WorldWideScience

Sample records for spectroscopic phase microscopy

  1. Confocal light scattering and absorption spectroscopic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Salahuddin, Saira; Zaman, Munir M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Freedman, Steven D.; Hanlon, Eugene B.; Itzkan, Irving; Perelman, Lev T.

    2008-04-01

    We have developed a novel optical method for observing submicron intracellular structures in living cells which is called confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy. It combines confocal microscopy, a well-established high-resolution microscopic technique, with light scattering spectroscopy (LSS). CLASS microscopy requires no exogenous labels and is capable of imaging and continuously monitoring individual viable cells, enabling the observation of cell and organelle functioning at scales on the order of 100 nm. In addition, it provides not only size information but also information about the biochemical and physical properties of the cell.

  2. Spectroscopic Imaging Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Electronic Structure in the Superconducting and Pseudogap Phases of Cuprate High-Tc Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kazuhiro; Schmidt, Andrew R.; Kim, Eun-Ah; Lawler, Michael J.; Lee, Dung Hai; Davis, J. C.; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    One of the key motivations for the development of atomically resolved spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (SI-STM) has been to probe the electronic structure of cuprate high temperature superconductors. In both the d-wave superconducting (dSC) and the pseudogap (PG) phases of underdoped cuprates, two distinct classes of electronic states are observed using SI-STM. The first class consists of the dispersive Bogoliubov quasiparticles of a homogeneous d-wave superconductor. These are detected below a lower energy scale |E|=Δ0 and only upon a momentum space (k-space) arc which terminates near the lines connecting k=±(π/a0,0) to k=±(0,π/a0). Below optimal doping, this ``nodal'' arc shrinks continuously with decreasing hole density. In both the dSC and PG phases, the only broken symmetries detected in the |E|≤Δ0 states are those of a d-wave superconductor. The second class of states occurs at energies near the pseudogap energy scale |E|˜ Δ1 which is associated conventionally with the ``antinodal'' states near k=±(π/a0,0) and k=±(0,π/a0). We find that these states break the expected 90°-rotational (C4) symmetry of electronic structure within CuO2 unit cells, at least down to 180°-rotational (C2) symmetry (nematic) but in a spatially disordered fashion. This intra-unit-cell C4 symmetry breaking coexists at |E|˜Δ1 with incommensurate conductance modulations locally breaking both rotational and translational symmetries (smectic). The characteristic wavevector Q of the latter is determined, empirically, by the k-space points where Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference terminates, and therefore evolves continuously with doping. The properties of these two classes of |E|˜Δ1 states are indistinguishable in the dSC and PG phases. To explain this segregation of k-space into the two regimes distinguished by the symmetries of their electronic states and their energy scales |E|˜Δ1 and |E|≤Δ0, and to understand how this impacts the electronic

  3. Diffraction phase and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongkeun; Popescu, Gabriel; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2006-09-04

    We have developed diffraction phase and fluorescence (DPF) microscopy as a new technique for simultaneous quantitative phase imaging and epi-fluorescence investigation of live cells. The DPF instrument consists of an interference microscope, which is incorporated into a conventional inverted fluorescence microscope. The quantitative phase images are characterized by sub-nanometer optical path-length stability over periods from milliseconds to a cell lifetime. The potential of the technique for quantifying rapid nanoscale motions in live cells is demonstrated by experiments on red blood cells, while the composite phase-fluorescence imaging mode is exemplified with mitotic kidney cells.

  4. Phase Aberrations in Diffraction Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesini, S; Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Howells, M R; Spence, J H; Cui, C; Weierstall, U; Minor, A M

    2005-09-29

    In coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy the diffraction pattern generated by a sample illuminated with coherent x-rays is recorded, and a computer algorithm recovers the unmeasured phases to synthesize an image. By avoiding the use of a lens the resolution is limited, in principle, only by the largest scattering angles recorded. However, the imaging task is shifted from the experiment to the computer, and the algorithm's ability to recover meaningful images in the presence of noise and limited prior knowledge may produce aberrations in the reconstructed image. We analyze the low order aberrations produced by our phase retrieval algorithms. We present two methods to improve the accuracy and stability of reconstructions.

  5. Spectroscopic analysis of skin intrinsic signals for multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Strupler, Mathias; Boulesteix, Thierry; Senni, Karim; Godeau, Gaston; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2006-02-01

    We recorded multiphoton images of human skin biopsies using endogenous sources of nonlinear optical signals. We detected simultaneously two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) from intrinsic fluorophores and second harmonic generation (SHG) from collagen. We observed SHG from fibrillar collagens in the dermis, whereas no SHG was detectable from the non fibrillar type IV collagen in the basal laminae. We compared these distinct behaviours of collagens I and IV in SHG microscopy to polarization-resolved surface SHG experiments on thin films of collagens I and IV molecules. We observed similar signals for both types of molecular films, except for the chiroptical contributions which are present only for collagen I and enhance the signal typically by a factor of 2. We concluded that SHG microscopy is a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in biological tissues. In order to elucidate the origin of the endogenous fluorescence signals, we recorded 2PEF spectra at various positions in the skin biopsies, and compared these data to in vitro spectroscopic analysis. In particular, we studied the keratin fluorescence and determined its 2PEF action cross section. We observed a good agreement between 2PEF spectra recorded in the keratinized upper layers of the epidermis and in a solution of purified keratin. Finally, to illustrate the capabilities of this technique, we recorded 2PEF/SHG images of skin biopsies obtained from patients of various ages.

  6. Vibrational phase contrast CARS microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurna, M.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes a new technique that improves specificity, selectivity and sensitivity in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. CARS microscopy is a nonlinear optical technique that utilizes specific bonds of molecules, sometimes referred to as the `fingerprint' of a

  7. Halo-free Phase Contrast Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tan H Nguyen; Mikhail Kandel; Haadi M Shakir; Catherine Best-popescu; Jyothi Arikkath; Minh N Do; Gabriel Popescu

    2017-01-01

    We present a new approach for retrieving halo-free phase contrast microscopy (hfPC) images by upgrading the conventional PC microscope with an external interferometric module, which generates sufficient data for reversing the halo artifact...

  8. Optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Wu, Yi; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Ito, Takuro; Yalikun, Yaxiaer; Lee, Sangwook; Isozaki, Akihiro; Li, Ming; Jiang, Yiyue; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Di Carlo, Dino; Tanaka, Yo; Yatomi, Yutaka; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-10-12

    Innovations in optical microscopy have opened new windows onto scientific research, industrial quality control, and medical practice over the last few decades. One of such innovations is optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy - an emerging method for high-throughput quantitative phase imaging that builds on the interference between temporally stretched signal and reference pulses by using dispersive properties of light in both spatial and temporal domains in an interferometric configuration on a microfluidic platform. It achieves the continuous acquisition of both intensity and phase images with a high throughput of more than 10,000 particles or cells per second by overcoming speed limitations that exist in conventional quantitative phase imaging methods. Applications enabled by such capabilities are versatile and include characterization of cancer cells and microalgal cultures. In this paper, we review the principles and applications of optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy and discuss its future perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoda, Hiroki; Tamai, Takayuki; Iijima, Hirofumi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kondo, Yukihito

    2015-06-01

    This report introduces the first results obtained using phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (P-STEM). A carbon-film phase plate (PP) with a small center hole is placed in the condenser aperture plane so that a phase shift is introduced in the incident electron waves except those passing through the center hole. A cosine-type phase-contrast transfer function emerges when the phase-shifted scattered waves interfere with the non-phase-shifted unscattered waves, which passed through the center hole before incidence onto the specimen. The phase contrast resulting in P-STEM is optically identical to that in phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy that is used to provide high contrast for weak phase objects. Therefore, the use of PPs can enhance the phase contrast of the STEM images of specimens in principle. The phase shift resulting from the PP, whose thickness corresponds to a phase shift of π, has been confirmed using interference fringes displayed in the Ronchigram of a silicon single crystal specimen. The interference fringes were found to abruptly shift at the edge of the PP hole by π. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Spiral phase contrast imaging in microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürhapter, Severin; Jesacher, Alexander; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2005-02-07

    We demonstrate an optical method for edge contrast enhancement in light microscopy. The method is based on holographic Fourier plane filtering of the microscopic image with a spiral phase element (also called vortex phase or helical phase filter) displayed as an off-axis hologram at a computer controlled high resolution spatial light modulator (SLM) in the optical imaging pathway. The phase hologram imprints a helical phase term of the form exp(i phi) on the diffracted light field in its Fourier plane. In the image plane, this results in a strong and isotropic edge contrast enhancement for both amplitude and phase objects.

  11. Spectroscopic near-field microscopy using frequency combs in the mid-infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Markus; Schliesser, Albert; Keilmann, Fritz

    2006-11-13

    We introduce a new concept of spectroscopic near-field optical microscopy that records broad infrared spectra at each pixel during scanning. Two coherent beams with harmonic frequency-comb spectra are employed, one for illuminating the scanning tip, the other as reference for multi-heterodyne detection of the scattered light. Our implementation yields 200 cm(-1) wide amplitude and phase spectra centered at 950 cm(-1) (this band can be tuned between 700 and 1400 cm(-1)). We introduce a new technique of background suppression enabled by the short, 10 mus "snapshot" acquisition of infrared spectra which allows time-resolving the tapping motion. Thus we demonstrate broad-band mid-infrared near-field imaging that is essentially free of background artefacts.

  12. Fourier phase microscopy with white light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Laser-based Fourier phase microscopy (FPM) works on the principle of decomposition of an image field in two spatial components that can be controllably shifted in phase with respect to each other. However, due to the coherent illumination, the contrast in phase images is degraded by speckles. In this paper we present FPM with spatially coherent white light (wFPM), which offers high spatial phase sensitivity due to the low temporal coherence and high temporal phase stability due to common path geometry. Further, by using a fast spatial light modulator (SLM) and a fast scientific-grade complementary metal oxide semiconductor (sCMOS) camera, we report imaging at a maximum rate of 12.5 quantitative phase frames per second with 5.5 mega pixels image size. We illustrate the utility of wFPM as a contrast enhancement as well as dynamic phase measurement method by imaging section of benign colonic glands and red blood cell membrane fluctuation.

  13. Phase-Modulation Laser Interference Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Alexey; Brazhe, Nadezda; Maximov, G. V.

    2008-01-01

    We describe how phase-modulation laser interference microscopy and wavelet analysis can be applied to noninvasive nonstained visualization and study of the structural and dynamical properties of living cells. We show how phase images of erythrocytes can reveal the difference between various...... erythrocyte forms and stages of hemolysis and how phase images of neurons reveal their complex intracellular structure. Temporal variations of the refractive index are analyzed to detect cellular rhythmic activity on different time scales as well as to uncover interactions between the cellular processes....

  14. Ex-vivo holographic microscopy and spectroscopic analysis of head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Stephen; Wurtz, Robert; Auyeung, Kelsey; Auyeung, Kris; Paspaley-Grbavac, Milan; Mulroe, Brigid; Sobrero, Maximiliano; Miles, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Optical probes to identify tumor margins in vivo would greatly reduce the time, effort and complexity in the surgical removal of malignant tissue in head and neck cancers. Current approaches involve visual microscopy of stained tissue samples to determine cancer margins, which results in the excision of excess of tissue to assure complete removal of the cancer. Such surgical procedures and follow-on chemotherapy can adversely affect the patient's recovery and subsequent quality of life. In order to reduce the complexity of the process and minimize adverse effects on the patient, we investigate ex vivo tissue samples (stained and unstained) using digital holographic microscopy in conjunction with spectroscopic analyses (reflectance and transmission spectroscopy) in order to determine label-free, optically identifiable characteristic features that may ultimately be used for in vivo processing of cancerous tissues. The tissue samples studied were squamous cell carcinomas and associated controls from patients of varying age, gender and race. Holographic microscopic imaging scans across both cancerous and non-cancerous tissue samples yielded amplitude and phase reconstructions that were correlated with spectral signatures. Though the holographic reconstructions and measured spectra indicate variations even among the same class of tissue, preliminary results indicate the existence of some discriminating features. Further analyses are presently underway to further this work and extract additional information from the imaging and spectral data that may prove useful for in vivo surgical identification.

  15. Local tomographic phase microscopy from differential projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnyakov, G. N.; Levin, G. G.; Minaev, V. L.; Nekrasov, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    It is proposed to use local tomography for optical studies of the internal structure of transparent phase microscopic objects, for example, living cells. From among the many local tomography methods that exist, the algorithms of back projection summation (in which partial derivatives of projections are used as projection data) are chosen. The application of local tomography to living cells is reasonable because, using optical phase microscopy, one can easily obtain projection data in the form of first-order derivatives of projections applying the methods of differential interference contrast and shear interferometry. The mathematical fundamentals of local tomography in differential projections are considered, and a computer simulation of different local tomography methods is performed. A tomographic phase microscope and the results of reconstructing a local tomogram of an erythrocyte from a set of experimental differential projections are described.

  16. Mapping of phase singularities with spiral phase contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Ruth; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2013-07-15

    In spiral phase contrast (SPC) microscopy the edge-enhancement is typically independent of the helicity of the phase vortex filter. Here we show that for layered specimens containing screw-dislocations, as are e.g. present in mica or some crystallized organic substances, the intensity distribution in the filtered image acquires a dependence on the rotational direction of the filter. This allows one to map the distribution of phase singularities in the topography of the sample, by taking the intensity difference between two images recorded with opposite handedness. For the demonstration of this feature in a microscopy set-up, we encode the vortex filter as a binary off-axis hologram displayed on a spatial light modulator (SLM) placed in a Fourier plane. Using a binary grating, the diffraction efficiencies for the plus and minus first diffraction orders are equal, giving rise to two image waves which travel in different directions and are Fourier filtered with opposite helicity. The corresponding two images can be recorded simultaneously in two separate regions of the camera chip. This enables mapping of dislocations in the sample in a single camera exposure, as was demonstrated for various transparent samples.

  17. Spectral-domain optical coherence phase and multiphoton microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joo, C.; Kim, K.I.; de Boer, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    We describe simultaneous quantitative phase contrast and multiphoton fluorescence imaging by combined spectral-domain optical coherence phase and multiphoton microscopy. The instrument employs two light sources for efficient optical coherence microscopic and multiphoton imaging and can generate

  18. Label-free imaging of the native, living cellular nanoarchitecture using partial-wave spectroscopic microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almassalha, Luay M; Bauer, Greta M; Chandler, John E

    2016-01-01

    of chromatin structure between these scales due to a lack of quantitative imaging technique in live cells. Previous work using partial-wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy, a quantitative imaging technique with sensitivity to macromolecular organization between 20 and 200 nm, has shown that transformation...... on the link between metabolic function and the structure of higher-order chromatin. In particular, we studied the temporal changes to chromatin during UV light exposure, show that live-cell DNA-binding dyes induce damage to chromatin within seconds, and demonstrate a direct link between higher-order chromatin...

  19. Quantitative phase measurements using optical quadrature microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockward, Willie S; Thomas, Anthony L; Zhao, Bing; Dimarzio, Charles A

    2008-04-01

    Imaging of phase or optical path length is becoming more important with the development of better imaging systems, computational algorithms, faster computers, and a greater interest in the imaging of transparent objects. Early phase imaging involved qualitative imaging of phase gradients. New computational algorithms can be used to extract some quantitative phase imaging from these techniques. In contrast, new hardware has enabled full-field quantitative phase imaging on a practical and cost-effective scale. We explore a quantitative comparison between two techniques for imaging phase. In the first technique, phase is recovered from a pair of differential interference contrast images, and in the second technique, phase is measured pixel-by-pixel interferometrically. It is shown, experimentally, that the overall results are similar, but each technique has its own advantages and disadvantages.

  20. Phase contrast and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centonze Frohlich, Victoria

    2008-08-06

    Phase-contrast microscopy is often used to produce contrast for transparent, non light-absorbing, biological specimens. The technique was discovered by Zernike, in 1942, who received the Nobel prize for his achievement. DIC microscopy, introduced in the late 1960s, has been popular in biomedical research because it highlights edges of specimen structural detail, provides high-resolution optical sections of thick specimens including tissue cells, eggs, and embryos and does not suffer from the phase halos typical of phase-contrast images. This protocol highlights the principles and practical applications of these microscopy techniques.

  1. Generalised phase contrast: microscopy, manipulation and more

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Generalised phase contrast (GPC) not only leads to more accurate phase imaging beyond thin biological samples, but serves as an enabling framework in developing tools over a wide spectrum of contemporary applications in optics and photonics, including optical trapping and micromanipulation, optic...

  2. Applicability of thin film phase plates in biological electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Danev, Radostin; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2006-01-01

    Presented is an evaluation of phase contrast techniques in transmission electron microscopy. The traditional defocus phase contrast is compared to two recently developed phase plate techniques. One is the Zernike phase contrast transmission electron microscope, the other is the Hilbert differential contrast thransmission electron microscope. The imaging characteristics of each technique are discussed. Phase plate techniques provide improved contrast for ice-embedded biological samples which a...

  3. Performance Analysis of Quantitative Phase Retrieval Method in Zernike Phase Contrast X-ray Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Heng; Gao, Kun; Wang, Dajiang; Song, Li; Wang, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Since the invention of Zernike phase contrast method in 1930, it has been widely used in optical microscopy and more recently in X-ray microscopy. Considering the image contrast is a mixture of absorption and phase information, we recently have proposed and demonstrated a method for quantitative phase retrieval in Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy. In this contribution, we analyzed the performance of this method at different photon energies. Intensity images of PMMA samples are simulate...

  4. Partial wave spectroscopic microscopy can predict prostate cancer progression and mitigate over-treatment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Graff, Taylor; Crawford, Susan; Subramanian, Hariharan; Thompson, Sebastian; Derbas, Justin R.; Lyengar, Radha; Roy, Hemant K.; Brendler, Charles B.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-02-01

    Prostate Cancer (PC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American men. While prostate specific antigen (PSA) test has been widely used for screening PC, >60% of the PSA detected cancers are indolent, leading to unnecessary clinical interventions. An alternative approach, active surveillance (AS), also suffer from high expense, discomfort and complications associated with repeat biopsies (every 1-3 years), limiting its acceptance. Hence, a technique that can differentiate indolent from aggressive PC would attenuate the harms from over-treatment. Combining microscopy with spectroscopy, our group has developed partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy, which can quantify intracellular nanoscale organizations (e.g. chromatin structures) that are not accessible by conventional microscopy. PWS microscopy has previously been shown to predict the risk of cancer in seven different organs (N ~ 800 patients). Herein we use PWS measurement of label-free histologically-normal prostatic epithelium to distinguish indolent from aggressive PC and predict PC risk. Our results from 38 men with low-grade PC indicated that there is a significant increase in progressors compared to non-progressors (p=0.002, effect size=110%, AUC=0.80, sensitivity=88% and specificity=72%), while the baseline clinical characteristics were not significantly different. We further improved the diagnostic power by performing nuclei-specific measurements using an automated system that separates in real-time the cell nuclei from the remaining prostate epithelium. In the long term, we envision that the PWS based prognostication can be coupled with AS without any change to the current procedure to mitigate the harms caused by over-treatment.

  5. Biological applications of phase-contrast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Here, I review the principles and applications of phase-contrast electron microscopy using phase plates. First, I develop the principle of phase contrast based on a minimal model of microscopy, introducing a double Fourier-transform process to mathematically formulate the image formation. Next, I explain four phase-contrast (PC) schemes, defocus PC, Zernike PC, Hilbert differential contrast, and schlieren optics, as image-filtering processes in the context of the minimal model, with particular emphases on the Zernike PC and corresponding Zernike phase plates. Finally, I review applications of Zernike PC cryo-electron microscopy to biological systems such as protein molecules, virus particles, and cells, including single-particle analysis to delineate three-dimensional (3D) structures of protein and virus particles and cryo-electron tomography to reconstruct 3D images of complex protein systems and cells.

  6. Tissue refractometry using Hilbert phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Niyom; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Lessard, Mark D; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Popescu, Gabriel

    2007-12-15

    We present, for the first time to our knowledge, quantitative phase images associated with unstained 5 mum thick tissue slices of mouse brain, spleen, and liver. The refractive properties of the tissue are retrieved in terms of the average refractive index and its spatial variation. We find that the average refractive index varies significantly with tissue type, such that the brain is characterized by the lowest value and the liver by the highest. The spatial power spectra of the phase images reveal power law behavior with different exponents for each tissue type. This approach opens a new possibility for stain-free characterization of tissues, where the diagnostic power is provided by the intrinsic refractive properties of the biological structure. We present results obtained for liver tissue affected by a lysosomal storage disease and show that our technique can quantify structural changes during this disease development.

  7. Phase Contrast and Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Centonze Frohlich, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Phase-contrast microscopy is often used to produce contrast for transparent, non light-absorbing, biological specimens. The technique was discovered by Zernike, in 1942, who received the Nobel prize for his achievement. DIC microscopy, introduced in the late 1960s, has been popular in biomedical research because it highlights edges of specimen structural detail, provides high-resolution optical sections of thick specimens including tissue cells, eggs, and embryos and does not suffer from the ...

  8. Interference microscopy in cell biophysics. 1. Principles and methodological aspects of coherent phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tychinsky, Vladimir P; Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of our tandem publications is to review the applications of the coherent phase microscopy to cell biophysics. In this article, we briefly consider the fundamentals and methodological aspects of the coherent phase microscopy (CPM). One of important advantages of this method is a high sensitivity of CPM images to changes in physical-chemical properties of biological samples. The optical path length difference (OPLD), measured with CPM instruments in different domains of an object, serves as the informative optical parameter used for visualization of individual cells or intracellular organelles. Metabolically dependent variations of CPM images reflect changes in the functional state of biological objects. In the next article, we review results of CPM studies of different cells and intracellular energy-transducing organelles.

  9. Spectroscopic infrared scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR-SNOM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vobornik, D. [Institut de Physique de la Matiere Complexe, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 3, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)]. E-mail: dusan.vobornik@epfl.ch; Margaritondo, G. [Institut de Physique de la Matiere Complexe, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 3, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Sanghera, J.S. [Optical Sciences Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Thielen, P. [Optical Sciences Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Aggarwal, I.D. [Optical Sciences Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ivanov, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 31235 (United States); Tolk, N.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 31235 (United States); Manni, V. [Institute of Neurobiology and Molecular Medicine, 00133 Rome (Italy); Grimaldi, S. [Institute of Neurobiology and Molecular Medicine, 00133 Rome (Italy); Lisi, A. [Institute of Neurobiology and Molecular Medicine, 00133 Rome (Italy); Rieti, S. [Institute of Neurobiology and Molecular Medicine, 00133 Rome (Italy); Piston, D.W. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Generosi, R. [Istituto di Stuttura della Materia, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Luce, M. [Istituto di Stuttura della Materia, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Perfetti, P. [Istituto di Stuttura della Materia, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Cricenti, A. [Istituto di Stuttura della Materia, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2005-09-29

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM or NSOM) is the technique with the highest lateral optical resolution available today, while infrared (IR) spectroscopy has a high chemical specificity. Combining SNOM with a tunable IR source produces a unique tool, IR-SNOM, capable of imaging distributions of chemical species with a 100 nm spatial resolution. We present in this paper boron nitride (BN) thin film images, where IR-SNOM shows the distribution of hexagonal and cubic phases within the sample. Exciting potential applications in biophysics and medical sciences are illustrated with SNOM images of the distribution of different chemical species within cells. We present in this article images with resolutions of the order of {lambda}/60 with SNOM working with infrared light. With our SNOM setup, we routinely get optical resolutions between 50 and 150 nm, regardless of the wavelength of the light used to illuminate the sample.

  10. Improved Zernike-type phase contrast for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeck, P J B

    2015-07-01

    Zernike phase contrast has been recognized as a means of recording high-resolution images with high contrast using a transmission electron microscope. This imaging mode can be used to image typical phase objects such as unstained biological molecules or cryosections of biological tissue. According to the original proposal discussed in Danev and Nagayama (2001) and references therein, the Zernike phase plate applies a phase shift of π/2 to all scattered electron beams outside a given scattering angle and an image is recorded at Gaussian focus or slight underfocus (below Scherzer defocus). Alternatively, a phase shift of -π/2 is applied to the central beam using the Boersch phase plate. The resulting image will have an almost perfect contrast transfer function (close to 1) from a given lowest spatial frequency up to a maximum resolution determined by the wave length, the amount of defocus and the spherical aberration of the microscope. In this paper, I present theory and simulations showing that this maximum spatial frequency can be increased considerably without loss of contrast by using a Zernike or Boersch phase plate that leads to a phase shift between scattered and unscattered electrons of only π /4, and recording images at Scherzer defocus. The maximum resolution can be improved even more by imaging at extended Scherzer defocus, though at the cost of contrast loss at lower spatial frequencies. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. A nanocrystalline Hilbert phase-plate for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dries, M; Hettler, S; Gamm, B; Müller, E; Send, W; Müller, K; Rosenauer, A; Gerthsen, D

    2014-04-01

    Thin-film-based phase-plates are applied to enhance the contrast of weak-phase objects in transmission electron microscopy. In this work, metal-film-based phase-plates are considered to reduce contamination and electrostatic charging, which up to now limit the application of phase-plates fabricated from amorphous C-films. Their crystalline structure requires a model for the simulation of the effect of crystallinity on the phase-plate properties and the image formation process. The model established in this work is verified by experimental results obtained by the application of a textured nanocrystalline Au-film-based Hilbert phase-plate. Based on the model, it is shown that monocrystalline and textured nanocrystalline phase-plate microstructures of appropriate thickness and crystalline orientation can be a promising approach for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Electronic structure of the cuprate superconducting and pseudogap phases from spectroscopic imaging STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A. R.; Fujita, K.; Kim, E.-A.; Lawler, M. J.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Lee, D.-H.; Davis, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    We survey the use of spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (SI-STM) to probe the electronic structure of underdoped cuprates. Two distinct classes of electronic states are observed in both the d-wave superconducting (dSC) and the pseudogap (PG) phases. The first class consists of the dispersive Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations of a homogeneous d-wave superconductor, existing below a lower energy scale E=Δ0. We find that the Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference (QPI) signatures of delocalized Cooper pairing are restricted to a k-space arc, which terminates near the lines connecting k=±(π/a0,0) to k=±(0,π/a0). This arc shrinks continuously with decreasing hole density such that Luttinger's theorem could be satisfied if it represents the front side of a hole-pocket that is bounded behind by the lines between k=±(π/a0,0) and k=±(0,π/a0). In both phases, the only broken symmetries detected for the |E|translational symmetries, coexist with this intra-unit-cell electronic symmetry breaking at E=Δ1. Their characteristic wavevector Q is determined by the k-space points where Bogoliubov QPI terminates and therefore changes continuously with doping. The distinct broken electronic symmetry states (intra-unit-cell and finite Q) coexisting at E~Δ1 are found to be indistinguishable in the dSC and PG phases. The next challenge for SI-STM studies is to determine the relationship of the E~Δ1 broken symmetry electronic states with the PG phase, and with the E<Δ0 states associated with Cooper pairing.

  13. Spiral phase plate contrast in optical and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchtmans, Roeland; Clark, Laura; Lubk, Axel; Verbeeck, Jo

    2016-08-01

    The use of phase plates in the back focal plane of a microscope is a well-established technique in optical microscopy to increase the contrast of weakly interacting samples and is gaining interest in electron microscopy as well. In this paper we study the spiral phase plate (SPP), also called helical, vortex, or two-dimensional Hilbert phase plate, which adds an angularly dependent phase of the form ei ℓ ϕk to the exit wave in Fourier space. In the limit of large collection angles, we analytically calculate that the average of a pair of ℓ =±1 SPP filtered images is directly proportional to the gradient squared of the exit wave, explaining the edge contrast previously seen in optical SPP work. We discuss the difference between a clockwise-anticlockwise pair of SPP filtered images and derive conditions under which the modulus of the wave's gradient can be seen directly from one SPP filtered image. This work provides the theoretical background to interpret images obtained with a SPP, thereby opening new perspectives for new experiments to study, for example, magnetic materials in an electron microscope.

  14. Cell-sensitive phase contrast microscopy imaging by multiple exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhaozheng; Su, Hang; Ker, Elmer; Li, Mingzhong; Li, Haohan

    2015-10-01

    We propose a novel way of imaging live cells in a Petri dish by the phase contrast microscope. By taking multiple exposures of phase contrast microscopy images on the same cell dish, we estimate a cell-sensitive camera response function which responds to cells' irradiance signals but generates a constant on non-cell background signal. The result of this new microscopy imaging is visually superior quality, which reveals the appearance details of cells and suppresses background noise near zero. Using the cell-sensitive microscopy imaging, cells' original irradiance signals are restored from all exposures and the irradiance signals on non-cell background regions are restored as a uniform constant (i.e., the imaging system is sensitive to cells only but insensitive to non-cell background). The restored irradiance signals greatly facilitate the cell segmentation by simple thresholding. The experimental results validate that high quality cell segmentation can be achieved by our approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative phase imaging with scanning holographic microscopy: an experimental assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indebetouw, Guy; Tada, Yoshitaka; Leacock, John

    2006-11-28

    This paper demonstrates experimentally how quantitative phase information can be obtained in scanning holographic microscopy. Scanning holography can operate in both coherent and incoherent modes, simultaneously if desired, with different detector geometries. A spatially integrating detector provides an incoherent hologram of the object's intensity distribution (absorption and/or fluorescence, for example), while a point detector in a conjugate plane of the pupil provides a coherent hologram of the object's complex amplitude, from which a quantitative measure of its phase distribution can be extracted. The possibility of capturing simultaneously holograms of three-dimensional specimens, leading to three-dimensional reconstructions with absorption contrast, reflectance contrast, fluorescence contrast, as was previously demonstrated, and quantitative phase contrast, as shown here for the first time, opens up new avenues for multimodal imaging in biological studies.

  16. Quantitative phase imaging with scanning holographic microscopy: an experimental assesment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada Yoshitaka

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper demonstrates experimentally how quantitative phase information can be obtained in scanning holographic microscopy. Scanning holography can operate in both coherent and incoherent modes, simultaneously if desired, with different detector geometries. A spatially integrating detector provides an incoherent hologram of the object's intensity distribution (absorption and/or fluorescence, for example, while a point detector in a conjugate plane of the pupil provides a coherent hologram of the object's complex amplitude, from which a quantitative measure of its phase distribution can be extracted. The possibility of capturing simultaneously holograms of three-dimensional specimens, leading to three-dimensional reconstructions with absorption contrast, reflectance contrast, fluorescence contrast, as was previously demonstrated, and quantitative phase contrast, as shown here for the first time, opens up new avenues for multimodal imaging in biological studies.

  17. Diffraction phase microscopy realized with an automatic digital pinhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cheng; Zhou, Renjie; Kuang, Cuifang; Zhao, Guangyuan; Zhang, Zhimin; Liu, Xu

    2017-12-01

    We report a novel approach to diffraction phase microscopy (DPM) with automatic pinhole alignment. The pinhole, which serves as a spatial low-pass filter to generate a uniform reference beam, is made out of a liquid crystal display (LCD) device that allows for electrical control. We have made DPM more accessible to users, while maintaining high phase measurement sensitivity and accuracy, through exploring low cost optical components and replacing the tedious pinhole alignment process with an automatic pinhole optical alignment procedure. Due to its flexibility in modifying the size and shape, this LCD device serves as a universal filter, requiring no future replacement. Moreover, a graphic user interface for real-time phase imaging has been also developed by using a USB CMOS camera. Experimental results of height maps of beads sample and live red blood cells (RBCs) dynamics are also presented, making this system ready for broad adaption to biological imaging and material metrology.

  18. Phase microscopy of technical and biological samples through random phase modulation with a difuser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almoro, Percival; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Gundu, Phanindra Narayan

    2010-01-01

    A technique for phase microscopy using a phase diffuser and a reconstruction algorithm is proposed. A magnified specimen wavefront is projected on the diffuser plane that modulates the wavefront into a speckle field. The speckle patterns at axially displaced planes are sampled and used in an iter...

  19. Quantitative phase retrieval in X-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Heng; Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Hou, Qiyue; Wang, Dajiang; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been devoted to X-ray phase contrast imaging, since it can provide high-contrast images by using phase variations. Among the different existing techniques, Zernike phase contrast microscopy is one of the most popular phase-sensitive techniques for investigating the fine structure of the sample at high spatial resolution. In X-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy, the image contrast is indeed a mixture of absorption and phase contrast. Therefore, this technique just provides qualitative information on the object, which makes the interpretation of the image difficult. In this contribution, an approach is proposed for quantitative phase retrieval in X-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy. By shifting the phase of the direct light by π/2 and 3π/2, two images of the same object are measured successively. The phase information of the object can then be quantitatively retrieved by a proper combination of the measured images. Numerical experiments were carried out and the results confirmed the feasibility of the proposed method. It is expected that the proposed method will find widespread applications in biology, materials science and so on.

  20. Efficient phase unwrapping architecture for digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wen-Jyi; Cheng, Shih-Chang; Cheng, Chau-Jern

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel phase unwrapping architecture for accelerating the computational speed of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). A fast Fourier transform (FFT) based phase unwrapping algorithm providing a minimum squared error solution is adopted for hardware implementation because of its simplicity and robustness to noise. The proposed architecture is realized in a pipeline fashion to maximize throughput of the computation. Moreover, the number of hardware multipliers and dividers are minimized to reduce the hardware costs. The proposed architecture is used as a custom user logic in a system on programmable chip (SOPC) for physical performance measurement. Experimental results reveal that the proposed architecture is effective for expediting the computational speed while consuming low hardware resources for designing an embedded DHM system.

  1. Region-referenced phase unwrapping architecture for digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wen-Jyi; Chen, Huan-Yuan; Cheng, Chau-Jern

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a novel hardware phase-unwrapping architecture for digital holographic microscopy. The architecture is based on an iterative region-referenced algorithm because of its simplicity and effectiveness for phase unwrapping. The architecture therefore consumes fewer hardware resources for very large-scale integration implementation. In addition, a novel data reuse scheme is adopted for reducing the memory bandwidth required by the architecture. The architecture can then have fast computation speed for the iterative operations. The architecture has been implemented by field programmable gate array. It acts as a hardware accelerator in an embedded system developed by a network-on-chip platform for performance measurement. The superiorities of the proposed architecture have been confirmed by the experiments.

  2. Efficient Phase Unwrapping Architecture for Digital Holographic Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jyi Hwang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel phase unwrapping architecture for accelerating the computational speed of digital holographic microscopy (DHM. A fast Fourier transform (FFT based phase unwrapping algorithm providing a minimum squared error solution is adopted for hardware implementation because of its simplicity and robustness to noise. The proposed architecture is realized in a pipeline fashion to maximize through put of thecomputation. Moreover, the number of hardware multipliers and dividers are minimized to reduce the hardware costs. The proposed architecture is used as a custom user logic in a system on programmable chip (SOPC for physical performance measurement. Experimental results reveal that the proposed architecture is effective for expediting the computational speed while consuming low hardware resources for designing an embedded DHM system.

  3. Combined atomic force microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry applied to the analysis of lipid-protein thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finot, Eric; Markey, Laurent; Hane, Francis; Amrein, Mathias; Leonenko, Zoya

    2013-04-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins and forms a thin film at the lung alveolar interface separating air from liquid environment. The film reduces the work of breathing during repeatable compressions of the alveoli which form a characteristic multilayer upon compression. In this work, we investigated the structure of bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES). We analysed the BLES films by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in order to provide combined characterization of both morphology and thickness of surfactant films. We show how the spectroscopic ellipsometry can be used to supplement the data obtained by AFM. We demonstrate that indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate used for spectroscopic ellipsometry is preferable over glass substrate to enhance the optical contrast. An optical model was proposed to account for non-uniform film morphology. We obtained good correlations between the multilayer surface coverage, determined by both AFM and SE. SE measures the thickness of the first uniform monolayer as 2.6 nm that cannot be achieved by AFM imaging alone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Live cell refractometry using Hilbert phase microscopy and confocal reflectance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Niyom; Choi, Wonshik; Popescu, Gabriel; Yaqoob, Zahid; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2009-11-26

    Quantitative chemical analysis has served as a useful tool for understanding cellular metabolisms in biology. Among many physical properties used in chemical analysis, refractive index in particular has provided molecular concentration that is an important indicator for biological activities. In this report, we present a method of extracting full-field refractive index maps of live cells in their native states. We first record full-field optical thickness maps of living cells by Hilbert phase microscopy and then acquire physical thickness maps of the same cells using a custom-built confocal reflectance microscope. Full-field and axially averaged refractive index maps are acquired from the ratio of optical thickness to physical thickness. The accuracy of the axially averaged index measurement is 0.002. This approach can provide novel biological assays of label-free living cells in situ.

  5. Single-shot quantitative phase microscopy with color-multiplexed differential phase contrast (cDPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Zachary F; Chen, Michael; Waller, Laura

    2017-01-01

    We present a new technique for quantitative phase and amplitude microscopy from a single color image with coded illumination. Our system consists of a commercial brightfield microscope with one hardware modification-an inexpensive 3D printed condenser insert. The method, color-multiplexed Differential Phase Contrast (cDPC), is a single-shot variant of Differential Phase Contrast (DPC), which recovers the phase of a sample from images with asymmetric illumination. We employ partially coherent illumination to achieve resolution corresponding to 2× the objective NA. Quantitative phase can then be used to synthesize DIC and phase contrast images or extract shape and density. We demonstrate amplitude and phase recovery at camera-limited frame rates (50 fps) for various in vitro cell samples and c. elegans in a micro-fluidic channel.

  6. Single-shot quantitative phase microscopy with color-multiplexed differential phase contrast (cDPC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary F Phillips

    Full Text Available We present a new technique for quantitative phase and amplitude microscopy from a single color image with coded illumination. Our system consists of a commercial brightfield microscope with one hardware modification-an inexpensive 3D printed condenser insert. The method, color-multiplexed Differential Phase Contrast (cDPC, is a single-shot variant of Differential Phase Contrast (DPC, which recovers the phase of a sample from images with asymmetric illumination. We employ partially coherent illumination to achieve resolution corresponding to 2× the objective NA. Quantitative phase can then be used to synthesize DIC and phase contrast images or extract shape and density. We demonstrate amplitude and phase recovery at camera-limited frame rates (50 fps for various in vitro cell samples and c. elegans in a micro-fluidic channel.

  7. Real-time phase error compensation in phase sensitive scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Sun, Lin; Wang, Jia; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2015-07-01

    Phase measurements are critical for investigations on the optical properties of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) nanostructures. In this paper, a real-time phase error compensation method based on a phase sensitive scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) measurement system is proposed. The method adopts the common optical path configuration and CMR (common-mode rejection) principle. It can be seen that the phase error compensation is real-time and mainly relies on optical devices, therefore neither post processing nor previous knowledge of environmental effects is required. The causes of the phase drift errors are discussed. We demonstrate experimentally the effectiveness of this method by measuring a SPP focusing device. Regardless of the drift velocity, degree of linearity, or phase accuracy, the compensation method shows great improvement compared to the previous phase sensitive SNOMs. All the measured distributions are in good agreement with theoretical simulations obtained by the finite-different time-domain (FDTD) method.

  8. SMALL MAIN-BELT ASTEROID SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY, PHASE II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains visible-wavelength (0.435-0.925 micron) spectra for 1341 main-belt asteroids observed during the second phase of the Small Main-belt Asteroid...

  9. Differential Counting of Asbestos Using Phase Contrast and Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomoki; Alexandrov, Maxym; Ishida, Takenori; Hirota, Ryuichi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Sekiguchi, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-11-01

    Considering the increasing use of various asbestos substitutes, asbestos risk management in many industries may require accurate techniques for detecting and distinguishing asbestos from non-asbestos fibers. Using fluorescently labeled asbestos-binding proteins, we previously developed a novel method for detection and counting of asbestos fibers under fluorescence microscopy (FM). This method can provide speedy, on-site detection and identification of the asbestos fibers and has higher sensitivity than phase contrast microscopy (PCM). However, current asbestos exposure limits are derived from risk assessments based on epidemiological studies that were conducted using PCM fiber counts. Therefore, the sensitivity of asbestos testing should be maintained at PCM level to properly assess compliance with these limit values. Here, we developed and tested a novel application of FM as a differential counting method that complements PCM analysis and is fully compatible with the PCM-based epidemiological data. In the combined PCM-FM method, the fluorescent asbestos-binding probe is applied prior to filter clearing. The method makes it possible to easily switch between two microscopic techniques while analyzing the same fields of view: PCM is used for counting fibers, and FM for differentiating asbestos from non-asbestos fibers. Using airborne dust samples from demolition sites in Japan, we compared PCM-FM with scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-based differential counting method. Statistical analysis indicated a slight conservative bias of PCM-FM method, combined with relatively high variability across the full range of fiber concentrations in our sample set. Using correlative microscopy, we also evaluated the specificity of FM staining, which is a potential cause of variability between the two methods. The energy-dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that ~95% of fluorescently stained fibers in the demolition site samples were correctly identified as asbestos. While further

  10. Atomic oxygen effects on thin film space coatings studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and laser light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synowicki, R. A.; Hale, Jeffrey S.; Woollam, John A.

    1992-01-01

    The University of Nebraska is currently evaluating Low Earth Orbit (LEO) simulation techniques as well as a variety of thin film protective coatings to withstand atomic oxygen (AO) degradation. Both oxygen plasma ashers and an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source are being used for LEO simulation. Thin film coatings are characterized by optical techniques including Variable Angle Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, Optical spectrophotometry, and laser light scatterometry. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is also used to characterize surface morphology. Results on diamondlike carbon (DLC) films show that DLC degrades with simulated AO exposure at a rate comparable to Kapton polyimide. Since DLC is not as susceptible to environmental factors such as moisture absorption, it could potentially provide more accurate measurements of AO fluence on short space flights.

  11. Atomic Force Microscopy and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry combined analysis of Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier adsorption on functional monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Ilaria; Parisse, Pietro; Gramazio, Federico; Ianeselli, Luca; Medagli, Barbara; Cavalleri, Ornella; Casalis, Loredana; Canepa, Maurizio

    2017-11-01

    The comprehension of mechanisms of interaction between functional layers and proteins is relevant for the development of sensitive and precise biosensors. Here we report our study which combines Atomic Force Microscopy and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry to investigate the His-Ni-NTA mediated interaction between 6His-tagged Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) protein with self assembled monolayers of NTA terminated alkanethiols. The use of AFM-based nanolithograhic tools and the analysis of ellipsometric spectra in situ and ex situ provided us a solid method to disentangle the effects of Ni(II)-mediated interaction between the NTA layer and the 6His-tagged SUMO and to accurately determine in physiological condition the thickness value of the SUMO layer. This investigation is a first step towards the study of layered systems of greater complexity of which the NTA/6His-tagged SUMO is a prototypical example.

  12. Study of fossil bones by synchrotron radiation micro-spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zougrou, I M; Katsikini, M; Pinakidou, F; Paloura, E C; Papadopoulou, L; Tsoukala, E

    2014-01-01

    Earlymost Villafranchian fossil bones of an artiodactyl and a perissodactyl from the Milia excavation site in Grevena, Greece, were studied in order to evaluate diagenetic effects. Optical microscopy revealed the different bone types (fibro-lamellar and Haversian, respectively) of the two fragments and their good preservation state. The spatial distribution of bone apatite and soil-originating elements was studied using micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) mapping and scanning electron microscopy. The approximate value of the Ca/P ratio was 2.2, as determined from scanning electron microscopy measurements. Bacterial boring was detected close to the periosteal region and Fe bearing oxides were found to fill bone cavities, e.g. Haversian canals and osteocyte lacunae. In the perissodactyl bone considerable amounts of Mn were detected close to cracks (the Mn/Fe weight ratio takes values up to 3.5). Goethite and pyrite were detected in both samples by means of metallographic microscopy. The local Ca/P ratio determined with µ-XRF varied significantly in metal-poor spots indicating spatial inhomogeneities in the ionic substitutions. XRF line scans that span the bone cross sections revealed that Fe and Mn contaminate the bones from both the periosteum and medullar cavity and aggregate around local maxima. The formation of goethite, irrespective of the local Fe concentration, was verified by the Fe K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Finally, Sr K-edge extended XAFS (EXAFS) revealed that Sr substitutes for Ca in bone apatite without obvious preference to the Ca1 or Ca2 unit-cell site occupation.

  13. On measuring cell confluence in phase contrast microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, K. P.; Richardson, J. B.; Lam, K. P.

    2014-03-01

    A principal focus highlighting recent advances in cell based therapies concerns the development of effective treatments for osteoarthritis. Earlier clinicaltrials have shown that 80% of patients receiving mesenchymal stem cell(MSC) based treatment have improved their quality of life by alleviating pain whilst extending the life of their natural joints. The current challenge facing researchers is to identify the biological differences between the treatments that have worked and those which have shown little improvement. One possible candidate for the difference in treatment prognosis is an examination of the proliferation of the ( type) cells as they grow. To further understanding of the proliferation and differentiation of MSC, non-invasive live cell imaging techniques have been developed which capture important cell events and dynamics in cell divisions over an extended period of time. An automated image analysis procedure capable of tracking cell confluence over time has also been implemented, providing an objective and realistic estimation of cell growth within continuous live cell cultures. The proposed algorithm accounts for the halo artefacts that occur in phase microscopy. In addition to a favourable run-time performance, the method was also validated using continuous live MSC cultures, with consistent and meaningful results.

  14. Individual sperm selection by microfluidics integrated with interferometric phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eravuchira, Pinkie J; Mirsky, Simcha K; Barnea, Itay; Levi, Mattan; Balberg, Michal; Shaked, Natan T

    2017-09-27

    The selection of sperm cells possessing normal morphology and motility is crucial for many assisted reproductive technologies (ART), especially for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), as sperm quality directly affects the probability of inducing healthy pregnancy. We present a novel platform for real-time quantitative analysis and selection of individual sperm cells without staining. Towards this end, we developed an integrated approach, combining interferometric phase microscopy (IPM), for stain-free sperm imaging and real-time automatic analysis based on the sperm cell 3D morphology and contents, with a disposable microfluidic device, for sperm selection and enrichment. On testing the capabilities of the microfluidic device, we obtained successful selection of sperm cells with a selectivity of 89.5±3.5%, with no negative-decision sperm cells being inadvertently selected. In addition, we demonstrate the accuracy of sperm cell analysis using IPM by comparing the quantitative analysis produced by our IPM-based algorithm to the qualitative visual analysis performed independently by an experienced embryologist, which resulted in precision and specificity of 100%. We believe that the presented integrated approach has the potential to dramatically change the way sperm cells are selected for ICSI and other ART procedures, making the selection process more objective, quantitative and automatic, and thereby increasing success rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Improving fabrication and application of Zach phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Simon; Gamm, Björn; Dries, Manuel; Frindt, Nicole; Schröder, Rasmus R; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2012-10-01

    Zach phase plates (PPs) are promising devices to enhance phase contrast in transmission electron microscopy. The Zach PP shifts the phase of the zero-order beam by a strongly localized inhomogeneous electrostatic potential in the back focal plane of the objective lens. We present substantial improvements of the Zach PP, which overcome previous limitations. The implementation of a microstructured heating device significantly reduces contamination and charging of the PP structure and extends its lifetime. An improved production process allows fabricating PPs with reduced dimensions resulting in lower cut-on frequencies as revealed by simulations of the electrostatic potential. Phase contrast with inversion of PbSe nanoparticles is demonstrated in a standard transmission electron microscope with LaB6 cathode by applying different voltages.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy of the preclinical phase of experimental phytophotodermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Larangeira de Almeida Jr

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the epidermis in induced phytophotodermatitis using transmission electron microscopy in order to detect histologic changes even before lesions are visible by light microscopy. INTRODUCTION: In the first six hours after the experimental induction of phytophotodermatitis, no changes are detectable by light microscopy. Only after 24 hours can keratinocyte necrosis and epidermal vacuolization be detected histologically, and blisters form by 48 hours. METHODS: The dorsum of four adult rats (Rattus norvegicus was manually epilated. After painting the right half of the rat with the peel juice of Tahiti lemon, they were exposed to sunlight for eight minutes under general anesthesia. The left side was used as the control and exposed to sunlight only. Biopsies were performed immediately after photoinduction and one and two hours later, and the tissue was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: No histological changes were seen on the control side. Immediately after induction, vacuolization in keratinocytes was observed. After one hour, desmosomal changes were also observed in addition to vacuolization. Keratin filaments were not attached to the desmosomal plaque. Free desmosomes and membrane ruptures were also seen. At two hours after induction, similar changes were found, and granular degeneration of keratin was also observed. DISCUSSION: The interaction of sunlight and psoralens generates a photoproduct that damages keratinocyte proteins, leading to keratinocyte necrosis and blister formation. CONCLUSIONS: Transmission electron microscopy can detect vacuolization, lesions of the membrane, and desmosomes in the first two hours after experimental induction of phytophotodermatitis.

  17. Quantitative imaging of complex samples by spiral phase contrast microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stefan Bernet; Alexander Jesacher; Severin Fürhapter; Christian Maurer; Monika Ritsch-Marte

    2006-01-01

    Recently a spatial spiral phase filter in a Fourier plane of a microscopic imaging setup has been demonstrated to produce edge enhancement and relief-like shadow formation of amplitude and phase samples...

  18. LDRD final report : raman spectroscopic measurements to monitor the HMX beta-delta phase transition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renlund, Anita Mariana; Tappan, Alexander Smith; Miller, Jill C.

    2000-11-01

    The HMX {beta}-{delta} solid-solid phase transition, which occurs as HMX is heated near 170 C, is linked to increased reactivity and sensitivity to initiation. Thermally damaged energetic materials (EMs) containing HMX therefore may present a safety concern. Information about the phase transition is vital to predictive safety models for HMX and HMX-containing EMs. We report work on monitoring the phase transition with real-time Raman spectroscopy aimed towards obtaining a better understanding of physical properties of HMX through the phase transition. HMX samples were confined in a cell of minimal free volume in a displacement-controlled or load-controlled arrangement. The cell was heated and then cooled at controlled rates while real-time Raman spectroscopic measurements were performed. Raman spectroscopy provides a clear distinction between the phases of HMX because the vibrational transitions of the molecule change with conformational changes associated with the phase transition. Temperature of phase transition versus load data are presented for both the heating and cooling cycles in the load-controlled apparatus, and general trends are discussed. A weak dependence of the temperature of phase transition on load was discovered during the heating cycle, with higher loads causing the phase transition to occur at a higher temperature. This was especially true in the temperature of completion of phase transition data as opposed to the temperature of onset of phase transition data. A stronger dependence on load was observed in the cooling cycle, with higher loads causing the reverse phase transitions to occur at a higher cooling temperature. Also, higher loads tended to cause the phase transition to occur over a longer period of time in the heating cycle and over a shorter period of time in the cooling cycle. All three of the pure HMX phases ({alpha}, {beta} and {delta}) were detected on cooling of the heated samples, either in pure form or as a mixture.

  19. Collagen-collagen interactions mediated by plant-derived proanthocyanidins: A spectroscopic and atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Cristina M P; Zhu, Weiying; Manohar, Suresh; Aydin, Berdan; Keiderling, Timothy A; Messersmith, Phillip B; Bedran-Russo, Ana K

    2016-09-01

    Collagen cross-linkings are determinant of biological tissue stability and function. Plant-derived proanthocyanidins (PACs) mimic different hierarchical levels of collagen cross-links by non-enzymatic interactions resulting in the enhancement to the biomechanics and biostability of collagen-rich tissues such as dentin. This study investigated the interaction of PACs from Vitis vinifera grape seed extract with type I collagen in solubilized form and in the demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) by fluorescence spectral analysis; collagen-collagen binding forces in presence of cross-linking solutions by atomic force microscopy (AFM); and spectroscopic analysis of the DDM using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Glutaraldehyde (GA) and carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) with known cross-linking mechanisms were selected for comparative analyses. Changes in fluorescence upon interaction of solubilized type I collagen with PACs, EDC and GA reflected pronounced modifications in collagen conformation. PACs also promoted stronger collagen-collagen fibrils interaction than EDC and GA. A new feature was observed using ATR-FTIR spectroscopic analysis in PACs-treated collagen and DDM. The findings suggest covalent interactions between collagen and PACs. The mechanisms of interaction between PACs-collagen hold attractive and promising tissue-tailored biomedical applications and the binding forces that potentially drive such interaction were characterized. Connective tissues such as skin, bone and dentin are mainly composed of type I collagen, which is cross-linked to promote tissue stability, strength and function. Novel therapies using substances that mimic cross-links have been proposed to promote repair of collagen-based-tissues. In dentistry, naturally occurring proanthocyanidins (PACs) have the potential to enhance dentin mechanical properties and reduce its enzymatic degradation, but their mechanisms of cross-linking are unclear. The

  20. Spectroscopic evidence of α,α-dimethylbenzyl radicals in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sang Youl; Lim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kuk

    2016-11-01

    We report the spectroscopic evidence of the jet-cooled α,α-dimethylbenzyl radical, which was generated in a technique of corona excited supersonic expansion using a pinhole-type glass nozzle. For identification of the α,α-dimethylbenzyl radical, precursors that form a common molecular radical, as a result of dissociation of either a Csbnd H bond or Csbnd C bond of alkyl group in a corona discharge, were employed. Based on comparisons of the spectra observed from the corona discharges of isopropylbenzene and tert-butylbenzene, evidence was obtained of the existence of the α,α-dimethylbenzyl radical in the gas phase.

  1. Lensless phase contrast microscopy based on multiwavelength Fresnel diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noom, D.W.E.; Eikema, K.S.E.; Witte, S.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact, wide-field, quantitative phase contrast microscope that does not require lenses for image formation. High-resolution images are retrieved from Fresnel diffraction patterns recorded at multiple wavelengths, combined with a robust iterative phase retrieval algorithm.

  2. Improved Hilbert phase contrast for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2015-07-01

    Hilbert phase contrast has been recognized as a means of recording high resolution images with high contrast using a transmission electron microscope. This imaging mode could be used to image typical phase objects such as unstained biological molecules or cryo sections of biological tissue. According to the original proposal by (Danev et al., 2002) the Hilbert phase plate applies a phase shift of π to approximately half the focal plane (for example the right half excluding the central beam) and an image is recorded at Gaussian focus. After correction for the inbuilt asymmetry of differential phase contrast this image will have an almost perfect contrast transfer function (close to 1) from the lowest spatial frequency up to a maximum resolution determined by the wave length and spherical aberration of the microscope. In this paper I present theory and simulations showing that this maximum spatial frequency can be increased considerably almost without loss of contrast by using a Hilbert phase plate of half the thickness, leading to a phase shift of π/2, and recording images at Scherzer defocus. The maximum resolution can be improved even more by imaging at extended Scherzer defocus, though at the cost of contrast loss at lower spatial frequencies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia A. Moss; Les Groom

    2001-01-01

    Microscopy is the study and interpretation of images produced by a microscope. "Interpretation" is the keyword, because the microscope enables one to see structures that are too small or too close together to be resolved by the unaided eye. (The human eye cannot separate two points or lines that are closer together than 0.1 mm.) it is important to...

  4. Theoretical study of ferroelectric nanoparticles using phase reconstructed electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phatak, C.; Petford-Long, A. K.; Beleggia, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectric nanostructures are important for a variety of applications in electronic and electro-optical devices, including nonvolatile memories and thin-film capacitors. These applications involve stability and switching of polarization using external stimuli, such as electric fields. We present...... a theoretical model describing how the shape of a nanoparticle affects its polarization in the absence of screening charges, and quantify the electron-optical phase shift for detecting ferroelectric signals with phase-sensitive techniques in a transmission electron microscope. We provide an example phase shift...

  5. Artifact characterization and reduction in scanning X-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Holzner, Christian; Mohacsi, Istvan; Karvinen, Petri; Diaz, Ana; Pigino, Gaia; David, Christian

    2015-05-18

    Zernike phase contrast microscopy is a well-established method for imaging specimens with low absorption contrast. It has been successfully implemented in full-field microscopy using visible light and X-rays. In microscopy Cowley's reciprocity principle connects scanning and full-field imaging. Even though the reciprocity in Zernike phase contrast has been discussed by several authors over the past thirty years, only recently it was experimentally verified using scanning X-ray microscopy. In this paper, we investigate the image and contrast formation in scanning Zernike phase contrast microscopy with a particular and detailed focus on the origin of imaging artifacts that are typically associated with Zernike phase contrast. We demonstrate experimentally with X-rays the effect of the phase mask design on the contrast and halo artifacts and present an optimized design of the phase mask with respect to photon efficiency and artifact reduction. Similarly, due to the principle of reciprocity the observations and conclusions of this work have direct applicability to Zernike phase contrast in full-field microscopy as well.

