, B L

    2010-01-01

    Renewed interest in deriving gravity (more precisely, the Einstein equations) from thermodynamics considerations [1, 2] is stirred up by a recent proposal that 'gravity is an entropic force' [3] (see also [4]). Even though I find the arguments justifying such a claim in this latest proposal rather ad hoc and simplistic compared to the original one I would unreservedly support the call to explore deeper the relation between gravity and thermodynamics, this having the same spirit as my long-held view that general relativity is the hydrodynamic limit [5, 6] of some underlying theories for the microscopic structure of spacetime - all these proposals, together with that of [7, 8], attest to the emergent nature of gravity [9]. In this first paper of two we set the modest goal of studying the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of classical matter only, bringing afore some interesting prior results, without invoking any quantum considerations such as Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, holography or Unruh effect. This is for the ...

  4. Twenty lectures on thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Buchdahl, H A

    2013-01-01

    Twenty Lectures on Thermodynamics is a course of lectures, parts of which the author has given various times over the last few years. The book gives the readers a bird's eye view of phenomenological and statistical thermodynamics. The book covers many areas in thermodynamics such as states and transition; adiabatic isolation; irreversibility; the first, second, third and Zeroth laws of thermodynamics; entropy and entropy law; the idea of the application of thermodynamics; pseudo-states; the quantum-static al canonical and grand canonical ensembles; and semi-classical gaseous systems. The text

  5. Introduction to applied thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Helsdon, R M; Walker, G E

    1965-01-01

    Introduction to Applied Thermodynamics is an introductory text on applied thermodynamics and covers topics ranging from energy and temperature to reversibility and entropy, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, and the properties of ideal gases. Standard air cycles and the thermodynamic properties of pure substances are also discussed, together with gas compressors, combustion, and psychrometry. This volume is comprised of 16 chapters and begins with an overview of the concept of energy as well as the macroscopic and molecular approaches to thermodynamics. The following chapters focus o

  6. Hamiltonian mechanics limits microscopic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, James; Gilz, Lukas; Thesing, Eike

    2015-05-01

    We propose a definition of fully microscopic engines (micro-engines) in terms of pure mechanics, without reference to thermodynamics, equilibrium, or cycles imposed by external control, and without invoking ergodic theory. This definition is pragmatically based on the observation that what makes engines useful is energy transport across a large ratio of dynamical time scales. We then prove that classical and quantum mechanics set non-trivial limits-of different kinds-on how much of the energy that a micro-engine extracts from its fuel can be converted into work. Our results are not merely formal; they imply manageable design constraints on micro-engines. They also suggest the novel possibility that thermodynamics does not emerge from mechanics in macroscopic regimes, but rather represents the macroscopic limit of a generalized theory, valid on all scales, which governs the important phenomenon of energy transport across large time scale ratios. We propose experimental realizations of the dynamical mechanisms we identify, with trapped ions and in Bose-Einstein condensates (``motorized bright solitons'').

  7. Rational extended thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Ingo

    1998-01-01

    Ordinary thermodynamics provides reliable results when the thermodynamic fields are smooth, in the sense that there are no steep gradients and no rapid changes. In fluids and gases this is the domain of the equations of Navier-Stokes and Fourier. Extended thermodynamics becomes relevant for rapidly varying and strongly inhomogeneous processes. Thus the propagation of high­ frequency waves, and the shape of shock waves, and the regression of small-scale fluctuation are governed by extended thermodynamics. The field equations of ordinary thermodynamics are parabolic while extended thermodynamics is governed by hyperbolic systems. The main ingredients of extended thermodynamics are • field equations of balance type, • constitutive quantities depending on the present local state and • entropy as a concave function of the state variables. This set of assumptions leads to first order quasi-linear symmetric hyperbolic systems of field equations; it guarantees the well-posedness of initial value problems and f...

  8. Thermodynamical interpretation of the geometrical variables associated with null surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Sumanta; Padmanabhan, T.

    2015-01-01

    The emergent gravity paradigm interprets gravitational field equations as describing the thermodynamic limit of the underlying statistical mechanics of microscopic degrees of freedom of the spacetime. The connection is established by attributing a heat density Ts to the null surfaces where T is the appropriate Davies-Unruh temperature and s is the entropy density. The field equations can be obtained from a thermodynamic variational principle which extremizes the total heat density of all null...

  9. An introduction to equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Morrill, Bernard; Hartnett, James P; Hughes, William F

    1973-01-01

    An Introduction to Equilibrium Thermodynamics discusses classical thermodynamics and irreversible thermodynamics. It introduces the laws of thermodynamics and the connection between statistical concepts and observable macroscopic properties of a thermodynamic system. Chapter 1 discusses the first law of thermodynamics while Chapters 2 through 4 deal with statistical concepts. The succeeding chapters describe the link between entropy and the reversible heat process concept of entropy; the second law of thermodynamics; Legendre transformations and Jacobian algebra. Finally, Chapter 10 provides a

  10. The second laws of quantum thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Fernando; Horodecki, Michał; Ng, Nelly; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Wehner, Stephanie

    2015-03-17

    The second law of thermodynamics places constraints on state transformations. It applies to systems composed of many particles, however, we are seeing that one can formulate laws of thermodynamics when only a small number of particles are interacting with a heat bath. Is there a second law of thermodynamics in this regime? Here, we find that for processes which are approximately cyclic, the second law for microscopic systems takes on a different form compared to the macroscopic scale, imposing not just one constraint on state transformations, but an entire family of constraints. We find a family of free energies which generalize the traditional one, and show that they can never increase. The ordinary second law relates to one of these, with the remainder imposing additional constraints on thermodynamic transitions. We find three regimes which determine which family of second laws govern state transitions, depending on how cyclic the process is. In one regime one can cause an apparent violation of the usual second law, through a process of embezzling work from a large system which remains arbitrarily close to its original state. These second laws are relevant for small systems, and also apply to individual macroscopic systems interacting via long-range interactions. By making precise the definition of thermal operations, the laws of thermodynamics are unified in this framework, with the first law defining the class of operations, the zeroth law emerging as an equivalence relation between thermal states, and the remaining laws being monotonicity of our generalized free energies.

  11. Thermodynamics of Bioreactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-06-07

    Thermodynamic principles have been applied to enzyme-catalyzed reactions since the beginning of the 1930s in an attempt to understand metabolic pathways. Currently, thermodynamics is also applied to the design and analysis of biotechnological processes. The key thermodynamic quantity is the Gibbs energy of reaction, which must be negative for a reaction to occur spontaneously. However, the application of thermodynamic feasibility studies sometimes yields positive Gibbs energies of reaction even for reactions that are known to occur spontaneously, such as glycolysis. This article reviews the application of thermodynamics in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It summarizes the basic thermodynamic relationships used for describing the Gibbs energy of reaction and also refers to the nonuniform application of these relationships in the literature. The review summarizes state-of-the-art approaches that describe the influence of temperature, pH, electrolytes, solvents, and concentrations of reacting agents on the Gibbs energy of reaction and, therefore, on the feasibility and yield of biological reactions.

  12. On thermodynamics and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Ian

    2017-09-01

    A new entropic gravity inspired derivation of general relativity from thermodynamics is presented. This generalizes the "Thermodynamics of Spacetime" approach by T. Jacobson, which relies on the null Raychaudhuri evolution equation. Here the rest of the first law of thermodynamics is incorporated by using the null Damour-Navier-Stokes equation, known from the membrane paradigm for describing the tangential flow of deformations along a horizon.

  13. Stochastic Thermodynamics of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldt, Sebastian; Seifert, Udo

    2017-01-01

    Virtually every organism gathers information about its noisy environment and builds models from those data, mostly using neural networks. Here, we use stochastic thermodynamics to analyze the learning of a classification rule by a neural network. We show that the information acquired by the network is bounded by the thermodynamic cost of learning and introduce a learning efficiency η ≤1 . We discuss the conditions for optimal learning and analyze Hebbian learning in the thermodynamic limit.

  14. Methods of thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Reiss, Howard

    1997-01-01

    Since there is no shortage of excellent general books on elementary thermodynamics, this book takes a different approach, focusing attention on the problem areas of understanding of concept and especially on the overwhelming but usually hidden role of ""constraints"" in thermodynamics, as well as on the lucid exposition of the significance, construction, and use (in the case of arbitrary systems) of the thermodynamic potential. It will be especially useful as an auxiliary text to be used along with any standard treatment.Unlike some texts, Methods of Thermodynamics does not use statistical m

  15. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  16. Spectroscopic analysis and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate; , James D.; Reed, Christopher J.; Domke, Christopher H.; Le, Linh; Seasholtz, Mary Beth; Weber, Andy; Lipp, Charles

    2017-04-18

    Apparatus for spectroscopic analysis which includes a tunable diode laser spectrometer having a digital output signal and a digital computer for receiving the digital output signal from the spectrometer, the digital computer programmed to process the digital output signal using a multivariate regression algorithm. In addition, a spectroscopic method of analysis using such apparatus. Finally, a method for controlling an ethylene cracker hydrogenator.

  17. Thermodynamic and Quantum Thermodynamic Analyses of Brownian Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Gyftopoulos, Elias P.

    2006-01-01

    Thermodynamic and quantum thermodynamic analyses of Brownian movement of a solvent and a colloid passing through neutral thermodynamic equilibrium states only. It is shown that Brownian motors and E. coli do not represent Brownian movement.

  18. Thermodynamics and heat power

    CERN Document Server

    Granet, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental ConceptsIntroductionThermodynamic SystemsTemperatureForce and MassElementary Kinetic Theory of GasesPressureReviewKey TermsEquations Developed in This ChapterQuestionsProblemsWork, Energy, and HeatIntroductionWorkEnergyInternal EnergyPotential EnergyKinetic EnergyHeatFlow WorkNonflow WorkReviewKey TermsEquations Developed in This ChapterQuestionsProblemsFirst Law of ThermodynamicsIntroductionFirst Law of ThermodynamicsNonflow SystemSteady-Flow SystemApplications of First Law of ThermodynamicsReviewKey TermsEquations Developed in This ChapterQuestionsProblemsThe Second Law of ThermodynamicsIntroductionReversibility-Second Law of ThermodynamicsThe Carnot CycleEntropyReviewKey TermsEquations Developed in This ChapterQuestionsProblemsProperties of Liquids and GasesIntroductionLiquids and VaporsThermodynamic Properties of SteamComputerized PropertiesThermodynamic DiagramsProcessesReviewKey TermsEquations Developed in This ChapterQuestionsProblemsThe Ideal GasIntroductionBasic ConsiderationsSpecific Hea...

  19. Equilibrium thermodynamics - Callen's postulational approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongschaap, R.J.J.; Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2001-01-01

    In order to provide the background for nonequilibrium thermodynamics, we outline the fundamentals of equilibrium thermodynamics. Equilibrium thermodynamics must not only be obtained as a special case of any acceptable nonequilibrium generalization but, through its shining example, it also elucidates

  20. Thermodynamics an engineering approach

    CERN Document Server

    Cengel, Yunus A

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamics, An Engineering Approach, eighth edition, covers the basic principles of thermodynamics while presenting a wealth of real-world engineering examples so students get a feel for how thermodynamics is applied in engineering practice. This text helps students develop an intuitive understanding by emphasizing the physics and physical arguments. Cengel and Boles explore the various facets of thermodynamics through careful explanations of concepts and use of numerous practical examples and figures, having students develop necessary skills to bridge the gap between knowledge and the confidence to properly apply their knowledge. McGraw-Hill is proud to offer Connect with the eighth edition of Cengel/Boles, Thermodynamics, An Engineering Approach. This innovative and powerful new system helps your students learn more efficiently and gives you the ability to assign homework problems simply and easily. Problems are graded automatically, and the results are recorded immediately. Track individual stude...

  1. Thermodynamics of complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Snoep, Jacky L.

    1998-01-01

    Thermodynamics has always been a remarkable science in that it studies macroscopic properties that are only partially determined by the properties of individual molecules. Entropy and free energy only exist in constellations of more than a single molecule (degree of freedom). They are the so...... understanding of this BioComplexity, modem thermodynamic concepts and methods (nonequilibrium thermodynamics, metabolic and hierarchical control analysis) will be needed. We shall propose to redefine nonequilibrium thermodynamics as: The science that aims at understanding the behaviour of nonequilibrium systems...... by taking into account both the molecular properties and the emergent properties that are due to (dys)organisation. This redefinition will free nonequilibrium thermodynamics from the limitations imposed by earlier near-equilibrium assumptions, resolve the duality with kinetics, and bridge the apparent gap...

  2. Mailing microscope slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many insects feed agriculturally important crops, trees, and ornamental plants and cause millions of dollars of damage annually. Identification for some of these require the preparation of a microscope slide for examination. There are times when a microscope slide may need to be sent away to a speci...

  3. Molecular Thermodynamics for Cell Biology as Taught with Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Luis S.; Lopez, Maria Jose; Becker, Wayne M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamic principles are basic to an understanding of the complex fluxes of energy and information required to keep cells alive. These microscopic machines are nonequilibrium systems at the micron scale that are maintained in pseudo-steady-state conditions by very sophisticated processes. Therefore, several nonstandard concepts need to be…

  4. Modern engineering thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Balmer, Robert T

    2010-01-01

    Designed for use in a standard two-semester engineering thermodynamics course sequence. The first half of the text contains material suitable for a basic Thermodynamics course taken by engineers from all majors. The second half of the text is suitable for an Applied Thermodynamics course in mechanical engineering programs. The text has numerous features that are unique among engineering textbooks, including historical vignettes, critical thinking boxes, and case studies. All are designed to bring real engineering applications into a subject that can be somewhat abstract and mathematica

  5. Thermodynamics I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Thermodynamics I includes review of properties and states of a pure substance, work and heat, energy and the first law of thermodynamics, entropy and the second law of thermodynamics

  6. Selected problems in thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianova, T.N.; Dzampov, B.V.; Remizov, S.A.; Zubarev, V.N.

    1981-01-01

    This collection of problems is designed for a course in engineering thermodynamics for engineering and thermophysical disciplines in energy institutes. The problems contain the following fundamentals: first and second laws of thermodynamics, physical state and change of state processes in ideal and real gases, water, steam and moist air; efflux and choking of gases and steam, internal combustion cycles, gas and steam turbines, refrigerators, compressors, as well as problems in chemical thermodynamics. Answers to all problems are given, examples include solutions. The SI system of units is used.

  7. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Groot, Sybren Ruurds

    1984-01-01

    The study of thermodynamics is especially timely today, as its concepts are being applied to problems in biology, biochemistry, electrochemistry, and engineering. This book treats irreversible processes and phenomena - non-equilibrium thermodynamics.S. R. de Groot and P. Mazur, Professors of Theoretical Physics, present a comprehensive and insightful survey of the foundations of the field, providing the only complete discussion of the fluctuating linear theory of irreversible thermodynamics. The application covers a wide range of topics: the theory of diffusion and heat conduction, fluid dyn

  8. [Microscopic colitis: update 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgmann, Konstantin; Fraga, Montserrat; Schoepfer, Alain M; Yun, Pu

    2014-09-03

    Microscopic colitis, which includes lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis, represents a frequent cause of chronic watery diarrhea especially in the elderly population. Several medications, such as nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors or antidepressants, as well as cigarette smoking have been recognized as risk factors for microscopic colitis. The diagnosis of microscopic colitis is based on a macroscopically normal ileo-colonoscopy and several biopsies from the entire colon, which demonstrate the pathognomonic histopathologic findings. Therapy is mainly based on the use of budesonide. Other medications, such as mesalazine, cholestyramine and bismuth, have been evaluated as well but the evidence is less solid.

  9. Spectroscopic Dosimeter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analysis of Phase I test data demonstrates that the Photogenics Spectroscopic Dosimeter will detect neutron energies from 0.8 up to 600 MeV. The detector...

  10. Confocal light scattering and absorption spectroscopic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Salahuddin, Saira; Zaman, Munir M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Freedman, Steven D.; Hanlon, Eugene B.; Itzkan, Irving; Perelman, Lev T.

    2008-04-01

    We have developed a novel optical method for observing submicron intracellular structures in living cells which is called confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy. It combines confocal microscopy, a well-established high-resolution microscopic technique, with light scattering spectroscopy (LSS). CLASS microscopy requires no exogenous labels and is capable of imaging and continuously monitoring individual viable cells, enabling the observation of cell and organelle functioning at scales on the order of 100 nm. In addition, it provides not only size information but also information about the biochemical and physical properties of the cell.

  11. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  12. Workshop on Teaching Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    1985-01-01

    It seemed appropriate to arrange a meeting of teachers of thermodynamics in the United Kingdom, a meeting held in the pleasant surroundings of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, in Sept~mber, 1984. This volume records the ideas put forward by authors, the discussion generated and an account of the action that discussion has initiated. Emphasis was placed on the Teaching of Thermodynamics to degree-level students in their first and second years. The meeting, a workshop for practitioners in which all were expected to take part, was remarkably well supported. This was notable in the representation of essentially every UK university and polytechnic engaged in teaching engineering thermodynamics and has led to a stimulating spread of ideas. By intention, the emphasis for attendance was put on teachers of engineering concerned with thermodynamics, both mechanical and chemical engineering disciplines. Attendance from others was encouraged but limited as follows: non-engineering acad­ emics, 10%, industrialists, 10%. The ...

  13. Elements of chemical thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Nash, Leonard K

    2005-01-01

    This survey of purely thermal data in calculating the position of equilibrium in a chemical reaction highlights the physical content of thermodynamics, as distinct from purely mathematical aspects. 1970 edition.

  14. Theoretical physics 5 thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Nolting, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    This concise textbook offers a clear and comprehensive introduction to thermodynamics, one of the core components of undergraduate physics courses. It follows on naturally from the previous volumes in this series, defining macroscopic variables, such as internal energy, entropy and pressure,together with thermodynamic principles. The first part of the book introduces the laws of thermodynamics and thermodynamic potentials. More complex themes are covered in the second part of the book, which describes phases and phase transitions in depth. Ideally suited to undergraduate students with some grounding in classical mechanics, the book is enhanced throughout with learning features such as boxed inserts and chapter summaries, with key mathematical derivations highlighted to aid understanding. The text is supported by numerous worked examples and end of chapter problem sets. About the Theoretical Physics series Translated from the renowned and highly successful German editions, the eight volumes of this series cove...

  15. Elementary chemical thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mahan, Bruce H

    1963-01-01

    This text introduces thermodynamic principles in a straightforward manner. Suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students, it emphasizes chemical applications and physical interpretations and simplifies mathematical development. 1964 edition.

  16. Electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynier, Yvan [Meylan, FR; Yazami, Rachid [Los Angeles, CA; Fultz, Brent T [Pasadena, CA

    2009-09-29

    The present invention provides systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems. Systems and methods of the present invention are configured for simultaneously collecting a suite of measurements characterizing a plurality of interconnected electrochemical and thermodynamic parameters relating to the electrode reaction state of advancement, voltage and temperature. Enhanced sensitivity provided by the present methods and systems combined with measurement conditions that reflect thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions allow very accurate measurement of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and electrochemical systems, such as the energy, power density, current rate and the cycle life of an electrochemical cell.

  17. Chemical engineering thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, S.A. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    This book contains most of the papers presented at the thermodynamics sessions of the Second World Congress of Chemical Engineering held October 4-9, 1981 in Montreal, Canada. The chapters of the book have been categorized into the following areas: (1) Phase Equilibria, (2) Equations of State, (3) Electrolytes, and (4) Other Thermodynamic Topics. Topics presented in the chapters include: thermophysical data banks; group contribution methods applied to phase equilibrai; equations of state for vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibria with applications to design; vapor-liquid equilibria in systems including bitumen, heavy oil and coal-derived liquids; thermodynamics of polar substances; coal char thermochemical data; chemical equilibria; petroleum fraction thermodynamics and sour water vapor-liquid equilibria. (DP)

  18. Polyelectrolytes thermodynamics and rheology

    CERN Document Server

    P M, Visakh; Picó, Guillermo Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses current development of theoretical models and experimental findings on the thermodynamics of polyelectrolytes. Particular emphasis is placed on the rheological description of polyelectrolyte solutions and hydrogels.

  19. General and Statistical Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir-Kheli, Raza

    2012-01-01

    This textbook explains completely the general and statistical thermodynamics. It begins with an introductory statistical mechanics course, deriving all the important formulae meticulously and explicitly, without mathematical short cuts. The main part of the book deals with the careful discussion of the concepts and laws of thermodynamics, van der Waals, Kelvin and Claudius theories, ideal and real gases, thermodynamic potentials, phonons and all the related aspects. To elucidate the concepts introduced and to provide practical problem solving support, numerous carefully worked examples are of great value for students. The text is clearly written and punctuated with many interesting anecdotes. This book is written as main textbook for upper undergraduate students attending a course on thermodynamics.

  20. Elements of statistical thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Nash, Leonard K

    2006-01-01

    Encompassing essentially all aspects of statistical mechanics that appear in undergraduate texts, this concise, elementary treatment shows how an atomic-molecular perspective yields new insights into macroscopic thermodynamics. 1974 edition.

  1. Ligand Binding Thermodynamics in Drug Discovery: Still a Hot Tip?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Ulander, Johan; Johansson, Patrik

    2015-08-27

    The use of ligand binding thermodynamics has been proposed as a potential success factor to accelerate drug discovery. However, despite the intuitive appeal of optimizing binding enthalpy, a number of factors complicate routine use of thermodynamic data. On a macroscopic level, a range of experimental parameters including temperature and buffer choice significantly influence the observed thermodynamic signatures. On a microscopic level, solute effects, structural flexibility, and cooperativity lead to nonlinear changes in enthalpy. This multifactorial character hides essential enthalpy contributions of intermolecular contacts, making them experimentally nonobservable. In this perspective, we present three case studies, reflect on some key factors affecting thermodynamic signatures, and investigate their relation to the hydrophobic effect, enthalpy-entropy compensation, lipophilic ligand efficiency, and promiscuity. The studies highlight that enthalpy and entropy cannot be used as direct end points but can together with calculations increase our understanding of ligand binding and identify interesting outliers that do not behave as expected.

  2. Statistical physics and thermodynamics an introduction to key concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Statistical physics and thermodynamics describe the behaviour of systems on the macroscopic scale. Their methods are applicable to a wide range of phenomena: from refrigerators to the interior of stars, from chemical reactions to magnetism. Indeed, of all physical laws, the laws of thermodynamics are perhaps the most universal. This text provides a concise yet thorough introduction to the key concepts which underlie statistical physics and thermodynamics. It begins with a review of classical probability theory and quantum theory, as well as a careful discussion of the notions of information and entropy, prior to embarking on the development of statistical physics proper. The crucial steps leading from the microscopic to the macroscopic domain are rendered transparent. In particular, the laws of thermodynamics are shown to emerge as natural consequences of the statistical framework. While the emphasis is on clarifying the basic concepts, the text also contains many applications and classroom-tested exercises,...

  3. Irreversible thermodynamic analysis and application for molecular heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto; Açıkkalp, Emin

    2017-09-01

    Is there a link between the macroscopic approach to irreversibility and microscopic behaviour of the systems? Consumption of free energy keeps the system away from a stable equilibrium. Entropy generation results from the redistribution of energy, momentum, mass and charge. This concept represents the essence of the thermodynamic approach to irreversibility. Irreversibility is the result of the interaction between systems and their environment. The aim of this paper is to determine lost works in a molecular engine and compare results with macro (classical) heat engines. Firstly, irreversible thermodynamics are reviewed for macro and molecular cycles. Secondly, irreversible thermodynamics approaches are applied for a quantum heat engine with -1/2 spin system. Finally, lost works are determined for considered system and results show that macro and molecular heat engines obey same limitations. Moreover, a quantum thermodynamic approach is suggested in order to explain the results previously obtained from an atomic viewpoint.

  4. Composite heat damage spectroscopic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C.J.; Muhs, J.D.; Wachter, E.A.; Ziegler, R.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Powell, G.L.; Smyrl, N.R. (Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (USA)); Philpot, H.E. (Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, TN (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Applied Technology Division (ORNL/ATD) has successfully demonstrated the unique applicability of two spectroscopic techniques that possess the capability of detecting heat damage in IM6/3501-6 laminates and correlation of this damage with the residual mechanical-strength properties. The results on the diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform (DRIFT) and laser-pumped fluorescence (LPF) spectroscopic techniques, which are capable of rapid, in-service, non-destructive detection and quantitation of heat damage in IM6/3501-6 laminates, is presented. Both of these techniques have been shown to be quite effective at probing the elusive and complex molecular changes that take place in IM6/3501-6 laminates subjected to varying degrees of thermal degradation. Using LPF or DRIFT techniques, it has been shown that laminates having different thermal histories can be readily differentiated from one another due to their characteristic fingerprint'' spectral features. The effects of short-term, elevated temperature heating on the room- temperature compressive interlaminar-shear, and flexural strengths and room-temperature shore-D hardness properties of dry'' and wet'' preconditioned IM6/3501-6 laminates are discussed. Additionally, the geometrical changes and percent-weight-loss measurements of IM6/3501-6 laminates that accompany heat damage are also examined. It was found that below a certain temperature/time exposure threshold, these laminates visually and microscopically appeared to be undamaged but, in fact, may have lost a significant percentage of their original strength. In addition, laminates that were exposed above the temperature/time exposure threshold suffered dramatic geometrical changes and large amounts of weight loss. 32 refs., 39 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Microscopic colitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, A; Mayberry, J F

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, microscopic colitis has been increasingly diagnosed. This review was carried out to evaluate demographic factors for microscopic colitis and to perform a systematic assessment of available treatment options. Relevant publications up to December 2013 were identified following searches of PubMed and Google Scholar using the key words 'microscopic colitis', 'collagenous colitis' and 'lymphocytic colitis'. Two-hundred and forty-eight articles were identified. The term microscopic colitis includes lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. Both have common clinical symptoms but are well defined histopathologically. The clinical course is usually benign, but serious complications, including death, may occur. A peak incidence from 60 to 70 years of age with a female preponderance is observed. Although most cases are idiopathic, associations with autoimmune disorders, such as coeliac disease and hypothyroidism, as well as with exposure to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton-pump inhibitors, have been observed. The incidence and prevalence of microscopic colitis is rising and good-quality epidemiological research is needed. Treatment is currently largely based on anecdotal evidence and on results from limited clinical trials of budesonide. Long-term follow-up of these patients is not well established. The review synthesizes work on the definition of microscopic colitis and the relationship between collagenous and lymphocytic colitis. It reviews the international epidemiology and work on aetiology. In addition, it critically considers the efficacy of a range of treatments. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. A New Perspective on Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lavenda, Bernard H

    2010-01-01

    Dr. Bernard H. Lavenda has written A New Perspective on Thermodynamics to combine an old look at thermodynamics with a new foundation. The book presents a historical perspective, which unravels the current presentation of thermodynamics found in standard texts, and which emphasizes the fundamental role that Carnot played in the development of thermodynamics. A New Perspective on Thermodynamics will: Chronologically unravel the development of the principles of thermodynamics and how they were conceived by their discoverers Bring the theory of thermodynamics up to the present time and indicate areas of further development with the union of information theory and the theory of means and their inequalities. New areas include nonextensive thermodynamics, the thermodynamics of coding theory, multifractals, and strange attractors. Reintroduce important, yet nearly forgotten, teachings of N.L. Sardi Carnot Highlight conceptual flaws in timely topics such as endoreversible engines, finite-time thermodynamics, geometri...

  7. Familial Microscopic Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Assad Abdo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous and lymphocytic colitis are two inflammatory conditions of the colon that are often collectively referred to as microscopic colitis. The present report describes what is believed to be the third published case of familial microscopic colitis. A 55-year-old woman who suffered from chronic diarrhea was diagnosed with lymphocytic colitis on colonic biopsy. Subsequently, her 36-year-old daughter was diagnosed with collagenous colitis. The familial occurrence of these diseases may support an immunological hypothesis for their etiology. In addition, it supports the assumption that collagenous and lymphocytic colitis are two manifestations of the same disease process rather than two completely separate entities. The familial tendency of this disease may make a case for early colonoscopy and biopsy in relatives of patients diagnosed with microscopic colitis if they present with suggestive symptoms.

  8. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattices, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. This book is divided into three parts. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. In the third part, the multi-electron system is discussed theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for the superconducting state in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and examined in-depth. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States is an introductory treatise and textbook on meso...

  9. Statistical thermodynamics of alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Gokcen, N A

    1986-01-01

    This book is intended for scientists, researchers, and graduate students interested in solutions in general, and solutions of metals in particular. Readers are assumed to have a good background in thermodynamics, presented in such books as those cited at the end of Chapter 1, "Thermo­ dynamic Background." The contents of the book are limited to the solutions of metals + metals, and metals + metalloids, but the results are also appli­ cable to numerous other types of solutions encountered by metallurgists, materials scientists, geologists, ceramists, and chemists. Attempts have been made to cover each topic in depth with numerical examples whenever necessary. Chapter 2 presents phase equilibria and phase diagrams as related to the thermodynamics of solutions. The emphasis is on the binary diagrams since the ternary diagrams can be understood in terms of the binary diagrams coupled with the phase rule, and the Gibbs energies of mixing. The cal­ culation of thermodynamic properties from the phase diagrams is ...

  10. Extended Irreversible Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jou, David

    2010-01-01

    This is the 4th edition of the highly acclaimed monograph on Extended Irreversible Thermodynamics, a theory that goes beyond the classical theory of irreversible processes. In contrast to the classical approach, the basic variables describing the system are complemented by non-equilibrium quantities. The claims made for extended thermodynamics are confirmed by the kinetic theory of gases and statistical mechanics. The book covers a wide spectrum of applications, and also contains a thorough discussion of the foundations and the scope of the current theories on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. For this new edition, the authors critically revised existing material while taking into account the most recent developments in fast moving fields such as heat transport in micro- and nanosystems or fast solidification fronts in materials sciences. Several fundamental chapters have been revisited emphasizing physics and applications over mathematical derivations. Also, fundamental questions on the definition of non-equil...

  11. Statistical thermodynamics understanding the properties of macroscopic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fai, Lukong Cornelius

    2012-01-01

    Basic Principles of Statistical PhysicsMicroscopic and Macroscopic Description of StatesBasic PostulatesGibbs Ergodic AssumptionGibbsian EnsemblesExperimental Basis of Statistical MechanicsDefinition of Expectation ValuesErgodic Principle and Expectation ValuesProperties of Distribution FunctionRelative Fluctuation of an Additive Macroscopic ParameterLiouville TheoremGibbs Microcanonical EnsembleMicrocanonical Distribution in Quantum MechanicsDensity MatrixDensity Matrix in Energy RepresentationEntropyThermodynamic FunctionsTemperatureAdiabatic ProcessesPressureThermodynamic IdentityLaws of Th

  12. Thermodynamics II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Thermodynamics II includes review of thermodynamic relations, power and refrigeration cycles, mixtures and solutions, chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, and flow through nozzl

  13. Thermodynamics for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Kaufui Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition from Students: "It is a great thermodynamics text…I loved it!-Mathew Walters "The book is comprehensive and easy to understand. I love the real world examples and problems, they make you feel like you are learning something very practical."-Craig Paxton"I would recommend the book to friends."-Faure J. Malo-Molina"The clear diction, as well as informative illustrations and diagrams, help convey the material clearly to the reader."-Paul C. Start"An inspiring and effective tool for any aspiring scientist or engineer. Definitely the best book on Classical Thermodynamics out."-Seth Marini.

  14. Concise chemical thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, APH

    2010-01-01

    EnergyThe Realm of ThermodynamicsEnergy BookkeepingNature's Driving ForcesSetting the Scene: Basic IdeasSystem and SurroundingsFunctions of StateMechanical Work and Expanding GasesThe Absolute Temperature Scale Forms of Energy and Their Interconversion Forms of Renewable Energy Solar Energy Wind Energy Hydroelectric Power Geothermal Energy Biomass Energy References ProblemsThe First Law of Thermodynamics Statement of the First Law Reversible Expansion of an Ideal GasConstant-Volume ProcessesConstant-Pressure ProcessesA New Function: EnthalpyRelationship between ?H and ?UUses and Conventions of

  15. Mechanics, Waves and Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan Jain, Sudhir

    2016-05-01

    Figures; Preface; Acknowledgement; 1. Energy, mass, momentum; 2. Kinematics, Newton's laws of motion; 3. Circular motion; 4. The principle of least action; 5. Work and energy; 6. Mechanics of a system of particles; 7. Friction; 8. Impulse and collisions; 9. Central forces; 10. Dimensional analysis; 11. Oscillations; 12. Waves; 13. Sound of music; 14. Fluid mechanics; 15. Water waves; 16. The kinetic theory of gases; 17. Concepts and laws of thermodynamics; 18. Some applications of thermodynamics; 19. Basic ideas of statistical mechanics; Bibliography; Index.

  16. Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2005-01-01

    Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics fills a niche in the market by providing a comprehensive introduction to a new, emerging topic in the field. The importance of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is addressed in order to fully understand how a system works, whether it is in a biological system like the brain or a system that develops plastic. In order to fully grasp the subject, the book clearly explains the physical concepts and mathematics involved, as well as presenting problems and solutions; over 200 exercises and answers are included. Engineers, scientists, and applied mathematicians can all use the book to address their problems in modelling, calculating, and understanding dynamic responses of materials.

  17. [Authentication of Trace Material Evidence in Forensic Science Field with Infrared Microscopic Technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-quan; Hu, Ke-liang

    2016-03-01

    In the field of forensic science, conventional infrared spectral analysis technique is usually unable to meet the detection requirements, because only very a few trace material evidence with diverse shapes and complex compositions, can be extracted from the crime scene. Infrared microscopic technique is developed based on a combination of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic technique and microscopic technique. Infrared microscopic technique has a lot of advantages over conventional infrared spectroscopic technique, such as high detection sensitivity, micro-area analysisand nondestructive examination. It has effectively solved the problem of authentication of trace material evidence in the field of forensic science. Additionally, almost no external interference is introduced during measurements by infrared microscopic technique. It can satisfy the special need that the trace material evidence must be reserved for witness in court. It is illustrated in detail through real case analysis in this experimental center that, infrared microscopic technique has advantages in authentication of trace material evidence in forensic science field. In this paper, the vibration features in infrared spectra of material evidences, including paints, plastics, rubbers, fibers, drugs and toxicants, can be comparatively analyzed by means of infrared microscopic technique, in an attempt to provide powerful spectroscopic evidence for qualitative diagnosis of various criminal and traffic accident cases. The experimental results clearly suggest that infrared microscopic technique has an incomparable advantage and it has become an effective method for authentication of trace material evidence in the field of forensic science.

