WorldWideScience

Sample records for spectral bipartitioning approach

  1. Co-clustering Analysis of Weblogs Using Bipartite Spectral Projection Approach

    Xu, Guandong; Zong, Yu; Dolog, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Web clustering is an approach for aggregating Web objects into various groups according to underlying relationships among them. Finding co-clusters of Web objects is an interesting topic in the context of Web usage mining, which is able to capture the underlying user navigational interest...... and content preference simultaneously. In this paper we will present an algorithm using bipartite spectral clustering to co-cluster Web users and pages. The usage data of users visiting Web sites is modeled as a bipartite graph and the spectral clustering is then applied to the graph representation of usage...... data. The proposed approach is evaluated by experiments performed on real datasets, and the impact of using various clustering algorithms is also investigated. Experimental results have demonstrated the employed method can effectively reveal the subset aggregates of Web users and pages which...

  2. Integration of Phenotypic Metadata and Protein Similarity in Archaea Using a Spectral Bipartitioning Approach

    Hooper, Sean D.; Anderson, Iain J; Pati, Amrita; Dalevi, Daniel; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    In order to simplify and meaningfully categorize large sets of protein sequence data, it is commonplace to cluster proteins based on the similarity of those sequences. However, it quickly becomes clear that the sequence flexibility allowed a given protein varies significantly among different protein families. The degree to which sequences are conserved not only differs for each protein family, but also is affected by the phylogenetic divergence of the source organisms. Clustering techniques that use similarity thresholds for protein families do not always allow for these variations and thus cannot be confidently used for applications such as automated annotation and phylogenetic profiling. In this work, we applied a spectral bipartitioning technique to all proteins from 53 archaeal genomes. Comparisons between different taxonomic levels allowed us to study the effects of phylogenetic distances on cluster structure. Likewise, by associating functional annotations and phenotypic metadata with each protein, we could compare our protein similarity clusters with both protein function and associated phenotype. Our clusters can be analyzed graphically and interactively online.

  3. Quantum trajectory approach to the geometric phase: open bipartite systems

    Yi, X X; Liu, D P; Wang, W

    2005-01-01

    Through the quantum trajectory approach, we calculate the geometric phase acquired by a bipartite system subjected to decoherence. The subsystems that compose the bipartite system interact with each other and then are entangled in the evolution. The geometric phase due to the quantum jump for both the bipartite system and its subsystems is calculated and analysed. As an example, we present two coupled spin-1/2 particles to detail the calculations

  4. Effect of bipartition on spectral properties of nanorings

    Gutiérrez, W.; García, L.F.; Mikhailov, I.D.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a special topological transformation on the energy levels, far-infrared spectra and magnetization of one electron inside a semiconductor nanoring under magnetic fields are studied. We have called this transformation as bipartition, and it is defined by a change in ring topological structure, when its shape is changed successively from a single oval-shaped loop up to quasi-two disconnected loops. Our results show that in the course of such transformation the low-lying energies dependencies with multiple crossovers between them, typical for the free electron rotation along an almost circular loop, are converted into a set of non-crossing double plaits related to a sub-barrier electron tunneling along a strongly non-circular loop in a quasi-local state. Also, we find that during the restructuring of the oval-shaped nanostructures the selection rules for the dipole transitions are changed allowing the appearance of additional peaks in the FIR spectrum

  5. iBGP: A Bipartite Graph Propagation Approach for Mobile Advertising Fraud Detection

    Hu, Jinlong; Liang, Junjie; Dong, Shoubin

    2017-01-01

    Online mobile advertising plays a vital financial role in supporting free mobile apps, but detecting malicious apps publishers who generate fraudulent actions on the advertisements hosted on their apps is difficult, since fraudulent traffic often mimics behaviors of legitimate users and evolves rapidly. In this paper, we propose a novel bipartite graph-based propagation approach, iBGP, for mobile apps advertising fraud detection in large advertising system. We exploit the characteristics of m...

  6. iBGP: A Bipartite Graph Propagation Approach for Mobile Advertising Fraud Detection

    Jinlong Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Online mobile advertising plays a vital financial role in supporting free mobile apps, but detecting malicious apps publishers who generate fraudulent actions on the advertisements hosted on their apps is difficult, since fraudulent traffic often mimics behaviors of legitimate users and evolves rapidly. In this paper, we propose a novel bipartite graph-based propagation approach, iBGP, for mobile apps advertising fraud detection in large advertising system. We exploit the characteristics of mobile advertising user’s behavior and identify two persistent patterns: power law distribution and pertinence and propose an automatic initial score learning algorithm to formulate both concepts to learn the initial scores of non-seed nodes. We propose a weighted graph propagation algorithm to propagate the scores of all nodes in the user-app bipartite graphs until convergence. To extend our approach for large-scale settings, we decompose the objective function of the initial score learning model into separate one-dimensional problems and parallelize the whole approach on an Apache Spark cluster. iBGP was applied on a large synthetic dataset and a large real-world mobile advertising dataset; experiment results demonstrate that iBGP significantly outperforms other popular graph-based propagation methods.

  7. Latent geometry of bipartite networks

    Kitsak, Maksim; Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2017-03-01

    Despite the abundance of bipartite networked systems, their organizing principles are less studied compared to unipartite networks. Bipartite networks are often analyzed after projecting them onto one of the two sets of nodes. As a result of the projection, nodes of the same set are linked together if they have at least one neighbor in common in the bipartite network. Even though these projections allow one to study bipartite networks using tools developed for unipartite networks, one-mode projections lead to significant loss of information and artificial inflation of the projected network with fully connected subgraphs. Here we pursue a different approach for analyzing bipartite systems that is based on the observation that such systems have a latent metric structure: network nodes are points in a latent metric space, while connections are more likely to form between nodes separated by shorter distances. This approach has been developed for unipartite networks, and relatively little is known about its applicability to bipartite systems. Here, we fully analyze a simple latent-geometric model of bipartite networks and show that this model explains the peculiar structural properties of many real bipartite systems, including the distributions of common neighbors and bipartite clustering. We also analyze the geometric information loss in one-mode projections in this model and propose an efficient method to infer the latent pairwise distances between nodes. Uncovering the latent geometry underlying real bipartite networks can find applications in diverse domains, ranging from constructing efficient recommender systems to understanding cell metabolism.

  8. Bipartite Networks

    Agneessens, F.; Moser, C.; Barnett, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Bipartite networks refer to a specific kind of network in which the nodes (or actors) can be partitioned into two subsets based on the fact that no links exist between actors within each subset, but only between the two subsets. Due to the partition of actors in two sets and the absence of relations

  9. Bipartite Networks of Wikipediaʼs Articles and Authors: a Meso-level Approach

    Jesus, Rut; Hansen-Schwartz, Martin; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study investigates the bipartite network of articles linked by common editors in Wikipedia, 'The Free Encyclopedia that Anyone Can Edit'. We use the articles in the categories (to depth three) of Physics and Philosophy and extract and focus on significant editors (at least 7 or 10...

  10. Inferring monopartite projections of bipartite networks: an entropy-based approach

    Saracco, Fabio; Straka, Mika J.; Di Clemente, Riccardo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Caldarelli, Guido; Squartini, Tiziano

    2017-05-01

    Bipartite networks are currently regarded as providing a major insight into the organization of many real-world systems, unveiling the mechanisms driving the interactions occurring between distinct groups of nodes. One of the most important issues encountered when modeling bipartite networks is devising a way to obtain a (monopartite) projection on the layer of interest, which preserves as much as possible the information encoded into the original bipartite structure. In the present paper we propose an algorithm to obtain statistically-validated projections of bipartite networks, according to which any two nodes sharing a statistically-significant number of neighbors are linked. Since assessing the statistical significance of nodes similarity requires a proper statistical benchmark, here we consider a set of four null models, defined within the exponential random graph framework. Our algorithm outputs a matrix of link-specific p-values, from which a validated projection is straightforwardly obtainable, upon running a multiple hypothesis testing procedure. Finally, we test our method on an economic network (i.e. the countries-products World Trade Web representation) and a social network (i.e. MovieLens, collecting the users’ ratings of a list of movies). In both cases non-trivial communities are detected: while projecting the World Trade Web on the countries layer reveals modules of similarly-industrialized nations, projecting it on the products layer allows communities characterized by an increasing level of complexity to be detected; in the second case, projecting MovieLens on the films layer allows clusters of movies whose affinity cannot be fully accounted for by genre similarity to be individuated.

  11. Bipartite binomial heaps

    Elmasry, Amr; Jensen, Claus; Katajainen, Jyrki

    2017-01-01

    the (total) number of elements stored in the data structure(s) prior to the operation. As the resulting data structure consists of two components that are different variants of binomial heaps, we call it a bipartite binomial heap. Compared to its counterpart, a multipartite binomial heap, the new structure...

  12. MRI findings in bipartite patella

    Kavanagh, Eoin C.; Zoga, Adam; Omar, Imran; Ford, Stephanie; Eustace, Stephen; Schweitzer, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Bipartite patella is a known cause of anterior knee pain. Our purpose was to detail the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of bipartite patella in a retrospective cohort of patients imaged at our institution. MRI exams from 53 patients with findings of bipartite patella were evaluated to assess for the presence of bone marrow edema within the bipartite fragment and for the presence of abnormal signal across the synchondrosis or pseudarthrosis. Any other significant knee pathology seen at MRI was also recorded. We also reviewed 400 consecutive knee MRI studies to determine the MRI prevalence of bipartite patella. Of the 53 patients with bipartite patella 40 (75%) were male; 35 (66%) had edema within the bipartite fragment. Of the 18 with no edema an alternative explanation for knee pain was found in 13 (72%). Edema within the bipartite fragment was the sole finding in 26 of 53 (49%) patients. Bipartite patella was seen in 3 (0.7%) of 400 patients. In patients with bipartite patella at knee MRI, bone marrow edema within the bipartite fragment was the sole finding on knee MRI in almost half of the patients in our series. (orig.)

  13. Groupies in random bipartite graphs

    Yilun Shang

    2010-01-01

    A vertex $v$ of a graph $G$ is called a groupie if its degree is notless than the average of the degrees of its neighbors. In thispaper we study the influence of bipartition $(B_1,B_2)$ on groupiesin random bipartite graphs $G(B_1,B_2,p)$ with both fixed $p$ and$p$ tending to zero.

  14. Perioperative management of facial bipartition surgery

    Caruselli M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Marco Caruselli,1 Michael Tsapis,1,2 Fabrice Ughetto,1 Gregoire Pech-Gourg,3 Dario Galante,4 Olivier Paut1 1Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, La Timone Children’s Hospital, 2Pediatric Transport Team, SAMU 13, La Timone Hospital, 3Pediatric Neurosurgery Unit, La Timone Children’s Hospital, Marseille, France; 4Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital Ospedali Riuniti of Foggia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Severe craniofacial malformations, such as Crouzon, Apert, Saethre-Chotzen, and Pfeiffer syndromes, are very rare conditions (one in 50,000/100,000 live births that often require corrective surgery. Facial bipartition is the more radical corrective surgery. It is a high-risk intervention and needs complex perioperative management and a multidisciplinary approach. Keywords: craniofacial surgery, facial bipartition surgery, craniofacial malformations, pediatric anesthesia

  15. Order and correlations in genomic DNA sequences. The spectral approach

    Lobzin, Vasilii V; Chechetkin, Vladimir R

    2000-01-01

    The structural analysis of genomic DNA sequences is discussed in the framework of the spectral approach, which is sufficiently universal due to the reciprocal correspondence and mutual complementarity of Fourier transform length scales. The spectral characteristics of random sequences of the same nucleotide composition possess the property of self-averaging for relatively short sequences of length M≥100-300. Comparison with the characteristics of random sequences determines the statistical significance of the structural features observed. Apart from traditional applications to the search for hidden periodicities, spectral methods are also efficient in studying mutual correlations in DNA sequences. By combining spectra for structure factors and correlation functions, not only integral correlations can be estimated but also their origin identified. Using the structural spectral entropy approach, the regularity of a sequence can be quantitatively assessed. A brief introduction to the problem is also presented and other major methods of DNA sequence analysis described. (reviews of topical problems)

  16. A Bayesian approach to spectral quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    Pulkkinen, A; Kaipio, J P; Tarvainen, T; Cox, B T; Arridge, S R

    2014-01-01

    A Bayesian approach to the optical reconstruction problem associated with spectral quantitative photoacoustic tomography is presented. The approach is derived for commonly used spectral tissue models of optical absorption and scattering: the absorption is described as a weighted sum of absorption spectra of known chromophores (spatially dependent chromophore concentrations), while the scattering is described using Mie scattering theory, with the proportionality constant and spectral power law parameter both spatially-dependent. It is validated using two-dimensional test problems composed of three biologically relevant chromophores: fat, oxygenated blood and deoxygenated blood. Using this approach it is possible to estimate the Grüneisen parameter, the absolute chromophore concentrations, and the Mie scattering parameters associated with spectral photoacoustic tomography problems. In addition, the direct estimation of the spectral parameters is compared to estimates obtained by fitting the spectral parameters to estimates of absorption, scattering and Grüneisen parameter at the investigated wavelengths. It is shown with numerical examples that the direct estimation results in better accuracy of the estimated parameters. (papers)

  17. Fractal and multifractal analyses of bipartite networks

    Liu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jian; Yu, Zu-Guo; Xie, Xian-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Bipartite networks have attracted considerable interest in various fields. Fractality and multifractality of unipartite (classical) networks have been studied in recent years, but there is no work to study these properties of bipartite networks. In this paper, we try to unfold the self-similarity structure of bipartite networks by performing the fractal and multifractal analyses for a variety of real-world bipartite network data sets and models. First, we find the fractality in some bipartite networks, including the CiteULike, Netflix, MovieLens (ml-20m), Delicious data sets and (u, v)-flower model. Meanwhile, we observe the shifted power-law or exponential behavior in other several networks. We then focus on the multifractal properties of bipartite networks. Our results indicate that the multifractality exists in those bipartite networks possessing fractality. To capture the inherent attribute of bipartite network with two types different nodes, we give the different weights for the nodes of different classes, and show the existence of multifractality in these node-weighted bipartite networks. In addition, for the data sets with ratings, we modify the two existing algorithms for fractal and multifractal analyses of edge-weighted unipartite networks to study the self-similarity of the corresponding edge-weighted bipartite networks. The results show that our modified algorithms are feasible and can effectively uncover the self-similarity structure of these edge-weighted bipartite networks and their corresponding node-weighted versions.

  18. Spectrally balanced chromatic landing approach lighting system

    Chase, W. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Red warning lights delineate the runway approach with additional blue lights juxtaposed with the red lights such that the red lights are chromatically balanced. The red/blue point light sources result in the phenomenon that the red lights appear in front of the blue lights with about one and one-half times the diameter of the blue. To a pilot observing these lights along a glide path, those red lights directly below appear to be nearer than the blue lights. For those lights farther away seen in perspective at oblique angles, the red lights appear to be in a position closer to the pilot and hence appear to be above the corresponding blue lights. This produces a very pronounced three dimensional effect referred to as chromostereopsis which provides valuable visual cues to enable the pilot to perceive his actual position above the ground and the actual distance to the runway.

  19. Asymptotic convertibility of entanglement: An information-spectrum approach to entanglement concentration and dilution

    Jiao, Yong; Wakakuwa, Eyuri; Ogawa, Tomohiro

    2018-02-01

    We consider asymptotic convertibility of an arbitrary sequence of bipartite pure states into another by local operations and classical communication (LOCC). We adopt an information-spectrum approach to address cases where each element of the sequences is not necessarily a tensor power of a bipartite pure state. We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the LOCC convertibility of one sequence to another in terms of spectral entropy rates of entanglement of the sequences. Based on these results, we also provide simple proofs for previously known results on the optimal rates of entanglement concentration and dilution of general sequences of bipartite pure states.

  20. Searching for Communities in Bipartite Networks

    Barber, Michael J.; Faria, Margarida; Streit, Ludwig; Strogan, Oleg

    2008-01-01

    Bipartite networks are a useful tool for representing and investigating interaction networks. We consider methods for identifying communities in bipartite networks. Intuitive notions of network community groups are made explicit using Newman's modularity measure. A specialized version of the modularity, adapted to be appropriate for bipartite networks, is presented; a corresponding algorithm is described for identifying community groups through maximizing this measure. The algorithm is applie...

  1. Bone-scintigraphy in painful bipartite patella

    Iossifidis, A.; Brueton, R.N.; Nunan, T.O.

    1995-01-01

    Although, the use of technetium scintigraphy in the assessment of anterior knee pain has been described, no reference has been made to the scintigraphic appearances of painful bipartite patella. We report the scintigraphic-appearances of painful bipartite patella in 25-year-old man a 2 1/2 years history of unexplained patellar pain. Painful bipartite patella is a rare cause of chronic post-traumatic patellar pain. Bone scintigraphy, by demonstrating increased uptake by the painful accessory bipartite fragment, appears to be an imaging method of choice in the diagnosis of this condition. (orig./MG)

  2. An Objective Approach to Identify Spectral Distinctiveness for Hearing Impairment

    Yeou-Jiunn Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate the process of developing speech perception, speech-language pathologists have to teach a subject with hearing loss the differences between two syllables by manually enhancing acoustic cues of speech. However, this process is time consuming and difficult. Thus, this study proposes an objective approach to automatically identify the regions of spectral distinctiveness between two syllables, which is used for speech-perception training. To accurately represent the characteristics of speech, mel-frequency cepstrum coefficients are selected as analytical parameters. The mismatch between two syllables in time domain is handled by dynamic time warping. Further, a filter bank is adopted to estimate the components in different frequency bands, which are also represented as mel-frequency cepstrum coefficients. The spectral distinctiveness in different frequency bands is then easily estimated by using Euclidean metrics. Finally, a morphological gradient operator is applied to automatically identify the regions of spectral distinctiveness. To evaluate the proposed approach, the identified regions are manipulated and then the manipulated syllables are measured by a close-set based speech-perception test. The experimental results demonstrated that the identified regions of spectral distinctiveness are very useful in speech perception, which indeed can help speech-language pathologists in speech-perception training.

  3. A spectral approach for discrete dislocation dynamics simulations of nanoindentation

    Bertin, Nicolas; Glavas, Vedran; Datta, Dibakar; Cai, Wei

    2018-07-01

    We present a spectral approach to perform nanoindentation simulations using three-dimensional nodal discrete dislocation dynamics. The method relies on a two step approach. First, the contact problem between an indenter of arbitrary shape and an isotropic elastic half-space is solved using a spectral iterative algorithm, and the contact pressure is fully determined on the half-space surface. The contact pressure is then used as a boundary condition of the spectral solver to determine the resulting stress field produced in the simulation volume. In both stages, the mechanical fields are decomposed into Fourier modes and are efficiently computed using fast Fourier transforms. To further improve the computational efficiency, the method is coupled with a subcycling integrator and a special approach is devised to approximate the displacement field associated with surface steps. As a benchmark, the method is used to compute the response of an elastic half-space using different types of indenter. An example of a dislocation dynamics nanoindentation simulation with complex initial microstructure is presented.

  4. Constellation modulation - an approach to increase spectral efficiency.

    Dash, Soumya Sunder; Pythoud, Frederic; Hillerkuss, David; Baeuerle, Benedikt; Josten, Arne; Leuchtmann, Pascal; Leuthold, Juerg

    2017-07-10

    Constellation modulation (CM) is introduced as a new degree of freedom to increase the spectral efficiency and to further approach the Shannon limit. Constellation modulation is the art of encoding information not only in the symbols within a constellation but also by encoding information by selecting a constellation from a set of constellations that are switched from time to time. The set of constellations is not limited to sets of partitions from a given constellation but can e.g., be obtained from an existing constellation by applying geometrical transformations such as rotations, translations, scaling, or even more abstract transformations. The architecture of the transmitter and the receiver allows for constellation modulation to be used on top of existing modulations with little penalties on the bit-error ratio (BER) or on the required signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The spectral bandwidth used by this modulation scheme is identical to the original modulation. Simulations demonstrate a particular advantage of the scheme for low SNR situations. So, for instance, it is demonstrated by simulation that a spectral efficiency increases by up to 33% and 20% can be obtained at a BER of 10 -3 and 2×10 -2 for a regular BPSK modulation format, respectively. Applying constellation modulation, we derive a most power efficient 4D-CM-BPSK modulation format that provides a spectral efficiency of 0.7 bit/s/Hz for an SNR of 0.2 dB at a BER of 2 × 10 -2 .

  5. Detecting quantum critical points using bipartite fluctuations.

    Rachel, Stephan; Laflorencie, Nicolas; Song, H Francis; Le Hur, Karyn

    2012-03-16

    We show that the concept of bipartite fluctuations F provides a very efficient tool to detect quantum phase transitions in strongly correlated systems. Using state-of-the-art numerical techniques complemented with analytical arguments, we investigate paradigmatic examples for both quantum spins and bosons. As compared to the von Neumann entanglement entropy, we observe that F allows us to find quantum critical points with much better accuracy in one dimension. We further demonstrate that F can be successfully applied to the detection of quantum criticality in higher dimensions with no prior knowledge of the universality class of the transition. Promising approaches to experimentally access fluctuations are discussed for quantum antiferromagnets and cold gases.

  6. Effect of attachment strategies on bipartite networks

    Ganguly, N.; Saha, S.; Maiti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Bipartite systems show remarkable variations in their topological asymptotic properties, e. g., in their degree distribution. Such variations depend on the underlying growth dynamics. A scenario of particular importance is when the two partitions of the bipartite structure do not grow at an equal...

  7. Quantum open system theory: bipartite aspects.

    Yu, T; Eberly, J H

    2006-10-06

    We demonstrate in straightforward calculations that even under ideally weak noise the relaxation of bipartite open quantum systems contains elements not previously encountered in quantum noise physics. While additivity of decay rates is known to be generic for decoherence of a single system, we demonstrate that it breaks down for bipartite coherence of even the simplest composite systems.

  8. A multimodal spectral approach to characterize rhythm in natural speech.

    Alexandrou, Anna Maria; Saarinen, Timo; Kujala, Jan; Salmelin, Riitta

    2016-01-01

    Human utterances demonstrate temporal patterning, also referred to as rhythm. While simple oromotor behaviors (e.g., chewing) feature a salient periodical structure, conversational speech displays a time-varying quasi-rhythmic pattern. Quantification of periodicity in speech is challenging. Unimodal spectral approaches have highlighted rhythmic aspects of speech. However, speech is a complex multimodal phenomenon that arises from the interplay of articulatory, respiratory, and vocal systems. The present study addressed the question of whether a multimodal spectral approach, in the form of coherence analysis between electromyographic (EMG) and acoustic signals, would allow one to characterize rhythm in natural speech more efficiently than a unimodal analysis. The main experimental task consisted of speech production at three speaking rates; a simple oromotor task served as control. The EMG-acoustic coherence emerged as a sensitive means of tracking speech rhythm, whereas spectral analysis of either EMG or acoustic amplitude envelope alone was less informative. Coherence metrics seem to distinguish and highlight rhythmic structure in natural speech.

  9. An Extended Spectral-Spatial Classification Approach for Hyperspectral Data

    Akbari, D.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper an extended classification approach for hyperspectral imagery based on both spectral and spatial information is proposed. The spatial information is obtained by an enhanced marker-based minimum spanning forest (MSF) algorithm. Three different methods of dimension reduction are first used to obtain the subspace of hyperspectral data: (1) unsupervised feature extraction methods including principal component analysis (PCA), independent component analysis (ICA), and minimum noise fraction (MNF); (2) supervised feature extraction including decision boundary feature extraction (DBFE), discriminate analysis feature extraction (DAFE), and nonparametric weighted feature extraction (NWFE); (3) genetic algorithm (GA). The spectral features obtained are then fed into the enhanced marker-based MSF classification algorithm. In the enhanced MSF algorithm, the markers are extracted from the classification maps obtained by both SVM and watershed segmentation algorithm. To evaluate the proposed approach, the Pavia University hyperspectral data is tested. Experimental results show that the proposed approach using GA achieves an approximately 8 % overall accuracy higher than the original MSF-based algorithm.

  10. 3-biplacement of bipartite graphs

    Lech Adamus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Let \\(G=(L,R;E\\ be a bipartite graph with color classes \\(L\\ and \\(R\\ and edge set \\(E\\. A set of two bijections \\(\\{\\varphi_1 , \\varphi_2\\}\\, \\(\\varphi_1 , \\varphi_2 :L \\cup R \\to L \\cup R\\, is said to be a \\(3\\-biplacement of \\(G\\ if \\(\\varphi_1(L= \\varphi_2(L = L\\ and \\(E \\cap \\varphi_1^*(E=\\emptyset\\, \\(E \\cap \\varphi_2^*(E=\\emptyset\\, \\(\\varphi_1^*(E \\cap \\varphi_2^*(E=\\emptyset\\, where \\(\\varphi_1^*\\, \\(\\varphi_2^*\\ are the maps defined on \\(E\\, induced by \\(\\varphi_1\\, \\(\\varphi_2\\, respectively. We prove that if \\(|L| = p\\, \\(|R| = q\\, \\(3 \\leq p \\leq q\\, then every graph \\(G=(L,R;E\\ of size at most \\(p\\ has a \\(3\\-biplacement.

  11. Separable decompositions of bipartite mixed states

    Li, Jun-Li; Qiao, Cong-Feng

    2018-04-01

    We present a practical scheme for the decomposition of a bipartite mixed state into a sum of direct products of local density matrices, using the technique developed in Li and Qiao (Sci. Rep. 8:1442, 2018). In the scheme, the correlation matrix which characterizes the bipartite entanglement is first decomposed into two matrices composed of the Bloch vectors of local states. Then, we show that the symmetries of Bloch vectors are consistent with that of the correlation matrix, and the magnitudes of the local Bloch vectors are lower bounded by the correlation matrix. Concrete examples for the separable decompositions of bipartite mixed states are presented for illustration.

  12. Quantumness of bipartite states in terms of conditional entropies

    Li, Nan; Luo, Shunlong; Zhang, Zhengmin

    2007-01-01

    Quantum discord, as defined by Olliver and Zurek (2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 017901) as the difference of two natural quantum extensions of the classical mutual information, plays an interesting role in characterizing quantumness of correlations. Inspired by this idea, we will study quantumness of bipartite states arising from different quantum analogs of the classical conditional entropy. Our approach is intrinsic, in contrast to the Olliver-Zurek method that involves extrinsic local measurements. For this purpose, we introduce two alternative variants of quantum conditional entropies via conditional density operators, which in turn are intuitive quantum extensions of equivalent classical expressions for the conditional probability. The significance of these quantum conditional entropies in characterizing quantumness of bipartite states is illustrated through several examples

  13. Bipartite Bell Inequality and Maximal Violation

    Li Ming; Fei Shaoming; Li-Jost Xian-Qing

    2011-01-01

    We present new bell inequalities for arbitrary dimensional bipartite quantum systems. The maximal violation of the inequalities is computed. The Bell inequality is capable of detecting quantum entanglement of both pure and mixed quantum states more effectively. (general)

  14. Data transfer using complete bipartite graph

    Chandrasekaran, V. M.; Praba, B.; Manimaran, A.; Kailash, G.

    2017-11-01

    Information exchange extent is an estimation of the amount of information sent between two focuses on a framework in a given time period. It is an extremely significant perception in present world. There are many ways of message passing in the present situations. Some of them are through encryption, decryption, by using complete bipartite graph. In this paper, we recommend a method for communication using messages through encryption of a complete bipartite graph.

  15. Anderson localization in bipartite lattices

    Fabrizio, Michele; Castellani, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    We study the localization properties of a disordered tight-binding Hamiltonian on a generic bipartite lattice close to the band center. By means of a fermionic replica trick method, we derive the effective non-linear σ-model describing the diffusive modes, which we analyse by using the Wilson-Polyakov renormalization group. In addition to the standard parameters which define the non-linear σ-model, namely, the conductance and the external frequency, a new parameter enters, which may be related to the fluctuations of the staggered density of states. We find that, when both the regular hopping and the disorder only couple one sublattice to the other, the quantum corrections to the Kubo conductivity vanish at the band center, thus implying the existence of delocalized states. In two dimensions, the RG equations predict that the conductance flows to a finite value, while both the density of states and the staggered density of states fluctuations diverge. In three dimensions, we find that, sufficiently close to the band center, all states are extended, independently of the disorder strength. We also discuss the role of various symmetry breaking terms, as a regular hopping between same sublattices, or an on-site disorder

  16. Anderson localization in bipartite lattices

    Fabrizio, M.; Castellani, C.