  6. Astigmatic intensity equation for electron microscopy based phase retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Tim C; Keast, Vicki J

    2007-08-01

    Phase retrieval, in principle, can be performed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) using arbitrary aberrations of electron waves; provided that the aberrations are well-characterised and known. For example, the transport of intensity equation (TIE) can be used to infer the phase from a through-focus series of images. In this work an "astigmatic intensity equation" (AIE) is considered, which relates phase gradients to intensity variations caused by TEM objective lens focus and astigmatism variations. Within the paraxial approximation, it is shown that an exact solution of the AIE for the phase can be obtained using efficient Fourier transform methods. Experimental requirements for using the AIE are the measurement of a through-focus derivative and another intensity derivative, which is taken with respect to objective lens astigmatism variation. Two quasi-experimental investigations are conducted to test the validity of the solution.

  7. High-resolution cell outline segmentation and tracking from phase-contrast microscopy images

    OpenAIRE

    Ambühl, Mark; Brepsant, C.; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander; Sbalzarini, I. F.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate extraction of cell outlines from microscopy images is essential for analysing the dynamics of migrating cells. Phase-contrast microscopy is one of the most common and convenient imaging modalities for observing cell motility because it does not require exogenous labelling and uses only moderate light levels with generally negligible phototoxicity effects. Automatic extraction and tracking of high-resolution cell outlines from phase-contrast images, however, is difficult due to comple...

  8. Vibrational phase contrast CARS microscopy for quantitative analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurna, M.; Garbacik, E.T.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cornelis; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Periasamy, Ammasi; So, Peter T.C.; Konig, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    In biological samples the resonant CARS signal of less abundant constituents can be overwhelmed by the nonresonant background, preventing detection of those molecules. We demonstrate a method to obtain the phase of the oscillators in the focal volume that allows discrimination of those hidden

  9. Enlightening intracellular complexity of living cells with quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Torres, C.; Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Boyer Provera, E.; Elezgaray, J.; Nicolini, F. E.; Maguer-Satta, V.; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-03-01

    The internal distribution of refractive indices (RIs) of a living cell is much more complex than usually admitted in multi-shell models. The reconstruction of RI maps from single phase images has rarely been achieved for several reasons: (i) we still have very little knowledge of the impact of internal macromolecular complexes on the local RI and (ii) phase changes produced by light propagation through the sample are mixed with diffraction effects by internal cell bodies. We propose the implementation a 2D wavelet-based contour chain detection method to distinguish internal boundaries thanks to their greatest optical path difference gradients. These contour chains correspond to the highest image phase contrast and follow the local RI inhomogeneities linked to the intracellular structural intricacy. Their statistics and spatial distribution are morphological indicators for distinguishing cells of different origins and to follow their transformation in pathologic situations. We use this method to compare non adherent blood cells from primary and laboratory culture origins, in healthy and pathological situations (chronic myelogenous leukaemia). In a second part of this presentation, we concentrate on the temporal dynamics of the phase contour chains and we discuss the spectral decomposition of their dynamics in both health and disease.

  10. Side lobe suppression in phase mask-based nonlinear superresolution microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beams, Ryan; Stranick, Stephan J.

    2017-08-01

    We compare side lobe suppression methods for nonlinear superresolution optical microscopy using phase masked excitation beams. The excitation point spread function (PSF) can be engineered by introducing a phase mask for superresolution microscopy. By applying a single π phase step to the excitation the central spot can be narrowed and provide improved lateral resolution. However, the energy redistribution leads to side lobes with increased intensity that complicates imaging applications. Several methods have been implemented to suppress the strength of the side lobes including confocal detection and utilizing beams with different phase masks in multiphoton microscopy. Side lobe suppression methods using confocal detection and different phase masks for the excitation beams are compared theoretically and experimentally. These results demonstrate the additional flexibility for PSF engineering for nonlinear optical processes.

  11. Time Resolved Phase Transitions via Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, B W; Armstrong, M R; Blobaum, K J; Browning, N D; Burnham, A K; Campbell, G H; Gee, R; Kim, J S; King, W E; Maiti, A; Piggott, W T; Torralva, B R

    2007-02-22

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) project is developing an in situ electron microscope with nanometer- and nanosecond-scale resolution for the study of rapid laser-driven processes in materials. We report on the results obtained in a year-long LDRD-supported effort to develop DTEM techniques and results for phase transitions in molecular crystals, reactive multilayer foils, and melting and resolidification of bismuth. We report the first in situ TEM observation of the HMX {beta}-{delta} phase transformation in sub-{micro}m crystals, computational results suggesting the importance of voids and free surfaces in the HMX transformation kinetics, and the first electron diffraction patterns of intermediate states in fast multilayer foil reactions. This project developed techniques which are applicable to many materials systems and will continue to be employed within the larger DTEM effort.

  12. Understanding the phase contrast optics to restore artifact-free microscopy images for segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhaozheng; Kanade, Takeo; Chen, Mei

    2012-07-01

    Phase contrast, a noninvasive microscopy imaging technique, is widely used to capture time-lapse images to monitor the behavior of transparent cells without staining or altering them. Due to the optical principle, phase contrast microscopy images contain artifacts such as the halo and shade-off that hinder image segmentation, a critical step in automated microscopy image analysis. Rather than treating phase contrast microscopy images as general natural images and applying generic image processing techniques on them, we propose to study the optical properties of the phase contrast microscope to model its image formation process. The phase contrast imaging system can be approximated by a linear imaging model. Based on this model and input image properties, we formulate a regularized quadratic cost function to restore artifact-free phase contrast images that directly correspond to the specimen's optical path length. With artifacts removed, high quality segmentation can be achieved by simply thresholding the restored images. The imaging model and restoration method are quantitatively evaluated on microscopy image sequences with thousands of cells captured over several days. We also demonstrate that accurate restoration lays the foundation for high performance in cell detection and tracking. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Decoupling of geometric thickness and refractive index in quantitative phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2013-03-15

    In quantitative phase imaging, a priori knowledge of either refractive index or physical thickness is used to estimate the change in one of these parameters. Here, we report a method for decoupling geometric thickness from refractive index in quantitative phase microscopy.

  14. Double-twist cylinders in liquid crystalline cholesteric blue phases observed by transmission electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Shu Tanaka; Hiroyuki Yoshida; Yuto Kawata; Ryusuke Kuwahara; Ryuji Nishi; Masanori Ozaki

    2015-01-01

    Cholesteric blue phases are liquid crystalline phases in which the constituent rod-like molecules spontaneously form three-dimensional, helical structures. Despite theoretical predictions that they are composed of cylindrical substructures within which the liquid crystal molecules are doubly twisted, real space observation of the arrangement of such structures had not been performed. Through transmission electron microscopy of photopolymerized blue phases with controlled lattice plane orienta...

  15. Conformations and spectroscopic properties of laccaic acid A in the gas phase and in implicit water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokmaisrijan, Supaporn; Payaka, Apirak; Tantishaiyakul, Vimon; Chairat, Montra; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2013-03-01

    Conformations and spectroscopic properties of laccaic acid A (lacA) were studied by means of the experimental and theoretical approaches. The minimum energy conformers of lacA in the gas phase and in implicit water obtained from the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) calculations displayed the same orientation of the COOH and OH groups on the anthraquinone-based component. The intramolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the COOH, Cdbnd O and OH groups are very strong. In contrast, the orientations of the Ph(OH)CH2CH2NHCOCH3 substituent moiety on the anthraquinone-based component in the gas phase and in implicit water are completely different. The substituent prefers to bind with the anthraquinone-based component in the gas phase while it moves away from the anthraquinone-based component in implicit water. The calculated IR spectra of the two lowest-lying energy conformers of lacA in the gas phase fit to the experimental FTIR spectrum. The full assignments of the vibrational modes with the correlated vibrational wavenumbers of those conformers were proposed here, for the first time. The intramolecular H-bond formations in lacA can cause the shift of the vibrational wavenumber for the COOH, Cdbnd O, OH and NH groups as compared to the normal vibrations of these groups. The NMR spectra showed that the stabilities of the two lowest-lying energy conformers of lacA in the gas phase are comparable and this is consistent with their computational energies. The UV-Vis spectra of the lowest-lying energy conformers of lacA in implicit water were compared with the experimental UV-Vis spectrum. The calculations suggested that the electronic transition in the visible region involves with the singlet π → π* excitation which the electron density transfers to a COOH group on the anthraquinone ring.

  16. Direct imaging of phase objects enables conventional deconvolution in bright field light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Candia, Carmen Noemí; Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio

    2014-01-01

    In transmitted optical microscopy, absorption structure and phase structure of the specimen determine the three-dimensional intensity distribution of the image. The elementary impulse responses of the bright field microscope therefore consist of separate absorptive and phase components, precluding general application of linear, conventional deconvolution processing methods to improve image contrast and resolution. However, conventional deconvolution can be applied in the case of pure phase (or pure absorptive) objects if the corresponding phase (or absorptive) impulse responses of the microscope are known. In this work, we present direct measurements of the phase point- and line-spread functions of a high-aperture microscope operating in transmitted bright field. Polystyrene nanoparticles and microtubules (biological polymer filaments) serve as the pure phase point and line objects, respectively, that are imaged with high contrast and low noise using standard microscopy plus digital image processing. Our experimental results agree with a proposed model for the response functions, and confirm previous theoretical predictions. Finally, we use the measured phase point-spread function to apply conventional deconvolution on the bright field images of living, unstained bacteria, resulting in improved definition of cell boundaries and sub-cellular features. These developments demonstrate practical application of standard restoration methods to improve imaging of phase objects such as cells in transmitted light microscopy.

  17. Direct imaging of phase objects enables conventional deconvolution in bright field light microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Noemí Hernández Candia

    Full Text Available In transmitted optical microscopy, absorption structure and phase structure of the specimen determine the three-dimensional intensity distribution of the image. The elementary impulse responses of the bright field microscope therefore consist of separate absorptive and phase components, precluding general application of linear, conventional deconvolution processing methods to improve image contrast and resolution. However, conventional deconvolution can be applied in the case of pure phase (or pure absorptive objects if the corresponding phase (or absorptive impulse responses of the microscope are known. In this work, we present direct measurements of the phase point- and line-spread functions of a high-aperture microscope operating in transmitted bright field. Polystyrene nanoparticles and microtubules (biological polymer filaments serve as the pure phase point and line objects, respectively, that are imaged with high contrast and low noise using standard microscopy plus digital image processing. Our experimental results agree with a proposed model for the response functions, and confirm previous theoretical predictions. Finally, we use the measured phase point-spread function to apply conventional deconvolution on the bright field images of living, unstained bacteria, resulting in improved definition of cell boundaries and sub-cellular features. These developments demonstrate practical application of standard restoration methods to improve imaging of phase objects such as cells in transmitted light microscopy.

  18. Phase stabilized homodyne of infrared scattering type scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiaoji G., E-mail: xgx214@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Gilburd, Leonid; Walker, Gilbert C., E-mail: gwalker@chem.utoronto.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2014-12-29

    Scattering type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) allows sub diffraction limited spatial resolution. Interferometric homodyne detection in s-SNOM can amplify the signal and extract vibrational responses based on sample absorption. A stable reference phase is required for a high quality homodyne-detected near-field signal. This work presents the development of a phase stabilization mechanism for s-SNOM to provide stable homodyne conditions. The phase stability is found to be better than 0.05 rad for the mid infrared light source. Phase stabilization results in improved near field images and vibrational spectroscopies. Spatial inhomogeneities of the boron nitride nanotubes are measured and compared.

  19. Zernike phase contrast in high-energy x-ray transmission microscopy based on refractive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falch, Ken Vidar; Lyubomirsky, Mikhail; Casari, Daniele; Snigirev, Anatoly; Snigireva, Irina; Detlefs, Carsten; Michiel, Marco Di; Lyatun, Ivan; Mathiesen, Ragnvald H

    2018-01-01

    The current work represents the first implementation of Zernike phase contrast for compound refractive lens based x-ray microscopy, and also the first successful Zernike phase contrast experiment at photon energies above 12 keV. Phase contrast was achieved by fitting a compound refractive lens with a circular phase plate. The resolution is demonstrated to be sub-micron, and can be improved using already existing technology. The possibility of combining the technique with polychromatic radiation is considered, and a preliminary test experiment was performed with positive results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Combining microscopy with spectroscopic and chemical methods for tracing the origin of atmospheric fallouts from mining sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navel, Aline; Uzu, Gaëlle; Spadini, Lorenzo [University Grenoble Alpes — LTHE UMR 5564–CNRS-INSU/UGA/INPG/IRD, 1025 rue de la Piscine, DU BP53 - 38041 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Sobanska, Sophie [LASIR, (UMR CNRS 8516), Université de Lille 1, Bât. C5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq CEDEX (France); Martins, Jean M.F., E-mail: jean.martins@yujf-grenoble.fr [University Grenoble Alpes — LTHE UMR 5564–CNRS-INSU/UGA/INPG/IRD, 1025 rue de la Piscine, DU BP53 - 38041 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Numerous ancient mines are left over without specific care for contaminated wastes. • Sources similarity makes the tracing of the origin of metallic fallouts challenging. • Physico-chemical fingerprints of all metal-source sites and fallouts were established. • Combining physical/chemical methods allowed discriminating polluted fallouts origin. • A Hierarchical cluster analysis permitted to identify the dominant particles source. - Abstract: Populations living close to mining sites are often exposed to important heavy metal concentrations, especially through atmospheric fallouts. Identifying the main sources of metal-rich particles remains a challenge because of the similarity of the particle signatures from the polluted sites. This work provides an original combination of physical and chemical methods to determine the main sources of airborne particles impacting inhabited zones. Raman microspectrometry (RMS), X-ray diffraction (DRX), morphology analyses by microscopy and chemical composition were assessed. Geochemical analysis allowed the identification of target and source areas; XRD and RMS analysis identified the main mineral phases in association with their metal content and speciation. The characterization of the dominant minerals was combined with particle morphology analysis to identify fallout sources. The complete description of dust morphologies permitted the successful determination of a fingerprint of each source site. The analysis of these chemical and morphological fingerprints allowed identification of the mine area as the main contributor of metal-rich particles impacting the inhabited zone. In addition to the identification of the main sources of airborne particles, this study will also permit to better define the extent of polluted zones requiring remediation or protection from eolian erosion inducing metal-rich atmospheric fallouts.

  1. Variable multimodal light microscopy with interference contrast and phase contrast; dark or bright field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, T; Piper, J

    2014-07-01

    Using the optical methods described, specimens can be observed with modified multimodal light microscopes based on interference contrast combined with phase contrast, dark- or bright-field illumination. Thus, the particular visual information associated with interference and phase contrast, dark- and bright-field illumination is joined in real-time composite images appearing in enhanced clarity and purified from typical artefacts, which are apparent in standard phase contrast and dark-field illumination. In particular, haloing and shade-off are absent or significantly reduced as well as marginal blooming and scattering. The background brightness and thus the range of contrast can be continuously modulated and variable transitions can be achieved between interference contrast and complementary illumination techniques. The methods reported should be of general interest for all disciplines using phase and interference contrast microscopy, especially in biology and medicine, and also in material sciences when implemented in vertical illuminators. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Carbon contamination in scanning transmission electron microscopy and its impact on phase-plate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Simon; Dries, Manuel; Hermann, Peter; Obermair, Martin; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Malac, Marek

    2017-05-01

    We analyze electron-beam induced carbon contamination in a transmission electron microscope. The study is performed on thin films potentially suitable as phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and phase-plate imaging is utilized to analyze the contamination. The deposited contamination layer is identified as a graphitic carbon layer which is not prone to electrostatic charging whereas a non-conductive underlying substrate charges. Several methods that inhibit contamination are evaluated and the impact of carbon contamination on phase-plate imaging is discussed. The findings are in general interesting for scanning transmission electron microscopy applications. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Advantages of intermediate X-ray energies in Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Hong, Youli; Ge, Xin; Wang, Dajiang; Pan, Zhiyun; Zhu, Peiping; Yun, Wenbing; Jacobsen, Chris; Wu, Ziyu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the hierarchical organizations of molecules and organelles within the interior of large eukaryotic cells is a challenge of fundamental interest in cell biology. Light microscopy is a powerful tool for observations of the dynamics of live cells, its resolution attainable is limited and insufficient. While electron microscopy can produce images with astonishing resolution and clarity of ultra-thin (microscopy offers superior imaging resolution compared to light microscopy, and unique capability of nondestructive three-dimensional imaging of hydrated unstained biological cells, complementary to existing light and electron microscopy. Until now, X-ray microscopes operating in the "water window" energy range between carbon and oxygen k-shell absorption edges have produced outstanding 3D images of cryo-preserved cells. The relatively low X-ray energy (phase contrast can overcome the above limitations and reduces radiation dose to the specimen. Using a hydrated model cell with an average chemical composition reported in literature, we calculated the image contrast and the radiation dose for absorption and Zernike phase contrast, respectively. The results show that an X-ray microscope operating at ~2.5 keV using Zernike phase contrast offers substantial advantages in terms of specimen size, radiation dose and depth-of-focus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of TEM methods for LiFePO4/FePO4 phase mapping: spectroscopic techniques (EFTEM, STEM-EELS) and STEM diffraction techniques (ACOM-TEM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, X.; Kobler, A.; Wang, D.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used intensively in investigating battery materials, e.g. to obtain phase maps of partially (dis)charged (lithium) iron phosphate (LFP/FP), which is one of the most promising cathode material for next generation lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. Due...... to the weak interaction between Li atoms and fast electrons, mapping of the Li distribution is not straightforward. In this work, we revisited the issue of TEM measurements of Li distribution maps for LFP/FP. Different TEM techniques, including spectroscopic techniques (energy filtered (EF)TEM in the energy...... with each other. Because of the strong difference in the imaging mechanisms, it proves the reliability of both the spectroscopic and STEM diffraction phase mapping. A comprehensive comparison of all methods is given in terms of information content, dose level, acquisition time and signal quality. The latter...

  5. One-particle spectroscopic intensities as a signature of shape phase transition: The γ-unstable case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Vitturi, A.

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of one-particle spectroscopic intensities as a possible signature of shape phase transitions. The study describes the odd systems in terms of the interacting boson fermion model. We consider the particular case of an odd j=3/2 particle coupled to an even-even boson core that undergoes a phase transition from spherical U(5) to γ-unstable O(6) situation. At the critical point, our findings are compared with the one-particle spectroscopic intensities that can be obtained within the E(5/4) model proposed by[F. Iachello, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 052503 (2005); F. Iachello, in Symmetries and Low-Energy Phase Transitions in Nuclear Structure Physics, edited by G. Lo Bianco (University of Camerino Press, Camerino, Italy, in press)].

  6. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.

  7. Complete staining of human spermatozoa and immature germ cells combined with phase contrast microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, A Y; Drejer, J O; Bagger, P V

    1987-01-01

    A method combining Janus green B and Thymol blue stains the anterior part of the head, the nuclear membrane, middle piece, and tail of spermatozoa light green and the nucleus deep purple. The method provides excellent stained preparations for the evaluation of sperm morphology by phase contrast...... microscopy. It produces significantly less abnormal spermatozoa compared with the Papanicolaou stain....

  8. Holography microscopy as an artifact-free alternative to phase-contrast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pastorek, Lukáš; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 2 (2018), s. 179-186 ISSN 0948-6143 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Holography microscopy * Phase-contrast * Halo effect Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.553, year: 2016

  9. Use of dyes to increase phase contrast for biological holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay L; Cho, Yong Bin; Lindensmith, Christian A

    2015-09-01

    Holographic microscopy is an emerging biological technique that provides amplitude and quantitative phase imaging, though the contrast provided by many cell types and organelles is low, and until now no dyes were known that increased contrast. Here we show that the metallocorrole Ga(tpfc)(SO3)2, which has a strong Soret band absorption, increases contrast in both amplitude and phase and facilitates tracking of Escherichia coli with minimal toxicity. The change in phase contrast may be calculated from the dye-absorbance spectrum using the Kramers-Kronig relations, and represents a general principle that may be applied to any dye or cell type. This enables the use of holographic microscopy for all applications in which specific labeling is desired.

  10. Time-resolved imaging refractometry of microbicidal films using quantitative phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Matthew T; Drake, Tyler K; Robles, Francisco E; Rohan, Lisa C; Katz, David; Wax, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy is applied to image temporal changes in the refractive index (RI) distributions of solutions created by microbicidal films undergoing hydration. We present a novel method of using an engineered polydimethylsiloxane structure as a static phase reference to facilitate calibration of the absolute RI across the entire field. We present a study of dynamic structural changes in microbicidal films during hydration and subsequent dissolution. With assumptions about the smoothness of the phase changes induced by these films, we calculate absolute changes in the percentage of film in regions across the field of view.

  11. Phase measurements of erythrocytes affected by metal ions with quantitative interferometric microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouyu; Yan, Keding; Shan, Yanke; Xu, Mingfei; Liu, Fei; Xue, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Erythrocyte morphology is an important factor in disease diagnosis, however, traditional setups as microscopes and cytometers cannot provide enough quantitative information of cellular morphology for in-depth statistics and analysis. In order to capture variations of erythrocytes affected by metal ions, quantitative interferometric microscopy (QIM) is applied to monitor their morphology changes. Combined with phase retrieval and cell recognition, erythrocyte phase images, as well as phase area and volume, can be accurately and automatically obtained. The research proves that QIM is an effective tool in cellular observation and measurement.

  12. Cell segmentation in phase contrast microscopy images via semi-supervised classification over optics-related features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hang; Yin, Zhaozheng; Huh, Seungil; Kanade, Takeo

    2013-10-01

    Phase-contrast microscopy is one of the most common and convenient imaging modalities to observe long-term multi-cellular processes, which generates images by the interference of lights passing through transparent specimens and background medium with different retarded phases. Despite many years of study, computer-aided phase contrast microscopy analysis on cell behavior is challenged by image qualities and artifacts caused by phase contrast optics. Addressing the unsolved challenges, the authors propose (1) a phase contrast microscopy image restoration method that produces phase retardation features, which are intrinsic features of phase contrast microscopy, and (2) a semi-supervised learning based algorithm for cell segmentation, which is a fundamental task for various cell behavior analysis. Specifically, the image formation process of phase contrast microscopy images is first computationally modeled with a dictionary of diffraction patterns; as a result, each pixel of a phase contrast microscopy image is represented by a linear combination of the bases, which we call phase retardation features. Images are then partitioned into phase-homogeneous atoms by clustering neighboring pixels with similar phase retardation features. Consequently, cell segmentation is performed via a semi-supervised classification technique over the phase-homogeneous atoms. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach produces quality segmentation of individual cells and outperforms previous approaches. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Volta potential phase plate for in-focus phase contrast transmission electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Danev, Radostin; Buijsse, Bart; Khoshouei, Maryam; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Biological electron cryomicroscopy is limited by the radiation sensitivity of the samples and the consequent need to minimize exposure to the beam. This, in turn, results in low-contrast images with a poor signal-to-noise ratio. The current practice to improve phase contrast by defocusing results in contrast transfer functions necessitating image restoration to provide interpretable data. Phase plates enable in-focus phase contrast, but the existing ones, including the thin film Zernike-type ...

  14. Wide-field interferometric phase microscopy with molecular specificity using plasmonic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turko, Nir A; Peled, Anna; Shaked, Natan T

    2013-11-01

    We present a method for adding molecular specificity to wide-field interferometric phase microscopy (IPM) by recording the phase signatures of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) labeling targets of interest in biological cells. The AuNPs are excited by time-modulated light at a wavelength corresponding to their absorption spectral peak, evoking a photothermal (PT) effect due to their plasmonic resonance. This effect induces a local temperature rise, resulting in local refractive index and phase changes that can be detected optically. Using a wide-field interferometric phase microscope, we acquired an image sequence of the AuNP sample phase profile without requiring lateral scanning, and analyzed the time-dependent profile of the entire field of view using a Fourier analysis, creating a map of the locations of AuNPs in the sample. The system can image a wide-field PT phase signal from a cluster containing down to 16 isolated AuNPs. AuNPs are then conjugated to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies and inserted to an EGFR-overexpressing cancer cell culture, which is imaged using IPM and verified by confocal microscopy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time wide-field interferometric PT imaging is performed at the subcellular level without the need for total internal reflection effects or scanning.

  15. Phase contrast microscopy with fringe contrast adjustable by using grating-based phase-shifter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Yao, Baoli; Gao, Peng; Ye, Tong

    2012-07-02

    In this paper a new phase contrast method with fringe contrast adjustable is proposed. In the Fourier plane of the object wave, two Ronchi gratings i.e., a central grating and a surrounding grating, are used to modulate the phases of the undiffracted and diffracted components, respectively. By loading the two gratings separately on spatial light modulator, the undiffracted and diffracted components can be measured independently, which simplify greatly the reconstruction process. Besides, the fringe contrast of the phase contrast interferogram can be adjusted by changing the modulation depth of the two gratings. The feasibility of the proposed method is verified by theoretical analysis and experiment.

  16. High-temperature phase transitions, spectroscopic properties, and dimensionality reduction in rubidium thorium molybdate family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bin; Gesing, Thorsten M; Kegler, Philip; Modolo, Giuseppe; Bosbach, Dirk; Schlenz, Hartmut; Suleimanov, Evgeny V; Alekseev, Evgeny V

    2014-03-17

    Four new rubidium thorium molybdates have been synthesized by high-temperature solid-state reactions. The crystal structures of Rb8Th(MoO4)6, Rb2Th(MoO4)3, Rb4Th(MoO4)4, and Rb4Th5(MoO4)12 were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All these compounds construct from MoO4 tetrahedra and ThO8 square antiprisms. The studied compounds adopt the whole range of possible structure dimensionalities from zero-dimensional (0D) to three-dimensional (3D): finite clusters, chains, sheets, and frameworks. Rb8Th(MoO4)6 crystallizes in 0D containing clusters of [Th(MoO4)6](8-). The crystal structure of Rb2Th(MoO4)3 is based upon one-dimensional chains with configuration units of [Th(MoO4)3](2-). Two-dimensional sheets occur in compound Rb4Th(MoO4)4, and a 3D framework with channels formed by thorium and molybdate polyhedra has been observed in Rb4Th5(MoO4)12. The Raman and IR spectroscopic properties of these compounds are reported. Temperature-depended phase transition effects were observed in Rb2Th(MoO4)3 and Rb4Th(MoO4)4 using thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry analysis and high-temperature powder diffraction methods.

  17. Practical Experience with Hole-Free Phase Plates for Cryo Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, Michael; Hsieh, Chyongere; Leith, Eric; Mastronarde, David; Motoki, Sohei

    2016-12-01

    Phase plate (PP) imaging has proven to be valuable in transmission cryo electron microscopy of unstained, native-state biological specimens. Many PP types have been described, however until the recent implementation of the "hole-free" phase plate (HFPP), imaging has been challenging. We found the HFPP to be simple to construct and to set up in the transmission electron microscopy, but care in implementing automated data collection is needed. Performance may be variable, both initially and over time, thus it is important to monitor and evaluate image quality by observing the power spectrum. We found that while some HFPPs gave transfer to high resolution without CTF oscillation, most reached high resolution when operated with modest defocus.

  18. Axial Phase-Darkfield-Contrast (APDC), a new technique for variable optical contrasting in light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, T; Piper, J

    2012-09-01

    Axial phase-darkfield-contrast (APDC) has been developed as an illumination technique in light microscopy which promises significant improvements and a higher variability in imaging of several transparent 'problem specimens'. With this method, a phase contrast image is optically superimposed on an axial darkfield image so that a partial image based on the principal zeroth order maximum (phase contrast) interferes with an image, which is based on the secondary maxima (axial darkfield). The background brightness and character of the resulting image can be continuously modulated from a phase contrast-dominated to a darkfield-dominated character. In order to achieve this illumination mode, normal objectives for phase contrast have to be fitted with an additional central light stopper needed for axial (central) darkfield illumination. In corresponding condenser light masks, a small perforation has to be added in the centre of the phase contrast providing light annulus. These light modulating elements are properly aligned when the central perforation is congruent with the objective's light stop and the light annulus is conjugate with the phase ring. The breadth of the condenser light annulus and thus the intensity of the phase contrast partial image can be regulated with the aperture diaphragm. Additional contrast effects can be achieved when both illuminating light components are filtered at different colours. In this technique, the axial resolution (depth of field) is significantly enhanced and the specimen's three-dimensional appearance is accentuated with improved clarity as well as fine details at the given resolution limit. Typical artefacts associated with phase contrast and darkfield illumination are reduced in our methods. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Holography microscopy as an artifact-free alternative to phase-contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorek, Lukáš; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2017-11-28

    Artifact-free microscopic images represent a key requirement of multi-parametric image analysis in modern biomedical research. Holography microscopy (HM) is one of the quantitative phase imaging techniques, which has been finding new applications in life science, especially in morphological screening, cell migration, and cancer research. Rather than the classical imaging of absorbing (typically stained) specimens by bright-field microscopy, the information about the light-wave's phase shifts induced by the biological sample is employed for final image reconstruction. In this comparative study, we investigated the usability and the reported advantage of the holography imaging. The claimed halo-free imaging was analyzed compared to the widely used Zernike phase-contrast microscopy. The intensity and phase cross-membrane profiles at the periphery of the cell were quantified. The intensity profile for cells in the phase-contrast images suffers from the significant increase in intensity values around the cell border. On the contrary, no distorted profile is present outside the cell membrane in holography images. The gradual increase in phase shift values is present in the internal part of the cell body projection in holography image. This increase may be related to the increase in the cell internal material according to the dry mass theory. Our experimental data proved the halo-free nature of the holography imaging, which is an important prerequisite of the correct thresholding and cell segmentation, nowadays frequently required in high-content screening and other image-based analysis. Consequently, HM is a method of choice whenever the image analysis relies on the accurate data on cell boundaries.

  20. Frequency, amplitude, and phase measurements in contact resonance atomic force microscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Stan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The resonance frequency, amplitude, and phase response of the first two eigenmodes of two contact-resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM configurations, which differ in the method used to excite the system (cantilever base vs sample excitation, are analyzed in this work. Similarities and differences in the observables of the cantilever dynamics, as well as the different effect of the tip–sample contact properties on those observables in each configuration are discussed. Finally, the expected accuracy of CR-AFM using phase-locked loop detection is investigated and quantification of the typical errors incurred during measurements is provided.

  1. 3D differential phase-contrast microscopy with computational illumination using an LED array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Wang, Jingyan; Waller, Laura

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate 3D differential phase-contrast (DPC) microscopy, based on computational illumination with a programmable LED array. By capturing intensity images with various illumination angles generated by sequentially patterning an LED array source, we digitally refocus images through various depths via light field processing. The intensity differences from images taken at complementary illumination angles are then used to generate DPC images, which are related to the gradient of phase. The proposed method achieves 3D DPC with simple, inexpensive optics and no moving parts. We experimentally demonstrate our method by imaging a camel hair sample in 3D.

  2. Phase imaging and nanoscale energy dissipation of supported graphene using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasić, Borislav; Matković, Aleksandar; Gajić, Radoš

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the phase imaging of supported graphene using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AFM), the so-called tapping mode. The phase contrast between graphene and the neighboring substrate grows in hard tapping conditions and the contrast is enhanced compared to the topographic one. Therefore, phase measurements could enable the high-contrast imaging of graphene and related two-dimensional materials and heterostructures, which is not achievable with conventional AFM based topographic measurements. Obtained phase maps are then transformed into energy dissipation maps, which are important for graphene applications in various nano-mechanical systems. From a fundamental point of view, energy dissipation gives further insight into mechanical properties. Reliable measurements, obtained in the repulsive regime, show that the energy dissipation on a graphene-covered substrate is lower than that on a bare one, so graphene provides certain shielding in tip–substrate interaction. Based on the obtained phase curves and their derivatives, as well as on correlation measurements based on AFM nanoindentation and force modulation microscopy, we conclude that the main dissipation channels in graphene–substrate systems are short-range hysteresis and long-range interfacial forces.

  3. Interferometric phase microscopy using slightly-off-axis reflective point diffraction interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hongyi; Zhong, Zhi; Shan, Mingguang; Liu, Lei; Guo, Lili; Zhang, Yabin

    2017-03-01

    An interferometric phase microscopy (IPM) is proposed using slightly-off-axis reflective point diffraction interferometry for quantitative phase imaging. A retro-reflector consisting two mirrors is used to generate an angle between the object beam and reference beam, and a 45° tilted polarizing beam splitter is used to split the horizontal and vertical components of the both beams. Two carrier interferograms with π/2 phase-shift can be acquired in one shot, and the phase distribution of a thin specimen can be retrieved using a fast reconstruction method. The new IPM without loss in the utilization of the input-plane field of view combines the real time and optimizing detector bandwidth measurement benefit associated with slightly-off-axis method, high stability associated with common path geometry, and simplicity in terms of procedure and setup. Experiments are carried out on both static and dynamic specimens to demonstrate the validity and stability of the proposed method.

  4. Rotational-diversity phase estimation from differential-interference-contrast microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preza, C

    2000-03-01

    An iterative phase-estimation method for the calculation of a specimen's phase function or optical-path-length (OPL) distribution from differential-interference-contrast (DIC) microscopy images is presented. The method minimizes the least-squares discrepancy measure by use of the conjugate-gradient technique to estimate the phase function from multiple DIC images acquired at different specimen rotations. The estimate is regularized with a quadratic smoothness penalty. Results from testing the method with simulations and measured DIC images show improvement in the estimated phase when at least two rotationally diverse DIC images instead of a single DIC image are used for the estimation. The OPL of a cell that is estimated from two DIC images was found to be much more reliable than the OPL computed from single DIC images (which had a coefficient of variation equal to 15.8%).

  5. Blood testing at the single cell level using quantitative phase and amplitude microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Mustafa; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been shown that quantitative phase imaging methods can provide clinically relevant parameters for red blood cell analysis with unprecedented detail and sensitivity. Since the quantitative phase information is dependent on both the thickness and refractive index, a major limitation to clinical translation has been a simple and practical approach to measure both simultaneously. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that, by combining quantitative phase with a single absorption measurement, it is possible to measure both quantities at the single cell level. We validate this approach by comparing our results to those acquired using a clinical blood analyzer. This approach to decouple the thickness and refractive index for red blood cells may be used with any quantitative phase imaging method that can operate in tandem with bright field microscopy at the Soret-band wavelength. PMID:22162816

  6. Practical aspects of Boersch phase contrast electron microscopy of biological specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Department of Structural Biology, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, D-60439 Frankfurt (Germany); Muzik, Heiko; Vieker, Henning; Turchanin, Andrey; Beyer, Andre; Goelzhaeuser, Armin [University of Bielefeld, Physics of Supramolecular Systems and Surfaces, Universitaetsstr. 25, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Lacher, Manfred; Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Schmitz, Sam; Holik, Peter [Caesar Research Center, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, D-53175 Bonn (Germany); Kuehlbrandt, Werner [Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Department of Structural Biology, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, D-60439 Frankfurt (Germany); Rhinow, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.rhinow@biophys.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Department of Structural Biology, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, D-60439 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Implementation of physical phase plates into transmission electron microscopes to achieve in-focus contrast for ice-embedded biological specimens poses several technological challenges. During the last decade several phase plates designs have been introduced and tested for electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM), including thin film (Zernike) phase plates and electrostatic devices. Boersch phase plates (BPPs) are electrostatic einzel lenses shifting the phase of the unscattered beam by an arbitrary angle. Adjusting the phase shift to 90 Degree-Sign achieves the maximum contrast transfer for phase objects such as biomolecules. Recently, we reported the implementation of a BPP into a dedicated phase contrast aberration-corrected electron microscope (PACEM) and demonstrated its use to generate in-focus contrast of frozen-hydrated specimens. However, a number of obstacles need to be overcome before BPPs can be used routinely, mostly related to the phase plate devices themselves. CryoEM with a physical phase plate is affected by electrostatic charging, obliteration of low spatial frequencies, and mechanical drift. Furthermore, BPPs introduce single sideband contrast (SSB), due to the obstruction of Friedel mates in the diffraction pattern. In this study we address the technical obstacles in detail and show how they may be overcome. We use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to identify contaminants responsible for electrostatic charging, which occurs with most phase plates. We demonstrate that obstruction of low-resolution features is significantly reduced by lowering the acceleration voltage of the microscope. Finally, we present computational approaches to correct BPP images for SSB contrast and to compensate for mechanical drift of the BPP. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Various obstacles need to be overcome before Boersch phase plates can be used routinely. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technical problems include

  7. Improved cancer risk stratification and diagnosis via quantitative phase microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Uttam, Shikhar; Pham, Hoa V.; Hartman, Douglas J.

    2017-02-01

    Pathology remains the gold standard for cancer diagnosis and in some cases prognosis, in which trained pathologists examine abnormality in tissue architecture and cell morphology characteristic of cancer cells with a bright-field microscope. The limited resolution of conventional microscope can result in intra-observer variation, missed early-stage cancers, and indeterminate cases that often result in unnecessary invasive procedures in the absence of cancer. Assessment of nanoscale structural characteristics via quantitative phase represents a promising strategy for identifying pre-cancerous or cancerous cells, due to its nanoscale sensitivity to optical path length, simple sample preparation (i.e., label-free) and low cost. I will present the development of quantitative phase microscopy system in transmission and reflection configuration to detect the structural changes in nuclear architecture, not be easily identifiable by conventional pathology. Specifically, we will present the use of transmission-mode quantitative phase imaging to improve diagnostic accuracy of urine cytology and the nuclear dry mass is progressively correlate with negative, atypical, suspicious and positive cytological diagnosis. In a second application, we will present the use of reflection-mode quantitative phase microscopy for depth-resolved nanoscale nuclear architecture mapping (nanoNAM) of clinically prepared formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. We demonstrated that the quantitative phase microscopy system detects a gradual increase in the density alteration of nuclear architecture during malignant transformation in animal models of colon carcinogenesis and in human patients with ulcerative colitis, even in tissue that appears histologically normal according to pathologists. We evaluated the ability of nanoNAM to predict "future" cancer progression in patients with ulcerative colitis.

  8. Practical aspects of Boersch phase contrast electron microscopy of biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Andreas; Muzik, Heiko; Vieker, Henning; Turchanin, Andrey; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Lacher, Manfred; Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Schmitz, Sam; Holik, Peter; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Rhinow, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Implementation of physical phase plates into transmission electron microscopes to achieve in-focus contrast for ice-embedded biological specimens poses several technological challenges. During the last decade several phase plates designs have been introduced and tested for electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM), including thin film (Zernike) phase plates and electrostatic devices. Boersch phase plates (BPPs) are electrostatic einzel lenses shifting the phase of the unscattered beam by an arbitrary angle. Adjusting the phase shift to 90° achieves the maximum contrast transfer for phase objects such as biomolecules. Recently, we reported the implementation of a BPP into a dedicated phase contrast aberration-corrected electron microscope (PACEM) and demonstrated its use to generate in-focus contrast of frozen-hydrated specimens. However, a number of obstacles need to be overcome before BPPs can be used routinely, mostly related to the phase plate devices themselves. CryoEM with a physical phase plate is affected by electrostatic charging, obliteration of low spatial frequencies, and mechanical drift. Furthermore, BPPs introduce single sideband contrast (SSB), due to the obstruction of Friedel mates in the diffraction pattern. In this study we address the technical obstacles in detail and show how they may be overcome. We use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to identify contaminants responsible for electrostatic charging, which occurs with most phase plates. We demonstrate that obstruction of low-resolution features is significantly reduced by lowering the acceleration voltage of the microscope. Finally, we present computational approaches to correct BPP images for SSB contrast and to compensate for mechanical drift of the BPP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Spectroscopic ellipsometric modeling of a Bi–Te–Se write layer of an optical data storage device as guided by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Madaan, Nitesh; Bagley, Jacob; Diwan, Anubhav [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Liu, Yiqun [Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Davis, Robert C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lunt, Barry M. [Department of Information Technology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Smith, Stacey J., E-mail: ssmith@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Linford, Matthew R., E-mail: mrlinford@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-31

    Conventional magnetic tape is the most widely used medium for archival data storage. However, data stored on it need to be migrated every ca. 5 years. Recently, optical discs that store information for hundreds, or even more than 1000 years, have been introduced to the market. We recently proposed that technology in these optical discs be used to make an optical tape that would show greater permanence than its magnetic counterpart. Here we provide a detailed optical characterization of a sputtered thin film of bismuth, tellurium, and selenium (BTS) that is a proposed data storage layer for these devices. The methodology described herein should be useful in the future development of related materials. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) data are obtained using interference enhancement, and the modeling of this data is guided by results from atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray reflectivity (XRR). By AFM, ca. 40 nm BTS films show ca. 10 nm roughness. SEM images also suggest considerable roughness in the films and indicate that they are composed of 13.1 ± 5.9 nm grains. XRD confirms that the films are crystalline and predicts a grain size of 17 ± 2 nm. XRD results are consistent with the composition of the films — a mildly oxidized BTS material. Three models of increasing complexity are investigated to explain the SE data. The first model consists of a smooth, homogeneous BTS film. The second model adds a roughness layer to the previous model. The third model also has two layers. The bottom layer is modeled as a mixture of BTS and void using a Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The upper layer is similarly modeled, but with a gradient. The first model was unable to adequately model the SE data. The second model was an improvement — lower MSE (4.4) and good agreement with step height measurements. The third model was even better — very low MSE (2.6) and good agreement with AFM results. The

  10. Investigation into spiral phase plate contrast in optical and electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Juchtmans, Roeland; Lubk, Axel; Verbeeck, Jo

    2016-01-01

    The use of phase plates in the back focal plane of a microscope is a well established technique in optical microscopy to increase the contrast of weakly interacting samples and is gaining interest in electron microscopy as well. In this paper we study the spiral phase plate (SPP), also called helical, vortex, or two-dimensional Hilbert phase plate, that adds an angularly dependent phase of the form $e^{i\\ell\\phi}$ to the exit wave in Fourier space. In the limit of large collection angles, we analytically calculate that the average of a pair of $\\ell=\\pm1$ SPP images is directly proportional to the gradient squared of the exit wave, explaining the edge contrast previously seen in optical SPP work. The difference between a clockwise-anticlockwise pair of SPP images and conditions where this difference vanishes and the gradient of the exit wave can be seen from one single SPP image, are discussed. Finally, we demonstrate how with three images, one without and one with each of an $\\ell=\\pm1$ SPP, may give enough ...

  11. Phase imaging and detection in pseudo-heterodyne scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Camilo; Alda, Javier; Kinzel, Edward; Boreman, Glenn

    2017-02-01

    When considering the pseudo-heterodyne mode for detection of the modulus and phase of the near field from scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) measurements, processing only the modulus of the signal may produce an undesired constraint in the accessible values of the phase of the near field. A two-dimensional analysis of the signal provided by the data acquisition system makes it possible to obtain phase maps over the whole [0, 2π) range. This requires post-processing of the data to select the best coordinate system in which to represent the data along the direction of maximum variance. The analysis also provides a quantitative parameter describing how much of the total variance is included within the component selected for calculation of the modulus and phase of the near field. The dependence of the pseudo-heterodyne phase on the mean position of the reference mirror is analyzed, and the evolution of the global phase is extracted from the s-SNOM data. The results obtained from this technique compared well with the expected maps of the near-field phase obtained from simulations.

  12. Spectroscopic studies of molecular iodine emitted into the gas phase by seaweed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Ball

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Time profiles of molecular iodine emissions from seven species of seaweed have been measured at high time resolution (7.5 s by direct spectroscopic quantification of the gas phase I2 using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy. Substantial differences were found between species, both in the amounts of I2 emitted when the plants were exposed to air and in the shapes of their emission time profiles. Two species of kelp, Laminaria digitata and Laminaria hyperborea, were found to be the most potent emitters, producing an intense burst of I2 when first exposed to air. I2 was also observed from Saccharina latissima and Ascophyllum nodosum but in lower amounts and with broader time profiles. I2 mixing ratios from two Fucus species and Dictyopteris membranacea were at or below the detection limit of the present instrument (25 pptv. A further set of experiments investigated the time dependence of I2 emissions and aerosol particle formation when fragments of L. digitata were exposed to desiccation in air, to ozone and to oligoguluronate stress factors. Particle formation occurred in all L. digitata stress experiments where ozone and light were present, subject to the I2 mixing ratios being above certain threshold amounts. Moreover, the particle number concentrations closely tracked variations in the I2 mixing ratios, confirming the results of previous studies that the condensable particle-forming gases derive from the photochemical oxidation of the plant's I2 emissions. This work also supports the theory that particle nucleation in the coastal atmosphere occurs in "hot-spot" regions of locally elevated concentrations of condensable gases: the greatest atmospheric concentrations of I2 and hence of condensable iodine oxides are likely to be above plants of the most efficiently

  13. Phase microscopy using light-field reconstruction method for cell observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-01

    The refractive index (RI) distribution can serve as a natural label for undyed cell imaging. However, the majority of images obtained through quantitative phase microscopy is integrated along the illumination angle and cannot reflect additional information about the refractive map on a certain plane. Herein, a light-field reconstruction method to image the RI map within a depth of 0.2 μm is proposed. It records quantitative phase-delay images using a four-step phase shifting method in different directions and then reconstructs a similar scattered light field for the refractive sample on the focus plane. It can image the RI of samples, transparent cell samples in particular, in a manner similar to the observation of scattering characteristics. The light-field reconstruction method is therefore a powerful tool for use in cytobiology studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of photothermal and piezoacoustic excitation methods for frequency and phase modulation atomic force microscopy in liquid environments

    OpenAIRE

    Labuda, A.; Kobayashi, K; D. Kiracofe; Suzuki, K; P. H. Grütter; Yamada, H

    2011-01-01

    In attempting to perform frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) in liquids, a non-flat phase transfer function in the self-excitation system prevents proper tracking of the cantilever natural frequency. This results in frequency-and-phase modulation atomic force microscopy (FPM-AFM) which lies in between phase modulation atomic force microscopy (PM-AFM) and FM-AFM. We derive the theory necessary to recover the conservative force and damping in such a situation, where standard F...

  15. Use of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) as a Timer of Cell Cycle S Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkelman, Irina A; Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Foley, Tara; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of thymidine analogues in replicating DNA, coupled with antibody and fluorophore staining, allows analysis of cell proliferation, but is currently limited to monolayer cultures, fixed cells and end-point assays. We describe a simple microscopy imaging method for live real-time analysis of cell proliferation, S phase progression over several division cycles, effects of anti-proliferative drugs and other applications. It is based on the prominent (~ 1.7-fold) quenching of fluorescence lifetime of a common cell-permeable nuclear stain, Hoechst 33342 upon the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in genomic DNA and detection by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We show that quantitative and accurate FLIM technique allows high-content, multi-parametric dynamic analyses, far superior to the intensity-based imaging. We demonstrate its uses with monolayer cell cultures, complex 3D tissue models of tumor cell spheroids and intestinal organoids, and in physiological study with metformin treatment.

  16. Total 3D imaging of phase objects using defocusing microscopy: application to red blood cells

    CERN Document Server

    Roma, P M S; Amaral, F T; Agero, U; Mesquita, O N

    2014-01-01

    We present Defocusing Microscopy (DM), a bright-field optical microscopy technique able to perform total 3D imaging of transparent objects. By total 3D imaging we mean the determination of the actual shapes of the upper and lower surfaces of a phase object. We propose a new methodology using DM and apply it to red blood cells subject to different osmolality conditions: hypotonic, isotonic and hypertonic solutions. For each situation the shape of the upper and lower cell surface-membranes (lipid bilayer/cytoskeleton) are completely recovered, displaying the deformation of RBCs surfaces due to adhesion on the glass-substrate. The axial resolution of our technique allowed us to image surface-membranes separated by distances as small as 300 nm. Finally, we determine volume, superficial area, sphericity index and RBCs refractive index for each osmotic condition.

  17. Conformational Heterogeneity of Methyl 4-Hydroxycinnamate: A Gas-Phase UV-IR Spectroscopic Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.M.M.; Amirjalayer, S.; Smolarek, S.; Vdovin, A.; Rijs, A.M.; Buma, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    UV excitation and IR absorption spectroscopy on Jet cooled molecules is used to study the conformational heterogeneity of methyl 4-hydroxycinnamate, a model chromophore of the Photoactive Yellow Protein (PYP), and to determine the spectroscopic properties of the various conformers UV-UV depletion

  18. Improved phase sensitivity in spectral domain phase microscopy using line-field illumination and self phase-referencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Choi, Wonshik; Oh, Seungeun; Lue, Niyom; Park, Yongkeun; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Badizadegan, Kamran; Feld, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    We report a quantitative phase microscope based on spectral domain optical coherence tomography and line-field illumination. The line illumination allows self phase-referencing method to reject common-mode phase noise. The quantitative phase microscope also features a separate reference arm, permitting the use of high numerical aperture (NA > 1) microscope objectives for high resolution phase measurement at multiple points along the line of illumination. We demonstrate that the path-length sensitivity of the instrument can be as good as 41 pm/Hz, which makes it suitable for nanometer scale study of cell motility. We present the detection of natural motions of cell surface and two-dimensional surface profiling of a HeLa cell. PMID:19550464

  19. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.Sporothrix schenckii foi estudado em microscopia eletrônica. Foram observados caracteres das hífas e dos esporos, vários elementos da classificação periódica foram postos em evidência graças à micro-análise a raios X.

  20. Nanosecond switching in GeSe phase change memory films by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, James L.; Grishin, Ilya; Gyu Choi, Yong; Cheong, Byung-ki; Lee, Suyoun; Kolosov, Oleg V.; Huey, Bryan D.

    2014-02-01

    Nanosecond scale threshold switching is investigated with conducting atomic force microscopy (AFM) for an amorphous GeSe film. Switched bits exhibit 2-3 orders of magnitude variations in conductivity, as demonstrated in phase change based memory devices. Through the nm-scale AFM probe, this crystallization was achieved with pulse durations of as low as 15 ns, the fastest reported with scanning probe based methods. Conductance AFM imaging of the switched bits further reveals correlations between the switched volume, pulse amplitude, and pulse duration. The influence of film heterogeneities on switching is also directly detected, which is of tremendous importance for optimal device performance.

  1. Spatially resolved quantitative mapping of thermomechanical properties and phase transition temperatures using scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Nikiforov, Maxim P

    2013-07-09

    An approach for the thermomechanical characterization of phase transitions in polymeric materials (polyethyleneterephthalate) by band excitation acoustic force microscopy is developed. This methodology allows the independent measurement of resonance frequency, Q factor, and oscillation amplitude of a tip-surface contact area as a function of tip temperature, from which the thermal evolution of tip-surface spring constant and mechanical dissipation can be extracted. A heating protocol maintained a constant tip-surface contact area and constant contact force, thereby allowing for reproducible measurements and quantitative extraction of material properties including temperature dependence of indentation-based elastic and loss moduli.

  2. Dual mode diffraction phase microscopy for quantitative functional assessment of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaikova, N. A.; Popov, A. P.; Kalyanov, A. L.; Ryabukho, V. P.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2017-10-01

    A diffraction phase microscopy approach with a combined use of transmission and reflection imaging modes has been developed and applied for non-invasive quantitative assessment of the refractive index of red blood cells (RBCs). We present the theoretical background of signal formation for both imaging modes, accompanied by the results of experimental studies. We demonstrate that simultaneous use of the two modes has great potential for accurate assessment of the refractive index of biological cells, and we perform a reconstruction of spatial distribution of the refractive index of RBC in 3D.

  3. Studies on the interaction of heparin with lysozyme by multi-spectroscopic techniques and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lunfu; Hu, Xiaoli; Liu, Zhongfang; Liu, Shaopu

    2016-02-05

    The interaction between heparin (Hep) and lysozyme (Lyso) in vitro was studied by fluorescence, UV-vis, circular dichroism (CD), resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) under normal physiological conditions. UV-vis spectra of Lyso showed the absorbance was significantly increased with the addition of Hep. Fluorescence studies revealed that the emission quenching of Lyso with Hep was initiated by static quenching mechanism. CD spectral studies showed that Hep induced conformational changes in the secondary structure of Lyso. RRS spectra of Lyso showed the intensity of scattering was significantly increased with the addition of Hep and the enhanced RRS intensities were proportional to the concentration of Hep in a certain range. Thus, a new RRS method using Lyso as a probe could be used for the determination of Hep. The detection limit for Hep was 3.9 ng mL(-1). In addition, the shape of the complex was characterized by AFM. The possible reaction mechanism and the reasons for the enhancement of RRS intensity had been discussed through experimental results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Au Colloids Formed by Ion Implantation in Muscovite Mica Studied by Vibrational and Electronic Spectroscopes and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Y. S.; Henderson, D. O.; Mu, R.; Ueda, A.; Collins, W. E.; White, C. W.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zhu, Jane G.

    1997-01-01

    Au was implanted into the (001) surface of Muscovite mica at an energy of 1.1 MeV and at doses of 1, 3, 6, and 10 x 10(exp 16) ions/cu cm. Optical spectra of the as-implanted samples revealed a peak at 2.28 eV (545 nm) which is attributed to the surface plasmon absorption of Au colloids. The infrared reflectance measurements show a decreasing reflectivity with increasing ion dose in the Si-O stretching region (900-1200 /cm). A new peak observed at 967 /cm increases with the ion dose and is assigned to an Si-O dangling bond. Atomic force microscopy images of freshly cleaved samples implanted with 6 and 10 x 10(exp 16) ions/sq cm indicated metal colloids with diameters between 0.9- 1.5 nm. AFM images of the annealed samples showed irregularly shaped structures with a topology that results from the fusion of smaller colloids.

  5. Investigation of the Interaction between Patulin and Human Serum Albumin by a Spectroscopic Method, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Molecular Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuqin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of patulin with human serum albumin (HSA was studied in vitro under normal physiological conditions. The study was performed using fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis, circular dichroism (CD, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and molecular modeling techniques. The quenching mechanism was investigated using the association constants, the number of binding sites, and basic thermodynamic parameters. A dynamic quenching mechanism occurred between HSA and patulin, and the binding constants (K were 2.60 × 104, 4.59 × 104, and 7.01 × 104 M−1 at 288, 300, and 310 K, respectively. Based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the distance between the HSA and patulin was determined to be 2.847 nm. The ΔG0, ΔH0, and ΔS0 values across various temperatures indicated that hydrophobic interaction was the predominant binding force. The UV-Vis and CD results confirmed that the secondary structure of HSA was altered in the presence of patulin. The AFM results revealed that the individual HSA molecule dimensions were larger after interaction with patulin. In addition, molecular modeling showed that the patulin-HSA complex was stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond forces. The study results suggested that a weak intermolecular interaction occurred between patulin and HSA. Overall, the results are potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of patulin when it is combined with the biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological, testing and other experiments.

  6. Twin-beams digital holography for 3D tracking and quantitative phase-contrast microscopy in microfluidics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Memmolo, Pasquale; Finizio, Andrea; Paturzo, Melania; Miccio, Lisa; Ferraro, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    .... The novel configuration allows 3D tracking of micro-particles and, at same time, can simultaneously furnish Quantitative Phase-contrast maps of tracked micro-objects by interference microscopy...

  7. Practical factors affecting the performance of a thin-film phase plate for transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danev, Radostin [Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 5-1 Higashiyama, Miyodaiji-cho, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan)], E-mail: rado@nips.ac.jp; Glaeser, Robert M. [Life Sciences Division, 363B Donner Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nagayama, Kuniaki [Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 5-1 Higashiyama, Miyodaiji-cho, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan)

    2009-03-15

    A number of practical issues must be addressed when using thin carbon films as quarter-wave plates for Zernike phase-contrast electron microscopy. We describe, for example, how we meet the more stringent requirements that must be satisfied for beam alignment in this imaging mode. In addition we address the concern that one might have regarding the loss of some of the scattered electrons as they pass through such a phase plate. We show that two easily measured parameters, (1) the low-resolution image contrast produced in cryo-EM images of tobacco mosaic virus particles and (2) the fall-off of the envelope function at high resolution, can be used to quantitatively compare the data quality for Zernike phase-contrast images and for defocused bright-field images. We describe how we prepare carbon-film phase plates that are initially free of charging or other effects that degrade image quality. We emphasize, however, that even though the buildup of hydrocarbon contamination can be avoided by heating the phase plates during use, their performance nevertheless deteriorates over the time scale of days to weeks, thus requiring their frequent replacement in order to maintain optimal performance.