  18. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the

  19. Microscope on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's microscopic imager (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  20. MICROSCOPIC, PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND CHROMATOGRAPHIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peters

    sulphated ash 19.6%, water-soluble ash 6.8%, alcohol-soluble extractive 9.5% and water-soluble extractive 24.1%. Chromatographic fingerprints of ... chloral hydrate, mounted in dilute glycerol on a microscope slide and viewed at different ... was washed off in water and the sample mounted on a slide with glycerin.

  1. Terahertz scanning probe microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides aterahertz scanning probe microscope setup comprising (i) a terahertz radiation source configured to generate terahertz radiation; (ii) a terahertz lens configured to receive at least part of the terahertz radiation from the terahertz radiation source; (iii) a cantilever unit

  2. SPM: Scanning positron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Dickmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Munich scanning positron microscope, operated by the Universität der Bundeswehr München and the Technische Universität München, located at NEPOMUC, permits positron lifetime measurements with a lateral resolution in the µm range and within an energy range of 1 – 20 keV.

  3. Experimental thermodynamics experimental thermodynamics of non-reacting fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Neindre, B Le

    2013-01-01

    Experimental Thermodynamics, Volume II: Experimental Thermodynamics of Non-reacting Fluids focuses on experimental methods and procedures in the study of thermophysical properties of fluids. The selection first offers information on methods used in measuring thermodynamic properties and tests, including physical quantities and symbols for physical quantities, thermodynamic definitions, and definition of activities and related quantities. The text also describes reference materials for thermometric fixed points, temperature measurement under pressures, and pressure measurements. The publicatio

  4. Classical or equilibrium thermodynamics: basic conceptual aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto Calvo Tiritan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The Classical or Equilibrium Thermodynamics is one of the most consolidated fields of Physics. It is synthesized by a well-known and self coherent knowledge structure. The essence of the Classical Thermodynamics theoretical structure consists of a set of natural laws that rule the macroscopic physical systems behavior. These laws were formulated based on observations generalizations and are mostly independent of any hypotheses concerning the microscopic nature of the matter. In general, the approaches established for the Classical Thermodynamics follow one of the following alternatives: the historical approach that describes chronologically the evolution of ideas, concepts and facts, and the postulational approach in which postulates are formulated but are not demonstrated a priori but can be confirmed a posteriori. In this work, a brief review of the pre-classical historical approach conceptual evolution is elaborated, from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the middle of the nineteenth century. As for this, the following themes are dealt with in an evolutionary and phenomenological way: heat nature, thermometry, calorimetry, Carnot’s heat engine, heat mechanical equivalent and the first and second laws. The Zeroth law that was formulated afterwards is included in the discussion.

  5. The Thermodynamics of Black Holes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emparan, Roberto; Tinto, Massimo; Barbero G, J Fernando; Heusler, Markus; Rendall, Alan D; Adamo, Timothy M; Liebling, Steven L; Sasaki, Misao; Poisson, Eric; Wald, Robert M; Postnov, Konstantin A; Amendola, Luca; Shibata, Masaru; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Reall, Harvey S; Kozameh, Carlos; Palenzuela, Carlos; Yungelson, Lev R; Villaseñor, Eduardo J. S; Appleby, Stephen; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev V; Bacon, David; Newman, Ezra T; Baker, Tessa; Baldi, Marco; Bartolo, Nicola; Blanchard, Alain; Bonvin, Camille; Borgani, Stefano; Branchini, Enzo; Burrage, Clare; Camera, Stefano; Carbone, Carmelita; Casarini, Luciano; Cropper, Mark; de Rham, Claudia; Di Porto, Cinzia; Ealet, Anne; Ferreira, Pedro G; Finelli, Fabio; García-Bellido, Juan; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Guzzo, Luigi; Heavens, Alan; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Heymans, Catherine; Hoekstra, Henk; Hollenstein, Lukas; Holmes, Rory; Horst, Ole; Jahnke, Knud; Kitching, Thomas D; Koivisto, Tomi; Kunz, Martin; La Vacca, Giuseppe; March, Marisa; Majerotto, Elisabetta; Markovic, Katarina; Marsh, David; Marulli, Federico; Massey, Richard; Mellier, Yannick; Mota, David F; Nunes, Nelson J; Percival, Will; Pettorino, Valeria; Porciani, Cristiano; Quercellini, Claudia; Read, Justin; Rinaldi, Massimiliano; Sapone, Domenico; Scaramella, Roberto; Skordis, Constantinos; Simpson, Fergus; Taylor, Andy; Thomas, Shaun; Trotta, Roberto; Verde, Licia; Vernizzi, Filippo; Vollmer, Adrian; Wang, Yun; Weller, Jochen; Zlosnik, Tom

    ...We review the present status of black hole thermodynamics. Our review includes discussion of classical black hole thermodynamics, Hawking radiation from black holes, the generalized second law, and the issue of entropy bounds...

  6. Chemical thermodynamics. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keszei, Ernoe [Budapest Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Physical Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Eminently suitable as a required textbook comprising complete material for or an undergraduate chemistry major course in chemical thermodynamics. Clearly explains details of formal derivations that students can easily follow and so master applied mathematical operations. Offers problems and solutions at the end of each chapter for self-test and self- or group study. This course-derived undergraduate textbook provides a concise explanation of the key concepts and calculations of chemical thermodynamics. Instead of the usual 'classical' introduction, this text adopts a straightforward postulatory approach that introduces thermodynamic potentials such as entropy and energy more directly and transparently. Structured around several features to assist students' understanding, Chemical Thermodynamics: - Develops applications and methods for the ready treatment of equilibria on a sound quantitative basis. - Requires minimal background in calculus to understand the text and presents formal derivations to the student in a detailed but understandable way. - Offers end-of-chapter problems (and answers) for self-testing and review and reinforcement, of use for self- or group study. This book is suitable as essential reading for courses in a bachelor and master chemistry program and is also valuable as a reference or textbook for students of physics, biochemistry and materials science.

  7. Thermodynamics with Design Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilento, E. V.; Sears, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses how basic thermodynamics concepts are integrated with design problems. Includes course goals, instructional strategies, and major advantages/disadvantages of the integrated design approach. Advantages include making subject more concrete, emphasizing interrelation of variables, and reinforcing concepts by use in design analysis; whereas…

  8. Thermodynamics of meat proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the water activity of meat, being a mixture of proteins, salts and water, by the Free-Volume-Flory–Huggins (FVFH) theory augmented with the equation. Earlier, the FVFH theory is successfully applied to describe the thermodynamics to glucose homopolymers like starch, dextrans and

  9. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Landsberg, Peter T

    1990-01-01

    Exceptionally articulate treatment combines precise mathematical style with strong physical intuition. Wide range of applications includes negative temperatures, negative heat capacities, special and general relativistic effects, black hole thermodynamics, gravitational collapse, more. Over 100 problems with worked solutions. Advanced undergraduate, graduate level. Table of applications. Useful formulas and other data.

  10. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a

  11. Thermodynamic stabilization of colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stol, R.J.; Bruyn, P.L. de

    An analysis is given of the conditions necessary for obtaining a thermodynamically stable dispersion (TSD) of solid particles in a continuous aqueous solution phase. The role of the adsorption of potential-determining ions at the planar interface in lowering the interfacial free energy (γ) to

  12. The thermodynamics of portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    Piotrowski, Edward W.; Jan Sladkowski

    2000-01-01

    We propose a new method of valuation of portfolios and their respective investing strategies. To this end we define a canonical ensemble of portfolios that allows to use the formalism of thermodynamics. (final version published in Acta Phys.Pol.B,32(2001)597-604)

  13. On Teaching Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbasch, F.

    2011-01-01

    The logical structure of classical thermodynamics is presented in a modern, geometrical manner. The first and second law receive clear, operatively oriented statements and the Gibbs free energy extremum principle is fully discussed. Applications relevant to chemistry, such as phase transitions, dilute solutions theory and, in particular, the law…

  14. Thermodynamical Arguments against Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenhouse, Jason

    2017-01-01

    The argument that the second law of thermodynamics contradicts the theory of evolution has recently been revived by anti-evolutionists. In its basic form, the argument asserts that whereas evolution implies that there has been an increase in biological complexity over time, the second law, a fundamental principle of physics, shows this to be…

  15. Thermodynamics Far from the Thermodynamic Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel, Rodrigo; Rubí, J Miguel

    2017-11-16

    Understanding how small systems exchange energy with a heat bath is important to describe how their unique properties can be affected by the environment. In this contribution, we apply Landsberg's theory of temperature-dependent energy levels to describe the progressive thermalization of small systems as their spectrum is perturbed by a heat bath. We propose a mechanism whereby the small system undergoes a discrete series of excitations and isentropic spectrum adjustments leading to a final state of thermal equilibrium. This produces standard thermodynamic results without invoking system size. The thermal relaxation of a single harmonic oscillator is analyzed as a model example of a system with a quantized spectrum than can be embedded in a thermal environment. A description of how the thermal environment affects the spectrum of a small system can be the first step in using environmental factors, such as temperature, as parameters in the design and operation of nanosystem properties.

  16. Stochastic and Macroscopic Thermodynamics of Strongly Coupled Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Jarzynski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a thermodynamic framework that describes a classical system of interest S that is strongly coupled to its thermal environment E. Within this framework, seven key thermodynamic quantities—internal energy, entropy, volume, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, heat, and work—are defined microscopically. These quantities obey thermodynamic relations including both the first and second law, and they satisfy nonequilibrium fluctuation theorems. We additionally impose a macroscopic consistency condition: When S is large, the quantities defined within our framework scale up to their macroscopic counterparts. By satisfying this condition, we demonstrate that a unifying framework can be developed, which encompasses both stochastic thermodynamics at one end, and macroscopic thermodynamics at the other. A central element in our approach is a thermodynamic definition of the volume of the system of interest, which converges to the usual geometric definition when S is large. We also sketch an alternative framework that satisfies the same consistency conditions. The dynamics of the system and environment are modeled using Hamilton’s equations in the full phase space.

  17. Thermodynamics for the practicing engineer

    CERN Document Server

    Theodore, Louis; Vanvliet, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    This book concentrates specifically on the applications of thermodynamics, rather than the theory. It addresses both technical and pragmatic problems in the field, and covers such topics as enthalpy effects, equilibrium thermodynamics, non-ideal thermodynamics and energy conversion applications. Providing the reader with a working knowledge of the principles of thermodynamics, as well as experience in their application, it stands alone as an easy-to-follow self-teaching aid to practical applications and contains worked examples.

  18. Stationary Distribution and Thermodynamic Relation in Nonequilibrium Steady States

    KAUST Repository

    Komatsu, Teruhisa S.

    2010-01-01

    We describe our recent attempts toward statistical mechanics and thermodynamics for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) realized, e.g., in a heat conducting system. Our first result is a simple expression of the probability distribution (of microscopic states) of a NESS. Our second result is a natural extension of the thermodynamic Clausius relation and a definition of an accompanying entropy in NESS. This entropy coincides with the normalization constant appearing in the above mentioned microscopic expression of NESS, and has an expression similar to the Shannon entropy (with a further symmetrization). The NESS entropy proposed here is a clearly defined measurable quantity even in a system with a large degrees of freedom. We numerically measure the NESS entropy in hardsphere fluid systems with a heat current, by observing energy exchange between the system and the heat baths when the temperatures of the baths are changed according to specified protocols.

  19. Ion photon emission microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  20. Microscopic approach to polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1981-01-01

    The interaction between excitons and light has been investigated in detail. The perturbational approach turns out to be invalid. However, an exact solution can be obtained directly from the Schrödinger equation for a fixed light field. This solution corresponds to a nonlinear optical response...... contrary to experimental experience. In order to remove this absurdity the semiclassical approach must be abandoned and the electromagnetic field quantized. A simple microscopic polariton model is then derived. From this the wave function for the interacting exciton-photon complex is obtained...... of light of the crystal. The introduction of damping smears out the excitonic spectra. The wave function of the polariton, however, turns out to be very independent of damping up to large damping values. Finally, this simplified microscopic polariton model is compared with the exact solutions obtained...

  1. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the object and, connected to the detector, a device for processing the detected electrons so as to form an object image, wherein a beam splitter is provided for dividing the electron beam from the electron...

  2. Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1987-04-01

    A color laser microscope utilizing a new color laser imaging system has been developed for the visual inspection of semiconductors. The light source, produced by three lasers (Red; He-Ne, Green; Ar, Blue; He-Cd), is deflected horizontally by an AOD (Acoustic Optical Deflector) and vertically by a vibration mirror. The laser beam is focused in a small spot which is scanned over the sample at high speed. The light reflected back from the sample is reformed to contain linear information by returning to the original vibration mirror. The linear light is guided to the CCD image sensor where it is converted into a video signal. Individual CCD image sensors are used for each of the three R, G, or B color image signals. The confocal optical system with its laser light source yields a color TV monitor image with no flaring and a much sharper resolution than that of the conventional optical microscope. The AOD makes possible a high speed laser scan and a NTSC or PAL TV video signal is produced in real time without any video memory. Since the light source is composed of R, G, and B laser beams, color separation superior to that of white light illumination is achieved. Because of the photometric linearity of the image detector, the R, G, and B outputs of the system are most suitably used for hue analysis. The CCD linear image sensors in the optical system produce no geometrical distortion, and good color registration is available principally. The output signal can be used for high accuracy line width measuring. The many features of the color laser microscope make it ideally suited for the visual inspection of semiconductor processing. A number of these systems have already been installed in such a capacity. The Color Laser Microscope can also be a very useful tool for the fields of material engineering and biotechnology.

  3. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattice, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. New to this edition is the examination of magnetic crystals, where magnetic symmetry is essential for magnetic phase transitions. The multi-electron system is also discussed  theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for superconductivity in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and studied in-depth. Thermod...

  4. Mechanics and thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    This introduction to classical mechanics and thermodynamics provides an accessible and clear treatment of the fundamentals. Starting with particle mechanics and an early introduction to special relativity this textbooks enables the reader to understand the basics in mechanics. The text is written from the experimental physics point of view, giving numerous real life examples and applications of classical mechanics in technology. This highly motivating presentation deepens the knowledge in a very accessible way. The second part of the text gives a concise introduction to rotational motion, an expansion to rigid bodies, fluids and gases. Finally, an extensive chapter on thermodynamics and a short introduction to nonlinear dynamics with some instructive examples intensify the knowledge of more advanced topics. Numerous problems with detailed solutions are perfect for self study.

  5. Thermodynamics and emergent universe

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Saumya; Gangopadhyay, Sunandan

    2016-01-01

    We show that in the isentropic scenario the first order thermodynamical particle creation model gives an emergent universe solution even when the chemical potential is non-zero. However there exists no emergent universe scenario in the second order non-equilibrium theory for the particle creation model. We then point out a correspondence between the particle creation model with barotropic equation of state and the equation of state giving rise to an emergent universe without particle creation...

  6. The effect of substrate orientation on the kinetics and thermodynamics of initial oxide-film growth on metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichel, Friederike

    2007-11-19

    This thesis addresses the effect of the parent metal-substrate orientation on the thermodynamics and kinetics of ultra-thin oxide-film growth on bare metals upon their exposure to oxygen gas at low temperatures (up to 650 K). A model description has been developed to predict the thermodynamically stable microstructure of a thin oxide film grown on its bare metal substrate as function of the oxidation conditions and the substrate orientation. For Mg and Ni, the critical oxide-film thickness is less than 1 oxide monolayer and therefore the initial development of an amorphous oxide phase on these metal substrates is unlikely. Finally, for Cu and densely packed Cr and Fe metal surfaces, oxide overgrowth is predicted to proceed by the direct formation and growth of a crystalline oxide phase. Further, polished Al single-crystals with {l_brace}111{r_brace}, {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}110{r_brace} surface orientations were introduced in an ultra-high vacuum system for specimen processing and analysis. After surface cleaning and annealing, the bare Al substrates have been oxidized by exposure to pure oxygen gas. During the oxidation, the oxide-film growth kinetics has been established by real-time in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. After the oxidation, the oxide-film microstructures were investigated by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. Finally, high-resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis was applied to study the microstructure and morphology of the grown oxide films on an atomic scale. (orig.)

  7. The discovery of thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Based on the idea that a scientific journal is also an "agora" (Greek: market place) for the exchange of ideas and scientific concepts, the history of thermodynamics between 1800 and 1910 as documented in the Philosophical Magazine Archives is uncovered. Famous scientists such as Joule, Thomson (Lord Kelvin), Clausius, Maxwell or Boltzmann shared this forum. Not always in the most friendly manner. It is interesting to find out, how difficult it was to describe in a scientific (mathematical) language a phenomenon like "heat", to see, how long it took to arrive at one of the fundamental principles in physics: entropy. Scientific progress started from the simple rule of Boyle and Mariotte dating from the late eighteenth century and arrived in the twentieth century with the concept of probabilities. Thermodynamics was the driving intellectual force behind the industrial revolution, behind the enormous social changes caused by this revolution. The history of thermodynamics is a fascinating story, which also gives insights into the mechanism that seem to govern science.

  8. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  9. Photography with a Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Fred; Oldfield, Ron

    2000-03-01

    This beautifully illustrated book describes the methods used to record images viewed through a microscope. The text describes the principles and practices of photomicrography, and is written for all who take photomicrographs, beginners and/or experienced practitioners. The authors describe techniques that may be applied to many disciplines for teaching, research, archives, or pleasure. The book includes chapters on standard photography, modern digital techniques, methods for improving contrast, and a short chapter on drawing. In addition to its value as a work of reference, the authors' clear, didactic style makes this book suitable as a textbook for courses in photomicrography and/or elementary light microscopy.

  10. Solid state optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  11. Athena Microscopic Imager investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Herkenhoff, K. E.

    2003-01-01

    The Athena science payload on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) includes the Microscopic Imager (MI). The MI is a fixed-focus camera mounted on the end of an extendable instrument arm, the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD). The MI was designed to acquire images at a spatial resolution of 30 microns/pixel over a broad spectral range (400–700 nm). The MI uses the same electronics design as the other MER cameras but has optics that yield a field of view of 31 31 mm across a 1024...

  12. Laser Scanning Fluorescence Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eric W.; Zelten, J. Peter; Wiseman, Benjamin A.

    1988-06-01

    We report on the development of a laser scanning fluorescence microscope possessing several features which facilitate its application to biological and biophysical analyses in living cells. It is built around a standard inverted microscope stand, enabling the use of standard optics, micromanipulation apparatus, and conventional (including video) microscopy in conjunction with laser scanning. The beam is scanned across the specimen by a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors, driven by a programmable controller which can operate in three modes: full raster scan, region of interest, and random-access. A full 512x512 pixel image can be acquired in one second. In region of interest mode, several subareas of the field can be selected for more rapid or detailed analysis. For those cases where the time scale of the observed phenomenon precludes full-field imaging, or where a full-field image is unnecessary, the random access mode enables an arbitrary pattern of isolated points to be selected and rapidly sequenced through. Via a graphical user interface implemented on the system's host computer, a user will be able to take a scout image either with video or a full-field laser scan, select regions or points on the scout image with a mouse, and set up experimental parameters such as detector integration times with a window-style menu. The instrument is designed to be a flexible testbed for investigating new techniques, without compromising its utility as a tool for biological research.

  13. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  14. Microscopic colitis. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William R; Tayal, Shalini

    2013-06-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is characterized by a triad of watery diarrhea, usually normal colonoscopic findings and typical microscopic findings. Two distinct histological forms of MC have been defined: lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis, but overlapping features may be present. The incidence of MC appears to be rising and in some countries it may account for as many as 10-20% of patients with non-bloody watery diarrhea. The cause of MC remains unknown and is likely to be multifactorial. The pathogenesis is poorly defined, and numerous immunological abnormalities have been reported. MC is commonly associated with autoimmune diseases including celiac disease. Use of various medications, most notably non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and proton pump inhibitors, have been etiologically implicated but not firmly established as causative. In imperfect trials several agents have been reported to be effective in the treatment of MC; budesonide is the best studied and evidence supporting its effectiveness is the most persuasive. In cases of otherwise unexplained watery, non-bloody diarrhea, MC should be considered and colonic biopsied specimens should be taken of normal-appearing mucosa. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Digestive Diseases © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine.

  15. Installation of an IR microscope at the nuclear resonance beamline ID18 of ESRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rackwitz, Sergej, E-mail: rackwitz@physik.uni-kl.de; Wolny, Juliusz A.; Muffler, Kai [University of Kaiserslautern, Department of Physics (Germany); Krueger, Hans-Joerg; Reh, Sabine; Kelm, Harald [University of Kaiserslautern, Department of Chemistry (Germany); Chumakov, Alexander I. [ESRF (France); Schuenemann, Volker [University of Kaiserslautern, Department of Physics (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    An IR microscope has been installed at the beamline ID18 at the ESRF in Grenoble, France in order to obtain nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) data and IR spectra simultaneously. This setup combines the advantages of both spectroscopic methods. The applicability of the installed setup to the study of the spin crossover (SCO) phenomenon in polynuclear iron complexes has been shown.

  16. Spectroscopic imaging: basic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoch, Antonin; Jiru, Filip; Bunke, Jürgen

    2008-08-01

    Spectroscopic imaging (SI) is a method that enables the measurement of the spatial distribution of metabolite concentrations in tissue. In this paper, an overview of measurement and processing techniques for SI is given. First, the basic structure of SI pulse sequences is introduced and the concepts of k-space, point spread function and spatial resolution are described. Then, special techniques are presented for the purpose of eliminating spurious signals and reducing measurement time. Finally, basic post-processing of SI data and the methods for viewing the results of SI measurement are summarized.

  17. Spectro-refractometry of individual microscopic objects using swept-source quantitative phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Hwang; Jang, Jaeduck; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-11-05

    We present a novel spectroscopic quantitative phase imaging technique with a wavelength swept-source, referred to as swept-source diffraction phase microscopy (ssDPM), for quantifying the optical dispersion of microscopic individual samples. Employing the swept-source and the principle of common-path interferometry, ssDPM measures the multispectral full-field quantitative phase imaging and spectroscopic microrefractometry of transparent microscopic samples in the visible spectrum with a wavelength range of 450-750 nm and a spectral resolution of less than 8 nm. With unprecedented precision and sensitivity, we demonstrate the quantitative spectroscopic microrefractometry of individual polystyrene beads, 30% bovine serum albumin solution, and healthy human red blood cells.

  18. Thermodynamics: The Unique Universal Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim M. Haddad

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamics is a physical branch of science that governs the thermal behavior of dynamical systems from those as simple as refrigerators to those as complex as our expanding universe. The laws of thermodynamics involving conservation of energy and nonconservation of entropy are, without a doubt, two of the most useful and general laws in all sciences. The first law of thermodynamics, according to which energy cannot be created or destroyed, merely transformed from one form to another, and the second law of thermodynamics, according to which the usable energy in an adiabatically isolated dynamical system is always diminishing in spite of the fact that energy is conserved, have had an impact far beyond science and engineering. In this paper, we trace the history of thermodynamics from its classical to its postmodern forms, and present a tutorial and didactic exposition of thermodynamics as it pertains to some of the deepest secrets of the universe.

  19. Thermodynamics of adaptive molecular resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R

    2016-11-13

    A relatively general thermodynamic formalism for adaptive molecular resolution (AMR) is presented. The description is based on the approximation of local thermodynamic equilibrium and considers the alchemic parameter λ as the conjugate variable of the potential energy difference between the atomistic and coarse-grained model Φ=U(1)-U(0) The thermodynamic formalism recovers the relations obtained from statistical mechanics of H-AdResS (Español et al, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 064115, 2015 (doi:10.1063/1.4907006)) and provides relations between the free energy compensation and thermodynamic potentials. Inspired by this thermodynamic analogy, several generalizations of AMR are proposed, such as the exploration of new Maxwell relations and how to treat λ and Φ as 'real' thermodynamic variablesThis article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Organogels thermodynamics, structure, solvent role, and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Guenet, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a physics-oriented introduction to organogels with a comparison to polymer thermoreversible gels whenever relevant. The past decade has seen the development of a wide variety of newly-synthesized molecules that can spontaneously self-assemble or crystallize from their organic or aqueous solutions to produce fibrillar networks, namely organogels, with potential applications in organic electronics, light harvesting, bio-imaging, non-linear optics, and the like. This compact volume presents a detailed outlook of these novel molecular systems with special emphasis upon their thermodynamics, morphology, molecular structure, and rheology. The definition of these complex systems is also tackled, as well as the role of the solvent. The text features numerous temperature-phase diagrams for a variety of organogels as well as illustrations of their structures at the microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic level. A review of some potential applications is provided including hybrid functional materials ...

  1. Multiscale thermodynamics and mechanics of heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grmela, Miroslav; Lebon, Georgy; Dubois, Charles

    2011-06-01

    Heat transfer is investigated on three levels of description: Fourier, Cattaneo, and Peierls. The microscopic nature of the heat that becomes important, in particular in nanoscale systems, is characterized by a vector field related to the heat flux on the Cattaneo level and by the phonon distribution function on the Peierls level. All dynamical theories discussed in the paper are fully nonlinear and all are proven to be compatible among themselves, with equilibrium thermodynamics, and with mechanics. An investigation of the first two compatibilities gives rise to potentials having the physical interpretation of nonequilibrium entropies. The compatibility with mechanics is manifested by the Hamiltonian structure of the time-reversible part of the time evolution.

  2. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs). However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE) element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  3. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin

    Full Text Available Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs. However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  4. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  5. THz wave emission microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tao

    Sensing and imaging using Terahertz (THz) radiation has attracted more and more interest in the last two decades thanks to the abundant material 'finger prints' in the THz frequency range. The low photon energy also makes THz radiation an attractive tool for nondestructive evaluation of materials and devices, biomedical applications, security checks and explosive screening. Due to the long wavelength, the far-field THz wave optical systems have relatively low spatial resolution. This physical limitation confines THz wave sensing and imaging to mostly macro-size samples. To investigate local material properties or micro-size structures and devices, near-field technology has to be employed. In this dissertation, the Electro-Optical THz wave emission microscope is investigated. The basic principle is to focus the femtosecond laser to a tight spot on a thin THz emitter layer to produce a THz wave source with a similar size as the focus spot. The apparatus provides a method for placing a THz source with sub-wavelength dimension in the near-field range of the investigated sample. Spatial resolution to the order of one tenth of the THz wavelength is demonstrated by this method. The properties of some widely used THz wave emission materials under tight focused pump light are studied. As an important branch of THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), THz wave emission spectroscopy has been widely used as a tool to investigate the material physics, such as energy band structure, carrier dynamics, material nonlinear properties and dynamics. As the main work of this dissertation, we propose to combine the THz wave emission spectroscopy with scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to build a tip-assisted THz wave emission microscope (TATEM), which is a valuable extension to current SPM science and technology. Illuminated by a femtosecond laser, the biased SPM tip forms a THz wave source inside the sample beneath the tip. The source size is proportional to the apex size of the tip so

  6. Time and Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkland, Kyle

    2007-01-01

    Temperature is vital to the health and welfare of all living beings, and Earth's temperature varies considerably from place to place. Early humans could only live in warm areas such as the tropics. Although modern humans have the technology to keep their houses and offices warm even in cold environments, the growth and development of civilization has created unintentional effects. Cities are warmer than their surrounding regions, and on a global scale, Earth is experiencing rising temperatures. Thus, the science of thermodynamics offers an important tool to study these effects. "Time and

  7. Molecular thermodynamics of nonideal fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Lloyd L

    2013-01-01

    Molecular Thermodynamics of Nonideal Fluids serves as an introductory presentation for engineers to the concepts and principles behind and the advances in molecular thermodynamics of nonideal fluids. The book covers related topics such as the laws of thermodynamics; entropy; its ensembles; the different properties of the ideal gas; and the structure of liquids. Also covered in the book are topics such as integral equation theories; theories for polar fluids; solution thermodynamics; and molecular dynamics. The text is recommended for engineers who would like to be familiarized with the concept

  8. Thermodynamics of Accelerating Black Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appels, Michael; Gregory, Ruth; Kubizňák, David

    2016-09-23

    We address a long-standing problem of describing the thermodynamics of an accelerating black hole. We derive a standard first law of black hole thermodynamics, with the usual identification of entropy proportional to the area of the event horizon-even though the event horizon contains a conical singularity. This result not only extends the applicability of black hole thermodynamics to realms previously not anticipated, it also opens a possibility for studying novel properties of an important class of exact radiative solutions of Einstein equations describing accelerated objects. We discuss the thermodynamic volume, stability, and phase structure of these black holes.

  9. Imaging arrangement and microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Chu, Steven

    2015-12-15

    An embodiment of the present invention is an imaging arrangement that includes imaging optics, a fiducial light source, and a control system. In operation, the imaging optics separate light into first and second tight by wavelength and project the first and second light onto first and second areas within first and second detector regions, respectively. The imaging optics separate fiducial light from the fiducial light source into first and second fiducial light and project the first and second fiducial light onto third and fourth areas within the first and second detector regions, respectively. The control system adjusts alignment of the imaging optics so that the first and second fiducial light projected onto the first and second detector regions maintain relatively constant positions within the first and second detector regions, respectively. Another embodiment of the present invention is a microscope that includes the imaging arrangement.

  10. Mars Under the Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured by the rover's microscopic imager on the 10th day, or sol, of its mission. Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

  11. Microscopic Theory of Transconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Jauho

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of momentum transfer between two closely spaced mesoscopic electronic systems, which couple via Coulomb interaction but where tunneling is inhibited, have proven to be a fruitful method of extracting information about interactions in mesoscopic systems. We report a fully microscopic theory for transconductivity σ12, or, equivalently, momentum transfer rate between the system constituents. Our main formal result expresses the transconductivity in terms of two fluctuation diagrams, which are topologically related, but not equivalent to, the Azlamazov-Larkin and Maki-Thompson diagrams known for superconductivity. In the present paper the magnetic field dependence of σ12 is discussed, and we find that σ12(B is strongly enhanced over its zero field value, and it displays strong features, which can be understood in terms of a competition between density-of-states and screening effects.

  12. Hydrotropy: binding models vs. statistical thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Seishi; Booth, Jonathan J; Abbott, Steven

    2013-12-21

    Hydrophobic drugs can often be solubilized by the addition of hydrotropes. We have previously shown that preferential drug-hydrotrope association is one of the major factors of increased solubility (but not "hydrotrope clustering" or changes in "water structure"). How, then, can we understand this drug-hydrotrope interaction at a molecular level? Thermodynamic models based upon stoichiometric solute-water and solute-hydrotrope binding have long been used to understand solubilization microscopically. Such binding models have shown that the solvation numbers or coordination numbers of the water and hydrotrope molecules around the drug solute is the key quantity for solute-water and solute-hydrotrope interaction. However, we show that a rigorous statistical thermodynamic theory (the fluctuation solution theory originated by Kirkwood and Buff) requires the total reconsideration of such a paradigm. Here we show that (i) the excess solvation number (the net increase or decrease, relative to the bulk, of the solvent molecules around the solute), not the coordination number, is the key quantity for describing the solute-hydrotrope interaction; (ii) solute-hydrotrope binding is beyond the reach of the stoichiometric models because long-range solvation structure plays an important role.

  13. Thermodynamics of Fluid Polyamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Mikhail A.; Duška, Michal; Caupin, Frédéric; Amrhein, Lauren E.; Rosenbaum, Amanda; Sadus, Richard J.

    2018-01-01

    Fluid polyamorphism is the existence of different condensed amorphous states in a single-component fluid. It is either found or predicted, usually at extreme conditions, for a broad group of very different substances, including helium, carbon, silicon, phosphorous, sulfur, tellurium, cerium, hydrogen, and tin tetraiodide. This phenomenon is also hypothesized for metastable and deeply supercooled water, presumably located a few degrees below the experimental limit of homogeneous ice formation. We present a generic phenomenological approach to describe polyamorphism in a single-component fluid, which is completely independent of the molecular origin of the phenomenon. We show that fluid polyamorphism may occur either in the presence or in the absence of fluid phase separation depending on the symmetry of the order parameter. In the latter case, it is associated with a second-order transition, such as in liquid helium or liquid sulfur. To specify the phenomenology, we consider a fluid with thermodynamic equilibrium between two distinct interconvertible states or molecular structures. A fundamental signature of this concept is the identification of the equilibrium fraction of molecules involved in each of these alternative states. However, the existence of the alternative structures may result in polyamorphic fluid phase separation only if mixing of these structures is not ideal. The two-state thermodynamics unifies all the debated scenarios of fluid polyamorphism in different areas of condensed-matter physics, with or without phase separation, and even goes beyond the phenomenon of polyamorphism by generically describing the anomalous properties of fluids exhibiting interconversion of alternative molecular states.

  14. Thermodynamics of geothermal fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1981-03-01

    A model to predict the thermodynamic properties of geothermal brines, based on a minimum amount of experimental data on a few key systems, is tested. Volumetric properties of aqueous sodium chloride, taken from the literature, are represented by a parametric equation over the range 0 to 300{sup 0}C and 1 bar to 1 kbar. Density measurements at 20 bar needed to complete the volumetric description also are presented. The pressure dependence of activity and thermal properties, derived from the volumetric equation, can be used to complete an equation of state for sodium chloride solutions. A flow calorimeter, used to obtain heat capacity data at high temperatures and pressures, is described. Heat capacity measurements, from 30 to 200{sup 0}C and 1 bar to 200 bar, are used to derive values for the activity coefficient and other thermodynamic properties of sodium sulfate solutions as a function of temperature. Literature data on the solubility of gypsum in mixed electrolyte solutions have been used to evaluate model parameters for calculating gypsum solubility in seawater and natural brines. Predictions of strontium and barium sulfate solubility in seawater also are given.