    2000-04-01

    We study the localization properties of a disordered tight-binding Hamiltonian on a generic bipartite lattice close to the band center. By means of a fermionic replica trick method, we derive the effective non-linear σ-model describing the diffusive modes, which we analyse by using the Wilson-Polyakov renormalization group. In addition to the standard parameters which define the non-linear σ-model, namely the conductance and the external frequency, a new parameter enters, which may be related to the fluctuations of the staggered density of states. We find that, when both the regular hopping and the disorder only couple one sublattice to the other, the quantum corrections to the Kubo conductivity vanish at the band center, thus implying the existence of delocalized states. In two dimensions, the RG equations predict that the conductance flows to a finite value, while both the density of states and the staggered density of states fluctuations diverge. In three dimensions, we find that, sufficiently close to the band center, all states are extended, independently of the disorder strength. We also discuss the role of various symmetry breaking terms, as a regular hopping between same sublattices, or an on-site disorder. (author)

  17. Eigenvalues and expansion of bipartite graphs

    Høholdt, Tom; Janwa, Heeralal

    2012-01-01

    We prove lower bounds on the largest and second largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix of bipartite graphs and give necessary and sufficient conditions for equality. We give several examples of classes that are optimal with respect to the bouns. We prove that BIBD-graphs are characterized by ...

  18. Relativistic quantum correlations in bipartite fermionic states

    The influences of relative motion, the size of the wave packet and the average momentum of the particles on different types of correlations present in bipartite quantum states are investigated. In particular, the dynamics of the quantum mutual information, the classical correlation and the quantum discord on the ...

  19. Relativistic quantum correlations in bipartite fermionic states

    2016-09-21

    Sep 21, 2016 ... particles on different types of correlations present in bipartite quantum states are investigated. In particular, the ... the focus of research for the last few years. Many re- ..... figures, the qualitative behaviour of all the three types ...

  20. Dynamic Matchings in Convex Bipartite Graphs

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Georgiadis, Loukas; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2007-01-01

    We consider the problem of maintaining a maximum matching in a convex bipartite graph G = (V,E) under a set of update operations which includes insertions and deletions of vertices and edges. It is not hard to show that it is impossible to maintain an explicit representation of a maximum matching...

  1. Effective approach to spectroscopy and spectral analysis techniques using Matlab

    Li, Xiang; Lv, Yong

    2017-08-01

    With the development of electronic information, computer and network, modern education technology has entered new era, which would give a great impact on teaching process. Spectroscopy and spectral analysis is an elective course for Optoelectronic Information Science and engineering. The teaching objective of this course is to master the basic concepts and principles of spectroscopy, spectral analysis and testing of basic technical means. Then, let the students learn the principle and technology of the spectrum to study the structure and state of the material and the developing process of the technology. MATLAB (matrix laboratory) is a multi-paradigm numerical computing environment and fourth-generation programming language. A proprietary programming language developed by MathWorks, MATLAB allows matrix manipulations, plotting of functions and data, Based on the teaching practice, this paper summarizes the new situation of applying Matlab to the teaching of spectroscopy. This would be suitable for most of the current school multimedia assisted teaching

  2. A time-spectral approach to numerical weather prediction

    Scheffel, Jan; Lindvall, Kristoffer; Yik, Hiu Fai

    2018-05-01

    Finite difference methods are traditionally used for modelling the time domain in numerical weather prediction (NWP). Time-spectral solution is an attractive alternative for reasons of accuracy and efficiency and because time step limitations associated with causal CFL-like criteria, typical for explicit finite difference methods, are avoided. In this work, the Lorenz 1984 chaotic equations are solved using the time-spectral algorithm GWRM (Generalized Weighted Residual Method). Comparisons of accuracy and efficiency are carried out for both explicit and implicit time-stepping algorithms. It is found that the efficiency of the GWRM compares well with these methods, in particular at high accuracy. For perturbative scenarios, the GWRM was found to be as much as four times faster than the finite difference methods. A primary reason is that the GWRM time intervals typically are two orders of magnitude larger than those of the finite difference methods. The GWRM has the additional advantage to produce analytical solutions in the form of Chebyshev series expansions. The results are encouraging for pursuing further studies, including spatial dependence, of the relevance of time-spectral methods for NWP modelling.

  3. Spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral data with mutual information based segmented stacked autoencoder approach

    Paul, Subir; Nagesh Kumar, D.

    2018-04-01

    Hyperspectral (HS) data comprises of continuous spectral responses of hundreds of narrow spectral bands with very fine spectral resolution or bandwidth, which offer feature identification and classification with high accuracy. In the present study, Mutual Information (MI) based Segmented Stacked Autoencoder (S-SAE) approach for spectral-spatial classification of the HS data is proposed to reduce the complexity and computational time compared to Stacked Autoencoder (SAE) based feature extraction. A non-parametric dependency measure (MI) based spectral segmentation is proposed instead of linear and parametric dependency measure to take care of both linear and nonlinear inter-band dependency for spectral segmentation of the HS bands. Then morphological profiles are created corresponding to segmented spectral features to assimilate the spatial information in the spectral-spatial classification approach. Two non-parametric classifiers, Support Vector Machine (SVM) with Gaussian kernel and Random Forest (RF) are used for classification of the three most popularly used HS datasets. Results of the numerical experiments carried out in this study have shown that SVM with a Gaussian kernel is providing better results for the Pavia University and Botswana datasets whereas RF is performing better for Indian Pines dataset. The experiments performed with the proposed methodology provide encouraging results compared to numerous existing approaches.

  4. Blood velocity estimation using ultrasound and spectral iterative adaptive approaches

    Gudmundson, Erik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    -mode images are interleaved with the Doppler emissions. Furthermore, the techniques are shown, using both simplified and more realistic Field II simulations as well as in vivo data, to outperform current state-of-the-art techniques, allowing for accurate estimation of the blood velocity spectrum using only 30......This paper proposes two novel iterative data-adaptive spectral estimation techniques for blood velocity estimation using medical ultrasound scanners. The techniques make no assumption on the sampling pattern of the emissions or the depth samples, allowing for duplex mode transmissions where B...

  5. Numerical Methods for Stochastic Computations A Spectral Method Approach

    Xiu, Dongbin

    2010-01-01

    The first graduate-level textbook to focus on fundamental aspects of numerical methods for stochastic computations, this book describes the class of numerical methods based on generalized polynomial chaos (gPC). These fast, efficient, and accurate methods are an extension of the classical spectral methods of high-dimensional random spaces. Designed to simulate complex systems subject to random inputs, these methods are widely used in many areas of computer science and engineering. The book introduces polynomial approximation theory and probability theory; describes the basic theory of gPC meth

  6. Building versatile bipartite probes for quantum metrology

    Farace, Alessandro; De Pasquale, Antonella; Adesso, Gerardo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    We consider bipartite systems as versatile probes for the estimation of transformations acting locally on one of the subsystems. We investigate what resources are required for the probes to offer a guaranteed level of metrological performance, when the latter is averaged over specific sets of local transformations. We quantify such a performance via the average skew information (AvSk), a convex quantity which we compute in closed form for bipartite states of arbitrary dimensions, and which is shown to be strongly dependent on the degree of local purity of the probes. Our analysis contrasts and complements the recent series of studies focused on the minimum, rather than the average, performance of bipartite probes in local estimation tasks, which was instead determined by quantum correlations other than entanglement. We provide explicit prescriptions to characterize the most reliable states maximizing the AvSk, and elucidate the role of state purity, separability and correlations in the classification of optimal probes. Our results can help in the identification of useful resources for sensing, estimation and discrimination applications when complete knowledge of the interaction mechanism realizing the local transformation is unavailable, and access to pure entangled probes is technologically limited.

  7. Building versatile bipartite probes for quantum metrology

    Farace, Alessandro; Pasquale, Antonella De; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    We consider bipartite systems as versatile probes for the estimation of transformations acting locally on one of the subsystems. We investigate what resources are required for the probes to offer a guaranteed level of metrological performance, when the latter is averaged over specific sets of local transformations. We quantify such a performance via the average skew information (AvSk), a convex quantity which we compute in closed form for bipartite states of arbitrary dimensions, and which is shown to be strongly dependent on the degree of local purity of the probes. Our analysis contrasts and complements the recent series of studies focused on the minimum, rather than the average, performance of bipartite probes in local estimation tasks, which was instead determined by quantum correlations other than entanglement. We provide explicit prescriptions to characterize the most reliable states maximizing the AvSk, and elucidate the role of state purity, separability and correlations in the classification of optimal probes. Our results can help in the identification of useful resources for sensing, estimation and discrimination applications when complete knowledge of the interaction mechanism realizing the local transformation is unavailable, and access to pure entangled probes is technologically limited. (paper)

  8. An evolving model of online bipartite networks

    Zhang, Chu-Xu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Liu, Chuang

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the structure and evolution of online bipartite networks is a significant task since they play a crucial role in various e-commerce services nowadays. Recently, various attempts have been tried to propose different models, resulting in either power-law or exponential degree distributions. However, many empirical results show that the user degree distribution actually follows a shifted power-law distribution, the so-called Mandelbrot’s law, which cannot be fully described by previous models. In this paper, we propose an evolving model, considering two different user behaviors: random and preferential attachment. Extensive empirical results on two real bipartite networks, Delicious and CiteULike, show that the theoretical model can well characterize the structure of real networks for both user and object degree distributions. In addition, we introduce a structural parameter p, to demonstrate that the hybrid user behavior leads to the shifted power-law degree distribution, and the region of power-law tail will increase with the increment of p. The proposed model might shed some lights in understanding the underlying laws governing the structure of real online bipartite networks.

  9. Local and Global Gestalt Laws: A Neurally Based Spectral Approach.

    Favali, Marta; Citti, Giovanna; Sarti, Alessandro

    2017-02-01

    This letter presents a mathematical model of figure-ground articulation that takes into account both local and global gestalt laws and is compatible with the functional architecture of the primary visual cortex (V1). The local gestalt law of good continuation is described by means of suitable connectivity kernels that are derived from Lie group theory and quantitatively compared with long-range connectivity in V1. Global gestalt constraints are then introduced in terms of spectral analysis of a connectivity matrix derived from these kernels. This analysis performs grouping of local features and individuates perceptual units with the highest salience. Numerical simulations are performed, and results are obtained by applying the technique to a number of stimuli.

  10. Spectrally-balanced chromatic approach-lighting system

    Chase, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    Approach lighting system employing combinations of red and blue lights reduces problem of color-based optical illusions. System exploits inherent chromatic aberration of eye to create three-dimensional effect, giving pilot visual clues of position.

  11. Guided-wave approaches to spectrally selective energy absorption

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of experiments designed to demonstrate spectrally selective absorption in dielectric waveguides on semiconductor substrates are reported. These experiments were conducted with three waveguides formed by sputtering films of PSK2 glass onto silicon-oxide layers grown on silicon substrates. The three waveguide samples were studied at 633 and 532 nm. The samples differed only in the thickness of the silicon-oxide layer, specifically 256 nm, 506 nm, and 740 nm. Agreement between theoretical predictions and measurements of propagation constants (mode angles) of the six or seven modes supported by these samples was excellent. However, the loss measurements were inconclusive because of high scattering losses in the structures fabricated (in excess of 10 dB/cm). Theoretical calculations indicated that the power distribution among all the modes supported by these structures will reach its steady state value after a propagation length of only 1 mm. Accordingly, the measured loss rates were found to be almost independent of which mode was initially excited. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment leads to the conclusion that low loss waveguides confirm the predicted loss rates.

  12. Electromagnetic microinstabilities in tokamak plasmas using a global spectral approach

    Falchetto, G. L

    2002-03-01

    Electromagnetic microinstabilities in tokamak plasmas are studied by means of a linear global eigenvalue numerical code. The code is the electromagnetic extension of an existing electrostatic global gyrokinetic spectral toroidal code, called GLOGYSTO. Ion dynamics is described by the gyrokinetic equation, so that ion finite Larmor radius effects are taken into account to all orders. Non adiabatic electrons are included in the model, with passing particles described by the drift-kinetic equation and trapped particles through the bounce averaged drift-kinetic equation. A low frequency electromagnetic perturbation is applied to a low -but finite- {beta}plasma (where the parameter {beta} identifies the ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure); thus, the parallel perturbations of the magnetic field are neglected. The system is closed by the quasi-neutrality equation and the parallel component of Ampere's law. The formulation is applied to a large aspect ratio toroidal configuration, with circular shifted surfaces. Such a simple configuration enables one to derive analytically the gyrocenter trajectories. The system is solved in Fourier space, taking advantage of a decomposition adapted to the toroidal geometry. The major contributions of this thesis are as follows. The electromagnetic effects on toroidal Ion Temperature Gradient driven (ITG) modes are studied. The stabilization of these modes with increasing {beta}, as predicted in previous work, is confirmed. The inclusion of trapped electron dynamics enables the study of its coupling to the ITG modes and of Trapped Electron Modes (TEM) .The effects of finite {beta} are considered together with those of different magnetic shear profiles and of the Shafranov shift. The threshold for the destabilization of an electromagnetic mode is identified. Moreover, the global formulation yields for the first time the radial structure of this so-called Alfvenic Ion Temperature Gradient (AITG) mode. The stability of the

  13. A singular-value decomposition approach to X-ray spectral estimation from attenuation data

    Tominaga, Shoji

    1986-01-01

    A singular-value decomposition (SVD) approach is described for estimating the exposure-rate spectral distributions of X-rays from attenuation data measured withvarious filtrations. This estimation problem with noisy measurements is formulated as the problem of solving a system of linear equations with an ill-conditioned nature. The principle of the SVD approach is that a response matrix, representing the X-ray attenuation effect by filtrations at various energies, can be expanded into summation of inherent component matrices, and thereby the spectral distributions can be represented as a linear combination of some component curves. A criterion function is presented for choosing the components needed to form a reliable estimate. The feasibility of the proposed approach is studied in detail in a computer simulation using a hypothetical X-ray spectrum. The application results of the spectral distributions emitted from a therapeutic X-ray generator are shown. Finally some advantages of this approach are pointed out. (orig.)

  14. A novel community detection method in bipartite networks

    Zhou, Cangqi; Feng, Liang; Zhao, Qianchuan

    2018-02-01

    Community structure is a common and important feature in many complex networks, including bipartite networks, which are used as a standard model for many empirical networks comprised of two types of nodes. In this paper, we propose a two-stage method for detecting community structure in bipartite networks. Firstly, we extend the widely-used Louvain algorithm to bipartite networks. The effectiveness and efficiency of the Louvain algorithm have been proved by many applications. However, there lacks a Louvain-like algorithm specially modified for bipartite networks. Based on bipartite modularity, a measure that extends unipartite modularity and that quantifies the strength of partitions in bipartite networks, we fill the gap by developing the Bi-Louvain algorithm that iteratively groups the nodes in each part by turns. This algorithm in bipartite networks often produces a balanced network structure with equal numbers of two types of nodes. Secondly, for the balanced network yielded by the first algorithm, we use an agglomerative clustering method to further cluster the network. We demonstrate that the calculation of the gain of modularity of each aggregation, and the operation of joining two communities can be compactly calculated by matrix operations for all pairs of communities simultaneously. At last, a complete hierarchical community structure is unfolded. We apply our method to two benchmark data sets and a large-scale data set from an e-commerce company, showing that it effectively identifies community structure in bipartite networks.

  15. Three methods to distill multipartite entanglement over bipartite noisy channels

    Lee, Soojoon; Park, Jungjoon

    2008-01-01

    We first assume that there are only bipartite noisy qubit channels in a given multipartite system, and present three methods to distill the general Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. By investigating the methods, we show that multipartite entanglement distillation by bipartite entanglement distillation has higher yield than ones in the previous multipartite entanglement distillations

  16. Quantifying Neural Oscillatory Synchronization: A Comparison between Spectral Coherence and Phase-Locking Value Approaches

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark J.; Bonizzi, Pietro; Karel, Joël; De Weerd, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization or phase-locking between oscillating neuronal groups is considered to be important for coordination of information among cortical networks. Spectral coherence is a commonly used approach to quantify phase locking between neural signals. We systematically explored the validity of spectral coherence measures for quantifying synchronization among neural oscillators. To that aim, we simulated coupled oscillatory signals that exhibited synchronization dynamics using an abstract phase-oscillator model as well as interacting gamma-generating spiking neural networks. We found that, within a large parameter range, the spectral coherence measure deviated substantially from the expected phase-locking. Moreover, spectral coherence did not converge to the expected value with increasing signal-to-noise ratio. We found that spectral coherence particularly failed when oscillators were in the partially (intermittent) synchronized state, which we expect to be the most likely state for neural synchronization. The failure was due to the fast frequency and amplitude changes induced by synchronization forces. We then investigated whether spectral coherence reflected the information flow among networks measured by transfer entropy (TE) of spike trains. We found that spectral coherence failed to robustly reflect changes in synchrony-mediated information flow between neural networks in many instances. As an alternative approach we explored a phase-locking value (PLV) method based on the reconstruction of the instantaneous phase. As one approach for reconstructing instantaneous phase, we used the Hilbert Transform (HT) preceded by Singular Spectrum Decomposition (SSD) of the signal. PLV estimates have broad applicability as they do not rely on stationarity, and, unlike spectral coherence, they enable more accurate estimations of oscillatory synchronization across a wide range of different synchronization regimes, and better tracking of synchronization-mediated information

  17. Quantifying Neural Oscillatory Synchronization: A Comparison between Spectral Coherence and Phase-Locking Value Approaches.

    Eric Lowet

    Full Text Available Synchronization or phase-locking between oscillating neuronal groups is considered to be important for coordination of information among cortical networks. Spectral coherence is a commonly used approach to quantify phase locking between neural signals. We systematically explored the validity of spectral coherence measures for quantifying synchronization among neural oscillators. To that aim, we simulated coupled oscillatory signals that exhibited synchronization dynamics using an abstract phase-oscillator model as well as interacting gamma-generating spiking neural networks. We found that, within a large parameter range, the spectral coherence measure deviated substantially from the expected phase-locking. Moreover, spectral coherence did not converge to the expected value with increasing signal-to-noise ratio. We found that spectral coherence particularly failed when oscillators were in the partially (intermittent synchronized state, which we expect to be the most likely state for neural synchronization. The failure was due to the fast frequency and amplitude changes induced by synchronization forces. We then investigated whether spectral coherence reflected the information flow among networks measured by transfer entropy (TE of spike trains. We found that spectral coherence failed to robustly reflect changes in synchrony-mediated information flow between neural networks in many instances. As an alternative approach we explored a phase-locking value (PLV method based on the reconstruction of the instantaneous phase. As one approach for reconstructing instantaneous phase, we used the Hilbert Transform (HT preceded by Singular Spectrum Decomposition (SSD of the signal. PLV estimates have broad applicability as they do not rely on stationarity, and, unlike spectral coherence, they enable more accurate estimations of oscillatory synchronization across a wide range of different synchronization regimes, and better tracking of synchronization

  18. Connectivity and Nestedness in Bipartite Networks from Community Ecology

    Corso, Gilberto; De Araujo, A I Levartoski; De Almeida, Adriana M

    2011-01-01

    Bipartite networks and the nestedness concept appear in two different contexts in theoretical ecology: community ecology and islands biogeography. From a mathematical perspective nestedness is a pattern in a bipartite network. There are several nestedness indices in the market, we used the index ν. The index ν is found using the relation ν = 1 - τ where τ is the temperature of the adjacency matrix of the bipartite network. By its turn τ is defined with help of the Manhattan distance of the occupied elements of the adjacency matrix of the bipartite network. We prove that the nestedness index ν is a function of the connectivities of the bipartite network. In addition we find a concise way to find ν which avoid cumbersome algorithm manupulation of the adjacency matrix.

  19. Connectivity and Nestedness in Bipartite Networks from Community Ecology

    Corso, Gilberto [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Centro de Biociencias, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, UFRN - Campus Universitario, Lagoa Nova, CEP 59078 972, Natal, RN (Brazil); De Araujo, A I Levartoski [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara Av. Treze de Maio, 2081 - Benfica CEP 60040-531 - Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); De Almeida, Adriana M, E-mail: corso@cb.ufrn.br [Departamento de Botanica, Ecologia e Zoologia, Centro de Biociencias, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, UFRN - Campus Universitario, Lagoa Nova, CEP 59078 972, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2011-03-01

    Bipartite networks and the nestedness concept appear in two different contexts in theoretical ecology: community ecology and islands biogeography. From a mathematical perspective nestedness is a pattern in a bipartite network. There are several nestedness indices in the market, we used the index {nu}. The index {nu} is found using the relation {nu} = 1 - {tau} where {tau} is the temperature of the adjacency matrix of the bipartite network. By its turn {tau} is defined with help of the Manhattan distance of the occupied elements of the adjacency matrix of the bipartite network. We prove that the nestedness index {nu} is a function of the connectivities of the bipartite network. In addition we find a concise way to find {nu} which avoid cumbersome algorithm manupulation of the adjacency matrix.

  20. Clustering coefficient and community structure of bipartite networks

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Jinliang; Li, Xiaojia; Li, Menghui; Di, Zengru; Fan, Ying

    2008-12-01

    Many real-world networks display natural bipartite structure, where the basic cycle is a square. In this paper, with the similar consideration of standard clustering coefficient in binary networks, a definition of the clustering coefficient for bipartite networks based on the fraction of squares is proposed. In order to detect community structures in bipartite networks, two different edge clustering coefficients LC4 and LC3 of bipartite networks are defined, which are based on squares and triples respectively. With the algorithm of cutting the edge with the least clustering coefficient, communities in artificial and real world networks are identified. The results reveal that investigating bipartite networks based on the original structure can show the detailed properties that is helpful to get deep understanding about the networks.

  1. Bipartite entanglement in continuous variable cluster states

    Cable, Hugo; Browne, Daniel E, E-mail: cqthvc@nus.edu.s, E-mail: d.browne@ucl.ac.u [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

    2010-11-15

    A study of the entanglement properties of Gaussian cluster states, proposed as a universal resource for continuous variable (CV) quantum computing is presented in this paper. The central aim is to compare mathematically idealized cluster states defined using quadrature eigenstates, which have infinite squeezing and cannot exist in nature, with Gaussian approximations that are experimentally accessible. Adopting widely used definitions, we first review the key concepts, by analysing a process of teleportation along a CV quantum wire in the language of matrix product states. Next we consider the bipartite entanglement properties of the wire, providing analytic results. We proceed to grid cluster states, which are universal for the qubit case. To extend our analysis of the bipartite entanglement, we adopt the entropic-entanglement width, a specialized entanglement measure introduced recently by Van den Nest et al (2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 150504), adapting their definition to the CV context. Finally, we consider the effects of photonic loss, extending our arguments to mixed states. Cumulatively our results point to key differences in the properties of idealized and Gaussian cluster states. Even modest loss rates are found to strongly limit the amount of entanglement. We discuss the implications for the potential of CV analogues for measurement-based quantum computation.

  2. Community detection for networks with unipartite and bipartite structure

    Chang, Chang; Tang, Chao

    2014-09-01

    Finding community structures in networks is important in network science, technology, and applications. To date, most algorithms that aim to find community structures only focus either on unipartite or bipartite networks. A unipartite network consists of one set of nodes and a bipartite network consists of two nonoverlapping sets of nodes with only links joining the nodes in different sets. However, a third type of network exists, defined here as the mixture network. Just like a bipartite network, a mixture network also consists of two sets of nodes, but some nodes may simultaneously belong to two sets, which breaks the nonoverlapping restriction of a bipartite network. The mixture network can be considered as a general case, with unipartite and bipartite networks viewed as its limiting cases. A mixture network can represent not only all the unipartite and bipartite networks, but also a wide range of real-world networks that cannot be properly represented as either unipartite or bipartite networks in fields such as biology and social science. Based on this observation, we first propose a probabilistic model that can find modules in unipartite, bipartite, and mixture networks in a unified framework based on the link community model for a unipartite undirected network [B Ball et al (2011 Phys. Rev. E 84 036103)]. We test our algorithm on synthetic networks (both overlapping and nonoverlapping communities) and apply it to two real-world networks: a southern women bipartite network and a human transcriptional regulatory mixture network. The results suggest that our model performs well for all three types of networks, is competitive with other algorithms for unipartite or bipartite networks, and is applicable to real-world networks.

  3. Premixed Turbulent Flames and Spectral Approach Flammes turbulentes de prémélange Approche spectrale

    Mathieu J.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientific and technical approach concerning the behaviour of flames developing in a turbulent medium are related in many recent papers. On the whole the problem is very complex!The chemical reaction develops inside a turbulent flow which requires a double scaling. Characteristic times and characteristic lengths have to be defined for both flame and the turbulent fields. With a view to enlarging these comparisons a spectral analyses of the turbulent field is proposed. It is widely supported by previous experimental data. The flame can be acted upon by an external turbulent fields. That supposes the flame to be thicker that the smallest turbulent structures in connection with the Kolmogorov scale. With increasing Reynolds numbers turbulent structures penetrate the flame front, they can disturb the preheat zone or event the chemical zone. The passage of a flame front regime to the case of a chemical reaction developing in a volume is thereby emphasized. As the reaction rate is decreasing, the domain affected by the reaction is increased chemical reactions generate a segregation process whereas the chemical species are mixed by the turbulent motion. In the premixed combustion engine a large range of operating points can be defined. The diagram usually used is that of Barrere Borghi. Several modeling methods should probably be developed according to the positions of the operating points in the diagram. Modeling methods are not presented herein. However the existence of typical structures in connection with the architecture of the combustion chamber could be examined in subsequent paper. The flame front can be subjected to distorting effects due to isolated rolling or to a sequence of vortices. Previously this last case has been touched upon. Using a spectral approach no discremination has to be made as for the sizes of these rollings: that could lead to new modeling methods if restricted shapes of vortices are accepted. By using a spectral method

  4. Bipartite quantum states and random complex networks

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Giorda, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a mapping between graphs and pure quantum bipartite states and show that the associated entanglement entropy conveys non-trivial information about the structure of the graph. Our primary goal is to investigate the family of random graphs known as complex networks. In the case of classical random graphs, we derive an analytic expression for the averaged entanglement entropy S-bar while for general complex networks we rely on numerics. For a large number of nodes n we find a scaling S-bar ∼c log n +g e where both the prefactor c and the sub-leading O(1) term g e are characteristic of the different classes of complex networks. In particular, g e encodes topological features of the graphs and is named network topological entropy. Our results suggest that quantum entanglement may provide a powerful tool for the analysis of large complex networks with non-trivial topological properties. (paper)

  5. Asymptotic adaptive bipartite entanglement-distillation protocol

    Hostens, Erik; Dehaene, Jeroen; De Moor, Bart

    2006-01-01

    We present an asymptotic bipartite entanglement-distillation protocol that outperforms all existing asymptotic schemes. This protocol is based on the breeding protocol with the incorporation of two-way classical communication. Like breeding, the protocol starts with an infinite number of copies of a Bell-diagonal mixed state. Breeding can be carried out as successive stages of partial information extraction, yielding the same result: one bit of information is gained at the cost (measurement) of one pure Bell state pair (ebit). The basic principle of our protocol is at every stage to replace measurements on ebits by measurements on a finite number of copies, whenever there are two equiprobable outcomes. In that case, the entropy of the global state is reduced by more than one bit. Therefore, every such replacement results in an improvement of the protocol. We explain how our protocol is organized as to have as many replacements as possible. The yield is then calculated for Werner states

  6. Catalytic transformations for bipartite pure states

    Turgut, S

    2007-01-01

    Entanglement catalysis is a phenomenon that usually enhances the conversion probability in the transformation of entangled states by the temporary involvement of another entangled state (so-called catalyst), where after the process is completed the catalyst is returned to the same state. For some pairs of bipartite pure entangled states, catalysis enables a transformation with unit probability of success, in which case the respective Schmidt coefficients of the states are said to satisfy the trumping relation, a mathematical relation which is an extension of the majorization relation. This paper provides all necessary and sufficient conditions for the trumping and two other associated relations. Using these conditions, the least upper bound of conversion probabilities using catalysis is also obtained. Moreover, best conversion ratios achievable with catalysis are found for transformations involving many copies of states

  7. A new dynamical downscaling approach with GCM bias corrections and spectral nudging

    Xu, Zhongfeng; Yang, Zong-Liang

    2015-04-01

    To improve confidence in regional projections of future climate, a new dynamical downscaling (NDD) approach with both general circulation model (GCM) bias corrections and spectral nudging is developed and assessed over North America. GCM biases are corrected by adjusting GCM climatological means and variances based on reanalysis data before the GCM output is used to drive a regional climate model (RCM). Spectral nudging is also applied to constrain RCM-based biases. Three sets of RCM experiments are integrated over a 31 year period. In the first set of experiments, the model configurations are identical except that the initial and lateral boundary conditions are derived from either the original GCM output, the bias-corrected GCM output, or the reanalysis data. The second set of experiments is the same as the first set except spectral nudging is applied. The third set of experiments includes two sensitivity runs with both GCM bias corrections and nudging where the nudging strength is progressively reduced. All RCM simulations are assessed against North American Regional Reanalysis. The results show that NDD significantly improves the downscaled mean climate and climate variability relative to other GCM-driven RCM downscaling approach in terms of climatological mean air temperature, geopotential height, wind vectors, and surface air temperature variability. In the NDD approach, spectral nudging introduces the effects of GCM bias corrections throughout the RCM domain rather than just limiting them to the initial and lateral boundary conditions, thereby minimizing climate drifts resulting from both the GCM and RCM biases.