  8. Investigation of the interaction between patulin and human serum albumin by a spectroscopic method, atomic force microscopy, and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuqin, Li; Guirong, You; Zhen, Yang; Caihong, Liu; Baoxiu, Jia; Jiao, Chen; Yurong, Guo

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of patulin with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied in vitro under normal physiological conditions. The study was performed using fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), circular dichroism (CD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and molecular modeling techniques. The quenching mechanism was investigated using the association constants, the number of binding sites, and basic thermodynamic parameters. A dynamic quenching mechanism occurred between HSA and patulin, and the binding constants (K) were 2.60 × 10(4), 4.59 × 10(4), and 7.01 × 10(4) M(-1) at 288, 300, and 310 K, respectively. Based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the distance between the HSA and patulin was determined to be 2.847 nm. The ΔG (0), ΔH (0), and ΔS (0) values across various temperatures indicated that hydrophobic interaction was the predominant binding force. The UV-Vis and CD results confirmed that the secondary structure of HSA was altered in the presence of patulin. The AFM results revealed that the individual HSA molecule dimensions were larger after interaction with patulin. In addition, molecular modeling showed that the patulin-HSA complex was stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond forces. The study results suggested that a weak intermolecular interaction occurred between patulin and HSA. Overall, the results are potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of patulin when it is combined with the biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological, testing and other experiments.

  9. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies of {sigma} phase in Ni-based single crystal superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Fei [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang Jianxin, E-mail: jianxin@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Liu Pan [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Feng Qiang [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Han Xiaodong; Mao Shengcheng [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2012-09-25

    Graphical abstract: (a) TEM micrograph of {sigma} phase; (b) HRTEM image of {sigma}/{gamma} interface corresponding to the area of the white frame in (a); (c) an enlarged image of area from the white frame in (b). The combination of {sigma}/{gamma} interface appears very well, and a two-atomic-layer step is shown on the {sigma}/{gamma} interface. In addition, {sigma} phase has the orientation relationship of [0 0 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 2{sup Macron }]{sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron} 2 0){sub {gamma}}//(1{sup Macron} 1 0){sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron }2{sup Macron} 0){sub {gamma}}//(1 1 1){sub {sigma}}; [0 1 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 0]{sub {sigma}}, (1 1{sup Macron} 1){sub {gamma}}//(0 0 1{sup Macron }){sub {sigma}} with the {gamma} phase. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elemental characteristic of {sigma} phase is studied by HAADF techniques and EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial characteristics of {sigma}/{gamma} interface are revealed by HRTEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An atomic structural {sigma}/{gamma} interface with a two-atomic-layer step has been proposed. - Abstract: By means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-angle annular dark-field image technique (HAADF), morphological of plate-shaped {sigma} phase and interfacial characteristics between plate-shaped {sigma} phase and {gamma} phase in Ni-based single crystal superalloys have been studied. On the basis of HRTEM observations, an atomic structural interface between {sigma} phase and {gamma} phase with a step has been proposed. {sigma} Phase has the relationship of [0 0 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 2{sup Macron }]{sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron} 2 0){sub {gamma}}//(1{sup Macron} 1 0){sub {sigma},} (2{sup Macron }2{sup Macron} 0){sub {gamma}}//(1 1 1){sub {sigma}}; [0 1 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 0]{sub {sigma}}, (1 1{sup Macron} 1){sub {gamma}}//(0 0 1{sup Macron }){sub {sigma}} with the {gamma} phase. The compositional characteristics of the {sigma} phase which

  10. New approaches for the analysis of confluent cell layers with quantitative phase digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, L.; Kaiser, M.; Ketelhut, S.; Pereira, S.; Goycoolea, F.; Kemper, Björn

    2016-03-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables high resolution non-destructive inspection of technical surfaces and minimally-invasive label-free live cell imaging. However, the analysis of confluent cell layers represents a challenge as quantitative DHM phase images in this case do not provide sufficient information for image segmentation, determination of the cellular dry mass or calculation of the cell thickness. We present novel strategies for the analysis of confluent cell layers with quantitative DHM phase contrast utilizing a histogram based-evaluation procedure. The applicability of our approach is illustrated by quantification of drug induced cell morphology changes and it is shown that the method is capable to quantify reliable global morphology changes of confluent cell layers.

  11. Image fidelity improvement in digital holographic microscopy using optical phase conjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Huang-Tian; Chew, Yang-Kun; Shiu, Min-Tzung; Chang, Chi-Ching

    2018-01-01

    With respect to digital holography, techniques in suppressing noises derived from reference arm are maturely developed. However, techniques for the object counterpart are not being well developed. Optical phase conjugation technique was believed to be a promising method for this interest. A 0°-cut BaTiO3 photorefractive crystal was involved in self-pumped phase conjugation scheme, and was employed to in-line digital holographic microscopy, in both transmission-type and reflection-type configuration. On pure physical compensation basis, results revealed that the image fidelity was improved substantially with 2.9096 times decrease in noise level and 3.5486 times increase in the ability to discriminate noise on average, by suppressing the scattering noise prior to recording stage.

  12. Real time quantitative phase microscopy based on single-shot transport of intensity equation (ssTIE) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Tian, Xiaolin; He, Xiaoliang; Song, Xiaojun; Xue, Liang; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Shouyu

    2016-08-01

    Microscopy based on transport of intensity equation provides quantitative phase distributions which opens another perspective for cellular observations. However, it requires multi-focal image capturing while mechanical and electrical scanning limits its real time capacity in sample detections. Here, in order to break through this restriction, real time quantitative phase microscopy based on single-shot transport of the intensity equation method is proposed. A programmed phase mask is designed to realize simultaneous multi-focal image recording without any scanning; thus, phase distributions can be quantitatively retrieved in real time. It is believed the proposed method can be potentially applied in various biological and medical applications, especially for live cell imaging.

  13. Analyzing optical properties of thin vanadium oxide films through semiconductor-to-metal phase transition using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianing; Pribil, Greg K.

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the optical behaviors of vanadium dioxide (VO2) films through the semiconductor-to-metal (STM) phase transition using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Correlations between film thickness and refractive index were observed resulting from the absorbing nature of these films. Simultaneously analyzing data at multiple temperatures using Kramers-Kronig consistent oscillator models help identify film thickness. Nontrivial variations in resulting optical constants were observed through STM transition. As temperature increases, a clear increase is observed in near infrared absorption due to Drude losses that accompany the transition from semiconducting to metallic phases. Thin films grown on silicon and sapphire substrate present different optical properties and thermal hysteresis due to lattice stress and compositional differences.

  14. Sparsity-based multi-height phase recovery in holographic microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Rivenson, Yair

    2016-11-30

    High-resolution imaging of densely connected samples such as pathology slides using digital in-line holographic microscopy requires the acquisition of several holograms, e.g., at >6–8 different sample-to-sensor distances, to achieve robust phase recovery and coherent imaging of specimen. Reducing the number of these holographic measurements would normally result in reconstruction artifacts and loss of image quality, which would be detrimental especially for biomedical and diagnostics-related applications. Inspired by the fact that most natural images are sparse in some domain, here we introduce a sparsity-based phase reconstruction technique implemented in wavelet domain to achieve at least 2-fold reduction in the number of holographic measurements for coherent imaging of densely connected samples with minimal impact on the reconstructed image quality, quantified using a structural similarity index. We demonstrated the success of this approach by imaging Papanicolaou smears and breast cancer tissue slides over a large field-of-view of ~20 mm2 using 2 in-line holograms that are acquired at different sample-to-sensor distances and processed using sparsity-based multi-height phase recovery. This new phase recovery approach that makes use of sparsity can also be extended to other coherent imaging schemes, involving e.g., multiple illumination angles or wavelengths to increase the throughput and speed of coherent imaging.

  15. Computerized Liquid Crystal Phase Identification by Neural Networks Analysis of Polarizing Microscopy Textures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaszi, Zoltan; Konya, Andrew; Dragan, Feodor; Jakli, Antal; CPIP/LCI; CS Dept. of Kent State University Collaboration

    Polarizing optical microscopy (POM) is traditionally the best-established method of studying liquid crystals, and using POM started already with Otto Lehman in 1890. An expert, who is familiar with the science of optics of anisotropic materials and typical textures of liquid crystals, can identify phases with relatively large confidence. However, for unambiguous identification usually other expensive and time-consuming experiments are needed. Replacement of the subjective and qualitative human eye-based liquid crystal texture analysis with quantitative computerized image analysis technique started only recently and were used to enhance the detection of smooth phase transitions, determine order parameter and birefringence of specific liquid crystal phases. We investigate if the computer can recognize and name the phase where the texture was taken. To judge the potential of reliable image recognition based on this procedure, we used 871 images of liquid crystal textures belonging to five main categories: Nematic, Smectic A, Smectic C, Cholesteric and Crystal, and used a Neural Network Clustering Technique included in the data mining software package in Java ``WEKA''. A neural network trained on a set of 827 LC textures classified the remaining 44 textures with 80% accuracy.

  16. Early responses of human cancer cells upon photodynamic treatment monitored by laser phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Theo A.; Graschew, Georgi; Perevedentseva, Elena V.; Rakowsky, Stefan; Dressler, Cathrin; Beuthan, Juergen; Schlag, Peter M.

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic treatment of cancer cells is known to eventually cause cell death in most cases. The precise pathways and the time course seem to vary among different cell types and modes of photodynamic treatment. In this contribution, the focus was put on the responses of human colon carcinoma cells HCT-116 within the first 15 minutes after laser irradiation in the presence of Photofrin« II (PII). To monitor the cell response in this early time period laser phase microscopic imaging was used, a method sensitive to changes in overall cell shape and intracellular structures, mediated by changes in the local refractive index. Laser irradiation of cells loaded with PII induced a significant reduction of the phase shifts, which probably reflects the induced damage to the different cellular membrane structures. The data suggest that even within the first 30 s after the onset of laser illumination, a significant reduction of the phase shifts can be detected. These results underline that laser phase microscopy is a suitable diagnostic tool for cellular research, also in the early time domain.

  17. On the role of inelastic scattering in phase-plate transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Simon; Wagner, Jochen; Dries, Manuel; Oster, Marco; Wacker, Christian; Schröder, Rasmus R; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2015-08-01

    The phase contrast of Au nanoparticles on amorphous-carbon films with different thicknesses is analyzed using an electrostatic Zach phase plate in a Zeiss 912 Ω transmission electron microscope with in-column energy filter. Specifically, unfiltered and plasmon-filtered phase-plate transmission electron microscopy (PP TEM) images are compared to gain insight in the role of coherence after inelastic scattering processes. A considerable phase-contrast contribution resulting from a combined elastic-inelastic scattering process is found in plasmon-filtered PP TEM images. The contrast reduction compared to unfiltered images mainly originates from zero-order beam broadening caused by the inelastic scattering process. The effect of the sequence of the elastic and inelastic scattering processes is studied by varying the position of the nanoparticles, which can be either located on top or at the bottom of the amorphous-carbon film with respect to the incident electron beam direction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Phase-transition thresholds and vaporization phenomena for ultrasound phase-change nanoemulsions assessed via high-speed optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Paul S; Matsunaga, Terry O; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-07-07

    Ultrasonically activated phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) based on perfluorocarbon droplets have been proposed for a variety of therapeutic and diagnostic clinical applications. When generated at the nanoscale, droplets may be small enough to exit the vascular space and then be induced to vaporize with high spatial and temporal specificity by externally-applied ultrasound. The use of acoustical techniques for optimizing ultrasound parameters for given applications can be a significant challenge for nanoscale PCCAs due to the contributions of larger outlier droplets. Similarly, optical techniques can be a challenge due to the sub-micron size of nanodroplet agents and resolution limits of optical microscopy. In this study, an optical method for determining activation thresholds of nanoscale emulsions based on the in vitro distribution of bubbles resulting from vaporization of PCCAs after single, short (<10 cycles) ultrasound pulses is evaluated. Through ultra-high-speed microscopy it is shown that the bubbles produced early in the pulse from vaporized droplets are strongly affected by subsequent cycles of the vaporization pulse, and these effects increase with pulse length. Results show that decafluorobutane nanoemulsions with peak diameters on the order of 200 nm can be optimally vaporized with short pulses using pressures amenable to clinical diagnostic ultrasound machines.

  19. Concomitant use of polarization and positive phase contrast microscopy for the study of microbial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žižka, Zdeněk; Gabriel, Jiří

    2015-11-01

    Polarization and positive phase contrast microscope were concomitantly used in the study of the internal structure of microbial cells. Positive phase contrast allowed us to view even the fine cell structure with a refractive index approaching that of the surrounding environment, e.g., the cytoplasm, and transferred the invisible phase image to a visible amplitude image. With polarization microscopy, crossed polarizing filters together with compensators and a rotary stage showed the birefringence of different cell structures. Material containing algae was collected in ponds in Sýkořice and Zbečno villages (Křivoklát region). The objects were studied in laboratory microscopes LOMO MIN-8 Sankt Petersburg and Polmi A Carl Zeiss Jena fitted with special optics for positive phase contrast, polarizers, analyzers, compensators, rotary stages, and digital SLR camera Nikon D 70 for image capture. Anisotropic granules were found in the cells of flagellates of the order Euglenales, in green algae of the orders Chlorococcales and Chlorellales, and in desmid algae of the order Desmidiales. The cell walls of filamentous algae of the orders Zygnematales and Ulotrichales were found to exhibit significant birefringence; in addition, relatively small amounts of small granules were found in the cytoplasm. A typical shape-related birefringence of the cylindrical walls and the septa between the cells differed in intensity, which was especially apparent when using a Zeiss compensator RI-c during its successive double setting. In conclusion, the anisotropic granules found in the investigated algae mostly showed strong birefringence and varied in number, size, and location of the cells. Representatives of the order Chlorococcales contained the highest number of granules per cell, and the size of these granules was almost double than that of the other monitored microorganisms. Very strong birefringence was exhibited by cell walls of filamentous algae; it differed in the intensity

  20. Transport-of-intensity approach to differential interference contrast (TI-DIC) microscopy for quantitative phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Shan Shan; Waller, Laura; Barbastathis, George; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2010-02-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is an inherently qualitative phase-imaging technique. What is obtained is an image with mixed phase-gradient and amplitude information rather than a true linear mapping of actual optical path length (OPL) differences. Here we investigate an approach that combines the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) with DIC microscopy, thus improving direct visual observation. There is little hardware modification and the computation is noniterative. Numerically solving for the propagation of light in a series of through-focus DIC images allows linear phase information in a single slice to be completely determined and restored from DIC intensity values.

  1. Dynamics of cellular response to hypotonic stimulation revealed by quantitative phase microscopy and multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Kumar, Satish; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2012-11-01

    Hypotonic stimulation is known to cause morphological changes in cells and also leads to modulation of cellular physiology. In order to evaluate the dynamics of cellular response to hypotonic stimulation, we utilized digital holographic microscopy for quantitative phase microscopy, achieved by a common-path interferometry geometry based on extraction of reference beam by spatial-filtering. Results from live cell investigations demonstrate the capability of this method for dynamic quantitative phase imaging. Further, wavelet and multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis revealed that the dynamic phase changes, in response to hypotonic stimulation, are multifractal in nature.

  2. Video-rate processing in tomographic phase microscopy of biological cells using CUDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardikman, Gili; Habaza, Mor; Waller, Laura; Shaked, Natan T

    2016-05-30

    We suggest a new implementation for rapid reconstruction of three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) maps of biological cells acquired by tomographic phase microscopy (TPM). The TPM computational reconstruction process is extremely time consuming, making the analysis of large data sets unreasonably slow and the real-time 3-D visualization of the results impossible. Our implementation uses new phase extraction, phase unwrapping and Fourier slice algorithms, suitable for efficient CPU or GPU implementations. The experimental setup includes an external off-axis interferometric module connected to an inverted microscope illuminated coherently. We used single cell rotation by micro-manipulation to obtain interferometric projections from 73 viewing angles over a 180° angular range. Our parallel algorithms were implemented using Nvidia's CUDA C platform, running on Nvidia's Tesla K20c GPU. This implementation yields, for the first time to our knowledge, a 3-D reconstruction rate higher than video rate of 25 frames per second for 256 × 256-pixel interferograms with 73 different projection angles (64 × 64 × 64 output). This allows us to calculate additional cellular parameters, while still processing faster than video rate. This technique is expected to find uses for real-time 3-D cell visualization and processing, while yielding fast feedback for medical diagnosis and cell sorting.

  3. Thin-Film Phase Plates for Transmission Electron Microscopy Fabricated from Metallic Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dries, Manuel; Hettler, Simon; Schulze, Tina; Send, Winfried; Müller, Erich; Schneider, Reinhard; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Luo, Yuansu; Samwer, Konrad

    2016-10-01

    Thin-film phase plates (PPs) have become an interesting tool to enhance the contrast of weak-phase objects in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thin film usually consists of amorphous carbon, which suffers from quick degeneration under the intense electron-beam illumination. Recent investigations have focused on the search for alternative materials with an improved material stability. This work presents thin-film PPs fabricated from metallic glass alloys, which are characterized by a high electrical conductivity and an amorphous structure. Thin films of the zirconium-based alloy Zr65.0Al7.5Cu27.5 (ZAC) were fabricated and their phase-shifting properties were evaluated. The ZAC film was investigated by different TEM techniques, which reveal beneficial properties compared with amorphous carbon PPs. Particularly favorable is the small probability for inelastic plasmon scattering, which results from the combined effect of a moderate inelastic mean free path and a reduced film thickness due to a high mean inner potential. Small probability plasmon scattering improves contrast transfer at high spatial frequencies, which makes the ZAC alloy a promising material for PP fabrication.

  4. Ultra-High Resolution Thin Film Thickness Delineation Using Reflection Phase-Sensitive Acoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, E. A.; Kamanyi, A.; von Buttlar, M.; Wannemacher, R.; Hillmann, K.; Ngwa, W.; Grill, W.

    The acoustic phase and magnitude data of a planar homogenous sample of smoothly varying thickness deposited on a glass substrate can best be represented by a polar plot. In this work, the method is extended to achieve topographical mapping of thin films with a height resolution beyond the diffraction limit of optical confocal microscopy. The radial dependence of the polar graph describes the regression of the magnitude of the reflected signal due to the attenuation. The later increases with the gradual increase of the thickness and is additionally influenced by interference effects. The angular dependence of the polar plot reveals the rotation of the phase angle of the signal due to reflection from different thicknesses of the sample. Model calculations are employed, and input values are varied until an optimum agreement with the measurement data points is achieved and the primary acoustic properties (speed of longitudinally polarized ultrasound, mechanical density of the sample and the attenuation within the material) are obtained. The model manifests the variation of the magnitude and phase of the reflected signal due to variation in thickness. After optimum adjustment of the model parameters, the thickness corresponding to each measured value of the reflectivity is obtained.

  5. Observation of fresh Bos indicus embryos comparing stereoscopic and phase contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, M E; Galina, C S; Moreno-Mendoza, N; Alarcón, M A; Godínez, B; Lammoglia, M A

    2014-05-01

    Summary The precision of embryo evaluation using stereoscopic microscopy (SM) and inverted phase contrast microscopy (PCM) was compared in 20 Bos indicus cows superovulated at two different times of the year. In total, 118 embryos were collected and classified according to their developmental stage and quality by two independent evaluators using SM and inverted PCM. Cohen's kappa coefficient was used to determine concordance between SM and PCM observations. A good level of agreement (k = 0.616) was found for quality level, and a moderate one (k = 0.464) for developmental stage, particularly at the morula stage. Using the TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling) technique, concordance level was deemed to be low with the SM (k = 0.169), and poor with the PCM (k = 0.217). Differences in concordance levels were also found between observations made at the two times of year, 78 embryos were evaluated in the rainy season when concordance level was good (k = 0.68), in contrast to the 40 embryos evaluated in the dry season when agreement was found to be poor (k = 0.24). In conclusion, inverted PCM was somewhat more effective for evaluating embryos, particularly at the morula stage. However, considering the high cost of an inverted PCM, the differences observed do not justify its purchase for routine embryo evaluation.

  6. Live Cell Refractometry Using Hilbert Phase Microscopy and Confocal Reflectance Microscopy†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Niyom; Choi, Wonshik; Popescu, Gabriel; Yaqoob, Zahid; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative chemical analysis has served as a useful tool for understanding cellular metabolisms in biology. Among many physical properties used in chemical analysis, refractive index in particular has provided molecular concentration that is an important indicator for biological activities. In this report, we present a method of extracting full-field refractive index maps of live cells in their native states. We first record full-field optical thickness maps of living cells by Hilbert phase microscopy and then acquire physical thickness maps of the same cells using a custom-built confocal reflectance microscope. Full-field and axially averaged refractive index maps are acquired from the ratio of optical thickness to physical thickness. The accuracy of the axially averaged index measurement is 0.002. This approach can provide novel biological assays of label-free living cells in situ. PMID:19803506

  7. Nonnegative mixed-norm convex optimization for mitotic cell detection in phase contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Anan; Hao, Tong; Gao, Zan; Su, Yuting; Yang, Zhaoxuan

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a nonnegative mix-norm convex optimization method for mitotic cell detection. First, we apply an imaging model-based microscopy image segmentation method that exploits phase contrast optics to extract mitotic candidates in the input images. Then, a convex objective function regularized by mix-norm with nonnegative constraint is proposed to induce sparsity and consistence for discriminative representation of deformable objects in a sparse representation scheme. At last, a Support Vector Machine classifier is utilized for mitotic cell modeling and detection. This method can overcome the difficulty in feature formulation for deformable objects and is independent of tracking or temporal inference model. The comparison experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can produce competing results with the state-of-the-art methods.

  8. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Nanostructural Changes in Phase-Change Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Meister, Stefan

    2011-04-26

    Phase-change memory (PCM) has been researched extensively as a promising alternative to flash memory. Important studies have focused on its scalability, switching speed, endurance, and new materials. Still, reliability issues and inconsistent switching in PCM devices motivate the need to further study its fundamental properties. However, many investigations treat PCM cells as black boxes; nanostructural changes inside the devices remain hidden. Here, using in situ transmission electron microscopy, we observe real-time nanostructural changes in lateral Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) PCM bridges during switching. We find that PCM devices with similar resistances can exhibit distinct threshold switching behaviors due to the different initial distribution of nanocrystalline and amorphous domains, explaining variability of switching behaviors of PCM cells in the literature. Our findings show a direct correlation between nanostructure and switching behavior, providing important guidelines in the design and operation of future PCM devices with improved endurance and lower variability. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  9. Single-nanoparticle phase transitions visualized by four-dimensional electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Renske M.; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Tissot, Antoine; Hauser, Andreas; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-05-01

    The advancement of techniques that can probe the behaviour of individual nanoscopic objects is of paramount importance in various disciplines, including photonics and electronics. As it provides images with a spatiotemporal resolution, four-dimensional electron microscopy, in principle, should enable the visualization of single-nanoparticle structural dynamics in real and reciprocal space. Here, we demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the technique by visualizing the spin crossover dynamics of single, isolated metal-organic framework nanocrystals. By introducing a small aperture in the microscope, it was possible to follow the phase transition and the associated structural dynamics within a single particle. Its behaviour was observed to be distinct from that imaged by averaging over ensembles of heterogeneous nanoparticles. The approach reported here has potential applications in other nanosystems and those that undergo (bio)chemical transformations.

  10. Single-nanoparticle phase transitions visualized by four-dimensional electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Renske M; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Tissot, Antoine; Hauser, Andreas; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2013-05-01

    The advancement of techniques that can probe the behaviour of individual nanoscopic objects is of paramount importance in various disciplines, including photonics and electronics. As it provides images with a spatiotemporal resolution, four-dimensional electron microscopy, in principle, should enable the visualization of single-nanoparticle structural dynamics in real and reciprocal space. Here, we demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the technique by visualizing the spin crossover dynamics of single, isolated metal-organic framework nanocrystals. By introducing a small aperture in the microscope, it was possible to follow the phase transition and the associated structural dynamics within a single particle. Its behaviour was observed to be distinct from that imaged by averaging over ensembles of heterogeneous nanoparticles. The approach reported here has potential applications in other nanosystems and those that undergo (bio)chemical transformations.

  11. Quantifying the Self-Assembly Behavior of Anisotropic Nanoparticles Using Liquid-Phase Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Binbin; Smith, John W; Ou, Zihao; Chen, Qian

    2017-05-16

    For decades, one of the overarching objectives of self-assembly science has been to define the rules necessary to build functional, artificial materials with rich and adaptive phase behavior from the bottom-up. To this end, the computational and experimental efforts of chemists, physicists, materials scientists, and biologists alike have built a body of knowledge that spans both disciplines and length scales. Indeed, today control of self-assembly is extending even to supramolecular and molecular levels, where crystal engineering and design of porous materials are becoming exciting areas of exploration. Nevertheless, at least at the nanoscale, there are many stones yet to be turned. While recent breakthroughs in nanoparticle (NP) synthesis have amassed a vast library of nanoscale building blocks, NP-NP interactions in situ remain poorly quantified, in large part due to technical and theoretical impediments. While increasingly many applications for self-assembled architectures are being demonstrated, it remains difficult to predict-and therefore engineer-the pathways by which these structures form. Here, we describe how investigations using liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have begun to play a role in pursuing some of these long-standing questions of fundamental and far-reaching interest. Liquid-phase TEM is unique in its ability to resolve the motions and trajectories of single NPs in solution, making it a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of NP self-assembly. Since 2012, liquid-phase TEM has been used to investigate the self-assembly behavior of a variety of simple, metallic NPs. In this Account, however, we focus on our work with anisotropic NPs, which we show to have very different self-assembly behavior, and especially on how analysis methods we and others in the field are developing can be used to convert their motions and trajectories revealed by liquid-phase TEM into quantitative understanding of underlying interactions and dynamics

  12. Super-resolution quantitative phase-contrast imaging by microsphere-based digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiaowen; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Yunxin; Guo, Sha; Panezai, Spozmai; Ouyang, Liting; Rong, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2017-03-01

    A super-resolution quantitative phase-contrast imaging method using high refractive index microsphere is developed to overcome the diffraction limit of optical field, which is produced by the object in the digital holographic microscopy. A microsphere placed on the surface of the object can collect the underlying near-field information, which appears as the evanescent waves and transforms them into propagating waves. Due to the spherical symmetry provided by the microsphere, the super-resolution of the imaging system can be realized in all directions at the same time with one-shot recording. The experiments are carried out for a cosine grating with the line width of 255 nm as the object, which confirms that the lateral resolution can be less than λ/2. Meanwhile, the quantitative phase-contrast image is experimentally obtained. The reconstructed complex field distribution provides the great flexibility with the digital processing for the microscope imaging, such as the ability of refocusing and numerical reconstruction.

  13. Comparison of fluorescence microscopy and solid-phase cytometry methods for counting bacteria in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisle, John T.; Hamilton, Martin A.; Willse, Alan R.; McFeters, Gordon A.

    2004-01-01

    Total direct counts of bacterial abundance are central in assessing the biomass and bacteriological quality of water in ecological and industrial applications. Several factors have been identified that contribute to the variability in bacterial abundance counts when using fluorescent microscopy, the most significant of which is retaining an adequate number of cells per filter to ensure an acceptable level of statistical confidence in the resulting data. Previous studies that have assessed the components of total-direct-count methods that contribute to this variance have attempted to maintain a bacterial cell abundance value per filter of approximately 106 cells filter-1. In this study we have established the lower limit for the number of bacterial cells per filter at which the statistical reliability of the abundance estimate is no longer acceptable. Our results indicate that when the numbers of bacterial cells per filter were progressively reduced below 105, the microscopic methods increasingly overestimated the true bacterial abundance (range, 15.0 to 99.3%). The solid-phase cytometer only slightly overestimated the true bacterial abundances and was more consistent over the same range of bacterial abundances per filter (range, 8.9 to 12.5%). The solid-phase cytometer method for conducting total direct counts of bacteria was less biased and performed significantly better than any of the microscope methods. It was also found that microscopic count data from counting 5 fields on three separate filters were statistically equivalent to data from counting 20 fields on a single filter.

  14. Analysis of atomic force microscopy phase data to dynamically detect adsorbed hydrogen under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Matthew J; Pfromm, Peter H; Rezac, Mary E; Law, Bruce M

    2014-10-14

    Characterization of the interactions of hydrogen with catalytic metal surfaces and the mass transfer processes involved in heterogeneous catalysis are important for catalyst development. Although a range of technologies for studying catalytic surfaces exist, much of it relies on high-vacuum conditions that preclude in situ research. In contrast, atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides an opportunity for direct observation of surfaces under or near actual reaction conditions. Tapping-mode AFM was explored here because it expands AFM beyond the usual topographic information toward speciation and other more subtle surface information. This work describes using phase-angle information from tapping-mode AFM to follow the interactions of hydrogen with palladium, polycarbonate, and iron. Real-time AFM phase-angle information allowed for the observation of multiphase mass transfer to and from the surface of palladium at atmospheric pressure and room temperature without the need for complex sample preparation. The AFM observations are quantitatively benchmarked against and confirm mass transfer predictions based on bulk hydrogen diffusion data. Additionally, they support recent studies that demonstrate the existence of multiple hydrogen states during interactions with palladium surfaces.

  15. Phase retrieval and 3D imaging in gold nanoparticles based fluorescence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilovitsh, Tali; Ilovitsh, Asaf; Weiss, Aryeh M.; Meir, Rinat; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-02-01

    Optical sectioning microscopy can provide highly detailed three dimensional (3D) images of biological samples. However, it requires acquisition of many images per volume, and is therefore time consuming, and may not be suitable for live cell 3D imaging. We propose the use of the modified Gerchberg-Saxton phase retrieval algorithm to enable full 3D imaging of gold nanoparticles tagged sample using only two images. The reconstructed field is free space propagated to all other focus planes using post processing, and the 2D z-stack is merged to create a 3D image of the sample with high fidelity. Because we propose to apply the phase retrieving on nano particles, the regular ambiguities typical to the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm, are eliminated. The proposed concept is then further enhanced also for tracking of single fluorescent particles within a three dimensional (3D) cellular environment based on image processing algorithms that can significantly increases localization accuracy of the 3D point spread function in respect to regular Gaussian fitting. All proposed concepts are validated both on simulated data as well as experimentally.

  16. Estimation of age based on tooth cementum annulations: A comparative study using light, polarized, and phase contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Prabhpreet; Astekar, Madhusudan; Singh, Jappreet; Arora, Karandeep Singh; Bhalla, Gagandeep

    2015-01-01

    The identification of living or deceased persons using unique traits and characteristics of the teeth and jaws is a cornerstone of forensic science. Teeth have been used to estimate age both in the young and old, as well as in the living and dead. Gradual structural changes in teeth throughout life are the basis for age estimation. Tooth cementum annulation (TCA) is a microscopic method for the determination of an individual's age based on the analysis of incremental lines of cementum. To compare ages estimated using incremental lines of cementum as visualized by bright field microscopy, polarized microscopy, and phase contrast microscopy with the actual age of subject and to determine accuracy and feasibility of the method used. Cementum annulations of 60 permanent teeth were analyzed after longitudinal ground sections were made in the mesiodistal plane. The incremental lines were counted manually using a light, polarized and phase contrast microscopy. Ages were estimated and then compared with the actual age of individual. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's t-test, the Pearson product-moment corre (PPMCC) and regression analysis were performed. PPMCC value r = 0.347, 0.542 and 0.989 were obtained using light, polarized and phase contrast microscopy methods respectively. It was concluded that incremental lines of cementum were most clearly visible under a phase contrast microscope, followed by a polarized microscope, and then a light microscope when used for age estimation.

  17. Raman Spectroscopic Study of the Vapour Phase of 1-Methylimidazolium Ethanoate, a Protic Ionic Liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Canongia Lopes, Jose N.; Ferreira, Rui

    2010-01-01

    The gas phase over the ionic liquid 1-methylimidazolium ethanoate, [Hmim][O2CCH3], was studied by means of Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra are presented, the species in the gas phase are identified, and their bands are assigned. The results are interpreted using ab initio quantum mechanical cal...... calculations that also predict vibrational spectra. The obtained data reinforce a previous interpretation, based on FT-ICR mass spectrometric data, that the vapor phase over [Hmim][O2CCH3] consists predominantly of two neutral molecules, monomeric ethanoic acid and 1-methylimidazole....

  18. Membrane protein stoichiometry studied in intact mammalian cells using liquid-phase electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Jonge, N

    2017-05-04

    Receptor membrane proteins in the plasma membranes of cells respond to extracellular chemical signals by conformational changes, spatial redistribution, and (re-)assembly into protein complexes, for example, into homodimers (pairs of the same protein type). The functional state of the proteins can be determined from information about how subunits are assembled into protein complexes. Stoichiometric information about the protein complex subunits, however, is generally not obtained from intact cells but from pooled material extracted from many cells, resulting in a lack of fundamental knowledge about the functioning of membrane proteins. First, functional states may dramatically differ from cell to cell on account of cell heterogeneity. Second, extracting the membrane proteins from the plasma membrane may lead to many artefacts. Liquid-phase scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), in short liquid STEM, is a new technique capable of determining the locations of individual membrane proteins within the intact plasma membranes of cells in liquid. Many tens of whole cells can readily be imaged. It is possible to analyse the stoichiometry of membrane proteins in single cells while accounting for heterogenic cell populations. Liquid STEM was used to image epidermal growth factor receptors in whole COS7 cells. A study of the dimerisation of the HER2 protein in breast cancer cells revealed the presence of rare cancer cells in which HER2 was in a different functional state than in the bulk cells. Stoichiometric information about receptors is essential not only for basic science but also for biomedical application because they present many important pharmaceutical targets. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Context based mixture model for cell phase identification in automated fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiaobo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated identification of cell cycle phases of individual live cells in a large population captured via automated fluorescence microscopy technique is important for cancer drug discovery and cell cycle studies. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy images provide an important method to study the cell cycle process under different conditions of perturbation. Existing methods are limited in dealing with such time-lapse data sets while manual analysis is not feasible. This paper presents statistical data analysis and statistical pattern recognition to perform this task. Results The data is generated from Hela H2B GFP cells imaged during a 2-day period with images acquired 15 minutes apart using an automated time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The patterns are described with four kinds of features, including twelve general features, Haralick texture features, Zernike moment features, and wavelet features. To generate a new set of features with more discriminate power, the commonly used feature reduction techniques are used, which include Principle Component Analysis (PCA, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA, Maximum Margin Criterion (MMC, Stepwise Discriminate Analysis based Feature Selection (SDAFS, and Genetic Algorithm based Feature Selection (GAFS. Then, we propose a Context Based Mixture Model (CBMM for dealing with the time-series cell sequence information and compare it to other traditional classifiers: Support Vector Machine (SVM, Neural Network (NN, and K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN. Being a standard practice in machine learning, we systematically compare the performance of a number of common feature reduction techniques and classifiers to select an optimal combination of a feature reduction technique and a classifier. A cellular database containing 100 manually labelled subsequence is built for evaluating the performance of the classifiers. The generalization error is estimated using the cross validation technique. The

  20. Conformational heterogeneity of methyl 4-hydroxycinnamate: a gas-phase UV-IR spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eric M M; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Smolarek, Szymon; Vdovin, Alexander; Rijs, Anouk M; Buma, Wybren J

    2013-05-02

    UV excitation and IR absorption spectroscopy on jet-cooled molecules is used to study the conformational heterogeneity of methyl 4-hydroxycinnamate, a model chromophore of the Photoactive Yellow Protein (PYP), and to determine the spectroscopic properties of the various conformers. UV-UV depletion spectroscopy identifies four different species with distinct electronic excitation spectra. Quantum chemical calculations argue that these species are associated with different conformers involving the s-cis/s-trans configuration of the ester with respect to the propenyl C-C single bond and the syn/anti orientation of the phenolic OH group. IR-UV hole-burning spectroscopy is used to record their IR absorption spectra in the fingerprint region. Comparison with IR absorption spectra predicted by quantum chemical calculations provides vibrational markers for each of the conformers, on the basis of which each of the species observed with UV-UV depletion spectroscopy is assigned. Although both DFT and wave function methods reproduce experimental frequencies, we find that calculations at the MP2 level are necessary to obtain agreement with experimentally observed intensities. To elucidate the role of the environment, we compare the IR spectra of the isolated conformers with IR spectra of methyl 4-hydroxycinnamate-water clusters, and with IR spectra of methyl 4-hydroxycinnamate in solution.

  1. Thermomorphic phase separation in ionic liquid-organic liquid systems - conductivity and spectroscopic characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Berg, Rolf W.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, FT-Raman and NMR measurements are demonstrated as useful tools to probe and determine phase behavior of thermomorphic ionic liquid-organic liquid systems. To illustrate the methods, consecutive conductivity measurements of a thermomorphic methoxyethoxyethyl-imidazolium io...... of the components in the system, the liquid-liquid equilibrium phase diagram of the binary mixture, and signify the importance of hydrogen bonding between the ionic liquid and the hydroxyl group of the alcohol....

  2. Simplified setup for imaging with digital holographic microscopy and enhanced quantitative phase contrast by osmotic stimulation of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Przibilla, Sabine; Rommel, Christina E.; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; von Bally, Gert

    2011-03-01

    Many interferometry-based quantitative phase contrast imaging techniques require the generation of a coherent reference wave, which results in a phase stability decrease and the demand for a precise adjustment of the intensity ratio between object and reference wave. Thus, investigations on a simplified digital holographic microscopy approach that avoids a separate reference wave were performed. Results from live cell investigations demonstrate the capability of the method for quantitative phase contrast imaging. In further experiments the modification of the intracellular refractive index distribution by osmotic stimulation was analyzed. Data from human pancreas tumor cells show that by choice of suitable buffer solutions live cell imaging with enhanced quantitative phase contrast is achieved.

  3. Purification and H-1 NMR spectroscopic characterization of phase II metabolites of tolfenamic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, U. G.; Christiansen, E.; Krogh, L.

    1997-01-01

    Tolfenamic acid, an anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is metabolized in vivo to form several oxidative metabolites which are all conjugated with beta-D-glucuronic acid, In this study, the metabolites of tolfenamic acid were identified by H-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in urine sa...... method was developed that simultaneously separates all the phase II metabolites identified as well as some phase I metabolites in urine samples obtained after intake of tolfenamic acid....... the endogenous polar compounds that are present in the urine. The individual metabolites were purified by preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then identified using H-1 NMR, Both one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments were performed to identify the phase II metabolites of tolfenamic......), and N-(2-methyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)-anthranilic acid (11) were identified. The phase II metabolites (5-11) had not previously been identified in urine from humans administered tolfenamic acid. The phase I metabolites of the glucuronides 7, 8, 10, and 11 were identified here for the first time. An HPLC...

  4. Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: a new imaging modality to identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, P.

    2016-05-03

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a powerful label-free technique in the field of living cell imaging allowing to non-invasively measure with a nanometric axial sensitivity cell structure and dynamics. Since the phase retardation of a light wave when transmitted through the observed cells, namely the quantitative phase signal (QPS), is sensitive to both cellular thickness and intracellular refractive index related to the cellular content, its accurate analysis allows to derive various cell parameters and monitor specific cell processes, which are very likely to identify new cell biomarkers. Specifically, quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM), thanks to its numerical flexibility facilitating parallelization and automation processes, represents an appealing imaging modality to both identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases as well to explore the underlying pathophysiological processes.

  5. Spectroscopic Study of the Effects of Pressure Media on High-Pressure Phase Transitions in Natrolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Liu; W Lei; Z Liu; Y Lee

    2011-12-31

    Structural phase transitions in natrolite have been investigated as a function of pressure and different hydrostatic media using micro-Raman scattering and synchrotron infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Natrolite undergoes two reversible phase transitions at 0.86 and 1.53 GPa under pure water pressure medium. These phase transitions are characterized by the changes in the vibrational frequencies of four- and eight-membered rings related to the variations in the bridging T-O-T angles and the geometry of the elliptical eight-ring channels under pressure. Concomitant to the changes in the framework vibrational modes, the number of the O-H stretching vibrational modes of natrolite changes as a result of the rearrangements of the hydrogen bonds in the channels caused by a successive increase in the hydration level under hydrostatic pressure. Similar phase transitions were also observed at relatively higher pressures (1.13 and 1.59 GPa) under alcohol-water pressure medium. Furthermore, no phase transition was found up to 2.52 GPa if a lower volume ratio of the alcohol-water to natrolite was employed. This indicates that the water content in the pressure media plays a crucial role in triggering the pressure-induced phase transitions in natrolite. In addition, the average of the mode Grueneisen parameters is calculated to be about 0.6, while the thermodynamic Grueneisen parameter is found to be 1.33. This might be attributed to the contrast in the rigidity between the TO{sub 4} tetrahedral primary building units and other flexible secondary building units in the natrolite framework upon compression and subsequent water insertion.

  6. Deleterious phases precipitation on superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750: characterization by light optical and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Pardal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious phases precipitation in superduplex stainless steels is the main concern in fabrication by welding and hot forming of this class of material. Sigma, chi and secondary austenite phases are considered deleterious phases because they produce negative effects on corrosion resistance. Besides, sigma and chi phases also promote strong decrease of toughness. In the present work, the precipitations of sigma, chi and secondary austenite under aging in the 800-950 °C interval were studied in two UNS S32750 steels with different grain sizes. The deleterious phases could be quantified by light optical microscopy, with no distinction between them. Scanning electron microscopy was used to distinguish the individual phases in various aging conditions. The results elucidate the influence of the aging temperature and grain size on the kinetics precipitation and morphology of deleterious phases. The kinetics of deleterious phases is higher in the fine grained material in the initial stage of aging, but the maximum amount of deleterious phases is higher in the coarse grained steel.

  7. Segmentation of phase contrast microscopy images based on multi-scale local Basic Image Features histograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, N; Szita, N; Griffin, L D

    2017-09-03

    Phase contrast microscopy (PCM) is routinely used for the inspection of adherent cell cultures in all fields of biology and biomedicine. Key decisions for experimental protocols are often taken by an operator based on typically qualitative observations. However, automated processing and analysis of PCM images remain challenging due to the low contrast between foreground objects (cells) and background as well as various imaging artefacts. We propose a trainable pixel-wise segmentation approach whereby image structures and symmetries are encoded in the form of multi-scale Basic Image Features local histograms, and classification of them is learned by random decision trees. This approach was validated for segmentation of cell versus background, and discrimination between two different cell types. Performance close to that of state-of-the-art specialised algorithms was achieved despite the general nature of the method. The low processing time ( < 4 s per 1280 × 960 pixel images) is suitable for batch processing of experimental data as well as for interactive segmentation applications.

  8. Insights into intermediate phases of human intestinal fluids visualized by atomic force microscopy and cryo-transmission electron microscopy ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllertz, Anette; Fatouros, Dimitrios G; Smith, James R; Vertzoni, Maria; Reppas, Christos

    2012-02-06

    The current work aims to study at the ultrastructural level the morphological development of colloidal intermediate phases of human intestinal fluids (HIFs) produced during lipid digestion. HIFs were aspirated near the ligament of Treitz early (30 min), Aspirate(early), and 1 h, Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp), after the administration of a heterogeneous liquid meal into the antrum. The composition of the sample aspirated 1 h after meal administration was similar to the average lumenal composition 1 h after meal administration (Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp)). The colloidal structures of individual aspirates and supernatants of aspirates after ultracentrifugation (micellar phase) were characterized by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). AFM revealed domain-like structures in Aspirate(early) and both vesicles and large aggregates Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp). Rough surfaces and domains varying in size were frequently present in the micellar phase of both Aspirate(early) and Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp). Cryo-TEM revealed an abundance of spherical micelles and occasionally presented worm-like micelles coexisting with faceted and less defined vesicles in Aspirate(early) and Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp). In Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp) oil droplets were visualized with bilayers closely located to their surface suggesting lipolytic product phases accumulated on the surface of the oil droplet. In the micellar phase of Aspirate(early), Cryo-TEM revealed the presence of spherical micelles, small vesicles, membrane fragments, oil droplets and plate-like structures. In the micellar phase of Aspirate(1h)(ave,comp) the only difference was the absence of oil droplets. Visualization studies previously performed with biorelevant media revealed structural features with many similarities as presented in the current investigation. The impression of the complexity and diversion of these phases has been reinforced with the excessive variation of structural

  9. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  10. In-focus electrostatic Zach phase plate imaging for transmission electron microscopy with tunable phase contrast of frozen hydrated biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frindt, Nicole; Oster, Marco; Hettler, Simon; Gamm, Björn; Dieterle, Levin; Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Schröder, Rasmus R

    2014-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of beam sensitive weak-phase objects such as biological cryo samples usually show a very low signal-to-noise ratio. These samples have almost no amplitude contrast and instead structural information is mainly encoded in the phase contrast. To increase the sample contrast in the image, especially for low spatial frequencies, the use of phase plates for close to focus phase contrast enhancement in TEM has long been discussed. Electrostatic phase plates are favorable in particular, as their tunable potential will allow an optimal phase shift adjustment and higher resolution than film phase plates as they avoid additional scattering events in matter. Here we show the first realization of close to focus phase contrast images of actin filament cryo samples acquired using an electrostatic Zach phase plate. Both positive and negative phase contrast is shown, which is obtained by applying appropriate potentials to the phase plate. The dependence of phase contrast improvement on sample orientation with respect to the phase plate is demonstrated and single-sideband artifacts are discussed. Additionally, possibilities to reduce contamination and charging effects of the phase plate are shown.

  11. Review of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: promising novel imaging technique to resolve neuronal network activity and identify cellular biomarkers of psychiatric disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marquet, Pierre; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a new powerful quantitative imaging technique well suited to noninvasively explore a transparent specimen with a nanometric axial sensitivity...

  12. New pressure-induced phase transitions of L-threonine crystal: A Raman spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R. O.; Lima, J. A.; Freire, P. T. C.; Melo, F. E. A.; Mendes Filho, J.; Polian, A.

    2015-07-01

    L-threonine crystal was studied by Raman spectroscopy under pressure in the spectral range from 50 to 3300 cm-1. The pressure range of a previous study has been extended from 4 to 27.0 GPa. Modifications in the whole spectrum give us evidence of three structural phase transitions undergone by this amino acid as well as two conformational change. The classification of the vibrational modes and the behavior of their frequencies as a function of the pressure are presented.

  13. Spectroscopic investigation of cement hydrate phases and their chloride binding properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping

    This thesis investigates the chloride binding properties of the hydrate phases present in Portland cement paste and the relationships between chloride binding capacity and the structure of these phases, using primarily NMR spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, XRD, thermal analysis, and chemical analysis. It provides important basic data and new insights into the effects of the structure of the individual hydrate phases on their chloride binding properties, and the atomic level structural states and dynamic behavior of the bound chloride in the cement hydrate crystals and at the solid/solution interface. The chloride binding capacity depends on the structure and surface properties of the individual hydrates. Portlandite and AFm surfaces have high affinity for chloride due to their positive zeta-potentials. For C-S-H samples, the chloride binding capacity increases with increasing C/S ratio due to increased numbers of surface Ca-OH sites and decreased polymerization of silicate chains. Aluminum substitution in C-S-H is unfavorable for chloride binding due to reduced layer charge and increased chain polymerization. For all hydrate phases the mechanism of chloride binding is not simply electrostatic attraction. Formation of metal-chloride clusters in the solution and sorption in the Stem layer may contribute substantially. The bound chlorides near the cement hydrate surfaces are in water solvated environments similar to those in the bulk solution and are in rapid exchange (>2kHz) with free chloride in the bulk solution. The chloride concentration near the surfaces is much higher than in the equilibrium bulk solution, and the reorientational frequency of the water molecules solvating the bound chloride is slower than those in the bulk solution. Chloride has a well-defined structural site in Friedel's salt. In solid solutions between Friedel's salt and hydroxyl-AFm, chloride occurs predominantly in Cl-rich domains except at high OH-contents.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopic and dielectric properties investigations of phase transitions in KMgPO4 compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, L.; Oueslati, A.; Guidara, K.

    2017-11-01

    The potassium orthophosphate KMgPO4 with a β-tridymite structure was synthesized via solid-state reaction. X-ray diffraction study confirms the formation of a single phase material which crystallizes at room temperature in monoclinic system. This compound has been investigated by vibrational spectroscopy in the temperature range573-723 K. Thermal analysis shows that this composition undergoes two phase transitions at T1=633Kand T2=693 K.The evolution of Raman line ν and half -width Δν versus temperature introduces huge changes which are associated with the phase transitions originating from the reorientation of the PO4 tetrahedron. Besides, an analysis of the dielectric constants ε‧ and ε″versus temperature at several frequencies shows a distribution of relaxation times. This relaxation is probably due to the change in dynamical state of the K+ cation. The ac conductivity behavior can be understood in terms of the motions of K+ cations along the tunnels which are formed by six-membered rings of MgO4 and PO4 tetrahedron linked by common vertices. The activation energies values obtained from the thermal evolution of the conductivity are: Ea1=0.52 eV (T693 K).

  15. Phase-resolved spectroscopic study of the isolated neutron star RBS 1223 (1RXS J130848.6+212708)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambaryan, V.; Suleimanov, V.; Schwope, A. D.; Neuhäuser, R.; Werner, K.; Potekhin, A. Y.

    2011-10-01

    Aims: We constrain the mass-to-radius ratio of isolated neutron stars by performing a spin-phase resolved X-ray spectroscopic analysis. Methods: We combined the data from all observations of RBS 1223 (1RXS J130848.6+212708) conducted by XMM-Newton EPIC pn with the same instrumental setup in 2003-2007 to form spin-phase resolved spectra. We implemented a number of complex models of neutron stars with strongly magnetized (Bpole ~ 1013-1014 G) surfaces, various temperature and magnetic-field distributions around their magnetic poles, and a partially ionized hydrogen-thin atmosphere above into the X-ray spectral fitting package XSPEC for simultaneous fitting of phase-resolved spectra. A Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is also applied to verify the results of fitting and estimating of parameters in multi-parameter models. Results: The spectra of different rotational phase intervals and light curves of different energy bands with high signal-to-noise ratio show a high complexity. The spectra can be parameterized with a Gaussian absorption-line superimposed on a blackbody spectrum, while the pulsed fraction of light curves with double-humped shape strongly depend upon the energy band (13 - 42%), which indicates that radiation emerges from at least two emitting areas. Conclusions: A model with a condensed iron surface and partially ionized hydrogen-thin atmosphere above allows us to fit simultaneously the observed general spectral shape and the broad absorption feature observed at 0.3 keV in different spin phases of RBS 1223. We constrain some physical properties of the X-ray emitting areas, i.e. the temperatures (Tp1 ~ 105 eV, Tp2 ~ 99 eV), magnetic field strengths (Bp1 ≈ Bp2 ~ 8.6 × 1013 G) at the poles, and their distribution parameters (a1 ~ 0.61, a2 ~ 0.29, indicating an absence of strong toroidal magnetic field component). In addition, we are able to place some constraints on the geometry of the emerging X-ray emission and the gravitational redshift (z

  16. Infrared spectroscopic study of thermotropic phase behavior of newly developed synthetic biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Rajan K.; Bruch, Reinhard F.; Covington, Aaron M.

    2011-10-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior of a suite of newly developed self-forming synthetic biopolymers has been investigated by variable-temperature Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy. The temperature-induced infrared spectra of these artificial biopolymers (lipids) composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl- rac-glycerol-3-dodecaethylene glycol (GDM-12), 1,2-dioleoyl- rac-glycerol-3-dodecaethylene glycol (GDO-12) and 1,2-distearoyl- rac-glycerol-3-triicosaethylene glycol (GDS-23) in the spectral range of 4000-500 cm -1 have been acquired by using a thin layered FT-IR spectrometer in conjunction with a custom built temperature-controlled demountable liquid cell having a pathlength of ˜15 μm. The lipids under consideration have long hydrophobic acyl chains and contain various units of hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) headgroups. In contrast to conventional phospholipids, this new kind of lipids forms liposomes or nanovesicles spontaneously upon hydration, without requiring external activation energy. We have found that the thermal stability of the PEGylated lipids differs greatly depending upon the acyl chain-lengths as well as the nature of the associated bonds and the number of PEG headgroup units. In particular, GDM-12 (saturated 14 hydrocarbon chains with 12 units of PEG headgroup) exhibits one sharp order-disorder phase transition over a temperature range increasing from 3 °C to 5 °C. Similarly, GDS-23 (saturated 18 hydrocarbon chains with 23 units of PEG headgroup) displays comparatively broad order-disorder phase transition profiles between temperature 17 °C and 22 °C. In contrast, GDO-12 (monounsaturated 18 hydrocarbon chains with 12 units of PEG headgroup) does not reveal any order-disorder transition phenomena demonstrating a highly disordered behavior for the entire temperature range. To confirm these observations, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was applied to the samples and revealed good agreement with the infrared spectroscopy

  17. Mineralogical composition and phase-to-phase relationships in natural hydraulic lime and/or natural cement - raw materials and burnt products revealed by scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovcev, Petr; Přikryl, Richard; Racek, Martin; Přikrylová, Jiřina

    2016-04-01

    In contrast to modern process of production of cement clinker, traditional burning of natural hydraulic lime below sintering temperature relied on the formation of new phases from ion migration between neighbouring mineral grains composing raw material. The importance of the mineralogical composition and spatial distribution of rock-forming minerals in impure limestones used as a raw material for natural hydraulic lime presents not well explored issue in the scientific literature. To fill this gap, the recent study focuses in detailed analysis of experimentally burnt impure limestones (mostly from Barrandian area, Bohemian Massif). The phase changes were documented by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) coupled with x-ray elemental mapping. The latest allowed for visualization of distribution of elements within raw materials and burnt products. SEM/EDS study brought valuable data on the presence of transitional and/or minor phases, which were poorly detectable by other methods.

  18. A Fast Variant of 1H Spectroscopic U-FLARE Imaging Using Adjusted Chemical Shift Phase Encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Andreas; Dreher, Wolfgang; Leibfritz, Dieter

    2000-02-01

    So far, fast spectroscopic imaging (SI) using the U-FLARE sequence has provided metabolic maps indirectly via Fourier transformation (FT) along the chemical shift (CS) dimension and subsequent peak integration. However, a large number of CS encoding steps Nω is needed to cover the spectral bandwidth and to achieve sufficient spectral resolution for peak integration even if the number of resonance lines is small compared to Nω and even if only metabolic images are of interest and not the spectra in each voxel. Other reconstruction algorithms require extensive prior knowledge, starting values, and/or model functions. An adjusted CS phase encoding scheme (APE) can be used to overcome these drawbacks. It incorporates prior knowledge only about the resonance frequencies present in the sample. Thus, Nω can be reduced by a factor of 4 for many 1H in vivo studies while no spectra have to be reconstructed, and no additional user interaction, prior knowledge, starting values, or model function are required. Phantom measurements and in vivo experiments on rat brain have been performed at 4.7 T to test the feasibility of the method for proton SI.

  19. Neurotransmitters in the gas phase: a computational and spectroscopic study of noradrenaline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, Lavina C.; van Mourik, Tanja; Simons, John P.

    2003-01-01

    The conformational structures of noradrenaline, isolated in the gas phase, have been explored through a combination of electronic structure computation (at the B3LYP/6-31+G*, MP2/6-31+G*, MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ and CIS/6-31+G* levels of theory) and mass selected ultraviolet and infrared ion dip spectroscopy (following laser ablation of the neurotransmitter into a pulsed supersonic argon expansion). Despite the many possible low-lying conformational possibilities predicted by theory, almost the entire population of jet-cooled noradrenaline adopts the global minimum structure, associated with an extended, AG1a, ethanolamine side chain conformation. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between the neighbouring hydroxyl groups on the catechol ring and between the hydroxyl and amino groups on the side chain.

