WorldWideScience

Sample records for spectroscopic imaging compared

  1. Utilization of Solar Dynamics Observatory space weather digital image data for comparative analysis with application to Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekoyan, V.; Dehipawala, S.; Liu, Ernest; Tulsee, Vivek; Armendariz, R.; Tremberger, G.; Holden, T.; Marchese, P.; Cheung, T.

    2012-10-01

    Digital solar image data is available to users with access to standard, mass-market software. Many scientific projects utilize the Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) format, which requires specialized software typically used in astrophysical research. Data in the FITS format includes photometric and spatial calibration information, which may not be useful to researchers working with self-calibrated, comparative approaches. This project examines the advantages of using mass-market software with readily downloadable image data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory for comparative analysis over with the use of specialized software capable of reading data in the FITS format. Comparative analyses of brightness statistics that describe the solar disk in the study of magnetic energy using algorithms included in mass-market software have been shown to give results similar to analyses using FITS data. The entanglement of magnetic energy associated with solar eruptions, as well as the development of such eruptions, has been characterized successfully using mass-market software. The proposed algorithm would help to establish a publicly accessible, computing network that could assist in exploratory studies of all FITS data. The advances in computer, cell phone and tablet technology could incorporate such an approach readily for the enhancement of high school and first-year college space weather education on a global scale. Application to ground based data such as that contained in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey is discussed.

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of benign prostatic tissue: findings at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T—initial experience☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitkara, Munish; Westphalen, Antonio; Kurhanewicz, John; Qayyum, Aliya; Poder, Liina; Reed, Galen; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2013-01-01

    In a retrospective study of 71 voxels of benign peripheral zone tissue from 3 men who underwent endorectal magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging of the prostate at both 1.5 and 3 T, 21 voxels that appeared more malignant at 3 T to either of two readers demonstrated significantly higher levels of choline and polyamines at 3 T compared to 1.5 T using a Wilcoxon ranked-sum test; awareness of this selective amplification of these metabolic signals at high field strength may help avoid overdiagnosis of prostate cancer. PMID:21724122

  3. A subspace approach to high-resolution spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Fan; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2014-04-01

    To accelerate spectroscopic imaging using sparse sampling of (k,t)-space and subspace (or low-rank) modeling to enable high-resolution metabolic imaging with good signal-to-noise ratio. The proposed method, called SPectroscopic Imaging by exploiting spatiospectral CorrElation, exploits a unique property known as partial separability of spectroscopic signals. This property indicates that high-dimensional spectroscopic signals reside in a very low-dimensional subspace and enables special data acquisition and image reconstruction strategies to be used to obtain high-resolution spatiospectral distributions with good signal-to-noise ratio. More specifically, a hybrid chemical shift imaging/echo-planar spectroscopic imaging pulse sequence is proposed for sparse sampling of (k,t)-space, and a low-rank model-based algorithm is proposed for subspace estimation and image reconstruction from sparse data with the capability to incorporate prior information and field inhomogeneity correction. The performance of the proposed method has been evaluated using both computer simulations and phantom studies, which produced very encouraging results. For two-dimensional spectroscopic imaging experiments on a metabolite phantom, a factor of 10 acceleration was achieved with a minimal loss in signal-to-noise ratio compared to the long chemical shift imaging experiments and with a significant gain in signal-to-noise ratio compared to the accelerated echo-planar spectroscopic imaging experiments. The proposed method, SPectroscopic Imaging by exploiting spatiospectral CorrElation, is able to significantly accelerate spectroscopic imaging experiments, making high-resolution metabolic imaging possible. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Development of a THz spectroscopic imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usami, M; Iwamoto, T; Fukasawa, R; Tani, M; Watanabe, M; Sakai, K

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a real-time THz imaging system based on the two-dimensional (2D) electro-optic (EO) sampling technique. Employing the 2D EO-sampling technique, we can obtain THz images using a CCD camera at a video rate of up to 30 frames per second. A spatial resolution of 1.4 mm was achieved. This resolution was reasonably close to the theoretical limit determined by diffraction. We observed not only static objects but also moving ones. To acquire spectroscopic information, time-domain images were collected. By processing these images on a computer, we can obtain spectroscopic images. Spectroscopy for silicon wafers was demonstrated

  5. Single-Shot MR Spectroscopic Imaging with Partial Parallel Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Yoshimoto, Akio Ernesto; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2010-01-01

    An MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) pulse sequence based on Proton-Echo-Planar-Spectroscopic-Imaging (PEPSI) is introduced that measures 2-dimensional metabolite maps in a single excitation. Echo-planar spatial-spectral encoding was combined with interleaved phase encoding and parallel imaging using SENSE to reconstruct absorption mode spectra. The symmetrical k-space trajectory compensates phase errors due to convolution of spatial and spectral encoding. Single-shot MRSI at short TE was evaluated in phantoms and in vivo on a 3 T whole body scanner equipped with 12-channel array coil. Four-step interleaved phase encoding and 4-fold SENSE acceleration were used to encode a 16×16 spatial matrix with 390 Hz spectral width. Comparison with conventional PEPSI and PEPSI with 4-fold SENSE acceleration demonstrated comparable sensitivity per unit time when taking into account g-factor related noise increases and differences in sampling efficiency. LCModel fitting enabled quantification of Inositol, Choline, Creatine and NAA in vivo with concentration values in the ranges measured with conventional PEPSI and SENSE-accelerated PEPSI. Cramer-Rao lower bounds were comparable to those obtained with conventional SENSE-accelerated PEPSI at the same voxel size and measurement time. This single-shot MRSI method is therefore suitable for applications that require high temporal resolution to monitor temporal dynamics or to reduce sensitivity to tissue movement. PMID:19097245

  6. Enhancing forensic science with spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Camilla; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    This presentation outlines the research we are developing in the area of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging with the focus on materials of forensic interest. FTIR spectroscopic imaging has recently emerged as a powerful tool for characterisation of heterogeneous materials. FTIR imaging relies on the ability of the military-developed infrared array detector to simultaneously measure spectra from thousands of different locations in a sample. Recently developed application of FTIR imaging using an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) mode has demonstrated the ability of this method to achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit of infrared light in air. Chemical visualisation with enhanced spatial resolution in micro-ATR mode broadens the range of materials studied with FTIR imaging with applications to pharmaceutical formulations or biological samples. Macro-ATR imaging has also been developed for chemical imaging analysis of large surface area samples and was applied to analyse the surface of human skin (e.g. finger), counterfeit tablets, textile materials (clothing), etc. This approach demonstrated the ability of this imaging method to detect trace materials attached to the surface of the skin. This may also prove as a valuable tool in detection of traces of explosives left or trapped on the surfaces of different materials. This FTIR imaging method is substantially superior to many of the other imaging methods due to inherent chemical specificity of infrared spectroscopy and fast acquisition times of this technique. Our preliminary data demonstrated that this methodology will provide the means to non-destructive detection method that could relate evidence to its source. This will be important in a wider crime prevention programme. In summary, intrinsic chemical specificity and enhanced visualising capability of FTIR spectroscopic imaging open a window of opportunities for counter-terrorism and crime-fighting, with applications ranging

  7. Role of endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging in defining treatable intraprostatic tumor foci in prostate cancer: Quantitative analysis of imaging contour compared to whole-mount histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, Mekhail; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Jung, Adam J.; Noworolski, Susan M.; Simko, Jeffry P.; Kurhanewicz, John; Roach, Mack; Carroll, Peter R.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging in defining the contour of treatable intraprostatic tumor foci in prostate cancer, since targeted therapy requires accurate target volume definition. Materials and methods: We retrospectively identified 20 patients with prostate cancer who underwent endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging prior to radical prostatectomy and subsequent creation of detailed histopathological tumor maps from whole-mount step sections. Two experienced radiologists independently reviewed all MR images and electronically contoured all suspected treatable (⩾0.5 cm 3 ) tumor foci. Deformable co-registration in MATLAB was used to calculate the margin of error between imaging and histopathological contours at both capsular and non-capsular surfaces and the treatment margin required to ensure at least 95% tumor coverage. Results: Histopathology showed 17 treatable tumor foci in 16 patients, of which 8 were correctly identified by both readers and an additional 2 were correctly identified by reader 2. For all correctly identified lesions, both readers accurately identified that tumor contacted the prostatic capsule, with no error in contour identification. On the non-capsular border, the median distance between the imaging and histopathological contour was 1.4 mm (range, 0–12). Expanding the contour by 5 mm at the non-capsular margin included 95% of tumor volume not initially covered within the MR contour. Conclusions: Endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging can be used to accurately contour treatable intraprostatic tumor foci; adequate tumor coverage is achieved by expanding the treatment contour at the non-capsular margin by 5 mm

  8. Spectroscopic and imaging diagnostics of pulsed laser deposition laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thareja, Raj K.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of laser spectroscopic techniques used in the diagnostics of laser ablated plumes used for thin film deposition is given. An emerging laser spectroscopic imaging technique for the laser ablation material processing is discussed. (author)

  9. Automated processing for proton spectroscopic imaging using water reference deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maudsley, A A; Wu, Z; Meyerhoff, D J; Weiner, M W

    1994-06-01

    Automated formation of MR spectroscopic images (MRSI) is necessary before routine application of these methods is possible for in vivo studies; however, this task is complicated by the presence of spatially dependent instrumental distortions and the complex nature of the MR spectrum. A data processing method is presented for completely automated formation of in vivo proton spectroscopic images, and applied for analysis of human brain metabolites. This procedure uses the water reference deconvolution method (G. A. Morris, J. Magn. Reson. 80, 547(1988)) to correct for line shape distortions caused by instrumental and sample characteristics, followed by parametric spectral analysis. Results for automated image formation were found to compare favorably with operator dependent spectral integration methods. While the water reference deconvolution processing was found to provide good correction of spatially dependent resonance frequency shifts, it was found to be susceptible to errors for correction of line shape distortions. These occur due to differences between the water reference and the metabolite distributions.

  10. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging: The Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging seemingly matured as a technology in the mid-2000s, with commercially successful instrumentation and reports in numerous applications. Recent developments, however, have transformed our understanding of the recorded data, provided capability for new instrumentation, and greatly enhanced the ability to extract more useful information in less time. These developments are summarized here in three broad areas— data recording, interpretation of recorded data, and information extraction—and their critical review is employed to project emerging trends. Overall, the convergence of selected components from hardware, theory, algorithms, and applications is one trend. Instead of similar, general-purpose instrumentation, another trend is likely to be diverse and application-targeted designs of instrumentation driven by emerging component technologies. The recent renaissance in both fundamental science and instrumentation will likely spur investigations at the confluence of conventional spectroscopic analyses and optical physics for improved data interpretation. While chemometrics has dominated data processing, a trend will likely lie in the development of signal processing algorithms to optimally extract spectral and spatial information prior to conventional chemometric analyses. Finally, the sum of these recent advances is likely to provide unprecedented capability in measurement and scientific insight, which will present new opportunities for the applied spectroscopist. PMID:23031693

  11. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brodwin, Mark; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Colless, Matthew; Coupon, Jean; Cunha, Carlos E.; Frye, Brenda L.; Gawiser, Eric J.; Gehrels, Neil; Grady, Kevin; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick B.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Shirley; Huterer, Dragan; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Lahav, Ofer; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Matthews, Daniel J.; Miquel, Ramon; Moniez, Marc; Moos, H. W.; Moustakas, John; Papovich, Casey; Peacock, John A.; Rhodes, Jason; Ricol, Jean-Stepane; Sadeh, Iftach; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Tyson, J. Anthony; Von der Linden, Anja; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zentner, A.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z's): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z's will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large sets of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our ''training set'' of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ∼30,000 objects over >∼15 widely-separated regions, each at least ∼20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo

  12. 2-d spectroscopic imaging of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, N.J.; Brotchie, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: This poster illustrates the use of two-dimensional spectroscopic imaging (2-D SI) in the characterisation of brain tumours, and the monitoring of subsequent treatment. After conventional contrast-enhanced MR imaging of patients with known or suspected brain tumours, 2-D SI is performed at a single axial level. The level is chosen to include the maximum volume of abnormal enhancement, or, in non-enhancing lesions. The most extensive T2 signal abnormality. Two different MR systems have been used (Marconi Edge and GE Signa LX); at each site, a PRESS localisation sequence is employed with TE 128-144 ms. Automated software is used to generate spectral arrays, metabolite maps, and metabolite ratio maps from the spectroscopic data. Colour overlays of the maps onto anatomical images are produced using manufacturer software or the Medex imaging data analysis package. High grade gliomas showed choline levels higher than those in apparently normal brain, with decreases in NAA and creatine. Some lesions showed spectral abnormality extending into otherwise normal appearing brain. This was also seen in a case of CNS lymphoma. Lowgrade lesions showed choline levels similar to normal brain, but with decreased NAA. Only a small number of metastases have been studied, but to date no metastasis has shown spectral abnormality beyond the margins suggested by conventional imaging. Follow-up studies generally show spectral heterogeneity. Regions with choline levels higher than those in normal-appearing brain are considered to represent recurrent high-grade tumour. Some regions show choline to be the dominant metabolite, but its level is not greater than that seen in normal brain. These regions are considered suspicious for residual / recurrent tumour when the choline / creatine ratio exceeds 2 (lower ratios may represent treatment effect). 2-D SI improves the initial assessment of brain tumours, and has potential for influencing the radiotherapy treatment strategy. 2-D SI also

  13. Comparative cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brundage, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    This book is designed to compare all major cardiac imaging techniques. All major imaging techniques - including conventional angiography, digital angiography, echocardiography and Doppler imaging, conventional radioisotope techniques, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging - are covered in this text as they apply to the major cardiovascular disorders. There is brief coverage of positron emission tomography and an extensive presentation of ultrafast computed tomography

  14. Chemical mapping of pharmaceutical cocrystals using terahertz spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Danielle M; Ajito, Katsuhiro; Kim, Jae-Young; Ueno, Yuko

    2013-02-19

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopic imaging is a promising technique for distinguishing pharmaceuticals of similar molecular composition but differing crystal structures. Physicochemical properties, for instance bioavailability, are manipulated by altering a drug's crystal structure through methods such as cocrystallization. Cocrystals are molecular complexes having crystal structures different from those of their pure components. A technique for identifying the two-dimensional distribution of these alternate forms is required. Here we present the first demonstration of THz spectroscopic imaging of cocrystals. THz spectra of caffeine-oxalic acid cocrystal measured at low temperature exhibit sharp peaks, enabling us to visualize the cocrystal distribution in nonuniform tablets. The cocrystal distribution was clearly identified using THz spectroscopic data, and the cocrystal concentration was calculated with 0.3-1.3% w/w error from the known total concentration. From this result, THz spectroscopy allows quantitative chemical mapping of cocrystals and offers researchers and drug developers a new analytical tool.

  15. Probing superconductors. Spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaguri, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in a cuprate triggered developments of various spectroscopic tools which have been utilized to elucidate electronic states of this mysterious compound. Particularly, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning-tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy are improved considerably. It is now possible to map the superconducting gap in both momentum and real spaces using these two techniques. Here we review spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy which is able to explore momentum-space phase structure of the superconducting gap, as well as real-space structure. Applications of this technique to a cuprate and an iron-based superconductor are discussed. (author)

  16. Single-shot magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with partial parallel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Yoshimoto, Akio Ernesto; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2009-03-01

    A magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) pulse sequence based on proton-echo-planar-spectroscopic-imaging (PEPSI) is introduced that measures two-dimensional metabolite maps in a single excitation. Echo-planar spatial-spectral encoding was combined with interleaved phase encoding and parallel imaging using SENSE to reconstruct absorption mode spectra. The symmetrical k-space trajectory compensates phase errors due to convolution of spatial and spectral encoding. Single-shot MRSI at short TE was evaluated in phantoms and in vivo on a 3-T whole-body scanner equipped with a 12-channel array coil. Four-step interleaved phase encoding and fourfold SENSE acceleration were used to encode a 16 x 16 spatial matrix with a 390-Hz spectral width. Comparison with conventional PEPSI and PEPSI with fourfold SENSE acceleration demonstrated comparable sensitivity per unit time when taking into account g-factor-related noise increases and differences in sampling efficiency. LCModel fitting enabled quantification of inositol, choline, creatine, and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) in vivo with concentration values in the ranges measured with conventional PEPSI and SENSE-accelerated PEPSI. Cramer-Rao lower bounds were comparable to those obtained with conventional SENSE-accelerated PEPSI at the same voxel size and measurement time. This single-shot MRSI method is therefore suitable for applications that require high temporal resolution to monitor temporal dynamics or to reduce sensitivity to tissue movement.

  17. Immunocytochemistry by electron spectroscopic imaging using a homogeneously boronated peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, M M; Qualmann, B; Klobasa, F; Sierralta, W D

    1996-05-01

    A linear all-L-oligopeptide containing five carboranyl amino acids (corresponding to 50 boron atoms) was synthesized and specifically attached to the free thiol group of monovalent antibody fragments F(ab)'. The boronated immunoreagent was used for the direct post-embedding detection of somatotrophic hormone in ultrathin sections of porcine pituitary embedded in Spurr resin. The specific boron-labelling of secretory vesicles in somatotrophs was detected by electron spectroscopic imaging and confirmed by conventional immunogold labelling run in parallel. In comparison with immunogold, boron-labelled F(ab)'-fragments showed higher tagging frequencies, as was expected; the small uncharged immunoreagents have an elongated shape and carry the antigen-combining structure and the detection tag at opposite ends, thus allowing for high spatial resolution in electron spectroscopic imaging.

  18. Spectroscopic AC susceptibility imaging (sASI) of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Nadar, Priyanka M.; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a method for alternating current (AC) susceptibility imaging (ASI) of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) using low cost instrumentation. The ASI method uses AC magnetic susceptibility measurements to create tomographic images using an array of drive coils, compensation coils and fluxgate magnetometers. Using a spectroscopic approach in conjunction with ASI, a series of tomographic images can be created for each frequency measurement set and is termed sASI. The advantage of sASI is that mNPs can be simultaneously characterized and imaged in a biological medium. System calibration was performed by fitting the in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibility measurements of an mNP sample with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm to a Brownian relaxation model (R 2 =0.96). Samples of mNPs with core diameters of 10 and 40 nm and a sample of 100 nm hydrodynamic diameter were prepared in 0.5 ml tubes. Three mNP samples were arranged in a randomized array and then scanned using sASI with six frequencies between 425 and 925 Hz. The sASI scans showed the location and quantity of the mNP samples (R 2 =0.97). Biological compatibility of the sASI method was demonstrated by scanning mNPs that were injected into a pork sausage. The mNP response in the biological medium was found to correlate with a calibration sample (R 2 =0.97, p<0.001). These results demonstrate the concept of ASI and advantages of sASI. - Highlights: • Development of an AC susceptibility imaging model. • Comparison of AC susceptibility imaging (ASI) and susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI). • Demonstration of ASI and spectroscopic ASI (sASI) using three different magnetic nanoparticle types. • SASI scan separation of three different magnetic nanoparticles samples using 5 spectroscopic frequencies. • Demonstration of biological feasibility of sASI

  19. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging for Prostate Pathology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Clinical Pathology, Chicago 3. Partin AW, Mangold LA, Lamm DM , Walsh PC, Epstein JI, Pearson JD (2001) Urology 58:843–848 4. De La Taille A, Viellefond...are used to seeing only in optical microscopy,” he recalls. “The crispness , the details were comparable.” In fact, the pixel size is only a half

  20. Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederick, B.deB.

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of 23 Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na + distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na + ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of 23 Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na + is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T 2 . Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo 23 Na T 2 values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic 1 H and 23 Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25μs, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form

  1. MOSS spectroscopic camera for imaging time resolved plasma species temperature and flow speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, Clive; Howard, John

    2000-01-01

    A MOSS (Modulated Optical Solid-State) spectroscopic camera has been devised to monitor the spatial and temporal variations of temperatures and flow speeds of plasma ion species, the Doppler broadening measurement being made of spectroscopic lines specified. As opposed to a single channel MOSS spectrometer, the camera images light from plasma onto an array of light detectors, being mentioned 2D imaging of plasma ion temperatures and flow speeds. In addition, compared to a conventional grating spectrometer, the MOSS camera shows an excellent light collecting performance which leads to the improvement of signal to noise ratio and of time resolution. The present paper first describes basic items of MOSS spectroscopy, then follows MOSS camera with an emphasis on the optical system of 2D imaging. (author)

  2. MOSS spectroscopic camera for imaging time resolved plasma species temperature and flow speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, Clive; Howard, John [Australian National Univ., Plasma Research Laboratory, Canberra (Australia)

    2000-03-01

    A MOSS (Modulated Optical Solid-State) spectroscopic camera has been devised to monitor the spatial and temporal variations of temperatures and flow speeds of plasma ion species, the Doppler broadening measurement being made of spectroscopic lines specified. As opposed to a single channel MOSS spectrometer, the camera images light from plasma onto an array of light detectors, being mentioned 2D imaging of plasma ion temperatures and flow speeds. In addition, compared to a conventional grating spectrometer, the MOSS camera shows an excellent light collecting performance which leads to the improvement of signal to noise ratio and of time resolution. The present paper first describes basic items of MOSS spectroscopy, then follows MOSS camera with an emphasis on the optical system of 2D imaging. (author)

  3. Undersampling strategies for compressed sensing accelerated MR spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidya Shankar, Rohini; Hu, Houchun Harry; Bikkamane Jayadev, Nutandev; Chang, John C.; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.

    2017-03-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) can accelerate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), facilitating its widespread clinical integration. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of different undersampling strategy on CS-MRSI reconstruction quality. Phantom data were acquired on a Philips 3 T Ingenia scanner. Four types of undersampling masks, corresponding to each strategy, namely, low resolution, variable density, iterative design, and a priori were simulated in Matlab and retrospectively applied to the test 1X MRSI data to generate undersampled datasets corresponding to the 2X - 5X, and 7X accelerations for each type of mask. Reconstruction parameters were kept the same in each case(all masks and accelerations) to ensure that any resulting differences can be attributed to the type of mask being employed. The reconstructed datasets from each mask were statistically compared with the reference 1X, and assessed using metrics like the root mean square error and metabolite ratios. Simulation results indicate that both the a priori and variable density undersampling masks maintain high fidelity with the 1X up to five-fold acceleration. The low resolution mask based reconstructions showed statistically significant differences from the 1X with the reconstruction failing at 3X, while the iterative design reconstructions maintained fidelity with the 1X till 4X acceleration. In summary, a pilot study was conducted to identify an optimal sampling mask in CS-MRSI. Simulation results demonstrate that the a priori and variable density masks can provide statistically similar results to the fully sampled reference. Future work would involve implementing these two masks prospectively on a clinical scanner.

  4. Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDowell, A. A.; Warwick, T.; Anders, S.; Lamble, G.M.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Padmore, H.A.

    1999-01-01

    One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications

  5. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuff, Norbert; Vermathen, Peter; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Weiner, Michael W.

    1999-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ( 1 H MRSI) was used to investigate changes in brain metabolites in Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Examples of results from several ongoing clinical studies are provided. Multislice 1 H MRSI of the human brain, without volume pre selection offers considerable advantage over previously available techniques. Furthermore, MRI tissue segmentation and completely automated spectral curve fitting greatly facilitate quantitative data analysis. Future efforts will be devoted to obtain full volumetric brain coverage and data acquisition at short spin-echo times (TE<30 ms) for the detection of metabolites. (author)

  6. Fatty infiltration of the liver: evaluation by proton spectroscopic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, J.P.; Lee, J.K.; Dixon, W.T.

    1985-01-01

    The reliability of proton spectroscopic imaging in evaluating fatty infiltration of the liver was investigated in 35 subjects (12 healthy volunteers and 23 patients with fatty livers). With this modified spin-echo technique, fatty liver could be separated from normal liver both visually and quantitatively. On the opposed image, normal liver had an intermediate signal intensity, greater than that of muscle, whereas fatty liver had a lower signal intensity, equal to or less than that of muscle. In normal livers, the lipid signal fraction was less than 10%, while in fatty livers it was greater than 10% and usually exceeded 20%. With this technique, nonuniform fatty infiltration of the liver can be differentiated from hepatic metastases, and the technique may prove useful in the differentiation of some hepatic disorders

  7. Spectroscopic imaging of X-rays anew look

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M

    2003-01-01

    In recent hybrid imaging devices a segmented (50-100mum) semiconductor sensor matrix is matched to a separate readout chip made in some standard silicon CMOS technology. The large number of contacts are made by high-density bump bonding interconnect technology. Extended functionality with hundreds of transistors in each electronics cell can serve a variety of purposes. Fluctuations in the response of the sensor matrix can be compensated in real-time. A single photon processing circuit in each pixel can achieve spectroscopic imaging by energy measurement even at high rates. However, it is necessary to take into account the distribution of the signals over adjacent pixels. Another possibility is the discrimination by energy of photon conversions in stacked layers with increasing absorption.

  8. A COMPARISON OF SPECTROSCOPIC VERSUS IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING CLOSE COMPANIONS TO KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTEREST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, Johanna K.; Everett, Mark E.; Hirsch, Lea; Furlan, Elise; Ciardi, David R.; Horch, Elliott P.; Howell, Steve B.; Gonzales, Erica; Crepp, Justin R.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler planet candidates require both spectroscopic and imaging follow-up observations to rule out false positives and detect blended stars. Traditionally, spectroscopy and high-resolution imaging have probed different host star companion parameter spaces, the former detecting tight binaries and the latter detecting wider bound companions as well as chance background stars. In this paper, we examine a sample of 11 Kepler host stars with companions detected by two techniques—near-infrared adaptive optics and/or optical speckle interferometry imaging, and a new spectroscopic deblending method. We compare the companion effective temperatures (T eff ) and flux ratios (F B /F A , where A is the primary and B is the companion) derived from each technique and find no cases where both companion parameters agree within 1σ errors. In 3/11 cases the companion T eff values agree within 1σ errors, and in 2/11 cases the companion F B /F A values agree within 1σ errors. Examining each Kepler system individually considering multiple avenues (isochrone mapping, contrast curves, probability of being bound), we suggest two cases for which the techniques most likely agree in their companion detections (detect the same companion star). Overall, our results support the advantage that the spectroscopic deblending technique has for finding very close-in companions (θ ≲ 0.″02–0.″05) that are not easily detectable with imaging. However, we also specifically show how high-contrast AO and speckle imaging observations detect companions at larger separations (θ ≥ 0.″02–0.″05) that are missed by the spectroscopic technique, provide additional information for characterizing the companion and its potential contamination (e.g., position angle, separation, magnitude differences), and cover a wider range of primary star effective temperatures. The investigation presented here illustrates the utility of combining the two techniques to reveal higher-order multiples in known

  9. In Vivo H MR spectroscopic imaging of human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Bo Young; Suh, Tae Suk; Choi, Kyo Ho; Bahk, Yong Whee; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the spatial distribution of various proton metabolites in the human brain with use of water-suppressed in vivo H MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) technique. All of water-suppressed in vivo H MRSI were performed on 1.5 T whole-body MRI/MRS system using Stimulated Echo Acquisition Method (STEAM) Chemical Shift Imaging (CSI) pulse sequence. T1-weighted MR images were used for CSI field of view (FOV; 24 cm). Voxel size of 1.5 cm 3 was designated from the periphery of the brain which was divided by 1024 X 16 X 16 data points. Metabolite images of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine/ phosphocreatine (Cr) + choline/phosphocholine (Cho), and complex of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) + glutamate (Glu) were obtained on the human brain. Our preliminary study suggests that in vivo H MRSI could provide the metabolite imaging to compensate for hypermetabolism on Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans on the basis of the metabolic informations on brain tissues. The unique ability of in vivo H MRSI to offer noninvasive information about tissue biochemistry in disease states will stimulate on clinical research and disease diagnosis

  10. Imaging and spectroscopic observations of the 9 March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse in Palangkaraya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kholish, Abdul Majid Al; Jihad, Imanul; Andika, Irham Taufik; Puspitaningrum, Evaria; Ainy, Fathin Q.; Ramadhan, Sahlan; Arifyanto, M. Ikbal; Malasan, Hakim L.

    2016-01-01

    The March 9 th 2016 total solar eclipse observation was carried out at Universitas Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan. Time-resolved imaging of the Sun has been conducted before, after, and during totality of eclipse while optical spectroscopic observation has been carried out only at the totality. The imaging observation in white light was done to take high resolution images of solar corona. The images were taken with a DSLR camera that is attached to a refractor telescope (d=66 mm, f/5.9). Despite cloudy weather during the eclipse moments, we managed to obtain the images with lower signal-to-noise ratio, including identifiable diamond ring, prominence and coronal structure. The images were processed using standard reduction procedure to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and to enhance the corona. Then, the coronal structure is determined and compared with ultraviolet data from SOHO to analyze the correlation between visual and ultraviolet corona. The spectroscopic observation was conducted using a slit-less spectrograph and a DSLR camera to obtain solar flash spectra. The flash spectra taken during the eclipse show emissions of H 4861 Å, He I 5876 Å, and H 6563 Å. The Fe XIV 5303 Å and Fe X 6374 Å lines are hardly detected due to low signal-to-noise ratio. Spectral reduction and analysis are conducted to derive the emission lines intensity relative to continuum intensity. We use the measured parameters to determine the temperature of solar chromosphere. (paper)

  11. Reproducibility of P-31 spectroscopic imaging of normal human myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, N.J.; Chew, W.; Auffermann, W.; Higgins, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    To assess reproducibility of P-31 MR spectroscopy of human myocardium, ten normal male volunteers were studied on two separate occasions. Spectra were acquired on a clinical 1.5-T MR imaging unit (Signa, General Electric) using a one-dimensional gated spectroscopic imaging sequence (matrix size, 32 X 256) over 20 minutes. Peaks in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) region, phosphocreatine (PCR), phosphodiesters (PD), and peaks attributable to 2,3 diphosphoglycerate from blood were observed. Interindividual and intraindividual variability expressed as standard errors of the mean (mean +- SEM) were 1.54 +- 0.04 (variability among subjects) and 0.04 (variability between first and second studies) for PCR/β ATP; 0.97 +- 0.18 and 0.06 for PD/β ATP; and 0.62 +- 0.10 and 0.05 for PD/PCR, respectively. In conclusion, P-31 MR spectroscopy yields consistent and reproducible myocardial spectra that might be useful in the future for the evaluation and monitoring of cardiac disease

  12. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging at superresolution: Overview and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Jeffrey; Klauser, Antoine; Lazeyras, François; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2016-02-01

    The notion of non-invasive, high-resolution spatial mapping of metabolite concentrations has long enticed the medical community. While magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is capable of achieving the requisite spatio-spectral localization, it has traditionally been encumbered by significant resolution constraints that have thus far undermined its clinical utility. To surpass these obstacles, research efforts have primarily focused on hardware enhancements or the development of accelerated acquisition strategies to improve the experimental sensitivity per unit time. Concomitantly, a number of innovative reconstruction techniques have emerged as alternatives to the standard inverse discrete Fourier transform (DFT). While perhaps lesser known, these latter methods strive to effect commensurate resolution gains by exploiting known properties of the underlying MRSI signal in concert with advanced image and signal processing techniques. This review article aims to aggregate and provide an overview of the past few decades of so-called "superresolution" MRSI reconstruction methodologies, and to introduce readers to current state-of-the-art approaches. A number of perspectives are then offered as to the future of high-resolution MRSI, with a particular focus on translation into clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical stage T1c prostate cancer: evaluation with endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingbo; Hricak, Hedvig; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Akin, Oguz; Ishill, Nicole M; Carlino, Lauren J; Reuter, Victor E; Eastham, James A

    2009-11-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of endorectal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging for prediction of the pathologic stage of prostate cancer and the presence of clinically nonimportant disease in patients with clinical stage T1c prostate cancer. The institutional review board approved-and waived the informed patient consent requirement for-this HIPAA-compliant study involving 158 patients (median age, 58 years; age range, 40-76 years) who had clinical stage T1c prostate cancer, had not been treated preoperatively, and underwent combined 1.5-T endorectal MR imaging-MR spectroscopic imaging between January 2003 and March 2004 before undergoing radical prostatectomy. On the MR images and combined endorectal MR-MR spectroscopic images, two radiologists retrospectively and independently rated the likelihood of cancer in 12 prostate regions and the likelihoods of extracapsular extension (ECE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and adjacent organ invasion by using a five-point scale, and they determined the probability of clinically nonimportant prostate cancer by using a four-point scale. Whole-mount step-section pathology maps were used for imaging-pathologic analysis correlation. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed and areas under the curves (AUCs) were estimated nonparametrically for assessment of reader accuracy. At surgical-pathologic analysis, one (0.6%) patient had no cancer; 124 (78%) patients, organ-confined (stage pT2) disease; 29 (18%) patients, ECE (stage pT3a); two (1%) patients, SVI (stage pT3b); and two (1%) patients, bladder neck invasion (stage pT4). Forty-six (29%) patients had a total tumor volume of less than 0.5 cm(3). With combined MR imaging-MR spectroscopic imaging, the two readers achieved 80% accuracy in disease staging and AUCs of 0.62 and 0.71 for the prediction of clinically nonimportant cancer. Clinical stage T1c prostate cancers are heterogeneous in pathologic stage and volume. MR imaging may

  14. Sparse spectral deconvolution algorithm for noncartesian MR spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Sampada; Eslami, Ramin; Jacob, Mathews

    2014-02-01

    To minimize line shape distortions and spectral leakage artifacts in MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). A spatially and spectrally regularized non-Cartesian MRSI algorithm that uses the line shape distortion priors, estimated from water reference data, to deconvolve the spectra is introduced. Sparse spectral regularization is used to minimize noise amplification associated with deconvolution. A spiral MRSI sequence that heavily oversamples the central k-space regions is used to acquire the MRSI data. The spatial regularization term uses the spatial supports of brain and extracranial fat regions to recover the metabolite spectra and nuisance signals at two different resolutions. Specifically, the nuisance signals are recovered at the maximum resolution to minimize spectral leakage, while the point spread functions of metabolites are controlled to obtain acceptable signal-to-noise ratio. The comparisons of the algorithm against Tikhonov regularized reconstructions demonstrates considerably reduced line-shape distortions and improved metabolite maps. The proposed sparsity constrained spectral deconvolution scheme is effective in minimizing the line-shape distortions. The dual resolution reconstruction scheme is capable of minimizing spectral leakage artifacts. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) Team Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1998-01-01

    This report covers activities on the above grant for the period through the end of September 1997. The work originally proposed to be performed under a three-year award was converted at that time to a two-year award for the remainder of the period, and is now funded under award NAGS-4027 through Goddard Space Flight Center. The P.I. is a co-investigator on the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) team, selected as a Small-Class Explorer (SNMX) mission in 1997. He has also been a participant in the Space Physics Roadmap Planning Group. Our research has been strongly influenced by the NASA mission opportunities related to these activities. The report is subdivided into four sections, each dealing with a different aspect of our research within this guiding theme. Personnel involved in this research at UAH include the P.I. and graduate students Michele Montgomery and Amy Winebarger. Much of the work has been carried out in collaboration with investigators at other institutions, as detailed below. Attachment: Laser wakefield acceleration and astrophysical applications.

  16. Electron spectroscopic imaging of antigens by reaction with boronated antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualmann, B; Kessels, M M; Klobasa, F; Jungblut, P W; Sierralta, W D

    1996-07-01

    Two small homogeneous markers for electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) containing eight dodecaborane cages linked to a poly-alpha, epsilon-L-lysine dendrimer were synthesized; one of these was made water soluble by the attachment of a polyether. The markers were coupled to the sulfhydryl group of (monovalent) antibody fragments (Fab') by a homobifunctional cross-linker. While the coupling ratios of the poorly water-soluble compound did not exceed 20%, the polyether-containing variant reacted quantitatively. Its suitability for immunolabelling was tested in a study of the mechanism of the transcellular transport of an administered heterologous protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA) through ileal enterocytes of newborn piglets by endocytotic vesicles in comparison to conventional immunogold reagents. The post-embedding technique was employed. The boronated Fab' gave rise to considerably higher tagging frequencies than seen with immunogold, as could be expected from its form- and size-related physical advantages and the dense packing of BSA in the vesicles. The new probe, carrying the antigen-combining cleft at one end and the boron clusters at the opposite end of the oval-shaped conjugate, add to the potential of ESI-based immunocytochemistry.

  17. Metabolic networks in epilepsy by MR spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, J W; Spencer, D D; Kuzniecky, R; Duckrow, R B; Hetherington, H; Spencer, S S

    2012-12-01

    The concept of an epileptic network has long been suggested from both animal and human studies of epilepsy. Based on the common observation that the MR spectroscopic imaging measure of NAA/Cr is sensitive to neuronal function and injury, we use this parameter to assess for the presence of a metabolic network in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) patients. A multivariate factor analysis is performed with controls and MTLE patients, using NAA/Cr measures from 12 loci: the bilateral hippocampi, thalami, basal ganglia, and insula. The factor analysis determines which and to what extent these loci are metabolically covarying. We extract two independent factors that explain the data's variability in control and MTLE patients. In controls, these factors characterize a 'thalamic' and 'dominant subcortical' function. The MTLE patients also exhibit a 'thalamic' factor, in addition to a second factor involving the ipsilateral insula and bilateral basal ganglia. These data suggest that MTLE patients demonstrate a metabolic network that involves the thalami, also seen in controls. The MTLE patients also display a second set of metabolically covarying regions that may be a manifestation of the epileptic network that characterizes limbic seizure propagation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Phosphorus-31 spectroscopic imaging of the human liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biran, M.; Raffard, G.; Canioni, P.; Kien, P.

    1993-01-01

    During the last decade, progresses in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (M.R.S.), have allowed the metabolic studies of complex biological systems. Since the coming out of whole body magnets, clinical applications are possible; they utilize magnetic field gradients coupled with selective pulse sequences. Study of the phosphorylated metabolism of human liver can be performed with sequences as ISIS, FROGS or 1D-CSI. But they present some disadvantages (for instance contamination by phosphocreatine from muscle). In the present work, we have studied the human liver in vivo by 31 P spectroscopic imaging. Several spectra could be acquired with only one acquisition. This study has needed the building of radiofrequency coils (surface coils), specially designed for liver observation (15 cm diameter 31 P coil and 19 cm diameter proton coil, both transmitter and receiver coils). Preliminary studies have been done on a phantom followed by in vivo measurements on healthy subject livers. We have obtained localized 31 P N.M.R. spectra corresponding to different voxels within the hepatic tissue. The conditions of acquisition of spectra and the problems related to the saturation of phosphorylated metabolite signals (in particular phosphodiesters) are discussed. (author). 5 figs., 15 refs

  19. A COMPARISON OF SPECTROSCOPIC VERSUS IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING CLOSE COMPANIONS TO KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTEREST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teske, Johanna K. [Carnegie DTM, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Everett, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Hirsch, Lea [Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Furlan, Elise; Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, 770 South Wilson Ave., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Horch, Elliott P. [Department of Physics, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515 (United States); Howell, Steve B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Gonzales, Erica; Crepp, Justin R., E-mail: jteske@carnegiescience.edu [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Kepler planet candidates require both spectroscopic and imaging follow-up observations to rule out false positives and detect blended stars. Traditionally, spectroscopy and high-resolution imaging have probed different host star companion parameter spaces, the former detecting tight binaries and the latter detecting wider bound companions as well as chance background stars. In this paper, we examine a sample of 11 Kepler host stars with companions detected by two techniques—near-infrared adaptive optics and/or optical speckle interferometry imaging, and a new spectroscopic deblending method. We compare the companion effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and flux ratios (F{sub B}/F{sub A}, where A is the primary and B is the companion) derived from each technique and find no cases where both companion parameters agree within 1σ errors. In 3/11 cases the companion T{sub eff} values agree within 1σ errors, and in 2/11 cases the companion F{sub B}/F{sub A} values agree within 1σ errors. Examining each Kepler system individually considering multiple avenues (isochrone mapping, contrast curves, probability of being bound), we suggest two cases for which the techniques most likely agree in their companion detections (detect the same companion star). Overall, our results support the advantage that the spectroscopic deblending technique has for finding very close-in companions (θ ≲ 0.″02–0.″05) that are not easily detectable with imaging. However, we also specifically show how high-contrast AO and speckle imaging observations detect companions at larger separations (θ ≥ 0.″02–0.″05) that are missed by the spectroscopic technique, provide additional information for characterizing the companion and its potential contamination (e.g., position angle, separation, magnitude differences), and cover a wider range of primary star effective temperatures. The investigation presented here illustrates the utility of combining the two techniques to reveal higher

  20. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, N. Andres [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Maudsley, Andrew A. [Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Gupta, Rakesh K. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Ishkanian, Fazilat; Huang, Kris [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Walker, Gail R. [Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core Resource, Sylvester Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Padgett, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Roy, Bhaswati [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Panoff, Joseph; Markoe, Arnold [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Stoyanova, Radka, E-mail: RStoyanova@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}, respectively). MTV{sub Cho} and MTV{sub NAA} were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTV{sub NAA} were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTV{sub Cho} was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTV{sub Cho} for these patients were outside of CTV{sub 60}. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on

  1. Bio-medical X-ray imaging with spectroscopic pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, A P H; Tipples, R; Cook, N; Watts, R; Meyer, J; Bell, A J; Melzer, T R; Butler, P H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the clinical potential of spectroscopic X-ray detectors and to undertake a feasibility study using a novel detector in a clinical hospital setting. Detectors currently in development, such as Medipix-3, will have multiple energy thresholds allowing for routine use of spectroscopic bio-medical imaging. We have coined the term MARS (Medipix All Resolution System) for bio-medical images that provide spatial, temporal, and energy information. The full clinical significance of spectroscopic X-ray imaging is difficult to predict but insights can be gained by examining both image reconstruction artifacts and the current uses of dual-energy techniques. This paper reviews the known uses of energy information in vascular imaging and mammography, clinically important fields. It then presents initial results from using Medipix-2, to image human tissues within a clinical radiology department. Detectors currently in development, such as Medipix-3, will have multiple energy thresholds allo...

  2. Proton MR spectroscopic imaging of basal ganglia and thalamus in neurofibromatosis type 1: correlation with T2 hyperintensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, Charlotte; Barantin, Laurent; Chabernaud, Camille; Bertrand, Philippe; Sembely, Catherine; Sirinelli, Dominique; Castelnau, Pierre; Cottier, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is frequently associated with hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images called ''unidentified bright objects'' (UBO). To better characterize the functional significance of UBO, we investigate the basal ganglia and thalamus using spectroscopic imaging in children with NF1 and compare the results to anomalies observed on T2-weighted images. Magnetic resonance (MR) data of 25 children with NF1 were analyzed. On the basis of T2-weighted images analysis, two groups were identified: one with normal MR imaging (UBO- group; n = 10) and one with UBO (UBO+ group; n = 15). Within the UBO+ group, a subpopulation of patients (n = 5) only had lesions of the basal ganglia. We analyzed herein seven regions of interest (ROIs) for each side: caudate nucleus, capsulo-lenticular region, lateral and posterior thalamus, thalamus (lateral and posterior voxels combined), putamen, and striatum. For each ROI, a spectrum of the metabolites and their ratio was obtained. Patients with abnormalities on T2-weighted images had significantly lower NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, and NAA/mI ratios in the lateral right thalamus compared with patients with normal T2. These abnormal spectroscopic findings were not observed in capsulo-lenticular regions that had UBO but in the thalamus region that was devoid of UBO. Multivoxel spectroscopic imaging using short-time echo showed spectroscopic abnormalities in the right thalamus of NF1 patients harboring UBO, which were mainly located in the basal ganglia. This finding could reflect the anatomical and functional interactions of these regions. (orig.)

  3. Spectroscopic imaging studies of nanoscale polarity and mass transport phenomena in self-assembled organic nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Nagasaka, Shinobu; Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Takashi; Higgins, Daniel A

    2017-08-02

    Synthetic organic nanotubes self-assembled from bolaamphiphile surfactants are now being explored for use as drug delivery vehicles. In this work, several factors important to their implementation in drug delivery are explored. All experiments are performed with the nanotubes immersed in ethanol. First, Nile Red (NR) and a hydroxylated Nile Red derivative (NR-OH) are loaded into the nanotubes and spectroscopic fluorescence imaging methods are used to determine the apparent dielectric constant of their local environment. Both are found in relatively nonpolar environments, with the NR-OH molecules preferring regions of relatively higher dielectric constant compared to NR. Unique two-color imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (imaging FCS) measurements are then used along with the spectroscopic imaging results to deduce the dielectric properties of the environments sensed by mobile and immobile populations of probe molecules. The results reveal that mobile NR molecules pass through less polar regions, likely within the nanotube walls, while immobile NR molecules are found in more polar regions, possibly near the nanotube surfaces. In contrast, mobile and immobile NR-OH molecules are found to locate in environments of similar polarity. The imaging FCS results also provide quantitative data on the apparent diffusion coefficient for each dye. The mean diffusion coefficient for the NR dye was approximately two-fold larger than that of NR-OH. Slower diffusion by the latter could result from its additional hydrogen bonding interactions with polar triglycine, amine, and glucose moieties near the nanotube surfaces. The knowledge gained in these studies will allow for the development of nanotubes that are better engineered for applications in the controlled transport and release of uncharged, dipolar drug molecules.

  4. A compact imaging spectroscopic system for biomolecular detections on plasmonic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shu-Cheng; Lin, En-Hung; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Tsai, Wan-Shao

    2016-10-17

    In this study, we demonstrate a compact imaging spectroscopic system for high-throughput detection of biomolecular interactions on plasmonic chips, based on a curved grating as the key element of light diffraction and light focusing. Both the curved grating and the plasmonic chips are fabricated on flexible plastic substrates using a gas-assisted thermal-embossing method. A fiber-coupled broadband light source and a camera are included in the system. Spectral resolution within 1 nm is achieved in sensing environmental index solutions and protein bindings. The detected sensitivities of the plasmonic chip are comparable with a commercial spectrometer. An extra one-dimensional scanning stage enables high-throughput detection of protein binding on a designed plasmonic chip consisting of several nanoslit arrays with different periods. The detected resonance wavelengths match well with the grating equation under an air environment. Wavelength shifts between 1 and 9 nm are detected for antigens of various concentrations binding with antibodies. A simple, mass-productive and cost-effective method has been demonstrated on the imaging spectroscopic system for real-time, label-free, highly sensitive and high-throughput screening of biomolecular interactions.

  5. High grade gilomas and solitary metastases: differentiation using perfusion MR imaging and spectroscopic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, M.; Cha, S.; Knopp, E.A.; Johnson, G.; Litt, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: To determine whether perfusion MRI (pMRI) and spectroscopic MR imaging (sMRI) can be used to differentiate high grade primary gliomas and solitary metastases on the basis of differences in vascularity and metabolite levels in the peritumoral. Fifty-one patients with a solitary brain tumor (33 gliomas, 18 metastases) underwent conventional MRI, contrast enhanced pMRI and sMRI before surgical resection or stereotactic biopsy. The peri-tumoral region is defined as the area within the white matter, immediately adjacent to the enhancing portion of the tumor (hyperintense on T2- weighted imaging but no enhancement on post-contrast T1-weighted imaging). Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) measurements were made in these regions from the pMRI data. Spectra from the enhancing tumor, the peritumoral region and normal brain, were obtained from the 2D multi-voxel CSI acquisition (TE = 135ms). The measured rCBV within the abnormal peritumoral region in highgrade gliomas and metastasis were 1.31 ± 0.97 (mean ± standard deviation) and 0.39 ± 0.19, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.0001). Spectroscopic imaging demonstrated elevated choline (Cho/Cr 2.28 ± 1.24) in the peritumoral region of gliomas but not in metastasis (Cho/Cr = 0.76 ± 0.23). The difference was again statistically significant (p 0.001), with Student's t-test. Although conventional imaging characteristics of solitary metastases and primary high grade gliomas may sometimes be similar, pMRI and sMRI are able to distinguish between the two, based on the rCBV and metabolite ratios within the peri-tumoral region. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. Detection of prostate cancer with MR spectroscopic imaging: an expanded paradigm incorporating polyamines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla-Dave, A.; Hricak, H.; Moskowitz, C.; Ishill, N.; Akin, O.; Kuroiwa, K.; Spector, J.; Kumar, M.; Reuter, V.E.; Koutcher, J.A.; Zakian, K.L. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Medical Physics

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To characterize benign and malignant prostate peripheral zone (PZ) tissue retrospectively by using a commercial magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging package and incorporating the choline plus creatine-to-citrate ratio ([Cho + Cr]/Cit) and polyamine (PA) information into a statistically based voxel classification procedure. Materials and methods: The institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant study and waived the requirement for informed consent. Fifty men (median age, 60 years; range, 44-69 years) with untreated biopsy-proved prostate cancer underwent combined endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging. Commercial software was used to acquire and process MR spectroscopic imaging data. The (Cho + Cr)/Cit and the PA level were tabulated for each voxel. The PA level was scored on a scale of 0 (PA undetectable) to 2 (PA peak as high as or higher than Cho peak). Whole-mount step-section histopathologic analysis constituted the reference standard. Classification and regression tree analysis in a training set generated a decision-making tree (rule) for classifying voxels as malignant or benign, which was validated in a test set. Receiver operating characteristic and generalized estimating equation regression analyses were used to assess accuracy and sensitivity, respectively. Results: The median (Cho + Cr)/Cit was 0.55 (mean {+-} standard deviation, 0.59 {+-} 0.03) in benign and 0.77 (mean, 1.08 {+-} 0.20) in malignant PZ voxels (P = .027). A significantly higher percentage of benign (compared with malignant) voxels had higher PA than choline peaks (P < .001). In the 24-patient training set (584 voxels), the rule yielded 54% sensitivity and 91% specificity for cancer detection; in the 26-patient test set (667 voxels), it yielded 42% sensitivity and 85% specificity. The percentage of cancer in the voxel at histopathologic analysis correlated positively (P < .001) with the sensitivity of the classification and regression tree rule

  7. (31) P MR spectroscopic imaging combined with (1) H MR spectroscopic imaging in the human prostate using a double tuned endorectal coil at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttje, Mariska P; Italiaander, Michel G M; Arteaga de Castro, Catalina S; van der Kemp, Wybe J M; Luijten, Peter R; van Vulpen, Marco; van der Heide, Uulke A; Klomp, Dennis W J

    2014-12-01

    Improved diagnostic sensitivity could be obtained in cancer detection and staging when individual compounds of the choline pool can be detected. Therefore, a novel coil design is proposed, providing the ability to acquire both (1) H and (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in patients with prostate cancer. A two-element (1) H/(31) P endorectal coil was designed by adjusting a commercially available 3T endorectal coil. The two-element coil setup was interfaced as a transceiver to a whole body 7T MR scanner. Simulations and phantom measurements were performed to compare the efficiency of the coil. (1) H MRSI and (31) P MRSI were acquired in vivo in prostate cancer patients. The efficiency of the (1) H/(31) P coil is comparable to the dual channel (1) H coil previously published. Individually distinguishable phospholipid metabolites in the in vivo (31) P spectra were: phosphoethanolamine, phosphocholine, phosphate, glycerophosphoethanolamine, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocreatine, and adenosine triposphate. (1) H MRSI was performed within the same scan session, visualizing choline, polyamines, creatine, and citrate. (1) H MRSI and (31) P MRSI can be acquired in the human prostate at 7T within the same scan session using an endorectal coil matched and tuned for (1) H (quadrature) and (31) P (linear) without the need of cable traps and with negligible efficiency losses in the (1) H and (31) P channel. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Initial experience of 3 tesla endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging and 1H-spectroscopic imaging of the prostate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fütterer, J.J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Huisman, H.J.; Klomp, D.W.J.; Dorsten, F.A. van; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Witjes, J.A.; Heerschap, A.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2004-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: We sought to explore the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate at 3T, with the knowledge of potential drawbacks of MRI at high field strengths. MATERIAL AND METHOD: MRI, dynamic MRI, and 1H-MR spectroscopic imaging were performed in 10 patients

  9. FT-IR spectroscopic imaging of reactions in multiphase flow in microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2012-05-01

    Rapid, in situ, and label-free chemical analysis in microfluidic devices is highly desirable. FT-IR spectroscopic imaging has previously been shown to be a powerful tool to visualize the distribution of different chemicals in flows in a microfluidic device at near video rate imaging speed without tracers or dyes. This paper demonstrates the possibility of using this imaging technology to capture the chemical information of all reactants and products at different points in time and space in a two-phase system. Differences in the rates of chemical reactions in laminar flow and segmented flow systems are also compared. Neutralization of benzoic acid in decanol with disodium phosphate in water has been used as the model reaction. Quantitative information, such as concentration profiles of reactant and products, can be extracted from the imaging data. The same feed flow rate was used in both the laminar flow and segmented flow systems. The laminar flow pattern was achieved using a plain wide T-junction, whereas the segmented flow was achieved by introducing a narrowed section and a nozzle at the T-junction. The results show that the reaction rate is limited by diffusion and is much slower with the laminar flow pattern, whereas the reaction is completed more quickly in the segmented flow due to better mixing.

  10. The hippocampus in patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ende, G; Braus, D F; Walter, S; Weber-Fahr, W; Henn, F A

    2000-10-01

    We monitored the effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on the nuclear magnetic resonance-detectable metabolites N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine, and choline-containing compounds in the hippocampus by means of hydrogen 1 magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. We hypothesized that if ECT-induced memory deterioration was associated with neuronal loss in the hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate signal would decrease after ECT and any increased membrane turnover would result in an increase in the signal from choline-containing compounds. Seventeen patients received complete courses of ECT, during which repeated proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging studies of the hippocampal region were performed. Individual changes during the course of ECT were compared with values obtained in 24 healthy control subjects and 6 patients remitted from major depression without ECT. No changes in the hippocampal N-acetylaspartate signals were detected after ECT. A significant mean increase of 16% of the signal from choline-containing compounds after 5 or more ECT treatments was observed. Despite the mostly unilateral ECT application (14 of 17 patients), the increase in the choline-containing compound signal was observed bilaterally. Lactate or elevated lipid signals were not detected. All patients showed clinical amelioration of depression after ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy is not likely to induce hippocampal atrophy or cell death, which would be reflected by a decrease in the N-acetylaspartate signal. Compared with an age-matched control group, the choline-containing compounds signal in patients with a major depressive episode was significantly lower than normal, before ECT and normalized during ECT.

  11. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros [Livermore, CA; Staggs, Michael C [Tracy, CA

    2006-12-12

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  12. Raman Spectroscopic Imaging of the Whole Ciona intestinalis Embryo during Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Mitsuru J.; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular composition and the distribution of bio-molecules play central roles in the specification of cell fates and morphogenesis during embryogenesis. Consequently, investigation of changes in the expression and distribution of bio-molecules, especially mRNAs and proteins, is an important challenge in developmental biology. Raman spectroscopic imaging, a non-invasive and label-free technique, allows simultaneous imaging of the intracellular composition and distribution of multiple bio-molecules. In this study, we explored the application of Raman spectroscopic imaging in the whole Ciona intestinalis embryo during development. Analysis of Raman spectra scattered from C. intestinalis embryos revealed a number of localized patterns of high Raman intensity within the embryo. Based on the observed distribution of bio-molecules, we succeeded in identifying the location and structure of differentiated muscle and endoderm within the whole embryo, up to the tailbud stage, in a label-free manner. Furthermore, during cell differentiation, we detected significant differences in cell state between muscle/endoderm daughter cells and daughter cells with other fates that had divided from the same mother cells; this was achieved by focusing on the Raman intensity of single Raman bands at 1002 or 1526 cm−1, respectively. This study reports the first application of Raman spectroscopic imaging to the study of identifying and characterizing differentiating tissues in a whole chordate embryo. Our results suggest that Raman spectroscopic imaging is a feasible label-free technique for investigating the developmental process of the whole embryo of C. intestinalis. PMID:23977129

  13. How spectroscopic x-ray imaging benefits from inter-pixel communication

    CERN Document Server

    Koenig, Thomas; Hamann, Elias; Cecilia, Angelica; Ballabriga, Rafael; Campbell, Michael; Ruat, Marie; Tlustos, Lukas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic x-ray imaging based on pixellated semiconductor detectors can be sensitive to charge sharing and K-fluorescence, depending on the sensor material used, its thickness and the pixel pitch employed. As a consequence, spectroscopic resolution is partially lost. In this paper, we study a new detector ASIC, the Medipix3RX, that offers a novel feature called charge summing, which is established by making adjacent pixels communicate with each other. Consequently, single photon interactions resulting in multiple hits are almost completely avoided. We investigate this charge summing mode with respect to those of its imaging properties that are of interest in medical physics and benchmark them against the case without charge summing. In particular, we review its influence on spectroscopic resolution and find that the low energy bias normally present when recording energy spectra is dramatically reduced. Furthermore, we show that charge summing provides a modulation transfer function which is almost indepen...

  14. Solar Flares Observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Solar flares are impressive examples of explosive energy release in unconfined, magnetized plasma. It is generally believed that the flare energy is derived from the coronal magnetic field. However, we have not been able to establish the specific energy release mechanism(s) or the relative partitioning of the released energy between heating, particle acceleration (electrons and ions), and mass motions. NASA's RHESSI Mission was designed to study the acceleration and evolution of electrons and ions in flares by observing the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions these energetic particles produce. This is accomplished through the combination of high-resolution spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, including the first images of flares in gamma rays. RHESSI has observed over 12,000 solar flares since its launch on February 5, 2002. I will demonstrate how we use the RHESSI spectra to deduce physical properties of accelerated electrons and hot plasma in flares. Using images to estimate volumes, w e typically find that the total energy in accelerated electrons is comparable to that in the thermal plasma. I will also present flare observations that provide strong support for the presence of magnetic reconnection in a large-scale, vertical current sheet in the solar corona. RHESSI observations such as these are allowing us to probe more deeply into the physics of solar flares.

  15. Correlated topographic and spectroscopic imaging by combined atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Dehong; Micic, Miodrag; Klymyshyn, Nicholas; Suh, Y.D.; Lu, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    Near-field scanning microscopy is a powerful approach to obtain topographic and spectroscopic characterization simultaneously for imaging biological and nanoscale systems. To achieve optical imaging at high spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit, aperture-less metallic scanning tips have been utilized to enhance the laser illumination local electromagnetic field at the apex of the scanning tips. In this paper, we discuss and review our work on combined fluorescence imaging with AFM-metallic tip enhancement, finite element method simulation of the tip enhancement, and their applications on AFM-tip enhanced fluorescence lifetime imaging (AFM-FLIM) and correlated AFM and FLIM imaging of the living cells

  16. Spectroscopic magnetic resonance imaging of a tumefactive demyelinating lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, M.; Meltzer, D.E.; Cha, S. [MRI Department, Department of Radiology, New York University Medical Center, Schwartz Building, Basement HCC, 530 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions can present with features similar, clinically and radiologically, to those of brain tumours. Proton MR spectroscopy has been increasingly used to characterize intracranial pathology. As the underlying pathophysiology of neoplasms is different from that of demyelinating disease, one may expect the metabolic composition of neoplasms to be significantly different from that of demyelinating lesions. We report a 49-year-old woman in whom the neurologic and radiologic findings were highly suggestive of a high-grade brain tumor, and the spectroscopic features were sufficiently similar to that of a tumor to convince the neurosurgeon to operate. This case emphasizes the need for caution when confronted with a patient who presents with a differential diagnosis of demyelinating lesion versus neoplasm. (orig.)

  17. Metabolite ratios in 1H MR spectroscopic imaging of the prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobus, T.; Wright, A.J.; Weiland, E.; Heerschap, A.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    In (1)H MR spectroscopic imaging ((1)H-MRSI) of the prostate the spatial distribution of the signal levels of the metabolites choline, creatine, polyamines, and citrate are assessed. The ratio of choline (plus spermine as the main polyamine) plus creatine over citrate [(Cho+(Spm+)Cr)/Cit] is derived

  18. Changes in NAA and lactate following ischemic stroke: a serial MR spectroscopic imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Maniega, S; Cvoro, V; Chappell, F M; Armitage, P A; Marshall, I; Bastin, M E; Wardlaw, J M

    2008-12-09

    Although much tissue damage may occur within the first few hours of ischemic stroke, the duration of tissue injury is not well defined. We assessed the temporal pattern of neuronal loss and ischemia after ischemic stroke using magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). We measured N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and lactate in 51 patients with acute ischemic stroke at five time points, from admission to 3 months, in voxels classified as normal, possibly or definitely abnormal (ischemic) according to the appearance of the stroke lesion on the admission DWI. We compared changes in NAA and lactate in different voxel classes using linear mixed models. NAA was significantly reduced from admission in definitely and possibly abnormal (p < 0.01) compared to contralateral normal voxels, reaching a nadir by 2 weeks and remaining reduced at 3 months. Lactate was significantly increased in definitely and possibly abnormal voxels (p < 0.01) during the first 5 days, falling to normal at 2 weeks, rising again later in these voxels. The progressive fall in N-acetylaspartate suggests that some additional neuronal death may continue beyond the first few hours for up to 2 weeks or longer. The mechanism is unclear but, if correct, then it is possible that interventions to limit this ongoing subacute tissue damage might add to the benefit of hyperacute treatment, making further improvements in outcome possible.

  19. Fiber optic spectroscopic digital imaging sensor and method for flame properties monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelepouga, Serguei A [Hoffman Estates, IL; Rue, David M [Chicago, IL; Saveliev, Alexei V [Chicago, IL

    2011-03-15

    A system for real-time monitoring of flame properties in combustors and gasifiers which includes an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end and a spectroscopic imaging system operably connected with the light output end of the imaging fiber optic bundle. Focusing of the light received by the light receiving end of the imaging fiber optic bundle by a wall disposed between the light receiving end of the fiber optic bundle and a light source, which wall forms a pinhole opening aligned with the light receiving end.

  20. Spectroscopic imaging technologies for online food safety and sanitation inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Microbial and Food Safety Laboratory, ARS, USDA is one of the leading groups for the development of optoelectronic sensing technologies and methodologies for food quality, safety, and sanitation inspection. High throughput hyperspectral and multispectral imaging techniques use Ram...

  1. Localised proton spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging in cerebral gliomas, with comparison to positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Go, K.G.; Kamman, R.L.; Mooyaart, E.L.; Heesters, M.A.A.M.; Pruim, J.; Vaalburg, W.; Paans, A.M.J.

    1995-01-01

    In 32 patients with gliomas, one- and two-dimensional proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) has been conducted, the latter allowing reconstruction of spectroscopic data into a spectroscopic image (MRSI), showing the distribution of the various metabolite concentrations over the cross-sectional plane. For lack of absolute concentrations, the measured concentrations of phosphocholine (CHOL), N-acetyl-L-aspartate (NAA), and lactate (LAC) were conventionally expressed in ratios relative to that of creatine (CREAT). Compared to normal brain tissue, an increased CHOL/CREAT ratio was found in all groups of tumours, in glioblastomas, high-, middle- and low-grade astrocytomas both at the margin and the core of the tumours, but in oligodendrogliomas only at the margin. This is consistent with an increased phosphocholine turnover in relation to membrane biosynthesis by the proliferating cells. The NAA/CREAT ratio was decreased in all groups of tumours, both in the centre and at the margin, reflecting replacement of functioning neurons by neoplastic cells. The LAC/CREAT ratio was elevated in the core of malignant gliomas, which may be the result of a prevailing glycolysis, characteristic of tumours, possibly in conjunction with hypoxia/ischaemia. In the perifocal oedema, there was neither elevation of the CHOL/CREAT ratio nor decrease of the NAA/CREAT ratio; an increased LAC/CREAT ratio therefore rather reflected ischaemia/hypoxia probably due to locally elevated pressure and compromised regional perfusion. In the normal brain, the metabolite ratios of grey matter did not differ from those of white matter. The frontal lobe and basal ganglia showed lower NAA/CREAT ratios than the other cerebral areas. In 7 patients positron emission tomography was also performed with [ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 FDG) or L-[1- 11 C]-tyrosine ( 11 C-TYR); the latter demonstrated a pattern of 11 C-TYR uptake similar to that of CHOL elevation in the MRSI. (orig.)

  2. Role of endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in two different Gleason scores in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Margolis, Daniel; McClure, Tim; Raman, Steve; Thomas, M Albert

    2011-01-01

    The major goal of the work was to record three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and to compare metabolite ratios between different Gleason scores (GS). MRSI localized by endorectal coil-acquired point-resolved spectroscopy was performed in 14 men with prostate cancer of GS 6 (n = 7) and 7 (n = 7) using a 1.5-tesla MRI scanner. The ratio of (choline + creatine)/citrate was increased with an increase of GS, i.e. 0.590 ± 0.171 in the target lesion and 0.321 ± 0.157 in the contralateral region of patients with a GS of 6 as opposed to 1.082 ± 0.432 in the target lesion and 0.360 ± 0.243 in the contralateral region of patients with a GS of 7. Our pilot results demonstrated that MRSI was an additional biochemical tool which is complementary to the current imaging modalities for early diagnosis and therapeutic management of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Automated prescription of oblique brain 3D magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhinsky, Eugene; Vigneron, Daniel B; Chang, Susan M; Nelson, Sarah J

    2013-04-01

    Two major difficulties encountered in implementing Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) in a clinical setting are limited coverage and difficulty in prescription. The goal of this project was to automate completely the process of 3D PRESS MRSI prescription, including placement of the selection box, saturation bands and shim volume, while maximizing the coverage of the brain. The automated prescription technique included acquisition of an anatomical MRI image, optimization of the oblique selection box parameters, optimization of the placement of outer-volume suppression saturation bands, and loading of the calculated parameters into a customized 3D MRSI pulse sequence. To validate the technique and compare its performance with existing protocols, 3D MRSI data were acquired from six exams from three healthy volunteers. To assess the performance of the automated 3D MRSI prescription for patients with brain tumors, the data were collected from 16 exams from 8 subjects with gliomas. This technique demonstrated robust coverage of the tumor, high consistency of prescription and very good data quality within the T2 lesion. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Initial results of 3-dimensional 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the localization of prostate cancer at 3 Tesla: should we use an endorectal coil?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakar, D.; Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Huisman, H.J.; Barentsz, J.O.; Futterer, J.J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of 3 Tesla, 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in the localization of prostate cancer (PCa) with and without the use of an endorectal coil (ERC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our prospective study

  5. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging and multivariate regression for prediction of proteoglycan content of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassi Rieppo

    Full Text Available Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging has been earlier applied for the spatial estimation of the collagen and the proteoglycan (PG contents of articular cartilage (AC. However, earlier studies have been limited to the use of univariate analysis techniques. Current analysis methods lack the needed specificity for collagen and PGs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of partial least squares regression (PLSR and principal component regression (PCR methods for the analysis of the PG content of AC. Multivariate regression models were compared with earlier used univariate methods and tested with a sample material consisting of healthy and enzymatically degraded steer AC. Chondroitinase ABC enzyme was used to increase the variation in PG content levels as compared to intact AC. Digital densitometric measurements of Safranin O-stained sections provided the reference for PG content. The results showed that multivariate regression models predict PG content of AC significantly better than earlier used absorbance spectrum (i.e. the area of carbohydrate region with or without amide I normalization or second derivative spectrum univariate parameters. Increased molecular specificity favours the use of multivariate regression models, but they require more knowledge of chemometric analysis and extended laboratory resources for gathering reference data for establishing the models. When true molecular specificity is required, the multivariate models should be used.