  8. Spectral Subtraction Approach for Interference Reduction of MIMO Channel Wireless Systems

    Tomohiro Ono

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a generalized spectral subtraction approach for reducing additive impulsive noise, narrowband signals, white Gaussian noise and DS-CDMA interferences in MIMO channel DS-CDMA wireless communication systems is investigated. The interference noise reduction or suppression is essential problem in wireless mobile communication systems to improve the quality of communication. The spectrum subtraction scheme is applied to the interference noise reduction problems for noisy MIMO channel systems. The interferences in space and time domain signals can effectively be suppressed by selecting threshold values, and the computational load with the FFT is not large. Further, the fading effects of channel are compensated by spectral modification with the spectral subtraction process. In the simulations, the effectiveness of the proposed methods for the MIMO channel DS-CDMA is shown to compare with the conventional MIMO channel DS-CDMA.

  9. Parallel exploitation of a spatial-spectral classification approach for hyperspectral images on RVC-CAL

    Lazcano, R.; Madroñal, D.; Fabelo, H.; Ortega, S.; Salvador, R.; Callicó, G. M.; Juárez, E.; Sanz, C.

    2017-10-01

    Hyperspectral Imaging (HI) assembles high resolution spectral information from hundreds of narrow bands across the electromagnetic spectrum, thus generating 3D data cubes in which each pixel gathers the spectral information of the reflectance of every spatial pixel. As a result, each image is composed of large volumes of data, which turns its processing into a challenge, as performance requirements have been continuously tightened. For instance, new HI applications demand real-time responses. Hence, parallel processing becomes a necessity to achieve this requirement, so the intrinsic parallelism of the algorithms must be exploited. In this paper, a spatial-spectral classification approach has been implemented using a dataflow language known as RVCCAL. This language represents a system as a set of functional units, and its main advantage is that it simplifies the parallelization process by mapping the different blocks over different processing units. The spatial-spectral classification approach aims at refining the classification results previously obtained by using a K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) filtering process, in which both the pixel spectral value and the spatial coordinates are considered. To do so, KNN needs two inputs: a one-band representation of the hyperspectral image and the classification results provided by a pixel-wise classifier. Thus, spatial-spectral classification algorithm is divided into three different stages: a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) algorithm for computing the one-band representation of the image, a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier, and the KNN-based filtering algorithm. The parallelization of these algorithms shows promising results in terms of computational time, as the mapping of them over different cores presents a speedup of 2.69x when using 3 cores. Consequently, experimental results demonstrate that real-time processing of hyperspectral images is achievable.

  10. Pulsed photothermal profiling of water-based samples using a spectrally composite reconstruction approach

    Majaron, B; Milanic, M

    2010-01-01

    Pulsed photothermal profiling involves reconstruction of temperature depth profile induced in a layered sample by single-pulse laser exposure, based on transient change in mid-infrared (IR) emission from its surface. Earlier studies have indicated that in watery tissues, featuring a pronounced spectral variation of mid-IR absorption coefficient, analysis of broadband radiometric signals within the customary monochromatic approximation adversely affects profiling accuracy. We present here an experimental comparison of pulsed photothermal profiling in layered agar gel samples utilizing a spectrally composite kernel matrix vs. the customary approach. By utilizing a custom reconstruction code, the augmented approach reduces broadening of individual temperature peaks to 14% of the absorber depth, in contrast to 21% obtained with the customary approach.

  11. An abstract approach to some spectral problems of direct sum differential operators

    Maksim S. Sokolov

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the common spectral properties of abstract self-adjoint direct sum operators, considered in a direct sum Hilbert space. Applications of such operators arise in the modelling of processes of multi-particle quantum mechanics, quantum field theory and, specifically, in multi-interval boundary problems of differential equations. We show that a direct sum operator does not depend in a straightforward manner on the separate operators involved. That is, on having a set of self-adjoint operators giving a direct sum operator, we show how the spectral representation for this operator depends on the spectral representations for the individual operators (the coordinate operators involved in forming this sum operator. In particular it is shown that this problem is not immediately solved by taking a direct sum of the spectral properties of the coordinate operators. Primarily, these results are to be applied to operators generated by a multi-interval quasi-differential system studied, in the earlier works of Ashurov, Everitt, Gesztezy, Kirsch, Markus and Zettl. The abstract approach in this paper indicates the need for further development of spectral theory for direct sum differential operators.

  12. Asymmetric intimacy and algorithm for detecting communities in bipartite networks

    Wang, Xingyuan; Qin, Xiaomeng

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, an algorithm to choose a good partition in bipartite networks has been proposed. Bipartite networks have more theoretical significance and broader prospect of application. In view of distinctive structure of bipartite networks, in our method, two parameters are defined to show the relationships between the same type nodes and heterogeneous nodes respectively. Moreover, our algorithm employs a new method of finding and expanding the core communities in bipartite networks. Two kinds of nodes are handled separately and merged, and then the sub-communities are obtained. After that, objective communities will be found according to the merging rule. The proposed algorithm has been simulated in real-world networks and artificial networks, and the result verifies the accuracy and reliability of the parameters on intimacy for our algorithm. Eventually, comparisons with similar algorithms depict that the proposed algorithm has better performance.

  13. Enhanced capital-asset pricing model for the reconstruction of bipartite financial networks

    Squartini, Tiziano; Almog, Assaf; Caldarelli, Guido; van Lelyveld, Iman; Garlaschelli, Diego; Cimini, Giulio

    2017-09-01

    Reconstructing patterns of interconnections from partial information is one of the most important issues in the statistical physics of complex networks. A paramount example is provided by financial networks. In fact, the spreading and amplification of financial distress in capital markets are strongly affected by the interconnections among financial institutions. Yet, while the aggregate balance sheets of institutions are publicly disclosed, information on single positions is mostly confidential and, as such, unavailable. Standard approaches to reconstruct the network of financial interconnection produce unrealistically dense topologies, leading to a biased estimation of systemic risk. Moreover, reconstruction techniques are generally designed for monopartite networks of bilateral exposures between financial institutions, thus failing in reproducing bipartite networks of security holdings (e.g., investment portfolios). Here we propose a reconstruction method based on constrained entropy maximization, tailored for bipartite financial networks. Such a procedure enhances the traditional capital-asset pricing model (CAPM) and allows us to reproduce the correct topology of the network. We test this enhanced CAPM (ECAPM) method on a dataset, collected by the European Central Bank, of detailed security holdings of European institutional sectors over a period of six years (2009-2015). Our approach outperforms the traditional CAPM and the recently proposed maximum-entropy CAPM both in reproducing the network topology and in estimating systemic risk due to fire sales spillovers. In general, ECAPM can be applied to the whole class of weighted bipartite networks described by the fitness model.

  14. A general evolving model for growing bipartite networks

    Tian, Lixin; He, Yinghuan; Liu, Haijun; Du, Ruijin

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter, we propose and study an inner evolving bipartite network model. Significantly, we prove that the degree distribution of two different kinds of nodes both obey power-law form with adjustable exponents. Furthermore, the joint degree distribution of any two nodes for bipartite networks model is calculated analytically by the mean-field method. The result displays that such bipartite networks are nearly uncorrelated networks, which is different from one-mode networks. Numerical simulations and empirical results are given to verify the theoretical results. -- Highlights: ► We proposed a general evolving bipartite network model which was based on priority connection, reconnection and breaking edges. ► We prove that the degree distribution of two different kinds of nodes both obey power-law form with adjustable exponents. ► The joint degree distribution of any two nodes for bipartite networks model is calculated analytically by the mean-field method. ► The result displays that such bipartite networks are nearly uncorrelated networks, which is different from one-mode networks.

  15. Effect of Bipartite Hallucal Sesamoid on Hallux Valgus Surgery.

    Park, Young Hwan; Jeong, Chan Dong; Choi, Gi Won; Kim, Hak Jun

    2017-06-01

    Bipartite hallucal sesamoids are often found in patients with hallux valgus. However, it is unknown whether bipartite hallucal sesamoids affect the results of hallux valgus surgery or not. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the outcomes of chevron osteotomy for hallux valgus with and without bipartite hallucal sesamoid. A total of 152 patients (168 feet) treated with distal or proximal chevron osteotomy for hallux valgus constituted the study cohort. The 168 feet were divided into 2 groups: bipartite hallucal sesamoid (31 feet) and without bipartite hallucal sesamoid (137 feet). Hallux valgus angle (HVA), intermetatarsal angle (IMA), distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA), tibial sesamoid position, and first metatarsal length were measured for radiographic outcomes and the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hallux metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal (MTP-IP) score was measured for clinical outcomes. All radiographic measurements and the AOFAS score showed significant ( P .05) were found between the 2 groups in terms of HVA, IMA, DMAA, tibial sesamoid position, metatarsal shortening, and AOFAS score on final follow-up. This study suggests that bipartite hallucal sesamoids do not affect the results of hallux valgus surgery. Level III, retrospective comparative study.

  16. Bipartite Graphs as Models of Population Structures in Evolutionary Multiplayer Games

    Peña, Jorge; Rochat, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    By combining evolutionary game theory and graph theory, “games on graphs” study the evolutionary dynamics of frequency-dependent selection in population structures modeled as geographical or social networks. Networks are usually represented by means of unipartite graphs, and social interactions by two-person games such as the famous prisoner’s dilemma. Unipartite graphs have also been used for modeling interactions going beyond pairwise interactions. In this paper, we argue that bipartite graphs are a better alternative to unipartite graphs for describing population structures in evolutionary multiplayer games. To illustrate this point, we make use of bipartite graphs to investigate, by means of computer simulations, the evolution of cooperation under the conventional and the distributed N-person prisoner’s dilemma. We show that several implicit assumptions arising from the standard approach based on unipartite graphs (such as the definition of replacement neighborhoods, the intertwining of individual and group diversity, and the large overlap of interaction neighborhoods) can have a large impact on the resulting evolutionary dynamics. Our work provides a clear example of the importance of construction procedures in games on graphs, of the suitability of bigraphs and hypergraphs for computational modeling, and of the importance of concepts from social network analysis such as centrality, centralization and bipartite clustering for the understanding of dynamical processes occurring on networked population structures. PMID:22970237

  17. Bipartite Community Structure of eQTLs.

    Platig, John; Castaldi, Peter J; DeMeo, Dawn; Quackenbush, John

    2016-09-01

    Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses have identified genetic associations with a wide range of human phenotypes. However, many of these variants have weak effects and understanding their combined effect remains a challenge. One hypothesis is that multiple SNPs interact in complex networks to influence functional processes that ultimately lead to complex phenotypes, including disease states. Here we present CONDOR, a method that represents both cis- and trans-acting SNPs and the genes with which they are associated as a bipartite graph and then uses the modular structure of that graph to place SNPs into a functional context. In applying CONDOR to eQTLs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we found the global network "hub" SNPs were devoid of disease associations through GWAS. However, the network was organized into 52 communities of SNPs and genes, many of which were enriched for genes in specific functional classes. We identified local hubs within each community ("core SNPs") and these were enriched for GWAS SNPs for COPD and many other diseases. These results speak to our intuition: rather than single SNPs influencing single genes, we see groups of SNPs associated with the expression of families of functionally related genes and that disease SNPs are associated with the perturbation of those functions. These methods are not limited in their application to COPD and can be used in the analysis of a wide variety of disease processes and other phenotypic traits.

  18. Competition for popularity in bipartite networks

    Beguerisse Díaz, Mariano; Porter, Mason A.; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2010-12-01

    We present a dynamical model for rewiring and attachment in bipartite networks. Edges are placed between nodes that belong to catalogs that can either be fixed in size or growing in size. The model is motivated by an empirical study of data from the video rental service Netflix, which invites its users to give ratings to the videos available in its catalog. We find that the distribution of the number of ratings given by users and that of the number of ratings received by videos both follow a power law with an exponential cutoff. We also examine the activity patterns of Netflix users and find bursts of intense video-rating activity followed by long periods of inactivity. We derive ordinary differential equations to model the acquisition of edges by the nodes over time and obtain the corresponding time-dependent degree distributions. We then compare our results with the Netflix data and find good agreement. We conclude with a discussion of how catalog models can be used to study systems in which agents are forced to choose, rate, or prioritize their interactions from a large set of options.

  19. An approach to estimate spatial distribution of analyte within cells using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy

    Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Irfanullah, Mir; Basu, Santanu Kumar; Madhu, Sheri; De, Suman; Jadhav, Sameer; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli; Chowdhury, Arindam

    2017-03-01

    While fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool amongst chemists and biologists for the detection of various analyte within cellular environments, non-uniform spatial distribution of sensors within cells often restricts extraction of reliable information on relative abundance of analytes in different subcellular regions. As an alternative to existing sensing methodologies such as ratiometric or FRET imaging, where relative proportion of analyte with respect to the sensor can be obtained within cells, we propose a methodology using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy, via which both the relative abundance of sensor as well as their relative proportion with respect to the analyte can be simultaneously extracted for local subcellular regions. This method is exemplified using a BODIPY sensor, capable of detecting mercury ions within cellular environments, characterized by spectral blue-shift and concurrent enhancement of emission intensity. Spectral emission envelopes collected from sub-microscopic regions allowed us to compare the shift in transition energies as well as integrated emission intensities within various intracellular regions. Construction of a 2D scatter plot using spectral shifts and emission intensities, which depend on the relative amount of analyte with respect to sensor and the approximate local amounts of the probe, respectively, enabled qualitative extraction of relative abundance of analyte in various local regions within a single cell as well as amongst different cells. Although the comparisons remain semi-quantitative, this approach involving analysis of multiple spectral parameters opens up an alternative way to extract spatial distribution of analyte in heterogeneous systems. The proposed method would be especially relevant for fluorescent probes that undergo relatively nominal shift in transition energies compared to their emission bandwidths, which often restricts their usage for quantitative ratiometric imaging in

  20. A numerical spectral approach to solve the dislocation density transport equation

    Djaka, K S; Taupin, V; Berbenni, S; Fressengeas, C

    2015-01-01

    A numerical spectral approach is developed to solve in a fast, stable and accurate fashion, the quasi-linear hyperbolic transport equation governing the spatio-temporal evolution of the dislocation density tensor in the mechanics of dislocation fields. The approach relies on using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. Low-pass spectral filters are employed to control both the high frequency Gibbs oscillations inherent to the Fourier method and the fast-growing numerical instabilities resulting from the hyperbolic nature of the transport equation. The numerical scheme is validated by comparison with an exact solution in the 1D case corresponding to dislocation dipole annihilation. The expansion and annihilation of dislocation loops in 2D and 3D settings are also produced and compared with finite element approximations. The spectral solutions are shown to be stable, more accurate for low Courant numbers and much less computation time-consuming than the finite element technique based on an explicit Galerkin-least squares scheme. (paper)

  1. Improving discrimination of savanna tree species through a multiple endmember spectral-angle-mapper (SAM) approach: canopy level analysis

    Cho, Moses A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available sensing. The objectives of this paper were to (i) evaluate the classification performance of a multiple-endmember spectral angle mapper (SAM) classification approach (conventionally known as the nearest neighbour) in discriminating ten common African...

  2. A New High-Resolution Spectral Approach to Noninvasively Evaluate Wall Deformations in Arteries

    Ivonne Bazan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By locally measuring changes on arterial wall thickness as a function of pressure, the related Young modulus can be evaluated. This physical magnitude has shown to be an important predictive factor for cardiovascular diseases. For evaluating those changes, imaging segmentation or time correlations of ultrasonic echoes, coming from wall interfaces, are usually employed. In this paper, an alternative low-cost technique is proposed to locally evaluate variations on arterial walls, which are dynamically measured with an improved high-resolution calculation of power spectral densities in echo-traces of the wall interfaces, by using a parametric autoregressive processing. Certain wall deformations are finely detected by evaluating the echoes overtones peaks with power spectral estimations that implement Burg and Yule Walker algorithms. Results of this spectral approach are compared with a classical cross-correlation operator, in a tube phantom and “in vitro” carotid tissue. A circulating loop, mimicking heart periods and blood pressure changes, is employed to dynamically inspect each sample with a broadband ultrasonic probe, acquiring multiple A-Scans which are windowed to isolate echo-traces packets coming from distinct walls. Then the new technique and cross-correlation operator are applied to evaluate changing parietal deformations from the detection of displacements registered on the wall faces under periodic regime.

  3. A New High-Resolution Spectral Approach to Noninvasively Evaluate Wall Deformations in Arteries

    Bazan, Ivonne; Negreira, Carlos; Ramos, Antonio; Brum, Javier; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    By locally measuring changes on arterial wall thickness as a function of pressure, the related Young modulus can be evaluated. This physical magnitude has shown to be an important predictive factor for cardiovascular diseases. For evaluating those changes, imaging segmentation or time correlations of ultrasonic echoes, coming from wall interfaces, are usually employed. In this paper, an alternative low-cost technique is proposed to locally evaluate variations on arterial walls, which are dynamically measured with an improved high-resolution calculation of power spectral densities in echo-traces of the wall interfaces, by using a parametric autoregressive processing. Certain wall deformations are finely detected by evaluating the echoes overtones peaks with power spectral estimations that implement Burg and Yule Walker algorithms. Results of this spectral approach are compared with a classical cross-correlation operator, in a tube phantom and “in vitro” carotid tissue. A circulating loop, mimicking heart periods and blood pressure changes, is employed to dynamically inspect each sample with a broadband ultrasonic probe, acquiring multiple A-Scans which are windowed to isolate echo-traces packets coming from distinct walls. Then the new technique and cross-correlation operator are applied to evaluate changing parietal deformations from the detection of displacements registered on the wall faces under periodic regime. PMID:24688596

  4. A Partial Order on Bipartite Graphs with n Vertices

    Emil Daniel Schwab

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines a partial order on bipartite graphs (X1, X2, E with n vertices, X1∪X2={1,2,…,n}. The basis of such bipartite graph is X1 = {1,2,…,k}, 0≤k≤n. If U = (X1, X2, E(U and V = (Y1,Y2, E(V then U≤V iff |X1| ≤ |Y1| and {(i,jE(U: j>|Y1|} = ={(i,jE(V:i≤|X1|}. This partial order is a natural partial order of subobjects of an object in a triangular category with bipartite graphs as morphisms.

  5. Two classes of bipartite networks: nested biological and social systems.

    Burgos, Enrique; Ceva, Horacio; Hernández, Laura; Perazzo, R P J; Devoto, Mariano; Medan, Diego

    2008-10-01

    Bipartite graphs have received some attention in the study of social networks and of biological mutualistic systems. A generalization of a previous model is presented, that evolves the topology of the graph in order to optimally account for a given contact preference rule between the two guilds of the network. As a result, social and biological graphs are classified as belonging to two clearly different classes. Projected graphs, linking the agents of only one guild, are obtained from the original bipartite graph. The corresponding evolution of its statistical properties is also studied. An example of a biological mutualistic network is analyzed in detail, and it is found that the model provides a very good fitting of all the main statistical features. The model also provides a proper qualitative description of the same features observed in social webs, suggesting the possible reasons underlying the difference in the organization of these two kinds of bipartite networks.

  6. Localization in random bipartite graphs: Numerical and empirical study

    Slanina, František

    2017-05-01

    We investigate adjacency matrices of bipartite graphs with a power-law degree distribution. Motivation for this study is twofold: first, vibrational states in granular matter and jammed sphere packings; second, graphs encoding social interaction, especially electronic commerce. We establish the position of the mobility edge and show that it strongly depends on the power in the degree distribution and on the ratio of the sizes of the two parts of the bipartite graph. At the jamming threshold, where the two parts have the same size, localization vanishes. We found that the multifractal spectrum is nontrivial in the delocalized phase, but still near the mobility edge. We also study an empirical bipartite graph, namely, the Amazon reviewer-item network. We found that in this specific graph the mobility edge disappears, and we draw a conclusion from this fact regarding earlier empirical studies of the Amazon network.

  7. A spectral approach for the quantitative description of cardiac collagen network from nonlinear optical imaging.

    Masè, Michela; Cristoforetti, Alessandro; Avogaro, Laura; Tessarolo, Francesco; Piccoli, Federico; Caola, Iole; Pederzolli, Carlo; Graffigna, Angelo; Ravelli, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of collagen structure in cardiac pathology, such as atrial fibrillation (AF), is essential for a complete understanding of the disease. This paper introduces a novel methodology for the quantitative description of collagen network properties, based on the combination of nonlinear optical microscopy with a spectral approach of image processing and analysis. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was applied to atrial tissue samples from cardiac surgery patients, providing label-free, selective visualization of the collagen structure. The spectral analysis framework, based on 2D-FFT, was applied to the SHG images, yielding a multiparametric description of collagen fiber orientation (angle and anisotropy indexes) and texture scale (dominant wavelength and peak dispersion indexes). The proof-of-concept application of the methodology showed the capability of our approach to detect and quantify differences in the structural properties of the collagen network in AF versus sinus rhythm patients. These results suggest the potential of our approach in the assessment of collagen properties in cardiac pathologies related to a fibrotic structural component.

  8. Bipartite Fuzzy Stochastic Differential Equations with Global Lipschitz Condition

    Marek T. Malinowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and analyze a new type of fuzzy stochastic differential equations. We consider equations with drift and diffusion terms occurring at both sides of equations. Therefore we call them the bipartite fuzzy stochastic differential equations. Under the Lipschitz and boundedness conditions imposed on drifts and diffusions coefficients we prove existence of a unique solution. Then, insensitivity of the solution under small changes of data of equation is examined. Finally, we mention that all results can be repeated for solutions to bipartite set-valued stochastic differential equations.

  9. Inseparability inequalities for higher order moments for bipartite systems

    Agarwal, G S; Biswas, Asoka

    2005-01-01

    There are several examples of bipartite entangled states of continuous variables for which the existing criteria for entanglement using the inequalities involving the second-order moments are insufficient. We derive new inequalities involving higher order correlation, for testing entanglement in non-Gaussian states. In this context, we study an example of a non-Gaussian state, which is a bipartite entangled state of the form Ψ(x a , x b ) ∝ (αx a + βx b ) e -(x a 2 +x b 2 )/2 . Our results open up an avenue to search for new inequalities to test entanglement in non-Gaussian states

  10. Spatially adaptive hp refinement approach for PN neutron transport equation using spectral element method

    Nahavandi, N.; Minuchehr, A.; Zolfaghari, A.; Abbasi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Powerful hp-SEM refinement approach for P N neutron transport equation has been presented. • The method provides great geometrical flexibility and lower computational cost. • There is a capability of using arbitrary high order and non uniform meshes. • Both posteriori and priori local error estimation approaches have been employed. • High accurate results are compared against other common adaptive and uniform grids. - Abstract: In this work we presented the adaptive hp-SEM approach which is obtained from the incorporation of Spectral Element Method (SEM) and adaptive hp refinement. The SEM nodal discretization and hp adaptive grid-refinement for even-parity Boltzmann neutron transport equation creates powerful grid refinement approach with high accuracy solutions. In this regard a computer code has been developed to solve multi-group neutron transport equation in one-dimensional geometry using even-parity transport theory. The spatial dependence of flux has been developed via SEM method with Lobatto orthogonal polynomial. Two commonly error estimation approaches, the posteriori and the priori has been implemented. The incorporation of SEM nodal discretization method and adaptive hp grid refinement leads to high accurate solutions. Coarser meshes efficiency and significant reduction of computer program runtime in comparison with other common refining methods and uniform meshing approaches is tested along several well-known transport benchmarks

  11. Bayesian Approach to Spectral Function Reconstruction for Euclidean Quantum Field Theories

    Burnier, Yannis; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel approach to the inference of spectral functions from Euclidean time correlator data that makes close contact with modern Bayesian concepts. Our method differs significantly from the maximum entropy method (MEM). A new set of axioms is postulated for the prior probability, leading to an improved expression, which is devoid of the asymptotically flat directions present in the Shanon-Jaynes entropy. Hyperparameters are integrated out explicitly, liberating us from the Gaussian approximations underlying the evidence approach of the maximum entropy method. We present a realistic test of our method in the context of the nonperturbative extraction of the heavy quark potential. Based on hard-thermal-loop correlator mock data, we establish firm requirements in the number of data points and their accuracy for a successful extraction of the potential from lattice QCD. Finally we reinvestigate quenched lattice QCD correlators from a previous study and provide an improved potential estimation at T=2.33TC.

  12. A spectral k-means approach to bright-field cell image segmentation.

    Bradbury, Laura; Wan, Justin W L

    2010-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of bright-field cell images is important to cell biologists, but difficult to complete due to the complex nature of the cells in bright-field images (poor contrast, broken halo, missing boundaries). Standard approaches such as level set segmentation and active contours work well for fluorescent images where cells appear as round shape, but become less effective when optical artifacts such as halo exist in bright-field images. In this paper, we present a robust segmentation method which combines the spectral and k-means clustering techniques to locate cells in bright-field images. This approach models an image as a matrix graph and segment different regions of the image by computing the appropriate eigenvectors of the matrix graph and using the k-means algorithm. We illustrate the effectiveness of the method by segmentation results of C2C12 (muscle) cells in bright-field images.

  13. Image-Based Airborne Sensors: A Combined Approach for Spectral Signatures Classification through Deterministic Simulated Annealing

    Guijarro, María; Pajares, Gonzalo; Herrera, P. Javier

    2009-01-01

    The increasing technology of high-resolution image airborne sensors, including those on board Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, demands automatic solutions for processing, either on-line or off-line, the huge amountds of image data sensed during the flights. The classification of natural spectral signatures in images is one potential application. The actual tendency in classification is oriented towards the combination of simple classifiers. In this paper we propose a combined strategy based on the Deterministic Simulated Annealing (DSA) framework. The simple classifiers used are the well tested supervised parametric Bayesian estimator and the Fuzzy Clustering. The DSA is an optimization approach, which minimizes an energy function. The main contribution of DSA is its ability to avoid local minima during the optimization process thanks to the annealing scheme. It outperforms simple classifiers used for the combination and some combined strategies, including a scheme based on the fuzzy cognitive maps and an optimization approach based on the Hopfield neural network paradigm. PMID:22399989

  14. Schur complements of matrices with acyclic bipartite graphs

    Britz, Thomas Johann; Olesky, D.D.; van den Driessche, P.

    2005-01-01

    Bipartite graphs are used to describe the generalized Schur complements of real matrices having nos quare submatrix with two or more nonzero diagonals. For any matrix A with this property, including any nearly reducible matrix, the sign pattern of each generalized Schur complement is shown to be ...

  15. Transformation of bipartite non-maximally entangled states into a ...

    We present two schemes for transforming bipartite non-maximally entangled states into a W state in cavity QED system, by using highly detuned interactions and the resonant interactions between two-level atoms and a single-mode cavity field. A tri-atom W state can be generated by adjusting the interaction times between ...

  16. Transformation of bipartite non-maximally entangled states into a ...

    We present two schemes for transforming bipartite non-maximally entangled states into a W state in cavity QED system, by using highly detuned interactions and the resonant interactions between ... Proceedings of the International Workshop/Conference on Computational Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science

  17. Controlled teleportation of a 3-dimensional bipartite quantum state

    Cao Haijing; Chen Zhonghua; Song Heshan

    2008-01-01

    A controlled teleportation scheme of an unknown 3-dimensional (3D) two-particle quantum state is proposed, where a 3D Bell state and 3D GHZ state function as the quantum channel. This teleportation scheme can be directly generalized to teleport an unknown d-dimensional bipartite quantum state

  18. Neural Correlates of Phrase Rhythm: An EEG Study of Bipartite vs. Rondo Sonata Form

    Antonio Fernández-Caballero

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the neural correlates of phrase rhythm. In short, phrase rhythm is the rhythmic aspect of phrase construction and the relationships between phrases. For the sake of establishing the neural correlates, a musical experiment has been designed to induce music-evoked stimuli related to phrase rhythm. Brain activity is monitored through electroencephalography (EEG by using a brain–computer interface. The power spectral value of each EEG channel is estimated to obtain how power variance distributes as a function of frequency. Our experiment shows statistical differences in theta and alpha bands in the phrase rhythm variations of two classical sonatas, one in bipartite form and the other in rondo form.