  20. Spectroscopic Dosimeter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analysis of Phase I test data demonstrates that the Photogenics Spectroscopic Dosimeter will detect neutron energies from 0.8 up to 600 MeV. The detector...

  1. A computational and spectroscopic study of the gas-phase conformers of adrenaline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çarçabal, P.; Snoek, L. C.; van Mourik, T.

    The conformational landscapes of the neurotransmitter l-adrenaline (l-epinephrine) and its diastereoisomer pseudo-adrenaline, isolated in the gas phase and un-protonated, have been investigated by using a combination of mass-selected ultraviolet and infrared holeburn spectroscopy, following laser desorption of the sample into a pulsed supersonic argon jet, and DFT and ab initio computation (at the B3LYP/6-31+G*, MP2/6-31+G* and MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory). Both for adrenaline and its diastereoisomer, pseudo-adrenaline, one dominant molecular conformation, very similar to the one seen in noradrenaline, has been observed. It could be assigned to an extended side-chain structure (AG1a) stabilized by an OH → N intramolecular hydrogen bond. An intramolecular hydrogen bond is also formed between the neighbouring hydroxyl groups on the catechol ring. The presence of further conformers for both diastereoisomers could not be excluded, but overlapping electronic spectra and low ion signals prevented further assignments.

  2. Differences in estimates of size distribution of beryllium powder materials using phase contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and liquid suspension counter techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Gregory A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Accurate characterization of the physicochemical properties of aerosols generated for inhalation toxicology studies is essential for obtaining meaningful results. Great emphasis must also be placed on characterizing particle properties of materials as administered in inhalation studies. Thus, research is needed to identify a suite of techniques capable of characterizing the multiple particle properties (i.e., size, mass, surface area, number of a material that may influence toxicity. The purpose of this study was to characterize the morphology and investigate the size distribution of a model toxicant, beryllium. Beryllium metal, oxides, and alloy particles were aerodynamically size-separated using an aerosol cyclone, imaged dry using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, then characterized using phase contrast microscopy (PCM, a liquid suspension particle counter (LPC, and computer-controlled SEM (CCSEM. Beryllium metal powder was compact with smaller sub-micrometer size particles attached to the surface of larger particles, whereas the beryllium oxides and alloy particles were clusters of primary particles. As expected, the geometric mean (GM diameter of metal powder determined using PCM decreased with aerodynamic size, but when suspended in liquid for LPC or CCSEM analysis, the GM diameter decreased by a factor of two (p

  3. Crystallization kinetics of the phase change material GeSb6Te measured with dynamic transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winseck, M M; Cheng, H-Y; Campbell, G H; Santala, M K

    2016-06-14

    GeSb6Te is a chalcogenide-based phase change material that has shown great ptoential for use in solid-state memory devices. The crystallization kinetics of amorphous thin films of GeSb6Te during laser crystallization were followed with dynamic transmission electron microscopy, a photo-emission electron microscopy technique with nanosecond-scale time resolution. Nine-frame movies of crystal growth were taken during laser crystallization. The nucleation rate is observed to be very low and the growth rates are very high, up to 10.8 m s(-1) for amorphous as-deposited films and significantly higher for an amorphous film subject to sub-threshold laser annealing before crystallization. The measured growth rates exceed any directly measured growth rate of a phase change material. The crystallization is reminiscent of explosive crystallization of elemental semiconductors both in the magnitude of the growth rate and in the resulting crystalline microstructures.

  4. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-13

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm(2) without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques.

  5. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm2 without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques.

  6. Zernike Phase Contrast Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Tomography for Structure Determination at Nanometer and Subnanometer Resolutions

    OpenAIRE

    Murata, Kazuyoshi; Liu, Xiangan; Danev, Radostin; Jakana, Joanita; Schmid, Michael F; King, Jonathan; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Chiu, Wah

    2010-01-01

    Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy (ZPC-cryoEM) is an emerging technique which is capable of producing higher image contrast than conventional cryoEM. By combining this technique with advanced image processing methods, we achieved subnanometer resolution for two biological specimens: 2-D bacteriorhodopsin crystal and epsilon15 bacteriophage. For an asymmetric reconstruction of epsilon15 bacteriophage, ZPC-cryoEM can reduce the required amount of data by a factor of ~3 compared to...

  7. Comparison of photothermal and piezoacoustic excitation methods for frequency and phase modulation atomic force microscopy in liquid environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Labuda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In attempting to perform frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM in liquids, a non-flat phase transfer function in the self-excitation system prevents proper tracking of the cantilever natural frequency. This results in frequency-and-phase modulation atomic force microscopy (FPM-AFM which lies in between phase modulation atomic force microscopy (PM-AFM and FM-AFM. We derive the theory necessary to recover the conservative force and damping in such a situation, where standard FM-AFM theory no longer applies. Although our recovery procedure applies to all cantilever excitation methods in principle, its practical implementation may be difficult, or even impossible, if the cantilever is driven piezoacoustically. Specifically, we contrast the piezoacoustic excitation method to the photothermal method in the context of force spectroscopy of hydration structures at the mica-water interface. The results clearly demonstrate that photothermal excitation is superior to piezoacoustic excitation, as it allows for accurate quantitative interpretation of the acquired data.

  8. Assessment of amide I spectroscopic maps for a gas-phase peptide using IR-UV double-resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J. K.; Zabuga, A. V.; Roy, S.; Rizzo, T. R.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopy of amide I vibrations has become a powerful tool for exploring protein structure and dynamics. To help with spectral interpretation, it is often useful to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To connect spectroscopic experiments to simulations in an efficient manner, several researchers have proposed “maps,” which relate observables in classical MD simulations to quantum spectroscopic variables. It can be difficult to discern whether errors in the theoretical results (compared to experiment) arise from inaccuracies in the MD trajectories or in the maps themselves. In this work, we evaluate spectroscopic maps independently from MD simulations by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra for a single conformation of the α-helical model peptide Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-Lys-H+ in the gas phase. Conformation-specific experimental spectra are obtained for the unlabeled peptide and for several singly and doubly 13C-labeled variants using infrared-ultraviolet double-resonance spectroscopy, and these spectra are found to be well-modeled by density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. We then compare DFT results for the deuterated and 13C18O-labeled peptide with those from spectroscopic maps developed and used previously by the Skinner group. We find that the maps are typically accurate to within a few cm−1 for both frequencies and couplings, having larger errors only for the frequencies of terminal amides. PMID:24929378

  9. Wide-field, full-field optical coherence microscopy for high-axial-resolution phase and amplitude imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Antoine; da Costa, Henrique S Gutierrez; Ogien, Jonas; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Dubois, Arnaud

    2015-09-20

    An original single-objective, full-field optical coherence microscopy system is reported that is capable of imaging both the phase and the amplitude of semi-transparent samples over a field of view of 17.5  mm×17.5  mm with an axial sectioning resolution of 1.5 μm. A special stack acquisition arrangement ensures optimal reachable imaging depth. Several phase-shifting interferometry algorithms for phase measurement with broadband light are compared theoretically and experimentally. Using the phase information, noninvasive depth-resolved topographic images of multilayer samples are produced to characterize each layer by measuring their defects and curvature with a nanometric scale precision. Using the amplitude information, tomographic images with a constant detection sensitivity of ∼80  dB through the entire field of view are obtained and applied to biological specimens.

  10. Simple and fast spectral domain algorithm for quantitative phase imaging of living cells with digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Junwei; Yao, Baoli; Ketelhut, Steffi; Kemper, Björn

    2017-02-01

    The modular combination of optical microscopes with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has been proven to be a powerful tool for quantitative live cell imaging. The introduction of condenser and different microscope objectives (MO) simplifies the usage of the technique and makes it easier to measure different kinds of specimens with different magnifications. However, the high flexibility of illumination and imaging also causes variable phase aberrations that need to be eliminated for high resolution quantitative phase imaging. The existent phase aberrations compensation methods either require add additional elements into the reference arm or need specimen free reference areas or separate reference holograms to build up suitable digital phase masks. These inherent requirements make them unpractical for usage with highly variable illumination and imaging systems and prevent on-line monitoring of living cells. In this paper, we present a simple numerical method for phase aberration compensation based on the analysis of holograms in spatial frequency domain with capabilities for on-line quantitative phase imaging. From a single shot off-axis hologram, the whole phase aberration can be eliminated automatically without numerical fitting or pre-knowledge of the setup. The capabilities and robustness for quantitative phase imaging of living cancer cells are demonstrated.

  11. In-focus electron microscopy of frozen-hydrated biological samples with a Boersch phase plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, B.; Rhinow, D.; Walter, A.; Schroeder, R. [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue Str. 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Benner, G.; Majorovits, E.; Matijevic, M.; Niebel, H. [Carl Zeiss NTS GmbH, D-73447 Oberkochen (Germany); Mueller, H.; Haider, M. [CEOS GmbH, Englerstr. 26, 69126 Heidleberg (Germany); Lacher, M.; Schmitz, S.; Holik, P. [Caesar Research Center, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, D-53175 Bonn (Germany); Kuehlbrandt, W., E-mail: werner.kuehlbrandt@mpibp-frankfurt.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue Str. 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    We report the implementation of an electrostatic Einzel lens (Boersch) phase plate in a prototype transmission electron microscope dedicated to aberration-corrected cryo-EM. The combination of phase plate, C{sub s} corrector and Diffraction Magnification Unit (DMU) as a new electron-optical element ensures minimal information loss due to obstruction by the phase plate and enables in-focus phase contrast imaging of large macromolecular assemblies. As no defocussing is necessary and the spherical aberration is corrected, maximal, non-oscillating phase contrast transfer can be achieved up to the information limit of the instrument. A microchip produced by a scalable micro-fabrication process has 10 phase plates, which are positioned in a conjugate, magnified diffraction plane generated by the DMU. Phase plates remained fully functional for weeks or months. The large distance between phase plate and the cryo sample permits the use of an effective anti-contaminator, resulting in ice contamination rates of <0.6 nm/h at the specimen. Maximal in-focus phase contrast was obtained by applying voltages between 80 and 700 mV to the phase plate electrode. The phase plate allows for in-focus imaging of biological objects with a signal-to-noise of 5-10 at a resolution of 2-3 nm, as demonstrated for frozen-hydrated virus particles and purple membrane at liquid-nitrogen temperature. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We implement an electrostatic Boersch phase plate into a dedicated prototypical TEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase contrast aberration-corrected electron microscope (PACEM) includes a diffraction magnification unit (DMU). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DMU minimizes obstruction of low spatial frequencies by the phase plate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In-focus phase contrast generation is demonstrated for frozen-hydrated biological specimens.

  12. Assessment of occupational exposure to asbestos fibers: Contribution of analytical transmission electron microscopy analysis and comparison with phase-contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eypert-Blaison, Céline; Romero-Hariot, Anita; Clerc, Frédéric; Vincent, Raymond

    2017-12-01

    From November 2009 until October 2010, the French general directorate for labour organised a large field-study using analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) to characterise occupational exposure to asbestos fibers during work on asbestos containing materials (ACM). The primary objective of this study was to establish a method and to validate the feasibility of using ATEM for the analysis of airborne asbestos of individual filters sampled in various occupational environments. For each sampling event, ATEM data were compared to those obtained by phase-contrast optical microscopy (PCOM), the WHO-recommended reference technique. A total of 265 results were obtained from 29 construction sites where workers were in contact with ACM. Data were sorted depending on the combination of the ACM type and the removal technique. For each "ACM-removal technique" combination, ATEM data were used to compute statistical indicators on short, fine and WHO asbestos fibers. Moreover, exposure was assessed taking into account the use of respiratory protective devices (RPD). As in previous studies, no simple relationship was found between results by PCOM and ATEM counting methods. Some ACM, such as asbestos-containing plasters, generated very high dust levels, and some techniques generated considerable levels of dust whatever the ACM treated. On the basis of these observations, recommendations were made to measure and control the occupational exposure limit. General prevention measures to be taken during work with ACM are also suggested. Finally, it is necessary to continue acquiring knowledge, in particular regarding RPD and the dust levels measured by ATEM for the activities not evaluated during this study.

  13. Structural dynamics of gas-phase molybdenum nanoclusters : A transmission electron microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vystavel, T; Koch, SA; Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, JTM

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study structural aspects of molybdenum clusters by transmission electron microscopy. The deposited clusters with sizes 4 nm or larger show a body-centered crystal (bcc) structure. The clusters are self-assembled from smaller structural units and form cuboids with a typical size of 4

  14. Characterization by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy of the Phase Composition at Interfaces in Thick Films of Polymer Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Lattante

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM has been used as a fast, user-friendly, and noninvasive tool for characterizing the phase composition differences at the substrate and air interfaces in thick films of polymer blends. A clearly different phase composition at the blend/glass interface and at the blend/air interface has been detected. We show that PCBM preferentially accumulates at the glass/blend interface, while P3HT preferentially accumulates at the blend/air interface, by comparing the integrated signal intensity of the luminescence coming from both interfaces. Our results demonstrate that CLSM can be used conveniently for the fast identification of a preferential phase segregation at interfaces in polymer blends. This is useful in the research field on devices (like sensors or planar waveguides that are based on very thick layers (thickness higher than 1 μm.

  15. Enhanced quantitative phase imaging in self-interference digital holographic microscopy using an electrically focus tunable lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Robin; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Kemper, Björn

    2014-12-01

    Self-interference digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has been found particular suitable for simplified quantitative phase imaging of living cells. However, a main drawback of the self-interference DHM principle are scattering patterns that are induced by the coherent nature of the laser light which affect the resolution for detection of optical path length changes. We present a simple and efficient technique for the reduction of coherent disturbances in quantitative phase images. Therefore, amplitude and phase of the sample illumination are modulated by an electrically focus tunable lens. The proposed method is in particular convenient with the self-interference DHM concept. Results from the characterization of the method show that a reduction of coherence induced disturbances up to 70 percent can be achieved. Finally, the performance for enhanced quantitative imaging of living cells is demonstrated.

  16. Real-time in vitro Fourier ptychographic microscopy for high resolution wide field of view phase imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Lei; Yeh, Li-Hao; Chen, Michael; Waller, Laura

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, microscopes have had to trade field of view (FOV) for resolution. Recently, a new computational imaging technique, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), circumvents this limit in order to capture gigapixel-scale images having both wide FOV and high resolution. FPM has enormous potential for revolutionizing biomedical microscopy; however, it has until now been limited to fixed samples, since acquisition time is on the order of minutes. Live biological samples are continuously evolving on multiple spatial and temporal scales, which can cause motion blur. Here, we present a Fast FPM method to achieve sub-second capture times for FPM results with 0.8 NA resolution across a 4x objective's FOV. We demonstrate the first FPM quantitative phase results for both growing and confluent in vitro cell cultures. Experiments capture real-time videos of HeLa and human mammary epithelial (MCF10A) cell division and migration and subcellular dynamical phenomena in adult rat neural stem cells.

  17. In-focus electron microscopy of frozen-hydrated biological samples with a Boersch phase plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, B; Rhinow, D; Walter, A; Schröder, R; Benner, G; Majorovits, E; Matijevic, M; Niebel, H; Müller, H; Haider, M; Lacher, M; Schmitz, S; Holik, P; Kühlbrandt, W

    2011-12-01

    We report the implementation of an electrostatic Einzel lens (Boersch) phase plate in a prototype transmission electron microscope dedicated to aberration-corrected cryo-EM. The combination of phase plate, C(s) corrector and Diffraction Magnification Unit (DMU) as a new electron-optical element ensures minimal information loss due to obstruction by the phase plate and enables in-focus phase contrast imaging of large macromolecular assemblies. As no defocussing is necessary and the spherical aberration is corrected, maximal, non-oscillating phase contrast transfer can be achieved up to the information limit of the instrument. A microchip produced by a scalable micro-fabrication process has 10 phase plates, which are positioned in a conjugate, magnified diffraction plane generated by the DMU. Phase plates remained fully functional for weeks or months. The large distance between phase plate and the cryo sample permits the use of an effective anti-contaminator, resulting in ice contamination rates of frozen-hydrated virus particles and purple membrane at liquid-nitrogen temperature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of bacterial spore germination using phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Guiwen; Yu, Jing; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2011-05-01

    This protocol describes a method combining phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers to characterize the germination of single bacterial spores. The characterization consists of the following steps: (i) loading heat-activated dormant spores into a temperature-controlled microscope sample holder containing a germinant solution plus a nucleic acid stain; (ii) capturing a single spore with optical tweezers; (iii) simultaneously measuring phase-contrast images, Raman spectra and fluorescence images of the optically captured spore at 2- to 10-s intervals; and (iv) analyzing the acquired data for the loss of spore refractility, changes in spore-specific molecules (in particular, dipicolinic acid) and uptake of the nucleic acid stain. This information leads to precise correlations between various germination events, and takes 1-2 h to complete. The method can also be adapted to use multi-trap Raman spectroscopy or phase-contrast microscopy of spores adhered on a cover slip to simultaneously obtain germination parameters for multiple individual spores.

  19. Dual-interference-channel quantitative-phase microscopy of live cell dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Natan T; Rinehart, Matthew T; Wax, Adam

    2009-03-15

    We introduce and experimentally demonstrate a fast and accurate method for quantitative imaging of the dynamics of live biological cells. Using a dual-channel interferometric setup, two phase-shifted interferograms of nearly transparent biological samples are acquired in a single digital camera exposure and digitally processed into the phase profile of the sample. Since two interferograms of the same sample are acquired simultaneously, most of the common phase noise is eliminated, enabling the visualization of millisecond-scale dynamic biological phenomena with subnanometer optical path length temporal stability.

  20. Quantitative Carré differential interference contrast microscopy to assess phase and amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Donald D; Fischer, David G; Dayton, Amanda; Prahl, Scott A

    2011-06-01

    We present a method of using an unmodified differential interference contrast microscope to acquire quantitative information on scatter and absorption of thin tissue samples. A simple calibration process is discussed that uses a standard optical wedge. Subsequently, we present a phase-stepping procedure for acquiring phase gradient information exclusive of absorption effects. The procedure results in two-dimensional maps of the local angular (polar and azimuthal) ray deviation. We demonstrate the calibration process, discuss details of the phase-stepping algorithm, and present representative results for a porcine skin sample.

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy of the mycotoxin citrinin in condensed phase and hydrogel films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Milena H; Gehlen, Marcelo H; de Jesus, Karen; Berlinck, Roberto G S

    2014-05-01

    The emission spectra, quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes of citrinin in organic solvents and hydrogel films have been determined. Citrinin shows complex fluorescence decays due to the presence of two tautomers in solution and interconversion from excited-state double proton transfer (ESDPT) process. The fluorescence decay times associated with the two tautomers have values near 1 and 5 ns depending on the medium. In hydrogel films of agarose and alginate, fluorescence imaging showed that citrinin is not homogeneously dispersed and highly emissive micrometer spots may be formed. Fluorescence spectrum and decay analysis are used to recognize the presence of citrinin in hydrogel films using confocal fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy.

  2. Experimental validation of phase using Nomarski microscopy with an extended Fried algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl, Scott A; Dayton, Amanda; Juedes, Kyle; Sánchez, Erik J; López, Rafael Páez; Duncan, Donald D

    2012-10-01

    Reconstruction of an image (or shape or wavefront) from measurements of the derivatives of the image in two orthogonal directions is a common problem. We demonstrate how a particular reconstructor, commonly referred to as the Fried algorithm, can be used with megapixel derivative images to recover the original image. Large datasets are handled by breaking the derivative images into smaller tiles, applying the Fried algorithm and stitching the tiles back together. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated using differential interference contrast microscopy on a known test object.

  3. Phase transitions in a LiMn2O4 nanowire battery observed by operando electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soyeon; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Hosono, Eiji; Zhou, Haoshen; Kim, Kyungsu; Chang, Hansen M; Kanno, Ryoji; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2015-01-27

    Fast charge-discharge process has been reported to give a high capacity loss. A nanobattery consisting of a single LiMn2O4 nanowire cathode, ionic liquid electrolyte and lithium titanium oxide anode was developed for in situ transmission electron microscopy. When it was fully charged or discharged within a range of 4 V in less than half an hour (corresponding average C rate: 2.5C), Li-rich and Li-poor phases were observed to be separated by a transition region, and coexisted during whole process. The phase transition region moved reversibly along the nanowire axis which corresponds to the [011] direction, allowing the volume fraction of both phases to change. In the electron diffraction patterns, the Li-rich phase was seen to have the (100) orientation with respect to the incident electron beam, while the Li-poor phase had the (111̅) orientation. The orientation was changed as the transition region moved. However, the nanowire did not fracture. This suggests that a LiMn2O4 nanowire has the advantage of preventing capacity fading at high charge rates.

  4. Photothermal nanoparticles as molecular specificity agents in interferometric phase microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Natan T.

    2017-02-01

    I review our latest advances in wide-field interferometric imaging of biological cells with molecular specificity, obtained by time-modulated photothermal excitation of gold nanoparticles. Heat emitted from the nanoparticles affects the measured phase signal via both the nanoparticle surrounding refractive-index and thickness changes. These nanoparticles can be bio-functionalized to bind certain biological cell components; thus, they can be used for biomedical imaging with molecular specificity, as new nanoscopy labels, and for photothermal therapy. Predicting the ideal nanoparticle parameters requires a model that computes the thermal and phase distributions around the particle, enabling more efficient phase imaging of plasmonic nanoparticles, and sparing trial and error experiments of using unsuitable nanoparticles. We thus developed a new model for predicting phase signatures from photothermal nanoparticles with arbitrary parameters. We also present a dual-modality technique based on wide-field photothermal interferometric phase imaging and simultaneous ablation to selectively deplete specific cell populations labelled by plasmonic nanoparticles. We experimentally demonstrated our ability to detect and specifically ablate in vitro cancer cells over-expressing epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), labelled with plasmonic nanoparticles, in the presence of either EGFR under-expressing cancer cells or white blood cells. This demonstration established an initial model for depletion of circulating tumour cells in blood. The proposed system is able to image in wide field the label-free quantitative phase profile together with the photothermal phase profile of the sample, and provides the ability of both detection and ablation of chosen cells after their selective imaging.

  5. Automated method for the rapid and precise estimation of adherent cell culture characteristics from phase contrast microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Combined use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy, phase contrast imaging for high resolution quantitative iron mapping in inflamed cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramaccioni, C.; Procopio, A.; Farruggia, G.; Malucelli, E.; Iotti, S.; Notargiacomo, A.; Fratini, M.; Yang, Y.; Pacureanu, A.; Cloetens, P.; Bohic, S.; Massimi, L.; Cutone, A.; Valenti, P.; Rosa, L.; Berlutti, F.; Lagomarsino, S.

    2017-06-01

    X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XRFM) is a powerful technique to detect and localize elements in cells. To derive information useful for biology and medicine, it is essential not only to localize, but also to map quantitatively the element concentration. Here we applied quantitative XRFM to iron in phagocytic cells. Iron, a primary component of living cells, can become toxic when present in excess. In human fluids, free iron is maintained at 10-18 M concentration thanks to iron binding proteins as lactoferrin (Lf). The iron homeostasis, involving the physiological ratio of iron between tissues/secretions and blood, is strictly regulated by ferroportin, the sole protein able to export iron from cells to blood. Inflammatory processes induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or bacterial pathoge inhibit ferroportin synthesis in epithelial and phagocytic cells thus hindering iron export, increasing intracellular iron and bacterial multiplication. In this respect, Lf is emerging as an important regulator of both iron and inflammatory homeostasis. Here we studied phagocytic cells inflamed by bacterial LPS and untreated or treated with milk derived bovine Lf. Quantitative mapping of iron concentration and mass fraction at high spatial resolution is obtained combining X-ray fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy and synchrotron phase contrast imaging.

  7. Lensless phase microscopy and diffraction tomography with multi-angle and multi-wavelength illuminations using a LED matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Zhang, Jialin; Hu, Yan; Chen, Qian

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate lensless quantitative phase microscopy and diffraction tomography based on a compact on-chip platform, using only a CMOS image sensor and a programmable color LED matrix. Based on the multi-wavelength phase retrieval and multi-angle illumination diffraction tomography, this platform offers high quality, depth resolved images with a lateral resolution of 3.72μm and an axial resolution of 5μm, across a wide field-of-view of 24mm2. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging cheek cells, micro-beads, and fertilized eggs of Parascaris equorum. Such high-throughput and miniaturized imaging device can provide a cost-effective tool for telemedicine applications and point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited environments.

  8. Phase variance optical coherence microscopy for label-free imaging of the developing vasculature in zebrafish embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Trinh, Le A.; Fingler, Jeff; Fraser, Scott E.

    2016-12-01

    A phase variance optical coherence microscope (pvOCM) has been created to image blood flow in the microvasculature of zebrafish embryos, without the use of exogenous labels. The pvOCM imaging system has axial and lateral resolutions of 2.8 μm in tissue and imaging depth of more than 100 μm. Images of 2 to 5 days postfertilization zebrafish embryos identified the detailed anatomical structure based on OCM intensity contrast. Phase variance contrast offered visualization of blood flow in the arteries, veins, and capillaries. The pvOCM images of the vasculature were confirmed by direct comparisons with fluorescence microscopy images of transgenic embryos in which the vascular endothelium is labeled with green fluorescent protein. The ability of pvOCM to capture activities of regional blood flow permits it to reveal functional information that is of great utility for the study of vascular development.

  9. Optofluidic bioimaging platform for quantitative phase imaging of lab on a chip devices using digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2016-01-20

    We propose a versatile 3D phase-imaging microscope platform for real-time imaging of optomicrofluidic devices based on the principle of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). Lab-on-chip microfluidic devices fabricated on transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and glass substrates have attained wide popularity in biological sensing applications. However, monitoring, visualization, and characterization of microfluidic devices, microfluidic flows, and the biochemical kinetics happening in these devices is difficult due to the lack of proper techniques for real-time imaging and analysis. The traditional bright-field microscopic techniques fail in imaging applications, as the microfluidic channels and the fluids carrying biological samples are transparent and not visible in bright light. Phase-based microscopy techniques that can image the phase of the microfluidic channel and changes in refractive indices due to the fluids and biological samples present in the channel are ideal for imaging the fluid flow dynamics in a microfluidic channel at high resolutions. This paper demonstrates three-dimensional imaging of a microfluidic device with nanometric depth precisions and high SNR. We demonstrate imaging of microelectrodes of nanometric thickness patterned on glass substrate and the microfluidic channel. Three-dimensional imaging of a transparent PDMS optomicrofluidic channel, fluid flow, and live yeast cell flow in this channel has been demonstrated using DHM. We also quantify the average velocity of fluid flow through the channel. In comparison to any conventional bright-field microscope, the 3D depth information in the images illustrated in this work carry much information about the biological system under observation. The results demonstrated in this paper prove the high potential of DHM in imaging optofluidic devices; detection of pathogens, cells, and bioanalytes on lab-on-chip devices; and in studying microfluidic dynamics in real time based on phase changes.

  10. Quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry for quantitative phase microscopy of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Pierre; Maucort, Guillaume; Wattellier, Benoit; Monneret, Serge

    2009-07-20

    Phase imaging with a high-resolution wavefront sensor is considered. This is based on a quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer mounted on a non-modified transmission white-light microscope. The measurement technology is explained both in the scope of wave optics and geometrical optics in order to discuss its implementation on a conventional microscope. In particular we consider the effect of a non spatially coherent source on the phase-image signal-to-noise ratio. Precise measurements of the phase-shift introduced by microscopic beads or giant unilamellar vesicles validate the principle and show the accuracy of the methods. Diffraction limited images of living COS-7 cells are then presented, with a particular focus on the membrane and organelle dynamics.

  11. Microscopy imaging and quantitative phase contrast mapping in turbid microfluidic channels by digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paturzo, Melania; Finizio, Andrea; Memmolo, Pasquale; Puglisi, Roberto; Balduzzi, Donatella; Galli, Andrea; Ferraro, Pietro

    2012-09-07

    We show that sharp imaging and quantitative phase-contrast microcopy is possible in microfluidics in flowing turbid media by digital holography. In fact, in flowing liquids with suspended colloidal particles, clear vision is hindered and cannot be recovered by any other microscopic imaging technique. On the contrary, using digital holography, clear imaging is possible thanks to the Doppler frequency shift experienced by the photons scattered by the flowing colloidal particles, which do not contribute to the interference process, i.e. the recorded hologram. The method is illustrated and imaging results are demonstrated for pure phase objects, i.e. biological cells in microfluidic channels.

  12. [Intraepithelial cervical squamous lesions: comparison between PAP-test, colposcopy, phase contrast microscopy and histology; usefulness of their synergic use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuspa, F; Maruotti, G; Del Bianco, A; Di Martino, A; Celeste, T; Pietropaolo, F

    2005-04-01

    In the last 10 years the tumors of cervix have showed a significant reduction in incidence, while the preneoplastic lesions are increased (linked often to human papilloma virus [HPV] infection), and so it is enhanced the role of early diagnosis. The Authors have examined 124 patients at colposcopy showing transformation zone anomalies and/or HPV infections. The patients have submitted to PAP-test, phase contrast microscopy and to biopsy. The analysis of our cases show oneself better sensitivity of colposcopy than cytologic exam, in particular in the diagnosis of low grade intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), corresponding to CIN 1 and HPV lesions. Phase contrast microscopy, by search of possible preneoplastic elements in the smear, is a complementary technique, and if performed systematically and by qualified operators allows to reduce furthermore false negative rate. The synergic use of tools allows to increase of number of intrecervical neoplasia diagnosis. The following cost's increase cannot be considered an obstacle and it is not should be necessary to counsel always the colposcopy in case of anomalous PAP smear revealed during screening.

  13. Vibrational Phase Contrast Microscopy by Use of Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurna, M.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cornelis; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2009-01-01

    In biological samples the resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering signal of less abundant constituents can be overwhelmed by the nonresonant background, preventing detection of those molecules. We demonstrate a method to obtain the phase of the oscillators in the focal volume that allows

  14. Short-coherence off-axis holographic phase microscopy of live cell dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, S.; Plauska, A.; Ridder, M.C.; van Berge, L.; Mansvelder, H.D.; Groot, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a single-shot holographic phase microscope that combines short-coherence laser pulses with an off-axis geometry. By introducing a controlled pulse front tilt, ultrashort pulses are made to interfere over a large field-of-view without loss of fringe contrast. With this microscope,

  15. Charging of carbon thin films in scanning and phase-plate transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hettler, Simon; Kano, Emi; Dries, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    A systematic study on charging of carbon thin films under intense electron-beam irradiation was performed in a transmission electron microscope to identify the underlying physics for the functionality of hole-free phase plates. Thin amorphous carbon films fabricated by different deposition techni...

  16. DESIGN OF A MICROFABRICATED, TWO-ELECTRODE PHASE-CONTRAST ELEMENTSUITABLE FOR ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambie, Rossana; Downing, Kenneth H.; Typke, Dieter; Glaeser,Robert M.; Jin, Jian

    2006-09-20

    A miniature electrostatic element has been designed to selectively apply a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plane of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. The design involves a cylindrically shaped, biased-voltage electrode, which is surrounded by a concentric grounded electrode. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that the fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size is greater than 5:1. Unlike the planar, three-electrode einzel lens originally proposed by Boersch for the same purpose, this new design does not require insulating layers to separate the biased and grounded electrodes, and it can thus be produced by a very simple microfabrication process. Scanning electron microscope images confirm that mechanically robust devices with feature sizes of {approx}1 {micro}m can be easily fabricated. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a 90-degree phase shift between the scattered and unscattered electrons, as expected.

  17. Application of maximum likelihood estimator in nano-scale optical path length measurement using spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Nezam, Smrm; Joo, C; Tearney, G.J.; Boer, de, I.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy (SD-OCPM) measures minute phase changes in transparent biological specimens using a common path interferometer and a spectrometer based optical coherence tomography system. The Fourier transform of the acquired interference spectrum in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is complex and the phase is affected by contributions from inherent random noise. To reduce this phase noise, knowledge of the probability density function ...

  18. High-throughput label-free screening of euglena gracilis with optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Ito, Takuro; Yaxiaer, Yalikun; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Jiang, Yiyue; Tanaka, Yo; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-02-01

    The development of reliable, sustainable, and economical sources of alternative fuels is an important, but challenging goal for the world. As an alternative to liquid fossil fuels, microalgal biofuel is expected to play a key role in reducing the detrimental effects of global warming since microalgae absorb atmospheric CO2 via photosynthesis. Unfortunately, conventional analytical methods only provide population-averaged lipid contents and fail to characterize a diverse population of microalgal cells with single-cell resolution in a noninvasive and interference-free manner. Here we demonstrate high-throughput label-free single-cell screening of lipid-producing microalgal cells with optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy. In particular, we use Euglena gracilis - an attractive microalgal species that produces wax esters (suitable for biodiesel and aviation fuel after refinement) within lipid droplets. Our optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscope is based on an integration of a hydrodynamic-focusing microfluidic chip, an optical time-stretch phase-contrast microscope, and a digital image processor equipped with machine learning. As a result, it provides both the opacity and phase contents of every single cell at a high throughput of 10,000 cells/s. We characterize heterogeneous populations of E. gracilis cells under two different culture conditions to evaluate their lipid production efficiency. Our method holds promise as an effective analytical tool for microalgaebased biofuel production.

  19. Liquid-solid phase transition of Ge-Sb-Te alloy observed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, Katja, E-mail: katja.berlin@pdi-berlin.de; Trampert, Achim

    2017-07-15

    Melting and crystallization dynamics of the multi-component Ge-Sb-Te alloy have been investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Starting point of the phase transition study is an ordered hexagonal Ge{sub 1}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 4} thin film on Si(111) where the crystal structure and the chemical composition are verified by scanning TEM and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, respectively. The in-situ observation of the liquid phase at 600°C including the liquid-solid and liquid-vacuum interfaces and their movements was made possible due to an encapsulation of the TEM sample. The solid-liquid interface during melting displays a broad and diffuse transition zone characterized by a vacancy induced disordered state. Although the velocities of interface movements are measured to be in the nanometer per second scale, both, for crystallization and solidification, the underlying dynamic processes are considerably different. Melting reveals linear dependence on time, whereas crystallization exhibits a non-linear time-dependency featuring a superimposed start-stop motion. Our results may provide valuable insight into the atomic mechanisms at interfaces during the liquid-solid phase transition of Ge-Sb-Te alloys. - Highlights: • In-situ TEM observation of liquid Ge-Sb-Te phase transition due to encapsulation. • During melting: Observation of non-ordered interface transition due to premelting. • During solidification: Observation of non-linear time-dependent crystallization.

  20. Charging of carbon thin films in scanning and phase-plate transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Simon; Kano, Emi; Dries, Manuel; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Pfaffmann, Lukas; Bruns, Michael; Beleggia, Marco; Malac, Marek

    2018-01-01

    A systematic study on charging of carbon thin films under intense electron-beam irradiation was performed in a transmission electron microscope to identify the underlying physics for the functionality of hole-free phase plates. Thin amorphous carbon films fabricated by different deposition techniques and single-layer graphene were studied. Clean thin films at moderate temperatures show small negative charging while thin films kept at an elevated temperature are stable and not prone to beam-generated charging. The charging is attributed to electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of chemisorbed water molecules from the thin-film surfaces and an accompanying change of work function. The ESD interpretation is supported by experimental results obtained by electron-energy loss spectroscopy, hole-free phase plate imaging, secondary electron detection and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as well as simulations of the electrostatic potential distribution. The described ESD-based model explains previous experimental findings and is of general interest to any phase-related technique in a transmission electron microscope. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Experimental evaluation of the 'transport-of-intensity' equation for magnetic phase reconstruction in Lorentz transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Amit; Habibi, Avihay; Mayo, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The 'transport-of-intensity' equation (TIE) is a general phase reconstruction methodology that can be applied to Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (TEM) through the use of Fresnel-contrast (defocused) images. We present an experimental study to test the application of the TIE for quantitative magnetic mapping in Lorentz TEM without aberration correction by examining sub-micrometer sized Ni80Fe20 (Permalloy) elements. For a JEOL JEM 2100F adapted for Lorentz microscopy, we find that quantitative magnetic phase reconstructions are possible for defoci distances ranging between approximately 200 μm and 800 μm. The lower limit originates from competing sources of image intensity variations in Fresnel-contrast images, namely structural defects and diffraction contrast. The upper defocus limit is due to a numerical error in the estimation of the intensity derivative based on three images. For magnetic domains, we show quantitative reconstructions of the product of the magnetic induction vector and thickness in element sizes down to approximately 100 nm in lateral size and 5 nm thick resulting in a minimal detection of 5Tnm. Three types of magnetic structures are tested in terms of phase reconstruction: vortex cores, domain walls, and element edges. We quantify vortex core structures at a diameter of 12 nm while the structures of domain walls and element edges are characterized qualitatively. Finally, we show by image simulations that the conclusions of this experimental study are relevant to other Lorentz TEM in which spherical aberration and defocus are dominant aberrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Variability in diagnosis of clue cells, lactobacillary grading and white blood cells in vaginal wet smears with conventional bright light and phase contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, G G G; Larsson, P G; Platz-Christensen, J J; Hallén, A; van der Meijden, W; Wölner-Hanssen, P

    2009-07-01

    Study the reproducibility of wet smear interpretation of clue cells, lactobacillary grades and leukocyte dominance with conventional bright light and phase contrast microscopy. Sets of vaginal specimens were taken from unselected consecutive women attending an outpatient gynaecology clinic. Air-dried vaginal fluid on a microscope slide was rehydrated with isotonic saline before examination by six independent international investigators. Some investigators initially used a conventional bright light microscope, followed by phase contrast technique. Using phase contrast microscopy, an excellent inter-observer agreement was obtained among all investigators for clue cells detection (Kappa values from 0.69 to 0.94) and lactobacillary grades (Kappa 0.73-0.93). When conventional light microscopes were used, poor agreement was obtained for these criteria (Kappa index 0.37-0.72 and 0.80, respectively), but switching to phase contrast microscopy by the same investigators, improved Kappa to 0.83-0.85 and 0.88, respectively. The inter-observer agreement for estimation of the leukocyte/epithelial cell ratio (Kappa index 0.17-0.67) was poor, irrespective of the type of microscopy applied. Intra-observer agreement of clue cell detection and lactobacillary grading was also found to be excellent if phase contrast microscopy was used (Kappa 0.87-0.93), and poor with conventional bright light microscopy (Kappa 0.45-0.66). Clue cells and the lactobacillary grades are reliably identified by phase contrast microscopy in wet smears, with excellent intra- and inter-observer reproducibility agreement, and better than when simple bright light microscopy was used. Evaluation of leukocyte grading, on the other hand, was inconsistent among the different microscopists, irrespective of the type of microscope used. We propose to grade the leukocytes in a different way than searching for leukocyte dominance over epithelial cells, namely by counting them per high power field and per epithelial cell.

  3. Picosecond phase-velocity dispersion of hypersonic phonons imaged with ultrafast electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Du, Daniel X.; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-12-01

    Here, we describe the direct imaging—with four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy—of the emergence, evolution, dispersion, and decay of photoexcited, hypersonic coherent acoustic phonons in nanoscale germanium wedges. Coherent strain waves generated via ultrafast in situ photoexcitation were imaged propagating with initial phase velocities of up to 35 km/s across discrete micrometer-scale crystal regions. We observe that, while each wave front travels at a constant velocity, the entire wave train evolves with a time-varying phase-velocity dispersion, displaying a single-exponential decay to the longitudinal speed of sound (5 km/s) and with a mean lifetime of 280 ps. We also find that the wave trains propagate along a single in-plane direction oriented parallel to striations introduced during specimen preparation, independent of crystallographic direction. Elastic-plate modeling indicates the dynamics arise from excitation of a single, symmetric (dilatational) guided acoustic mode. Further, by precisely determining the experiment time-zero position with a plasma-lensing method, we find that wave-front emergence occurs approximately 100 ps after femtosecond photoexcitation, which matches well with Auger recombination times in germanium. We conclude by discussing the similarities between the imaged hypersonic strain-wave dynamics and electron/hole plasma-wave dynamics in strongly photoexcited semiconductors.

  4. Study of NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase by optical spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejía-Uriarte, E.V., E-mail: elsi.mejia@ccadet.unam.mx [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Kolokoltsev, O. [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Navarrete Montesinos, M. [Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, D.F. México (Mexico); Camarillo, E.; Hernández A, J.; Murrieta S, H. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 20-364, C.P. 01000, D.F. México (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase have been studied by fluorescence (emission and excitation) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a function of temperature. The “as-grown” samples give rise to two broad emission bands that peak at 508 (green emission) and 610 nm (red emission). The excitation spectrum shows peaks at 227 nm and 232 nm for emission wavelengths at 508 nm and 610 nm, respectively. When the samples are heated continuously from room temperature up to 220 °C, the green emission (associated to the excitation peak at 227 nm) disappears at a temperature close to 120 °C, whilst only the red emission remains, which is characteristic of manganese ions. AFM images on the (0 0 1) surface (freshly cleaved) show several conformations of nanostructures, such as disks of 20–50 nm in diameter. Particularly, the images also reveal nanostructures with rectangular shape of ~280×160 nm{sup 2} and ~6 nm height; these are present only in samples with green emission associated to the Suzuki phase. Then, the evidence suggests that this topographic configuration might be related to the interaction with the first neighbors and the next neighbors, according to the configuration that has been suggested for the Suzuki phase. - Highlights: • NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} single crystals in the Suzuki phase contain rectangular nanostructures. • Double emission of manganese ions: green (508 nm) and red (610 nm) bands. • The excitation peak at 227 nm is attributed to rectangular nanostructures. • The green emission band associated to Suzuki phase is extinguished at 120 °C.

  5. One- and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies of solution-phase homogeneous catalysis and spin-forbidden reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Karma Rae [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Understanding chemical reactions requires the knowledge of the elementary steps of breaking and making bonds, and often a variety of experimental techniques are needed to achieve this goal. The initial steps occur on the femto- through picosecond time-scales, requiring the use of ultrafast spectroscopic methods, while the rate-limiting steps often occur more slowly, requiring alternative techniques. Ultrafast one and two-dimensional infrared and step-scan FTIR spectroscopies are used to investigate the photochemical reactions of four organometallic complexes. The analysis leads to a detailed understanding of mechanisms that are general in nature and may be applicable to a variety of reactions.

  6. A phase-contrast microscopy-based method for modeling the mechanical behavior of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mayssam; Sharabani-Yosef, Orna; Weihs, Daphne; Gefen, Amit

    2016-10-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models of single, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), generated from images obtained by optical phase-contrast microscopy and used to quantify the structural responses of the studied cells to externally applied mechanical loads. Mechanical loading has been shown to affect cell morphology and structure, phenotype, motility and other biological functions. Cells experience mechanical loads naturally, yet under prolonged or sizable loading, damage and cell death may occur, which motivates research regarding the structural behavior of loaded cells. For example, near the weight-bearing boney prominences of the buttocks of immobile persons, tissues may become highly loaded, eventually leading to massive cell death that manifests as pressure ulcers. Cell-specific computational models have previously been developed by our group, allowing simulations of cell deformations under compressive or stretching loads. These models were obtained by reconstructing specific cell structures from series of 2D fluorescence, confocal image-slices, requiring cell-specific fluorescent-staining protocols and costly (confocal) microscopy equipment. Alternative modeling approaches represent cells simply as half-spheres or half-ellipsoids (i.e. idealized geometries), which neglects the curvature details of the cell surfaces associated with changes in concentrations of strains and stresses. Thus, we introduce here for the first time an optical image-based FE modeling, where loads are simulated on reconstructed 3D geometrical cell models from a single 2D, phase-contrast image. Our novel modeling method eliminates the need for confocal imaging and fluorescent staining preparations (both expensive), and makes cell-specific FE modeling affordable and accessible to the biomechanics community. We demonstrate the utility of this cost-effective modeling method by performing simulations of compression of MSCs embedded in a gel.

  7. Analysis of holographic photopolymers for integrated optical systems via quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glugla, David J.; Alim, Marvin D.; Chosy, Madeline B.; Sullivan, Amy C.; McLeod, Robert R.

    2017-05-01

    Optically-driven diffusion of high refractive index molecules within a transparent thermoset polymer matrix is a promising platform for hybrid optics that combines a wide range of optical structures from large scale holograms to micron-scale gradient index waveguides in a single integrated optical system. Design of such a system requires characterization of the optical response of the material at a wide range of spatial scales and intensities. While holographic analysis of the photopolymers is appropriate to probe the smaller spatial scales and lower intensity optical response, quantitative phase mapping of isolated structures is needed to probe the response to the higher intensities and lower spatial frequencies used in direct write lithography of waveguides. We apply the transport of intensity equation (TIE) to demonstrate quantitative refractive index measurements of 10 μm-scale localized gradient index structures written into diffusive photopolymer materials using both single- and two-photon polymerization. These quantitative measurements allow us to study the effect of different exposure conditions and material parameters such as writing beam power, exposure time, and wt% loading of the writing monomer on the overall profile of the refractive index structure. We use these measurements to probe the time scales over which diffusion is significant, and take advantage of the diffusion of monomer with a multiple-write scheme that achieves a peak refractive index contrast of 0.025.

  8. Hierarchical Mergence Approach to Cell Detection in Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase contrast microscope is one of the most universally used instruments to observe long-term cell movements in different solutions. Most of classic segmentation methods consider a homogeneous patch as an object, while the recorded cell images have rich details and a lot of small inhomogeneous patches, as well as some artifacts, which can impede the applications. To tackle these challenges, this paper presents a hierarchical mergence approach (HMA to extract homogeneous patches out and heuristically add them up. Initially, the maximum region of interest (ROI, in which only cell events exist, is drawn by using gradient information as a mask. Then, different levels of blurring based on kernel or grayscale morphological operations are applied to the whole image to produce reference images. Next, each of unconnected regions in the mask is applied with Otsu method independently according to different reference images. Consequently, the segmentation result is generated by the combination of usable patches in all informative layers. The proposed approach is more than simply a fusion of the basic segmentation methods, but a well-organized strategy that integrates these basic methods. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms previous methods within our datasets.

  9. MR microscopy of human skin using phased-array of microcoils at 9.4 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goebel, Katharina; Leupold, Jochen; LeVan, Pierre; Hennig, Juergen; Elverfeldt, Dominik von [Dept. of Radiology, Medical Physics, University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany); Gruschke, Oliver G. [Lab. of Simulation, University of Freiburg - IMTEK (Germany); Kern, Johannes S. [Dept. of Dermatology, University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany); Korvink, Jan G. [Lab. of Simulation, University of Freiburg - IMTEK (Germany); Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Freiburg (Germany); Baxan, Nicoleta [Dept. of Radiology, Medical Physics, University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany); Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    MRI of the skin as non-invasive alternative to histopathology requires dedicated approaches to overcome both the low sensitivity and low contrast of standard MR investigations applied at microscale. The geometry of the skin with layers of large lateral dimensions and a few μm thickness demands exceptionally high resolution combined with large imaging matrix size. A home-made microcoil-based MR detector in planar phased-array geometry (diameter=5.5 mm) was developed to alleviate such limitations by combining the advantages of a large field-of-view and high signal-to-noise ratio. The detector was first characterized in terms of influence on B{sub 0} homogeneity and SNR. Trials on healthy and Acne inversa diseased human skin biopsies allowed the acquisition of high resolution images (30 x 30 x 100 μm{sup 3}) in reasonable scan time. Histology was subsequently performed to validate the MRI results, demonstrating the suitability of this methodological approach for the characterization and early detection of structural skin changes.

  10. Phase and Index of Refraction Imaging by Hyperspectral Reflectance Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selci, Stefano

    2016-12-16

    A hyperspectral reflectance confocal microscope (HSCM) was realized by CNR-ISC (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi) a few years ago. The instrument and data have been already presented and discussed. The main activity of this HSCM has been within biology, and reflectance data have shown good matching between spectral signatures and the nature or evolution on many types of cells. Such a relationship has been demonstrated mainly with statistical tools like Principal Component Analysis (PCA), or similar concepts, which represent a very common approach for hyperspectral imaging. However, the point is that reflectance data contains much more useful information and, moreover, there is an obvious interest to go from reflectance, bound to the single experiment, to reflectivity, or other physical quantities, related to the sample alone. To accomplish this aim, we can follow well-established analyses and methods used in reflectance spectroscopy. Therefore, we show methods of calculations for index of refraction n, extinction coefficient k and local thicknesses of frequency starting from phase images by fast Kramers-Kronig (KK) algorithms and the Abeles matrix formalism. Details, limitations and problems of the presented calculations as well as alternative procedures are given for an example of HSCM images of red blood cells (RBC).

  11. Spectroscopic evidence for Fermi liquid-like energy and temperature dependence of the relaxation rate in the pseudogap phase of the cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Seyed Iman; Stricker, Damien; Hancock, Jason N; Berthod, Christophe; Georges, Antoine; van Heumen, Erik; Chan, Mun K; Zhao, Xudong; Li, Yuan; Greven, Martin; Barišić, Neven; van der Marel, Dirk

    2013-04-09

    Cuprate high-Tc superconductors exhibit enigmatic behavior in the nonsuperconducting state. For carrier concentrations near "optimal doping" (with respect to the highest Tcs) the transport and spectroscopic properties are unlike those of a Landau-Fermi liquid. On the Mott-insulating side of the optimal carrier concentration, which corresponds to underdoping, a pseudogap removes quasi-particle spectral weight from parts of the Fermi surface and causes a breakup of the Fermi surface into disconnected nodal and antinodal sectors. Here, we show that the near-nodal excitations of underdoped cuprates obey Fermi liquid behavior. The lifetime τ(ω, T) of a quasi-particle depends on its energy ω as well as on the temperature T. For a Fermi liquid, 1/τ(ω, T) is expected to collapse on a universal function proportional to (ℏω)(2) + (pπk(B)T)(2). Magneto-transport experiments, which probe the properties in the limit ω = 0, have provided indications for the presence of a T(2) dependence of the dc (ω = 0) resistivity of different cuprate materials. However, Fermi liquid behavior is very much about the energy dependence of the lifetime, and this can only be addressed by spectroscopic techniques. Our optical experiments confirm the aforementioned universal ω- and T dependence of 1/τ(ω, T), with p ∼ 1.5. Our data thus provide a piece of evidence in favor of a Fermi liquid-like scenario of the pseudogap phase of the cuprates.

  12. Evaluation of the dark-medium objective lens in counting asbestos fibers by phase-contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Nelson, John H; Kashon, Michael L; Harper, Martin

    2015-06-01

    routine fiber counting as it will maintain continuity with risk assessments based on earlier phase-contrast microscopy fiber counts from field samples. Published standard methods would need to be modified to allow a higher aperture specification for the objective. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society 2015.

  13. Determination of electrostatic force and its characteristics based on phase difference by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kesheng; Cheng, Jia; Yao, Shiji; Lu, Yijia; Ji, Linhong; Xu, Dengfeng

    2016-12-01

    Electrostatic force measurement at the micro/nano scale is of great significance in science and engineering. In this paper, a reasonable way of applying voltage is put forward by taking an electrostatic chuck in a real integrated circuit manufacturing process as a sample, applying voltage in the probe and the sample electrode, respectively, and comparing the measurement effect of the probe oscillation phase difference by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy. Based on the phase difference obtained from the experiment, the quantitative dependence of the absolute magnitude of the electrostatic force on the tip-sample distance and applied voltage is established by means of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The results show that the varying characteristics of the electrostatic force with the distance and voltage at the micro/nano scale are similar to those at the macroscopic scale. Electrostatic force gradually decays with increasing distance. Electrostatic force is basically proportional to the square of applied voltage. Meanwhile, the applicable conditions of the above laws are discussed. In addition, a comparison of the results in this paper with the results of the energy dissipation method shows the two are consistent in general. The error decreases with increasing distance, and the effect of voltage on the error is small.

  14. X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis of ceramõmetal interface at different firing temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Saini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Porcelain chipping from porcelain fused to metal restoration has been Achilles heel till date. There has been advent of newer ceramics in past but but none of them has been a panacea for Porcelain fracture. An optimal firing is thus essential for the clinical success of the porcelain-fused to metal restoration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate ceramo-metal interface at different firing temperature using XRD and SEM-EDS analysis. Clinical implication of the study was to predict the optimal firing temperature at which porcelain should be fused with metal in order to possibly prevent the occasional failure of the porcelain fused to metal restorations. Materials and Methods: To meet the above-mentioned goal, porcelain was fused to metal at different firing temperatures (930-990°C in vacuum. The microstructural observations of interface between porcelain and metal were evaluated using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy. Results: Based on the experimental investigation of the interaction zone of porcelain fused to metal samples, it was observed that as the firing temperature was increased, the pores became less in number as well as the size of the pores decreased at the porcelain/metal interface upto 975°C but increased in size at 990°C. The least number of pores with least diameter were found in samples fired at 975°C. Several oxides like Cr 2 O 3 , NiO, and Al 2 O 3 and intermetallic compounds (CrSi 2 , AlNi 3 were also formed in the interaction zone. Conclusions : It is suggested that the presence of pores may trigger the crack propagation along the interface, causing the failure of the porcelain fused to metal restoration during masticatory action.

  15. Subcellular spectroscopic markers, topography and nanomechanics of human lung cancer and breast cancer cells examined by combined confocal Raman microspectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Gerald D; Wu, Yangzhe; Tang, Mingjie; Qi, Xiaojun; Xiao, Zhongmiao; Baker, Sherry M; Yu, Tian; Gilbertson, Timothy A; DeWald, Daryll B; Zhou, Anhong

    2013-02-21

    The nanostructures and hydrophobic properties of cancer cell membranes are important for membrane fusion and cell adhesion. They are directly related to cancer cell biophysical properties, including aggressive growth and migration. Additionally, chemical component analysis of the cancer cell membrane could potentially be applied in clinical diagnosis of cancer by identification of specific biomarker receptors expressed on cancer cell surfaces. In the present work, a combined Raman microspectroscopy (RM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique was applied to detect the difference in membrane chemical components and nanomechanics of three cancer cell lines: human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549), and human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-435 with and without BRMS1 metastasis suppressor). Raman spectral analysis indicated similar bands between the A549, 435 and 435/BRMS1 including ~720 cm(-1) (guanine band of DNA), 940 cm(-1) (skeletal mode polysaccharide), 1006 cm(-1) (symmetric ring breathing phenylalanine), and 1451 cm(-1) (CH deformation). The membrane surface adhesion forces for these cancer cells were measured by AFM in culture medium: 0.478 ± 0.091 nN for A549 cells, 0.253 ± 0.070 nN for 435 cells, and 1.114 ± 0.281 nN for 435/BRMS1 cells, and the cell spring constant was measured at 2.62 ± 0.682 mN m(-1) for A549 cells, 2.105 ± 0.691 mN m(-1) for 435 cells, and 5.448 ± 1.081 mN m(-1) for 435/BRMS1 cells.

  16. Chemical and spectroscopic investigation on the plaster of a Byzantine church.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Davide; Scarabino, Carla; Inverso, Donato; Proto, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The discovery of a Byzantine church under the floor of one of the oldest churches of Salerno (Italy) has given us the opportunity to investigate the fine composition of the plaster through chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, considering that plasters are generally formed by a carbonate phase (carbonates) and an inert phase (silicates), the characterization, performed on the carbonate phase by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), has revealed the presence of dolomite minerals. This information indicates that, during the building process, some accessory minerals of marble were added in the mortar to be used like fillers. The carbonate phase makes too difficult the spectroscopic characterization of the inert phase. Only by acid attack of the plaster the inert phase has been isolated and its characterization, by XRD and optical microscopy, has indicated the presence of olivine minerals and other typical silicates of river sands.

  17. Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Phase Transisions in A1c60 Compounds (a=K,Rb,Cs)

    OpenAIRE

    Koller, Daniel; Martin, Michael C.; Mihaly, Laszlo

    1994-01-01

    Optical measurements on doped C$_{60}$ films provide evidence for a transition from a high temperature conducting phase to a low temperature insulating phase in quenched Rb$_1$C$_{60}$ and K$_1$C$_{60}$ compounds, while Cs$_1$C$_{60}$ did not exhibit this behavior. For slow cooled samples our study confirms earlier results indicating phase separation of K$_1$C$_{60}$ to K$_3$C$_{60}$ and C$_{60}$, and the formation of a new Rb$_1$C$_{60}$ phase at low temperatures. Upon slow cooling Cs$_1$C$_...