  6. 1H-MR-spectroscopic imaging in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, W.; Traeber, F.; Kuhl, C.K.; Fric, M.; Keller, E.; Lamerichs, R.; Rink, H.; Moeller, H.J.; Schild, H.H.

    1995-01-01

    To detect regional differences in accompanying metabolic changes, 1 H-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging was performed in 16 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD); the clinical diagnosis was based upon DSM-III-R and NINCDS-ADRDA guidelines. In the hippocampal region metabolic maps of the local distribution of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), creatine compounds (P(Cr)) and lactate were determined. Ratios of Cho/NAA, (P)Cr/NAA and Cho/(P)Cr calculated from selected hippocampal spectra were compared to those from healthy volunteers (n=17). AD patients demonstrated an increase of Cho/NAA and (P)Cr/NAA ratios caused by increased choline compounds and decreased NAA. These alterations were observed in 11/12 cases in the hippocampal and in 7/12 in the temporo-occipital region. Hippocampal Cho/NAA ratios (0.56±0.19) were significantly elevated compared with controls. The observed elevation of choline compounds in the hippocampus supports the hypothesis that alterations in the cholinergic system play an important role in Alzheimer's disease. The observed reduction of NAA is due to neuronal degeneration. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Recent advances in the applications of vibrational spectroscopic imaging and mapping to pharmaceutical formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Andrew V.; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2018-05-01

    Vibrational spectroscopic imaging and mapping approaches have continued in their development and applications for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulations. Obtaining spatially resolved chemical information about the distribution of different components within pharmaceutical formulations is integral for improving the understanding and quality of final drug products. This review aims to summarise some key advances of these technologies over recent years, primarily since 2010. An overview of FTIR, NIR, terahertz spectroscopic imaging and Raman mapping will be presented to give a perspective of the current state-of-the-art of these techniques for studying pharmaceutical samples. This will include their application to reveal spatial information of components that reveals molecular insight of polymorphic or structural changes, behaviour of formulations during dissolution experiments, uniformity of materials and detection of counterfeit products. Furthermore, new advancements will be presented that demonstrate the continuing novel applications of spectroscopic imaging and mapping, namely in FTIR spectroscopy, for studies of microfluidic devices. Whilst much of the recently developed work has been reported by academic groups, examples of the potential impacts of utilising these imaging and mapping technologies to support industrial applications have also been reviewed.

  8. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons

  9. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.

  10. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging at 7 T in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagemaat, Miriam W; Vos, Eline K; Maas, Marnix C; Bitz, Andreas K; Orzada, Stephan; van Uden, Mark J; Kobus, Thiele; Heerschap, Arend; Scheenen, Tom W J

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify characteristics of phosphorus (P) spectra of the human prostate and to investigate changes of individual phospholipid metabolites in prostate cancer through in vivo P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) at 7 T. In this institutional review board-approved study, 15 patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and 3-dimensional P MRSI at 7 T. Voxels were selected at the tumor location, in normal-appearing peripheral zone tissue, normal-appearing transition zone tissue, and in the base of the prostate close to the seminal vesicles. Phosphorus metabolite ratios were determined and compared between tissue types. Signals of phosphoethanolamine (PE) and phosphocholine (PC) were present and well resolved in most P spectra in the prostate. Glycerophosphocholine signals were observable in 43% of the voxels in malignant tissue, but in only 10% of the voxels in normal-appearing tissue away from the seminal vesicles. In many spectra, independent of tissue type, 2 peaks resonated in the chemical shift range of inorganic phosphate, possibly representing 2 separate pH compartments. The PC/PE ratio in the seminal vesicles was highly elevated compared with the prostate in 5 patients. A considerable overlap of P metabolite ratios was found between prostate cancer and normal-appearing prostate tissue, preventing direct discrimination of these tissues. The only 2 patients with high Gleason scores tumors (≥4+5) presented with high PC and glycerophosphocholine levels in their cancer lesions. Phosphorus MRSI at 7 T shows distinct features of phospholipid metabolites in the prostate gland and its surrounding structures. In this exploratory study, no differences in P metabolite ratios were observed between prostate cancer and normal-appearing prostate tissue possibly because of the partial volume effects of small tumor foci in large MRSI voxels.

  11. Spectroscopic imaging of the pilocarpine model of human epilepsy suggests that early NAA reduction predicts epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, W A; Lado, F A; de Lanerolle, N C; Takahashi, K; Pan, C; Hetherington, H P

    2007-08-01

    Reduced hippocampal N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) is commonly observed in patients with advanced, chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). It is unclear, however, whether an NAA deficit is also present during the clinically quiescent latent period that characterizes early TLE. This question has important implications for the use of MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in the early identification of patients at risk for TLE. To determine whether NAA is diminished during the latent period, we obtained high-resolution (1)H spectroscopic imaging during the latent period of the rat pilocarpine model of human TLE. We used actively detuneable surface reception and volume transmission coils to enhance sensitivity and a semiautomated voxel shifting method to accurately position voxels within the hippocampi. During the latent period, 2 and 7 d following pilocarpine treatment, hippocampal NAA was significantly reduced by 27.5 +/- 6.9% (P NAA deficit is not due to neuron loss and therefore likely represents metabolic impairment of hippocampal neurons during the latent phase. Therefore, spectroscopic imaging provides an early marker for metabolic dysfunction in this model of TLE.

  12. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  13. X-ray imaging spectroscopic diagnostics on Nike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Ralchenko, Yu.

    2017-10-01

    Electron temperature and density diagnostics of the laser plasma produced within the focal spot of the NRL's Nike laser are being explored with the help of X-ray imaging spectroscopy. Spectra of He-like and H-like ions were taken by Nike focusing spectrometers in a range of lower (1.8 kev, Si XIV) and higher (6.7 kev, Fe XXV) x-ray energies. Data that were obtained with spatial resolution were translated into the temperature and density as functions of distance from the target. As an example electron density was determined from He-like satellites to Ly-alpha in Si XIV. The dielectronic satellites with intensity ratios that are sensitive to collisional transfer of population between different triplet groups of double-excited states 2l2l' in Si XIII were observed with high spatial and spectral resolution Lineouts taken at different axial distances from the planar Si target show changing spectral shapes due to the different electron densities as determined by supporting non-LTE simulations. These shapes are relatively insensitive to the plasma temperature which was measured using different spectral lines. This work was supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  14. Application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry for characterization of gold reduction from organometallic compound by means of plasma jet technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodák, Jiří, E-mail: jiri.vodak@yahoo.com [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Nečas, David [RG Plasma Technologies, CEITEC Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Pavliňák, David [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Macak, Jan M [Center of Materials and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Nám. Čs. Legií 565, 530 02 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Řičica, Tomáš; Jambor, Roman [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentská 573, 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Ohlídal, Miloslav [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics, Faculty of Mining and Geology, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Metallic gold is reduced from an organometallic compound layer using a plasma jet. • Imaging spectroscopic reflectometry is used to locate areas with metallic gold. • The results are completed with XPS and optical microscopy observations. - Abstract: This work presents a new application of imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to determine a distribution of metallic gold in a layer of an organogold precursor which was treated by a plasma jet. Gold layers were prepared by spin coating from a solution of the precursor containing a small amount of polyvinylpyrrolidone on a microscopy glass, then they were vacuum dried. A difference between reflectivity of metallic gold and the precursor was utilized by imaging spectroscopic reflectometry to create a map of metallic gold distribution using a newly developed model of the studied sample. The basic principle of the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry is also shown together with the data acquisition principles. XPS measurements and microscopy observations were made to complete the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry results. It is proved that the imaging spectroscopic reflectometry represents a new method for quantitative evaluation of local reduction of metallic components from metaloorganic compounds.

  15. Combined spectroscopic imaging and chemometric approach for automatically partitioning tissue types in human prostate tissue biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Kidder, Linda H.; Lewis, E. Neil

    2001-07-01

    We have applied Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging, coupling a mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) focal plane array detector (FPA) and a Michelson step scan interferometer, to the investigation of various states of malignant human prostate tissue. The MCT FPA used consists of 64x64 pixels, each 61 micrometers 2, and has a spectral range of 2-10.5 microns. Each imaging data set was collected at 16-1 resolution, resulting in 512 image planes and a total of 4096 interferograms. In this article we describe a method for separating different tissue types contained within FTIR spectroscopic imaging data sets of human prostate tissue biopsies. We present images, generated by the Fuzzy C-Means clustering algorithm, which demonstrate the successful partitioning of distinct tissue type domains. Additionally, analysis of differences in the centroid spectra corresponding to different tissue types provides an insight into their biochemical composition. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to partition tissue type regions in a different data set using centroid spectra calculated from the original data set. This has implications for the use of the Fuzzy C-Means algorithm as an automated technique for the separation and examination of tissue domains in biopsy samples.

  16. Sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Wald, Lawrence L; Belliveau, John W; Posse, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provides spatially resolved metabolite information that is invaluable for both neuroscience studies and clinical applications. However, lengthy data acquisition times, which are a result of time-consuming phase encoding, represent a major challenge for MRSI. Fast MRSI pulse sequences that use echo-planar readout gradients, such as proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI), are capable of fast spectral-spatial encoding and thus enable acceleration of image acquisition times. Combining PEPSI with recent advances in parallel MRI utilizing RF coil arrays can further accelerate MRSI data acquisition. Here we investigate the feasibility of ultrafast spectroscopic imaging at high field (3T and 4T) by combining PEPSI with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) MRI using eight-channel head coil arrays. We show that the acquisition of single-average SENSE-PEPSI data at a short TE (15 ms) can be accelerated to 32 s or less, depending on the field strength, to obtain metabolic images of choline (Cho), creatine (Cre), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), and J-coupled metabolites (e.g., glutamate (Glu) and inositol (Ino)) with acceptable spectral quality and localization. The experimentally measured reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) of metabolite resonances were well explained by both the g-factor and reduced measurement times. Thus, this technology is a promising means of reducing the scan times of 3D acquisitions and time-resolved 2D measurements. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Mid-infrared fiber-coupled supercontinuum spectroscopic imaging using a tapered chalcogenide photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg Petersen, Christian; Prtljaga, Nikola; Farries, Mark; Ward, Jon; Napier, Bruce; Lloyd, Gavin Rhys; Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Stone, Nick; Bang, Ole

    2018-02-01

    We present the first demonstration of mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging of human tissue using a fiber-coupled supercontinuum source spanning from 2-7.5 μm. The supercontinuum was generated in a tapered large mode area chalcogenide photonic crystal fiber in order to obtain broad bandwidth, high average power, and single-mode output for good imaging properties. Tissue imaging was demonstrated in transmission by raster scanning over a sub-mm region of paraffinized colon tissue on CaF2 substrate, and the signal was measured using a fiber-coupled grating spectrometer. This demonstration has shown that we can distinguish between epithelial and surrounding connective tissues within a paraffinized section of colon tissue by imaging at discrete wavelengths related to distinct chemical absorption features.

  18. Organ-confined prostate cancer: effect of prior transrectal biopsy on endorectal MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, Aliya; Coakley, F.V.; Lu, Y.; Olpin, J.D.; Wu, L.; Yeh, B.M.; Carroll, P.R.; Kurhanewicz, J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to determine the effect of prior transrectal biopsy on endorectal MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging findings in patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Endorectal MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging were performed in 43 patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy confirming organ-confined disease. For each sextant, two independent reviewers scored the degree of hemorrhage on a scale from 1 to 5 and recorded the presence or absence of capsular irregularity. A spectroscopist recorded the number of spectrally degraded voxels in the peripheral zone. The outcome variables of capsular irregularity and spectral degradation were correlated with the predictor variables of time from biopsy and degree of hemorrhage after biopsy. Results: Capsular irregularity was unrelated to time from biopsy or to degree of hemorrhage. Spectral degradation was inversely related to time from biopsy (p < 0.01); the mean percentage of degraded peripheral zone voxels was 18.5% within 8 weeks of biopsy compared with 7% after 8 weeks. Spectral degradation was unrelated to the degree of hemorrhage. Conclusion: In organ-confined prostate cancer, capsular irregularity can be seen at any time after biopsy and is independent of the degree of hemorrhage, whereas spectral degradation is seen predominantly in the first 8 weeks after biopsy. MRI staging criteria and guidelines for scheduling studies after biopsy may require appropriate modification. (author)

  19. Multi-voxel MR spectroscopic imaging of the brain: utility in clinical setting-initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Hemant; Lim, Tchoyoson C.C.; Yin Hong; Chua, Violet; Khin, Lay-Wai; Raidy, Tom; Hui, Francis

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Compared to single voxel methods, MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of the brain provides metabolic information with improved anatomical coverage and spectral resolution, but may be difficult to perform in the clinical setting. We evaluate the factors influencing spectral quality in MRSI using a semi-automated method, focussing on lipid contamination, and phase correction errors related to magnetic field inhomogeneity. Methods: We retrospectively analysed MRSI studies planned by radiologists and radiographers. Two-dimensional MRSI studies using point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) localisation, at long echo time (135 or 144 ms) were acquired on a 1.5 T scanner. Studies that contained lipid contamination and abnormally inverted spectra were reviewed and the latter correlated with anatomic location at the base of skull, and with the area of the region of interest (ROI) studied. Results: Of 128 consecutive MRSI studies, six showed abnormal inverted spectra, of which four were acquired at the base of skull. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that study location at the base of skull, but not larger ROI, was a significant predictor for the risk of being affected by inverted spectra (RR for base of skull: 11.76, 95% CI: 1.86-74.18, P = 0.009. RR for area of ROI: 3.68, 95% CI: 0.57-23.67, P = 0.170). Seven studies showed lipid contamination; all were in close proximity to the overlying scalp. Conclusion: Using a semi-automated acquisition and post-processing method, MRSI can be successfully applied in the clinical setting. However, care should be taken to avoid regions of high magnetic field inhomogeneity at the base of skull, and lipid contamination in voxels prescribed near the scalp

  20. An important step forward in continuous spectroscopic imaging of ionising radiations using ASICs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessler, P. [11 rue Rabelais, 92170 Vanves (France); Coffin, J. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Eberle, H. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Raad Iseli, C. de [Smart Silicon Systems SA, Ch. de la Graviere 6, CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hilt, B. [Universite de Haute-Alsace, GRPHE, 61, rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse (France); Huss, D. [Universite de Haute-Alsace, GRPHE, 61, rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse (France); Krummenacher, F. [Smart Silicon Systems SA, Ch. de la Graviere 6, CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Lutz, J.R. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Prevot, G. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Renouprez, A. [Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne (France); Sigward, M.H. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Schwaller, B. [Universite de Haute-Alsace, GRPHE, 61, rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse (France); Voltolini, C. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    1999-01-21

    Characterization results are given for an original ASIC allowing continuous acquisition of ionising radiation images in spectroscopic mode. Ionising radiation imaging in general and spectroscopic imaging in particular must primarily be guided by the attempt to decrease statistical noise, which requires detection systems designed to allow very high counting rates. Any source of dead time must therefore be avoided. Thus, the use of on-line corrections of the inevitable dispersion of characteristics between the large number of electronic channels of the detection system, shall be precluded. Without claiming to achieve ultimate noise levels, the work described is focused on how to prevent good individual acquisition channel noise performance from being totally destroyed by the dispersion between channels without introducing dead times. With this goal, we developed an automatic charge amplifier output voltage offset compensation system which operates regardless of the cause of the offset (detector or electronic). The main performances of the system are the following: the input equivalent noise charge is 190 e rms (input non connected, peaking time 500 ns), the highest gain is 255 mV/fC, the peaking time is adjustable between 200 ns and 2 {mu}s and the power consumption is 10 mW per channel. The agreement between experimental data and theoretical simulation results is excellent.

  1. An important step forward in continuous spectroscopic imaging of ionising radiations using ASICs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessler, P.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Raad Iseli, C. de; Hilt, B.; Huss, D.; Krummenacher, F.; Lutz, J.R.; Prevot, G.; Renouprez, A.; Sigward, M.H.; Schwaller, B.; Voltolini, C.

    1999-01-01

    Characterization results are given for an original ASIC allowing continuous acquisition of ionising radiation images in spectroscopic mode. Ionising radiation imaging in general and spectroscopic imaging in particular must primarily be guided by the attempt to decrease statistical noise, which requires detection systems designed to allow very high counting rates. Any source of dead time must therefore be avoided. Thus, the use of on-line corrections of the inevitable dispersion of characteristics between the large number of electronic channels of the detection system, shall be precluded. Without claiming to achieve ultimate noise levels, the work described is focused on how to prevent good individual acquisition channel noise performance from being totally destroyed by the dispersion between channels without introducing dead times. With this goal, we developed an automatic charge amplifier output voltage offset compensation system which operates regardless of the cause of the offset (detector or electronic). The main performances of the system are the following: the input equivalent noise charge is 190 e rms (input non connected, peaking time 500 ns), the highest gain is 255 mV/fC, the peaking time is adjustable between 200 ns and 2 μs and the power consumption is 10 mW per channel. The agreement between experimental data and theoretical simulation results is excellent

  2. A Compton camera for spectroscopic imaging from 100 keV to 1 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earnhart, J.R.D.

    1998-01-01

    A review of spectroscopic imaging issues, applications, and technology is presented. Compton cameras based on solid state semiconductor detectors stands out as the best system for the nondestructive assay of special nuclear materials. A camera for this application has been designed based on an efficient specific purpose Monte Carlo code developed for this project. Preliminary experiments have been performed which demonstrate the validity of the Compton camera concept and the accuracy of the code. Based on these results, a portable prototype system is in development. Proposed future work is addressed

  3. Prostate cancer in magnetic resonance imaging: diagnostic utilites of spectroscopic sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caivano, Rocchina; Cirillo, Patrizia; Lotumolo, Antonella; Fortunato, Giovanna; Zandolino, Alexis; Cammarota, Aldo; Balestra, Antonio; Macarini, Luca; Vita, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our work is to determine the efficacy of a combined study 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3T MRI), with phased-array coil, for the detection of prostate cancer using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI) in identifying doubt nodules. In this study, we prospectively studied 46 patients who consecutively underwent digital-rectal exploration for high doses of prostate specific antigen (PSA), as well as a MRI examination and a subsequent rectal biopsy. The study of magnetic resonance imaging was performed with a Philips Achieva 3T scanner and phased-array coil. The images were obtained with turbo spin-echo sequences T2-weighted images, T1-weighted before and after the administration of contrast medium, DWI sequences and 3D spectroscopic sequences. The ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy was performed approximately 15 days after the MRI. The data obtained from MR images and spectroscopy were correlated with histological data. MRI revealed sensitivity and specificity of 88% and 61% respectively and positive predictive value (PPV) of 73%, negative predicted value (NPV) of 81% and accuracy of 76%. In identifying the location of prostate cancer, the sensitivity of 3T MRS was 92%, with a specificity of 89%, PPV of 87%, NPV of 88% and accuracy of 87%; DWI showed a sensitivity of 88%, specificity of 61%, PPV of 73%, NPV of 81% and accuracy of 76%. The 3T MR study with phased-array coil and the use of DWI and spectroscopic sequences, in addition to T2-weighted sequences, revealed to be accurate in the diagnosis of prostate cancer and in the identification of nodules to be biopsied. It may be indicated as a resolute way before biopsy in patients with elevated PSA value and can be proposed in the staging and follow-up.

  4. Quantitative mapping of total choline in healthy human breast using proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenguang; Bolan, Patrick J; Royce, Melanie; Lakkadi, Navneeth; Eberhardt, Steven; Sillerud, Laurel; Lee, Sang-Joon; Posse, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    To quantitatively measure tCho levels in healthy breasts using Proton-Echo-Planar-Spectroscopic-Imaging (PEPSI). The two-dimensional mapping of tCho at 3 Tesla across an entire breast slice using PEPSI and a hybrid spectral quantification method based on LCModel fitting and integration of tCho using the fitted spectrum were developed. This method was validated in 19 healthy females and compared with single voxel spectroscopy (SVS) and with PRESS prelocalized conventional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) using identical voxel size (8 cc) and similar scan times (∼7 min). A tCho peak with a signal to noise ratio larger than 2 was detected in 10 subjects using both PEPSI and SVS. The average tCho concentration in these subjects was 0.45 ± 0.2 mmol/kg using PEPSI and 0.48 ± 0.3 mmol/kg using SVS. Comparable results were obtained in two subjects using conventional MRSI. High lipid content in the spectra of nine tCho negative subjects was associated with spectral line broadening of more than 26 Hz, which made tCho detection impossible. Conventional MRSI with PRESS prelocalization in glandular tissue in two of these subjects yielded tCho concentrations comparable to PEPSI. The detection sensitivity of PEPSI is comparable to SVS and conventional PRESS-MRSI. PEPSI can be potentially used in the evaluation of tCho in breast cancer. A tCho threshold concentration value of ∼0.7 mmol/kg might be used to differentiate between cancerous and healthy (or benign) breast tissues based on this work and previous studies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Dual-wavelength differential spectroscopic imaging for diagnostics of laser-induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motto-Ros, V., E-mail: vincent.motto-ros@univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Ma, Q.L. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Gregoire, S. [CRITT Matriaux Alsace, 19 rue de St Junien, 67300 Schiltigheim (France); Lei, W.Q.; Wang, X.C. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Pelascini, F.; Surma, F. [CRITT Matriaux Alsace, 19 rue de St Junien, 67300 Schiltigheim (France); Detalle, V. [Laboratoire de Recherche des Monuments Historiques, 29 rue de Paris, 77420 Champs-sur-Marne (France); Yu, J. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France)

    2012-08-15

    A specific configuration for plasma fast spectroscopic imaging was developed, where a pair of narrowband filters, one fitting an emission line of a species to be studied and the other out of its emission line, allowed double images to be taken for a laser-induced plasma. A dedicated software was developed for the subtraction between the double images. The result represents therefore the monochromatic emission image of the species in the plasma. We have shown in this work that such configuration is especially efficient for the monitoring of a plasma generated under the atmospheric pressure at very short delays after the impact of the laser pulse on the target, when a strong continuum emission is observed. The efficiency of the technique has been particularly demonstrated in the study of laser-induced plasma on a polymer target. Molecular species, such as C{sub 2} and CN, as well as atomic species, such as C and N, were imaged starting from 50 ns after the laser impact. Moreover space segregation of different species, atomic or molecular, inside of the plasma was clearly observed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imaging to study species with time and space resolution in laser induced plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Image display of multiple species is proposed based on RGB color model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular emission (CN and C{sub 2}) is observed at very short delays (50 ns). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Segregation of different species inside the plasma is clearly established.

  6. Early detection of chemotherapy-refractory patients by monitoring textural alterations in diffuse optical spectroscopic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Czarnota, Gregory J., E-mail: Gregory.Czarnota@sunnybrook.ca [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Vorauer, Eric [Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Chin, Lee [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tran, William T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Wright, Frances C. [Division of General Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Gandhi, Sonal [Division of Medical Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, and Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Yaffe, Martin J. [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Changes in textural characteristics of diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) functional images, accompanied by alterations in their mean values, are demonstrated here for the first time as early surrogates of ultimate treatment response in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). NAC, as a standard component of treatment for LABC patient, induces measurable heterogeneous changes in tumor metabolism which were evaluated using DOS-based metabolic maps. This study characterizes such inhomogeneous nature of response development, by determining alterations in textural properties of DOS images apparent at early stages of therapy, followed later by gross changes in mean values of these functional metabolic maps. Methods: Twelve LABC patients undergoing NAC were scanned before and at four times after treatment initiation, and tomographic DOS images were reconstructed at each time. Ultimate responses of patients were determined clinically and pathologically, based on a reduction in tumor size and assessment of residual tumor cellularity. The mean-value parameters and textural features were extracted from volumetric DOS images for several functional and metabolic parameters prior to the treatment initiation. Changes in these DOS-based biomarkers were also monitored over the course of treatment. The measured biomarkers were applied to differentiate patient responses noninvasively and compared to clinical and pathologic responses. Results: Responding and nonresponding patients demonstrated different changes in DOS-based textural and mean-value parameters during chemotherapy. Whereas none of the biomarkers measured prior the start of therapy demonstrated a significant difference between the two patient populations, statistically significant differences were observed at week one after treatment initiation using the relative change in contrast/homogeneity of seven functional maps (0.001 < p < 0.049), and mean value of water

  7. Characterization of intact subcellular bodies in whole bacteria by cryo-electron tomography and spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolli, L R; Kundmann, M; Downing, K H

    2006-07-01

    We illustrate the combined use of cryo-electron tomography and spectroscopic difference imaging in the study of subcellular structure and subcellular bodies in whole bacteria. We limited our goal and focus to bodies with a distinct elemental composition that was in a sufficiently high concentration to provide the necessary signal-to-noise level at the relatively large sample thicknesses of the intact cell. This combination proved very powerful, as demonstrated by the identification of a phosphorus-rich body in Caulobacter crescentus. We also confirmed the presence of a body rich in carbon, demonstrated that these two types of bodies are readily recognized and distinguished from each other, and provided, for the first time to our knowledge, structural information about them in their intact state. In addition, we also showed the presence of a similar type of phosphorus-rich body in Deinococcus grandis, a member of a completely unrelated bacteria genus. Cryo-electron microscopy and tomography allowed the study of the biogenesis and morphology of these bodies at resolutions better than 10 nm, whereas spectroscopic difference imaging provided a direct identification of their chemical composition.

  8. Characterization of cytochrome c as marker for retinal cell degeneration by uv/vis spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmach, Julia; Schweizer, Julia; Steiner, Gerald; Knels, Lilla; Funk, Richard H. W.; Thalheim, Silko; Koch, Edmund

    2011-07-01

    Retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration have become an important cause of visual loss depending on increasing life expectancy and lifestyle habits. Due to the fact that no satisfying treatment exists, early diagnosis and prevention are the only possibilities to stop the degeneration. The protein cytochrome c (cyt c) is a suitable marker for degeneration processes and apoptosis because it is a part of the respiratory chain and involved in the apoptotic pathway. The determination of the local distribution and oxidative state of cyt c in living cells allows the characterization of cell degeneration processes. Since cyt c exhibits characteristic absorption bands between 400 and 650 nm wavelength, uv/vis in situ spectroscopic imaging was used for its characterization in retinal ganglion cells. The large amount of data, consisting of spatial and spectral information, was processed by multivariate data analysis. The challenge consists in the identification of the molecular information of cyt c. Baseline correction, principle component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) were performed in order to identify cyt c within the spectral dataset. The combination of PCA and CA reveals cyt c and its oxidative state. The results demonstrate that uv/vis spectroscopic imaging in conjunction with sophisticated multivariate methods is a suitable tool to characterize cyt c under in situ conditions.

  9. Proton MR spectroscopic features of liver cirrhosis : comparing with normal liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soon Gu; Choi, Won; Kim, Young Soo; Kim, Mi Young; Jee, Keum Nahn; Lee, Kyung Hee; Suh, Chang Hae

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the proton MR spectroscopic features of liver cirrhosis and the different proton MR spectroscopic features between liver cirrhosis and the normal human liver by comparing the two different conditions. The investigation involved 30 cases of in-vivo proton MR spectra obtained from 15 patients with liver cirrhosis demonstrated on the basis of radiologic and clinical findings, and from 15 normal volunteers without a past or current history of liver disease. MR spectroscopy involved the use of 1.5T GESigna Horizon system (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, U. S. A.) with body coil. STEAM (STimulated Echo-Acquisition Mode) with 3000/30 msec of TR/TE was used for signal acquisition; patients were in the prone position and respiration was not interrupted. Cases were assigned to either the cirrhosis or normal group, and using the proton MR spectra of cases of in each group, peak changes occurring in lipids (at 1.3 ppm), glutamate and glutamine (at 2.4-2.5 ppm), phosphomonoesters (at 3.0-3.1 ppm), and glycogen and glucose (at 3.4-3.9 ppm) were evaluated. Mean and standard deviation of the ratio of glutamate + glutamine/lipids, phosphomonoesters/lipids, glycogen + glucose/lipids were calculated from the area of their peaks. The ratio of various metabolites to lipid content was compared between the normal and cirrhosis group. The main characteristic change in proton MR spectra in cases of liver cirrhosis compared with normal liver was decreased relative intensity of lipid peak. Mean and standard deviation of ratio of glutamate + glutamine/lipids, phosphomonoesters /lipids, glycogen + glucose /lipid calculated from the area of their peaks of normal and cirrhotic liver were 0.0204 ±0.0067 and 0.0693 ±0.0371 (p less than 0.05), 0.0146 ± 0.0090 and 0.0881 ±0.0276 (p less than 0.05), 0.0403 ± 0.0267 and 0.2325 ± 0.1071 (p less than 0.05), respectively The other characteristic feature of proton MR spectra of liver cirrhosis was the peak

  10. Spectroscopic imaging of limiter heat and particle fluxes and the resulting impurity sources during Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephey, L; Wurden, G A; Schmitz, O; Frerichs, H; Effenberg, F; Biedermann, C; Harris, J; König, R; Kornejew, P; Krychowiak, M; Unterberg, E A

    2016-11-01

    A combined IR and visible camera system [G. A. Wurden et al., "A high resolution IR/visible imaging system for the W7-X limiter," Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)] and a filterscope system [R. J. Colchin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 2068 (2003)] were implemented together to obtain spectroscopic data of limiter and first wall recycling and impurity sources during Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas. Both systems together provided excellent temporal and spatial spectroscopic resolution of limiter 3. Narrowband interference filters in front of the camera yielded C-III and H α photon flux, and the filterscope system provided H α , H β , He-I, He-II, C-II, and visible bremsstrahlung data. The filterscopes made additional measurements of several points on the W7-X vacuum vessel to yield wall recycling fluxes. The resulting photon flux from both the visible camera and filterscopes can then be compared to an EMC3-EIRENE synthetic diagnostic [H. Frerichs et al., "Synthetic plasma edge diagnostics for EMC3-EIRENE, highlighted for Wendelstein 7-X," Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)] to infer both a limiter particle flux and wall particle flux, both of which will ultimately be used to infer the complete particle balance and particle confinement time τ P .

  11. Spectroscopic imaging of limiter heat and particle fluxes and the resulting impurity sources during Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephey, L., E-mail: stephey@wisc.edu; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Effenberg, F. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wurden, G. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Biedermann, C.; König, R.; Kornejew, P.; Krychowiak, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasma Physik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Harris, J.; Unterberg, E. A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A combined IR and visible camera system [G. A. Wurden et al., “A high resolution IR/visible imaging system for the W7-X limiter,” Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)] and a filterscope system [R. J. Colchin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 2068 (2003)] were implemented together to obtain spectroscopic data of limiter and first wall recycling and impurity sources during Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas. Both systems together provided excellent temporal and spatial spectroscopic resolution of limiter 3. Narrowband interference filters in front of the camera yielded C-III and H{sub α} photon flux, and the filterscope system provided H{sub α}, H{sub β}, He-I, He-II, C-II, and visible bremsstrahlung data. The filterscopes made additional measurements of several points on the W7-X vacuum vessel to yield wall recycling fluxes. The resulting photon flux from both the visible camera and filterscopes can then be compared to an EMC3-EIRENE synthetic diagnostic [H. Frerichs et al., “Synthetic plasma edge diagnostics for EMC3-EIRENE, highlighted for Wendelstein 7-X,” Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)] to infer both a limiter particle flux and wall particle flux, both of which will ultimately be used to infer the complete particle balance and particle confinement time τ{sub P}.

  12. Accelerated proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) using GRAPPA with a 32-channel phased-array coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Posse, Stefan; Lin, Yi-Ru; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Wald, Lawrence L; Wiggins, Graham C; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2008-05-01

    Parallel imaging has been demonstrated to reduce the encoding time of MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Here we investigate up to 5-fold acceleration of 2D proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) at 3T using generalized autocalibrating partial parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) with a 32-channel coil array, 1.5 cm(3) voxel size, TR/TE of 15/2000 ms, and 2.1 Hz spectral resolution. Compared to an 8-channel array, the smaller RF coil elements in this 32-channel array provided a 3.1-fold and 2.8-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the peripheral region and the central region, respectively, and more spatial modulated information. Comparison of sensitivity-encoding (SENSE) and GRAPPA reconstruction using an 8-channel array showed that both methods yielded similar quantitative metabolite measures (P > 0.1). Concentration values of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), choline (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), and the sum of glutamate and glutamine (Glx) for both methods were consistent with previous studies. Using the 32-channel array coil the mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLB) were less than 8% for NAA, tCr, and Cho and less than 15% for mI and Glx at 2-fold acceleration. At 4-fold acceleration the mean CRLB for NAA, tCr, and Cho was less than 11%. In conclusion, the use of a 32-channel coil array and GRAPPA reconstruction can significantly reduce the measurement time for mapping brain metabolites. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Lateralisation with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy: an evaluation of visual and region-of-interest analysis of metabolite concentration images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikhoff-Baaz, B. [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Div. of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden); Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Malmgren, K. [Dept. of Neurology, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden); Joensson, L.; Ekholm, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden); Starck, G. [Div. of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden); Ljungberg, M.; Forssell-Aronsson, E. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Uvebrant, P. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden)

    2001-09-01

    We carried out spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) on nine consecutive patients with temporal lobe epilepsy being assessed for epilepsy surgery, and nine neurologically healthy, age-matched volunteers. A volume of interest (VOI) was angled along the temporal horns on axial and sagittal images, and symmetrically over the temporal lobes on coronal images. Images showing the concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and of choline-containing compounds plus creatine and phosphocreatine (Cho + Cr) were used for lateralisation. We compared assessment by visual inspection and by signal analysis from regions of interest (ROI) in different positions, where side-to-side differences in NAA/(Cho + Cr) ratio were used for lateralisation. The NAA/(Cho + Cr) ratio from the different ROI was also compared with that in the brain stem to assess if the latter could be used as an internal reference, e. g., for identification of bilateral changes. The metabolite concentration images were found useful for lateralisation of temporal lobe abnormalities related to epilepsy. Visual analysis can, with high accuracy, be used routinely. ROI analysis is useful for quantifying changes, giving more quantitative information about spatial distribution and the degree of signal loss. There was a large variation in NAA/(Cho + Cr) values in both patients and volunteers. The brain stem may be used as a reference for identification of bilateral changes. (orig.)

  14. Lateralisation with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy: an evaluation of visual and region-of-interest analysis of metabolite concentration images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhoff-Baaz, B.; Joensson, L.; Ekholm, S.; Starck, G.

    2001-01-01

    We carried out spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) on nine consecutive patients with temporal lobe epilepsy being assessed for epilepsy surgery, and nine neurologically healthy, age-matched volunteers. A volume of interest (VOI) was angled along the temporal horns on axial and sagittal images, and symmetrically over the temporal lobes on coronal images. Images showing the concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and of choline-containing compounds plus creatine and phosphocreatine (Cho + Cr) were used for lateralisation. We compared assessment by visual inspection and by signal analysis from regions of interest (ROI) in different positions, where side-to-side differences in NAA/(Cho + Cr) ratio were used for lateralisation. The NAA/(Cho + Cr) ratio from the different ROI was also compared with that in the brain stem to assess if the latter could be used as an internal reference, e. g., for identification of bilateral changes. The metabolite concentration images were found useful for lateralisation of temporal lobe abnormalities related to epilepsy. Visual analysis can, with high accuracy, be used routinely. ROI analysis is useful for quantifying changes, giving more quantitative information about spatial distribution and the degree of signal loss. There was a large variation in NAA/(Cho + Cr) values in both patients and volunteers. The brain stem may be used as a reference for identification of bilateral changes. (orig.)

  15. Accelerated echo-planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging in the human brain using compressed sensing: a pilot validation in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, M K; Nagarajan, R; Macey, P M; Kumar, R; Villablanca, J P; Furuyama, J; Thomas, M A

    2014-06-01

    Echo-planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging is a fast spectroscopic technique to record the biochemical information in multiple regions of the brain, but for clinical applications, time is still a constraint. Investigations of neural injury in obstructive sleep apnea have revealed structural changes in the brain, but determining the neurochemical changes requires more detailed measurements across multiple brain regions, demonstrating a need for faster echo-planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging. Hence, we have extended the compressed sensing reconstruction of prospectively undersampled 4D echo-planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging to investigate metabolic changes in multiple brain locations of patients with obstructive sleep apnea and healthy controls. Nonuniform undersampling was imposed along 1 spatial and 1 spectral dimension of 4D echo-planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging, and test-retest reliability of the compressed sensing reconstruction of the nonuniform undersampling data was tested by using a brain phantom. In addition, 9 patients with obstructive sleep apnea and 11 healthy controls were investigated by using a 3T MR imaging/MR spectroscopy scanner. Significantly reduced metabolite differences were observed between patients with obstructive sleep apnea and healthy controls in multiple brain regions: NAA/Cr in the left hippocampus; total Cho/Cr and Glx/Cr in the right hippocampus; total NAA/Cr, taurine/Cr, scyllo-Inositol/Cr, phosphocholine/Cr, and total Cho/Cr in the occipital gray matter; total NAA/Cr and NAA/Cr in the medial frontal white matter; and taurine/Cr and total Cho/Cr in the left frontal white matter regions. The 4D echo-planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging technique using the nonuniform undersampling-based acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and healthy brain is feasible in a clinically suitable time. In addition to brain metabolite changes previously reported by 1D MR

  16. Evaluation of heterogeneous metabolic profile in an orthotopic human glioblastoma xenograft model using compressed sensing hyperpolarized 3D 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ilwoo; Hu, Simon; Bok, Robert; Ozawa, Tomoko; Ito, Motokazu; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Phillips, Joanna J; James, C David; Pieper, Russell O; Ronen, Sabrina M; Vigneron, Daniel B; Nelson, Sarah J

    2013-07-01

    High resolution compressed sensing hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging was applied in orthotopic human glioblastoma xenografts for quantitative assessment of spatial variations in (13)C metabolic profiles and comparison with histopathology. A new compressed sensing sampling design with a factor of 3.72 acceleration was implemented to enable a factor of 4 increase in spatial resolution. Compressed sensing 3D (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging data were acquired from a phantom and 10 tumor-bearing rats following injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]-pyruvate using a 3T scanner. The (13)C metabolic profiles were compared with hematoxylin and eosin staining and carbonic anhydrase 9 staining. The high-resolution compressed sensing (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging data enabled the differentiation of distinct (13)C metabolite patterns within abnormal tissues with high specificity in similar scan times compared to the fully sampled method. The results from pathology confirmed the different characteristics of (13)C metabolic profiles between viable, non-necrotic, nonhypoxic tumor, and necrotic, hypoxic tissue. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Performance assessment of diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging instruments in a 2-year multicenter breast cancer trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leproux, Anaïs; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Cerussi, Albert; Durkin, Amanda; Hill, Brian; Hylton, Nola; Yodh, Arjun G.; Carp, Stefan A.; Boas, David; Jiang, Shudong; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian; Roblyer, Darren; Yang, Wei; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-12-01

    We present a framework for characterizing the performance of an experimental imaging technology, diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI), in a 2-year multicenter American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) breast cancer study (ACRIN-6691). DOSI instruments combine broadband frequency-domain photon migration with time-independent near-infrared (650 to 1000 nm) spectroscopy to measure tissue absorption and reduced scattering spectra and tissue hemoglobin, water, and lipid composition. The goal of ACRIN-6691 was to test the effectiveness of optically derived imaging endpoints in predicting the final pathologic response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Sixty patients were enrolled over a 2-year period at participating sites and received multiple DOSI scans prior to and during 3- to 6-month NAC. The impact of three sources of error on accuracy and precision, including different operators, instruments, and calibration standards, was evaluated using a broadband reflectance standard and two different solid tissue-simulating optical phantoms. Instruments showed <0.0010 mm-1 (10.3%) and 0.06 mm-1 (4.7%) deviation in broadband absorption and reduced scattering, respectively, over the 2-year duration of ACRIN-6691. These variations establish a useful performance criterion for assessing instrument stability. The proposed procedures and tests are not limited to DOSI; rather, they are intended to provide methods to characterize performance of any instrument used in translational optical imaging.

  18. Confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements of depth dependent hydration dynamics in human skin in-vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, P.; Hashemi, M.; Hoppe, S.; Wessel, S.; Hagens, R.; Jaspers, S.; Wenck, H.; Rübhausen, M.

    2017-11-01

    We present confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements applied to in-vivo studies to determine the depth dependent hydration profiles of human skin. The observed spectroscopic signal covers the spectral range from 810 nm to 2100 nm allowing to probe relevant absorption signals that can be associated with e.g. lipid and water-absorption bands. We employ a spectrally sensitive autofocus mechanism that allows an ultrafast focusing of the measurement spot on the skin and subsequently probes the evolution of the absorption bands as a function of depth. We determine the change of the water concentration in m%. The water concentration follows a sigmoidal behavior with an increase of the water content of about 70% within 5 μm in a depth of about 14 μm. We have applied our technique to study the hydration dynamics of skin before and after treatment with different concentrations of glycerol indicating that an increase of the glycerol concentration leads to an enhanced water concentration in the stratum corneum. Moreover, in contrast to traditional corneometry we have found that the application of Aluminium Chlorohydrate has no impact to the hydration of skin.

  19. Confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements of depth dependent hydration dynamics in human skin in-vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Behm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements applied to in-vivo studies to determine the depth dependent hydration profiles of human skin. The observed spectroscopic signal covers the spectral range from 810 nm to 2100 nm allowing to probe relevant absorption signals that can be associated with e.g. lipid and water-absorption bands. We employ a spectrally sensitive autofocus mechanism that allows an ultrafast focusing of the measurement spot on the skin and subsequently probes the evolution of the absorption bands as a function of depth. We determine the change of the water concentration in m%. The water concentration follows a sigmoidal behavior with an increase of the water content of about 70% within 5 μm in a depth of about 14 μm. We have applied our technique to study the hydration dynamics of skin before and after treatment with different concentrations of glycerol indicating that an increase of the glycerol concentration leads to an enhanced water concentration in the stratum corneum. Moreover, in contrast to traditional corneometry we have found that the application of Aluminium Chlorohydrate has no impact to the hydration of skin.

  20. Book Review: Reiner Salzer and Heinz W. Siesler (Eds.): Infrared and Raman spectroscopic imaging, 2nd ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, David Steven

    2015-01-01

    This second edition of 'Infrared and Raman Spectroscopic Imaging' propels practitioners in that wide-ranging field, as well as other readers, to the current state of the art in a well-produced and full-color, completely revised and updated, volume. This new edition chronicles the expanded application of vibrational spectroscopic imaging from yesterday's time-consuming point-by-point buildup of a hyperspectral image cube, through the improvements afforded by the addition of focal plane arrays and line scan imaging, to methods applicable beyond the diffraction limit, instructs the reader on the improved instrumentation and image and data analysis methods, and expounds on their application to fundamental biomedical knowledge, food and agricultural surveys, materials science, process and quality control, and many others

  1. Imaging, scattering, and spectroscopic systems for biomedical optics: Tools for bench top and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, William J.

    Optical advances have had a profound impact on biology and medicine. The capabilities range from sensing biological analytes to whole animal and subcellular imaging and clinical therapies. The work presented in this thesis describes three independent and multifunctional optical systems, which explore clinical therapy at the tissue level, biological structure at the cell/organelle level, and the function of underlying fundamental cellular processes. First, we present a portable clinical instrument for delivering delta-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) while performing noninvasive spectroscopic monitoring in vivo. Using an off-surface probe, the instrument delivered the treatment beam to a user-defined field on the skin and performed reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies at two regions within this field. The instrument was used to monitor photosensitizer fluorescence photobleaching, fluorescent photoproduct kinetics, and blood oxygen saturation during a clinical ALA-PDT trial on superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC). Protoporphyrin IX and photoproduct fluorescence excited by the 632.8 nm PDT treatment laser was collected between 665 and 775 nm. During a series of brief treatment interruptions at programmable time points, white-light reflectance spectra between 475 and 775 nm were acquired. Fluorescence spectra were corrected for the effects of absorption and scattering, informed by the reflectance measurements, and then decomposed into known fluorophore contributions in real time using a robust singular-value decomposition fitting routine. Reflectance spectra additionally provided information on hemoglobin oxygen saturation. We next describe the incorporation of this instrument into clinical trials at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (Buffalo, NY). In this trial we examined the effects of light irradiance on photodynamic efficiency and pain. The rate of singlet-oxygen production depends on the product of irradiance and photosensitizer and oxygen

  2. Construction and performance of a dilution-refrigerator based spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, U R; Enayat, M; White, S C; Wahl, P

    2013-01-01

    We report on the set-up and performance of a dilution-refrigerator based spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscope. It operates at temperatures below 10 mK and in magnetic fields up to 14T. The system allows for sample transfer and in situ cleavage. We present first-results demonstrating atomic resolution and the multi-gap structure of the superconducting gap of NbSe(2) at base temperature. To determine the energy resolution of our system we have measured a normal metal/vacuum/superconductor tunneling junction consisting of an aluminum tip on a gold sample. Our system allows for continuous measurements at base temperature on time scales of up to ≈170 h.

  3. Time-resolved spectroscopic imaging reveals the fundamentals of cellular NADH fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Zheng, Wei; Qu, Jianan Y

    2008-10-15

    A time-resolved spectroscopic imaging system is built to study the fluorescence characteristics of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), an important metabolic coenzyme and endogenous fluorophore in cells. The system provides a unique approach to measure fluorescence signals in different cellular organelles and cytoplasm. The ratios of free over protein-bound NADH signals in cytosol and nucleus are slightly higher than those in mitochondria. The mitochondrial fluorescence contributes about 70% of overall cellular fluorescence and is not a completely dominant signal. Furthermore, NADH signals in mitochondria, cytosol, and the nucleus respond to the changes of cellular activity differently, suggesting that cytosolic and nuclear fluorescence may complicate the well-known relationship between mitochondrial fluorescence and cellular metabolism.

  4. Principal component and spatial correlation analysis of spectroscopic-imaging data in scanning probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2009-01-01

    An approach for the analysis of multi-dimensional, spectroscopic-imaging data based on principal component analysis (PCA) is explored. PCA selects and ranks relevant response components based on variance within the data. It is shown that for examples with small relative variations between spectra, the first few PCA components closely coincide with results obtained using model fitting, and this is achieved at rates approximately four orders of magnitude faster. For cases with strong response variations, PCA allows an effective approach to rapidly process, de-noise, and compress data. The prospects for PCA combined with correlation function analysis of component maps as a universal tool for data analysis and representation in microscopy are discussed.

  5. Three dimensional proton MR spectroscopic imaging in transition zone prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yi; Zhao Wenlu; Shen Junkang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical value of three dimensional proton MR spectroscopic imaging (3D 1 HMRSI) in the detection of transition zone (TZ) prorate cancer and evaluate the feasibility of 3D 1 HMRSI for determining the aggressiveness of TZ cancer by analyzing its metabolic characteristics. Methods: The 3D 1 HMRSI data of sixty patients suspected TZ cancer in conventional MR examinations were retrospectively analyzed. The values of (Cho + Cre)/Cit of TZ cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) voxels were recorded and compared using independent sample t' test, and the area under the ROC curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy. Based on Gleason scores, TZ cancer voxels were divided into three groups,including low-risk (Gleason score <7), intermediate-risk (Gleason score =7) and high-risk (Gleason score >7). The values of (Cho + Cre)/Cit were compared among the three groups using Kruskal-Wallis test. The correlation of the value of (Cho + Cre)/Cit and Gleason score was analyzed using rank correlation analysis. Results: Among the 60 patients, histopathology confirmed TZ cancer in 25 patients and BPH in 35 patients. The inversion of Cho and Cit peak value with increased (Cho + Cre)/Cit was detected in 160 out of 177 TZ cancer voxels. Most spectral curves of the 517 BPH voxels were similar with that of normal peripheral zone on 1 HMRSI. The mean values of (Cho + Cre)/Cit of TZ cancer and BPH voxels were 2.17 ± 1.29 and 0.77 ± 0.20, respectively, with significant difference between them (t'=14.38, P<0.01). Using (Cho + Cre)/Cit for distinguishing TZ cancer, the area under ROC curve was 0.985 (P<0.01).With the cut-off point 1.08, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of TZ cancer diagnosis was 92.7%, 94.2% and 93.8%, respectively. The number of low-risk, intermediate-risk and high-risk TZ cancer voxels were 57, 64 and 56 respectively, and the mean values of (Cho + Cre)/Cit of the three groups were 1.43 (1.16-1.87), 1.66 (1

  6. Accelerated high-resolution 3D magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the brain At 7 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hangel, G.

    2015-01-01

    With the announcement of the first series of magnetic resonance (MR) scanners with a field strength of 7 Tesla (T) intended for clinical practice, the development of high-performance sequences for higher field strengths has gained importance. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in the brain currently offers the unique ability to spatially resolve the distribution of multiple metabolites simultaneously. Its big diagnostic potential could be applied to many clinical protocols, for example the assessment of tumour treatment or progress of Multiple Sclerosis. Moving to ultra-high fields like 7 T has the main benefits of increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and improved spectral quality, but brings its own challenges due to stronger field inhomogeneities. Necessary for a robust, flexible and useful MRSI sequence in the brain are high resolutions, shortened measurement times, the possibility for 3D-MRSI and the suppression of spectral contamination by trans-cranial lipids. This thesis addresses these limitations and proposes Hadamard spectroscopic imaging (HSI) as solution for multi-slice MRSI, the application of generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) and spiral trajectories for measurement acceleration, non-selective inversion recovery (IR) lipid-suppression as well as combinations of these methods. Further, the optimisation of water suppression for 7 T systems and the acquisition of ultra-high resolution (UHR)-MRSI are discussed. In order to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of these approaches, MRSI measurement results of a glioma patient are presented. The discussion of the obtained results in the context of the state-of-art in 7 T MRSI in the brain, possible future applications as well as potential further improvements of the MRSI sequences conclude this thesis. (author) [de

  7. Aberration-free FTIR spectroscopic imaging of live cells in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2013-07-21

    The label-free, non-destructive chemical analysis offered by FTIR spectroscopic imaging is a very attractive and potentially powerful tool for studies of live biological cells. FTIR imaging of live cells is a challenging task, due to the fact that cells are cultured in an aqueous environment. While the synchrotron facility has proven to be a valuable tool for FTIR microspectroscopic studies of single live cells, we have demonstrated that high quality infrared spectra of single live cells using an ordinary Globar source can also be obtained by adding a pair of lenses to a common transmission liquid cell. The lenses, when placed on the transmission cell window, form pseudo hemispheres which removes the refraction of light and hence improve the imaging and spectral quality of the obtained data. This study demonstrates that infrared spectra of single live cells can be obtained without the focus shifting effect at different wavenumbers, caused by the chromatic aberration. Spectra of the single cells have confirmed that the measured spectral region remains in focus across the whole range, while spectra of the single cells measured without the lenses have shown some erroneous features as a result of the shift of focus. It has also been demonstrated that the addition of lenses can be applied to the imaging of cells in microfabricated devices. We have shown that it was not possible to obtain a focused image of an isolated cell in a droplet of DPBS in oil unless the lenses are applied. The use of the approach described herein allows for well focused images of single cells in DPBS droplets to be obtained.

  8. Regional neuro axonal injury detected by 1H 3 Tesla spectroscopic imaging in late onset Tay sachs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagoski, Borjan Aleksandar; Eichler, Florian S.

    2010-01-01

    Late-onset Tay Sachs (LOTS) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder resulting from mutations of the subunit of the lysosomal enzyme β-hexosaminidase A, which catalyzes the degradation of GM2 ganglioside. We have applied the fast encoding spectroscopic imaging technique to LOTS patients to further investigate the neuro degenerative consequences of this disease.(Author)

  9. Three-dimensional proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with and without an endorectal coil: a prostate phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, C.; Chen, L.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Lu, J.; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of the prostate has been used with only a combination of external surface coils. The quality of spectral fitting of the (choline + creatine)/citrate ([Cho + Cr]/Cit) ratio at different field strengths and different coils is important for

  10. Imaging properties of small-pixel spectroscopic x-ray detectors based on cadmium telluride sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Thomas; Schulze, Julia; Zuber, Marcus; Rink, Kristian; Oelfke, Uwe; Butzer, Jochen; Hamann, Elias; Cecilia, Angelica; Zwerger, Andreas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopic x-ray imaging by means of photon counting detectors has received growing interest during the past years. Critical to the image quality of such devices is their pixel pitch and the sensor material employed. This paper describes the imaging properties of Medipix2 MXR multi-chip assemblies bump bonded to 1 mm thick CdTe sensors. Two systems were investigated with pixel pitches of 110 and 165 μm, which are in the order of the mean free path lengths of the characteristic x-rays produced in their sensors. Peak widths were found to be almost constant across the energy range of 10 to 60 keV, with values of 2.3 and 2.2 keV (FWHM) for the two pixel pitches. The average number of pixels responding to a single incoming photon are about 1.85 and 1.45 at 60 keV, amounting to detective quantum efficiencies of 0.77 and 0.84 at a spatial frequency of zero. Energy selective CT acquisitions are presented, and the two pixel pitches' abilities to discriminate between iodine and gadolinium contrast agents are examined. It is shown that the choice of the pixel pitch translates into a minimum contrast agent concentration for which material discrimination is still possible. We finally investigate saturation effects at high x-ray fluxes and conclude with the finding that higher maximum count rates come at the cost of a reduced energy resolution. (paper)

  11. In vivo, noninvasive functional measurements of bone sarcoma using diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Hannah M.; Hoang, Bang H.; Geller, David; Yang, Rui; Gorlick, Richard; Berger, Jeremy; Tingling, Janet; Roth, Michael; Gill, Jonathon; Roblyer, Darren

    2017-12-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) is an emerging near-infrared imaging technique that noninvasively measures quantitative functional information in thick tissue. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of using DOSI to measure optical contrast from bone sarcomas. These tumors are rare and pose technical and practical challenges for DOSI measurements due to the varied anatomic locations and tissue depths of presentation. Six subjects were enrolled in the study. One subject was unable to be measured due to tissue contact sensitivity. For the five remaining subjects, the signal-to-noise ratio, imaging depth, optical properties, and quantitative tissue concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, water, and lipids from tumor and contralateral normal tissues were assessed. Statistical differences between tumor and contralateral normal tissue were found in chromophore concentrations and optical properties for four subjects. Low signal-to-noise was encountered during several subject's measurements, suggesting increased detector sensitivity will help to optimize DOSI for this patient population going forward. This study demonstrates that DOSI is capable of measuring optical properties and obtaining functional information in bone sarcomas. In the future, DOSI may provide a means to stratify treatment groups and monitor chemotherapy response for this disease.

  12. Development of a spectroscopic Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometer for nanostructure metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiuguo; Du, Weichao; Yuan, Kui; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Chuanwei; Liu, Shiyuan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a spectroscopic Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometer (MMIE), which combines the great power of Mueller matrix ellipsometry with the high spatial resolution of optical microscopy. A dual rotating-compensator configuration is adopted to collect the full 4 × 4 imaging Mueller matrix in a single measurement. The light wavelengths are scanned in the range of 400–700 nm by a monochromator. The instrument has measurement accuracy and precision better than 0.01 for all the Mueller matrix elements in both the whole image and the whole spectral range. The instrument was then applied for the measurement of nanostructures combined with an inverse diffraction problem solving technique. The experiment performed on a photoresist grating sample has demonstrated the great potential of MMIE for accurate grating reconstruction from spectral data collected by a single pixel of the camera and for efficient quantification of geometrical profile of the grating structure over a large area with pixel resolution. It is expected that MMIE will be a powerful tool for nanostructure metrology in future high-volume nanomanufacturing.

  13. Development of a spectroscopic Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometer for nanostructure metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiuguo; Du, Weichao; Yuan, Kui; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Hao, E-mail: hjiang@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Chuanwei; Liu, Shiyuan, E-mail: hjiang@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wuhan Eoptics Technology Co. Ltd., Wuhan 430075 (China)

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, we describe the development of a spectroscopic Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometer (MMIE), which combines the great power of Mueller matrix ellipsometry with the high spatial resolution of optical microscopy. A dual rotating-compensator configuration is adopted to collect the full 4 × 4 imaging Mueller matrix in a single measurement. The light wavelengths are scanned in the range of 400–700 nm by a monochromator. The instrument has measurement accuracy and precision better than 0.01 for all the Mueller matrix elements in both the whole image and the whole spectral range. The instrument was then applied for the measurement of nanostructures combined with an inverse diffraction problem solving technique. The experiment performed on a photoresist grating sample has demonstrated the great potential of MMIE for accurate grating reconstruction from spectral data collected by a single pixel of the camera and for efficient quantification of geometrical profile of the grating structure over a large area with pixel resolution. It is expected that MMIE will be a powerful tool for nanostructure metrology in future high-volume nanomanufacturing.

  14. Constraining reconnection region conditions using imaging and spectroscopic analysis of a coronal jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Sean; Kankelborg, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Coronal jets typically appear as thin, collimated structures in EUV and X-ray wavelengths, and are understood to be initiated by magnetic reconnection in the lower corona or upper chromosphere. Plasma that is heated and accelerated upward into coronal jets may therefore carry indirect information on conditions in the reconnection region and current sheet located at the jet base. On 2017 October 14, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) observed a series of jet eruptions originating from NOAA AR 12599. The jet structure has a length-to-width ratio that exceeds 50, and remains remarkably straight throughout its evolution. Several times during the observation bright blobs of plasma are seen to erupt upward, ascending and subsequently descending along the structure. These blobs are cotemporal with footpoint and arcade brightenings, which we believe indicates multiple episodes of reconnection at the structure base. Through imaging and spectroscopic analysis of jet and footpoint plasma we determine a number of properties, including the line-of-sight inclination, the temperature and density structure, and lift-off velocities and accelerations of jet eruptions. We use these properties to constrain the geometry of the jet structure and conditions in reconnection region.

  15. Comparative Spectroscopic Investigation of Tm3+:Tellurite Glasses for 2-μm Lasing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Cankaya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We performed a comparative spectroscopic analysis on three novel Tm3+:tellurite-based glasses with the following compositions Tm2O3:TeO2-ZnO (TeZnTm, Tm2O3:TeO2-Nb2O5 (TeNbTm, and Tm3+:TeO2-K2O-Nb2O5 (TeNbKTm, primarily for 2-μm laser applications. Tellurite glasses were prepared at different doping concentrations in order to investigate the effect of Tm3+ ion concentration as well as host composition on the stimulated emission cross sections and the luminescence quantum efficiencies. By performing Judd–Ofelt analysis, we determined the average radiative lifetimes of the 3H4 level to be 2.55 ± 0.07 ms, 2.76 ± 0.03 ms and 2.57 ± 0.20 ms for the TeZnTm, TeNbTm and TeNbKTm samples, respectively. We clearly observed the effect of the cross-relaxation, which becomes significant at higher Tm2O3 concentrations, leading to the quenching of 1460-nm emission and enhancement of 1860-nm emission. Furthermore, with increasing Tm2O3 concentrations, we observed a decrease in the fluorescence lifetimes as a result of the onset of non-radiative decay. For the 3H4 level, the highest obtained quantum efficiency was 32% for the samples with the lowest Tm2O3 ion concentration. For the 1860-nm emission band, the average emission cross section was determined to measure around 6.33 ± 0.34 × 10−21 cm2, revealing the potential of thulium-doped tellurite gain media for 2-μm laser applications in bulk and fiber configurations.

  16. Hard X-Ray Flare Source Sizes Measured with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Pernak, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of 18 double hard X-ray sources seen at energies above 25 keV are analyzed to determine the spatial extent of the most compact structures evident in each case. The following four image reconstruction algorithms were used: Clean, Pixon, and two routines using visibilities maximum entropy and forward fit (VFF). All have been adapted for this study to optimize their ability to provide reliable estimates of the sizes of the more compact sources. The source fluxes, sizes, and morphologies obtained with each method are cross-correlated and the similarities and disagreements are discussed. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the major axes of the sources with assumed elliptical Gaussian shapes are generally well correlated between the four image reconstruction routines and vary between the RHESSI resolution limit of approximately 2" up to approximately 20" with most below 10". The FWHM of the minor axes are generally at or just above the RHESSI limit and hence should be considered as unresolved in most cases. The orientation angles of the elliptical sources are also well correlated. These results suggest that the elongated sources are generally aligned along a flare ribbon with the minor axis perpendicular to the ribbon. This is verified for the one flare in our list with coincident Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) images. There is evidence for significant extra flux in many of the flares in addition to the two identified compact sources, thus rendering the VFF assumption of just two Gaussians inadequate. A more realistic approximation in many cases would be of two line sources with unresolved widths. Recommendations are given for optimizing the RHESSI imaging reconstruction process to ensure that the finest possible details of the source morphology become evident and that reliable estimates can be made of the source dimensions.

  17. A time-gated near-infrared spectroscopic imaging device for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Patrick; Uhring, Wilfried; Hanselmann, Walter; Glazenborg, René; Nouizi, Farouk; Zint, Virginie; Hirschi, Werner

    2013-03-01

    A time-resolved, spectroscopic, diffuse optical tomography device was assembled for clinical applications like brain functional imaging. The entire instrument lies in a unique setup that includes a light source, an ultrafast time-gated intensified camera and all the electronic control units. The light source is composed of four near infrared laser diodes driven by a nanosecond electrical pulse generator working in a sequential mode at a repetition rate of 100 MHz. The light pulses are less than 80 ps FWHM. They are injected in a four-furcated optical fiber ended with a frontal light distributor to obtain a uniform illumination spot directed towards the head of the patient. Photons back-scattered by the subject are detected by the intensified CCD camera. There are resolved according to their time of flight inside the head. The photocathode is powered by an ultrafast generator producing 50 V pulses, at 100 MHz and a width corresponding to a 200 ps FWHM gate. The intensifier has been specially designed for this application. The whole instrument is controlled by an FPGA based module. All the acquisition parameters are configurable via software through an USB plug and the image data are transferred to a PC via an Ethernet link. The compactness of the device makes it a perfect device for bedside clinical applications. The instrument will be described and characterized. Preliminary data recorded on test samples will be presented.

  18. Immunocytochemistry by electron spectroscopic imaging using well defined boronated monovalent antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, M M; Qualmann, B; Sierralta, W D

    1996-01-01

    Contributing to the rapidly developing field of immunoelectron microscopy a new kind of markers has been created. The element boron, incorporated as very stable carborane clusters into different kinds of peptides, served as a marker detectable by electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI)--an electron microscopic technique with high-resolution potential. Covalently linked immunoreagents conspicuous by the small size of both antigen recognizing part and marker moiety are accessible by using peptide concepts for label construction and their conjugation with Fab' fragments. Due to a specific labeling of the free thiol groups of the Fab' fragments, the antigen binding capacity was not affected by the attachment of the markers and the resulting immunoprobes exhibited an elongated shape with the antigen combining site and the label located at opposite ends. The labeling densities observed with these reagents were found to be significantly higher than those obtained by using conventional colloidal gold methods. Combined with digital image processing and analysis systems, boron-based ESI proved to be a powerful approach in ultrastructural immunocytochemistry employing pre- and post-embedding methods.