  19. An adaptive demodulation approach for bearing fault detection based on adaptive wavelet filtering and spectral subtraction

    Zhang, Yan; Tang, Baoping; Liu, Ziran; Chen, Rengxiang

    2016-02-01

    Fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings is important for improving mechanical system reliability and performance. Vibration signals contain a wealth of complex information useful for state monitoring and fault diagnosis. However, any fault-related impulses in the original signal are often severely tainted by various noises and the interfering vibrations caused by other machine elements. Narrow-band amplitude demodulation has been an effective technique to detect bearing faults by identifying bearing fault characteristic frequencies. To achieve this, the key step is to remove the corrupting noise and interference, and to enhance the weak signatures of the bearing fault. In this paper, a new method based on adaptive wavelet filtering and spectral subtraction is proposed for fault diagnosis in bearings. First, to eliminate the frequency associated with interfering vibrations, the vibration signal is bandpass filtered with a Morlet wavelet filter whose parameters (i.e. center frequency and bandwidth) are selected in separate steps. An alternative and efficient method of determining the center frequency is proposed that utilizes the statistical information contained in the production functions (PFs). The bandwidth parameter is optimized using a local ‘greedy’ scheme along with Shannon wavelet entropy criterion. Then, to further reduce the residual in-band noise in the filtered signal, a spectral subtraction procedure is elaborated after wavelet filtering. Instead of resorting to a reference signal as in the majority of papers in the literature, the new method estimates the power spectral density of the in-band noise from the associated PF. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated using simulated data, test rig data, and vibration data recorded from the transmission system of a helicopter. The experimental results and comparisons with other methods indicate that the proposed method is an effective approach to detecting the fault-related impulses

  20. An adaptive demodulation approach for bearing fault detection based on adaptive wavelet filtering and spectral subtraction

    Zhang, Yan; Tang, Baoping; Chen, Rengxiang; Liu, Ziran

    2016-01-01

    Fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings is important for improving mechanical system reliability and performance. Vibration signals contain a wealth of complex information useful for state monitoring and fault diagnosis. However, any fault-related impulses in the original signal are often severely tainted by various noises and the interfering vibrations caused by other machine elements. Narrow-band amplitude demodulation has been an effective technique to detect bearing faults by identifying bearing fault characteristic frequencies. To achieve this, the key step is to remove the corrupting noise and interference, and to enhance the weak signatures of the bearing fault. In this paper, a new method based on adaptive wavelet filtering and spectral subtraction is proposed for fault diagnosis in bearings. First, to eliminate the frequency associated with interfering vibrations, the vibration signal is bandpass filtered with a Morlet wavelet filter whose parameters (i.e. center frequency and bandwidth) are selected in separate steps. An alternative and efficient method of determining the center frequency is proposed that utilizes the statistical information contained in the production functions (PFs). The bandwidth parameter is optimized using a local ‘greedy’ scheme along with Shannon wavelet entropy criterion. Then, to further reduce the residual in-band noise in the filtered signal, a spectral subtraction procedure is elaborated after wavelet filtering. Instead of resorting to a reference signal as in the majority of papers in the literature, the new method estimates the power spectral density of the in-band noise from the associated PF. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated using simulated data, test rig data, and vibration data recorded from the transmission system of a helicopter. The experimental results and comparisons with other methods indicate that the proposed method is an effective approach to detecting the fault-related impulses

  1. A bipartite fitness model for online music streaming services

    Pongnumkul, Suchit; Motohashi, Kazuyuki

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes an evolution model and an analysis of the behavior of music consumers on online music streaming services. While previous studies have observed power-law degree distributions of usage in online music streaming services, the underlying behavior of users has not been well understood. Users and songs can be described using a bipartite network where an edge exists between a user node and a song node when the user has listened that song. The growth mechanism of bipartite networks has been used to understand the evolution of online bipartite networks Zhang et al. (2013). Existing bipartite models are based on a preferential attachment mechanism László Barabási and Albert (1999) in which the probability that a user listens to a song is proportional to its current popularity. This mechanism does not allow for two types of real world phenomena. First, a newly released song with high quality sometimes quickly gains popularity. Second, the popularity of songs normally decreases as time goes by. Therefore, this paper proposes a new model that is more suitable for online music services by adding fitness and aging functions to the song nodes of the bipartite network proposed by Zhang et al. (2013). Theoretical analyses are performed for the degree distribution of songs. Empirical data from an online streaming service, Last.fm, are used to confirm the degree distribution of the object nodes. Simulation results show improvements from a previous model. Finally, to illustrate the application of the proposed model, a simplified royalty cost model for online music services is used to demonstrate how the changes in the proposed parameters can affect the costs for online music streaming providers. Managerial implications are also discussed.

  2. Spectral unmixing of urban land cover using a generic library approach

    Degerickx, Jeroen; Lordache, Marian-Daniel; Okujeni, Akpona; Hermy, Martin; van der Linden, Sebastian; Somers, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing based land cover classification in urban areas generally requires the use of subpixel classification algorithms to take into account the high spatial heterogeneity. These spectral unmixing techniques often rely on spectral libraries, i.e. collections of pure material spectra (endmembers, EM), which ideally cover the large EM variability typically present in urban scenes. Despite the advent of several (semi-) automated EM detection algorithms, the collection of such image-specific libraries remains a tedious and time-consuming task. As an alternative, we suggest the use of a generic urban EM library, containing material spectra under varying conditions, acquired from different locations and sensors. This approach requires an efficient EM selection technique, capable of only selecting those spectra relevant for a specific image. In this paper, we evaluate and compare the potential of different existing library pruning algorithms (Iterative Endmember Selection and MUSIC) using simulated hyperspectral (APEX) data of the Brussels metropolitan area. In addition, we develop a new hybrid EM selection method which is shown to be highly efficient in dealing with both imagespecific and generic libraries, subsequently yielding more robust land cover classification results compared to existing methods. Future research will include further optimization of the proposed algorithm and additional tests on both simulated and real hyperspectral data.

  3. A New Spectral Shape-Based Record Selection Approach Using Np and Genetic Algorithms

    Edén Bojórquez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim to improve code-based real records selection criteria, an approach inspired in a parameter proxy of spectral shape, named Np, is analyzed. The procedure is based on several objectives aimed to minimize the record-to-record variability of the ground motions selected for seismic structural assessment. In order to select the best ground motion set of records to be used as an input for nonlinear dynamic analysis, an optimization approach is applied using genetic algorithms focuse on finding the set of records more compatible with a target spectrum and target Np values. The results of the new Np-based approach suggest that the real accelerograms obtained with this procedure, reduce the scatter of the response spectra as compared with the traditional approach; furthermore, the mean spectrum of the set of records is very similar to the target seismic design spectrum in the range of interest periods, and at the same time, similar Np values are obtained for the selected records and the target spectrum.

  4. A brute-force spectral approach for wave estimation using measured vessel motions

    Nielsen, Ulrik D.; Brodtkorb, Astrid H.; Sørensen, Asgeir J.

    2018-01-01

    , and the procedure is simple in its mathematical formulation. The actual formulation is extending another recent work by including vessel advance speed and short-crested seas. Due to its simplicity, the procedure is computationally efficient, providing wave spectrum estimates in the order of a few seconds......The article introduces a spectral procedure for sea state estimation based on measurements of motion responses of a ship in a short-crested seaway. The procedure relies fundamentally on the wave buoy analogy, but the wave spectrum estimate is obtained in a direct - brute-force - approach......, and the estimation procedure will therefore be appealing to applications related to realtime, onboard control and decision support systems for safe and efficient marine operations. The procedure's performance is evaluated by use of numerical simulation of motion measurements, and it is shown that accurate wave...

  5. Energy Efficiency - Spectral Efficiency Trade-off: A Multiobjective Optimization Approach

    Amin, Osama

    2015-04-23

    In this paper, we consider the resource allocation problem for energy efficiency (EE) - spectral efficiency (SE) trade-off. Unlike traditional research that uses the EE as an objective function and imposes constraints either on the SE or achievable rate, we propound a multiobjective optimization approach that can flexibly switch between the EE and SE functions or change the priority level of each function using a trade-off parameter. Our dynamic approach is more tractable than the conventional approaches and more convenient to realistic communication applications and scenarios. We prove that the multiobjective optimization of the EE and SE is equivalent to a simple problem that maximizes the achievable rate/SE and minimizes the total power consumption. Then we apply the generalized framework of the resource allocation for the EE-SE trade-off to optimally allocate the subcarriers’ power for orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with imperfect channel estimation. Finally, we use numerical results to discuss the choice of the trade-off parameter and study the effect of the estimation error, transmission power budget and channel-to-noise ratio on the multiobjective optimization.

  6. Energy Efficiency - Spectral Efficiency Trade-off: A Multiobjective Optimization Approach

    Amin, Osama; Bedeer, Ebrahim; Ahmed, Mohamed; Dobre, Octavia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the resource allocation problem for energy efficiency (EE) - spectral efficiency (SE) trade-off. Unlike traditional research that uses the EE as an objective function and imposes constraints either on the SE or achievable rate, we propound a multiobjective optimization approach that can flexibly switch between the EE and SE functions or change the priority level of each function using a trade-off parameter. Our dynamic approach is more tractable than the conventional approaches and more convenient to realistic communication applications and scenarios. We prove that the multiobjective optimization of the EE and SE is equivalent to a simple problem that maximizes the achievable rate/SE and minimizes the total power consumption. Then we apply the generalized framework of the resource allocation for the EE-SE trade-off to optimally allocate the subcarriers’ power for orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with imperfect channel estimation. Finally, we use numerical results to discuss the choice of the trade-off parameter and study the effect of the estimation error, transmission power budget and channel-to-noise ratio on the multiobjective optimization.

  7. Retrieval of spheroid particle size distribution from spectral extinction data in the independent mode using PCA approach

    Tang, Hong; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    An improved anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) method is presented for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroids firstly. In this approach, the extinction efficiency of spheroid particles can be calculated with good accuracy and high efficiency in a wider size range by combining the Latimer method and the ADA theory, and this method can present a more general expression for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroid particles with various complex refractive indices and aspect ratios. Meanwhile, the visible spectral extinction with varied spheroid particle size distributions and complex refractive indices is surveyed. Furthermore, a selection principle about the spectral extinction data is developed based on PCA (principle component analysis) of first derivative spectral extinction. By calculating the contribution rate of first derivative spectral extinction, the spectral extinction with more significant features can be selected as the input data, and those with less features is removed from the inversion data. In addition, we propose an improved Tikhonov iteration method to retrieve the spheroid particle size distributions in the independent mode. Simulation experiments indicate that the spheroid particle size distributions obtained with the proposed method coincide fairly well with the given distributions, and this inversion method provides a simple, reliable and efficient method to retrieve the spheroid particle size distributions from the spectral extinction data. -- Highlights: ► Improved ADA is presented for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroids. ► Selection principle about spectral extinction data is developed based on PCA. ► Improved Tikhonov iteration method is proposed to retrieve the spheroid PSD.

  8. Emergent bipartiteness in a society of knights and knaves

    Del Genio, C I; Gross, T

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple model of a social network based on the so-called knights-and-knaves puzzles. The model describes the formation of networks between two classes of agents where links are formed by agents introducing their neighbors to others of their own class. We show that if the proportion of knights and knaves is within a certain range, the network self-organizes to a perfectly bipartite state. However, if the excess of one of the two classes is greater than a threshold value, bipartiteness is not observed. We offer a detailed theoretical analysis of the behavior of the model, investigate its behavior in the thermodynamic limit and argue that it provides a simple example of a topology-driven model whose behavior is strongly reminiscent of first-order phase transitions far from equilibrium. (paper)

  9. Controlling bi-partite entanglement in multi-qubit systems

    Plesch, Martin; Novotny, Jaroslav; Dzurakova, Zuzana; Buzek, VladimIr

    2004-01-01

    Bi-partite entanglement in multi-qubit systems cannot be shared freely. The rules of quantum mechanics impose bounds on how multi-qubit systems can be correlated. In this paper, we utilize a concept of entangled graphs with weighted edges in order to analyse pure quantum states of multi-qubit systems. Here qubits are represented by vertexes of the graph, while the presence of bi-partite entanglement is represented by an edge between corresponding vertexes. The weight of each edge is defined to be the entanglement between the two qubits connected by the edge, as measured by the concurrence. We prove that each entangled graph with entanglement bounded by a specific value of the concurrence can be represented by a pure multi-qubit state. In addition, we present a logic network with O(N 2 ) elementary gates that can be used for preparation of the weighted entangled graphs of N qubits

  10. Controlling bi-partite entanglement in multi-qubit systems

    Plesch, Martin; Novotný, Jaroslav; Dzuráková, Zuzana; Buzek, Vladimír

    2004-02-01

    Bi-partite entanglement in multi-qubit systems cannot be shared freely. The rules of quantum mechanics impose bounds on how multi-qubit systems can be correlated. In this paper, we utilize a concept of entangled graphs with weighted edges in order to analyse pure quantum states of multi-qubit systems. Here qubits are represented by vertexes of the graph, while the presence of bi-partite entanglement is represented by an edge between corresponding vertexes. The weight of each edge is defined to be the entanglement between the two qubits connected by the edge, as measured by the concurrence. We prove that each entangled graph with entanglement bounded by a specific value of the concurrence can be represented by a pure multi-qubit state. In addition, we present a logic network with O(N2) elementary gates that can be used for preparation of the weighted entangled graphs of N qubits.

  11. Bipartite separability and nonlocal quantum operations on graphs

    Dutta, Supriyo; Adhikari, Bibhas; Banerjee, Subhashish; Srikanth, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we consider the separability problem for bipartite quantum states arising from graphs. Earlier it was proved that the degree criterion is the graph-theoretic counterpart of the familiar positive partial transpose criterion for separability, although there are entangled states with positive partial transpose for which the degree criterion fails. Here we introduce the concept of partially symmetric graphs and degree symmetric graphs by using the well-known concept of partial transposition of a graph and degree criteria, respectively. Thus, we provide classes of bipartite separable states of dimension m ×n arising from partially symmetric graphs. We identify partially asymmetric graphs that lack the property of partial symmetry. We develop a combinatorial procedure to create a partially asymmetric graph from a given partially symmetric graph. We show that this combinatorial operation can act as an entanglement generator for mixed states arising from partially symmetric graphs.

  12. Comment on "Protecting bipartite entanglement by quantum interferences"

    Nair, Anjali N.; Arun, R.

    2018-03-01

    In an interesting article [Phys. Rev. A 81, 052341 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.81.052341], Das and Agarwal have discussed the preservation of bipartite entanglement in three-level atoms employing the coherences induced by spontaneous emission. The authors considered various initially entangled qubits prepared from two V -type three-level atoms and showed that more than 50 % of the initial (bipartite) entanglement can be preserved in steady state due to vacuum-induced coherence. In this Comment, we point out that their analytical formulas for the entanglement measure contain errors affecting all the numerical results of that article. We substantiate our claim by giving correct analytical results for the time evolution of the two-atom system.

  13. Complexity of Products of Some Complete and Complete Bipartite Graphs

    S. N. Daoud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of spanning trees in graphs (networks is an important invariant; it is also an important measure of reliability of a network. In this paper, we derive simple formulas of the complexity, number of spanning trees, of products of some complete and complete bipartite graphs such as cartesian product, normal product, composition product, tensor product, and symmetric product, using linear algebra and matrix analysis techniques.

  14. One-sided interval edge-colorings of bipartite graphs

    Casselgren, Carl Johan; Toft, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Let G be a bipartite graph with parts X and Y . An X-interval coloring of G is a proper edge coloring of G by integers such that the colors on the edges incident to any vertex in X form an interval. Denote by χ′int(G,X) the minimum k such that G has an X-interval coloring with k colors. In this p...

  15. Introduction into bi-partite networks in python

    Kasberger, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    This essay and the related computation delivers a comprehensive introduction into the concept of bipartite networks, a class of networks whose nodes are divided into two sets and only the connection between two nodes in different sets is allowed (Easley and Kleinberg, 2010). The analysis and visualization is done in the programming language Python and offers easy to understand first steps in both fields, network analyses and python programming. As data a collaboration network of github users ...

  16. Correlation/Communication complexity of generating bipartite states

    Jain, Rahul; Shi, Yaoyun; Wei, Zhaohui; Zhang, Shengyu

    2012-01-01

    We study the correlation complexity (or equivalently, the communication complexity) of generating a bipartite quantum state $\\rho$. When $\\rho$ is a pure state, we completely characterize the complexity for approximately generating $\\rho$ by a corresponding approximate rank, closing a gap left in Ambainis, Schulman, Ta-Shma, Vazirani and Wigderson (SIAM Journal on Computing, 32(6):1570-1585, 2003). When $\\rho$ is a classical distribution $P(x,y)$, we tightly characterize the complexity of gen...

  17. Tripartite to Bipartite Entanglement Transformations and Polynomial Identity Testing

    Chitambar, Eric; Duan, Runyao; Shi, Yaoyun

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of deciding if a given three-party entangled pure state can be converted, with a non-zero success probability, into a given two-party pure state through local quantum operations and classical communication. We show that this question is equivalent to the well-known computational problem of deciding if a multivariate polynomial is identically zero. Efficient randomized algorithms developed to study the latter can thus be applied to the question of tripartite to bipartit...

  18. Balanced Bipartite Graph Based Register Allocation for Network Processors in Mobile and Wireless Networks

    Feilong Tang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile and wireless networks are the integrant infrastructure of mobile and pervasive computing that aims at providing transparent and preferred information and services for people anytime anywhere. In such environments, end-to-end network bandwidth is crucial to improve user's transparent experience when providing on-demand services such as mobile video playing. As a result, powerful computing power is required for networked nodes, especially for routers. General-purpose processors cannot meet such requirements due to their limited processing ability, and poor programmability and scalability. Intel's network processor IXP is specially designed for fast packet processing to achieve a broad bandwidth. IXP provides a large number of registers to reduce the number of memory accesses. Registers in an IXP are physically partitioned as two banks so that two source operands in an instruction have to come from the two banks respectively, which makes the IXP register allocation tricky and different from conventional ones. In this paper, we investigate an approach for efficiently generating balanced bipartite graph and register allocation algorithms for the dual-bank register allocation in IXPs. The paper presents a graph uniform 2-way partition algorithm (FPT, which provides an optimal solution to the graph partition, and a heuristic algorithm for generating balanced bipartite graph. Finally, we design a framework for IXP register allocation. Experimental results demonstrate the framework and the algorithms are efficient in register allocation for IXP network processors.

  19. Disentangling bipartite and core-periphery structure in financial networks

    Barucca, Paolo; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of systems are represented as networks whose architecture conveys significant information and determines many of their properties. Examples of network architecture include modular, bipartite, and core-periphery structures. However inferring the network structure is a non trivial task and can depend sometimes on the chosen null model. Here we propose a method for classifying network structures and ranking its nodes in a statistically well-grounded fashion. The method is based on the use of Belief Propagation for learning through Entropy Maximization on both the Stochastic Block Model (SBM) and the degree-corrected Stochastic Block Model (dcSBM). As a specific application we show how the combined use of the two ensembles—SBM and dcSBM—allows to disentangle the bipartite and the core-periphery structure in the case of the e-MID interbank network. Specifically we find that, taking into account the degree, this interbank network is better described by a bipartite structure, while using the SBM the core-periphery structure emerges only when data are aggregated for more than a week.

  20. Grand canonical validation of the bipartite international trade network

    Straka, Mika J.; Caldarelli, Guido; Saracco, Fabio

    2017-08-01

    Devising strategies for economic development in a globally competitive landscape requires a solid and unbiased understanding of countries' technological advancements and similarities among export products. Both can be addressed through the bipartite representation of the International Trade Network. In this paper, we apply the recently proposed grand canonical projection algorithm to uncover country and product communities. Contrary to past endeavors, our methodology, based on information theory, creates monopartite projections in an unbiased and analytically tractable way. Single links between countries or products represent statistically significant signals, which are not accounted for by null models such as the bipartite configuration model. We find stable country communities reflecting the socioeconomic distinction in developed, newly industrialized, and developing countries. Furthermore, we observe product clusters based on the aforementioned country groups. Our analysis reveals the existence of a complicated structure in the bipartite International Trade Network: apart from the diversification of export baskets from the most basic to the most exclusive products, we observe a statistically significant signal of an export specialization mechanism towards more sophisticated products.

  1. Grand canonical validation of the bipartite international trade network.

    Straka, Mika J; Caldarelli, Guido; Saracco, Fabio

    2017-08-01

    Devising strategies for economic development in a globally competitive landscape requires a solid and unbiased understanding of countries' technological advancements and similarities among export products. Both can be addressed through the bipartite representation of the International Trade Network. In this paper, we apply the recently proposed grand canonical projection algorithm to uncover country and product communities. Contrary to past endeavors, our methodology, based on information theory, creates monopartite projections in an unbiased and analytically tractable way. Single links between countries or products represent statistically significant signals, which are not accounted for by null models such as the bipartite configuration model. We find stable country communities reflecting the socioeconomic distinction in developed, newly industrialized, and developing countries. Furthermore, we observe product clusters based on the aforementioned country groups. Our analysis reveals the existence of a complicated structure in the bipartite International Trade Network: apart from the diversification of export baskets from the most basic to the most exclusive products, we observe a statistically significant signal of an export specialization mechanism towards more sophisticated products.

  2. Bipartite Diametrical Graphs of Diameter 4 and Extreme Orders

    Salah Al-Addasi

    2008-01-01

    in which this upper bound is attained, this graph can be viewed as a generalization of the Rhombic Dodecahedron. Then we show that for any ≥2, the graph (2,2 is the unique (up to isomorphism bipartite diametrical graph of diameter 4 and partite sets of cardinalities 2 and 2, and hence in particular, for =3, the graph (6,8 which is just the Rhombic Dodecahedron is the unique (up to isomorphism bipartite diametrical graph of such a diameter and cardinalities of partite sets. Thus we complete a characterization of -graphs of diameter 4 and cardinality of the smaller partite set not exceeding 6. We prove that the neighborhoods of vertices of the larger partite set of (2,2 form a matroid whose basis graph is the hypercube . We prove that any -graph of diameter 4 is bipartite self complementary, thus in particular (2,2. Finally, we study some additional properties of (2,2 concerning the order of its automorphism group, girth, domination number, and when being Eulerian.

  3. Induced bipartite entanglement from three qubit states and quantum teleportation

    Park, Dae-Kil; Son, Jin-Woo; Cha, Seong-Keuck [Kyungnam University, Masan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Only Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and W states are well known to have genuine tripartite entanglement in all three qubit states. The entanglement of quantum state is also well known to play an important role in various quantum information processes. Then, the following question naturally arises: which one is better between the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and the W states in real quantum information processing? We try to give an answer to this question from two aspects. First, we compute the induced bipartite entanglement for a mixture consisting of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and W states. If the entanglement is the only physical resource for information processing, the induced bipartite entanglement suggests that Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and W states are equally good. Second, we choose the bipartite teleportation scheme as an example of quantum information processing using the mixture as a quantum channel and compute the average fidelities. Our calculation shows that the W state is slightly more robust than the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state when a small perturbation disturbs the teleportation process. This slight discrepancy seems to imply that entanglement is not the only resource for quantum information processing.

  4. Induced bipartite entanglement from three qubit states and quantum teleportation

    Park, Dae-Kil; Son, Jin-Woo; Cha, Seong-Keuck

    2010-01-01

    Only Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and W states are well known to have genuine tripartite entanglement in all three qubit states. The entanglement of quantum state is also well known to play an important role in various quantum information processes. Then, the following question naturally arises: which one is better between the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and the W states in real quantum information processing? We try to give an answer to this question from two aspects. First, we compute the induced bipartite entanglement for a mixture consisting of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and W states. If the entanglement is the only physical resource for information processing, the induced bipartite entanglement suggests that Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and W states are equally good. Second, we choose the bipartite teleportation scheme as an example of quantum information processing using the mixture as a quantum channel and compute the average fidelities. Our calculation shows that the W state is slightly more robust than the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state when a small perturbation disturbs the teleportation process. This slight discrepancy seems to imply that entanglement is not the only resource for quantum information processing.

  5. A spatial-spectral approach for deriving high signal quality eigenvectors for remote sensing image transformations

    Rogge, Derek; Bachmann, Martin; Rivard, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Spectral decorrelation (transformations) methods have long been used in remote sensing. Transformation of the image data onto eigenvectors that comprise physically meaningful spectral properties (signal) can be used to reduce the dimensionality of hyperspectral images as the number of spectrally...... distinct signal sources composing a given hyperspectral scene is generally much less than the number of spectral bands. Determining eigenvectors dominated by signal variance as opposed to noise is a difficult task. Problems also arise in using these transformations on large images, multiple flight...... and spectral subsampling to the data, which is accomplished by deriving a limited set of eigenvectors for spatially contiguous subsets. These subset eigenvectors are compiled together to form a new noise reduced data set, which is subsequently used to derive a set of global orthogonal eigenvectors. Data from...

  6. A HyperSpectral Imaging (HSI) approach for bio-digestate real time monitoring

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Fabbri, Andrea; Serranti, Silvia

    2014-05-01

    One of the key issues in developing Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) is represented by the optimal utilisation of fertilisers and herbicidal to reduce the impact of Nitrates in soils and the environment. In traditional agriculture practises, these substances were provided to the soils through the use of chemical products (inorganic/organic fertilizers, soil improvers/conditioners, etc.), usually associated to several major environmental problems, such as: water pollution and contamination, fertilizer dependency, soil acidification, trace mineral depletion, over-fertilization, high energy consumption, contribution to climate change, impacts on mycorrhizas, lack of long-term sustainability, etc. For this reason, the agricultural market is more and more interested in the utilisation of organic fertilisers and soil improvers. Among organic fertilizers, there is an emerging interest for the digestate, a sub-product resulting from anaerobic digestion (AD) processes. Several studies confirm the high properties of digestate if used as organic fertilizer and soil improver/conditioner. Digestate, in fact, is somehow similar to compost: AD converts a major part of organic nitrogen to ammonia, which is then directly available to plants as nitrogen. In this paper, new analytical tools, based on HyperSpectral Imaging (HSI) sensing devices, and related detection architectures, is presented and discussed in order to define and apply simple to use, reliable, robust and low cost strategies finalised to define and implement innovative smart detection engines for digestate characterization and monitoring. This approach is finalized to utilize this "waste product" as a valuable organic fertilizer and soil conditioner, in a reduced impact and an "ad hoc" soil fertilisation perspective. Furthermore, the possibility to contemporary utilize the HSI approach to realize a real time physicalchemical characterisation of agricultural soils (i.e. nitrogen, phosphorus, etc., detection) could

  7. Analysis and mitigation of systematic errors in spectral shearing interferometry of pulses approaching the single-cycle limit [Invited

    Birge, Jonathan R.; Kaertner, Franz X.

    2008-01-01

    We derive an analytical approximation for the measured pulse width error in spectral shearing methods, such as spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER), caused by an anomalous delay between the two sheared pulse components. This analysis suggests that, as pulses approach the single-cycle limit, the resulting requirements on the calibration and stability of this delay become significant, requiring precision orders of magnitude higher than the scale of a wavelength. This is demonstrated by numerical simulations of SPIDER pulse reconstruction using actual data from a sub-two-cycle laser. We briefly propose methods to minimize the effects of this sensitivity in SPIDER and review variants of spectral shearing that attempt to avoid this difficulty

  8. An integrated approach to fingerprint indexing using spectral clustering based on minutiae points

    Mngenge, NA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available this problem by constructing a rotational, scale and translation (RST) invariant fingerprint descriptor based on minutiae points. The proposed RST invariant descriptor dimensions are then reduced and passed to a spectral clustering algorithm which automatically...

  9. A wavelet and least square filter based spatial-spectral denoising approach of hyperspectral imagery

    Li, Ting; Chen, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Gang; Xue, Bo; Ni, Guo-Qiang

    2009-11-01

    Noise reduction is a crucial step in hyperspectral imagery pre-processing. Based on sensor characteristics, the noise of hyperspectral imagery represents in both spatial and spectral domain. However, most prevailing denosing techniques process the imagery in only one specific domain, which have not utilized multi-domain nature of hyperspectral imagery. In this paper, a new spatial-spectral noise reduction algorithm is proposed, which is based on wavelet analysis and least squares filtering techniques. First, in the spatial domain, a new stationary wavelet shrinking algorithm with improved threshold function is utilized to adjust the noise level band-by-band. This new algorithm uses BayesShrink for threshold estimation, and amends the traditional soft-threshold function by adding shape tuning parameters. Comparing with soft or hard threshold function, the improved one, which is first-order derivable and has a smooth transitional region between noise and signal, could save more details of image edge and weaken Pseudo-Gibbs. Then, in the spectral domain, cubic Savitzky-Golay filter based on least squares method is used to remove spectral noise and artificial noise that may have been introduced in during the spatial denoising. Appropriately selecting the filter window width according to prior knowledge, this algorithm has effective performance in smoothing the spectral curve. The performance of the new algorithm is experimented on a set of Hyperion imageries acquired in 2007. The result shows that the new spatial-spectral denoising algorithm provides more significant signal-to-noise-ratio improvement than traditional spatial or spectral method, while saves the local spectral absorption features better.