  15. Biochemical Thermodynamics under near Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The recommendations for nomenclature and tables in Biochemical Thermodynamics approved by IUBMB and IUPAC in 1994 can be easily introduced after the chemical thermodynamic formalism. Substitution of the usual standard thermodynamic properties by the transformed ones in the thermodynamic equations, and the use of appropriate thermodynamic tables…

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of cardiovascular tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R H; Isner, J M; Gauthier, T; Nakagawa, K; Cerio, F; Hanlon, E; Gaffney, E; Rouse, E; DeJesus, S

    1988-01-01

    We present results of a series of laser spectroscopic measurements on in vitro samples of cardiovascular tissue. These include laser Raman scattering, Fourier transform infrared, plasma emission and fluorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results of these spectroscopic measurements are discussed in terms of their implications for the field of laser angioplasty.

  17. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  18. Proper alignment of the microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenfusser, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    The light microscope is merely the first element of an imaging system in a research facility. Such a system may include high-speed and/or high-resolution image acquisition capabilities, confocal technologies, and super-resolution methods of various types. Yet more than ever, the proverb "garbage in-garbage out" remains a fact. Image manipulations may be used to conceal a suboptimal microscope setup, but an artifact-free image can only be obtained when the microscope is optimally aligned, both mechanically and optically. Something else is often overlooked in the quest to get the best image out of the microscope: Proper sample preparation! The microscope optics can only do its job when its design criteria are matched to the specimen or vice versa. The specimen itself, the mounting medium, the cover slip, and the type of immersion medium (if applicable) are all part of the total optical makeup. To get the best results out of a microscope, understanding the functions of all of its variable components is important. Only then one knows how to optimize these components for the intended application. Different approaches might be chosen to discuss all of the microscope's components. We decided to follow the light path which starts with the light source and ends at the camera or the eyepieces. To add more transparency to this sequence, the section up to the microscope stage was called the "Illuminating Section", to be followed by the "Imaging Section" which starts with the microscope objective. After understanding the various components, we can start "working with the microscope." To get the best resolution and contrast from the microscope, the practice of "Koehler Illumination" should be understood and followed by every serious microscopist. Step-by-step instructions as well as illustrations of the beam path in an upright and inverted microscope are included in this chapter. A few practical considerations are listed in Section 3. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  19. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-Ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital c...

  20. Scanning Electron Microscope Analysis System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides the capability to examine surfaces microscopically with high resolution (5 nanometers), perform micro chemical analyses of these surfaces, and...

  1. Photon scanning tunneling microscope in combination with a force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Tack, R.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1994-01-01

    The simultaneous operation of a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an atomic force microscope is presented. The use of standard atomic force silicon nitride cantilevers as near-field optical probes offers the possibility to combine the two methods. Vertical forces and torsion are detected

  2. Thermodynamics of disordered Heisenberg model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulanix, Michael; Khatami, Ehsan

    Using numerical linked-cluster expansions, we study the thermodynamic properties of the disordered Heisenberg model on the square lattice. We implement a new technique for treating continuous disorder within the NLCE and obtain results for the energy, entropy, specific heat, and spin correlations in the thermodynamic limit.

  3. Thermodynamic aspects of energy conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gool, W. van

    1980-01-01

    Thermodynamics deals with processes in a time independent approach. Industrial productions and many other activities are bound to perform a certain production per unit of time. It will be demonstrated that the stationary process model is a useful tool in relating thermodynamic functions to the

  4. Thermodynamics from Car to Kitchen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auty, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    The historical background to the laws of thermodynamics is explained using examples we can all observe in the world around us, focusing on motorised transport, refrigeration and solar heating. This is not to be considered as an academic article. The purpose is to improve understanding of thermodynamics rather than impart new knowledge, and for…

  5. The Thermodynamics of Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wald Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the present status of black hole thermodynamics. Our review includes discussion of classical black hole thermodynamics, Hawking radiation from black holes, the generalized second law, and the issue of entropy bounds. A brief survey also is given of approaches to the calculation of black hole entropy. We conclude with a discussion of some unresolved open issues.

  6. Microscopic Investigation of Reversible Nanoscale Surface Size Dependent Protein Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Carpenter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Aβ1-40 coated 20 nm gold colloidal nanoparticles exhibit a reversible color change as pH is externally altered between pH 4 and 10. This reversible process may contain important information on the initial reversible step reported for the fibrillogenesis of Aβ (a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. We examined this reversible color change by microscopic investigations. AFM images on graphite surfaces revealed the morphology of Aβ aggregates with gold colloids. TEM images clearly demonstrate the correspondence between spectroscopic features and conformational changes of the gold colloid.

  7. Applied thermodynamics: A new frontier for biotechnology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    The scientific career of one of the most outstanding scientists in molecular thermodynamics, Professor John M. Prausnitz at Berkeley, reflects the change in the agenda of molecular thermodynamics, from hydrocarbon chemistry to biotechnology. To make thermodynamics a frontier for biotechnology...

  8. Thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Leachman, Jacob; Lemmon, Eric; Penoncello, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This update to a classic reference text provides practising engineers and scientists with accurate thermophysical property data for cryogenic fluids. The equations for fifteen important cryogenic fluids are presented in a basic format, accompanied by pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy charts and tables of thermodynamic properties. It begins with a chapter introducing the thermodynamic relations and functional forms for equations of state, and goes on to describe the requirements for thermodynamic property formulations, needed for the complete definition of the thermodynamic properties of a fluid. The core of the book comprises extensive data tables and charts for the most commonly-encountered cryogenic fluids. This new edition sees significant updates to the data presented for air, argon, carbon monoxide, deuterium, ethane, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen and xenon. The book supports and complements NIST’s REFPROP - an interactive database and tool for the calculation of thermodynamic propertie...

  9. Thermodynamics of anisotropic branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ávila, Daniel [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-542, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Fernández, Daniel [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik,Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Patiño, Leonardo [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-542, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Trancanelli, Diego [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo,05314-970 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-11-22

    We study the thermodynamics of flavor D7-branes embedded in an anisotropic black brane solution of type IIB supergravity. The flavor branes undergo a phase transition between a ‘Minkowski embedding’, in which they lie outside of the horizon, and a ‘black hole embedding’, in which they fall into the horizon. This transition depends on the black hole temperature, its degree of anisotropy, and the mass of the flavor degrees of freedom. It happens either at a critical temperature or at a critical anisotropy. A general lesson we learn from this analysis is that the anisotropy, in this particular realization, induces similar effects as the temperature. In particular, increasing the anisotropy bends the branes more and more into the horizon. Moreover, we observe that the transition becomes smoother for higher anisotropies.

  10. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  11. Thermodynamics of Fluid Polyamorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Anisimov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid polyamorphism is the existence of different condensed amorphous states in a single-component fluid. It is either found or predicted, usually at extreme conditions, for a broad group of very different substances, including helium, carbon, silicon, phosphorous, sulfur, tellurium, cerium, hydrogen, and tin tetraiodide. This phenomenon is also hypothesized for metastable and deeply supercooled water, presumably located a few degrees below the experimental limit of homogeneous ice formation. We present a generic phenomenological approach to describe polyamorphism in a single-component fluid, which is completely independent of the molecular origin of the phenomenon. We show that fluid polyamorphism may occur either in the presence or in the absence of fluid phase separation depending on the symmetry of the order parameter. In the latter case, it is associated with a second-order transition, such as in liquid helium or liquid sulfur. To specify the phenomenology, we consider a fluid with thermodynamic equilibrium between two distinct interconvertible states or molecular structures. A fundamental signature of this concept is the identification of the equilibrium fraction of molecules involved in each of these alternative states. However, the existence of the alternative structures may result in polyamorphic fluid phase separation only if mixing of these structures is not ideal. The two-state thermodynamics unifies all the debated scenarios of fluid polyamorphism in different areas of condensed-matter physics, with or without phase separation, and even goes beyond the phenomenon of polyamorphism by generically describing the anomalous properties of fluids exhibiting interconversion of alternative molecular states.

  12. Ecofriendly gold nanoparticles - Lysozyme interaction: Thermodynamical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Swarup; Saxena, Shailendra K; Mishra, Suryakant; Yogi, Priyanka; Sagdeo, P R; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-09-01

    In the featured work interaction between biosynthesized gold nanoparticles (GNP) and lysozyme (Lys) has been studied using multi-spectroscopic approach. A moderate association constant (Kapp) of 2.66×104L/mol has been observed indicative of interactive nature. The binding constant (Kb) was 1.99, 6.30 and 31.6×104L/mol at 291, 298 and 305K respectively and the number of binding sites (n) was found to be approximately one. Estimated values of thermodynamic parameters (Enthalpy change, ΔH=141.99kJ/mol, entropy change, ΔS=570J/mol/K, Gibbs free energy change, ΔG=-27.86kJ/mol at 298K) suggest hydrophobic force as the main responsible factor for the Lys-GNP interaction and also the process of interaction is spontaneous. The average binding distance (r=3.06nm) and the critical energy transfer distance (Ro=1.84nm) between GNP and Lys was also evaluated using Förster's non-radiative energy transfer (FRET) theory and results clearly indicate that non-radiative type energy transfer is possible. Moreover, the addition of GNP does not show any significant change in the secondary structure of Lys as confirmed from circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Furthermore, NMR spectroscopy also indicates interaction between Lys and GNP. The resulting insight is important for the better understanding of structural nature and thermodynamic aspects of binding between the Lys and GNP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of hydrogen fluoride at several thermodynamic states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreitmeir, M.; Bertagnolli, H.; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen fluoride is a simple but interesting system for studies of the influence of hydrogen bonds on physical properties. We have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of HF at several thermodynamic states, where we examine the microscopic structure of the liquid as well...

  14. Infrared up-conversion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented an up-conversion infrared microscope (110) arranged for imaging an associated object (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared microscope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein an objective optical...

  15. THERMODYNAMICS OF PROTEIN-LIGAND INTERACTIONS AND THEIR ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rummi Devi Saini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Physiological processes are controlled mainly by intermolecular recognition mechanisms which involve protein–protein and protein–ligand interactions with a high specificity and affinity to form a specific complex. Proteins being an important class of macromolecules in biological systems, it is important to understand their actions through binding to other molecules of proteins or ligands. In fact, the binding of low molecular weight ligands to proteins plays a significant role in regulating biological processes such as cellular metabolism and signal transmission. Therefore knowledge of the protein–ligand interactions and the knowledge of the mechanisms involved in the protein-ligand recognition and binding are key in understanding biology at molecular level which will facilitate the discovery, design, and development of drugs. In this review, the mechanisms involved in protein–ligand binding, the binding kinetics, thermodynamic concepts and binding driving forces are discussed. Thermodynamic mechanisms involved in a few important protein-ligand binding are described. Various spectroscopic, non-spectroscopic and computational method for analysis of protein–ligand binding are also discussed.

  16. Spectroscopic investigation of local mechanical impedance of living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luca; Benseny-Cases, Núria; Mayeaux, Véronique; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of PC12 living cells have been studied at the nanoscale with a Force Feedback Microscope using two experimental approaches. Firstly, the local mechanical impedance of the cell membrane has been mapped simultaneously to the cell morphology at constant force. As the force of the interaction is gradually increased, we observed the appearance of the sub-membrane cytoskeleton. We shall compare the results obtained with this method with the measurement of other existing techniques. Secondly, a spectroscopic investigation has been performed varying the indentation of the tip in the cell membrane and consequently the force applied on it. In contrast with conventional dynamic atomic force microscopy techniques, here the small oscillation amplitude of the tip is not necessarily imposed at the cantilever first eigenmode. This allows the user to arbitrarily choose the excitation frequency in developing spectroscopic AFM techniques. The mechanical response of the PC12 cell membrane is found to be...

  17. Modification Of Normal Microscope To Magneto-Optical Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurazlin Ahmad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present work reports on the modification of polarizing microscope to a magnetic domain imaging microscope based on Faraday Effect. Sample used in this research is a ferromagnetic garnet BiTmNa3FeGa5O12. The halogen lamp in the microscope is replaced by helium-neon HeNe laser as a light source. To reduce the laser spatial coherent effect thin transparent plastics placed in the laser path. The plastics are rotated at certain velocity. Other factors to be considered are the plastic rotation velocity the laser intensity and the laser alignment. Typical magnetic domain pattern is obtained with the new system.

  18. Thermodynamic Constraints Improve Metabolic Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Elias W; Libourel, Igor G L

    2017-08-08

    In pursuit of establishing a realistic metabolic phenotypic space, the reversibility of reactions is thermodynamically constrained in modern metabolic networks. The reversibility constraints follow from heuristic thermodynamic poise approximations that take anticipated cellular metabolite concentration ranges into account. Because constraints reduce the feasible space, draft metabolic network reconstructions may need more extensive reconciliation, and a larger number of genes may become essential. Notwithstanding ubiquitous application, the effect of reversibility constraints on the predictive capabilities of metabolic networks has not been investigated in detail. Instead, work has focused on the implementation and validation of the thermodynamic poise calculation itself. With the advance of fast linear programming-based network reconciliation, the effects of reversibility constraints on network reconciliation and gene essentiality predictions have become feasible and are the subject of this study. Networks with thermodynamically informed reversibility constraints outperformed gene essentiality predictions compared to networks that were constrained with randomly shuffled constraints. Unconstrained networks predicted gene essentiality as accurately as thermodynamically constrained networks, but predicted substantially fewer essential genes. Networks that were reconciled with sequence similarity data and strongly enforced reversibility constraints outperformed all other networks. We conclude that metabolic network analysis confirmed the validity of the thermodynamic constraints, and that thermodynamic poise information is actionable during network reconciliation. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermodynamic Metrics and Optimal Paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivak, David; Crooks, Gavin

    2012-05-08

    A fundamental problem in modern thermodynamics is how a molecular-scale machine performs useful work, while operating away from thermal equilibrium without excessive dissipation. To this end, we derive a friction tensor that induces a Riemannian manifold on the space of thermodynamic states. Within the linear-response regime, this metric structure controls the dissipation of finite-time transformations, and bestows optimal protocols with many useful properties. We discuss the connection to the existing thermodynamic length formalism, and demonstrate the utility of this metric by solving for optimal control parameter protocols in a simple nonequilibrium model.

  20. Statistical Thermodynamics of Disperse Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander

    1996-01-01

    Principles of statistical physics are applied for the description of thermodynamic equilibrium in disperse systems. The cells of disperse systems are shown to possess a number of non-standard thermodynamic parameters. A random distribution of these parameters in the system is determined....... On the basis of this distribution, it is established that the disperse system has an additional degree of freedom called the macro-entropy. A large set of bounded ideal disperse systems allows exact evaluation of thermodynamic characteristics. The theory developed is applied to the description of equilibrium...

  1. The Thermodynamic Properties of Cubanite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, E. L.; Lauretta, D. S.; Keller, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    CuFe2S3 exists in two polymorphs, a low-temperature orthorhombic form (cubanite) and a high-temperature cubic form (isocubanite). Cubanite has been identified in the CI-chondrite and Stardust collections. However, the thermodynamic properties of cubanite have neither been measured nor estimated. Our derivation of a thermodynamic model for cubanite allows constraints to be placed on the formation conditions. This data, along with the temperature constraint afforded by the crystal structure, can be used to assess the environments in which cubanite formation is (or is not) thermodynamically favored.

  2. The head-mounted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. The ineluctable constraints of thermodynamics in the aetiology of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiselle, Denis S; Barclay, Christopher J

    2017-10-10

    We exploit the detail-independence feature of thermodynamics to examine issues related to the development of obesity. We adopt a 'global' approach consistent with focus on the first law of thermodynamics - namely that the metabolic energy provided by dietary foodstuffs has only three possible fates: the performance of work (be it microscopic or macroscopic), the generation of heat, or storage - primarily in the form of adipose tissue. Quantification of the energy expended, in the form of fat metabolised, during selected endurance events, reveals the inherent limitation of over-reliance on exercise as a primary agent of weight loss. This result prompts examination of various (non-exercise based) possibilities of increasing the rate of heat loss. Since these, too, give little cause for optimism, we are obliged to conclude that obesity can be prevented, or weight loss achieved, only if exercise is supplemented by reduction of food intake. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Exact analytical thermodynamic expressions for a Brownian heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, Mesfin Asfaw

    2015-09-01

    The nonequilibrium thermodynamics feature of a Brownian motor operating between two different heat baths is explored as a function of time t. Using the Gibbs entropy and Schnakenberg microscopic stochastic approach, we find exact closed form expressions for the free energy, the rate of entropy production, and the rate of entropy flow from the system to the outside. We show that when the system is out of equilibrium, it constantly produces entropy and at the same time extracts entropy out of the system. Its entropy production and extraction rates decrease in time and saturate to a constant value. In the long time limit, the rate of entropy production balances the rate of entropy extraction, and at equilibrium both entropy production and extraction rates become zero. Furthermore, via the present model, many thermodynamic theories can be checked.

  5. Thermodynamical string fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nadine; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2017-01-01

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from the LHC. While some improvements can be noted, it turns out to be nontrivial to obtain effects as big as required, and further work is called for.

  6. Association theories for complex thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Rafiqul Gani

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamics of complex systems (e.g. with associating molecules, multicomponent mixtures, multiphase equilibria, wide ranges of conditions, estimation of many different properties simultaneously) is a topic of great importance in chemical engineering and for a wide range of industrial...... promising direction for a general and useful for engineering purposes modeling of complex thermodynamics is via the use of association theories e.g. those based on chemical theory (like APACT), or on the lattice theory (like NRHB) or those based on perturbation theory (like SAFT and CPA). The purpose...... applications. While specialized models can handle different cases, even complex ones, with the advent of powerful theories and computers there is the hope that a single or a few models could be suitable for a general modeling of complex thermodynamics. After more than 100 years with active use of thermodynamic...

  7. Experimental approaches to membrane thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Thermodynamics describes a system on the macroscopic scale, yet it is becoming an important tool for the elucidation of many specific molecular aspects of membrane properties. In this note we discuss this application of thermodynamics, and give a number of examples on how thermodynamic measuremen...... have contributed to the understanding of specific membrane phenomena. We mainly focus on non-specific interactions of bilayers and small molecules (water and solutes) in the surrounding solvent, and the changes in membrane properties they bring about. Differences between thermodynamic...... and stoichiometric (structural) definitions of non-specific binding or partitioning are emphasized, and it is concluded that this distinction is important for weak, but not for strong, interactions....

  8. Spectrophotometric Determination and Thermodynamic Parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Spectrophotometric Determination and Thermodynamic. Parameters of Charge Transfer Complexation Between. Stavudine and Chloranilic Acid. Wilfred O Obonga, Edwin O Omeje*, Philip F Uzor and Malachy O Ugwu. Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University ...

  9. Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) facility, within Sandia’s Solid Dynamic Physics Department, is one of a few institutions in the world with a...

  10. Thermodynamics from concepts to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Shavit, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The book presents a logical methodology for solving problems in the context of conservation laws and property tables or equations. The authors elucidate the terms around which thermodynamics has historically developed, such as work, heat, temperature, energy, and entropy. Using a pedagogical approach that builds from basic principles to laws and eventually corollaries of the laws, the text enables students to think in clear and correct thermodynamic terms as well as solve real engineering problems.

  11. Thermodynamics of Asymptotically Conical Geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Gibbons, Gary W; Saleem, Zain H

    2015-06-12

    We study the thermodynamical properties of a class of asymptotically conical geometries known as "subtracted geometries." We derive the mass and angular momentum from the regulated Komar integral and the Hawking-Horowitz prescription and show that they are equivalent. By deriving the asymptotic charges, we show that the Smarr formula and the first law of thermodynamics hold. We also propose an analog of Christodulou-Ruffini inequality. The analysis can be generalized to other asymptotically conical geometries.

  12. THERRP: a thermodynamic properties program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeds, R.S.

    1977-05-01

    The computer program THERPP, a program that calculates the thermodynamic properties of light hydrocarbons and mixtures of light hydrocarbons is documented. A specific pressure--temperature or pressure--enthalpy grid is input to obtain properties in the desired region. THERPP is a modification of the program HSGC. Thermodynamic properties are calculated using Starling's modification to the Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state.

  13. Thermodynamics of nonsingular bouncing universes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Pedro C. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Pavon, Diego [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Departamento de Fisica, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Homogeneous and isotropic, nonsingular, bouncing world models are designed to evade the initial singularity at the beginning of the cosmic expansion. Here, we study the thermodynamics of the subset of these models governed by general relativity. Considering the entropy of matter and radiation and considering the entropy of the apparent horizon to be proportional to its area, we argue that these models do not respect the generalized second law of thermodynamics, also away from the bounce. (orig.)

  14. [Progress in Raman spectroscopic measurement of methane hydrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Li-hua; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Long-jun

    2009-09-01

    Complex thermodynamics and kinetics problems are involved in the methane hydrate formation and decomposition, and these problems are crucial to understanding the mechanisms of hydrate formation and hydrate decomposition. However, it was difficult to accurately obtain such information due to the difficulty of measurement since methane hydrate is only stable under low temperature and high pressure condition, and until recent years, methane hydrate has been measured in situ using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy, a non-destructive and non-invasive technique, is used to study vibrational modes of molecules. Studies of methane hydrate using Raman spectroscopy have been developed over the last decade. The Raman spectra of CH4 in vapor phase and in hydrate phase are presented in this paper. The progress in the research on methane hydrate formation thermodynamics, formation kinetics, decomposition kinetics and decomposition mechanism based on Raman spectroscopic measurements in the laboratory and deep sea are reviewed. Formation thermodynamic studies, including in situ observation of formation condition of methane hydrate, analysis of structure, and determination of hydrate cage occupancy and hydration numbers by using Raman spectroscopy, are emphasized. In the aspect of formation kinetics, research on variation in hydrate cage amount and methane concentration in water during the growth of hydrate using Raman spectroscopy is also introduced. For the methane hydrate decomposition, the investigation associated with decomposition mechanism, the mutative law of cage occupancy ratio and the formulation of decomposition rate in porous media are described. The important aspects for future hydrate research based on Raman spectroscopy are discussed.

  15. Overview of the Microscope Objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ruijuan

    Microscopes are widely used in research and industry. The objective lens is the most significant part of the microscope. Some characteristics and different types of microscope objectives are discussed in this thesis. The markings on the objective indicate some main optical characteristics. However, it is not always possible to know the materials, the radius or the thickness of each surface in an objective lens and it is not easy to simulate an objective without this data. In this thesis, we build a first order model which can simulate a refractive microscope objective when the magnification and numerical aperture are known. The model contains a thin lens made by two standard surfaces and also simulates the principal planes. This model provides more accurate ray heights and it is aplanatic. Some design examples of an objective lens are also discussed in order to get a better understanding of design and optimization considerations.

  16. Microscopic examination of deteriorated concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Larbi, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Concrete petrography is the integrated microscopic and mesoscale (hand specimen size) investigation of hardened concrete, that can provide information on the composition of concrete, the original relationships between the concrete's various constituents, and any changes therein, whether as a result

  17. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Suh, B.J.; Roukes, M.L.; Midzor, M.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1999-06-03

    Our objectives were to develop the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) into an instrument capable of scientific studies of buried structures in technologically and scientifically important electronic materials such as magnetic multilayer materials. This work resulted in the successful demonstration of MRFM-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as a microscopic characterization tool for thin magnetic films. Strong FMR spectra obtained from microscopic Co thin films (500 and 1000 angstroms thick and 40 x 200 microns in lateral extent) allowed us to observe variations in sample inhomogeneity and magnetic anisotropy field. We demonstrated lateral imaging in microscopic FMR for the first time using a novel approach employing a spatially selective local field generated by a small magnetically polarized spherical crystallite of yttrium iron garnet. These successful applications of the MRFM in materials studies provided the basis for our successful proposal to DOE/BES to employ the MRF M in studies of buried interfaces in magnetic materials.

  18. (Center of excellence: Microlaser microscope)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    This Center-of-Excellence grant has two components: development of an imaging system based on microlaser arrays forms a central project among a group of laser diagnostic and therapeutic efforts primarily funded outside the grant. In these first 8 months we have set up the Microlaser Microscope using small microlaser arrays. We have emphasized the basics of microlaser handling and electronic addressing and the optics of the microscope. Details of electronics and optics given here will be used in the larger arrays which should be available soon. After a description of the central Microlaser Microscope project, we touch briefly on the other projects of the Center, which have been outstandingly fruitful this year. Publications are necessarily concerned with the smaller projects, since the Microlaser Microscope is in its early stages.

  19. Microscopic Procedures for Plant Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braselton, James P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes laboratory techniques designed to familiarize students with meiosis and how microscopic preparations of meiosis are made. These techniques require the use of fresh or fixed flowers. Contains 18 references. (DDR)

  20. Scanning laser video camera/ microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. P.; Bow, R. T.

    1984-10-01

    A laser scanning system capable of scanning at standard video rate has been developed. The scanning mirrors, circuit design and system performance, as well as its applications to video cameras and ultra-violet microscopes, are discussed.

  1. [MICROSCOPIC COLITIS: THE CLINICAL CASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulygina, Y A; Skalinskaya, M I; Ageeva, T A

    2015-01-01

    During past years incidence and prevalence of microscopic colitis (MC) have increased, that is possible caused to the improvement of knowledge of doctors about the disease. This article contain modern views on epidemiology, diagnostic and variant of microscopic colitis treatment. A typical clinical picture of MC in the form of recurrent a watery diarrhea, with the absence of pathologic changes at roentgenologic and endoscopic investigations is described with the example of a clinical case.

  2. Thermodynamics of firms' growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Eduardo; Hernando, Alberto; Hernando, Ricardo; Plastino, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of firms' growth and firms' sizes is a topic under intense scrutiny. In this paper, we show that a thermodynamic model based on the maximum entropy principle, with dynamical prior information, can be constructed that adequately describes the dynamics and distribution of firms' growth. Our theoretical framework is tested against a comprehensive database of Spanish firms, which covers, to a very large extent, Spain's economic activity, with a total of 1 155 142 firms evolving along a full decade. We show that the empirical exponent of Pareto's law, a rule often observed in the rank distribution of large-size firms, is explained by the capacity of economic system for creating/destroying firms, and that can be used to measure the health of a capitalist-based economy. Indeed, our model predicts that when the exponent is larger than 1, creation of firms is favoured; when it is smaller than 1, destruction of firms is favoured instead; and when it equals 1 (matching Zipf's law), the system is in a full macroeconomic equilibrium, entailing ‘free’ creation and/or destruction of firms. For medium and smaller firm sizes, the dynamical regime changes, the whole distribution can no longer be fitted to a single simple analytical form and numerical prediction is required. Our model constitutes the basis for a full predictive framework regarding the economic evolution of an ensemble of firms. Such a structure can be potentially used to develop simulations and test hypothetical scenarios, such as economic crisis or the response to specific policy measures. PMID:26510828

  3. The Thermodynamical Arrow and the Historical Arrow; Are They Equivalent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Tamm

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the relationship between the thermodynamic and historical arrows of time is studied. In the context of a simple combinatorial model, their definitions are made more precise and in particular strong versions (which are not compatible with time symmetric microscopic laws and weak versions (which can be compatible with time symmetric microscopic laws are given. This is part of a larger project that aims to explain the arrows as consequences of a common time symmetric principle in the set of all possible universes. However, even if we accept that both arrows may have the same origin, this does not imply that they are equivalent, and it is argued that there can be situations where one arrow may be well-defined but the other is not.

  4. Condensation: Passenger Not Driver in Atmospheric Thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Jack Denur

    2016-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics states that processes yielding work or at least capable of yielding work are thermodynamically spontaneous, and that those costing work are thermodynamically nonspontaneous. Whether a process yields or costs heat is irrelevant. Condensation of water vapor yields work and hence is thermodynamically spontaneous only in a supersaturated atmosphere; in an unsaturated atmosphere it costs work and hence is thermodynamically nonspontaneous. Far more of Earth’s atmosp...

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of biogenic and synthetic polyamines conjugation with PAMAM-G4 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanphai, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-02-01

    We report the thermodynamic analysis of the bindings of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM-G4) nanoparticles with biogenic polyamines spermine (spm), spermidine (spmd) and synthetic polyamines 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane·4HCl (BE-333) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions. Multiple spectroscopic methods, thermodynamic parameters and molecular modelling were used to analyse polyamine bindings to PAMAM dendrimers. Thermodynamic parameters ΔS, ΔH and ΔG parameters showed that polyamines bind polymer through H-bonding and van der Waals contacts with biogenic polyamines form more stable conjugates than synthetic polyamines. Modelling showed that polyamines are located at the surface of PAMAM with the free binding energy of -3.56 (spermine), -3.88 (spermidine) and -3.13 kcal/mol (BE-333), indicating spontaneous polyamine-polymer interaction at room temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermodynamic anomaly in magnesium hydroxide decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, T.A.

    1983-08-01

    The Origin of the discrepancy in the equilibrium water vapor pressure measurements for the reaction Mg(OH)/sub 2/(s) = MgO(s) + H/sub 2/O(g) when determined by Knudsen effusion and static manometry at the same temperature was investigated. For this reaction undergoing continuous thermal decomposition in Knudsen cells, Kay and Gregory observed that by extrapolating the steady-state apparent equilibrium vapor pressure measurements to zero-orifice, the vapor pressure was approx. 10/sup -4/ of that previously established by Giauque and Archibald as the true thermodynamic equilibrium vapor pressure using statistical mechanical entropy calculations for the entropy of water vapor. This large difference in vapor pressures suggests the possibility of the formation in a Knudsen cell of a higher energy MgO that is thermodynamically metastable by about 48 kJ / mole. It has been shown here that experimental results are qualitatively independent of the type of Mg(OH)/sub 2/ used as a starting material, which confirms the inferences of Kay and Gregory. Thus, most forms of Mg(OH)/sub 2/ are considered to be the stable thermodynamic equilibrium form. X-ray diffraction results show that during the course of the reaction only the equilibrium NaCl-type MgO is formed, and no different phases result from samples prepared in Knudsen cells. Surface area data indicate that the MgO molar surface area remains constant throughout the course of the reaction at low decomposition temperatures, and no significant annealing occurs at less than 400/sup 0/C. Scanning electron microscope photographs show no change in particle size or particle surface morphology. Solution calorimetric measurements indicate no inherent hgher energy content in the MgO from the solid produced in Knudsen cells. The Knudsen cell vapor pressure discrepancy may reflect the formation of a transient metastable MgO or Mg(OH)/sub 2/-MgO solid solution during continuous thermal decomposition in Knudsen cells.

  7. Thermodynamics of weight loss diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fine Eugene J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonly held that "a calorie is a calorie", i.e. that diets of equal caloric content will result in identical weight change independent of macronutrient composition, and appeal is frequently made to the laws of thermodynamics. We have previously shown that thermodynamics does not support such a view and that diets of different macronutrient content may be expected to induce different changes in body mass. Low carbohydrate diets in particular have claimed a "metabolic advantage" meaning more weight loss than in isocaloric diets of higher carbohydrate content. In this review, for pedagogic clarity, we reframe the theoretical discussion to directly link thermodynamic inefficiency to weight change. The problem in outline: Is metabolic advantage theoretically possible? If so, what biochemical mechanisms might plausibly explain it? Finally, what experimental evidence exists to determine whether it does or does not occur? Results Reduced thermodynamic efficiency will result in increased weight loss. The laws of thermodynamics are silent on the existence of variable thermodynamic efficiency in metabolic processes. Therefore such variability is permitted and can be related to differences in weight lost. The existence of variable efficiency and metabolic advantage is therefore an empiric question rather than a theoretical one, confirmed by many experimental isocaloric studies, pending a properly performed meta-analysis. Mechanisms are as yet unknown, but plausible mechanisms at the metabolic level are proposed. Conclusions Variable thermodynamic efficiency due to dietary manipulation is permitted by physical laws, is supported by much experimental data, and may be reasonably explained by plausible mechanisms.

  8. Signatures of Solvation Thermodynamics in Spectra of Intermolecular Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the thermodynamic and vibrational properties of water in the three-dimensional environment of solvated ions and small molecules using molecular simulations. The spectrum of intermolecular vibrations in liquid solvents provides detailed information on the shape of the local potential energy surface, which in turn determines local thermodynamic properties such as the entropy. Here, we extract this information using a spatially resolved extension of the two-phase thermodynamics method to estimate hydration water entropies based on the local vibrational density of states (3D-2PT). Combined with an analysis of solute–water and water–water interaction energies, this allows us to resolve local contributions to the solvation enthalpy, entropy, and free energy. We use this approach to study effects of ions on their surrounding water hydrogen bond network, its spectrum of intermolecular vibrations, and resulting thermodynamic properties. In the three-dimensional environment of polar and nonpolar functional groups of molecular solutes, we identify distinct hydration water species and classify them by their characteristic vibrational density of states and molecular entropies. In each case, we are able to assign variations in local hydration water entropies to specific changes in the spectrum of intermolecular vibrations. This provides an important link for the thermodynamic interpretation of vibrational spectra that are accessible to far-infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy experiments. Our analysis provides unique microscopic details regarding the hydration of hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional groups, which enable us to identify interactions and molecular degrees of freedom that determine relevant contributions to the solvation entropy and consequently the free energy. PMID:28783431

  9. Signatures of Solvation Thermodynamics in Spectra of Intermolecular Vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Rasmus A X; Pattni, Viren; Singh, Anurag; Kast, Stefan M; Heyden, Matthias

    2017-09-12

    This study explores the thermodynamic and vibrational properties of water in the three-dimensional environment of solvated ions and small molecules using molecular simulations. The spectrum of intermolecular vibrations in liquid solvents provides detailed information on the shape of the local potential energy surface, which in turn determines local thermodynamic properties such as the entropy. Here, we extract this information using a spatially resolved extension of the two-phase thermodynamics method to estimate hydration water entropies based on the local vibrational density of states (3D-2PT). Combined with an analysis of solute-water and water-water interaction energies, this allows us to resolve local contributions to the solvation enthalpy, entropy, and free energy. We use this approach to study effects of ions on their surrounding water hydrogen bond network, its spectrum of intermolecular vibrations, and resulting thermodynamic properties. In the three-dimensional environment of polar and nonpolar functional groups of molecular solutes, we identify distinct hydration water species and classify them by their characteristic vibrational density of states and molecular entropies. In each case, we are able to assign variations in local hydration water entropies to specific changes in the spectrum of intermolecular vibrations. This provides an important link for the thermodynamic interpretation of vibrational spectra that are accessible to far-infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy experiments. Our analysis provides unique microscopic details regarding the hydration of hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional groups, which enable us to identify interactions and molecular degrees of freedom that determine relevant contributions to the solvation entropy and consequently the free energy.