  19. Proton magnetic spectroscopic imaging of the child's brain: the response of tumors to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, A.A.; Young Poussaint, T.; Astrakas, L.G.; Barnes, P.D.; Goumnerova, L.; Scott, R.M.; Black, P.McL.; Anthony, D.C.; Billett, A.L.; Tarbell, N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Our aim was to determine and/or predict response to treatment of brain tumors in children using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). We studied 24 patients aged 10 months to 24 years, using MRI and point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS; TR 2000 TE 65 ms) with volume preselection and phase-encoding in two dimensions on a 1.5 T imager. Multiple logistic regression was used to establish independent predictors of active tumor growth. Biologically vital cell metabolites, such as N-acetyl aspartate and choline-containing compounds (Cho), were significantly different between tumor and control tissues (P<0.001). The eight brain tumors which responded to radiation or chemotherapy, exhibited lower Cho (P=0.05), higher total creatine (tCr) (P=0.02) and lower lactate and lipid (L) (P=0.04) than16 tumors which were not treated (except by surgery) or did not respond to treatment. The only significant independent predictor of active tumor growth was tCr (P<0.01). We suggest that tCr is useful in assessing response of brain tumors to treatment. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of the variations in fat content in normal liver using a fast MR imaging method in comparison with results obtained by spectroscopic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwan, Roy; Edens, Mireille A.; Sijens, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    A recently published Dixon-based MRI method for quantifying liver fat content using dual-echo breath-hold gradient echo imaging was validated by phantom experiments and compared with results of biopsy in two patients (Radiology 2005;237:1048-1055). We applied this method in ten healthy volunteers and compared the outcomes with the results of MR spectroscopy (MRS), the gold standard in quantifying liver fat content. Novel was the use of spectroscopic imaging yielding the variations in fat content across the liver rather than a single value obtained by single voxel MRS. Compared with the results of MRS, liver fat content according to MRI was too high in nine subjects (range 3.3-10.7% vs. 0.9-7.7%) and correct in one (21.1 vs. 21.3%). Furthermore, in one of the ten subjects the MRI fat content according to the Dixon-based MRI method was incorrect due to a (100-x) versus x percent lipid content mix-up. The second problem was fixed by a minor adjustment of the MRI algorithm. Despite systematic overestimation of liver fat contents by MRI, Spearman's correlation between the adjusted MRI liver fat contents with MRS was high (r = 0.927, P < 0.001). Even after correction of the algorithm, the problem remaining with the Dixon-based MRI method for the assessment of liver fat content,is that, at the lower end range, liver fat content is systematically overestimated by 4%. (orig.)

  1. Scatterometry or imaging overlay: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Simon C. C.; Pai, Yuan Chi; Chen, Charlie; Yu, Chun Chi; Hsing, Henry; Wu, Hsing-Chien; Kuo, Kelly T. L.; Amir, Nuriel

    2015-03-01

    Most fabrication facilities today use imaging overlay measurement methods, as it has been the industry's reliable workhorse for decades. In the last few years, third-generation Scatterometry Overlay (SCOL™) or Diffraction Based Overlay (DBO-1) technology was developed, along another DBO technology (DBO-2). This development led to the question of where the DBO technology should be implemented for overlay measurements. Scatterometry has been adopted for high volume production in only few cases, always with imaging as a backup, but scatterometry overlay is considered by many as the technology of the future. In this paper we compare imaging overlay and DBO technologies by means of measurements and simulations. We outline issues and sensitivities for both technologies, providing guidelines for the best implementation of each. For several of the presented cases, data from two different DBO technologies are compared as well, the first with Pupil data access (DBO-1) and the other without pupil data access (DBO-2). Key indicators of overlay measurement quality include: layer coverage, accuracy, TMU, process robustness and robustness to process changes. Measurement data from real cases across the industry are compared and the conclusions are also backed by simulations. Accuracy is benchmarked with reference OVL, and self-consistency, showing good results for Imaging and DBO-1 technology. Process sensitivity and metrology robustness are mostly simulated with MTD (Metrology Target Designer) comparing the same process variations for both technologies. The experimental data presented in this study was done on ten advanced node layers and three production node layers, for all phases of the IC fabrication process (FEOL, MEOL and BEOL). The metrology tool used for most of the study is KLA-Tencor's Archer 500LCM system (scatterometry-based and imaging-based measurement technologies on the same tool) another type of tool is used for DBO-2 measurements. Finally, we conclude that

  2. Diffusion tensor spectroscopic imaging of the human brain in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotso, Kevin; Dager, Stephen R; Landow, Alec; Ackley, Elena; Myers, Orrin; Dixon, Mindy; Shaw, Dennis; Corrigan, Neva M; Posse, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    We developed diffusion tensor spectroscopic imaging (DTSI), based on proton-echo-planar-spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI), and evaluated the feasibility of mapping brain metabolite diffusion in adults and children. PRESS prelocalized DTSI at 3 Tesla (T) was performed using navigator-based correction of movement-related phase errors and cardiac gating with compensation for repetition time (TR) related variability in T 1 saturation. Mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) of total N-acetyl-aspartate (tNAA), total creatine (tCr), and total choline (tCho) were measured in eight adults (17-60 years) and 10 children (3-24 months) using b max  = 1734 s/mm 2 , 1 cc and 4.5 cc voxel sizes, with nominal scan times of 17 min and 8:24 min. Residual movement-related phase encoding ghosting (PEG) was used as a regressor across scans to correct overestimation of MD. After correction for PEG, metabolite slice-averaged MD estimated at 20% PEG were lower (P < 0.042) for adults (0.17/0.20/0.18 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s) than for children (0.26/0.27/0.24 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s). Extrapolated to 0% PEG, the MD estimates decreased further (0.09/0.11/0.11 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s versus 0.15/0.16/0.15 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s). Slice-averaged FA of tNAA (P = 0.049), tCr (P = 0.067), and tCho (P = 0.003) were higher in children. This high-speed DTSI approach with PEG regression allows for estimation of metabolite MD and FA with improved tolerance to movement. Our preliminary data suggesting age-related changes support DTSI as a sensitive technique for investigating intracellular markers of biological processes. Magn Reson Med 78:1246-1256, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Short- and long-term quantitation reproducibility of brain metabolites in the medial wall using proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Lin, Yi-Ru; Wang, Woan-Chyi; Niddam, David M

    2012-11-15

    Proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) is a fast magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) technique that allows mapping spatial metabolite distributions in the brain. Although the medial wall of the cortex is involved in a wide range of pathological conditions, previous MRSI studies have not focused on this region. To decide the magnitude of metabolic changes to be considered significant in this region, the reproducibility of the method needs to be established. The study aims were to establish the short- and long-term reproducibility of metabolites in the right medial wall and to compare regional differences using a constant short-echo time (TE30) and TE averaging (TEavg) optimized to yield glutamatergic information. 2D sagittal PEPSI was implemented at 3T using a 32 channel head coil. Acquisitions were repeated immediately and after approximately 2 weeks to assess the coefficients of variation (COV). COVs were obtained from eight regions-of-interest (ROIs) of varying size and location. TE30 resulted in better spectral quality and similar or lower quantitation uncertainty for all metabolites except glutamate (Glu). When Glu and glutamine (Gln) were quantified together (Glx) reduced quantitation uncertainty and increased reproducibility was observed for TE30. TEavg resulted in lowered quantitation uncertainty for Glu but in less reliable quantification of several other metabolites. TEavg did not result in a systematically improved short- or long-term reproducibility for Glu. The ROI volume was a major factor influencing reproducibility. For both short- and long-term repetitions, the Glu COVs obtained with TEavg were 5-8% for the large ROIs, 12-17% for the medium sized ROIs and 16-26% for the smaller cingulate ROIs. COVs obtained with TE30 for the less specific Glx were 3-5%, 8-10% and 10-15%. COVs for N-acetyl aspartate, creatine and choline using TE30 with long-term repetition were between 2-10%. Our results show that the cost of more specific

  4. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of white matter signal hyperintensity areas in elderly subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constans, J M [Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of California Magnetic Resonance Unit, San Francisco, CA (United States); [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Meyerhoff, D J [Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of California Magnetic Resonance Unit, San Francisco, CA (United States); [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Norman, D [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Fein, G [Department of Veterans Affairs Psychiatry Service, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); [University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry; Weiner, M W [Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of California Magnetic Resonance Unit, San Francisco, CA (United States); [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine; [DVA Medical Center, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Unit, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    White matter signal hyperintensities (WMSH) are commonly seen on MRI of elderly subjects. The purpose of this study was to characterize metabolic changes in the white matter of elderly subjects with extensive WMSH. We used water-suppressed proton ({sup 1}H) magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to compare six subjects with extensive WMSH with eight age-matched elderly subjects with minimal or absent WMSH, and phosphorus ({sup 31}P) MRSI to compare nine subjects with extensive WMSH and seven age-matched elderly subjects without extensive WMSH. Relative to region-matched tissue in elderly controls, extensive WMSH were associated with increased signal from choline-containing metabolites, no significant change of signal from N-acetylaspartate, and a trend to a decreased phosphomonoester (PME) resonance. These findings suggest that WMSH may be associated with an alteration of brain myelin phospholipids in the absence of axonal damage. There were no differences in energy phosphates, consistent with lack of ongoing brain ischemia. Within the group with extensive WMSH, PME resonance measures were significantly lower in WMSH than in contralateral normal-appearing white matter. These results provide information on pathophysiology of WMSH and a basis for comparison with WMSH in Alzheimer`s disease, vascular dementia, multiple sclerosis, and other diseases. (orig.). With 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Noninvasive measurements of cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolites in dilated cardiomyopathy by using 31P spectroscopic chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansch, A.; Rzanny, R.; Heyne, J.-P.; Reichenbach, J.R.; Kaiser, W.A.; Leder, U.

    2005-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is accompanied by an impaired cardiac energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate metabolic ratios in patients with DCM compared to controls by using spectroscopic two-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D-CSI). Twenty volunteers and 15 patients with severe symptoms (left ventricular ejection fraction, LVEF 30%) of DCM were investigated. Cardiac 31 P MR 2D-CSI measurements (voxel size: 40 x 40 x 100 mm 3 ) were performed with a 1.5 T whole-body scanner. Measurement time ranged from 15 min to 30 min. Peak areas and ratios of different metabolites were evaluated, including high-energy phosphates (PCr, ATP), 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and phosphodiesters (PDE). In addition, we evaluated how PCr/ATP ratios correlate with LVEF as an established prognostic factor of heart failure. The PCr/γ-ATP ratio was significantly decreased in patients with moderate and severe DCM and showed a linear correlation with reduced LVEFs. PDE/ATP ratios were significantly increased only in patients with severe DCM as compared to volunteers. Applying 31 P MRS with commonly-available 2D-CSI sequences is a valuable technique to evaluate DCM by determining PCr/ATP ratios noninvasively. In addition to reduced PCr/ATP ratios observed in patients suffering from DCM, significantly-increased PDE/ATP ratios were found in patients with severe DCM. (orig.)

  6. The biocompatibility of carbon hydroxyapatite/β-glucan composite for bone tissue engineering studied with Raman and FTIR spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka-Bartnicka, Anna; Kimber, James A; Borkowski, Leszek; Pawlowska, Marta; Polkowska, Izabela; Kalisz, Grzegorz; Belcarz, Anna; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Ginalska, Grazyna; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2015-10-01

    The spectroscopic approaches of FTIR imaging and Raman mapping were applied to the characterisation of a new carbon hydroxyapatite/β-glucan composite developed for bone tissue engineering. The composite is an artificial bone material with an apatite-forming ability for the bone repair process. Rabbit bone samples were tested with an implanted bioactive material for a period of several months. Using spectroscopic and chemometric methods, we were able to determine the presence of amides and phosphates and the distribution of lipid-rich domains in the bone tissue, providing an assessment of the composite's bioactivity. Samples were also imaged in transmission using an infrared microscope combined with a focal plane array detector. CaF2 lenses were also used on the infrared microscope to improve spectral quality by reducing scattering artefacts, improving chemometric analysis. The presence of collagen and lipids at the bone/composite interface confirmed biocompatibility and demonstrate the suitability of FTIR microscopic imaging with lenses in studying these samples. It confirmed that the composite is a very good background for collagen growth and increases collagen maturity with the time of the bone growth process. The results indicate the bioactive and biocompatible properties of this composite and demonstrate how Raman and FTIR spectroscopic imaging have been used as an effective tool for tissue characterisation.

  7. Practical protocols for fast histopathology by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Frances N.; Reddy, Rohith K.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2008-02-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging technique that combines the molecular selectivity of spectroscopy with the spatial specificity of optical microscopy. We demonstrate a new concept in obtaining high fidelity data using commercial array detectors coupled to a microscope and Michelson interferometer. Next, we apply the developed technique to rapidly provide automated histopathologic information for breast cancer. Traditionally, disease diagnoses are based on optical examinations of stained tissue and involve a skilled recognition of morphological patterns of specific cell types (histopathology). Consequently, histopathologic determinations are a time consuming, subjective process with innate intra- and inter-operator variability. Utilizing endogenous molecular contrast inherent in vibrational spectra, specially designed tissue microarrays and pattern recognition of specific biochemical features, we report an integrated algorithm for automated classifications. The developed protocol is objective, statistically significant and, being compatible with current tissue processing procedures, holds potential for routine clinical diagnoses. We first demonstrate that the classification of tissue type (histology) can be accomplished in a manner that is robust and rigorous. Since data quality and classifier performance are linked, we quantify the relationship through our analysis model. Last, we demonstrate the application of the minimum noise fraction (MNF) transform to improve tissue segmentation.

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in breast cancer detection: possibilities beyond the conventional theoretical framework for data analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkic, Karen E-mail: karen.belkic@radfys.ki.se

    2004-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) is a promising method for breast cancer diagnosis, providing, in addition to the anatomic picture, complementary biochemical and physiologic information in the form of spectra. It should be able to identify key biochemical changes before the tumour becomes detectable by other functional imaging methods that rely upon single markers not entirely sensitive or specific for malignant activity. MRSI is potentially well suited for screening and repeated monitoring since it entails no radiation exposure. There are, however, limitations to current applications of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and MRSI. Many of these can be directly related to reliance upon the conventional data analytical method, i.e. the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which has low resolution, poor signal/noise (S/N) in clinical signals, supplies only shape spectra and requires fitting, which is non-unique, so that the number of metabolites must be guessed in advance. This can lead to spurious peaks (over-fitting) and true metabolites being undetected (under-fitting). These limitations of the FFT can be circumvented by recent mathematical advances in signal processing via e.g. the Fast Pade Transform (FPT). As a high resolution, non-linear, stable parametric method, the FPT substantially improves S/N, and fulfills stringent requirements for tumour diagnostics: no post-processing fitting, provides precise numerical results for all peak parameters, and specifies the exact number of metabolites (including those that overlap) from the encoded data. We illustrate in a realistic synthesized model problem similar to MRS that the FPT can identify overlapping peaks that are entirely missed by the FFT, and we give an example from in vivo MRS of the superior resolving power of the FPT compared to FFT at short acquisition time. We also perform detailed paired and logistic regression analyses of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data on extracted breast specimens

  9. H-1 MR spectroscopic imaging detects prolonged elevation of lactate and increased Ch/NAA ratio in patients with focal cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Rijen, P.C.; Tulleken, C.A.F.; den Hollander, J.A.; Luyten, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    H-1 MR spectroscopy of patients with a recent stroke (range, 78 hours to 18 days after stroke) showed an increased Ch/NAA ratio in a large ischemic region of the brain, while lactate was increased in the center of the infarct. A spectroscopic image taken 8 months after the stroke did not show any increased lactate; however, the Ch/NAA ratio image still showed increased intensity even in regions that looked normal on the MR images. H-1 MR spectra measured during clinical recovery (range 10-48 days) still showed elevated lactate compared with control regions, although lactate was lower than in the acute phase. This suggests on ongoing anaerobic glycolysis in the metabolically compromised penumbra

  10. The role of gray and white matter segmentation in quantitative proton MR spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Assaf; Kirov, Ivan I; Grossman, Robert I; Gonen, Oded

    2012-12-01

    Since the brain's gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) metabolite concentrations differ, their partial volumes can vary the voxel's ¹H MR spectroscopy (¹H-MRS) signal, reducing sensitivity to changes. While single-voxel ¹H-MRS cannot differentiate between WM and GM signals, partial volume correction is feasible by MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) using segmentation of the MRI acquired for VOI placement. To determine the magnitude of this effect on metabolic quantification, we segmented a 1-mm³ resolution MRI into GM, WM and CSF masks that were co-registered with the MRSI grid to yield their partial volumes in approximately every 1 cm³ spectroscopic voxel. Each voxel then provided one equation with two unknowns: its i- metabolite's GM and WM concentrations C(i) (GM) , C(i) (WM) . With the voxels' GM and WM volumes as independent coefficients, the over-determined system of equations was solved for the global averaged C(i) (GM) and C(i) (WM) . Trading off local concentration differences offers three advantages: (i) higher sensitivity due to combined data from many voxels; (ii) improved specificity to WM versus GM changes; and (iii) reduced susceptibility to partial volume effects. These improvements made no additional demands on the protocol, measurement time or hardware. Applying this approach to 18 volunteered 3D MRSI sets of 480 voxels each yielded N-acetylaspartate, creatine, choline and myo-inositol C(i) (GM) concentrations of 8.5 ± 0.7, 6.9 ± 0.6, 1.2 ± 0.2, 5.3 ± 0.6 mM, respectively, and C(i) (WM) concentrations of 7.7 ± 0.6, 4.9 ± 0.5, 1.4 ± 0.1 and 4.4 ± 0.6mM, respectively. We showed that unaccounted voxel WM or GM partial volume can vary absolute quantification by 5-10% (more for ratios), which can often double the sample size required to establish statistical significance. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Thumb-size ultrasonic-assisted spectroscopic imager for in-situ glucose monitoring as optional sensor of conventional dialyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogo, Kosuke; Mori, Keita; Qi, Wei; Hosono, Satsuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    We proposed the ultrasonic-assisted spectroscopic imaging for the realization of blood-glucose-level monitoring during dialytic therapy. Optical scattering and absorption caused by blood cells deteriorate the detection accuracy of glucose dissolved in plasma. Ultrasonic standing waves can agglomerate blood cells at nodes. In contrast, around anti-node regions, the amount of transmitted light increases because relatively clear plasma appears due to decline the number of blood cells. Proposed method can disperse the transmitted light of plasma without time-consuming pretreatment such as centrifugation. To realize the thumb-size glucose sensor which can be easily attached to dialysis tubes, an ultrasonic standing wave generator and a spectroscopic imager are required to be small. Ultrasonic oscillators are ∅30[mm]. A drive circuit of oscillators, which now size is 41×55×45[mm], is expected to become small. The trial apparatus of proposed one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imager, whose size is 30×30×48[mm], also can be little-finger size in principal. In the experiment, we separated the suspension mixed water and micro spheres (Θ10[mm) into particles and liquid regions with the ultrasonic standing wave (frequency: 2[MHz]). Furthermore, the spectrum of transmitted light through the suspension could be obtained in visible light regions with a white LED.

  12. Endorectal coil MRI and MR-spectroscopic imaging in patients with elevated serum prostate specific antigen with negative trus transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq Ahmad Ganie

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Prostatic biopsy directed with endorectal coil MRI and MR-spectroscopic imaging findings in patients with elevated serum PSA and prior negative biopsy, improves the early diagnosis of prostatic carcinoma and accurate localization of prostate cancer within the gland.

  13. Corrosion investigation of fire-gilded bronze involving high surface resolution spectroscopic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masi, G.; Chiavari, C.; Avila, J.; Esvan, J.; Raffo, S.; Bignozzi, M.C.; Asensio, M.C.; Robbiola, L.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fire-gilded bronze prepared by ancient methods (Au–Hg layer on Cu–Sn–Zn–Pb–Sb). • Heating during gilding induces Sn and Znenrichment in the top part of the gilded layer. • SR-HRPES mapping of corrosion craters (cross-section) after accelerated ageing. • Selective dissolution of Cu and Zn in the craters induces Sn species enrichment. • The main species in the craters are related to hydroxi-oxide compounds. - Abstract: Gilded bronzes are often affected by severe corrosion, due to defects in the Au layer and Au/Cu alloy galvanic coupling, stimulated by large cathodic area of the gilded layer. Galvanic corrosion, triggered by gilding defects, leads to products growth at the Au/bronze interface, inducing blistering or break-up of the Au layer. In this context, fire-gilded bronze replicas prepared by ancient methods (use of spreadable Au–Hg paste) was specifically characterised by compiling complementary spectroscopic and imaging information before/after accelerated ageing with synthetic rain. Fire-gilded bronze samples were chemically imaged in cross-section at nano-metric scale (<200 nm) using high energy and lateral resolution synchrotron radiation photoemission (HR-SRPES) of core levels and valence band after conventional characterisation of the samples by Glow Discharge optical Emission Spectroscopy (GD-OES) and conventional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We have found a net surface enrichment in Zn and Sn after fire-gilding and presence of metallic Hg, Pb and Cu within the Au layer. Moreover, the composition distribution of the elements together with their oxidation has been determined. It was also revealed that metallic phases including Hg and Pb remain in the gilding after corrosion. Moreover, selective dissolution of Zn and Cu occurs in the crater due to galvanic coupling, which locally induces relative Sn species enrichment (decuprification). The feasibility advantages and disadvantages of

  14. Corrosion investigation of fire-gilded bronze involving high surface resolution spectroscopic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masi, G., E-mail: giulia.masi5@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Chimica, Ambientale e dei Materiali, Università di Bologna, via Terracini 28, 40131 Bologna (Italy); Chiavari, C., E-mail: cristina.chiavari@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Chimica, Ambientale e dei Materiali, Università di Bologna, via Terracini 28, 40131 Bologna (Italy); C.I.R.I. (Centro Interdipartimentale Ricerca Industriale) Meccanica Avanzata e Materiali, Università di Bologna, Bologna, via Terracini 28, 40131 Bologna (Italy); Avila, J., E-mail: jose.avila@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, 91190 Saint-Aubin (France); Esvan, J., E-mail: jerome.esvan@ensiacet.fr [Centre Interuniversitaire de Recherche et d’Ingénierie des Matériaux, Université de Toulouse, 4 allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse (France); Raffo, S., E-mail: simona.raffo2@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale “Toso Montanari”, Università di Bologna, viale Risorgimento 4, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Bignozzi, M.C., E-mail: maria.bignozzi@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Chimica, Ambientale e dei Materiali, Università di Bologna, via Terracini 28, 40131 Bologna (Italy); Asensio, M.C., E-mail: maria-carmen.asensio@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, 91190 Saint-Aubin (France); Robbiola, L., E-mail: robbiola@univ-tlse2.fr [TRACES Lab (CNRS UMR5608), Université Toulouse Jean-Jaurès, 5, allées Antonio-Machado, 31058 Toulouse (France); and others

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fire-gilded bronze prepared by ancient methods (Au–Hg layer on Cu–Sn–Zn–Pb–Sb). • Heating during gilding induces Sn and Znenrichment in the top part of the gilded layer. • SR-HRPES mapping of corrosion craters (cross-section) after accelerated ageing. • Selective dissolution of Cu and Zn in the craters induces Sn species enrichment. • The main species in the craters are related to hydroxi-oxide compounds. - Abstract: Gilded bronzes are often affected by severe corrosion, due to defects in the Au layer and Au/Cu alloy galvanic coupling, stimulated by large cathodic area of the gilded layer. Galvanic corrosion, triggered by gilding defects, leads to products growth at the Au/bronze interface, inducing blistering or break-up of the Au layer. In this context, fire-gilded bronze replicas prepared by ancient methods (use of spreadable Au–Hg paste) was specifically characterised by compiling complementary spectroscopic and imaging information before/after accelerated ageing with synthetic rain. Fire-gilded bronze samples were chemically imaged in cross-section at nano-metric scale (<200 nm) using high energy and lateral resolution synchrotron radiation photoemission (HR-SRPES) of core levels and valence band after conventional characterisation of the samples by Glow Discharge optical Emission Spectroscopy (GD-OES) and conventional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We have found a net surface enrichment in Zn and Sn after fire-gilding and presence of metallic Hg, Pb and Cu within the Au layer. Moreover, the composition distribution of the elements together with their oxidation has been determined. It was also revealed that metallic phases including Hg and Pb remain in the gilding after corrosion. Moreover, selective dissolution of Zn and Cu occurs in the crater due to galvanic coupling, which locally induces relative Sn species enrichment (decuprification). The feasibility advantages and disadvantages of

  15. Apertureless near-field/far-field CW two-photon microscope for biological and material imaging and spectroscopic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Derek B; Lawrence, A J; Sánchez, Erik J

    2010-12-10

    We present the development of a versatile spectroscopic imaging tool to allow for imaging with single-molecule sensitivity and high spatial resolution. The microscope allows for near-field and subdiffraction-limited far-field imaging by integrating a shear-force microscope on top of a custom inverted microscope design. The instrument has the ability to image in ambient conditions with optical resolutions on the order of tens of nanometers in the near field. A single low-cost computer controls the microscope with a field programmable gate array data acquisition card. High spatial resolution imaging is achieved with an inexpensive CW multiphoton excitation source, using an apertureless probe and simplified optical pathways. The high-resolution, combined with high collection efficiency and single-molecule sensitive optical capabilities of the microscope, are demonstrated with a low-cost CW laser source as well as a mode-locked laser source.

  16. Spectroscopic techniques (Moessbauer spectrometry, NMR, ESR...) as tools to resolve doubtful NMR images: Study of the craniopharyngioma tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimbert, J.N.; Dumas, F.; Lafargue, C.; Kellershohn, C.; Brunelle, F.; Lallemand, D.

    1990-01-01

    Craniopharyngioma, an intracranial tumor, exhibits hyperintensity in the Spin-Echo-T 2 -NMR image and a hyposignal in the SE-T 1 -image. However, in some cases (15-20% cases), hypersignals are seen in both SE-T 1 and T 2 -MRI. Using spectroscopic techniques, Moessbauer spectrometry in particular, we have demonstrated that the T 1 hypersignal is due to ferritin, dissolved in the cystic liquid, after tumor cell lysis, in the course of time. Other possible reasons inducing a shortening of the T 1 relaxation time (presence of lipids, intratumoral hemorrhage) have been rejected. (orig.)

  17. Electronic structure of the cuprate superconducting and pseudogap phases from spectroscopic imaging STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A. R.; Fujita, K.; Kim, E.-A.; Lawler, M. J.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Lee, D.-H.; Davis, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    We survey the use of spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (SI-STM) to probe the electronic structure of underdoped cuprates. Two distinct classes of electronic states are observed in both the d-wave superconducting (dSC) and the pseudogap (PG) phases. The first class consists of the dispersive Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations of a homogeneous d-wave superconductor, existing below a lower energy scale E=Δ0. We find that the Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference (QPI) signatures of delocalized Cooper pairing are restricted to a k-space arc, which terminates near the lines connecting k=±(π/a0,0) to k=±(0,π/a0). This arc shrinks continuously with decreasing hole density such that Luttinger's theorem could be satisfied if it represents the front side of a hole-pocket that is bounded behind by the lines between k=±(π/a0,0) and k=±(0,π/a0). In both phases, the only broken symmetries detected for the |E|modulations, locally breaking both rotational and translational symmetries, coexist with this intra-unit-cell electronic symmetry breaking at E=Δ1. Their characteristic wavevector Q is determined by the k-space points where Bogoliubov QPI terminates and therefore changes continuously with doping. The distinct broken electronic symmetry states (intra-unit-cell and finite Q) coexisting at E~Δ1 are found to be indistinguishable in the dSC and PG phases. The next challenge for SI-STM studies is to determine the relationship of the E~Δ1 broken symmetry electronic states with the PG phase, and with the E<Δ0 states associated with Cooper pairing.

  18. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the substantia nigra of healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeger, Adriane; Godau, Jana; Berg, Daniela; Chadzynski, Grzegorz; Klose, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the substantia nigra in patients with Parkinson's disease three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with high spatial resolution at 3 Tesla was performed. Regional variations of spectroscopic data between the rostral and caudal regions of the substantia nigra as well as the midbrain tegmentum areas were evaluated in healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease. Nine patients with Parkinson's disease and eight age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Data were acquired by using three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging measurements. The ratios between rostral and caudal voxels of the substantia nigra as well as the midbrain tegmentum areas were calculated for the main-metabolites N-acetyl aspartate, creatine, choline, and myo-inositol. Additionally, the metabolite/creatine ratios were calculated. In all subjects spectra of acceptable quality could be obtained with a nominal voxel size of 0.252 ml. The calculated rostral-to-caudal ratios of the metabolites as well as of the metabolite/creatine ratios showed with exception of choline/creatine ratio significant differences between healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease. The findings from this study indicate that regional variations in N-acetyl aspartate/creatine ratios in the regions of the substantia nigra may differentiate patients with Parkinson's disease and healthy controls. (orig.)

  19. 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging at 3 Tesla for Early Response Assessment of Glioblastoma Patients During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P.; Smith, Brian J.; Anderson, Carryn M.; Morris, Ann; Capizzano, Aristides A.; Magnotta, Vincent; McGuire, Sarah M.; Smith, Mark C.; Bayouth, John E.; Buatti, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium-enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17 to 20 fractions of radiation therapy. All patients received standard radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Imaging for response assessment consisted of MR scans every 2 months. Progression-free survival was defined by the criteria of MacDonald et al. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline/N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel-by-voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of RT. Changes in Cho/NAA between pretherapy and third-week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression-free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: After a median follow-up time of 8.6 months, 50% of patients had experienced progression based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (P<.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the third-week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (P<.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the third-week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.71; P=.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥2 volume, where recurrence most often occurred. Conclusion: Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of

  20. 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging at 3 Tesla for Early Response Assessment of Glioblastoma Patients During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Smith, Brian J. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Anderson, Carryn M.; Morris, Ann [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Capizzano, Aristides A.; Magnotta, Vincent [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); McGuire, Sarah M.; Smith, Mark C.; Bayouth, John E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Buatti, John M., E-mail: john-buatti@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium-enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17 to 20 fractions of radiation therapy. All patients received standard radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Imaging for response assessment consisted of MR scans every 2 months. Progression-free survival was defined by the criteria of MacDonald et al. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline/N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel-by-voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of RT. Changes in Cho/NAA between pretherapy and third-week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression-free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: After a median follow-up time of 8.6 months, 50% of patients had experienced progression based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (P<.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the third-week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (P<.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the third-week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.71; P=.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥2 volume, where recurrence most often occurred. Conclusion: Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of

  1. 3-Dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging at 3 Tesla for early response assessment of glioblastoma patients during external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P; Smith, Brian J; Anderson, Carryn M; Morris, Ann; Capizzano, Aristides A; Magnotta, Vincent; McGuire, Sarah M; Smith, Mark C; Bayouth, John E; Buatti, John M

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the utility of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium-enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17 to 20 fractions of radiation therapy. All patients received standard radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Imaging for response assessment consisted of MR scans every 2 months. Progression-free survival was defined by the criteria of MacDonald et al. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline/N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel-by-voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of RT. Changes in Cho/NAA between pretherapy and third-week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression-free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. After a median follow-up time of 8.6 months, 50% of patients had experienced progression based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (P<.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the third-week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (P<.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the third-week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.71; P=.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥2 volume, where recurrence most often occurred. Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of early progression. The potential impact for risk

  2. Multi-slice echo-planar spectroscopic MR imaging provides both global and local metabolite measures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Henrik Kahr; Tscherning, Thomas; Sorensen, Per Soelberg

    2005-01-01

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about neuronal loss or dysfunction by measuring decreases in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), a metabolite widely believed to be a marker of neuronal viability. In multiple sclerosis (MS), whole-brain NAA (WBNAA) has been suggested as a marker of disease...... progression and treatment efficacy in treatment trials, and the ability to measure NAA loss in specific brain regions early in the evolution of this disease may have prognostic value. Most spectroscopic studies to date have been limited to single voxels or nonlocalized measurements of WBNAA only......, measurements of metabolites in specific brain areas chosen after image acquisition (e.g., normal-appearing white matter (NAWM), gray matter (GM), and lesions) can be obtained. The identification and exclusion of regions that are inadequate for spectroscopic evaluation in global assessments can significantly...

  3. Multimodality imaging using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in local prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla-Dave, Amita; Wassberg, Cecilia; Pucar, Darko; Schöder, Heiko; Goldman, Debra A; Mazaheri, Yousef; Reuter, Victor E; Eastham, James; Scardino, Peter T; Hricak, Hedvig

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the relationship using multimodality imaging between intermediary citrate/choline metabolism as seen on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI) and glycolysis as observed on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. METHODS The study included 22 patients with local PCa who were referred for endorectal magnetic resonance imaging/1H-MRSI (April 2002 to July 2007) and 18F-FDG-PET/CT and then underwent prostatectomy as primary or salvage treatment. Whole-mount step-section pathology was used as the standard of reference. We assessed the relationships between PET parameters [standardized uptake value (SUVmax and SUVmean)] and MRSI parameters [choline + creatine/citrate (CC/Cmax and CC/Cmean) and total number of suspicious voxels] using spearman’s rank correlation, and the relationships of PET and 1H-MRSI index lesion parameters to surgical Gleason score. RESULTS Abnormal intermediary metabolism on 1H-MRSI was present in 21/22 patients, while abnormal glycolysis on 18F-FDG-PET/CT was detected in only 3/22 patients. Specifically, index tumor localization rates were 0.95 (95%CI: 0.77-1.00) for 1H-MRSI and 0.14 (95%CI: 0.03-0.35) for 18F-FDG-PET/CT. Spearman rank correlations indicated little relationship (ρ = -0.36-0.28) between 1H-MRSI parameters and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameters. Both the total number of suspicious voxels (ρ = 0.55, P = 0.0099) and the SUVmax (ρ = 0.46, P = 0.0366) correlated weakly with the Gleason score. No significant relationship was found between the CC/Cmax, CC/Cmean or SUVmean and the Gleason score (P = 0.15-0.79). CONCLUSION The concentration of intermediary metabolites detected by 1H MRSI and glycolytic flux measured 18F-FDG PET show little correlation. Furthermore, only few tumors were FDG avid on PET, possibly because increased glycolysis represents a late and rather ominous event in the progression of PCa. PMID:28396727

  4. Ground-based multi-station spectroscopic imaging with ALIS. - Scientific highlights, project status and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändström; Gustavsson, Björn; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta; Sandahl, Ingrid; Sergienko, Tima; Steen, Ake

    2005-08-01

    The Auroral Large Imaging System (ALIS) was first proposed at the ESA-PAC meeting in Lahnstein 1989. The first spectroscopic imaging station was operational in 1994, and since then up to six stations have been in simultaneous operation. Each station has a scientific-grade CCD-detector and a filter-wheel for narrow-band interference-filters with six positions. The field-of-view is around 70°. Each imager is mounted in a positioning system, enabling imaging of a common volume from several sites. This enables triangulation and tomography. Raw data from ALIS is freely available at ("http://alis.irf.se") and ALIS is open for scientific colaboration. ALIS made the first unambiguous observations of Radio-induced optical emissions at high latitudes, and the detection of water in a Leonid meteor-trail. Both rockets and satellite coordination are considered for future observations with ALIS.

  5. 3D-MR Spectroscopic Imaging at 3Tesla for Early Response Assessment of Glioblastoma Patients during External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P; Smith, Brian J; Anderson, Carryn M; Morris, Ann; Capizzano, Aristides A; Magnotta, Vincent; McGuire, Sarah M; Smith, Mark C; Bayouth, John E; Buatti, John M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the utility of 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17-20 fractions of radiotherapy. All patients received standard radiotherapy with temozolomide and follow-up with every two month MR scans. Progression free survival was defined using MacDonald criteria. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline / N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel by voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥ 2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of radiotherapy. Changes in Cho/NAA between pre-therapy and 3rd week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results After 8.6 months (median follow-up), 50% of patients had progressed based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (p< 0.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the 3rd week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (p <0.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the 3rd week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval 1.10-6.71, p= 0.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥ 2 volume, which was where recurrence most often occurred. Conclusion Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of early progression. The potential impact for risk-adaptive therapy based on early spectroscopic findings is suggested. PMID:24986746

  6. High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopic Imaging of Human Tissue Sections towards Improving Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Peter L.; Davidson, Bennett; Akkina, Sanjeev; Guzman, Grace; Setty, Suman; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Walsh, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging approach to obtain detailed images that have associated biochemical information. FT-IR imaging of tissue is based on the principle that different regions of the mid-infrared are absorbed by different chemical bonds (e.g., C=O, C-H, N-H) within cells or tissue that can then be related to the presence and composition of biomolecules (e.g., lipids, DNA, glycogen, protein, collagen). In an FT-IR image, every pixel within the image comprises an entire Infrared (IR) spectrum that can give information on the biochemical status of the cells that can then be exploited for cell-type or disease-type classification. In this paper, we show: how to obtain IR images from human tissues using an FT-IR system, how to modify existing instrumentation to allow for high-definition imaging capabilities, and how to visualize FT-IR images. We then present some applications of FT-IR for pathology using the liver and kidney as examples. FT-IR imaging holds exciting applications in providing a novel route to obtain biochemical information from cells and tissue in an entirely label-free non-perturbing route towards giving new insight into biomolecular changes as part of disease processes. Additionally, this biochemical information can potentially allow for objective and automated analysis of certain aspects of disease diagnosis. PMID:25650759

  7. High throughput assessment of cells and tissues: Bayesian classification of spectral metrics from infrared vibrational spectroscopic imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rohit; Fernandez, Daniel C; Hewitt, Stephen M; Levin, Ira W

    2006-07-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy allows a visualization of tissue constituents based on intrinsic chemical composition and provides a potential route to obtaining diagnostic markers of diseases. Characterizations utilizing infrared vibrational spectroscopy, in particular, are conventionally low throughput in data acquisition, generally lacking in spatial resolution with the resulting data requiring intensive numerical computations to extract information. These factors impair the ability of infrared spectroscopic measurements to represent accurately the spatial heterogeneity in tissue, to incorporate robustly the diversity introduced by patient cohorts or preparative artifacts and to validate developed protocols in large population studies. In this manuscript, we demonstrate a combination of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging, tissue microarrays (TMAs) and fast numerical analysis as a paradigm for the rapid analysis, development and validation of high throughput spectroscopic characterization protocols. We provide an extended description of the data treatment algorithm and a discussion of various factors that may influence decision-making using this approach. Finally, a number of prostate tissue biopsies, arranged in an array modality, are employed to examine the efficacy of this approach in histologic recognition of epithelial cell polarization in patients displaying a variety of normal, malignant and hyperplastic conditions. An index of epithelial cell polarization, derived from a combined spectral and morphological analysis, is determined to be a potentially useful diagnostic marker.

  8. Proton MR spectroscopy in patients with pyogenic brain abscess: MR spectroscopic imaging versus single-voxel spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Shuo-Hsiu, E-mail: gerwuver@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chou, Ming-Chung, E-mail: mcchou@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Ko, Cheng-Wen, E-mail: chengwen.ko@gmail.com [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hsu, Shu-Shong, E-mail: sshsu59@yahoo.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Huey-Shyan, E-mail: sc035@fy.edu.tw [Program of Health-Business Administration, School of Nursing, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Fu, Jui-Hsun, E-mail: fujuihsun@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Po-Chin, E-mail: hiscore6@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Pan, Huay-Ben, E-mail: panhb@vghks.gov.tw [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lai, Ping-Hong, E-mail: pinghonglai@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS) has been the gold standard technique to diagnose the pyogenic abssess. Two-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is able to provide spatial distribution of metabolic concentration, and is potentially more suitable for differential diagnosis between abscess and necrotic tumors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalence of MRSI and SVS in the detection of the metabolites in pyogenic brain abscesses. Materials and methods: Forty-two patients with pyogenic abscesses were studied by using both SVS and MRSI methods. Two neuroradiologists reviewed the MRS data independently. A κ value was calculated to express inter-reader agreement of the abscesses metabolites, and a correlation coefficient was calculated to show the similarity of two spectra. After consensus judgment of two readers, the binary value of metabolites of pyogenic abscesses (presence or absence) was compared between SVS and MRSI. Results: The consistency of spectral interpretation of the two readers was very good (κ ranged from 0.95 to 1), and the similarity of two spectra was also very high (cc = 0.9 ± 0.05). After consensus judgment of two readers, the sensitivities of MRSI ranged from 91% (acetate) to 100% (amino acids, succinate, lactate, lipid), and the specificities of MRSI were 100% for detecting all metabolites with SVS as reference. Conclusion: SVS and MRSI provide similar metabolites in the cavity of pyogenic brain abscess. With additional metabolic information of cavity wall and contralateral normal-appearing brain tissue, MRSI would be a more suitable technique to differentiate abscesses from necrotic tumors.

  9. In vivo measurement of regional brain metabolic response to hyperventilation using magnetic resonance: proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posse, S; Dager, S R; Richards, T L; Yuan, C; Ogg, R; Artru, A A; Müller-Gärtner, H W; Hayes, C

    1997-06-01

    A new rapid spectroscopic imaging technique with improved sensitivity and lipid suppression, referred to as Proton Echo Planar Spectroscopic Imaging (PEPSI), has been developed to measure the 2-dimensional distribution of brain lactate increases during hyperventilation on a conventional clinical scanner equipped with a head surface coil phased array. PEPSI images (nominal voxel size: 1.125 cm3) in five healthy subjects from an axial section approximately 20 mm inferior to the intercommissural line were obtained during an 8.5-min baseline period of normocapnia and during the final 8.5 min of a 10-min period of capnometry-controlled hyperventilation (end-tidal PCO2 of 20 mmHg). The lactate/N-acetyl aspartate signal increased significantly from baseline during hyperventilation for the insular cortex, temporal cortex, and occipital regions of both the right and left hemisphere, but not in the basal ganglia. Regional or hemispheric right-to-left differences were not found. The study extends previous work using single-voxel MR spectroscopy to dynamically study hyperventilation effects on brain metabolism.

  10. Initial results of 3-dimensional 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the localization of prostate cancer at 3 Tesla: should we use an endorectal coil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakar, Derya; Heijmink, Stijn W T P J; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Huisman, Henkjan; Barentsz, Jelle O; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Scheenen, Tom W J

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of 3 Tesla, 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in the localization of prostate cancer (PCa) with and without the use of an endorectal coil (ERC). Our prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Between October 2004 and January 2006, 18 patients with histologically proven PCa on biopsy and scheduled for radical prostatectomy were included and underwent 3D-MRSI with and without an ERC. The prostate was divided into 14 regions of interest (ROIs). Four readers independently rated (on a 5-point scale) their confidence that cancer was present in each of these ROIs. These findings were correlated with whole-mount prostatectomy specimens. Areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve were determined. A difference with a P Tesla slightly but significantly increased the localization performance compared with not using an ERC.

  11. Fully automated atlas-based method for prescribing 3D PRESS MR spectroscopic imaging: Toward robust and reproducible metabolite measurements in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Wei; Li, Yan; Crane, Jason C; Nelson, Sarah J

    2018-02-01

    To implement a fully automated atlas-based method for prescribing 3D PRESS MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). The PRESS selected volume and outer-volume suppression bands were predefined on the MNI152 standard template image. The template image was aligned to the subject T 1 -weighted image during a scan, and the resulting transformation was then applied to the predefined prescription. To evaluate the method, H-1 MRSI data were obtained in repeat scan sessions from 20 healthy volunteers. In each session, datasets were acquired twice without repositioning. The overlap ratio of the prescribed volume in the two sessions was calculated and the reproducibility of inter- and intrasession metabolite peak height and area ratios was measured by the coefficient of variation (CoV). The CoVs from intra- and intersession were compared by a paired t-test. The average overlap ratio of the automatically prescribed selection volumes between two sessions was 97.8%. The average voxel-based intersession CoVs were less than 0.124 and 0.163 for peak height and area ratios, respectively. Paired t-test showed no significant difference between the intra- and intersession CoVs. The proposed method provides a time efficient method to prescribe 3D PRESS MRSI with reproducible imaging positioning and metabolite measurements. Magn Reson Med 79:636-642, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Application of second derivative spectroscopy for increasing molecular specificity of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieppo, L; Saarakkala, S; Närhi, T; Helminen, H J; Jurvelin, J S; Rieppo, J

    2012-05-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is a promising method that enables the analysis of spatial distribution of biochemical components within histological sections. However, analysis of FT-IR spectroscopic data is complicated since absorption peaks often overlap with each other. Second derivative spectroscopy is a technique which enhances the separation of overlapping peaks. The objective of this study was to evaluate the specificity of the second derivative peaks for the main tissue components of articular cartilage (AC), i.e., collagen and proteoglycans (PGs). Histological bovine AC sections were measured before and after enzymatic removal of PGs. Both formalin-fixed sections (n = 10) and cryosections (n = 6) were investigated. Relative changes in the second derivative peak heights caused by the removal of PGs were calculated for both sample groups. The results showed that numerous peaks, e.g., peaks located at 1202 cm(-1) and 1336 cm(-1), altered less than 5% in the experiment. These peaks were assumed to be specific for collagen. In contrast, two peaks located at 1064 cm(-1) and 1376 cm(-1) were seen to alter notably, approximately 50% or more. These peaks were regarded to be specific for PGs. The changes were greater in cryosections than formalin-fixed sections. The results of this study suggest that the second derivative spectroscopy offers a practical and more specific method than routinely used absorption spectrum analysis methods to obtain compositional information on AC with FT-IR spectroscopic imaging. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative study of image restoration techniques in forensic image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijhold, Jurrien; Kuijper, Arjan; Westhuis, Jaap-Harm

    1997-02-01

    In this work we investigated the forensic applicability of some state-of-the-art image restoration techniques for digitized video-images and photographs: classical Wiener filtering, constrained maximum entropy, and some variants of constrained minimum total variation. Basic concepts and experimental results are discussed. Because all methods appeared to produce different results, a discussion is given of which method is the most suitable, depending on the image objects that are questioned, prior knowledge and type of blur and noise. Constrained minimum total variation methods produced the best results for test images with simulated noise and blur. In cases where images are the most substantial part of the evidence, constrained maximum entropy might be more suitable, because its theoretical basis predicts a restoration result that shows the most likely pixel values, given all the prior knowledge used during restoration.

  14. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUN AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES WITH THE MURCHISON WIDEFIELD ARRAY PROTOTYPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberoi, Divya; Matthews, Lynn D.; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Benkevitch, Leonid; Cairns, Iver H.; Lobzin, Vasili; Emrich, David; Wayth, Randall B.; Arcus, Wayne; Morgan, Edward H.; Williams, Christopher; Prabu, T.; Vedantham, Harish; Williams, Andrew; White, Stephen M.; Allen, G.; Barnes, David; Bernardi, Gianni; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, Frank H.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9- 201.6 MHz. Though our observing period is characterized as a period of 'low' to 'medium' activity, one broadband emission feature and numerous short-lived, narrowband, non-thermal emission features are evident. Our data represent a significant advance in low radio frequency solar imaging, enabling us to follow the spatial, spectral, and temporal evolution of events simultaneously and in unprecedented detail. The rich variety of features seen here reaffirms the coronal diagnostic capability of low radio frequency emission and provides an early glimpse of the nature of radio observations that will become available as the next generation of low-frequency radio interferometers come online over the next few years.

  15. Comparing imaging procedures: techniques and examples. Gastroenterology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmud, L.S.

    1982-01-01

    The distinct advantages of nuclear medicine procedures, in comparison to radiography, contrast studies, computerized tomography and ultrasound, are emphasized. Scintigraphic methods offer quantitative data regarding function which competing imaging modalities are unable to provide, and make them the studies of choice in the evaluation of gastrointestinal physiology and functional abnormalities

  16. Spectroscopic and vibrational analysis of the methoxypsoralen system: A comparative experimental and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Yuan, H.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    2013-03-01

    Raman spectra measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate three psoralens: 5-amino-8-methoxypsoralen (5-A-8-MOP), 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) and 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) with the aim of differentiating these similar bioactive molecules. The Raman spectra were recorded in the region 300-3500 cm-1. All three psoralens were found to have similar Raman spectrum in the region 1500-1650 cm-1. 5-A-8-MOP can be easily differentiated from 5-MOP or 8-MOP based on the Raman spectrum. The Raman spectrum differences at 651 and 795 cm-1 can be used to identify 5-MOP from 8-MOP. The theoretically computed vibrational frequencies and relative peak intensities were compared with experimental data. DFT calculations using the B3LYP method and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set were found to yield results that are very comparable to experimental Raman spectra. Detailed vibrational assignments were performed with DFT calculations and the potential energy distribution (PED) obtained from the Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) program.

  17. Proton spectroscopic imaging of polyacrylamide gel dosimeters for absolute radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.S.; Schwarz, A.J.; Leach, M.O.

    2000-01-01

    Proton spectroscopy has been evaluated as a method for quantifying radiation induced changes in polyacrylamide gel dosimeters. A calibration was first performed using BANG-type gel samples receiving uniform doses of 6 MV photons from 0 to 9 Gy in 1 Gy intervals. The peak integral of the acrylic protons belonging to acrylamide and methylenebisacrylamide normalized to the water signal was plotted against absorbed dose. Response was approximately linear within the range 0-7 Gy. A large gel phantom irradiated with three, coplanar 3x3cm square fields to 5.74 Gy at isocentre was then imaged with an echo-filter technique to map the distribution of monomers directly. The image, normalized to the water signal, was converted into an absolute dose map. At the isocentre the measured dose was 5.69 Gy (SD = 0.09) which was in good agreement with the planned dose. The measured dose distribution elsewhere in the sample shows greater errors. A T 2 derived dose map demonstrated a better relative distribution but gave an overestimate of the dose at isocentre of 18%. The data indicate that MR measurements of monomer concentration can complement T 2 -based measurements and can be used to verify absolute dose. Compared with the more usual T 2 measurements for assessing gel polymerization, monomer concentration analysis is less sensitive to parameters such as gel pH and temperature, which can cause ambiguous relaxation time measurements and erroneous absolute dose calculations. (author)

  18. Active and passive spectroscopic imaging in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zeeland, M A; Brooks, N H; Burrell, K H; Groebner, R J; Hyatt, A W; Luce, T C; Wade, M R; Yu, J H; Pablant, N; Heidbrink, W W; Solomon, W M

    2010-01-01

    Wide-angle, 2D imaging of Doppler-shifted, Balmer alpha (D α ) emission from high energy injected neutrals, charge exchange recombination (CER) emission from neutral beam interaction with thermal ions and fully stripped impurity ions and visible bremsstrahlung (VB) from the core of DIII-D plasmas has been carried out. Narrowband interference filters were used to isolate the specific wavelength ranges of visible radiation for detection by a tangentially viewing, fast-framing camera. Measurements of the D α emission from fast neutrals injected into the plasma from the low field side reveal the vertical distribution of the beam, its divergence and the variation in its radial penetration with density. Modeling of this emission using both a full Monte Carlo collisional radiative code as well as a simple beam attenuation code coupled to Atomic Data and Analysis Structure emissivity lookup tables yields qualitative agreement, however the absolute magnitudes of the emissivities in the predicted distribution are larger than those measured. Active measurements of carbon CER brightness are in agreement with those made independently along the beam midplane using DIII-D's multichordal, CER spectrometer system, confirming the potential of this technique for obtaining 2D profiles of impurity density. Passive imaging of VB, which can be inverted to obtain local emissivity profiles, is compared with measurements from both a calibrated filter/photomultiplier array and the standard multichordal CER spectrometer system.

  19. Active and passive spectroscopic imaging in the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Zeeland, M A; Brooks, N H; Burrell, K H; Groebner, R J; Hyatt, A W; Luce, T C; Wade, M R [General Atomics, PO Box 85608 San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Yu, J H; Pablant, N [University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Heidbrink, W W [University of California-Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Solomon, W M, E-mail: vanzeeland@fusion.gat.co [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Wide-angle, 2D imaging of Doppler-shifted, Balmer alpha (D{sub a}lpha) emission from high energy injected neutrals, charge exchange recombination (CER) emission from neutral beam interaction with thermal ions and fully stripped impurity ions and visible bremsstrahlung (VB) from the core of DIII-D plasmas has been carried out. Narrowband interference filters were used to isolate the specific wavelength ranges of visible radiation for detection by a tangentially viewing, fast-framing camera. Measurements of the D{sub a}lpha emission from fast neutrals injected into the plasma from the low field side reveal the vertical distribution of the beam, its divergence and the variation in its radial penetration with density. Modeling of this emission using both a full Monte Carlo collisional radiative code as well as a simple beam attenuation code coupled to Atomic Data and Analysis Structure emissivity lookup tables yields qualitative agreement, however the absolute magnitudes of the emissivities in the predicted distribution are larger than those measured. Active measurements of carbon CER brightness are in agreement with those made independently along the beam midplane using DIII-D's multichordal, CER spectrometer system, confirming the potential of this technique for obtaining 2D profiles of impurity density. Passive imaging of VB, which can be inverted to obtain local emissivity profiles, is compared with measurements from both a calibrated filter/photomultiplier array and the standard multichordal CER spectrometer system.

  20. Spectroscopic, thermogravimetric and structural characterization analyses for comparing Municipal Solid Waste composts and vermicomposts stability and maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soobhany, Nuhaa; Gunasee, Sanjana; Rago, Yogeshwari Pooja; Joyram, Hashita; Raghoo, Pravesh; Mohee, Romeela; Garg, Vinod Kumar

    2017-07-01

    This is the first-ever study of its kind for an extensive assessment and comparison of maturity indexes between compost and vermicompost that have been derived from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW). The spectroscopic (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and structural characterization (scanning electron microscope: SEM) were recorded. FT-IR spectra showed an increase in conversion of polysaccharides species and aliphatic methylene groups in vermicompost compared to compost as depicted from the variation of the intensity of the peaks. TG curves of final vermicompost showed a much lower mass loss when compared to compost, indicating higher stability in feedstock. SEM micrographs of the vermicompost reflected strong fragmentation of material than composts which revealed the extent of intra-structural degradation of MSW. These findings elucidate on a clear comparison between composts and vermicomposts in terms of maturity indexes for soil enhancement and in agriculture as organic fertilizer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparative analysis of five chrome green pigments based on different spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desnica, V.; Furic, K.; Hochleitner, B.; Mantler, M.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed study of five chrome-based green pigments belonging to a large pigment collection at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, Austria has been performed. The samples were analyzed and compared using the two X-ray methods--X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction, and the two optical methods--Raman spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The composition differences between the similarly denoted samples of the collection were determined and the significant sensitivity differences of the investigated methods to specific compounds have been established. This relative discrepancy of the obtained results depending on the technique used proved once again the need of a combined use of the investigated methods

  2. Comparison of structure and organization of cutaneous lipids in a reconstructed skin model and human skin: spectroscopic imaging and chromatographic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfayli, Ali; Bonnier, Franck; Farhane, Zeineb; Libong, Danielle; Byrne, Hugh J; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2014-06-01

    The use of animals for scientific research is increasingly restricted by legislation, increasing the demand for human skin models. These constructs present comparable bulk lipid content to human skin. However, their permeability is significantly higher, limiting their applicability as models of barrier function, although the molecular origins of this reduced barrier function remain unclear. This study analyses the stratum corneum (SC) of one such commercially available reconstructed skin model (RSM) compared with human SC by spectroscopic imaging and chromatographic profiling. Total lipid composition was compared by chromatographic analysis (HPLC). Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate the conformational order, lateral packing and distribution of lipids in the surface and skin/RSM sections. Although HPLC indicates that all SC lipid classes are present, significant differences are observed in ceramide profiles. Raman imaging demonstrated that the RSM lipids are distributed in a non-continuous matrix, providing a better understanding of the limited barrier function. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma: Predictive Value for the Site of Postradiotherapy Relapse in a Prospective Longitudinal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laprie, Anne; Catalaa, Isabelle; Cassol, Emmanuelle; McKnight, Tracy R.; Berchery, Delphine; Marre, Delphine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Berry, Isabelle; Moyal, Elizabeth Cohen-Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI)-defined, metabolically abnormal tumor regions and subsequent sites of relapse in data from patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) in a prospective clinical trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three examinations were performed prospectively for 9 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme studied in a Phase I trial combining Tipifarnib and RT. The patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRSI before treatment and every 2 months until relapse. The MRSI data were categorized by the choline (Cho)/N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratio (CNR) as a measure of spectroscopic abnormality. CNRs corresponding to T1 and T2 MRI for 1,207 voxels were evaluated before RT and at recurrence. Results: Before treatment, areas of CNR2 (CNR ≥2) represented 25% of the contrast-enhancing (T1CE) regions and 10% of abnormal T2 regions outside T1CE (HyperT2). The presence of CNR2 was often an early indicator of the site of relapse after therapy. In fact, 75% of the voxels within the T1CE+CNR2 before therapy continued to exhibit CNR2 at relapse, compared with 22% of the voxels within the T1CE with normal CNR (p < 0.05). The location of new contrast enhancement with CNR2 corresponded in 80% of the initial HyperT2+CNR2 vs. 20.7% of the HyperT2 voxels with normal CNR (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Metabolically active regions represented a small percentage of pretreatment MRI abnormalities and were predictive for the site of post-RT relapse. The incorporation of MRSI data in the definition of RT target volumes for selective boosting may be a promising avenue leading to increased local control of glioblastomas

  4. Comparative analysis of different methods for image enhancement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴笑峰; 胡仕刚; 赵瑾; 李志明; 李劲; 唐志军; 席在芳

    2014-01-01

    Image enhancement technology plays a very important role to improve image quality in image processing. By enhancing some information and restraining other information selectively, it can improve image visual effect. The objective of this work is to implement the image enhancement to gray scale images using different techniques. After the fundamental methods of image enhancement processing are demonstrated, image enhancement algorithms based on space and frequency domains are systematically investigated and compared. The advantage and defect of the above-mentioned algorithms are analyzed. The algorithms of wavelet based image enhancement are also deduced and generalized. Wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) is a method for detecting the fractal dimension of a signal, it is well used for image enhancement. The image techniques are compared by using the mean (μ), standard deviation (s), mean square error (MSE) and PSNR (peak signal to noise ratio). A group of experimental results demonstrate that the image enhancement algorithm based on wavelet transform is effective for image de-noising and enhancement. Wavelet transform modulus maxima method is one of the best methods for image enhancement.

  5. Spectroscopic Imaging Using Ge and CdTe Based Detector Systems for Hard X-ray Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astromskas, Vytautas

    Third generation synchrotron facilities such as the Diamond Light Source (DLS) have a wide range of experiments performed for a wide range of science fields. The DLS operates at energies up to 150 keV which introduces great challenges to radiation detector technology. This work focuses on the requirements that the detector technology faces for X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) and powder diffraction experiments in I12 and I15 beam lines, respectively. A segmented HPGe demonstrator detector with in-built charge sensitive CUBE preamplifiers and a Schottky e- collection CdTe Medipix3RX detector systems were investigated to understand the underlying mechanisms that limit spectroscopic, imaging performances and stability and to find ways to overcome or minimise those limitations. The energy resolution and stability of the Ge demonstrator detector was found to have the required characteristics for XAFS measurements. Charge sharing was identified as a limiting factor to the resolution which is going to be addressed in the future development of a full detector system as well as reductions in electronic noise and cross-talk effects. The stability study of the Schottky CdTe Medipix3RX detector showed that polarization is highly dependent on temperature, irradiation duration and incoming flux. A new pixel behaviour called tri-phase (3-P) pixel was identified and a novel method for determining optimum operational conditions was developed. The use of the 3-P pixels as a criterion for depolarization resulted in a stable performance of the detector. Furthermore, the detector was applied in powder diffraction measurement at the I15 beam line and resulted in the detector diffraction pattern matching the simulated data. CdTe Medipix3RX and HEXITEC spectroscopic imaging detectors were applied in identification and discrimination of transitional metals for security application and K-edge subtraction for medical applications. The results showed that both detectors have potential

  6. Development of quality control and instrumentation performance metrics for diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging instruments in the multi-center clinical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Samuel T.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Warren, Robert V.; Hill, Brian; Roblyer, Darren; Leproux, AnaÑ--s.; Durkin, Amanda F.; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Haghany, Hosain; Mantulin, William W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-03-01

    Instrument equivalence and quality control are critical elements of multi-center clinical trials. We currently have five identical Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Imaging (DOSI) instruments enrolled in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN, #6691) trial located at five academic clinical research sites in the US. The goal of the study is to predict the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 60 patients. In order to reliably compare DOSI measurements across different instruments, operators and sites, we must be confident that the data quality is comparable. We require objective and reliable methods for identifying, correcting, and rejecting low quality data. To achieve this goal, we developed and tested an automated quality control algorithm that rejects data points below the instrument noise floor, improves tissue optical property recovery, and outputs a detailed data quality report. Using a new protocol for obtaining dark-noise data, we applied the algorithm to ACRIN patient data and successfully improved the quality of recovered physiological data in some cases.

  7. A spectroscopic approach to imaging and quantification of cartilage lesions in human knee joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, A; Oeberg, P A; Sundqvist, T; Kuiper, J-H

    2011-01-01

    We have previously described a technology based on diffuse reflectance of broadband light for measuring joint articular cartilage thickness, utilizing that optical absorption is different in cartilage and subchondral bone. This study is the first evaluation of the technology in human material. We also investigated the prospects of cartilage lesion imaging, with the specific aim of arthroscopic integration. Cartilage thickness was studied ex vivo in a number of sites (n = 87) on human knee joint condyles, removed from nine patients during total knee replacement surgery. A reflectance spectrum was taken at each site and the cartilage thickness was estimated using the blue, green, red and near-infrared regions of the spectrum, respectively. Estimated values were compared with reference cartilage thickness values (taken after sample slicing) using an exponential model. Two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were performed in a theoretical analysis of the experimental results. The reference cartilage thickness of the investigated sites was 1.60 ± 1.30 mm (mean ± SD) in the range 0-4.2 mm. Highest correlation coefficients were seen for the calculations based on the near-infrared region after normalization to the red region (r = 0.86) and for the green region (r = 0.80).

  8. 7 Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in adult X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratai, Eva; Kok, Trina; Wiggins, Christopher; Wiggins, Graham; Grant, Ellen; Gagoski, Borjan; O'Neill, Gilmore; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Eichler, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Background Adult patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) remain at risk for progressive neurological deterioration. Phenotypes vary in their pathology, ranging from axonal degeneration to inflammatory demyelination. The severity of symptoms is poorly explained by conventional imaging. Objective To test the hypothesis that neurochemistry in normal appearing brain differs among adult phenotypes of X-ALD, and that neurochemical changes correlate with the severity of symptoms. Patients and Methods Using a 7 Tesla scanner we performed structural and proton MRSI in 13 adult patients with X-ALD, including 4 patients with adult cerebral ALD (ACALD), 5 with adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) and 4 female heterozygotes. Studies were also performed in nine healthy controls. Results Among adult X-ALD phenotypes, MI/Cr was 46% higher and Cho/Cr 21% higher in normal appearing white matter of ACALD compared to AMN (p Tesla proton MRSI reveals differences in the neurochemistry of ACALD but is unable to distinguish AMN from female heterozygotes. MI/Cr correlates with the severity of the symptoms and may be a meaningful biomarker in adult X-ALD. PMID:19001168

  9. A polymer-based magnetic resonance tracer for visualization of solid tumors by 13C spectroscopic imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Suzuki

    Full Text Available Morphological imaging precedes lesion-specific visualization in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI because of the superior ability of this technique to depict tissue morphology with excellent spatial and temporal resolutions. To achieve lesion-specific visualization of tumors by MRI, we investigated the availability of a novel polymer-based tracer. Although the 13C nucleus is a candidate for a detection nucleus because of its low background signal in the body, the low magnetic resonance sensitivity of the nucleus needs to be resolved before developing a 13C-based tracer. In order to overcome this problem, we enriched polyethylene glycol (PEG, a biocompatible polymer, with 13C atoms. 13C-PEG40,000 (13C-PEG with an average molecular weight of 40 kDa emitted a single 13C signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio due to its ability to maintain signal sharpness, as was confirmed by in vivo investigation, and displayed a chemical shift sufficiently distinct from that of endogenous fat. 13C-PEG40,000 intravenously injected into mice showed long retention in circulation, leading to its effective accumulation in tumors reflecting the well-known phenomenon that macromolecules accumulate in tumors because of leaky tumor capillaries. These properties of 13C-PEG40,000 allowed visualization of tumors in mice by 13C spectroscopic imaging. These findings suggest that a technique based on 13C-PEG is a promising strategy for tumor detection.

  10. Using Raman spectroscopic imaging for non-destructive analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boros, Evelin; Porse, Peter Bak; Nielsen, Inga

    2016-01-01

    A feasibility study on using Raman spectral imaging for visualization and analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled poly-propylene samples has been carried out. The spectral images were acquired using a Raman spectrometer with 785 nm light source.Eight injection-molded samples with concentr...

  11. Micro-Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging of Individual Identified Marine Biogenic and Ambient Organic Ice Nuclei (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, D. A.; Alpert, P. A.; Wang, B.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R. C.; Aller, J. Y.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation represents one of the least understood atmospheric processes with important implications for the hydrological cycle and climate. Current freezing descriptions assume that ice active sites on the particle surface initiate ice nucleation, however, the nature of these sites remains elusive. Here, we present a new experimental method that allows us to relate physical and chemical properties of individual particles with observed water uptake and ice nucleation ability using a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical techniques. We apply this method to field-collected particles and particles generated via bursting of bubbles produced by glass frit aeration and plunging water impingement jets in a mesocosm containing artificial sea water and bacteria and/or phytoplankton. The most efficient ice nuclei (IN) within a particle population are identified and characterized. Single particle characterization is achieved by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. A vapor controlled cooling-stage coupled to an optical microscope is used to determine the onsets of water uptake, immersion freezing, and deposition ice nucleation of the individual particles as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. In addition, we perform CCSEM/EDX to obtain on a single particle level the elemental composition of the entire particle population. Thus, we can determine if the IN are exceptional in nature or belong to a major particle type class with respect to composition and size. We find that ambient and sea spray particles are coated by organic material and can induce ice formation under tropospheric relevant conditions. Micro-spectroscopic single particle analysis of the investigated particle samples invokes a potential

  12. Spectroscopic imaging of self-organization in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Joakim; Ni, Pavel; Anders, André

    2013-01-01

    Excitation and ionization conditions in traveling ionization zones of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas were investigated using fast camera imaging through interference filters. The images, taken in end-on and side-on views using light of selected gas and target atom and ion spectral lines, suggest that ionization zones are regions of enhanced densities of electrons, and excited atoms and ions. Excited atoms and ions of the target material (Al) are strongly concentrated near the target surface. Images from the highest excitation energies exhibit the most localized regions, suggesting localized Ohmic heating consistent with double layer formation

  13. Preliminary results from a high-pressure imaging spectroscopic proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, C.J.; Bazzano, A.; Lewis, R.A.; Parker, B.; Ubertini, P.; Worgan, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    A new type of high-pressure proportional counter, with both spatial resolution and spectroscopic capabilities is being jointly developed by the Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale (CNR), Frascati, Italy and the SERC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, UK. The characteristics of the detector can be optimized for the particular requirement of the experiment, either for x-ray astronomy observations from space, or for the high count rate applications associated with a synchrotron light source. In its baseline configuration, the detector is filled to 5 bar with a xenon/quench gas mixture and will be sensitive over the energy range 5 keV to 150 keV (2.5 to 0.08 A). The positional resolution will range from 500 μm at the lower energies to around 1 mm at the higher end of the energy range. The current prototype has a sensitive area of 200x200 mm. The final version is hoped to have an area closer to 425x425 mm. The very small photon absorption length in the higher pressure gas allows the parallax effect, a feature of 1 atmosphere detectors, to be greatly reduced. The timing resolution (150 ns) of the detector enables both a high-rate capability and the possibility of the escape gate technique to achieve higher spectral resolution at energies > the Xe K edge. Preliminary results are presented showing the spectral and positional resolution for the prototype detector

  14. A deep X-ray spectroscopic survey of the ESO imaging survey fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Jørgensen, H.E.; Hansen, Lene

    1998-01-01

    The deepest ROSAT surveys have shown, that, in the energy range 0.5-2.0 keV, QSO's can account for similar to 30 per cent of the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXRB), and Narrow Emission Line Galaxies (NELG) and clusters of galaxies for about 10 per cent each. But, by assuming characteristic spectral ...... provide new insight into the evolution of galaxies, clusters of galaxies and AGN's.......The deepest ROSAT surveys have shown, that, in the energy range 0.5-2.0 keV, QSO's can account for similar to 30 per cent of the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXRB), and Narrow Emission Line Galaxies (NELG) and clusters of galaxies for about 10 per cent each. But, by assuming characteristic spectral....... This spectroscopic X-ray survey will provide a large, statistically complete, sample of sources detected at high energies, more than an order of magnitude fainter than obtained by previous missions. The study of these sources will significantly improve our understanding not only of the origin of DXRB, but also...