  10. Infrared spectral imaging as a novel approach for histopathological recognition in colon cancer diagnosis

    Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Gobinet, Cyril; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Untereiner, Valérie; Bouché, Olivier; Manfait, Michel; Sockalingum, Ganesh Dhruvananda; Piot, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    Innovative diagnostic methods are the need of the hour that could complement conventional histopathology for cancer diagnosis. In this perspective, we propose a new concept based on spectral histopathology, using IR spectral micro-imaging, directly applied to paraffinized colon tissue array stabilized in an agarose matrix without any chemical pre-treatment. In order to correct spectral interferences from paraffin and agarose, a mathematical procedure is implemented. The corrected spectral images are then processed by a multivariate clustering method to automatically recover, on the basis of their intrinsic molecular composition, the main histological classes of the normal and the tumoral colon tissue. The spectral signatures from different histological classes of the colonic tissues are analyzed using statistical methods (Kruskal-Wallis test and principal component analysis) to identify the most discriminant IR features. These features allow characterizing some of the biomolecular alterations associated with malignancy. Thus, via a single analysis, in a label-free and nondestructive manner, main changes associated with nucleotide, carbohydrates, and collagen features can be identified simultaneously between the compared normal and the cancerous tissues. The present study demonstrates the potential of IR spectral imaging as a complementary modern tool, to conventional histopathology, for an objective cancer diagnosis directly from paraffin-embedded tissue arrays.

  11. Spectral stratigraphy

    Lang, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to stratigraphic analysis is described which uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral remote sensing data combined with topographic information to determine the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata exposed at the surface. The new stratigraphic procedure is illustrated by examples in the literature. The published results demonstrate the potential of spectral stratigraphy for mapping strata, determining dip and strike, measuring and correlating stratigraphic sequences, defining lithofacies, mapping biofacies, and interpreting geological structures.

  12. Discord as a quantum resource for bi-partite communication

    Chrzanowski, Helen M.; Assad, Syed M.; Symul, Thomas; Lam, Ping Koy; Gu, Mile; Modi, Kavan; Vedral, Vlatko; Ralph, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent interactions that generate negligible entanglement can still exhibit unique quantum behaviour. This observation has motivated a search beyond entanglement for a complete description of all quantum correlations. Quantum discord is a promising candidate. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that under certain measurement constraints, discord between bipartite systems can be consumed to encode information that can only be accessed by coherent quantum interactions. The inability to access this information by any other means allows us to use discord to directly quantify this ‘quantum advantage’

  13. Multipartite-to-bipartite entanglement transformations and polynomial identity testing

    Chitambar, Eric; Duan Runyao; Shi Yaoyun

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of deciding if some multiparty entangled pure state can be converted, with a nonzero success probability, into a given bipartite pure state shared between two specified parties through local quantum operations and classical communication. We show that this question is equivalent to the well-known computational problem of deciding if a multivariate polynomial is identically zero. Efficient randomized algorithms developed to study the latter can thus be applied to our question. As a result, a given transformation is possible if and only if it is generically attainable by a simple randomized protocol.

  14. Additional Quantum Properties of Entangled Bipartite Qubit Systems Coupled to Photon Baths

    Quintana, C

    2016-01-01

    The time evolution of an entangled bi-partite qubit interacting with two independent photon baths in isolated cavities is not unitary. It is shown that the bi-partite qubit oscillates between pure and mixed states, and that the initial entanglement is lost and recovered in time by time as a consequence of its interaction with the baths. (paper)

  15. Traumatic separation of a type I patella bipartite in a sportsman

    Ottesen, Casper Smedegaard; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Holck, Kim

    2014-01-01

    fibrocartilage was found on both parts of the patella. Asymptomatic patella bi-partite was found on X-ray imaging of the patient's left knee, and he was diagnosed to have traumatic separation of a type I patella bipartite. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgical and radiological findings....

  16. Mutually Unbiased Maximally Entangled Bases for the Bipartite System Cd⊗ C^{dk}

    Nan, Hua; Tao, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Tian-Jiao; Zhang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The construction of maximally entangled bases for the bipartite system Cd⊗ Cd is discussed firstly, and some mutually unbiased bases with maximally entangled bases are given, where 2≤ d≤5. Moreover, we study a systematic way of constructing mutually unbiased maximally entangled bases for the bipartite system Cd⊗ C^{dk}.

  17. Simulating high-frequency seismograms in complicated media: A spectral approach

    Orrey, J.L.; Archambeau, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    The main attraction of using a spectral method instead of a conventional finite difference or finite element technique for full-wavefield forward modeling in elastic media is the increased accuracy of a spectral approximation. While a finite difference method accurate to second order typically requires 8 to 10 computational grid points to resolve the smallest wavelengths on a 1-D grid, a spectral method that approximates the wavefield by trignometric functions theoretically requires only 2 grid points per minimum wavelength and produces no numerical dispersion from the spatial discretization. The resultant savings in computer memory, which is very significant in 2 and 3 dimensions, allows for larger scale and/or higher frequency simulations

  18. A probabilistic approach for the estimation of earthquake source parameters from spectral inversion

    Supino, M.; Festa, G.; Zollo, A.

    2017-12-01

    The amplitude spectrum of a seismic signal related to an earthquake source carries information about the size of the rupture, moment, stress and energy release. Furthermore, it can be used to characterize the Green's function of the medium crossed by the seismic waves. We describe the earthquake amplitude spectrum assuming a generalized Brune's (1970) source model, and direct P- and S-waves propagating in a layered velocity model, characterized by a frequency-independent Q attenuation factor. The observed displacement spectrum depends indeed on three source parameters, the seismic moment (through the low-frequency spectral level), the corner frequency (that is a proxy of the fault length) and the high-frequency decay parameter. These parameters are strongly correlated each other and with the quality factor Q; a rigorous estimation of the associated uncertainties and parameter resolution is thus needed to obtain reliable estimations.In this work, the uncertainties are characterized adopting a probabilistic approach for the parameter estimation. Assuming an L2-norm based misfit function, we perform a global exploration of the parameter space to find the absolute minimum of the cost function and then we explore the cost-function associated joint a-posteriori probability density function around such a minimum, to extract the correlation matrix of the parameters. The global exploration relies on building a Markov chain in the parameter space and on combining a deterministic minimization with a random exploration of the space (basin-hopping technique). The joint pdf is built from the misfit function using the maximum likelihood principle and assuming a Gaussian-like distribution of the parameters. It is then computed on a grid centered at the global minimum of the cost-function. The numerical integration of the pdf finally provides mean, variance and correlation matrix associated with the set of best-fit parameters describing the model. Synthetic tests are performed to

  19. Functional analysis of bipartite begomovirus coat protein promoter sequences

    Lacatus, Gabriela; Sunter, Garry

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that the AL2 gene of Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV) activates the CP promoter in mesophyll and acts to derepress the promoter in vascular tissue, similar to that observed for Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV). Binding studies indicate that sequences mediating repression and activation of the TGMV and CaLCuV CP promoter specifically bind different nuclear factors common to Nicotiana benthamiana, spinach and tomato. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrates that TGMV AL2 can interact with both sequences independently. Binding of nuclear protein(s) from different crop species to viral sequences conserved in both bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses, including TGMV, CaLCuV, Pepper golden mosaic virus and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus suggests that bipartite begomoviruses bind common host factors to regulate the CP promoter. This is consistent with a model in which AL2 interacts with different components of the cellular transcription machinery that bind viral sequences important for repression and activation of begomovirus CP promoters

  20. Faster Double-Size Bipartite Multiplication out of Montgomery Multipliers

    Yoshino, Masayuki; Okeya, Katsuyuki; Vuillaume, Camille

    This paper proposes novel algorithms for computing double-size modular multiplications with few modulus-dependent precomputations. Low-end devices such as smartcards are usually equipped with hardware Montgomery multipliers. However, due to progresses of mathematical attacks, security institutions such as NIST have steadily demanded longer bit-lengths for public-key cryptography, making the multipliers quickly obsolete. In an attempt to extend the lifespan of such multipliers, double-size techniques compute modular multiplications with twice the bit-length of the multipliers. Techniques are known for extending the bit-length of classical Euclidean multipliers, of Montgomery multipliers and the combination thereof, namely bipartite multipliers. However, unlike classical and bipartite multiplications, Montgomery multiplications involve modulus-dependent precomputations, which amount to a large part of an RSA encryption or signature verification. The proposed double-size technique simulates double-size multiplications based on single-size Montgomery multipliers, and yet precomputations are essentially free: in an 2048-bit RSA encryption or signature verification with public exponent e=216+1, the proposal with a 1024-bit Montgomery multiplier is at least 1.5 times faster than previous double-size Montgomery multiplications.

  1. Bipartite fidelity and Loschmidt echo of the bosonic conformal interface

    Zhou, Tianci; Lin, Mao

    2017-12-01

    We study the quantum quench problem for a class of bosonic conformal interfaces by computing the Loschmidt echo and the bipartite fidelity. The quench can be viewed as a sudden change of boundary conditions parametrized by θ when connecting two one-dimensional critical systems. They are classified by S (θ ) matrices associated with the current scattering processes on the interface. The resulting Loschmidt echo of the quench has long time algebraic decay t-α, whose exponent also appears in the finite size bipartite fidelity as L-α/2. We perform analytic and numerical calculations of the exponent α , and find that it has a quadratic dependence on the change of θ if the prior and post-quench boundary conditions are of the same type of S , while remaining 1/4 otherwise. Possible physical realizations of these interfaces include, for instance, connecting different quantum wires (Luttinger liquids), quench of the topological phase edge states, etc., and the exponent can be detected in an x-ray edge singularity-type experiment.

  2. Uncovering collective listening habits and music genres in bipartite networks

    Lambiotte, R.; Ausloos, M.

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we analyze web-downloaded data on people sharing their music library, that we use as their individual musical signatures. The system is represented by a bipartite network, nodes being the music groups and the listeners. Music groups’ audience size behaves like a power law, but the individual music library size is an exponential with deviations at small values. In order to extract structures from the network, we focus on correlation matrices, that we filter by removing the least correlated links. This percolation idea-based method reveals the emergence of social communities and music genres, that are visualized by a branching representation. Evidence of collective listening habits that do not fit the neat usual genres defined by the music industry indicates an alternative way of classifying listeners and music groups. The structure of the network is also studied by a more refined method, based upon a random walk exploration of its properties. Finally, a personal identification-community imitation model for growing bipartite networks is outlined, following Potts ingredients. Simulation results do reproduce quite well the empirical data.

  3. Upper bounds on entangling rates of bipartite Hamiltonians

    Bravyi, Sergey

    2007-01-01

    We discuss upper bounds on the rate at which unitary evolution governed by a nonlocal Hamiltonian can generate entanglement in a bipartite system. Given a bipartite Hamiltonian H coupling two finite dimensional particles A and B, the entangling rate is shown to be upper bounded by c log(d) parallel H parallel, where d is the smallest dimension of the interacting particles parallel H parallel is the operator norm of H, and c is a constant close to 1. Under certain restrictions on the initial state we prove an analogous upper bound for the ancilla-assisted entangling rate with a constant c that does not depend upon dimensions of local ancillas. The restriction is that the initial state has at most two distinct Schmidt coefficients (each coefficient may have arbitrarily large multiplicity). Our proof is based on analysis of a mixing rate - a functional measuring how fast entropy can be produced if one mixes a time-independent state with a state evolving unitarily

  4. Spectral Approach to Derive the Representation Formulae for Solutions of the Wave Equation

    Gusein Sh. Guseinov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using spectral properties of the Laplace operator and some structural formula for rapidly decreasing functions of the Laplace operator, we offer a novel method to derive explicit formulae for solutions to the Cauchy problem for classical wave equation in arbitrary dimensions. Among them are the well-known d'Alembert, Poisson, and Kirchhoff representation formulae in low space dimensions.

  5. A new approach to passivity preserving model reduction : the dominant spectral zero method

    Ionutiu, R.; Rommes, J.; Antoulas, A.C.; Roos, J.; Costa, L.R.J.

    2010-01-01

    A new model reduction method for circuit simulation is presented, which preserves passivity by interpolating dominant spectral zeros. These are computed as poles of an associated Hamiltonian system, using an iterative solver: the subspace accelerated dominant pole algorithm (SADPA). Based on a

  6. Multi-tissue partial volume quantification in multi-contrast MRI using an optimised spectral unmixing approach.

    Collewet, Guylaine; Moussaoui, Saïd; Deligny, Cécile; Lucas, Tiphaine; Idier, Jérôme

    2018-06-01

    Multi-tissue partial volume estimation in MRI images is investigated with a viewpoint related to spectral unmixing as used in hyperspectral imaging. The main contribution of this paper is twofold. It firstly proposes a theoretical analysis of the statistical optimality conditions of the proportion estimation problem, which in the context of multi-contrast MRI data acquisition allows to appropriately set the imaging sequence parameters. Secondly, an efficient proportion quantification algorithm based on the minimisation of a penalised least-square criterion incorporating a regularity constraint on the spatial distribution of the proportions is proposed. Furthermore, the resulting developments are discussed using empirical simulations. The practical usefulness of the spectral unmixing approach for partial volume quantification in MRI is illustrated through an application to food analysis on the proving of a Danish pastry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comprehensive spectral and instrumental approaches for the easy monitoring of features and purity of different carbon nanostructures for nanocomposite applications

    Boccaleri, Enrico; Arrais, Aldo; Frache, Alberto; Gianelli, Walter; Fino, Paolo; Camino, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    A wide series of carbon nanostructures (ranging from fullerenes, through carbon nanotubes, up to carbon nanofibers) promise to change several fields in material science, but a real industrial implementation depends on their availability at reasonable prices with affordable and reproducible degrees of purity. In this study we propose simple instrumental approaches to efficiently characterize different commercial samples, particularly for qualitative evaluation of impurities, the discrimination of their respective spectral features and, when possible, for quantitative determination. We critically discuss information that researchers in the field of nanocomposite technology can achieve in this aim by spectral techniques such as Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy, thermo-gravimetrical analysis, mass spectrometry-hyphenated thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. All these can be helpful, in applied research on material science, for a fast reliable monitoring of the actual purity of carbon products in both commercial and laboratory-produced samples as well as in composite materials

  8. A simple approach to spectrally resolved fluorescence and bright field microscopy over select regions of interest.

    Dahlberg, Peter D; Boughter, Christopher T; Faruk, Nabil F; Hong, Lu; Koh, Young Hoon; Reyer, Matthew A; Shaiber, Alon; Sherani, Aiman; Zhang, Jiacheng; Jureller, Justin E; Hammond, Adam T

    2016-11-01

    A standard wide field inverted microscope was converted to a spatially selective spectrally resolved microscope through the addition of a polarizing beam splitter, a pair of polarizers, an amplitude-mode liquid crystal-spatial light modulator, and a USB spectrometer. The instrument is capable of simultaneously imaging and acquiring spectra over user defined regions of interest. The microscope can also be operated in a bright-field mode to acquire absorption spectra of micron scale objects. The utility of the instrument is demonstrated on three different samples. First, the instrument is used to resolve three differently labeled fluorescent beads in vitro. Second, the instrument is used to recover time dependent bleaching dynamics that have distinct spectral changes in the cyanobacteria, Synechococcus leopoliensis UTEX 625. Lastly, the technique is used to acquire the absorption spectra of CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 perovskites and measure differences between nanocrystal films and micron scale crystals.

  9. A simple approach to spectrally resolved fluorescence and bright field microscopy over select regions of interest

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Boughter, Christopher T.; Faruk, Nabil F.; Hong, Lu; Koh, Young Hoon; Reyer, Matthew A.; Shaiber, Alon; Sherani, Aiman; Zhang, Jiacheng; Jureller, Justin E.; Hammond, Adam T.

    2016-11-01

    A standard wide field inverted microscope was converted to a spatially selective spectrally resolved microscope through the addition of a polarizing beam splitter, a pair of polarizers, an amplitude-mode liquid crystal-spatial light modulator, and a USB spectrometer. The instrument is capable of simultaneously imaging and acquiring spectra over user defined regions of interest. The microscope can also be operated in a bright-field mode to acquire absorption spectra of micron scale objects. The utility of the instrument is demonstrated on three different samples. First, the instrument is used to resolve three differently labeled fluorescent beads in vitro. Second, the instrument is used to recover time dependent bleaching dynamics that have distinct spectral changes in the cyanobacteria, Synechococcus leopoliensis UTEX 625. Lastly, the technique is used to acquire the absorption spectra of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskites and measure differences between nanocrystal films and micron scale crystals.

  10. Spectral Kernel Approach to Study Radiative Response of Climate Variables and Interannual Variability of Reflected Solar Spectrum

    Jin, Zhonghai; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Loukachine, Constantin; Charlock, Thomas P.; Young, David; Noeel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The radiative kernel approach provides a simple way to separate the radiative response to different climate parameters and to decompose the feedback into radiative and climate response components. Using CERES/MODIS/Geostationary data, we calculated and analyzed the solar spectral reflectance kernels for various climate parameters on zonal, regional, and global spatial scales. The kernel linearity is tested. Errors in the kernel due to nonlinearity can vary strongly depending on climate parameter, wavelength, surface, and solar elevation; they are large in some absorption bands for some parameters but are negligible in most conditions. The spectral kernels are used to calculate the radiative responses to different climate parameter changes in different latitudes. The results show that the radiative response in high latitudes is sensitive to the coverage of snow and sea ice. The radiative response in low latitudes is contributed mainly by cloud property changes, especially cloud fraction and optical depth. The large cloud height effect is confined to absorption bands, while the cloud particle size effect is found mainly in the near infrared. The kernel approach, which is based on calculations using CERES retrievals, is then tested by direct comparison with spectral measurements from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) (a different instrument on a different spacecraft). The monthly mean interannual variability of spectral reflectance based on the kernel technique is consistent with satellite observations over the ocean, but not over land, where both model and data have large uncertainty. RMS errors in kernel ]derived monthly global mean reflectance over the ocean compared to observations are about 0.001, and the sampling error is likely a major component.

  11. A simple approach to spectrally resolved fluorescence and bright field microscopy over select regions of interest

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Boughter, Christopher T.; Faruk, Nabil F.; Hong, Lu; Koh, Young Hoon; Reyer, Matthew A.; Shaiber, Alon; Sherani, Aiman; Zhang, Jiacheng; Jureller, Justin E.; Hammond, Adam T.

    2016-01-01

    A standard wide field inverted microscope was converted to a spatially selective spectrally resolved microscope through the addition of a polarizing beam splitter, a pair of polarizers, an amplitude-mode liquid crystal-spatial light modulator, and a USB spectrometer. The instrument is capable of simultaneously imaging and acquiring spectra over user defined regions of interest. The microscope can also be operated in a bright-field mode to acquire absorption spectra of micron scale objects. Th...

  12. Measurement of high-temperature spectral emissivity using integral blackbody approach

    Pan, Yijie; Dong, Wei; Lin, Hong; Yuan, Zundong; Bloembergen, Pieter

    2016-11-01

    Spectral emissivity is one of the most critical thermophysical properties of a material for heat design and analysis. Especially in the traditional radiation thermometry, normal spectral emissivity is very important. We developed a prototype instrument based upon an integral blackbody method to measure material's spectral emissivity at elevated temperatures. An optimized commercial variable-high-temperature blackbody, a high speed linear actuator, a linear pyrometer, and an in-house designed synchronization circuit was used to implemented the system. A sample was placed in a crucible at the bottom of the blackbody furnace, by which the sample and the tube formed a simulated reference blackbody which had an effective total emissivity greater than 0.985. During the measurement, a pneumatic cylinder pushed a graphite rode and then the sample crucible to the cold opening within hundreds of microseconds. The linear pyrometer was used to monitor the brightness temperature of the sample surface, and the corresponding opto-converted voltage was fed and recorded by a digital multimeter. To evaluate the temperature drop of the sample along the pushing process, a physical model was proposed. The tube was discretized into several isothermal cylindrical rings, and the temperature of each ring was measurement. View factors between sample and rings were utilized. Then, the actual surface temperature of the sample at the end opening was obtained. Taking advantages of the above measured voltage signal and the calculated actual temperature, normal spectral emissivity under the that temperature point was obtained. Graphite sample at 1300°C was measured to prove the validity of the method.

  13. Coherent Structures and Spectral Energy Transfer in Turbulent Plasma: A Space-Filter Approach

    Camporeale, E.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Califano, F.; Retinò, A.

    2018-03-01

    Plasma turbulence at scales of the order of the ion inertial length is mediated by several mechanisms, including linear wave damping, magnetic reconnection, the formation and dissipation of thin current sheets, and stochastic heating. It is now understood that the presence of localized coherent structures enhances the dissipation channels and the kinetic features of the plasma. However, no formal way of quantifying the relationship between scale-to-scale energy transfer and the presence of spatial structures has been presented so far. In the Letter we quantify such a relationship analyzing the results of a two-dimensional high-resolution Hall magnetohydrodynamic simulation. In particular, we employ the technique of space filtering to derive a spectral energy flux term which defines, in any point of the computational domain, the signed flux of spectral energy across a given wave number. The characterization of coherent structures is performed by means of a traditional two-dimensional wavelet transformation. By studying the correlation between the spectral energy flux and the wavelet amplitude, we demonstrate the strong relationship between scale-to-scale transfer and coherent structures. Furthermore, by conditioning one quantity with respect to the other, we are able for the first time to quantify the inhomogeneity of the turbulence cascade induced by topological structures in the magnetic field. Taking into account the low space-filling factor of coherent structures (i.e., they cover a small portion of space), it emerges that 80% of the spectral energy transfer (both in the direct and inverse cascade directions) is localized in about 50% of space, and 50% of the energy transfer is localized in only 25% of space.

  14. Rendezvous effects in the diffusion process on bipartite metapopulation networks.

    Cao, Lang; Li, Xun; Wang, Bing; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2011-10-01

    Epidemic outbreaks have been shown to be closely related to the rendezvous-induced transmission of infection, which is caused by casual contact with infected individuals in public gatherings. To investigate rendezvous effects in the spread of infectious diseases, we propose an epidemic model on metapopulation networks bipartite-divided into two sets of location and rendezvous nodes. At a given transition rate γ(kk')(p), each individual transfers from location k to rendezvous p (where rendezvous-induced disease incidence occurs) and thereafter moves to location k'. We find that the eigenstructure of a transition-rate-dependent matrix determines the epidemic threshold condition. Both analytical and numerical results show that rendezvous-induced transmission accelerates the progress of infectious diseases, implying the significance of outbreak control measures including prevention of public gatherings or decentralization of a large-scale rendezvous into downsized ones.

  15. No-signaling, perfect bipartite dichotomic correlations and local randomness

    Seevinck, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    The no-signaling constraint on bi-partite correlations is reviewed. It is shown that in order to obtain non-trivial Bell-type inequalities that discern no-signaling correlations from more general ones, one must go beyond considering expectation values of products of observables only. A new set of nontrivial no-signaling inequalities is derived which have a remarkably close resemblance to the CHSH inequality, yet are fundamentally different. A set of inequalities by Roy and Singh and Avis et al., which is claimed to be useful for discerning no-signaling correlations, is shown to be trivially satisfied by any correlation whatsoever. Finally, using the set of newly derived no-signaling inequalities a result with potential cryptographic consequences is proven: if different parties use identical devices, then, once they have perfect correlations at spacelike separation between dichotomic observables, they know that because of no-signaling the local marginals cannot but be completely random.

  16. Partial recovery of entanglement in bipartite-entanglement transformations

    Bandyopadhyay, Somshubhro; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Vatan, Farrokh

    2002-01-01

    Any deterministic bipartite-entanglement transformation involving finite copies of pure states and carried out using local operations and classical communication (LOCC) results in a net loss of entanglement. We show that for almost all such transformations, partial recovery of lost entanglement is achievable by using 2x2 auxiliary entangled states, no matter how large the dimensions of the parent states are. For the rest of the special cases of deterministic LOCC transformations, we show that the dimension of the auxiliary entangled state depends on the presence of equalities in the majorization relations of the parent states. We show that genuine recovery is still possible using auxiliary states in dimensions less than that of the parent states for all patterns of majorization relations except only one special case

  17. E6 and the bipartite entanglement of three qutrits

    Duff, M. J.; Ferrara, S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent investigations have established an analogy between the entropy of four-dimensional supersymmetric black holes in string theory and entanglement in quantum information theory. Examples include: (1) N=2 STU black holes and the tripartite entanglement of three qubits (2-state systems), where the common symmetry is [SL(2)] 3 and (2) N=8 black holes and the tripartite entanglement of seven qubits where the common symmetry is E 7 superset of [SL(2)] 7 . Here we present another example: N=8 black holes (or black strings) in five dimensions and the bipartite entanglement of three qutrits (3-state systems), where the common symmetry is E 6 superset of [SL(3)] 3 . Both the black hole (or black string) entropy and the entanglement measure are provided by the Cartan cubic E 6 invariant. Similar analogies exist for magic N=2 supergravity black holes in both four and five dimensions

  18. Epidemic spread in bipartite network by considering risk awareness

    Han, She; Sun, Mei; Ampimah, Benjamin Chris; Han, Dun

    2018-02-01

    Human awareness plays an important role in the spread of infectious diseases and the control of propagation patterns. Exploring the interplay between human awareness and epidemic spreading is a topic that has been receiving increasing attention. Considering the fact, some well-known diseases only spread between different species we propose a theoretical analysis of the Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) epidemic spread from the perspective of bipartite network and risk aversion. Using mean field theory, the epidemic threshold is calculated theoretically. Simulation results are consistent with the proposed analytic model. The results show that, the final infection density is negative linear with the value of individuals' risk awareness. Therefore, the epidemic spread could be effectively suppressed by improving individuals' risk awareness.

  19. Spin-1 Dirac-Weyl fermions protected by bipartite symmetry

    Lin, Zeren [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Zhirong, E-mail: LiuZhiRong@pku.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Nanochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-07

    We propose that bipartite symmetry allows spin-1 Dirac-Weyl points, a generalization of the spin-1/2 Dirac points in graphene, to appear as topologically protected at the Fermi level. In this spirit, we provide methodology to construct spin-1 Dirac-Weyl points of this kind in a given 2D space group and get the classification of the known spin-1 systems in the literature. We also apply the workflow to predict two new systems, P3m1-9 and P31m-15, to possess spin-1 at K/K′ in the Brillouin zone of hexagonal lattice. Their stability under various strains is investigated and compared with that of T{sub 3}, an extensively studied model of ultracold atoms trapped in optical lattice with spin-1 also at K/K′.

  20. Quantum correlations for bipartite continuous-variable systems

    Ma, Ruifen; Hou, Jinchuan; Qi, Xiaofei; Wang, Yangyang

    2018-04-01

    Two quantum correlations Q and Q_P for (m+n)-mode continuous-variable systems are introduced in terms of average distance between the reduced states under the local Gaussian positive operator-valued measurements, and analytical formulas of these quantum correlations for bipartite Gaussian states are provided. It is shown that the product states do not contain these quantum correlations, and conversely, all (m+n)-mode Gaussian states with zero quantum correlations are product states. Generally, Q≥ Q_{P}, but for the symmetric two-mode squeezed thermal states, these quantum correlations are the same and a computable formula is given. In addition, Q is compared with Gaussian geometric discord for symmetric squeezed thermal states.

  1. Entanglement dynamics of a pure bipartite system in dissipative environments

    Tahira, Rabia; Ikram, Manzoor; Azim, Tasnim; Suhail Zubairy, M [Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-10-28

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden death of entanglement in a bipartite system subjected to dissipative environments with arbitrary initial pure entangled state between two atoms. We find that in a vacuum reservoir the presence of the state where both atoms are in excited states is a necessary condition for the sudden death of entanglement. Otherwise entanglement remains for an infinite time and decays asymptotically with the decay of individual qubits. For pure 2-qubit entangled states in a thermal environment, we observe that the sudden death of entanglement always happens. The sudden death time of the entangled states is related to the temperature of the reservoir and the initial preparation of the entangled states.

  2. Entanglement dynamics of a pure bipartite system in dissipative environments

    Tahira, Rabia; Ikram, Manzoor; Azim, Tasnim; Suhail Zubairy, M

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden death of entanglement in a bipartite system subjected to dissipative environments with arbitrary initial pure entangled state between two atoms. We find that in a vacuum reservoir the presence of the state where both atoms are in excited states is a necessary condition for the sudden death of entanglement. Otherwise entanglement remains for an infinite time and decays asymptotically with the decay of individual qubits. For pure 2-qubit entangled states in a thermal environment, we observe that the sudden death of entanglement always happens. The sudden death time of the entangled states is related to the temperature of the reservoir and the initial preparation of the entangled states.

  3. All pure bipartite entangled states can be self-tested

    Coladangelo, Andrea; Goh, Koon Tong; Scarani, Valerio

    2017-05-01

    Quantum technologies promise advantages over their classical counterparts in the fields of computation, security and sensing. It is thus desirable that classical users are able to obtain guarantees on quantum devices, even without any knowledge of their inner workings. That such classical certification is possible at all is remarkable: it is a consequence of the violation of Bell inequalities by entangled quantum systems. Device-independent self-testing refers to the most complete such certification: it enables a classical user to uniquely identify the quantum state shared by uncharacterized devices by simply inspecting the correlations of measurement outcomes. Self-testing was first demonstrated for the singlet state and a few other examples of self-testable states were reported in recent years. Here, we address the long-standing open question of whether every pure bipartite entangled state is self-testable. We answer it affirmatively by providing explicit self-testing correlations for all such states.