  18. Estimates of historical exposures by phase contrast and transmission electron microscopy in North Carolina USA asbestos textile plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dement, J M; Myers, D; Loomis, D; Richardson, D; Wolf, S

    2009-09-01

    To develop a job-exposure matrix (JEM) for fibre exposures in three asbestos textile plants and to develop estimates of fibre size-specific exposures. Historical dust samples from three North Carolina, USA asbestos textile plants were obtained. Plant specific samples were used to express impinger dust concentrations as fibre concentrations by phase contract microscopy (PCM). Mixed models were used to estimate PCM exposures by plant, department, job and calendar time. Archived membrane filter samples were analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the bivariate diameter/length distribution of airborne fibres by plant and operation. PCM fibre levels estimated from the models were very high in the 1930s, with some operations having in excess of 200 fibres/ml, and decreased appreciably over time. TEM results for 77 airborne dust samples found that only a small proportion of airborne fibres were measured by PCM (>0.25 microm in diameter and >5 microm in length) and the proportion varied considerably by plant and operation (range 2.9% to 10.0%). The bivariate diameter/length distribution of airborne fibres demonstrated a relatively high degree of variability by plant and operation. PCM adjustment factors also varied substantially across plants and operations. These data provide new information concerning airborne fibre levels and characteristics in three historically important asbestos textile plants. PCM concentrations were high in the early years and TEM data demonstrate that the vast majority of airborne fibres inhaled by the workers were shorter than 5 microm in length, and thus not included in the PCM-based fibre counts.

  19. Use of Raman Spectroscopy and Phase-Contrast Microscopy To Characterize Cold Atmospheric Plasma Inactivation of Individual Bacterial Spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiwei; Doona, Christopher J; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy and phase-contrast microscopy were used to examine calcium dipicolinate (CaDPA) levels and rates of nutrient and nonnutrient germination of multiple individual Bacillus subtilis spores treated with cold atmospheric plasma (CAP). Major results for this work include the following: (i) >5 logs of spores deposited on glass surfaces were inactivated by CAP treatment for 3 min, while deposited spores placed inside an impermeable plastic bag were inactivated only ∼2 logs in 30 min; (ii) >80% of the spores treated for 1 to 3 min with CAP were nonculturable and retained CaDPA in their core, while >95% of spores treated with CAP for 5 to 10 min lost all CaDPA; (iii) Raman measurements of individual CAP-treated spores without CaDPA showed differences from spores that germinated with l-valine in terms of nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins; and (iv) 1 to 2 min of CAP treatment killed 99% of spores, but these spores still germinated with nutrients or exogenous CaDPA, albeit more slowly and to a lesser extent than untreated spores, while spores CAP treated for >3 min that retained CaDPA did not germinate via nutrients or CaDPA. However, even after 1 to 3 min of CAP treatment, spores germinated normally with dodecylamine. These results suggest that exposure to the present CAP configuration severely damages a spore's inner membrane and key germination proteins, such that the treated spores either lose CaDPA or can neither initiate nor complete germination with nutrients or CaDPA. Analysis of the various CAP components indicated that UV photons contributed minimally to spore inactivation, while charged particles and reactive oxygen species contributed significantly. Much research has shown that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is a promising tool for the inactivation of spores in the medical and food industries. However, knowledge about the effects of plasma treatment on spore properties is limited, especially at the single-cell level. In this study, Raman

  20. UriSed as an Alternative to Phase-Contrast Microscopy in the Differentiation between Glomerular and Non-Glomerular Hematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottini, Paula V; Andreguetto, Bruna D; Krempser, Kelly; Lauand, José Ricardo; Garlipp, Célia R

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation between glomerular and non-glomerular hematuria by observation of the erythrocyte morphology using phase-contrast is a time-consuming and labor-intensive procedure that requires skilled personnel. This paper has the purpose to evaluate the performance of UriSed (also called sediMAX in some countries) as an alternative to the phase-contrast microscopic analysis of erythrocyte morphology. 312 urine samples with hematuria were analyzed by UriSed and by phase-contrast microscopy. Based on the presence of codocytes and/or acanthocytes, samples were classified as non-glomerular and glomerular. Kappa correlation was used to assess the agreement between both methods. Our data showed excellent agreement between erythrocyte morphology analyzed by both methods (r = 0.974, kappa = 0.9484, p phase-contrast microscopy.

  1. The Use of Graphene and Its Derivatives for Liquid-Phase Transmission Electron Microscopy of Radiation-Sensitive Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hoduk; Jones, Matthew R; Nguyen, Son C; Hauwiller, Matthew R; Zettl, Alex; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2017-01-11

    One of the key challenges facing liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of biological specimens has been the damaging effects of electron beam irradiation. The strongly ionizing electron beam is known to induce radiolysis of surrounding water molecules, leading to the formation of reactive radical species. In this study, we employ DNA-assembled Au nanoparticle superlattices (DNA-AuNP superlattices) as a model system to demonstrate that graphene and its derivatives can be used to mitigate electron beam-induced damage. We can image DNA-AuNP superlattices in their native saline environment when the liquid cell window material is graphene, but not when it is silicon nitride. In the latter case, initial dissociation of assembled AuNPs was followed by their random aggregation and etching. Using graphene-coated silicon nitride windows, we were able to replicate the observation of stable DNA-AuNP superlattices achieved with graphene liquid cells. We then carried out a correlative Raman spectroscopy and TEM study to compare the effect of electron beam irradiation on graphene with and without the presence of water and found that graphene reacts with the products of water radiolysis. We attribute the protective effect of graphene to its ability to efficiently scavenge reactive radical species, especially the hydroxyl radicals which are known to cause DNA strand breaks. We confirmed this by showing that stable DNA-AuNP assemblies can be imaged in silicon nitride liquid cells when graphene oxide and graphene quantum dots, which have also recently been reported as efficient radical scavengers, are added directly to the solution. We anticipate that our study will open up more opportunities for studying biological specimens using liquid-phase TEM with the use of graphene and its derivatives as biocompatible radical scavengers to alleviate the effects of radiation damage.

  2. Identifying the crystallinity, phase, and arsenic uptake of the nanomineral schwertmannite using analytical high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. A.; Kim, B.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    Schwertmannite, an iron oxyhydroxide sulfate nanomineral, plays a significant role in the geochemistry of acid mine drainage (AMD) as a metastable phase with respect to goethite and by retaining toxic metals, e.g. arsenic [1]. Schwertmannite’s characteristic morphology is needles 100-300 nm long and only 5-10 nm in diameter extending from a dense aggregate. The poorly-and nano-crystalline nature of this mineral requires using high resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM) to be fully characterized. We used HRTEM to identify the polyphasic nature of natural samples of schwertmannite collected from the Iberian Pyrite Belt in Spain. In order to analyze the dense core, samples were prepared in thin section using an ultramicrotome. Data on a sample identified as pure schwertmannite through powder XRD shows the presence of 5-10 nm goethite nanocrystals making up a significant portion of one of the nanoneedle tips (Figure 1). These nanocrystals exhibit lattice fringes and faceted surfaces, both of which match that expected for goethite. The great majority of the nanoneedles are poorly-crystalline (no lattice fringes) with atomically rough surfaces which may be highly active in the uptake of As. The presence of a range of phases and crystallinities in this sample demonstrate incipient stages of the mechanism that results in transformation of schwertmannite to goethite. Further analytical TEM analyses will help us track sorption/desorption, as well as the specific locations of As within these materials upon initial formation, as well as during transformation. [1] Acero et al. (2006) GCA 70, 4130-4139. Figure 1. HRTEM image of 'schwertmannite' nanoneedle with FFT data (inset).

  3. Microscopie à l'angle de Brewster : transitions de phases et défauts d'orientation dans des films monomoléculairess

    OpenAIRE

    Hénon, Sylvie

    1993-01-01

    Microscopy at the Brewster angle is a new powerful technique for the study of monolayers at the free surface of water. Taking advantage of the reflectivity properties of an interface, it is sensitive to the thickness, density and anisotopy of the films. This technique was used to study the phase transitions that sometimes occur during the formation of films adsorbed at the surface of aqueous solutionsof amphiphiles. The number, nature and morphology of these phases depend on experimental cond...

  4. Effective segmentation of fresh post-mortem murine lung parenchyma in phase contrast X-ray tomographic microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Cremona, Tiziana P.; Lovric, Goran; Arcadu, Filippo; Stampanoni, Marco; Schittny, Johannes C.

    2017-06-01

    The acinus represents the functional unit of the mammalian lung. It is defined as the small tree of gas-exchanging airways, which is fed by the most distal purely conducting airway. Different hypotheses exist on how the fine structure of the acinus changes during ventilation and development. Since in classical 2-dimensional (2D) sections of the lung the borders of the acini are not detectable, every study of acini requires 3-dimensional (3D) datasets. As a basis for further studies of pulmonary acini we imaged rodent lungs as close to life as possible using phase contrast synchrotron radiation-based X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM), and developed a protocol for the segmentation of the alveolar septa. The method is based on a combined multilevel filtering approach. Seeds are automatically defined for separate regions of tissue and airspace during each 2D filtering level and then given as input to a 3D random walk segmentation. Thus, the different types of artifacts present in the images are treated separately, taking into account the sample’s structural complexity. The proposed procedure yields high-quality 3D segmentations of acinar microstructure that can be used for a reliable morphological analysis.

  5. Diffraction phase microscopy imaging and multi-physics modeling of the nanoscale thermal expansion of a suspended resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Lu, Tianjian; Yu, Xin; Jin, Jian-Ming; Goddard, Lynford L

    2017-07-04

    We studied the nanoscale thermal expansion of a suspended resistor both theoretically and experimentally and obtained consistent results. In the theoretical analysis, we used a three-dimensional coupled electrical-thermal-mechanical simulation and obtained the temperature and displacement field of the suspended resistor under a direct current (DC) input voltage. In the experiment, we recorded a sequence of images of the axial thermal expansion of the central bridge region of the suspended resistor at a rate of 1.8 frames/s by using epi-illumination diffraction phase microscopy (epi-DPM). This method accurately measured nanometer level relative height changes of the resistor in a temporally and spatially resolved manner. Upon application of a 2 V step in voltage, the resistor exhibited a steady-state increase in resistance of 1.14 Ω and in relative height of 3.5 nm, which agreed reasonably well with the predicted values of 1.08 Ω and 4.4 nm, respectively.

  6. Noncritical phase-matched lithium triborate optical parametric oscillator for high resolution coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy and microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurna, M.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Otto, Cornelis

    2006-01-01

    An efficient, widely tunable, narrow-bandwidth, green-pumped, noncritical phase-matched lithium triborate based optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is applied to coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy and microscopy. The tunable signal beam (740–930 nm) of the OPO is combined with

  7. Chemically exfoliated Mo S2 layers: Spectroscopic evidence for the semiconducting nature of the dominant trigonal metastable phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Banabir; Singh, Anjali; Sharada, G.; Mahale, Pratibha; Kumar, Abhinav; Thirupathaiah, S.; Sezen, H.; Amati, M.; Gregoratti, Luca; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Sarma, D. D.

    2017-11-01

    A metastable trigonal phase, existing only as small patches on a chemically exfoliated few-layered, thermodynamically stable 1 H phase of Mo S2 , is believed to critically influence the properties of Mo S2 -based devices. The electronic structure of this metastable phase is little understood in the absence of a direct experimental investigation of its electronic properties, complicated further by conflicting claims from theoretical investigations. We address this issue by investigating the electronic structure of this minority phase in chemically exfoliated Mo S2 few-layered systems by enhancing its contributions with the use of highly spatially resolved (≤120 nm resolution) photoemission spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations. Based on these results, we establish that the ground state of this phase, arrived at by the chemical exfoliation of Mo S2 using the usual Li intercalation technique, is a small gap (˜90 ±40 meV ) semiconductor in contrast to most claims in the literature; we also identify the specific trigonal structure it has among many suggested ones.

  8. Review of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: promising novel imaging technique to resolve neuronal network activity and identify cellular biomarkers of psychiatric disorders

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre

    2014-09-22

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a new powerful quantitative imaging technique well suited to noninvasively explore a transparent specimen with a nanometric axial sensitivity. In this review, we expose the recent developments of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM). Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM) represents an important and efficient quantitative phase method to explore cell structure and dynamics. In a second part, the most relevant QPM applications in the field of cell biology are summarized. A particular emphasis is placed on the original biological information, which can be derived from the quantitative phase signal. In a third part, recent applications obtained, with QP-DHM in the field of cellular neuroscience, namely the possibility to optically resolve neuronal network activity and spine dynamics, are presented. Furthermore, potential applications of QPM related to psychiatry through the identification of new and original cell biomarkers that, when combined with a range of other biomarkers, could significantly contribute to the determination of high risk developmental trajectories for psychiatric disorders, are discussed.

  9. Quantitative asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (Q-ATOM) for ultrafast quantitative phase imaging flow cytometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Andy K. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Chung, Bob M. F.; Tsang, Kwok Yeung; Chan, Antony C. S.; Wei, Xiaoming; Wong, Kenneth K.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Cheah, Kathryn S. E.; Shum, Anderson H. C.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the interferometric or holographic approaches, recent QPM techniques provide quantitative-phase information, e.g cell volume, dry mass and optical scattering properties for label-free cellular physical phenotyping. These approaches generally rely on iterative phase-retrieval algorithms to obtain quantitative-phase information, which are computationally intensive. Moreover, current QPM techniques can only offer limited image acquisition rate by using CMOS/CCD image sensors, these two limitations hinder QPM for high-throughput quantitative image-based single-cell analysis in real-time. To this end, we demonstrate an interferometry-free quantitative phase microscopy developed on a new generation of time-stretch microscopy, asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which is coined quantitative ATOM (Q-ATOM) - featuring an unprecedented cell measurement throughput together with the assorted intrinsic optical phenotypes (e.g. angular light scattering profile) and the derived physical properties of the cells (e.g. cell size, dry mass density etc.). Based on a similar concept to Schlieren imaging, Q-ATOM retrieves quantitative-phase information through multiple off-axis light-beam detection at a line-scan rate of throughput equivalent to ~100,000 cells/sec without image blur. This technique shows a great potential for ultrahigh throughput label-free image-based single-cell biophysical phentotyping.

  10. Highly specific detection of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in human stool samples by undemanding and inexpensive phase contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatius, Ralf; Klemm, Thomas; Zander, Steffen; Gahutu, Jean Bosco; Kimmig, Peter; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Regnath, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    To compare phase contrast microscopy (PCM) of unstained slides for the detection of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts with a commercially available enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the detection of cryptosporidial antigen in human stool samples, we prospectively analysed by both methods 463 fresh human stool samples obtained from diarrhoeic patients between July and October 2014. Compared with the EIA, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of PCM were 88.9 % (95 % confidence interval (CI), 66.0-98.1 %), 100 % (95 % CI, 99.0-100 %), 100 % (95 % CI, 77.3-100 %) and 99.6 % (95 % CI, 98.3-100 %), respectively. Additionally, we retrospectively examined with PCM 65 fixed stool samples that had been collected in 2010 from mostly asymptomatic Rwandan children <5 years of age; 14 of these samples had previously yielded positive results with a highly sensitive real-time (RT)-PCR. PCM detected cryptosporidia in 5/14 RT-PCR-positive samples, and notably, also in one of 51 RT-PCR-negative samples, which was subsequently confirmed by acid-fast staining. Positive and negative percent agreement of PCM with RT-PCR were 35.7 % (95 % CI, 16.2-61.4 %) and 98.0 % (95 % CI, 88.7-100 %), respectively. Positive PCM results were associated with higher RT-PCR cycle threshold values (p = 0.044). In conclusion, PCM offers a highly specific, undemanding and inexpensive method for the laboratory diagnosis of acute human cryptosporidiosis independent of the causative Cryptosporidium species.

  11. Effect of Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation Treatment on Nasal Ciliary Motility: A Study with Phase-Contrast Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Chiara; Pagliuca, Giulio; Martellucci, Salvatore; de Vincentiis, Marco; Greco, Antonio; Fusconi, Massimo; De Virgilio, Armando; Gallipoli, Camilla; Simonelli, Marilia; Gallo, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the efficacy of nasal ciliary motility after radiofrequency ablation treatment in patients with isolated inferior turbinate hypertrophy and to clarify how long until normal ciliary function is restored. Prospective, single-group, pretest-posttest design. Academic tertiary care medical center. This study involved 34 adult patients affected by nasal obstruction due to inferior turbinate hypertrophy who underwent radiofrequency ablation treatment between June and December 2014. Diagnosis was assessed according to clinical history, nasal endoscopy, and active anterior rhinomanometry. Cytologic samples were collected by nasal scraping before surgery and 1, 2, and 3 months after surgery. Ciliary motility was evaluated by nasal cytology with phase-contrast microscopy. Functional aspects of nasal mucosa were studied, with a focus on 3 parameters: (1) nasal mucociliary clearance, assessed by saccharin nasal transit time test; (2) percentage of ciliated cell motility, measured as the ratio between cells with motility and cells without motility; and (3) efficacy of ciliary motility, measured as the ratio between cells with valid motility and cells with hypovalid motility. Ciliary motility and ciliary efficacy showed a significant reduction after 1 and 2 months from surgery, returning to normal values within 3 months. No significant changes in saccharin nasal transit time were recorded during the follow-up. The outcomes of this study suggest that radiofrequency ablation treatment causes ciliary motility changes of nasal mucosa that are completely restored after at least 3 months after surgery. These cytologic abnormalities do not affect nasal functionality. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  12. Investigation of dynamic morphological changes of cancer cells during photoimmuno therapy (PIT) by low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Mikako; Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Iwai, Hidenao; Magata, Yasuhiro; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2014-03-01

    We have reported a new molecular-targeted cancer phototherapy, photoimmunotherapy (PIT), which killed implanted tumors in mice without side-effects. To understand the mechanism of cell killing with PIT, three-dimentional dynamic low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy (3D LC-QPM), a device developed by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K, was used to detect morphologic changes in cancer cells during PIT. 3T3/HER2 cells were incubated with anti-HER2 trastuzumab-IR700 (10 μg/mL, 0.1 μM as IR700) for 24 hours, then, three-dimensionally imaged with the LC-QPM during the exposure of two different optically filtered lights for excitation of IR700 (500-780 nm) and imaging (780-950 nm). For comparison with traditional PDT, the same experiments were performed with Photofrin (10 and 1 μM). Serial changes in the cell membrane were readily visualized on 3D LC-QPM. 3T3/HER2 cells began to swell rapidly after exposure to 500-780 nm light excitation. The cell volume reached a maximum within 1 min after continuous exposure, and then the cells appeared to burst. This finding suggests that PIT damages the cell membrane by photo-reaction inducing an influx of water into the cell causing swelling and bursting of the cells. Interestingly, even after only 5 seconds of light exposure, the cells demonstrated swelling and bursting albeit more slowly, implying that sufficient cumulative damage occurs on the cell membrane to induce lethal damage to cells even at minimal light exposure. Similar but non-selective membrane damage was shown in PDT-treated cells Photofrin. Thus, PIT induces sufficient damage to the cell membrane within 5 seconds to induce rapid necrotic cell death which can be observed directly with 3D LC-QPM. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the biochemical mechanisms underlying PIT-induced cellular membrane damage.

  13. Mechanochromism of piroxicam accompanied by intermolecular proton transfer probed by spectroscopic methods and solid-phase changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Agam R; Lubach, Joseph W; Munson, Eric J; Muller, Francis X; Grant, David J W

    2005-05-11

    Structural and solid-state changes of piroxicam in its crystalline form under mechanical stress were investigated using cryogenic grinding, powder X-ray diffractometry, diffuse-reflectance solid-state ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, variable-temperature solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and solid-state diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. Crystalline piroxicam anhydrate exists as colorless single crystals irrespective of the polymorphic form and contains neutral piroxicam molecules. Under mechanical stress, these crystals become yellow amorphous piroxicam, which has a strong propensity to recrystallize to a colorless crystalline phase. The yellow color of amorphous piroxicam is attributed to charged piroxicam molecules. Variable-temperature solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy indicates that most of the amorphous piroxicam consists of neutral piroxicam molecules; the charged species comprise only about 8% of the amorphous phase. This ability to quantify the fractions of charged and neutral molecules of piroxicam in the amorphous phase highlights the unique capability of solid-state NMR to quantify mixtures in the absence of standards. Other compounds of piroxicam, which are yellow, are known to contain zwitterionic piroxicam molecules. The present work describes a system in which proton transfer accompanies both solid-state disorder and a change in color induced by mechanical stress, a phenomenon which may be termed mechanochromism of piroxicam.

  14. Optical measurements of the phase diagrams of Langmuir monolayers of fatty acid, ester, and alcohol mixtures by Brewster-angle microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teer, Ellis; Knobler, Charles M.; Lautz, Carsten; Wurlitzer, Stefan; Kildae, John; Fischer, Thomas M.

    1997-02-01

    Surface pressure-temperature phase diagrams have been determined by Brewster-angle microscopy for Langmuir monolayers of heneicosanoic acid with the esters methyl and ethyl heneicosanoate and octadecanoic acid with methyl, ethyl, and propyl octadecanoate. The behavior is similar to that found previously in mixtures of an acid and an alcohol. In each case with increasing ester concentration the L2/L2' phase boundary moves toward lower pressure and higher temperature while the L2/Ov boundary moves toward lower pressure and lower temperature. The L2' and Ov phases eventually merge and the boundary with the L2 phase moves to zero pressure. The phase diagram of eicosyl acetate is similar to that of the fatty acids. We attribute the variations in the diagrams to the extent of hydrogen bonding between the head group and the subphase.

  15. Introduction to fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiran, Ionita C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of basic principles of fluorescence microscopy, including a brief history on the invention of this type of microscopy. The chapter highlights important points related to properties of fluorochromes, resolution in fluorescence microscopy, phase contrast and fluorescence, fluorescence filters, construction of a fluorescence microscope, and tips on the correct use of this equipment.

  16. Nano-spectroscopic imaging of intermolecular structure, coupling and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pollard, Benjamin; Hinrichs, Karsten; Raschke, Markus B

    2013-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly, the function of biomembranes, and the performance of organic solar cells rely on molecular interactions on the nanoscale. The understanding and design of such intrinsic or engineered heterogeneous functional soft matter has long been impeded by a lack of spectroscopic tools with sufficient nanometer spatial resolution, attomolar sensitivity, and intermolecular spectroscopic specificity. We implement vibrational scattering-scanning near-field optical microscopy ($s$-SNOM) in a multi-spectral modality with unprecedented spectral precision to investigate the structure-function relationship in nano-phase separated block-copolymers. We use a vibrational resonance as a sensitive reporter of the local chemical environment and resolve, with few nanometer spatial resolution and 0.2 cm$^{-1}$ spectral precision, spectral Stark shifts and line broadening correlated with molecular-scale morphologies. By creating images of solvatochromic vibrational shifts we discriminate local variations in elect...

  17. Quantitative dispersion microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dan; Choi, Wonshik; Sung, Yongjin; Yaqoob, Zahid; Ramachandra R Dasari; Feld, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Refractive index dispersion is an intrinsic optical property and a useful source of contrast in biological imaging studies. In this report, we present the first dispersion phase imaging of living eukaryotic cells. We have developed quantitative dispersion microscopy based on the principle of quantitative phase microscopy. The dual-wavelength quantitative phase microscope makes phase measurements at 310 nm and 400 nm wavelengths to quantify dispersion (refractive index increment ratio) of live...

  18. Spectroscopic data

    CERN Document Server

    Melzer, J

    1976-01-01

    During the preparation of this compilation, many people contributed; the compilers wish to thank all of them. In particular they appreciate the efforts of V. Gilbertson, the manuscript typist, and those of K. C. Bregand, J. A. Kiley, and W. H. McPherson, who gave editorial assistance. They would like to thank Dr. J. R. Schwartz for his cooperation and encouragement. In addition, they extend their grati­ tude to Dr. L. Wilson of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, who gave the initial impetus to this project. v Contents I. I ntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. Organization ofthe Spectroscopic Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Methods of Production and Experimental Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Band Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2...

  19. Correlating metal poisoning with zeolite deactivation in an individual catalyst particle by chemical and phase sensitive X-ray microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Martinez, J.; Beale, A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325802068; Deka, U.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325811202; O'Brien, M.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314003738; Quinn, P.D.; Mosselmans, J.F.W.; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2013-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is the main conversion process used in oil refineries. An X-ray microscopy method is used to show that metal poisoning and related structural changes in the zeolite active material lead to a non-uniform core–shell deactivation of FCC catalyst particles. The study links

  20. Lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles and their correspondence with equilibrium thermodynamic phases: A quantitative fluorescence microscopy imaging approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidorra, Matthias; Garcia, Alejandra; Ipsen, John Hjort

    2009-01-01

    We report a novel analytical procedure to measure the surface areas of coexisting lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) based on image processing of 3D fluorescence microscopy data. The procedure involves the segmentation of lipid domains from fluorescent image stacks...

  1. Application of maximum likelihood estimator in nano-scale optical path length measurement using spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghian Nezam, S M R; Joo, C; Tearney, G J; de Boer, J F

    2008-10-27

    Spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy (SD-OCPM) measures minute phase changes in transparent biological specimens using a common path interferometer and a spectrometer based optical coherence tomography system. The Fourier transform of the acquired interference spectrum in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is complex and the phase is affected by contributions from inherent random noise. To reduce this phase noise, knowledge of the probability density function (PDF) of data becomes essential. In the present work, the intensity and phase PDFs of the complex interference signal are theoretically derived and the optical path length (OPL) PDF is experimentally validated. The full knowledge of the PDFs is exploited for optimal estimation (Maximum Likelihood estimation) of the intensity, phase, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in SD-OCPM. Maximum likelihood (ML) estimates of the intensity, SNR, and OPL images are presented for two different scan modes using Bovine Pulmonary Artery Endothelial (BPAE) cells. To investigate the phase accuracy of SD-OCPM, we experimentally calculate and compare the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of the OPL standard deviation and the square root of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (1/ square root 2SNR ) over 100 BPAE images for two different scan modes. The correction to the OPL measurement by applying ML estimation to SD-OCPM for BPAE cells is demonstrated.

  2. Phase evolution, characterization, and impedance spectroscopic analysis of nanocrystalline SrBi2Nb2O9 in glassy Li2B4O7 matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, N S; Varma, K B

    2001-12-01

    Transparent glass composites in the system (100 - x) Li2B4O7 - x SrBi2Nb2O9 (where x = 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30, in molar ratio) were fabricated by conventional melt-quenching technique. The amorphous nature of the as-quenched glass composites was confirmed via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) studies. Differential thermal analyses (DTA) established the glassy nature of the as-quenched samples. Glass nanocomposites (GNC's) with high-optical transparency were obtained by controlled heat-treatment of the glass composites at 750 K/6 h. Perovskite SrBi2Nb2O9 (SBN) phase formation through an intermediate fluorite phase was confirmed by XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The dielectric constant (epsilon r) in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 40 MHz at room temperature increases whereas dielectric loss (D) decreases with increase in SBN content in Li2B4O7 glass matrix. Impedance spectroscopy employed to rationalize the electrical behavior of the as-quenched glasses and glass nanocomposites suggests the coexistence of electronic and ionic conduction in these materials. The optical transmission and band-gap energy of these composites were found to be crystallite size dependent.

  3. Repeated crack healing in MAX-phase ceramics revealed by 4D in situ synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, W.G.; Pei, R.; McDonald, S.A.; Fife, J.L.; Shen, L.; Boatemaa, L.; Farle, A.S.; Yan, K.; Zhang, X.; Van der Zwaag, S.; Lee, P.D.; Withers, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    MAX phase materials are emerging as attractive engineering materials in applications where the material is exposed to severe thermal and mechanical conditions in an oxidative environment. The Ti2AlC MAX phase possesses attractive thermomechanical properties even beyond a temperature of 1000 K. An

  4. Faceting, composition and crystal phase evolution in III-V antimonide nanowire heterostructures revealed by combining microscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Dick, Kimberly A.; Plissard, Sébastien; Hai Nguyen, Thanh; Makoudi, Younes; Berthe, Maxime; Nys, Jean-Philippe; Wallart, Xavier; Grandidier, Bruno; Caroff, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    III-V antimonide nanowires are among the most interesting semiconductors for transport physics, nanoelectronics and long-wavelength optoelectronic devices due to their optimal material properties. In order to investigate their complex crystal structure evolution, faceting and composition, we report a combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of gold-nucleated ternary InAs/InAs1-xSbx nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. SEM showed the general morphology and faceting, TEM revealed the internal crystal structure and ternary compositions, while STM was successfully applied to characterize the oxide-free nanowire sidewalls, in terms of nanofaceting morphology, atomic structure and surface composition. The complementary use of these techniques allows for correlation of the morphological and structural properties of the nanowires with the amount of Sb incorporated during growth. The addition of even a minute amount of Sb to InAs changes the crystal structure from perfect wurtzite to perfect zinc blende, via intermediate stacking fault and pseudo-periodic twinning regimes. Moreover, the addition of Sb during the axial growth of InAs/InAs1-xSbx heterostructure nanowires causes a significant conformal lateral overgrowth on both segments, leading to the spontaneous formation of a core-shell structure, with an Sb-rich shell.

  5. Real-time atomic-resolution imaging of crystal growth process in water by phase modulation atomic force microscopy at one frame per second

    OpenAIRE

    Miyata, Kazuki; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancement in dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled its operation in liquid with atomic-scale resolution. However, its imaging speed has often been too slow to visualize atomic-scale dynamic processes. Here, we propose a method for making a significant improvement in the operation speed of dynamic-mode AFM. In this method, we use a wideband and low-latency phase detector with an improved algorithm for the signal complexification. We demonstrate atomic-scale imaging of...

  6. Phase transition behaviors of the supported DPPC bilayer investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heng-Liang; Tong, Yujin; Peng, Qiling; Li, Na; Ye, Shen

    2016-01-21

    The phase transition behaviors of a supported bilayer of dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) have been systematically evaluated by in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using an asymmetric bilayer composed of per-deuterated and per-protonated monolayers, i.e., DPPC-d75/DPPC and a symmetric bilayer of DPPC/DPPC, we were able to probe the molecular structural changes during the phase transition process of the lipid bilayer by SFG spectroscopy. It was found that the DPPC bilayer is sequentially melted from the top (adjacent to the solution) to bottom leaflet (adjacent to the substrate) over a wide temperature range. The conformational ordering of the supported bilayer does not decrease (even slightly increases) during the phase transition process. The conformational defects in the bilayer can be removed after the complete melting process. The phase transition enthalpy for the bottom leaflet was found to be approximately three times greater than that for the top leaflet, indicating a strong interaction of the lipids with the substrate. The present SFG and AFM observations revealed similar temperature dependent profiles. Based on these results, the temperature-induced structural changes in the supported lipid bilayer during its phase transition process are discussed in comparison with previous studies.

  7. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for whic...

  8. In situ observation of the impact of surface oxidation on the crystallization mechanism of GeTe phase-change thin films by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, R.; Bernier, N.; Cooper, D.; Sabbione, C.; Hippert, F.; Noé, P.

    2017-09-01

    The crystallization mechanisms of prototypical GeTe phase-change material thin films have been investigated by in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy annealing experiments. A novel sample preparation method has been developed to improve sample quality and stability during in situ annealing, enabling quantitative analysis and live recording of phase change events. Results show that for an uncapped 100 nm thick GeTe layer, exposure to air after fabrication leads to composition changes which promote heterogeneous nucleation at the oxidized surface. We also demonstrate that protecting the GeTe layer with a 10 nm SiN capping layer prevents nucleation at the surface and allows volume nucleation at a temperature 50 °C higher than the onset of crystallization in the oxidized sample. Our results have important implications regarding the integration of these materials in confined memory cells.

  9. Hybrid random walk-linear discriminant analysis method for unwrapping quantitative phase microscopy images of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Diane N. H.; Teitell, Michael A.; Reed, Jason; Zangle, Thomas A.

    2015-11-01

    Standard algorithms for phase unwrapping often fail for interferometric quantitative phase imaging (QPI) of biological samples due to the variable morphology of these samples and the requirement to image at low light intensities to avoid phototoxicity. We describe a new algorithm combining random walk-based image segmentation with linear discriminant analysis (LDA)-based feature detection, using assumptions about the morphology of biological samples to account for phase ambiguities when standard methods have failed. We present three versions of our method: first, a method for LDA image segmentation based on a manually compiled training dataset; second, a method using a random walker (RW) algorithm informed by the assumed properties of a biological phase image; and third, an algorithm which combines LDA-based edge detection with an efficient RW algorithm. We show that the combination of LDA plus the RW algorithm gives the best overall performance with little speed penalty compared to LDA alone, and that this algorithm can be further optimized using a genetic algorithm to yield superior performance for phase unwrapping of QPI data from biological samples.

  10. Phase Boundary Propagation in Li-Alloying Battery Electrodes Revealed by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, Andrew J; Jungjohann, Katherine L; Zavadil, Kevin R; Harris, Charles T

    2016-06-28

    Battery cycle life is directly influenced by the microstructural changes occurring in the electrodes during charge and discharge cycles. Here, we image in situ the nanoscale phase evolution in negative electrode materials for Li-ion batteries using a fully enclosed liquid cell in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to reveal early degradation that is not evident in the charge-discharge curves. To compare the electrochemical phase transformation behavior between three model materials, thin films of amorphous Si, crystalline Al, and crystalline Au were lithiated and delithiated at controlled rates while immersed in a commercial liquid electrolyte. This method allowed for the direct observation of lithiation mechanisms in nanoscale negative electrodes, revealing that a simplistic model of a surface-to-interior lithiation front is insufficient. For the crystalline films, a lithiation front spread laterally from a few initial nucleation points, with continued grain nucleation along the growing interface. The intermediate lithiated phases were identified using electron diffraction, and high-resolution postmortem imaging revealed the details of the final microstructure. Our results show that electrochemically induced solid-solid phase transformations can lead to highly concentrated stresses at the laterally propagating phase boundary which should be considered for future designs of nanostructured electrodes for Li-ion batteries.

  11. High-resolution STEM imaging with a quadrant detector--conditions for differential phase contrast microscopy in the weak phase object approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majert, S; Kohl, H

    2015-01-01

    Differential phase contrast is a contrast mechanism that can be utilized in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to determine the distribution of magnetic or electric fields. In practice, several different detector geometries can be used to obtain differential phase contrast. As recent high resolution differential phase contrast experiments with the STEM are focused on ring quadrant detectors, we evaluate the contrast transfer characteristics of different quadrant detector geometries, namely two ring quadrant detectors with different inner detector angles and a conventional quadrant detector, by calculating the corresponding phase gradient transfer functions. For an ideal microscope and a weak phase object, this can be done analytically. The calculated phase gradient transfer functions indicate that the barely illuminated ring quadrant detector setup used for imaging magnetic fields in the specimen reduces the resolution limit to about 2.5Å for an aberration corrected STEM. Our results show that the resolution can be drastically improved by using a conventional quadrant detector instead. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Spectroscopic evidence for Fermi liquid-like energy and temperature dependence of the relaxation rate in the pseudogap phase of the cuprates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirzaei, S.I.; Stricker, D.; Hancock, J.N.; Berthod, C.; Georges, A.; van Heumen, E.; Chan, M.K.; Zhao, X.; Li, Y.; Greven, M.; Barišić, N.; van der Marel, D.

    2013-01-01

    Cuprate high-Tc superconductors exhibit enigmatic behavior in the nonsuperconducting state. For carrier concentrations near "optimal doping" (with respect to the highest Tcs) the transport and spectroscopic properties are unlike those of a Landau-Fermi liquid. On the Mott-insulating side of the

  13. Imaging the morphological change of tissue structure during the early phase of esophageal tumor progression using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Esophageal cancer is a common malignancy with a very poor prognosis. Successful strategies for primary prevention and early detection are critically needed to control this disease. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is becoming a novel optical tool of choice for imaging tissue architecture and cellular morphology by two-photon excited fluorescence. In this study, we used MPM to image microstructure of human normal esophagus, carcinoma in situ (CIS), and early invasive carcinoma in order to establish the morphological features to differentiate these tissues. The diagnostic features such as the appearance of cancerous cells, the significant loss of stroma, the absence of the basement membrane were extracted to distinguish between normal and cancerous esophagus tissue. These results correlated well with the paired histological findings. With the advancement of clinically miniaturized MPM and the multi-photon probe, combining MPM with standard endoscopy will therefore allow us to make a real-time in vivo diagnosis of early esophageal cancer at the cellular level.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy studying of structural features of NiTi B2 phase formed under pulsed electron-beam impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, Ludmila L.; Semin, Viktor O.; Gudimova, Ekaterina Y. [Institute of Strength Physicists and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Neiman, Alexey A., E-mail: nasa@ispms.tsc.ru; Lotkov, Alexander I.; Ostapenko, Marina G. [Institute of Strength Physicists and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Koval, Nikolai N.; Teresov, Anton D. [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    By transmission electron microscopy method the evolution of structural-phase states on a depth of close to equiatomic NiTi modified layer has been studied. Modification performed by pulse impact on its surface low-energy high-current electron beam (beam energy density 10 J/sm{sup 2}, 10 pulses, pulse duration 50mks). It is established that during the treatment in the layer thickness of 8–10 μm, the melting of primary B2 phase and contained therein as Ti2Ni phase particles occurs. The result is change in the concentration ratio of titanium and nickel in the direction of increasing titanium content, which was confirmed by X-ray analysis in the form of increased unit cell parameter B2 phase. Analysis of the electron diffraction pattern showed that the modified layer is characterized as a highly distorted structure on the basis of bcc lattice. Lattice distortions are maximal near the surface and extends to a depth of melt. In subjacent layer there is gradual decline lattice distortions is observed.

  15. Structure refinement of the δ1p phase in the Fe-Zn system by single-crystal X-ray diffraction combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Norihiko L; Tanaka, Katsushi; Yasuhara, Akira; Inui, Haruyuki

    2014-04-01

    The structure of the δ1p phase in the iron-zinc system has been refined by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy. The large hexagonal unit cell of the δ1p phase with the space group of P63/mmc comprises more or less regular (normal) Zn12 icosahedra, disordered Zn12 icosahedra, Zn16 icosioctahedra and dangling Zn atoms that do not constitute any polyhedra. The unit cell contains 52 Fe and 504 Zn atoms so that the compound is expressed with the chemical formula of Fe13Zn126. All Fe atoms exclusively occupy the centre of normal and disordered icosahedra. Iron-centred normal icosahedra are linked to one another by face- and vertex-sharing forming two types of basal slabs, which are bridged with each other by face-sharing with icosioctahedra, whereas disordered icosahedra with positional disorder at their vertex sites are isolated from other polyhedra. The bonding features in the δ1p phase are discussed in comparison with those in the Γ and ζ phases in the iron-zinc system.

  16. Multi-Layer Phase Analysis: Quantifying the Elastic Properties of Soft Tissues and Live Cells with Ultra-High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuegen; Akhtar, Riaz; Nijenhuis, Nadja; Wilkinson, Steven J.; Murphy, Lilli; Ballestrem, Christoph; Sherratt, Michael. J.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Derby, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy is potentially a powerful tool for characterising the elastic properties of soft biological tissues and cells. In this paper, we present a method, Multi-Layer Phase Analysis (MLPA), which can be used to extract local speed of sound values, for both thin tissue sections mounted on glass slides and cultured cells grown on cell culture plastic, with a resolution close to 1 μm. The method exploits the phase information that is preserved in the interference between the acoustic wave reflected from the substrate surface and internal reflections from the acoustic lens. In practice, a stack of acoustic images are captured beginning with the acoustic focal point 4 μm above the substrate surface and moving down in 0.1 μm increments. Scanning parameters, such as acoustic wave frequency and gate position, were adjusted to obtain optimal phase and lateral resolution. The data were processed offline to extract the phase information with the contribution of any inclination in the substrate removed prior to the calculation of sound speed. Here, we apply this approach to both skin sections and fibroblast cells, and compare our data with the V(f) (voltage vs frequency) method that has previously been used for characterisation of soft tissues and cells. Compared with the V(f) method, the MPLA method not only reduces signal noise but can be implemented without making a priori assumptions with regards to tissue or cell parameters. PMID:22547273

  17. Microcoil-based MR phase imaging and manganese enhanced microscopy of glial tumor neurospheres with direct optical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxan, Nicoleta; Kahlert, Ulf; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Nikkhah, Guido; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2012-07-01

    Susceptibility differences among tissues were recently used for highlighting complementary contrast in MRI different from the conventional T(1), T(2), or spin density contrasts. This method, based on the signal phase, previously showed improved image contrast of human or rodent neuroarchitecture in vivo, although direct MR phase imaging of cellular architecture was not available until recently. In this study, we present for the first time the ability of microcoil-based phase MRI to resolve the structure of human glioma neurospheres at significantly improved resolutions (10 × 10 μm(2)) with direct optical image correlation. The manganese chloride property to function as a T(1) contrast agent enabled a closer examination of cell physiology with MRI. Specifically the temporal changes of manganese chloride uptake, retention and release time within and from individual clusters were assessed. The optimal manganese chloride concentration for improved MR signal enhancement was determined while keeping the cellular viability unaffected. The presented results demonstrate the possibilities to reveal structural and functional observation of living glioblastoma human-derived cells. This was achieved through the combination of highly sensitive microcoils, high magnetic field, and methods designed to maximize contrast to noise ratio. The presented approach may provide a powerful multimodal tool that merges structural and functional information of submilimeter biological samples. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Single shot white light interference microscopy with colour fringe analysis for quantitative phase imaging of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vishal; Mehta, D. S.

    2013-02-01

    To quantitatively obtain the phase map of Onion and human red blood cell (RBC) from white light interferogram we used Hilbert transform color fringe analysis technique. The three Red, Blue and Green color components are decomposed from single white light interferogram and Refractive index profile for Red, Blue and Green colour were computed in a completely non-invasive manner for Onion and human RBC. The present technique might be useful for non-invasive determination of the refractive index variation within cells and tissues and morphological features of sample with ease of operation and low cost.

  20. Micromechanical analysis of martensite distribution on strain localization in dual phase steels by scanning electron microscopy and crystal plasticity simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ziaei-Rad, S., E-mail: szrad@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saeidi, N. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jamshidian, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-07-18

    The morphology and distribution of the dispersed martensite islands in the ferrite matrix plays a key role in the formation of shear bands in dual phase steels. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the martensite dispersion and the strain localization regions due to the formation of shear bands in fine-grained DP 780 steel, employing experimental observations as well as numerical simulations. SEM studies of the deformed microstructure showed that voids nucleated at ferrite-martensite interface within larger ferrite grains and regions with low local martensite fraction. The experimental results were precisely analyzed by finite element simulations based on the theory of crystal plasticity. A parametric study was then performed to obtain a deeper insight in to the effect of martensite dispersion on the strain localization of the neighboring ferrite. Crystal plasticity simulation results revealed that in a more regular structure compared to a random structure, a greater region of the ferrite phase contributes to accommodate plasticity. In addition, these regions limit the formation of main shear bands by creating barriers against stress concentration regions, results in lower growth and interaction of stress concentration regions with each others.

  1. Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  2. Liquid-phase sample preparation method for real-time monitoring of airborne asbestos fibers by dual-mode high-throughput microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myoung-Ock; Kim, Jung Kyung; Han, Hwataik; Lee, Jeonghoon

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos that had been used widely as a construction material is a first-level carcinogen recognized by the World Health Organization. It can be accumulated in body by inhalation causing virulent respiratory diseases including lung cancer. In our previous study, we developed a high-throughput microscopy (HTM) system that can minimize human intervention accompanied by the conventional phase contrast microscopy (PCM) through automated counting of fibrous materials and thus significantly reduce analysis time and labor. Also, we attempted selective detection of chrysotile using DksA protein extracted from Escherichia coli through a recombinant protein production technique, and developed a dual-mode HTM (DM-HTM) by upgrading the HTM device. We demonstrated that fluorescently-labeled chrysotile asbestos fibers can be identified and enumerated automatically among other types of asbestos fibers or non-asbestos particles in a high-throughput manner through a newly modified HTM system for both reflection and fluorescence imaging. However there is a limitation to apply DM-HTM to airborne sample with current air collecting method due to the difficulty of applying the protein to dried asbestos sample. Here, we developed a technique for preparing liquid-phase asbestos sample using an impinger normally used to collect odor molecules in the air. It would be possible to improve the feasibility of the dual-mode HTM by integrating a sample preparation unit for making collected asbestos sample dispersed in a solution. The new technique developed for highly sensitive and automated asbestos detection can be a potential alternative to the conventional manual counting method, and it may be applied on site as a fast and reliable environmental monitoring tool.

  3. Nanoscale Phase-Separated Structure in Core-Shell Nanoparticles of SiO2-Si1-xGexO2 Glass Revealed by Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yugo; Yonezawa, Kazuhiro

    2017-09-05

    SiO2-based optical fibers are indispensable components of modern information communication technologies. It has recently become increasingly important to establish a technique for visualizing the nanoscale phase-separated structure inside SiO2-GeO2 glass nanoparticles during the manufacturing of SiO2-GeO2 fibers. This is because the rapidly increasing price of Ge has made it necessary to improve the Ge yield by clarifying the detailed mechanism of Ge diffusion into SiO2. However, direct observation of the internal nanostructure of glass particles has been extremely difficult, mainly due to electrostatic charging and the damage induced by electron and X-ray irradiation. In the present study, we used state-of-the-art scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to examine cross-sectional samples of SiO2-GeO2 particles embedded in an epoxy resin, which were fabricated using a broad Ar ion beam and a focused Ga ion beam. These advanced techniques enabled us to observe the internal phase-separated structure of the nanoparticles. We have for the first time clearly determined the SiO2-Si1-xGexO2 core-shell structure of such particles, the element distribution, the degree of crystallinity, and the quantitative chemical composition of microscopic regions, and we discuss the formation mechanism for the observed structure. The proposed imaging protocol is highly promising for studying the internal structure of various core-shell nanoparticles, which affects their catalytic, optical, and electronic properties.

  4. High-throughput, label-free, single-cell, microalgal lipid screening by machine-learning-equipped optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Ito, Takuro; Yalikun, Yaxiaer; Jiang, Yiyue; Tanaka, Yo; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-05-01

    The development of reliable, sustainable, and economical sources of alternative fuels to petroleum is required to tackle the global energy crisis. One such alternative is microalgal biofuel, which is expected to play a key role in reducing the detrimental effects of global warming as microalgae absorb atmospheric CO 2 via photosynthesis. Unfortunately, conventional analytical methods only provide population-averaged lipid amounts and fail to characterize a diverse population of microalgal cells with single-cell resolution in a non-invasive and interference-free manner. Here high-throughput label-free single-cell screening of lipid-producing microalgal cells with optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy was demonstrated. In particular, Euglena gracilis, an attractive microalgal species that produces wax esters (suitable for biodiesel and aviation fuel after refinement), within lipid droplets was investigated. The optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscope is based on an integration of a hydrodynamic-focusing microfluidic chip, an optical time-stretch quantitative phase microscope, and a digital image processor equipped with machine learning. As a result, it provides both the opacity and phase maps of every single cell at a high throughput of 10,000 cells/s, enabling accurate cell classification without the need for fluorescent staining. Specifically, the dataset was used to characterize heterogeneous populations of E. gracilis cells under two different culture conditions (nitrogen-sufficient and nitrogen-deficient) and achieve the cell classification with an error rate of only 2.15%. The method holds promise as an effective analytical tool for microalgae-based biofuel production. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  5. Three-dimensional morphological imaging of human induced pluripotent stem cells by using low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Kakuno, Yumi; Goto, Kentaro; Fukami, Tadashi; Sugiyama, Norikazu; Iwai, Hidenao; Mizuguchi, Yoshinori; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing need for non-invasive imaging techniques in the field of stem cell research. Label-free techniques are the best choice for assessment of stem cells because the cells remain intact after imaging and can be used for further studies such as differentiation induction. To develop a high-resolution label-free imaging system, we have been working on a low-coherence quantitative phase microscope (LC-QPM). LC-QPM is a Linnik-type interference microscope equipped with nanometer-resolution optical-path-length control and capable of obtaining three-dimensional volumetric images. The lateral and vertical resolutions of our system are respectively 0.5 and 0.93 μm and this performance allows capturing sub-cellular morphological features of live cells without labeling. Utilizing LC-QPM, we reported on three-dimensional imaging of membrane fluctuations, dynamics of filopodia, and motions of intracellular organelles. In this presentation, we report three-dimensional morphological imaging of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS cells). Two groups of monolayer hiPS cell cultures were prepared so that one group was cultured in a suitable culture medium that kept the cells undifferentiated, and the other group was cultured in a medium supplemented with retinoic acid, which forces the stem cells to differentiate. The volumetric images of the 2 groups show distinctive differences, especially in surface roughness. We believe that our LC-QPM system will prove useful in assessing many other stem cell conditions.

  6. Local structure of amorphous Ag5In5Sb60Te30 and In3SbTe2 phase change materials revealed by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Smriti; Manivannan, Anbarasu; Shaik, Habibuddin; Mohan Rao, G.

    2017-07-01

    Reversible switching between highly resistive (binary "0") amorphous phase and low resistive (binary "1") crystalline phase of chalcogenide-based Phase Change Materials is accredited for the development of next generation high-speed, non-volatile, data storage applications. The doped Sb-Te based materials have shown enhanced electrical/optical properties, compared to Ge-Sb-Te family for high-speed memory devices. We report here the local atomic structure of as-deposited amorphous Ag5In5Sb60Te30 (AIST) and In3SbTe2 (IST) phase change materials using X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopic studies. Although AIST and IST materials show identical crystallization behavior, they differ distinctly in their crystallization temperatures. Our experimental results demonstrate that the local environment of In remains identical in the amorphous phase of both AIST and IST material, irrespective of its atomic fraction. In bonds with Sb (˜44%) and Te (˜56%), thereby forming the primary matrix in IST with a very few Sb-Te bonds. Sb2Te constructs the base matrix for AIST (˜63%) along with few Sb-Sb bonds. Furthermore, an interesting assimilation of the role of small-scale dopants such as Ag and In in AIST, reveals rare bonds between themselves, while showing selective substitution in the vicinity of Sb and Te. This results in increased electronegativity difference, and consequently, the bond strength is recognized as the factor rendering stability in amorphous AIST.

  7. Three-dimensional motion-picture imaging of dynamic object by parallel-phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy using an inverted magnification optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takahito; Shinomura, Masato; Xia, Peng; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Matoba, Osamu

    2017-04-01

    We constructed a parallel-phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy (PPSDHM) system using an inverted magnification optical system, and succeeded in three-dimensional (3D) motion-picture imaging for 3D displacement of a microscopic object. In the PPSDHM system, the inverted and afocal magnification optical system consisted of a microscope objective (16.56 mm focal length and 0.25 numerical aperture) and a convex lens (300 mm focal length and 82 mm aperture diameter). A polarization-imaging camera was used to record multiple phase-shifted holograms with a single-shot exposure. We recorded an alum crystal, sinking down in aqueous solution of alum, by the constructed PPSDHM system at 60 frames/s for about 20 s and reconstructed high-quality 3D motion-picture image of the crystal. Then, we calculated amounts of displacement of the crystal from the amounts in the focus plane and the magnifications of the magnification optical system, and obtained the 3D trajectory of the crystal by that amounts.

  8. Effect of colistin exposure and growth phase on the surface properties of live Acinetobacter baumannii cells examined by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Rachel L.; Nation, Roger L.; Harper, Marina; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D.; Tan, Chun-Hong; Li, Jian; Larson, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The diminishing antimicrobial development pipeline has forced the revival of colistin as a last line of defence against infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative ‘superbugs’ such as Acinetobacter baumannii. The complete loss of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediates colistin resistance in some A. baumannii strains. Atomic force microscopy was used to examine the surface properties of colistin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains at mid-logarithmic and stationary growth phases in liquid and in response to colistin treatment. The contribution of LPS to surface properties was investigated using A. baumannii strains constructed with and without the lpxA gene. Bacterial spring constant measurements revealed that colistin-susceptible cells were significantly stiffer than colistin-resistant cells at both growth phases (P colistin treatment at high concentrations (32 mg/L) resulted in more rigid surfaces for both phenotypes. Multiple, large adhesive peaks frequently noted in force curves captured on colistin-susceptible cells were not evident for colistin-resistant cells. Adhesion events were markedly reduced following colistin exposure. The cell membranes of strains of both phenotypes remained intact following colistin treatment, although fine topographical details were illustrated. These studies, conducted for the first time on live A. baumannii cells in liquid, have contributed to our understanding of the action of colistin in this problematic pathogen. PMID:21925844

  9. Combining gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA), light scattering, field flow fractionation and cryo electron microscopy in a multidimensional approach to characterize liposomal carrier vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urey, Carlos; Weiss, Victor U; Gondikas, Andreas; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Marko-Varga, György; Andersson, Roland

    2016-11-20

    For drug delivery, characterization of liposomes regarding size, particle number concentrations, occurrence of low-sized liposome artefacts and drug encapsulation are of importance to understand their pharmacodynamic properties. In our study, we aimed to demonstrate the applicability of nano Electrospray Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analyser (nES GEMMA) as a suitable technique for analyzing these parameters. We measured number-based particle concentrations, identified differences in size between nominally identical liposomal samples, and detected the presence of low-diameter material which yielded bimodal particle size distributions. Subsequently, we compared these findings to dynamic light scattering (DLS) data and results from light scattering experiments coupled to Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (AF4), the latter improving the detectability of smaller particles in polydisperse samples due to a size separation step prior detection. However, the bimodal size distribution could not be detected due to method inherent limitations. In contrast, cryo transmission electron microscopy corroborated nES GEMMA results. Hence, gas-phase electrophoresis proved to be a versatile tool for liposome characterization as it could analyze both vesicle size and size distribution. Finally, a correlation of nES GEMMA results with cell viability experiments was carried out to demonstrate the importance of liposome batch-to-batch control as low-sized sample components possibly impact cell viability. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Confocal Raman microscopy as a tool to describe different mineral and organic phases at high spatial resolution within marine biogenic carbonates: case study on Nerita undata (Gastropoda, Neritopsina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrke, G.; Nouet, J.

    2011-06-01

    Marine biogenic carbonates formed by invertebrates (e.g. corals and mollusk shells) represent complex composites of one or more mineral phases and organic molecules. This complexity ranges from the macroscopic structures observed with the naked eye down to sub micrometric structures only revealed by micro analytical techniques. Understanding to what extent and how organisms can control the formation of these structures requires that the mineral and organic phases can be identified and their spatial distribution related. Here we demonstrate the capability of confocal Raman microscopy applied to cross sections of a shell of Nerita undata to describe the distribution of calcite and aragonite including their crystallographic orientation with high lateral resolution (∼300 nm). Moreover, spatial distribution of functional groups of organic compounds can be simultaneously acquired, allowing to specifically relate them to the observed microstructures. The data presented in this case study highlights the possible new contributions of this method to the description of modalities of Nerita undata shell formation, and what could be expected of its application to other marine biogenic carbonates. Localization of areas of interest would also allow further investigations using more localized methods, such as TEM that would provide complementary information on the relation between organic molecules and crystallographic lattice.

  11. Ab initio structural and spectroscopic study of HPS{sup x} and HSP{sup x} (x = 0,+1,−1) in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaghlane, Saida Ben [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications – LSAMA, Université de Tunis, Tunis (Tunisia); Cotton, C. Eric; Francisco, Joseph S., E-mail: francisc@purdue.edu, E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr [Department of Chemistry and Department of Earth and Atmospheric Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 49707 (United States); Linguerri, Roberto; Hochlaf, Majdi, E-mail: francisc@purdue.edu, E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr [Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, Université Paris-Est, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France)

    2013-11-07

    Accurate ab initio computations of structural and spectroscopic parameters for the HPS/HSP molecules and corresponding cations and anions have been performed. For the electronic structure computations, standard and explicitly correlated coupled cluster techniques in conjunction with large basis sets have been adopted. In particular, we present equilibrium geometries, rotational constants, harmonic vibrational frequencies, adiabatic ionization energies, electron affinities, and, for the neutral species, singlet-triplet relative energies. Besides, the full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) for HPS{sup x} and HSP{sup x} (x = −1,0,1) systems have been generated at the standard coupled cluster level with a basis set of augmented quintuple-zeta quality. By applying perturbation theory to the calculated PESs, an extended set of spectroscopic constants, including τ, first-order centrifugal distortion and anharmonic vibrational constants has been obtained. In addition, the potentials have been used in a variational approach to deduce the whole pattern of vibrational levels up to 4000 cm{sup −1} above the minima of the corresponding PESs.