  15. High resolution spectroscopic mapping imaging applied in situ to multilayer structures for stratigraphic identification of painted art objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Georgios Th.

    2016-04-01

    The development of non-destructive techniques is a reality in the field of conservation science. These techniques are usually not so accurate, as the analytical micro-sampling techniques, however, the proper development of soft-computing techniques can improve their accuracy. In this work, we propose a real-time fast acquisition spectroscopic mapping imaging system that operates from the ultraviolet to mid infrared (UV/Vis/nIR/mIR) area of the electromagnetic spectrum and it is supported by a set of soft-computing methods to identify the materials that exist in a stratigraphic structure of paint layers. Particularly, the system acquires spectra in diffuse-reflectance mode, scanning in a Region-Of-Interest (ROI), and having wavelength range from 200 up to 5000 nm. Also, a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm, i.e., the particular soft-computing algorithm, produces the mapping images. The evaluation of the method was tested on a byzantine painted icon.

  16. A New Method to Comprehensively Diagnose Shock Waves in the Solar Atmosphere Based on Simultaneous Spectroscopic and Imaging Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Wenzhi; Yan, Limei; He, Jiansen; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Linghua; Wei, Yong

    2018-06-01

    Shock waves are believed to play an important role in plasma heating. The shock-like temporal jumps in radiation intensity and Doppler shift have been identified in the solar atmosphere. However, a quantitative diagnosis of the shocks in the solar atmosphere is still lacking, seriously hindering the understanding of shock dissipative heating of the solar atmosphere. Here, we propose a new method to realize the goal of the shock quantitative diagnosis, based on Rankine–Hugoniot equations and taking the advantages of simultaneous imaging and spectroscopic observations from, e.g., IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph). Because of this method, the key parameters of shock candidates can be derived, such as the bulk velocity and temperature of the plasma in the upstream and downstream, the propagation speed and direction. The method is applied to the shock candidates observed by IRIS, and the overall characteristics of the shocks are revealed quantitatively for the first time. This method is also tested with the help of forward modeling, i.e., virtual observations of simulated shocks. The parameters obtained from the method are consistent with the parameters of the shock formed in the model and are independent of the viewing direction. Therefore, the method we proposed here is applicable to the quantitative and comprehensive diagnosis of the observed shocks in the solar atmosphere.

  17. Fast mapping of the T2 relaxation time of cerebral metabolites using proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Posse, Stefan; Lin, Yi-Ru; Ko, Cheng-Wen; Otazo, Ricardo; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2007-05-01

    Metabolite T2 is necessary for accurate quantification of the absolute concentration of metabolites using long-echo-time (TE) acquisition schemes. However, lengthy data acquisition times pose a major challenge to mapping metabolite T2. In this study we used proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) at 3T to obtain fast T2 maps of three major cerebral metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cre), and choline (Cho). We showed that PEPSI spectra matched T2 values obtained using single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS). Data acquisition for 2D metabolite maps with a voxel volume of 0.95 ml (32 x 32 image matrix) can be completed in 25 min using five TEs and eight averages. A sufficient spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for T2 estimation was validated by high Pearson's correlation coefficients between logarithmic MR signals and TEs (R2 = 0.98, 0.97, and 0.95 for NAA, Cre, and Cho, respectively). In agreement with previous studies, we found that the T2 values of NAA, but not Cre and Cho, were significantly different between gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM; P PEPSI and SVS scans was less than 9%. Consistent spatial distributions of T2 were found in six healthy subjects, and disagreement among subjects was less than 10%. In summary, the PEPSI technique is a robust method to obtain fast mapping of metabolite T2. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at low temperature and high magnetic eld for biomedical applications in Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutailler, Florent

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis work was to design, build and optimize a large volume multi-samples DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) polarizer dedicated to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging applications. The experimental system is made up of a high magnetic field magnet (3,35 T) in which takes place a cryogenic system with a pumped bath of liquid helium ("4He) allowing temperatures lower than 1,2 K. A set of inserts is used for the different steps of DNP: irradiation of the sample by a microwave field (f=94 GHz and P=50 mW), polarization measurement by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance... With this system, up to three samples of 1 mL volume can be polarized to a rate of few per-cents. The system has a long autonomy of four hours, so it can be used for polarizing molecules with a long time constant of polarization. Finally, the possibility to get quasi-simultaneously, after dissolution, several samples with a high rate of polarization opens the way of new applications in biomedical imaging. (author) [fr

  19. A portable neutron spectroscope (NSPECT) for detection, imaging and identification of nuclear material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James M.; Bancroft, Christopher; Bloser, Peter; Bravar, Ulisse; Fourguette, Dominique; Frost, Colin; Larocque, Liane; McConnell, Mark L.; Legere, Jason; Pavlich, Jane; Ritter, Greg; Wassick, Greg; Wood, Joshua; Woolf, Richard

    2010-08-01

    We have developed, fabricated and tested a prototype imaging neutron spectrometer designed for real-time neutron source location and identification. Real-time detection and identification is important for locating materials. These materials, specifically uranium and transuranics, emit neutrons via spontaneous or induced fission. Unlike other forms of radiation (e.g. gamma rays), penetrating neutron emission is very uncommon. The instrument detects these neutrons, constructs images of the emission pattern, and reports the neutron spectrum. The device will be useful for security and proliferation deterrence, as well as for nuclear waste characterization and monitoring. The instrument is optimized for imaging and spectroscopy in the 1-20 MeV range. The detection principle is based upon multiple elastic neutron-proton scatters in organic scintillator. Two detector panel layers are utilized. By measuring the recoil proton and scattered neutron locations and energies, the direction and energy spectrum of the incident neutrons can be determined and discrete and extended sources identified. Event reconstruction yields an image of the source and its location. The hardware is low power, low mass, and rugged. Its modular design allows the user to combine multiple units for increased sensitivity. We will report the results of laboratory testing of the instrument, including exposure to a calibrated Cf-252 source. Instrument parameters include energy and angular resolution, gamma rejection, minimum source identification distances and times, and projected effective area for a fully populated instrument.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Tumor Metabolic Markers for Cancer Diagnosis, Metabolic Phenotyping, and Characterization of Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhong He

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display heterogeneous genetic characteristics, depending on the tumor dynamic microenvironment. Abnormal tumor vasculature and poor tissue oxygenation generate a fraction of hypoxic tumor cells that have selective advantages in metastasis and invasion and often resist chemo- and radiation therapies. The genetic alterations acquired by tumors modify their biochemical pathways, which results in abnormal tumor metabolism. An elevation in glycolysis known as the “Warburg effect” and changes in lipid synthesis and oxidation occur. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS has been used to study tumor metabolism in preclinical animal models and in clinical research on human breast, brain, and prostate cancers. This technique can identify specific genetic and metabolic changes that occur in malignant tumors. Therefore, the metabolic markers, detectable by MRS, not only provide information on biochemical changes but also define different metabolic tumor phenotypes. When combined with the contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, which has a high sensitivity for cancer diagnosis, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI improves the diagnostic specificity of malignant human cancers and is becoming an important clinical tool for cancer management and care. This article reviews the MRSI techniques as molecular imaging methods to detect and quantify metabolic changes in various tumor tissue types, especially in extracranial tumor tissues that contain high concentrations of fat. MRI/MRSI methods have been used to characterize tumor microenvironments in terms of blood volume and vessel permeability. Measurements of tissue oxygenation and glycolytic rates by MRS also are described to illustrate the capability of the MR technology in probing molecular information non-invasively in tumor tissues and its important potential for studying molecular mechanisms of human cancers in physiological conditions.

  1. {sup 1}H-MR-spectroscopic imaging in patients with Alzheimer`s disease; {sup 1}H-MR-spektroskopische Bildgebung bei Patienten mit klinisch gesichertem Morbus Alzheimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, W [Radiogische Klinik der Univ. Bonn (Germany); Traeber, F [Radiogische Klinik der Univ. Bonn (Germany); Kuhl, C K [Radiogische Klinik der Univ. Bonn (Germany); Fric, M [Psychiatrische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany); Keller, E [Radiogische Klinik der Univ. Bonn (Germany); Lamerichs, R [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Rink, H [Radiogische Klinik der Univ. Bonn (Germany); Moeller, H J [Psychiatrische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany); Schild, H H [Radiogische Klinik der Univ. Bonn (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    To detect regional differences in accompanying metabolic changes, {sup 1}H-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging was performed in 16 patients with Alzheimer`s disease (AD); the clinical diagnosis was based upon DSM-III-R and NINCDS-ADRDA guidelines. In the hippocampal region metabolic maps of the local distribution of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), creatine compounds (P(Cr)) and lactate were determined. Ratios of Cho/NAA, (P)Cr/NAA and Cho/(P)Cr calculated from selected hippocampal spectra were compared to those from healthy volunteers (n=17). AD patients demonstrated an increase of Cho/NAA and (P)Cr/NAA ratios caused by increased choline compounds and decreased NAA. These alterations were observed in 11/12 cases in the hippocampal and in 7/12 in the temporo-occipital region. Hippocampal Cho/NAA ratios (0.56{+-}0.19) were significantly elevated compared with controls. The observed elevation of choline compounds in the hippocampus supports the hypothesis that alterations in the cholinergic system play an important role in Alzheimer`s disease. The observed reduction of NAA is due to neuronal degeneration. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Zur Darstellung von regionalen metabolischen Veraenderungen bei Morbus Alzheimer wurden mit dem Verfahren des {sup 1}H-Magnetic-Resonance-Spectroscopic-Imaging 16 Patienten untersucht, deren Diagnose klinisch entsprechend DSM-III-R- und NINCDS-ADRDA-Kriterien gestellt wurde. In Hoehe des Hippocampus wurden transaxiale ``Metabolitenkarten`` der regionalen Verteilung von N-Acetyl-Aspartat (NAA), cholinhaltiger Verbindungen (Cho), Gesamtkreatin (P(Cr)) und Laktat erstellt. Zur Quantifizierung der Unterschiede zum Normalkollektiv (n=17) wurden die Metabolitenquotienten Cho/NAA, (P)Cr/NAA und Cho/(P)Cr, insbesondere aus der Hippocampusregion, ermittelt. Das Krankheitsbild des M. Alzheimer stellte sich durch eine Erhoehung der Quotienten Cho/NAA und Cho/(P)Cr dar, wobei neben einer Cholinerhoehung die Reduktion des Neurotransmitters NAA

  2. Topical azithromycin and oral doxycycline therapy of meibomian gland dysfunction: a comparative clinical and spectroscopic pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulks, Gary N; Borchman, Douglas; Yappert, Marta; Kakar, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is a common clinical problem that is often associated with evaporative dry eye disease. Alterations of the lipids of the meibomian glands have been identified in several studies of MGD. This prospective, observational, open-label clinical trial documents the improvement in both clinical signs and symptoms of disease as well as spectroscopic characteristics of the meibomian gland lipids after therapy with topical azithromycin ophthalmic solution and oral doxycycline treatment. Subjects with symptomatic MGD were recruited. Signs of MGD were evaluated with a slit lamp. Symptoms of MGD were measured by the response of subjects to a questionnaire. Meibum lipid-lipid interaction strength, conformation, and phase transition parameters, and meibum protein content were measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and principal component analysis. Terpenoids, short-chain CH3 moieties, lipid oxidation, wax, cholesterylesters and glycerides were measured with a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectrometer. Topical therapy with azithromycin and oral therapy with doxycycline relieved signs and symptoms and restored the lipid properties of the meibomian gland secretion toward normal. Compared with 4 weeks of azithromycin treatment reported in our previous study, oral doxycycline treatment was slightly less effective in improving foreign body sensation and the signs of plugging and secretion. In subjects with clinical evidence of MGD, changes in ordering of the lipids and phase transition temperature were brought closer to normal with azithromycin treatment than doxycycline treatment. Treatment with doxycycline but not azithromycin restored the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-principal component analysis scores and relative area of the H-NMR resonance at 1.26 ppm. Both doxycycline and azithromycin treatment restored the levels of the relative areas of the H-NMR resonance at 5.2 and 7.9 ppm to normal levels. The levels

  3. Comparative imaging study on monkeys with hemi-parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Yu Xiaoping; Mao Jun; Liu Sheng; Wang Xiaoyi; Peng Guangchun; Wang Ruiwen

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging appearance of experimental Parkinson's disease (PD) and to evaluate the different medical imaging exams on PD. Methods: CT, MRI, SPECT (dopamine transporter imaging and regional cerebral blood flow imaging, DAT imaging and rCBF imaging), and PET (glucose metabolism imaging) were performed on 8 monkeys before and after the infusion of MPTP into unilateral internal carotid artery to develop hemi-Parkinsonism models. Results: Hemi-Parkinsonism models were successfully induced on all 8 monkeys. On DAT imaging, the uptake values of the lesioned striatums decreased obviously after the MPTP treatment and were lower than that of the contralateral ones. The glucose metabolic rates of the lesioned striatums and thalamus in PD models were lower, compared to that of the healthy monkeys and that of the contralateral sides of themselves. Neither DAT nor glucose metabolism abnormalities was found on both the contralateral sides of the healthy and PD monkeys. On MRI images before MPTP treatment, only 4 of 8 PD models showed hypointense in bilateral globus pallidus. No abnormal MRI findings occurred in the first 2 months after injection of MPTP. At tile third month, hypointense appeared in globus pallidus of three monkeys. Enlarged hyposignal region in globus pallidus were found in three models. Of the above 6 monkeys, two appeared hypointense in putamina. Substantia nigra demonstrated no abnormalities before and after MPTP treatment. All rCBF and CT images were normal. Conclusion: The decreased density of DAT and decreased glucose metabolism on experimental PD can be showed early by DAT imaging and glucose metabolism imaging, MRI can show abnormal signal in the basal ganglia of PD but it is later than DAT and glucose metabolism imaging. CT and rCBF find no abnormality on PD

  4. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  5. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF CONTINUOUS OUTFLOWS AND PROPAGATING WAVES FROM NOAA 10942 WITH EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER/HINODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizuka, N.; Hara, H.

    2011-01-01

    We focused on 'sit-and-stare' observations of an outflow region at the edge of active region NOAA 10942 on 2007 February 20 obtained by the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode. We analyzed the data above the base of the outflow and found both continuous outflows and waves, which propagate from the base of the outflow. The spectra at the base of the outflow and at higher locations show different properties. The line profiles show blue-side asymmetry at the base of the outflow where nonthermal broadening becomes large because of fast upflows generated by heating events. On the other hand, at higher locations line profiles are symmetric and the intensity disturbances vary in phase with the velocity disturbances. The correlations between the intensity and velocity disturbances become noticeable at higher locations, so this indicates evidence of (at least locally) upward propagating slow-mode waves along the outflow. We also found a transient oscillation of different period in the wavelet spectrum. This indicates that a different wave is additionally observed during a limited period. High cadence spectroscopic observations revealed intermittent signatures of nonthermal velocities. Each of them seems to correspond to the base of the propagating disturbances. Furthermore, a jet was captured by the sit-and-stare observations across the slit. The similarity of line profiles of the outflow and the jet may indicate that the flows and waves originate in unresolved explosive events in the lower atmosphere of the corona.

  6. Comparing Generative Adversarial Network Techniques for Image Creation and Modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Mathijs; Wiering, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Generative adversarial networks (GANs) have demonstrated to be successful at generating realistic real-world images. In this paper we compare various GAN techniques, both supervised and unsupervised. The effects on training stability of different objective functions are compared. We add an encoder

  7. Echo-Planar Imaging Based J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging for Improved Metabolite Detection in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Clinical Setting" was presented at the 20th International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) meeting in Melbourne , Australia (May 5-11...experience. Eur Urol 2001;40(1):75–83. 5. Chandra RV, Heinze S, Dowling R, Shadbolt C, Costello A, Pedersen J. Endorectal mag- netic resonance imaging

  8. High-pulse energy supercontinuum laser for high-resolution spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging of lipids in the 1650-1850 nm region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasa, Manoj Kumar; Markos, Christos; Maria, Michael; Petersen, Christian R; Moselund, Peter M; Bang, Ole

    2018-04-01

    We propose a cost-effective high-pulse energy supercontinuum (SC) source based on a telecom range diode laser-based amplifier and a few meters of standard single-mode optical fiber, with a pulse energy density as high as ~25 nJ/nm in the 1650-1850 nm regime (factor >3 times higher than any SC source ever used in this wavelength range). We demonstrate how such an SC source combined with a tunable filter allows high-resolution spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging and the spectroscopy of lipids in the first overtone transition band of C-H bonds (1650-1850 nm). We show the successful discrimination of two different lipids (cholesterol and lipid in adipose tissue) and the photoacoustic cross-sectional scan of lipid-rich adipose tissue at three different locations. The proposed high-pulse energy SC laser paves a new direction towards compact, broadband and cost-effective source for spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging.

  9. Combining parallel detection of proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) measurements with a data-consistency constraint improves SNR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Chu, Ying-Hua; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2015-12-01

    One major challenge of MRSI is the poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which can be improved by using a surface coil array. Here we propose to exploit the spatial sensitivity of different channels of a coil array to enforce the k-space data consistency (DC) in order to suppress noise and consequently to improve MRSI SNR. MRSI data were collected using a proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) sequence at 3 T using a 32-channel coil array and were averaged with one, two and eight measurements (avg-1, avg-2 and avg-8). The DC constraint was applied using a regularization parameter λ of 1, 2, 3, 5 or 10. Metabolite concentrations were quantified using LCModel. Our results show that the suppression of noise by applying the DC constraint to PEPSI reconstruction yields up to 32% and 27% SNR gain for avg-1 and avg-2 data with λ = 5, respectively. According to the reported Cramer-Rao lower bounds, the improvement in metabolic fitting was significant (p < 0.01) when the DC constraint was applied with λ ≥ 2. Using the DC constraint with λ = 3 or 5 can minimize both root-mean-square errors and spatial variation for all subjects using the avg-8 data set as reference values. Our results suggest that MRSI reconstructed with a DC constraint can save around 70% of scanning time to obtain images and spectra with similar SNRs using λ = 5. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Echo-Planar Imaging-Based, J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging for Improved Metabolite Detection in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    post-process the multi-dimensional MRS data from different prostate pathologies . Scope: Improved cancer detection (specificity) in differentiating...MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients Between March 2012 and May 2013, twenty-two patients with PCa with a mean age of 63.8 years (range, 46–79 years), who...tumor voxels, which was confirmed by the pathology report. After reconstruction, the EP-JRESI data were overlaid onto MRI images. MRI and MRSI A body

  11. Towards UV imaging sensors based on single-crystal diamond chips for spectroscopic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Sio, A. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, 50125 Florence (Italy)], E-mail: desio@arcetri.astro.it; Bocci, A. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, 50125 Florence (Italy); Bruno, P.; Di Benedetto, R.; Greco, V.; Gullotta, G. [INAF-Astrophysical Observatory of Catania (Italy); Marinelli, M. [INFN-Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Roma ' Tor Vergata' (Italy); Pace, E. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, 50125 Florence (Italy); Rubulotta, D.; Scuderi, S. [INAF-Astrophysical Observatory of Catania (Italy); Verona-Rinati, G. [INFN-Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Roma ' Tor Vergata' (Italy)

    2007-12-11

    The recent improvements achieved in the Homoepitaxial Chemical Vapour Deposition technique have led to the production of high-quality detector-grade single-crystal diamonds. Diamond-based detectors have shown excellent performances in UV and X-ray detection, paving the way for applications of diamond technology to the fields of space astronomy and high-energy photon detection in harsh environments or against strong visible light emission. These applications are possible due to diamond's unique properties such as its chemical inertness and visible blindness, respectively. Actually, the development of linear array detectors represents the main issue for a full exploitation of diamond detectors. Linear arrays are a first step to study bi-dimensional sensors. Such devices allow one to face the problems related to pixel miniaturisation and of signal read-out from many channels. Immediate applications would be in spectroscopy, where such arrays are preferred. This paper reports on the development of imaging detectors made by our groups, starting from the material growth and characterisation, through the design, fabrication and packaging of 2xn pixel arrays, to their electro-optical characterisation in terms of UV sensitivity, uniformity of the response and to the development of an electronic circuit suitable to read-out very low photocurrent signals. The detector and its electronic read-out were then tested using a 2x5 pixel array based on a single-crystal diamond. The results will be discussed in the framework of the development of an imager device for X-UV astronomy applications in space missions.

  12. Spectroscopic CZT detectors development for x- and gamma-ray imaging instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrini, Egidio M.; Uslenghi, Michela; Alderighi, Monica; Casini, Fabio; D'Angelo, Sergio; Fiorini, Mauro; La Palombara, Nicola; Mancini, Marcello; Monti, Serena; Bazzano, Angela; Di Cosimo, Sergio; Frutti, Massimo; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ubertini, Pietro; Guadalupi, Giuseppe M.; Sassi, Matteo; Negri, Barbara

    2007-09-01

    In the context of R&D studies financed by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), a feasibility study to evaluate the Italian Industry interest in medium-large scale production of enhanced CZT detectors has been performed by an Italian Consortium. The R&D investment aims at providing in-house source of high quality solid state spectrometers for Space Astrophysics applications. As a possible spin-off industrial applications to Gamma-ray devices for non-destructive inspections in medical, commercial and security fields have been considered by ASI. The short term programme mainly consists of developing proprietary procedures for 2-3" CZT crystals growth, including bonding and contact philosophy, and a newly designed low-power electronics readout chain. The prototype design and breadboarding is based on a fast signal AD conversion with the target in order to perform a new run for an already existing low-power (digital photon energy reconstruction with particular care for multiple events and polarimetry evaluations. Scientific requirement evaluations for Space Astrophysics Satellite applications have been carried out in parallel, targeted to contribute to the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 Announcement of Opportunity. Detailed accommodation studies are undergoing, as part of this programme, to size a "Large area arcsecond angular resolution Imager" for the Gamma Ray Imager satellite (Knödlseder et al., this conference).and a new Gamma-ray Wide Field Camera for the "EDGE" proposal (Piro et al., this conference). Finally, an extended market study for cost analysis evaluation in view of the foreseen massive detector production has been performed.

  13. MR spectroscopic imaging studies of prostate cancer: comparison of body coil and endorectal coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinmin; Wang Xiaoying; Guo Xuemei; Wang He; Jiang Xuexiang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of MRS acquired by body coil (BODY) and endorectal Coil (ERC) in the detection of prostate cancer. Methods: MRI and 3D MRS were performed in 12 patients with prostate disease, in which 6 of them were proved to have prostate cancer and the other 6 noncancerous disease. Both BODY and ERC MRS were performed in 7 patients, and only BODY MRS was performed in the other 5 patients. All MRS data were quantitatively assessed with a per-sextant method. The metabolic ratio of (Choline + Creatine)/Citrate [(Cho + Crc )/Cit] was measured in each ROI. ROC analysis was carried out to assess and to compare the diagnostic value of BODY and ERC MRS in patients with prostate cancer with Wilcoxon test. Results: (1) The ratios of (Cho + Cre)/Cit in the prostate cancer group (median 1.744, 0.295 to 7.998) was statistically higher than that in the non-prostate cancer group (median 0.412, 0.112 to 2.113)acquired by using BODY MRS(Z=-9.159, P 0.05). (4) ROC analysis for diagnosing prostate cancer showed no significant difference (P=0.851 ) between the areas under the curve of BODY and that of ERC MRS (Az=0.931 and 0.935 respectively). Conclusion: The BODY MRS could provide comparable diagnostic efficacy to ERC MRS in patients with prostate cancer. (authors)

  14. Uniform and non-uniform modes of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric air: fast imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong; Dobrynin, Danil; Fridman, Alexander

    2014-06-25

    In this study, we report experimental results on fast ICCD imaging of development of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric air and spectroscopic measurements of electric field in the discharge. Uniformity of the discharge images obtained with nanosecond exposure times were analyzed using chi-square test. The results indicate that DBD uniformity strongly depends on applied (global) electric field in the discharge gap, and is a threshold phenomenon. We show that in the case of strong overvoltage on the discharge gap (provided by fast rise times), there is transition from filamentary to uniform DBD mode which correlates to the corresponding decrease of maximum local electric field in the discharge.

  15. Spectroscopic techniques (Mössbauer spectrometry, NMR, ESR,…) as tools to resolve doubtful NMR images: Study of the craniopharyngioma tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbert, J. N.; Dumas, F.; Lafargue, C.; Kellershohn, C.; Brunelle, F.; Lallemand, D.

    1990-07-01

    Craniopharyngioma, an intracranial tumor, exhibits hyperintensity in the Spin-Echo-T2-NMR image and a hyposignal in the SE-T1-image. However, in some cases (15-20% cases), hypersignals are seen in both SE-T1 and T2-MRI. Using spectroscopic techniques, Mössbauer spectrometry in particular, we have demonstrated that the T1 hypersignal is due to ferritin, dissolved in the cystic liquid, after tumor cell lysis, in the course of time. Other possible reasons inducing a shortening of the T1 relaxation time (presence of lipids, intratumoral hemorrhage) have been rejected.

  16. New Image Qualities in Education: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çankaya, Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Turkish and European Union Countries Educations in terms of the new image qualities such as data like access to online education, digital access, foreign languages learnt per pupil, research & development investments, human resources employed in science and technology, the study opportunities offered to…

  17. Fast quantification of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Himanshu; Sajja, Balasrinivasa Rao; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2006-11-01

    Accurate quantification of the MRSI-observed regional distribution of metabolites involves relatively long processing times. This is particularly true in dealing with large amount of data that is typically acquired in multi-center clinical studies. To significantly shorten the processing time, an artificial neural network (ANN)-based approach was explored for quantifying the phase corrected (as opposed to magnitude) spectra. Specifically, in these studies radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) was used. This method was tested on simulated and normal human brain data acquired at 3T. The N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr), choline (Cho)/Cr, glutamate + glutamine (Glx)/Cr, and myo-inositol (mI)/Cr ratios in normal subjects were compared with the line fitting (LF) technique and jMRUI-AMARES analysis, and published values. The average NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, Glx/Cr and mI/Cr ratios in normal controls were found to be 1.58 ± 0.13, 0.9 ± 0.08, 0.7 ± 0.17 and 0.42 ± 0.07, respectively. The corresponding ratios using the LF and jMRUI-AMARES methods were 1.6 ± 0.11, 0.95 ± 0.08, 0.78 ± 0.18, 0.49 ± 0.1 and 1.61 ± 0.15, 0.78 ± 0.07, 0.61 ± 0.18, 0.42 ± 0.13, respectively. These results agree with those published in literature. Bland-Altman analysis indicated an excellent agreement and minimal bias between the results obtained with RBFNN and other methods. The computational time for the current method was 15 s compared to approximately 10 min for the LF-based analysis.

  18. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the substantia nigra of healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeger, Adriane; Godau, Jana; Berg, Daniela [University of Tuebingen, Department of Neurodegeneration, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and German Center for Neurodegenerative Disease (DZNE), Tuebingen (Germany); Chadzynski, Grzegorz; Klose, Uwe [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    To investigate the substantia nigra in patients with Parkinson's disease three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with high spatial resolution at 3 Tesla was performed. Regional variations of spectroscopic data between the rostral and caudal regions of the substantia nigra as well as the midbrain tegmentum areas were evaluated in healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease. Nine patients with Parkinson's disease and eight age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Data were acquired by using three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging measurements. The ratios between rostral and caudal voxels of the substantia nigra as well as the midbrain tegmentum areas were calculated for the main-metabolites N-acetyl aspartate, creatine, choline, and myo-inositol. Additionally, the metabolite/creatine ratios were calculated. In all subjects spectra of acceptable quality could be obtained with a nominal voxel size of 0.252 ml. The calculated rostral-to-caudal ratios of the metabolites as well as of the metabolite/creatine ratios showed with exception of choline/creatine ratio significant differences between healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease. The findings from this study indicate that regional variations in N-acetyl aspartate/creatine ratios in the regions of the substantia nigra may differentiate patients with Parkinson's disease and healthy controls. (orig.)

  19. Comparative investigation on the spectroscopic properties of Pr3+-doped boro-phosphate, boro-germo-silicate and tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liaolin; Dong, Guoping; Peng, Mingying; Qiu, Jianrong

    We report on the spectroscopic properties of Pr3+-doped boro-phosphate, boro-germo-silicate and tellurite glasses. The stimulated absorption and emission cross sections were estimated. Only one emission at 596 nm and 605 nm is observed in Pr3+-doped boro-phosphate and boro-germo-silicate glasses, respectively, while three emissions at 605 nm, 612 nm and 645 nm are observed in Pr3+-doped tellurite glass when excited at 467 nm. The fluorescence lifetime at 600 nm in Pr3+-doped boro-phosphate, boro-germo-silicate and tellurite glasses is 137 μs, 73 μs and 51 μs, respectively. The emissions from Pr3+-doped boro-phosphate, boro-germo-silicate and tellurite glasses show different decay behaviors and can be well explained by multiphonon relaxation theory.

  20. Comparative FT-Raman, FT-IR and colour shifts spectroscopic evaluation of gamma irradiated experimental models of oil paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manca, M.M.; Virgolici, M.; Cutrubinis, M.; Moise, I.V.; Ponta, C.C.; Negut, C.D.; Stanculescu, I.R.; Bucharest University

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The present study follows the changes of gamma irradiated historic pigments and experimental models of oil paintings with non-destructive and non-contact spectroscopic analytical techniques which are the only ones accepted by the conservators/restorers community. Molecular structure characterization was performed by FT-IR / Raman spectroscopy using a Bruker Vertex 70 class equipped with two mobile probes: a MIR fibre module for MIR probes (with LN2 cooled detector) and a Raman RAM II module (LN2 Ge detector) with a RAMPROBE fibre. Colour was measured by a portable reflectance spectrophotometer (Miniscan XE Plus, HunterLab) in diffuse/8 deg geometry with a beam diameter of 4 mm and specular component included. Correlations between colour shifts and changes in molecular structure induced by gamma irradiation were further investigated.

  1. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  2. Comparative study of ultrasound imaging, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in gynecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hisaaki; Hoshihara, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Mitsunao; Suda, Yoshio; Takenaka, Eiichi; Sasa, Hidenori.

    1989-01-01

    We studied 18 patients who were operated at the National Defense Medical College Hospital and confirmed by pathological diagnosis. We compared ultrasound imaging, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patients. MRI was useful to diagnose enlargement of the uterine cavity and a small amount of ascites and to understand orientation of the pelvic organs. Ultrasound imaging is the most useful examination to diagnose gynecological diseases. But when it is difficult to diagnose by ultrasound imaging alone, we should employ either CT or MRI, or preferably both. (author)

  3. Image based 3D city modeling : Comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth’s surface and it’s related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing rapidly for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally four main image based approaches were used for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers were used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling, third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling and fourth approach is mainly based on Computer Vision techniques. SketchUp, CityEngine, Photomodeler and Agisoft Photoscan are the main softwares to represent these approaches respectively. These softwares have different approaches & methods suitable for image based 3D city modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete such type of comparative study available to create complete 3D city model by using images. This paper gives a comparative assessment of these four image based 3D modeling approaches. This comparative study is mainly based on data acquisition methods, data processing techniques and output 3D model products. For this research work, study area is the campus of civil engineering department, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India. This 3D campus acts as a prototype for city. This study also explains various governing parameters, factors and work experiences. This research work also gives a brief introduction, strengths and weakness of these four image based techniques. Some personal comment is also given as what can do or what can’t do from these softwares. At the last, this study shows; it concluded that, each and every software has some advantages and limitations. Choice of software depends on user requirements of 3D project. For normal visualization project, SketchUp software is a good option. For 3D documentation record, Photomodeler gives good

  4. a Comparative Case Study of Reflection Seismic Imaging Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamooti, M.; Aydin, A.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic imaging is the most common means of gathering information about subsurface structural features. The accuracy of seismic images may be highly variable depending on the complexity of the subsurface and on how seismic data is processed. One of the crucial steps in this process, especially in layered sequences with complicated structure, is the time and/or depth migration of seismic data.The primary purpose of the migration is to increase the spatial resolution of seismic images by repositioning the recorded seismic signal back to its original point of reflection in time/space, which enhances information about complex structure. In this study, our objective is to process a seismic data set (courtesy of the University of South Carolina) to generate an image on which the Magruder fault near Allendale SC can be clearly distinguished and its attitude can be accurately depicted. The data was gathered by common mid-point method with 60 geophones equally spaced along an about 550 m long traverse over a nearly flat ground. The results obtained from the application of different migration algorithms (including finite-difference and Kirchhoff) are compared in time and depth domains to investigate the efficiency of each algorithm in reducing the processing time and improving the accuracy of seismic images in reflecting the correct position of the Magruder fault.

  5. A comparative study of image low level feature extraction algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. El-gayar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction and matching is at the base of many computer vision problems, such as object recognition or structure from motion. Current methods for assessing the performance of popular image matching algorithms are presented and rely on costly descriptors for detection and matching. Specifically, the method assesses the type of images under which each of the algorithms reviewed herein perform to its maximum or highest efficiency. The efficiency is measured in terms of the number of matches founds by the algorithm and the number of type I and type II errors encountered when the algorithm is tested against a specific pair of images. Current comparative studies asses the performance of the algorithms based on the results obtained in different criteria such as speed, sensitivity, occlusion, and others. This study addresses the limitations of the existing comparative tools and delivers a generalized criterion to determine beforehand the level of efficiency expected from a matching algorithm given the type of images evaluated. The algorithms and the respective images used within this work are divided into two groups: feature-based and texture-based. And from this broad classification only three of the most widely used algorithms are assessed: color histogram, FAST (Features from Accelerated Segment Test, SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform, PCA-SIFT (Principal Component Analysis-SIFT, F-SIFT (fast-SIFT and SURF (speeded up robust features. The performance of the Fast-SIFT (F-SIFT feature detection methods are compared for scale changes, rotation, blur, illumination changes and affine transformations. All the experiments use repeatability measurement and the number of correct matches for the evaluation measurements. SIFT presents its stability in most situations although its slow. F-SIFT is the fastest one with good performance as the same as SURF, SIFT, PCA-SIFT show its advantages in rotation and illumination changes.

  6. Statistical methods of evaluating and comparing imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past 20 years several new methods of generating images of internal organs and the anatomy of the body have been developed and used to enhance the accuracy of diagnosis and treatment. These include ultrasonic scanning, radioisotope scanning, computerised X-ray tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The new techniques have made a considerable impact on radiological practice in hospital departments, not least on the investigational process for patients suspected or known to have malignant disease. As a consequence of the increased range of imaging techniques now available, there has developed a need to evaluate and compare their usefulness. Over the past 10 years formal studies of the application of imaging technology have been conducted and many reports have appeared in the literature. These studies cover a range of clinical situations. Likewise, the methodologies employed for evaluating and comparing the techniques in question have differed widely. While not attempting an exhaustive review of the clinical studies which have been reported, this paper aims to examine the statistical designs and analyses which have been used. First a brief review of the different types of study is given. Examples of each type are then chosen to illustrate statistical issues related to their design and analysis. In the final sections it is argued that a form of classification for these different types of study might be helpful in clarifying relationships between them and bringing a perspective to the field. A classification based upon a limited analogy with clinical trials is suggested

  7. Proposal of AAA-battery-size one-shot ATR Fourier spectroscopic imager for on-site analysis: Simultaneous measurement of multi-components with high accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Satsuki; Qi, Wei; Sato, Shun; Suzuki, Yo; Fujiwara, Masaru; Hiramatsu, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satoru; Abeygunawardhana, P. K. W.; Wada, Kenji; Nishiyama, Akira; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    For simultaneous measurement of multi-components on-site like factories, the ultra-compact (diameter: 9[mm], length: 45[mm], weight: 200[g]) one-shot ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) Fourier spectroscopic imager was proposed. Because the proposed one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imaging is based on spatial-phase-shift interferometer, interferograms could be obtained with simple optical configurations. We introduced the transmission-type relativeinclined phase-shifter, that was constructed with a cuboid prism and a wedge prism, onto the optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected optical systems. And also, small light-sources and cameras in the mid-infrared light region, whose size are several millimeter on a side, are essential components for the ultra-compact spectroscopic configuration. We selected the Graphite light source (light source area: 1.7×1.7[mm], maker: Hawkeye technologies) whose radiation factor was high. Fortunately, in these days we could apply the cost-effective 2-dimensional light receiving device for smartphone (e.g. product name: LEPTON, maker: FLIR, price: around 400USD). In the case of alcoholic drinks factory, conventionally workers measure glucose and ethanol concentrations by bringing liquid solution back to laboratories every day. The high portable spectroscopy will make it possible to measure multi-components simultaneously on manufacturing scene. But we found experimentally that absorption spectrum of glucose and water and ethanol were overlapped each other in near infrared light region. But for mid-infrared light region, we could distinguish specific absorption peaks of glucose (@10.5[μm]) and ethanol (@11.5[μm]) independently from water absorption. We obtained standard curve between absorption (@9.6[μm]) and ethanol concentration with high correlation coefficient 0.98 successfully by ATR imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy (wavelength resolution: 0.057[μm]) with the graphite light source (maker: Hawkeye

  8. Short-echo 3D H-1 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of patients with glioma at 7T for characterization of differences in metabolite levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Larson, Peder; Chen, Albert P.; Lupo, Janine M.; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Kelley, Douglas; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a short echo time, 3D H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequence at 7T to assess the metabolic signature of lesions for patients with glioma. Materials and Methods 29 patients with glioma were studied. MRSI data were obtained using CHESS water suppression, spectrally-selective adiabatic inversion-recovery pulses and automatically prescribed outer-volume-suppression for lipid suppression, and spin echo slice selection (TE=30ms). An interleaved flyback echo-planar trajectory was applied to shorten the total acquisition time (~10min). Relative metabolite ratios were estimated in tumor and in normal-appearing white and gray matter (NAWM, GM). Results Levels of glutamine, myo-inositol, glycine and glutathione relative to total creatine (tCr) were significantly increased in the T2 lesions for all tumor grades compared to those in the NAWM (p < 0.05), while N-acetyl aspartate to tCr were significantly decreased (p < 0.05). In grade 2 gliomas, level of total choline-containing-compounds to tCr was significantly increased (p = 0.0137), while glutamate to tCr was significantly reduced (p = 0.0012). Conclusion The improved sensitivity of MRSI and the increased number of metabolites that can be evaluated using 7T MR scanners is of interest for evaluating patients with glioma. This study has successfully demonstrated the application of a short-echo spin-echo MRSI sequence to detect characteristic differences in regions of tumor versus normal appearing brain. PMID:24935758

  9. Comparative study of low-energy neutral atom imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Scime, E.E.

    1994-01-01

    Low-energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging promise to be a revolutionary tool for global imaging of space plasmas. The technical challenges of LENA detection include separating them from the intense ambient UV without losing information about their incident trajectories, quantifying their trajectories, and obtaining high-sensitivity measurements. Two techniques that have been proposed for this purpose are based on fundamentally different atomic interaction mechanisms between LENAs and a solid; LENA transmission through an ultra thin foil and LENA reflection from a solid surface. Both of these methods provide LENA ionization (for subsequent removal from the UV by electrostatic deflection) and secondary electron emission (for time-of-flight start pulse generation and/or coincidence). They present a comparative study of the transmission and reflection techniques based on differences in atomic interactions with solids and surfaces. Transmission methods are shown to be superior for secondary electron emission rather than reflection methods. Furthermore, transmission methods are shown to be a sufficient for LENA imaging at LENA energies of approximately 1 keV to greater than 30 keV. A hybrid instrument using reflection from a low work function surface for LENA ionization and transmission for secondary electron emission is optimal for imaging of LENAs with energies less than approximately 1 keV

  10. Technical note: Evaluation of the uncertainties in (choline+creatine)/citrate ratios measured by proton MR spectroscopic imaging in patients suspicious for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbyn, S.; Krssak, M.; Memarsadeghi, M.; Gholami, B.; Haitel, A.; Weber, M.; Helbich, T.H.; Trattnig, S.; Moser, E.; Gruber, S.

    2014-07-15

    The presented evaluation of the relative uncertainty (δ'CCC) of the (choline + creatine)/citrate (CC/C) ratios can provide objective information about the quality and diagnostic value of prostate MR spectroscopic imaging data. This information can be combined with the numeric values of CC/C ratios and provides metabolic-quality maps enabling accurate cancer detection and user-independent data evaluation. In addition, the prostate areas suffering most from the low precision of CC/C ratios (e. g., prostate base) were identified.

  11. Comparative occupational radiation exposure between fixed and mobile imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Daniel E; Miller, Claire P; Moorehead, Pamela A; Kim, Ann H; Baele, Henry R; Wong, Virginia L; Jordan, David W; Kashyap, Vikram S

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular intervention exposes surgical staff to scattered radiation, which varies according to procedure and imaging equipment. The purpose of this study was to determine differences in occupational exposure between procedures performed with fixed imaging (FI) in an endovascular suite compared with conventional mobile imaging (MI) in a standard operating room. A series of 116 endovascular cases were performed over a 4-month interval in a dedicated endovascular suite with FI and conventional operating room with MI. All cases were performed at a single institution and radiation dose was recorded using real-time dosimetry badges from Unfors RaySafe (Hopkinton, Mass). A dosimeter was mounted in each room to establish a radiation baseline. Staff dose was recorded using individual badges worn on the torso lead. Total mean air kerma (Kar; mGy, patient dose) and mean case dose (mSv, scattered radiation) were compared between rooms and across all staff positions for cases of varying complexity. Statistical analyses for all continuous variables were performed using t test and analysis of variance where appropriate. A total of 43 cases with MI and 73 cases with FI were performed by four vascular surgeons. Total mean Kar, and case dose were significantly higher with FI compared with MI. (mean ± standard error of the mean, 523 ± 49 mGy vs 98 ± 19 mGy; P < .00001; 0.77 ± 0.03 mSv vs 0.16 ± 0.08 mSv, P < .00001). Exposure for the primary surgeon and assistant was significantly higher with FI compared with MI. Mean exposure for all cases using either imaging modality, was significantly higher for the primary surgeon and assistant than for support staff (ie, nurse, radiology technologist) beyond 6 feet from the X-ray source, indicated according to one-way analysis of variance (MI: P < .00001; FI: P < .00001). Support staff exposure was negligible and did not differ between FI and MI. Room dose stratified according to case complexity (Kar) showed statistically significantly

  12. Comparative study between rib imaging of DR dual energy subtraction technology and chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jianming; Lei Ziqiao; Kong Xiangchuang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the application value of DR dual energy subtraction technology in rib lesions. Methods: 200 patients were performed with chest DR dual energy subtraction, comparing the rib imaging between DR of thorax and chest imaging using ROC analysis. Results: Among the total of 200 patients, there are 50 cases of rib calcification, 7 cases of rib destruction, 22 cases of rib fracture. The calcification, destruction and fracture were displayed respectively by ribs below diaphragm and rib markings. The analytic parameter of rib imaging of DR dual energy subtraction Az is 0.9367, while that of rib imaging of chest Az is 0.6830. Conclusion: DR dual energy subtraction technology is superior to chest imaging in the displaying of rib lesion and ribs below diaphragm. (authors)

  13. Thermal stability and hot-stage Raman spectroscopic study of Ca-montmorillonite modified with different surfactants: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhiming; Park, Yuri; Zheng, Shuilin; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Frost, Ray L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A typical Ca-montmorillonite was modified with three surfactants through ion exchange. • The organoclays were characterized by XRD, TG and hot stage Raman. • The structural geometry and thermal properties of organoclays were analyzed. • The prepared organoclays show potential prospects in the environmental remediation. - Abstract: Three long chain cationic surfactants were intercalated into Ca-montmorillonite through ion exchange and the obtained organoclays were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and Raman spectroscopy. The intercalation of surfactants not only changes the surface properties of clay from hydrophilic to hydrophobic but also greatly increases the basal spacing of the interlayers based on XRD analysis. The thermal stability of organoclays intercalated with three surfactants (TTAB, DTAB and CTAB) and the different arrangements of the surfactant molecules intercalated into Ca-montmorillonite were determined by TG-DTG analysis. A Raman spectroscopic study on the Ca-montmorillonite modified by three surfactants prepared at different concentrations provided the detailed conformational ordering of different intercalated long-chain surfactants under different conditions. The wavenumber of the antisymmetric stretching mode is more sensitive than that of the symmetric stretching mode to the mobility of the tail of the amine chain. At room temperature, the conformational ordering is more easily affected by the packing density in the lateral model. With the increase of the temperature, the positions of both the antisymmetric and symmetric stretching bands shift to higher wavenumbers, which indicates a decrease of conformational ordering. This study offers new insights into the structure and properties of Ca-montmorillonite modified with different long chain surfactants. Moreover, the experimental results confirm the potential applications of organic Ca-montmorillonites for the removal

  14. Comparative analysis of Medicare spending for medical imaging: sustained dramatic slowdown compared with other services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David W; Duszak, Richard; Hughes, Danny R

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess trends in Medicare spending growth for medical imaging relative to other services and the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA). We calculated per-beneficiary Part B Medicare medical imaging expenditures for three-digit Berenson-Eggers Type of Service (BETOS) categories using Physician Supplier Procedure Summary Master Files for 32 million beneficiaries from 2000 to 2011. We adjusted BETOS categories to address changes in coding and payment policy and excluded categories with 2011 aggregate spending less than $500 million. We computed and ranked compound annual growth rates over three periods: pre-DRA (2000-2005), DRA transition period (2005-2007), and post-DRA (2007-2011). Forty-four modified BETOS categories fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Between 2000 and 2006, Medicare outlays for nonimaging services grew by 6.8% versus 12.0% for imaging services. In the ensuing 5 years, annual growth in spending for nonimaging continued at 3.6% versus a decline of 3.5% for imaging. Spending growth for all services during the pre-DRA, DRA, and post-DRA periods were 7.8%, 3.8%, and 2.9 compared with 15.0%, -3.4%, and -2.2% for advanced imaging services. Advanced imaging was among the fastest growing categories of Medicare services in the early 2000s but was in the bottom 2% of spending categories in 2011. Between 2007 and 2011, the fastest growing service categories were evaluation and management services with other specialists (29.1%), nursing home visits (11.2%), anesthesia (9.1%), and other ambulatory procedures (9.0%). Slowing volume growth and massive Medicare payment cuts have left medical imaging near the bottom of all service categories contributing to growth in Medicare spending.

  15. Measurements of diagnostic examination performance using quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient and proton MR spectroscopic imaging in the preoperative evaluation of tumor grade in cerebral gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, Andres; Kulle, Bettina; Gadmar, Oystein B.; Josefsen, Roger; Kumar, Theresa; Nakstad, Per H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor grading is very important both in treatment decision and evaluation of prognosis. While tissue samples are obtained as part of most therapeutic approaches, factors that may result in inaccurate grading due to sampling error (namely, heterogeneity in tissue sampling, as well as tumor-grade heterogeneity within the same tumor specimen), have led to a desire to use imaging better to ascertain tumor grade. The purpose in our study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), area under the curve (AUC), and accuracy of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI), proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) or both in grading primary cerebral gliomas. Materials and methods: We performed conventional MR imaging (MR), DWI, and MRSI in 74 patients with newly diagnosed brain gliomas: 59 patients had histologically verified high-grade gliomas: 37 glioblastomas multiform (GBM) and 22 anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), and 15 patients had low-grade gliomas. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of tumor and peritumoral edema, and ADC ratios (ADC in tumor or peritumoral edema to ADC of contralateral white matter, as well as ADC in tumor to ADC in peritumoral edema) were determined from three regions of interest. The average of the mean, maximum, and minimum for ADC variables was calculated for each patient. The metabolite ratios of Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA at intermediate TE were assessed from spectral maps in the solid portion of tumor, peritumoral edema and contralateral normal-appearing white matter. Tumor grade determined with the two methods was then compared with that from histopathologic grading. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were performed to determine optimum thresholds for tumor grading. Measures of diagnostic examination performance, such as sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, AUC, and accuracy for identifying high-grade gliomas were also calculated

  16. Prior-knowledge Fitting of Accelerated Five-dimensional Echo Planar J-resolved Spectroscopic Imaging: Effect of Nonlinear Reconstruction on Quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zohaib; Wilson, Neil E; Thomas, M Albert

    2017-07-24

    1 H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic imaging (SI) is a powerful tool capable of investigating metabolism in vivo from mul- tiple regions. However, SI techniques are time consuming, and are therefore difficult to implement clinically. By applying non-uniform sampling (NUS) and compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction, it is possible to accelerate these scans while re- taining key spectral information. One recently developed method that utilizes this type of acceleration is the five-dimensional echo planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging (5D EP-JRESI) sequence, which is capable of obtaining two-dimensional (2D) spectra from three spatial dimensions. The prior-knowledge fitting (ProFit) algorithm is typically used to quantify 2D spectra in vivo, however the effects of NUS and CS reconstruction on the quantitation results are unknown. This study utilized a simulated brain phantom to investigate the errors introduced through the acceleration methods. Errors (normalized root mean square error >15%) were found between metabolite concentrations after twelve-fold acceleration for several low concentra- tion (OGM) human brain matter were quantified in vivo using the 5D EP-JRESI sequence with eight-fold acceleration.

  17. Elastic models: a comparative study applied to retinal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karali, E; Lambropoulou, S; Koutsouris, D

    2011-01-01

    In this work various methods of parametric elastic models are compared, namely the classical snake, the gradient vector field snake (GVF snake) and the topology-adaptive snake (t-snake), as well as the method of self-affine mapping system as an alternative to elastic models. We also give a brief overview of the methods used. The self-affine mapping system is implemented using an adapting scheme and minimum distance as optimization criterion, which is more suitable for weak edges detection. All methods are applied to glaucomatic retinal images with the purpose of segmenting the optical disk. The methods are compared in terms of segmentation accuracy and speed, as these are derived from cross-correlation coefficients between real and algorithm extracted contours and segmentation time, respectively. As a result, the method of self-affine mapping system presents adequate segmentation time and segmentation accuracy, and significant independence from initialization.

  18. Uniform and non-uniform modes of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric air: fast imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chong; Dobrynin, Danil; Fridman, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report experimental results on fast intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) imaging of the development of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric air and spectroscopic measurements of the electric field in the discharge. The uniformity of the discharge images obtained with nanosecond exposure times was analysed using chi-square test. The results indicate that DBD uniformity strongly depends on the applied (global) electric field in the discharge gap, which is a threshold phenomenon. We show that in the case of strong overvoltage on the discharge gap (provided by fast rise times), there is a transition from filamentary to uniform DBD mode that correlates to the corresponding decrease of the maximum local electric field in the discharge. (fast track communication)

  19. Uniform and non-uniform modes of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric air: fast imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong; Dobrynin, Danil; Fridman, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report experimental results on fast ICCD imaging of development of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric air and spectroscopic measurements of electric field in the discharge. Uniformity of the discharge images obtained with nanosecond exposure times were analyzed using chi-square test. The results indicate that DBD uniformity strongly depends on applied (global) electric field in the discharge gap, and is a threshold phenomenon. We show that in the case of strong overvoltage on the discharge gap (provided by fast rise times), there is transition from filamentary to uniform DBD mode which correlates to the corresponding decrease of maximum local electric field in the discharge. PMID:25071294

  20. Acute putaminal necrosis and white matter demyelination in a child with subnormal copper metabolism in Wilson disease: MR imaging and spectroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan, Chun-Jung; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Chen, Cheng-Yu.; Chin, Shy-Chy; Hsueh, Chun-Jen; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chu, Hsin; Zimmerman, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) that manifests solely with acute and severe neurological damage in the absence of hepatic disease and Kayser-Fleischer ring of the cornea is rare and difficult to diagnose at the acute setting. This report describes unusual diffusion and proton spectroscopic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in a 12-year-old boy with WD who presented with hemichorea and subnormal copper metabolism. The MR imaging findings of lactate accumulation, decrease of N-acerylaspartate/creatinine (NAA/Cr) ratio and markedly increased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the asymmetrical edematous putaminal lesions in the early stage were suggestive of acute necrosis with anaerobic metabolism of glucose leading to poor clinical outcome at follow-up. (orig.)

  1. Acute putaminal necrosis and white matter demyelination in a child with subnormal copper metabolism in Wilson disease: MR imaging and spectroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan, Chun-Jung; Chung, Hsiao-Wen [National Taiwan University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Taipei (Taiwan); Tri-Service General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (Taiwan); Chen, Cheng-Yu.; Chin, Shy-Chy; Hsueh, Chun-Jen [Tri-Service General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (Taiwan); Liu, Yi-Jui [Feng Chia University, Department of Automatic Control Engineering, Taichung (Taiwan); Chu, Hsin [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Taipei (Taiwan); Zimmerman, Robert A. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Wilson disease (WD) that manifests solely with acute and severe neurological damage in the absence of hepatic disease and Kayser-Fleischer ring of the cornea is rare and difficult to diagnose at the acute setting. This report describes unusual diffusion and proton spectroscopic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in a 12-year-old boy with WD who presented with hemichorea and subnormal copper metabolism. The MR imaging findings of lactate accumulation, decrease of N-acerylaspartate/creatinine (NAA/Cr) ratio and markedly increased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the asymmetrical edematous putaminal lesions in the early stage were suggestive of acute necrosis with anaerobic metabolism of glucose leading to poor clinical outcome at follow-up. (orig.)

  2. In vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI): [3,4-(13)CH(2)]glutamate/glutamine tomography in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, F; Renken, R; Rothman, D L

    1999-12-01

    A method for in vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) is described. This method is composed of an echo-planar based acquisition implemented with (13)C-(1)H J editing spectroscopy and is intended for high temporal and spatial resolution in vivo spectroscopic imaging of (13)C turnover, from D-[1,6-(13)C]glucose to glutamate and glutamine, in the brain. At a static magnetic field strength of 7 T, both in vitro and in vivo chemical shift imaging data are presented with a spatial resolution of 8 microL (i.e., 1.25 x 1.25 x 5.00 mm(3)) and a maximum spectral bandwidth of 5.2 ppm in (1)H. Chemical shift imaging data acquired every 11 minutes allowed detection of regional [4-(13)CH(2)]glutamate turnover in rat brain. The [4-(13)CH(2)]glutamate turnover curves, which can be converted to tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes, showed that the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux (V(TCA)) in pure gray and white matter can range from 1.2 +/- 0.2 to 0.5 +/- 0.1 micromol/g/min, respectively, for morphine-anesthetized rats. The mean cortical V(TCA) from 32 voxels of 1.0 +/- 0.3 micromol/g/min (N = 3) is in excellent agreement with previous localized measurements that have demonstrated that V(TCA) can range from 0.9-1.1 micromol/g/min under identical anesthetized conditions. Magn Reson Med 42:997-1003, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Correcting the effect of refraction and dispersion of light in FT-IR spectroscopic imaging in transmission through thick infrared windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2013-01-15

    Transmission mode is one of the most common sampling methods for FT-IR spectroscopic imaging because the spectra obtained generally have a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. However, dispersion and refraction of infrared light occurs when samples are sandwiched between infrared windows or placed underneath a layer of liquid. Dispersion and refraction cause infrared light to focus with different focal lengths depending on the wavelength (wavenumber) of the light. As a result, images obtained are in focus only at a particular wavenumber while they are defocused at other wavenumber values. In this work, a solution to correct this spread of focus by means of adding a lens on top of the infrared transparent window, such that a pseudo hemisphere is formed, has been investigated. Through this lens (or pseudo hemisphere), refraction of light is removed and the light across the spectral range has the same focal depth. Furthermore, the lens acts as a solid immersion objective and an increase of both magnification and spatial resolution (by 1.4 times) is demonstrated. The spatial resolution was investigated using an USAF resolution target, showing that the Rayleigh criterion can be achieved, as well as a sample with a sharp polymer interface to indicate the spatial resolution that can be expected in real samples. The reported approach was used to obtain chemical images of cross sections of cancer tissue and hair samples sandwiched between infrared windows showing the versatility and applicability of the method. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, the results reported herein also demonstrate that the lens can reduce the effect of scattering near the edges of tissue samples. The advantages of the presented approach, obtaining FT-IR spectroscopic images in transmission mode with the same focus across all wavenumber values and simultaneous improvement in spatial resolution, will have wide implications ranging from studies of live cells to sorption of drugs into tissues.

  4. 1H Spectroscopic Imaging of Human Brain at 3T: Comparison of Fast 3D-MRSI Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierhut, Matthew L.; Ozturk-Isik, Esin; Chen, Albert P.; Park, Ilwoo; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and data quality of time-reduced 1H 3D-MRSI techniques in the human brain at 3T. Materials and Methods Techniques that were investigated included ellipsoidal k-space sampling, parallel imaging, and EPSI. The SNR values for NAA, Cho, Cre, and lactate or lipid peaks were compared after correcting for effective spatial resolution and acquisition time in a phantom and in the brains of human volunteers. Other factors considered were linewidths, metabolite ratios, partial volume effects, and subcutaneous lipid contamination. Results In volunteers, the median normalized SNR for parallel imaging data decreased by 34–42%, but could be significantly improved using regularization. The normalized signal to noise loss in flyback EPSI data was 11–18%. The effective spatial resolutions of the traditional, ellipsoidal, SENSE, and EPSI data were 1.02, 2.43, 1.03, and 1.01cm3, respectively. As expected, lipid contamination was variable between subjects but was highest for the SENSE data. Patient data obtained using the flyback EPSI method were of excellent quality. Conclusions Data from all 1H 3D-MRSI techniques were qualitatively acceptable, based upon SNR, linewidths, and metabolite ratios. The larger FOV obtained with the EPSI methods showed negligible lipid aliasing with acceptable SNR values in less than 9.5 minutes without compromising the PSF. PMID:19711396

  5. Multi-slice echo-planar spectroscopic MR imaging provides both global and local metabolite measures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Henrik Kahr; Tscherning, Thomas; Sorensen, Per Soelberg

    2005-01-01

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about neuronal loss or dysfunction by measuring decreases in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), a metabolite widely believed to be a marker of neuronal viability. In multiple sclerosis (MS), whole-brain NAA (WBNAA) has been suggested as a marker of disease...... progression and treatment efficacy in treatment trials, and the ability to measure NAA loss in specific brain regions early in the evolution of this disease may have prognostic value. Most spectroscopic studies to date have been limited to single voxels or nonlocalized measurements of WBNAA only...

  6. A comparative study on medical image segmentation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praylin Selva Blessy SELVARAJ ASSLEY

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation plays an important role in medical images. It has been a relevant research area in computer vision and image analysis. Many segmentation algorithms have been proposed for medical images. This paper makes a review on segmentation methods for medical images. In this survey, segmentation methods are divided into five categories: region based, boundary based, model based, hybrid based and atlas based. The five different categories with their principle ideas, advantages and disadvantages in segmenting different medical images are discussed.

  7. Recent Advances and Applications of External Cavity-QCLs towards Hyperspectral Imaging for Standoff Detection and Real-Time Spectroscopic Sensing of Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Ostendorf

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available External-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL are now established as versatile wavelength-tunable light sources for analytical spectroscopy in the mid-infrared (MIR spectral range. We report on the realization of rapid broadband spectral tuning with kHz scan rates by combining a QCL chip with a broad gain spectrum and a resonantly driven micro-opto-electro-mechanical (MOEMS scanner with an integrated diffraction grating in Littrow configuration. The capability for real-time spectroscopic sensing based on MOEMS EC-QCLs is demonstrated by transmission measurements performed on polystyrene reference absorber sheets, as well as on hazardous substances, such as explosives. Furthermore, different applications for the EC-QCL technology in spectroscopic sensing are presented. These include the fields of process analysis with on- or even inline capability and imaging backscattering spectroscopy for contactless identification of solid and liquid contaminations on surfaces. Recent progress in trace detection of explosives and related precursors in relevant environments as well as advances in food quality monitoring by discriminating fresh and mold contaminated peanuts based on their MIR backscattering spectrum is shown.

  8. Pilot Assessment of Brain Metabolism in Perinatally HIV-Infected Youths Using Accelerated 5D Echo Planar J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zohaib; Wilson, Neil E; Keller, Margaret A; Michalik, David E; Church, Joseph A; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Deville, Jaime; Souza, Raissa; Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Thomas, M Albert

    2016-01-01

    To measure cerebral metabolite levels in perinatally HIV-infected youths and healthy controls using the accelerated five dimensional (5D) echo planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging (EP-JRESI) sequence, which is capable of obtaining two dimensional (2D) J-resolved spectra from three spatial dimensions (3D). After acquisition and reconstruction of the 5D EP-JRESI data, T1-weighted MRIs were used to classify brain regions of interest for HIV patients and healthy controls: right frontal white (FW), medial frontal gray (FG), right basal ganglia (BG), right occipital white (OW), and medial occipital gray (OG). From these locations, respective J-resolved and TE-averaged spectra were extracted and fit using two different quantitation methods. The J-resolved spectra were fit using prior knowledge fitting (ProFit) while the TE-averaged spectra were fit using the advanced method for accurate robust and efficient spectral fitting (AMARES). Quantitation of the 5D EP-JRESI data using the ProFit algorithm yielded significant metabolic differences in two spatial locations of the perinatally HIV-infected youths compared to controls: elevated NAA/(Cr+Ch) in the FW and elevated Asp/(Cr+Ch) in the BG. Using the TE-averaged data quantified by AMARES, an increase of Glu/(Cr+Ch) was shown in the FW region. A strong negative correlation (r 0.6) were shown between Asp/(Cr+Ch) and CD4 counts in the FG and BG. The complimentary results using ProFit fitting of J-resolved spectra and AMARES fitting of TE-averaged spectra, which are a subset of the 5D EP-JRESI acquisition, demonstrate an abnormal energy metabolism in the brains of perinatally HIV-infected youths. This may be a result of the HIV pathology and long-term combinational anti-retroviral therapy (cART). Further studies of larger perinatally HIV-infected cohorts are necessary to confirm these findings.

  9. Simultaneous PET/MRI with 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (hyperPET): phantom-based evaluation of PET quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Adam E.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Henriksen, Sarah T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Integrated PET/MRI with hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (13C-MRSI) offers simultaneous, dual-modality metabolic imaging. A prerequisite for the use of simultaneous imaging is the absence of interference between the two modalities. This has been documented...... for a clinical whole-body system using simultaneous 1 H-MRI and PET but never for 13C-MRSI and PET. Here, the feasibility of simultaneous PET and 13C-MRSI as well as hyperpolarized 13C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is evaluated using phantom experiments. Methods: Combined PET and 13C......-MRSI phantoms including a NEMA [18F]-FDG phantom, 13C-acetate and 13C-urea sources, and hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate were imaged repeatedly with PET and/or 13C-MRSI. Measurements evaluated for interference effects included PET activity values in the largest sphere and a background region; total number of PET...

  10. Vanillin and isovanillin: Comparative vibrational spectroscopic studies, conformational stability and NLO properties by density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, V.; Parimala, K.

    This study is a comparative analysis of FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of vanillin (3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde) and isovanillin (3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde). The molecular structure, vibrational wavenumbers, infrared intensities, Raman scattering activities were calculated for both molecules using the B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) with the standard 6-311++G∗∗ basis set. The computed values of frequencies are scaled using multiple scaling factors to yield good coherence with the observed values. The calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies are compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The geometrical parameters and total energies of vanillin and isovanillin were obtained for all the eight conformers (a-h) from DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G∗∗ basis set. The computational results identified the most stable conformer of vanillin and isovanillin as in the "a" form. Non-linear properties such as electric dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α), and hyperpolarizability (β) values of the investigated molecules have been computed using B3LYP quantum chemical calculation. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecules.