  4. Cloud phase identification of Arctic boundary-layer clouds from airborne spectral reflection measurements: test of three approaches

    A. Ehrlich

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Arctic boundary-layer clouds were investigated with remote sensing and in situ instruments during the Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR campaign in March and April 2007. The clouds formed in a cold air outbreak over the open Greenland Sea. Beside the predominant mixed-phase clouds pure liquid water and ice clouds were observed. Utilizing measurements of solar radiation reflected by the clouds three methods to retrieve the thermodynamic phase of the cloud are introduced and compared. Two ice indices IS and IP were obtained by analyzing the spectral pattern of the cloud top reflectance in the near infrared (1500–1800 nm wavelength spectral range which is characterized by ice and water absorption. While IS analyzes the spectral slope of the reflectance in this wavelength range, IS utilizes a principle component analysis (PCA of the spectral reflectance. A third ice index IA is based on the different side scattering of spherical liquid water particles and nonspherical ice crystals which was recorded in simultaneous measurements of spectral cloud albedo and reflectance.

    Radiative transfer simulations show that IS, IP and IA range between 5 to 80, 0 to 8 and 1 to 1.25 respectively with lowest values indicating pure liquid water clouds and highest values pure ice clouds. The spectral slope ice index IS and the PCA ice index IP are found to be strongly sensitive to the effective diameter of the ice crystals present in the cloud. Therefore, the identification of mixed-phase clouds requires a priori knowledge of the ice crystal dimension. The reflectance-albedo ice index IA is mainly dominated by the uppermost cloud layer (τ<1.5. Therefore, typical boundary-layer mixed-phase clouds with a liquid cloud top layer will

  5. Asystasia mosaic Madagascar virus: a novel bipartite begomovirus infecting the weed Asystasia gangetica in Madagascar.

    De Bruyn, Alexandre; Harimalala, Mireille; Hoareau, Murielle; Ranomenjanahary, Sahondramalala; Reynaud, Bernard; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2015-06-01

    Here, we describe for the first time the complete genome sequence of a new bipartite begomovirus in Madagascar isolated from the weed Asystasia gangetica (Acanthaceae), for which we propose the tentative name asystasia mosaic Madagascar virus (AMMGV). DNA-A and -B nucleotide sequences of AMMGV were only distantly related to known begomovirus sequence and shared highest nucleotide sequence identity of 72.9 % (DNA-A) and 66.9 % (DNA-B) with a recently described bipartite begomovirus infecting Asystasia sp. in West Africa. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this novel virus from Madagascar belongs to a new lineage of Old World bipartite begomoviruses.

  6. Spatial-Spectral Approaches to Edge Detection in Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    Cox, Cary M.

    This dissertation advances geoinformation science at the intersection of hyperspectral remote sensing and edge detection methods. A relatively new phenomenology among its remote sensing peers, hyperspectral imagery (HSI) comprises only about 7% of all remote sensing research - there are five times as many radar-focused peer reviewed journal articles than hyperspectral-focused peer reviewed journal articles. Similarly, edge detection studies comprise only about 8% of image processing research, most of which is dedicated to image processing techniques most closely associated with end results, such as image classification and feature extraction. Given the centrality of edge detection to mapping, that most important of geographic functions, improving the collective understanding of hyperspectral imagery edge detection methods constitutes a research objective aligned to the heart of geoinformation sciences. Consequently, this dissertation endeavors to narrow the HSI edge detection research gap by advancing three HSI edge detection methods designed to leverage HSI's unique chemical identification capabilities in pursuit of generating accurate, high-quality edge planes. The Di Zenzo-based gradient edge detection algorithm, an innovative version of the Resmini HySPADE edge detection algorithm and a level set-based edge detection algorithm are tested against 15 traditional and non-traditional HSI datasets spanning a range of HSI data configurations, spectral resolutions, spatial resolutions, bandpasses and applications. This study empirically measures algorithm performance against Dr. John Canny's six criteria for a good edge operator: false positives, false negatives, localization, single-point response, robustness to noise and unbroken edges. The end state is a suite of spatial-spectral edge detection algorithms that produce satisfactory edge results against a range of hyperspectral data types applicable to a diverse set of earth remote sensing applications. This work

  7. The spectral element approach for the solution of neutron transport problems

    Barbarino, A.; Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.; Mund, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a possible application of the Spectral Element Method to neutron transport problems is presented. The basic features of the numerical scheme on the one-dimensional diffusion equation are illustrated. Then, the AN model for neutron transport is introduced, and the basic steps for the construction of a bi-dimensional solver are described. The AN equations are chosen for their structure, involving a system of coupled elliptic-type equations. Some calculations are carried out on typical benchmark problems and results are compared with the Finite Element Method, in order to evaluate their performances. (author)

  8. A spectral approach to compute the mean performance measures of the queue with low-order BMAP input

    Ho Woo Lee

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper targets engineers and practitioners who want a simple procedure to compute the mean performance measures of the Batch Markovian Arrival process (BMAP/G/1 queueing system when the parameter matrices order is very low. We develop a set of system equations and derive the vector generating function of the queue length. Starting from the generating function, we propose a spectral approach that can be understandable to those who have basic knowledge of M/G/1 queues and eigenvalue algebra.

  9. A New Statistical Approach to the Optical Spectral Variability in Blazars

    Jose A. Acosta-Pulido

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a spectral variability study of a sample of about 25 bright blazars, based on optical spectroscopy. Observations cover the period from the end of 2008 to mid 2015, with an approximately monthly cadence. Emission lines have been identified and measured in the spectra, which permits us to classify the sources into BL Lac-type or FSRQs, according to the commonly used EW limit. We have obtained synthetic photometry and produced colour-magnitude diagrams which show different trends associated with the object classes: generally, BL Lacs tend to become bluer when brighter and FSRQs become redder when brighter, although several objects exhibit both trends, depending on brightness. We have also applied a pattern recognition algorithm to obtain the minimum number of physical components which can explain the variability of the optical spectrum. We have used NMF (Non-Negative Matrix Factorization instead of PCA (Principal Component Analysis to avoid un-realistic negative components. For most targets we found that 2 or 3 meta-components are enough to explain the observed spectral variability.

  10. Bayesian latent feature modeling for modeling bipartite networks with overlapping groups

    Jørgensen, Philip H.; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2016-01-01

    Bi-partite networks are commonly modelled using latent class or latent feature models. Whereas the existing latent class models admit marginalization of parameters specifying the strength of interaction between groups, existing latent feature models do not admit analytical marginalization...... by the notion of community structure such that the edge density within groups is higher than between groups. Our model further assumes that entities can have different propensities of generating links in one of the modes. The proposed framework is contrasted on both synthetic and real bi-partite networks...... feature representations in bipartite networks provides a new framework for accounting for structure in bi-partite networks using binary latent feature representations providing interpretable representations that well characterize structure as quantified by link prediction....

  11. A Family of Bipartite |Cardinality Matching Problems Solvable in O(n\\^2) Time

    Clausen, Jens; Krarup, J.

    1995-01-01

    For a given, unweighted bipartite graph G with 2n non isolated vertices, we consider the so called bipartite cardinality matching problem (BCMP) for which the time complexity of the fastest exact algorithm available is O(n/sup 5/2/ ). We devise a greedy algorithm which either finds a perfect...... matching in O(n/sup 2/ ) time or identifies cycle of length 4 in the complement G of G...

  12. Common neighbours and the local-community-paradigm for topological link prediction in bipartite networks

    Daminelli, Simone; Thomas, Josephine Maria; Durán, Claudio; Vittorio Cannistraci, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Bipartite networks are powerful descriptions of complex systems characterized by two different classes of nodes and connections allowed only across but not within the two classes. Unveiling physical principles, building theories and suggesting physical models to predict bipartite links such as product-consumer connections in recommendation systems or drug–target interactions in molecular networks can provide priceless information to improve e-commerce or to accelerate pharmaceutical research. The prediction of nonobserved connections starting from those already present in the topology of a network is known as the link-prediction problem. It represents an important subject both in many-body interaction theory in physics and in new algorithms for applied tools in computer science. The rationale is that the existing connectivity structure of a network can suggest where new connections can appear with higher likelihood in an evolving network, or where nonobserved connections are missing in a partially known network. Surprisingly, current complex network theory presents a theoretical bottle-neck: a general framework for local-based link prediction directly in the bipartite domain is missing. Here, we overcome this theoretical obstacle and present a formal definition of common neighbour index and local-community-paradigm (LCP) for bipartite networks. As a consequence, we are able to introduce the first node-neighbourhood-based and LCP-based models for topological link prediction that utilize the bipartite domain. We performed link prediction evaluations in several networks of different size and of disparate origin, including technological, social and biological systems. Our models significantly improve topological prediction in many bipartite networks because they exploit local physical driving-forces that participate in the formation and organization of many real-world bipartite networks. Furthermore, we present a local-based formalism that allows to intuitively

  13. Common neighbours and the local-community-paradigm for topological link prediction in bipartite networks

    Daminelli, Simone; Thomas, Josephine Maria; Durán, Claudio; Vittorio Cannistraci, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    Bipartite networks are powerful descriptions of complex systems characterized by two different classes of nodes and connections allowed only across but not within the two classes. Unveiling physical principles, building theories and suggesting physical models to predict bipartite links such as product-consumer connections in recommendation systems or drug-target interactions in molecular networks can provide priceless information to improve e-commerce or to accelerate pharmaceutical research. The prediction of nonobserved connections starting from those already present in the topology of a network is known as the link-prediction problem. It represents an important subject both in many-body interaction theory in physics and in new algorithms for applied tools in computer science. The rationale is that the existing connectivity structure of a network can suggest where new connections can appear with higher likelihood in an evolving network, or where nonobserved connections are missing in a partially known network. Surprisingly, current complex network theory presents a theoretical bottle-neck: a general framework for local-based link prediction directly in the bipartite domain is missing. Here, we overcome this theoretical obstacle and present a formal definition of common neighbour index and local-community-paradigm (LCP) for bipartite networks. As a consequence, we are able to introduce the first node-neighbourhood-based and LCP-based models for topological link prediction that utilize the bipartite domain. We performed link prediction evaluations in several networks of different size and of disparate origin, including technological, social and biological systems. Our models significantly improve topological prediction in many bipartite networks because they exploit local physical driving-forces that participate in the formation and organization of many real-world bipartite networks. Furthermore, we present a local-based formalism that allows to intuitively

  14. Co-Clustering by Bipartite Spectral Graph Partitioning for Out-of-Tutor Prediction

    Trivedi, Shubhendu; Pardos, Zachary A.; Sarkozy, Gabor N.; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2012-01-01

    Learning a more distributed representation of the input feature space is a powerful method to boost the performance of a given predictor. Often this is accomplished by partitioning the data into homogeneous groups by clustering so that separate models could be trained on each cluster. Intuitively each such predictor is a better representative of…

  15. Foodsheds in Virtual Water Flow Networks: A Spectral Graph Theory Approach

    Nina Kshetry

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A foodshed is a geographic area from which a population derives its food supply, but a method to determine boundaries of foodsheds has not been formalized. Drawing on the food–water–energy nexus, we propose a formal network science definition of foodsheds by using data from virtual water flows, i.e., water that is virtually embedded in food. In particular, we use spectral graph partitioning for directed graphs. If foodsheds turn out to be geographically compact, it suggests the food system is local and therefore reduces energy and externality costs of food transport. Using our proposed method we compute foodshed boundaries at the global-scale, and at the national-scale in the case of two of the largest agricultural countries: India and the United States. Based on our determination of foodshed boundaries, we are able to better understand commodity flows and whether foodsheds are contiguous and compact, and other factors that impact environmental sustainability. The formal method we propose may be used more broadly to study commodity flows and their impact on environmental sustainability.

  16. New Approach for Snow Cover Detection through Spectral Pattern Recognition with MODIS Data

    Kyeong-Sang Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Snow cover plays an important role in climate and hydrology, at both global and regional scales. Most previous studies have used static threshold techniques to detect snow cover, which can lead to errors such as misclassification of snow and clouds, because the reflectance of snow cover exhibits variability and is affected by several factors. Therefore, we present a simple new algorithm for mapping snow cover from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data using dynamic wavelength warping (DWW, which is based on dynamic time warping (DTW. DTW is a pattern recognition technique that is widely used in various fields such as human action recognition, anomaly detection, and clustering. Before performing DWW, we constructed 49 snow reflectance spectral libraries as reference data for various solar zenith angle and digital elevation model conditions using approximately 1.6 million sampled data. To verify the algorithm, we compared our results with the MODIS swath snow cover product (MOD10_L2. Producer’s accuracy, user’s accuracy, and overall accuracy values were 92.92%, 78.41%, and 92.24%, respectively, indicating good overall classification accuracy. The proposed algorithm is more useful for discriminating between snow cover and clouds than threshold techniques in some areas, such as those with a high viewing zenith angle.

  17. A Spectral Approach for Quenched Limit Theorems for Random Expanding Dynamical Systems

    Dragičević, D.; Froyland, G.; González-Tokman, C.; Vaienti, S.

    2018-01-01

    We prove quenched versions of (i) a large deviations principle (LDP), (ii) a central limit theorem (CLT), and (iii) a local central limit theorem for non-autonomous dynamical systems. A key advance is the extension of the spectral method, commonly used in limit laws for deterministic maps, to the general random setting. We achieve this via multiplicative ergodic theory and the development of a general framework to control the regularity of Lyapunov exponents of twisted transfer operator cocycles with respect to a twist parameter. While some versions of the LDP and CLT have previously been proved with other techniques, the local central limit theorem is, to our knowledge, a completely new result, and one that demonstrates the strength of our method. Applications include non-autonomous (piecewise) expanding maps, defined by random compositions of the form {T_{σ^{n-1} ω} circ\\cdotscirc T_{σω}circ T_ω} . An important aspect of our results is that we only assume ergodicity and invertibility of the random driving {σ:Ω\\toΩ} ; in particular no expansivity or mixing properties are required.

  18. Coordination chemistry of oxovanadium(V) complexes with active Schiff bases: synthetic, spectral, and antimicrobial approach

    Garg, R; Fahmi, N.; Singh, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    The Schiff bases, 3-(indolin-2-one)hydrazinecarbothioamide, 3-(indolin-2-one)hydrazinecarboxamide, 5,6-dimethyl-3-(indolin-2-one)hydrazinecarbothioamide, and 5,6-dimethyl-3-(indolin-2-one)hydrazinecarboxamide, have been synthesized by the condensation of 1H-indol-2,3-dione and 5,6-dimethyl-1H-indol-2,3-dione with the corresponding hydrazinecarbothioamide and hydrazinecarboxamide, respectively. The complexes of oxovanadium and ligands have been characterized by elemental analyses, melting points, conductance measurements, molecular weight determinations, and IR, 1 H NMR and UV spectral studies. These studies showed that the ligands coordinated to the oxovanadium in a monobasic bidentate fashion through oxygen or sulfur and the nitrogen donor system. Thus, penta- and hexa coordinated environment around the vanadium atom has been proposed. All the complexes and their parent organic moieties have been screened for their biological activity on several pathogenic fungi and bacteria and were found to possess appreciable fungicidal and bactericidal properties [ru

  19. SURVEY DESIGN FOR SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION FITTING: A FISHER MATRIX APPROACH

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Gawiser, Eric; Bickerton, Steven J.; Grogin, Norman A.; Guo Yicheng; Lee, Seong-Kook

    2012-01-01

    The spectral energy distribution (SED) of a galaxy contains information on the galaxy's physical properties, and multi-wavelength observations are needed in order to measure these properties via SED fitting. In planning these surveys, optimization of the resources is essential. The Fisher Matrix (FM) formalism can be used to quickly determine the best possible experimental setup to achieve the desired constraints on the SED-fitting parameters. However, because it relies on the assumption of a Gaussian likelihood function, it is in general less accurate than other slower techniques that reconstruct the probability distribution function (PDF) from the direct comparison between models and data. We compare the uncertainties on SED-fitting parameters predicted by the FM to the ones obtained using the more thorough PDF-fitting techniques. We use both simulated spectra and real data, and consider a large variety of target galaxies differing in redshift, mass, age, star formation history, dust content, and wavelength coverage. We find that the uncertainties reported by the two methods agree within a factor of two in the vast majority (∼90%) of cases. If the age determination is uncertain, the top-hat prior in age used in PDF fitting to prevent each galaxy from being older than the universe needs to be incorporated in the FM, at least approximately, before the two methods can be properly compared. We conclude that the FM is a useful tool for astronomical survey design.

  20. The delta-Sobolev approach for modeling solar spectral irradiance and radiance

    Xiang, Xuwu.

    1990-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a solar radiation model is reported, which gives irradiance and radiance results at the bottom and top of an atmosphere of specified optical depth for each of 145 spectral intervals from 0.29 to 4.05 microns. Absorption by water vapor, aerosols, ozone, and uniformly mixed gases; scattering by molecules and aerosols; and non-Lambertian surface reflectance are included in the model. For solving the radiative transfer equation, an innovative delta-Sobolev method is developed. It applies a delta-function modification to the conventional Sobolev solutions in a way analogous to the delta-Eddington method. The irradiance solution by the delta-Sobolev method turns out to be mathematically identical to the delta-Eddington approximation. The radiance solution by the delta-Sobolov method provides a convenient way to obtain the directional distribution pattern of the radiation transfer field, a feature unable to be obtained by most commonly used approximation methods. Such radiance solutions are also especially useful in models for satellite remote sensing. The model is tested against the rigorous Dave model, which solves the radiation transfer problem by the spherical harmonic method, an accurate but very time consuming process. Good agreement between the current model results and those of Dave's model are observed. The advantages of the delta-Sobolev model are simplicity, reasonable accuracy and capability for implementation on a minicomputer or microcomputer

  1. A novel approach for characterizing broad-band radio spectral energy distributions

    Harvey, V. M.; Franzen, T.; Morgan, J.; Seymour, N.

    2018-05-01

    We present a new broad-band radio frequency catalogue across 0.12 GHz ≤ ν ≤ 20 GHz created by combining data from the Murchison Widefield Array Commissioning Survey, the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey, and the literature. Our catalogue consists of 1285 sources limited by S20 GHz > 40 mJy at 5σ, and contains flux density measurements (or estimates) and uncertainties at 0.074, 0.080, 0.119, 0.150, 0.180, 0.408, 0.843, 1.4, 4.8, 8.6, and 20 GHz. We fit a second-order polynomial in log-log space to the spectral energy distributions of all these sources in order to characterize their broad-band emission. For the 994 sources that are well described by a linear or quadratic model we present a new diagnostic plot arranging sources by the linear and curvature terms. We demonstrate the advantages of such a plot over the traditional radio colour-colour diagram. We also present astrophysical descriptions of the sources found in each segment of this new parameter space and discuss the utility of these plots in the upcoming era of large area, deep, broad-band radio surveys.

  2. The bipartite mitochondrial genome of Ruizia karukerae (Rhigonematomorpha, Nematoda).

    Kim, Taeho; Kern, Elizabeth; Park, Chungoo; Nadler, Steven A; Bae, Yeon Jae; Park, Joong-Ki

    2018-05-10

    Mitochondrial genes and whole mitochondrial genome sequences are widely used as molecular markers in studying population genetics and resolving both deep and shallow nodes in phylogenetics. In animals the mitochondrial genome is generally composed of a single chromosome, but mystifying exceptions sometimes occur. We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of the millipede-parasitic nematode Ruizia karukerae and found its mitochondrial genome consists of two circular chromosomes, which is highly unusual in bilateral animals. Chromosome I is 7,659 bp and includes six protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes and nine tRNA genes. Chromosome II comprises 7,647 bp, with seven protein-coding genes and 16 tRNA genes. Interestingly, both chromosomes share a 1,010 bp sequence containing duplicate copies of cox2 and three tRNA genes (trnD, trnG and trnH), and the nucleotide sequences between the duplicated homologous gene copies are nearly identical, suggesting a possible recent genesis for this bipartite mitochondrial genome. Given that little is known about the formation, maintenance or evolution of abnormal mitochondrial genome structures, R. karukerae mtDNA may provide an important early glimpse into this process.

  3. Identifying online user reputation of user-object bipartite networks

    Liu, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Jian-Guo; Yang, Kai; Guo, Qiang; Han, Jing-Ti

    2017-02-01

    Identifying online user reputation based on the rating information of the user-object bipartite networks is important for understanding online user collective behaviors. Based on the Bayesian analysis, we present a parameter-free algorithm for ranking online user reputation, where the user reputation is calculated based on the probability that their ratings are consistent with the main part of all user opinions. The experimental results show that the AUC values of the presented algorithm could reach 0.8929 and 0.8483 for the MovieLens and Netflix data sets, respectively, which is better than the results generated by the CR and IARR methods. Furthermore, the experimental results for different user groups indicate that the presented algorithm outperforms the iterative ranking methods in both ranking accuracy and computation complexity. Moreover, the results for the synthetic networks show that the computation complexity of the presented algorithm is a linear function of the network size, which suggests that the presented algorithm is very effective and efficient for the large scale dynamic online systems.

  4. The Random Walk Model Based on Bipartite Network

    Zhang Man-Dun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the continuing development of the electronic commerce and growth of network information, there is a growing possibility for citizens to be confused by the information. Though the traditional technology of information retrieval have the ability to relieve the overload of information in some extent, it can not offer a targeted personality service based on user’s interests and activities. In this context, the recommendation algorithm arose. In this paper, on the basis of conventional recommendation, we studied the scheme of random walk based on bipartite network and the application of it. We put forward a similarity measurement based on implicit feedback. In this method, a uneven character vector is imported(the weight of item in the system. We put forward a improved random walk pattern which make use of partial or incomplete neighbor information to create recommendation information. In the end, there is an experiment in the real data set, the recommendation accuracy and practicality are improved. We promise the reality of the result of the experiment

  5. Conditional mutual information of bipartite unitaries and scrambling

    Ding, Dawei; Hayden, Patrick; Walter, Michael [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,382 Via Pueblo, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-12-28

    One way to diagnose chaos in bipartite unitary channels is via the tripartite information of the corresponding Choi state, which for certain choices of the subsystems reduces to the negative conditional mutual information (CMI). We study this quantity from a quantum information-theoretic perspective to clarify its role in diagnosing scrambling. When the CMI is zero, we find that the channel has a special normal form consisting of local channels between individual inputs and outputs. However, we find that arbitrarily low CMI does not imply arbitrary proximity to a channel of this form, although it does imply a type of approximate recoverability of one of the inputs. When the CMI is maximal, we find that the residual channel from an individual input to an individual output is completely depolarizing when the other input is maximally mixed. However, we again find that this result is not robust. We also extend some of these results to the multipartite case and to the case of Haar-random pure input states. Finally, we look at the relationship between tripartite information and its Rényi-2 version which is directly related to out-of-time-order correlation functions. In particular, we demonstrate an arbitrarily large gap between the two quantities.

  6. Conserving relativistic many-body approach: Equation of state, spectral function, and occupation probabilities of nuclear matter

    de Jong, F.; Malfliet, R.

    1991-01-01

    Starting from a relativistic Lagrangian we derive a ''conserving'' approximation for the description of nuclear matter. We show this to be a nontrivial extension over the relativistic Dirac-Brueckner scheme. The saturation point of the equation of state calculated agrees very well with the empirical saturation point. The conserving character of the approach is tested by means of the Hugenholtz--van Hove theorem. We find the theorem fulfilled very well around saturation. A new value for compression modulus is derived, K=310 MeV. Also we calculate the occupation probabilities at normal nuclear matter densities by means of the spectral function. The average depletion κ of the Fermi sea is found to be κ∼0.11

  7. A full-spectral Bayesian reconstruction approach based on the material decomposition model applied in dual-energy computed tomography

    Cai, C.; Rodet, T.; Mohammad-Djafari, A.; Legoupil, S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) makes it possible to get two fractions of basis materials without segmentation. One is the soft-tissue equivalent water fraction and the other is the hard-matter equivalent bone fraction. Practical DECT measurements are usually obtained with polychromatic x-ray beams. Existing reconstruction approaches based on linear forward models without counting the beam polychromaticity fail to estimate the correct decomposition fractions and result in beam-hardening artifacts (BHA). The existing BHA correction approaches either need to refer to calibration measurements or suffer from the noise amplification caused by the negative-log preprocessing and the ill-conditioned water and bone separation problem. To overcome these problems, statistical DECT reconstruction approaches based on nonlinear forward models counting the beam polychromaticity show great potential for giving accurate fraction images.Methods: This work proposes a full-spectral Bayesian reconstruction approach which allows the reconstruction of high quality fraction images from ordinary polychromatic measurements. This approach is based on a Gaussian noise model with unknown variance assigned directly to the projections without taking negative-log. Referring to Bayesian inferences, the decomposition fractions and observation variance are estimated by using the joint maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation method. Subject to an adaptive prior model assigned to the variance, the joint estimation problem is then simplified into a single estimation problem. It transforms the joint MAP estimation problem into a minimization problem with a nonquadratic cost function. To solve it, the use of a monotone conjugate gradient algorithm with suboptimal descent steps is proposed.Results: The performance of the proposed approach is analyzed with both simulated and experimental data. The results show that the proposed Bayesian approach is robust to noise and materials. It is also

  8. Dual-energy approach to contrast-enhanced mammography using the balanced filter method: spectral optimization and preliminary phantom measurement.

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2007-11-01

    Dual-energy contrast agent-enhanced mammography is a technique of demonstrating breast cancers obscured by a cluttered background resulting from the contrast between soft tissues in the breast. The technique has usually been implemented by exploiting two exposures to different x-ray tube voltages. In this article, another dual-energy approach using the balanced filter method without switching the tube voltages is described. For the spectral optimization of dual-energy mammography using the balanced filters, we applied a theoretical framework reported by Lemacks et al. [Med. Phys. 29, 1739-1751 (2002)] to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in an iodinated contrast agent subtraction image. This permits the selection of beam parameters such as tube voltage and balanced filter material, and the optimization of the latter's thickness with respect to some critical quantity-in this case, mean glandular dose. For an imaging system with a 0.1 mm thick CsI:T1 scintillator, we predict that the optimal tube voltage would be 45 kVp for a tungsten anode using zirconium, iodine, and neodymium balanced filters. A mean glandular dose of 1.0 mGy is required to obtain an SNR of 5 in order to detect 1.0 mg/cm2 iodine in the resulting clutter-free image of a 5 cm thick breast composed of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissue. In addition to spectral optimization, we carried out phantom measurements to demonstrate the present dual-energy approach for obtaining a clutter-free image, which preferentially shows iodine, of a breast phantom comprising three major components-acrylic spheres, olive oil, and an iodinated contrast agent. The detection of iodine details on the cluttered background originating from the contrast between acrylic spheres and olive oil is analogous to the task of distinguishing contrast agents in a mixture of glandular and adipose tissues.

  9. Dual-energy approach to contrast-enhanced mammography using the balanced filter method: Spectral optimization and preliminary phantom measurement

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Dual-energy contrast agent-enhanced mammography is a technique of demonstrating breast cancers obscured by a cluttered background resulting from the contrast between soft tissues in the breast. The technique has usually been implemented by exploiting two exposures to different x-ray tube voltages. In this article, another dual-energy approach using the balanced filter method without switching the tube voltages is described. For the spectral optimization of dual-energy mammography using the balanced filters, we applied a theoretical framework reported by Lemacks et al. [Med. Phys. 29, 1739-1751 (2002)] to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in an iodinated contrast agent subtraction image. This permits the selection of beam parameters such as tube voltage and balanced filter material, and the optimization of the latter's thickness with respect to some critical quantity--in this case, mean glandular dose. For an imaging system with a 0.1 mm thick CsI:Tl scintillator, we predict that the optimal tube voltage would be 45 kVp for a tungsten anode using zirconium, iodine, and neodymium balanced filters. A mean glandular dose of 1.0 mGy is required to obtain an SNR of 5 in order to detect 1.0 mg/cm 2 iodine in the resulting clutter-free image of a 5 cm thick breast composed of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissue. In addition to spectral optimization, we carried out phantom measurements to demonstrate the present dual-energy approach for obtaining a clutter-free image, which preferentially shows iodine, of a breast phantom comprising three major components - acrylic spheres, olive oil, and an iodinated contrast agent. The detection of iodine details on the cluttered background originating from the contrast between acrylic spheres and olive oil is analogous to the task of distinguishing contrast agents in a mixture of glandular and adipose tissues

  10. Accurate X-Ray Spectral Predictions: An Advanced Self-Consistent-Field Approach Inspired by Many-Body Perturbation Theory.

    Liang, Yufeng; Vinson, John; Pemmaraju, Sri; Drisdell, Walter S; Shirley, Eric L; Prendergast, David

    2017-03-03

    Constrained-occupancy delta-self-consistent-field (ΔSCF) methods and many-body perturbation theories (MBPT) are two strategies for obtaining electronic excitations from first principles. Using the two distinct approaches, we study the O 1s core excitations that have become increasingly important for characterizing transition-metal oxides and understanding strong electronic correlation. The ΔSCF approach, in its current single-particle form, systematically underestimates the pre-edge intensity for chosen oxides, despite its success in weakly correlated systems. By contrast, the Bethe-Salpeter equation within MBPT predicts much better line shapes. This motivates one to reexamine the many-electron dynamics of x-ray excitations. We find that the single-particle ΔSCF approach can be rectified by explicitly calculating many-electron transition amplitudes, producing x-ray spectra in excellent agreement with experiments. This study paves the way to accurately predict x-ray near-edge spectral fingerprints for physics and materials science beyond the Bethe-Salpether equation.