  12. The Fourteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and from the second phase of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfathi, Bela; Aguado, D. S.; Aguilar, Gabriela; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Ananna, Tonima Tasnim; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Anguiano, Borja; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Ata, Metin; Aubourg, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) has been in operation since July 2014. This paper describes the second data release from this phase, and the fourteenth from SDSS overall (making this, Data Release Fourteen or DR14). This release makes public data taken by SDSS-IV in its first two years of operation (July 2014-2016). Like all previous SDSS releases, DR14 is cumulative, including the most recent reductions and calibrations of all data taken by SDSS since the firs...

  13. Estimates of historical exposures by phase contrast and transmission electron microscopy for pooled exposure--response analyses of North Carolina and South Carolina, USA asbestos textile cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dement, John M; Loomis, Dana; Richardson, David; Wolf, Susanne H; Kuempel, Eileen D

    2011-08-01

    To develop pooled size-specific asbestos fiber exposure estimates for North Carolina and South Carolina asbestos textile plants. Airborne sample data and prior exposure estimates by phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) for the two cohorts were reviewed and compared. Estimates by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for 160 membrane filter samples from all plant were pooled. Poisson regression models were developed to predict bivariate diameter/length airborne fiber size distributions based on independent categorical variables for fiber diameter, fiber length, plant, and exposure zone. The model predicted bivariate diameter/length distributions were expressed as the proportion of fibers in 28 size-specific cells and these data were used to calculate PCM to TEM adjustment factors in order to estimate fiber size-specific exposures for the pooled cohort. Exposure levels in the North Carolina plants were in excess of 50 f/cc for many operations through about 1955 owing to lack of dust control measures in early years whereas levels in the South Carolina plant were generally less than 10 f/cc by about 1950. The Poisson regression models found covariates for plant department to be a stronger predictor of bivariate size proportions than plant; however, a plant effect was observed. The final Poisson models demonstrated good fit to the observed data. Consistent with early studies, fiber exposures in the North Carolina plants were much higher than in South Carolina plant. Use of the predicted size-specific TEM exposures by plant and department based on the Poisson model predictions should reduce exposure.

  14. Quenching Phase Separation by Vapor Deposition Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ran; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2015-03-01

    Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) is a solventless, free radical technique predominately used to deposit homogeneous films of linear and crosslinked polymers directly from gas phase feeds. We report a template-free method to fabricate continuous-phase porous polymer films by simultaneous phase separation during iCVD. Phase separation during film growth is achieved by condensing an inert porogen, along with initiator, monomer, and crosslinker. When the vapor mixture transports to the cooled substrate, phase separation occurs along with polymerization and crosslinking, which quench the state of phase separation. The kinetics of spontaneously phase separation can be qualitatively understood on the basis of Cahn-Hilliard theory. A series of films were grown by varying monomer and porogen's degree of saturation. Deposited films were studied by electron microscopy and spectroscopic techniques.

  15. Acoustic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Briggs, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    For many years 'Acoustic Microscopy' has been the definitive book on the subject. A key development since it was first published has been the development of ultrasonic force microscopy. This edition has a major new chapter on this technique and its applications.

  16. Comment on 'in situ visible Raman spectroscopic study of phase change in LiCoO 2 film by laser irradiation'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, V.

    2004-12-01

    SHFY [S.-W. Song, K.-S. Han, H. Fujita, M. Yoshimura, Chem. Phys. Lett. 344 (2001) 299], reported recently the observation of a structural phase transition in LiCoO 2/Co films from the layered trigonal phase to the cubic spinel phase and improvement in crystallization of the spinel phase under laser irradiation. Our analysis indicate that their results are more consistent with the formation of Co 3O 4 instead, their Raman data caring the specific fingerprints of this latter.

  17. Thermal, conductivity, NMR, and Raman spectroscopic measurements and phase diagram of the Cs2S2O7-CsHSO4 system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Hama, Hind; Lapina, Olga

    2003-01-01

    the water molecules are strongly associated in the melt. Fast exchange reactions take place between the species present, leading to the observed O-17 NMR single line with an averaged chemical shift. Super-ionic and thermodynamic stable phases and the temperatures of phase transitions have been identified...

  18. Structural phase transition of ternary dielectric SmGdO{sub 3}: Evidence from angle dispersive x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Yogesh, E-mail: rkatiyar@uprrp.edu, E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: yogesh.sharma@upr.edu; Sahoo, Satyaprakash, E-mail: rkatiyar@uprrp.edu, E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: yogesh.sharma@upr.edu; Misra, Pankaj; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Katiyar, Ram S., E-mail: rkatiyar@uprrp.edu, E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: yogesh.sharma@upr.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-8377 (United States); Mishra, A. K.; Dwivedi, Abhilash; Sharma, S. M. [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2015-03-07

    High-pressure synchrotron based angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) studies were carried out on SmGdO{sub 3} (SGO) up to 25.7 GPa at room temperature. ADXRD results indicated a reversible pressure-induced phase transition from ambient monoclinic to hexagonal phase at ∼8.9 GPa. The observed pressure-volume data were fitted with the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state yielding zero pressure bulk modulus B{sub 0} = 132(22) and 177(9) GPa for monoclinic (B-type) and hexagonal (A-type) phases, respectively. Pressure dependent micro-Raman spectroscopy further confirmed the monoclinic to hexagonal phase transition at about 5.24 GPa. The mode Grüneisen parameters and pressure coefficients for different Raman modes corresponding to each individual phases of SGO were calculated using pressure dependent Raman mode analysis.

  19. Spectro-refractometry of individual microscopic objects using swept-source quantitative phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Hwang; Jang, Jaeduck; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-11-05

    We present a novel spectroscopic quantitative phase imaging technique with a wavelength swept-source, referred to as swept-source diffraction phase microscopy (ssDPM), for quantifying the optical dispersion of microscopic individual samples. Employing the swept-source and the principle of common-path interferometry, ssDPM measures the multispectral full-field quantitative phase imaging and spectroscopic microrefractometry of transparent microscopic samples in the visible spectrum with a wavelength range of 450-750 nm and a spectral resolution of less than 8 nm. With unprecedented precision and sensitivity, we demonstrate the quantitative spectroscopic microrefractometry of individual polystyrene beads, 30% bovine serum albumin solution, and healthy human red blood cells.

  20. Aromatic hydrazones derived from nicotinic acid hydrazide as fluorimetric pH sensing molecules: Structural analysis by computational and spectroscopic methods in solid phase and in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benković, T.; Kenđel, A.; Parlov-Vuković, J.; Kontrec, D.; Chiş, V.; Miljanić, S.; Galić, N.

    2018-02-01

    Structural analyses of aroylhydrazones were performed by computational and spectroscopic methods (solid state NMR, 1 and 2D NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR (ATR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectrometry and spectrofluorimetry) in solid state and in solution. The studied compounds were N‧-(2,3-dihydroxyphenylmethylidene)-3-pyridinecarbohydrazide (1), N‧-(2,5-dihydroxyphenylmethylidene)-3-pyridinecarbohydrazide (2), N‧-(3-chloro-2-hydroxy-phenylmethylidene)-3-pyridinecarbohydrazide (3), and N‧-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl-methylidene)-3-pyridinecarbohydrazide (4). Both in solid state and in solution, all compounds were in ketoamine form (form I, sbnd COsbnd NHsbnd Ndbnd Csbnd), stabilized by intramolecular H-bond between hydroxyl proton and nitrogen atom of the Cdbnd N group. In solid state, the Cdbnd O group of 1-4 were involved in additional intermolecular H-bond between closely packed molecules. Among hydrazones studied, the chloro- and methoxy-derivatives have shown pH dependent and reversible fluorescence emission connected to deprotonation/protonation of salicylidene part of the molecules. All findings acquired by experimental methods (NMR, IR, Raman, and UV-Vis spectra) were in excellent agreement with those obtained by computational methods.

  1. Theoretical spectroscopic investigations of HNS{sup q} and HSN{sup q} (q = 0, +1, −1) in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Yaghlane, S., E-mail: roberto.linguerri@u-pem.fr, E-mail: saidayagh@gmail.com; Jaidane, N.-E. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications - LSAMA, Université de Tunis El Manar, Tunis (Tunisia); Cotton, C. E.; Francisco, J. S. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Earth and Atmospheric Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 49707 (United States); Al Mogren, M. M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Saud University, PO Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Linguerri, R., E-mail: roberto.linguerri@u-pem.fr, E-mail: saidayagh@gmail.com; Hochlaf, M. [Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, Université Paris-Est, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France)

    2014-06-28

    We performed accurate ab initio investigations of the geometric parameters and the vibrational structure of neutral HNS/HSN triatomics and their singly charged anions and cations. We used standard and explicitly correlated coupled cluster approaches in connection with large basis sets. At the highest levels of description, we show that results nicely approach those obtained at the complete basis set limit. Moreover, we generated the three-dimensional potential energy surfaces (3D PESs) for these molecular entities at the coupled cluster level with singles and doubles and a perturbative treatment of triple excitations, along with a basis set of augmented quintuple-zeta quality (aug-cc-pV5Z). A full set of spectroscopic constants are deduced from these potentials by applying perturbation theory. In addition, these 3D PESs are incorporated into variational treatment of the nuclear motions. The pattern of the lowest vibrational levels and corresponding wavefunctions, up to around 4000 cm{sup −1} above the corresponding potential energy minimum, is presented for the first time.

  2. A high pressure infrared spectroscopic study of PbCO3-cerussite: constraints on the structure of the post-aragonite phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalli, K.; Santillán, J.; Williams, Q.

    2005-09-01

    We have measured the infrared spectrum of aragonite-structured PbCO3-cerussite to 41 GPa at 300 K in the diamond anvil cell. We observed a phase transition from an orthorhombic to a trigonal structure beginning at 15 GPa, manifested by a splitting of the ν2-out-of-plane bending vibration and a broadening and dramatic decrease in amplitude of the ν1-symmetric stretching vibration of the carbonate group. While the locations of the ν1-symmetric stretching and ν4-in-plane bending bands are similar between the low- and high-pressure phases, their mode shifts and peak shapes change markedly near the transition. In particular, the ν1 symmetric stretch has an essentially zero pressure shift in the high pressure phase, and its dramatically enhanced peak width indicates that it may be symmetry forbidden. The decreased mode shifts of the carbonate vibrations after the phase transition suggest that the carbonate group is less compressible in the new structure. The spectral changes observed are consistent with a small, trigonal unit cell, with space group {Pbar{3}{1c}} and two formula units, instead of a previously proposed orthorhombic cell with sixteen formula units. This structure is identical to that of the high-pressure phase of BaCO3, and likely CaCO3 as well. Our results thus indicate that the post-aragonite, high-pressure phase of divalent-cation carbonates may be a comparatively high-symmetry trigonal structure.

  3. Correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  4. Characterization, modeling and physical mechanisms of different surface treatment methods at room temperature on the oxide and interfacial quality of the SiO2 film using the spectroscopic scanning capacitance microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Mun Wong

    Full Text Available In this article, a simple, low cost and combined surface treatment method [pre-oxidation immersion of the p-type silicon (Si substrate in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and post oxidation ultra-violet (UV irradiation of the silicon-dioxide (SiO2 film] at room temperature is investigated. The interface trap density at midgap [Dit(mg] of the resulting SiO2 film (denoted as sample 1A is quantified from the full width at half-maximum of the scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM differential capacitance (dC/dV characteristics by utilizing a previously validated theoretical model. The Dit(mg of sample 1A is significantly lower than the sample without any surface treatments which indicates that it is a viable technique for improving the interfacial quality of the thicker SiO2 films prepared by wet oxidation. Moreover, the proposed combined surface treatment method may possibly complement the commonly used forming gas anneal process to further improve the interfacial quality of the SiO2 films. The positive shift of the flatband voltage due to the overall oxide charges (estimated from the probe tip dc bias at the peak dC/dV spectra of sample 1A suggests the presence of negative oxide fixed charge density (Nf in the oxide. In addition, an analytical formula is derived to approximate the difference of the Nf values between the oxide samples that are immersed in H2O2 and UV irradiated from their measured SCM dC/dV spectra. Conversely, some physical mechanisms are proposed that result in the ionization of the SiO− species (which are converted from the neutral SiOH groups that originate from the pre-oxidation immersion in H2O2 and ensuing wet oxidation during the UV irradiation as well as the UV photo-injected electrons from the Si substrate (which did not interact with the SiOH groups. They constitute the source of mobile electrons which partially passivate the positively charged empty donor-like interface traps at the Si-SiO2 interface. Keywords: Dielectrics

  5. Spectroscopic analysis and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate; , James D.; Reed, Christopher J.; Domke, Christopher H.; Le, Linh; Seasholtz, Mary Beth; Weber, Andy; Lipp, Charles

    2017-04-18

    Apparatus for spectroscopic analysis which includes a tunable diode laser spectrometer having a digital output signal and a digital computer for receiving the digital output signal from the spectrometer, the digital computer programmed to process the digital output signal using a multivariate regression algorithm. In addition, a spectroscopic method of analysis using such apparatus. Finally, a method for controlling an ethylene cracker hydrogenator.

  6. Applied quantum chemistry: Spectroscopic detection and characterization of the F2BS and Cl2BS free radicals in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bing; Sheridan, Phillip M; Clouthier, Dennis J

    2015-03-28

    In this and previous work [D. J. Clouthier, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 244309 (2014)], the spectroscopic signatures of the X2BY (X = H, halogen, Y = O, S) free radicals have been predicted using high level ab initio theory. The theoretical results have been used to calculate the electronic absorption and single vibronic level (SVL) emission spectra of the radicals under typical jet-cooled conditions. Using these diagnostic predictions, the previously unknown F2BS and Cl2BS free radicals have been identified and characterized. The radicals were prepared in a free jet expansion by subjecting precursor mixtures of BF3 or BCl3 and CS2 vapor to an electric discharge at the exit of a pulsed molecular beam valve. The B̃(2)A1-X̃(2)B2 laser-induced fluorescence spectra were found within 150 cm(-1) of their theoretically predicted positions with vibronic structure consistent with our Franck-Condon simulations. The B̃(2)A1 state emits down to the ground state and to the low-lying Ã(2)B1 excited state and the correspondence between the observed and theoretically derived SVL emission Franck-Condon profiles was used to positively identify the radicals and make assignments. Excited state Coriolis coupling effects complicate the emission spectra of both radicals. In addition, a forbidden component of the electronically allowed B̃-X̃ band system of Cl2BS is evident, as signaled by the activity in the b2 modes in the spectrum. Symmetry arguments indicate that this component gains intensity due to a vibronic interaction of the B̃(2)A1 state with a nearby electronic state of (2)B2 symmetry.

  7. A high throughput spectral image microscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesley, M.; Puri, R.

    2018-01-01

    A high throughput spectral image microscopy system is configured for rapid detection of rare cells in large populations. To overcome flow cytometry rates and use of fluorophore tags, a system architecture integrates sample mechanical handling, signal processors, and optics in a non-confocal version of light absorption and scattering spectroscopic microscopy. Spectral images with native contrast do not require the use of exogeneous stain to render cells with submicron resolution. Structure may be characterized without restriction to cell clusters of differentiation.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigations of phase biaxiality in the nematic glass of a shape-persistent V-shaped mesogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueirinhas, João L; Feio, Gabriel; Cruz, Carlos; Lehmann, Matthias; Köhn, Christiane; Dong, Ronald Y

    2010-11-07

    Deuterium and carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy were used to study both the high temperature uniaxial nematic and the low temperature biaxial nematic glass of a shape-persistent V-shaped mesogen. It was found that biaxial ordering determined in the domains of the latter has symmetry lower than D(2h) and is compatible with C(2h) symmetry or lower. In particular, elements of the ordering matrix including biaxial phase order parameters were determined from (2)H NMR at two temperatures, one just below the glass transition, and the other deep inside the biaxial glass, which allowed for the characterization of the dominant molecular motions at these temperatures. (13)C NMR magic angle spinning sideband patterns, collected both in the high temperature nematic phase and in the nematic glass, clearly show the difference between them in terms of the phase symmetry.

  9. Multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehle, Jean-Louis [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Samartzis, Peter C., E-mail: sama@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Stamataki, Katerina [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Voutes, 71003, Heraklion (Greece); Piel, Jean-Philippe [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Katsoprinakis, George E.; Papadakis, Vassilis [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Schimowski, Xavier [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Rakitzis, T. Peter [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, Voutes, 71003, Heraklion (Greece); Loppinet, Benoit [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece)

    2014-03-31

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is an established technique, particularly useful for thickness measurements of thin films. It measures polarization rotation after a single reflection of a beam of light on the measured substrate at a given incidence angle. In this paper, we report the development of multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry where the light beam reflects multiple times on the sample. We have investigated both theoretically and experimentally the effect of sample reflectivity, number of reflections (passes), angles of incidence and detector dynamic range on ellipsometric observables tanΨ and cosΔ. The multiple pass approach provides increased sensitivity to small changes in Ψ and Δ, opening the way for single measurement determination of optical thickness T, refractive index n and absorption coefficient k of thin films, a significant improvement over the existing techniques. Based on our results, we discuss the strengths, the weaknesses and possible applications of this technique. - Highlights: • We present multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry (MPSE), a multi-pass approach to ellipsometry. • Different detectors, samples, angles of incidence and number of passes were tested. • N passes improve polarization ratio sensitivity to the power of N. • N reflections improve phase shift sensitivity by a factor of N. • MPSE can significantly improve thickness measurements in thin films.

  10. High-Q dynamic force microscopy in liquid and its application to living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, J; Humphris, A D; Owen, R J; Miles, M J

    2001-07-01

    We present a new dynamic force microscopy technique for imaging in liquids in the piconewton regime. The low quality factor (Q) of the cantilever is increased up to three orders of magnitude by the implementation of a positive feedback control. The technique also includes a phase-locked loop unit to track the resonance of the cantilever. Experiments and computer simulations indicate that the tip-sample forces are below 100 pN, about two orders of magnitude lower than in conventional tapping mode atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, the spectroscopic ability is greatly enhanced. Either the phase shift or the resonant frequency shows a high sensitivity to variations in either the energy dissipation or conservative interactions between the tip and the sample, respectively. The potential of this technique is demonstrated by imaging living cells.

  11. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Millet, Larry; Mir, Mustafa; Ding, Huafeng; Unarunotai, Sakulsuk; Rogers, John; Gillette, Martha U; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-01-17

    We present spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) as a new optical microscopy technique, capable of measuring nanoscale structures and dynamics in live cells via interferometry. SLIM combines two classic ideas in light imaging: Zernike's phase contrast microscopy, which renders high contrast intensity images of transparent specimens, and Gabor's holography, where the phase information from the object is recorded. Thus, SLIM reveals the intrinsic contrast of cell structures and, in addition, renders quantitative optical path-length maps across the sample. The resulting topographic accuracy is comparable to that of atomic force microscopy, while the acquisition speed is 1,000 times higher. We illustrate the novel insight into cell dynamics via SLIM by experiments on primary cell cultures from the rat brain. SLIM is implemented as an add-on module to an existing phase contrast microscope, which may prove instrumental in impacting the light microscopy field at a large scale.

  12. Assessing fabrication tolerances for a multilevel 2D binary grating for 3D multifocus microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davanco, Marcelo; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Luciani, Vincent; Liddle, James Alexander

    2016-05-02

    We perform a comprehensive theoretical assessment of fabrication tolerances for a 2D eight-level binary phase grating that is the central element of a multi-focal plane 3D microscopy apparatus. The fabrication process encompasses a sequence of aligned lithography and etching steps with stringent requirements on layer-to-layer overlay, etch depth and etched sidewall slope, which we show are nonetheless achievable with state-of-the-art optical lithography and etching tools. We also perform broadband spectroscopic diffraction pattern measurements on a fabricated grating, and show how such measurements can be valuable in determining small fabrication errors in diffractive optical elements.

  13. Confocal microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    molecular aggregates in artificial light harvesting sys- tem it is important to elucidate the exciton dynamics of individual micro-rods which can be achieved by using confocal microscopy and polarization resolved single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy.30 41 In the present work, we have studied exciton dynamics of two.

  14. Gallium-containing Heusler phases ScRh{sub 2}Ga, ScPd{sub 2}Ga, TmRh{sub 2}Ga and LuRh{sub 2}Ga. Magnetic and solid state NMR-spectroscopic characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heletta, Lukas; Seidel, Stefan; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Benndorf, Christopher [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie, Kristallographie und Materialwissenschaften; Eckert, Hellmut [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie; Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos (Brazil). Inst. of Physics

    2017-10-01

    The gallium-containing Heusler phases ScRh{sub 2}Ga, ScPd{sub 2}Ga, TmRh{sub 2}Ga and LuRh{sub 2}Ga have been synthesized by arc-melting of the elements followed by different annealing sequences to improve phase purity. The samples have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction. The structures of Lu{sub 0.97}Rh{sub 2}Ga{sub 1.03} (Fm3m, a=632.94(5) pm, wR2=0.0590, 46 F{sup 2} values, seven variables) and Sc{sub 0.88}Rh{sub 2}Ga{sub 1.12} (a=618.91(4) pm, wR2=0.0284, 44 F{sup 2} values, six variables) have been refined from single crystal X-ray diffractometer data. Both gallides show structural disorder through Lu/Ga and Sc/Ga mixing. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements showed Pauli paramagnetism for ScRh{sub 2}Ga, ScPd{sub 2}Ga, and LuRh{sub 2}Ga and Curie-Weiss paramagnetism for TmRh{sub 2}Ga. {sup 45}Sc and {sup 71}Ga solid state MAS NMR spectroscopic investigations of the Sc containing compounds confirmed the site mixing effects typically observed for Heusler phases. The data indicate that the effect of mixed Sc/Ga occupancy is significantly stronger in ScRh{sub 2}Ga than in ScPd{sub 2}Ga.

  15. Mg2+-induced DNA compaction, condensation, and phase separation in gene delivery vehicles based on zwitterionic phospholipids: a dynamic light scattering and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süleymanoğlu, Erhan

    2017-12-01

    Despite the significant efforts towards applying improved non-destructive and label-free measurements of biomolecular structures of lipid-based gene delivery vectors, little is achieved in terms of their structural relevance in gene transfections. Better understanding of structure-activity relationships of lipid-DNA complexes and their gene expression efficiencies thus becomes an essential issue. Raman scattering offers a complimentary measurement technique for following the structural transitions of both DNA and lipid vesicles employed for their transfer. This work describes the use of SERS coupled with light scattering approaches for deciphering the bioelectrochemical phase formations between nucleic acids and lipid vesicles within lipoplexes and their surface parameters that could influence both the uptake of non-viral gene carriers and the endocytic routes of interacting cells. As promising non-viral alternatives of currently employed risky viral systems or highly cytotoxic cationic liposomes, complexations of both nucleic acids and zwitterionic lipids in the presence of Mg 2+ were studied applying colloidal Ag nanoparticles. It is shown that the results could be employed in further conformational characterizations of similar polyelectrolyte gene delivery systems.

  16. Phase transformation and impedance spectroscopic study of Ba substituted Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Rekha [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, 125001, Haryana (India); Ahlawat, Neetu, E-mail: neetugju@yahoo.co.in [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, 125001, Haryana (India); Agarwal, Ashish; Sanghi, Sujata [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, 125001, Haryana (India); Sindhu, Monica [Department of Physics, MKJK College, Rohtak, 124001, Haryana (India); Ahlawat, Navneet [Matu Ram Institute of Engineering and Management, Rohtak, 124001, Haryana (India)

    2016-08-15

    (Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}){sub 1−x}Ba{sub x}TiO{sub 3} (x = 0.05, 0.1 and 0.15) ceramics abbreviated as (NBBT1, NBBT2 and NBBT3) are fabricated by conventional ceramic fabrication technique. The analysis of X-ray diffraction pattern of the prepared ceramic performed by Rietveld refinement indicate that crystal structure is rhombohedral for NBBT1, tetragonal for NBBT3 and a phase boundary occurs for NBBT2. Impedance spectroscopy has been employed to study the electrical properties of these ceramics in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 5 MHz and in a temperature range of 303 K–723 K. Frequency and temperature dependent electrical data is analyzed in the framework of conductivity, impedance and electric modulus formalisms. Conductivity spectrum obeys double power law for NBBT1, which is evidenced from two different dispersion regions. While for NBBT2 and NBBT3 only single power law is observed. Relaxation frequency for impedance is found to increase with temperature and obeys Arrhenius relationship with activation energy ≈0.764, 0.527 and 0.471 eV for NBBT1, NBBT2 and NBBT3 respectively. Variation of dielectric constant and tanδ with frequency at different temperatures was analyzed with the help of Maxwell–Wagner and Koop's phenomenogical theory. The presence of peaks in plots showing frequency dependence of tanδ for NBBT2 and NBBT3 indicates relaxor behavior of these compositions. - Highlights: • (Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}){sub 1−x}Ba{sub x}TiO{sub 3} (x = 0.05, 0.1, 0.15) ceramics have been synthesized. • There is change in crystal structure with Ba doping. • NBBT2 and NBBT3 show relaxor behavior.

  17. Preparation and Spectroscopic Characterization of Iron Doped Mullite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Buljan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for preparation of Fe2+/Fe3+ substituted mullite is described. Aluminosilicate gels are applied as precursors instead of crystalline aluminosilicates as used in other common syntheses. The process is composed of three stages. First, iron is introduced into a homogeneous aluminosilicate gel by ion exchange. The gel is converted to a mixture of mullite and amorphous silica in a 1263 K 3 h isothermal calcination in the the second stage. Finally, in order to obtain the nano-scale pure mullite phase the formed amorphous silica is removed by a dissolution in alkaline media. The components formed in various stages of the process are characterized by 57Fe Mössbauer and Fourier transform infra red spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction method and scanning electron microscopy. Spectroscopic and diffraction methods helped the identification of the mullite phase. Mössbauer measurements revealed the presence of both Fe2+ and Fe3+ states providing a chance for perspective catalytic application of the obtained Fe-mullite.

  18. Growth models of coexisting p(2 × 1) and c(6 × 2) phases on an oxygen-terminated Cu(110) surface studied by noncontact atomic force microscopy at 78 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan Jun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kinoshita, Yukinori; Ma, Zong Min; Wen, Huanfei; Nomura, Hikaru; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-20

    We present an experimental study of coexisting p(2 × 1) and c(6 × 2) phases on an oxygen-terminated Cu(110) surface by noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) at 78 K. Ball models of the growth processes of coexisting p(2 × 1)/c(6 × 2) phases on a terrace and near a step are proposed. We found that the p(2 × 1) and c(6 × 2) phases are grown from the super Cu atoms on both sides of O-Cu-O rows of an atomic spacing. In this paper, we summarize our investigations of an oxygen-terminated Cu(110) surface by NC-AFM employing O- and Cu-terminated tips. Also, we state several problems and issues for future investigation.

  19. Optical Characterization of Thin Colloidal Gold Films by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst S.; Wormeester, Herbert; Brouwer, E.A.M.; van Vroonhoven, E.; van Silfhout, Arend; Poelsema, Bene

    2002-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments are employed to characterize nanocolloidal gold films, self-assembled at APTES-derivatized Si/SiO2 surfaces. X-ray fluorescence measurements after deposition confirm that AFM provides a representative means to probe the

  20. Correlating metal poisoning with zeolite deactivation in an individual catalyst particle by chemical and phase-sensitive X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Beale, Andrew M; Deka, Upakul; O'Brien, Mathew G; Quinn, Paul D; Mosselmans, J Fred W; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2013-06-03

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is the main conversion process used in oil refineries. An X-ray microscopy method is used to show that metal poisoning and related structural changes in the zeolite active material lead to a non-uniform core–shell deactivation of FCC catalyst particles. The study links the detrimental effect of V and Ni poisoning with zeolite destruction and dealumination in a spatial manner within a single FCC catalyst particle.

  1. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  2. Optical properties of TiAlC/TiAlCN/TiAlSiCN/TiAlSiCO/TiAlSiO tandem absorber coatings by phase-modulated spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothi, J.; Biswas, A.; Sarkar, P.; Soum-Glaude, A.; Nagaraja, H. S.; Barshilia, Harish C.

    2017-07-01

    TiAlC, TiAlCN, TiAlSiCN, TiAlSiCO, and TiAlSiO layers of thicknesses 2.2 μm, 755, 491, 393, and 431 nm, respectively, were deposited on stainless steel, silicon, and glass substrates to study their refractive indices and extinction coefficients using the phase-modulated spectroscopic ellipsometry in the wavelength range of 300-1200 nm. Absorption coefficient of each layer was calculated from the extinction coefficient of the layer. The results indicate that the first three layers (i.e., TiAlC, TiAlCN, and TiAlSiCN) are absorbing in nature, while TiAlSiCO and TiAlSiO act as intermediate and antireflection layers. Subsequently, a tandem absorber of TiAlC/TiAlCN/TiAlSiCN/TiAlSiCO/TiAlSiO with layer thicknesses of 62, 20, 18, 16, and 27 nm, respectively, was deposited on stainless steel substrates to fabricate a spectrally selective coating with absorptance of 0.961 and emittance of 0.15 at 82 °C. The obtained refractive indices and extinction coefficients of the tandem absorber were used to simulate the reflectance of the deposited tandem absorber using SCOUT software. Simulated reflectance data of the tandem absorber showed a good agreement with the experimental data measured by UV-Vis-NIR and FTIR spectrophotometry. The angular dependence of the selective properties of the tandem absorber was studied by measuring the reflectance spectra of the tandem absorber at different incident angles.

  3. Morfologia do Mycobacterium leprae hominis e do M. leprae muris: estudo baseado na microscopia electrônica e de contraste de fases Morphology of Mycobacterium leprae hominis and M. leprae muris based on electron and phases contrast microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. de Souza-Araújo

    1955-12-01

    Full Text Available Hansen's Bacillus: By electron microscopy this bacillus shows membrane and halo, this being more visible when sorrounding the globi or bundles of bacilli; shows, also, free granules of various sizes which were before considered as dust of the dyes; shows external granules bound with the membrane and some times branching. By phases contrast microscopy examining leproma suspensions and subcataneous lymph at 400 x we saw many free granules with intense rotatory movement; granulated bacilli with screw, skip or stroke motion, producing slow progressive motion. All such elementes are surrounded by a halo, corresponding to the classical gloea. By a patient and delayed examination we were able to see that the internal granules are motile and help the progression of the bacilli, giving the impression that the cytoplasm is liquid. By a lasting observation we could see the larger granules form prolapse, like a pseudopode and abandon the bacilli and going in very rapid rotatory movement. There are branched bacilli; there are pedunculated fred granules like comets. The addition of a drop of formol at the preparation stops all movements. Stefansky's Bacillus: Repeated examination by RCA electron microscope, type EMU-25 of fresh suspensions of rat lepromas, led us to confirm the close relationship between human and murine leprosy agents. We examined also material from carabo (Lepra bubalorum from Java, but due to fixation, the material was unsuitable for comparative studies. The Stefansky's bacilli showed also emmbranes and halos, internal or external granules (smaller than those of Hansen's bacillus. The bacilli shaded by chromium look thicker and shorter than those of Hansen. Due to electron bombardment both, Hansen's and Stefansky's baccilli suffer considerable alterations in their structure, showing black barrs of chromatin condensation at their extremities as also in their centers. By phase microscopy the Stefansky's bacilli showed elements with 1, 2

  4. The stoichiometry of the TMEM16A ion channel determined in intact plasma membranes of COS-7 cells using liquid-phase electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckys, Diana B; Stoerger, Christof; Latta, Lorenz; Wissenbach, Ulrich; Flockerzi, Veit; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-08-01

    TMEM16A is a membrane protein forming a calcium-activated chloride channel. A homodimeric stoichiometry of the TMEM16 family of proteins has been reported but an important question is whether the protein resides always in a dimeric configuration in the plasma membrane or whether monomers of the protein are also present in its native state within in the intact plasma membrane. We have determined the stoichiometry of the human (h)TMEM16A within whole COS-7 cells in liquid. For the purpose of detecting TMEM16A subunits, single proteins were tagged by the streptavidin-binding peptide within extracellular loops accessible by streptavidin coated quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles. The labeled proteins were then imaged using correlative light microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detection. The locations of 19,583 individual proteins were determined of which a statistical analysis using the pair correlation function revealed the presence of a dimeric conformation of the protein. The amounts of detected label pairs and single labels were compared between experiments in which the TMEM16A SBP-tag position was varied, and experiments in which tagged and non-tagged TMEM16A proteins were present. It followed that hTMEM16A resides in the plasma membrane as dimer only and is not present as monomer. This strategy may help to elucidate the stoichiometry of other membrane protein species within the context of the intact plasma membrane in future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of the phases formed by the sulfur adsorption on Au(100) from an alkaline solution of 1,4-piperazine(bis)-dithiocarbamate of potassium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, Javier A. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, El Vedado, Plaza de la Revolución, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Valenzuela B, José [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología (CNyN), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) , km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Cao Milán, R. [Facultad de Química, Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, El Vedado, Plaza de la Revolución, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Herrera, José [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, El Vedado, Plaza de la Revolución, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Farías, Mario H. [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología (CNyN), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) , km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Hernández, Mayra P., E-mail: mayrap@fisica.uh.cu [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, El Vedado, Plaza de la Revolución, La Habana 10400 (Cuba)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • New phases of sulfur on gold: hexamer and (√(2)×√(2)) were observed by STM. • Hexamers and (√(2)×√(2)) structures coexist with well-known octomers. • Formation of sulfur multilayer by K{sub 2}DTC{sub 2}pz hydrolysis under alkaline condition. • Top octomer layer have dynamic behavior while (√(2)×√(2)) and hexamer were static. • A model is presented to explain sulfur multilayer formation on Au(100). - Abstract: Piperazine-dithiocarbamate of potassium (K{sub 2}DTC{sub 2}pz) was used as a new precursor for the spontaneous deposition of sulfur on the Au(100) surface in alkaline solution. Two new sulfur phases were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These phases were formed by six sulfur atoms (S{sub 6} phase, hexamer) and by four sulfur atoms (S{sub 4} phase, tetramer with (√(2)×√(2)) structure), and they were observed in coexistence with the well-known quasi-square patterns formed by eight sulfur atoms (S{sub 8} phase, octomer). A model was proposed where sulfur multilayers were formed by a (√(2)×√(2)) phase adsorbed directly on the gold surface while one of the other structures: hexamers or octomers were deposited on top. Sulfur layers were formed on gold terraces, vacancies and islands produced by lifting reconstructed surface. Sequential high-resolution STM images allowed the direct observation of the dynamic of the octomers, while the (√(2)×√(2)) structure remained static. Images also showed the reversible association/dissociation of the octomer.

  6. Absorption of hydrophobic compounds into the poly(dimethylsiloxane) coating of solid-phase microextraction fibers : high partition coefficients and fluorescence microscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayer, P.; Vaes, W.H.J.; Hermens, J.L.M.

    2000-01-01

    The use of solid-phase microextraction with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-coated glass fibers for the extraction and analysis of hydrophobic organic analytes is increasing. The literature on this topic is characterized by large discrepancies in partition coefficients and an uncertainty of whether

  7. Spatial characterization of hot melt extruded dispersion systems using thermal atomic force microscopy methods: the effects of processing parameters on phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Jonathan G; Qi, Sheng; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2014-07-01

    In this study we explore the use of nano-scale localized thermal analysis (LTA) and transition temperature microcopy (TTM) as a novel combined approach to studying phase separation in HME dispersions of cyclosporine A in Eudragit EPO. Modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MTDSC), attenuated total reflectance FTIR spectroscopy, nano-LTA and TTM were performed on raw materials and dispersions prepared by hot melt extrusion (HME) and spin coating. For samples prepared by HME, two mixing temperatures (110°C and 150°C) and residence times (5 and 15 min) were investigated. Spin coated samples showed an intermediate T g for the mixed systems consistent with molecular dispersion formation. The HME samples prepared at 110°C showed evidence of inhomogeneity using MTDSC and FTIR, while those produced at 150°C h showed evidence for the formation of a single phase system using MTDSC. The nanothermal methods, however, indicated the presence of phase separated cyclosporine A at the higher preparation temperature while the TTM was able to map regions of differing penetration temperatures, indicating the presence of compositionally inhomogeneous regions in all but the high processing temperature/high residence time samples. TTM is a potentially important new method for studying phase separation and that such separation may remain undetected or poorly understood using conventional bulk analytical techniques.

  8. Structural and spectroscopic properties of Mn-doped YAlO{sub 3} ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhydachevskii, Ya [Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera, Lviv 79646 (Ukraine); Durygin, A; Drozd, V [CeSMEC, Florida International University, University Park, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Suchocki, A; Wrobel, J [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 32/46 Aleja Lotnikow, Warsaw 02668 (Poland); Sugak, D [Institute of Materials, SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska, Lviv 79031 (Ukraine)

    2008-03-05

    We report results on structural and optical spectroscopic properties of Mn-doped YAlO{sub 3} (YAP) ceramics prepared by a solid-state reaction method starting from nanocrystalline oxides. A series of ceramic samples with different Mn concentrations and different Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} compositions have been studied by means of x-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, photoluminescence and thermoluminescence measurements. Peculiarities of YAP phase formation and incorporation of manganese ions into the host are discussed. The possible application of Mn-doped YAP ceramics as thermoluminescent screens for visualization of local heating of various origin, including a heating caused by infrared laser light, has been demonstrated.

  9. On Ultrafast Time-Domain TeraHertz Spectroscopy in the Condensed Phase: Linear Spectroscopic Measurements of Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics of Astrochemical Ice Analogs and Nonlinear TeraHertz Kerr Effect Measurements of Vibrational Quantum Beats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allodi, Marco A.

    Much of the chemistry that affects life on planet Earth occurs in the condensed phase. The TeraHertz (THz) or far-infrared (far-IR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum (from 0.1 THz to 10 THz) has been shown to provide unique possibilities in the study of condensed-phase processes. The goal of this work is to expand the possibilities available in the THz region and undertake new investigations of fundamental interest to chemistry. Since we are fundamentally interested in condensed-phase processes, this thesis focuses on two areas where THz spectroscopy can provide new understanding: astrochemistry and solvation science. To advance these fields, we had to develop new instrumentation that would enable the experiments necessary to answer new questions in either astrochemistry or solvation science. We first developed a new experimental setup capable of studying astrochemical ice analogs in both the TeraHertz (THz), or far-Infrared (far-IR), region (0.3 - 7.5 THz; 10 - 250 wavenumbers) and the mid-IR (400 - 4000 wavenumbers). The importance of astrochemical ices lies in their key role in the formation of complex organic molecules, such as amino acids and sugars in space. Thus, the instruments are capable of performing variety of spectroscopic studies that can provide especially relevant laboratory data to support astronomical observations from telescopes such as the Herschel Space Telescope, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The experimental apparatus uses a THz time-domain spectrometer, with a 1750/875 nm plasma source and a GaP detector crystal, to cover the bandwidth mentioned above with 10 GHz (0.3 wavenumber) resolution. Using the above instrumentation, experimental spectra of astrochemical ice analogs of water and carbon dioxide in pure, mixed, and layered ices were collected at different temperatures under high-vacuum conditions with the goal of investigating the structure of the ice

  10. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigation of an explanted opacified intraocular lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, V., E-mail: viosimon@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics and Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences, 400084 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Radu, T.; Vulpoi, A. [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics and Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences, 400084 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Rosca, C. [Optilens Clinic of Ophthalmology, 400604 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Eniu, D. [Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Molecular Sciences, 400349 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Changes on intraocular lens (IOL) surface after implantation. • Partial opacification of IOL central area. • Elemental composition on IOL surface prior to and after implantation. • First XPS depth profiling examination of the opacifying deposits. • Cell-mediated hydroxyapatite structuring. - Abstract: The investigated polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens explanted an year after implantation presented a fine granularity consisting of ring-like grains of about 15 μm in diameter. In order to evidence the changes occurred on intraocular lens relative to morphology, elemental composition and atomic environments, microscopic and spectroscopic analyses were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDS), and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopies. The results revealed that the grains contain hydroxyapatite mineral phase. A protein layer covers the lens both in opacified and transparent zones. The amide II band is like in basal epithelial cells. The shape and size of the grains, and the XPS depth profiling results indicate the possibility of a cell-mediated process involving lens epithelial cells which fagocitated apoptotic epithelial cells, and in which the debris derived from cell necrosis were calcified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on explanted intraocular lenses using XPS depth profiling in order to examine the inside of the opacifying deposits.

  11. Polarized Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  12. Wide-range high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals morphological and distributional changes of endomembrane compartments during log to stationary transition of growth phase in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyooka, Kiminori; Sato, Mayuko; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Higaki, Takumi; Sawaki, Fumie; Wakazaki, Mayumi; Goto, Yumi; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Nagata, Noriko; Matsuoka, Ken

    2014-09-01

    Rapid growth of plant cells by cell division and expansion requires an endomembrane trafficking system. The endomembrane compartments, such as the Golgi stacks, endosome and vesicles, are important in the synthesis and trafficking of cell wall materials during cell elongation. However, changes in the morphology, distribution and number of these compartments during the different stages of cell proliferation and differentiation have not yet been clarified. In this study, we examined these changes at the ultrastructural level in tobacco Bright yellow 2 (BY-2) cells during the log and stationary phases of growth. We analyzed images of the BY-2 cells prepared by the high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution technique with the aid of an auto-acquisition transmission electron microscope system. We quantified the distribution of secretory and endosomal compartments in longitudinal sections of whole cells by using wide-range gigapixel-class images obtained by merging thousands of transmission electron micrographs. During the log phase, all Golgi stacks were composed of several thick cisternae. Approximately 20 vesicle clusters (VCs), including the trans-Golgi network and secretory vesicle cluster, were observed throughout the cell. In the stationary-phase cells, Golgi stacks were thin with small cisternae, and only a few VCs were observed. Nearly the same number of multivesicular body and small high-density vesicles were observed in both the stationary and log phases. Results from electron microscopy and live fluorescence imaging indicate that the morphology and distribution of secretory-related compartments dramatically change when cells transition from log to stationary phases of growth. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Recent developments in GSDIM microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyba, Marcus; Simonutti, Giulio A.; Fölling, Jonas

    2012-02-01

    In the presented study we characterized the suitability of 15 conventional fluorescence dyes for GSDIM microscopy. For all dyes involved in the screening labeled secondary antibodies for immunohistochemistry are commercially available. The dye performance was tested after staining to fixed mammalian cells. Chemical environments were chosen to be compatible with the applicative and spectroscopic demands. Investigated watery environments are suitable for TIRF based applications. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time systematic screening for configurations of dyes embedded in solid polymer. The polymer mounting matches well to the refractive index of oil immersion optics. This is crucial for applications at high penetration depth into the sample and suitable for long-term sample storage. We rated the final super-resolution image quality additional to quantitative characterization of important spectroscopic parameters. Therefore, this dye screening is optimized for various biological imaging applications. Control of the single molecule blinking rate by 405nm light exposure is quantified, as well. It is shown that this important effect is applicable to numerous fluorescent dyes. Thus, the controlled application of low intensities of 405nm light allows to maximize recording speed. As this option is already included in commercial GSDIM microscopes the results of our study allow optimized super-resolution imaging down to ~20nm with multiple dyes and multi-color staining.

  14. Sputum smear microscopy at two months into continuation-phase: should it be done in all patients with sputum smear-positive tuberculosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Padamchand Gandhi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program (RNTCP of India recommends follow-up sputum smear examination at two months into the continuation phase of treatment. The main intent of this (mid-CP follow-up is to detect patients not responding to treatment around two-three months earlier than at the end of the treatment. However, the utility of mid-CP follow-up under programmatic conditions has been questioned. We undertook a multi-district study to determine if mid-CP follow-up is able to detect cases of treatment failures early among all types of patients with sputum smear-positive TB. METHODOLOGY: We reviewed existing records of patients with sputum smear-positive TB registered under the RNTCP in 43 districts across three states of India during a three month period in 2009. We estimated proportions of patients that could be detected as a case of treatment failure early, and assessed the impact of various policy options on laboratory workload and number needed to test to detect one case of treatment failure early. RESULTS: Of 10055 cases, mid-CP follow-up was done in 6944 (69% cases. Mid-CP follow-up could benefit 117/8015 (1.5% new and 206/2040 (10% previously-treated sputum smear-positive cases by detecting their treatment failure early. Under the current policy, 31 patients had to be tested to detect one case of treatment failure early. All cases of treatment failure would still be detected early if mid-CP follow-up were discontinued for new sputum smear-positive cases who become sputum smear-negative after the intensive-phase of treatment. This would reduce the related laboratory workload by 69% and only 10 patients would need to be tested to detect one case of treatment failure early. CONCLUSION: Discontinuation of mid-CP follow-up among new sputum smear-positive cases who become sputum smear-negative after completing the intensive-phase of treatment will reduce the laboratory workload without impacting overall early

  15. Spectroscopic imaging: basic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoch, Antonin; Jiru, Filip; Bunke, Jürgen

    2008-08-01

    Spectroscopic imaging (SI) is a method that enables the measurement of the spatial distribution of metabolite concentrations in tissue. In this paper, an overview of measurement and processing techniques for SI is given. First, the basic structure of SI pulse sequences is introduced and the concepts of k-space, point spread function and spatial resolution are described. Then, special techniques are presented for the purpose of eliminating spurious signals and reducing measurement time. Finally, basic post-processing of SI data and the methods for viewing the results of SI measurement are summarized.

  16. Déformation et transformation de phase induites par ondes de choc dans les silicates. Caractérisation par la microscopie électronique en transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Tattevin, Hélène

    1987-01-01

    Mémoires et Documents du Centre Armoricain d'Etude Structurale des Socles n°13, 150p. ISBN: 2-905532-12-2; Les matériaux soumis à des ondes de choc subissent des déformations et des transformations de phase. L'étude de leurs mécanismes fait l'objet de ce travail. Les échantillons étudiés proviennent du cratère d'impact météoritique de Ries, Allemagne, et sont constitués de quartz et de feldspath. L'étude a porté sur des minéraux choqués présentant des éléments planaires à l'échelle du microsc...

  17. Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetard, L; Passian, A; Farahi, R H; Kalluri, U C; Davison, B H; Thundat, T

    2010-05-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass and Populus. These features may be attributable to the lignocellulosic cell wall composition, as the collected images exhibit the characteristic macromolecular globule structures attributable to the lignocellulosic systems. Using both AFM and a single case of mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) to characterize Populus, we obtained images that clearly show the cell wall structure. The results are of importance in providing a better understanding of the characteristic features of both mature cells as well as developing plant cells. In addition, we present spectroscopic investigation of the same samples.

  18. Spectroscopic characterization of cardiovascular tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R H; Isner, J M; Gauthier, T; Nakagawa, K; Cerio, F; Hanlon, E; Gaffney, E; Rouse, E; DeJesus, S

    1988-01-01

    We present results of a series of laser spectroscopic measurements on in vitro samples of cardiovascular tissue. These include laser Raman scattering, Fourier transform infrared, plasma emission and fluorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results of these spectroscopic measurements are discussed in terms of their implications for the field of laser angioplasty.

  19. Observation of a low-symmetry phase in Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} crystals by optical birefringence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorfman, S.; Thomas, P.A. [Warwick Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Glazer, A.M. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Clarendon Lab.; Noguchi, Y.; Miyayama, M. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Luo, H. [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Shanghai (China)

    2012-06-15

    Single crystals of sodium bismuth titanate (Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3}, NBT) (pure and Mn-doped) have been investigated by means of optical birefringence microscopy. For both crystals, it was found that, above {proportional_to}573 K, the optical axis is perfectly aligned with one of the pseudocubic left angle 001 right angle {sub PC} directions, while the domain walls appearing in the images are parallel to the pseudocubic left angle 011 right angle {sub PC} directions. These observations are consistent with a tetragonal symmetry. Below {proportional_to}573 K, the observed optical orientation of both crystals shows a broad angular distribution, with no clearly visible crystallographically oriented domain walls. These results are consistent with monoclinic symmetry. Most importantly, the direct observation of the temperature-driven rotation of the optical axis within the monoclinic plane is reported for the first time in a perovskite oxide material, in the present case for Mn-doped NBT. This has consequences for the understanding of phase transitions in technologically relevant compounds, such as PbZr{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3}, which are considered to have monoclinic structure in some parts of the phase diagram. (orig.)

  20. Application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry for characterization of gold reduction from organometallic compound by means of plasma jet technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodák, Jiří; Nečas, David; Pavliňák, David; Macak, Jan M.; Řičica, Tomáš; Jambor, Roman; Ohlídal, Miloslav

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a new application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to determine a distribution of metallic gold in a layer of an organogold precursor which was treated by a plasma jet. Gold layers were prepared by spin coating from a solution of the precursor containing a small amount of polyvinylpyrrolidone on a microscopy glass, then they were vacuum dried. A difference between reflectivity of metallic gold and the precursor was utilized by imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to create a map of metallic gold distribution using a newly developed model of the studied sample. The basic principle of the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry is also shown together with the data acquisition principles. XPS measurements and microscopy observations were made to complete the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry results. It is proved that the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry represents a new method for quantitative evaluation of local reduction of metallic components from metaloorganic compounds.

  1. Correlated Light Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjollema, Klaas A.; Schnell, Ulrike; Kuipers, Jeroen; Kalicharan, Ruby; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; MullerReichert, T; Verkade, P

    2012-01-01

    Understanding where, when, and how biomolecules (inter)act is crucial to uncover fundamental mechanisms in cell biology. Recent developments in fluorescence light microscopy (FLM) allow protein imaging in living cells and at the near molecular level. However, fluorescence microscopy only reveals

  2. Nanoscale simultaneous chemical and mechanical imaging via peak force infrared microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Wang, Haomin; Wagner, Martin; Yan, Yong; Jakob, Devon S.; Xu, Xiaoji G.

    2017-01-01

    Nondestructive chemical and mechanical measurements of materials with ~10-nm spatial resolution together with topography provide rich information on the compositions and organizations of heterogeneous materials and nanoscale objects. However, multimodal nanoscale correlations are difficult to achieve because of the limitation on spatial resolution of optical microscopy and constraints from instrumental complexities. We report a novel noninvasive spectroscopic scanning probe microscopy method—peak force infrared (PFIR) microscopy—that allows chemical imaging, collection of broadband infrared spectra, and mechanical mapping at a spatial resolution of 10 nm. In our technique, chemical absorption information is directly encoded in the withdraw curve of the peak force tapping cycle after illumination with synchronized infrared laser pulses in a simple apparatus. Nanoscale phase separation in block copolymers and inhomogeneity in CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite crystals are studied with correlative infrared/mechanical nanoimaging. Furthermore, we show that the PFIR method is sensitive to the presence of surface phonon polaritons in boron nitride nanotubes. PFIR microscopy will provide a powerful analytical tool for explorations at the nanoscale across wide disciplines. PMID:28691096

  3. Near-field microscopy and lithography of light-emitting polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, David; Cacialli, Franco

    2004-04-15

    We describe the application of scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) to the study of the photophysical and self-organization properties of thin films of blends of conjugated polymers, and also to the lateral nanoscale patterning of conjugated-polymer structures. Such thin-film plastic semiconductor nanostructures offer significant potential for use in opto-electronic devices. The implementation of SNOM we employ is the most established form in which a probe with a sub-wavelength aperture is scanned in close proximity to the sample surface. We consider the nature of the near-field optical distribution, which decays within the first ca. 100 nm of these semiconductor materials, and address the identification of topographic artefacts in near-field optical images. While the topographic information obtained simultaneously with optical data in any SNOM experiment enables an easy comparison with the higher-resolution tapping-mode atomic force microscopy, the spectroscopic contrast provided by fluorescence SNOM gives an unambiguous chemical identification of the different phases in a conjugated-polymer blend. Both fluorescence and photoconductivity SNOM indicate that intermixing of constituent polymers in a blend, or nanoscale phase separation, is responsible for the high efficiency of devices employing these materials as their active layer. We also demonstrate a scheme for nano-optical lithography with SNOM of conjugated-polymer structures, which has been employed successfully for the fabrication of poly(-phenylene vinylene) nanostructures with 160 nm feature sizes.

  4. Studying cell dynamics and function with CLASS microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Salahuddin, Saira; Turner, Bradley S.; Keates, Sarah E.; Modell, Mark D.; Bansil, Rama; Itzkan, Irving; Hanlon, Eugene B.; Perelman, Lev T.

    2008-02-01

    Confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy is a novel optical technique for observing submicron intracellular structures in living cells. It allows monitoring nondestructively cell function and cell dynamics in vivo and in real time. CLASS microscopy, having accuracy well beyond the diffraction limit, does not require cell fixation as the electron microscopy. In addition, it provides not only size information but also information about the biochemical and physical properties of the cell. CLASS microscopy can also visualize multiple compartments inside of living cell without employing exogenous molecular markers which are required by fluorescence microscopy and which can affect normal cell functioning. Recently we improved our CLASS microscope by utilizing the full power output of the supercontinuum laser and used it to study apoptosis in live cells.

  5. Condenser-free contrast methods for transmitted-light microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Kevin F.

    2014-01-01

    Phase contrast microscopy allows the study of highly transparent yet detail-rich specimens by producing intensity contrast from phase objects within the sample. Presented here is a generalized phase contrast illumination schema in which condenser optics are entirely abrogated, yielding a condenser- free yet highly effective method of obtaining phase contrast in transmitted-light microscopy. A ring of light emitting diodes (LEDs) is positioned within the light-path such that observation of the...

  6. Spectroscopic investigation of local mechanical impedance of living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luca; Benseny-Cases, Núria; Mayeaux, Véronique; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of PC12 living cells have been studied at the nanoscale with a Force Feedback Microscope using two experimental approaches. Firstly, the local mechanical impedance of the cell membrane has been mapped simultaneously to the cell morphology at constant force. As the force of the interaction is gradually increased, we observed the appearance of the sub-membrane cytoskeleton. We shall compare the results obtained with this method with the measurement of other existing techniques. Secondly, a spectroscopic investigation has been performed varying the indentation of the tip in the cell membrane and consequently the force applied on it. In contrast with conventional dynamic atomic force microscopy techniques, here the small oscillation amplitude of the tip is not necessarily imposed at the cantilever first eigenmode. This allows the user to arbitrarily choose the excitation frequency in developing spectroscopic AFM techniques. The mechanical response of the PC12 cell membrane is found to be...

  7. New microscopy for nanoimaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kinjo, Y; Watanabe, M

    2002-01-01

    Two types of new microscopy, namely, X-ray contact microscopy (XRCM) in combination with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray projection microscopy (XRPM) using synchrotron radiation and zone plate optics were used to image the fine structures of human chromosomes. In the XRCM plus AFM system, location of X-ray images on a photoresist has become far easier than that with our previous method using transmission electron microscopy coupled with the replica method. In addition, the images obtained suggested that the conformation of chromatin fiber differs from the current textbook model regarding the architecture of a eukaryotic chromosome. X-ray images with high contrast of the specimens could be obtained with XRPM. The resolution of each microscopy was about 30 and 200-300 nm for XRCM plus AFM and XRPM, respectively. (author)

  8. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Spectroscopic analysis of optoelectronic semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with standard spectroscopic techniques which can be used to analyze semiconductor samples or devices, in both, bulk, micrometer and submicrometer scale. The book aims helping experimental physicists and engineers to choose the right analytical spectroscopic technique in order to get specific information about their specific demands. For this purpose, the techniques including technical details such as apparatus and probed sample region are described. More important, also the expected outcome from experiments is provided. This involves also the link to theory, that is not subject of this book, and the link to current experimental results in the literature which are presented in a review-like style. Many special spectroscopic techniques are introduced and their relationship to the standard techniques is revealed. Thus the book works also as a type of guide or reference book for people researching in optical spectroscopy of semiconductors.