  11. Image quality and stability of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) devices: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Markus; Pasler, Marlies; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Homolka, Peter; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Our aim was to implement standards for quality assurance of IGRT devices used in our department and to compare their performances with that of a CT simulator. Materials and methods: We investigated image quality parameters for three devices over a period of 16 months. A multislice CT was used as a benchmark and results related to noise, spatial resolution, low contrast visibility (LCV) and uniformity were compared with a cone beam CT (CBCT) at a linac and simulator. Results: All devices performed well in terms of LCV and, in fact, exceeded vendor specifications. MTF was comparable between CT and linac CBCT. Integral nonuniformity was, on average, 0.002 for the CT and 0.006 for the linac CBCT. Uniformity, LCV and MTF varied depending on the protocols used for the linac CBCT. Contrast-to-noise ratio was an average of 51% higher for the CT than for the linac and simulator CBCT. No significant time trend was observed and tolerance limits were implemented. Discussion: Reasonable differences in image quality between CT and CBCT were observed. Further research and development are necessary to increase image quality of commercially available CBCT devices in order for them to serve the needs for adaptive and/or online planning.

  12. Image quality and stability of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) devices: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Markus; Pasler, Marlies; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Homolka, Peter; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar

    2009-10-01

    Our aim was to implement standards for quality assurance of IGRT devices used in our department and to compare their performances with that of a CT simulator. We investigated image quality parameters for three devices over a period of 16months. A multislice CT was used as a benchmark and results related to noise, spatial resolution, low contrast visibility (LCV) and uniformity were compared with a cone beam CT (CBCT) at a linac and simulator. All devices performed well in terms of LCV and, in fact, exceeded vendor specifications. MTF was comparable between CT and linac CBCT. Integral nonuniformity was, on average, 0.002 for the CT and 0.006 for the linac CBCT. Uniformity, LCV and MTF varied depending on the protocols used for the linac CBCT. Contrast-to-noise ratio was an average of 51% higher for the CT than for the linac and simulator CBCT. No significant time trend was observed and tolerance limits were implemented. Reasonable differences in image quality between CT and CBCT were observed. Further research and development are necessary to increase image quality of commercially available CBCT devices in order for them to serve the needs for adaptive and/or online planning.

  13. Comparative evaluation of image quality in computed radiology systems using imaging plates with different usage time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzaro, M.V.; Luz, R.M. da; Capaverde, A.S.; Silva, A.M. Marques da

    2015-01-01

    Computed Radiology (CR) systems use imaging plates (IPs) for latent image acquisition. Taking into account the quality control (QC) of these systems, imaging plates usage time is undetermined. Different recommendations and publications on the subject suggest tests to evaluate these systems. The objective of this study is to compare the image quality of IPs of a CR system, in a mammography service, considering the usage time and consistency of assessments. 8 IPs were used divided into two groups: the first group included 4 IPs with 3 years of use (Group A); the second group consisted of 4 new IPs with no previous exposure (Group B). The tests used to assess the IP's quality were: Uniformity, Differential Signal to Noise Ratio (SDNR), Ghost Effect and Figure of Merit (FOM). Statistical results show that the proposed tests are shown efficient in assessing the conditions of image quality obtained in CR systems in mammography and can be used as determining factors for the replacement of IP's. Moreover, comparing the two sets of IP, results led to the replacement of all the set of IP’s with 3 years of use. This work demonstrates the importance of an efficient quality control, not only with regard to the quality of IP's used, but in the acquisition system as a whole. From this work, these tests will be conducted on an annual basis, already targeting as future work, monitoring the wear of IP's Group B and the creation of a baseline for analysis and future replacements. (author)

  14. Spectroscopic investigations of plasma nitriding processes: A comparative study using steel and carbon as active screen materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Biermann, H.; Röpcke, J.

    2017-04-01

    Low-pressure pulsed DC H2-N2 plasmas were investigated in the laboratory active screen plasma nitriding monitoring reactor, PLANIMOR, to compare the usage of two different active screen electrodes: (i) a steel screen with the additional usage of CH4 as carbon containing precursor in the feeding gas and (ii) a carbon screen without the usage of any additional gaseous carbon precursor. Applying the quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy, the evolution of the concentration of four stable molecular species, NH3, HCN, CH4, and C2H2, has been monitored. The concentrations were found to be in a range of 1012-1016 molecules cm-3. By analyzing the development of the molecular concentrations at variations of the screen plasma power, a similar behavior of the monitored reaction products has been found for both screen materials, with NH3 and HCN as the main reaction products. When using the carbon screen, the concentration of HCN and C2H2 was 30 and 70 times higher, respectively, compared to the usage of the steel screen with an admixture of 1% CH4. Considering the concentration of the three detected hydrocarbon reaction products, a combustion rate of the carbon screen of up to 69 mg h-1 has been found. The applied optical emission spectroscopy enabled the determination of the rotational temperature of the N2+ ion which has been in a range of 650-900 K increasing with the power in a similar way in the plasma of both screens. Also with power the ionic component of nitrogen molecules, represented by the N2+ (0-0) band of the first negative system, as well as the CN (0-0) band of the violet system increase strongly in relation to the intensity of the neutral nitrogen component, i.e., the N2 (0-0) band of the second positive system. In addition, steel samples have been treated with both the steel and the carbon screen resulting in a formation of a compound layer of up to 10 wt. % nitrogen and 10 wt. % carbon, respectively, depending on the screen material.

  15. Molecular binding of toxic phenothiazinium derivatives, azures to bovine serum albumin: A comparative spectroscopic, calorimetric, and in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Somnath; Islam, Md Maidul; Jana, Gopal Chandra; Patra, Anirudha; Jha, Pradeep K; Hossain, Maidul

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the comparative binding behavior of antimalarial drug azure A, azure B and azure C with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been studied. The interaction has been confirmed by multispectroscopic (UV, fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and circular dichroism) and molecular docking techniques. The experimental results show that azure B has the highest BSA binding affinity followed by azure A and azure C. The experimental evidence of binding showed a static quenching mechanism in the interaction azures with BSA. The isothermal titration calorimetry result reveals that the binding was exothermic with positive entropy contribution in each case. The thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔG, and ΔS at 25°C were calculated, which indicates that the weak van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding rather than the hydrophobic effect played an important role in the interaction. According to the theory of Förster nonradiative energy transfer, the distance (r) between the donor (BSA) and acceptor azures found to be albumins. We hope, the outcome of this work will be most helpful for synthesizing a new type of phenothiazinium derivatives of the better therapeutic application. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. In vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) : [3,4-(CH2)-C-13] glutamate/glutamine tomography in rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyder, F; Renken, R; Rothman, DL

    1999-01-01

    A method for in vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) is described. This method is composed of an echo-planar based acquisition implemented with C-13-H-1 J editing spectroscopy and is intended for high temporal and spatial resolution in vivo

  17. STAR FORMATION PROPERTIES IN BARRED GALAXIES (SFB). I. ULTRAVIOLET TO INFRARED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF NGC 7479

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhimin; Meng Xianmin; Wu Hong; Cao Chen

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale bars and minor mergers are important drivers for the secular evolution of galaxies. Based on ground-based optical images and spectra as well as ultraviolet data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we present a multi-wavelength study of star formation properties in the barred galaxy NGC 7479, which also has obvious features of a minor merger. Using various tracers of star formation, we find that under the effects of both a stellar bar and a minor merger, star formation activity mainly takes place along the galactic bar and arms, while the star formation rate changes from the bar to the disk. With the help of spectral synthesis, we find that strong star formation took place in the bar region about 100 Myr ago, and the stellar bar might have been ∼10 Gyr old. By comparing our results with the secular evolutionary scenario from Jogee et al., we suggest that NGC 7479 is possibly in a transitional stage of secular evolution at present, and it may eventually become an earlier type galaxy or a luminous infrared galaxy. We also note that the probable minor merger event happened recently in NGC 7479, and we find two candidates for minor merger remnants.

  18. Spectroscopic data

    CERN Document Server

    Melzer, J

    1976-01-01

    During the preparation of this compilation, many people contributed; the compilers wish to thank all of them. In particular they appreciate the efforts of V. Gilbertson, the manuscript typist, and those of K. C. Bregand, J. A. Kiley, and W. H. McPherson, who gave editorial assistance. They would like to thank Dr. J. R. Schwartz for his cooperation and encouragement. In addition, they extend their grati­ tude to Dr. L. Wilson of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, who gave the initial impetus to this project. v Contents I. I ntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. Organization ofthe Spectroscopic Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Methods of Production and Experimental Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Band Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2...

  19. Comparing neutron and X-ray images from NIF implosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson D.C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Directly laser driven and X-radiation driven DT filled capsules differ in the relationship between neutron and X-ray images. Shot N110217, a directly driven DT-filled glass micro-balloon provided the first neutron images at the National Ignition Facility. As seen in implosions on the Omega laser, the neutron image can be enclosed inside time integrated X-ray images. HYDRA simulations show the X-ray image is dominated by emission from the hot glass shell while the neutron image arises from the DT fuel it encloses. In the absence of mix or jetting, X-ray images of a cryogenically layered THD fuel capsule should be dominated by emission from the hydrogen rather than the cooler plastic shell that is separated from the hot core by cold DT fuel. This cool, dense DT, invisible in X-ray emission, shows itself by scattering hot core neutrons. Germanium X-ray emission spectra and Ross pair filtered X-ray energy resolved images suggest that germanium doped plastic emits in the torus shaped hot spot, probably reducing the neutron yield.

  20. TH-AB-209-05: Validating Hemoglobin Saturation and Dissolved Oxygen in Tumors Using Photoacoustic Computed Tomographic Spectroscopic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, J; Sick, J; Liu, B [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cao, N [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Nakshatri, H; Mendonca, M [Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Stantz, K [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Photoacoustic computed tomographic spectroscopy (PCT-S) provides intra-tumor measurements of oxygenation with high spatial resolution (0.2mm) and temporal fidelity (1–2 minutes) without the need for exogenous agents or ionizing radiation, thus providing a unique in vivo assay to measure SaO{sub 2} and investigate acute and chronic forms of hypoxia. The goal of this study is to validate in vivo SaO{sub 2} levels within tail artery of mice and the relationship between SaO{sub 2} and pO{sub 2} within subcutaneous breast tumors using PCT-S imaging, pulse oximetry and an OxyLite probe. Methods: A closed circuit phantom was fabricated to control blood oxygenation levels, where SaO{sub 2} was measured using a co-oximeter and pO{sub 2} using an Oxylite probe. Next, SaO{sub 2} levels within the tail arteries of mice (n=3) were measured using PCT-S and pulse oximetry while breathing high-to-low oxygen levels (6-cycles). Finally, PCT-S was used to measure SaO{sub 2} levels in MCF-7, MCF-7-VEGF165, and MDA-MB-231 xenograft breast tumors and compared to Oxylite pO{sub 2} levels values. Results: SaO{sub 2} and pO{sub 2} data obtained from the calibration phantom was fit to Hill’s equation: aO{sub 2} levels between 88 and 52% demonstrated a linear relationship (r2=0.96) and a 3.2% uncertainty between PCT-S values relative to pulse oximetry. Scatter plots of localized PCT-S measured SaO2 and Oxylite pO{sub 2} levels in MCF-7/MCF-7-VEGF165 and MDA-MD-231 breast tumors were fit to Hill’s equation: P50=17.2 and 20.7mmHg, and n=1.76 and 1.63. These results are consistent with sigmoidal form of Hill’s equation, where the lower P{sub 50} value is indicative of an acidic tumor microenvironment. Conclusion: The results demonstrate photoacoustic imaging can be used to measure SaO{sub 2} cycling and intra-tumor oxygenation, and provides a powerful in vivo assay to investigate the role of hypoxia in radiation, anti-angiogenic, and immunotherapies.

  1. Toward 3-D E-field visualization in laser-produced plasma by polarization-spectroscopic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong W.

    2004-01-01

    A 3-D volume radiator such as laser-produced plasma (LPP) plumes is observed in the form of a 2-D projection of its radiative structure. The traditional approach to 3-D structure reconstruction relies on multiple projections but is not suitable as a general method for unsteady radiating objects. We have developed a general method for 3-D structure reconstruction for LPP plumes in stages of increasing complexity. We have chosen neutral gas-confined LPP plumes from an aluminum target immersed in high-density argon because the plasma experiences Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We make use of two time-resolved, mutually orthogonal side views of a LPP plume and a front-view snapshot. No symmetry assumptions are needed. Two scaling relations are invoked that connects the plasma temperature and pressure to local specific intensity at selected wavelength(s). Two mutually-orthogonal lateral luminosity views of the plume at each known distance from the target surface are compared with those computed from the trial specific intensity profiles and the scaling relations. The luminosity error signals are minimized to find the structure. The front-view snapshot is used to select the initial trial profile and as a weighting function for allocation of the error signal into corrections for specific intensities from the plasma cells along the line of sight. Full Saha equilibrium for multiple stages of ionization is treated, together with the self-absorption, in the computation of the luminosity. We show the necessary optics for determination of local electric fields through polarization-resolved imaging. (author)

  2. Comparative imaging features of brucellar and tuberculous spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, H.S.; Aldeyan, O.; Clark, D.C.; Madkour, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    Images obtained with various modalities in 17 patients with Brucella spondylitis and 12 patients with tuberculous spondylitis were analyzed in order to identify distinguishing features. All patients underwent radiography, 21 underwent bone scintigraphy, and all underwent high-resolution CT and/or MR imaging. Characteristic findings in Brucella spondylitis included a predilection for the lumbar spine, bone destruction limited to the end-plates and associated with sclerosis, and disk space collapse (16 of 19) with disk vacuum phenomenon in eight and localized soft-tissue edema. MR imaging showed diffuse increased signal in vertebrae, disks, and adjacent soft tissues on long repetition time/long echo time studies (four patients). Tuberculosis spondylitis was characterized by a midthoracic predilection, diffuse vertebral destruction with gibbus deformity, severe disk collapse, and extensive paraspinal abscesses. MR imaging findings (three patients) were similar to but more severe than findings in Brucella spondylitis

  3. Acid-base titrations of functional groups on the surface of the thermophilic bacterium Anoxybacillus flavithermus: comparing a chemical equilibrium model with ATR-IR spectroscopic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Hannah T M; Bremer, Phil J; Daughney, Christopher J; McQuillan, A James

    2007-02-27

    Acid-base functional groups at the surface of Anoxybacillus flavithermus (AF) were assigned from the modeling of batch titration data of bacterial suspensions and compared with those determined from in situ infrared spectroscopic titration analysis. The computer program FITMOD was used to generate a two-site Donnan model (site 1: pKa = 3.26, wet concn = 2.46 x 10(-4) mol g(-1); site 2: pKa = 6.12, wet concn = 6.55 x 10(-5) mol g(-1)), which was able to describe data for whole exponential phase cells from both batch acid-base titrations at 0.01 M ionic strength and electrophoretic mobility measurements over a range of different pH values and ionic strengths. In agreement with information on the composition of bacterial cell walls and a considerable body of modeling literature, site 1 of the model was assigned to carboxyl groups, and site 2 was assigned to amino groups. pH difference IR spectra acquired by in situ attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of carboxyl groups. The spectra appear to show a carboxyl pKa in the 3.3-4.0 range. Further peaks were assigned to phosphodiester groups, which deprotonated at slightly lower pH. The presence of amino groups could not be confirmed or discounted by IR spectroscopy, but a positively charged group corresponding to site 2 was implicated by electrophoretic mobility data. Carboxyl group speciation over a pH range of 2.3-10.3 at two different ionic strengths was further compared to modeling predictions. While model predictions were strongly influenced by the ionic strength change, pH difference IR data showed no significant change. This meant that modeling predictions agreed reasonably well with the IR data for 0.5 M ionic strength but not for 0.01 M ionic strength.

  4. Comparing the difference of measured GFR of ectopic pelvic kidney between anterior and posterior imaging processing in renal dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Baojun; Zhao Deshan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare and analyze the difference of measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of ectopic pelvic kidney between anterior and posterior imaging processing in renal dynamic imaging. Methods: There were 10 patients collected retrospectively, with ectopic kidneys in pelvic cavity confirmed by ultrasound, CT, renal dynamic imaging and other imaging modalities. All images of ectopic kidneys in renal dynamic imaging were processed by anterior and posterior methods respectively. The ectopic kidney was only processed in anterior imaging, ectopic kidney and contralateral normal kidney were processed in posterior imaging. Total GFR equalled the sum of GFR of normal kidney in posterior imaging and GFR of ectopic kidney in anterior imaging, was compared with total GFR of two kidneys in posterior imaging and GFR in two-sample method. All correlation analysis were completed between GFRs from three methods and all patients were followed up. Statistically paired t-test and bivariate correlation analysis test were used. Results: The mean GFR of ectopic kidney in anterior imaging equal to (27.48±12.24) ml/(min · 1.73 m 2 ). It was more than GFR [(10.71 ±4.74) ml/ (min · 1.73 m 2 )] in posterior imaging above 46% (t=5.481, P<0.01). There was no significant difference (t=-2.238, P>0.05), but better correlation (r=0.704, P<0.05) between total GFR in anterior imaging and GFR in two-sample method. There was significant difference (t=4.629, P<0.01)and worse correlation (r=0.576, P>0.05) between total GFR in posterior imaging and GFR in two-sample method. Conclusion: Comparing with GFR in posterior imaging, GFR in anterior imaging can more truly reflect function condition of ectopic pelvic kidney in renal dynamic imaging. (authors)

  5. Are Compassionate and Self-Image Goals Comparable across Cultures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuncewicz Dariusz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study tested whether compassionate goals to support others and self-image goals to maintain and defend desired self-images: 1 are equivalent constructs across three cultures (U.S., Japan, Poland; 2 overlap with interdependent self-construal; and 3 predict relationships and growth measures similarly in each country. We re-analyzed data from American (n = 130 and Japanese (n = 203 students, reported in Niiya et al. (2013, along with new data from Poland (n = 246. Single and multiple group confirmatory analyses showed that the two-factor structure holds across the three cultures. Interdependence correlated with compassionate and self-image goals only in Japan. In all three samples, compassionate goals correlated with non-zero-sum belief, feeling close, growth-seeking, self-compassion, and learning from failures, whereas self-image goals correlated with defensive responses to conflicts and validation-seeking. Our results suggest that compassionate and self-image goals may serve similar functions in relationships and growth across cultures.

  6. Spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, M.; Rodriguez, R.; Arroyo, R.

    1999-01-01

    This work is focused about the spectroscopic properties of a polymer material which consists of Polyacrylic acid (Paa) doped at different concentrations of Europium ions (Eu 3+ ). They show that to stay chemically joined with the polymer by a study of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) of 1 H, 13 C and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (Ft-IR) they present changes in the intensity of signals, just as too when this material is irradiated at λ = 394 nm. In according with the results obtained experimentally in this type of materials it can say that is possible to unify chemically the polymer with this type of cations, as well as, varying the concentration of them, since that these are distributed homogeneously inside the matrix maintaining its optical properties. These materials can be obtained more quickly and easy in solid or liquid phase and they have the best conditions for to make a quantitative analysis. (Author)

  7. Imaging characteristics of hepatocellular adenoma compared with pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jing; Zhao Xinming; Ouyang Han; Huang Wenting; Zhou Chunwu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively compare CT and MR features of hepatocellular adenoma with pathologic findings. Methods: Twelve patients with histopathologically proved hepatocellular adenoma were classified on the basis of pathologic and genotype phenotype findings into four groups: steatotic type, cytological abnormality type, telangiectatic adenoma with inflammatory infiltrates type and atypical adenoma type. The CT and MR features of each type were reviewed retrospectively compared with the pathological results. Results: In this retrospective study, 12 patients were examined with CT (8 patients) and MR (8 patients). Among 12 patients, 4 patients showed a steatotic type. One patient showed hypo-density on the non-enhanced CT and 3 patients demonstrated hypo-density on all phases of the post-contrast scans. Two lesions showed iso-intense signal on the in-phase T 1 WI with signal dropout on the out-of-phase T 1 WI, and hypo-intense signal on the T 2 WI with fat suppression sequences. One lesion demonstrated moderate hypointense signal on all phases of the post-contrast MRI scans. Two patients with the telangiectatic adenoma inflammatory infiltrates type were found. One patient showed hypo-density on the non-enhanced CT scans and hyper-density on all phases of the post-contrast CT scans. One patient demonstrated iso-intense signal and the other hypo-intense signal on the T 1 WI, and both displayed moderate hyper-intense signal on the T 2 WI with fat suppression sequences and hyper-intense signal with gradual enhancement on all phases of post-contrast MR scans. There were 3 patients with a cytological abnormality type. One patient appeared hypo-density and 1 patient showed uniform iso-density on non-enhanced CT scans. All patients who had undergone contrast-enhanced CT scans were found to have hyper-density on the hepatic arterial-dominant phase and became slightly lower on the portal venous phase. On the delay phase the density reduced further. One mass showed iso

  8. Comparing personal image collections with PICTuReVis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Corput, P.N.A.; van Wijk, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Digital image collections contain a wealth of information, which for instance can be used to trace illegal activities and investigate criminal networks. We present a method that enables analysts to reveal relations among people, based on the patterns in their collections. Similar temporal and

  9. Comparative evaluation of the porta hepatis/hepatoduodenal ligament with CT and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, P.M.; Feuerstein, I.M.; Zeman, R.K.; Jaffe, M.H.; Garra, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    CT and MR imaging were compared in a retrospective evaluation of 16 patients with abnormalities, predominantly neoplasms, of the porta hepatis/hepatoduodenal ligament. Masses on CT were of decreased density compared with that of liver and were seen in contrast to surrounding periportal fat. On MR images, T1-weighted images demonstrated findings similar to those of CT. T2-weighted images clearly depicted intrahepatic lesions but less distinctly depicted lesions surrounded by fat. Short inversion recovery (STIR) images better demonstrated tumor relative to fat. CT was better than all MR imaging sequences in one of 16 cases, whereas at least one MR imaging sequence was better than CT in six of 16. In nine cases, CT was equivalent to the best MR imaging sequence. In five of six cases where MR imaging was better than CT, STIR sequences were most favorable. In conclusion, MR imaging provided a valuable technique for assessing abnormalities of the porta hepatis/hepatoduodenal ligament

  10. Built-in hyperspectral camera for smartphone in visible, near-infrared and middle-infrared lights region (second report): sensitivity improvement of Fourier-spectroscopic imaging to detect diffuse reflection lights from internal human tissues for healthcare sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Natsumi; Hosono, Satsuki; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We proposed the snapshot-type Fourier spectroscopic imaging for smartphone that was mentioned in 1st. report in this conference. For spectroscopic components analysis, such as non-invasive blood glucose sensors, the diffuse reflection lights from internal human skins are very weak for conventional hyperspectral cameras, such as AOTF (Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter) type. Furthermore, it is well known that the spectral absorption of mid-infrared lights or Raman spectroscopy especially in long wavelength region is effective to distinguish specific biomedical components quantitatively, such as glucose concentration. But the main issue was that photon energies of middle infrared lights and light intensities of Raman scattering are extremely weak. For improving sensitivity of our spectroscopic imager, the wide-field-stop & beam-expansion method was proposed. Our line spectroscopic imager introduced a single slit for field stop on the conjugate objective plane. Obviously to increase detected light intensities, the wider slit width of the field stop makes light intensities higher, regardless of deterioration of spatial resolutions. Because our method is based on wavefront-division interferometry, it becomes problems that the wider width of single slit makes the diffraction angle narrower. This means that the narrower diameter of collimated objective beams deteriorates visibilities of interferograms. By installing the relative inclined phaseshifter onto optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected optical systems, the collimated half flux of objective beams derived from single-bright points on objective surface penetrate through the wedge prism and the cuboid glass respectively. These two beams interfere each other and form the infererogram as spatial fringe patterns. Thus, we installed concave-cylindrical lens between the wider slit and objective lens as a beam expander. We successfully obtained the spectroscopic characters of hemoglobin from reflected lights from

  11. Collagenous sprue cross-sectional imaging: a comparative blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bawardy, Badr; Sheedy, Shannon P; Herberts, Michelle B; Murray, Joseph A; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Rajan, Elizabeth; Bruining, David H; Hansel, Stephanie L; Barlow, John M; Fletcher, Joel G; Fidler, Jeff L

    2017-02-01

    Collagenous sprue (CS) is a rare enteropathy characterized by villous atrophy and a thickened subepithelial collagen band. The aim of this study is to describe the cross-sectional imaging findings of CS. A case-control, retrospective study with cases of all CS patients from January 2000 to 2015 was performed. Inclusion criteria were (1) Histopathologic diagnosis and (2) Imaging with computed tomography abdomen/pelvis (CT A/P), CT enterography (CTE), or magnetic resonance enterography within 6 months of small bowel (SB) biopsy. Control subjects were irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients who underwent CTE. Imaging studies were examined by two GI radiologists, blinded to patient data. 108 patients (54 CS; 54 IBS) were included. Mean age was 56.7 ± 16.5 years, and 68% were female (72% in CS group vs. 63% in IBS group; p = 0.3). CS patients were significantly older (67 ± 12 vs. 47 ± 15 year; p reversal (46% vs. 6%; p < 0.001), SB dilation (28% vs. 0%; p < 0.001), SB conformational change (28% vs. 6%; p = 0.002), SB wall thickening (13% vs. 2%; p = 0.03), and ulcerative jejunoileitis (4% vs. 0%; p = 0.01). Radiologists suspected malabsorption in 72% in the CS group and 2% in the IBS group (p < 0.001). Imaging findings suggestive of mucosal malabsorption are commonly demonstrated in CS.

  12. Comparative analysis of imaging configurations and objectives for Fourier microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurvits, Jonathan A; Jiang, Mingming; Zia, Rashid

    2015-11-01

    Fourier microscopy is becoming an increasingly important tool for the analysis of optical nanostructures and quantum emitters. However, achieving quantitative Fourier space measurements requires a thorough understanding of the impact of aberrations introduced by optical microscopes that have been optimized for conventional real-space imaging. Here we present a detailed framework for analyzing the performance of microscope objectives for several common Fourier imaging configurations. To this end, we model objectives from Nikon, Olympus, and Zeiss using parameters that were inferred from patent literature and confirmed, where possible, by physical disassembly. We then examine the aberrations most relevant to Fourier microscopy, including the alignment tolerances of apodization factors for different objective classes, the effect of magnification on the modulation transfer function, and vignetting-induced reductions of the effective numerical aperture for wide-field measurements. Based on this analysis, we identify an optimal objective class and imaging configuration for Fourier microscopy. In addition, the Zemax files for the objectives and setups used in this analysis have been made publicly available as a resource for future studies.

  13. Epithelial and stromal metabolite changes in the transition from cervical intraepithelial neoplasia to cervical cancer: an in vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging study with ex vivo correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Sonali S. de; Payne, Geoffrey S.; Morgan, Veronica A.; Ind, Thomas E.J.; Shepherd, John H.; Barton, Desmond P.J.; Souza, Nandita M. de

    2009-01-01

    To investigate epithelial and stromal metabolite changes in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer in vivo and correlate findings with MR spectroscopy of tissue samples. Forty-seven women (19 with CIN, 28 with cervical cancer) underwent endovaginal MR at 1.5 T with T2-W and localised 2D MR spectroscopic imaging (PRESS, TR=1,500 ms, TE=135 ms). tCho, 2 ppm and -CH 2 lipid peaks were measured in epithelial (>50% epithelium, no tumour), stromal (>50% stroma, no tumour) and tumour (>30% tumour) voxels. Unsuppressed water signal from the same voxel provided a concentration reference. 1 H HR-MAS MR spectra were acquired from tissue in 37 patients (11.74 T, pulse-acquire and cpmg sequences, with water pre-saturation). Analysable data from 17 CIN and 25 cancer patients showed significant increases in tCho (p=0.03) and 2 ppm (p=0.007) in tumour compared with epithelial voxels from CIN patients, but not with epithelial voxels from cancer patients. No significant differences were seen in stroma from cancer compared with CIN patients. Differences in -CH 2 lipids were not significant between groups. There was no significant correlation between in vivo and ex vivo tCho or -CH 2 lipids. Estimated in vivo concentrations of tCho and 2 ppm resonances increase in tumour and adjacent epithelium in progression from CIN to cervical cancer. (orig.)

  14. What Images Reveal: a Comparative Study of Science Images between Australian and Taiwanese Junior High School Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yun-Ping; Unsworth, Len; Wang, Kuo-Hua; Chang, Huey-Por

    2017-07-01

    From a social semiotic perspective, image designs in science textbooks are inevitably influenced by the sociocultural context in which the books are produced. The learning environments of Australia and Taiwan vary greatly. Drawing on social semiotics and cognitive science, this study compares classificational images in Australian and Taiwanese junior high school science textbooks. Classificational images are important kinds of images, which can represent taxonomic relations among objects as reported by Kress and van Leeuwen (Reading images: the grammar of visual design, 2006). An analysis of the images from sample chapters in Australian and Taiwanese high school science textbooks showed that the majority of the Taiwanese images are covert taxonomies, which represent hierarchical relations implicitly. In contrast, Australian classificational images included diversified designs, but particularly types with a tree structure which depicted overt taxonomies, explicitly representing hierarchical super-ordinate and subordinate relations. Many of the Taiwanese images are reminiscent of the specimen images in eighteenth century science texts representing "what truly is", while more Australian images emphasize structural objectivity. Moreover, Australian images support cognitive functions which facilitate reading comprehension. The relationships between image designs and learning environments are discussed and implications for textbook research and design are addressed.

  15. Translational Approaches for Studying Neurodevelopmental Disorders Utilizing in Vivo Proton (+H) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, April E.

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine complications have been implicated in the etiology of neuripsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, autism and ADHD. This presentation will describe new translational studies derived from in vivo magnetic resonance imaging of developing and adult brain following perinatal asphyxia (PA). Our findings reveal significant effects of PA on neurometabolic profiles at one week of age, and significant relationships between early metabolites and later life phenotypes including behavior and brain morphometry

  16. Signal to noise comparison of metabolic imaging methods on a clinical 3T MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, C. A.; Hansen, Rie Beck; Skinner, J. G.

    MRI with hyperpolarized tracers has enabled new diagnostic applications, e.g. metabolic imaging in cancer research. However, the acquisition of the transient, hyperpolarized signal with spatial and frequency resolution requires dedicated imaging methods. Here, we compare three promising candidate...... for 2D MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI): (i) multi-echo balanced steady-state free precession (me-bSSFP), 1,2 (ii) echo planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) sequence and (iii) phase-encoded, pulseacquisition chemical-shift imaging (CSI)...

  17. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haw [Moraga, CA; Cang, Hu [Berkeley, CA; Xu, Cangshan [Berkeley, CA; Wong, Chung M [San Gabriel, CA

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  18. Reproducibility of proton MR spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI): comparison of dyslexic and normal-reading children and effects of treatment on brain lactate levels during language tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Todd L; Berninger, Virginia W; Aylward, Elizabeth H; Richards, Anne L; Thomson, Jennifer B; Nagy, William E; Carlisle, Joanne F; Dager, Stephen R; Abbott, Robert D

    2002-01-01

    We repeated a proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) study to test the hypothesis that children with dyslexia and good readers differ in brain lactate activation during a phonologic judgment task before but not after instructional treatment. We measured PEPSI brain lactate activation (TR/TE, 4000/144; 1.5 T) at two points 1-2 months apart during two language tasks (phonologic and lexical) and a control task (passive listening). Dyslexic participants (n = 10) and control participants (n = 8) (boys and girls aged 9-12 years) were matched in age, verbal intelligence quotients, and valid PEPSI voxels. In contrast to patients in past studies who received combined treatment, our patients were randomly assigned to either phonologic or morphologic (meaning-based) intervention between the scanning sessions. Before treatment, the patients showed significantly greater lactate elevation in the left frontal regions (including the inferior frontal gyrus) during the phonologic task. Both patients and control subjects differed significantly in the right parietal and occipital regions during both tasks. After treatment, the two groups did not significantly differ in any brain region during either task, but individuals given morphologic treatment were significantly more likely to have reduced left frontal lactate activation during the phonologic task. The previous finding of greater left frontal lactate elevation in children with dyslexia during a phonologic judgment task was replicated, and brain activation changed as a result of treatment. However, the treatment effect was due to the morphologic component rather than the phonologic component.

  19. Reproducibility over a 1-month period of 1H-MR spectroscopic imaging NAA/Cr ratios in clinically stable multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, J P; Blaauw, Y; Koch, M W; Kuiper, A J; Hoogduin, J M; De Keyser, J

    2008-08-01

    N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios, assessed with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, are increasingly used as a surrogate marker for axonal dysfunction and degeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of this study was to test short-time reproducibility of NAA/Cr ratios in patients with clinically stable MS. In 35 MS patients we analysed NAA/Cr ratios obtained with (1)H-MR spectroscopic imaging at the centrum semiovale either with lateral ventricles partially included (group 1; n=15) or more cranially with no ventricles included (group 2; n=20). To test short-term reproducibility of the NAA/Cr measurements, patients were scanned twice 4 weeks apart. We determined mean NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios of 12 grey matter and 24 white matter voxels. Mean NAA/Cr ratios of both the white and grey matter did not change after 4 weeks. Overall 4-week reproducibility of the NAA/Cr ratio, expressed as coefficient of variation, was 4.8% for grey matter and 3.5% for white matter. Reproducibility of cranial scanning of the ventricles was slightly better than with cerebrospinal fluid included. Our study shows good short-term reproducibility of NAA/Cr ratio measurements in the centrum semiovale, which supports the reliability of this technique for longitudinal studies.

  20. Use of spectroscopic and imaging techniques to evaluate pretreated sugarcane bagasse as a substrate for cellulase production under solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Zúñiga, Ursula Fabiola; Bertucci Neto, Victor; Couri, Sonia; Crestana, Silvio; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez

    2014-03-01

    The enzymatic cocktail of cellulases is one of the most costly inputs affecting the economic viability of the biochemical route for biomass conversion into biofuels and other chemicals. Here, the influence of liquid hot water, dilute acid, alkali, and combined acid/alkali pretreatments on sugarcane bagasse (SCB) used for cellulase production was investigated by means of spectroscopic and imaging techniques. Chemical composition and structural characteristics, such as crystallinity (determined by X-ray diffraction), functional groups (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), and microstructure (scanning electron microscopy), were used to correlate SCB pretreatments with enzymatic biosynthesis by a strain of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger under solid-state fermentation. The combined acid/alkali pretreatment resulted in a SCB with higher cellulose content (86.7%). However, the high crystallinity (74%) of the resulting biomass was detrimental to microbial uptake and enzyme production. SCB pretreated with liquid hot water yielded the highest filter paper cellulase (FPase), carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase), and xylanase activities (0.4, 14.9, and 26.1 U g(-1), respectively). The results showed that a suitable pretreatment for SCB to be used as a substrate for cellulase production should avoid severe conditions in order to preserve amorphous cellulose and to enhance the physical properties that assist microbial access.

  1. Localization of calcium in the cyanobiont and gonidial zone of Cycas revoluta Thunb. by microelectrodes, chlorotetracycline, electron spectroscopic imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caiola, M.G.; Canini, A.; Brandizzi, F.

    1994-01-01

    Ionic calcium concentration was measured in the gonidial zone of fresh coralloid roots by means of calcium microelectrodes. It was 10 -6 M in the apical segments of coralloid roots and increased to 10 -5 M in the gonidial zones of median and basal segments. Loosely membrane-bound calcium was evidenced by using chloro-tetracycline (CTC) or ethylene glycol-bis-(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and CTC, in cell walls of columnar cells of Cycas and in the cytoplasm of cyanobiont. Sub-cellular localization of calcium was obtained by electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analyses applied at transmission electron microscopy on thin, unstained sections of gonidial zone of coralloid roots. By means of these techniques, bound-calcium was detected inside the mucilage of apical and median segments whereas, in the basal segments, it was completely absent. In the heterocysts of apical segments of coralloid, calcium was localized on the envelope, cell walls, thylakoids and cyanophycin granules. In the gonidial zone of the basal segments, dead or degenerating heterocysts completely lacked calcium. Therefore, the high ionic calcium amounts detected in the gonidial zone of median and basal segments could represent a minor calcium uptake by the cells or release by lysed ones. The decreases in nitrogenase activity recorded in the median and basal segments of the coralloid roots paralleled the decrease in calcium amount in heterocyst envelope. (authors)

  2. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC DIAGNOSTICS ON THE FORMATION OF TWO MAGNETIC FLUX ROPES REVEALED BY SDO/AIA AND IRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Fang, C., E-mail: xincheng@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-05-10

    Helical magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a fundamental structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and has been discovered recently to exist as a sigmoidal channel structure prior to its eruption in the EUV high-temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). However, when and where the MFR is built up are still elusive. In this paper, we investigate two MFRs (MFR1 and MFR2) in detail, whose eruptions produced two energetic solar flares and CMEs on 2014 April 18 and 2014 September 10, respectively. The AIA EUV images reveal that for a long time prior to their eruption, both MFR1 and MFR2 are under formation, which is probably through magnetic reconnection between two groups of sheared arcades driven by the shearing and converging flows in the photosphere near the polarity inversion line. At the footpoints of the MFR1, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph Si iv, C ii, and Mg ii lines exhibit weak to moderate redshifts and a non-thermal broadening in the pre-flare phase. However, a relatively large blueshift and an extremely strong non-thermal broadening are found at the formation site of the MFR2. These spectral features consolidate the proposition that the reconnection plays an important role in the formation of MFRs. For the MFR1, the reconnection outflow may propagate along its legs, penetrating into the transition region and the chromosphere at the footpoints. For the MFR2, the reconnection probably takes place in the lower atmosphere and results in the strong blueshift and non-thermal broadening for the Mg ii, C ii, and Si iv lines.

  3. Imaging and Spectroscopic Diagnostics on the Formation of Two Magnetic Flux Ropes Revealed by SDO/AIA and IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Fang, C.

    2015-05-01

    Helical magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a fundamental structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and has been discovered recently to exist as a sigmoidal channel structure prior to its eruption in the EUV high-temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). However, when and where the MFR is built up are still elusive. In this paper, we investigate two MFRs (MFR1 and MFR2) in detail, whose eruptions produced two energetic solar flares and CMEs on 2014 April 18 and 2014 September 10, respectively. The AIA EUV images reveal that for a long time prior to their eruption, both MFR1 and MFR2 are under formation, which is probably through magnetic reconnection between two groups of sheared arcades driven by the shearing and converging flows in the photosphere near the polarity inversion line. At the footpoints of the MFR1, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph Si iv, C ii, and Mg ii lines exhibit weak to moderate redshifts and a non-thermal broadening in the pre-flare phase. However, a relatively large blueshift and an extremely strong non-thermal broadening are found at the formation site of the MFR2. These spectral features consolidate the proposition that the reconnection plays an important role in the formation of MFRs. For the MFR1, the reconnection outflow may propagate along its legs, penetrating into the transition region and the chromosphere at the footpoints. For the MFR2, the reconnection probably takes place in the lower atmosphere and results in the strong blueshift and non-thermal broadening for the Mg ii, C ii, and Si iv lines.

  4. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC DIAGNOSTICS ON THE FORMATION OF TWO MAGNETIC FLUX ROPES REVEALED BY SDO/AIA AND IRIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Fang, C.

    2015-01-01

    Helical magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a fundamental structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and has been discovered recently to exist as a sigmoidal channel structure prior to its eruption in the EUV high-temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). However, when and where the MFR is built up are still elusive. In this paper, we investigate two MFRs (MFR1 and MFR2) in detail, whose eruptions produced two energetic solar flares and CMEs on 2014 April 18 and 2014 September 10, respectively. The AIA EUV images reveal that for a long time prior to their eruption, both MFR1 and MFR2 are under formation, which is probably through magnetic reconnection between two groups of sheared arcades driven by the shearing and converging flows in the photosphere near the polarity inversion line. At the footpoints of the MFR1, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph Si iv, C ii, and Mg ii lines exhibit weak to moderate redshifts and a non-thermal broadening in the pre-flare phase. However, a relatively large blueshift and an extremely strong non-thermal broadening are found at the formation site of the MFR2. These spectral features consolidate the proposition that the reconnection plays an important role in the formation of MFRs. For the MFR1, the reconnection outflow may propagate along its legs, penetrating into the transition region and the chromosphere at the footpoints. For the MFR2, the reconnection probably takes place in the lower atmosphere and results in the strong blueshift and non-thermal broadening for the Mg ii, C ii, and Si iv lines

  5. "Refsdal" Meets Popper: Comparing Predictions of the Re-appearance of the Multiply Imaged Supernova Behind MACSJ1149.5+2223

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treu, T.; Brammer, G.; Diego, J. M.; Grillo, C.; Kelly, P. L.; Oguri, M.; Rodney, S. A.; Rosati, P.; Sharon, K.; Zitrin, A.; Balestra, I.; Bradač, M.; Broadhurst, T.; Caminha, G. B.; Halkola, A.; Hoag, A.; Ishigaki, M.; Johnson, T. L.; Karman, W.; Kawamata, R.; Mercurio, A.; Schmidt, K. B.; Strolger, L.-G.; Suyu, S. H.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Patel, B.

    2016-01-01

    Supernova “Refsdal,” multiply imaged by cluster MACS1149.5+2223, represents a rare opportunity to make a true blind test of model predictions in extragalactic astronomy, on a timescale that is short compared to a human lifetime. In order to take advantage of this event, we produced seven gravitational lens models with five independent methods, based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Hubble Frontier Field images, along with extensive spectroscopic follow-up observations by HST, the Very Large and the Keck Telescopes. We compare the model predictions and show that they agree reasonably well with the measured time delays and magnification ratios between the known images, even though these quantities were not used as input. This agreement is encouraging, considering that the models only provide statistical uncertainties, and do not include additional sources of uncertainties such as structure along the line of sight, cosmology, and the mass sheet degeneracy. We then present the model predictions for the other appearances of supernova “Refsdal.” A future image will reach its peak in the first half of 2016, while another image appeared between 1994 and 2004. The past image would have been too faint to be detected in existing archival images. The future image should be approximately one-third as bright as the brightest known image (I.e., {H}{{AB}}≈ 25.7 mag at peak and {H}{{AB}}≈ 26.7 mag six months before peak), and thus detectable in single-orbit HST images. We will find out soon whether our predictions are correct.

  6. Imaging and spectroscopic observations of a strange elliptical bubble in the northern arm of the spiral galaxy NGC 6946

    OpenAIRE

    Efremov, Yuri N.; Moiseev, Alexei V.

    2016-01-01

    NGC 6946, known as the Fireworks galaxy because of its high supernova rate and high star formation, is embedded in a very extended HI halo. Its northern spiral arm is well detached from the galactic main body. We found that this arm contains a large (~300 pc in size) Red Ellipse, named according to a strong contamination of the H-alpha emission line on its optical images. The ellipse is accompanied by a short parallel arc and a few others still smaller and less regular; a bright star cluster ...

  7. Regarding the Focal Treatment of Prostate Cancer: Inference of the Gleason Grade From Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brame, Ryan S.; Zaider, Marco; Zakian, Kristen L.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Reuter, Victor E.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Scardino, Peter T.; Hricak, Hedvig

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify, as a function of average magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) score and tumor volume, the probability that a cancer-suspected lesion has an elevated Gleason grade. Methods and Materials: The data consist of MRS imaging ratios R stratified by patient, lesion (contiguous abnormal voxels), voxels, biopsy and pathologic Gleason grade, and lesion volume. The data were analyzed using a logistic model. Results: For both low and high Gleason score biopsy lesions, the probability of pathologic Gleason score ≥4+3 increases with lesion volume. At low values of R a lesion volume of at least 15-20 voxels is needed to reach a probability of success of 80%; the biopsy result helps reduce the prediction uncertainty. At larger MRS ratios (R > 6) the biopsy result becomes essentially uninformative once the lesion volume is >12 voxels. With the exception of low values of R, for lesions with low Gleason score at biopsy, the MRS ratios serve primarily as a selection tool for assessing lesion volumes. Conclusions: In patients with biopsy Gleason score ≥4+3, high MRS imaging tumor volume and (creatine + choline)/citrate ratio may justify the initiation of voxel-specific dose escalation. This is an example of biologically motivated focal treatment for which intensity-modulated radiotherapy and especially brachytherapy are ideally suited.

  8. Built-in hyperspectral camera for smartphone in visible, near-infrared and middle-infrared lights region (third report): spectroscopic imaging for broad-area and real-time componential analysis system against local unexpected terrorism and disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Satsuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Wollherr, Dirk; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    The distributed networks for information collection of chemical components with high-mobility objects, such as drones or smartphones, will work effectively for investigations, clarifications and predictions against unexpected local terrorisms and disasters like localized torrential downpours. We proposed and reported the proposed spectroscopic line-imager for smartphones in this conference. In this paper, we will mention the wide-area spectroscopic-image construction by estimating 6 DOF (Degrees Of Freedom: parallel movements=x,y,z and rotational movements=θx, θy, θz) from line data to observe and analyze surrounding chemical-environments. Recently, smartphone movies, what were photographed by peoples happened to be there, had worked effectively to analyze what kinds of phenomenon had happened around there. But when a gas tank suddenly blew up, we did not recognize from visible-light RGB-color cameras what kinds of chemical gas components were polluting surrounding atmospheres. Conventionally Fourier spectroscopy had been well known as chemical components analysis in laboratory usages. But volatile gases should be analyzed promptly at accident sites. And because the humidity absorption in near and middle infrared lights has very high sensitivity, we will be able to detect humidity in the sky from wide field spectroscopic image. And also recently, 6-DOF sensors are easily utilized for estimation of position and attitude for UAV (Unmanned Air Vehicle) or smartphone. But for observing long-distance views, accuracies of angle measurements were not sufficient to merge line data because of leverage theory. Thus, by searching corresponding pixels between line spectroscopic images, we are trying to estimate 6-DOF in high accuracy.

  9. Simultaneous PET/MRI with (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (hyperPET): phantom-based evaluation of PET quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Adam E; Andersen, Flemming L; Henriksen, Sarah T; Vignaud, Alexandre; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan H; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas; Klausen, Thomas L

    2016-12-01

    Integrated PET/MRI with hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((13)C-MRSI) offers simultaneous, dual-modality metabolic imaging. A prerequisite for the use of simultaneous imaging is the absence of interference between the two modalities. This has been documented for a clinical whole-body system using simultaneous (1)H-MRI and PET but never for (13)C-MRSI and PET. Here, the feasibility of simultaneous PET and (13)C-MRSI as well as hyperpolarized (13)C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is evaluated using phantom experiments. Combined PET and (13)C-MRSI phantoms including a NEMA [(18)F]-FDG phantom, (13)C-acetate and (13)C-urea sources, and hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate were imaged repeatedly with PET and/or (13)C-MRSI. Measurements evaluated for interference effects included PET activity values in the largest sphere and a background region; total number of PET trues; and (13)C-MRSI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for urea and acetate phantoms. Differences between measurement conditions were evaluated using t tests. PET and (13)C-MRSI data acquisition could be performed simultaneously without any discernible artifacts. The average difference in PET activity between acquisitions with and without simultaneous (13)C-MRSI was 0.83 (largest sphere) and -0.76 % (background). The average difference in net trues was -0.01 %. The average difference in (13)C-MRSI SNR between acquisitions with and without simultaneous PET ranged from -2.28 to 1.21 % for all phantoms and measurement conditions. No differences were significant. The system was capable of (13)C-MRSI of hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate. Simultaneous PET and (13)C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is feasible. Phantom experiments showed that possible interference effects introduced by acquiring data from the two modalities simultaneously are small and non-significant. Further experiments can now investigate the benefits of simultaneous PET and

  10. MapX: An In Situ, Full-Frame X-Ray Spectroscopic Imager for the Biogenic Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David; Sarrazin, Philippe; Thompson, Kathy; Bristow, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Microbial life exploits microscale disequilibria at boundaries where valence, chemical potential, pH, Eh, etc. vary on a length scale commensurate with the organisms themselves - tens to hundreds of micrometers. These disequilibria can exist within cracks or veins in rocks and ice, at inter- or intra-crystalline boundaries, at sediment/water or sediment/atmosphere interfaces, or even within fluid inclusions trapped inside minerals. The detection of accumulations of the biogenic elements C,N,O,P,S at appropriate concentrations on or in a mineral/ice substrate would constitute permissive evidence of extant life, but context is also required. Does the putative biosignature exist in a habitable environment? Under what conditions of P, T, and chemical potential was the host mineralogy formed? MapX is an arm-deployed contact instrument that directly images the biogenic elements C, N, O, P, S, as well as the cations of the rock-forming minerals (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe) and important anions such as Cl, Fl. The instrument provides element images having =100 micron lateral spatial resolution over a 2.5 cm X 2.5 cm area, as well as quantitative XRF spectra from ground-selected or instrument-selected Regions of Interest (ROI) on the sample. Quantitative XRF spectra from ROI can be translated into mineralogies using ground- or instrument-based algorithms. Either an X-ray tube source (X-ray fluorescence) or a radioisotope source such as 244-Cm (alpha-particle and gamma-ray fluorescence) can be used, and characteristic X-rays emitted from the sample are imaged onto an X-ray sensitive CCD through an X-ray MicroPore Optic (MPO). As a fluorescent source, 244-Cm is highly desirable in a MapX instrument intended for life detection since high-energy alpha-particles are unrivaled in fluorescence yield for the low-Z elements. The MapX design as well as baseline performance requirements for a MapX instrument intended for life detection/identification of habitable

  11. MapX An In Situ, Full-frame X-Ray Spectroscopic Imager for Planetary Science and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David; Sarrazin, Philippe; Thompson, Kathleen; Bristow, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Microbial life exploits micron-scale disequilibria at boundaries where valence, chemical potential, pH, Eh, etc. vary on a length scale commensurate with the organisms - 10's to 100's of microns. The detection of accumulations of the biogenic elements C,N,O,P,S at appropriate concentrations on or in a mineral/ice substrate would constitute permissive evidence of extant life, but context is also required. Does the putative biosignature exist under habitable conditions? Under what conditions of P, T, and chemical potential was the host mineralogy formed? MapX is an in situ robotic spacecraft instrument that images the biogenic elements C, N, O, P, S, as well as the cations of the rock-forming minerals (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe) and important anions such as Cl, Fl. MapX provides element maps with less than or equal to100 microns resolution over a 2.5 cm X 2.5 cm area, as well as quantitative XRF spectra from ground- or instrument-selected Regions of Interest (ROI). XRF spectra are converted to mineralogies using ground- or instrument-based algorithms. Either X-ray tube or radioisotope sources such as 244Cm (Alpha-particle and gamma- ray fluorescence) can be used. Fluoresced sample Xrays are imaged onto an X-ray sensitive CCD through an X-ray MicroPore Optic (MPO). The MapX design as well as baseline performance requirements for a MapX instrument intended for life detection / identification of habitable environments will be presented.

  12. Automated image-matching technique for comparative diagnosis of the liver on CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Eiichiro; Sanada, Shigeru; Suzuki, Masayuki; Tsushima, Yoshito; Matsui, Osamu

    2005-01-01

    When interpreting enhanced computer tomography (CT) images of the upper abdomen, radiologists visually select a set of images of the same anatomical positions from two or more CT image series (i.e., non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced CT images at arterial and delayed phase) to depict and to characterize any abnormalities. The same process is also necessary to create subtraction images by computer. We have developed an automated image selection system using a template-matching technique that allows the recognition of image sets at the same anatomical position from two CT image series. Using the template-matching technique, we compared several anatomical structures in each CT image at the same anatomical position. As the position of the liver may shift according to respiratory movement, not only the shape of the liver but also the gallbladder and other prominent structures included in the CT images were compared to allow appropriate selection of a set of CT images. This novel technique was applied in 11 upper abdominal CT examinations. In CT images with a slice thickness of 7.0 or 7.5 mm, the percentage of image sets selected correctly by the automated procedure was 86.6±15.3% per case. In CT images with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm, the percentages of correct selection of image sets by the automated procedure were 79.4±12.4% (non-enhanced and arterial-phase CT images) and 86.4±10.1% (arterial- and delayed-phase CT images). This automated method is useful for assisting in interpreting CT images and in creating digital subtraction images. (author)

  13. Biomedical Applications of Mid-Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging and Multivariate Data Analysis: Contribution to the Understanding of Diabetes Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboualizadeh, Ebrahim

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of diabetes and a leading cause of adult vision loss. Although a great deal of progress has been made in ophthalmological examinations and clinical approaches to detect the signs of retinopathy in patients with diabetes, there still remain outstanding questions regarding the molecular and biochemical changes involved. To discover the biochemical mechanisms underlying the development and progression of changes in the retina as a result of diabetes, a more comprehensive understanding of the bio-molecular processes, in individual retinal cells subjected to hyperglycemia, is required. Animal models provide a suitable resource for temporal detection of the underlying pathophysiological and biochemical changes associated with DR, which is not fully attainable in human studies. In the present study, I aimed to determine the nature of diabetes-induced, highly localized biochemical changes in the retinal tissue from Ins2Akita/+ (Akita/+; a model of Type I diabetes) male mice with different duration of diabetes. Employing label-free, spatially resolved Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging engaged with chemometric tools enabled me to identify temporal-dependent reproducible biomarkers of the diabetic retinal tissue from mice with 6 or 12 weeks, and 6 or 10 months of diabetes. I report, for the first time, the origin of molecular changes in the biochemistry of individual retinal layers with different duration of diabetes. A robust classification between distinctive retinal layers - namely photoreceptor layer (PRL), outer plexiform layer (OPL), inner nuclear layer (INL), and inner plexiform layer (IPL) - and associated temporal-dependent spectral biomarkers, were delineated. Spatially-resolved super resolution chemical images revealed oxidative stress-induced structural and morphological alterations within the nucleus of the photoreceptors. Comparison among the PRL, OPL, INL, and IPL suggested that the

  14. 1H MR spectroscopic imaging in patients with MRI-negative extratemporal epilepsy: correlation with ictal onset zone and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krsek, Pavel; Komarek, Vladimir; Hajek, Milan; Dezortova, Monika; Jiru, Filip; Skoch, Antonin; Marusic, Petr; Zamecnik, Josef; Kyncl, Martin; Tichy, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) is beneficial in the lateralization of the epileptogenic zone in temporal lobe epilepsy; however, its role in extratemporal and, especially, MRI-negative epilepsy has not been established. This study seeks to verify how 1 H MRS could help in localizing the epileptogenic zone in patients with MRI-negative extratemporal epilepsy. Seven patients (8-23 years) with MRI-negative refractory focal epilepsy were studied using 1 H MRS on a 1.5T MR system. Chemical shift imaging sequence in the transversal plane was directed towards the suspected epileptogenic zone localized by seizure semiology, scalp video/EEG, ictal SPECT and 18 FDG-PET. Spectra were evaluated using the program CULICH, and the coefficient of asymmetry was used for quantitative lateralization. MRS detected lateralization in all patients and was able to localize pathology in five. The most frequent findings were decreased ratios of N-acetylaspartate to choline compounds characterized by increasing choline concentration. The localization of the 1 H MRS abnormality correlated well with ictal SPECT and subdural mapping. In all cases, histopathological analysis revealed MRI-undetected focal cortical dysplasias. 1 H MRS could be more sensitive for the detection of discrete malformations of cortical development than conventional MRI. It is valuable in the presurgical evaluation of patients without MRI-apparent lesions. (orig.)

  15. The DEPFET detector-amplifier structure for spectroscopic imaging in astronomy and for experiments at free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, G., E-mail: gerhard.lutz@pnsensor.de; Aschauer, S.; Majewski, P.; Holl, P.; Strüder, L.

    2017-02-11

    The DEPFET detector-amplifier structure possesses several unique properties which make it extremely useful as readout element in semiconductor detectors and in particular as building block of semiconductor pixel detectors. Variations of DEPFETs can be tuned to specific requirements as to be sensitive only in predetermined time intervals, to measure signal charge with sub-electron precision, dead-time-free readout and with signal compression. These devices have been shown to work in simulations and in prototypes. Recently the first two fully developed detector systems have been finished and installed in the MIXS (Mercury Image X-ray Spectrometer) instrument of the Mercury Planetary Orbiter scheduled to be launched in 2017. A further DEPFET detector system under development is the DSSC (Depfet Sensor with Signal Compression) that will be installed in one of the beam-lines of XFEL. The requirements of the two projects are rather different. While the MIXS sensors are supposed to measure precisely the energy and position of single photons down to very low energies but at moderate rates, the DSSC has to measure the number of photons arriving in each pixel within a time interval of 220 ns. Here the challenge is the capability of detecting single X-ray photons in one pixel simultaneously with up to 10,000 photons in some other pixels. Device functioning has been verified with sensors produced in a research laboratory. Now process and design have been adapted to an industrial type production line, allowing additional improvements.

  16. Maxillary sinusitis - a comparative study of different imaging diagnosis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueb, Marcelo Miguel; Borges, Fabiano de Almeida; Pulcinelli, Emilte; Souza, Wandir Ferreira; Borges, Luiz Marcondes

    1999-01-01

    We conducted prospective study comparing different methods (plain X-rays, computed tomography and ultrasonography mode-A) for the initial diagnosis of maxillary sinusitis. Twenty patients (40 maxillary sinuses) with a clinical history suggestive of sinusitis included in this study. The results were classified as abnormal or normal, using computed tomography as gold standard. The sensitivity for ultrasonography and plain X-rays was 84.6% and 69.2%, respectively. The specificity of both methods was 92.6%. This study suggests that ultrasonography can be used as a good follow-up method for patients with maxillary. sinusitis. (author)

  17. Bio-Spectroscopic Imaging Provides Evidence of Hippocampal Zn Deficiency and Decreased Lipid Unsaturation in an Accelerated Ageing Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimognari, Nicholas; Hollings, Ashley; Lam, Virginie; Tidy, Rebecca J; Kewish, Cameron M; Albrecht, Matthew A; Takechi, Ryu; Mamo, John C L; Hackett, Mark J

    2018-06-14

    Western society is facing a health epidemic due to the increasing incidence of dementia in ageing populations, and there are still few effective diagnostic methods, minimal treatment options, and no cure. Ageing is the greatest risk factor for memory loss that occurs during the natural ageing process, as well as being the greatest risk factor for neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, greater understanding of the biochemical pathways that drive a healthy ageing brain towards dementia (pathological ageing or Alzheimer's disease), is required to accelerate the development of improved diagnostics and therapies. Unfortunately, many animal models of dementia model chronic amyloid precursor protein over-expression, which although highly relevant to mechanisms of amyloidosis and familial Alzheimer's disease, does not model well dementia during the natural ageing process. A promising animal model reported to model mechanisms of accelerated natural ageing and memory impairments, is the senescence accelerated murine prone strain 8 (SAMP8), which has been adopted by many research group to study the biochemical transitions that occur during brain ageing. A limitation to traditional methods of biochemical characterisation is that many important biochemical and elemental markers (lipid saturation, lactate, transition metals) cannot be imaged at meso- or micro-spatial resolution. Therefore, in this investigation we report the first multi-modal biospectroscopic characterisation of the SAMP8 model, and have identified important biochemical and elemental alterations, and co-localisations, between 4 month old SAMP8 mice and the relevant control (SAMR1) mice. Specifically, we demonstrate direct evidence of altered metabolism and disturbed lipid homeostasis within corpus callosum white matter, in addition to localised hippocampal metal deficiencies, in the accelerated ageing phenotype. Such findings have important implication for future research aimed at

  18. The combined use of conventional MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging increases the diagnostic accuracy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervo, Amedeo [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Cocozza, Sirio, E-mail: siriococozza@hotmail.it [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Saccà, Francesco [Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive Sciences and Odontostomatology, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Giorgio, Sara M.d.A. [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Morra, Vincenzo Brescia [Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive Sciences and Odontostomatology, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Tedeschi, Enrico [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Marsili, Angela; Vacca, Giovanni [Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive Sciences and Odontostomatology, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Palma, Vincenzo [U.O.C. Neurofisiopatologia, PO S. Gennaro ASL Napoli 1, Naples (Italy); Brunetti, Arturo [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Quarantelli, Mario [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute, National Research Council, Naples (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • We assessed in ALS the diagnostic accuracy of MRI signal and MRS data used alone and in combination. • We found that T2-hypointensity and NAA decrease in motor cortex are two independent phenomena. • These two variables taken alone do not provide acceptable diagnostic accuracy in ALS. • The same variables, when used in combination, improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in ALS. - Abstract: Purpose: We aimed to assess, in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the diagnostic accuracy of the combined use of conventional MRI signal changes (namely, hypointensity of the precentral cortex and hyperintensity of the corticospinal tracts on T2-weighted images), and N-Acetyl-Aspartate (NAA) reduction in the motor cortex at Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), which are affected by limited diagnostic accuracy when used separately. Methods: T2-hypointensity and NAA/(Choline + Creatine) ratio of the precentral gyrus and T2-hyperintensity of the corticospinal tracts were measured in 84 ALS patients and 28 healthy controls, using a Region-of-Interest approach. Sensitivity and specificity values were calculated using Fisher stepwise discriminant analysis, and cross-validated using the leave-one-out method. Results: Precentral gyrus T2 signal intensity (p < 10{sup −4}) and NAA peak (p < 10{sup −6}) were significantly reduced in patients, and their values did not correlate significantly to each other both in patients and controls, while no significant differences were obtained in terms of T2-hyperintensity of the corticospinal tract. Sensitivity and specificity of the two discriminant variables, taken alone, were 71.4% and 75.0%, for NAA peak, and 63.1% and 71.4% for T2-hypointensity, respectively. When using these two variables in combination, a significant increase in sensitivity (78.6%) and specificity (82.1%) was achieved. Conclusions: Precentral gyrus T2-hypointensity and NAA peak are not significantly correlated in ALS patients, suggesting that they

  19. NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF THE SOUTHERN REGION OF THE YOUNG OPEN CLUSTER NGC 2264

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinas, Naibi; Lada, Elizabeth A. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Teixiera, Paula S. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Lada, Charles J. [Harvard-Smithsonian CFA, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    We have obtained JHK near-IR images and JH band low-resolution spectra of candidate members of the southern region of the young open cluster NGC 2264. We have determined spectral types from H-band spectra for 54 sources, 25 of which are classified for the first time. The stars in our sample cover a large range of spectral types (A8-M8). Using a cluster distance of 780 pc, we determined a median age of 1 Myr for this region of NGC 2264, with 90% of the stars being 5 Myr or younger. To improve the statistical significance of our sample, we included 66 additional cluster members within our field of view with optical spectral classification in the literature. We derived infrared excesses using stellar properties to model the photospheric emission for each source and the extinction to correct FLAMINGOS near-IR and Spitzer mid-IR photometry, and obtained a disk fraction of 51% {+-} 5% for the region. Binning the stars by stellar mass, we find a disk fraction of 38% {+-} 9% for the 0.1-0.3 solar mass group, 55% {+-} 6% for 0.3-1 solar masses, and 58% {+-} 10% for the higher than 1 solar mass group. The lower disk fraction for the lower mass stars is similar to the results found in non-cluster regions like Taurus and Chamaeleon, but differs from the older 3 Myr cluster IC 348 in which the disk fraction is lower for the higher mass stars. This mass-dependent disk fraction is accentuated in the sample with isochrone ages younger than 2 Myr. Here, we find that 45% {+-} 11% of the 0.1-0.3 solar mass stars have disks, 60% {+-} 7% of the 0.3-1 solar mass stars have disks, and all 1-3 solar mass stars have disks. Stellar masses might be an important factor in the ability of a system to form or retain a disk early on. However, regardless of the stellar mass, the large infrared excesses expected from optically thick disks disappear within the first 2 Myr for all stars in our study and small excesses from optically thin disks are found mostly in sources younger than 4 Myr.

  20. The combined use of conventional MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging increases the diagnostic accuracy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervo, Amedeo; Cocozza, Sirio; Saccà, Francesco; Giorgio, Sara M.d.A.; Morra, Vincenzo Brescia; Tedeschi, Enrico; Marsili, Angela; Vacca, Giovanni; Palma, Vincenzo; Brunetti, Arturo; Quarantelli, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We assessed in ALS the diagnostic accuracy of MRI signal and MRS data used alone and in combination. • We found that T2-hypointensity and NAA decrease in motor cortex are two independent phenomena. • These two variables taken alone do not provide acceptable diagnostic accuracy in ALS. • The same variables, when used in combination, improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in ALS. - Abstract: Purpose: We aimed to assess, in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the diagnostic accuracy of the combined use of conventional MRI signal changes (namely, hypointensity of the precentral cortex and hyperintensity of the corticospinal tracts on T2-weighted images), and N-Acetyl-Aspartate (NAA) reduction in the motor cortex at Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), which are affected by limited diagnostic accuracy when used separately. Methods: T2-hypointensity and NAA/(Choline + Creatine) ratio of the precentral gyrus and T2-hyperintensity of the corticospinal tracts were measured in 84 ALS patients and 28 healthy controls, using a Region-of-Interest approach. Sensitivity and specificity values were calculated using Fisher stepwise discriminant analysis, and cross-validated using the leave-one-out method. Results: Precentral gyrus T2 signal intensity (p < 10 −4 ) and NAA peak (p < 10 −6 ) were significantly reduced in patients, and their values did not correlate significantly to each other both in patients and controls, while no significant differences were obtained in terms of T2-hyperintensity of the corticospinal tract. Sensitivity and specificity of the two discriminant variables, taken alone, were 71.4% and 75.0%, for NAA peak, and 63.1% and 71.4% for T2-hypointensity, respectively. When using these two variables in combination, a significant increase in sensitivity (78.6%) and specificity (82.1%) was achieved. Conclusions: Precentral gyrus T2-hypointensity and NAA peak are not significantly correlated in ALS patients, suggesting that they reflect

  1. Physiological neuronal decline in healthy aging human brain - An in vivo study with MRI and short echo-time whole-brain (1)H MR spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-Qi; Maudsley, Andrew A; Sabati, Mohammad; Sheriff, Sulaiman; Schmitz, Birte; Schütze, Martin; Bronzlik, Paul; Kahl, Kai G; Lanfermann, Heinrich

    2016-08-15

    Knowledge of physiological aging in healthy human brain is increasingly important for neuroscientific research and clinical diagnosis. To investigate neuronal decline in normal aging brain eighty-one healthy subjects aged between 20 and 70years were studied with MRI and whole-brain (1)H MR spectroscopic imaging. Concentrations of brain metabolites N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), total creatine (tCr), myo-inositol (mI), and glutamine+glutamate (Glx) in ratios to internal water, and the fractional volumes of brain tissue were estimated simultaneously in eight cerebral lobes and in cerebellum. Results demonstrated that an age-related decrease in gray matter volume was the largest contribution to changes in brain volume. Both lobar NAA and the fractional volume of gray matter (FVGM) decreased with age in all cerebral lobes, indicating that the decreased NAA was predominantly associated with decreased gray matter volume and neuronal density or metabolic activity. In cerebral white matter Cho, tCr, and mI increased with age in association with increased fractional volume, showing altered cellular membrane turn-over, energy metabolism, and glial activity in human aging white matter. In cerebellum tCr increased while brain tissue volume decreased with age, showing difference to cerebral aging. The observed age-related metabolic and microstructural variations suggest that physiological neuronal decline in aging human brain is associated with a reduction of gray matter volume and neuronal density, in combination with cellular aging in white matter indicated by microstructural alterations and altered energy metabolism in the cerebellum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 16-Channel surface coil for 13C-hyperpolarized spectroscopic imaging of cardiac metabolism in pig heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frijia, Francesca; Santarelli, Maria Filomena; Koellisch, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate and its metabolites in large animal models is a powerful tool for assessing cardiac metabolism in patho-physiological conditions. In 13C studies, a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is crucial to overcome the intrinsic data quality...... both targets. In this study, a 16-channel receive surface coil was designed for 13C hyperpolarized studies of the pig heart with a clinical 3-T scanner. The coil performance was characterized by phantom experiments and compared with that of a birdcage coil used in transmit/receive mode. Segmental...... of the 16-channel coil is recommended for studies of septal and anterior LV walls....