  11. The effect of organic contaminants on the spectral induced polarization response of porous media - mechanistic approach

    Schwartz, N.; Huisman, J. A.; Furman, A.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, there is a growing interest in using geophysical methods in general and spectral induced polarization (SIP) in particular as a tool to detect and monitor organic contaminants within the subsurface. The general idea of the SIP method is to inject alternating current through a soil volume and to measure the resultant potential in order to obtain the relevant soil electrical properties (e.g. complex impedance, complex conductivity/resistivity). Currently, a complete mechanistic understanding of the effect of organic contaminants on the SIP response of soil is still absent. In this work, we combine laboratory experiments with modeling to reveal the main processes affecting the SIP signature of soil contaminated with organic pollutant. In a first set of experiments, we investigate the effect of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) on the complex conductivity of unsaturated porous media. Our results show that addition of NAPL to the porous media increases the real component of the soil electrical conductivity and decreases the polarization of the soil (imaginary component of the complex conductivity). Furthermore, addition of NAPL to the soil resulted in an increase of the electrical conductivity of the soil solution. Based on these results, we suggest that adsorption of NAPL to the soil surface, and exchange process between polar organic compounds in the NAPL and inorganic ions in the soil are the main processes affecting the SIP signature of the contaminated soil. To further support our hypothesis, the temporal change of the SIP signature of a soil as function of a single organic cation concentration was measured. In addition to the measurements of the soil electrical properties, we also measured the effect of the organic cation on the chemical composition of both the bulk and the surface of the soil. The results of those experiments again showed that the electrical conductivity of the soil increased with increasing contaminant concentration. In addition

  12. Cross spectral, active and passive approach to face recognition for improved performance

    Grudzien, A.; Kowalski, M.; Szustakowski, M.

    2017-08-01

    Biometrics is a technique for automatic recognition of a person based on physiological or behavior characteristics. Since the characteristics used are unique, biometrics can create a direct link between a person and identity, based on variety of characteristics. The human face is one of the most important biometric modalities for automatic authentication. The most popular method of face recognition which relies on processing of visual information seems to be imperfect. Thermal infrared imagery may be a promising alternative or complement to visible range imaging due to its several reasons. This paper presents an approach of combining both methods.

  13. A new approach to the spectral analysis of liquid membrane oscillators by Gábor transformation

    Płocharska-Jankowska, E.; Szpakowska, M.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Liquid membrane oscillators very frequently have an irregular oscillatory behavior. Fourier transformation cannot be used for these nonstationary oscillations to establish their power spectra. This important point seems to be overlooked in the field of chemical oscillators. A new approach...... is presented here based on Gábor transformation allowing one to obtain power spectra of any kind of oscillations that can be met experimentally. The proposed Gábor analysis is applied to a liquid membrane oscillator containing a cationic surfactant. It was found that the power spectra are strongly influenced...

  14. An Extended HITS Algorithm on Bipartite Network for Features Extraction of Online Customer Reviews

    Chen Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available How to acquire useful information intelligently in the age of information explosion has become an important issue. In this context, sentiment analysis emerges with the growth of the need of information extraction. One of the most important tasks of sentiment analysis is feature extraction of entities in consumer reviews. This paper first constitutes a directed bipartite feature-sentiment relation network with a set of candidate features-sentiment pairs that is extracted by dependency syntax analysis from consumer reviews. Then, a novel method called MHITS which combines PMI with weighted HITS algorithm is proposed to rank these candidate product features to find out real product features. Empirical experiments indicate the effectiveness of our approach across different kinds and various data sizes of product. In addition, the effect of the proposed algorithm is not the same for the corpus with different proportions of the word pair that includes the “bad”, “good”, “poor”, “pretty good”, “not bad” these general collocation words.

  15. A unified approach for suppressing sidelobes arising in the spectral response of rugate filters

    Abo-Zahhad, M.; Bataineh, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper suggests a universal approach to reduce the side lobes which usually appear at both sides of a stop band of a ru gate filter. Both quin tic matching layers and anodization functions are to used to improve the filter's response. The proposed technique could be used to control the ripples level by properly choosing the refractive index profile after amending it to include mat aching layers and/or modulating its profile with a slowly varying anodization (or ta perine) function. Two illustrative examples are given to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed technique. The given examples suggest that combining both effects on the index of refraction profile lead to the lowest possible ripple level. A multichannel filter response is obtained by wavelet cons traction of the refractive index profile with potential applications in multimode lasers and wavelength division multiple xin networks. The obtained results demonstrate the applicability of the adopted approach to design ripple free ru gate filters. The extension to stack filters and other wave guiding structures are also visible. (authors). 14 refs., 8 figs

  16. Probabilistic modeling and global sensitivity analysis for CO 2 storage in geological formations: a spectral approach

    Saad, Bilal Mohammed

    2017-09-18

    This work focuses on the simulation of CO2 storage in deep underground formations under uncertainty and seeks to understand the impact of uncertainties in reservoir properties on CO2 leakage. To simulate the process, a non-isothermal two-phase two-component flow system with equilibrium phase exchange is used. Since model evaluations are computationally intensive, instead of traditional Monte Carlo methods, we rely on polynomial chaos (PC) expansions for representation of the stochastic model response. A non-intrusive approach is used to determine the PC coefficients. We establish the accuracy of the PC representations within a reasonable error threshold through systematic convergence studies. In addition to characterizing the distributions of model observables, we compute probabilities of excess CO2 leakage. Moreover, we consider the injection rate as a design parameter and compute an optimum injection rate that ensures that the risk of excess pressure buildup at the leaky well remains below acceptable levels. We also provide a comprehensive analysis of sensitivities of CO2 leakage, where we compute the contributions of the random parameters, and their interactions, to the variance by computing first, second, and total order Sobol’ indices.

  17. Global approach to the spectral problem of microinstabilities in tokamak plasmas using a gyrokinetic model

    Brunner, S.

    1997-08-01

    Ion temperature gradient (ITG)-related instabilities are studied in tokamak-like plasmas with the help of a new global eigenvalue code. Ions are modelled in the frame of gyrokinetic theory so that finite Larmor radius effects of these particles are retained to all orders. Non-adiabatic trapped electron dynamics is taken into account through the bounce-averaged drift kinetic equation. Assuming electrostatic perturbations, the system is closed with the quasineutrality relation. Practical methods are presented which make this global approach feasible. These include a non-standard wave decomposition compatible with the curved geometry as well as adapting an efficient root finding algorithm for computing the unstable spectrum. These techniques are applied to a low pressure configuration given by a large aspect ratio torus with circular, concentric magnetic surfaces. Simulations from a linear, time evolution, particle in cell code provide a useful benchmark. Comparisons with local ballooning calculations for different parameter scans enable further validation while illustrating the limits of that representation at low toroidal wave numbers or for non-interchange-like instabilities. The stabilizing effect of negative magnetic shear is also considered, in which case the global results show not only an attenuation of the growth rate but also a reduction of the radial extent induced by a transition from the toroidal- to the slab-ITG mode. Contributions of trapped electrons to the ITG instability as well as the possible coupling to the trapped electron mode are clearly brought to the fore. (author) figs., tabs., 69 refs

  18. Probabilistic modeling and global sensitivity analysis for CO 2 storage in geological formations: a spectral approach

    Saad, Bilal Mohammed; Alexanderian, Alen; Prudhomme, Serge; Knio, Omar

    2017-01-01

    This work focuses on the simulation of CO2 storage in deep underground formations under uncertainty and seeks to understand the impact of uncertainties in reservoir properties on CO2 leakage. To simulate the process, a non-isothermal two-phase two-component flow system with equilibrium phase exchange is used. Since model evaluations are computationally intensive, instead of traditional Monte Carlo methods, we rely on polynomial chaos (PC) expansions for representation of the stochastic model response. A non-intrusive approach is used to determine the PC coefficients. We establish the accuracy of the PC representations within a reasonable error threshold through systematic convergence studies. In addition to characterizing the distributions of model observables, we compute probabilities of excess CO2 leakage. Moreover, we consider the injection rate as a design parameter and compute an optimum injection rate that ensures that the risk of excess pressure buildup at the leaky well remains below acceptable levels. We also provide a comprehensive analysis of sensitivities of CO2 leakage, where we compute the contributions of the random parameters, and their interactions, to the variance by computing first, second, and total order Sobol’ indices.

  19. Impedance spectral fingerprint of E. coli cells on interdigitated electrodes: A new approach for label free and selective detection

    Maria Mallén-Alberdi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Impedance-based biosensors for bacterial detection offer a rapid and cost-effective alternative to conventional techniques that are time-consuming and require specialized equipment and trained users. In this work, a new bacteria detection scheme is presented based on impedance measurements with antibody-modified polysilicon interdigitated electrodes (3 μm pitch, IDEs. The detection approach was carried out taking advantage of the E. coli structure which, in electrical terms, is constituted by two insulating cell membranes that separate a conductive cytoplasmatic medium and a more conductive periplasm. Impedance detection of bacteria is usually analyzed using electrical equivalent circuit models that show limitations for the interpretation of such complex cell structure. Here, a differential impedance spectrum representation is used to study the unique fingerprint that arises when bacteria attach to the surface of IDEs. That fingerprint shows the dual electrical behavior, insulating and conductive, at different frequency ranges. In parallel, finite-element simulations of this system using a three-shell bacteria model are performed to explain such phenomena. Overall, a new approach to detect bacteria is proposed that also enables to differentiate viable bacteria from other components non-specifically attached to the IDE surface by just detecting their spectral fingerprints. Keywords: Impedance spectroscopy, Bacterial detection, Interdigitated electrodes, Label-free detection, Immuno-detection, E. coli O157:H7

  20. Identification and functional characterization of a novel bipartite nuclear localization sequence in ARID1A

    Bateman, Nicholas W. [Women' s Health Integrated Research Center at Inova Health System, Gynecologic Cancer Center of Excellence, Annandale 22003, VA (United States); The John P. Murtha Cancer Center, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda 20889, MD (United States); Shoji, Yutaka [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids 49503, MI (United States); Conrads, Kelly A.; Stroop, Kevin D. [Women' s Health Integrated Research Center at Inova Health System, Gynecologic Cancer Center of Excellence, Annandale 22003, VA (United States); Hamilton, Chad A. [Women' s Health Integrated Research Center at Inova Health System, Gynecologic Cancer Center of Excellence, Annandale 22003, VA (United States); The John P. Murtha Cancer Center, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda 20889, MD (United States); Gynecologic Oncology Service, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Wisconsin Ave, MD, Bethesda, 20889 (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda 20814, MD (United States); Darcy, Kathleen M. [Women' s Health Integrated Research Center at Inova Health System, Gynecologic Cancer Center of Excellence, Annandale 22003, VA (United States); The John P. Murtha Cancer Center, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda 20889, MD (United States); Maxwell, George L. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA 22042 (United States); Risinger, John I. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids 49503, MI (United States); and others

    2016-01-01

    AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) is a recently identified nuclear tumor suppressor frequently altered in solid tumor malignancies. We have identified a bipartite-like nuclear localization sequence (NLS) that contributes to nuclear import of ARID1A not previously described. We functionally confirm activity using GFP constructs fused with wild-type or mutant NLS sequences. We further show that cyto-nuclear localized, bipartite NLS mutant ARID1A exhibits greater stability than nuclear-localized, wild-type ARID1A. Identification of this undescribed functional NLS within ARID1A contributes vital insights to rationalize the impact of ARID1A missense mutations observed in patient tumors. - Highlights: • We have identified a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in ARID1A. • Confirmation of the NLS was performed using GFP constructs. • NLS mutant ARID1A exhibits greater stability than wild-type ARID1A.

  1. Effect of the social influence on topological properties of user-object bipartite networks

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hu, Zhaolong; Guo, Qiang

    2013-11-01

    Social influence plays an important role in analyzing online users' collective behaviors [Salganik et al., Science 311, 854 (2006)]. However, the effect of the social influence from the viewpoint of theoretical model is missing. In this paper, by taking into account the social influence and users' preferences, we develop a theoretical model to analyze the topological properties of user-object bipartite networks, including the degree distribution, average nearest neighbor degree and the bipartite clustering coefficient, as well as topological properties of the original user-object networks and their unipartite projections. According to the users' preferences and the global ranking effect, we analyze the theoretical results for two benchmark data sets, Amazon and Bookcrossing, which are approximately consistent with the empirical results. This work suggests that this model is feasible to analyze topological properties of bipartite networks in terms of the social influence and the users' preferences.

  2. Complete genome sequence of a new bipartite begomovirus infecting fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis) plants in Cameroon.

    Leke, Walter N; Khatabi, Behnam; Fondong, Vincent N; Brown, Judith K

    2016-08-01

    The complete genome sequence was determined and characterized for a previously unreported bipartite begomovirus from fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis, family Cucurbitaceae) plants displaying mosaic symptoms in Cameroon. The DNA-A and DNA-B components were ~2.7 kb and ~2.6 kb in size, and the arrangement of viral coding regions on the genomic components was like those characteristic of other known bipartite begomoviruses originating in the Old World. While the DNA-A component was more closely related to that of chayote yellow mosaic virus (ChaYMV), at 78 %, the DNA-B component was more closely related to that of soybean chlorotic blotch virus (SbCBV), at 64 %. This newly discovered bipartite Old World virus is herein named telfairia mosaic virus (TelMV).

  3. Bipartite consensus for multi-agent systems with antagonistic interactions and communication delays

    Guo, Xing; Lu, Jianquan; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Alsaadi, Fuad E.

    2018-04-01

    This paper studies the consensus problems over signed digraphs with arbitrary finite communication delays. For the considered system, the information flow is directed and only locally delayed information can be used for each node. We derive that bipartite consensus of this system can be realized when the associated signed digraph is strongly connected. Furthermore, for structurally balanced networks, this paper studies the pinning partite consensus for the considered system. we design a pinning scheme to pin any one agent in the signed network, and obtain that the network achieves pinning bipartite consensus with any initial conditions. Finally, two examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our main results.

  4. Coupling-Induced Bipartite Pointer States in Arrays of Electron Billiards: Quantum Darwinism in Action?

    Brunner, R.; Akis, R.; Ferry, D. K.; Kuchar, F.; Meisels, R.

    2008-07-01

    We discuss a quantum system coupled to the environment, composed of an open array of billiards (dots) in series. Beside pointer states occurring in individual dots, we observe sets of robust states which arise only in the array. We define these new states as bipartite pointer states, since they cannot be described in terms of simple linear combinations of robust single-dot states. The classical existence of bipartite pointer states is confirmed by comparing the quantum-mechanical and classical results. The ability of the robust states to create “offspring” indicates that quantum Darwinism is in action.

  5. Ordering non-bipartite unicyclic graphs with pendant vertices by the least Q-eigenvalue

    Shu-Guang Guo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A unicyclic graph is a connected graph whose number of edges is equal to the number of vertices. Fan et al. (Discrete Math. 313:903-909, 2013 and Liu et al. (Electron. J. Linear Algebra 26:333-344, 2013 determined, independently, the unique unicyclic graph whose least Q-eigenvalue attains the minimum among all non-bipartite unicyclic graphs of order n with k pendant vertices. In this paper, we extend their results and determine the first three non-bipartite unicyclic graphs of order n with k pendant vertices ordering by least Q-eigenvalue.

  6. BATAS ATAS BILANGAN RAMSEY UNTUK GRAF BINTANG DAN GRAF BIPARTIT LENGKAP

    Rosyida, Isnaini

    2008-01-01

    Misal G dan H dua buah graf sebarang, bilangan Ramsey R(G,H) adalah bilangan asli terkecil n sehingga untuk setiap graf F dengan n titik akan memuat G atau komplemen dari F memuat H. Makalah ini akan membahas batas atas dari bilangan Ramsey untuk graf bintang Sn dan graf bipartit lengkap Kp,q. Khususnya, kita akan menunjukkan batas atas dari R(Sn, K2,q) serta batas atas dari R(Sn, Kp,q) untuk n ≥ 5, 3 ≤ p ≤ n-1 dan q ≤ 2.Kata Kunci : Bilangan Ramsey, Graf Bintang dan Bipartit

  7. Congenital bipartite atlas with hypodactyly in a dog: clinical, radiographic and CT findings.

    Wrzosek, M; Płonek, M; Zeira, O; Bieżyński, J; Kinda, W; Guziński, M

    2014-07-01

    A three-year-old Border collie was diagnosed with a bipartite atlas and bilateral forelimb hypodactyly. The dog showed signs of acute, non-progressive neck pain, general stiffness and right thoracic limb non-weight-bearing lameness. Computed tomography imaging revealed a bipartite atlas with abaxial vertical bone proliferation, which was the cause of the clinical signs. In addition, bilateral hypodactyly of the second and fifth digits was incidentally found. This report suggests that hypodactyly may be associated with atlas malformations. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  8. Approaches to contactless optical thermometer in the NIR spectral range based on Nd{sup 3+} doped crystalline nanoparticles

    Kaldvee, K.; Nefedova, A.V. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi st. 1, Tartu 50411 (Estonia); Fedorenko, S.G. [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Vanetsev, A.S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi st. 1, Tartu 50411 (Estonia); Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS, Vavilov st. 38, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Orlovskaya, E.O. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS, Vavilov st. 38, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Puust, L.; Pärs, M.; Sildos, I. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi st. 1, Tartu 50411 (Estonia); Ryabova, A.V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS, Vavilov st. 38, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Kashirskoe Highway, 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Orlovskii, Yu.V., E-mail: orlovski@Lst.gpi.ru [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi st. 1, Tartu 50411 (Estonia); Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS, Vavilov st. 38, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The fluorescence kinetics and spectral intensity ratio (FIR) methods for contactless optical temperature measurement in the NIR spectral range with Nd{sup 3+} doped YAG micro- and YPO{sub 4} nanocrystals are considered and the problems are revealed. The requirements for good temperature RE doped crystalline nanoparticles sensor are formulated.

  9. A Kullback-Leibler approach for 3D reconstruction of spectral CT data corrupted by Poisson noise

    Hohweiller, Tom; Ducros, Nicolas; Peyrin, Françoise; Sixou, Bruno

    2017-09-01

    While standard computed tomography (CT) data do not depend on energy, spectral computed tomography (SPCT) acquire energy-resolved data, which allows material decomposition of the object of interest. Decompo- sitions in the projection domain allow creating projection mass density (PMD) per materials. From decomposed projections, a tomographic reconstruction creates 3D material density volume. The decomposition is made pos- sible by minimizing a cost function. The variational approach is preferred since this is an ill-posed non-linear inverse problem. Moreover, noise plays a critical role when decomposing data. That is why in this paper, a new data fidelity term is used to take into account of the photonic noise. In this work two data fidelity terms were investigated: a weighted least squares (WLS) term, adapted to Gaussian noise, and the Kullback-Leibler distance (KL), adapted to Poisson noise. A regularized Gauss-Newton algorithm minimizes the cost function iteratively. Both methods decompose materials from a numerical phantom of a mouse. Soft tissues and bones are decomposed in the projection domain; then a tomographic reconstruction creates a 3D material density volume for each material. Comparing relative errors, KL is shown to outperform WLS for low photon counts, in 2D and 3D. This new method could be of particular interest when low-dose acquisitions are performed.

  10. The study of entanglement and teleportation of the harmonic oscillator bipartite coherent states

    A Rabeie and

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we reproduce the harmonic oscillator bipartite coherent states with imperfect cloning of coherent states. We show that if these entangled coherent states are embedded in a vacuum environment, their entanglement is degraded but not totally lost . Also, the optimal fidelity of these states is worked out for investigating their teleportation

  11. On bipartite pure-state entanglement structure in terms of disentanglement

    Herbut, Fedor

    2006-12-01

    Schrödinger's disentanglement [E. Schrödinger, Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 31, 555 (1935)], i.e., remote state decomposition, as a physical way to study entanglement, is carried one step further with respect to previous work in investigating the qualitative side of entanglement in any bipartite state vector. Remote measurement (or, equivalently, remote orthogonal state decomposition) from previous work is generalized to remote linearly independent complete state decomposition both in the nonselective and the selective versions. The results are displayed in terms of commutative square diagrams, which show the power and beauty of the physical meaning of the (antiunitary) correlation operator inherent in the given bipartite state vector. This operator, together with the subsystem states (reduced density operators), constitutes the so-called correlated subsystem picture. It is the central part of the antilinear representation of a bipartite state vector, and it is a kind of core of its entanglement structure. The generalization of previously elaborated disentanglement expounded in this article is a synthesis of the antilinear representation of bipartite state vectors, which is reviewed, and the relevant results of [Cassinelli et al., J. Math. Anal. Appl. 210, 472 (1997)] in mathematical analysis, which are summed up. Linearly independent bases (finite or infinite) are shown to be almost as useful in some quantum mechanical studies as orthonormal ones. Finally, it is shown that linearly independent remote pure-state preparation carries the highest probability of occurrence. This singles out linearly independent remote influence from all possible ones.

  12. Effects of the bipartite structure of a network on performance of recommenders

    Wang, Qing-Xian; Li, Jian; Luo, Xin; Xu, Jian-Jun; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2018-02-01

    Recommender systems aim to predict people's preferences for online items by analyzing their historical behaviors. A recommender can be modeled as a high-dimensional and sparse bipartite network, where the key issue is to understand the relation between the network structure and a recommender's performance. To address this issue, we choose three network characteristics, clustering coefficient, network density and user-item ratio, as the analyzing targets. For the cluster coefficient, we adopt the Degree-preserving rewiring algorithm to obtain a series of bipartite network with varying cluster coefficient, while the degree of user and item keep unchanged. Furthermore, five state-of-the-art recommenders are applied on two real datasets. The performances of recommenders are measured by both numerical and physical metrics. These results show that a recommender's performance is positively related to the clustering coefficient of a bipartite network. Meanwhile, higher density of a bipartite network can provide more accurate but less diverse or novel recommendations. Furthermore, the user-item ratio is positively correlated with the accuracy metrics but negatively correlated with the diverse and novel metrics.

  13. Study of Chromatic parameters of Line, Total, Middle graphs and Graph operators of Bipartite graph

    Nagarathinam, R.; Parvathi, N.

    2018-04-01

    Chromatic parameters have been explored on the basis of graph coloring process in which a couple of adjacent nodes receives different colors. But the Grundy and b-coloring executes maximum colors under certain restrictions. In this paper, Chromatic, b-chromatic and Grundy number of some graph operators of bipartite graph has been investigat

  14. A simple model of bipartite cooperation for ecological and organizational networks.

    Saavedra, Serguei; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Uzzi, Brian

    2009-01-22

    In theoretical ecology, simple stochastic models that satisfy two basic conditions about the distribution of niche values and feeding ranges have proved successful in reproducing the overall structural properties of real food webs, using species richness and connectance as the only input parameters. Recently, more detailed models have incorporated higher levels of constraint in order to reproduce the actual links observed in real food webs. Here, building on previous stochastic models of consumer-resource interactions between species, we propose a highly parsimonious model that can reproduce the overall bipartite structure of cooperative partner-partner interactions, as exemplified by plant-animal mutualistic networks. Our stochastic model of bipartite cooperation uses simple specialization and interaction rules, and only requires three empirical input parameters. We test the bipartite cooperation model on ten large pollination data sets that have been compiled in the literature, and find that it successfully replicates the degree distribution, nestedness and modularity of the empirical networks. These properties are regarded as key to understanding cooperation in mutualistic networks. We also apply our model to an extensive data set of two classes of company engaged in joint production in the garment industry. Using the same metrics, we find that the network of manufacturer-contractor interactions exhibits similar structural patterns to plant-animal pollination networks. This surprising correspondence between ecological and organizational networks suggests that the simple rules of cooperation that generate bipartite networks may be generic, and could prove relevant in many different domains, ranging from biological systems to human society.

  15. Nonclassicality and entanglement criteria for bipartite optical fields characterized by quadratic detectors

    Peřina Jr., J.; Arkhipov, I.I.; Michálek, Václav; Haderka, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 4 (2017), s. 1-15, č. článku 043845. ISSN 2469-9926 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : parametric down-conversion * photon statistic * bipartite optical fields * quadratic detectors Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 2.925, year: 2016

  16. A single-shot nonlinear autocorrelation approach for time-resolved physics in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range

    Rompotis, Dimitrios

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a single-shot temporal metrology scheme operating in the vacuum-extreme ultraviolet spectral range has been designed and experimentally implemented. Utilizing an anti-collinear geometry, a second-order intensity autocorrelation measurement of a vacuum ultraviolet pulse can be performed by encoding temporal delay information on the beam propagation coordinate. An ion-imaging time-of-flight spectrometer, offering micrometer resolution has been set-up for this purpose. This instrument enables the detection of a magnified image of the spatial distribution of ions exclusively generated by direct two-photon absorption in the combined counter-propagating pulse focus and thus obtain the second-order intensity autocorrelation measurement on a single-shot basis. Additionally, an intense VUV light source based on high-harmonic generation has been experimentally realized. It delivers intense sub-20 fs Ti:Sa fifth-harmonic pulses utilizing a loose-focusing geometry in a long Ar gas cell. The VUV pulses centered at 161.8 nm reach pulse energies of 1.1 μJ per pulse, while the corresponding pulse duration is measured with a second-order, fringe-resolved autocorrelation scheme to be 18 ± 1 fs on average. Non-resonant, two-photon ionization of Kr and Xe and three-photon ionization of Ne verify the fifth-harmonic pulse intensity and indicate the feasibility of multi-photon VUV pump/VUV probe studies of ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Finally, the extended functionally of the counter-propagating pulse metrology approach is demonstrated by a single-shot VUV pump/VUV probe experiment aiming at the investigation of ultrafast dissociation dynamics of O 2 excited in the Schumann-Runge continuum at 162 nm.

  17. Sensitivity of coronal loop sausage mode frequencies and decay rates to radial and longitudinal density inhomogeneities: a spectral approach

    Cally, Paul S.; Xiong, Ming

    2018-01-01

    Fast sausage modes in solar magnetic coronal loops are only fully contained in unrealistically short dense loops. Otherwise they are leaky, losing energy to their surrounds as outgoing waves. This causes any oscillation to decay exponentially in time. Simultaneous observations of both period and decay rate therefore reveal the eigenfrequency of the observed mode, and potentially insight into the tubes’ nonuniform internal structure. In this article, a global spectral description of the oscillations is presented that results in an implicit matrix eigenvalue equation where the eigenvalues are associated predominantly with the diagonal terms of the matrix. The off-diagonal terms vanish identically if the tube is uniform. A linearized perturbation approach, applied with respect to a uniform reference model, is developed that makes the eigenvalues explicit. The implicit eigenvalue problem is easily solved numerically though, and it is shown that knowledge of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenfrequency is sufficient to determine the width and density contrast of a boundary layer over which the tubes’ enhanced internal densities drop to ambient values. Linearized density kernels are developed that show sensitivity only to the extreme outside of the loops for radial fundamental modes, especially for small density enhancements, with no sensitivity to the core. Higher radial harmonics do show some internal sensitivity, but these will be more difficult to observe. Only kink modes are sensitive to the tube centres. Variation in internal and external Alfvén speed along the loop is shown to have little effect on the fundamental dimensionless eigenfrequency, though the associated eigenfunction becomes more compact at the loop apex as stratification increases, or may even displace from the apex.

  18. Modeling and inversion of the microtremor H/ V spectral ratio: physical basis behind the diffuse field approach

    Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J.