  10. Spectroscopic analysis of optoelectronic semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with standard spectroscopic techniques which can be used to analyze semiconductor samples or devices, in both, bulk, micrometer and submicrometer scale. The book aims helping experimental physicists and engineers to choose the right analytical spectroscopic technique in order to get specific information about their specific demands. For this purpose, the techniques including technical details such as apparatus and probed sample region are described. More important, also the expected outcome from experiments is provided. This involves also the link to theory, that is not subject of this book, and the link to current experimental results in the literature which are presented in a review-like style. Many special spectroscopic techniques are introduced and their relationship to the standard techniques is revealed. Thus the book works also as a type of guide or reference book for people researching in optical spectroscopy of semiconductors.

  11. EEL spectroscopic tomography: Towards a new dimension in nanomaterials analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yedra, Lluis, E-mail: llyedra@el.ub.es [Laboratory of Electron Nanoscopies (LENS)-MIND/IN2UB, Dept. d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Marti Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); CCiT, Scientific and Technological Centers, Universitat de Barcelona, C/Lluis Sole i Sabaris 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Eljarrat, Alberto [Laboratory of Electron Nanoscopies (LENS)-MIND/IN2UB, Dept. d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Marti Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Arenal, Raul [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Fundacion ARAID, E-50004 Zaragoza (Spain); Pellicer, Eva; Cabo, Moises [Departament de Fisica, Facultat de Ciencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Lopez-Ortega, Alberto; Estrader, Marta [CIN2(CIN-CSIC) and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology, Campus de la UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Sort, Jordi [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Departament de Fisica, Facultat de Ciencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Baro, Maria Dolors [Departament de Fisica, Facultat de Ciencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); and others

    2012-11-15

    Electron tomography is a widely spread technique for recovering the three dimensional (3D) shape of nanostructured materials. Using a spectroscopic signal to achieve a reconstruction adds a fourth chemical dimension to the 3D structure. Up to date, energy filtering of the images in the transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) is the usual spectroscopic method even if most of the information in the spectrum is lost. Unlike EFTEM tomography, the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectrum images (SI) for tomographic reconstruction retains all chemical information, and the possibilities of this new approach still remain to be fully exploited. In this article we prove the feasibility of EEL spectroscopic tomography at low voltages (80 kV) and short acquisition times from data acquired using an aberration corrected instrument and data treatment by Multivariate Analysis (MVA), applied to Fe{sub x}Co{sub (3-x)}O{sub 4}@Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} mesoporous materials. This approach provides a new scope into materials; the recovery of full EELS signal in 3D. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EELS-SI tomography was performed at low voltage and low acquisition times. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MVA has been applied for noise reduction and information extraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tomographic reconstruction has been achieved for chemical information. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elemental distribution extraction in 3D has been proved.

  12. Microscope and method of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers.

  13. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a novel...... a quasipoint source with a spatial extension similar to the size of a dangling bond. [S0031-9007(98)08376-8]....

  14. Thermodynamics of quantum information scrambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Michele; Goold, John

    2017-06-01

    Scrambling of quantum information can conveniently be quantified by so-called out-of-time-order correlators (OTOCs), i.e., correlators of the type 〈[W_{τ},V]^{†}[W_{τ},V]〉, whose measurements present a formidable experimental challenge. Here we report on a method for the measurement of OTOCs based on the so-called two-point measurement scheme developed in the field of nonequilibrium quantum thermodynamics. The scheme is of broader applicability than methods employed in current experiments and provides a clear-cut interpretation of quantum information scrambling in terms of nonequilibrium fluctuations of thermodynamic quantities, such as work and heat. Furthermore, we provide a numerical example on a spin chain which highlights the utility of our thermodynamic approach when understanding the differences between integrable and ergodic behaviors. We also discuss how the method can be used to extend the reach of current experiments.

  15. Nanofluidics thermodynamic and transport properties

    CERN Document Server

    Michaelides, Efstathios E (Stathis)

    2014-01-01

    This volume offers a comprehensive examination of the subject of heat and mass transfer with nanofluids as well as a critical review of the past and recent research projects in this area. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of the transport processes using particle-fluid suspensions, such as nanofluids. The nanofluid research is examined and presented in a holistic way using a great deal of our experience with the subjects of continuum mechanics, statistical thermodynamics, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of transport processes. Using a thorough database, the experimental, analytical, and numerical advances of recent research in nanofluids are critically examined and connected to past research with medium and fine particles as well as to functional engineering systems. Promising applications and technological issues of heat/mass transfer system design with nanofluids are also discussed. This book also: Provides a deep scientific analysis of nanofluids using classical thermodynamics and statistical therm...

  16. Thermodynamics a complete undergraduate course

    CERN Document Server

    Steane, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    This is an undergraduate textbook in thermodynamics—the science of heat, work, temperature, and entropy. The text presents thermodynamics in and of itself, as an elegant and powerful set of ideas and methods. These methods open the way to understanding a very wide range of phenomena in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology. Starting out from an introduction of concepts at first year undergraduate level, the roles of temperature, internal energy, and entropy are explained via the laws of thermodynamics. The text employs a combination of examples, exercises, and careful discussion, with a view to conveying the feel of the subject as well as avoiding common misunderstandings. The Feynman–Smuluchowski ratchet, Szilard’s engine, and Maxwell’s daemon are used to elucidate entropy and the second law. Free energy and thermodynamic potentials are discussed at length, with applications to solids as well as fluids and flow processes. Thermal radiation is discussed, and the main ideas significant to global...

  17. The Thermodynamic Machinery of Life

    CERN Document Server

    Kurzynski, Michal

    2006-01-01

    Living organisms are open thermodynamic systems whose functional structure has developed and been kinetically frozen during the historical process of biological evolution. A thermodynamics of both nonequilibrium and complex systems is needed for their description. In this book, the foundations of such a thermodynamics are presented. Biological processes at the cellular level are considered as coupled chemical reactions and transport processes across internal and the cytoplasmic membrane. All these processes are catalyzed by specific enzymes hence the kinetics of enzymatic catalysis and its control are described here in detail. The coupling of several processes through a common enzyme is considered in the context of free energy or signal transduction. Special attention is paid to evidence for a rich stochastic internal dynamics of native proteins and its possible role in the control of enzyme activity and in the action of biological molecular machines.

  18. Statistical thermodynamics of clustered populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsoukas, Themis

    2014-08-01

    We present a thermodynamic theory for a generic population of M individuals distributed into N groups (clusters). We construct the ensemble of all distributions with fixed M and N, introduce a selection functional that embodies the physics that governs the population, and obtain the distribution that emerges in the scaling limit as the most probable among all distributions consistent with the given physics. We develop the thermodynamics of the ensemble and establish a rigorous mapping to regular thermodynamics. We treat the emergence of a so-called giant component as a formal phase transition and show that the criteria for its emergence are entirely analogous to the equilibrium conditions in molecular systems. We demonstrate the theory by an analytic model and confirm the predictions by Monte Carlo simulation.

  19. Microscopic colitis: a concise review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippi, M; Marcheggiano, A; Crispino, P; Occhigrossi, G; Severi, C

    2010-01-01

    Microscopic colitis is an increasingly common cause of chronic watery diarrhoea, and often a causes of abdominal pain of unknown origins. The increase of interest for this clinical entity is due to a misdiagnosis of any symptoms that have been frequently attributed to diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, often for many years before diagnosis. Presumably, most estimates of incidence and prevalence understate the true frequency of microscopic colitis for this reason. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the importance of microscopic colitis as cause of chronic non bloody diarrhoea, on the basis of literature review. These kind of colitis are characterized by normal colonic mucosa at endoscopy or barium enema but with increased inflammation in colonic biopsies. Microscopic colitis consists of two main subtypes, collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis, distinguished by the presence of absence of a thickened subepithelial collagen band. Several models of pathogenesis has been proposed but no convincing mechanism has been identified, although is difficult to characterize this clinical entity as an independent phenomenon or a simple manifestation or related factors active to induce microscopic changing in the colonic mucosa. A rational approach to therapy does not exist and was conduct with several types of drugs after the exclusion of other causes, commonly characterized by this symptoms and the definitive histological assessment in the biopsies specimens. In the majority of cases this condition tends to follow a self-limited course but potentially can assume the characteristics of relapsing course with the necessity to a chronic therapy. Several long-term follow-up studies excluded a possible progression to neoplastic malignancies of microscopic colitis.

  20. Atomic force microscope featuring an integrated optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to image the surface of both conductors and nonconductors. Biological specimens constitute a large group of nonconductors. A disadvantage of most AFM's is the fact that relatively large areas of the sample surface have to be scanned to pinpoint a biological

  1. An introduction to endoreversible thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann, Karl Heinz

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Reversible thermodynamic processes are convenient abstractions of real processes, which are always irreversible. Approaching the reversible regime means to become more and more quasistatic, letting behind processes which achieve any kind of finite transformation rate for the quantities studied. On the other hand studying processes with finite transformation rates means to deal with irreversibilities and in many cases these irreversibilities must be included in a realistic description of such processes. Endoreversible thermodynamics is a non-equilibrium approach in this direction by viewing a system as a network of internally reversible (endoreversible subsystems exchanging energy in an irreversible fashion. This material provides an introduction to the subject.

  2. Thermodynamic and solidification modeling coupled with experimental investigation of the multicomponent aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xinyan

    2001-07-01

    In order to obtain a thermodynamic description for the Al-Cu-Mg-Si quaternary system, three constituent binary systems, Al-Si, Cu-Si and Mg-Si, are first modeled based on the available experimental data, and the thermodynamic models used to describe the phases in the binary systems are presented. The calculated binary phase diagrams and the thermodynamic properties are in good agreement with the experimental data. Three constituent ternary systems, Al-Cu-Si, Al-Mg-Si and Cu-Mg-Si, are then modeled based on experimental data available in the literature. A thermodynamic description of the Al-Cu-Mg-Si system has been developed based on the established descriptions of its constituent binaries and ternaries as well as using data relating to the quaternary intermetallic compound Q-Al5Cu2Mg8Si6. The calculated quaternary phase diagrams, including invariant equilibria, isopleths and isotherms are in accord with the experimental data available in the literature. The phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of the Al-Cu-Mg-Si system can now be calculated from this thermodynamic description at any temperature and composition. A numerical microscopic model has been developed in the present study for the prediction of the microstructure and microsegregation in multicomponent alloys during dendritic solidification. This microscopic model is directly coupled with multicomponent phase diagram calculations using a user-friendly and robust phase diagram calculation engine-PANENGINE. Solid back diffusion, thermodynamic correction of the interface concentrations, undercooling and dendrite arm coarsening effects are included in this model. The experimentally measured or calculated cooling curves are input into the model to carry out the microsegregation calculations. To validate the microscopic model and the Al-Cu-Mg-Si thermodynamic description, microstructures and microsegregations in a Al-4.5wt%Cu binary alloy, as well as Al-4.5wt%Cu-1wt%Si-0.5wt%Mg and Al-6.27wt%Cu-0.22wt%Si-0

  3. Spectroscopic Classification of Two Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, S.; Blanchard, P.; Nicholl, M.; Berger, E.

    2018-02-01

    We obtained optical spectroscopic observations of 2 transients reported to the Transient Name Server by the ATLAS survey (Tonry et al. 2011, PASP, 123, 58; Tonry et al., ATel #8680) and the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST; Huber et al., ATel #7153; http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/).

  4. Microscopic theory of the one-particle excitation spectrum of normal Fermi systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodel' , V. A.; Shaginyan, V. R.

    1989-01-01

    A microscopic theory of one-particle excitations in normal Fermi systems is proposed in the framework of the density-functional method. A system of equations is obtained which makes it possible to calculate the effective mass of a quasiparticle, starting from the interaction between the particles in the vacuum. A system of equations for calculating the thermodynamic functions of heated nuclear matter is also proposed. The equations do not contain any parameters.

  5. Microscopic cross sections: An utopia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilaire, S. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF 91 (France); Koning, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, PO Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Goriely, S. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus de la Plaine, CP 226, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    The increasing need for cross sections far from the valley of stability poses a challenge for nuclear reaction models. So far, predictions of cross sections have relied on more or less phenomenological approaches, depending on parameters adjusted to available experimental data or deduced from systematical relations. While such predictions are expected to be reliable for nuclei not too far from the experimentally known regions, it is clearly preferable to use more fundamental approaches, based on sound physical bases, when dealing with very exotic nuclei. Thanks to the high computer power available today, all major ingredients required to model a nuclear reaction can now be (and have been) microscopically (or semi-microscopically) determined starting from the information provided by a nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. We have implemented all these microscopic ingredients in the TALYS nuclear reaction code, and we are now almost able to perform fully microscopic cross section calculations. The quality of these ingredients and the impact of using them instead of the usually adopted phenomenological parameters will be discussed. (authors)

  6. Curriculum Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curricula in microscopic anatomy offer an overview of the histology curriculum, note primary educational goals, outline specific content for general and oral histology, suggest prerequisites, and make recommendations for sequencing. Appropriate faculty and facilities are also suggested.…

  7. Phase sensitive scanning optical microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungerman, R.L.; Hobbs, P.C.D.; Kino, G.S.

    1984-10-15

    An electronically scanned optical microscope which quantitatively measures amplitude and phase is described. The system is insenstive to mechanical vibrations. The phase infromation makes it possible to measure surface height variations with an accuracy of better than 100 A and can also be used to improve the lateral resolution.

  8. Thermodynamic properties for polycyclic systems by non-calorimetric methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Klots, T.D.

    1993-03-01

    A detailed vibrational spectroscopic study of furan, pyrrole, and thiophene has been completed. These compounds form part of the base of five-membered ring systems on which the rest of the research program will be built Several methyl-substituted derivatives were also studied. The results will be used to confirm the model for alkyl- substitution in the ring systems. Gas-phase spectra and fundamental- frequency assignments were completed for 2,3- and 2,5-dihydrofuran. Those compounds initiate work on ring-puckering within the research program. A paper describing the need for third virial estimation, when using the virial equation of state to derive thermodynamic properties at pressures greater than 1 bar was completed.

  9. Microscope sterility during spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; O'Neill, Kevin R; Crosby, Colin G; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2012-04-01

    Prospective study. Assess the contamination rates of sterile microscope drapes after spine surgery. The use of the operating microscope has become more prevalent in certain spine procedures, providing superior magnification, visualization, and illumination of the operative field. However, it may represent an additional source of bacterial contamination and increase the risk of developing a postoperative infection. This study included 25 surgical spine cases performed by a single spine surgeon that required the use of the operative microscope. Sterile culture swabs were used to obtain samples from 7 defined locations on the microscope drape after its use during the operation. The undraped technician's console was sampled in each case as a positive control, and an additional 25 microscope drapes were swabbed immediately after they were applied to the microscope to obtain negative controls. Swab samples were assessed for bacterial growth on 5% sheep blood Columbia agar plates using a semiquantitative technique. No growth was observed on any of the 25 negative control drapes. In contrast, 100% of preoperative and 96% of postoperative positive controls demonstrated obvious contamination. In the postoperative group, all 7 sites of evaluation were found to be contaminated with rates of 12% to 44%. Four of the 7 evaluated locations were found to have significant contamination rates compared with negative controls, including the shafts of the optic eyepieces on the main surgeon side (24%, P = 0.022), "forehead" portion on both the main surgeon (24%, P = 0.022) and assistant sides (28%, P = 0.010), and "overhead" portion of the drape (44%, P = 0.0002). Bacterial contamination of the operative microscope was found to be significant after spine surgery. Contamination was more common around the optic eyepieces, likely due to inadvertent touching of unsterile portions. Similarly, all regions above the eyepieces also have a propensity for contamination because of unknown contact

  10. On thermodynamic limits of entropy densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moriya, H; Van Enter, A

    We give some sufficient conditions which guarantee that the entropy density in the thermodynamic limit is equal to the thermodynamic limit of the entropy densities of finite-volume (local) Gibbs states.

  11. Thermodynamics of asymptotically safe theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rischke, Dirk H.; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of a novel class of gauge-Yukawa theories that have recently been shown to be completely asymptotically safe, because their short-distance behaviour is determined by the presence of an interacting fixed point. Not only do all the coupling constants freeze...

  12. Thermodynamics of random number generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-06-01

    We analyze the thermodynamic costs of the three main approaches to generating random numbers via the recently introduced Information Processing Second Law. Given access to a specified source of randomness, a random number generator (RNG) produces samples from a desired target probability distribution. This differs from pseudorandom number generators (PRNGs) that use wholly deterministic algorithms and from true random number generators (TRNGs) in which the randomness source is a physical system. For each class, we analyze the thermodynamics of generators based on algorithms implemented as finite-state machines, as these allow for direct bounds on the required physical resources. This establishes bounds on heat dissipation and work consumption during the operation of three main classes of RNG algorithms—including those of von Neumann, Knuth, and Yao and Roche and Hoshi—and for PRNG methods. We introduce a general TRNG and determine its thermodynamic costs exactly for arbitrary target distributions. The results highlight the significant differences between the three main approaches to random number generation: One is work producing, one is work consuming, and the other is potentially dissipation neutral. Notably, TRNGs can both generate random numbers and convert thermal energy to stored work. These thermodynamic costs on information creation complement Landauer's limit on the irreducible costs of information destruction.

  13. Some Considerations about Thermodynamic Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, M. F. Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    After completing their introductory studies on thermodynamics at the university level, typically in a second-year university course, most students show a number of misconceptions. In this work, we identify some of those erroneous ideas and try to explain their origins. We also give a suggestion to attack the problem through a systematic and…

  14. Thermodynamics on the Molality Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.; Maheswaran, M.

    2013-01-01

    For physical measurements, the compositions of solutions, especially electrolyte solutions, are expressed in terms of molality rather than mole fractions. The development of the necessary thermodynamic equations directly in terms of molality is not common in textbooks, and the treatment in the literature is not very systematic. We develop a…

  15. One Antimatter— Two Possible Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Y. Klimenko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Conventional thermodynamics, which is formulated for our world populated by radiation and matter, can be extended to describe physical properties of antimatter in two mutually exclusive ways: CP-invariant or CPT-invariant. Here we refer to invariance of physical laws under charge (C, parity (P and time reversal (T transformations. While in quantum field theory CPT invariance is a theorem confirmed by experiments, the symmetry principles applied to macroscopic phenomena or to the whole of the Universe represent only hypotheses. Since both versions of thermodynamics are different only in their treatment of antimatter, but are the same in describing our world dominated by matter, making a clear experimentally justified choice between CP invariance and CPT invariance in context of thermodynamics is not possible at present. This work investigates the comparative properties of the CP- and CPT-invariant extensions of thermodynamics (focusing on the latter, which is less conventional than the former and examines conditions under which these extensions can be experimentally tested.

  16. Conformal Gauge Transformations in Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bravetti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we show that the thermodynamic phase space is naturally endowed with a non-integrable connection, defined by all of those processes that annihilate the Gibbs one-form, i.e., reversible processes. We argue that such a connection is invariant under re-scalings of the connection one-form, whilst, as a consequence of the non-integrability of the connection, its curvature is not and, therefore, neither is the associated pseudo-Riemannian geometry. We claim that this is not surprising, since these two objects are associated with irreversible processes. Moreover, we provide the explicit form in which all of the elements of the geometric structure of the thermodynamic phase space change under a re-scaling of the connection one-form. We call this transformation of the geometric structure a conformal gauge transformation. As an example, we revisit the change of the thermodynamic representation and consider the resulting change between the two metrics on the thermodynamic phase space, which induce Weinhold’s energy metric and Ruppeiner’s entropy metric. As a by-product, we obtain a proof of the well-known conformal relation between Weinhold’s and Ruppeiner’s metrics along the equilibrium directions. Finally, we find interesting properties of the almost para-contact structure and of its eigenvectors, which may be of physical interest.

  17. Thermodynamic basis for cluster kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Lina; Bian, Xiufang; Qin, Xubo

    2006-01-01

    Due to the inaccessibility of the supercooled region of marginal metallic glasses (MMGs) within the experimental time window, we study the cluster kinetics above the liquidus temperature, Tl, to acquire information on the fragility of the MMG systems. Thermodynamic basis for the stability...

  18. THERMODYNAMICS USED IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermodynamics is a science in which energy transformations are studied as well as their relationships to the changes in the chemical properties of a system. It is the fundamental basis of many engineering fields. The profession of environmental engineering is no exception. In pa...

  19. A Simple Statistical Thermodynamics Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Comparing the predicted and actual rolls of combinations of both two and three dice can help to introduce many of the basic concepts of statistical thermodynamics, including multiplicity, probability, microstates, and macrostates, and demonstrate that entropy is indeed a measure of randomness, that disordered states (those of higher entropy) are…

  20. Simulating Metabolism with Statistical Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William R.

    2014-01-01

    New methods are needed for large scale modeling of metabolism that predict metabolite levels and characterize the thermodynamics of individual reactions and pathways. Current approaches use either kinetic simulations, which are difficult to extend to large networks of reactions because of the need for rate constants, or flux-based methods, which have a large number of feasible solutions because they are unconstrained by the law of mass action. This report presents an alternative modeling approach based on statistical thermodynamics. The principles of this approach are demonstrated using a simple set of coupled reactions, and then the system is characterized with respect to the changes in energy, entropy, free energy, and entropy production. Finally, the physical and biochemical insights that this approach can provide for metabolism are demonstrated by application to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of Escherichia coli. The reaction and pathway thermodynamics are evaluated and predictions are made regarding changes in concentration of TCA cycle intermediates due to 10- and 100-fold changes in the ratio of NAD+:NADH concentrations. Finally, the assumptions and caveats regarding the use of statistical thermodynamics to model non-equilibrium reactions are discussed. PMID:25089525

  1. Simulating metabolism with statistical thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William R

    2014-01-01

    New methods are needed for large scale modeling of metabolism that predict metabolite levels and characterize the thermodynamics of individual reactions and pathways. Current approaches use either kinetic simulations, which are difficult to extend to large networks of reactions because of the need for rate constants, or flux-based methods, which have a large number of feasible solutions because they are unconstrained by the law of mass action. This report presents an alternative modeling approach based on statistical thermodynamics. The principles of this approach are demonstrated using a simple set of coupled reactions, and then the system is characterized with respect to the changes in energy, entropy, free energy, and entropy production. Finally, the physical and biochemical insights that this approach can provide for metabolism are demonstrated by application to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of Escherichia coli. The reaction and pathway thermodynamics are evaluated and predictions are made regarding changes in concentration of TCA cycle intermediates due to 10- and 100-fold changes in the ratio of NAD+:NADH concentrations. Finally, the assumptions and caveats regarding the use of statistical thermodynamics to model non-equilibrium reactions are discussed.

  2. Multi-scale thermodynamic analysis method for 2D SiC/SiC composite turbine guide vanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin LIU

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC turbine guide vanes possess multi-scale stress and strain with inhomogeneity at the microscopic scale. Given that the macroscopic distribution cannot reflect the microscopic stress fluctuation, the macroscopic method fails to meet the requirements of stress and strain analysis of CMC turbine guide vanes. Furthermore, the complete thermodynamic properties of 2D woven SiC/SiC-CMC cannot be obtained through experimentation. Accordingly, a method to calculate the thermodynamic properties of CMC and analyze multi-scale stress and strain of the turbine guide vanes should be established. In this study, the multi-scale thermodynamic analysis is investigated. The thermodynamic properties of Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI processed SiC/SiC-CMC are predicted by a Representative Volume Element (RVE model with porosity, leading to the result that the relative error between the calculated in-plane tensile modulus and the experimental value is 4.2%. The macroscopic response of a guide vane under given conditions is predicted. The relative error between the predicted strain on the trailing edge and the experimental value is 9.7%. The calculation of the stress distribution of micro-scale RVE shows that the maximum value of microscopic stress, which is located in the interlayer matrix, is more than 1.5 times that of macroscopic stress in the same direction and the microscopic stress distribution of the interlayer matrix is related to the pore distribution of the composite.

  3. Chemical Thermodynamics and Information Theory with Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    Thermodynamics and information touch theory every facet of chemistry. However, the physical chemistry curriculum digested by students worldwide is still heavily skewed toward heat/work principles established more than a century ago. Rectifying this situation, Chemical Thermodynamics and Information Theory with Applications explores applications drawn from the intersection of thermodynamics and information theory--two mature and far-reaching fields. In an approach that intertwines information science and chemistry, this book covers: The informational aspects of thermodynamic state equations The

  4. Thermodynamics of statistical inference by cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Alex H; Fisher, Charles K; Mora, Thierry; Mehta, Pankaj

    2014-10-03

    The deep connection between thermodynamics, computation, and information is now well established both theoretically and experimentally. Here, we extend these ideas to show that thermodynamics also places fundamental constraints on statistical estimation and learning. To do so, we investigate the constraints placed by (nonequilibrium) thermodynamics on the ability of biochemical signaling networks to estimate the concentration of an external signal. We show that accuracy is limited by energy consumption, suggesting that there are fundamental thermodynamic constraints on statistical inference.

  5. Some Trends in Quantum Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. von Spakovsky

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional answers to what the 2nd Law is are well known. Some are based on the microstate of a system wandering rapidly through all accessible phase space, while others are based on the idea of a system occupying an initial multitude of states due to the inevitable imperfections of measurements that then effectively, in a coarse grained manner, grow in time (mixing. What has emerged are two somewhat less traditional approaches from which it is said that the 2nd Law emerges, namely, that of the theory of quantum open systems and that of the theory of typicality. These are the two principal approaches, which form the basis of what today has come to be called quantum thermodynamics. However, their dynamics remains strictly linear and unitary, and, as a number of recent publications have emphasized, “testing the unitary propagation of pure states alone cannot rule out a nonlinear propagation of mixtures”. Thus, a non-traditional approach to capturing such a propagation would be one which complements the postulates of QM by the 2nd Law of thermodynamics, resulting in a possibly meaningful, nonlinear dynamics. An unorthodox approach, which does just that, is intrinsic quantum thermodynamics and its mathematical framework, steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics. The latter has evolved into an effective tool for modeling the dynamics of reactive and non-reactive systems at atomistic scales. It is the usefulness of this framework in the context of quantum thermodynamics as well as the theory of typicality which are discussed here in some detail. A brief discussion of some other trends such as those related to work, work extraction, and fluctuation theorems is also presented.

  6. The thermodynamic cube: A mnemonic and learning device for students of classical thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Stephen F.

    1999-12-01

    The "thermodynamic cube," a mnemonic device for learning and recalling thermodynamic relations, is introduced. The cube is an extension of the familiar "thermodynamic square" seen in many textbooks. The cube reproduces the functions of the usual thermodynamic squares and incorporates the Euler relations which are not as well known.

  7. A Derivation of a Microscopic Entropy and Time Irreversibility From the Discreteness of Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Riek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The basic microsopic physical laws are time reversible. In contrast, the second law of thermodynamics, which is a macroscopic physical representation of the world, is able to describe irreversible processes in an isolated system through the change of entropy ΔS > 0. It is the attempt of the present manuscript to bridge the microscopic physical world with its macrosocpic one with an alternative approach than the statistical mechanics theory of Gibbs and Boltzmann. It is proposed that time is discrete with constant step size. Its consequence is the presence of time irreversibility at the microscopic level if the present force is of complex nature (F(r ≠ const. In order to compare this discrete time irreversible mechamics (for simplicity a “classical”, single particle in a one dimensional space is selected with its classical Newton analog, time reversibility is reintroduced by scaling the time steps for any given time step n by the variable sn leading to the Nosé-Hoover Lagrangian. The corresponding Nos´e-Hoover Hamiltonian comprises a term Ndf kB T ln sn (kB the Boltzmann constant, T the temperature, and Ndf the number of degrees of freedom which is defined as the microscopic entropy Sn at time point n multiplied by T. Upon ensemble averaging this microscopic entropy Sn in equilibrium for a system which does not have fast changing forces approximates its macroscopic counterpart known from thermodynamics. The presented derivation with the resulting analogy between the ensemble averaged microscopic entropy and its thermodynamic analog suggests that the original description of the entropy by Boltzmann and Gibbs is just an ensemble averaging of the time scaling variable sn which is in equilibrium close to 1, but that the entropy

  8. Microscopic analysis of currency and stock exchange markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kador, L

    1999-08-01

    Recently it was shown that distributions of short-term price fluctuations in foreign-currency exchange exhibit striking similarities to those of velocity differences in turbulent flows. Similar profiles represent the spectral-diffusion behavior of impurity molecules in disordered solids at low temperatures. It is demonstrated that a microscopic statistical theory of the spectroscopic line shapes can be applied to the other two phenomena. The theory interprets the financial data in terms of information which becomes available to the traders and their reactions as a function of time. The analysis shows that there is no characteristic time scale in financial markets, but that instead stretched-exponential or algebraic memory functions yield good agreement with the price data. For an algebraic function, the theory yields truncated Lévy distributions which are often observed in stock exchange markets.

  9. Bioengineering Thermodynamics: An Engineering Science for Thermodynamics of Biosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Cells are open complex thermodynamic systems. Energy transformations, thermo-electro-chemical processes and transports occur across the cells membranes. Different thermo-electro-biochemical behaviours occur between health and disease states. Moreover, living systems waste heat, the result of the internal irreversibility. This heat is dissipated into the environment. But, this wasted heat represent a sort of information, which outflows from the cell toward its environment, completely accessibl...

  10. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of gametes...

  11. Microscope Project for Undergraduate Laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Chippendale, Rachel Kemp Alexander; Shumway, Jennifer; Tan, Amanda; Zuraw, Sarah; Ross, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Optics is an important subfield of physics required for instrument design and used in a variety of other disciplines, including materials science, physics, and life sciences such as developmental biology and cell biology. It is important to educate students from a variety of disciplines and backgrounds in the basics of optics in order to train the next generation of interdisciplinary researchers and instrumentalists who will push the boundaries of discovery. In this paper, we present an experimental system developed to teach students in the basics of geometric optics, including ray and wave optics. The students learn these concepts through designing, building, and testing a home-built light microscope made from component parts. We describe the experimental equipment and basic measurements students can perform to learn principles, technique, accuracy, and resolution of measurement. Students find the magnification and test the resolution of the microscope system they build. The system is open and versatile to a...

  12. Microscopic colitis: a therapeutic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guslandi, Mario

    2013-06-21

    The treatment of microscopic colitis is mainly based on the use of budesonide, the only drug found effective in controlled clinical trials. After an initial course at a dose of 9 mg daily, however, most patients relapse when the drug is discontinued, hence a maintenance therapy at doses of 6 mg daily or lower is necessary. In order to avoid steroid dependence and drug toxicity different pharmacological agents should be considered as an alternative to indefinite long-term budesonide treatment. Evidence-based guidelines are currently lacking due to the lack of conclusive data concerning the use of either immunosuppressive or anti-tumor necrosis factor agents. For the time being in clinical practice the skilled physician should therefore tailor long term management of microscopic colitis on the single patient.

  13. Coupling between chemical kinetics and mechanics that is both nonlinear and compatible with thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klika, Václav; Grmela, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by biological applications (e.g., bone tissue development and regeneration) we investigate coupling between mesoscopic mechanics and chemical kinetics. Governing equations of both dynamical systems are first written in a form expressing manifestly their compatibility with microscopic mechanics and thermodynamics. The same form is then required from governing equations of the coupled dynamics. The main result of the paper is an admissible form of the coupled dynamics.

  14. The 1997 spectroscopic GEISA databank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Arie, E.; Ballard, J.; Barbe, A.; Bjoraker, G.; Bonnet, B.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Champion, J. P.; Chedin, A.; Chursin, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Duxbury, G.; Flaud, J.-M.; Fourrie, N.; Fayt, A.; Graner, G.; Gamache, R.; Goldman, A.; Golovko, V.; Guelachvili, G.; Hartmann, J. M.; Hilico, J. C.; Hillman, J.; Lefevre, G.; Lellouch, E.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nemtchinov, V.; Newnham, D. A.; Nikitin, A.; Orphal, J.; Perrin, A.; Reuter, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Rosenmann, L.; Rothman, L. S.; Scott, N. A.; Selby, J.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Sirota, J. M.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, K. M.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Tipping, R. H.; Urban, S.; Varanasi, P.; Weber, M.

    1999-05-01

    The current version GEISA-97 of the computer-accessible database system GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) is described. This catalogue contains 1,346,266 entries. These are the spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located between 0 and 22656 cm-1. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the giant planets. GEISA-97 contains also a catalog of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. The modifications and improvements made to the earlier edition (GEISA-92) and the data management software are described.

  15. Classical thermodynamics of non-electrolyte solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Van Ness, H C

    1964-01-01

    Classical Thermodynamics of Non-Electrolyte Solutions covers the historical development of classical thermodynamics that concerns the properties of vapor and liquid solutions of non-electrolytes. Classical thermodynamics is a network of equations, developed through the formal logic of mathematics from a very few fundamental postulates and leading to a great variety of useful deductions. This book is composed of seven chapters and begins with discussions on the fundamentals of thermodynamics and the thermodynamic properties of fluids. The succeeding chapter presents the equations of state for

  16. Quantum Chemical Methods for the Prediction of Energetic, Physical, and Spectroscopic Properties of Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izgorodina, Ekaterina I; Seeger, Zoe L; Scarborough, David L A; Tan, Samuel Y S

    2017-05-24

    The accurate prediction of physicochemical properties of condensed systems is a longstanding goal of theoretical (quantum) chemistry. Ionic liquids comprising entirely of ions provide a unique challenge in this respect due to the diverse chemical nature of available ions and the complex interplay of intermolecular interactions among them, thus resulting in the wide variability of physicochemical properties, such as thermodynamic, transport, and spectroscopic properties. It is well understood that intermolecular forces are directly linked to physicochemical properties of condensed systems, and therefore, an understanding of this relationship would greatly aid in the design and synthesis of functionalized materials with tailored properties for an application at hand. This review aims to give an overview of how electronic structure properties obtained from quantum chemical methods such as interaction/binding energy and its fundamental components, dipole moment, polarizability, and orbital energies, can help shed light on the energetic, physical, and spectroscopic properties of semi-Coulomb systems such as ionic liquids. Particular emphasis is given to the prediction of their thermodynamic, transport, spectroscopic, and solubilizing properties.