  10. The HITRAN 2004 molecular spectroscopic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, L.S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)]. E-mail: lrothman@cfa.harvard.edu; Jacquemart, D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Barbe, A. [Universite de Reims-Champagne-Ardenne, Groupe de Spectrometrie Moleculaire et Atmospherique, 51062 Reims (France)] (and others)

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2004 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are unresolvable; individual line parameters and absorption cross-sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols; tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for 39 molecules including many of their isotopologues. The format of the section of the database on individual line parameters of HITRAN has undergone the most extensive enhancement in almost two decades. It now lists the Einstein A-coefficients, statistical weights of the upper and lower levels of the transitions, a better system for the representation of quantum identifications, and enhanced referencing and uncertainty codes. In addition, there is a provision for making corrections to the broadening of line transitions due to line mixing.

  11. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  12. Coherent light microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Pietro; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    This book deals with the latest achievements in the field of optical coherent microscopy. While many other books exist on microscopy and imaging, this book provides a unique resource dedicated solely to this subject. Similarly, many books describe applications of holography, interferometry and speckle to metrology but do not focus on their use for microscopy. The coherent light microscopy reference provided here does not focus on the experimental mechanics of such techniques but instead is meant to provide a users manual to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of developing techniques. Th

  13. Bridging fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    Development of new fluorescent probes and fluorescence microscopes has led to new ways to study cell biology. With the emergence of specialized microscopy units at most universities and research centers, the use of these techniques is well within reach for a broad research community. A major

  14. Handbook of Microscopy for Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nan; Wang, Zhong L.

    This handbook highlights various key microcopic techniques and their applications in this fast-growing field. Topics to be covered include the following: scanning near field optical microscopy, confocal optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning turning microscopy, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, and many more.

  15. LEDs for fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Garini, Y.; Dietrich, H.R.C.; Van Oel, W.; Liqui Lung, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional light sources for fluorescence microscopy have been mercury lamps, xenon lamps, and lasers. These sources have been essential in the development of fluorescence microscopy but each can have serious disadvantages: lack of near monochromaticity, heat generation, cost, lifetime of the light

  16. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  17. Spectroscopic Classification of Two Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, S.; Blanchard, P.; Nicholl, M.; Berger, E.

    2018-02-01

    We obtained optical spectroscopic observations of 2 transients reported to the Transient Name Server by the ATLAS survey (Tonry et al. 2011, PASP, 123, 58; Tonry et al., ATel #8680) and the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST; Huber et al., ATel #7153; http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/).

  18. Application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry for characterization of gold reduction from organometallic compound by means of plasma jet technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodák, Jiří, E-mail: jiri.vodak@yahoo.com [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Nečas, David [RG Plasma Technologies, CEITEC Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Pavliňák, David [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Macak, Jan M [Center of Materials and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Nám. Čs. Legií 565, 530 02 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Řičica, Tomáš; Jambor, Roman [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentská 573, 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Ohlídal, Miloslav [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics, Faculty of Mining and Geology, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Metallic gold is reduced from an organometallic compound layer using a plasma jet. • Imaging spectroscopic reflectometry is used to locate areas with metallic gold. • The results are completed with XPS and optical microscopy observations. - Abstract: This work presents a new application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to determine a distribution of metallic gold in a layer of an organogold precursor which was treated by a plasma jet. Gold layers were prepared by spin coating from a solution of the precursor containing a small amount of polyvinylpyrrolidone on a microscopy glass, then they were vacuum dried. A difference between reflectivity of metallic gold and the precursor was utilized by imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to create a map of metallic gold distribution using a newly developed model of the studied sample. The basic principle of the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry is also shown together with the data acquisition principles. XPS measurements and microscopy observations were made to complete the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry results. It is proved that the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry represents a new method for quantitative evaluation of local reduction of metallic components from metaloorganic compounds.

  19. Diagnóstico de criptosporidiose em amostras fecais de bezerros por imunofluorescência direta e microscopia de contraste de fase Diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis in fecal samples of calves using direct immunofluorescence and phase contrast microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weslen Fabricio Pires Teixeira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo teve como objetivo comparar as técnicas de imunofluorescência direta (IFD e a microscopia de contraste de fase em solução de Sheather (MCF, para detecção de oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. em amostras fecais de bezerros. A determinação dos limiares detecção da IFD e da MCF foi realizada utilizando cinco alíquotas de uma amostra fecal de bezerro, comprovadamente negativa para Cryptosporidium spp., adicionadas com diferentes quantidades de oocistos de Cryptosporidium parvum. Ao exame das 5 alíquotas, a IFD e a MCF apresentaram, respectivamente, limiares de detecção de 3,3x104 (duas alíquotas positivas e 3,3x105 oocistos (1 alíquota positiva por grama de fezes. Foram também realizadas a comparação entre a positividade obtida e uma análise semiquantitativa do número de oocistos observados por campo de microscopia, em ambos os métodos, em 300 amostras fecais de bezerros. Entre as 300 amostras, 19,7% (59/300 foram positivas pela IFD, com diferença estatisticamente significante (P=0,0098 quando comparada com a positividade obtida pela MCF, que foi de 11,7% (35/300. As amostras positivas foram submetidas à reação em cadeia da polimerase para amplificação de fragmentos da subunidade 18S do rRNA, com posterior sequenciamento dos fragmentos amplificados, o que permitiu a identificação de Cryptosporidium andersoni em 11,9% (7/59 e de C.parvum em 88,1% (52/59 das amostras. Os resultados observados comprovam que a IFD foi mais eficiente que a MCF para detecção de oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. em amostras fecais de bezerros.This study aimed to compare the direct immunofluorescence assay (DIF and the phase contrast microscopy in Sheather solution (PCM for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in fecal samples from calves. The determination of the thresholds of detection of DIF and PCM was performed using five aliquots of a fecal sample from a calf negative for Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts, spiked with

  20. Mn doped InSb studied at the atomic scale by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauger, S. J. C.; Bocquel, J.; Koenraad, P. M.; Feeser, C. E.; Parashar, N. D.; Wessels, B. W.

    2015-11-01

    We present an atomically resolved study of metal-organic vapor epitaxy grown Mn doped InSb. Both topographic and spectroscopic measurements have been performed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The measurements on the Mn doped InSb samples show a perfect crystal structure without any precipitates and reveal that Mn acts as a shallow acceptor. The Mn concentration of the order of ˜1020 cm-3 obtained from the cross-sectional STM data compare well with the intended doping concentration. While the pair correlation function of the Mn atoms showed that their local distribution is uncorrelated beyond the STM resolution for observing individual dopants, disorder in the Mn ion location giving rise to percolation pathways is clearly noted. The amount of clustering that we see is thus as expected for a fully randomly disordered distribution of the Mn atoms and no enhanced clustering or second phase material was observed.

  1. The NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, M. R.; McLean, I. S.; Prato, L.; Burgasser, A. J.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    The major goal of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey (BDSS - McLean et al. 2000, ApJ, 533, L45) is to obtain a complete sample of low resolution (R ~ 2000) spectra spanning the M, L, and T dwarf sub-classes in order to extend spectral classification schemes to near-infrared wavebands and to investigate the spectral signatures of temperature, gravity, and composition by comparison to theoretical models. Additional goals include the acquisition of higher resolution spectra (R ~ 25,000) of a sub-sample of the survey for detailed comparison with models and to search for radial velocity variations. The initial phase of the survey is complete with the acquisition of low resolution J-band spectra for two objects per sub-class spanning the range M6 to T8, with one object every other sub-class, in the same range, observed from 0.9-2.35 microns to produce a complete, flux-calibrated spectrum overlapping with previously obtained Keck LRIS data from 0.5-1.0 microns. Several of the brighter sources have also been observed at high resolution at J-band. To date, over 70 objects have been studied including 17 M dwarfs, 36 L dwarfs and 18 T dwarfs. Results from the initial phase of the survey are presented along with some preliminary results from our next directed phase study into the investigation of gravity signatures in these low-mass objects based upon infrared spectral features.

  2. Confocal Raman microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Hollricher, Olaf

    2018-01-01

    This second edition provides a cutting-edge overview of physical, technical and scientific aspects related to the widely used analytical method of confocal Raman microscopy. The book includes expanded background information and adds insights into how confocal Raman microscopy, especially 3D Raman imaging, can be integrated with other methods to produce a variety of correlative microscopy combinations. The benefits are then demonstrated and supported by numerous examples from the fields of materials science, 2D materials, the life sciences, pharmaceutical research and development, as well as the geosciences.

  3. A history of urine microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2015-11-01

    The naked-eye appearance of the urine must have been studied by shamans and healers since the Stone Age, and an elaborate interpretation of so-called Uroscopy began around 600 AD as a form of divination. A 1000 years later, the first primitive monocular and compound microscopes appeared in the Netherlands, and along with many other objects and liquids, urine was studied from around 1680 onwards as the enlightenment evolved. However, the crude early instruments did not permit fine study because of chromatic and linear/spherical blurring. Only after complex multi-glass lenses which avoided these problems had been made and used in the 1820s in London by Lister, and in Paris by Chevalier and Amici, could urinary microscopy become a practical, clinically useful tool in the 1830s. Clinical urinary microscopy was pioneered by Rayer and his pupils in Paris (especially Vigla), in the late 1830s, and spread to UK and Germany in the 1840s, with detailed descriptions and interpretations of cells and formed elements of the urinary sediment by Nasse, Henle, Robinson and Golding Bird. Classes were held, most notably by Donné in Paris. After another 50 years, optical microscopy had reached its apogee, with magnifications of over 1000 times obtainable free of aberration, using immersion techniques. Atlases of the urinary sediment were published in all major European countries and in the US. Polarised light and phase contrast was used also after 1900 to study urine, and by the early 20th century, photomicroscopy (pioneered by Donné and Daguerre 50 years previously, but then ignored) became usual for teaching and recording. In the 1940s electron microscopy began, followed by detection of specific proteins and cells using immunofluorescent antibodies. All this had been using handheld methodology. Around 1980, machine-assisted observations began, and have dominated progress since.

  4. International Multidisciplinary Microscopy Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Oral, Ahmet; Ozer, Mehmet; InterM; INTERM2013

    2014-01-01

    The International Multidisciplinary Microscopy Congress (INTERM2013) was organized on October 10-13, 2013. The aim of the congress was to bring together scientists from various branches to discuss the latest advances in the field of microscopy. The contents of the congress have been broadened to a more "interdisciplinary" scope, so as to allow all scientists working on related subjects to participate and present their work. These proceedings include 39 peer-reviewed technical papers, submitted by leading academic and research institutions from over 12 countries and representing some of the most cutting-edge research available. The 39 papers are grouped into the following sections: - Applications of Microscopy in the Physical Sciences - Applications of Microscopy in the Biological Sciences

  5. Clinical specular microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, L.W.; Laing, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides the general ophthalmologist with a guide to the clinical applications of specular microscopy. Important material is included on laser injury, cataract surgery, corneal transplants, glaucoma, uveitis, and trauma.

  6. Dispersion-enhanced third-harmonic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Christian; Zlatanov, Kaloyan; Halfmann, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate strong enhancements of signal yield and image contrast in third-harmonic microscopy by appropriate choice of driving laser wavelength to modulate the phase-matching conditions of the conversion process by dispersion control. Tuning the laser wavelength in the range of 1010 - 1350 nm at samples containing interfaces with water and glass, we obtained large signal enhancements up to a factor of 19, and improvements in the image contrast by an order of magnitude. The effect is most pronounced at interfaces with media of small and/or not too different nonlinear optical susceptibilities, e.g., as it is the case in typical samples in harmonic microscopy. Beyond the demonstration of this new variant of third-harmonic microscopy, our findings are also of relevance to a proper choice of laser systems for harmonic microscopy setups.

  7. Aberration corrected Lorentz scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McVitie, S., E-mail: stephen.mcvitie@glasgow.ac.uk; McGrouther, D.; McFadzean, S.; MacLaren, D.A.; O’Shea, K.J.; Benitez, M.J.

    2015-05-15

    We present results from an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope which has been customised for high resolution quantitative Lorentz microscopy with the sample located in a magnetic field free or low field environment. We discuss the innovations in microscope instrumentation and additional hardware that underpin the imaging improvements in resolution and detection with a focus on developments in differential phase contrast microscopy. Examples from materials possessing nanometre scale variations in magnetisation illustrate the potential for aberration corrected Lorentz imaging as a tool to further our understanding of magnetism on this lengthscale. - Highlights: • Demonstration of nanometre scale resolution in magnetic field free environment using aberration correction in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). • Implementation of differential phase contrast mode of Lorentz microscopy in aberration corrected STEM with improved sensitivity. • Quantitative imaging of magnetic induction of nanostructures in amorphous and cross-section samples.

  8. The 1997 spectroscopic GEISA databank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Arie, E.; Ballard, J.; Barbe, A.; Bjoraker, G.; Bonnet, B.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Champion, J. P.; Chedin, A.; Chursin, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Duxbury, G.; Flaud, J.-M.; Fourrie, N.; Fayt, A.; Graner, G.; Gamache, R.; Goldman, A.; Golovko, V.; Guelachvili, G.; Hartmann, J. M.; Hilico, J. C.; Hillman, J.; Lefevre, G.; Lellouch, E.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nemtchinov, V.; Newnham, D. A.; Nikitin, A.; Orphal, J.; Perrin, A.; Reuter, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Rosenmann, L.; Rothman, L. S.; Scott, N. A.; Selby, J.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Sirota, J. M.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, K. M.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Tipping, R. H.; Urban, S.; Varanasi, P.; Weber, M.

    1999-05-01

    The current version GEISA-97 of the computer-accessible database system GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) is described. This catalogue contains 1,346,266 entries. These are the spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located between 0 and 22656 cm-1. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the giant planets. GEISA-97 contains also a catalog of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. The modifications and improvements made to the earlier edition (GEISA-92) and the data management software are described.

  9. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy: Three-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Three-dimensional imaging of the director. O D LAVRENTOVICH. Chemical Physics ... cholesteric LCs. Keywords. 3D imaging; confocal microscopy; liquid crystals; dislocations. PACS Nos 07.60. ... magnetic resonance, x-ray diffraction, optical phase retardation, etc., suffer from the same deficiency: they produce only an ...

  10. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haw [Moraga, CA; Cang, Hu [Berkeley, CA; Xu, Cangshan [Berkeley, CA; Wong, Chung M [San Gabriel, CA

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  11. Spectroscopic Classification of Seven Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, P.; Gomez, S.; Nicholl, M.; Berger, E.

    2018-01-01

    We obtained optical spectroscopic observations of 7 transients reported to the Transient Name Server by the ATLAS survey (Tonry et al. 2011, PASP, 123, 58; Tonry et al., ATel #8680), the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST; Huber et al., ATel #7153; http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/), DPAC and the ESA Gaia Photometric Science Alerts Team (http://gsaweb.ast.cam.ac.uk/alerts), and the Tsinghua University-National Astronomical Observatories of China Transient Survey (TNTS).

  12. The fourteenth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey : first spectroscopic data from the extended Baryon Oscillation Sky Survey and from the second phase of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfathi, Bela; Aguado, D. S.; Aguilar, Gabriela; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Anguiano, Borja; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Ata, Metin; Aubourg, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Funding for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, and the Participating Institutions. SDSS-IV acknowledges support and resources from the Center for High-Performance Computing at the University of Utah. The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) has been in operation since July 2014. This paper describes the second data release from this phase, and the fourteenth from SDSS o...

  13. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Manson-Smith, S K

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provi...

  14. Electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the high temperature crystal structures of GexSb2Te3+x (x=1,2,3) phase change material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    The crystal structures of GeSb2Te4, Ge2Sb2Te5, and Ge3Sb2Te6 were determined using electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The structure determined for the former two crystals deviates from the ones proposed in the literature. These crystal structures were

  15. Confocal Raman Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Toporski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy is a relatively new technique that allows chemical imaging without specific sample preparation. By integrating a sensitive Raman spectrometer within a state-of-the-art microscope, Raman microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 200nm laterally and 500nm vertically can be achieved using visible light excitation. Recent developments in detector and computer technology as well as optimized instrument design have reduced integration times of Raman spectra by orders of magnitude, so that complete images consisting of tens of thousands of Raman spectra can be acquired in seconds or minutes rather than hours, which used to be standard just one decade ago. The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a comprehensive overview of the rapidly developing field of Confocal Raman Microscopy and its applications.

  16. Confocal scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    This report is based on a metrological investigation on confocal microscopy technique carried out by Uffe Rolf Arlø Theilade and Paolo Bariani. The purpose of the experimental activity was twofold a metrological instrument characterization and application to assessment of rough PP injection moulded...... replicated topography. Confocal microscopy is seen to be a promising technique in metrology of microstructures. Some limitations with respect to surface metrology were found during the experiments. The experiments were carried out using a Zeiss LSM 5 Pascal microscope owned by the Danish Polymer Centre...

  17. Raman spectroscopic study of cyclohexane at pressures below 1000 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Erwei; Zheng, Haifei

    2017-10-01

    At present, the room temperature freezing pressure of cyclohexane is still uncertain, and the phase transition pressure of solid I - solid III is not reliable at ambient temperature. In this work, we have performed a Raman spectroscopic study of cyclohexane in a Moissanite anvil cell at pressures below 1000 MPa at 25 °C, and analyzed the characteristic of Raman brands νs(CH2), νas(CH2) and νb(Ring). Two phase transition pressures 80 MPa and 550 MPa were determined by a quartz pressure gauge, and they are the room temperature freezing pressure of cyclohexane and the phase transition pressure of solid I to solid III, respectively. Furthermore, from the phase diagram of cyclohexane, it is inferred that pressure plays an important role on the stability of cyclohexane as the main constituent of oil, and it can be beneficial to understanding the formation, migration and preservation of petroleum in subterranean rock strata.

  18. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging-Guided Confocal Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  19. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF RHODOTORULA GLUTINIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, T. R.; Conti, S. F.; Naylor, H. B.

    1962-01-01

    Thyagarajan, T. R. (Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, N. H.), S. F. Conti, and H. B. Naylor. Electron microscopy of Rhodotorula glutinis. J. Bacteriol. 83:381–394. 1962.—The structure and manner of nuclear division in Rhodotorula glutinis was studied by electron microscopy of ultrathin sections. Parallel studies with the light microscope, employing conventional staining techniques and phase-contrast microscope observations on nuclei in living cells, were carried out. The nucleus is spherical to oval and is bounded by a nuclear membrane. Intranuclear structures, identified as nucleoli, and electron-transparent areas were observed. The nuclear membrane persists throughout the various stages of cell division. Observations of the nucleus with the electron microscope revealed that nuclear division occurs by a process of elongation and constriction similar to that seen in both living and stained cells. The fine structure of mitochondria and other components of the yeast cell and their behavior during cell division are described. The absence of vacuoles in actively dividing cells of Rhodotorula glutinis lends further support to the view that the vacuole is not an integral part of the nucleus. The results with the electron microscope generally support and considerably extend those obtained with living and stained cells. Images PMID:13921132

  20. Single particle electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Folea, Mihaela; Kouril, Roman

    2009-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) in combination with image analysis is a powerful technique to study protein structures at low, medium, and high resolution. Since electron micrographs of biological objects are very noisy, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio by image processing is an integral part of

  1. and transmission electron microscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    immune-electron microscopy (IEM) from patients' feces. They reported this virus particle as the causative agent of winter vomiting outbreaks in Norwalk (Kapikian et al.,. 1972). This is the remarkable landmark study of non- bacterial gastroenteritis viruses, especially for small round structured viruses (SRSVs). After that, many.

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Atomic Force Microscopy - A Tool to Unveil the Mystery of Biological Systems ... Transcription and Disease Laboratory, Molecular Biology and Genetics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 ...

  3. Photoacoustic computed microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lei; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is emerging as a powerful technique for imaging microvasculature at depths beyond the ~1 mm depth limit associated with confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy and optical coherence tomography. PAM, however, is currently qualitative in nature and cannot quantitatively measure important functional parameters including oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), deoxyhemoglobin (HbR), oxygen saturation (sO2), blood flow (BF) and rate of oxygen metabolism (MRO2). Here we describe a new photoacoustic microscopic method, termed photoacoustic computed microscopy (PACM) that combines current PAM technique with a model-based inverse reconstruction algorithm. We evaluate the PACM approach using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate its in vivo imaging ability of quantifying HbO2, HbR, sO2, cerebral BF and cerebral MRO2 at the small vessel level in a rodent model. This new technique provides a unique tool for neuroscience research and for visualizing microvasculature dynamics involved in tumor angiogenesis and in inflammatory joint diseases.

  4. Second harmonic generation microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Risbo, Jens

    2010-01-01

    -temperature endotherm peak observable in the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms. DSC analysis of epimysium, the connective tissue layer that enfold skeletal muscles, produces one large endotherm starting at 57 °C and peaking at 59.5 °C. SHG microscopy of collagen fibers reveals a variability of thermal...

  5. Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelmann, Leon

    Principle of MFM In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the magnetic stray field above a very flat specimen, or sample, is detected by placing a small magnetic element, the tip, mounted on a cantilever spring very close to the surface of the sample (Figure 1). Typical dimensions are a cantilever length

  6. Exploring Neural Cell Dynamics with Digital Holographic Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre

    2013-04-21

    In this talk, I will present how digital holographic microscopy, as a powerful quantitative phase technique, can non-invasively measure cell dynamics and especially resolve local neuronal network activity through simultaneous multiple site optical recording.

  7. Synthesis, structure and spectroscopic properties of luminescent GdVO4:Dy3+ and DyVO4 particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Dragana J.; Chiappini, Andrea; Zur, Lidia; Gavrilović, Tamara V.; Lam Tran, Thi Ngoc; Chiasera, Alessandro; Lukowiak, Anna; Smits, Krisjanis; Dramićanin, Miroslav D.; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we focused on the syntheses, structure and spectroscopic properties of GdVO4:Dy3+ and DyVO4 (nano)particles of different sizes and shapes (spherical nanoparticles of 2 nm, 4 nm, and 20 nm in size, nanorods with a few nanometers in diameter and up to 10-20 nm in length and microparticles of 1-8 μm) obtained by four synthetic methods. The size effect on the structure, Raman active modes, and photoluminescence emission intensities was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and diffuse reflection spectroscopy. All X-ray diffraction patterns clearly indicated presence of a single tetragonal zircon-type phase; absence of impurity phases indicate that the dopant Dy3+ ions were successfully and uniformly incorporated into the GdVO4 host lattice due to the equal valence and similar ionic radii. Micro-Raman measurements support the XRD measurements and showed Raman-active modes of the REVO4 systems (RE = Gd, Dy). The difference between the two hosts in the diffuse reflectance spectra was observed and it could be attributed to more effective Gd3+ ions on the charge transfer bands and different polarization (compared to bulk material) in smaller nanoparticles. Photoluminescence spectroscopy showed several bands in the visible and near-infrared regions which can be exclusively attributed to the f-f transitions of Dy3+ ions.

  8. Contributed review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, F J; Otto, C

    2015-01-01

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In research fields, such as cell biology and materials science, there is an increasing demand to correlate these individual levels of information and in this way to obtain a better understanding of sample preparation and specific sample properties. To address this need, integrated systems were developed that combine nanometer resolution electron microscopes with optical microscopes, which produce chemically or label specific information through spectroscopy. The complementary information from electron microscopy and light microscopy presents an opportunity to investigate a broad range of sample properties in a correlated fashion. An important part of correlating the differences in information lies in bridging the different resolution and image contrast features. The trend to analyse samples using multiple correlated microscopes has resulted in a new research field. Current research is focused, for instance, on (a) the investigation of samples with nanometer scale distribution of inorganic and organic materials, (b) live cell analysis combined with electron microscopy, and (c) in situ spectroscopic and electron microscopy analysis of catalytic materials, but more areas will benefit from integrated correlative microscopy.

  9. Spectroscopic insight for tablet compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakio, S; Ylinärä, H; Antikainen, O; Räikkönen, H; Yliruusi, J

    2015-02-01

    Tablet compression process has been studied over the years from various perspectives. However what exactly happens to material during compression is still unknown. In this study a novel compression die which enables real-time spectroscopic measurements during the compression of material is represented. Both near infrared and Raman spectroscope probes can be attached to the die. In this study the usage of the die is demonstrated by using Raman spectroscopy. Eicosane, d-glucose anhydrate, α-lactose monohydrate and xylitol were used in the study because their compression behavior and bonding properties during compression were assumed to be different. The intensity of the Raman signal changed during compression with all of the materials. However, the intensity changes were different within the materials. The biggest differences were within the xylitol spectra. It was noticed that some peaks disappeared with higher compression pressures indicating that the pressure affected variously on different bonds in xylitol structure. These reversible changes were supposed to relate the changes in conformation and crystal structure. As a conclusion, the die was found to be a significant addition for studying compression process in real-time. It can help to reveal Process induced transformations (PITs) occurring during powder compaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Atomic force microscopy of virus shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Madrid, Francisco; Martín-González, Natalia; Llauró, Aida; Ortega-Esteban, Alvaro; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; Douglas, Trevor; Schaap, Iwan A T; de Pablo, Pedro J

    2017-04-15

    Microscopes are used to characterize small objects with the help of probes that interact with the specimen, such as photons and electrons in optical and electron microscopies, respectively. In atomic force microscopy (AFM), the probe is a nanometric tip located at the end of a microcantilever which palpates the specimen under study just as a blind person manages a walking stick. In this way, AFM allows obtaining nanometric resolution images of individual protein shells, such as viruses, in a liquid milieu. Beyond imaging, AFM also enables not only the manipulation of single protein cages, but also the characterization of every physicochemical property capable of inducing any measurable mechanical perturbation to the microcantilever that holds the tip. In the present revision, we start revising some recipes for adsorbing protein shells on surfaces. Then, we describe several AFM approaches to study individual protein cages, ranging from imaging to spectroscopic methodologies devoted to extracting physical information, such as mechanical and electrostatic properties. We also explain how a convenient combination of AFM and fluorescence methodologies entails monitoring genome release from individual viral shells during mechanical unpacking. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Atomic force microscopy of virus shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo, Pedro J

    2017-08-26

    Microscopes are used to characterize small specimens with the help of probes, such as photons and electrons in optical and electron microscopies, respectively. In atomic force microscopy (AFM) the probe is a nanometric tip located at the end of a microcantilever which palpates the specimen under study as a blind person manages a white cane to explore the surrounding. In this way, AFM allows obtaining nanometric resolution images of individual protein shells, such as viruses, in liquid milieu. Beyond imaging, AFM also enables the manipulation of single protein cages, and the characterization of every physico-chemical property able of inducing any measurable mechanical perturbation to the microcantilever that holds the tip. Here we describe several AFM approaches to study individual protein cages, including imaging and spectroscopic methodologies for extracting mechanical and electrostatic properties. In addition, AFM allows discovering and testing the self-healing capabilities of protein cages because occasionally they may recover fractures induced by the AFM tip. Beyond the protein shells, AFM also is able of exploring the genome inside, obtaining, for instance, the condensation state of dsDNA and measuring its diffusion when the protein cage breaks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microscopic and Spectroscopic Investigation of Poly(3-hexylthiophene Interaction with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio De Crescenzi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix has been proposed to enhance the polymer’s physical and electrical properties. In this study, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques are used to investigate the interaction between poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT and nanotubes and the reciprocal modification of physical properties. The presence of P3HT-covered nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix has been observed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Then, the modification of P3HT optical properties due to nanotube inclusion has been evidenced with spectroscopic techniques like absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The study is completed with detailed nanoscale analysis by scanning probe techniques. The ordered self assembly of polymer adhering on the nanotube is unveiled by showing an example of helical wrapping of P3HT. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy study provides information on the electronic structure of nanotube-polymer assembly, revealing the charge transfer from P3HT to the nanotube.

  13. Transmission Electron Microscopy Physics of Image Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kohl, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fifth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of aberration correction and energy filtering; moreover, the topics introduced in the fourth edition have been updated. Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation is written f...

  14. Spatially resolved TiOx phases in switched RRAM devices using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, D.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Guttmann, P.; Regoutz, A.; Khiat, A.; Serb, A.; Gupta, I.; Prodromakis, T.

    2016-02-01

    Reduction in metal-oxide thin films has been suggested as the key mechanism responsible for forming conductive phases within solid-state memory devices, enabling their resistive switching capacity. The quantitative spatial identification of such conductive regions is a daunting task, particularly for metal-oxides capable of exhibiting multiple phases as in the case of TiOx. Here, we spatially resolve and chemically characterize distinct TiOx phases in localized regions of a TiOx-based memristive device by combining full-field transmission X-ray microscopy with soft X-ray spectroscopic analysis that is performed on lamella samples. We particularly show that electrically pre-switched devices in low-resistive states comprise reduced disordered phases with O/Ti ratios around 1.37 that aggregate in a ~100 nm highly localized region electrically conducting the top and bottom electrodes of the devices. We have also identified crystalline rutile and orthorhombic-like TiO2 phases in the region adjacent to the main reduced area, suggesting that the temperature increases locally up to 1000 K, validating the role of Joule heating in resistive switching. Contrary to previous studies, our approach enables to simultaneously investigate morphological and chemical changes in a quantitative manner without incurring difficulties imposed by interpretation of electron diffraction patterns acquired via conventional electron microscopy techniques.

  15. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  16. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) functions as a non-destructive microtome and microscope that uses a plane of light to optically section and view tissues with subcellular resolution. This method is well suited for imaging deep within transparent tissues or within whole organisms, and because tissues are exposed to only a thin plane of light, specimen photobleaching and phototoxicity are minimized compared to wide-field fluorescence, confocal, or multiphoton microscopy. LSFMs produce well-registered serial sections that are suitable for three-dimensional reconstruction of tissue structures. Because of a lack of a commercial LSFM microscope, numerous versions of light sheet microscopes have been constructed by different investigators. This review describes development of the technology, reviews existing devices, provides details of one LSFM device, and shows examples of images and three-dimensional reconstructions of tissues that were produced by LSFM. PMID:21339178

  17. Multimodal hyperspectral optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Irina V.; Smallwood, Chuck R.; Gong, Yu; Hu, Dehong; Hendricks, Leif; Evans, James E.; Bhattarai, Ashish; Hess, Wayne P.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.

    2017-11-01

    We describe a unique approach to hyperspectral optical microscopy, herein achieved by coupling a hyperspectral imager to various optical microscopes. Hyperspectral fluorescence micrographs of isolated fluorescent beads are first employed to ensure spectral calibration of our detector and to gauge the attainable spatial resolution of our measurements. Different science applications of our instrument are then described. Spatially over-sampled absorption spectroscopy of a single lipid (18:1 Liss Rhod PE) layer reveals that optical densities on the order of 10-3 can be resolved by spatially averaging the recorded optical signatures. This is followed by three applications in the general areas of plasmonics and bioimaging. Notably, we deploy hyperspectral absorption microscopy to identify and image pigments within a simple biological system, namely, a single live Tisochrysis lutea cell. Overall, this work paves the way for multimodal spectral imaging measurements spanning the realms of several scientific disciplines.

  18. Electron microscopy of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laue, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Electron microscopy is widely used in virology because viruses are generally too small for a direct inspection by light microscopy. Analysis of virus morphology is necessary in many circumstances, e.g., for the diagnosis of a virus in particular clinical situations or the analysis of virus entry and assembly. Moreover, quality control of virus particle integrity is required if a virus is propagated in cell culture, particularly if the virus genome has changed. In most cases already the basic methodology for transmission electron microscopy, i.e., negative staining and ultrathin sectioning, is sufficient to give relevant information on virus ultrastructure. This chapter gives detailed information on the principles of these basic methodologies and provides simple but reliable protocols for a quick start. Moreover, the description of standard protocols for negative staining and ultrathin sectioning are supplemented by protocols on immuno-negative staining and rapid ultrathin sectioning. Finally, principles of methods for an extended ultrastructural research using more elaborate techniques, such as cryotechniques or methods to reveal the three-dimensional virus architecture, are briefly reviewed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Deep Learning Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Rivenson, Yair

    2017-05-12

    We demonstrate that a deep neural network can significantly improve optical microscopy, enhancing its spatial resolution over a large field-of-view and depth-of-field. After its training, the only input to this network is an image acquired using a regular optical microscope, without any changes to its design. We blindly tested this deep learning approach using various tissue samples that are imaged with low-resolution and wide-field systems, where the network rapidly outputs an image with remarkably better resolution, matching the performance of higher numerical aperture lenses, also significantly surpassing their limited field-of-view and depth-of-field. These results are transformative for various fields that use microscopy tools, including e.g., life sciences, where optical microscopy is considered as one of the most widely used and deployed techniques. Beyond such applications, our presented approach is broadly applicable to other imaging modalities, also spanning different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, and can be used to design computational imagers that get better and better as they continue to image specimen and establish new transformations among different modes of imaging.

  20. Raman spectroscopic study of LiHPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Sei; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Moon, Joonhee; Lee, Sookyoung; Jeon, Minhyon

    2008-03-01

    The dielectric constant of polycrystalline LiH 2PO 4 has been measured between 297 and 17 K. No marked changes were observed over this range, indicating that the room-temperature orthorhombic phase persisted up to 17 K. Raman spectra of polycrystalline LiH 2PO 4 were also measured at 297, 200, and 70 K in the frequency shift region of 15-4000 cm -1 with Raman-active vibrational modes naively assigned to low-frequency (0-300 cm -1) external and high-frequency (300-4000 cm -1) internal modes. In addition to the internal modes of the PO 4 tetrahedra, the internal modes of the LiO 4 tetrahedra spectroscopically manifested themselves between 390-500 cm -1. This frequency range overlaps those of ν2 (PO 4) and ν4 (PO 4). The LiH 2PO 4O-H vibrational frequencies were in good agreement with crystallographic reports that there are two types of hydrogen bonds: intermediate (long bonds) and strong (short bonds).

  1. Herschel spectroscopic observations of PPNe and PNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Lario, Pedro; Ramos-Medina, J.; Sánchez-Contreras, C.

    2017-10-01

    We are building a catalogue of interactively reprocessed observations of evolved stars observed with Herschel. The catalogue will offer not only the PACS and SPIRE spectroscopic data for each observation, but also complementary information from other infrared space observatories. As a first step, we are concentrating our efforts on two main activities: 1) the interactive data-reduction of more than 500 individual spectra obtained with PACS in the 55-210 μm range, available in the Herschel Science Archive; 2) the creation of a catalogue, accesible via a web-based interface and through the Virtual Observatory. Our ultimate goal is to carry out a comprehensive and systematic study of the far infrared properties of low-and intermediate-mass evolved stars using these data and enable science based on Herschel archival data. The objects cover the whole range of possible evolutionary stages in this short-lived phase of stellar evolution, from the AGB to the PN stage, displaying a wide variety of chemical and physical properties.

  2. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopic Study of Carbon-Cobalt Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Tembre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of carbon-cobalt thin films using infrared spectroscopy has shown existence of carbon-cobalt stretching mode and great porosity. The Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy have been used in order to investigate the microstructure of the films. These films exhibit complex Raman spectra suggesting the presence of amorphous and crystallized phases. The different fractions of phases and the correlation between the atomic bond structures and the Raman features depend on the cobalt content.

  3. Salmon Muscle Adherence to Polymer Coatings and Determination of Antibiotic Residues by Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zumelzu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The persistent adhesion of salmon muscle to food container walls after treatment with urea solution was observed. This work evaluated the diffusion of antibiotics from the salmon muscle to the polyethylene terephthalate (PET coating protecting the electrolytic chromium coated steel (ECCS plates. New aquaculture production systems employ antibiotics such as florfenicol, florfenicol amine, oxytetracycline, and erythromycin to control diseases. The introduction of antibiotics is a matter of concern regarding the effects on human health and biodiversity. It is important to determine their impact on the adhesion of postmortem salmon muscle to can walls and the surface and structural changes affecting the functionality of multilayers. This work characterized the changes occurring in the multilayer PET polymer and steel of containers by electron microscopy, 3D atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR analyses. A robust mass spectrometry methodology was employed to determine the presence of antibiotic residues. No evidence of antibiotics was observed on the protective coating in the range between 0.001 and 2.0 ng/mL; however, the presence of proteins, cholesterol, and alpha-carotene was detected. This in-depth profiling of the matrix-level elements is relevant for the use of adequate materials in the canning export industry.

  4. Condenser-free contrast methods for transmitted-light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, K F

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast microscopy allows the study of highly transparent yet detail-rich specimens by producing intensity contrast from phase objects within the sample. Presented here is a generalized phase contrast illumination schema in which condenser optics are entirely abrogated, yielding a condenser-free yet highly effective method of obtaining phase contrast in transmitted-light microscopy. A ring of light emitting diodes (LEDs) is positioned within the light-path such that observation of the objective back focal plane places the illuminating ring in appropriate conjunction with the phase ring. It is demonstrated that true Zernike phase contrast is obtained, whose geometry can be flexibly manipulated to provide an arbitrary working distance between illuminator and sample. Condenser-free phase contrast is demonstrated across a range of magnifications (4-100×), numerical apertures (0.13-1.65NA) and conventional phase positions. Also demonstrated is condenser-free darkfield microscopy as well as combinatorial contrast including Rheinberg illumination and simultaneous, colour-contrasted, brightfield, darkfield and Zernike phase contrast. By providing enhanced and arbitrary working space above the preparation, a range of concurrent imaging and electrophysiological techniques will be technically facilitated. Condenser-free phase contrast is demonstrated in conjunction with scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), using a notched ring to admit the scanned probe. The compact, versatile LED illumination schema will further lend itself to novel next-generation transmitted-light microscopy designs. The condenser-free illumination method, using rings of independent or radially-scanned emitters, may be exploited in future in other electromagnetic wavebands, including X-rays or the infrared. © 2014 The Author. Journal of Microscopy published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd on behalf of the Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Composite heat damage spectroscopic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C.J.; Muhs, J.D.; Wachter, E.A.; Ziegler, R.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Powell, G.L.; Smyrl, N.R. (Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (USA)); Philpot, H.E. (Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, TN (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Applied Technology Division (ORNL/ATD) has successfully demonstrated the unique applicability of two spectroscopic techniques that possess the capability of detecting heat damage in IM6/3501-6 laminates and correlation of this damage with the residual mechanical-strength properties. The results on the diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform (DRIFT) and laser-pumped fluorescence (LPF) spectroscopic techniques, which are capable of rapid, in-service, non-destructive detection and quantitation of heat damage in IM6/3501-6 laminates, is presented. Both of these techniques have been shown to be quite effective at probing the elusive and complex molecular changes that take place in IM6/3501-6 laminates subjected to varying degrees of thermal degradation. Using LPF or DRIFT techniques, it has been shown that laminates having different thermal histories can be readily differentiated from one another due to their characteristic fingerprint'' spectral features. The effects of short-term, elevated temperature heating on the room- temperature compressive interlaminar-shear, and flexural strengths and room-temperature shore-D hardness properties of dry'' and wet'' preconditioned IM6/3501-6 laminates are discussed. Additionally, the geometrical changes and percent-weight-loss measurements of IM6/3501-6 laminates that accompany heat damage are also examined. It was found that below a certain temperature/time exposure threshold, these laminates visually and microscopically appeared to be undamaged but, in fact, may have lost a significant percentage of their original strength. In addition, laminates that were exposed above the temperature/time exposure threshold suffered dramatic geometrical changes and large amounts of weight loss. 32 refs., 39 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Biological cryo‐electron microscopy in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cryo‐electron microscopy (cryo‐EM) plays an increasingly more important role in structural biology. With the construction of an arm of the Chinese National Protein Science Facility at Tsinghua University, biological cryo‐EM has entered a phase of rapid development in China. This article briefly reviews the history of biological cryo‐EM in China, describes its current status, comments on its impact on the various biological research fields, and presents future outlook. PMID:27534377

  7. Biological cryo?electron microscopy in China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hong Wei; Lei, Jianlin; Shi, Yigong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cryo?electron microscopy (cryo?EM) plays an increasingly more important role in structural biology. With the construction of an arm of the Chinese National Protein Science Facility at Tsinghua University, biological cryo?EM has entered a phase of rapid development in China. This article briefly reviews the history of biological cryo?EM in China, describes its current status, comments on its impact on the various biological research fields, and presents future outlook.

  8. Laser-based dual-space microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Maged; Gedies, Robert; Alzayed, Abdullah; Aldawsari, Fahad; Dominguez, Daniel; Grave de Peralta, Luis

    2017-11-01

    We show using two-dimensional simulations that the dual-space microscopy (DSM) phase-recovery algorithm converges to the correct result for arbitrary samples. We present experimental results obtained by implementing the DSM technique using a laser. We demonstrate that DSM produces synthetic images with a large field of view when a laser is used as the illumination source. However, speckles affect the quality of the obtained images.

  9. A flexible and rapid frequency selective scheme for SRS microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingting; Yue, Yuankai; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2017-02-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is a label-free imaging technique suitable for studying biological systems. Due to stimulated nature by ultrafast laser pulses, SRS microscopy has the advantage of significantly higher sensitivity but often reduced spectroscopic information. In this paper, we present a newly constructed femtosecond SRS microscope with a high-speed dynamic micromirror device based pulse shaper to achieve flexible and rapid frequency selection within the C-H stretch region near 2800 to 3100 cm-1 with spectral width of 30 cm-1. This technique is applicable to lipid profiling such as cell activity mapping, lipid distribution mapping and distinction among subclasses.

  10. Sixth International Conference on X-ray Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1999-08-23

    More than 180 participants from around the world crowded the Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California, Berkeley, from August 1-6, 1999 for the Sixth International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy (XRM99). Held every three years since 1983, the XRM conferences have become the primary international forum for the presentation and discussion of advances in high-spatial-resolution x-ray imaging and applications (including the use of x-ray spectroscopic and analytical techniques) in biological and medical sciences, environmental and soil sciences, and materials and surface sciences.

  11. Gradient field microscopy of unstained specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taewoo; Sridharan, Shamira; Popescu, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    We present a phase derivative microscopy technique referred to as gradient field microscopy (GFM), which provides the first-order derivatives of the phase associated with an optical field passing through a transparent specimen. GFM utilizes spatial light modulation at the Fourier plane of a bright field microscope to optically obtain the derivatives of the phase and increase the contrast of the final image. The controllable spatial modulation pattern allows us to obtain both one component of the field gradient (derivative along one direction) and the gradient intensity, which offers some advantages over the regular differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Most importantly, unlike DIC, GFM does not use polarizing optics and, thus, it is applicable to birefringent samples. We demonstrate these features of GFM with studies of static and dynamic biological cells (HeLa cells and red blood cells). We show that GFM is capable of qualitatively providing information about cell membrane fluctuations. Specifically, we captured the disappearance of the bending mode of fluctuations in osmotically swollen red blood cells. PMID:22418558

  12. Electrochemical force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam F.; Rodriguez, Brian J.

    2017-01-10

    A system and method for electrochemical force microscopy are provided. The system and method are based on a multidimensional detection scheme that is sensitive to forces experienced by a biased electrode in a solution. The multidimensional approach allows separation of fast processes, such as double layer charging, and charge relaxation, and slow processes, such as diffusion and faradaic reactions, as well as capturing the bias dependence of the response. The time-resolved and bias measurements can also allow probing both linear (small bias range) and non-linear (large bias range) electrochemical regimes and potentially the de-convolution of charge dynamics and diffusion processes from steric effects and electrochemical reactivity.

  13. Reinventing Pocket Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kamal, T; Lee, W M

    2015-01-01

    The key to the success of pocket microscopes stems from the convenience for anyone to magnify the fine details (tens of micrometres) of any object on-thespot. The capability with a portable microscope lets us surpass our limited vision and is commonly used in many areas of science, industry, education. The growth of imaging and computing power in smartphones is creating the possibility of converting your smartphone into a high power pocket microscope. In this article, we briefly describe the history of pocket microscopy and elucidate how mobile technologies are set to become the next platform for pocket microscopes

  14. Multi-colour photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of the WN5 star EZ Canis Majoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijsens, MFJ; vanderHucht, KA; vanGenderen, AM; Schwarz, HE; Linders, HPJ; Kolkman, OM

    1996-01-01

    We present and analyse photometric and spectroscopic observations of the WN5 star EZ Canis Majoris obtained over a period of 7 years. We discuss the changing light curve, the shift in phase of the maxima and point to flare type variability seen in one night. Small amplitude variations are reported

  15. Spectroscopic Confirmation of ASASSN-16ra as a 2016 Galactic Nova in Norma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomiuk, L.; Strader, J.; Bahramian, A.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.

    2017-09-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of the recently announced optical transient ASASSN-16ra (ATel #10740) as a Galactic nova in the nebular phase. The spectrum was obtained with the Goodman Spectrograph on the SOAR telescope on Sep 20.98, 18 months after it first appeared in ASAS-SN data.

  16. Structural and spectroscopic studies of a commercial glassy carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stewart F.; Imberti, Silvia; Callear, Samantha K.; Albers, Peter W.

    2013-12-01

    Glassy carbon is a form of carbon made by heating a phenolic resin to high temperature in an inert atmosphere. It has been suggested that it is composed of fullerene-like structures. The aim of the present work was to characterize the material using both structural (neutron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy) and spectroscopic (inelastic neutron scattering, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies) methods. We find no evidence to support the suggestion of fullerene-like material being present to a significant extent, rather the model that emerges from all of the techniques is that the material is very like amorphous carbon, consisting of regions of small graphite-like basic structural units of partly stacked but mismatched structure with the edges terminated by hydrogen or hydroxyls. We do find evidence for the presence of a small quantity of water trapped in the network and suggest that this may account for batch-to-batch variation in properties that may occur.

  17. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Daneault

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, the intermolecular interaction of amino acids and peptides was avoided and uniform coupling of these molecules on ONC was achieved. The coupling reaction was very fast in mild conditions and without alteration of the polysaccharide. The coupling products (ONC-amino acids and ONC-peptides were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by the absorption, emission, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS spectroscopic techniques.

  18. Multivariate Chemical Image Fusion of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife A. Gowen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemical image fusion refers to the combination of chemical images from different modalities for improved characterisation of a sample. Challenges associated with existing approaches include: difficulties with imaging the same sample area or having identical pixels across microscopic modalities, lack of prior knowledge of sample composition and lack of knowledge regarding correlation between modalities for a given sample. In addition, the multivariate structure of chemical images is often overlooked when fusion is carried out. We address these challenges by proposing a framework for multivariate chemical image fusion of vibrational spectroscopic imaging modalities, demonstrating the approach for image registration, fusion and resolution enhancement of chemical images obtained with IR and Raman microscopy.

  19. Confinement in single walled carbon nanotubes investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battie, Y., E-mail: yann.battie@univ-lorraine.fr [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Jamon, D. [Université de Lyon, Université Jean Monnet, EA 3523, Laboratoire Télécom Claude Chappe, 25 rue du Dr Rémy Annino, 42000 Saint Etienne (France); Lauret, J.S. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, UPR 3321, ENS Cachan, 94245 Cachan (France); Gu, Q.; Gicquel-Guézo, M. [FOTON, UMR 6082, INSA, Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, 35043 Rennes (France); En Naciri, A. [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Loiseau, A. [Laboratoire d' étude des microstructures, ONERA-CNRS UMR 104, 29 Av. de la Division Leclerc, 92322 Chatillon (France)

    2014-11-28

    Thick films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameter and chirality distributions are characterized by combining transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dependence of the dielectric function with the increase of the SWCNT diameter occurs with a drastic redshift of the S{sub 11}, S{sub 22} and M{sub 11} transition energies. The transfer integral parameter γ{sub 0} of SWCNT is also evaluated and analyzed. We demonstrate that parts of the optical properties of SWCNTs are attributed to a one dimensional confinement effect. - Highlights: • Ellipsometric measurements are performed on carbon nanotube thick films. • The complex dielectric functions of conventional carbon nanotubes are given. • Confinement effects explain the variations of dielectric function of nanotubes.

  20. New Lyotropic Mixtures with Non-Chiral N-Acylamino Acid Surfactants Presenting the Biaxial Nematic Phase Investigated by Laser Conoscopy, Polarized Optical Microscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Akpinar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid-based surfactants were used as the main surfactants to prepare new lyotropic mixtures presenting three nematic phases. One of them is biaxial (NB, and the two others are uniaxial, discotic (ND and calamitic (NC. These surfactants were the non-chiral molecules, potassium N-dodecanoyl-DL-alaninate (DL-KDDA, potassium N-dodecanoyl-DL-serinate (DL-KDDS, disodium N-dodecanoyl-DL-aspartate (DL-NaDDAs and potassium N-dodecanoyl-glycinate (KDDGly. Measurements of the optical birefringences and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to characterize the nematic phases and phase transitions. Mixtures with DL-KDDS exhibited the largest biaxial phase domain (~9 °C with respect to the other mixtures in this study. The results obtained with the KDDGly mixture showed that the existence of hydrogen bonding between the head groups of the surfactant molecules seems to hinder the orientation of the micelles under the action of an external magnetic field.

  1. Correlative Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doory; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Sigal, Yaron M.; Babcock, Hazen P.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and imaging conditions for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and EM are often not compatible. Here, we have developed several experiment protocols for correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and EM methods, both for un-embedded samples by applying EM-specific sample preparations after STORM imaging and for embedded and sectioned samples by optimizing the fluorescence under EM fixation, staining and embedding conditions. We demonstrated these methods using a variety of cellular targets. PMID:25874453

  2. Multimodal hyperspectral optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikova, Irina V.; Smallwood, Chuck R.; Gong, Yu; Hu, Dehong; Hendricks, Leif; Evans, James E.; Bhattarai, Ashish; Hess, Wayne P.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.

    2017-09-01

    We describe a unique and convenient approach to multimodal hyperspectral optical microscopy, herein achieved by coupling a portable and transferable hyperspectral imager to various optical microscopes. The experimental and data analysis schemes involved in recording spectrally and spatially resolved fluorescence, dark field, and optical absorption micrographs are illustrated through prototypical measurements targeting selected model systems. Namely, hyperspectral fluorescence micrographs of isolated fluorescent beads are employed to ensure spectral calibration of our detector and to gauge the attainable spatial resolution of our measurements; the recorded images are diffraction-limited. Moreover, spatially over-sampled absorption spectroscopy of a single lipid (18:1 Liss Rhod PE) layer reveals that optical densities on the order of 10-3 may be resolved by spatially averaging the recorded optical signatures. We also briefly illustrate two applications of our setup in the general areas of plasmonics and cell biology. Most notably, we deploy hyperspectral optical absorption microscopy to identify and image algal pigments within a single live Tisochrysis lutea cell. Overall, this work paves the way for multimodal multidimensional spectral imaging measurements spanning the realms of several scientific disciples.

  3. Magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  4. Digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Solomon; Dimiduk, Thomas; Manoharan, Vinothan

    Digital holographic microscopy is a 3D optical imaging technique with high temporal ( ms) and spatial ( 10 nm) precision. However, its adoption as a characterization technique has been limited due to the inherent difficulty of recovering 3D data from the holograms. Successful analysis has traditionally required substantial knowledge about the sample being imaged (for example, the approximate positions of particles in the field of view), as well as expertise in scattering theory. To overcome the obstacles to widespread adoption of holographic microscopy, we developed HoloPy - an open source python package for analysis of holograms and scattering data. HoloPy uses Bayesian statistical methods to determine the geometry and properties of discrete scatterers from raw holograms. We demonstrate the use of HoloPy to measure the dynamics of colloidal particles at interfaces, to ascertain the structures of self-assembled colloidal particles, and to track freely swimming bacteria. The HoloPy codebase is thoroughly tested and well-documented to facilitate use by the broader experimental community. This research is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1306410 and NSERC.

  5. Imaging bacterial spores by soft-x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W. [Univ. of London, Surrey (United Kingdom); Judge, J. [Unilever plc, Sharnbrook (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Bacterial spores are able to survive dehydration, but neither the physiological nor structural basis of this have been fully elucidated. Furthermore, once hydrated, spores often require activation before they will germinate. Several treatments can be used to activate spores, but in the case of Bacillus subtlis the most effective is heat treatment. The physiological mechanism associated with activation is also not understood, but some workers suggest that the loss of calcium from the spores may be critical. However, just prior to germination, the spores change from being phase bright to phase dark when viewed by light microscopy. Imaging spores by soft x-ray microscopy is possible without fixation. Thus, in contrast to electron microscopy, it is possible to compare the structure of dehydrated and hydrated spores in a manner not possible previously. A further advantage is that it is possible to monitor individual spores by phase contrast light microscopy immediately prior to imaging with soft x-rays; whereas, with both electron microscopy and biochemical studies, it is a population of spores being studied without knowledge of the phase characteristics of individual spores. This study has therefore tried to compare dehydrated and hydrated spores and to determine if there is a mass loss from individual spores as they pass the transition from being phase bright to phase dark.

  6. Advanced microscopy of microbial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Regenberg, Birgitte; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Growing awareness of heterogeneity in cells of microbial populations has emphasized the importance of advanced microscopy for visualization and understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cell-to-cell variation. In this review, we highlight some of the recent advances in confocal...... microscopy, super-resolution optical microscopy (STED, SIM, PALM) as well as atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using examples of bistability in microbial populations as well as biofilm development and differentiation in bacterial and yeast consortia, we demonstrate the importance of microscopy...

  7. Synthesis, Spectroscopic and Pharmacological Studies of Bivalent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis, Spectroscopic and Pharmacological Studies of Bivalent Copper, Zinc and Mercury Complexes of Thiourea. ... All the metal complexes were characterized by elemental chemical analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements and IR spectroscopy. Cu(II) complexes were additionally ...

  8. Structural, thermal and spectroscopic properties of supramolecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 118; Issue 6. Structural, thermal and spectroscopic properties of supramolecular coordination solids. Birinchi Kumar Das Sanchay Jyoti Bora Monideepa Chakrabortty Laksheswar Kalita Rajesh Chakrabarty Ramakanta Barman. Volume 118 Issue 6 November 2006 ...

  9. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural characterization of new ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 125; Issue 3. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural characterization of new linear mononuclear silver(I) complexes containing -keto phosphorus ylides as ambidentate ligands. Seyed Javad Sabounchei Mohsen Ahmadi Fatemeh Akhlaghi Hamid Reza Khavasi.

  10. 42 CFR 493.19 - Provider-performed microscopy (PPM) procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-field or phase-contrast microscopy. (4) The specimen is labile or delay in performing the test could... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provider-performed microscopy (PPM) procedures. 493....19 Provider-performed microscopy (PPM) procedures. (a) Requirement. To be categorized as a PPM...

  11. Stacking Structures of Few-Layer Graphene Revealed by Phase-Sensitive Infrared Nanoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deok-Soo; Kwon, Hyuksang; Nikitin, Alexey Yu; Ahn, Seongjin; Martín-Moreno, Luis; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Ryu, Sunmin; Min, Hongki; Kim, Zee Hwan

    2015-07-28

    The stacking orders in few-layer graphene (FLG) strongly influences the electronic properties of the material. To explore the stacking-specific properties of FLG in detail, one needs powerful microscopy techniques that visualize stacking domains with sufficient spatial resolution. We demonstrate that infrared (IR) scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (sSNOM) directly maps out the stacking domains of FLG with a nanometric resolution, based on the stacking-specific IR conductivities of FLG. The intensity and phase contrasts of sSNOM are compared with the sSNOM contrast model, which is based on the dipolar tip-sample coupling and the theoretical conductivity spectra of FLG, allowing a clear assignment of each FLG domain as Bernal, rhombohedral, or intermediate stacks for tri-, tetra-, and pentalayer graphene. The method offers 10-100 times better spatial resolution than the far-field Raman and infrared spectroscopic methods, yet it allows far more experimental flexibility than the scanning tunneling microscopy and electron microscopy.

  12. Incorporating spectroscopic on-line monitoring as a method of detection for a Lewis cell setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Forrest D.; Casella, Amanda J.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2017-01-01

    A Lewis cell was designed and constructed for investigating solvent extraction systems by spectrophotometrically monitoring both the organic and aqueous phases in real time. This new Lewis cell was tested and shown to perform well compared to other previously reported Lewis cell designs. The advantage of the new design is that the spectroscopic measurement allows determination of not only metal ion concentrations, but also information regarding chemical speciation—information not available with previous Lewis cell designs. For convenience, the new Lewis cell design was dubbed COSMOFLEX (COntinuous Spectroscopic MOnitoring of Forrest’s Liquid-liquid EXtraction cell).