  3. Differences in the Pattern of Hemodynamic Response to Self-Face and Stranger-Face Images in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Inoue

    Full Text Available There have been no reports concerning the self-face perception in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuronal correlates of viewing self-face images (i.e. images of familiar face and stranger-face images (i.e. images of an unfamiliar face in female adolescents with and without AN. We used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS to measure hemodynamic responses while the participants viewed full-color photographs of self-face and stranger-face. Fifteen females with AN (mean age, 13.8 years and 15 age- and intelligence quotient (IQ-matched female controls without AN (mean age, 13.1 years participated in the study. The responses to photographs were compared with the baseline activation (response to white uniform blank. In the AN group, the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb significantly increased in the right temporal area during the presentation of both the self-face and stranger-face images compared with the baseline level. In contrast, in the control group, the concentration of oxy-Hb significantly increased in the right temporal area only during the presentation of the self-face image. To our knowledge the present study is the first report to assess brain activities during self-face and stranger-face perception among female adolescents with AN. There were different patterns of brain activation in response to the sight of the self-face and stranger-face images in female adolescents with AN and controls.

  4. Differences in the Pattern of Hemodynamic Response to Self-Face and Stranger-Face Images in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Sakuta, Yuiko; Shimamura, Keiichi; Ichikawa, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Megumi; Otani, Ryoko; Yamaguchi, Masami K; Kanazawa, So; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Sakuta, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    There have been no reports concerning the self-face perception in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). The purpose of this study was to compare the neuronal correlates of viewing self-face images (i.e. images of familiar face) and stranger-face images (i.e. images of an unfamiliar face) in female adolescents with and without AN. We used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure hemodynamic responses while the participants viewed full-color photographs of self-face and stranger-face. Fifteen females with AN (mean age, 13.8 years) and 15 age- and intelligence quotient (IQ)-matched female controls without AN (mean age, 13.1 years) participated in the study. The responses to photographs were compared with the baseline activation (response to white uniform blank). In the AN group, the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) significantly increased in the right temporal area during the presentation of both the self-face and stranger-face images compared with the baseline level. In contrast, in the control group, the concentration of oxy-Hb significantly increased in the right temporal area only during the presentation of the self-face image. To our knowledge the present study is the first report to assess brain activities during self-face and stranger-face perception among female adolescents with AN. There were different patterns of brain activation in response to the sight of the self-face and stranger-face images in female adolescents with AN and controls.

  5. The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). VI. Comparing the Mass and Light in MACS J0416.1-2403 Using Frontier Field Imaging and GLASS Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoag, A.; Huang, K.-H.; Treu, T.; Bradač, M.; Schmidt, K. B.; Wang, X.; Brammer, G. B.; Broussard, A.; Amorin, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Schrabback, T.; Trenti, M.; Vulcani, B.

    2016-11-01

    We present a model using both strong and weak gravitational lensing of the galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1-2403, constrained using spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) and Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging data. We search for emission lines in known multiply imaged sources in the GLASS spectra, obtaining secure spectroscopic redshifts of 30 multiple images belonging to 15 distinct source galaxies. The GLASS spectra provide the first spectroscopic measurements for five of the source galaxies. The weak lensing signal is acquired from 884 galaxies in the F606W HFF image. By combining the weak lensing constraints with 15 multiple image systems with spectroscopic redshifts and nine multiple image systems with photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster on an adaptive grid. The resulting map of total mass density is compared with a map of stellar mass density obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields imaging data to study the relative distribution of stellar and total mass in the cluster. We find that the projected stellar mass to total mass ratio, f ⋆, varies considerably with the stellar surface mass density. The mean projected stellar mass to total mass ratio is =0.009+/- 0.003 (stat.), but with a systematic error as large as 0.004-0.005, dominated by the choice of the initial mass function. We find agreement with several recent measurements of f ⋆ in massive cluster environments. The lensing maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available to the broader community in the standard HFF format.

  6. Sonography compared with MR imaging in the evaluation of card tethering following myelomeningocele repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, B.; Bowen, A.; Albright, L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on MR imaging and videotaped US spine examinations to evaluate cord tethering were retrospectively compared in 12 children with prior myelomeningocele repair and correlated with clinical and surgical findings. Although US did not delineate normal or abnormal anatomy as well as MR imaging, both types of studies confirmed the presence of tethering in 10 patients. One child with a normal US examination and abnormal MR images had tethering confirmed surgically. A second child had a US study suggestive of tethering with equivocal MR images. Postoperative studies in eight patients correlated less well; US suggested persistent tethering in five patients and MR imaging indicated tethering in two

  7. A comparative study of MR imaging scores and MR perfusion imaging in pre-operative grading of intracranial gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Honglin; Chen Junkun; Zhang Zongjun; Lu Guangming; Chen Ziqian; Wang Wei; Ji Xueman; Tang Xiaojun; Li Lin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of MR imaging scores with MR perfusion imaging in pre-operative grading of intracranial gliomas. Methods: Thirty patients with intracranial gliomas (8 low-grade and 22 high-grade, according to WHO criteria) were examined with MR perfusion imaging pre-operatively. The lesions were evaluated by using an MR imaging score based on nine criteria. rCBV of the lesions were calculated by comparing the CBV of the lesion and that of contralateral normal white matter. The scores and ratios in high-grade and low-grade tumours were compared. Results: The MR imaging score of low grade (grades I and II) gliomas (0.67±0.29) were significantly lower than that of grades III (1.32 ± 0.47) (t=-3.48, P=0.003) and IV (1.56 ± 0.20) (t=-7.36, P=0.000) gliomas. There was no statistical difference when MR imaging scores of grades III and IV gliomas (t=-1.39, P=0.182) were compared. The maximum rCBV ratio of low grade (grades I and II) gliomas (2.38 ± 0.66 ) were significantly lower than that of grades III (5.81 ± 3.20) (t=-3.57, P=0.003) and IV (6.99 ± 2.47) (t=-5.09, P=0.001). There was no statistical difference when rCBV ratios of grades III and IV (t =-0.93, P=0.365) gliomas were compared. The accuracy of MR imaging scores in the noninvasive grading of untreated gliomas was all most the same as that of MR perfusion imaging (90.00% vs 89.29%). Conclusion: The MR imaging scores and MR perfusion imaging are two very useful tools in the evaluation of the histopathologic grade of cerebral gliomas. The overall accuracy in the noninvasive grading of gliomas may be imp roved if MR imaging scores and MR perfusion imaging are combined. (authors)

  8. A comparative spectroscopic and kinetic study of photoexcitations in detergent-isolated and membrane-embedded LH2 light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, Arvi; Rätsep, Margus; Timpmann, Kõu

    2012-08-01

    Integral membrane proteins constitute more than third of the total number of proteins present in organisms. Solubilization with mild detergents is a common technique to study the structure, dynamics, and catalytic activity of these proteins in purified form. However beneficial the use of detergents may be for protein extraction, the membrane proteins are often denatured by detergent solubilization as a result of native lipid membrane interactions having been modified. Versatile investigations of the properties of membrane-embedded and detergent-isolated proteins are, therefore, required to evaluate the consequences of the solubilization procedure. Herein, the spectroscopic and kinetic fingerprints have been established that distinguish excitons in individual detergent-solubilized LH2 light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes from them in the membrane-embedded complexes of purple photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides. A wide arsenal of spectroscopic techniques in visible optical range that include conventional broadband absorption-fluorescence, fluorescence anisotropy excitation, spectrally selective hole burning and fluorescence line-narrowing, and transient absorption-fluorescence have been applied over broad temperature range between physiological and liquid He temperatures. Significant changes in energetics and dynamics of the antenna excitons upon self-assembly of the proteins into intracytoplasmic membranes are observed, analyzed, and discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Testing the white dwarf mass-radius relation and comparing optical and far-UV spectroscopic results with Gaia DR2, HST and FUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, S. R. G.; Barstow, M. A.; Casewell, S. L.; Burleigh, M. R.; Holberg, J. B.; Bond, H. E.

    2018-05-01

    Observational tests of the white dwarf mass-radius relationship have always been limited by the uncertainty in the available distance measurements. Most studies have focused on Balmer line spectroscopy because these spectra can be obtained from ground based observatories, while the Lyman lines are only accessible to space based UV telescopes. We present results using parallax data from Gaia DR2 combined with space based spectroscopy from HST and FUSE covering the Balmer and Lyman lines. We find that our sample supports the theoretical relation, although there is at least one star which is shown to be inconsistent. Comparison of results between Balmer and Lyman line spectra shows they are in agreement when the latest broadening tables are used. We also assess the factors which contribute to the error in the mass-radius calculations and confirm the findings of other studies which show that the spread in results for targets where multiple spectra are available is larger than the statistical error. The uncertainty in the spectroscopically derived log g parameter is now the main source of error rather than the parallax. Finally, we present new results for the radius and spectroscopic mass of Sirius B which agree with the dynamical mass and mass-radius relation within 1σ.

  10. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF EDGE BASED LSB MATCHING STEGANOGRAPHY FOR COLOR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Umbarkar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Steganography is a very pivotal technique mainly used for covert transfer of information over a covert communication channel. This paper proposes a significant comparative study of the spatial LSB domain technique that focuses on sharper edges of the color as well as gray scale images for the purpose of data hiding and hides secret message first in sharper edge regions and then in smooth regions of the image. Message embedding depends on content of the image and message size. The experimental results illustrate that, for low embedding rate the method hides the message in sharp edges of cover image to get better stego image visualization quality. For high embedding rate, smooth regions and edges of the cover image are used for the purpose of data hiding. In this steganography method, color image and textured kind of image preserves better visual quality of stego image. The novelty of the comparative study is that, it helps to analyze the efficiency and performance of the method as it gives better results because it directly works on color images instead of converting to gray scale image.

  11. Spectroscopically Enhanced Method and System for Multi-Factor Biometric Authentication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishva, Davar

    This paper proposes a spectroscopic method and system for preventing spoofing of biometric authentication. One of its focus is to enhance biometrics authentication with a spectroscopic method in a multifactor manner such that a person's unique ‘spectral signatures’ or ‘spectral factors’ are recorded and compared in addition to a non-spectroscopic biometric signature to reduce the likelihood of imposter getting authenticated. By using the ‘spectral factors’ extracted from reflectance spectra of real fingers and employing cluster analysis, it shows how the authentic fingerprint image presented by a real finger can be distinguished from an authentic fingerprint image embossed on an artificial finger, or molded on a fingertip cover worn by an imposter. This paper also shows how to augment two widely used biometrics systems (fingerprint and iris recognition devices) with spectral biometrics capabilities in a practical manner and without creating much overhead or inconveniencing their users.

  12. Comparative evaluation of RetCam vs. gonioscopy images in congenital glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Azad, Raj V; Chandra, Parijat; Chandra, Anuradha; Gupta, Aparna; Gupta, Viney; Sihota, Ramanjit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare clarity, exposure and quality of anterior chamber angle visualization in congenital glaucoma patients, using RetCam and indirect gonioscopy images. Design: Cross-sectional study Participants. Congenital glaucoma patients over age of 5 years. Materials and Methods: A prospective consecutive pilot study was done in congenital glaucoma patients who were older than 5 years. Methods used are indirect gonioscopy and RetCam imaging. Clarity of the image, extent of angle visible a...

  13. Comparative effects of Facebook and conventional media on body image dissatisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Rachel; Blaszczynski, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Background Appearance comparison has consistently been shown to engender body image dissatisfaction. To date, most studies have demonstrated this relationship between appearance comparison and body image dissatisfaction in the context of conventional media images depicting the thin-ideal. Social comparison theory posits that people are more likely to compare themselves to similar others. Since social media forums such as Facebook involve one?s peers, the current study aimed to determine wheth...

  14. A comparative study of 2 computer-assisted methods of quantifying brightfield microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, George H; Marson, Lorna P

    2013-10-01

    Immunohistochemistry continues to be a powerful tool for the detection of antigens. There are several commercially available software packages that allow image analysis; however, these can be complex, require relatively high level of computer skills, and can be expensive. We compared 2 commonly available software packages, Adobe Photoshop CS6 and ImageJ, in their ability to quantify percentage positive area after picrosirius red (PSR) staining and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining. On analysis of DAB-stained B cells in the mouse spleen, with a biotinylated primary rat anti-mouse-B220 antibody, there was no significant difference on converting images from brightfield microscopy to binary images to measure black and white pixels using ImageJ compared with measuring a range of brown pixels with Photoshop (Student t test, P=0.243, correlation r=0.985). When analyzing mouse kidney allografts stained with PSR, Photoshop achieved a greater interquartile range while maintaining a lower 10th percentile value compared with analysis with ImageJ. A lower 10% percentile reflects that Photoshop analysis is better at analyzing tissues with low levels of positive pixels; particularly relevant for control tissues or negative controls, whereas after ImageJ analysis the same images would result in spuriously high levels of positivity. Furthermore comparing the 2 methods by Bland-Altman plot revealed that these 2 methodologies did not agree when measuring images with a higher percentage of positive staining and correlation was poor (r=0.804). We conclude that for computer-assisted analysis of images of DAB-stained tissue there is no difference between using Photoshop or ImageJ. However, for analysis of color images where differentiation into a binary pattern is not easy, such as with PSR, Photoshop is superior at identifying higher levels of positivity while maintaining differentiation of low levels of positive staining.

  15. Comparative study of the interactions between bisphenol-A and its endocrine disrupting analogues with bovine serum albumin using multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhlas, Shoeb; Usman, Afia; Ahmad, Masood

    2018-04-24

    Interaction studies of bisphenol analogues; biphenol-A (BPA), bisphenol-B (BPB), and bisphenol-F (BPF) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were performed using multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking studies at the protein level. The mechanism of binding of bisphenols with BSA was dynamic in nature. SDS refolding experiments demonstrated no stabilization of BSA structure denatured by BPB, however, BSA denatured by BPA and BPF was found to get stabilized. Also, CD spectra and molecular docking studies revealed that BPB bound more strongly and induced more conformational changes in BSA in comparison to BPA. Hence, this study throws light on the replacement of BPA by its analogues and whether the replacement is associated with a possible risk, raising a doubt that perhaps BPB is not a good substitute of BPA.

  16. Comparative investigation on the spectroscopic properties of Pr³⁺-doped boro-phosphate, boro-germo-silicate and tellurite glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liaolin; Dong, Guoping; Peng, Mingying; Qiu, Jianrong

    2012-07-01

    We report on the spectroscopic properties of Pr(3+)-doped boro-phosphate, boro-germo-silicate and tellurite glasses. The stimulated absorption and emission cross sections were estimated. Only one emission at 596 nm and 605 nm is observed in Pr(3+)-doped boro-phosphate and boro-germo-silicate glasses, respectively, while three emissions at 605 nm, 612 nm and 645 nm are observed in Pr(3+)-doped tellurite glass when excited at 467 nm. The fluorescence lifetime at 600 nm in Pr(3+)-doped boro-phosphate, boro-germo-silicate and tellurite glasses is 137 μs, 73 μs and 51 μs, respectively. The emissions from Pr(3+)-doped boro-phosphate, boro-germo-silicate and tellurite glasses show different decay behaviors and can be well explained by multiphonon relaxation theory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Post-contrast T1-weighted sequences in pediatric abdominal imaging: comparative analysis of three different sequences and imaging approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roque, Andreia; Ramalho, Miguel; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Heredia, Vasco; Burke, Lauren M.; De Campos, Rafael O.P.; Semelka, Richard C. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Radiology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Post-contrast T1-weighted imaging is an essential component of a comprehensive pediatric abdominopelvic MR examination. However, consistent good image quality is challenging, as respiratory motion in sedated children can substantially degrade the image quality. To compare the image quality of three different post-contrast T1-weighted imaging techniques - standard three-dimensional gradient-echo (3-D-GRE), magnetization-prepared gradient-recall echo (MP-GRE) and 3-D-GRE with radial data sampling (radial 3-D-GRE) - acquired in pediatric patients younger than 5 years of age. Sixty consecutive exams performed in 51 patients (23 females, 28 males; mean age 2.5 ± 1.4 years) constituted the final study population. Thirty-nine scans were performed at 3 T and 21 scans were performed at 1.5 T. Two different reviewers independently and blindly qualitatively evaluated all sequences to determine image quality and extent of artifacts. MP-GRE and radial 3-D-GRE sequences had the least respiratory motion (P < 0.0001). Standard 3-D-GRE sequences displayed the lowest average score ratings in hepatic and pancreatic edge definition, hepatic vessel clarity and overall image quality. Radial 3-D-GRE sequences showed the highest scores ratings in overall image quality. Our preliminary results support the preference of fat-suppressed radial 3-D-GRE as the best post-contrast T1-weighted imaging approach for patients under the age of 5 years, when dynamic imaging is not essential. (orig.)

  18. Comparing planar image quality of rotating slat and parallel hole collimation: influence of system modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holen, Roel van; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2008-01-01

    The main remaining challenge for a gamma camera is to overcome the existing trade-off between collimator spatial resolution and system sensitivity. This problem, strongly limiting the performance of parallel hole collimated gamma cameras, can be overcome by applying new collimator designs such as rotating slat (RS) collimators which have a much higher photon collection efficiency. The drawback of a RS collimated gamma camera is that, even for obtaining planar images, image reconstruction is needed, resulting in noise accumulation. However, nowadays iterative reconstruction techniques with accurate system modeling can provide better image quality. Because the impact of this modeling on image quality differs from one system to another, an objective assessment of the image quality obtained with a RS collimator is needed in comparison to classical projection images obtained using a parallel hole (PH) collimator. In this paper, a comparative study of image quality, achieved with system modeling, is presented. RS data are reconstructed to planar images using maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) with an accurate Monte Carlo derived system matrix while PH projections are deconvolved using a Monte Carlo derived point-spread function. Contrast-to-noise characteristics are used to show image quality for cold and hot spots of varying size. Influence of the object size and contrast is investigated using the optimal contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR o ). For a typical phantom setup, results show that cold spot imaging is slightly better for a PH collimator. For hot spot imaging, the CNR o of the RS images is found to increase with increasing lesion diameter and lesion contrast while it decreases when background dimensions become larger. Only for very large background dimensions in combination with low contrast lesions, the use of a PH collimator could be beneficial for hot spot imaging. In all other cases, the RS collimator scores better. Finally, the simulation of a

  19. Comparative effects of Facebook and conventional media on body image dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Rachel; Blaszczynski, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Appearance comparison has consistently been shown to engender body image dissatisfaction. To date, most studies have demonstrated this relationship between appearance comparison and body image dissatisfaction in the context of conventional media images depicting the thin-ideal. Social comparison theory posits that people are more likely to compare themselves to similar others. Since social media forums such as Facebook involve one's peers, the current study aimed to determine whether the relationship between appearance comparison and body image dissatisfaction would be stronger for those exposed to social media images, compared to conventional media images. A sample of 193 female first year university students were randomly allocated to view a series of either Facebook or conventional media thin-ideal images. Participants completed questionnaires assessing pre- and post- image exposure measures of thin-ideal internalisation, appearance comparison, self-esteem, Facebook use and eating disorder risk. Type of exposure was not found to moderate the relationship between appearance comparison and changes in body image dissatisfaction. When analysed according to exposure type, appearance comparison only significantly predicted body image dissatisfaction change for those exposed to Facebook, but not conventional media. Facebook use was found to predict higher baseline body image dissatisfaction and was associated with higher eating disorder risk. The findings suggest the importance of extending the body image dissatisfaction literature by taking into account emerging social media formats. It is recommended that interventions for body image dissatisfaction and eating disorders consider appearance comparison processes elicited by thin-ideal content on social media forums, such as Facebook, in addition to conventional media.

  20. Overlapping montage: a comparative study of mainstream film and moving-image installations

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Orla G.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation develops a discussion on the need for a comparative approach to the study of film and moving- image installations. It addresses the lack of critical attention given to moving-image installations within film studies generally and academic teaching programmes in particular. The development of a comparative approach requires researching a number of interlinking and independent fields of study such as film studies, art history/criticism, photography, literary theory, critical th...

  1. Spectroscopic Imaging Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Electronic Structure in the Superconducting and Pseudogap Phases of Cuprate High-Tc Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kazuhiro; Schmidt, Andrew R.; Kim, Eun-Ah; Lawler, Michael J.; Lee, Dung Hai; Davis, J. C.; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    One of the key motivations for the development of atomically resolved spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (SI-STM) has been to probe the electronic structure of cuprate high temperature superconductors. In both the d-wave superconducting (dSC) and the pseudogap (PG) phases of underdoped cuprates, two distinct classes of electronic states are observed using SI-STM. The first class consists of the dispersive Bogoliubov quasiparticles of a homogeneous d-wave superconductor. These are detected below a lower energy scale |E|=Δ0 and only upon a momentum space (k-space) arc which terminates near the lines connecting k=±(π/a0,0) to k=±(0,π/a0). Below optimal doping, this ``nodal'' arc shrinks continuously with decreasing hole density. In both the dSC and PG phases, the only broken symmetries detected in the |E|≤Δ0 states are those of a d-wave superconductor. The second class of states occurs at energies near the pseudogap energy scale |E|˜ Δ1 which is associated conventionally with the ``antinodal'' states near k=±(π/a0,0) and k=±(0,π/a0). We find that these states break the expected 90°-rotational (C4) symmetry of electronic structure within CuO2 unit cells, at least down to 180°-rotational (C2) symmetry (nematic) but in a spatially disordered fashion. This intra-unit-cell C4 symmetry breaking coexists at |E|˜Δ1 with incommensurate conductance modulations locally breaking both rotational and translational symmetries (smectic). The characteristic wavevector Q of the latter is determined, empirically, by the k-space points where Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference terminates, and therefore evolves continuously with doping. The properties of these two classes of |E|˜Δ1 states are indistinguishable in the dSC and PG phases. To explain this segregation of k-space into the two regimes distinguished by the symmetries of their electronic states and their energy scales |E|˜Δ1 and |E|≤Δ0, and to understand how this impacts the electronic

  2. 31P MR spectroscopic imaging in preoperative embolization therapy of meningiomas; Phosphor-31-MR-spektroskopische Bildgebung bei praeoperativer Embolisationstherapie von Meningeomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenhorn, M. [Psychiatrische Universitaetsklinik, Ulm (Germany). Abteilung III; Bachert, P.; Kaick, G. van [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg (Germany). Forschungsschwerpunkt Radiologische Diagnostik; Semmler, W. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostikforschung; Ende, G. [Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, Mannheim (Germany). NMR-Forschung in der Psychiatrie; Tronnier, V. [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Klinikum der Universitaet, Heidelberg (Germany); Sartor, K. [Neurologische Klinik, Klinikum der Universitaet, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Neuroradiologie

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: {sup 31}P MR spectroscopic imaging ({sup 31}P SI) was evaluated in a clinical study as a method for monitoring presurgical devascularization of meningiomas. The aim was to assess noninvasively metabolic alterations in tumor and in healthy brain tissue before and after embolization. Methods: Localized {sup 31}P MR spectra of the brain were obtained by means of 2D-SI (voxel size: 36 cm{sup 3}) using a 1,5-T whole-body MR tomograph. Results: Eleven of 19 patients with intracranial meningiomas examined in this study underwent preoperative embolization therapy; eight patients were examined before and after treatment. After embolization, alterations of pH and of the concentrations of high-energy phosphates (nucleoside-5`triphosphate=NTP, phosphocreatine=PCr), inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}), and membrane constituents were observed in the tumors. A tendency of [P{sub i}] increase and decrease of [NTP], [PCr], and pH predominated, which is explained by ischemic processes after tumor devascularization. Conclusion: {sup 31}P SI is applicable in clinical studies and detects alterations of phosphate metabolism in a meningioma after embolization. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Die {sup 31}P-MR-spektroskopische Bildgebung ({sup 31}P-SI) wurde im Rahmen der praeoperativen Embolisationstherapie von Patienten mit Meningeomen als Methode zur Therapieverlaufskontrolle klinisch geprueft. Ziel der Studie war die nichtinvasive Erfassung von Veraenderungen im Metabolismus der Tumoren vor und nach Embolisation im Vergleich zum gesunden Hirngewebe. Methoden: Lokalisierte {sup 31}P-MR-Spektren des Gehirns wurden mit 2D-SI (Voxelgroesse: 36 cm{sup 3}) an einem 1,5-T-Ganzkoerper-MR-Tomographen aufgenommen. Ergebnisse: Elf von insgesamt 19 untersuchten Patienten unterzogen sich einer praeoperativen Embolisation, bei acht Patienten konnte eine Verlaufskontrolle durchgefuehrt werden. Nach Embolisation wurden Veraenderungen des pH und der Konzentrationen von energiereichen Phosphaten (Nukleosid

  3. Design-related bias in estimates of accuracy when comparing imaging tests: examples from breast imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houssami, Nehmat; Ciatto, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    This work highlights concepts on the potential for design-related factors to bias estimates of test accuracy in comparative imaging research. We chose two design factors, selection of eligible subjects and the reference standard, to examine the effect of design limitations on estimates of accuracy. Estimates of sensitivity in a study of the comparative accuracy of mammography and ultrasound differed according to how subjects were selected. Comparison of a new imaging test with an existing test should distinguish whether the new test is to be used as a replacement for, or as an adjunct to, the conventional test, to guide the method for subject selection. Quality of the reference standard, examined in a meta-analysis of preoperative breast MRI, varied across studies and was associated with estimates of incremental accuracy. Potential solutions to deal with the reference standard are outlined where an ideal reference standard may not be available in all subjects. These examples of breast imaging research demonstrate that design-related bias, when comparing a new imaging test with a conventional imaging test, may bias accuracy in a direction that favours the new test by overestimating the accuracy of the new test or by underestimating that of the conventional test. (orig.)

  4. Detection rates in pediatric diagnostic imaging: a picture archive and communication system compared with a web-based imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, L.; Cramer, B.; Barrett, B.

    2006-01-01

    This prospective study assesses whether there are differences in accuracy of interpretation of diagnostic images among users of a picture archive and communication system (PACS) diagnostic workstation, compared with a less costly Web-based imaging system on a personal computer (PC) with a high resolution monitor. One hundred consecutive pediatric chest or abdomen and skeletal X-rays were selected from hospital inpatient and outpatient studies over a 5-month interval. They were classified as normal (n = 32), obviously abnormal (n = 33), or having subtle abnormal findings (n = 35) by 2 senior radiologists who reached a consensus for each individual case. Subsequently, 5 raters with varying degrees of experience independently viewed and interpreted the cases as normal or abnormal. Raters viewed each image 1 month apart on a PACS and on the Web-based PC imaging system. There was no relation between accuracy of detection and the system used to evaluate X-ray images (P = 0.92). The total percentage of incorrect interpretations on the Web-based PC imaging system was 23.2%, compared with 23.6% on the PACS (P = 0.92). For all raters combined, the overall difference in proportion assessed incorrectly on the PACS, compared with the PC system, was not significant at 0.4% (95%CI, -3.5% to 4.3%). The high-resolution Web-based imaging system via PC is an adequate alternative to a PACS clinical workstation. Accordingly, the provision of a more extensive network of workstations throughout the hospital setting could have potentially significant cost savings. (author)

  5. Detection of Normal Aging Effects on Human Brain Metabolite Concentrations and Microstructure with Whole-Brain MR Spectroscopic Imaging and Quantitative MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylers, V V; Maudsley, A A; Bronzlik, P; Dellani, P R; Lanfermann, H; Ding, X-Q

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of age-related physiological changes in the human brain is a prerequisite to identify neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, in this study whole-brain (1)H-MRS was used in combination with quantitative MR imaging to study the effects of normal aging on healthy human brain metabolites and microstructure. Sixty healthy volunteers, 21-70 years of age, were studied. Brain maps of the metabolites NAA, creatine and phosphocreatine, and Cho and the tissue irreversible and reversible transverse relaxation times T2 and T2' were derived from the datasets. The relative metabolite concentrations and the values of relaxation times were measured with ROIs placed within the frontal and parietal WM, centrum semiovale, splenium of the corpus callosum, hand motor area, occipital GM, putamen, thalamus, pons ventral/dorsal, and cerebellar white matter and posterior lobe. Linear regression analysis and Pearson correlation tests were used to analyze the data. Aging resulted in decreased NAA concentrations in the occipital GM, putamen, splenium of the corpus callosum, and pons ventral and decreased creatine and phosphocreatine concentrations in the pons dorsal and putamen. Cho concentrations did not change significantly in selected brain regions. T2 increased in the cerebellar white matter and decreased in the splenium of the corpus callosum with aging, while the T2' decreased in the occipital GM, hand motor area, and putamen, and increased in the splenium of the corpus callosum. Correlations were found between NAA concentrations and T2' in the occipital GM and putamen and between creatine and phosphocreatine concentrations and T2' in the putamen. The effects of normal aging on brain metabolites and microstructure are region-dependent. Correlations between both processes are evident in the gray matter. The obtained data could be used as references for future studies on patients. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  6. Image quality characteristics of a novel colour scanning digital ophthalmoscope (SDO) compared with fundus photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Rupert W; Krieglstein, Tina R; Priglinger, Siegfried G; Reis, Werner; Ulbig, Michael W; Kampik, Anselm; Neubauer, Aljoscha S

    2007-11-01

    To establish a set of quality parameters for grading image quality and apply those to evaluate the fundus image quality obtained by a new scanning digital ophthalmoscope (SDO) compared with standard slide photography. On visual analogue scales a total of eight image characteristics were defined: overall quality, contrast, colour brilliance, focus (sharpness), resolution and details, noise, artefacts and validity of clinical assessment. Grading was repeated after 4 months to assess repeatability. Fundus images of 23 patients imaged digitally by SDO and by Zeiss 450FF fundus camera using Kodak film were graded side-by-side by three graders. Lens opacity was quantified with the Interzeag Lens Opacity Meter 701. For all of the eight scales of image quality, good repeatability within the graders (mean Kendall's W 0.69) was obtained after 4 months. Inter-grader agreement ranged between 0.31 and 0.66. Despite the SDO's limited nominal image resolution of 720 x 576 pixels, the Zeiss FF 450 camera performed better in only two of the subscales - noise (p = 0.001) and artefacts (p = 0.01). Lens opacities significantly influenced only the two subscales 'resolution' and 'details', which deteriorated with increasing media opacities for both imaging systems. Distinct scales to grade image characteristics of different origin were developed and validated. Overall SDO digital imaging was found to provide fundus pictures of a similarly high level of quality as expert photography on slides.

  7. Hip imaging of avascular necrosis at 7 Tesla compared with 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theysohn, J.M.; Kraff, O.; Theysohn, N.; Orzada, S.; Lauenstein, T.C. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Landgraeber, S. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Essen (Germany); Ladd, M.E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    To compare ultra-high field, high-resolution bilateral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hips at 7 Tesla (T) with 3 T MRI in patients with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head by subjective image evaluations, contrast measurements, and evaluation of the appearance of imaging abnormalities. Thirteen subjects with avascular necrosis treated using advanced core decompression underwent MRI at both 7 T and 3 T. Sequence parameters as well as resolution were kept identical for both field strengths. All MR images (MEDIC, DESS, PD/T2w TSE, T1w TSE, and STIR) were evaluated by two radiologists with regard to subjective image quality, soft tissue contrasts, B1 homogeneity (four-point scale, higher values indicating better image quality) and depiction of imaging abnormalities of the femoral heads (three-point scale, higher values indicating the superiority of 7 T). Contrast ratios of soft tissues were calculated and compared with subjective data. 7-T imaging of the femoral joints, as well as 3-T imaging, achieved ''good'' to ''very good'' quality in all sequences. 7 T showed significantly higher soft tissue contrasts for T2w and MEDIC compared with 3 T (cartilage/fluid: 2.9 vs 2.2 and 3.6 vs 2.6), better detailed resolution for cartilage defects (PDw, T2w, T1w, MEDIC, DESS > 2.5) and better visibility of joint effusions (MEDIC 2.6; PDw/T2w 2.4; DESS 2.2). Image homogeneity compared with 3 T (3.9-4.0 for all sequences) was degraded, especially in TSE sequences at 7 T through signal variations (7 T: 2.1-2.9); to a lesser extent also GRE sequences (7 T: 2.9-3.5). Imaging findings related to untreated or treated AVN were better delineated at 3 T (≤1.8), while joint effusions (2.2-2.6) and cartilage defects (2.5-3.0) were better visualized at 7 T. STIR performed much more poorly at 7 T, generating large contrast variations (1.5). 7-T hip MRI showed comparable results in hip joint imaging compared with 3 T with slight

  8. Hip imaging of avascular necrosis at 7 Tesla compared with 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theysohn, J.M.; Kraff, O.; Theysohn, N.; Orzada, S.; Lauenstein, T.C.; Landgraeber, S.; Ladd, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    To compare ultra-high field, high-resolution bilateral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hips at 7 Tesla (T) with 3 T MRI in patients with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head by subjective image evaluations, contrast measurements, and evaluation of the appearance of imaging abnormalities. Thirteen subjects with avascular necrosis treated using advanced core decompression underwent MRI at both 7 T and 3 T. Sequence parameters as well as resolution were kept identical for both field strengths. All MR images (MEDIC, DESS, PD/T2w TSE, T1w TSE, and STIR) were evaluated by two radiologists with regard to subjective image quality, soft tissue contrasts, B1 homogeneity (four-point scale, higher values indicating better image quality) and depiction of imaging abnormalities of the femoral heads (three-point scale, higher values indicating the superiority of 7 T). Contrast ratios of soft tissues were calculated and compared with subjective data. 7-T imaging of the femoral joints, as well as 3-T imaging, achieved ''good'' to ''very good'' quality in all sequences. 7 T showed significantly higher soft tissue contrasts for T2w and MEDIC compared with 3 T (cartilage/fluid: 2.9 vs 2.2 and 3.6 vs 2.6), better detailed resolution for cartilage defects (PDw, T2w, T1w, MEDIC, DESS > 2.5) and better visibility of joint effusions (MEDIC 2.6; PDw/T2w 2.4; DESS 2.2). Image homogeneity compared with 3 T (3.9-4.0 for all sequences) was degraded, especially in TSE sequences at 7 T through signal variations (7 T: 2.1-2.9); to a lesser extent also GRE sequences (7 T: 2.9-3.5). Imaging findings related to untreated or treated AVN were better delineated at 3 T (≤1.8), while joint effusions (2.2-2.6) and cartilage defects (2.5-3.0) were better visualized at 7 T. STIR performed much more poorly at 7 T, generating large contrast variations (1.5). 7-T hip MRI showed comparable results in hip joint imaging compared with 3 T with slight advantages in contrast detail (cartilage defects

  9. Comparative study of 201Tl reinjection mycoardial imaging and late imaging after reinjection for detecting myocardial viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jinghui; Chai Xiaofeng; Zhu Mei

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare 201 Tl reinjection imaging with late imaging in detecting myocardial viability. METHODS: 62 patients with myocardial infarction underwent 201 Tl exercise, 3∼5 hours redistribution, 16∼35 minutes and 12∼19 hours post 201 Tl reinjection mycoardial tomography imaging. After imaging, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) were performed in 15 patients, and then exercise-redistribution myocardial imaging were repeated. RESULTS: 62 patients had 126 segments of irreversible defects on stress-redistribution imaging, 48 segments showed radioactive filling at 16∼35 minutes post-reinjection. The detecting rate of myocardial viability was 38.1% (48/126). 51 segments presented redistribution on 12∼19 hours late imaging, the detecting rate of myocardial viability was 40.5% (51/126). There were no significant difference in the detecting rate between them (x 2 0.16, P>0.05). But in combination of both methods, there were 62 segments refilling, thereby detecting rate was enhanced to 49.2% (62/126). In 15 patients who had PTCA, out of 17 segments were discovered to be viable before PTCA. After PTCA 12 segments had an improved perfusion of 201 Tl, the positive predictive accuracy was 70.6%. Out of 11 segments were discovered to be infarcted, 9 segments had non-improved 201 Tl perfusion after PTCA, the negative predictive accuracy was 81.8%. CONCLUSION: There were no significant difference in the detecting rate of myocardial viability between 2 '0 1 Tl reinjection and late imaging. In combination of both methods the detecting rate can be enhanced

  10. Comparative evaluation of RetCam vs. gonioscopy images in congenital glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj V Azad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare clarity, exposure and quality of anterior chamber angle visualization in congenital glaucoma patients, using RetCam and indirect gonioscopy images. Design: Cross-sectional study Participants. Congenital glaucoma patients over age of 5 years. Materials and Methods: A prospective consecutive pilot study was done in congenital glaucoma patients who were older than 5 years. Methods used are indirect gonioscopy and RetCam imaging. Clarity of the image, extent of angle visible and details of angle structures seen were graded for both methods, on digitally recorded images, in each eye, by two masked observers. Outcome Measures: Image clarity, interobserver agreement. Results: 40 eyes of 25 congenital glaucoma patients were studied. RetCam image had excellent clarity in 77.5% of patients versus 47.5% by gonioscopy. The extent of angle seen was similar by both methods. Agreement between RetCam and gonioscopy images regarding details of angle structures was 72.50% by observer 1 and 65.00% by observer 2. Conclusions: There was good agreement between RetCam and indirect gonioscopy images in detecting angle structures of congenital glaucoma patients. However, RetCam provided greater clarity, with better quality, and higher magnification images. RetCam can be a useful alternative to gonioscopy in infants and small children without the need for general anesthesia.

  11. Comparative evaluation of RetCam vs. gonioscopy images in congenital glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Raj V; Chandra, Parijat; Chandra, Anuradha; Gupta, Aparna; Gupta, Viney; Sihota, Ramanjit

    2014-02-01

    To compare clarity, exposure and quality of anterior chamber angle visualization in congenital glaucoma patients, using RetCam and indirect gonioscopy images. Cross-sectional study Participants. Congenital glaucoma patients over age of 5 years. A prospective consecutive pilot study was done in congenital glaucoma patients who were older than 5 years. Methods used are indirect gonioscopy and RetCam imaging. Clarity of the image, extent of angle visible and details of angle structures seen were graded for both methods, on digitally recorded images, in each eye, by two masked observers. Image clarity, interobserver agreement. 40 eyes of 25 congenital glaucoma patients were studied. RetCam image had excellent clarity in 77.5% of patients versus 47.5% by gonioscopy. The extent of angle seen was similar by both methods. Agreement between RetCam and gonioscopy images regarding details of angle structures was 72.50% by observer 1 and 65.00% by observer 2. There was good agreement between RetCam and indirect gonioscopy images in detecting angle structures of congenital glaucoma patients. However, RetCam provided greater clarity, with better quality, and higher magnification images. RetCam can be a useful alternative to gonioscopy in infants and small children without the need for general anesthesia.

  12. Fundus autofluorescence and colour fundus imaging compared during telemedicine screening in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeyer, Anton M; Baumrind, Benjamin R; Szirth, Bernard C; Shahid, Khadija; Khouri, Albert S

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the use of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging in screening the eyes of patients with diabetes. Images were obtained from 50 patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing telemedicine screening with colour fundus imaging. The colour and FAF images were obtained with a 15.1 megapixel non-mydriatic retinal camera. Colour and FAF images were compared for pathology seen in nonproliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR and PDR, respectively). A qualitative assessment was made of the ease of detecting early retinopathy changes and the extent of existing retinopathy. The mean age of the patients was 47 years, most were male (82%) and most were African American (68%). Their mean visual acuity was 20/45 and their mean intraocular pressure was 14.3 mm Hg. Thirty-eight eyes (76%) did not show any diabetic retinopathy changes on colour or FAF imaging. Seven patients (14%) met the criteria for NPDR and five (10%) for severe NPDR or PDR. The most common findings were microaneurysms, hard exudates and intra-retinal haemorrhages (IRH) (n = 6 for each). IRH, microaneurysms and chorioretinal scars were more easily visible on FAF images. Hard exudates, pre-retinal haemorrhage and fibrosis, macular oedema and Hollenhorst plaque were easier to identify on colour photographs. The value of FAF imaging as a complementary technique to colour fundus imaging in detecting diabetic retinopathy during ocular screening warrants further investigation.

  13. A convolutional neural network to filter artifacts in spectroscopic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbani, Saumya S; Schreibmann, Eduard; Maudsley, Andrew A; Cordova, James Scott; Soher, Brian J; Poptani, Harish; Verma, Gaurav; Barker, Peter B; Shim, Hyunsuk; Cooper, Lee A D

    2018-03-09

    Proton MRSI is a noninvasive modality capable of generating volumetric maps of in vivo tissue metabolism without the need for ionizing radiation or injected contrast agent. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging has been shown to be a viable imaging modality for studying several neuropathologies. However, a key hurdle in the routine clinical adoption of MRSI is the presence of spectral artifacts that can arise from a number of sources, possibly leading to false information. A deep learning model was developed that was capable of identifying and filtering out poor quality spectra. The core of the model used a tiled convolutional neural network that analyzed frequency-domain spectra to detect artifacts. When compared with a panel of MRS experts, our convolutional neural network achieved high sensitivity and specificity with an area under the curve of 0.95. A visualization scheme was implemented to better understand how the convolutional neural network made its judgement on single-voxel or multivoxel MRSI, and the convolutional neural network was embedded into a pipeline capable of producing whole-brain spectroscopic MRI volumes in real time. The fully automated method for assessment of spectral quality provides a valuable tool to support clinical MRSI or spectroscopic MRI studies for use in fields such as adaptive radiation therapy planning. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Spectroscopic analysis and in vitro imaging applications of a pH responsive AIE sensor with a two-input inhibit function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhan; Gu, Fenglong; Peng, Liang; Hu, Ying; Wang, Qianming

    2015-08-04

    A novel terpyridine derivative formed stable aggregates in aqueous media (DMSO/H2O = 1/99) with dramatically enhanced fluorescence compared to its organic solution. Moreover, the ultra-violet absorption spectra also demonstrated specific responses to the incorporation of water. The yellow emission at 557 nm changed to a solution with intense greenish luminescence only in the presence of protons and it conformed to a molecular logic gate with a two-input INHIBIT function. This molecular-based material could permeate into live cells and remain undissociated in the cytoplasm. The new aggregation induced emission (AIE) pH type bio-probe permitted easy collection of yellow luminescence images on a fluorescent microscope. As designed, it displayed striking green emission in organelles at low internal pH. This feature enabled the self-assembled structure to have a whole new function for the pH detection within the field of cell imaging.

  15. Comparative performance evaluation of transform coding in image pre-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vignesh V.; NB, Harikrishnan; Narayanan, Gayathri; CK, Niveditha

    2017-07-01

    We are in the midst of a communication transmute which drives the development as largely as dissemination of pioneering communication systems with ever-increasing fidelity and resolution. Distinguishable researches have been appreciative in image processing techniques crazed by a growing thirst for faster and easier encoding, storage and transmission of visual information. In this paper, the researchers intend to throw light on many techniques which could be worn at the transmitter-end in order to ease the transmission and reconstruction of the images. The researchers investigate the performance of different image transform coding schemes used in pre-processing, their comparison, and effectiveness, the necessary and sufficient conditions, properties and complexity in implementation. Whimsical by prior advancements in image processing techniques, the researchers compare various contemporary image pre-processing frameworks- Compressed Sensing, Singular Value Decomposition, Integer Wavelet Transform on performance. The paper exposes the potential of Integer Wavelet transform to be an efficient pre-processing scheme.

  16. Image and surgery-related costs comparing cone beam CT and panoramic imaging before removal of impacted mandibular third molars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Bo; Olsen, Kim Rose; Christensen, Jennifer Heather

    2014-01-01

    resource utilization. Differences in resources used for surgical and post-surgical management were calculated for each patient. Results: Converted to monetary units, the total costs for panoramic imaging equalized (sic)49.29 and for CBCT examination (sic)184.44. Modifying effects on this outcome......Objectives: The aim of this prospective clinical study was to derive the absolute and relative costs of cone beam CT (CBCT) and panoramic imaging before removal of an impacted mandibular third molar. Furthermore, the study aimed to analyse the influence of different cost-setting scenarios...... on the outcome of the absolute and relative costs and the incremental costs related to surgery. Methods: A randomized clinical trial compared complications following surgical removal of a mandibular third molar, where the pre-operative diagnostic method had been panoramic imaging or CBCT. The resources implied...

  17. Comparative Analysis between LDR and HDR Images for Automatic Fruit Recognition and Counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana M. Pinho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Precision agriculture is gaining an increasing interest in the current farming paradigm. This new production concept relies on the use of information technology (IT to provide a control and supervising structure that can lead to better management policies. In this framework, imaging techniques that provide visual information over the farming area play an important role in production status monitoring. As such, accurate representation of the gathered production images is a major concern, especially if those images are used in detection and classification tasks. Real scenes, observed in natural environment, present high dynamic ranges that cannot be represented by the common LDR (Low Dynamic Range devices. However, this issue can be handled by High Dynamic Range (HDR images since they have the ability to store luminance information similarly to the human visual system. In order to prove their advantage in image processing, a comparative analysis between LDR and HDR images, for fruits detection and counting, was carried out. The obtained results show that the use of HDR images improves the detection performance to more than 30% when compared to LDR.

  18. HVS scheme for DICOM image compression: Design and comparative performance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakar, B. [Biomedical and Engineering Division, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036, Tamil Nadu (India)]. E-mail: prabhakarb@iitm.ac.in; Reddy, M. Ramasubba [Biomedical and Engineering Division, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2007-07-15

    Advanced digital imaging technology in medical domain demands efficient and effective DICOM image compression for progressive image transmission and picture archival. Here a compression system, which incorporates sensitivities of HVS coded with SPIHT quantization, is discussed. The weighting factors derived from luminance CSF are used to transform the wavelet subband coefficients to reflect characteristics of HVS in best possible manner. Mannos et al. and Daly HVS models have been used and results are compared. To evaluate the performance, Eskicioglu chart metric is considered. Experiment is done on both Monochrome and Color Dicom images of MRI, CT, OT, and CR, natural and benchmark images. Reconstructed image through our technique showed improvement in visual quality and Eskicioglu chart metric at same compression ratios. Also the Daly HVS model based compression shows better performance perceptually and quantitatively when compared to Mannos et el. model. Further 'bior4.4' wavelet filter provides better results than 'db9' filter for this compression system. Results give strong evidence that under common boundary conditions; our technique achieves competitive visual quality, compression ratio and coding/decoding time, when compared with jpeg2000 (kakadu)

  19. Comparative study of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence image enhancement methods to improve an optical imaging system for oral cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ching-Fen; Wang, Chih-Yu; Chiang, Chun-Ping

    2011-07-01

    Optoelectronics techniques to induce protoporphyrin IX fluorescence with topically applied 5-aminolevulinic acid on the oral mucosa have been developed to noninvasively detect oral cancer. Fluorescence imaging enables wide-area screening for oral premalignancy, but the lack of an adequate fluorescence enhancement method restricts the clinical imaging application of these techniques. This study aimed to develop a reliable fluorescence enhancement method to improve PpIX fluorescence imaging systems for oral cancer detection. Three contrast features, red-green-blue reflectance difference, R/B ratio, and R/G ratio, were developed first based on the optical properties of the fluorescence images. A comparative study was then carried out with one negative control and four biopsy confirmed clinical cases to validate the optimal image processing method for the detection of the distribution of malignancy. The results showed the superiority of the R/G ratio in terms of yielding a better contrast between normal and neoplastic tissue, and this method was less prone to errors in detection. Quantitative comparison with the clinical diagnoses in the four neoplastic cases showed that the regions of premalignancy obtained using the proposed method accorded with the expert's determination, suggesting the potential clinical application of this method for the detection of oral cancer.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Japanese monkey brains compared with X-ray photography and histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Shinji; Matsuda, Keiji; Kawano, Kenji; Komatsu, Hidehiko; Yamane, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Takashi; Nose, Tadao.

    1991-01-01

    The localization of a small target area in the brain is usually estimated by using stereotaxic atlases, assisted by X-ray photography or electrophysiological mapping, and determined finally by histological reconstruction. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can visualize, noninvasively cross sections in any plane of three dimensional structures of the brain. We compared images of MRI, X-ray, and histology from a monkey brain. A Japanese monkey (Macaca fuscata, male, 11 kg) was anesthetised, fixed in a newly developed magnetic-free stereotaxic apparatus, and mounted in the MRI scanner unit (BRUKER, BIOSPEC 24/40, 2.4 Tesla). Some para-saggital (5 mm thick) and para-frontal (2.5 mm thick, every 5 mm distance) images were obtained. The outline of the bone on the MRI image was compared with that on the X-ray photograph taken by an X-ray instrument (Toshiba, TR-80A). The two images fitted very well. The animal was sacrificed, the brain was sliced in 100 μm and stained with Cresyl violet. The histological preparations were shrunk some 10 % during the process, which was revealed by comparison of MRI, X-ray, and histological images. In conclusion, MRI images are reliable enough to determine a small target in deep structures of the brain, and their superimposed images on X-rays will assist in identifying the location of electrode or needle tips. We constructed a data base of these MRI and histological images on a Macintosh computer, and they can be easily accessed by a mouse operation. (author)

  1. Spectroscopic classification of transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stritzinger, M. D.; Fraser, M.; Hummelmose, N. N.

    2017-01-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of several transients based on observations taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) equipped with ALFOSC, over the nights 23-25 August 2017.......We report the spectroscopic classification of several transients based on observations taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) equipped with ALFOSC, over the nights 23-25 August 2017....

  2. Three-dimensional velocity map imaging: Setup and resolution improvement compared to three-dimensional ion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauczok, S.; Goedecke, N.; Veckenstedt, M.; Maul, C.; Gericke, K.-H.; Chichinin, A. I.

    2009-01-01

    For many years the three-dimensional (3D) ion imaging technique has not benefited from the introduction of ion optics into the field of imaging in molecular dynamics. Thus, a lower resolution of kinetic energy as in comparable techniques making use of inhomogeneous electric fields was inevitable. This was basically due to the fact that a homogeneous electric field was needed in order to obtain the velocity component in the direction of the time of flight spectrometer axis. In our approach we superimpose an Einzel lens field with the homogeneous field. We use a simulation based technique to account for the distortion of the ion cloud caused by the inhomogeneous field. In order to demonstrate the gain in kinetic energy resolution compared to conventional 3D Ion Imaging, we use the spatial distribution of H + ions emerging from the photodissociation of HCl following the two photon excitation to the V 1 Σ + state. So far a figure of merit of approximately four has been achieved, which means in absolute numbers Δv/v=0.022 compared to 0.086 at v≅17 000 m/s. However, this is not a theoretical limit of the technique, but due to our rather short TOF spectrometer (15 cm). The photodissociation of HBr near 243 nm has been used to recognize and eliminate systematic deviations between the simulation and the experimentally observed distribution. The technique has also proven to be essential for the precise measurement of translationally cold distributions.

  3. Low molecular weight dextran provides similar optical coherence tomography coronary imaging compared to radiographic contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Kyle; Michael, Tesfaldet T; Alomar, Mohammed; Mohammed, Atif; Rangan, Bavana V; Abdullah, Shuaib; Grodin, Jerrold; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) coronary imaging requires displacement of red blood cells from the vessel lumen. This is usually accomplished using radiographic contrast. Low molecular weight dextran has low cost and is safe in low volumes. In the present study, we compared dextran with contrast for coronary OCT imaging. Fifty-one vessels in 26 patients were sequentially imaged using manual injection of radiographic contrast (iodixanol) and dextran. OCT images were analyzed at 1 mm intervals to determine the image clarity (defined as a visible lumen border > 270°) and to measure the lumen area and lumen diameter. To correct for the refractive index of dextran, the dextran area measurements were multiplied by 1.117 and the dextran length measurements were multiplied by 1.057. A total of 3,418 cross-sections (1,709 with contrast and 1,709 with dextran) were analyzed. There were no complications related to OCT imaging or to contrast or dextran administration. Clear image segments were observed in 97.0% vs. 96.7% of the cross-sections obtained with contrast and dextran, respectively (P = 0.45). The mean lumen areas were also similar: 6.69 ± 1.95 mm(2) with iodixanol vs. 7.06 ± 2.06 mm(2) with dextran (correlation coefficient 0.984). The image quality and measurements during OCT image acquisition are similar for dextran and contrast. Dextran could be used instead of contrast for OCT imaging, especially in patients in whom contrast load minimization is desired. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Convolutional neural networks for vibrational spectroscopic data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquarelli, Jacopo; van Laarhoven, Twan; Gerretzen, Jan; Tran, Thanh N; Buydens, Lutgarde M C; Marchiori, Elena

    2017-02-15

    In this work we show that convolutional neural networks (CNNs) can be efficiently used to classify vibrational spectroscopic data and identify important spectral regions. CNNs are the current state-of-the-art in image classification and speech recognition and can learn interpretable representations of the data. These characteristics make CNNs a good candidate for reducing the need for preprocessing and for highlighting important spectral regions, both of which are crucial steps in the analysis of vibrational spectroscopic data. Chemometric analysis of vibrational spectroscopic data often relies on preprocessing methods involving baseline correction, scatter correction and noise removal, which are applied to the spectra prior to model building. Preprocessing is a critical step because even in simple problems using 'reasonable' preprocessing methods may decrease the performance of the final model. We develop a new CNN based method and provide an accompanying publicly available software. It is based on a simple CNN architecture with a single convolutional layer (a so-called shallow CNN). Our method outperforms standard classification algorithms used in chemometrics (e.g. PLS) in terms of accuracy when applied to non-preprocessed test data (86% average accuracy compared to the 62% achieved by PLS), and it achieves better performance even on preprocessed test data (96% average accuracy compared to the 89% achieved by PLS). For interpretability purposes, our method includes a procedure for finding important spectral regions, thereby facilitating qualitative interpretation of results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging provides additional information as compared to anatomical imaging for decision-making in vestibular schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleijwegt, M.C.; Mey, A.G.L. van der; Wiggers-deBruine, F.T.; Malessy, M.J.A; Osch, M.J.P. van

    2016-01-01

    •DSC/ASL-MRI can be acquired in growing VS with sufficient image quality.•In most patients DSC and ASL techniques provide similar qualitative scores.•These techniques can be of importance in future decision-making. DSC/ASL-MRI can be acquired in growing VS with sufficient image quality. In most patients DSC and ASL techniques provide similar qualitative scores. These techniques can be of importance in future decision-making. The added value of perfusion MRI for decision-making in vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients is unknown. MRI offers two perfusion methods: the first employing contrast agent (dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI) that provides information on cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF), the second by magnetic labeling of blood (arterial spin labeling (ASL)-MRI), providing CBF-images. The goal of the current study is to investigate whether DSC and ASL perfusion MRI provides complimentary information to current anatomical imaging in treatment selection process of VS. Nine patients with growing VS with extrameatal diameter >9 mm were included (>2 mm/year and 20% volume expansion/year) and one patient with 23 mm extrameatal VS without growth. DSC and ASL perfusion MRI were obtained on 3 T MRI. Perfusion in VS was scored as hyperintense, hypointense or isointense compared to the contralateral region. Seven patients showed hyperintense signal on DSC and ASL sequences. Three patients showed iso- or hypointense signal on at least one perfusion map (1 patient hypointense on both DSC-MRI and ASL; 1 patient isointense on DSC-CBF; 1 patient isointense on ASL). All patients showed enhancement on post-contrast T1 anatomical scan. Perfusion MR provides additional information compared to anatomical imaging for decision-making in VS

  6. SU-E-J-248: Comparative Study of Two Image Registration for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy in Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, K; Wang, J; Liu, D; Li, R; Cao, Y; Chi, Z [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, CN, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is one of the major treatment of esophageal cancer. Gray value registration and bone registration are two kinds of image registration, the purpose of this work is to compare which one is more suitable for esophageal cancer patients. Methods: Twenty three esophageal patients were treated by Elekta Synergy, CBCT images were acquired and automatically registered to planning kilovoltage CT scans according to gray value or bone registration. The setup errors were measured in the X, Y and Z axis, respectively. Two kinds of setup errors were analysed by matching T test statistical method. Results: Four hundred and five groups of CBCT images were available and the systematic and random setup errors (cm) in X, Y, Z directions were 0.35, 0.63, 0.29 and 0.31, 0.53, 0.21 with gray value registration, while 0.37, 0.64, 0.26 and 0.32, 0.55, 0.20 with bone registration, respectively. Compared with bone registration and gray value registration, the setup errors in X and Z axis have significant differences. In Y axis, both measurement comparison results of T value is 0.256 (P value > 0.05); In X axis, the T value is 5.287(P value < 0.05); In Z axis, the T value is −5.138 (P value < 0.05). Conclusion: Gray value registration is recommended in image-guided radiotherapy for esophageal cancer and the other thoracic tumors. Manual registration could be applied when it is necessary. Bone registration is more suitable for the head tumor and pelvic tumor department where composed of redundant interconnected and immobile bone tissue.

  7. Comparative study on the performance of textural image features for active contour segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona

    2012-07-01

    We present a computerized method for the semi-automatic detection of contours in ultrasound images. The novelty of our study is the introduction of a fast and efficient image function relating to parametric active contour models. This new function is a combination of the gray-level information and first-order statistical features, called standard deviation parameters. In a comprehensive study, the developed algorithm and the efficiency of segmentation were first tested for synthetic images. Tests were also performed on breast and liver ultrasound images. The proposed method was compared with the watershed approach to show its efficiency. The performance of the segmentation was estimated using the area error rate. Using the standard deviation textural feature and a 5×5 kernel, our curve evolution was able to produce results close to the minimal area error rate (namely 8.88% for breast images and 10.82% for liver images). The image resolution was evaluated using the contrast-to-gradient method. The experiments showed promising segmentation results.

  8. Comparative study of digital laser film and analog paper image recordings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.R.; Cox, G.G.; Templeton, A.W.; Preston, D.F.; Anderson, W.H.; Hensley, K.S.; Dwyer, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    The increase in the use of various imaging modalities demands higher quality and more efficacious analog image recordings. Laser electronic recordings with digital array prints of 4,000 x 5,000 x 12 bits obtained using laser-sensitive film or paper are being evaluated. Dry silver paper recordings are being improved and evaluated. High-resolution paper dot printers are being studied to determine their gray-scale capabilities. The authors evaluated the image quality, costs, clinical utilization, and acceptability of CT scans, MR images, digital subtraction angiograms, digital radiographs, and radionuclide scans recorded by seven different printers (three laser, three silver paper, and one dot) and compared the same features in conventional film recording. This exhibit outlines the technical developments and instrumentation of digital laser film and analog paper recorders and presents the results of the study

  9. Comparing the Scoring of Human Decomposition from Digital Images to Scoring Using On-site Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbs, Gretchen R; Bytheway, Joan A; Connor, Melissa

    2017-09-01

    When in forensic casework or empirical research in-person assessment of human decomposition is not possible, the sensible substitution is color photographic images. To date, no research has confirmed the utility of color photographic images as a proxy for in situ observation of the level of decomposition. Sixteen observers scored photographs of 13 human cadavers in varying decomposition stages (PMI 2-186 days) using the Total Body Score system (total n = 929 observations). The on-site TBS was compared with recorded observations from digital color images using a paired samples t-test. The average difference between on-site and photographic observations was -0.20 (t = -1.679, df = 928, p = 0.094). Individually, only two observers, both students with human decomposition based on digital images can be substituted for assessments based on observation of the corpse in situ, when necessary. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Potential for observing and discriminating impact craters and comparable volcanic landforms on Magellan radar images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of small terrestrial craters by Seasat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) at high resolution (approx. 25 m) and of comparatively large Venusian craters by Venera 15/16 images at low resolution (1000 to 2000 m) and shorter wavelength show similarities in the radar responses to crater morphology. At low incidence angles, the responses are dominated by large scale slope effects on the order of meters; consequently it is difficult to locate the precise position of crater rims on the images. Abrupt contrasts in radar response to changing slope (hence incidence angle) across a crater produce sharp tonal boundaries normal to the illumination. Crater morphology that is radially symmetrical appears on images to have bilateral symmetry parallel to the illumination vector. Craters are compressed in the distal sector and drawn out in the proximal sector. At higher incidence angles obtained with the viewing geometry of SIR-A, crater morphology appears less compressed on the images. At any radar incidence angle, the distortion of a crater outline is minimal across the medial sector, in a direction normal to the illumination. Radar bright halos surround some craters imaged by SIR-A and Venera 15 and 16. The brightness probably denotes the radar response to small scale surface roughness of the surrounding ejecta blankets. Similarities in the radar responses of small terrestrial impact craters and volcanic craters of comparable dimensions emphasize the difficulties in discriminating an impact origin from a volcanic origin in the images. Similar difficulties will probably apply in discriminating the origin of small Venusian craters, if they exist. Because of orbital considerations, the nominal incidence angel of Magellan radar at the center of the imaging swath will vary from about 45 deg at 10 deg N latitude to about 16 deg at the north pole and at 70 deg S latitude. Impact craters and comparable volcanic landforms will show bilateral symmetry

  11. Comparative anatomy of rabbit and human achilles tendons with magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Geoffrey P; Koike, Yoichi; Uhthoff, Hans K; Lecompte, Martin; Trudel, Guy

    2006-02-01

    We sought to describe the comparative anatomy of the Achilles tendon in rabbits and humans by using macroscopic observation, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography. The calcaneus-Achilles tendon-gastrocnemius-soleus complexes from 18 New Zealand white rabbits underwent ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and gross anatomic sectioning; these results were compared with those from a cadaveric gastrocnemius-soleus-Achilles tendon-calcaneus specimen from a 68-y-old human male. The medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscle tendons merged 5.2 +/- 0.6 mm proximal to the calcaneal insertion macroscopically, at 93% of their course, different from the gastrocnemius human tendons, which merged at 23% of their overall course. The rabbit flexor digitorum superficialis tendon, corresponding to the flexor digitorum longus tendon in human and comparable in size with the gastrocnemius tendons, was located medial and anterior to the medial gastrocnemius tendon proximally and rotated dorsally and laterally to run posterior to the Achilles tendon-calcaneus insertion. In humans, the flexor digitorum longus tendon tracks posteriorly to the medial malleolus. The soleus muscle and tendon are negligible in the rabbit; these particular comparative anatomic features in the rabbit were confirmed on the MR images. Therefore the rabbit Achilles tendon shows distinctive gross anatomical and MR imaging features that must be considered when using the rabbit as a research model, especially for mechanical testing, or when generalizing results from rabbits to humans.