  17. Duties to Extraterrestrial Microscopic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, C. S.

    Formulating a normative axiology for the treatment of extraterrestrial microscopic organisms, should they ever be found, requires an extension of environmental ethics to beyond the Earth. Using an ethical framework for the treatment of terrestrial micro-organisms, this paper elaborates a similar ethic for the treatment of extraterrestrial microscopic organisms. An ethic of `teloempathy' allows for the moral considerability of any organism that has `interests', based on rudimentary qualities of conativism, and therefore allows for an identical treatment of all life, related or not related to life on Earth. Although, according to this ethic, individual extraterrestrial microscopic organisms have a good of their own and even `rights', at this level the ethic can only be theoretical, allowing for the inevitable destruction of many individual organisms during the course of human exploratory missions, similarly to the daily destruction of microbes by humans on Earth. A holistic teloempathy, an operative ethic, not only provides a framework for human exploration, but it also has important implications for planetary protection and proposals to implement planetary-scale atmospheric alterations on other bodies. Even prior to the discovery of extraterrestrial life, or the discovery of a complete absence of such life, this exercise yields important insights into the moral philosophy that guides our treatment of terrestrial micro-organisms.

  18. Spectroscopic Classification of Seven Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, P.; Gomez, S.; Nicholl, M.; Berger, E.

    2018-01-01

    We obtained optical spectroscopic observations of 7 transients reported to the Transient Name Server by the ATLAS survey (Tonry et al. 2011, PASP, 123, 58; Tonry et al., ATel #8680), the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST; Huber et al., ATel #7153; http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/), DPAC and the ESA Gaia Photometric Science Alerts Team (http://gsaweb.ast.cam.ac.uk/alerts), and the Tsinghua University-National Astronomical Observatories of China Transient Survey (TNTS).

  19. Multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehle, Jean-Louis [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Samartzis, Peter C., E-mail: sama@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Stamataki, Katerina [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Voutes, 71003, Heraklion (Greece); Piel, Jean-Philippe [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Katsoprinakis, George E.; Papadakis, Vassilis [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Schimowski, Xavier [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Rakitzis, T. Peter [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, Voutes, 71003, Heraklion (Greece); Loppinet, Benoit [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece)

    2014-03-31

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is an established technique, particularly useful for thickness measurements of thin films. It measures polarization rotation after a single reflection of a beam of light on the measured substrate at a given incidence angle. In this paper, we report the development of multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry where the light beam reflects multiple times on the sample. We have investigated both theoretically and experimentally the effect of sample reflectivity, number of reflections (passes), angles of incidence and detector dynamic range on ellipsometric observables tanΨ and cosΔ. The multiple pass approach provides increased sensitivity to small changes in Ψ and Δ, opening the way for single measurement determination of optical thickness T, refractive index n and absorption coefficient k of thin films, a significant improvement over the existing techniques. Based on our results, we discuss the strengths, the weaknesses and possible applications of this technique. - Highlights: • We present multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry (MPSE), a multi-pass approach to ellipsometry. • Different detectors, samples, angles of incidence and number of passes were tested. • N passes improve polarization ratio sensitivity to the power of N. • N reflections improve phase shift sensitivity by a factor of N. • MPSE can significantly improve thickness measurements in thin films.

  20. Gravity and/is Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, T

    2015-01-01

    The equations of motion describing all physical systems, except gravity, remain invariant if a constant is added to the Lagrangian. In the conventional approach, gravitational theories break this symmetry exhibited by all other physical systems. Restoring this symmetry to gravity and demanding that gravitational field equations should also remain invariant under the addition of a constant to a Lagrangian, leads to the interpretation of gravity as the thermodynamic limit of the kinetic theory of atoms of space. This approach selects, in a very natural fashion, Einstein's general relativity in $d=4$. Developing this paradigm at a deeper level, one can obtain the distribution function for the atoms of space and connect it up with the thermodynamic description of spacetime. This extension relies on a curious fact that the quantum spacetime endows each event with a finite area but zero volume. This approach allows us determine the numerical value of the cosmological constant and suggests a new perspective on cosmo...

  1. Thermodynamic Measure for Nonequilibrium Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Grandpierre

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most fundamental laws of Nature is formulated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. At present, in its usual formulation the central concept is entropy characterized in terms of equilibrium state variables. We point out that because thermodynamic changes arise when systems are out of equilibrium and because entropy is not a natural state variable characterizing non-equilibrium states, a new formulation of the Second Law is required. In this paper, we introduce a new, more general, but still entropic measure that is suitable in non-equilibrium conditions as well. This new entropic measure has given a name extropy. The introduction of extropy allows us to formulate the Second Law in a more suitable and precise form, and it resolves some conceptual difficulties related to the interpretation of entropy. We point out that extropy has a fundamental significance in physics, in biology, and in our scientific worldview.

  2. Thermodynamic Model of Spatial Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Miron; Allen, P.

    1998-03-01

    We develop and test a thermodynamic model of spatial memory. Our model is an application of statistical thermodynamics to cognitive science. It is related to applications of the statistical mechanics framework in parallel distributed processes research. Our macroscopic model allows us to evaluate an entropy associated with spatial memory tasks. We find that older adults exhibit higher levels of entropy than younger adults. Thurstone's Law of Categorical Judgment, according to which the discriminal processes along the psychological continuum produced by presentations of a single stimulus are normally distributed, is explained by using a Hooke spring model of spatial memory. We have also analyzed a nonlinear modification of the ideal spring model of spatial memory. This work is supported by NIH/NIA grant AG09282-06.

  3. Thermodynamic Calculations for Systems Biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu, Rohana; Gundersen, Maria T.; Woodley, John M.

    2015-01-01

    ‘Systems Biocatalysis’ is a term describing multi-enzyme processes in vitro for the synthesis of chemical products. Unlike in-vivo systems, such an artificial metabolism can be controlled in a highly efficient way in order to achieve a sufficiently favourable conversion for a given target product...... the transamination of a pro-chiral ketone into a chiral amine (interesting in many pharmaceutical applications). Here, the products are often less energetically stable than the reactants, meaning that the reaction may be thermodynamically unfavourable. As in nature, such thermodynamically-challenged reactions can...... energy change, View the MathML source ΔGro′, of the overall cascade. The findings show that unfavourable reactions in the cascade can be improved by coupling to a favourable reaction giving more energetically stable products....

  4. Statistical Thermodynamics of Economic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Quevedo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We formulate the thermodynamics of economic systems in terms of an arbitrary probability distribution for a conserved economic quantity. As in statistical physics, thermodynamic macroeconomic variables emerge as the mean value of microeconomic variables, and their determination is reduced to the computation of the partition function, starting from an arbitrary function. Explicit hypothetical examples are given which include linear and nonlinear economic systems as well as multiplicative systems such as those dominated by a Pareto law distribution. It is shown that the macroeconomic variables can be drastically changed by choosing the microeconomic variables in an appropriate manner. We propose to use the formalism of phase transitions to study severe changes of macroeconomic variables.

  5. Statistical thermodynamics of nonequilibrium processes

    CERN Document Server

    Keizer, Joel

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the theory ofthermodynamics has changed enormously since its inception in the middle of the nineteenth century. Shortly after Thomson and Clausius enunciated their versions of the Second Law, Clausius, Maxwell, and Boltzmann began actively pursuing the molecular basis of thermo­ dynamics, work that culminated in the Boltzmann equation and the theory of transport processes in dilute gases. Much later, Onsager undertook the elucidation of the symmetry oftransport coefficients and, thereby, established himself as the father of the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Com­ bining the statistical ideas of Gibbs and Langevin with the phenomenological transport equations, Onsager and others went on to develop a consistent statistical theory of irreversible processes. The power of that theory is in its ability to relate measurable quantities, such as transport coefficients and thermodynamic derivatives, to the results of experimental measurements. As powerful as that theory is, it is linear and...

  6. Living matter observations with a novel hyperspectral supercontinuum confocal microscope for VIS to near-IR reflectance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, Francesca R; Ferrari, Luisa; Mussi, Valentina; Botti, Elisabetta; Costanzo, Antonio; Selci, Stefano

    2013-10-25

    A broad range hyper-spectroscopic microscope fed by a supercontinuum laser source and equipped with an almost achromatic optical layout is illustrated with detailed explanations of the design, implementation and data. The real novelty of this instrument, a confocal spectroscopic microscope capable of recording high resolution reflectance data in the VIS-IR spectral range from about 500 nm to 2.5 μm wavelengths, is the possibility of acquiring spectral data at every physical point as defined by lateral coordinates, X and Y, as well as at a depth coordinate, Z, as obtained by the confocal optical sectioning advantage. With this apparatus we collect each single scanning point as a whole spectrum by combining two linear spectral detector arrays, one CCD for the visible range, and one InGaAs infrared array, simultaneously available at the sensor output channel of the home made instrument. This microscope has been developed for biomedical analysis of human skin and other similar applications. Results are shown illustrating the technical performances of the instrument and the capability in extracting information about the composition and the structure of different parts or compartments in biological samples as well as in solid statematter. A complete spectroscopic fingerprinting of samples at microscopic level is shown possible by using statistical analysis on raw data or analytical reflectance models based on Abelés matrix transfer methods.

  7. Living Matter Observations with a Novel Hyperspectral Supercontinuum Confocal Microscope for VIS to Near-IR Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca R. Bertani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A broad range hyper-spectroscopic microscope fed by a supercontinuum laser source and equipped with an almost achromatic optical layout is illustrated with detailed explanations of the design, implementation and data. The real novelty of this instrument, a confocal spectroscopic microscope capable of recording high resolution reflectance data in the VIS-IR spectral range from about 500 nm to 2.5 μm wavelengths, is the possibility of acquiring spectral data at every physical point as defined by lateral coordinates, X and Y, as well as at a depth coordinate, Z, as obtained by the confocal optical sectioning advantage. With this apparatus we collect each single scanning point as a whole spectrum by combining two linear spectral detector arrays, one CCD for the visible range, and one InGaAs infrared array, simultaneously available at the sensor output channel of the home made instrument. This microscope has been developed for biomedical analysis of human skin and other similar applications. Results are shown illustrating the technical performances of the instrument and the capability in extracting information about the composition and the structure of different parts or compartments in biological samples as well as in solid statematter. A complete spectroscopic fingerprinting of samples at microscopic level is shown possible by using statistical analysis on raw data or analytical reflectance models based on Abelés matrix transfer methods.

  8. Toward Improved Understanding of the Physical Meaning of Entropy in Classical Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Akih-Kumgeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The year 2015 marked the 150th anniversary of “entropy” as a concept in classical thermodynamics. Despite its central role in the mathematical formulation of the Second Law and most of classical thermodynamics, its physical meaning continues to be elusive and confusing. This is especially true when we seek a reconstruction of the classical thermodynamics of a system from the statistical behavior of its constituent microscopic particles or vice versa. This paper sketches the classical definition by Clausius and offers a modified mathematical definition that is intended to improve its conceptual meaning. In the modified version, the differential of specific entropy appears as a non-dimensional energy term that captures the invigoration or reduction of microscopic motion upon addition or withdrawal of heat from the system. It is also argued that heat transfer is a better model process to illustrate entropy; the canonical heat engines and refrigerators often used to illustrate this concept are not very relevant to new areas of thermodynamics (e.g., thermodynamics of biological systems. It is emphasized that entropy changes, as invoked in the Second Law, are necessarily related to the non-equilibrium interactions of two or more systems that might have initially been in thermal equilibrium but at different temperatures. The overall direction of entropy increase indicates the direction of naturally occurring heat transfer processes in an isolated system that consists of internally interacting (non-isolated sub systems. We discuss the implication of the proposed modification on statements of the Second Law, interpretation of entropy in statistical thermodynamics, and the Third Law.

  9. Fundamentals of Nano-Thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, M.; Mahler, G.; Hess, O.

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress in the synthesis and processing of nano-structured materials and systems calls for an improved understanding of thermal properties on small length scales. In this context, the question whether thermodynamics and, in particular, the concept of temperature can apply on the nanoscale is of central interest. Here we consider a quantum system consisting of a regular chain of elementary subsystems with nearest neighbour interactions and assume that the total system is in a canonical...

  10. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas; Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-01-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature?pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variatio...

  11. Thermodynamic properties of sea air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Feistel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Very accurate thermodynamic potential functions are available for fluid water, ice, seawater and humid air covering wide ranges of temperature and pressure conditions. They permit the consistent computation of all equilibrium properties as, for example, required for coupled atmosphere-ocean models or the analysis of observational or experimental data. With the exception of humid air, these potential functions are already formulated as international standards released by the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS, and have been adopted in 2009 for oceanography by IOC/UNESCO.

    In this paper, we derive a collection of formulas for important quantities expressed in terms of the thermodynamic potentials, valid for typical phase transitions and composite systems of humid air and water/ice/seawater. Particular attention is given to equilibria between seawater and humid air, referred to as "sea air" here. In a related initiative, these formulas will soon be implemented in a source-code library for easy practical use. The library is primarily aimed at oceanographic applications but will be relevant to air-sea interaction and meteorology as well.

    The formulas provided are valid for any consistent set of suitable thermodynamic potential functions. Here we adopt potential functions from previous publications in which they are constructed from theoretical laws and empirical data; they are briefly summarized in the appendix. The formulas make use of the full accuracy of these thermodynamic potentials, without additional approximations or empirical coefficients. They are expressed in the temperature scale ITS-90 and the 2008 Reference-Composition Salinity Scale.

  12. Chiral thermodynamics of nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorilla, Salvatore

    2012-10-23

    The equation of state of nuclear matter is calculated at finite temperature in the framework of in-medium chiral perturbation theory up to three-loop order. The dependence of its thermodynamic properties on the isospin-asymmetry is investigated. The chiral quark condensate is evaluated for symmetric nuclear matter. Its behaviour as a function of density and temperature sets important nuclear physics constraints for the QCD phase diagram.

  13. Thermodynamic aspects of therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlandingham, Sean C; Kurz, Michael C; Wang, Henry E

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is an important treatment for post-cardiac arrest syndrome. Despite its widespread practice, only limited data describe the thermodynamic aspects of heat transfer during TH. This paper reviews the principles of human body heat balance and provides a conceptual model for characterizing heat exchange during TH. The model may provide a framework for computer simulation for improving training in or clinical methods of TH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Thermodynamics of Exercise Science

    OpenAIRE

    Simeoni, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the “human body engine” via a thermodynamics-based model that considers the work associated with gas pressure, volume and temperature changes for the glucose-based equation of respiration. The efficacy of the model is supported by prior studies that: accurately predict the slow component of oxygen uptake kinetics; quantitatively explain observed race splitting strategies within endurance events; and accurately predict maximum velocities in endurance swimming. These pr...

  15. Thermodynamic functions of arsenic selenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babanly, D. M.; Velieva, G. M.; Imamaliyeva, S. Z.; Babanly, M. B.

    2017-07-01

    The solid-phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of an As-Se system are studied using the electromotive force (EMF). The existence of compounds As2Se3, AsSe, and As4Se3 in a system with near constant composition is confirmed. The relative partial molar functions, standard Gibbs free energies, enthalpies of formation, and standard entropies of As in the alloys are calculated using EMF measurements.

  16. Hadron melting and QCD thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Jakovac, A.

    2013-01-01

    We study in this paper mechanisms of hadron melting based on the spectral representation of hadronic quantum channels, and examine the hadron width dependence of the pressure. The findings are applied to a statistical hadron model of QCD thermodynamics, where hadron masses are distributed by the Hagedorn model and a uniform mechanism for producing hadron widths is assumed. According to this model the hadron - quark gluon plasma transition occurs at $T\\approx 200$-250 MeV, the numerically obse...

  17. Force microscopic and thermodynamic analysis of the adhesion between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa expresses a plethora of virulence factors and many species have developed warning systems to detect and evade P. aeruginosa. Candida albicans detects P. aeruginosa by sensing the secreted bacterial quorum sensing molecule 3OC(12)HSL and responds by reverting to the yeast

  18. Force microscopic and thermodynamic analysis of the adhesion between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovchinnikova, E.S.; Krom, B.P.; van der Mei, H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa expresses a plethora of virulence factors and many species have developed warning systems to detect and evade P. aeruginosa. Candida albicans detects P. aeruginosa by sensing the secreted bacterial quorum sensing molecule 3OC12HSL and responds by reverting to the yeast

  19. 2D lattice model of a lipid bilayer: Microscopic derivation and thermodynamic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Davit; Heuer, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Based on all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of a lipid bilayer we present a systematic mapping on a 2D lattice model. Keeping the lipid type and the chain order parameter as key variables we derive a free energy functional, containing the enthalpic interaction of adjacent lipids as well as the tail entropy. The functional form of both functions is explicitly determined for saturated and polyunsaturated lipids. By studying the lattice model via Monte Carlo simulations it is possible to reproduce the temperature dependence of the distribution of order parameters of the pure lipids, including the prediction of the gel transition. Furthermore, application to a mixture of saturated and polyunsaturated lipids yields the correct phase separation behavior at lower temperatures with a simulation time reduced by approximately 7 orders of magnitude as compared to the corresponding MD simulations. Even the time-dependence of the de-mixing is reproduced on a semi-quantitative level. Due to the generality of the approach we envisage a large number of further applications, ranging from modeling larger sets of lipids, sterols, and solvent proteins to predicting nucleation barriers for the melting of lipids. Particularly, from the properties of the 2D lattice model one can directly read off the enthalpy and entropy change of the 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine gel-to-liquid transition in excellent agreement with experimental and MD results.

  20. Literature survey on microscopic friction modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand contact and friction conditions, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed in order to take microscopic dependencies into account. Friction is developed on microscopic level by adhesion between contacting asperities, the ploughing effect between asperities and the

  1. Statistical Laws in Urban Mobility from microscopic GPS data in the area of Florence

    CERN Document Server

    Bazzani, Armando; Rambaldi, Sandro; Gallotti, Riccardo; Giovannini, Luca

    2009-01-01

    The application of Statistical Physics to social systems is mainly related to the search for macroscopic laws, that can be derived from experimental data averaged in time or space,assuming the system in a steady state. One of the major goals would be to find a connection between the statistical laws to the microscopic properties: for example to understand the nature of the microscopic interactions or to point out the existence of interaction networks. The probability theory suggests the existence of few classes of stationary distributions in the thermodynamics limit, so that the question is if a statistical physics approach could be able to enroll the complex nature of the social systems. We have analyzed a large GPS data base for single vehicle mobility in the Florence urban area, obtaining statistical laws for path lengths, for activity downtimes and for activity degrees. We show also that simple generic assumptions on the microscopic behavior could explain the existence of stationary macroscopic laws, with...

  2. Microscopic and Spectroscopic Characterisation of Waterlogged Archaeological Softwood from Anoxic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nanna Bjerregaard

    Confocal Raman imaging, UV-microspectrophotometry, light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, compositional analysis, and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy has been applied to waterlogged archaeological Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst] and Scots pine [Pinus sylvestris L.] retrieved from anoxic...

  3. Molecular insights of oxidation process of iron nanoparticles: spectroscopic, magnetic, and microscopic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Auffan, Mélanie; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Rose, Jérôme; Olivi, Luca; Borschneck, Daniel; Kvapil, Petr; Jublot, Michael; Kaifas, Delphine; Malleret, Laure; Doumenq, Pierre; Bottero, Jean-Yves

    2014-12-02

    Oxidation behavior of nano-Fe(0) particles in an anoxic environment was determined using different state-of-the-art analytical approaches, including high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) combined with energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and magnetic measurements. Oxidation in controlled experiments was compared in standard double distilled (DD) water, DD water spiked with trichloroethene (TCE), and TCE contaminated site water. Using HR-TEM and EFTEM, we observed a surface oxide layer (∼3 nm) formed immediately after the particles were exposed to water. XAS analysis followed the dynamic change in total metallic iron concentration and iron oxide concentration for the experimental duration of 35 days. The metallic iron concentration in nano-Fe(0) particles exposed to water, was ∼40% after 35 days; in contrast, the samples containing TCE were reduced to ∼15% and even to nil in the case of TCE contaminated site water, suggesting that the contaminants enhance the oxidation of nano-Fe(0). Frequency dependence measurements confirmed the formation of superparamagnetic particles in the system. Overall, our results suggest that nano-Fe(0) oxidized via the Fe(0) - Fe(OH)2 - Fe3O4 - (γ-Fe2O3) route and the formation of superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles due to disruption of the surface oxide layer.

  4. Microscopic and Spectroscopic Analyses of Chlorhexidine Tolerance in Delftia acidovorans Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rema, Tara; Lawrence, John R.; Dynes, James J.; Hitchcock, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    The physicochemical responses of Delftia acidovorans biofilms exposed to the commonly used antimicrobial chlorhexidine (CHX) were examined in this study. A CHX-sensitive mutant (MIC, 1.0 μg ml−1) was derived from a CHX-tolerant (MIC, 15.0 μg ml−1) D. acidovorans parent strain using transposon mutagenesis. D. acidovorans mutant (MT51) and wild-type (WT15) strain biofilms were cultivated in flow cells and then treated with CHX at sub-MIC and inhibitory concentrations and examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Specific morphological, structural, and chemical compositional differences between the CHX-treated and -untreated biofilms of both strains were observed. Apart from architectural differences, CLSM revealed a negative effect of CHX on biofilm thickness in the CHX-sensitive MT51 biofilms relative to those of the WT15 strain. STXM analyses showed that the WT15 biofilms contained two morphochemical cell variants, whereas only one type was detected in the MT51 biofilms. The cells in the MT51 biofilms bioaccumulated CHX to a similar extent as one of the cell types found in the WT15 biofilms, whereas the other cell type in the WT15 biofilms did not bioaccumulate CHX. STXM and IR spectral analyses revealed that CHX-sensitive MT51 cells accumulated the highest levels of CHX. Pretreating biofilms with EDTA promoted the accumulation of CHX in all cells. Thus, it is suggested that a subpopulation of cells that do not accumulate CHX appear to be responsible for greater CHX resistance in D. acidovorans WT15 biofilm in conjunction with the possible involvement of bacterial membrane stability. PMID:25022584

  5. Thermodynamical journey in plant biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelin eBarbacci

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonequilibrium irreversible thermodynamics constitute a meaningful point of view suitable to explore life with a rich paradigm. This analytical framework can be used to span the gap from molecular processes to plant function and shows great promise to create a holistic description of life. Since living organisms dissipate energy, exchange entropy and matter with their environment, they can be assimilated to dissipative structures. This concept inherited from nonequilibrium thermodynamics has four properties which defines a scale independent framework suitable to provide a simpler and more comprehensive view of the highly complex plant biology. According to this approach, a biological process is modeled as an avalanche of dissipative structures. Each dissipative structure, corresponds to an unitary biological process, which is initiated by the amplification of a fluctuation. Evolution of the process leads to the breakage of the system symmetry and to the export of entropy. Exporting entropy to the surrounding environment corresponds to collecting information about it. Biological actors which break the symmetry of the system and which store information are by consequence, key actors on which experiments and data analysis focus most. This paper aims at illustrating properties of dissipative structure through familiar examples and thus initiating the dialogue between nonequilibrium thermodynamics and plant biology.

  6. Predicting RNA pseudoknot folding thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Song; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experimentally determined atomic coordinates for RNA helices and the self-avoiding walks of the P (phosphate) and C4 (carbon) atoms in the diamond lattice for the polynucleotide loop conformations, we derive a set of conformational entropy parameters for RNA pseudoknots. Based on the entropy parameters, we develop a folding thermodynamics model that enables us to compute the sequence-specific RNA pseudoknot folding free energy landscape and thermodynamics. The model is validated through extensive experimental tests both for the native structures and for the folding thermodynamics. The model predicts strong sequence-dependent helix-loop competitions in the pseudoknot stability and the resultant conformational switches between different hairpin and pseudoknot structures. For instance, for the pseudoknot domain of human telomerase RNA, a native-like and a misfolded hairpin intermediates are found to coexist on the (equilibrium) folding pathways, and the interplay between the stabilities of these intermediates causes the conformational switch that may underlie a human telomerase disease. PMID:16709732

  7. A Student-Built Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkens, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Many introductory and nanotechnology textbooks discuss the operation of various microscopes including atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM), and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In a nanotechnology laboratory class, students frequently utilize microscopes to obtain data without a thought about the detailed operation of the tool itself.…

  8. Enhanced optical coupling and Raman scattering via microscopic interface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jonathan V.; Hokr, Brett H.; Kim, Wihan; Ballmann, Charles W.; Applegate, Brian E.; Jo, Javier A.; Yamilov, Alexey; Cao, Hui; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2017-11-01

    Spontaneous Raman scattering is an extremely powerful tool for the remote detection and identification of various chemical materials. However, when those materials are contained within strongly scattering or turbid media, as is the case in many biological and security related systems, the sensitivity and range of Raman signal generation and detection is severely limited. Here, we demonstrate that through microscopic engineering of the optical interface, the optical coupling of light into a turbid material can be substantially enhanced. This improved coupling facilitates the enhancement of the Raman scattering signal generated by molecules within the medium. In particular, we detect at least two-orders of magnitude more spontaneous Raman scattering from a sample when the pump laser light is focused into a microscopic hole in the surface of the sample. Because this approach enhances both the interaction time and interaction region of the laser light within the material, its use will greatly improve the range and sensitivity of many spectroscopic techniques, including Raman scattering and fluorescence emission detection, inside highly scattering environments.

  9. Thermodynamic studies for drug design and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Nichola C; Chaires, Jonathan B

    2012-04-01

    A key part of drug design and development is the optimization of molecular interactions between an engineered drug candidate and its binding target. Thermodynamic characterization provides information about the balance of energetic forces driving binding interactions and is essential for understanding and optimizing molecular interactions. This review discusses the information that can be obtained from thermodynamic measurements and how this can be applied to the drug development process. Current approaches for the measurement and optimization of thermodynamic parameters are presented, specifically higher throughput and calorimetric methods. Relevant literature for this review was identified in part by bibliographic searches for the period 2004 - 2011 using the Science Citation Index and PUBMED and the keywords listed below. The most effective drug design and development platform comes from an integrated process utilizing all available information from structural, thermodynamic and biological studies. Continuing evolution in our understanding of the energetic basis of molecular interactions and advances in thermodynamic methods for widespread application are essential to realize the goal of thermodynamically driven drug design. Comprehensive thermodynamic evaluation is vital early in the drug development process to speed drug development toward an optimal energetic interaction profile while retaining good pharmacological properties. Practical thermodynamic approaches, such as enthalpic optimization, thermodynamic optimization plots and the enthalpic efficiency index, have now matured to provide proven utility in the design process. Improved throughput in calorimetric methods remains essential for even greater integration of thermodynamics into drug design. © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd.

  10. Thermodynamic Studies for Drug Design and Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Nichola C.; Chaires, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A key part of drug design and development is the optimization of molecular interactions between an engineered drug candidate and its binding target. Thermodynamic characterization provides information about the balance of energetic forces driving binding interactions and is essential for understanding and optimizing molecular interactions. Areas covered This review discusses the information that can be obtained from thermodynamic measurements and how this can be applied to the drug development process. Current approaches for the measurement and optimization of thermodynamic parameters are presented, specifically higher throughput and calorimetric methods. Relevant literature for this review was identified in part by bibliographic searches for the period 2004 – 2011 using the Science Citation Index and PUBMED and the keywords listed below. Expert opinion The most effective drug design and development platform comes from an integrated process utilizing all available information from structural, thermodynamic and biological studies. Continuing evolution in our understanding of the energetic basis of molecular interactions and advances in thermodynamic methods for widespread application are essential to realize the goal of thermodynamically-driven drug design. Comprehensive thermodynamic evaluation is vital early in the drug development process to speed drug development towards an optimal energetic interaction profile while retaining good pharmacological properties. Practical thermodynamic approaches, such as enthalpic optimization, thermodynamic optimization plots and the enthalpic efficiency index, have now matured to provide proven utility in design process. Improved throughput in calorimetric methods remains essential for even greater integration of thermodynamics into drug design. PMID:22458502

  11. Microscopically Based Nuclear Energy Functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, S. K.

    2009-05-01

    A major goal of the SciDAC project "Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional" is to develop next-generation nuclear energy density functionals that give controlled extrapolations away from stability with improved performance across the mass table. One strategy is to identify missing physics in phenomenological Skyrme functionals based on our understanding of the underlying internucleon interactions and microscopic many-body theory. In this contribution, I describe ongoing efforts to use the density matrix expansion of Negele and Vautherin to incorporate missing finite-range effects from the underlying two- and three-nucleon interactions into phenomenological Skyrme functionals.

  12. Multivariate Chemical Image Fusion of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife A. Gowen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemical image fusion refers to the combination of chemical images from different modalities for improved characterisation of a sample. Challenges associated with existing approaches include: difficulties with imaging the same sample area or having identical pixels across microscopic modalities, lack of prior knowledge of sample composition and lack of knowledge regarding correlation between modalities for a given sample. In addition, the multivariate structure of chemical images is often overlooked when fusion is carried out. We address these challenges by proposing a framework for multivariate chemical image fusion of vibrational spectroscopic imaging modalities, demonstrating the approach for image registration, fusion and resolution enhancement of chemical images obtained with IR and Raman microscopy.

  13. Study of interaction of butyl p-hydroxybenzoate with human serum albumin by molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qin, E-mail: wqing07@lzu.c [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang Yaheng, E-mail: zhangyah04@lzu.c [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Sun Huijun, E-mail: sun.hui.jun-04@163.co [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chen Hongli, E-mail: hlchen@lzu.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chen Xingguo, E-mail: chenxg@lzu.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Study of the interaction between butyl p-hydroxybenzoate (butoben) and human serum albumin (HSA) has been performed by molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic method. The interaction mechanism was predicted through molecular modeling first, then the binding parameters were confirmed using a series of spectroscopic methods, including fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The thermodynamic parameters of the reaction, standard enthalpy {Delta}H{sup 0} and entropy {Delta}S{sup 0}, have been calculated to be -29.52 kJ mol{sup -1} and -24.23 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}, respectively, according to the Van't Hoff equation, which suggests the van der Waals force and hydrogen bonds are the predominant intermolecular forces in stabilizing the butoben-HSA complex. Results obtained by spectroscopic methods are consistent with that of the molecular modeling study. In addition, alteration of secondary structure of HSA in the presence of butoben was evaluated using the data obtained from UV-visible absorbance, CD and FT-IR spectroscopies. - Research highlights: The interaction between butyl p-hydroxybenzoate with HSA has been investigated for the first time. Molecular modeling study can provide theoretical direction for experimental design. Multi-spectroscopic method can provide the binding parameters and thermodynamic parameters. These results are important for food safety and human health when using parabens as a preservative.

  14. Robotic autopositioning of the operating microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenlander, Mark E; Chowdhry, Shakeel A; Merkl, Brandon; Hattendorf, Guido M; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-06-01

    Use of the operating microscope has become pervasive since its introduction to the neurosurgical world. Neuronavigation fused with the operating microscope has allowed accurate correlation of the focal point of the microscope and its location on the downloaded imaging study. However, the robotic ability of the Pentero microscope has not been utilized to orient the angle of the microscope or to change its focal length to hone in on a predefined target. To report a novel technology that allows automatic positioning of the operating microscope onto a set target and utilization of a planned trajectory, either determined with the StealthStation S7 by using preoperative imaging or intraoperatively with the microscope. By utilizing the current motorized capabilities of the Zeiss OPMI Pentero microscope, a robotic autopositioning feature was developed in collaboration with Surgical Technologies, Medtronic, Inc. (StealthStation S7). The system is currently being tested at the Barrow Neurological Institute. Three options were developed for automatically positioning the microscope: AutoLock Current Point, Align Parallel to Plan, and Point to Plan Target. These options allow the microscope to pivot around the lesion, hover in a set plane parallel to the determined trajectory, or rotate and point to a set target point, respectively. Integration of automatic microscope positioning into the operative workflow has potential to increase operative efficacy and safety. This technology is best suited for precise trajectories and entry points into deep-seated lesions.

  15. Modelling of the MICROSCOPE Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Stefanie; List, Meike

    2010-03-01

    The French space mission MICROSCOPE aims at testing the Equivalence Principle (EP) up to an accuracy of 10-15. The experiment will be carried out on a satellite which is developed and produced within the CNES Myriade series. The measuring accuracy will be achieved by means of two high-precision capacitive differential accelerometers that are built by the French institute ONERA, see Touboul and Rodrigues (Class. Quantum Gravity 18:2487-2498, 2001). At ZARM, which is a member of the science team, the data evaluation process is prepared. Therefore, a comprehensive simulation of the real system including the science signal and all error sources is built for the development and testing of data reduction and data analysis algorithms to extract the EP violation signal. Currently, the ZARM Drag-Free simulator, a tool to support mission modelling, is adapted for the MICROSCOPE mission in order to simulate test mass and satellite dynamics. Models of environmental disturbances like solar radiation pressure are considered, also. Additionally, detailed modelling of the on-board capacitive sensors is done. The actual status of the mission modelling will be presented. Particularly, the modelling of disturbances forces will be discussed in detail.

  16. Microscopic colitis: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA PAULA HAMER SOUSA CLARA

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Microscopic colitis (MC refers to chronic inflammation of the colon which is characterized by histologic changes at the level of a radiologically and endoscopically normal mucosa. It is a common cause of chronic non-bloody diarrhea that occurs primarily in older individuals; however, there are few studies in the literature with strong scientific evidence compared to other inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, which limits the knowledge of physicians and pathologists. This article aims to review the information on MC, describing diagnostic methods and drugs available for treatment. We conducted a search of the Pubmed database and CAPES Portal using the keywords “microscopic colitis”, “collagenous colitis”, “lymphocytic colitis”, and “review” for selection of articles published between 1996 and 2015 related to the topic. Based on the studies discussed in this review, we conclude that MC is a relatively new gastrointestinal disorder, most studies are incipient particularly with respect to pathophysiology and immunology, and budesonide is the best documented short-term treatment. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the best strategy for treatment in the long term.