  13. Single atom microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity.

  14. Photometric and spectroscopic investigation of TW Draconis

    OpenAIRE

    Zejda, M.; Wolf, M.; Slechta, M.; Mikulasek, Z.; Zverko, J.; Svoboda, P.; Krticka, J.; Janik, J.; Bozic, H.

    2010-01-01

    Context. TW Draconis is one of the best studied Algol-type eclipsing binaries. There is significant evidence for miscellaneous physical processes between interacting binary components manifesting themselves by period and light curve changes. Aims. Obtaining new set of photometric and spectroscopic observations, we analysed them together with the older spectroscopic and photometric data to build model of this eclipsing system with respect to observed changes of O-C diagram and light curve. Met...

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, U.; Szeghalmi, A.; Schmitt, M.; Kiefer, W.; Popp, J.; Holzgrabe, U.

    2005-05-01

    Quinolones are important gyrase inhibitors. Even though they are used as active agents in many antibiotics, the detailed mechanism of action on a molecular level is so far not known. It is of greatest interest to shed light on this drug-target interaction to provide useful information in the fight against growing resistances and obtain new insights for the development of new powerful drugs. To reach this goal, on a first step it is essential to understand the structural characteristics of the drugs and the effects that are caused by the environment in detail. In this work we report on Raman spectroscopical investigations of a variety of gyrase inhibitors (nalidixic acid, oxolinic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, enoxacin, sarafloxacin and moxifloxacin) by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy excited with various excitation wavelengths, both in the off-resonance region (532, 633, 830 and 1064 nm) and in the resonance region (resonance Raman spectroscopy at 244, 257 and 275 nm). Furthermore DFT calculations were performed to assign the vibrational modes, as well as for an identification of intramolecular hydrogen bonding motifs. The effect of small changes in the drug environment was studied by adding successively small amounts of water until physiological low concentrations of the drugs in aqueous solution were obtained. At these low concentrations resonance Raman spectroscopy proved to be a useful and sensitive technique. Supplementary information was obtained from IR and UV/vis spectroscopy.

  16. Spectroscopic Detection of Caries Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Ruohonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A caries lesion causes changes in the optical properties of the affected tissue. Currently a caries lesion can be detected only at a relatively late stage of development. Caries diagnosis also suffers from high interobserver variance. Methods. This is a pilot study to test the suitability of an optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for caries diagnosis. Reflectance visible/near-infrared spectroscopy (VIS/NIRS was used to measure caries lesions and healthy enamel on extracted human teeth. The results were analysed with a computational algorithm in order to find a rule-based classification method to detect caries lesions. Results. The classification indicated that the measured points of enamel could be assigned to one of three classes: healthy enamel, a caries lesion, and stained healthy enamel. The features that enabled this were consistent with theory. Conclusions. It seems that spectroscopic measurements can help to reduce false positives at in vitro setting. However, further research is required to evaluate the strength of the evidence for the method’s performance.

  17. Spatially resolved analyses of uranium species using a coupled system made up of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS); Ortsaufgeloeste Analyse von Uranspezies mittels einem Gekoppelten System aus Konfokaler Laser-Scanning Mikroskopie (CLSM) und Laser Induzierter Fluoreszenzspektroskopie (LIFS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, S. [Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany); Grossmann, K.; Arnold, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany). Inst. fuer Ressourcenoekologie

    2014-01-15

    The fluorescent properties of uranium when excited by UV light are used increasingly for spectroscope analyses of uranium species within watery samples. Here, alongside the fluorescent properties of the hexavalent oxidation phases, the tetra and pentavalent oxidation phases also play an increasingly important role. The detection of fluorescent emission spectrums on solid and biological samples using (time-resolved) laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS or LIFS respectively) has, however, the disadvantage that no statements regarding the spatial localisation of the uranium can be made. However, particularly in complex, biological samples, such statements on the localisation of the uranium enrichment in the sample are desired, in order to e.g. be able to distinguish between intra and extra-cellular uranium bonds. The fluorescent properties of uranium (VI) compounds and minerals can also be used to detect their localisation within complex samples. So the application of fluorescent microscopic methods represents one possibility to localise and visualise uranium precipitates and enrichments in biological samples, such as biofilms or cells. The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) is especially well suited to this purpose. Coupling confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) makes it possible to localise and visualise fluorescent signals spatially and three-dimensionally, while at the same time being able to detect spatially resolved, fluorescent-spectroscopic data. This technology is characterised by relatively low detection limits from up to 1.10{sup -6} M for uranium (VI) compounds within the confocal volume. (orig.)

  18. Electron microscopy and forensic practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrlý, Marek; Turková, Ivana

    2013-05-01

    Electron microanalysis in forensic practice ranks among basic applications used in investigation of traces (latents, stains, etc.) from crime scenes. Applying electron microscope allows for rapid screening and receiving initial information for a wide range of traces. SEM with EDS/WDS makes it possible to observe topography surface and morphology samples and examination of chemical components. Physical laboratory of the Institute of Criminalistics Prague use SEM especially for examination of inorganic samples, rarely for biology and other material. Recently, possibilities of electron microscopy have been extended considerably using dual systems with focused ion beam. These systems are applied mainly in study of inner micro and nanoparticles , thin layers (intersecting lines in graphical forensic examinations, analysis of layers of functional glass, etc.), study of alloys microdefects, creating 3D particles and aggregates models, etc. Automated mineralogical analyses are a great asset to analysis of mineral phases, particularly soils, similarly it holds for cathode luminescence, predominantly colour one and precise quantitative measurement of their spectral characteristics. Among latest innovations that are becoming to appear also at ordinary laboratories are TOF - SIMS systems and micro Raman spectroscopy with a resolution comparable to EDS/WDS analysis (capable of achieving similar level as through EDS/WDS analysis).

  19. Spectroscopic parameters of the cuticle and ethanol extracts of the fluorescent cave isopod Mesoniscus graniger (Isopoda, Oniscidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Giurginca

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The body surface of the terrestrial isopod Mesoniscus graniger (Frivaldsky, 1863 showed blue autofluorescence under UV light (330–385 nm, using epifluorescence microscopy and also in living individuals under a UV lamp with excitation light of 365 nm. Some morphological cuticular structures expressed a more intense autofluorescence than other body parts. For this reason, only the cuticle was analyzed. The parameters of autofluorescence were investigated using spectroscopic methods (molecular spectroscopy in infrared, ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy in samples of two subspecies of M. graniger preserved in ethanol. Samples excited by UV light (from 350 to 380 nm emitted blue light of wavelengths 419, 420, 441, 470 and 505 nm (solid phase and 420, 435 and 463 (ethanol extract. The results showed that the autofluorescence observed from living individuals may be due to some β-carboline or coumarin derivatives, some crosslinking structures, dityrosine, or due to other compounds showing similar excitation-emission characteristics.

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic, coordination and biological activities of some transition metal complexes containing ONO tridentate Schiff base ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belal, A A M; El-Deen, I M; Farid, N Y; Zakaria, Rosan; Refat, Moamen S

    2015-01-01

    The main target of this paper is to get an interesting data for the preparation and characterizations of metal oxide (MO) nanoparticles using H2L Schiff base complexes as precursors through the thermal decomposition procedure. Five Schiff base complexes of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) metal ions were synthesized from 2-[(2-hydroxy-naphthalen-1-ylmethylene)-amino]-benzoic acid new adduct (H2L). Theses complexes were characterized using infrared, electronic, mass and (1)H NMR spectroscopic techniques. The elemental analysis data was confirmed that the stoichiometry of (metal:H2L) is 1:1 molar ratio. The molar conductance indicates that all of complexes are non electrolytic. The general chemical formulas of these complexes is [M(L)(NH3)]·nH2O. All complexes are tetrahedral geometry. The thermal decomposition behavior of H2L hydrated and anhydrous complexes has been discussed using thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTG) and differential thermal analyses (DTA) under nitrogen atmosphere. The crystalline phases of the reaction products were checked using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy growth, transmission electron microscopy, and magneto-optical spectroscopy of individual InAsxP1 -x/Ga0.5In0.5P quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozo-Zamudio, O.; Puebla, J.; Krysa, A.; Toro, R.; Sanchez, A. M.; Beanland, R.; Tartakovskii, A. I.; Skolnick, M. S.; Chekhovich, E. A.

    2017-08-01

    We report on growth and characterization of individual InAsxP1 -x /GaInP quantum dots with variable nominal As molar fraction. Magnetophotoluminescence experiments reveal quantum dot emission in a wide range from 1.3 to 1.8 eV, confirming successful incorporation of As into the quantum dots. Transmission electron microscopy reveals a core-cap structure of InAsP quantum dots with an InAs-rich core capped by an InP-rich layer. Inside the core, an average As molar fraction up to x ≈0.15 is observed. The heavy-hole g factors are found to be strongly dependent on As molar fraction, while the electron g factors are close to the InP values. This suggests type-II carrier confinement in the studied InAsP dots with holes (electrons) localized in the core (cap) region. Finally, dynamic nuclear polarization is observed, which allows for further insight into structural properties using nuclear magnetic resonance.

  2. Forming spectroscopic massive protobinaries by disc fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Kuiper, R.; Kley, W.; Johnston, K. G.; Vorobyov, E.

    2018-01-01

    The surroundings of massive protostars constitute an accretion disc which has numerically been shown to be subject to fragmentation and responsible for luminous accretion-driven outbursts. Moreover, it is suspected to produce close binary companions which will later strongly influence the star's future evolution in the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram. We present three-dimensional gravitation-radiation-hydrodynamic numerical simulations of 100 M⊙ pre-stellar cores. We find that accretion discs of young massive stars violently fragment without preventing the (highly variable) accretion of gaseous clumps on to the protostars. While acquiring the characteristics of a nascent low-mass companion, some disc fragments migrate on to the central massive protostar with dynamical properties showing that its final Keplerian orbit is close enough to constitute a close massive protobinary system, having a young high- and a low-mass components. We conclude on the viability of the disc fragmentation channel for the formation of such short-period binaries, and that both processes - close massive binary formation and accretion bursts - may happen at the same time. FU-Orionis-type bursts, such as observed in the young high-mass star S255IR-NIRS3, may not only indicate ongoing disc fragmentation, but also be considered as a tracer for the formation of close massive binaries - progenitors of the subsequent massive spectroscopic binaries - once the high-mass component of the system will enter the main-sequence phase of its evolution. Finally, we investigate the Atacama Large (sub-)Millimeter Array observability of the disc fragments.

  3. The Spectroscopic Evolution of Nova Cygni 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro-Martin, A.; Garnavich, P. M.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Alpert, A.

    1996-12-01

    Optical spectroscopic observations of Nova Cygni 1992 spanning 4 years are modeled in this study. The data were obtained primarily with the DAO 1.8m telescope and cover a wavelength range from ~ 3200 - 8000 Angstroms. The observations begin on May 92 (85 days after the outburst) and end on June 1996, i.e. during most of the optically thin evolutionary phase. The spectra were modeled in a relatively straightforward way by using the flux predicted by a photoionization code [1] for most of the emission lines (down to 0.1% of Hβ ) and transforming these numbers into a synthetic spectrum. There are, however, significant differences in the detailed procedure in comparison with similar works [2]. First, the photoionization models were run at a fixed abundance value for the most prominent elements (i.e. H, He, C, O, N, Ne, Fe, etc) over the entire time sequence. Second, the brightest lines, e.g. [Ne V], [Ne III], [O III] and the Balmer lines, were initially used as guide to match the observations. The rest of the spectra, which includes the fainter lines, were then directly predicted by the photoionization code. Considering the complicated structure of the shell [3], the lack of well defined values of its gas density and our limited knowledge of the time evolution of the surface temperature of the photoionization source, the comparison between models and observations agrees remarkably well. It was found that the time evolution of some of the Iron coronal lines, [Fe VII] 6087 Angstroms and [Fe X] 6374 Angstroms, closely follows that of the X-rays [4]. [1] Ferland, G.J 1993, CLOUDY, U. of Kentucky Dept. Phys & Astr. Internal Report. [2] Austin et al. 1992, AJ, 111, 869 [3] Paresce, Livio, Hack & Korista (1995) A&A, 299, 823 [4] Krautter et al. (1996), ApJ, 456, 788

  4. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy.

  5. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lulu; Cai, Mingjun; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2017-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy.

  6. Seeing phenomena in flatland: studies of monolayers by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobler, C M

    1990-08-24

    Monolayers formed at the interface between air and water can be seen with fluorescence microscopy. This allows the phase behavior of these monolayers to be determined by direct observation and opens up the possibility of following the kinetics of phase transformations in two-dimensional systems. Some unexpected morphologies have been discovered that provide information about the nature of monolayer phases and have connections to pattern formation in other systems.

  7. Multi-color phase imaging and sickle cell anemia (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Poorya; Zhou, Renjie; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter T. C.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase measurements at multiple wavelengths has created an opportunity for exploring new avenues in phase microscopy such as enhancing imaging-depth (1), measuring hemoglobin concentrations in erythrocytes (2), and more recently in tomographic mapping of the refractive index of live cells (3). To this end, quantitative phase imaging has been demonstrated both at few selected spectral points as well as with high spectral resolution (4,5). However, most of these developed techniques compromise imaging speed, field of view, or the spectral resolution to perform interferometric measurements at multiple colors. In the specific application of quantitative phase in studying blood diseases and red blood cells, current techniques lack the required sensitivity to quantify biological properties of interest at individual cell level. Recently, we have set out to develop a stable quantitative interferometric microscope allowing for measurements of such properties for red cells without compromising field of view or speed of the measurements. The feasibility of the approach will be initially demonstrated in measuring dispersion curves of known solutions, followed by measuring biological properties of red cells in sickle cell anemia. References: 1. Mann CJ, Bingham PR, Paquit VC, Tobin KW. Quantitative phase imaging by three-wavelength digital holography. Opt Express. 2008;16(13):9753-64. 2. Park Y, Yamauchi T, Choi W, Dasari R, Feld MS. Spectroscopic phase microscopy for quantifying hemoglobin concentrations in intact red blood cells. Opt Lett. 2009;34(23):3668-70. 3. Hosseini P, Sung Y, Choi Y, Lue N, Yaqoob Z, So P. Scanning color optical tomography (SCOT). Opt Express. 2015;23(15):19752-62. 4. Jung J-H, Jang J, Park Y. Spectro-refractometry of individual microscopic objects using swept-source quantitative phase imaging. Anal Chem. 2013;85(21):10519-25. 5. Rinehart M, Zhu Y, Wax A. Quantitative phase spectroscopy. Biomed Opt Express. 2012;3(5):958-65.

  8. Use of atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy for correlative studies of bacterial capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukalov, Oleg; Korenevsky, Anton; Beveridge, Terry J; Dutcher, John R

    2008-09-01

    Bacteria can possess an outermost assembly of polysaccharide molecules, a capsule, which is attached to their cell wall. We have used two complementary, high-resolution microscopy techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to study bacterial capsules of four different gram-negative bacterial strains: Escherichia coli K30, Pseudomonas aeruginosa FRD1, Shewanella oneidensis MR-4, and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. TEM analysis of bacterial cells using different preparative techniques (whole-cell mounts, conventional embeddings, and freeze-substitution) revealed capsules for some but not all of the strains. In contrast, the use of AFM allowed the unambiguous identification of the presence of capsules on all strains used in the present study, including those that were shown by TEM to be not encapsulated. In addition, the use of AFM phase imaging allowed the visualization of the bacterial cell within the capsule, with a depth sensitivity that decreased with increasing tapping frequency.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy of polymer blends and block copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of soft matter is a field that warrants further investigation. Developments in sample preparation, imaging and spectroscopic techniques could lead to novel experiments that may further our understanding of the structure and the role structure plays in the functionality of various organic materials. Unlike most hard materials, TEM of organic molecules is limited by the amount of radiation damage the material can withstand without changing its structure. Despite this limitation, TEM has been and will be a powerful tool to study polymeric materials and other soft matter. In this dissertation, an introduction of TEM for polymer scientists is presented. The fundamentals of interactions of electrons with matter are described using the Schrodinger wave equation and scattering cross-sections to fully encompass coherent and incoherent scattering. The intensity, which is the product of the wave function and its complex conjugate, shows no perceptible change due to the sample. Instead, contrast is generated through the optical system of the microscope by removing scattered electrons or by generating interference due to material-induced phase changes. Perhaps the most challenging aspect of taking TEM images, however, is sample preparation, because TEM experiments require materials with approximately 50 nm thickness. Although ultramicrotomy is a well-established powerful tool for preparing biological and polymeric sections for TEM, the development of cryogenic Focused Ion Beam may enable unprecedented cross-sectional TEM studies of polymer thin films on arbitrary substrates with nanometer precision. Two examples of TEM experiments of polymeric materials are presented. The first involves quantifying the composition profile across a lamellar phase obtained in a multicomponent blend of saturated poly(butadiene) and poly(isobutylene), stabilized by a saturated poly(butadiene) copolymer serving as a surfactant, using TEM and self

  10. A quantitative comparison of dispersion- and absorption-spectroscopic gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Jakob; Martín-Mateos, Pedro; Acedo, Pablo; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    Dispersion spectroscopic sensing of trace gases, measuring the anomalous dispersion at a molecular resonance rather than absorption, has experienced increased attention in the past view years. Their advantages over absorption based spectroscopic sensing are the independence of signals from laser power and their linearity with concentration, even for optically thick samples. In this contribution, we give a comparative discussion of performance, noise and limitations of dispersion and absorption spectroscopy. We relate dispersion spectroscopy to phase-shift rangefinding, for which figures of merit are available in literature. Based on our analysis we conclude that dispersion spectroscopy cannot outperform absorption spectroscopy in most experimental situations. In some applications, where the optical power reaching the detector is unstable, dispersion spectroscopic techniques can, however, be advantageous.

  11. Design and realization of the IP control core in field controllers for LAMOST spectroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianing; Han, Zhongyi; Zeng, Yizhong; Dai, Songxin; Hu, Zhongwen; Zhu, Yongtian; Wang, Lei; Hou, Yonghui

    2010-07-01

    The China-made telescope, LAMOST, consists of 16 spectroscopes to detect stellar spectra via 4000 optical fibers. In each spectroscope, many movable parts work in phase. Those parts are real-time controlled and managed by field controllers based on FPGA. This paper mainly introduces how to use DSP Builder module library in MATLAB / Simulink to construct the IP control core on FPGA chip. This method can also be used to design the control core of PID arithmetic, to carry out arithmetic simulation and generate VHDL language file, as well as to integrate it into SOPC developing environment so as to repeatedly use. In this way, the design period of the control system may be shortened and design process simplified. Finally due to the reversibility and programmability of the IP control core ,a system on a chip for field controllers of spectroscope is realized, which meets astronomical control requirements, providing an effective scheme for embedded system in astronomical instrument applications.

  12. Investigating bioconjugation by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnological applications increasingly exploit the selectivity and processivity of biological molecules. Integration of biomolecules such as proteins or DNA into nano-systems typically requires their conjugation to surfaces, for example of carbon-nanotubes or fluorescent quantum dots. The bioconjugated nanostructures exploit the unique strengths of both their biological and nanoparticle components and are used in diverse, future oriented research areas ranging from nanoelectronics to biosensing and nanomedicine. Atomic force microscopy imaging provides valuable, direct insight for the evaluation of different conjugation approaches at the level of the individual molecules. Recent technical advances have enabled high speed imaging by AFM supporting time resolutions sufficient to follow conformational changes of intricately assembled nanostructures in solution. In addition, integration of AFM with different spectroscopic and imaging approaches provides an enhanced level of information on the investigated sample. Furthermore, the AFM itself can serve as an active tool for the assembly of nanostructures based on bioconjugation. AFM is hence a major workhorse in nanotechnology; it is a powerful tool for the structural investigation of bioconjugation and bioconjugation-induced effects as well as the simultaneous active assembly and analysis of bioconjugation-based nanostructures. PMID:23855448

  13. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Label-free imaging of the native, living cellular nanoarchitecture using partial-wave spectroscopic microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almassalha, Luay M; Bauer, Greta M; Chandler, John E

    2016-01-01

    of chromatin at these length scales is a fundamental event during carcinogenesis. As the dynamics of chromatin likely play a critical regulatory role in cellular function, it is critical to develop live-cell imaging techniques that can probe the real-time temporal behavior of the chromatin nanoarchitecture...

  15. Impedance Spectroscopic Investigation of Proton Conductivity in Nafion Using Transient Electrochemical Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Roduner

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Spatially resolved impedance spectroscopy of a Nafion polyelectrolyte membrane is performed employing a conductive and Pt-coated tip of an atomic force microscope as a point-like contact and electrode. The experiment is conducted by perturbing the system by a rectangular voltage step and measuring the incurred current, followed by Fourier transformation and plotting the impedance against the frequency in a conventional Bode diagram. To test the potential and limitations of this novel method, we present a feasibility study using an identical hydrogen atmosphere at a well-defined relative humidity on both sides of the membrane. It is demonstrated that good quality impedance spectra are obtained in a frequency range of 0.2–1,000 Hz. The extracted polarization curves exhibit a maximum current which cannot be explained by typical diffusion effects. Simulation based on equivalent circuits requires a Nernst element for restricted diffusion in the membrane which suggests that this effect is based on the potential dependence of the electrolyte resistance in the high overpotential region.

  16. NDE Acoustic Microscopy Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to develop advanced, more effective high-resolution micro-NDE materials characterization methods using scanning acoustic microscopy. The laboratory's...

  17. Influence of local structural disorders on spectroscopic properties of multi-component CaF2-Bi2O3-P2O5-B2O3 glass ceramics with Cr2O3 as nucleating agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, S.; Narendrudu, T.; Yusub, S.; Suneel Kumar, A.; Ravi Kumar, V.; Veeraiah, N.; Krishna Rao, D.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-component CaF2-Bi2O3-P2O5-B2O3 glasses doped with different concentrations of Cr2O3 were crystallized through heat treatment. The prepared glass ceramic samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Spectroscopic studies viz., optical absorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were carried out. The XRD, SEM and DTA studies indicated that the samples contain different crystalline phases. Results of optical absorption and EPR studies pointed out the gradual conversion of chromium ions from Cr3 + state to Cr6 + state with an increase of Cr2O3 content from 0.1 to 0.5 mol%. The results of FTIR, Raman and EPR studies revealed that Cr6 + ions participate in the glass network in tetrahedral positions and seemed to increase the polymerization of the glass ceramics. The quantitative analysis of results of the spectroscopic studies further indicated that the glasses crystallized with low concentration of Cr2O3 are favourable for solid state laser devices.

  18. Raman spectroscopic investigation of polycrystalline structures of CVD-grown graphene by isotope labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengnan; Suzuki, Satoru; Hibino, Hiroki

    2014-11-21

    Topological defects, such as point defects, dislocations and grain boundaries, have a dramatic influence on the chemical and physical properties of large-scale graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Here we demonstrate the Raman visualization of polycrystalline structures in an isotopically modified CVD graphene. By means of the reversible reaction of methane on a copper catalyst, the etching of (12)C-lattice and surface deposition of (13)C-atoms occur in CVD graphene by sequentially introducing hydrogen and isotopic methane after standard growth of graphene with full monolayer coverage. Spatial Raman spectroscopic mapping on labeled graphene reveals pronounced network-like (13)C-rich regions, which are further identified to exist along the grain boundaries of graphene by low-energy electron microscopy. The structural defects inside the graphene grains are also targeted in the isotope labeling process. Our work opens a new way to investigate multiple grain structures in CVD graphene with a simple spectroscopic technique.

  19. Infrared spectroscopic imaging: Label-free biochemical analysis of stroma and tissue fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazeer, Shaiju S; Sreedhar, Hari; Varma, Vishal K; Martinez-Marin, David; Massie, Christine; Walsh, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging is a potentially powerful adjunct tool to current histopathology techniques. By coupling the biochemical signature obtained through infrared spectroscopy to the spatial information offered by microscopy, this technique can selectively analyze the chemical composition of different features of unlabeled, unstained tissue sections. In the past, the tissue features that have received the most interest were parenchymal and epithelial cells, chiefly due to their involvement in dysplasia and progression to carcinoma; however, the field has recently turned its focus toward stroma and areas of fibrotic change. These components of tissue present an untapped source of biochemical information that can shed light on many diverse disease processes, and potentially hold useful predictive markers for these same pathologies. Here we review the recent applications of infrared spectroscopic imaging to stromal and fibrotic regions of diseased tissue, and explore the potential of this technique to advance current capabilities for tissue analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of annealing induced γ-phase nucleation, clustering, and interfacial dynamics in reactively sputtered amorphous alumina thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A. K. Nanda, E-mail: aknk27@yahoo.com; Subramanian, B. [ECMS Division, Central Electro Chemical Research Institute, Karaikudi (India); Prasanna, S. [Department of Physics, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore (India); Jayakumar, S. [Department of Physics, PSG Institute of Technology and Applied Research, Coimbatore (India); Rao, G. Mohan [Department of Instrumentation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)

    2015-03-28

    Pure α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits a very high degree of thermodynamical stability among all metal oxides and forms an inert oxide scale in a range of structural alloys at high temperatures. We report that amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films sputter deposited over crystalline Si instead show a surprisingly active interface. On annealing, crystallization begins with nuclei of a phase closely resembling γ-Alumina forming almost randomly in an amorphous matrix, and with increasing frequency near the substrate/film interface. This nucleation is marked by the signature appearance of sharp (400) and (440) reflections and the formation of a diffuse diffraction halo with an outer maximal radius of ≈0.23 nm enveloping the direct beam. The microstructure then evolves by a cluster-coalescence growth mechanism suggestive of swift nucleation and sluggish diffusional kinetics, while locally the Al ions redistribute slowly from chemisorbed and tetrahedral sites to higher anion coordinated sites. Chemical state plots constructed from XPS data and simple calculations of the diffraction patterns from hypothetically distorted lattices suggest that the true origins of the diffuse diffraction halo are probably related to a complex change in the electronic structure spurred by the a-γ transformation rather than pure structural disorder. Concurrent to crystallization within the film, a substantially thick interfacial reaction zone also builds up at the film/substrate interface with the excess Al acting as a cationic source.

  1. Advanced computing in electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkland, Earl J

    2010-01-01

    This book features numerical computation of electron microscopy images as well as multislice methods High resolution CTEM and STEM image interpretation are included in the text This newly updated second edition will bring the reader up to date on new developments in the field since the 1990's The only book that specifically addresses computer simulation methods in electron microscopy

  2. Electronic Blending in Virtual Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybury, Terrence S.; Farah, Camile S.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual microscopy (VM) is a relatively new technology that transforms the computer into a microscope. In essence, VM allows for the scanning and transfer of glass slides from light microscopy technology to the digital environment of the computer. This transition is also a function of the change from print knowledge to electronic knowledge, or as…

  3. Biological cryo-electron microscopy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Lei, Jianlin; Shi, Yigong

    2017-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) plays an increasingly more important role in structural biology. With the construction of an arm of the Chinese National Protein Science Facility at Tsinghua University, biological cryo-EM has entered a phase of rapid development in China. This article briefly reviews the history of biological cryo-EM in China, describes its current status, comments on its impact on the various biological research fields, and presents future outlook. © 2016 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  4. Optical Spectroscopic Monitoring of Parachute Yarn Aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallant, D.R.; Garcia, M.J.; Simpson, R.L.; Behr, V.L.; Whinery, L.D.; Peng, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Optical spectroscopic techniques were evaluated as nondestructive monitors of the aging of parachutes in nuclear weapons. We analyzed thermally aged samples of nylon and Kevlar webbing by photoluminescence spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy. Infrared analysis was also performed to help understand the degradation mechanisms of the polymer materials in the webbing. The photoluminescence and reflection spectra were analyzed by chemometric data treatment techniques to see if aged-induced changes in the spectra correlated to changes in measured tensile strength. A correlation was found between the shapes of the photoluminescent bands and the measured tensile strengths. Photoluminescent spectra can be used to predict the tensile strengths of nylon and Kevlar webbing with sufficient accuracy to categorize the webbing sample as above rated tensile strength, marginal or below rated tensile strength. The instrumentation required to perform the optical spectroscopic measurement can be made rugged, compact and portable. Thus, optical spectroscopic techniques offer a means for nondestructive field monitoring of parachutes in the enduring stockpile/

  5. Microscopic techniques bridging between nanoscale and microscale with an atomically sharpened tip - field ion microscopy/scanning probe microscopy/ scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Sasahara, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Over a hundred years an atomistic point of view has been indispensable to explore fascinating properties of various materials and to develop novel functional materials. High-resolution microscopies, rapidly developed during the period, have taken central roles in promoting materials science and related techniques to observe and analyze the materials. As microscopies with the capability of atom-imaging, field ion microscopy (FIM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be cited, which have been highly evaluated as methods to ultimately bring forward the viewpoint of reductionism in materials science. On one hand, there have been difficulties to derive useful and practical information on large (micro) scale unique properties of materials using these excellent microscopies and to directly advance the engineering for practical materials. To make bridges over the gap between an atomic scale and an industrial engineering scale, we have to develop emergence science step-by-step as a discipline having hierarchical structures for future prospects by combining nanoscale and microscale techniques; as promising ways, the combined microscopic instruments covering the scale gap and the extremely sophisticated methods for sample preparation seem to be required. In addition, it is noted that spectroscopic and theoretical methods should implement the emergence science.Fundamentally, the function of microscope is to determine the spatial positions of a finite piece of material, that is, ultimately individual atoms, at an extremely high resolution with a high stability. To define and control the atomic positions, the STM and AFM as scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have successfully demonstrated their power; the technological heart of SPM lies in an atomically sharpened tip, which can be observed by FIM and TEM. For emergence science we would like to set sail using the tip as a base. Meanwhile, it is significant

  6. Temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopic study and DFT calculations of the sorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, G. D.; Nogueira, C. E. S.; Freire, P. T. C.; de Sousa, F. F.; da Silva, J. H.; Teixeira, A. M. R.; Mendes Filho, J.

    2015-02-01

    This work reports a temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopic study of the sorbic acid (C6H8O2), as well as the mode assignment at ambient conditions, based on the density functional theory. Temperature-dependent vibrational properties have been performed in polycrystalline sorbic acid through both Raman and infrared spectroscopy in the 20-300 K and 80-300 K temperature ranges, respectively. These studies present the occurrence of some modifications in the Raman spectra that could be interpreted as a low temperature phase transition undergone by sorbic acid from the monoclinic phase to an unknown phase with conformational change of the molecules in the unit cell.

  7. Development of a THz spectroscopic imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, M [TOCHIGI Nikon Corporation, 770 Midori, Ohtawara, Tochigi (Japan); Iwamoto, T [TOCHIGI Nikon Corporation, 770 Midori, Ohtawara, Tochigi (Japan); Fukasawa, R [TOCHIGI Nikon Corporation, 770 Midori, Ohtawara, Tochigi (Japan); Tani, M [Kansai Advanced Research Center, Communications Research Laboratory, 588-2 Iwaoka, Nishi-ku, Kobe (Japan); Watanabe, M [Kansai Advanced Research Center, Communications Research Laboratory, 588-2 Iwaoka, Nishi-ku, Kobe (Japan); Sakai, K [Kansai Advanced Research Center, Communications Research Laboratory, 588-2 Iwaoka, Nishi-ku, Kobe (Japan)

    2002-11-07

    We have developed a real-time THz imaging system based on the two-dimensional (2D) electro-optic (EO) sampling technique. Employing the 2D EO-sampling technique, we can obtain THz images using a CCD camera at a video rate of up to 30 frames per second. A spatial resolution of 1.4 mm was achieved. This resolution was reasonably close to the theoretical limit determined by diffraction. We observed not only static objects but also moving ones. To acquire spectroscopic information, time-domain images were collected. By processing these images on a computer, we can obtain spectroscopic images. Spectroscopy for silicon wafers was demonstrated.

  8. Multistage bioassociation of uranium onto an extremely halophilic archaeon revealed by a unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, Miriam; Müller, Katharina; Foerstendorf, Harald; Drobot, Björn [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Matthias; Musat, Niculina [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZ, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Swanson, Juliet S.; Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Repository Science and Operations, 1400 University Drive, Carlsbad, NM, 88220 (United States); Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Cherkouk, Andrea, E-mail: a.cherkouk@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • First prolonged kinetics study of uranium to halophilic archaea was performed. • An atypical time-dependent bioassociation behavior of uranium was observed. • Unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods was used. • In situ ATR FT-IR showed association of U(VI) to phosphoryl and carboxylate groups. • Time-dependent changes of U(VI) localization could be monitored by SEM/EDX. - Abstract: The interactions of two extremely halophilic archaea with uranium were investigated at high ionic strength as a function of time, pH and uranium concentration. Halobacterium noricense DSM-15987 and Halobacterium sp. putatively noricense, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository, were used for these investigations. The kinetics of U(VI) bioassociation with both strains showed an atypical multistage behavior, meaning that after an initial phase of U(VI) sorption, an unexpected interim period of U(VI) release was observed, followed by a slow reassociation of uranium with the cells. By applying in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the involvement of phosphoryl and carboxylate groups in U(VI) complexation during the first biosorption phase was shown. Differences in cell morphology and uranium localization become visible at different stages of the bioassociation process, as shown with scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate for the first time that association of uranium with the extremely halophilic archaeon is a multistage process, beginning with sorption and followed by another process, probably biomineralization.

  9. Extended full-field optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Arnaud

    2013-05-01

    Full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM) is a recent optical technology based on low-coherence interference microscopy for semi-transparent sample imaging with ˜ 1 μm spatial resolution. FF-OCM has been successfully applied to three-dimensional imaging of various biological tissues at cellular-level resolution. The contrast of FF-OCM images results from the intensity of light backscattered by the sample microstructures. This contrast mechanism, based on refractive index changes, provides information on the internal architectural morphology of the sample. In this paper, we present a multimodal FF-OCM system, capable of measuring simultaneously the intensity, the power spectrum and the phase-retardation of light backscattered by the sample being imaged. Tomographic fluorescence-based images can also be produced by coupling to the FF-OCM set-up a fluorescence microscopy system with structured illumination. Fluorescence targeted probes can be used to identify molecular components of subcellular scattering structures. Compared to conventional FF-OCM, this multimodal system provides enhanced imaging contrasts at the price of a moderate increase in experimental complexity and cost.

  10. Differential dynamic microscopy of bidisperse colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad S; Poling-Skutvik, Ryan; Vekilov, Peter G; Conrad, Jacinta C

    2017-01-01

    Research tasks in microgravity include monitoring the dynamics of constituents of varying size and mobility in processes such as aggregation, phase separation, or self-assembly. We use differential dynamic microscopy, a method readily implemented with equipment available on the International Space Station, to simultaneously resolve the dynamics of particles of radius 50 nm and 1 μm in bidisperse aqueous suspensions. Whereas traditional dynamic light scattering fails to detect a signal from the larger particles at low concentrations, differential dynamic microscopy exhibits enhanced sensitivity in these conditions by accessing smaller wavevectors where scattering from the large particles is stronger. Interference patterns due to scattering from the large particles induce non-monotonic decay of the amplitude of the dynamic correlation function with the wavevector. We show that the position of the resulting minimum contains information on the vertical position of the particles. Together with the simple instrumental requirements, the enhanced sensitivity of differential dynamic microscopy makes it an appealing alternative to dynamic light scattering to characterize samples with complex dynamics.

  11. Microscopy techniques in flavivirus research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Mun Keat; Chua, Anthony Jin Shun; Tan, Terence Tze Tong; Tan, Suat Hoon; Ng, Mah Lee

    2014-04-01

    The Flavivirus genus is composed of many medically important viruses that cause high morbidity and mortality, which include Dengue and West Nile viruses. Various molecular and biochemical techniques have been developed in the endeavour to study flaviviruses. However, microscopy techniques still have irreplaceable roles in the identification of novel virus pathogens and characterization of morphological changes in virus-infected cells. Fluorescence microscopy contributes greatly in understanding the fundamental viral protein localizations and virus-host protein interactions during infection. Electron microscopy remains the gold standard for visualizing ultra-structural features of virus particles and infected cells. New imaging techniques and combinatory applications are continuously being developed to push the limit of resolution and extract more quantitative data. Currently, correlative live cell imaging and high resolution three-dimensional imaging have already been achieved through the tandem use of optical and electron microscopy in analyzing biological specimens. Microscopy techniques are also used to measure protein binding affinities and determine the mobility pattern of proteins in cells. This chapter will consolidate on the applications of various well-established microscopy techniques in flavivirus research, and discuss how recently developed microscopy techniques can potentially help advance our understanding in these membrane viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fluorescence confocal microscopy for pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzi, Moira; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Foroni, Monica; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Gardini, Giorgio; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is a non-invasive method of optical imaging that may provide microscopic images of untreated tissue that correspond almost perfectly to hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Nowadays, following two confocal imaging systems are available: (1) reflectance confocal microscopy, based on the natural differences in refractive indices of subcellular structures within the tissues; (2) fluorescence confocal microscopy, based on the use of fluorochromes, such as acridine orange, to increase the contrast epithelium-stroma. In clinical practice to date, confocal microscopy has been used with the goal of obviating the need for excision biopsies, thereby reducing the need for pathological examination. The aim of our study was to test fluorescence confocal microscopy on different types of surgical specimens, specifically breast, lymph node, thyroid, and colon. The confocal images were correlated to the corresponding histological sections in order to provide a morphologic parallel and to highlight current limitations and possible applications of this technology for surgical pathology practice. As a result, neoplastic tissues were easily distinguishable from normal structures and reactive processes such as fibrosis; the use of fluorescence enhanced contrast and image quality in confocal microscopy without compromising final histologic evaluation. Finally, the fluorescence confocal microscopy images of the adipose tissue were as accurate as those of conventional histology and were devoid of the frozen-section-related artefacts that can compromise intraoperative evaluation. Despite some limitations mainly related to black/white images, which require training in imaging interpretation, this study confirms that fluorescence confocal microscopy may represent an alternative to frozen sections in the assessment of margin status in selected settings or when the conservation of the specimen is crucial. This is the first study to employ fluorescent confocal microscopy on

  13. Velocity Curve Analysis of the Spectroscopic Binary Stars PV Pup ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    lined spectroscopic binary systems PV Pup, HD 141929, EE Cet and V921 Her, we find both the orbital and the combined spectroscopic elements of these systems. Our numerical results are in good agreement with those obtained ...

  14. Nucleation and initial growth of atomic layer deposited titanium oxide determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and the effect of pretreatment by surface barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, David C., E-mail: dccameron@mail.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Krumpolec, Richard, E-mail: richard.krumpolec@fmph.uniba.sk [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 842 4 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ivanova, Tatiana V., E-mail: tatiana.ivanova@lut.fi [ASTRaL team, Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Homola, Tomáš, E-mail: tomas.homola@mail.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Černák, Mirko, E-mail: cernak@physics.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Spectroscopic ellipsometry shows initial nucleation and growth process in atomic layer deposited titanium dioxide. • Quantum confinement effects were used to measure evolution of crystallite size. • Crystallite surface density can be extracted from ellipsometric surface roughness data and crystallite size. • Pretreatment of silicon substrates by diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge has only minor effects on titanium dioxide film nucleation and growth. - Abstract: This paper reports on the use of spectroscopic ellipsometry to characterise the initial nucleation stage of the atomic layer deposition of the anatase phase of titanium dioxide on silicon substrates. Careful control and analysis of the ellipsometric measurements enables the determination of the evolution of crystallite diameter and surface density in the nucleation stage before a continuous film is formed. This growth behaviour is in line with atomic force microscopy measurements of the crystallite size. The crystallite diameter is a linear function of the number of ALD cycles with a slope of approximately 1.7 Å cycle{sup −1} which is equivalent to a layer growth rate of 0.85 Å cycle{sup −1} consistent with a ripening process which increases the crystallite size while reducing their density. The crystallite density decreases from ∼3 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3} in the initial nucleation stages to ∼3 × 10{sup 15} m{sup −3} before the film becomes continuous. The effect of exposing the substrate to a diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in an air atmosphere before deposition was measured and only small differences were found: the plasma treated samples were slightly rougher in the initial stages and required a greater number of cycles to form a continuous film (∼80) compared to the untreated films (∼50). A thicker layer of native oxide was found after plasma treatment.

  15. Spectroscopic Studies of Atmospheric Radical-Radical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Mitchio

    2004-03-01

    The reactions of trace free radicals largely determine the chemical composition of gas phase species in the atmosphere. Reactions between pairs of radicals are very important, but exhibit a high degree of complexity; fundamental studies have revealed the importance of multiple wells, adduct formation, chaperone effects, and nonadiabatic coupling among potential energy surfaces. We have investigated the spectra, kinetics, and dynamics of a number of radical-radical reactions using infrared cavity ringdown, FM diode laser, and action spectroscopic methods. New results will be presented on peroxynitrous acid, HOONO, a minor but significant channel in the OH + NO2 + M reaction, a major sink for HOx and NOx radicals in polluted tropospheric air. These experiments lead to a detailed understanding of HOONO formation and kinetics under thermal conditions. Additional work on peroxyl radical spectroscopy and chemistry, including the role of hydrogen-bonded adducts, will also be discussed.

  16. Spectroscopic, thermal and biological studies of coordination ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    (Cl)(H2O)3]⋅xH2O (M = Cr(III) and Y(III), x = 5 and 6, respectively) were obtained and characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. The IR spectra of the complexes suggest that the sulfasalazine behaves as a monoanionic bidentate ligand. The thermal decomposition of the complexes as well as ...

  17. Planar chromatography coupled with spectroscopic techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somsen, G.W.; Wilson, I.D.; Morden, W.

    1995-01-01

    Recent progress in the combination of planar, or thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with a variety of modern spectroscopic techniques is reviewed. The utility of TLC for separation followed by mass spectrometry, with a variety of ionisation techniques, is illustrated with reference to a wide range of

  18. Structural, thermal and spectroscopic properties of supramolecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (H2O)4 have been reported.18 No general synthetic methodology for metal isonicotinate tetrahydrates has been reported so far. Detailed magnetic and spectroscopic properties of the compounds have not also been studied. Herein we report their high yield syntheses ... purpose of quantitative metal analysis by the gra-.

  19. An interesting spectroscopic method for chromofluorogenic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    537–543. c Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12039-016-1051-y. An interesting spectroscopic method for chromofluorogenic detection of cyanide ion in aqueous solution: Disruption of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). ABDOLHAMID ALIZADEHa,b∗. , SOHRAB GHOUZIVANDa, MOHAMMAD M KHODAEIa,∗.

  20. Ultraviolet spectroscopic evaluation of bioactive saponin fraction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultraviolet spectroscopic evaluation of bioactive saponin fraction from the aqueous extract of Vernonia amygdalina [Esteraeceae] leaf. Paul Chukwuemeka ADIUKWU 1*, Martina BONSU 1, Inemesit OKON-BEN 1,. Paul PEPRAH 1, Paapa MENSAH-KANE 1, Jonathan JATO 1 and Grace NAMBATYA 2. 1School of Pharmacy ...

  1. Synthesis, magnetic measurement and spectroscopic studies on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis, magnetic measurement and spectroscopic studies on cobalt (II) complexes in thiosemicarbazones derived from P-anisaldehyde, P-tolualdehyde, P-vanillin and 9-fluorenone. ... The coordination takes place through thiolato sulphur and azonmethine /imine nitrogen atoms. The tetrahedral flattened structures have ...

  2. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 3. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation properties of ONO/ONS donor Schiff base ruthenium(III) complexes containing PPh3/AsPh3. Priyarega M Muthu Tamizh R Karvembu R Prabhakaran K Natarajan. Volume 123 Issue 3 May ...

  3. Pulsating variable stars and large spectroscopic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cat, Peter

    2017-09-01

    In the past decade, the research of pulsating variable stars has taken a giant leap forward thanks to the photometric measurements provided by space missions like Most, CoRoT, Kepler/K2, and Brite. These missions have provided quasi uninterrupted photometric time-series with an ultra-high quality and a total length that is not achievable from Earth. However, many of the success stories could not have been told without ground-based spectroscopic follow-up observations. Indeed, spectroscopy has some important assets as it can provide (more) accurate information about stellar parameters (like the effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and abundances that are mandatory parameters for an in-depth asteroseismic study), the radial velocity (that is important for the detection of binaries and for the confirmation of cluster membership, if applicable), and the projected rotational velocity (that allows the study of the effects of rotation on pulsations). Fortunately, several large spectroscopic surveys are (becoming) available that can be used for these purposes. For some of these surveys, sub-projects have been initiated with the specific goal to complement space-based photometry. In this review, several spectroscopic surveys are introduced and compared with each other. We show that a large amount of spectroscopic data is (becoming) available for a large variety of objects.

  4. Nanoantenna-Enhanced Infrared Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühner, Lucca; Hentschel, Mario; Zschieschang, Ute; Klauk, Hagen; Vogt, Jochen; Huck, Christian; Giessen, Harald; Neubrech, Frank

    2017-05-26

    Spectroscopic infrared chemical imaging is ideally suited for label-free and spatially resolved characterization of molecular species, but often suffers from low infrared absorption cross sections. Here, we overcome this limitation by utilizing confined electromagnetic near-fields of resonantly excited plasmonic nanoantennas, which enhance the molecular absorption by orders of magnitude. In the experiments, we evaporate microstructured chemical patterns of C60 and pentacene with nanometer thickness on top of homogeneous arrays of tailored nanoantennas. Broadband mid-infrared spectra containing plasmonic and vibrational information were acquired with diffraction-limited resolution using a two-dimensional focal plane array detector. Evaluating the enhanced infrared absorption at the respective frequencies, spatially resolved chemical images were obtained. In these chemical images, the microstructured chemical patterns are only visible if nanoantennas are used. This confirms the superior performance of our approach over conventional spectroscopic infrared imaging. In addition to the improved sensitivity, our technique provides chemical selectivity, which would not be available with plasmonic imaging that is based on refractive index sensing. To extend the accessible spectral bandwidth of nanoantenna-enhanced spectroscopic imaging, we employed nanostructures with dual-band resonances, providing broadband plasmonic enhancement and sensitivity. Our results demonstrate the potential of nanoantenna-enhanced spectroscopic infrared chemical imaging for spatially resolved characterization of organic layers with thicknesses of several nanometers. This is of potential interest for medical applications which are currently hampered by state-of-art infrared techniques, e.g., for distinguishing cancerous from healthy tissues.

  5. Molecular structure, vibrational spectroscopic studies and natural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp. 845–860. Molecular structure, vibrational spectroscopic studies and natural bond orbital analysis of 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin ..... [15] A Frisch, A B Nielsen and A J Holder, GAUSSIANVIEW Users Manual, Gaussian. Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (2000). [16] S Selladurai and K Subramanian, Acta Crystallogr. C48, 281 ...

  6. Synthesis, molecular structure, spectroscopic investigations and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 128; Issue 8. Synthesis, molecular structure ... The molecular geometry and spectroscopic data of the title compound have been calculated by using the density functional method (B3LYP) invoking 6-311G(d,p) basis set. UV-Vis spectra of the two forms were recorded.

  7. Wireless spectroscopic compact photonic explorer for diagnostic optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leming; Zhang, G; Luo, J C; Zeng, F; Wang, Q Z; Alfano, S A; Katz, A; Zevallos, M; Alfano, R R

    2005-06-01

    A remote, small-size spectroscopic-based device called Compact Photonics Explorer (CPE) was designed, assembled, and tested for medical and non-medical spectroscopic and imaging applications. Spatial images acquired using the spectroscopic CPE are presented. Operational principles are demonstrated for various biomedical and non-medical applications.

  8. Holography and transmission electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Matteucci, G.; Pozzi, G.; Tonomura, A.

    1993-01-01

    The basic principles and methods of off-axis electron holography are presented and illustrated by means of three examples related to its application in high resolution electron microscopy and the investigation of electric and magnetic fields in thin specimens.

  9. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Gadella, Th.W.J.; Rietdorf, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a technique to map the spatial distribution of nanosecond excited state lifetimes within microscopic images. FLIM systems have been implemented both in the frequency domain, using sinusoidally intensity-modulated excitation light and modulated

  11. Filter-Dense Multicolor Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kijani, Siavash; Yrlid, Ulf; Heyden, Maria; Levin, Malin; Borén, Jan; Fogelstrand, Per

    2015-01-01

    .... However, because of the risk of bleed-through signals between fluorochromes, standard multicolor microscopy is restricted to a maximum of four fluorescence channels, including one for nuclei staining...

  12. UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy and microscopy of heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonheydt, Robert A

    2010-12-01

    This critical review article discusses the characterization of heterogeneous catalysts by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy and microscopy with special emphasis on transition metal ion containing catalysts. A review is given of the transitions, that can be observed in the UV-VIS-NIR region and the peculiarities of catalytic solids that have to be taken into account. This is followed by a short discussion of the techniques that have been developed over the years: diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, UV-VIS microscopy, in situ or operando spectroscopy, the combination of UV-VIS spectroscopy with other spectroscopic techniques, with chemometrics and with quantum chemistry. In the third part of this paper four successes of UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy and microscopy are discussed; (1) coordination of transition metal ions to surface oxygens; (2) quantitative determination of the oxidation states of transition metal ions; (3) characterization of active sites and (4) study of the distribution of transition metal ions and carbocations in catalytic bodies, particles and crystals (104 references).

  13. Spectroscopic AC susceptibility imaging (sASI) of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficko, Bradley W., E-mail: Bradley.W.Ficko@Dartmouth.edu; Nadar, Priyanka M.; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-02-01

    This study demonstrates a method for alternating current (AC) susceptibility imaging (ASI) of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) using low cost instrumentation. The ASI method uses AC magnetic susceptibility measurements to create tomographic images using an array of drive coils, compensation coils and fluxgate magnetometers. Using a spectroscopic approach in conjunction with ASI, a series of tomographic images can be created for each frequency measurement set and is termed sASI. The advantage of sASI is that mNPs can be simultaneously characterized and imaged in a biological medium. System calibration was performed by fitting the in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibility measurements of an mNP sample with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm to a Brownian relaxation model (R{sup 2}=0.96). Samples of mNPs with core diameters of 10 and 40 nm and a sample of 100 nm hydrodynamic diameter were prepared in 0.5 ml tubes. Three mNP samples were arranged in a randomized array and then scanned using sASI with six frequencies between 425 and 925 Hz. The sASI scans showed the location and quantity of the mNP samples (R{sup 2}=0.97). Biological compatibility of the sASI method was demonstrated by scanning mNPs that were injected into a pork sausage. The mNP response in the biological medium was found to correlate with a calibration sample (R{sup 2}=0.97, p<0.001). These results demonstrate the concept of ASI and advantages of sASI. - Highlights: • Development of an AC susceptibility imaging model. • Comparison of AC susceptibility imaging (ASI) and susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI). • Demonstration of ASI and spectroscopic ASI (sASI) using three different magnetic nanoparticle types. • SASI scan separation of three different magnetic nanoparticles samples using 5 spectroscopic frequencies. • Demonstration of biological feasibility of sASI.

  14. The Spectroscopic Studies of the Long Period Eclipsing Binary AZ CAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun-Suk Chun

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopic observations of the long period eclipsing binary AZ Cas were made using 122cm telescope/Image Tube. From the relatively sharp and strong spectral FeI lines we can calculate the mean radial velocity as -39.7 km/sec. The estimated equivalent widths of some atomic lines are well fitted to the phase of the AZ Cas.

  15. Exploring neural cell dynamics with digital holographic microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre

    2013-07-11

    In this review, we summarize how the new concept of digital optics applied to the field of holographic microscopy has allowed the development of a reliable and flexible digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy (DH-QPM) technique at the nanoscale particularly suitable for cell imaging. Particular emphasis is placed on the original biological ormation provided by the quantitative phase signal. We present the most relevant DH-QPM applications in the field of cell biology, including automated cell counts, recognition, classification, three-dimensional tracking, discrimination between physiological and pathophysiological states, and the study of cell membrane fluctuations at the nanoscale. In the last part, original results show how DH-QPM can address two important issues in the field of neurobiology, namely, multiple-site optical recording of neuronal activity and noninvasive visualization of dendritic spine dynamics resulting from a full digital holographic microscopy tomographic approach. Copyright © 2013 by Annual Reviews.

  16. Spectroscopic ellipsometric and Raman spectroscopic investigations of pulsed laser treated glassy carbon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csontos, J., E-mail: jcsontos@titan.physx.u-szeged.hu [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Pápa, Z.; Gárdián, A. [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Füle, M. [University of Szeged, Department of Experimental Physics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Budai, J. [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Toth, Z. [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); University of Szeged, Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, Tisza Lajos krt. 64, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser treatment modifies the top layer of glassy carbon as shown by ellipsometry. • Raman signal is composed from signals of the layer and the glassy carbon substrate. • Using volumetric fluence allows to compare the effects of different lasers. • Melting effects of glassy carbon was observed in case of Nd:YAG laser treatment. - Abstract: In this study spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and Raman spectroscopy are applied to study structural modification of glassy carbon, due to high intensity laser ablation. Two KrF lasers with different pulse durations (480 fs and 18 ns), an ArF (20 ns), and a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (8 ns) were applied to irradiate the surface of glassy carbon targets. The main characteristics of the different laser treatments are compared by introducing the volumetric fluence which takes into account the different absorption values at different wavelengths. SE showed the appearance of a modified layer on the ablated surfaces. In the case of the ns lasers the thickness of this layer was in the range of 10–60 nm, while in the case of fs laser it was less than 20 nm. In all cases the average refractive index (n) of the modified layers slightly decreased compared to the refractive index of glassy carbon. Increase in extinction coefficient (k) was observed in the cases of ArF and fs KrF laser treatment, while the k values decreased significantly in the cases of nanosecond pulse duration KrF and Nd:YAG laser treatments. In the Raman spectra of the ablated areas the characteristic D and G peaks were widened due to appearance of an amorphous phase. Both Raman spectroscopy and SE indicate that the irradiated areas show carbon nanoparticle formation in all cases.

  17. Fourier ptychographic microscopy at telecommunication wavelengths using a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ishtiaque; Alotaibi, Maged; Skinner-Ramos, Sueli; Dominguez, Daniel; Bernussi, Ayrton A.; de Peralta, Luis Grave

    2017-12-01

    We report the implementation of the Fourier Ptychographic Microscopy (FPM) technique, a phase retrieval technique, at telecommunication wavelengths using a low-coherence ultrafast pulsed laser source. High quality images, near speckle-free, were obtained with the proposed approach. We demonstrate that FPM can also be used to image periodic features through a silicon wafer.

  18. Cryoelectron microscopy of block-copolymers in an organic solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostergetel, G.T.; Esselink, F.J; Hadziioannou, G

    1995-01-01

    Solutions of the diblock copolymer polystyrene/poly-2-vinylpyridine (PS/P2VP) in toluene were studied by cryo-transmission electron microscopy following fast freezing of a thin film of the solution in liquid nitrogen. The block copolymer forms spherical micelles which can be visualized using phase

  19. Identification of root filling interfaces by microscopy and tomography methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaslansky, P.; Fratzl, P.; Rack, A.; Wu, M.K.; Wesselink, P.R.; Shemesh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim  To assess differences in observed cross-sectional areas of root canals and filling materials, as imaged by three microscopy and two tomography methods. Methodology  Six roots filled with laterally compacted Gutta-percha and AH26 were scanned with phase-contrast enhanced microtomography in a

  20. Recent Results of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Emily L.; McLean, I. S.; Prato, L.; McGovern, M. R.; Burgasser, A. J.; Kirkpatrick, J.; Kim, S. S.

    2006-12-01

    The NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey (BDSS) began in 1999 with the commissioning of NIRSPEC on Keck II. In the first phase of the survey, J-band spectra of 53 objects covering all spectral types from M6 to T8 were obtained at a resolving power of R 2000 (McLean et al. 2003). This poster presents results from the second phase of the survey, which focused on high-resolution (R 20,000) J-band observations for a sample of 16 very low mass stars and brown dwarfs from M2.5 to T6 (McLean et al. 2006, submitted). By comparing opacity plots and line lists to the high-resolution spectra we identify hundreds of FeH, H2O, and atomic features and analyze how these features change with spectral type. We also begin to explore the apparently complex dependence of spectral features on the metallicity and surface gravity of brown dwarf atmospheres, which is the topic of the current phase of the BDSS. Data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.