  12. Perinatal mortality: clinical value of postmortem magnetic resonance imaging compared with autopsy in routine obstetric practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderliesten, Marianne E.; Peringa, Jan; van der Hulst, Victor P. M.; Blaauwgeers, Hans L. G.; van Lith, Jan M. M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To compare postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with autopsy in perinatal deaths. To determine the acceptance and feasibility of postmortem perinatal MRI. Design Cohort study. Setting Large teaching hospital. Population Fetuses and neonates from 16 weeks gestational age until 28

  13. How does c-view image quality compare with conventional 2D FFDM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jeffrey S; Wells, Jered R; Baker, Jay A; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-05-01

    The FDA approved the use of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in 2011 as an adjunct to 2D full field digital mammography (FFDM) with the constraint that all DBT acquisitions must be paired with a 2D image to assure adequate interpretative information is provided. Recently manufacturers have developed methods to provide a synthesized 2D image generated from the DBT data with the hope of sparing patients the radiation exposure from the FFDM acquisition. While this much needed alternative effectively reduces the total radiation burden, differences in image quality must also be considered. The goal of this study was to compare the intrinsic image quality of synthesized 2D c-view and 2D FFDM images in terms of resolution, contrast, and noise. Two phantoms were utilized in this study: the American College of Radiology mammography accreditation phantom (ACR phantom) and a novel 3D printed anthropomorphic breast phantom. Both phantoms were imaged using a Hologic Selenia Dimensions 3D system. Analysis of the ACR phantom includes both visual inspection and objective automated analysis using in-house software. Analysis of the 3D anthropomorphic phantom includes visual assessment of resolution and Fourier analysis of the noise. Using ACR-defined scoring criteria for the ACR phantom, the FFDM images scored statistically higher than c-view according to both the average observer and automated scores. In addition, between 50% and 70% of c-view images failed to meet the nominal minimum ACR accreditation requirements-primarily due to fiber breaks. Software analysis demonstrated that c-view provided enhanced visualization of medium and large microcalcification objects; however, the benefits diminished for smaller high contrast objects and all low contrast objects. Visual analysis of the anthropomorphic phantom showed a measureable loss of resolution in the c-view image (11 lp/mm FFDM, 5 lp/mm c-view) and loss in detection of small microcalcification objects. Spectral analysis of the

  14. How does C-VIEW image quality compare with conventional 2D FFDM?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Jeffrey S.; Wells, Jered R.; Baker, Jay A.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The FDA approved the use of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in 2011 as an adjunct to 2D full field digital mammography (FFDM) with the constraint that all DBT acquisitions must be paired with a 2D image to assure adequate interpretative information is provided. Recently manufacturers have developed methods to provide a synthesized 2D image generated from the DBT data with the hope of sparing patients the radiation exposure from the FFDM acquisition. While this much needed alternative effectively reduces the total radiation burden, differences in image quality must also be considered. The goal of this study was to compare the intrinsic image quality of synthesized 2D C-VIEW and 2D FFDM images in terms of resolution, contrast, and noise. Methods: Two phantoms were utilized in this study: the American College of Radiology mammography accreditation phantom (ACR phantom) and a novel 3D printed anthropomorphic breast phantom. Both phantoms were imaged using a Hologic Selenia Dimensions 3D system. Analysis of the ACR phantom includes both visual inspection and objective automated analysis using in-house software. Analysis of the 3D anthropomorphic phantom includes visual assessment of resolution and Fourier analysis of the noise. Results: Using ACR-defined scoring criteria for the ACR phantom, the FFDM images scored statistically higher than C-VIEW according to both the average observer and automated scores. In addition, between 50% and 70% of C-VIEW images failed to meet the nominal minimum ACR accreditation requirements—primarily due to fiber breaks. Software analysis demonstrated that C-VIEW provided enhanced visualization of medium and large microcalcification objects; however, the benefits diminished for smaller high contrast objects and all low contrast objects. Visual analysis of the anthropomorphic phantom showed a measureable loss of resolution in the C-VIEW image (11 lp/mm FFDM, 5 lp/mm C-VIEW) and loss in detection of small microcalcification

  15. How does C-VIEW image quality compare with conventional 2D FFDM?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Jeffrey S., E-mail: nelson.jeffrey@duke.edu; Wells, Jered R. [Department of Radiology, Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Baker, Jay A. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Department of Radiology, Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The FDA approved the use of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in 2011 as an adjunct to 2D full field digital mammography (FFDM) with the constraint that all DBT acquisitions must be paired with a 2D image to assure adequate interpretative information is provided. Recently manufacturers have developed methods to provide a synthesized 2D image generated from the DBT data with the hope of sparing patients the radiation exposure from the FFDM acquisition. While this much needed alternative effectively reduces the total radiation burden, differences in image quality must also be considered. The goal of this study was to compare the intrinsic image quality of synthesized 2D C-VIEW and 2D FFDM images in terms of resolution, contrast, and noise. Methods: Two phantoms were utilized in this study: the American College of Radiology mammography accreditation phantom (ACR phantom) and a novel 3D printed anthropomorphic breast phantom. Both phantoms were imaged using a Hologic Selenia Dimensions 3D system. Analysis of the ACR phantom includes both visual inspection and objective automated analysis using in-house software. Analysis of the 3D anthropomorphic phantom includes visual assessment of resolution and Fourier analysis of the noise. Results: Using ACR-defined scoring criteria for the ACR phantom, the FFDM images scored statistically higher than C-VIEW according to both the average observer and automated scores. In addition, between 50% and 70% of C-VIEW images failed to meet the nominal minimum ACR accreditation requirements—primarily due to fiber breaks. Software analysis demonstrated that C-VIEW provided enhanced visualization of medium and large microcalcification objects; however, the benefits diminished for smaller high contrast objects and all low contrast objects. Visual analysis of the anthropomorphic phantom showed a measureable loss of resolution in the C-VIEW image (11 lp/mm FFDM, 5 lp/mm C-VIEW) and loss in detection of small microcalcification

  16. Comparative value of diagnostic imaging techniques in a cat with exophthalmos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, D.T.; Gerding, P.A. Jr.; Losonsky, J.M.; Kuriashkin, I.V.; Clarkson, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    A mass that appeared to originate from the frontal bone and extended into retrobulbar tissues of the light orbit was imaged in a cat using ultrasound, skull radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The cat was presented with ventrolateral strabismus, exophthalmos, and elevated nictitans membrane of the tight eye. The mass was not delineated entirely after orbital echography and survey radiography of the skull was performed. Cytologic examination of fine-needle aspirate of the mass was suggestive of a neoplastic disease. Results of computed tomography indicated lysis of the calvarium but did not delineate borders of the mass in the calvarium. Magnetic resonance imaging was then used to confirm borders of the neoplasm. Magnetic resonance imaging was the only imaging technique that delineated the entire border of the neoplasm, including in the calvarium, when compared to postmortem evaluation. Results of orbital echography, skull radiographs, or computed tomography, when used as the only diagnostic imaging modality, must be interpreted with caution when evaluating borders of retrobulbar neoplasia prior to surgical planning

  17. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajan, Zahra Dalili; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Hemmaty, Yasmin Babael; Roushan, Zahra Atrkar; Khademi, Jalil

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1-weighted images, fast spin-echo T2-weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires

  18. Comparative Accuracy of Facial Models Fabricated Using Traditional and 3D Imaging Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Ketu P; Sun, Albert Y T; Prihoda, Thomas J; Sutton, Alan J

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the accuracy of facial models fabricated using facial moulage impression methods to the three-dimensional printed (3DP) fabrication methods using soft tissue images obtained from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D stereophotogrammetry (3D-SPG) scans. A reference phantom model was fabricated using a 3D-SPG image of a human control form with ten fiducial markers placed on common anthropometric landmarks. This image was converted into the investigation control phantom model (CPM) using 3DP methods. The CPM was attached to a camera tripod for ease of image capture. Three CBCT and three 3D-SPG images of the CPM were captured. The DICOM and STL files from the three 3dMD and three CBCT were imported to the 3DP, and six testing models were made. Reversible hydrocolloid and dental stone were used to make three facial moulages of the CPM, and the impressions/casts were poured in type IV gypsum dental stone. A coordinate measuring machine (CMM) was used to measure the distances between each of the ten fiducial markers. Each measurement was made using one point as a static reference to the other nine points. The same measuring procedures were accomplished on all specimens. All measurements were compared between specimens and the control. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey pairwise comparison of the raters, methods, and fiducial markers. The ANOVA multiple comparisons showed significant difference among the three methods (p 3D-SPG showed statistical difference in comparison to the models fabricated using the traditional method of facial moulage and 3DP models fabricated from CBCT imaging. 3DP models fabricated using 3D-SPG were less accurate than the CPM and models fabricated using facial moulage and CBCT imaging techniques. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. Feedforward Object-Vision Models Only Tolerate Small Image Variations Compared to Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud eGhodrati

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Invariant object recognition is a remarkable ability of primates' visual system that its underlying mechanism has constantly been under intense investigations. Computational modelling is a valuable tool toward understanding the processes involved in invariant object recognition. Although recent computational models have shown outstanding performances on challenging image databases, they fail to perform well when images with more complex variations of the same object are applied to them. Studies have shown that making sparse representation of objects by extracting more informative visual features through a feedforward sweep can lead to higher recognition performances. Here, however, we show that when the complexity of image variations is high, even this approach results in poor performance compared to humans. To assess the performance of models and humans in invariant object recognition tasks, we built a parametrically controlled image database consisting of several object categories varied in different dimensions and levels, rendered from 3D planes. Comparing the performance of several object recognition models with human observers shows that only in low-level image variations the models perform similar to humans in categorization tasks. Furthermore, the results of our behavioral experiments demonstrate that, even under difficult experimental conditions (i.e. briefly presented masked stimuli with complex image variations, human observers performed outstandingly well, suggesting that the models are still far from resembling humans in invariant object recognition. Taken together, we suggest that learning sparse informative visual features, although desirable, is not a complete solution for future progresses in object-vision modelling. We show that this approach is not of significant help in solving the computational crux of object recognition (that is invariant object recognition when the identity-preserving image variations become more complex.

  20. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajan, Zahra Dalili; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Hemmaty, Yasmin Babael; Roushan, Zahra Atrkar; Khademi, Jalil [Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1-weighted images, fast spin-echo T2-weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires.

  1. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalili Kajan, Zahra; Khademi, Jalil; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Babaei Hemmaty, Yasamin; Atrkar Roushan, Zahra

    2015-09-01

    This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1 -weighted images, fast spin-echo T2 -weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires.

  2. Spectroscopic methods for detection of impurities in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strashnikova, Natalia V.; Papiashvili, Nona; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Mark, Shlomo; Shilon, Guy; Khankin, Daniel; Kalisky, Yehoshua; Kalisky, Ofra; Parola, Abraham H.

    2011-11-01

    Optical photoluminescence spectroscopic method for detection of impurities, hazardous materials, pesticides, and pollutants in water resources, both qualitatively and quantitatively, is presented. The method is based on synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) of organic aromatic compounds, or poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and is carried out by following simultaneously their excitation and emission spectra. The full excitation emission matrix (EEM) generated in this way provides a 2-D and 3-D fluorescence map of the tested sample and the diagonals through the axes origin provide the synchronous fluorescence spectra at a constant wavelengths differences between the emission and excitation wavelengths, thus enabling multitude components identification. This map contains all the relevant spectroscopic information of the tested sample, and serves as a unique "fingerprint" with a very specific and accurate identification. When compared with pre-determined spectra and calibration curves from a "databank", there is a one-toone correspondence between the image and the specific compound, and it can be identified accurately both qualitatively and quantitatively. This method offers several significant advantages, and it provides a sensitive (ppm detection level), accurate and simple spectroscopic tool to monitor impurities and pollutants in water. The design and performance of the spectrofluorimeter prototype, as well as the software development and analysis of chemical organic compounds and mixtures in water will be discussed in this paper.

  3. A comparative study of 99Tcm-tetrofosmin and 99Tcm-MIBI myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Kui; Chen Peng; Zhang Furong; Shen Wenhua

    2001-01-01

    normal coronary artery were included in the study. Conclusions: Myocardial perfusion imaging with 99 Tc m -tetrofosmin or 99 Tc m -MIBI gives diagnostic information comparable to each other in patients undergoing one-day exercise/rest protocol for assessment of coronary artery disease. One-day exercise/rest myocardial perfusion with 99 Tc m -tetrofosmin is clinically feasible in detecting coronary artery disease

  4. Comparing an FPGA to a Cell for an Image Processing Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvic, Ryan N.; Ngo, Hau; Broussard, Randy P.; Ives, Robert W.

    2010-12-01

    Modern advancements in configurable hardware, most notably Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), have provided an exciting opportunity to discover the parallel nature of modern image processing algorithms. On the other hand, PlayStation3 (PS3) game consoles contain a multicore heterogeneous processor known as the Cell, which is designed to perform complex image processing algorithms at a high performance. In this research project, our aim is to study the differences in performance of a modern image processing algorithm on these two hardware platforms. In particular, Iris Recognition Systems have recently become an attractive identification method because of their extremely high accuracy. Iris matching, a repeatedly executed portion of a modern iris recognition algorithm, is parallelized on an FPGA system and a Cell processor. We demonstrate a 2.5 times speedup of the parallelized algorithm on the FPGA system when compared to a Cell processor-based version.

  5. Comparative methods for quantifying thyroid volume using planar imaging and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, H.

    1996-01-01

    Thyroid volume determination using planar imaging is a procedure often performed in routine nuclear medicine, but is hampered by several physical difficulties, in particular by structures which overlie or underlie the organ of interest. SPECT enables improved accuracy over planar imaging in the determination of the volume since it is derived from the 3-D data rather than from a 2-D projection with a certain geometric assumption regarding the thyroid configuration. By using the phantoms of known volume, it was possible to estimate the accuracy of 3 different methods of determining thyroid volume from planar imaging used in clinical routine. The experimental results demonstrate that compared with conventional scintigraphy, thyroid phantom volumes were most accurately determined with SPECT when attenuation and scatter corrections are performed which allows accurate radiation dosimetry in humans without the need for assumptions on organ size or concentrations. Poster 181. (author)

  6. [Comparation on Haversian system between human and animal bones by imaging analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui-Ling; Zheng, Jing; Yao, Ya-Nan; Chen, Sen; Wang, Hui-Pin; Chen, Li-Xian; Guo, Jing-Yuan

    2006-04-01

    To explore the differences in Haversian system between human and animal bones through imaging analysis and morphology description. Thirty-five slices grinding from human being as well as dog, pig, cow and sheep bones were observed to compare their structure, then were analysed with the researchful microscope. Plexiform bone or oeston band was not found in human bones; There were significant differences in the shape, size, location, density of Haversian system, between human and animal bones. The amount of Haversian lamella and diameter of central canal in human were the biggest; Significant differences in the central canal diameter and total area percentage between human and animal bones were shown by imaging analysis. (1) Plexiform bone and osteon band could be the exclusive index in human bone; (2) There were significant differences in the structure of Haversian system between human and animal bones; (3) The percentage of central canals total area was valuable in species identification through imaging analysis.

  7. Comparing an FPGA to a Cell for an Image Processing Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Ives

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern advancements in configurable hardware, most notably Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs, have provided an exciting opportunity to discover the parallel nature of modern image processing algorithms. On the other hand, PlayStation3 (PS3 game consoles contain a multicore heterogeneous processor known as the Cell, which is designed to perform complex image processing algorithms at a high performance. In this research project, our aim is to study the differences in performance of a modern image processing algorithm on these two hardware platforms. In particular, Iris Recognition Systems have recently become an attractive identification method because of their extremely high accuracy. Iris matching, a repeatedly executed portion of a modern iris recognition algorithm, is parallelized on an FPGA system and a Cell processor. We demonstrate a 2.5 times speedup of the parallelized algorithm on the FPGA system when compared to a Cell processor-based version.

  8. Resolution and Determination of the Absolute Configuration of a Twisted Bis-Lactam Analogue of Troger's Base: A Comparative Spectroscopic and Computational Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rúnarsson, Ögmundur Vidar; Benkhäuser, Christian; Christensen, Niels Johan

    2015-01-01

    ) and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra. The absolute configuration of (-)-2 was determined by comparing experimental and calculated electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra. The corresponding theoretical spectra were calculated using the lowest energy conformation of (R,R)-2 and (S,S)-2 at the B3LYP...

  9. A comparative study of automatic image segmentation algorithms for target tracking in MR-IGRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuan; Kawrakow, Iwan; Olsen, Jeff; Parikh, Parag J; Noel, Camille; Wooten, Omar; Du, Dongsu; Mutic, Sasa; Hu, Yanle

    2016-03-01

    On-board magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance during radiation therapy offers the potential for more accurate treatment delivery. To utilize the real-time image information, a crucial prerequisite is the ability to successfully segment and track regions of interest (ROI). The purpose of this work is to evaluate the performance of different segmentation algorithms using motion images (4 frames per second) acquired using a MR image-guided radiotherapy (MR-IGRT) system. Manual contours of the kidney, bladder, duodenum, and a liver tumor by an experienced radiation oncologist were used as the ground truth for performance evaluation. Besides the manual segmentation, images were automatically segmented using thresholding, fuzzy k-means (FKM), k-harmonic means (KHM), and reaction-diffusion level set evolution (RD-LSE) algorithms, as well as the tissue tracking algorithm provided by the ViewRay treatment planning and delivery system (VR-TPDS). The performance of the five algorithms was evaluated quantitatively by comparing with the manual segmentation using the Dice coefficient and target registration error (TRE) measured as the distance between the centroid of the manual ROI and the centroid of the automatically segmented ROI. All methods were able to successfully segment the bladder and the kidney, but only FKM, KHM, and VR-TPDS were able to segment the liver tumor and the duodenum. The performance of the thresholding, FKM, KHM, and RD-LSE algorithms degraded as the local image contrast decreased, whereas the performance of the VP-TPDS method was nearly independent of local image contrast due to the reference registration algorithm. For segmenting high-contrast images (i.e., kidney), the thresholding method provided the best speed (<1 ms) with a satisfying accuracy (Dice=0.95). When the image contrast was low, the VR-TPDS method had the best automatic contour. Results suggest an image quality determination procedure before segmentation and a combination of different

  10. Post-mortem imaging compared with autopsy in trauma victims--A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalzadeh, Hamid; Giannakopoulos, Georgios F; Berger, Ferco H; Fronczek, Judith; van de Goot, Frank R W; Reijnders, Udo J; Zuidema, Wietse P

    2015-12-01

    Post-mortem imaging or virtual autopsy is a rapidly advancing field of post-mortem investigations of trauma victims. In this review we evaluate the feasibility of complementation or replacement of conventional autopsy by post-mortem imaging in trauma victims. A systematic review was performed in compliance with the PRISMA guidelines. MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane databases were systematically searched for studies published between January 2008 and January 2014, in which post-mortem imaging was compared to conventional autopsy in trauma victims. Studies were included when two or more trauma victims were investigated. Twenty-six studies were included, with a total number of 563 trauma victims. Post-mortem computer tomography (PMCT) was performed in 22 studies, post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (PMMRI) in five studies and conventional radiography in two studies. PMCT and PMMRI both demonstrate moderate to high-grade injuries and cause of death accurately. PMCT is more sensitive than conventional autopsy or PMMRI in detecting skeletal injuries. For detecting minor organ and soft tissue injuries, autopsy remains superior to imaging. Aortic injuries are missed frequently by PMCT and PMMRI and form their main limitation. PMCT should be considered as an essential supplement to conventional autopsy in trauma victims since it detects many additional injuries. Despite some major limitations, PMCT could be used as an alternative for conventional autopsy in situations where conventional autopsy is rejected or unavailable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative study of quantitative phase imaging techniques for refractometry of optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dorlodot, Bertrand; Bélanger, Erik; Bérubé, Jean-Philippe; Vallée, Réal; Marquet, Pierre

    2018-02-01

    The refractive index difference profile of optical fibers is the key design parameter because it determines, among other properties, the insertion losses and propagating modes. Therefore, an accurate refractive index profiling method is of paramount importance to their development and optimization. Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) is one of the available tools to retrieve structural characteristics of optical fibers, including the refractive index difference profile. Having the advantage of being non-destructive, several different QPI methods have been developed over the last decades. Here, we present a comparative study of three different available QPI techniques, namely the transport-of-intensity equation, quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry and digital holographic microscopy. To assess the accuracy and precision of those QPI techniques, quantitative phase images of the core of a well-characterized optical fiber have been retrieved for each of them and a robust image processing procedure has been applied in order to retrieve their refractive index difference profiles. As a result, even if the raw images for all the three QPI methods were suffering from different shortcomings, our robust automated image-processing pipeline successfully corrected these. After this treatment, all three QPI techniques yielded accurate, reliable and mutually consistent refractive index difference profiles in agreement with the accuracy and precision of the refracted near-field benchmark measurement.

  12. Comparative diagnostic imaging of a partial patellar ligament tear in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ricciardi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic lesions of the patellar ligament (PL are rare in dogs. The resulting injury can be a complete or partial laceration, depending on the quantity of torn collagen fibres. Information obtained from imaging evaluation is of great value to the clinical approach towards PL injuries, because subsequent treatment options are affected by the distinction between complete or partial tears. Imaging diagnosis of PL damage in veterinary practice commonly relies on radiographic examination through the recognition of indirect signs, such as “patella alta”, bone fragments at the level of the patellar or tibial insertion, and soft tissue opacity at the cranial aspect of the joint. Although ultrasound (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have been described as useful diagnostic tools for the assessment of PL tears in human patients, specific comparative data regarding the evaluation of PL rupture in dogs using different imaging modalities is lacking in the veterinary literature. This paper describes the radiographic, ultrasonographic, CT and MRI imaging findings of a partial PL tear in a dog and discusses the utility of these techniques in diagnosing this condition. CT provided more detailed information than X-ray examination in the assessment of the osteoligamentous junction, the exclusion of microfracture and distal PL avulsion, but did not add information regarding PL integrity. MRI and US provided the most useful information regarding intra-ligamentous damage and as such their combined use may be considered for the assessment of PL injuries after clinical examination and survey radiographs.

  13. Ultrasonography of symptomatic rotator cuff tears compared with MR imaging and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotiadou, Anastasia N.; Vlychou, Marianna; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Karataglis, Dimitrios S.; Palladas, Panagiotis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of rotator cuff tears. Materials and methods: Ninety-six patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff pathology underwent ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder. The findings in 88 patients were compared with arthroscopy or open surgery. Results: Full-thickness tear was confirmed in 57 cases, partial-thickness tear in 30 cases and degenerative changes without tear in 1. In all 57 cases of full-thickness tear and in 28 out of 30 cases of partial-thickness tear the supraspinatus tendon was involved. The accuracy in the detection of full-thickness tears was 98 and 100% for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. The accuracy in the detection of bursal or articular partial-thickness tears was 87 and 90% for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Conclusions: In experienced hands ultrasonography should be considered as an accurate modality for the initial investigation of rotator cuff, especially supraspinatus, tears

  14. Ultrasonography of symptomatic rotator cuff tears compared with MR imaging and surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotiadou, Anastasia N. [Radiology Department, University Hospital of Larissa, Mezourlo 41110, Larissa (Greece); Radiology Department, G. Papanikolaou Hospital, Exochi 32100, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: natfot@yahoo.gr; Vlychou, Marianna [Radiology Department, University Hospital of Larissa, Mezourlo 41110, Larissa (Greece)], E-mail: mvlychou@med.uth.gr; Papadopoulos, Periklis [University Orthopaedic Clinic, G. Papanikolaou Hospital, Exochi 32100, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: perpap@otenet.gr; Karataglis, Dimitrios S. [University Orthopaedic Clinic, G. Papanikolaou Hospital, Exochi 32100, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: dkarataglis@yahoo.gr; Palladas, Panagiotis [Radiology Department, G. Papanikolaou Hospital, Exochi 32100, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: palladaspan@in.gr; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. [Radiology Department, University Hospital of Larissa, Mezourlo 41110, Larissa (Greece)], E-mail: oswestanast@yahoo.gr

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of rotator cuff tears. Materials and methods: Ninety-six patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff pathology underwent ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder. The findings in 88 patients were compared with arthroscopy or open surgery. Results: Full-thickness tear was confirmed in 57 cases, partial-thickness tear in 30 cases and degenerative changes without tear in 1. In all 57 cases of full-thickness tear and in 28 out of 30 cases of partial-thickness tear the supraspinatus tendon was involved. The accuracy in the detection of full-thickness tears was 98 and 100% for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. The accuracy in the detection of bursal or articular partial-thickness tears was 87 and 90% for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Conclusions: In experienced hands ultrasonography should be considered as an accurate modality for the initial investigation of rotator cuff, especially supraspinatus, tears.

  15. Comparative study of image quality and radiation dose between prospective and retrospective ECG gating technique in coronary artery imaging with 64-slice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianxin; Liu Jian; Dou Yanbin; Wang Jichen; Sun Hongyue

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare the image quality and radiation dose between prospective ECG-trigering and retrospective ECG gating technique in coronary artery imaging. Methods: 33 patients suspected coronary artery disease were included in this study and divided into experimental group (prospective ECG-triggering coronary artery imaging, heart rate 0.05). The mean DLP of experimental group (234.4 mGy · cm) was DLP of control group (974.4 mGy · cm) 24.1%. The mean effective dose of prospective ECG gating coronary artery imaging was 3.2 mSv. Effective dose reduced 76.47 %. Conclusions: Prospective ECG gating coronary artery imaging can obtain the similar image quality compared with prospective ECG gating coronary artery imaging but the effective dose reduced 76.47 %. Prospective ECG gating coronary artery imaging has clinical value to peoples who are able to not accept high radiation dose and with low heart rate. (authors)

  16. Bone scintigraphy in post-SARS patients and compared with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qian; Huang Lili; Qin Shuling

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the characteristics of bone scintigraphy in post-SARS patients and evaluate the usefulness of bone scintigraphy in the prediction of avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) comparing with the MR imaging.. Methods: Our study included 66 patients who were diagnosed as SARS based on the diagnostic criteria issued by the Ministry of Health of China (MHC), including 46 women and 20 men. Their ages ranged from 19 to 63 years (mean, 31.6±0.1 years). All of the patients were treated with methyprednisonlone, rabavirin, broad spectrum antimicrobials and supportive therapy. Dosage of methyprednisonlone was 80∼800 mg/d for 4-72 days. Of them, varied seat of joint pain occurred in 47 patients 3 to 18 weeks after the onset of SARS. Since multiple joints were involved in many patients, bone scintigraphy was performed for screening AVN. The other 19 patients without of evident joint pain were also examined as their demand. Informed consents were obtained in all of the examined patients. No previously joint pain or trauma history was found in this group of patients. Of the 66 patients, planer X-ray was performed in 34 of the symptomatic patients previous to the scintigraphy, but it was negative in all. MR examination was performed in 54 patients before or after the scintigraphy, and the interval between two the tests was average of 8 days (range, 0 to 30 days). In addition, 27 consecutive cases aged lower than 45 years (mean, 40.4±0.8 years) with breast cancer who underwent bone scintigraphy for screening metastastic disease and had negative results were also involved as a control group. Whole body skeletal scintigraphy was performed 3 hours after intravenous administration of technetium-99m methylene-diphosphonate 740 MBq. Increased uptake lesion seen in the limb joints was defined as positive, but 'hot patella' sign was considered to be non diagnostic value. When a lesion was found in the whole body imaging, corresponding regional image was further taken. Two

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the kidneys: A comparative study with anatomical sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilch, H.G.; Posel, P.; Muenchen Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Specimens of human kidneys (n=24) were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and compared with the corresponding cross-sections that had been prepared later from the same kidneys. The tomographs reveal detailed informations of renal fine structure. In particular, parenchyma and sinus can be easily differentiated from vasculature. It is possible to visualize vessel arborisation, including the arcuate vessels of the renal cortex. The clinical significance of renal MR tomographs is discussed. (orig.) [de

  18. Comparing the Zeiss Callisto Eye and the Alcon Verion Image Guided System Toric Lens Alignment Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hura, Arjan S; Osher, Robert H

    2017-07-01

    To compare the alignment meridian generated by the Zeiss Callisto Eye (Carl Zeiss AG, Dublin, CA) and the Alcon Verion Image Guided System (Alcon Laboratories, Inc., Fort Worth, TX). In this retrospective comparative evaluation of technology, intraoperative images were captured at different steps in the same surgery, allowing the comparison of the guidance lines generated by the Verion system to the parallel guidance lines generated by the Callisto Eye system. Measurements of each hemi-meridian were quantified using Adobe Photoshop 2015 CC software (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA). The numbers of degrees separating these alignment meridians were calculated, entered into a database, and analyzed. The authors found that of 98 captured images of 16 eyes, the two technologies were identical in 0 eyes (θ 1 = θ 2 = 0), similar by 3° in 52 (53%) captured images (θ 1 ≠ θ 2 ≠ 0), and different by at least 3° in 46 (47%) captured images (θ 1 ≠ θ 2 ≠ 0). The target meridians were superimposed, the target lines were minimally separated, and the target lines were dissimilar. It was noted that some intraoperative variation occurred from measurement to measurement. Within the small group of 16 cases of routine toric lens implantation in this study, the absolute average number of degrees of misalignment between the Verion and Callisto Eye systems was 3.355 for θ 1 and 3.838 for θ 2 . On average, the intraoperative variation termed "drift" was noted to be 3.963° for θ 1 , and 4.557° for θ 2 . The authors found that small deviations were frequent when comparing two sophisticated technologies. Although deviations greater than 3° occurred in less than 47% of captured images from 16 eyes, smaller but significant variations of less than 3° occurred in 53% of captured images from 16 eyes. It was rare to identify a large deviation. However, the authors identified "drift" in the same eye when measurements were taken at different times. The results indicate that the two

  19. Comparative magnetic resonance imaging findings between gliomas and presumed cerebrovascular accidents in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Vicente; Mai, Wilfried; Vite, Charles H; Johnson, Victoria; Dayrell-Hart, Betsy; Seiler, Gabriela S

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents, or strokes, and gliomas are common intraaxial brain lesions in dogs. An accurate differentiation of these two lesions is necessary for prognosis and treatment decisions. The magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of 21 dogs with a presumed cerebrovascular accident and 17 with a glioma were compared. MR imaging findings were reviewed retrospectively by three observers unaware of the final diagnosis. Statistically significant differences between the appearance of gliomas and cerebrovascular accidents were identified based on lesion location, size, mass effect, perilesional edema, and appearance of the apparent diffusion coefficient map. Gliomas were predominantly located in the cerebrum (76%) compared with presumed cerebrovascular accidents that were located mainly in the cerebellum, thalamus, caudate nucleus, midbrain, and brainstem (76%). Gliomas were significantly larger compared with presumed cerebrovascular accidents and more commonly associated with mass effect and perilesional edema. Wedge-shaped lesions were seen only in 19% of presumed cerebrovascular accidents. Between the three observers, 10-47% of the presumed cerebrovascular accidents were misdiagnosed as gliomas, and 0-12% of the gliomas were misdiagnosed as cerebrovascular accidents. Diffusion weighted imaging increased the accuracy of the diagnosis for both lesions. Agreement between observers was moderate (kappa = 0.48, P < 0.01).

  20. A comparative study of automatic image segmentation algorithms for target tracking in MR‐IGRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuan; Kawrakow, Iwan; Olsen, Jeff; Parikh, Parag J.; Noel, Camille; Wooten, Omar; Du, Dongsu; Mutic, Sasa

    2016-01-01

    On‐board magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance during radiation therapy offers the potential for more accurate treatment delivery. To utilize the real‐time image information, a crucial prerequisite is the ability to successfully segment and track regions of interest (ROI). The purpose of this work is to evaluate the performance of different segmentation algorithms using motion images (4 frames per second) acquired using a MR image‐guided radiotherapy (MR‐IGRT) system. Manual contours of the kidney, bladder, duodenum, and a liver tumor by an experienced radiation oncologist were used as the ground truth for performance evaluation. Besides the manual segmentation, images were automatically segmented using thresholding, fuzzy k‐means (FKM), k‐harmonic means (KHM), and reaction‐diffusion level set evolution (RD‐LSE) algorithms, as well as the tissue tracking algorithm provided by the ViewRay treatment planning and delivery system (VR‐TPDS). The performance of the five algorithms was evaluated quantitatively by comparing with the manual segmentation using the Dice coefficient and target registration error (TRE) measured as the distance between the centroid of the manual ROI and the centroid of the automatically segmented ROI. All methods were able to successfully segment the bladder and the kidney, but only FKM, KHM, and VR‐TPDS were able to segment the liver tumor and the duodenum. The performance of the thresholding, FKM, KHM, and RD‐LSE algorithms degraded as the local image contrast decreased, whereas the performance of the VP‐TPDS method was nearly independent of local image contrast due to the reference registration algorithm. For segmenting high‐contrast images (i.e., kidney), the thresholding method provided the best speed (<1 ms) with a satisfying accuracy (Dice=0.95). When the image contrast was low, the VR‐TPDS method had the best automatic contour. Results suggest an image quality determination procedure before segmentation and

  1. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging features of hepatic hemangioma compared with enhanced computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Tateyama, Akihiro; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Takumi, Koji; Shindo, Toshikazu; Kumagae, Yuichi; Kamimura, Kiyohisa; Nakajo, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To clarify features of hepatic hemangiomas on gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with enhanced computed tomography (CT).

  2. [The alcoholic's self-image: a comparative study between men and women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, C; Gay, M-C; Romo, L; Joffre, S

    2004-01-01

    Self-image is a central problem in alcoholism. Most theories about the relationships between the self-image of alcoholics and their behaviour have been derived from -clinical observations rather than empirical research. Most observations have pointed out that alcoholics are prone to underevaluation of themselves and that low self-image is the basis of much of the problem drinker's behaviour. All the research on self-image has concluded that alcoholics have a lower self-image than non-alcoholics. Some empirical research has been conducted on the self-image of alcoholics; it has, however, been carried out only a few times, restricted to small samples, and concerned with a limited number of aspects of self-image. Moreover, most of these studies are not recent, and it seems that this area of research is not well covered. Even though the hypothesis of a bad self-image in alcoholics was validated by various older studies, the representation of alcoholism has since changed. Because of this evolution, the ways in which the disease has been viewed have changed. One can question to what extent changes in society can influence the self-image of alcoholics. This question seems all the more pertinent for alcoholic women, given the evolution of the female condition since the Seventies. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the self-image of alcoholics and non-alcoholics, and to compare the self-image of male and female alcoholics. Our hypotheses are that: 1) the self-image of an alcoholic is more negative than that of a non-alcoholic, and that: 2) female alcoholics have a more negative self-image than male alcoholics. Two groups of 30 subjects each were made up: a group of alcoholics recruited in an alcohol-dependency unit and a group of non-alcoholics recruited in a public place. The comparison of socio-demographic data between the alcoholic group and the control group does not show a significant difference except for age and level of schooling. The average age of the

  3. X-ray spectroscopic study of amorphous and polycrystalline PbO films, α-PbO, and β-PbO for direct conversion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, A; LeBlanc, K; Semeniuk, O; Reznik, A; Lin, J; Pan, Y; Moewes, A

    2017-10-13

    We investigated the electronic structure of Lead Oxide (PbO) - one of the most promising photoconductor materials for direct conversion x-ray imaging detectors, using soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy. Two structural configurations of thin PbO layers, namely the polycrystalline and the amorphous phase, were studied, and compared to the properties of powdered α-PbO and β-PbO samples. In addition, we performed calculations within the framework of density functional theory and found an excellent agreement between the calculated and the measured absorption and emission spectra, which indicates high accuracy of our structural models. Our work provides strong evidence that the electronic structure of PbO layers, specifically the width of the band gap and the presence of additional interband and intraband states in both conduction and valence band, depend on the deposition conditions. We tested several model structures using DFT simulations to understand what the origin of these states is. The presence of O vacancies is the most plausible explanation for these additional electronic states. Several other plausible models were ruled out including interstitial O, dislocated O and the presence of significant lattice stress in PbO.

  4. State of the art imaging of multiple myeloma: Comparative review of FDG PET/CT imaging in various clinical settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesguich, Charles, E-mail: charles.mesguich@chu-bordeaux.fr [Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Fardanesh, Reza; Tanenbaum, Lawrence [Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Chari, Ajai; Jagannath, Sundar [Department of Medicine Division of Hematology and Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Kostakoglu, Lale, E-mail: lale.kostakoglu@mssm.edu [Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Metabolic changes on FDG PET/CT offer an earlier response evaluation than MRI. • PET/CT is less sensitive than MRI for diffuse bone marrow involvement. • PET/CT is a highly sensitive modality to determine extra-medullary disease. • Red marrow expansion: false positive findings on both FDG PET/CT and MRI. • Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI. - Abstract: 18-Flurodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography with computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have higher sensitivity and specificity than whole-body X-ray (WBXR) survey in evaluating disease extent in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Both modalities are now recommended by the Durie–Salmon Plus classification although the emphasis is more on MRI than PET/CT. The presence of extra-medullary disease (EMD) as evaluated by PET/CT imaging, initial SUV{sub max} and number of focal lesions (FL) are deemed to be strong prognostic parameters at staging. MRI remains the most sensitive technique for the detection of diffuse bone marrow involvement in both the pre and post-therapy setting. Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI signal changes, for determining vertebroplasty candidates. While PET/CT allows for earlier and more specific evaluation of therapeutic efficacy compared to MRI, when signal abnormalities persist years after treatment. PET/CT interpretation, however, can be challenging in the vertebral column and pelvis as well as in cases with post-therapy changes. Hence, a reading approach combining the high sensitivity of MRI and superior specificity of FDG PET/CT would be preferred to increase the diagnostic accuracy. In summary, the established management methods in MM, mainly relying on biological tumor parameters should be complemented with functional imaging data, both at staging and restaging for optimal management of MM.

  5. Detection ability of FDG-PET/CT comparing with other imaging modalities in multiple myeloma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Min Jeong; Lee, Tae Hyun; Pai, Moon Sun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2007-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by bone marrow infiltration with malignant plasma cells. It is important to detect involving bone for diagnosis and management of MM. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic ability and limitation of 18F-FDG-PET/CT (PET/CT) comparing other imaging modalities (separated PET and CT, whole body plain X-ray (XR), bone scintigraphy (BS), and MRI) in MM. Twenty PET/CT scans were performed in 16 patients (M: F=6: 10, median age=59 y). PET/CT findings were compared with available other images (n of CT=21, XR=21, BS=8, and MRI=5). Concordance with more than 2 image modalities, laboratory data, symptom, and biopsies were used for diagnosis of detected lesions. PET/CT revealed 256 of total 287 sites (sensitivity, 89.2%; accuracy, 84.8%). The sensitivity and accuracy of separating PET, CT, and XR were 86.3%, 70.4%; 47.4%, 50.3%; and 72.8%, 72.4%, respectively. Available BS identified 67 of 202 sites (sensitivity, 33.2%; accuracy, 44.0%). MRI detected 20 of 24 sites (sensitivity, 83.3%; accuracy, 36.3%). False positive rate (FP) of PET, XR, and MRI was as high as 87.8%, 95.1%, and 100%. PET for rib lesion identified 9 of 10 patients (90.0%) but for skull lesion only 4 of 7 patients (57.2%) with underestimation. 5 patients in MRI showed diffuse marrow signal change but only 3 had marrow involvement. But PET/CT showed higher accuracy than MRI. PET/CT was the most useful tool for detecting involving bone of MM comparing with other imaging modalities. Moreover, PET/CT is expected to overcome the limitations for the small osteolytic bone lesions with diffuse FDG uptake on PET

  6. A comparative study of deep learning models for medical image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suvajit; Manideep, B. C. S.; Rai, Shalva; Vijayarajan, V.

    2017-11-01

    Deep Learning(DL) techniques are conquering over the prevailing traditional approaches of neural network, when it comes to the huge amount of dataset, applications requiring complex functions demanding increase accuracy with lower time complexities. Neurosciences has already exploited DL techniques, thus portrayed itself as an inspirational source for researchers exploring the domain of Machine learning. DL enthusiasts cover the areas of vision, speech recognition, motion planning and NLP as well, moving back and forth among fields. This concerns with building models that can successfully solve variety of tasks requiring intelligence and distributed representation. The accessibility to faster CPUs, introduction of GPUs-performing complex vector and matrix computations, supported agile connectivity to network. Enhanced software infrastructures for distributed computing worked in strengthening the thought that made researchers suffice DL methodologies. The paper emphases on the following DL procedures to traditional approaches which are performed manually for classifying medical images. The medical images are used for the study Diabetic Retinopathy(DR) and computed tomography (CT) emphysema data. Both DR and CT data diagnosis is difficult task for normal image classification methods. The initial work was carried out with basic image processing along with K-means clustering for identification of image severity levels. After determining image severity levels ANN has been applied on the data to get the basic classification result, then it is compared with the result of DNNs (Deep Neural Networks), which performed efficiently because of its multiple hidden layer features basically which increases accuracy factors, but the problem of vanishing gradient in DNNs made to consider Convolution Neural Networks (CNNs) as well for better results. The CNNs are found to be providing better outcomes when compared to other learning models aimed at classification of images. CNNs are

  7. A comparative analysis of double inversion recovery TFE and TSE sequences on carotid artery wall imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Di Yujin; Bu Chunqing; Zhang Yanfeng; Li Shuhua

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of double inversion recovery (DIR) turbo field echo (TFE) and turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences and explore the value of double inversion recovery TFE sequence on carotid artery wall imaging. Patients and methods: 56 patients (32 males and 24 females, aged 31–76 years with a mean age of 53 years) were performed with DIR TFE and DIR TSE T1 weighted imaging (T1WI) sequences on carotid artery bifurcations. Image quality acquired by different techniques were evaluated and scored by two physicians. Whether there is significant difference is determined by SPSS 11.0 software. Paired-samples t test was used for statistics. Results: There was no significant difference in the image quality scores between two sequences (t = 0.880, P = 0.383 > 0.05). Conclusions: DIR TFE sequence has short scanning time and high spatial resolution. DIR TFE sequence can be used as the preferred sequence for screening carotid atherosclerotic plaque compared with DIR TSE sequence.

  8. Comparative analysis of partial imaging performance parameters of home and imported X-ray machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yunxi; Wang Xianyun; Liu Huiqin; Guo Yongxin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare and analyze the performance indexes and the imaging quality of the home and imported X-ray machines through testing their partial imaging performance parameters. Methods: By separate sampling from 10 home and 10 imported X-ray machines, the parameters including tube current, time of exposure, machine total exposure, and repeatability were tested, and the imaging performance was evaluated according to the national standard. Results: All the performance indexes met the standard of GB4505-84. The first sampling tests showed the maximum changing coefficient of imaging performance repeatability of the home X-ray machines was Δmax1 = 0.025, while that of the imported X-ray machine was Δmax1 = 0.016. In the second sampling tests, the maximum changing coefficients of the two were Δmax2 = 0.048 and Δmax2 = 0.022, respectively. Conclusion: The 2 years' follow-up tests indicate that there is no significant difference between the above-mentioned parameters of the elaborately adjusted home X-ray machines and imported ones, but the home X-ray machines are no better than the imported X-ray machines in stability and consistency

  9. Spectroscopic investigation on structure (monomer and dimer), molecular characteristics and comparative study on vibrational analysis of picolinic and isonicotinic acids using experimental and theoretical (DFT & IVP) methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Gaddam; Reddy, Byru Venkatram

    2018-05-01

    ) analysis. The 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts of the molecules are calculated by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental results. UV-visible (UV-Vis) spectra of the compounds are also recorded in the region 200-400 nm. Thermodynamic parameters and rotational constants are also determined and found that they are comparable with experimental literature values for these molecules.

  10. Comparing the Spectroscopic and Molecular Characteristics of Different Dissolved Organic Matter Fractions Isolated by Hydrophobic and Anionic Exchange Resins Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy and FT-ICR-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Derrien

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the environmental significance of dissolved organic matter (DOM, characterizing DOM is still challenging due to its structural complexity and heterogeneity. In this study, three different chemical fractions, including hydrophobic acid (HPOA, transphilic acid (TPIA, and hydrophilic neutral and base (HPIN/B fractions, were separated from bulk aquatic DOM samples, and their spectral features and the chemical composition at the molecular level were compared using both fluorescence excitation emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS. The HPIN/B fraction was distinguished from the two acidic fractions (i.e., HPOA and TPIA by the EEM-PARAFAC, while the TPIA fraction was discriminated by using the molecular parameters derived from the FT-ICR MS analyses. Statistical comparison suggests that the spectral dissimilarity among the three chemical fractions might result from the acido-basic properties of DOM samples, while the differences in molecular composition were more likely to be affected by the hydrophobicity of the DOM fractions. The non-metric multidimensional scaling map further revealed that the HPOA was the most heterogeneous among the three fractions. The number of overlapping formulas among the three chemical fractions constituted only <5% of all identified formulas, and those between two different fractions ranged from 2.0% to 24.1%, implying relatively homogeneous properties of the individual chemical fractions with respect to molecular composition. Although employing chemical fractionation achieved a lowering of the DOM heterogeneity, prevalent signatures of either acido-basic property or the hydrophobic nature of DOM on the characteristics of three chemical isolated fractions were not found for this study.

  11. Spectroscopic studies of the molecular parentage of radical species in cometary comae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Pierce, Donna; Cochran, Anita

    2015-11-01

    We have observed several comets using an integral-field unit spectrograph (the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph) on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory. Full-coma spectroscopic images were obtained for various radical species (C2, C3, CH, CN, NH2). By constructing azimuthal average profiles from the full-coma spectroscopic images we can test Haser model parameters with our observations. The Haser model was used to determine production rates and possible parent lifetimes that would be consistent with the model. By iterating through a large range of possible parents lifetimes, we can see what range of values in which the Haser model is consistent with observations. Also, this type of analysis gives us perspective on how sensitive the model's fit quality is to changes in parent lifetimes. Here, we present the work completed to date, and we compare our results to other comet taxonomic surveys.

  12. A comparative study on methods of improving SCR for ship detection in SAR image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Haitao; Shi, Hongji; Tao, Yunhong; Ma, Li

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge about ship positions plays a critical role in a wide range of maritime applications. To improve the performance of ship detector in SAR image, an effective strategy is improving the signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) before conducting detection. In this paper, we present a comparative study on methods of improving SCR, including power-law scaling (PLS), max-mean and max-median filter (MMF1 and MMF2), method of wavelet transform (TWT), traditional SPAN detector, reflection symmetric metric (RSM), scattering mechanism metric (SMM). The ability of SCR improvement to SAR image and ship detection performance associated with cell- averaging CFAR (CA-CFAR) of different methods are evaluated on two real SAR data.

  13. New tools for comparing microscopy images: quantitative analysis of cell types in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-02-15

    Fluorescence microscopy is a method commonly used to examine individual differences between bacterial cells, yet many studies still lack a quantitative analysis of fluorescence microscopy data. Here we introduce some simple tools that microbiologists can use to analyze and compare their microscopy images. We show how image data can be converted to distribution data. These data can be subjected to a cluster analysis that makes it possible to objectively compare microscopy images. The distribution data can further be analyzed using distribution fitting. We illustrate our methods by scrutinizing two independently acquired data sets, each containing microscopy images of a doubly labeled Bacillus subtilis strain. For the first data set, we examined the expression of srfA and tapA, two genes which are expressed in surfactin-producing and matrix-producing cells, respectively. For the second data set, we examined the expression of eps and tapA; these genes are expressed in matrix-producing cells. We show that srfA is expressed by all cells in the population, a finding which contrasts with a previously reported bimodal distribution of srfA expression. In addition, we show that eps and tapA do not always have the same expression profiles, despite being expressed in the same cell type: both operons are expressed in cell chains, while single cells mainly express eps. These findings exemplify that the quantification and comparison of microscopy data can yield insights that otherwise would go unnoticed. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy compared with permanent prostate implantation in low-risk prostate cancer based on endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging and prostate-specific antigen level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, Barby; Kurhanewicz, John; Pouliot, Jean; Weinberg, Vivian; Shinohara, Katsuto; Coakley, Fergus; Roach, Mack

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the metabolic response by comparing the time to resolution of spectroscopic abnormalities (TRSA) and the time to prostate-specific antigen level in low-risk prostate cancer patients after treatment with three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) compared with permanent prostate implantation (PPI). Recent studies have suggested that the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer yields similar results for patients treated with 3D-CRT or PPI. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 patients, 25 in each group, who had been treated with 3D-CRT or PPI, had undergone endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging before and/or at varying times after therapy. The 3D-CRT patients had received radiation doses of ≥72 Gy compared with 144 Gy for the PPI patients. The spectra from all usable voxels were examined for detectable levels of metabolic signal, and the percentages of atrophic and cancerous voxels were tabulated. Results: The median time to resolution of the spectroscopic abnormalities was 32.2 and 24.8 months and the time to the nadir prostate-specific antigen level was 52.4 and 38.0 months for the 3D-CRT and PPI patients, respectively. Of the 3D-CRT patients, 92% achieved negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 40% having complete metabolic atrophy. All 25 PPI patients had negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 60% achieving complete metabolic atrophy. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that metabolic and biochemical responses of the prostate are more pronounced after PPI. Our results have not proved PPI is more effective at curing prostate cancer, but they have demonstrated that it may be more effective at destroying prostate metabolism

  15. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Boggs, Steve; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing hard X-ray (6 - 80 keV) telescope to orbit. NuSTAR will offer a factor 50 - 100 sensitivity improvement compared to previous collimated or coded mask imagers that have operated...... in this energy band. In addition, NuSTAR provides sub-arcminute imaging with good spectral resolution over a 12-arcminute eld of view. After launch, NuSTAR will carry out a two-year primary science mission that focuses on four key programs: studying the evolution of massive black holes through surveys carried...... on-orbit deployment of an extendable mast. An aspect and alignment metrology system enable reconstruction of the absolute aspect and variations in the telescope alignment resulting from mast exure during ground data processing. Data will be publicly available at GSFC's High Energy Archive Research...

  16. Spectroscopic Profiles of Comets Garradd and McNaught

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ien; Pierce, Donna M.; Cochran, Anita L.

    2017-10-01

    We have used the integral-field unit spectrograph (the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph) on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory to obtain spectroscopic images of the comae of several comets. The images were obtained for various radical species (C2, C3, CN, NH2). Radial and azimuthal average profiles of the radical species were created to enhance any observed cometary coma morphological features. We compare the observed coma features across the observed species and over the different observation periods in order to constrain possible rotational states of the observed comets, as well as determine possible source differences in the coma between the observed radical species. We will present results for several comets, including C/2009 P1 (Garradd) and 260P (McNaught).

  17. Evaluation of gastric carcinoma with CT three-dimensional imaging compared with conventional barium study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Shenghong; Chen Feng; Zheng Kai'er; Sun Jun

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of three-dimensional (3D) CT imaging including CT virtual gastroscopy (CTVG), surface-shaded display (SSD), and Raysum Display in the evaluation of gastric carcinoma compared with upper gastrointestinal series (UGI). Methods: In 43 histologically proved gastric carcinoma patients (37 advanced gastric carcinomas and 6 early gastric carcinomas), the results of CTVG and 3D CT imaging were compared to that of UGI. Two observers blindly evaluated images with all four techniques in terms of image quality, artifacts, diagnostic confidence, and Borrmann classification. Sensitivities of lesion detection and classification based on Borrmann classification of CTVG and 3D CT were determined by comparing them to surgical and histological findings. Results: The lesion detection sensitivity of CTVG, SSD, Raysum, and UGI by two observers were 98%, 67%, 60% and 84%, and 98%, 70%, 70% and 88%, respectively. The Borrmann's classification sensitivity by two observers were 76%, 49%, 38% and 49%, and 78%, 51%, 35% and 43%, respectively. Overall image quality of CTVG, SSD, and Raysum was considered similar to that of UGI by both observers (P>0.05). There was no statistical significant difference for advanced lesion (with diagnostic confidence of 3 or above) in detection sensitivity between CTVG and UGI (χ 2 = 0.50 and 0.25, P>0.05), but the lesion detection sensitivity of SSD and Raysum display were lower than that of UGI (χ 2 4.17, 7.11 and 5.14, 4.17, P 2 = 4.90 and 4.92, P 2 = 2.25, P > 0.05). Excess fluid remained in the stomach and patient respiratory movement during breath holds were the reasons causing severe artifacts (6.1%) that influenced the diagnostic evaluation. Conclusion: The performance of CTVG was equivalent to UGI in the Borrmann's classification. CTVG has potential in the detection of early gastric carcinoma. The value of SSD and Raysum display was limited in the evaluation of gastric carcinoma when used alone clinically

  18. Spectroscopic surveys of LAMOST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongheng

    2015-01-01

    The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST), a new type of reflecting Schmidt telescope, has been designed and produced in China. It marks a breakthrough for large scale spectroscopic survey observation in that both large aperture and wide field of view have been achieved. LAMOST has the highest spectrum acquisition rate, and from October 2011 to June 2014 it has obtained 4.13 million spectra of celestial objects, of which 3.78 million are spectra of stars, with the stellar parameters of 2.20 million stars included. (author)

  19. Comparative study on developmental stages of the clavicle by postmortem MRI and CT imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sara Tangmose; Lynnerup, Niels; Jensen, K.E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The developmental stages of the clavicles are important for forensic age estimation purposes in adolescents. This study compares the 4-stage system to evaluate the ossification of the medial end of the clavicle as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography...... (CT). As several forensic institutes routinely perform CT scans, the large amount of available data may serve as reference sample for MRI in specific cases. Material and methods: This prospective study included an MRI and CT scan of 47 autopsy cases performed prior to medico-legal autopsy (age range...

  20. PRISM: Processing routines in IDL for spectroscopic measurements (installation manual and user's guide, version 1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes procedures for installing and using the U.S. Geological Survey Processing Routines in IDL for Spectroscopic Measurements (PRISM) software. PRISM provides a framework to conduct spectroscopic analysis of measurements made using laboratory, field, airborne, and space-based spectrometers. Using PRISM functions, the user can compare the spectra of materials of unknown composition with reference spectra of known materials. This spectroscopic analysis allows the composition of the material to be identified and characterized. Among its other functions, PRISM contains routines for the storage of spectra in database files, import/export of ENVI spectral libraries, importation of field spectra, correction of spectra to absolute reflectance, arithmetic operations on spectra, interactive continuum removal and comparison of spectral features, correction of imaging spectrometer data to ground-calibrated reflectance, and identification and mapping of materials using spectral feature-based analysis of reflectance data. This report provides step-by-step instructions for installing the PRISM software and running its functions.

  1. Simultaneous storage of medical images in the spatial and frequency domain: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya U Rajendra

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital watermarking is a technique of hiding specific identification data for copyright authentication. This technique is adapted here for interleaving patient information with medical images, to reduce storage and transmission overheads. Methods The patient information is encrypted before interleaving with images to ensure greater security. The bio-signals are compressed and subsequently interleaved with the image. This interleaving is carried out in the spatial domain and Frequency domain. The performance of interleaving in the spatial, Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT, Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT and Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT coefficients is studied. Differential pulse code modulation (DPCM is employed for data compression as well as encryption and results are tabulated for a specific example. Results It can be seen from results, the process does not affect the picture quality. This is attributed to the fact that the change in LSB of a pixel changes its brightness by 1 part in 256. Spatial and DFT domain interleaving gave very less %NRMSE as compared to DCT and DWT domain. Conclusion The Results show that spatial domain the interleaving, the %NRMSE was less than 0.25% for 8-bit encoded pixel intensity. Among the frequency domain interleaving methods, DFT was found to be very efficient.

  2. Visual grading of 2D and 3D functional MRI compared with image-based descriptive measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragnehed, Mattias [Linkoeping University, Division of Radiological Sciences, Radiology, IMH, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences/Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden); Leinhard, Olof Dahlqvist; Pihlsgaard, Johan; Lundberg, Peter [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Division of Radiological Sciences, Radiation Physics, IMH, Linkoeping (Sweden); Wirell, Staffan [Linkoeping University, Division of Radiological Sciences, Radiology, IMH, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Soekjer, Hannibal; Faegerstam, Patrik [Linkoeping University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Jiang, Bo [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, Linkoeping (Sweden); Smedby, Oerjan; Engstroem, Maria [Linkoeping University, Division of Radiological Sciences, Radiology, IMH, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2010-03-15

    A prerequisite for successful clinical use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the selection of an appropriate imaging sequence. The aim of this study was to compare 2D and 3D fMRI sequences using different image quality assessment methods. Descriptive image measures, such as activation volume and temporal signal-to-noise ratio (TSNR), were compared with results from visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis of the fMRI results. Significant differences in activation volume and TSNR were not directly reflected by differences in VGC scores. The results suggest that better performance on descriptive image measures is not always an indicator of improved diagnostic quality of the fMRI results. In addition to descriptive image measures, it is important to include measures of diagnostic quality when comparing different fMRI data acquisition methods. (orig.)

  3. Comparing Individual Tree Segmentation Based on High Resolution Multispectral Image and Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, P.; Kelly, M.; Guo, Q.

    2014-12-01

    This study compares the use of high-resolution multispectral WorldView images and high density Lidar data for individual tree segmentation. The application focuses on coniferous and deciduous forests in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tree objects are obtained in two ways: a hybrid region-merging segmentation method with multispectral images, and a top-down and bottom-up region-growing method with Lidar data. The hybrid region-merging method is used to segment individual tree from multispectral images. It integrates the advantages of global-oriented and local-oriented region-merging strategies into a unified framework. The globally most-similar pair of regions is used to determine the starting point of a growing region. The merging iterations are constrained within the local vicinity, thus the segmentation is accelerated and can reflect the local context. The top-down region-growing method is adopted in coniferous forest to delineate individual tree from Lidar data. It exploits the spacing between the tops of trees to identify and group points into a single tree based on simple rules of proximity and likely tree shape. The bottom-up region-growing method based on the intensity and 3D structure of Lidar data is applied in deciduous forest. It segments tree trunks based on the intensity and topological relationships of the points, and then allocate other points to exact tree crowns according to distance. The accuracies for each method are evaluated with field survey data in several test sites, covering dense and sparse canopy. Three types of segmentation results are produced: true positive represents a correctly segmented individual tree, false negative represents a tree that is not detected and assigned to a nearby tree, and false positive represents that a point or pixel cluster is segmented as a tree that does not in fact exist. They respectively represent correct-, under-, and over-segmentation. Three types of index are compared for segmenting individual tree

  4. Automated Diabetic Retinopathy Image Assessment Software: Diagnostic Accuracy and Cost-Effectiveness Compared with Human Graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufail, Adnan; Rudisill, Caroline; Egan, Catherine; Kapetanakis, Venediktos V; Salas-Vega, Sebastian; Owen, Christopher G; Lee, Aaron; Louw, Vern; Anderson, John; Liew, Gerald; Bolter, Louis; Srinivas, Sowmya; Nittala, Muneeswar; Sadda, SriniVas; Taylor, Paul; Rudnicka, Alicja R

    2017-03-01

    With the increasing prevalence of diabetes, annual screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR) by expert human grading of retinal images is challenging. Automated DR image assessment systems (ARIAS) may provide clinically effective and cost-effective detection of retinopathy. We aimed to determine whether ARIAS can be safely introduced into DR screening pathways to replace human graders. Observational measurement comparison study of human graders following a national screening program for DR versus ARIAS. Retinal images from 20 258 consecutive patients attending routine annual diabetic eye screening between June 1, 2012, and November 4, 2013. Retinal images were manually graded following a standard national protocol for DR screening and were processed by 3 ARIAS: iGradingM, Retmarker, and EyeArt. Discrepancies between manual grades and ARIAS results were sent to a reading center for arbitration. Screening performance (sensitivity, false-positive rate) and diagnostic accuracy (95% confidence intervals of screening-performance measures) were determined. Economic analysis estimated the cost per appropriate screening outcome. Sensitivity point estimates (95% confidence intervals) of the ARIAS were as follows: EyeArt 94.7% (94.2%-95.2%) for any retinopathy, 93.8% (92.9%-94.6%) for referable retinopathy (human graded as either ungradable, maculopathy, preproliferative, or proliferative), 99.6% (97.0%-99.9%) for proliferative retinopathy; Retmarker 73.0% (72.0 %-74.0%) for any retinopathy, 85.0% (83.6%-86.2%) for referable retinopathy, 97.9% (94.9%-99.1%) for proliferative retinopathy. iGradingM classified all images as either having disease or being ungradable. EyeArt and Retmarker saved costs compared with manual grading both as a replacement for initial human grading and as a filter prior to primary human grading, although the latter approach was less cost-effective. Retmarker and EyeArt systems achieved acceptable sensitivity for referable retinopathy when compared

  5. Socializing the Semantic Gap: A Comparative Survey on Image Tag Assignment, Refinement and Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Uricchio, T.; Ballan, L.; Bertini, M.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Del Bimbo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Where previous reviews on content-based image retrieval emphasize what can be seen in an image to bridge the semantic gap, this survey considers what people tag about an image. A comprehensive treatise of three closely linked problems (i.e., image tag assignment, refinement, and tag-based image

  6. Evaluation of low-energy contrast-enhanced spectral mammography images by comparing them to full-field digital mammography using EUREF image quality criteria

    OpenAIRE

    Lalji, U. C.; Jeukens, C. R. L. P. N.; Houben, I.; Nelemans, P. J.; van Engen, R. E.; van Wylick, E.; Beets-Tan, R. G. H.; Wildberger, J. E.; Paulis, L. E.; Lobbes, M. B. I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) examination results in a low-energy (LE) and contrast-enhanced image. The LE appears similar to a full-field digital mammogram (FFDM). Our aim was to evaluate LE CESM image quality by comparing it to FFDM using criteria defined by the European Reference Organization for Quality Assured Breast Screening and Diagnostic Services (EUREF). Methods A total of 147 cases with both FFDM and LE images were independently scored by two experienced r...

  7. Comparing image quality of print-on-demand books and photobooks from web-based vendors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Bajorski, Peter; Burns, Peter; Fredericks, Erin; Rosen, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    Because of the emergence of e-commerce and developments in print engines designed for economical output of very short runs, there are increased business opportunities and consumer options for print-on-demand books and photobooks. The current state of these printing modes allows for direct uploading of book files via the web, printing on nonoffset printers, and distributing by standard parcel or mail delivery services. The goal of this research is to assess the image quality of print-on-demand books and photobooks produced by various Web-based vendors and to identify correlations between psychophysical results and objective metrics. Six vendors were identified for one-off (single-copy) print-on-demand books, and seven vendors were identified for photobooks. Participants rank ordered overall quality of a subset of individual pages from each book, where the pages included text, photographs, or a combination of the two. Observers also reported overall quality ratings and price estimates for the bound books. Objective metrics of color gamut, color accuracy, accuracy of International Color Consortium profile usage, eye-weighted root mean square L*, and cascaded modulation transfer acutance were obtained and compared to the observer responses. We introduce some new methods for normalizing data as well as for strengthening the statistical significance of the results. Our approach includes the use of latent mixed-effect models. We found statistically significant correlation with overall image quality and some of the spatial metrics, but correlations between psychophysical results and other objective metrics were weak or nonexistent. Strong correlation was found between psychophysical results of overall quality assessment and estimated price associated with quality. The photobook set of vendors reached higher image-quality ratings than the set of print-on-demand vendors. However, the photobook set had higher image-quality variability.

  8. Assessment of relevant hepatic steatosis in obese adolescents by rapid fat-selective GRE imaging with spatial-spectral excitation: a quantitative comparison with spectroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, Fabian; Schick, Fritz; Ehehalt, Stefan; Binder, Gerhard; Sommer, Julia; Ballweg, Verena; Machann, Juergen; Claussen, Claus D.

    2011-01-01

    To test the feasibility of fat-selective GRE imaging using a spectral-spatial excitation technique for determination of intrahepatic lipid content (IHL) in obese adolescents. Fat-selective MR imaging (1.5 T) was applied to record a single axial slice through a representative liver region within a single breath-hold. The sequence uses six equidistant slice-selective excitation pulses with binomial amplitude ratios to achieve high selectivity for lipid signals after appropriate shimming. IHL MRI content was quantified using signal intensity of adjacent subcutaneous adipose tissue. As the gold standard for IHL quantification, single-voxel stimulated echo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was applied. IHL MRS was quantified using the water peak as a reference. Forty-five MR examinations could be performed, and IHL MRS content ranged from 0.7% to 19.1%. Results from MRS and fat-selective imaging correlated well with Spearman coefficients between r = 0.78 and r = 0.86. There were no relevant regional differences in IHL within the liver parenchyma (p > 0.6359). Fat-selective imaging was able to reliably identify patients with IHL content above 5% with positive/negative likelihood ratio of 11.8 and 0.05, respectively. Fat-selective MR imaging provides both a reliable and a convenient method of rapidly quantifying IHL content in obese adolescents. (orig.)