  17. Microscopic colitis: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clara, Ana Paula Hamer Sousa; Magnago, Flávia Drago; Ferreira, Juliana Neves; Grillo, Thais Gagno

    2016-12-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) refers to chronic inflammation of the colon which is characterized by histologic changes at the level of a radiologically and endoscopically normal mucosa. It is a common cause of chronic non-bloody diarrhea that occurs primarily in older individuals; however, there are few studies in the literature with strong scientific evidence compared to other inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which limits the knowledge of physicians and pathologists. This article aims to review the information on MC, describing diagnostic methods and drugs available for treatment. We conducted a search of the Pubmed database and CAPES Portal using the keywords "microscopic colitis", "collagenous colitis", "lymphocytic colitis", and "review" for selection of articles published between 1996 and 2015 related to the topic. Based on the studies discussed in this review, we conclude that MC is a relatively new gastrointestinal disorder, most studies are incipient particularly with respect to pathophysiology and immunology, and budesonide is the best documented short-term treatment. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the best strategy for treatment in the long term.

  18. Thermodynamics of Complexation between Thiourea-based Receptor and Acetate in Water/Acetonitrile Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takaya; Shibuya, Yuuta; Sato, Takaya; Nishizawa, Seiichi; Sato, Itaru; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    A thiourea-based receptor has been extensively studied for selective anion recognition for reasons of its strong hydrogen bond donor ability. In the present study, the thermodynamics of complexation between a thiourea-based receptor and acetate was examined in a water/acetonitrile mixture. The receptor used in this study was N,N'-bis(p-nitrophenyl)thiourea (BNPTU). UV/vis spectroscopic titration and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments clearly revealed endothermic and entropy-driven complexation of BNPTU with acetate in water/acetonitrile mixtures. Since the endothermic peaks found in water/acetonitrile mixtures were about three times greater than those in acetonitrile, it appears that preferential hydration of both receptor and acetate was responsible for the endothermic and entropy-driven complexation reaction. The thermodynamic properties found in this study have the potential to contribute to the design of a thiourea-based anion receptor.

  19. Thermodynamics for Chemists, Physicists and Engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Hołyst, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamics is an essential part of chemical physics and is of fundamental importance in physics, chemistry and engineering courses. This textbook takes an interdisciplinary approach to the subject and is therefore suitable for undergraduates in all those courses. The book is an introduction to phenomenological thermodynamics and its applications to phase transitions and chemical reactions, with some references to statistical mechanics. It strikes the balance between the rigorousness of the Callen text and phenomenological approach of the Atkins text. The book is divided in three parts. The first introduces the postulates and laws of thermodynamics and complements these initial explanations with practical examples. The second part is devoted to applications of thermodynamics to phase transitions in pure substances and mixtures. The third part covers thermodynamic systems in which chemical reactions take place. There are some sections on more advanced topics such as thermodynamic potentials, natural variabl...

  20. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Phase Transformations in Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-08-31

    The aim of this project is to develop and apply computational materials science tools to determine and predict critical properties of hydrogen storage materials. By better understanding the absorption/desorption mechanisms and characterizing their physical properties it is possible to explore and evaluate new directions for hydrogen storage materials. Particular emphasis is on the determination of the structure and thermodynamics of hydrogen storage materials, the investigation of microscopic mechanisms of hydrogen uptake and release in various materials and the role of catalysts in this process. As a team we have decided to focus on a single material, NaAlH{sub 4}, in order to fully be able to study the many aspects of hydrogen storage. We have focused on phase stability, mass transport and size-dependent reaction mechanisms in this material.

  1. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic study of charge transfer complexes of cloxacillin sodium in aqueous ethanol medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Dalim Kumar; Saha, Avijit; Mukherjee, Asok K.

    2005-07-01

    Cloxacillin sodium has been shown to form charge transfer (CT) complexes of 1:1 stoichiometry with a number of electron acceptors in 50% (v/v) aqueous ethanol medium. From the trends in the CT absorption bands, the vertical ionization potential of the drug molecule (cloxacillin sodium) has been estimated to be 7.89 eV. The enthalpies and entropies of formation of two such complexes have been determined by estimating the formation constants spectrophotometrically at five different temperatures. The oscillator strengths and transition dipole moments of these complexes have been determined. It has further been noted that the reduction of o-chloranil by aqueous ethanol is completely inhibited by cloxacillin sodium, a phenomenon that makes the present study of formation equilibrium possible.

  2. Thermodynamic studies on the recognition of flexible peptides by transition-metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuguang; Fazal, Md Abul; Roy, Bidhan C; Chandra, Binita; Mallik, Sanku

    2002-03-25

    Strong and selective binding to a trihistidine peptide has been achieved employing Cu(2+)-histidine interactions in aqueous medium (25 mM HEPES buffer, pH 7.0). When the pattern of cupric ions on a complex matched with the pattern of histidines on the peptide, a strong and selective binding was observed. UV-vis spectroscopic studies show that the cupric ions coordinate to the histidines of the peptides. Thermodynamic studies reveal that the binding process is enthalpy driven over the entire range of working temperature (25-40 degrees C). An enthalpy-entropy compensation effect was also observed.

  3. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Fischer

    Full Text Available Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks.

  4. Thermodynamics of Random Reaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jakob; Kleidon, Axel; Dittrich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha) and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa −1.5 for linear and −1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks. PMID:25723751

  5. Interaction of methotrexate with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Cao, Jian; Zhou, Qiuhua

    2013-11-01

    Trypsin is one of important digestive enzymes that have intimate correlation with human health and illness. In this work, the interaction of trypsin with methotrexate was investigated by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The results revealed that methotrexate could interact with trypsin with about one binding site. Methotrexate molecule could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis implied that electrostatic force, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions were the main interactions for stabilizing the trypsin-methotrexate system, which agreed well with the results from the molecular modeling study.

  6. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature–pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid...... phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio...

  7. Thermodynamics of the hot BIon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grignani, Gianluca; Harmark, Troels; Marini, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics of the recently obtained nite temperature BIon solution of arXiv:1012.1494, focusing on two aspects. The first concerns comparison of the free energy of the three available phases for the finite temperature brane-antibrane wormhole configuration. Based on this we...... propose a heuristic picture for the dynamics of the phases that involves a critical temperature below which a stable phase exists. This stable phase is the finite temperature analogue of the thin throat branch of the extremal brane anti-brane wormhole configuration. The second aspect that we consider...

  8. An introduction to statistical thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Terrell L

    1987-01-01

    ""A large number of exercises of a broad range of difficulty make this book even more useful…a good addition to the literature on thermodynamics at the undergraduate level."" - Philosophical MagazineAlthough written on an introductory level, this wide-ranging text provides extensive coverage of topics of current interest in equilibrium statistical mechanics. Indeed, certain traditional topics are given somewhat condensed treatment to allow room for a survey of more recent advances.The book is divided into four major sections. Part I deals with the principles of quantum statistical mechanics a

  9. Thermal physics kinetic theory and thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Devraj; Yadav, Raja Ram

    2016-01-01

    THERMAL PHYSICS: Kinetic Theory and Thermodynamics is designed for undergraduate course in Thermal Physics and Thermodynamics. The book provides thorough understanding of the fundamental principles of the concepts in Thermal Physics. The book begins with kinetic theory, then moves on liquefaction, transport phenomena, the zeroth, first, second and third laws, thermodynamics relations and thermal conduction. The book concluded with radiation phenomenon. KEY FEATURES: * Include exercises * Short Answer Type Questions * Long Answer Type Questions * Numerical Problems * Multiple Choice Questions

  10. Quantum Thermodynamics with Degenerate Eigenstate Coherences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Bulnes Cuetara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We establish quantum thermodynamics for open quantum systems weakly coupled to their reservoirs when the system exhibits degeneracies. The first and second law of thermodynamics are derived, as well as a finite-time fluctuation theorem for mechanical work and energy and matter currents. Using a double quantum dot junction model, local eigenbasis coherences are shown to play a crucial role on thermodynamics and on the electron counting statistics.

  11. Quantum thermodynamics: a nonequilibrium Green's function approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Ochoa, Maicol A; Galperin, Michael

    2015-02-27

    We establish the foundations of a nonequilibrium theory of quantum thermodynamics for noninteracting open quantum systems strongly coupled to their reservoirs within the framework of the nonequilibrium Green's functions. The energy of the system and its coupling to the reservoirs are controlled by a slow external time-dependent force treated to first order beyond the quasistatic limit. We derive the four basic laws of thermodynamics and characterize reversible transformations. Stochastic thermodynamics is recovered in the weak coupling limit.

  12. Thermodynamically consistent model calibration in chemical kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamics of biochemical reaction systems are constrained by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, which impose well-defined relationships among the reaction rate constants characterizing these systems. Constructing biochemical reaction systems from experimental observations often leads to parameter values that do not satisfy the necessary thermodynamic constraints. This can result in models that are not physically realizable and may lead to inaccurate, or even erroneous, descriptions of cellular function. Results We introduce a thermodynamically consistent model calibration (TCMC method that can be effectively used to provide thermodynamically feasible values for the parameters of an open biochemical reaction system. The proposed method formulates the model calibration problem as a constrained optimization problem that takes thermodynamic constraints (and, if desired, additional non-thermodynamic constraints into account. By calculating thermodynamically feasible values for the kinetic parameters of a well-known model of the EGF/ERK signaling cascade, we demonstrate the qualitative and quantitative significance of imposing thermodynamic constraints on these parameters and the effectiveness of our method for accomplishing this important task. MATLAB software, using the Systems Biology Toolbox 2.1, can be accessed from http://www.cis.jhu.edu/~goutsias/CSS lab/software.html. An SBML file containing the thermodynamically feasible EGF/ERK signaling cascade model can be found in the BioModels database. Conclusions TCMC is a simple and flexible method for obtaining physically plausible values for the kinetic parameters of open biochemical reaction systems. It can be effectively used to recalculate a thermodynamically consistent set of parameter values for existing thermodynamically infeasible biochemical reaction models of cellular function as well as to estimate thermodynamically feasible values for the parameters of new

  13. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  14. Conceptual understanding of thermodynamics: A study of undergraduate and graduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patron, Francis

    1997-11-01

    There is a perception among college students that physical chemistry is an impossibly difficult subject. The hypothesis guiding this study is that this perception is caused by the mismatch between the physical chemistry curriculum and the cognitive needs of students, whose learning styles, misconceptions, and difficulties are not explicitly addressed. A qualitative approach was used to examine students' conceptions of concepts such as internal energy, enthalpy, heat capacity, entropy, and Gibbs free energy. Students' views about science, physical chemistry, and thermodynamics were also examined. The subjects of the study were nine undergraduate and graduate students taking introductory or review courses in thermodynamics. Data were obtained from twenty-five individual interviews, thirteen of which took place while respondents were taking a course and twelve after they had completed it. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed and the transcripts were analyzed by a cross-case comparison method. The results show that graduate students had many of the same difficulties and misconceptions as undergraduate students. After a semester, students retained a minimal understanding of the main ideas of thermodynamics and the connections between them. They had a limited understanding of the relevance of thermodynamics to chemistry. Students regarded mathematical derivations as a fundamental component of thermodynamics and relied exclusively on mathematical equations to represent concepts such as enthalpy. Mathematical presentations were emphasized in lectures. The mathematical and pictorial symbols that students copied from the blackboard did not necessarily hold the same meaning for them as they did for professors. Many students had difficulty connecting mathematical symbols to physical concepts. They often confused the macroscopic and microscopic pictures and did not understand the concept of equilibrium. They never mentioned equilibrium in their descriptions of the

  15. Treatise on irreversible and statistical thermodynamics an introduction to nonclassical thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Yourgrau, Wolfgang; Raw, Gough

    2002-01-01

    Extensively revised edition of a much-respected work examines thermodynamics of irreversible processes, general principles of statistical thermodynamics, assemblies of noninteracting structureless particles, and statistical theory. 1966 edition.

  16. Black hole thermodynamics with conical defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appels, Michael; Gregory, Ruth; Kubizňák, David

    2017-05-01

    Recently we have shown [1] how to formulate a thermodynamic first law for a single (charged) accelerated black hole in AdS space by fixing the conical deficit angles present in the spacetime. Here we show how to generalise this result, formulating thermodynamics for black holes with varying conical deficits. We derive a new potential for the varying tension defects: the thermodynamic length, both for accelerating and static black holes. We discuss possible physical processes in which the tension of a string ending on a black hole might vary, and also map out the thermodynamic phase space of accelerating black holes and explore their critical phenomena.

  17. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerlander, P.; Anders, J.

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed. PMID:26916503

  18. Spectroscopic insight for tablet compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakio, S; Ylinärä, H; Antikainen, O; Räikkönen, H; Yliruusi, J

    2015-02-01

    Tablet compression process has been studied over the years from various perspectives. However what exactly happens to material during compression is still unknown. In this study a novel compression die which enables real-time spectroscopic measurements during the compression of material is represented. Both near infrared and Raman spectroscope probes can be attached to the die. In this study the usage of the die is demonstrated by using Raman spectroscopy. Eicosane, d-glucose anhydrate, α-lactose monohydrate and xylitol were used in the study because their compression behavior and bonding properties during compression were assumed to be different. The intensity of the Raman signal changed during compression with all of the materials. However, the intensity changes were different within the materials. The biggest differences were within the xylitol spectra. It was noticed that some peaks disappeared with higher compression pressures indicating that the pressure affected variously on different bonds in xylitol structure. These reversible changes were supposed to relate the changes in conformation and crystal structure. As a conclusion, the die was found to be a significant addition for studying compression process in real-time. It can help to reveal Process induced transformations (PITs) occurring during powder compaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermodynamic optimization of a Penrose process: an engineers' approach to black hole thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bravetti, Alessandro; Gruber, Christine; Lopez-Monsalvo, Cesar S.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a new view on the thermodynamics of black holes introducing effects of irreversibility by employing thermodynamic optimization and finite-time thermodynamics. These questions are of importance both in physics and in engineering, combining standard thermodynamics with optimal control theory in order to find optimal protocols and bounds for realistic processes without assuming anything about the microphysics involved. We find general bounds on the maximum work and the ef...

  20. On the relation between the Langmuir and thermodynamic flux equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titus Sebastiaan van Erp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its approximative nature, the Langmuir theory has shown to be a very successful approach to describe experimental adsorption isotherms. Langmuir kinetics is based on systems of non- interacting particles that can transfer from the gas phase to the adsorbed phase with a transition flux that depends both on the gas pressure and surface coverage. Recent molecular simulation results suggest, however, that some systems can have isotherms that are apparently Langmuirian while the kinetics are not. This remarkably result seems to question the interpretation of innumerous adsorption experiments. The observed anomalous kinetics were described by thermodynamic rate equations giving exactly the same isotherms. Unidirectional rates, as obtained from mesoscopic non- equilibrium theory, correct for the non-ideality of matter using activities instead of concentrations and seem to suggest that fluxes from phase A to another phase B only depends on the properties of phase A alone. In this article we show, however, that the theories and simulations are actually consistent when the following two points are taken into account. The first point is methodological and related to how one should count crossing events considering the presence of possible correlations. The second point is theoretical and related to the microscopic link between the Langmuir and thermodynamic rate theory. Specifically, we show how to define diffusion and activity coefficients at the border of the gas/solid interface. If both points are taken into account, there is neither a contradiction between both theories, nor with the molecular simulation results.

  1. Thermodynamic features of dioxins’ adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prisciandaro, Marina [Department of Industrial and Information Engineering and of Economics, University of L’Aquila, Viale Giovanni Gronchi 18, L’Aquila 67100 (Italy); Piemonte, Vincenzo, E-mail: v.piemonte@unicampus.it [Faculty of Engineering, University Campus Biomedico of Rome, Via Alvaro del Portillo 21, Rome 00128 (Italy); Mazziotti di Celso, Giuseppe [Faculty of Bioscience, University of Teramo, Via R. Balzarini, 1, 64100 Teramo (Italy); Ronconi, Silvia [Arta Abruzzo, Department of L’Aquila, Bazzano (AQ), 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Capocelli, Mauro [Faculty of Engineering, University Campus Biomedico of Rome, Via Alvaro del Portillo 21, Rome 00128 (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • We develop the P-T diagram for six PCDD. • We derive theoretical adsorption isotherms according to the Langmuir’s model. • We calculate K and w{sub max} values for several temperatures. • We estimate the adsorption heat with a good agreement with literature data. - Abstract: In this paper, the six more poisonous species among all congeners of dioxin group are taken into account, and the P-T diagram for each of them is developed. Starting from the knowledge of vapour tensions and thermodynamic parameters, the theoretical adsorption isotherms are calculated according to the Langmuir’s model. In particular, the Langmuir isotherm parameters (K and w{sub max}) have been validated through the estimation of the adsorption heat (ΔH{sub ads}), which varies in the range 20–24 kJ/mol, in agreement with literature values. This result will allow to put the thermodynamical basis for a rational design of different process units devoted to dioxins removal.

  2. Bioengineering thermodynamics of biological cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2015-12-01

    Cells are open complex thermodynamic systems. They can be also regarded as complex engines that execute a series of chemical reactions. Energy transformations, thermo-electro-chemical processes and transports phenomena can occur across the cells membranes. Moreover, cells can also actively modify their behaviours in relation to changes in their environment. Different thermo-electro-biochemical behaviours occur between health and disease states. But, all the living systems waste heat, which is no more than the result of their internal irreversibility. This heat is dissipated into the environment. But, this wasted heat represent also a sort of information, which outflows from the cell toward its environment, completely accessible to any observer. The analysis of irreversibility related to this wasted heat can represent a new approach to study the behaviour of the cells themselves and to control their behaviours. So, this approach allows us to consider the living systems as black boxes and analyze only the inflows and outflows and their changes in relation to the modification of the environment. Therefore, information on the systems can be obtained by analyzing the changes in the cell heat wasted in relation to external perturbations. The bioengineering thermodynamics bases are summarized and used to analyse possible controls of the calls behaviours based on the control of the ions fluxes across the cells membranes.

  3. Thermodynamic indicators for environmental certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzieri, Margherita; Porcelli, Marcello; Pulselli, Federico Maria

    2002-09-01

    The Earth is an open thermodynamic system, that remains in a steady state far from the equilibrium, through energy and matter exchanges with the surrounding environment. These natural constraints, which prevent the system from maximizing its entropy, are threatened by human action and our ecosystem needs urgent protection. In this viewpoint the environmental certification was born, according to international standards ISO 14001, ISO 14040, and European Regulation EMAS. These are voluntary adhesions to a program of environmental protection by companies, administrations and organizations which, starting from the respect of the existing environmental laws and regulations, decide to further improve their environmental performance. To obtain and maintain certification of a system is necessary to apply some indicators to evaluate its environmental performance and to demonstrate its progressive improvement. Here we propose to use for this purpose the thermodynamic indicators produced from energy analysis by Odum. The case study is Montalcino city (Italy) and energy indicators are used to evaluate environmental performance of this system where exist different activities, from agricultural productions, to tourism. Results show that energy analysis could become a valid standard monitoring method for environmental certification, especially in consideration of its wide application field.

  4. Microscopic dynamics of liquid hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Zoppi, M; Celli, M

    2001-01-01

    We have measured the almost-pure incoherent scattering function of liquid parahydrogen using neutron inelastic scattering. The experiment was carried out on TOSCA, a time-of-flight, inverse geometry, crystal analyser spectrometer, operating on the pulsed- neutron source ISIS (UK). Since the instrument kinematic region is close to a line in the (k, E)-plane, we have actually measured the projection of S/sub inc/(k, w) on this line. The measured cross- section gives a direct experimental access to the microscopic dynamic of the centre-of-mass motion of molecular hydrogen. The data have been analysed using the Gaussian approximation and have been compared with the results of a novel Quantum Mechanical Molecular Dynamics simulation technique. The results are encouraging, but claim for further developments of the theoretical approach, as well as for more extensive experimental data. (14 refs).

  5. Microscopic dynamics underlying anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniadakis, G.; Lapenta, G.

    2000-09-01

    The time-dependent Tsallis statistical distribution describing anomalous diffusion is usually obtained in the literature as the solution of a nonlinear Fokker-Planck (FP) equation [A.R. Plastino and A. Plastino, Physica A 222, 347 (1995)]. The scope of the present paper is twofold. First, we show that this distribution can be obtained also as a solution of the nonlinear porous media equation. Second, we prove that the time-dependent Tsallis distribution can be obtained also as a solution of a linear FP equation [G. Kaniadakis and P. Quarati, Physica A 237, 229 (1997)] with coefficients depending on the velocity, which describes a generalized Brownian motion. This linear FP equation is shown to arise from a microscopic dynamics governed by a standard Langevin equation in the presence of multiplicative noise.

  6. Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kollár, Alicia J.; Taylor, Stephen F.; Turner, Richard W.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed-matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented dc-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (approximately 2 μ m ) or 6 nT /√{Hz } per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly 100 points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT /√{Hz } for each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner measures these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10-6 Φ0/√{Hz } ) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns in a system where samples may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge-transport images at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  7. Endoscopic versus microscopic stapes surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmelioglu, Ozgur; Ozdemir, Suleyman; Tarkan, Ozgur; Tuncer, Ulku; Dagkiran, Muhammed; Cetik, Fikret

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study to compare the outcomes and complications of endoscopic stapes surgery versus microscopic stapes surgery. This study involved patients who underwent stapedotomy at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Cukurova University between January 2012 and July 2014. The patients were divided into two groups. Patients in group I were operated with endoscope and patients in group II were operated with microscope. Pure tone audiometry was carried out in all patients preoperatively. Peroperative surgical findings, complications, and duration of surgery were noted and compared between the two groups. Air conduction and bone conduction thresholds were measured at frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000Hz, and the mean (±SD) air-bone gap was noted. Mean preoperative air-bone gap was 36.9±6.8dB (23.3-50dB) in group I and 35.1±6dB (26.6-50dB) in group II. Mean postoperative air-bone gap was 9.3±7.1dB (0-30dB) in group I and 13.5±9.7dB (1.6-35dB) in group II. The difference in preoperative and postoperative air-bone gap between the two groups was statistically significant (p=0.023). Patients in group I did not complain of postoperative pain but this was felt in four patients in group II. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.045). Endoscopic stapes surgery has many benefits such as good visualization, and easy accessibility to the stapes, oval window niche, and facial nerve. Removal of the scutum and manipulation of the chorda tympani nerve are less frequent with the endoscopic technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  9. Universal thermodynamics in different gravity theories: Conditions for generalized second law of thermodynamics and thermodynamical equilibrium on the horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Saugata; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2016-01-01

    The present work deals with a detailed study of universal thermodynamics in different modified gravity theories. The validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics (GSLT) and thermodynamical equilibrium (TE) of the Universe bounded by a horizon (apparent/event) in f(R)-gravity, Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, RS-II brane scenario and DGP brane model has been investigated. In the perspective of recent observational evidences, the matter in the Universe is chosen as interacting holographic dark energy model. The entropy on the horizons are evaluated from the validity of the unified first law and as a result there is a correction (in integral form) to the usual Bekenstein entropy. The other thermodynamical parameter namely temperature on the horizon is chosen as the recently introduced corrected Hawking temperature. The above thermodynamical analysis is done for homogeneous and isotropic flat FLRW model of the Universe. The restrictions for the validity of GSLT and the TE are presented in tabular form f...

  10. Thermodynamic equilibrium at heterogeneous pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in metamorphic petrology point out the importance of grain-scale pressure variations in high-temperature metamorphic rocks. Pressures derived from chemical zonation using unconventional geobarometry based on equal chemical potentials fit mechanically feasible pressure variations. Here a thermodynamic equilibrium method is presented that predicts chemical zoning as a result of pressure variations by Gibbs energy minimization. Equilibrium thermodynamic prediction of the chemical zoning in the case of pressure heterogeneity is done by constraint Gibbs minimization using linear programming techniques. Compositions of phases considered in the calculation are discretized into 'pseudo-compounds' spanning the entire compositional space. Gibbs energies of these discrete compounds are generated for a given range and resolution of pressures for example derived by barometry or from mechanical model predictions. Gibbs energy minimization is subsequently performed considering all compounds of different composition and pressure. In addition to constraining the system composition a certain proportion of the system is constraint at a specified pressure. Input pressure variations need to be discretized and each discrete pressure defines an additional constraint for the minimization. The proportion of the system at each different pressure is equally distributed over the number of input pressures. For example if two input pressures P1 and P2 are specified, two constraints are added: 50 percent of the system is constraint at P1 while the remaining 50 percent is constraint at P2. The method has been tested for a set of 10 input pressures obtained by Tajčmanová et al. (2014) using their unconventional geobarometry method in a plagioclase rim around kyanite. Each input pressure is added as constraint to the minimization (1/10 percent of the system for each discrete pressure). Constraining the system composition to the average composition of the plagioclase rim

  11. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  12. Quantum quenches in the thermodynamic limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, M

    2014-05-02

    We introduce a linked-cluster based computational approach that allows one to study quantum quenches in lattice systems in the thermodynamic limit. This approach is used to study quenches in one-dimensional lattices. We provide evidence that, in the thermodynamic limit, thermalization occurs in the nonintegrable regime but fails at integrability. A phase transitionlike behavior separates the two regimes.

  13. Impact of Thermodynamic Principles in Systems Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that properties of biological systems which are relevant for systems biology motivated mathematical modelling are strongly shaped by general thermodynamic principles such as osmotic limit, Gibbs energy dissipation, near equilibria and thermodynamic driving force. Each of these aspects

  14. Simple, Chemoselective Hydrogenation with Thermodynamic Stereocontrol

    OpenAIRE

    Iwasaki, Kotaro; Wan, Kanny K.; Oppedisano, Alberto; Crossley, Steven W. M.; Shenvi, Ryan A.

    2014-01-01

    Few methods permit the hydrogenation of alkenes to a thermodynamically favored configuration when steric effects dictate the alternative trajectory of hydrogen delivery. Dissolving metal reduction achieves this control, but with extremely low functional group tolerance. Here we demonstrate a catalytic hydrogenation of alkenes that affords the thermodynamic alkane products with remarkably broad functional group compatibility and rapid reaction rates at standard temperature and pressure.

  15. Simple, chemoselective hydrogenation with thermodynamic stereocontrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Kotaro; Wan, Kanny K; Oppedisano, Alberto; Crossley, Steven W M; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2014-01-29

    Few methods permit the hydrogenation of alkenes to a thermodynamically favored configuration when steric effects dictate the alternative trajectory of hydrogen delivery. Dissolving metal reduction achieves this control, but with extremely low functional group tolerance. Here we demonstrate a catalytic hydrogenation of alkenes that affords the thermodynamic alkane products with remarkably broad functional group compatibility and rapid reaction rates at standard temperature and pressure.

  16. Warming to ecocide a thermodynamic diagnosis

    CERN Document Server

    Sangster, Alan J

    2011-01-01

    Suggests a route to avoiding runaway climate change by reinstating the greenhouse thermostat to its full operational capacity Addresses mankind's contribution to climate change from a thermodynamic perspective Describes and illustrates the power of thermodynamics to furnish insights into the thermal behaviour of complex physical systems

  17. Thermodynamic Ground States of Complex Oxide Heterointerfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunkel, F.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S.; Heinen, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    The formation mechanism of 2-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at heterointerfaces between nominally insulating oxides is addressed with a thermodynamical approach. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the thermodynamic ground states of various 2DEG systems directly probed in high temperature...

  18. An Experimental Determination of Thermodynamic Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Erling; Muccianti, Christine; Vogel, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Measurements have been added to an old demonstration of chemical equilibria allowing the determination of thermodynamic constants. The experiment allows the students an opportunity to merge qualitative observations associated with Le Chatelier's principle and thermodynamic calculations using graphical techniques. (Contains 4 figures.)

  19. Detonation Jet Engine. Part 1--Thermodynamic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Volkov, Konstantin N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the most relevant works on jet engine design that utilize thermodynamic cycle of detonative combustion. The efficiency advantages of thermodynamic detonative combustion cycle over Humphrey combustion cycle at constant volume and Brayton combustion cycle at constant pressure were demonstrated. An ideal Ficket-Jacobs detonation cycle, and…

  20. Thermodynamic Property Needs for the Oleochemical Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ana Perederic, Olivia; Kalakul, Sawitree; Sarup, Bent

    and/or reliable thermodynamic models for the chemicals involved. Limited availability ofconsistent physical and thermodynamic properties of lipids compounds and their mixtures lead to difficulties with the use of process simulators for process synthesis and design, since all themodels to be used...

  1. Thermodynamics of charged and rotating black strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Aeeman; Saifullah, K.

    2012-10-01

    We study thermodynamics of cylindrically symmetric black holes. Uncharged as well as charged and rotating objects have been discussed. We derive surface gravity and hence the Hawking temperature and entropy for all these cases. We correct some results in the literature and present new ones. It is seen that thermodynamically these black configurations behave differently from spherically symmetric objects.

  2. Thermodynamics and heat transfer in fire fighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, P. N.; Koshmarov, Y. A.; Bashkirtsev, M. P.

    1985-05-01

    The book presents the fundamental principles of thermodynamics and heat transfer with particular reference to their application in problems related to fire prevention. Special attention is given to the study of unsteady heat transfer, radiant heat transfer (including radiation from flames to the surrounding), thermodynamic analysis of the growth of fires and theoretical modeling of fires in building.

  3. The thermodynamic solar energy; Le solaire thermodynamique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivoire, B. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS-IMP), 66 - Perpignan (France)

    2002-04-01

    The thermodynamic solar energy is the technic in the whole aiming to transform the solar radiation energy in high temperature heat and then in mechanical energy by a thermodynamic cycle. These technic are most often at an experimental scale. This paper describes and analyzes the research programs developed in the advanced countries, since 1980. (A.L.B.)

  4. Understanding the Thermodynamics of Biological Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    By growth in size and complexity (i.e., changing from more probable to less probable states), plants and animals appear to defy the second law of thermodynamics. The usual explanation describes the input of nutrient and sunlight energy into open thermodynamic systems. However, energy input alone does not address the ability to organize and create…

  5. Friction Force: From Mechanics to Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Christian; Gruber, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We study some mechanical problems in which a friction force is acting on a system. Using the fundamental concepts of state, time evolution and energy conservation, we explain how to extend Newtonian mechanics to thermodynamics. We arrive at the two laws of thermodynamics and then apply them to investigate the time evolution and heat transfer of…

  6. Teaching Differentials in Thermodynamics Using Spatial Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Yueh; Hou, Ching-Han

    2012-01-01

    The greatest difficulty that is encountered by students in thermodynamics classes is to find relationships between variables and to solve a total differential equation that relates one thermodynamic state variable to two mutually independent state variables. Rules of differentiation, including the total differential and the cyclic rule, are…

  7. Foldscope: Origami-based paper microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Cybulski, James; Prakash, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an ultra-low-cost origami-based approach for large-scale manufacturing of microscopes, specifically demonstrating brightfield, darkfield, and fluorescence microscopes. Merging principles of optical design with origami enables high-volume fabrication of microscopes from 2D media. Flexure mechanisms created via folding enable a flat compact design. Structural loops in folded paper provide kinematic constraints as a means for passive self-alignment. This light, rugged instrument can survive harsh field conditions while providing a diversity of imaging capabilities, thus serving wide-ranging applications for cost-effective, portable microscopes in science and education.

  8. Foldscope: Origami-Based Paper Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, James S.; Clements, James; Prakash, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an ultra-low-cost origami-based approach for large-scale manufacturing of microscopes, specifically demonstrating brightfield, darkfield, and fluorescence microscopes. Merging principles of optical design with origami enables high-volume fabrication of microscopes from 2D media. Flexure mechanisms created via folding enable a flat compact design. Structural loops in folded paper provide kinematic constraints as a means for passive self-alignment. This light, rugged instrument can survive harsh field conditions while providing a diversity of imaging capabilities, thus serving wide-ranging applications for cost-effective, portable microscopes in science and education. PMID:24940755

  9. Foldscope: origami-based paper microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S Cybulski

    Full Text Available Here we describe an ultra-low-cost origami-based approach for large-scale manufacturing of microscopes, specifically demonstrating brightfield, darkfield, and fluorescence microscopes. Merging principles of optical design with origami enables high-volume fabrication of microscopes from 2D media. Flexure mechanisms created via folding enable a flat compact design. Structural loops in folded paper provide kinematic constraints as a means for passive self-alignment. This light, rugged instrument can survive harsh field conditions while providing a diversity of imaging capabilities, thus serving wide-ranging applications for cost-effective, portable microscopes in science and education.

  10. An introduction to thermodynamics and statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, A K

    2016-01-01

    An Introduction to Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics aims to serve as a text book for undergraduate hons.and postgraduate students of physics. The book covers First Law of Thermodynamics, Entropy and Second Law ofThermodynamics, Thermodynamic Relations, The Statistical Basis of Thermodynamics, Microcanonical Ensemble,Classical Statistical and Canonical Distribution, Grand Canonical Ensemble, Quantum Statistical Mechanics, PhaseTransitions, Fluctuations, Irreversible Processes and Transport Phenomena (Diffusion).SALIENT FEATURES:iC* Offers students a conceptual development of the subjectiC* Review questions at the end of chapters.NEW TO THE SECOND EDITIONiC* PVT SurfacesiC* Real Heat EnginesiC* Van der Waals Models (Qualitative Considerations)iC* Cluster ExpansioniC* Brownian Motion (Einstein's Theory)

  11. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of restricted Boltzmann machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Domingos S. P.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we analyze the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a class of neural networks known as restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) in the context of unsupervised learning. We show how the network is described as a discrete Markov process and how the detailed balance condition and the Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium distribution are sufficient conditions for a complete thermodynamics description, including nonequilibrium fluctuation theorems. Numerical simulations in a fully trained RBM are performed and the heat exchange fluctuation theorem is verified with excellent agreement to the theory. We observe how the contrastive divergence functional, mostly used in unsupervised learning of RBMs, is closely related to nonequilibrium thermodynamic quantities. We also use the framework to interpret the estimation of the partition function of RBMs with the annealed importance sampling method from a thermodynamics standpoint. Finally, we argue that unsupervised learning of RBMs is equivalent to a work protocol in a system driven by the laws of thermodynamics in the absence of labeled data.