  9. Assessment of relevant hepatic steatosis in obese adolescents by rapid fat-selective GRE imaging with spatial-spectral excitation: a quantitative comparison with spectroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Fabian; Schick, Fritz [University Hospital Tuebingen, Section on Experimental Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Ehehalt, Stefan; Binder, Gerhard [University Children' s Hospital Tuebingen, Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Tuebingen (Germany); Sommer, Julia; Ballweg, Verena; Machann, Juergen [University Hospital Tuebingen, Section on Experimental Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Claussen, Claus D. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    To test the feasibility of fat-selective GRE imaging using a spectral-spatial excitation technique for determination of intrahepatic lipid content (IHL) in obese adolescents. Fat-selective MR imaging (1.5 T) was applied to record a single axial slice through a representative liver region within a single breath-hold. The sequence uses six equidistant slice-selective excitation pulses with binomial amplitude ratios to achieve high selectivity for lipid signals after appropriate shimming. IHL{sub MRI} content was quantified using signal intensity of adjacent subcutaneous adipose tissue. As the gold standard for IHL quantification, single-voxel stimulated echo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was applied. IHL{sub MRS} was quantified using the water peak as a reference. Forty-five MR examinations could be performed, and IHL{sub MRS} content ranged from 0.7% to 19.1%. Results from MRS and fat-selective imaging correlated well with Spearman coefficients between r = 0.78 and r = 0.86. There were no relevant regional differences in IHL within the liver parenchyma (p > 0.6359). Fat-selective imaging was able to reliably identify patients with IHL content above 5% with positive/negative likelihood ratio of 11.8 and 0.05, respectively. Fat-selective MR imaging provides both a reliable and a convenient method of rapidly quantifying IHL content in obese adolescents. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging findings compared with histological findings of the labrum in hip osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanezaki, Shiho; Nakamura, Shigeru; Matsushita, Takashi; Yamamoto, Asako; Osawa, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Patients with disorders such as acetabular dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement are at risk of developing hip osteoartbritis. Assessment of the cartilage and labrum in the hip joint based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been challenging because of the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to its deep location, ball and socket structure, and small volume of those structures compared with the whole joint size. To achieve better imaging assessment, direct MR. arthrography (d-MRA) and other techniques such as T2* mapping, T2 mapping, Tlrho, and delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI (dGEMRIC) have been developed along with the increasing use of high-field MRI. In patients with no apparent osteoarthritic changes such as joint space narrowing or osteophyte and subchondral cyst formation on radiographs, these techniques can detect early cartilage or labral damage. A recently developed semiquantitative MRI-based scoring system for hip osteoarthritis includes evaluation of the labrum, and its application as a potential therapeutic monitoring tool is anticipated. The labrum shows pathological changes such as macroscopic hypertrophy and histological degeneration in hip osteoartbritis, but the pathological background is not well understood when evaluated by MRI. Kubo et al. compared radial MRI findings with histological changes of the labrum in ll hips with osteoarthritis using 1.5-T MRJ and found that fibrous separation and mucoid deposition occurred in the labrum with a ''diffuse high signal'' or ''obscure'' pattern. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have demonstrated a correlation between MRI fmdings and histological evidence of the severity of degeneration of the labrum. We hypothesized that radially reconstructed images of the acetabular labrum acquired by 3-T MRI can depict degenerative changes of the labrum. In this study, we sought to determine the correlation between MRI and histological findings of the

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging findings compared with histological findings of the labrum in hip osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanezaki, Shiho; Nakamura, Shigeru; Matsushita, Takashi [Teikyo University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Asako; Osawa, Marie [Teikyo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    Patients with disorders such as acetabular dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement are at risk of developing hip osteoartbritis. Assessment of the cartilage and labrum in the hip joint based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been challenging because of the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to its deep location, ball and socket structure, and small volume of those structures compared with the whole joint size. To achieve better imaging assessment, direct MR. arthrography (d-MRA) and other techniques such as T2* mapping, T2 mapping, Tlrho, and delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI (dGEMRIC) have been developed along with the increasing use of high-field MRI. In patients with no apparent osteoarthritic changes such as joint space narrowing or osteophyte and subchondral cyst formation on radiographs, these techniques can detect early cartilage or labral damage. A recently developed semiquantitative MRI-based scoring system for hip osteoarthritis includes evaluation of the labrum, and its application as a potential therapeutic monitoring tool is anticipated. The labrum shows pathological changes such as macroscopic hypertrophy and histological degeneration in hip osteoartbritis, but the pathological background is not well understood when evaluated by MRI. Kubo et al. compared radial MRI findings with histological changes of the labrum in ll hips with osteoarthritis using 1.5-T MRJ and found that fibrous separation and mucoid deposition occurred in the labrum with a ''diffuse high signal'' or ''obscure'' pattern. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have demonstrated a correlation between MRI fmdings and histological evidence of the severity of degeneration of the labrum. We hypothesized that radially reconstructed images of the acetabular labrum acquired by 3-T MRI can depict degenerative changes of the labrum. In this study, we sought to determine the correlation between MRI and histological findings of the

  12. Shell model and spectroscopic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poves, P.

    2007-01-01

    In these lectures, I introduce the notion of spectroscopic factor in the shell model context. A brief review is given of the present status of the large scale applications of the Interacting Shell Model. The spectroscopic factors and the spectroscopic strength are discussed for nuclei in the vicinity of magic closures and for deformed nuclei. (author)

  13. Comparative study of clinicopathological states and imaging diagnosis in patients with fatty liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariga, Hisayuki; Arakawa, Yasuyuki; Miyamoto, Masatoshi

    1985-01-01

    The authors clarified the characteristics of the clinicopathological states of 74 patients with the fatty liver classified by the etiology, simultaneously evaluating clinically the usefulness of imaging diagnosis with ultrasound and CT by the comparison of pathohistological findings(the rate of fat occupation in the liver). It was confirmed that, although the outcome of ultrasonic diagnosis was inferior to that of CT in the diagnostic capacity, the so-called bright liver finding was obtained, provided that the accumulation of fat in the liver was over Grade III (40 - 60 %), and that clinical diagnosis for fatty liver was possible. With CT, on the other hand, there was negative correlation between the degree of fat accumulation in the liver vs. the liver CT level and the CT ratio of the liver/spleen. Particularly, the CT ratio of the liver/spleen in this disease was 0.80 ± 0.18, indicating a significantly lower level as compared with 1.13 ± 0.13 in the control (p < 0.001). It is therefore suggested that, in patients in whom accumulation of fat in the liver is comparatively a lower level of Grade II (20 - 40 %), diagnosis for fatty liver by CT may be possible at a considerably high probability. Since these imaging diagnostic methods have been highly evaluated as non-invasive and convenient screening means of the fatty liver, it is important to establish the diagnostic criteria for graphic quantification of the fatty liver. (author)

  14. Stereoscopic Visualization of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Data: A Comparative Survey of Visualization Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raslan, O.; Debnam, J.M.; Ketonen, L.; Kumar, A.J.; Schellingerhout, D.; Wang, J.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data has traditionally been displayed as a gray scale functional anisotropy map (GSFM) or color coded orientation map (CCOM). These methods use black and white or color with intensity values to map the complex multidimensional DTI data to a two-dimensional image. Alternative visualization techniques, such as V m ax maps utilize enhanced graphical representation of the principal eigenvector by means of a headless arrow on regular non stereoscopic (VM) or stereoscopic display (VMS). A survey of clinical utility of patients with intracranial neoplasms was carried out by 8 neuro radiologists using traditional and nontraditional methods of DTI display. Pairwise comparison studies of 5 intracranial neoplasms were performed with a structured questionnaire comparing GSFM, CCOM, VM, and VMS. Six of 8 neuro radiologists favored V m ax maps over traditional methods of display (GSFM and CCOM). When comparing the stereoscopic (VMS) and the non-stereoscopic (VM) modes, 4 favored VMS, 2 favored VM, and 2 had no preference. In conclusion, processing and visualizing DTI data stereoscopically is technically feasible. An initial survey of users indicated that V m ax based display methodology with or without stereoscopic visualization seems to be preferred over traditional methods to display DTI data.

  15. Sedation with nitrous oxide compared with no sedation during catheterization for urologic imaging in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zier, Judith L.; Kvam, Kathryn A.; Kurachek, Stephen C.; Finkelstein, Marsha

    2007-01-01

    Various strategies to mitigate children's distress during voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) have been described. Sedation with nitrous oxide is comparable to that with oral midazolam for VCUG, but a side-by-side comparison of nitrous oxide sedation and routine care is lacking. The effects of sedation/analgesia using 70% nitrous oxide and routine care for VCUG and radionuclide cystography (RNC) were compared. A sample of 204 children 4-18 years of age scheduled for VCUG or RNC with sedation or routine care were enrolled in this prospective study. Nitrous oxide/oxygen (70%/30%) was administered during urethral catheterization to children in the sedated group. The outcomes recorded included observed distress using the Brief Behavioral Distress Score, self-reported pain, and time in department. The study included 204 patients (99 nonsedated, 105 sedated) with a median age of 6.3 years (range 4.0-15.2 years). Distress and pain scores were greater in nonsedated than in sedated patients (P < 0.001). Time in department was longer in the sedated group (90 min vs. 30 min); however, time from entry to catheterization in a non-imaging area accounted for most of the difference. There was no difference in radiologic imaging time. Sedation with nitrous oxide is effective in reducing distress and pain during catheterization for VCUG or RNC in children. (orig.)

  16. Comparative evaluation of an ultraviolet and an orthochromatic rare-earth imaging system for veterinary radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, C.R.; Wortman, J.A.; Lloyd, J.K.F.; Saunders, H.M.; Biery, D.N.; Rhodes, W.H.; Evans, S.M.; Walker, L.M.; Green, P.; Mendez-Aguillar, R.

    1995-01-01

    The relative quality and speed of a new ultraviolet-emitting screen, ultraviolet-sensitive film rare-earth system (DuPont Ultra-Vision) was compared to an orthochromatic rare-earth system (Kodak Lanex) in a clinical trial. Seven different sets of radiographs of a human foot phantom, or actual canine anatomical structures (tarsus, pelvis, skull, chest, abdomen) were evaluated independently by radiologists, radiology residents and technicians who were unaware of the screen/film combinations used. The 400-speed, Ultra-Vision Rapid/UVG screen/film combination produced superior image detail compared to blue/green emitting 400 and 200-speed screen/film combinations. The image detail of the Ultra-Vision Rapid/UVG system was nearly equivalent to that produced using a 100-speed, fine-detail blue/green emitting screen/film combination. A 200-speed Ultra-Vision system was also tested and produced thoracic and abdominal radiographs of equivalent to slightly superior quality than those produced using blue/green emitting system

  17. Arterial spin-labeling MR imaging in moyamoya disease compared with clinical assessments and other MR imaging finings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Tomoyuki, E-mail: tnogucci@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Kawashima, Masatou [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Nishihara, Masashi; Hirai, Tetsuyoshi [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Matsushima, Toshio [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Irie, Hiroyuki [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to identify the causal factors for the perfusion distribution obtained with ASL-MRI by comparing ASL-MRI with clinical information and other MRI findings in moyamoya disease. Methods: Seventy-one patients with moyamoya disease underwent ASL-MRI and other MRI, including fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging (FLAIR) and three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) on 3.0-Tesla MRI system. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) values (ASL values) for the cerebral hemispheres (142 sides) were measured on CBF maps generated by ASL-MRI. Relationships between the ASL values and the following 9 factors were assessed: sex, family history, revascularization surgery, age at MR exam, age at onset, the steno-occlusive severity on MRA (MRA score), degree of basal collaterals, degree of leptomeningeal high signal intensity seen on FLAIR, and size of ischemic or hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident lesion (CVA score). Results: Patients with a family history had significantly higher ASL values than those without such a history. There were significant negative correlations between ASL values and age at MR exam, MRA score, and CVA score. Conclusions: ASL-MRI may have cause-and-effect or mutual associations with family history, current patient age, size of CVA lesion, and intracranial arterial steno-occlusive severity in Moyamoya disease.

  18. Arterial spin-labeling MR imaging in moyamoya disease compared with clinical assessments and other MR imaging finings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Tomoyuki; Kawashima, Masatou; Nishihara, Masashi; Hirai, Tetsuyoshi; Matsushima, Toshio; Irie, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to identify the causal factors for the perfusion distribution obtained with ASL-MRI by comparing ASL-MRI with clinical information and other MRI findings in moyamoya disease. Methods: Seventy-one patients with moyamoya disease underwent ASL-MRI and other MRI, including fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging (FLAIR) and three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) on 3.0-Tesla MRI system. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) values (ASL values) for the cerebral hemispheres (142 sides) were measured on CBF maps generated by ASL-MRI. Relationships between the ASL values and the following 9 factors were assessed: sex, family history, revascularization surgery, age at MR exam, age at onset, the steno-occlusive severity on MRA (MRA score), degree of basal collaterals, degree of leptomeningeal high signal intensity seen on FLAIR, and size of ischemic or hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident lesion (CVA score). Results: Patients with a family history had significantly higher ASL values than those without such a history. There were significant negative correlations between ASL values and age at MR exam, MRA score, and CVA score. Conclusions: ASL-MRI may have cause-and-effect or mutual associations with family history, current patient age, size of CVA lesion, and intracranial arterial steno-occlusive severity in Moyamoya disease

  19. Comparative study of the macroscopic finding, conventional tomographic imaging, and computed tomographic imaging in locating the mandibular canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Moon; You, Dong Soo

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was comparison of conventional tomography with reformatted computed tomography for dental implant in locating the mandibular canal. Five dogs were used and after conventional tomographs and fitted computed tomographs were taken, four dentist traced all films. Mandibles were sectioned with 2 mm slice thickness and the sections were then radiographed (contact radiography). Each radiograpic image was traced and linear measurements were made from mandibular canal to alveolar crest, buccal cortex, lingual cortex, and inferior border. The following results were obtained; 1. Reformatted computed tomographs were exacter than conventional tomography by alveolar crest to canal length of -0.6 mm difference between real values and radiographs 2. The average measurements of buccal cortex to mandibular canal width and lingual cortex to mandibular canal width of conventional tomographs were exacter than reformatted computed tomographs, but standard deviations were higher than reformatted computed tomographs. 3. Standard deviations of reformatted computed tomographs were lower than conventional tomographs at all comparing sites 4. At reformatted computed tomography 62.5% of the measurements performed were within ±1 mm of the true value, and at conventional tomography 24.1% were. 5. Mandibular canal invisibility was 0.8% at reformatted computed tomography and 9.2% at conventional tomography. Reformatted computed tomography has been shown to be more useful radiographic technique for assessment of the mandibular canal than conventional tomography.

  20. Comparative methods for PET image segmentation in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Abdoli, Mehrsima [University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Fuentes, Carolina Llina [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); Naqa, Issam M.El [McGill University, Department of Medical Physics, Montreal (Canada)

    2012-05-15

    Several methods have been proposed for the segmentation of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in PET. In this study, we assessed the performance of four categories of {sup 18}F-FDG PET image segmentation techniques in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma using clinical studies where the surgical specimen served as the benchmark. Nine PET image segmentation techniques were compared including: five thresholding methods; the level set technique (active contour); the stochastic expectation-maximization approach; fuzzy clustering-based segmentation (FCM); and a variant of FCM, the spatial wavelet-based algorithm (FCM-SW) which incorporates spatial information during the segmentation process, thus allowing the handling of uptake in heterogeneous lesions. These algorithms were evaluated using clinical studies in which the segmentation results were compared to the 3-D biological tumour volume (BTV) defined by histology in PET images of seven patients with T3-T4 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent a total laryngectomy. The macroscopic tumour specimens were collected ''en bloc'', frozen and cut into 1.7- to 2-mm thick slices, then digitized for use as reference. The clinical results suggested that four of the thresholding methods and expectation-maximization overestimated the average tumour volume, while a contrast-oriented thresholding method, the level set technique and the FCM-SW algorithm underestimated it, with the FCM-SW algorithm providing relatively the highest accuracy in terms of volume determination (-5.9 {+-} 11.9%) and overlap index. The mean overlap index varied between 0.27 and 0.54 for the different image segmentation techniques. The FCM-SW segmentation technique showed the best compromise in terms of 3-D overlap index and statistical analysis results with values of 0.54 (0.26-0.72) for the overlap index. The BTVs delineated using the FCM-SW segmentation technique were seemingly the most accurate and approximated closely the 3-D BTVs

  1. Evaluation of combined near-IR spectroscopic (NIRS)-IVUS imaging as a means to detect lipid-rich plaque burden in human coronary autopsy specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jimmy L.; Grainger, Stephanie J.; Greiner, Cherry A.; Hendricks, Michael J.; Goode, Meghan M.; Saybolt, Matthew D.; Wilensky, Robert L.; Madden, Sean P.; Muller, James E.

    2016-02-01

    Intracoronary near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can identify lipid in the coronary arteries, but lacks depth resolution. A novel catheter is currently in clinical use that combines NIRS with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), which provides depth-resolved structural information via the IVUS modality. A measure designated as lipid-rich plaque burden (LRPB) has been proposed as a means to interpret the combined acoustic and optical information of NIRS-IVUS. LRPB is defined as the area created by the intersection of the NIRS lipid-rich arc with the corresponding IVUS-measured plaque burden. We determined the correlation in human coronary autopsy specimens between LRPB, a measure of lipid presence and extent available via intravascular imaging in patients, and the area of lipid-rich plaque as determined by the gold-standard of histology. Fifteen artery segments from 8 human autopsy hearts were imaged with the NIRS-IVUS system (TVC Imaging System, Infraredx Inc., Burlington, MA). Arteries were imaged in a specialty fixture that assured accurate co-registration between imaging and histology. The arteries were then fixed and divided into 2 mm blocks for histological staining. Pathological contouring of lipid-rich areas was performed on the stained thin sections for 54 lipid-rich blocks. Computation of LRPB was performed on transverse NIRS-IVUS frames corresponding to the histologic sections. The quantified LRPB was frequently higher than the lipid-rich plaque area determined by histology, because the region denoted by the EEL and lumen within the NIRS lipid-rich arc is not entirely comprised of lipid. Overall, a moderate to strong correlation (R = 0.73) was found between LRPB determined by NIRS-IVUS imaging and the lipid-rich plaque area determined by histology. LRPB, which can be measured in patients with NIRS-IVUS imaging, corresponds to the amount of lipid-rich plaque in a coronary artery. LRPB should be evaluated in prospective clinical trials for its ability to

  2. Field, Laboratory and Imaging spectroscopic Analysis of Landslide, Debris Flow and Flood Hazards in Lacustrine, Aeolian and Alluvial Fan Deposits Surrounding the Salton Sea, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, B. E.; Hooper, D. M.; Mars, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    recently flooded channels, as well as coarse-grained hyper-concentrated flow deposits that leave sorted (dark) heavy mineral concentrate behind. These observations, as well as supporting spectroscopic and change detection studies, will allow us to evaluate such hazards in this and similar inter-montane pluvial basins around the world.

  3. COMPAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuefner, K.

    1976-01-01

    COMPAR works on FORTRAN arrays with four indices: A = A(i,j,k,l) where, for each fixed k 0 ,l 0 , only the 'plane' [A(i,j,k 0 ,l 0 ), i = 1, isub(max), j = 1, jsub(max)] is held in fast memory. Given two arrays A, B of this type COMPAR has the capability to 1) re-norm A and B ind different ways; 2) calculate the deviations epsilon defined as epsilon(i,j,k,l): =[A(i,j,k,l) - B(i,j,k,l)] / GEW(i,j,k,l) where GEW (i,j,k,l) may be chosen in three different ways; 3) calculate mean, standard deviation and maximum in the array epsilon (by several intermediate stages); 4) determine traverses in the array epsilon; 5) plot these traverses by a printer; 6) simplify plots of these traverses by the PLOTEASY-system by creating input data blocks for this system. The main application of COMPAR is given (so far) by the comparison of two- and three-dimensional multigroup neutron flux-fields. (orig.) [de

  4. Three-dimensional volume rendering of the ankle based on magnetic resonance images enables the generation of images comparable to real anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Bruschetta, Daniele; Trimarchi, Fabio; Ielitro, Giuseppe; Cammaroto, Simona; Duca, Antonio; Bramanti, Placido; Favaloro, Angelo; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2009-11-01

    We have applied high-quality medical imaging techniques to study the structure of the human ankle. Direct volume rendering, using specific algorithms, transforms conventional two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance image (MRI) series into 3D volume datasets. This tool allows high-definition visualization of single or multiple structures for diagnostic, research, and teaching purposes. No other image reformatting technique so accurately highlights each anatomic relationship and preserves soft tissue definition. Here, we used this method to study the structure of the human ankle to analyze tendon-bone-muscle relationships. We compared ankle MRI and computerized tomography (CT) images from 17 healthy volunteers, aged 18-30 years (mean 23 years). An additional subject had a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon. The MRI images demonstrated superiority in overall quality of detail compared to the CT images. The MRI series accurately rendered soft tissue and bone in simultaneous image acquisition, whereas CT required several window-reformatting algorithms, with loss of image data quality. We obtained high-quality digital images of the human ankle that were sufficiently accurate for surgical and clinical intervention planning, as well as for teaching human anatomy. Our approach demonstrates that complex anatomical structures such as the ankle, which is rich in articular facets and ligaments, can be easily studied non-invasively using MRI data.

  5. A comparative study between magnetic resonance imaging and histological findings of bone and soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Koichi

    1995-01-01

    Diagnostic methodology for bone and soft tissue tumors has made great strides recently through the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we report a comparative assessment of the histological findings of bone and soft tissue tumors with MRI from 212 cases. The accuracy of a qualitative diagnosis was observed in a solitary bone cyst, enchondroma, giant cell tumor, chondrosarcoma, lipoma, hemangioma, neurinoma, and in a synovial cyst. However, the qualitative diagnosis of a malignant tumor was difficult because of the variety of the intratumoral histological changes. An enhanced-image using Gd-DTPA was useful for differentiation of the viable region in the internal area of a tumor, discrimination of the reactive zone of an edema or assessing vascularity, and for discrimination between a cyst and a solid tumor. Based on comparison with findings from the excised specimen, it was found that histological changes such as calcification, fibrosis, hemorrhaging and necrosis, and the presence or absence of a tumor capsule had been reflected accurately on MR images. However, infiltration of the tumor into the bone cortex and into the articular cartilage were found frequently to be false-positive on MRI. Although problems remained to be solved regarding the evaluation of the presence or absence of tumor infiltration into adjacent tissue, the depiction of periosteal reaction, and regarding differentiation from inflammatory disease, MRI was a very useful information source for operative planning because it could evaluate the relationship between the tumor and adjacent blood vessels or nerves, the effect of preoperative therapy, and effectively discriminate between benign and malignant tumors. (author)

  6. An observer study comparing spot imaging regions selected by radiologists and a computer for an automated stereo spot mammography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lydick, Justin T.; Gandra, Chaitanya R.; Chen, Nelson G.; Helvie, Mark A.; Bailey, Janet E.; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Paramagul, Chintana; Blane, Caroline E.; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas A.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing an automated stereo spot mammography technique for improved imaging of suspicious dense regions within digital mammograms. The technique entails the acquisition of a full-field digital mammogram, automated detection of a suspicious dense region within that mammogram by a computer aided detection (CAD) program, and acquisition of a stereo pair of images with automated collimation to the suspicious region. The latter stereo spot image is obtained within seconds of the original full-field mammogram, without releasing the compression paddle. The spot image is viewed on a stereo video display. A critical element of this technique is the automated detection of suspicious regions for spot imaging. We performed an observer study to compare the suspicious regions selected by radiologists with those selected by a CAD program developed at the University of Michigan. True regions of interest (TROIs) were separately determined by one of the radiologists who reviewed the original mammograms, biopsy images, and histology results. We compared the radiologist and computer-selected regions of interest (ROIs) to the TROIs. Both the radiologists and the computer were allowed to select up to 3 regions in each of 200 images (mixture of 100 CC and 100 MLO views). We computed overlap indices (the overlap index is defined as the ratio of the area of intersection to the area of interest) to quantify the agreement between the selected regions in each image. The averages of the largest overlap indices per image for the 5 radiologist-to-computer comparisons were directly related to the average number of regions per image traced by the radiologists (about 50% for 1 region/image, 84% for 2 regions/image and 96% for 3 regions/image). The average of the overlap indices with all of the TROIs was 73% for CAD and 76.8%+/-10.0% for the radiologists. This study indicates that the CAD determined ROIs could potentially be useful for a screening technique that includes stereo spot

  7. A Comparative Study of Improved Artificial Bee Colony Algorithms Applied to Multilevel Image Thresholding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjana Charansiriphaisan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilevel thresholding is a highly useful tool for the application of image segmentation. Otsu’s method, a common exhaustive search for finding optimal thresholds, involves a high computational cost. There has been a lot of recent research into various meta-heuristic searches in the area of optimization research. This paper analyses and discusses using a family of artificial bee colony algorithms, namely, the standard ABC, ABC/best/1, ABC/best/2, IABC/best/1, IABC/rand/1, and CABC, and some particle swarm optimization-based algorithms for searching multilevel thresholding. The strategy for an onlooker bee to select an employee bee was modified to serve our purposes. The metric measures, which are used to compare the algorithms, are the maximum number of function calls, successful rate, and successful performance. The ranking was performed by Friedman ranks. The experimental results showed that IABC/best/1 outperformed the other techniques when all of them were applied to multilevel image thresholding. Furthermore, the experiments confirmed that IABC/best/1 is a simple, general, and high performance algorithm.

  8. Chronic pelvic pain: how does noninvasive imaging compare with diagnostic laparoscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirlapur, Seema A; Daniels, Jane P; Khan, Khalid S

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) has an annual prevalence of 38/1000 in the UK, with coexisting pathologies often present. Diagnostic laparoscopy has long been the gold standard diagnostic test, but with up to 40% showing no abnormality, we explore the value of noninvasive imaging, such as pelvic ultrasound and MRI. A literature review from inception until January 2015 of the following databases: PubMed, MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Excerpta Medica database, and System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe were performed to identify published studies assessing the usefulness of ultrasound, MRI, and laparoscopy in the diagnosis of CPP. Three studies (194 women) addressed their comparative performance in patients with endometriosis, showing the sensitivity of ultrasound ranged between 58 and 88.5%; MRI was 56-91.5% and in the one study using histology as its reference standard, the sensitivity of laparoscopy was 85.7%. Noninvasive imaging has the additional benefit of being well tolerated, safer, and cheaper than surgery. CPP, by nature of its multifactorial causation, can be difficult to manage and often requires a multidisciplinary team. Ultrasound and MRI may provide information about the presence or lack of abnormality, which would allow general practitioners or office gynaecologists to initiate treatment and think about surgery as a second-line investigative tool.

  9. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging in recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, U.; Wuerstlin, S.; Frank-Raue, K.; Raue, F.; Hehrmann, R.; Iser, G.; Scholz, M.; Guhl, L.; Buhr, H.J.; Bihl, H.

    1993-01-01

    In a prospective study, 18 patients with recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the neck and mediastinum and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with 111 In-labeled pentetreotide. In nine patients with macroscopic MTC, 17 corresponding lesions were found on MRI and SRS; in addition, 13 suspicious lesions were seen on SRS only. Histological confirmation was available for 19 metastatic lesions, showing MRI to be true positive in 13 metastases, SRS in 18. In minimal residual disease (n=10), MRI and SRS were compared with the histological findings in three patients and with selective venous catheterization (SVC) in seven patients. Corresponding findings on MRI and SVC were seen in one of seven, whereas SRS and SVC showed concordant localization of tumor recurrence in five of seven. Histological examination demonstrated MTC tissue in one of three cases; MRI and SRS were false positive in one of three cases, while in the others the interpretation remained uncertain. In conclusion, SRS is a promising imaging modality for localization of MTC recurrence. MRI provides better spatial resolution and thus facilitates the planning of surgery for macroscopic metastases. In minimal residual disease, SRS turned out to be superior in detecting occult MTC recurrence, confirming SVC findings. (orig.)

  10. Comparative silicone breast implant evaluation using mammography, sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging: experience with 59 implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, C Y; DeBruhl, N D; Gorczyca, D P; Shaw, W W; Bassett, L W

    1994-10-01

    With the current controversy regarding the safety of silicone implants, the detection and evaluation of implant rupture are causing concern for both plastic surgeons and patients. Our study obtained comparative value analysis of mammography, sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of silicone implant rupture. Twenty-nine symptomatic patients (total of 59 silicone implants) were entered into the study. Intraoperative findings revealed 21 ruptured implants (36 percent). During physical examination, a positive "squeeze test" was highly suggestive of implant rupture. Mammograms were obtained of 51 implants (sensitivity 11 percent, specificity 89 percent). Sonography was performed on 57 implants (sensitivity 70 percent, specificity 92 percent). MRI was performed on 55 implants (sensitivity 81 percent, specificity 92 percent). Sonographically, implant rupture is demonstrated by the "stepladder sign." Double-lumen implants may appear as false-positive results for rupture on sonography. On MRI, the "linguine sign" represents disrupted fragments of a ruptured implant. The most reliable imaging modality for implant rupture detection is MRI, followed by sonogram. Mammogram is the least reliable. Our study supports the clinical indication and diagnostic value of sonogram and MRI in the evaluation of symptomatic breast implant patients.

  11. An experimental comparative study of radiography, ultrasonography and CT imaging in the IV catheter fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to detect the fragments generated during IV (intravenous) catheter injection of contrast medium and drug administration in a clinical setting and removal was performed by experimentally producing a phantom, and to compare the radiography, ultrasonography, and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) imaging and radiation dose. A 1 cm fragment of an 18 gage Teflon® IV catheter with saline was inserted into the IV control line. Radiography, CT, and ultrasonography were performed and radiography and CT dose were calculated. CT and ultrasonography showed an IV catheter fragment clinically and radiography showed no visible difference in the ability to provide a useful image of an IV catheter fragment modality (p >.05). Radiography of effective dose (0.2139 mSv·Gy-1·cm-2) form DAP DAP (0.93 μGy·m2 ), and dose length product (DLP) (201 mGy·cm) to effective dose was calculated as 0.483 mSv. IV catheter fragment were detected of radiography, ultrasonography and CT. These results can be obtained by menas of an excellent IV catheter fragment of detection capability CT. However, CT is followed by radiation exposure. IV catheter fragment confirming the position and information recommend an ultrasonography

  12. The image evaluation of iterative motion correction reconstruction algorithm PROPELLER T2-weighted imaging compared with MultiVane T2-weighted imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk-Jun; Yu, Seung-Man

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness and clinical applications of MultiVaneXD which was applying iterative motion correction reconstruction algorithm T2-weighted images compared with MultiVane images taken with a 3T MRI. A total of 20 patients with suspected pathologies of the liver and pancreatic-biliary system based on clinical and laboratory findings underwent upper abdominal MRI, acquired using the MultiVane and MultiVaneXD techniques. Two reviewers analyzed the MultiVane and MultiVaneXD T2-weighted images qualitatively and quantitatively. Each reviewer evaluated vessel conspicuity by observing motion artifacts and the sharpness of the portal vein, hepatic vein, and upper organs. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated by one reviewer for quantitative analysis. The interclass correlation coefficient was evaluated to measure inter-observer reliability. There were significant differences between MultiVane and MultiVaneXD in motion artifact evaluation. Furthermore, MultiVane was given a better score than MultiVaneXD in abdominal organ sharpness and vessel conspicuity, but the difference was insignificant. The reliability coefficient values were over 0.8 in every evaluation. MultiVaneXD (2.12) showed a higher value than did MultiVane (1.98), but the difference was insignificant ( p = 0.135). MultiVaneXD is a motion correction method that is more advanced than MultiVane, and it produced an increased SNR, resulting in a greater ability to detect focal abdominal lesions.

  13. Quantitative characterization of chitosan in the skin by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic imaging and ninhydrin assay: application in transdermal sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, A; Wong, T W

    2016-07-01

    The chitosan has been used as the primary excipient in transdermal particulate dosage form design. Its distribution pattern across the epidermis and dermis is not easily accessible through chemical assay and limited to radiolabelled molecules via quantitative autoradiography. This study explored Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy imaging technique with built-in microscope as the means to examine chitosan molecular distribution over epidermis and dermis with the aid of histology operation. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy skin imaging was conducted using chitosan of varying molecular weights, deacetylation degrees, particle sizes and zeta potentials, obtained via microwave ligation of polymer chains at solution state. Both skin permeation and retention characteristics of chitosan increased with the use of smaller chitosan molecules with reduced acetyl content and size, and increased positive charge density. The ratio of epidermal to dermal chitosan content decreased with the use of these chitosan molecules as their accumulation in dermis (3.90% to 18.22%) was raised to a greater extent than epidermis (0.62% to 1.92%). A larger dermal chitosan accumulation nonetheless did not promote the transdermal polymer passage more than the epidermal chitosan. A small increase in epidermal chitosan content apparently could fluidize the stratum corneum and was more essential to dictate molecular permeation into dermis and systemic circulation. The histology technique aided Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy imaging approach introduces a new dimension to the mechanistic aspect of chitosan in transdermal delivery. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  14. Comparative in vivo mucoadhesion studies of thiomer formulations using magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, K; Greindl, M; Kremser, C; Wolf, C; Debbage, P; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2006-09-28

    The aim of this study was to compare different oral delivery systems based on the thiolated polymer polycarbophil-cysteine (PCP-Cys) and to provide evidence for the validity of the hypothesis that unhydrated polymers provide better mucoadhesion in vivo. To achieve dry polymer application, a new, experimental dosage form named Eutex (made of Eudragit L100-55 and latex) capsule has been developed. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to localize the point of release of the thiolated polymer from the application forms via the positive magnetic resonance signal from a gadolinium complex (Gd-DTPA). In vivo mucoadhesion was determined by ascertaining the residence time of the fluorescence-tagged thiomer on intestinal mucosa after 3 h. Results showed that in comparison to conventional application forms the Eutex capsules led to 1.9-fold higher mucoadhesive properties of PCP-Cys when compared to application with a conventional enteric-coated capsule, and to 1.4-fold higher mucoadhesion when compared to administration with an enteric-coated tablet of the thiomer. The findings of this study should contribute to the understanding of mucoadhesion and mucoadhesion influencing parameters in vivo and should therefore be of considerable interest for the development of future mucoadhesive oral drug delivery dosage forms.

  15. Evaluating and comparing imaging techniques: a review and classification of study designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    The design of studies to evaluate and compare imaging techniques are reviewed. Thirteen principles for the design of studies of diagnostic accuracy are given. Because of the 'independence principle' these studies are not able directly to evaluate the contribution of a technique to clinical management. For the latter, the 'clinical value' study design is recommended. A classification of study designs is proposed in parallel with the standard classification of clinical trials. Studies of diagnostic accuracy are analogous to Phase II, whereas studies evaluating the contribution to clinical management correspond to the Phase III category. Currently the majority of published studies employ the Phase II design. More emphasis on Phase III studies is required. (author)

  16. COMPARING IMAGE-BASED METHODS FOR ASSESSING VISUAL CLUTTER IN GENERALIZED MAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Touya

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Map generalization abstracts and simplifies geographic information to derive maps at smaller scales. The automation of map generalization requires techniques to evaluate the global quality of a generalized map. The quality and legibility of a generalized map is related to the complexity of the map, or the amount of clutter in the map, i.e. the excessive amount of information and its disorganization. Computer vision research is highly interested in measuring clutter in images, and this paper proposes to compare some of the existing techniques from computer vision, applied to generalized maps evaluation. Four techniques from the literature are described and tested on a large set of maps, generalized at different scales: edge density, subband entropy, quad tree complexity, and segmentation clutter. The results are analyzed against several criteria related to generalized maps, the identification of cluttered areas, the preservation of the global amount of information, the handling of occlusions and overlaps, foreground vs background, and blank space reduction.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging compared with trimodal evoked potentials in possible multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roullet, E.; Leger-Ravet, M.B.; Amarenco, P.; Marteau, R.; Lavallard-Rousseau, M.-C.; Dupuch, K.; Iba-Zizen, M.T.; Tamraz, J.; Cabanis, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain and Evoked Potentials (EP) can both demonstrate the presence of clinically unsuspected demyelinating lesions and have proven to be sensitive (but not specific) in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). MRI and EP are positive in 90 to 100% of patients with a definite diagnosis of MS. However, few studies have been conducted in patients with a lesser diagnostic certainty. In possible or suspected MS they gave conflicting results, possibly because of technical discrepancies and different clinical inclusion criteria. Since a number of putative new treatments can be evaluated in patients who have a definite diagnosis of MS, but nevertheless a short duration of disease and a low disability, it was decided to compare the sensitivity of MRI and EP as diagnostic tools in possible MS patients. MRI is shown to be more sensitive, shows more multiple lesions and gives a clearer appreciation of their size and exact location than EP. 10 refs.; 3 tabs

  18. Metabolite-cycled density-weighted concentric rings k-space trajectory (DW-CRT) enables high-resolution 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging at 3-Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Adam; Chiew, Mark; Jezzard, Peter; Voets, Natalie L; Plaha, Puneet; Thomas, Michael Albert; Stagg, Charlotte J; Emir, Uzay E

    2018-05-17

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is a promising technique in both experimental and clinical settings. However, to date, MRSI has been hampered by prohibitively long acquisition times and artifacts caused by subject motion and hardware-related frequency drift. In the present study, we demonstrate that density weighted concentric ring trajectory (DW-CRT) k-space sampling in combination with semi-LASER excitation and metabolite-cycling enables high-resolution MRSI data to be rapidly acquired at 3 Tesla. Single-slice full-intensity MRSI data (short echo time (TE) semi-LASER TE = 32 ms) were acquired from 6 healthy volunteers with an in-plane resolution of 5 × 5 mm in 13 min 30 sec using this approach. Using LCModel analysis, we found that the acquired spectra allowed for the mapping of total N-acetylaspartate (median Cramer-Rao Lower Bound [CRLB] = 3%), glutamate+glutamine (8%), and glutathione (13%). In addition, we demonstrate potential clinical utility of this technique by optimizing the TE to detect 2-hydroxyglutarate (long TE semi-LASER, TE = 110 ms), to produce relevant high-resolution metabolite maps of grade III IDH-mutant oligodendroglioma in a single patient. This study demonstrates the potential utility of MRSI in the clinical setting at 3 Tesla.

  19. Pathologic contrast enhancement of cerebral lesions: A comparative study using stereotactic CT, stereotactic MR imaging, and stereotactic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earnest, F. IV; Kelly, P.J.; Scheithauer, B.; Kall, B.; Cascino, T.L.; Ehman, R.L.; Forbes, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author compared the pattern and degree of Gd-DTPA dimeglumine contrast enhancement demonstrated on stereotactic MR images with that seen on stereotactic CT images obtained after conventional iodinated contrast agent enhancement and with histopathologic findings on sequential stereotactic brain biopsies. Stereotactic biopsies of the areas that enhanced on CT or MR imaging revealed tumor tissue with neovascularity. Tumor tissue with no or mild neovascularity did not enhance with contrast agent administration. Isolated tumor cells were frequently found beyond the margins of some primary brain neoplasms defined by contrast agent-enhanced MR imaging and CT. The histopathologic findings associated with pathologic contrast agent enhancement are presented

  20. Interatrial septum pacing decreases atrial dyssynchrony on strain rate imaging compared with right atrial appendage pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuoka, Yoshinori; Abe, Haruhiko; Umekawa, Seiko; Katsuki, Keiko; Tanaka, Norio; Araki, Ryo; Imanaka, Takahiro; Matsutera, Ryo; Morisawa, Daisuke; Kitada, Hirokazu; Hattori, Susumu; Noda, Yoshiki; Adachi, Hidenori; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Miyatake, Kunio

    2011-03-01

    Interatrial septum pacing (IAS-P) decreases atrial conduction delay compared with right atrial appendage pacing (RAA-P). We evaluate the atrial contraction with strain rate of tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) during sinus activation or with IAS-P or RAA-P. Fifty-two patients with permanent pacemaker for sinus node disease were enrolled in the study. Twenty-three subjects were with IAS-P and 29 with RAA-P. The time from end-diastole to peak end-diastolic strain rate was measured and corrected with RR interval on electrocardiogram. It was defined as the time from end-diastole to peak end-diastolic strain rate (TSRc), and the balance between maximum and minimum TSRc at three sites (ΔTSRc) was compared during sinus activation and with pacing rhythm in each group. There were no significant differences observed in general characteristics and standard echocardiographic parameters except the duration of pacing P wave between the two groups. The duration was significantly shorter in the IAS-P group compared with the RAA-P group (95 ± 34 vs 138 ± 41; P = 0.001). TSRc was significantly different between sinus activation and pacing rhythm (36.3 ± 35.7 vs 61.6 ± 36.3; P = 0.003) in the RAA-P group, whereas no significant differences were observed in the IAS-P group (25.4 ± 12.1 vs 27.7 ± 14.7; NS). During the follow-up (mean 2.4 ± 0.7 years), the incidence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) conversion to permanent AF was not significantly different between the two groups. IAS-P decreased the contraction delay on atrial TDI compared to RAA-P; however, it did not contribute to the reduction of AF incidence in the present study. ©2010, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Diagnosis of alveolar and root fractures: an in vitro study comparing CBCT imaging with periapical radiographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange KOBAYASHI-VELASCO

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare periapical radiograph (PR and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT in the diagnosis of alveolar and root fractures. Material and Methods Sixty incisor teeth (20 higid and 40 with root fracture from dogs were inserted in 60 anterior alveolar sockets (40 higid and 20 with alveolar fracture of 15 macerated canine maxillae. Each fractured socket had a root fractured tooth inserted in it. Afterwards, each maxilla was submitted to PR in two different vertical angulation incidences, and to CBCT imaging with a small field of view (FOV and high-definition protocol. Images were randomized and posteriorly analyzed by two oral and maxillofacial radiologists two times, with a two-week interval between observations. Results Sensitivity and specificity values were good for root fractures for PR and CBCT. For alveolar fractures, sensitivity ranged from 0.10 to 0.90 for PR and from 0.50 to 0.65 for CBCT. Specificity for alveolar fractures showed lower results than for root fractures for PR and CBCT. Areas under the ROC curve showed good results for both PR and CBCT for root fractures. However, results were fair for both PR and CBCT for alveolar fractures. When submitted to repeated measures ANOVA tests, there was a statistically significant difference between PR and CBCT for root fractures. Root fracture intraobserver agreement ranged from 0.90 to 0.93, and alveolar fracture intraobserver agreement ranged from 0.30 to 0.57. Interobserver agreement results were substantial for root fractures and poor/fair for alveolar fractures (0.11 for PR and 0.30 for CBCT. Conclusion Periapical radiograph with two different vertical angulations may be considered an accurate method to detect root fractures. However, PR showed poorer results than CBCT for the diagnosis of alveolar fractures. When no fractures are diagnosed in PR and the patient describes pain symptoms, the subsequent exam of choice is CBCT.

  2. Supporting Imagers' VOICE: A National Training Program in Comparative Effectiveness Research and Big Data Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Stella K; Rawson, James V; Recht, Michael P

    2017-12-05

    Provided methodologic training, more imagers can contribute to the evidence basis on improved health outcomes and value in diagnostic imaging. The Value of Imaging Through Comparative Effectiveness Research Program was developed to provide hands-on, practical training in five core areas for comparative effectiveness and big biomedical data research: decision analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, evidence synthesis, big data principles, and applications of big data analytics. The program's mixed format consists of web-based modules for asynchronous learning as well as in-person sessions for practical skills and group discussion. Seven diagnostic radiology subspecialties and cardiology are represented in the first group of program participants, showing the collective potential for greater depth of comparative effectiveness research in the imaging community. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Spectroscopic methods for characterization of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    Spectroscopic techniques have contributed immensely in the characterisation and speciation of materials relevant to a variety of applications. These techniques have time tested credentials and continue to expand into newer areas. In the field of nuclear fuel fabrication, atomic spectroscopic methods are used for monitoring the trace metallic constituents in the starting materials and end product, and for monitoring process pick up. The current status of atomic spectroscopic methods for the determination of trace metallic constituents in nuclear fuel materials will be briefly reviewed and new approaches will be described with a special emphasis on inductively coupled plasma techniques and ETV-ICP-AES hyphenated techniques. Special emphasis will also be given in highlighting the importance of chemical separation procedures for the optimum utilization of potential of ICP. The presentation will also include newer techniques like Photo Acoustic Spectroscopy, and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Imaging. PAS results on uranium and plutonium oxides will be described with a reference to the determination of U 4+ /U 6+ concentration in U 3 O 8 . EPR imaging techniques for speciation and their spatial distribution in solids will be described and its potential use for Gd 3+ containing UO 2 pellets (used for flux flattening) will be highlighted. (author)

  4. SU-E-J-89: Comparative Analysis of MIM and Velocity’s Image Deformation Algorithm Using Simulated KV-CBCT Images for Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, K; Narayanasamy, G; Obediat, M; Stanley, D; Stathakis, S; Kirby, N [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Cancer Therapy and Research Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Kim, H [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deformable image registration (DIR) is used routinely in the clinic without a formalized quality assurance (QA) process. Using simulated deformations to digitally deform images in a known way and comparing to DIR algorithm predictions is a powerful technique for DIR QA. This technique must also simulate realistic image noise and artifacts, especially between modalities. This study developed an algorithm to create simulated daily kV cone-beam computed-tomography (CBCT) images from CT images for DIR QA between these modalities. Methods: A Catphan and physical head-and-neck phantom, with known deformations, were used. CT and kV-CBCT images of the Catphan were utilized to characterize the changes in Hounsfield units, noise, and image cupping that occur between these imaging modalities. The algorithm then imprinted these changes onto a CT image of the deformed head-and-neck phantom, thereby creating a simulated-CBCT image. CT and kV-CBCT images of the undeformed and deformed head-and-neck phantom were also acquired. The Velocity and MIM DIR algorithms were applied between the undeformed CT image and each of the deformed CT, CBCT, and simulated-CBCT images to obtain predicted deformations. The error between the known and predicted deformations was used as a metric to evaluate the quality of the simulated-CBCT image. Ideally, the simulated-CBCT image registration would produce the same accuracy as the deformed CBCT image registration. Results: For Velocity, the mean error was 1.4 mm for the CT-CT registration, 1.7 mm for the CT-CBCT registration, and 1.4 mm for the CT-simulated-CBCT registration. These same numbers were 1.5, 4.5, and 5.9 mm, respectively, for MIM. Conclusion: All cases produced similar accuracy for Velocity. MIM produced similar values of accuracy for CT-CT registration, but was not as accurate for CT-CBCT registrations. The MIM simulated-CBCT registration followed this same trend, but overestimated MIM DIR errors relative to the CT

  5. SU-E-J-89: Comparative Analysis of MIM and Velocity’s Image Deformation Algorithm Using Simulated KV-CBCT Images for Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, K; Narayanasamy, G; Obediat, M; Stanley, D; Stathakis, S; Kirby, N; Kim, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Deformable image registration (DIR) is used routinely in the clinic without a formalized quality assurance (QA) process. Using simulated deformations to digitally deform images in a known way and comparing to DIR algorithm predictions is a powerful technique for DIR QA. This technique must also simulate realistic image noise and artifacts, especially between modalities. This study developed an algorithm to create simulated daily kV cone-beam computed-tomography (CBCT) images from CT images for DIR QA between these modalities. Methods: A Catphan and physical head-and-neck phantom, with known deformations, were used. CT and kV-CBCT images of the Catphan were utilized to characterize the changes in Hounsfield units, noise, and image cupping that occur between these imaging modalities. The algorithm then imprinted these changes onto a CT image of the deformed head-and-neck phantom, thereby creating a simulated-CBCT image. CT and kV-CBCT images of the undeformed and deformed head-and-neck phantom were also acquired. The Velocity and MIM DIR algorithms were applied between the undeformed CT image and each of the deformed CT, CBCT, and simulated-CBCT images to obtain predicted deformations. The error between the known and predicted deformations was used as a metric to evaluate the quality of the simulated-CBCT image. Ideally, the simulated-CBCT image registration would produce the same accuracy as the deformed CBCT image registration. Results: For Velocity, the mean error was 1.4 mm for the CT-CT registration, 1.7 mm for the CT-CBCT registration, and 1.4 mm for the CT-simulated-CBCT registration. These same numbers were 1.5, 4.5, and 5.9 mm, respectively, for MIM. Conclusion: All cases produced similar accuracy for Velocity. MIM produced similar values of accuracy for CT-CT registration, but was not as accurate for CT-CBCT registrations. The MIM simulated-CBCT registration followed this same trend, but overestimated MIM DIR errors relative to the CT

  6. SSGSS: THE SPITZER–SDSS–GALEX SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dowd, Matthew J.; Schiminovich, David; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Treyer, Marie A.; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted K.; Charlot, Stéphane; Heckman, Timothy M.; Martins, Lucimara P.; Seibert, Mark; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey (SSGSS) provides a new sample of 101 star-forming galaxies at z < 0.2 with unprecedented multi-wavelength coverage. New mid- to far-infrared spectroscopy from the Spitzer Space Telescope is added to a rich suite of previous imaging and spectroscopy, including ROSAT, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and Spitzer/SWIRE. Sample selection ensures an even coverage of the full range of normal galaxy properties, spanning two orders of magnitude in stellar mass, color, and dust attenuation. In this paper we present the SSGSS data set, describe the science drivers, and detail the sample selection, observations, data reduction, and quality assessment. Also in this paper, we compare the shape of the thermal continuum and the degree of silicate absorption of these typical, star-forming galaxies to those of starburst galaxies. We investigate the link between star formation rate, infrared luminosity, and total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon luminosity, with a view to calibrating the latter for spectral energy distribution models in photometric samples and at high redshift. Last, we take advantage of the 5-40 μm spectroscopic and far-infrared photometric coverage of this sample to perform detailed fitting of the Draine et al. dust models, and investigate the link between dust mass and star formation history and active galactic nucleus properties.

  7. The Design and Implementation in $0.13\\mu m$ CMOS of an Algorithm Permitting Spectroscopic Imaging with High Spatial Resolution for Hybrid Pixel Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ballabriga, Rafael; Vilasís-Cardona, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Advances in pixel detector technology are opening up new possibilities in many fields of science. Modern High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments use pixel detectors in tracking systems where excellent spatial resolution, precise timing and high signal-to-noise ratio are required for accurate and clean track reconstruction. Many groups are working worldwide to adapt the hybrid pixel technology to other fields such as medical X-ray radiography, protein structure analysis or neutron imaging. The Medipix3 chip is a 256x256 channel hybrid pixel detector readout chip working in Single Photon Counting Mode. It has been developed with a new front-end architecture aimed at eliminating the spectral distortion produced by charge diffusion in highly segmented semiconductor detectors. In the new architecture neighbouring pixels communicate with one another. Charges can be summed event-by-event and the incoming quantum can be assigned as a single hit to the pixel with the biggest charge deposit. In the case where incoming X-...

  8. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopic imaging in patients with MRI-negative extratemporal epilepsy: correlation with ictal onset zone and histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krsek, Pavel; Komarek, Vladimir [Charles University, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Second Medical School, Motol Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic); Hajek, Milan [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Prague (Czech Republic); Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, MR Spectroscopy, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Dezortova, Monika; Jiru, Filip; Skoch, Antonin [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Prague (Czech Republic); Marusic, Petr [Charles University, Department of Neurology, Second Medical School, Motol Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic); Zamecnik, Josef [Charles University, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Second Medical School, Motol Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic); Kyncl, Martin [Charles University, Department of Radiology, Second Medical School, Motol Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic); Tichy, Michal [Charles University, Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Second Medical School, Motol Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2007-08-15

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) is beneficial in the lateralization of the epileptogenic zone in temporal lobe epilepsy; however, its role in extratemporal and, especially, MRI-negative epilepsy has not been established. This study seeks to verify how {sup 1}H MRS could help in localizing the epileptogenic zone in patients with MRI-negative extratemporal epilepsy. Seven patients (8-23 years) with MRI-negative refractory focal epilepsy were studied using {sup 1}H MRS on a 1.5T MR system. Chemical shift imaging sequence in the transversal plane was directed towards the suspected epileptogenic zone localized by seizure semiology, scalp video/EEG, ictal SPECT and {sup 18}FDG-PET. Spectra were evaluated using the program CULICH, and the coefficient of asymmetry was used for quantitative lateralization. MRS detected lateralization in all patients and was able to localize pathology in five. The most frequent findings were decreased ratios of N-acetylaspartate to choline compounds characterized by increasing choline concentration. The localization of the {sup 1}H MRS abnormality correlated well with ictal SPECT and subdural mapping. In all cases, histopathological analysis revealed MRI-undetected focal cortical dysplasias. {sup 1}H MRS could be more sensitive for the detection of discrete malformations of cortical development than conventional MRI. It is valuable in the presurgical evaluation of patients without MRI-apparent lesions. (orig.)

  9. Dual-energy compared to single-energy CT in pediatric imaging: a phantom study for DECT clinical guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Servaes, Sabah; Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, The Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McCullough, William P. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mecca, Patricia [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Dual-energy CT technology is available on scanners from several vendors and offers significant advantages over classic single-energy CT technology in multiple clinical applications. Many studies have detailed dual-energy CT applications in adults and several have evaluated the relative radiation dose performance of dual-energy CT in adult imaging. However, little has been published on dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population, and the relative dose performance of dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population is not well described. When evaluating dual-energy CT technology for implementation into a routine clinical pediatric imaging practice, the radiation dose implications must be considered, and when comparing relative CT dose performance, image quality must also be evaluated. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop dual-energy CT scan protocols based on our optimized single-energy scan protocols and compare the dose. We scanned the head, chest and abdomen regions of pediatric-size anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts, using our optimized single-energy clinical imaging protocols on a Siemens Flash {sup registered} CT scanner. We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. The effective CT dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol}) of the scans was used as a surrogate for relative dose in comparing the single- and dual-energy scans. Additionally, we evaluated image quality using visual assessment and contrast-to-noise ratio. Dual-energy CT scans of the head and abdomen were dose-neutral for all three phantoms. Dual-energy CT scans of the chest showed a relative dose increase over the single-energy scan for 1- and 5-year-old child-based age-equivalent phantoms, ranging 11-20%. Quantitative analysis of image quality showed no statistically significant difference in image quality between the single-energy and dual-energy scans. There was no clinically significant difference in image quality by

  10. Dual-energy compared to single-energy CT in pediatric imaging: a phantom study for DECT clinical guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Servaes, Sabah; Darge, Kassa; McCullough, William P.; Mecca, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy CT technology is available on scanners from several vendors and offers significant advantages over classic single-energy CT technology in multiple clinical applications. Many studies have detailed dual-energy CT applications in adults and several have evaluated the relative radiation dose performance of dual-energy CT in adult imaging. However, little has been published on dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population, and the relative dose performance of dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population is not well described. When evaluating dual-energy CT technology for implementation into a routine clinical pediatric imaging practice, the radiation dose implications must be considered, and when comparing relative CT dose performance, image quality must also be evaluated. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop dual-energy CT scan protocols based on our optimized single-energy scan protocols and compare the dose. We scanned the head, chest and abdomen regions of pediatric-size anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts, using our optimized single-energy clinical imaging protocols on a Siemens Flash "r"e"g"i"s"t"e"r"e"d CT scanner. We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. The effective CT dose index volume (CTDI_v_o_l) of the scans was used as a surrogate for relative dose in comparing the single- and dual-energy scans. Additionally, we evaluated image quality using visual assessment and contrast-to-noise ratio. Dual-energy CT scans of the head and abdomen were dose-neutral for all three phantoms. Dual-energy CT scans of the chest showed a relative dose increase over the single-energy scan for 1- and 5-year-old child-based age-equivalent phantoms, ranging 11-20%. Quantitative analysis of image quality showed no statistically significant difference in image quality between the single-energy and dual-energy scans. There was no clinically significant difference in image quality

  11. Ultrasonography compared to magnetic resonance imaging in thyroid-associated Graves' ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlainich, Ana R.; Romaldini, Joao H.; Pedro, Ana B.; Farah, Chady S.; Sinisgalli Junior, Cicero A., E-mail: anavlainich@uol.com.b [Hospital do Servidor Publico Estadual de Sao Paulo (IAMSPE), SP (Brazil)

    2011-04-15

    Objective: to compare ultrasonography (US) to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the clinical activity score (CAS) in Graves' ophthalmopathy. Subjects and methods: Nineteen patients underwent extraocular muscle thickness measurements by US and MRI, reflectivity by US and signal-intensity ratio by MRI. There were also twelve US control subjects. Results: US median thicknesses were greater than in controls. Correlation was found between US and MRI in the median thickness of the left eye rectus medial muscle as well as between signal-intensity ratio (SIR) and thickness by US. An inverse correlation was found between reflectivity and SIR in the inferior and lateral rectus. On associating the tests for detecting activity the best results were obtained with CAS plus MRI (sensitivity 75%), and US and MRI (positive predictive value 77% and specificity 80%). Conclusion: CAS and US results showed poor correlation with MRI results suggesting that they cannot replace each other but when combined these methods can improve the evaluation of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy. (author)

  12. Ultrasonography compared to magnetic resonance imaging in thyroid-associated Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlainich, Ana R.; Romaldini, Joao H.; Pedro, Ana B.; Farah, Chady S.; Sinisgalli Junior, Cicero A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to compare ultrasonography (US) to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the clinical activity score (CAS) in Graves' ophthalmopathy. Subjects and methods: Nineteen patients underwent extraocular muscle thickness measurements by US and MRI, reflectivity by US and signal-intensity ratio by MRI. There were also twelve US control subjects. Results: US median thicknesses were greater than in controls. Correlation was found between US and MRI in the median thickness of the left eye rectus medial muscle as well as between signal-intensity ratio (SIR) and thickness by US. An inverse correlation was found between reflectivity and SIR in the inferior and lateral rectus. On associating the tests for detecting activity the best results were obtained with CAS plus MRI (sensitivity 75%), and US and MRI (positive predictive value 77% and specificity 80%). Conclusion: CAS and US results showed poor correlation with MRI results suggesting that they cannot replace each other but when combined these methods can improve the evaluation of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy. (author)

  13. Comparing subjective image quality measurement methods for the creation of public databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redi, Judith; Liu, Hantao; Alers, Hani; Zunino, Rodolfo; Heynderickx, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    The Single Stimulus (SS) method is often chosen to collect subjective data testing no-reference objective metrics, as it is straightforward to implement and well standardized. At the same time, it exhibits some drawbacks; spread between different assessors is relatively large, and the measured ratings depend on the quality range spanned by the test samples, hence the results from different experiments cannot easily be merged . The Quality Ruler (QR) method has been proposed to overcome these inconveniences. This paper compares the performance of the SS and QR method for pictures impaired by Gaussian blur. The research goal is, on one hand, to analyze the advantages and disadvantages of both methods for quality assessment and, on the other, to make quality data of blur impaired images publicly available. The obtained results show that the confidence intervals of the QR scores are narrower than those of the SS scores. This indicates that the QR method enhances consistency across assessors. Moreover, QR scores exhibit a higher linear correlation with the distortion applied. In summary, for the purpose of building datasets of subjective quality, the QR approach seems promising from the viewpoint of both consistency and repeatability.

  14. Compression of Multispectral Images with Comparatively Few Bands Using Posttransform Tucker Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, data compression for the multispectral charge-coupled device (CCD images with comparatively few bands (MSCFBs is done independently on each multispectral channel. This compression codec is called a “monospectral compressor.” The monospectral compressor does not have a removing spectral redundancy stage. To fill this gap, we propose an efficient compression approach for MSCFBs. In our approach, the one dimensional discrete cosine transform (1D-DCT is performed on spectral dimension to exploit the spectral information, and the posttransform (PT in 2D-DWT domain is performed on each spectral band to exploit the spatial information. A deep coupling approach between the PT and Tucker decomposition (TD is proposed to remove residual spectral redundancy between bands and residual spatial redundancy of each band. Experimental results on multispectral CCD camera data set show that the proposed compression algorithm can obtain a better compression performance and significantly outperforms the traditional compression algorithm-based TD in 2D-DWT and 3D-DCT domain.

  15. Application of the ROC method to assessment of image quality issues in mammography. Part 2. Comparative evaluation of image quality and radiation dose to thick body sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.; Saebel, M.

    2000-01-01

    For the experimental comparative assessment reported, the following radiation qualities were compared for radiation dose applied and image quality: molydenum anode, 30mum molybdenum filter, X-ray tube potential differences of 26-32 kV; molybdenum anode, 25 mum rhodium filter, X-ray tube potential differences of 26-32 kV; tungsten anode, 50 mum rhodium filter, X-ray tube potential differences of 26-32 kV. The results show that in the differentiated assessment according to the various radiation qualities, significant deviations in imaging quality of the different detail types are possible. (orig./CB) [de

  16. Evaluation of the Lactate-to-N-Acetyl-aspartate Ratio Defined With Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging Before Radiation Therapy as a New Predictive Marker of the Site of Relapse in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deviers, Alexandra [Département de Radiothérapie, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); UMR (Unité Mixte de Recherche) 825, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse (France); INP (Institut National Polytechnique), ENVT (Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire de Toulouse), Unité d' Anatomie-Imagerie-Embryologie, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Ken, Soléakhéna [Département de Radiothérapie, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); UMR (Unité Mixte de Recherche) 825, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas [Bureau des Etudes Cliniques, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Rowland, Benjamin; Laruelo, Andrea [Département de Radiothérapie, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Catalaa, Isabelle; Lubrano, Vincent [UMR (Unité Mixte de Recherche) 825, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse (France); Hôpital de Rangueil, CHU (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire) de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Celsis, Pierre [UMR (Unité Mixte de Recherche) 825, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse (France); and others

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Because lactate accumulation is considered a surrogate for hypoxia and tumor radiation resistance, we studied the spatial distribution of the lactate-to-N-acetyl-aspartate ratio (LNR) before radiation therapy (RT) with 3D proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (3D-{sup 1}H-MRSI) and assessed its impact on local tumor control in glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with newly diagnosed GBM included in a phase 2 chemoradiation therapy trial constituted our database. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRSI data before RT were evaluated and correlated to MRI data at relapse. The optimal threshold for tumor-associated LNR was determined with receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of the pre-RT LNR values and MRI characteristics of the tumor. This threshold was used to segment pre-RT normalized LNR maps. Two spatial analyses were performed: (1) a pre-RT volumetric comparison of abnormal LNR areas with regions of MRI-defined lesions and a choline (Cho)-to- N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratio ≥2 (CNR2); and (2) a voxel-by-voxel spatial analysis of 4,186,185 voxels with the intention of evaluating whether pre-RT abnormal LNR areas were predictive of the site of local recurrence. Results: A LNR of ≥0.4 (LNR-0.4) discriminated between tumor-associated and normal LNR values with 88.8% sensitivity and 97.6% specificity. LNR-0.4 voxels were spatially different from those of MRI-defined lesions, representing 44% of contrast enhancement, 64% of central necrosis, and 26% of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) abnormality volumes before RT. They extended beyond the overlap with CNR2 for most patients (median: 20 cm{sup 3}; range: 6-49 cm{sup 3}). LNR-0.4 voxels were significantly predictive of local recurrence, regarded as contrast enhancement at relapse: 71% of voxels with a LNR-0.4 before RT were contrast enhanced at relapse versus 10% of voxels with a normal LNR (P<.01). Conclusions: Pre-RT LNR-0.4 in GBM

  17. THE PLERIONIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G21.5-0.9 POWERED BY PSR J1833-1034: NEW SPECTROSCOPIC AND IMAGING RESULTS REVEALED WITH THE CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheson, Heather; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2010-01-01

    In 1999, the Chandra X-ray Observatory revealed a 150'' radius halo surrounding the 40'' radius pulsar wind nebula (PWN) G21.5-0.9. A 2005 imaging study of G21.5-0.9 showed that the halo is limb-brightened and suggested that this feature is a candidate for the long-sought supernova remnant (SNR) shell. We present a spectral analysis of SNR G21.5-0.9, using the longest effective observation to date (578.6 ks with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and 278.4 ks with the High-Resolution Camera (HRC)) to study unresolved questions about the spectral nature of remnant features, such as the limb brightening of the X-ray halo and the bright knot in the northern part of the halo. The Chandra analysis favors the non-thermal interpretation of the limb. Its spectrum is fit well with a power-law model with a photon index Γ = 2.13 (1.94-2.33) and a luminosity of L x (0.5-8 keV) = (2.3 ± 0.6) x 10 33 erg s -1 (at an assumed distance of 5.0 kpc). An srcut model was also used to fit the spectrum between the radio and X-ray energies. While the absence of a shell in the radio still prohibits constraining the spectrum at radio wavelengths, we assume a range of spectral indices to infer the 1 GHz flux density and the rolloff frequency of the synchrotron spectrum in X-rays and find that the maximum energy to which electrons are accelerated at the shock ranges from ∼60 to 130 TeV (B/10 μG) -1/2 , where B is the magnetic field in units of μG. For the northern knot, we constrain previous models and find that a two-component power-law (or srcut) + pshock model provides an adequate fit, with the pshock model requiring a very low ionization timescale and solar abundances for Mg and Si. Our spectroscopic study of PSR J1833-1034, the highly energetic pulsar powering G21.5-0.9, shows that its spectrum is dominated by hard non-thermal X-ray emission with some evidence of a thermal component that represents ∼9% of the observed non-thermal emission and that suggests non

  18. Comparing the brand image of two market leading pram brands - Bugaboo and Emmaljunga

    OpenAIRE

    Huttula, Tia; Nurminen, Peppi-Sisko

    2017-01-01

    Brand image is one of the most significant factors affecting the success of brands. Information channels have a large impact on brand images, but there is many other aspects on branding. Bugaboo and Emmaljunga are pram brands with different brand image. Emmaljunga is and old and traditional brand, whereas Bugaboo is a new and trendy brand. The case company Lastentarvike is selling Emmaljunga and helps with this research. The main objectives of the thesis project are to study how pra...

  19. Evaluation of low-energy contrast-enhanced spectral mammography images by comparing them to full-field digital mammography using EUREF image quality criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalji, U C; Jeukens, C R L P N; Houben, I; Nelemans, P J; van Engen, R E; van Wylick, E; Beets-Tan, R G H; Wildberger, J E; Paulis, L E; Lobbes, M B I

    2015-10-01

    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) examination results in a low-energy (LE) and contrast-enhanced image. The LE appears similar to a full-field digital mammogram (FFDM). Our aim was to evaluate LE CESM image quality by comparing it to FFDM using criteria defined by the European Reference Organization for Quality Assured Breast Screening and Diagnostic Services (EUREF). A total of 147 cases with both FFDM and LE images were independently scored by two experienced radiologists using these (20) EUREF criteria. Contrast detail measurements were performed using a dedicated phantom. Differences in image quality scores, average glandular dose, and contrast detail measurements between LE and FFDM were tested for statistical significance. No significant differences in image quality scores were observed between LE and FFDM images for 17 out of 20 criteria. LE scored significantly lower on one criterion regarding the sharpness of the pectoral muscle (p < 0.001), and significantly better on two criteria on the visualization of micro-calcifications (p = 0.02 and p = 0.034). Dose and contrast detail measurements did not reveal any physical explanation for these observed differences. Low-energy CESM images are non-inferior to FFDM images. From this perspective FFDM can be omitted in patients with an indication for CESM. • Low-energy CESM images are non-inferior to FFDM images. • Micro-calcifications are significantly more visible on LE CESM than on FFDM. • There is no physical explanation for this improved visibility of micro-calcifications. • There is no need for an extra FFDM when CESM is indicated.

  20. A comparative study of three-dimensional reconstructive images of temporomandibular joint using computed tomogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Suk Young; Koh, Kwang Joon

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the spatial relationship of temporomandibular joint and to an aid in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder. For this study, three-dimensional images of normal temporomandibular joint were reconstructed by computer image analysis system and three-dimensional reconstructive program integrated in computed tomography. The obtained results were as follows : 1. Two-dimensional computed tomograms had the better resolution than three dimensional computed tomograms in the evaluation of bone structure and the disk of TMJ. 2. Direct sagittal computed tomograms and coronal computed tomograms had the better resolution in the evaluation of the disk of TMJ. 3. The positional relationship of the disk could be visualized, but the configuration of the disk could not be clearly visualized on three-dimensional reconstructive CT images. 4. Three-dimensional reconstructive CT images had the smoother margin than three-dimensional images reconstructed by computer image analysis system, but the images of the latter had the better perspective. 5. Three-dimensional reconstructive images had the better spatial relationship of the TMJ articulation, and the joint space were more clearly visualized on dissection images.