  12. eQuilibrator—the biochemical thermodynamics calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamholz, Avi; Noor, Elad; Bar-Even, Arren; Milo, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The laws of thermodynamics constrain the action of biochemical systems. However, thermodynamic data on biochemical compounds can be difficult to find and is cumbersome to perform calculations with manually. Even simple thermodynamic questions like ‘how much Gibbs energy is released by ATP hydrolysis at pH 5?’ are complicated excessively by the search for accurate data. To address this problem, eQuilibrator couples a comprehensive and accurate database of thermodynamic properties of biochemical compounds and reactions with a simple and powerful online search and calculation interface. The web interface to eQuilibrator (http://equilibrator.weizmann.ac.il) enables easy calculation of Gibbs energies of compounds and reactions given arbitrary pH, ionic strength and metabolite concentrations. The eQuilibrator code is open-source and all thermodynamic source data are freely downloadable in standard formats. Here we describe the database characteristics and implementation and demonstrate its use. PMID:22064852

  13. Horizon thermodynamics in fourth-order gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Sen Ma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of horizon thermodynamics, the field equations of Einstein gravity and some other second-order gravities can be rewritten as the thermodynamic identity: dE=TdS−PdV. However, in order to construct the horizon thermodynamics in higher-order gravity, we have to simplify the field equations firstly. In this paper, we study the fourth-order gravity and convert it to second-order gravity via a so-called “Legendre transformation” at the cost of introducing two other fields besides the metric field. With this simplified theory, we implement the conventional procedure in the construction of the horizon thermodynamics in 3 and 4 dimensional spacetime. We find that the field equations in the fourth-order gravity can also be written as the thermodynamic identity. Moreover, we can use this approach to derive the same black hole mass as that by other methods.

  14. Advanced working fluids: Thermodynamic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lloyd L.; Gering, Kevin L.

    1990-10-01

    Electrolytes are used as working fluids in gas fired heat pump chiller engine cycles. To find out which molecular parameters of the electrolytes impact on cycle performance, a molecular theory is developed for calculating solution properties, enthalpies, vapor-liquid equilibria, and engine cycle performance. Aqueous and ammoniac single and mixed salt solutions in single and multisolvent systems are investigated. An accurate correlation is developed to evaluate properties for concentrated electrolyte solutions. Sensitivity analysis is used to determine the impact of molecular parameters on the thermodynamic properties and cycle performance. The preferred electrolytes are of 1-1 valence type, small ion size, high molecular weight, and in strongly colligative cosolvent. The operating windows are determined for a number of absorption fluids of industrial importance.

  15. Thermodynamic cost of external control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2017-07-01

    Artificial molecular machines are often driven by the periodic variation of an external parameter. This external control exerts work on the system of which a part can be extracted as output if the system runs against an applied load. Usually, the thermodynamic cost of the process that generates the external control is ignored. Here, we derive a refined second law for such small machines that include this cost, which is, for example, generated by free energy consumption of a chemical reaction that modifies the energy landscape for such a machine. In the limit of irreversible control, this refined second law becomes the standard one. Beyond this ideal limiting case, our analysis shows that due to a new entropic term unexpected regimes can occur: the control work can be smaller than the extracted work and the work required to generate the control can be smaller than this control work. Our general inequalities are illustrated by a paradigmatic three-state system.

  16. Quantum cosmic models and thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F; Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto [Colina de los Chopos, Centro de Fisica ' Miguel A Catalan' , Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: p.gonzalezdiaz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: a.rozas@cfmac.csic.es

    2008-09-07

    The current accelerating phase of the evolution of the universe is considered by constructing the most economical cosmic models that use just general relativity and some dominating quantum effects associated with the probabilistic description of quantum physics. Two such models are explicitly analyzed. They are based on the existence of a sub-quantum potential and correspond to a generalization of the spatially flat exponential model of de Sitter space. The thermodynamics of these two cosmic solutions is discussed, using the second principle as a guide to choose which among the two is more feasible. The paper also discusses the relativistic physics on which the models are based, their holographic description, some implications from the classical energy conditions and an interpretation of dark energy in terms of the entangled energy of the universe.

  17. Thermodynamic modeling of complex systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Xiaodong

    been developed, which has avoided the numerical pitfalls of having more than three volume roots in the real application range. It has been shown that it is possible to directly use the original PC-SAFT parameters with the new universal constants for the systems considered in this thesis. Finally...... after an oil spill. Engineering thermodynamics could be applied in the state-of-the-art sonar products through advanced artificial technology, if the speed of sound, solubility and density of oil-seawater systems could be satisfactorily modelled. The addition of methanol or glycols into unprocessed well...... streams during subsea pipelines is necessary to inhibit gas hydrate formation, and the offshore reservoirs often mean complicated temperature and pressure conditions. Accurate description of the phase behavior and thermalphysical properties of complex systems containing petroleum fluids and polar...

  18. Thermodynamic properties of Dynes superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, František; Hlubina, Richard

    2018-01-01

    The tunneling density of states in dirty s -wave superconductors is often well described by the phenomenological Dynes formula. Recently we have shown that this formula can be derived, within the coherent potential approximation, for superconductors with simultaneously present pair-conserving and pair-breaking impurity scattering. Here we demonstrate that the theory of such so-called Dynes superconductors is thermodynamically consistent. We calculate the specific heat and critical field of the Dynes superconductors, and we show that their gap parameter, specific heat, critical field, and penetration depth exhibit power-law scaling with temperature in the low-temperature limit. We also show that in the vicinity of a coupling-constant-controlled superconductor to normal metal transition, the Homes law is replaced by a different, pair-breaking-dominated scaling law.

  19. Modeling the thermodynamics of QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, Thomas

    2010-07-26

    Strongly interacting (QCD) matter is expected to exhibit a multifaceted phase structure: a hadron gas at low temperatures, a quark-gluon plasma at very high temperatures, nuclear matter in the low-temperature and high-density region, color superconductors at asymptotically high densities. Most of the conjectured phases cannot yet be scrutinized by experiments. Much of the present picture - particularly concerning the intermediate temperature and density area of the phase diagram of QCD matter - is based on model calculations. Further insights come from Lattice-QCD computations. The present thesis elaborates a nonlocal covariant extension of the Nambu and Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model with built-in constraints from the running coupling of QCD at high-momentum and instanton physics at low-momentum scales. We present this model for two and three quark flavors (in the latter case paying particular attention to the axial anomaly). At finite temperatures and densities, gluon dynamics is incorporated through a gluonic background field, expressed in terms of the Polyakov loop (P). The thermodynamics of this nonlocal PNJL model accounts for both chiral and deconfinement transitions. We obtain results in mean-field approximation and beyond, including additional pionic and kaonic contributions to the chiral condensate, the pressure and other thermodynamic quantities. Finally, the nonlocal PNJL model is applied to the finite-density region of the QCD phase diagram; for three quark flavors we investigate, in particular, the dependence of the critical point appearing in the models on the axial anomaly. The thesis closes with a derivation of the nonlocal PNJL model from first principles of QCD. (orig.)

  20. Thermodynamic analysis and purifying an amorphous phase of frozen crystallization centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysov, V. I.; Tsaregradskaya, T. L.; Turkov, O. V.; Saenko, G. V.

    2017-12-01

    The possibility of dissolving frozen crystallization centers in amorphous alloys of the Fe-B system is considered by means of thermodynamic calculations. This can in turn improve the thermal stability of an amorphous alloy. The effect isothermal annealing has on the thermal stability of multicomponent amorphous alloys based on iron is investigated via the highly sensitive dilatometric technique, measurements of microsolidity, and electron microscopic investigations. The annealing temperature is determined empirically on the basis of the theses of the thermodynamic theory of the high temperature stability of multicomponent amorphous alloys, according to which there exists a range of temperatures that is characterized by a negative difference between the chemical potentials of phases in a heterogeneous amorphous matrix-frozen crystallization centers system. The thermodynamic condition of the possible dissolution of frozen crystallization centers is thus met. It is shown that introducing regimes of thermal processing allows us to expand the ranges of the thermal stability of iron-based amorphous alloys by 20-40 K through purifying an amorphous matrix of frozen crystallization centers. This conclusion is proved via electron microscopic investigations.

  1. Diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging: A multidimensional approach for probing microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeun; Doyle, Eamon K; Wisnowski, Jessica L; Kim, Joong Hee; Haldar, Justin P

    2017-12-01

    To propose and evaluate a novel multidimensional approach for imaging subvoxel tissue compartments called Diffusion-Relaxation Correlation Spectroscopic Imaging. Multiexponential modeling of MR diffusion or relaxation data is commonly used to infer the many different microscopic tissue compartments that contribute signal to macroscopic MR imaging voxels. However, multiexponential estimation is known to be difficult and ill-posed. Observing that this ill-posedness is theoretically reduced in higher dimensions, diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging uses a novel multidimensional imaging experiment that jointly encodes diffusion and relaxation information, and then uses a novel constrained reconstruction technique to generate a multidimensional diffusion-relaxation correlation spectrum for every voxel. The peaks of the multidimensional spectrum are expected to correspond to the distinct tissue microenvironments that are present within each macroscopic imaging voxel. Using numerical simulations, experiment data from a custom-built phantom, and experiment data from a mouse model of traumatic spinal cord injury, diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging is demonstrated to provide substantially better multicompartment resolving power compared to conventional diffusion- and relaxation-based methods. The diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging approach provides powerful new capabilities for resolving the different components of multicompartment tissue models, and can be leveraged to significantly expand the insights provided by MRI in studies of tissue microstructure. Magn Reson Med 78:2236-2249, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Low bone mass in microscopic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorinczy, Katalin; Lakatos, Gábor; Müllner, Katalin; Hritz, István; Lakatos, Péter László; Tulassay, Zsolt; Miheller, Pál

    2011-05-19

    Microscopic colitis presents with similar symptoms to classic inflammatory bowel diseases. Osteoporosis is a common complication of Crohn's disease but there are no data concerning bone metabolism in microscopic colitis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone density and metabolism in patients with microscopic colitis. Fourteen patients microscopic colitis were included in the study, and 28 healthy persons and 28 age and gender matched Crohn's disease patients were enrolled as controls. Bone mineral density was measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine, femoral neck and the radius. Serum bone formation and bone resorption markers (osteocalcin and beta-crosslaps, respectively) were measured using immunoassays. Low bone mass was measured in 57.14% patients with microscopic colitis. Bone mineral density at the femoral neck in patients suffering from microscopic colitis and Crohn's disease was lower than in healthy controls (0.852 ± 0.165 and 0.807 ± 0.136 vs. 1.056 ± 0.126 g/cm²; p microscopic colitis patients (0.565 ± 0.093 vs. 0.667 ± 0.072 g/cm²; p microscopic colitis and Crohn's disease patients than controls (417.714 ± 250.37 and 466.071 ± 249.96 vs. 264.75 ± 138.65 pg/ml; p microscopic colitis patients. Low bone mass is frequent in microscopic colitis, and alterations to bone metabolism are similar to those present in Crohn's disease. Therefore, microscopic colitis-associated osteopenia could be a significant problem in such patients.

  3. Mice embryology: a microscopic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Maria Letícia Baptista; Lessa, Thais Borges; Russo, Fabiele Baldino; Fernandes, Renata Avancini; Kfoury, José Roberto; Braga, Patricia Cristina Baleeiro Beltrão; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we studied the embryology of mice of 12, 14, and 18 days of gestation by gross observation, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Grossly, the embryos of 12 days were observed in C-shaped region of the brain, eye pigmentation of the retina, first, second, and third pharyngeal arches gill pit nasal region on the fourth ventricle brain, cervical curvature, heart, liver, limb bud thoracic, spinal cord, tail, umbilical cord, and place of the mesonephric ridge. Microscopically, the liver, cardiovascular system and spinal cord were observed. In the embryo of 14 days, we observed structures that make up the liver and heart. At 18 days of gestation fetuses, it was noted the presence of eyes, mouth, and nose in the cephalic region, chest and pelvic region with the presence of well-developed limbs, umbilical cord, and placenta. Scanning electron microscopy in 18 days of gestation fetuses evidenced head, eyes closed eyelids, nose, vibrissae, forelimb, heart, lung, kidney, liver, small bowel, diaphragm, and part of the spine. The results obtained in this work describe the internal and external morphology of mice, provided by an integration of techniques and review of the morphological knowledge of the embryonic development of this species, as this animal is of great importance to scientific studies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-09-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  5. Glycosylation and thermodynamic versus kinetic stability of horseradish peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tams, J.W.; Welinder, Karen G.

    1998-01-01

    Glycoprotein stability, glycoprotein unfolding, horseradish peroxidase, thermodynamic stability, kinetik stability......Glycoprotein stability, glycoprotein unfolding, horseradish peroxidase, thermodynamic stability, kinetik stability...

  6. Multibeam scanning electron microscope : Experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the first results obtained with their multibeam scanning electron microscope. For the first time, they were able to image 196 (array of 14×14) focused beams of a multielectron beam source on a specimen using single beam scanning electron microscope (SEM) optics. The system

  7. Microscopic colitis : an unfamiliar but treatable disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, E. J.; Karrenbeld, A.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Dijkstra, G.

    Chronic diarrhoea is a frequent complaint in clinical practice. Microscopic colitis is the cause of this symptom in 10% of these cases and the prevalence is rising. To exclude microscopic colitis a colonoscopy with multiple biopsies of different regions of the colon is mandatory. A sigmoidoscopy

  8. Scanning laser microscope for biological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovits, P; Egger, M D

    1971-07-01

    The theory and design of a special purpose scanning laser microscope are described. This microscope, particularly suited for biological investigations, is intended for the observation of objects embedded within transparent or translucent bodies, such as nerve cells in an intact brain. Some photographs made with a prototype are shown.

  9. Polymerized LB Films Imaged with a Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Fluorescence Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined

  10. Structure and thermodynamic insights on acetylaminofluorene-modified deletion DNA duplexes as models for frameshift mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandineni, Anusha; Lin, Bin; MacKerell, Alexander D; Cho, Bongsup P

    2013-06-17

    2-Acetylaminofluorene (AAF) is a prototype arylamine carcinogen that forms C8-substituted dG-AAF and dG-AF as the major DNA lesions. The bulky N-acetylated dG-AAF lesion can induce various frameshift mutations depending on the base sequence around the lesion. We hypothesized that the thermodynamic stability of bulged-out slipped mutagenic intermediates (SMIs) is directly related to deletion mutations. The objective of the present study was to probe the structural/conformational basis of various dG-AAF-induced SMIs formed during translesion synthesis. We performed spectroscopic, thermodynamic, and molecular dynamics studies of several AAF-modified 16-mer model DNA duplexes, including fully paired and -1, -2, and -3 deletion duplexes of the 5'-CTCTCGATG[FAAF]CCATCAC-3' sequence and an additional -1 deletion duplex of the 5'-CTCTCGGCG[FAAF]CCATCAC-3' NarI sequence. Modified deletion duplexes existed in a mixture of external B and stacked S conformers, with the population of the S conformer being 'GC'-1 (73%) > 'AT'-1 (72%) > full (60%) > -2 (55%) > -3 (37%). Thermodynamic stability was in the order of -1 deletion > -2 deletion > fully paired > -3 deletion duplexes. These results indicate that the stacked S-type conformer of SMIs is thermodynamically more stable than the conformationally flexible external B conformer. Results from the molecular dynamics simulations indicate that perturbation of base stacking dominates the relative stability along with contributions from bending, duplex dynamics, and solvation effects that are important in specific cases. Taken together, these results support a hypothesis that the conformational and thermodynamic stabilities of the SMIs are critical determinants for the induction of frameshift mutations.

  11. Cholesterics of colloidal helices: predicting the macroscopic pitch from the particle shape and thermodynamic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussi, Simone; Belli, Simone; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2015-02-21

    Building a general theoretical framework to describe the microscopic origin of macroscopic chirality in (colloidal) liquid crystals is a long-standing challenge. Here, we combine classical density functional theory with Monte Carlo calculations of virial-type coefficients to obtain the equilibrium cholesteric pitch as a function of thermodynamic state and microscopic details. Applying the theory to hard helices, we observe both right- and left-handed cholesteric phases that depend on a subtle combination of particle geometry and system density. In particular, we find that entropy alone can even lead to a (double) inversion in the cholesteric sense of twist upon changing the packing fraction. We show how the competition between single-particle properties (shape) and thermodynamics (local alignment) dictates the macroscopic chiral behavior. Moreover, by expanding our free-energy functional, we are able to assess, quantitatively, Straley's theory of weak chirality, which is used in several earlier studies. Furthermore, by extending our theory to different lyotropic and thermotropic liquid-crystal models, we analyze the effect of an additional soft interaction on the chiral behavior of the helices. Finally, we provide some guidelines for the description of more complex chiral phases, like twist-bend nematics. Our results provide new insights into the role of entropy in the microscopic origin of this state of matter.

  12. Microscopic Colitis and Medication Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monina F. Pascua

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The incidence of microscopic colitis (MC is increasing, but its etiology remains unknown. Case reports and limited controlled data suggest that commonly prescribed drugs may be triggers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of selected medication use [Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins, and Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs] in patients with MC compared to ‘random controls’ and ‘diarrhea controls.' Methods All patients were selected from primary care practices of a university health system during 2002 to 2007. Patients with biopsy proven lymphocytic or collagenous colitis were identified as cases. Diarrhea controls consisted of a 10:1 random sample of patients with chronic diarrhea and normal colon biopsies. Ten random controls were matched to each case on sex and index date (date of biopsy proven diagnosis. Drugs prescribed within the year prior to the index date were collected from the electronic medical record system. Results 26 cases (median age 68.9 yrs, 259 random, and 259 diarrhea controls were identified. The adjusted ORs for PPI, SSRI, and statin prescription within 12 months of diagnosis of MC between cases and diarrhea controls were 0.28 (0.07-1.07, 0.87 (0.28-2.64, 1.12 (0.34-3.71 respectively. Use of PPI and statins was less common in MC patients than in random controls ( P < 0.05 for both comparisons. Conclusions While prior data suggest that PPIs, statins, and SSRIs may be etiologically related to MC, our study found no increased association with these drugs.

  13. Thermodynamic properties of uranium--mercury system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    The EMF values in the fused salt cells of the type U(..cap alpha..)/KCl--LiCl--BaCl/sub 2/ eutectic, UCl/sub 3//U--Hg alloy, for the different two-phase alloys in the uranium--mercury system have been measured and the thermodynamic properties of this system have been calculated. These calculated values are in good agreement with values based on mercury vapor pressure measurements made by previous investigators. The inconsistency of the thermodynamic properties with the phase diagram determined by Frost are also confirmed. A tentative phase diagram based on the thermodynamic properties measured in this work was constructed.

  14. Introduction to physics mechanics, hydrodynamics thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Frauenfelder, P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction of Physics: Mechanics , Hydrodynamics, Thermodynamics covers the principles of matter and its motion through space and time, as well as the related concepts of energy and force. This book is composed of eleven chapters, and begins with an introduction to the basic principles of mechanics, hydrodynamics, and thermodynamics. The subsequent chapters deal with the statics of rigid bodies and the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. These topics are followed by discussions on elasticity, mechanics of fluids, the basic concept of thermodynamic, kinetic theory, and crystal structure o

  15. Thermodynamic Formalism and Applications to Dimension Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Barreira, Luis

    2011-01-01

    This self-contained monograph presents a unified exposition of the thermodynamic formalism and some of its main extensions, with emphasis on the relation to dimension theory and multifractal analysis of dynamical systems. In particular, the book considers three different flavors of the thermodynamic formalism, namely nonadditive, subadditive, and almost additive, and provides a detailed discussion of some of the most significant results in the area, some of them quite recent. It also includes a discussion of the most substantial applications of these flavors of the thermodynamic formalism to d

  16. Thermodynamic Volume in AdS/CFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Kiu; Ahn, Byoungjoon

    2018-01-01

    In this note, we study on extended thermodynamics of AdS black holes by varying cosmological constant. We found and discussed pressure and volume of both bulk and boundary physics through AdS/CFT correspondence. In particular, we derive the relation between thermodynamic volume and a chemical potential for M2 brane dual to four dimensional AdS space. In addition, we show that thermodynamic volume of hyperbolic black hole is related to `entanglement pressure' coming from a generalized first law of entanglement entropy.

  17. Thermodynamics of cosmological matter creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigogine, I.; Geheniau, J.; Gunzig, E.; Nardone, P.

    1988-01-01

    A type of cosmological history that includes large-scale entropy production is proposed. These cosmologies are based on reinterpretation of the matter-energy stress tensor in Einstein's equations. This modifies the usual adiabatic energy conservation laws, thereby including irreversible matter creation. This creation corresponds to an irreversible energy flow from the gravitational field to the created matter constituents. This point of view results from consideration of the thermodynamics of open systems in the framework of cosmology. It is shown that the second law of thermodynamics requires that space-time transforms into matter, while the inverse transformation is forbidden. It appears that the usual initial singularity associated with the big bang is structurally unstable with respect to irreversible matter creation. The corresponding cosmological history therefore starts from an instability of the vacuum rather than from a singularity. This is exemplified in the framework of a simple phenomenological model that leads to a three-stage cosmology: the first drives the cosmological system from the initial instability to a de Sitter regime, and the last connects with the usual matter-radiation Robertson-Walker universe. Matter as well as entropy creation occurs during the first two stages, while the third involves the traditional cosmological evolution. A remarkable fact is that the de Sitter stage appears to be an attractor independent of the initial fluctuation. This is also the case for all the physical predictions involving the present Robertson-Walker universe. Most results obtained previously, in the framework of quantum field theory, can now be obtained on a macroscopic basis. It is shown that this description leads quite naturally to the introduction of primeval black holes as the intermediate stage between the Minkowski vacuum and the present matter-radiation universe. The instability at the origin of the universe is the result of fluctuations of the

  18. Thermodynamics of cosmological matter creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigogine, I; Geheniau, J; Gunzig, E; Nardone, P

    1988-10-01

    A type of cosmological history that includes large-scale entropy production is proposed. These cosmologies are based on reinterpretation of the matter-energy stress tensor in Einstein's equations. This modifies the usual adiabatic energy conservation laws, thereby including irreversible matter creation. This creation corresponds to an irreversible energy flow from the gravitational field to the created matter constituents. This point of view results from consideration of the thermodynamics of open systems in the framework of cosmology. It is shown that the second law of thermodynamics requires that space-time transforms into matter, while the inverse transformation is forbidden. It appears that the usual initial singularity associated with the big bang is structurally unstable with respect to irreversible matter creation. The corresponding cosmological history therefore starts from an instability of the vacuum rather than from a singularity. This is exemplified in the framework of a simple phenomenological model that leads to a three-stage cosmology: the first drives the cosmological system from the initial instability to a de Sitter regime, and the last connects with the usual matter-radiation Robertson-Walker universe. Matter as well as entropy creation occurs during the first two stages, while the third involves the traditional cosmological evolution. A remarkable fact is that the de Sitter stage appears to be an attractor independent of the initial fluctuation. This is also the case for all the physical predictions involving the present Robertson-Walker universe. Most results obtained previously, in the framework of quantum field theory, can now be obtained on a macroscopic basis. It is shown that this description leads quite naturally to the introduction of primeval black holes as the intermediate stage between the Minkowski vacuum and the present matter-radiation universe. The instability at the origin of the universe is the result of fluctuations of the

  19. Synthesis, Spectroscopic and Pharmacological Studies of Bivalent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis, Spectroscopic and Pharmacological Studies of Bivalent Copper, Zinc and Mercury Complexes of Thiourea. ... All the metal complexes were characterized by elemental chemical analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements and IR spectroscopy. Cu(II) complexes were additionally ...

  20. Structural, thermal and spectroscopic properties of supramolecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 118; Issue 6. Structural, thermal and spectroscopic properties of supramolecular coordination solids. Birinchi Kumar Das Sanchay Jyoti Bora Monideepa Chakrabortty Laksheswar Kalita Rajesh Chakrabarty Ramakanta Barman. Volume 118 Issue 6 November 2006 ...

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural characterization of new ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 125; Issue 3. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural characterization of new linear mononuclear silver(I) complexes containing -keto phosphorus ylides as ambidentate ligands. Seyed Javad Sabounchei Mohsen Ahmadi Fatemeh Akhlaghi Hamid Reza Khavasi.

  2. Geometric Thermodynamics: Black Holes and the Meaning of the Scalar Curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel García-Ariza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show that the vanishing of the scalar curvature of Ruppeiner-like metrics does not characterize the ideal gas. Furthermore, we claim through an example that flatness is not a sufficient condition to establish the absence of interactions in the underlying microscopic model of a thermodynamic system, which poses a limitation on the usefulness of Ruppeiner’s metric and conjecture. Finally, we address the problem of the choice of coordinates in black hole thermodynamics. We propose an alternative energy representation for Kerr-Newman black holes that mimics fully Weinhold’s approach. The corresponding Ruppeiner’s metrics become degenerate only at absolute zero and have non-vanishing scalar curvatures.

  3. Photometric and spectroscopic investigation of TW Draconis

    OpenAIRE

    Zejda, M.; Wolf, M.; Slechta, M.; Mikulasek, Z.; Zverko, J.; Svoboda, P.; Krticka, J.; Janik, J.; Bozic, H.

    2010-01-01

    Context. TW Draconis is one of the best studied Algol-type eclipsing binaries. There is significant evidence for miscellaneous physical processes between interacting binary components manifesting themselves by period and light curve changes. Aims. Obtaining new set of photometric and spectroscopic observations, we analysed them together with the older spectroscopic and photometric data to build model of this eclipsing system with respect to observed changes of O-C diagram and light curve. Met...

  4. Structural, conformational and thermodynamic aspects of groove-directed-intercalation of flavopiridol into DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Bhumika; Agarwal, Shweta; Lohani, Neelam; Rajeswari, Moganty R; Mehrotra, Ranjana

    2016-11-01

    Certain plant-derived alkaloids and flavonoids have shown propitious cytotoxic acitvity against different types of cancer, having deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) as their main cellular target. Flavopiridol, a semi-synthetic derivative of rohitukine (a natural compound isolated from Dysoxylum binectariferum plant), has attained much attention owing to its anticancer potential against various haematological malignancies and solid tumours. This work focuses on investigating interaction between flavopiridol and DNA at molecular level in order to decipher its underlying mechanism of action, which is not well understood. To define direct influence of flavopiridol on the structural, conformational and thermodynamic aspects of DNA, various spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques have been used. ATR-FTIR and SERS spectral outcomes indicate a novel insight into groove-directed-intercalation of flavopiridol into DNA via direct binding with nitrogenous bases guanine (C6=O6) and thymine (C2=O2) in DNA groove together with slight external binding to its sugar-phosphate backbone. Circular dichroism spectral analysis of flavopiridol-DNA complexes suggests perturbation in native B-conformation of DNA and its transition into C-form, which may be localized up to a few base pairs of DNA. UV-visible spectroscopic results illustrate dual binding mode of flavopiridol when interacts with DNA having association constant, Ka = 1.18 × 10(4) M(-1). This suggests moderate type of interaction between flavopiridol and DNA. Further, UV melting analysis also supports spectroscopic outcomes. Thermodynamically, flavopiridol-DNA complexation is an enthalpy-driven exothermic process. These conclusions drawn from this study could be helpful in unveiling mechanism of cytoxicity induced by flavopiridol that can be further applied in the development of flavonoid-based new chemotherapeutics with more specificity and better efficacy.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, U.; Szeghalmi, A.; Schmitt, M.; Kiefer, W.; Popp, J.; Holzgrabe, U.

    2005-05-01

    Quinolones are important gyrase inhibitors. Even though they are used as active agents in many antibiotics, the detailed mechanism of action on a molecular level is so far not known. It is of greatest interest to shed light on this drug-target interaction to provide useful information in the fight against growing resistances and obtain new insights for the development of new powerful drugs. To reach this goal, on a first step it is essential to understand the structural characteristics of the drugs and the effects that are caused by the environment in detail. In this work we report on Raman spectroscopical investigations of a variety of gyrase inhibitors (nalidixic acid, oxolinic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, enoxacin, sarafloxacin and moxifloxacin) by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy excited with various excitation wavelengths, both in the off-resonance region (532, 633, 830 and 1064 nm) and in the resonance region (resonance Raman spectroscopy at 244, 257 and 275 nm). Furthermore DFT calculations were performed to assign the vibrational modes, as well as for an identification of intramolecular hydrogen bonding motifs. The effect of small changes in the drug environment was studied by adding successively small amounts of water until physiological low concentrations of the drugs in aqueous solution were obtained. At these low concentrations resonance Raman spectroscopy proved to be a useful and sensitive technique. Supplementary information was obtained from IR and UV/vis spectroscopy.

  6. Spectroscopic Detection of Caries Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Ruohonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A caries lesion causes changes in the optical properties of the affected tissue. Currently a caries lesion can be detected only at a relatively late stage of development. Caries diagnosis also suffers from high interobserver variance. Methods. This is a pilot study to test the suitability of an optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for caries diagnosis. Reflectance visible/near-infrared spectroscopy (VIS/NIRS was used to measure caries lesions and healthy enamel on extracted human teeth. The results were analysed with a computational algorithm in order to find a rule-based classification method to detect caries lesions. Results. The classification indicated that the measured points of enamel could be assigned to one of three classes: healthy enamel, a caries lesion, and stained healthy enamel. The features that enabled this were consistent with theory. Conclusions. It seems that spectroscopic measurements can help to reduce false positives at in vitro setting. However, further research is required to evaluate the strength of the evidence for the method’s performance.

  7. Comparative study of image contrast in scanning electron microscope and helium ion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Fox, D; Maguire, P; Wang, J J; Rodenburg, C

    2017-12-01

    Images of Ga+ -implanted amorphous silicon layers in a 110 n-type silicon substrate have been collected by a range of detectors in a scanning electron microscope and a helium ion microscope. The effects of the implantation dose and imaging parameters (beam energy, dwell time, etc.) on the image contrast were investigated. We demonstrate a similar relationship for both the helium ion microscope Everhart-Thornley and scanning electron microscope Inlens detectors between the contrast of the images and the Ga+ density and imaging parameters. These results also show that dynamic charging effects have a significant impact on the quantification of the helium ion microscope and scanning electron microscope contrast. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Thermodynamics of quantum spacetime histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Lee

    2017-11-01

    We show that the simplicity constraints, which define the dynamics of spin foam models, imply, and are implied by, the first law of thermodynamics, when the latter is applied to causal diamonds in the quantum spacetime. This result reveals an intimate connection between the holographic nature of gravity, as reflected by the Bekenstein entropy, and the fact that general relativity and other gravitational theories can be understood as constrained topological field theories. To state and derive this correspondence we describe causal diamonds in the causal structure of spin foam histories and generalize arguments given for the near horizon region of black holes by Frodden, Gosh and Perez [Phys. Rev. D 87, 121503 (2013); , 10.1103/PhysRevD.87.121503Phys. Rev. D 89, 084069 (2014); , 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.084069Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 241301 (2011); , 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.241301Phys. Rev. Lett.108, 169901(E) (2012)., 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.169901] and Bianchi [arXiv:1204.5122.]. This allows us to apply a recent argument of Jacobson [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 201101 (2016).10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.201101] to show that if a spin foam history has a semiclassical limit described in terms of a smooth metric geometry, that geometry satisfies the Einstein equations. These results suggest also a proposal for a quantum equivalence principle.

  9. Thermodynamics of Quantum Feedback Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Liuzzo-Scorpo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to initialize quantum registers in pure states lies at the core of many applications of quantum technologies, from sensing to quantum information processing and computation. In this paper, we tackle the problem of increasing the polarization bias of an ensemble of two-level register spins by means of joint coherent manipulations, involving a second ensemble of ancillary spins and energy dissipation into an external heat bath. We formulate this spin refrigeration protocol, akin to algorithmic cooling, in the general language of quantum feedback control, and identify the relevant thermodynamic variables involved. Our analysis is two-fold: on the one hand, we assess the optimality of the protocol by means of suitable figures of merit, accounting for both its work cost and effectiveness; on the other hand, we characterise the nature of correlations built up between the register and the ancilla. In particular, we observe that neither the amount of classical correlations nor the quantum entanglement seem to be key ingredients fuelling our spin refrigeration protocol. We report instead that a more general indicator of quantumness beyond entanglement, the so-called quantum discord, is closely related to the cooling performance.

  10. Thermodynamics of superconducting quantum metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallaire-Demers, Pierre-Luc; Wilhelm-Mauch, Frank [Universitaet des Saarlandes (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Left-handed matematerials are capacitively coupled layers of inductive pieces of conductors. These systems are well studied in the context of microwave metamaterials but their full quantum description or their embedding in highly correlated materials like superconductors are still an open problem. Notably, they are known to have a Van Hove singularity in the density of states at low energy and high pseudo-momentum that could effectively couple and condense Cooper pairs. The goal of this research is to analyze the thermodynamical properties of the order parameter of stacked layers of superconductors with a small repulsive Coulomb interaction. A 3D toy model of such a material is mapped to a Fermi-Hubbard lattice. The temperature dependent anomalous correlation functions are computed variationally from a self-energy functional of a small cluster where inter-cluster tunneling is treated perturbatively. The effect of the repulsive interaction on the Cooper pairs binding can then be seen from the momentum distribution of the condensation amplitude. Such a material could potentially be realized with optical lattices or nanoscaled superconductors.

  11. Computational studies of the electronic, conductivities, and spectroscopic properties of hydrolysed Ru(II) anticancer complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Adebayo A; Ajibade, Peter A

    2013-11-01

    The mechanism of activation of metal-based anticancer agents was reported to be through hydrolysis. In this study, computational method was used to gain insight to the correlation between the chemistry of the hydrolysis and the anticancer activities of selected Ru(II)-based complexes. Interestingly, we observed that the mechanism of activation by hydrolysis and their consequential anticancer activities is associated with favourable thermodynamic changes, higher hyperpolarizability (β), lower band-gap and higher first-order net current. The Fermi contact (FC) and spin dipole (SD) are found to be the two most significant Ramsey terms that determine the spin-spin couplings (J(HZ)) of most of the existing bonds in the complexes. Many of the computed properties give insights into the change in the chemistry of the complexes due to hydrolysis. Besides strong correlations of the computed properties to the anticancer activities of the complexes, using the quantum theory of atoms in a molecule (QTAIM) to analyse the spectroscopic properties shows a stronger correlation between the spectroscopic properties of Ru atom to the reported anticancer activities than the sum over of the spectroscopic properties of all atoms in the complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  13. Low bone mass in microscopic colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakatos Péter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microscopic colitis presents with similar symptoms to classic inflammatory bowel diseases. Osteoporosis is a common complication of Crohn's disease but there are no data concerning bone metabolism in microscopic colitis. Aims The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone density and metabolism in patients with microscopic colitis. Methods Fourteen patients microscopic colitis were included in the study, and 28 healthy persons and 28 age and gender matched Crohn's disease patients were enrolled as controls. Bone mineral density was measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine, femoral neck and the radius. Serum bone formation and bone resorption markers (osteocalcin and beta-crosslaps, respectively were measured using immunoassays. Results Low bone mass was measured in 57.14% patients with microscopic colitis. Bone mineral density at the femoral neck in patients suffering from microscopic colitis and Crohn's disease was lower than in healthy controls (0.852 ± 0.165 and 0.807 ± 0.136 vs. 1.056 ± 0.126 g/cm2; p 2; p 2. Mean beta-crosslaps concentration was higher in microscopic colitis and Crohn's disease patients than controls (417.714 ± 250.37 and 466.071 ± 249.96 vs. 264.75 ± 138.65 pg/ml; p Conclusions Low bone mass is frequent in microscopic colitis, and alterations to bone metabolism are similar to those present in Crohn's disease. Therefore, microscopic colitis-associated osteopenia could be a significant problem in such patients.

  14. [Thermodynamics of life from the point of view of technical thermodynamics and exergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassmann, P

    1984-07-01

    All living beings are, from the thermodynamic point of view, open, well regulated, and optimized systems with considerable internal irreversibilities. However scientific research is mainly based on closed systems. The theory of open systems is very well developed in engineering thermodynamics. Here the concept of "exergy"--the thermodynamic potential related to given surroundings--clearly distinguishes between the two concepts of the word "energy".

  15. Universalities of thermodynamic signatures in topological phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempkes, S. N.; Quelle, A.; de Morais Smith, C.

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators (superconductors) are materials that host symmetry-protected metallic edge states in an insulating (superconducting) bulk. Although they are well understood, a thermodynamic description of these materials remained elusive, firstly because the edges yield a non-extensive

  16. Thermodynamic Products in the Extended Phase Space

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2016-01-01

    We have examined the thermodynamic properties of spherically symmetric charged-AdS black hole, charged AdS BH surrounded by quintessence and charged AdS BH in $f(R)$ gravity in the extended phase-space. Where the cosmological constant should be treated as thermodynamic pressure and its conjugate parameter as thermodynamic volume. Then they should behave as a analog of Van der Waal like systems. In the extended phase space we have calculated the \\emph{entropy product} and \\emph{thermodynamic volume product} of all horizons. The mass(or enthalpy) independent nature of the said products signals they are "universal" quantities. Various types of pictorial diagram of the specific heat is given. The divergence of the specific heat indicates that the second order phase transition occurs under certain condition.

  17. Metrics and Energy Landscapes in Irreversible Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarne Andresen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe how several metrics are possible in thermodynamic state space but that only one, Weinhold’s, has achieved widespread use. Lengths calculated based on this metric have been used to bound dissipation in finite-time (irreversible processes be they continuous or discrete, and described in the energy picture or the entropy picture. Examples are provided from thermodynamics of heat conversion processes as well as chemical reactions. Even losses in economics can be bounded using a thermodynamic type metric. An essential foundation for the metric is a complete equation of state including all extensive variables of the system; examples are given. Finally, the second law of thermodynamics imposes convexity on any equation of state, be it analytical or empirical.

  18. Quantum thermodynamics of general quantum processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Felix; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Modi, Kavan; Goold, John

    2015-03-01

    Accurately describing work extraction from a quantum system is a central objective for the extension of thermodynamics to individual quantum systems. The concepts of work and heat are surprisingly subtle when generalizations are made to arbitrary quantum states. We formulate an operational thermodynamics suitable for application to an open quantum system undergoing quantum evolution under a general quantum process by which we mean a completely positive and trace-preserving map. We derive an operational first law of thermodynamics for such processes and show consistency with the second law. We show that heat, from the first law, is positive when the input state of the map majorizes the output state. Moreover, the change in entropy is also positive for the same majorization condition. This makes a strong connection between the two operational laws of thermodynamics.

  19. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics in Multiphase Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mauri, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Non-equilibrium thermodynamics is a general framework that allows the macroscopic description of irreversible processes. This book introduces non-equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to the rheology of multiphase flows. The subject is relevant to graduate students in chemical and mechanical engineering, physics and material science. This book is divided into two parts. The first part presents the theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, reviewing its essential features and showing, when possible, some applications. The second part of this book deals with how the general theory can be applied to model multiphase flows and, in particular, how to determine their constitutive relations. Each chapter contains problems at the end, the solutions of which are given at the end of the book. No prior knowledge of statistical mechanics is required; the necessary prerequisites are elements of transport phenomena and on thermodynamics. “The style of the book is mathematical, but nonetheless it remains very re...

  20. Thermodynamics of sedimentation in paucidisperse systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooyman, G.J.

    1956-01-01

    The previously given treatment of sedimentation phenomena in monodisperse uncharged systems with the help of thermodynamics of irreversible processes is extended to paucidisperse systems. The sedimentation rates of the components are derived by neglecting transverse effects and by introducing the

  1. Fluctuations of Intensive Quantities in Statistical Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur E. Ruuge

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In phenomenological thermodynamics, the canonical coordinates of a physical system split in pairs, with each pair consisting of an extensive quantity and an intensive one. In the present paper, the quasithermodynamic fluctuation theory of a model system of a large number of oscillators is extended to statistical thermodynamics based on the idea of perceiving the fluctuations of intensive variables as the fluctuations of specific extensive ones in a “thermodynamically dual” system. The extension is motivated by the symmetry of the problem in the context of an analogy with quantum mechanics, which is stated in terms of a generalized Pauli problem for the thermodynamic fluctuations. The doubled Boltzmann constant divided by the number of particles plays a similar role as the Planck constant.

  2. The entropy principle thermodynamics for the unsatisfied

    CERN Document Server

    Thess, André

    2011-01-01

    Entropy is the most important and the most difficult to understand term of thermodynamics. This book helps make this key concept understandable. It includes seven illustrative examples of applications of entropy, which are presented step by step.

  3. Thermodynamics of Computational Copying in Biochemical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Govern, Christopher C.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2017-04-01

    Living cells use readout molecules to record the state of receptor proteins, similar to measurements or copies in typical computational devices. But is this analogy rigorous? Can cells be optimally efficient, and if not, why? We show that, as in computation, a canonical biochemical readout network generates correlations; extracting no work from these correlations sets a lower bound on dissipation. For general input, the biochemical network cannot reach this bound, even with arbitrarily slow reactions or weak thermodynamic driving. It faces an accuracy-dissipation trade-off that is qualitatively distinct from and worse than implied by the bound, and more complex steady-state copy processes cannot perform better. Nonetheless, the cost remains close to the thermodynamic bound unless accuracy is extremely high. Additionally, we show that biomolecular reactions could be used in thermodynamically optimal devices under exogenous manipulation of chemical fuels, suggesting an experimental system for testing computational thermodynamics.

  4. Thermodynamic considerations in renal separation processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert H Louw; David M Rubin; David Glasser; Robyn F R Letts; Diane Hildebrandt

    2017-01-01

    .... This study uses a thermodynamic analysis to evaluate the minimum work requirements for urine production in the human kidney and provide a new perspective on the energy costs of urine production...

  5. Raman spectroscopic analysis of a 'noli me tangere' painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberts, Stephen; Edwards, Howell G M; Abdel-Ghani, Mona; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2016-12-13

    The discovery of an oil painting in seriously damaged condition with an important historical and a heterodox detail with possible origins in the late fifteenth century has afforded the opportunity for Raman microscopic analysis prior to its restoration being undertaken. The painting depicts a risen Christ following His crucifixion in a 'noli me tangere' pose with three women in an Italian terrace garden with a stone balustrade overlooking a rural landscape and an undoubted view of late-medieval Florence. The picture has suffered much abuse and is in very poor condition, which is possibly attributable to its controversial portrayal of a polydactylic Christ with six toes on His right foot. By the late sixteenth century, after the Council of Trent, this portrayal would almost certainly have been frowned upon by the Church authorities or more controversially as a depiction of the holy. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments places the painting as being consistent chronologically with the Renaissance period following the identification of cinnabar, haematite, red lead, lead white, goethite, verdigris, caput mortuum and azurite with no evidence of more modern synthetic pigments or of modern restoration having been carried out. An interesting pigment mixture found here is that of the organic dye carmine and cinnabar to produce a particular bright red pigment coloration. Stratigraphic examination of the paint fragments has demonstrated the presence of an orange resin layer immediately on top of the canvas substrate, effectively rendering the pigment as a sandwich between this substratal resin and the overlying varnish. The Raman spectroscopic evidence clearly indicates that an attribution of the artwork to the Renaissance is consistent with the scientific analysis of the pigment composition.This article is part of the themed issue 'Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Spectroscopic optical coherence tomography for ex vivo brain tumor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Marcel; Krug, Robin; Dillmann, Christopher; Gerling, Alexandra; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Welp, Hubert; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2017-02-01

    For neurosurgeries precise tumor resection is essential for the subsequent recovery of the patients since nearby healthy tissue that may be harmed has a huge impact on the life quality after the surgery. However, so far no satisfying methodology has been established to assist the surgeon during surgery to distinguish between healthy and tumor tissue. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) potentially enables non-contact in vivo image acquisition at penetration depths of 1-2 mm with a resolution of approximately 1-15 μm. To analyze the potential of OCT for distinction between brain tumors and healthy tissue, we used a commercially available Thorlabs Callisto system to measure healthy tissue and meningioma samples ex vivo. All samples were measured with the OCT system and three dimensional datasets were generated. Afterwards they were sent to the pathology for staining with hematoxylin and eosin and then investigated with a bright field microscope to verify the tissue type. This is the actual gold standard for ex vivo analysis. The images taken by the OCT system exhibit variations in the structure for different tissue types, but these variations may not be objectively evaluated from raw OCT images. Since an automated distinction between tumor and healthy tissue would be highly desirable to guide the surgeon, we applied Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography to further enhance the differences between the tissue types. Pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms were applied to classify the derived spectroscopic information. Finally, the classification results are analyzed in comparison to the histological analysis of the samples.

  7. Raman spectroscopic analysis of a `noli me tangere' painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberts, Stephen; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Abdel-Ghani, Mona; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The discovery of an oil painting in seriously damaged condition with an important historical and a heterodox detail with possible origins in the late fifteenth century has afforded the opportunity for Raman microscopic analysis prior to its restoration being undertaken. The painting depicts a risen Christ following His crucifixion in a `noli me tangere' pose with three women in an Italian terrace garden with a stone balustrade overlooking a rural landscape and an undoubted view of late-medieval Florence. The picture has suffered much abuse and is in very poor condition, which is possibly attributable to its controversial portrayal of a polydactylic Christ with six toes on His right foot. By the late sixteenth century, after the Council of Trent, this portrayal would almost certainly have been frowned upon by the Church authorities or more controversially as a depiction of the holy. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments places the painting as being consistent chronologically with the Renaissance period following the identification of cinnabar, haematite, red lead, lead white, goethite, verdigris, caput mortuum and azurite with no evidence of more modern synthetic pigments or of modern restoration having been carried out. An interesting pigment mixture found here is that of the organic dye carmine and cinnabar to produce a particular bright red pigment coloration. Stratigraphic examination of the paint fragments has demonstrated the presence of an orange resin layer immediately on top of the canvas substrate, effectively rendering the pigment as a sandwich between this substratal resin and the overlying varnish. The Raman spectroscopic evidence clearly indicates that an attribution of the artwork to the Renaissance is consistent with the scientific analysis of the pigment composition. This article is part of the themed issue "Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology".

  8. The Mathematical Microscope - Making the inaccessible accessible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2011-01-01

      In this chapter we introduce a new term, the "Mathematical Microscope", as a method of using mathematics in accessing information about reality when this information is otherwise inaccessible. Furthermore, we discuss how models and experiments are related: none of which are important without...... the other. In the sciences and medicine, a link that is often missing in the chain of a system can be made visible with the aid of the mathematical microscope. The mathematical microscope serves not only as a lens to clarify a blurred picture but more important as a tool to unveil profound truths...

  9. A video rate laser scanning confocal microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongzhou; Jiang, James; Ren, Hongwu; Cable, Alex E.

    2008-02-01

    A video-rate laser scanning microscope was developed as an imaging engine to integrate with other photonic building blocks to fulfill various microscopic imaging applications. The system is quipped with diode laser source, resonant scanner, galvo scanner, control electronic and computer loaded with data acquisition boards and imaging software. Based on an open frame design, the system can be combined with varies optics to perform the functions of fluorescence confocal microscopy, multi-photon microscopy and backscattering confocal microscopy. Mounted to the camera port, it allows a traditional microscope to obtain confocal images at video rate. In this paper, we will describe the design principle and demonstrate examples of applications.

  10. Pushing the physical limits of spectroscopic imaging for new biology and better medicine (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2017-02-01

    In vivo molecular spectroscopic imaging is not a simple addition of a spectrometer to a microscope. Innovations are needed to break the physical limits in sensitivity, depth, speed and resolution perspectives. I will present our most recent advances in modality development, biological application, and clinical translation. My talk will focus on the development of mid-infrared photothermal microscope for depth-resolved vibrational imaging of living cells (Science Advances, in press), the discovery of a metabolic signature in cancer stem cells by hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering imaging (Cell Stem Cell, in press), and the development of an intravascular vibrational photoacoustic catheter for label-free sensing of lipid laden plaques (Scientific Report 2016, 6:25236).

  11. Thermodynamics and folding pathway of tetraloop receptor-mediated RNA helical packing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Meulen, Kirk A.; Davis, Jared H.; Foster, Trenton R.; Record, M. Thomas; Butcher, Samuel E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Little is known about the thermodynamic forces that drive the folding pathways of higher order RNA structure. In this study, we employ calorimetric (ITC and DSC) and spectroscopic (NMR and UV) methods to characterize the thermodynamics of the GAAA tetraloop – receptor interaction, utilizing a previously described bivalent construct. ITC studies indicate that the bivalent interaction is enthalpy-driven and highly stable, with a binding constant (Kobs) of 5.5 × 106 M−1 and enthalpy (ΔHobs°) of −33.8 kcal/mol at 45°C in 20 mM KCl and 2 mM MgCl2. Thus we derive the ΔHobs° for a single tetraloop-receptor interaction to be −16.9 kcal/mol at these conditions. UV absorbance data indicate that an increase in base stacking quality contributes to the enthalpy of complex formation. These highly favorable thermodynamics are consistent with the known critical role for the tetraloop-receptor motif in the folding of large RNAs. Additionally, a significant heat capacity change (ΔCp,obs°) of −0.24 kcal·mol−1·K−1 was determined by ITC. DSC and UV monitored thermal denaturation experiments indicate that the bivalent tetraloop-receptor construct follows a minimally 5–state unfolding pathway, and suggest the observed ΔCp,obs° for the interaction results from a temperature-dependent unbound receptor RNA structure. PMID:18845162

  12. Universalities of thermodynamic signatures in topological phases

    OpenAIRE

    S. N. Kempkes; Quelle, A.; de Morais Smith, C.

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators (superconductors) are materials that host symmetry-protected metallic edge states in an insulating (superconducting) bulk. Although they are well understood, a thermodynamic description of these materials remained elusive, firstly because the edges yield a non-extensive contribution to the thermodynamic potential, and secondly because topological field theories involve non-local order parameters, and cannot be captured by the Ginzburg-Landau formalism. Recently, this ch...

  13. Qualitative and quantitative reasoning about thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorstad, G.; Forbus, K. (Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (US))

    1989-01-01

    This paper shows how qualitative process theory can be used to express concepts of engineering thermodynamics. In particular, the authors describe how to integrate qualitative and quantitative knowledge to solve textbook problems involving thermodynamic cycles, such as gas turbine plants and steam power plants. These ideas have been implemented in a program called SCHISM. The authors describe its analysis of a sample textbook problem and discuss plans for future work.

  14. Tables of thermodynamic properties of sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.K.

    1982-06-01

    The thermodynamic properties of saturated sodium, superheated sodium, and subcooled sodium are tabulated as a function of temperature. The temperature ranges are 380 to 2508 K for saturated sodium, 500 to 2500 K for subcooled sodium, and 400 to 1600 K for superheated sodium. Tabulated thermodynamic properties are enthalpy, heat capacity, pressure, entropy, density, instantaneous thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and thermal pressure coefficient. Tables are given in SI units and cgs units.

  15. Chemical engineering and thermodynamics using Mat lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim Heon; Kim, Moon Gap; Lee, Hak Yeong; Yeo, Yeong Gu; Ham, Seong Won

    2002-02-15

    This book consists of twelve chapters and four appendixes about chemical engineering and thermodynamics using Mat lab, which deals with introduction, energy budget, entropy, thermodynamics process, generalization on any fluid, engineering equation of state for PVT properties, deviation of the function, phase equilibrium of pure fluid, basic of multicomponent, phase equilibrium of compound by state equation, activity model and reaction system. The appendixes is about summary of computer program, related mathematical formula and material property of pure component.

  16. Thermodynamical analysis of human thermal comfort

    OpenAIRE

    Prek, Matjaž

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods of human thermal comfort analysis are based on the first law of thermodynamics. These methods use an energy balance of the human body to determine heat transfer between the body and its environment. By contrast, the second law of thermodynamics introduces the useful concept of exergy. It enables the determination of the exergy consumption within the human body dependent on human and environmental factors. Human body exergy consumption varies with the combination of environ...

  17. Molecular thermodynamics using fluctuation solution theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela

    to relevant experimental data is limited. This thesis addresses the issue of generating and using simple thermodynamic models within a rigorous statistical mechanical framework, the so-called fluctuation solution theory, from which relations connecting properties and phase equilibria can be obtained....... The framework relates thermodynamic variables to molecular pair correlation functions of liquid mixtures. In this thesis, application of the framework is illustrated using two approaches: 1. Solubilities of solid solutes in mixed solvent systems are determined from fluctuation solution theory application...

  18. OPTIMAL PROCESSES IN IRREVERSIBLE THERMODYNAMICS AND MICROECONOMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Kazakov

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes general methodology that allows one to extend Carnot efficiency of classical thermodynamic for zero rate processes onto thermodynamic systems with finite rate. We define the class of minimal dissipation processes and show that it represents generalization of reversible processes and determines the limiting possibilities of finite rate systems. The described methodology is then applied to microeconomic exchange systems yielding novel estimates of limiting efficiencies for such systems.

  19. Hadron thermodynamics in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammiraju, P.

    1985-01-01

    Various phenomenological models based on statistical thermodynamical considerations were used to fit the experimental data at high P sub T to a two temperature distribution. Whether this implies that the two temperatures belong to two different reaction mechanisms, or consequences of Lorentz-contraction factor, or related in a fundamental way to the intrinsic thermodynamics of Space-Time can only be revealed by further theoretical and experimental investigations of high P sub T phenomena in extremely energetic hadron-hadron collisions.

  20. Thermodynamics for separation-process technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-10-01

    When contemplating or designing a separation process, every chemical engineer at once recognizes the thermodynamic boundary conditions that must be satisfied: when a mixture is continuously processed to yield at least partially purified products, energy and mass must be conserved and work must be done. In his daily tasks, a chemical engineer uses thermodynamic concepts as tacit, almost subconscious, knowledge. Thus, qualitative thermodynamics significantly informs process conception at its most fundamental level. However, quantitative design requires detailed knowledge of thermodynamic relations and physical chemistry. Most process engineers, concerned with flow sheets and economics, cannot easily command that detailed knowledge and therefore it is advantageous for them to maintain close contact with those specialists who do. Quantitative chemical thermodynamics provides an opportunity to evaluate possible separation processes not only because it may give support to the process engineer`s bold imagination but also because, when coupled with molecular models, it can significantly reduce the experimental effort required to determine an optimum choice of process alternatives. Six examples are presented to indicate the application of thermodynamics for conventional and possible future separation processes.

  1. Universalities of thermodynamic signatures in topological phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempkes, S. N.; Quelle, A.; Smith, C. Morais

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators (superconductors) are materials that host symmetry-protected metallic edge states in an insulating (superconducting) bulk. Although they are well understood, a thermodynamic description of these materials remained elusive, firstly because the edges yield a non-extensive contribution to the thermodynamic potential, and secondly because topological field theories involve non-local order parameters, and cannot be captured by the Ginzburg-Landau formalism. Recently, this challenge has been overcome: by using Hill thermodynamics to describe the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model in two dimensions, it was shown that at the topological phase transition the thermodynamic potential does not scale extensively due to boundary effects. Here, we extend this approach to different topological models in various dimensions (the Kitaev chain and Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model in one dimension, the Kane-Mele model in two dimensions and the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model in three dimensions) at zero temperature. Surprisingly, all models exhibit the same universal behavior in the order of the topological-phase transition, depending on the dimension. Moreover, we derive the topological phase diagram at finite temperature using this thermodynamic description, and show that it displays a good agreement with the one calculated from the Uhlmann phase. Our work reveals unexpected universalities and opens the path to a thermodynamic description of systems with a non-local order parameter. PMID:27929041

  2. Thermodynamic DFT analysis of natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Abel F G; Huda, Muhammad N; Marques, Francisco C; Borges, Rosivaldo S; Neto, Antonio M J C

    2017-08-01

    Density functional theory was performed for thermodynamic predictions on natural gas, whose B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31+G(d), CBS-QB3, G3, and G4 methods were applied. Additionally, we carried out thermodynamic predictions using G3/G4 averaged. The calculations were performed for each major component of seven kinds of natural gas and to their respective air + natural gas mixtures at a thermal equilibrium between room temperature and the initial temperature of a combustion chamber during the injection stage. The following thermodynamic properties were obtained: internal energy, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy and entropy, which enabled us to investigate the thermal resistance of fuels. Also, we estimated an important parameter, namely, the specific heat ratio of each natural gas; this allowed us to compare the results with the empirical functions of these parameters, where the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and G3/G4 methods showed better agreements. In addition, relevant information on the thermal and mechanic resistance of natural gases were investigated, as well as the standard thermodynamic properties for the combustion of natural gas. Thus, we show that density functional theory can be useful for predicting the thermodynamic properties of natural gas, enabling the production of more efficient compositions for the investigated fuels. Graphical abstract Investigation of the thermodynamic properties of natural gas through the canonical ensemble model and the density functional theory.

  3. Thermodynamics of Phase Transitions and Bipolar Filamentary Switching in Resistive Random-Access Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, V. G.; Niraula, D.; Karpov, I. V.; Kotlyar, R.

    2017-08-01

    We present a phenomenological theory of bipolar filamentary resistive random-access memory describing the commonly observed features of their current-voltage characteristics. Our approach follows the approach of a thermodynamic theory developed earlier for chalcogenide memory and threshold switches and largely independent of their microscopic details. It explains, without adjustable parameters, such features as the domains of filament formation and switching, voltage-independent current in set and current-independent voltage in reset regimes, the relation between the set and reset voltages, filament resistance independent of its length, etc. Furthermore, it expresses the observed features through the material and circuitry parameters, thus paving the way to device improvements.

  4. Thermodynamic properties of potassium oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byker, H.J. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman); Eliezer, I.; Howald, R.C.; Ehlert, T.C.

    1979-09-01

    KO/sub 0/ /sub 5/ has been prepared by the reaction of excess potassium with KNO/sub 3/ in an effusion cell. Observations of the 2KO/sub 0/ /sub 5/ ..-->.. K/sub 2/O(g) equilibrium mass spectrometrically give a new value for the enthalpy of solid KO/sub 0/ /sub 5/, ..delta..H/sub f,298//sup 0/ = -170 +- 5 kJ mol/sup -1/. Observations on KO/sup +/ in the same series of experiments give good estimates for the thermodynamic properties of K/sub 2/O/sub 2/(g). This leads to an improved interpretation of data on the vaporization of KO/sub 0/ /sub 5/-K/sub 2/O/sub 2/ mixtures and solutions. Similarly literature data on the K/sub 2/O/sub 2/-KO/sub 2/ system have been collected and reexamined, leading to the values ..delta..H/sub f,298//sup 0/ = -495.4 kJ mol/sup -1/ and S/sub 298//sup 0/ = 110.1 J mol/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ for K/sub 2/O/sub 2/(s). We have calculated a preliminary phase diagram for the entire region from KO/sub 0/ /sub 5/ to KO/sub 2/, treating the liquid as solutions of O (1) in KO/sub 0/ /sub 5/ (1). Differential thermal analysis data supporting the calculated phase diagram are reported.

  5. Thermodynamic and structural characterization of amphiphilic melamine-type monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollhardt, D; Fainerman, V B; Liu, F

    2005-06-16

    Monolayers of amphiphilic melamine derivatives are good candidates for the formation of supramolecular structures by hydrogen-bonding of nonsurface active species dissolved in the aqueous subphase by molecular recognition. In the present work, the thermodynamic and structural properties of the Langmuir monolayers of a homologous series of a selected amphiphilic melamine-type are characterized. Good candidates for such studies are the decyl, undecyl, and dodecyl homologues of the 2,4-di(n-alkylamino)-6-amino-1,3,5-triazine (2CnH(2n+1)-melamine) monolayers because of their two-phase coexistence region in the accessible temperature range. The characterization of the structural and phase behavior is performed by a combination of surface pressure studies with Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) imaging and Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) measurements. A comprehensive thermodynamic analysis provides good agreement between the experimental surface pressure - area (Pi-A) isotherms and the theoretical curves that were calculated on the basis of equations of state for a large region of monolayer stages developed by us in J. Phys. Chem. 1999, 103, 145. Theoretical curves calculated by application of equations of state only for the fluid monolayer state proposed recently by Rusanov (J. Chem Phys. 2004, 120, 10736) are in good agreement with the experiments in a limited temperature range. A rigorous equation is derived and applied to the experimental results for the calculation of the enthalpy of two-dimensional phase transition. The combination of BAM and GIXD illustrates that the microscopic long range ordering of the condensed monolayer phases is related to the lattice structure of the condensed monolayer.

  6. 3D printing of microscopic bacterial communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jodi L. Connell; Eric T. Ritschdorff; Marvin Whiteley; Jason B. Shear

    2013-01-01

    .... Here, we describe a microscopic threedimensional (3D) printing strategy that enables multiple populations of bacteria to be organized within essentially any 3D geometry, including adjacent, nested, and free-floating...

  7. Special Microscopy Using a Standard Student Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Marshall D.

    1984-01-01

    Explains the procedures used in a general botany course to obtain polarization, fluorescence, and dark field images using a standard student microscope. Provides sources for materials and references. (JM)

  8. A pragmatic guide to multiphoton microscope design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael D.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Bartels, Randy A.; Squier, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a ubiquitous tool for studying microscopic structure and function across a broad range of disciplines. As such, the intent of this paper is to present a comprehensive resource for the construction and performance evaluation of a multiphoton microscope that will be understandable to the broad range of scientific fields that presently exploit, or wish to begin exploiting, this powerful technology. With this in mind, we have developed a guide to aid in the design of a multiphoton microscope. We discuss source selection, optical management of dispersion, image-relay systems with scan optics, objective-lens selection, single-element light-collection theory, photon-counting detection, image rendering, and finally, an illustrated guide for building an example microscope. PMID:27182429

  9. Understanding and caring for an operating microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Cordero

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An operating or surgical microscope is an optical instrument that provides the surgeon with a stereoscopic, high quality magnified and illuminated image of the small structures in the surgical area.

  10. Microscopic dissipative structuring and proliferation at the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelian, Karo

    2017-10-01

    Some fundamental molecules of life are suggested to have been formed, proliferated, and evolved through photochemical microscopic dissipative structuring and autocatalytic proliferation under the UV-C/UV-B solar environment prevalent at Earth's surface throughout the Archean. Evidence is given in the numerous salient characteristics of these, including their strong absorption in this spectral region and their rapid non-radiative excited state decay through inherent conical intersections. The examples of the dissipative structuring and dissipative proliferation of the purines and of single strand DNA are given. UV-C and UV-B-induced stationary state isomerizations and tautomerizations are shown to be crucial to the formation of the purines from hydrogen cyanide in an aqueous environment under UV-C light, while UV-C induced phosphorylation of nucleosides and denaturing of double helix RNA and DNA are similarly important to the production and proliferation of single strand DNA. This thermodynamic dissipation perspective provides a physical-chemical foundation for understanding the origin and evolution of life.

  11. Communication: Mechanochemical fluctuation theorem and thermodynamics of self-phoretic motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, Pierre; Kapral, Raymond

    2017-12-01

    Microscopic dynamical aspects of the propulsion of nanomotors by self-phoretic mechanisms are considered. Propulsion by self-diffusiophoresis relies on the mechanochemical coupling between the fluid velocity field and the concentration fields induced by asymmetric catalytic reactions on the motor surface. The consistency between the thermodynamics of this coupling and the microscopic reversibility of the underlying molecular dynamics is investigated. For this purpose, a mechanochemical fluctuation theorem for the joint probability to find the motor at position r after n reactive events have occurred during the time interval t is derived, starting from coupled Langevin equations for the translational, rotational, and chemical fluctuations of self-phoretic motors. An important result that follows from this analysis is the identification of an effect that is reciprocal to self-propulsion by diffusiophoresis, which leads to a dependence of the reaction rate on the value of an externally applied force.

  12. Surface Plasmon Polariton microscope with Parabolic Reflectors

    OpenAIRE

    Drezet, Aurelien; Koller, Daniel; Hohenau, Andreas; Leitner, Alfred; Aussenegg, Franz R.; Krenn, Joachim R.

    2010-01-01

    We report the realization of a two--dimensional optical microscope for surface plasmons polaritons (SPPs) based on parabolic Bragg mirrors. These mirrors are built from lithographically fabricated gold nanostructures on gold thin films. We show by direct imaging by leakage radiation microscopy that the magnification power of the SPP microscope follows basic predictions of geometrical optics. Spatial resolution down to the value set by the diffraction limit is demonstrated.

  13. [Color television microscope with an automatic stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Z; Liu, S; Xuan, Z; Zhao, Q; Liu, R

    1997-09-01

    To mount a group of stepper motors on a television microscope automates the instrument in coarse focussing and equi-spaced moving a specimen. A microprocessor 8031 application system is used to control the stepper motors. For enhancing the properties and reliability of the system, we select RIF 530, a field effect transistor for the power amplifier of the motor. Combination PC with the instrument becomes basic hardware of a universal microscopic image processing system.

  14. Microscopic polyangiitis: An unusual neurologic complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayet Kaaroud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic polyangiitis is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis of the small vessels. Its typical clinical manifestations are rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and alveolar hemorrhage. We describe a 30-year-old woman with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Seven years later, she presented with partial loss of motor and sensory function in both lower limbs with sphincter dysfunction. This is the first reported case of epidural inflammation ascribed to microscopic poly-angiitis. Possible mechanisms include auto-immune disease.

  15. International thermodynamic tables of the fluid state propylene (propene)

    CERN Document Server

    Angus, S; De Reuck, K M

    2013-01-01

    International Thermodynamic Tables of the Fluid State - 7 Propylene (Propene) is a compilation of internationally agreed values of the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of propylene. This book is composed of three chapters, and begins with the presentation of experimental result of thermodynamic studies compared with the equations used to generate the tables. The succeeding chapter deals with correlating equations for thermodynamic property determination of propylene. The last chapter provides the tabulations of the propylene's thermodynamic properties and constants. This book will prove

  16. Thermodynamic properties of organic compounds estimation methods, principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Janz, George J

    1967-01-01

    Thermodynamic Properties of Organic Compounds: Estimation Methods, Principles and Practice, Revised Edition focuses on the progression of practical methods in computing the thermodynamic characteristics of organic compounds. Divided into two parts with eight chapters, the book concentrates first on the methods of estimation. Topics presented are statistical and combined thermodynamic functions; free energy change and equilibrium conversions; and estimation of thermodynamic properties. The next discussions focus on the thermodynamic properties of simple polyatomic systems by statistical the

  17. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckewer, Szymon; DiCicco, Darrell S.; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Sathre, Robert; Skinner, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  18. IMIS: An intelligence microscope imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Michael; Hunter, Norwood; Taylor, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Until recently microscope users in space relied on traditional microscopy techniques that required manual operation of the microscope and recording of observations in the form of written notes, drawings, or photographs. This method was time consuming and required the return of film and drawings from space for analysis. No real-time data analysis was possible. Advances in digital and video technologies along with recent developments in article intelligence will allow future space microscopists to have a choice of three additional modes of microscopy: remote coaching, remote control, and automation. Remote coaching requires manual operations of the microscope with instructions given by two-way audio/video transmission during critical phases of the experiment. When using the remote mode of microscopy, the Principal Investigator controls the microscope from the ground. The automated mode employs artificial intelligence to control microscope functions and is the only mode that can be operated in the other three modes as well. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the four modes of of microscopy and how the IMIS, a proposed intelligent microscope imaging system, can be used as a model for developing and testing concepts, operating procedures, and equipment design of specifications required to provide a comprehensive microscopy/imaging capability onboard Space Station Freedom.

  19. The Digital Microscope and Its Image Processing Utility

    OpenAIRE

    Tri Wahyu Supardi; Agus Harjoko; Sri Hartati

    2011-01-01

    Many institutions, including high schools, own a large number of analog or ordinary microscopes. These microscopes are used to observe small objects. Unfortunately, object observations on the ordinary microscope require precision and visual acuity of the user. This paper discusses the development of a high-resolution digital microscope from an analog microscope, including the image processing utility, which allows the digital microscope users to capture, store and process the digital images o...

  20. Virtual reality microscope versus conventional microscope regarding time to diagnosis: an experimental study.

    OpenAIRE

    Randell, R; Ruddle, RA; Mello-Thoms, C; Thomas, RG; Quirke, P; Treanor, D

    2013-01-01

    Aims:  To create and evaluate a virtual reality (VR) microscope that is as efficient as the conventional microscope, seeking to support the introduction of digital slides into routine practice. Methods and results:  A VR microscope was designed and implemented by combining ultra-high-resolution displays with VR technology, techniques for fast interaction, and high usability. It was evaluated using a mixed factorial experimental design with technology and task as within-participant variables a...