    2017-07-01

    Microtremor H/ V spectral ratio (MHVSR) has gained popularity to assess the dominant frequency of soil sites. It requires measurement of ground motion due to seismic ambient noise at a site and a relatively simple processing. Theory asserts that the ensemble average of the autocorrelation of motion components belonging to a diffuse field at a given receiver gives the directional energy densities (DEDs) which are proportional to the imaginary parts of the Green's function components when both source and receiver are the same point and the directions of force and response coincide. Therefore, the MHVSR can be modeled as the square root of 2 × Im G 11/Im G 33, where Im G 11 and Im G 33 are the imaginary parts of Green's functions at the load point for the horizontal (sub-index 1) and vertical (sub-index 3) components, respectively. This connection has physical implications that emerge from the duality DED force and allows understanding the behavior of the MHVSR. For a given model, the imaginary parts of the Green's functions are integrals along a radial wavenumber. To deal with these integrals, we have used either the popular discrete wavenumber method or the Cauchy's residue theorem at the poles that account for surface waves normal modes giving the contributions due to Rayleigh and Love waves. For the retrieval of the velocity structure, one can minimize the weighted differences between observations and calculated values using the strategy of an inversion scheme. In this research, we used simulated annealing but other optimization techniques can be used as well. This last approach allows computing separately the contributions of different wave types. An example is presented for the mouth of Andarax River at Almería, Spain. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Remote Sensing Image Fusion at the Segment Level Using a Spatially-Weighted Approach: Applications for Land Cover Spectral Analysis and Mapping

    Brian Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Segment-level image fusion involves segmenting a higher spatial resolution (HSR image to derive boundaries of land cover objects, and then extracting additional descriptors of image segments (polygons from a lower spatial resolution (LSR image. In past research, an unweighted segment-level fusion (USF approach, which extracts information from a resampled LSR image, resulted in more accurate land cover classification than the use of HSR imagery alone. However, simply fusing the LSR image with segment polygons may lead to significant errors due to the high level of noise in pixels along the segment boundaries (i.e., pixels containing multiple land cover types. To mitigate this, a spatially-weighted segment-level fusion (SWSF method was proposed for extracting descriptors (mean spectral values of segments from LSR images. SWSF reduces the weights of LSR pixels located on or near segment boundaries to reduce errors in the fusion process. Compared to the USF approach, SWSF extracted more accurate spectral properties of land cover objects when the ratio of the LSR image resolution to the HSR image resolution was greater than 2:1, and SWSF was also shown to increase classification accuracy. SWSF can be used to fuse any type of imagery at the segment level since it is insensitive to spectral differences between the LSR and HSR images (e.g., different spectral ranges of the images or different image acquisition dates.

  20. Rectangular spectral collocation

    Driscoll, Tobin A.; Hale, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Boundary conditions in spectral collocation methods are typically imposed by removing some rows of the discretized differential operator and replacing them with others that enforce the required conditions at the boundary. A new approach based upon

  1. Chimera states in bipartite networks of FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators

    Wu, Zhi-Min; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Feng, Yuee; Li, Hai-Hong; Dai, Qiong-Lin; Yang, Jun-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Chimera states consisting of spatially coherent and incoherent domains have been observed in different topologies such as rings, spheres, and complex networks. In this paper, we investigate bipartite networks of nonlocally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) oscillators in which the units are allocated evenly to two layers, and FHN units interact with each other only when they are in different layers. We report the existence of chimera states in bipartite networks. Owing to the interplay between chimera states in the two layers, many types of chimera states such as in-phase chimera states, antiphase chimera states, and out-of-phase chimera states are classified. Stability diagrams of several typical chimera states in the coupling strength-coupling radius plane, which show strong multistability of chimera states, are explored.

  2. Forbidden regimes in the distribution of bipartite quantum correlations due to multiparty entanglement

    Kumar, Asutosh [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Dhar, Himadri Shekhar [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10/136, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Prabhu, R. [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Patna 800013 (India); Sen, Aditi [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Sen, Ujjwal, E-mail: ujjwal@hri.res.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2017-05-25

    Monogamy is a nonclassical property that limits the distribution of quantum correlation among subparts of a multiparty system. We show that monogamy scores for different quantum correlation measures are bounded above by functions of genuine multipartite entanglement for a large majority of pure multiqubit states. The bound is universal for all three-qubit pure states. We derive necessary conditions to characterize the states that violate the bound, which can also be observed by numerical simulation for a small set of states, generated Haar uniformly. The results indicate that genuine multipartite entanglement restricts the distribution of bipartite quantum correlations in a multiparty system. - Highlights: • Monogamy is an intrinsic property of several quantum characteristics including entanglement. • It is possible to quantify monogamy by using the so-called monogamy scores. • Genuine multisite entanglement can be used to bound monogamy scores. • Distribution of bipartite entanglement in a system is, therefore, restricted by its multisite entanglement content.

  3. Phase-controlled localization and directed transport in an optical bipartite lattice.

    Hai, Kuo; Luo, Yunrong; Lu, Gengbiao; Hai, Wenhua

    2014-02-24

    We investigate coherent control of a single atom interacting with an optical bipartite lattice via a combined high-frequency modulation. Our analytical results show that the quantum tunneling and dynamical localization can depend on phase difference between the modulation components, which leads to a different route for the coherent destruction of tunneling and a convenient phase-control method for stabilizing the system to implement the directed transport of atom. The similar directed transport and the phase-controlled quantum transition are revealed for the corresponding many-particle system. The results can be referable for experimentally manipulating quantum transport and transition of cold atoms in the tilted and shaken optical bipartite lattice or of analogical optical two-mode quantum beam splitter, and also can be extended to other optical and solid-state systems.

  4. Bipartite hallucal sesamoid bones: relationship with hallux valgus and metatarsal index

    Munuera, Pedro V.; Dominguez, Gabriel [University of Seville, Department of Podiatrics, Seville (Spain); Centro Docente de Fisioterapia y Podologia, Departamento de Podologia, Seville (Spain); Reina, Maria; Trujillo, Piedad [Centro Docente de Fisioterapia y Podologia, Departamento de Podologia, Seville (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    The objective was to relate the incidence of the partition of the hallucal sesamoid bones to the size of the first metatarsal and the hallux valgus deformity. In a sample of 474 radiographs, the frequency of appearance of bipartite sesamoids was studied. The length and relative protrusion of the first metatarsal, and the hallux abductus angle, were measured and compared between the feet with and without sesamoid partition. The results showed that 14.6% of the feet studied had at least one partite sesamoid, that the sesamoid most frequently divided was the medial, and that unilateral partition was the most common. No difference was found in the incidence of partite sesamoids between men and women, or between left and right feet. Protrusion and length of the first metatarsal are greater in feet with partite sesamoids than in feet without this condition. A significantly higher incidence of bipartite medial sesamoid was obtained in feet with hallux valgus compared with normal feet. (orig.)

  5. Bipartite hallucal sesamoid bones: relationship with hallux valgus and metatarsal index

    Munuera, Pedro V.; Dominguez, Gabriel; Reina, Maria; Trujillo, Piedad

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to relate the incidence of the partition of the hallucal sesamoid bones to the size of the first metatarsal and the hallux valgus deformity. In a sample of 474 radiographs, the frequency of appearance of bipartite sesamoids was studied. The length and relative protrusion of the first metatarsal, and the hallux abductus angle, were measured and compared between the feet with and without sesamoid partition. The results showed that 14.6% of the feet studied had at least one partite sesamoid, that the sesamoid most frequently divided was the medial, and that unilateral partition was the most common. No difference was found in the incidence of partite sesamoids between men and women, or between left and right feet. Protrusion and length of the first metatarsal are greater in feet with partite sesamoids than in feet without this condition. A significantly higher incidence of bipartite medial sesamoid was obtained in feet with hallux valgus compared with normal feet. (orig.)

  6. Bipartite entangled stabilizer mutually unbiased bases as maximum cliques of Cayley graphs

    van Dam, Wim; Howard, Mark

    2011-07-01

    We examine the existence and structure of particular sets of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) in bipartite qudit systems. In contrast to well-known power-of-prime MUB constructions, we restrict ourselves to using maximally entangled stabilizer states as MUB vectors. Consequently, these bipartite entangled stabilizer MUBs (BES MUBs) provide no local information, but are sufficient and minimal for decomposing a wide variety of interesting operators including (mixtures of) Jamiołkowski states, entanglement witnesses, and more. The problem of finding such BES MUBs can be mapped, in a natural way, to that of finding maximum cliques in a family of Cayley graphs. Some relationships with known power-of-prime MUB constructions are discussed, and observables for BES MUBs are given explicitly in terms of Pauli operators.

  7. Bipartite entangled stabilizer mutually unbiased bases as maximum cliques of Cayley graphs

    Dam, Wim van; Howard, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We examine the existence and structure of particular sets of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) in bipartite qudit systems. In contrast to well-known power-of-prime MUB constructions, we restrict ourselves to using maximally entangled stabilizer states as MUB vectors. Consequently, these bipartite entangled stabilizer MUBs (BES MUBs) provide no local information, but are sufficient and minimal for decomposing a wide variety of interesting operators including (mixtures of) Jamiolkowski states, entanglement witnesses, and more. The problem of finding such BES MUBs can be mapped, in a natural way, to that of finding maximum cliques in a family of Cayley graphs. Some relationships with known power-of-prime MUB constructions are discussed, and observables for BES MUBs are given explicitly in terms of Pauli operators.

  8. Application of Bipartite Entangled States to Quantum Mechanical Version of Complex Wavelet Transforms

    Fan Hongyi; Lu Hailiang; Xu Xuefen

    2006-01-01

    We introduce the bipartite entangled states to present a quantum mechanical version of complex wavelet transform. Using the technique of integral within an ordered product of operators we show that the complex wavelet transform can be studied in terms of various quantum state vectors in two-mode Fock space. In this way the creterion for mother wavelet can be examined quantum-mechanically and therefore more deeply.

  9. SibRank: Signed bipartite network analysis for neighbor-based collaborative ranking

    Shams, Bita; Haratizadeh, Saman

    2016-09-01

    Collaborative ranking is an emerging field of recommender systems that utilizes users' preference data rather than rating values. Unfortunately, neighbor-based collaborative ranking has gained little attention despite its more flexibility and justifiability. This paper proposes a novel framework, called SibRank that seeks to improve the state of the art neighbor-based collaborative ranking methods. SibRank represents users' preferences as a signed bipartite network, and finds similar users, through a novel personalized ranking algorithm in signed networks.

  10. Some Congruence Properties of a Restricted Bipartition Function cN(n

    Nipen Saikia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Let cN(n denote the number of bipartitions (λ,μ of a positive integer n subject to the restriction that each part of μ is divisible by N. In this paper, we prove some congruence properties of the function cN(n for N=7, 11, and 5l, for any integer l≥1, by employing Ramanujan’s theta-function identities.

  11. Application of Bipartite and Tripartite Entangled State Representations in Quantum Teleportation of Continuous Variables

    YUAN Hong-Chun; QI Kai-Guo

    2005-01-01

    We mostly investigate two schemes. One is to teleport a multi-mode W-type entangled coherent state using a peculiar bipartite entangled state as the quantum channel different from other proposals. Based on our formalism,teleporting multi-mode coherent state or squeezed state is also possible. Another is that the tripartite entangled state is used as the quantum channel of controlled teleportation of an arbitrary and unknown continuous variable in the case of three participators.

  12. The minimal entanglement of bipartite decompositions as a witness of strong entanglement in a quantum system

    Zenchuk, A. I.

    2010-01-01

    We {characterize the multipartite entanglement in a quantum system by the quantity} which vanishes if only the quantum system may be decomposed into two weakly entangled subsystems, unlike measures of multipartite entanglement introduced before. We refer to this {quantity} as the minimal entanglement of bipartite decompositions (MEBD). Big MEBD means that the system may not be decomposed into two weakly entangled subsystems. MEBD allows one to define, for instance, whether the given quantum s...

  13. Information Filtering via Clustering Coefficients of User-Object Bipartite Networks

    Guo, Qiang; Leng, Rui; Shi, Kerui; Liu, Jian-Guo

    The clustering coefficient of user-object bipartite networks is presented to evaluate the overlap percentage of neighbors rating lists, which could be used to measure interest correlations among neighbor sets. The collaborative filtering (CF) information filtering algorithm evaluates a given user's interests in terms of his/her friends' opinions, which has become one of the most successful technologies for recommender systems. In this paper, different from the object clustering coefficient, users' clustering coefficients of user-object bipartite networks are introduced to improve the user similarity measurement. Numerical results for MovieLens and Netflix data sets show that users' clustering effects could enhance the algorithm performance. For MovieLens data set, the algorithmic accuracy, measured by the average ranking score, can be improved by 12.0% and the diversity could be improved by 18.2% and reach 0.649 when the recommendation list equals to 50. For Netflix data set, the accuracy could be improved by 14.5% at the optimal case and the popularity could be reduced by 13.4% comparing with the standard CF algorithm. Finally, we investigate the sparsity effect on the performance. This work indicates the user clustering coefficients is an effective factor to measure the user similarity, meanwhile statistical properties of user-object bipartite networks should be investigated to estimate users' tastes.

  14. Statistical analysis of modal parameters of a suspension bridge based on Bayesian spectral density approach and SHM data

    Li, Zhijun; Feng, Maria Q.; Luo, Longxi; Feng, Dongming; Xu, Xiuli

    2018-01-01

    Uncertainty of modal parameters estimation appear in structural health monitoring (SHM) practice of civil engineering to quite some significant extent due to environmental influences and modeling errors. Reasonable methodologies are needed for processing the uncertainty. Bayesian inference can provide a promising and feasible identification solution for the purpose of SHM. However, there are relatively few researches on the application of Bayesian spectral method in the modal identification using SHM data sets. To extract modal parameters from large data sets collected by SHM system, the Bayesian spectral density algorithm was applied to address the uncertainty of mode extraction from output-only response of a long-span suspension bridge. The posterior most possible values of modal parameters and their uncertainties were estimated through Bayesian inference. A long-term variation and statistical analysis was performed using the sensor data sets collected from the SHM system of the suspension bridge over a one-year period. The t location-scale distribution was shown to be a better candidate function for frequencies of lower modes. On the other hand, the burr distribution provided the best fitting to the higher modes which are sensitive to the temperature. In addition, wind-induced variation of modal parameters was also investigated. It was observed that both the damping ratios and modal forces increased during the period of typhoon excitations. Meanwhile, the modal damping ratios exhibit significant correlation with the spectral intensities of the corresponding modal forces.

  15. Spectral Classification of Galaxies at 0.5 <= z <= 1 in the CDFS: The Artificial Neural Network Approach

    Teimoorinia, H.

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work is to combine spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting with artificial neural network techniques to assign spectral characteristics to a sample of galaxies at 0.5 MUSIC catalog covering bands between ~0.4 and 24 μm in 10-13 filters. We use the CIGALE code to fit photometric data to Maraston's synthesis spectra to derive mass, specific star formation rate, and age, as well as the best SED of the galaxies. We use the spectral models presented by Kinney et al. as targets in the wavelength interval ~1200-7500 Å. Then a series of neural networks are trained, with average performance ~90%, to classify the best SED in a supervised manner. We consider the effects of the prominent features of the best SED on the performance of the trained networks and also test networks on the galaxy spectra of Coleman et al., which have a lower resolution than the target models. In this way, we conclude that the trained networks take into account all the features of the spectra simultaneously. Using the method, 105 out of 142 galaxies of the sample are classified with high significance. The locus of the classified galaxies in the three graphs of the physical parameters of mass, age, and specific star formation rate appears consistent with the morphological characteristics of the galaxies.

  16. Bipartite Network Analysis of the Archaeal Virosphere: Evolutionary Connections between Viruses and Capsidless Mobile Elements.

    Iranzo, Jaime; Koonin, Eugene V; Prangishvili, David; Krupovic, Mart

    2016-12-15

    Archaea and particularly hyperthermophilic crenarchaea are hosts to many unusual viruses with diverse virion shapes and distinct gene compositions. As is typical of viruses in general, there are no universal genes in the archaeal virosphere. Therefore, to obtain a comprehensive picture of the evolutionary relationships between viruses, network analysis methods are more productive than traditional phylogenetic approaches. Here we present a comprehensive comparative analysis of genomes and proteomes from all currently known taxonomically classified and unclassified, cultivated and uncultivated archaeal viruses. We constructed a bipartite network of archaeal viruses that includes two classes of nodes, the genomes and gene families that connect them. Dissection of this network using formal community detection methods reveals strong modularity, with 10 distinct modules and 3 putative supermodules. However, compared to similar previously analyzed networks of eukaryotic and bacterial viruses, the archaeal virus network is sparsely connected. With the exception of the tailed viruses related to bacteriophages of the order Caudovirales and the families Turriviridae and Sphaerolipoviridae that are linked to a distinct supermodule of eukaryotic and bacterial viruses, there are few connector genes shared by different archaeal virus modules. In contrast, most of these modules include, in addition to viruses, capsidless mobile elements, emphasizing tight evolutionary connections between the two types of entities in archaea. The relative contributions of distinct evolutionary origins, in particular from nonviral elements, and insufficient sampling to the sparsity of the archaeal virus network remain to be determined by further exploration of the archaeal virosphere. Viruses infecting archaea are among the most mysterious denizens of the virosphere. Many of these viruses display no genetic or even morphological relationship to viruses of bacteria and eukaryotes, raising questions

  17. SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION OF GALAXIES AT 0.5 {<=} z {<=} 1 IN THE CDFS: THE ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK APPROACH

    Teimoorinia, H., E-mail: hteimoo@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8P 1A1 (Canada)

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work is to combine spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting with artificial neural network techniques to assign spectral characteristics to a sample of galaxies at 0.5 < z < 1. The sample is selected from the spectroscopic campaign of the ESO/GOODS-South field, with 142 sources having photometric data from the GOODS-MUSIC catalog covering bands between {approx}0.4 and 24 {mu}m in 10-13 filters. We use the CIGALE code to fit photometric data to Maraston's synthesis spectra to derive mass, specific star formation rate, and age, as well as the best SED of the galaxies. We use the spectral models presented by Kinney et al. as targets in the wavelength interval {approx}1200-7500 A. Then a series of neural networks are trained, with average performance {approx}90%, to classify the best SED in a supervised manner. We consider the effects of the prominent features of the best SED on the performance of the trained networks and also test networks on the galaxy spectra of Coleman et al., which have a lower resolution than the target models. In this way, we conclude that the trained networks take into account all the features of the spectra simultaneously. Using the method, 105 out of 142 galaxies of the sample are classified with high significance. The locus of the classified galaxies in the three graphs of the physical parameters of mass, age, and specific star formation rate appears consistent with the morphological characteristics of the galaxies.

  18. SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION OF GALAXIES AT 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1 IN THE CDFS: THE ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK APPROACH

    Teimoorinia, H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to combine spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting with artificial neural network techniques to assign spectral characteristics to a sample of galaxies at 0.5 < z < 1. The sample is selected from the spectroscopic campaign of the ESO/GOODS-South field, with 142 sources having photometric data from the GOODS-MUSIC catalog covering bands between ∼0.4 and 24 μm in 10-13 filters. We use the CIGALE code to fit photometric data to Maraston's synthesis spectra to derive mass, specific star formation rate, and age, as well as the best SED of the galaxies. We use the spectral models presented by Kinney et al. as targets in the wavelength interval ∼1200-7500 Å. Then a series of neural networks are trained, with average performance ∼90%, to classify the best SED in a supervised manner. We consider the effects of the prominent features of the best SED on the performance of the trained networks and also test networks on the galaxy spectra of Coleman et al., which have a lower resolution than the target models. In this way, we conclude that the trained networks take into account all the features of the spectra simultaneously. Using the method, 105 out of 142 galaxies of the sample are classified with high significance. The locus of the classified galaxies in the three graphs of the physical parameters of mass, age, and specific star formation rate appears consistent with the morphological characteristics of the galaxies.

  19. Tolerating Correlated Failures for Generalized Cartesian Distributions via Bipartite Matching

    Ali, Nawab; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Daily, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Faults are expected to play an increasingly important role in how algorithms and applications are designed to run on future extreme-scale systems. A key ingredient of any approach to fault tolerance is effective support for fault tolerant data storage. A typical application execution consists of phases in which certain data structures are modified while others are read-only. Often, read-only data structures constitute a large fraction of total memory consumed. Fault tolerance for read-only data can be ensured through the use of checksums or parities, without resorting to expensive in-memory duplication or checkpointing to secondary storage. In this paper, we present a graph-matching approach to compute and store parity data for read-only matrices that are compatible with fault tolerant linear algebra (FTLA). Typical approaches only support blocked data distributions with each process holding one block with the parity located on additional processes. The matrices are assumed to be blocked by a cartesian grid with each block assigned to a process. We consider a generalized distribution in which each process can be assigned arbitrary blocks. We also account for the fact that multiple processes might be part of the same failure unit, say an SMP node. The flexibility enabled by our novel application of graph matching extends fault tolerance support to data distributions beyond those supported by prior work. We evaluate the matching implementations and cost to compute the parity and recover lost data, demonstrating the low overhead incurred by our approach.

  20. Novel Approaches to Spectral Properties of Correlated Electron Materials: From Generalized Kohn-Sham Theory to Screened Exchange Dynamical Mean Field Theory

    Delange, Pascal; Backes, Steffen; van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Pourovskii, Leonid; Jiang, Hong; Biermann, Silke

    2018-04-01

    The most intriguing properties of emergent materials are typically consequences of highly correlated quantum states of their electronic degrees of freedom. Describing those materials from first principles remains a challenge for modern condensed matter theory. Here, we review, apply and discuss novel approaches to spectral properties of correlated electron materials, assessing current day predictive capabilities of electronic structure calculations. In particular, we focus on the recent Screened Exchange Dynamical Mean-Field Theory scheme and its relation to generalized Kohn-Sham Theory. These concepts are illustrated on the transition metal pnictide BaCo2As2 and elemental zinc and cadmium.

  1. A Bipartite Network-based Method for Prediction of Long Non-coding RNA–protein Interactions

    Mengqu Ge

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As one large class of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs have gained considerable attention in recent years. Mutations and dysfunction of lncRNAs have been implicated in human disorders. Many lncRNAs exert their effects through interactions with the corresponding RNA-binding proteins. Several computational approaches have been developed, but only few are able to perform the prediction of these interactions from a network-based point of view. Here, we introduce a computational method named lncRNA–protein bipartite network inference (LPBNI. LPBNI aims to identify potential lncRNA–interacting proteins, by making full use of the known lncRNA–protein interactions. Leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV test shows that LPBNI significantly outperforms other network-based methods, including random walk (RWR and protein-based collaborative filtering (ProCF. Furthermore, a case study was performed to demonstrate the performance of LPBNI using real data in predicting potential lncRNA–interacting proteins.

  2. Political Obstacles to Regionalization of the SUS: perceptions of Municipal Health Secretaries with seat in the Bipartite Interagency Commissions.

    Moreira, Marcelo Rasga; Ribeiro, José Mendes; Ouverney, Assis Mafort

    2017-04-01

    This paper aims to identify and analyze the political obstacles to the implementation of Organizational Contract of Public Action (COAP) based on the perceptions of municipal health secretaries of Bipartite Interagency Commissions (CIB). For this purpose, we interviewed 195 secretaries (92% of the total) from October 2015 to August 2016. Based on the approach of policy analysis, the main hurdles identified were, in short, a traditional obstacle (lack of resources), one that has been gaining strength in recent years (judicialization of politics) and another, perhaps unheard of: the party-political system and the State Executive Branch are the great absentees in the coalitions in support of SUS regionalization policies. We can conclude that such obstacles indicate an extremely negative setting for the implementation of the COAP and other SUS regionalization policies. Thus, it is incumbent upon those involved to reflect, negotiate and build consensus on improving the health of the population and overcome such obstacles if, of course, they embrace the authors' concept that regionalization is fundamental for the SUS.

  3. Optimality of the barrier strategy in de Finetti's dividend problem for spectrally negative Lévy processes: An alternative approach

    Yin, Chuancun; Wang, Chunwei

    2009-11-01

    The optimal dividend problem proposed in de Finetti [1] is to find the dividend-payment strategy that maximizes the expected discounted value of dividends which are paid to the shareholders until the company is ruined. Avram et al. [9] studied the case when the risk process is modelled by a general spectrally negative Lévy process and Loeffen [10] gave sufficient conditions under which the optimal strategy is of the barrier type. Recently Kyprianou et al. [11] strengthened the result of Loeffen [10] which established a larger class of Lévy processes for which the barrier strategy is optimal among all admissible ones. In this paper we use an analytical argument to re-investigate the optimality of barrier dividend strategies considered in the three recent papers.

  4. Local hypothesis testing between a pure bipartite state and the white noise state

    Owari, Masaki; Hayashi, Masahito

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we treat a local discrimination problem in the framework of asymmetric hypothesis testing. We choose a known bipartite pure state $\\ket{\\Psi}$ as an alternative hypothesis, and the completely mixed state as a null hypothesis. As a result, we analytically derive an optimal type 2 error and an optimal POVM for one-way LOCC POVM and Separable POVM. For two-way LOCC POVM, we study a family of simple three-step LOCC protocols, and show that the best protocol in this family has stric...

  5. Strong monogamy of bipartite and genuine multipartite entanglement: the Gaussian case.

    Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2007-10-12

    We demonstrate the existence of general constraints on distributed quantum correlations, which impose a trade-off on bipartite and multipartite entanglement at once. For all N-mode Gaussian states under permutation invariance, we establish exactly a monogamy inequality, stronger than the traditional one, that by recursion defines a proper measure of genuine N-partite entanglement. Strong monogamy holds as well for subsystems of arbitrary size, and the emerging multipartite entanglement measure is found to be scale invariant. We unveil its operational connection with the optimal fidelity of continuous variable teleportation networks.

  6. Non-parametric co-clustering of large scale sparse bipartite networks on the GPU

    Hansen, Toke Jansen; Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2011-01-01

    of row and column clusters from a hypothesis space of an infinite number of clusters. To reach large scale applications of co-clustering we exploit that parameter inference for co-clustering is well suited for parallel computing. We develop a generic GPU framework for efficient inference on large scale...... sparse bipartite networks and achieve a speedup of two orders of magnitude compared to estimation based on conventional CPUs. In terms of scalability we find for networks with more than 100 million links that reliable inference can be achieved in less than an hour on a single GPU. To efficiently manage...

  7. Bipartite Anterior Extraperitoneal Teratoma: Evidence for the Embryological Origins of Teratomas?

    D. J. B. Keene

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Teratomas are thought to arise from totipotent primordial germ cells (PGCs Dehner (1983 which may miss their target destination Moore and Persaud (1984. Teratomas can occur anywhere from the brain to the coccygeal area but are usually in the midline close to the embryological position of the gonadal ridges Bale (1984, Nguyen and Laberge (2000. We report a case of a bipartite anterior extraperitoneal teratoma. This is an unusual position for a teratoma, but one which may support the “missed target” theory of embryology.

  8. Forbidden regimes in the distribution of bipartite quantum correlations due to multiparty entanglement

    Kumar, Asutosh; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar; Prabhu, R.; Sen(De), Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2017-05-01

    Monogamy is a nonclassical property that limits the distribution of quantum correlation among subparts of a multiparty system. We show that monogamy scores for different quantum correlation measures are bounded above by functions of genuine multipartite entanglement for a large majority of pure multiqubit states. The bound is universal for all three-qubit pure states. We derive necessary conditions to characterize the states that violate the bound, which can also be observed by numerical simulation for a small set of states, generated Haar uniformly. The results indicate that genuine multipartite entanglement restricts the distribution of bipartite quantum correlations in a multiparty system.

  9. Inefficiency and classical communication bounds for conversion between partially entangled pure bipartite states

    Fortescue, Ben; Lo, H.-K.

    2005-01-01

    We derive lower limits on the inefficiency and classical communication costs of dilution between two-term bipartite pure states that are partially entangled. We first calculate explicit relations between the allowable error and classical communication costs of entanglement dilution using a previously described protocol, then consider a two-stage dilution from singlets with this protocol followed by some unknown protocol for conversion between partially entangled states. Applying overall lower bounds on classical communication and inefficiency to this two-stage protocol, we derive bounds for the unknown protocol. In addition we derive analogous (but looser) bounds for general pure states

  10. Editorial Commentary: Got Evidence? What We Really Need Is an Algorithm for Treating Symptomatic Bipartite Patella.

    Fithian, Donald C

    2018-05-01

    Bipartite patella is an uncommon but potentially troublesome problem for young athletes. Numerous uncontrolled retrospective studies have reported good results after various treatments. What is needed are studies that will guide workup and support treatment decisions based on the condition of the cartilage surfaces of the fragment, presence of pseudoarthrosis, and size and location of the fragment. To support decisions, we need prospective comparative studies, either randomized or, at least, prospective cohort studies that identify patients at the time of presentation, document key decision points, and follow patients to successful resolution of symptoms. Copyright © 2018 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Combining Temporal and Spectral Information with Spatial Mapping to Identify Differences between Phonological and Semantic Networks: A Magnetoencephalographic Approach.

    McNab, Fiona; Hillebrand, Arjan; Swithenby, Stephen J; Rippon, Gina

    2012-01-01

    Early, lesion-based models of language processing suggested that semantic and phonological processes are associated with distinct temporal and parietal regions respectively, with frontal areas more indirectly involved. Contemporary spatial brain mapping techniques have not supported such clear-cut segregation, with strong evidence of activation in left temporal areas by both processes and disputed evidence of involvement of frontal areas in both processes. We suggest that combining spatial information with temporal and spectral data may allow a closer scrutiny of the differential involvement of closely overlapping cortical areas in language processing. Using beamforming techniques to analyze magnetoencephalography data, we localized the neuronal substrates underlying primed responses to nouns requiring either phonological or semantic processing, and examined the associated measures of time and frequency in those areas where activation was common to both tasks. Power changes in the beta (14-30 Hz) and gamma (30-50 Hz) frequency bands were analyzed in pre-selected time windows of 350-550 and 500-700 ms In left temporal regions, both tasks elicited power changes in the same time window (350-550 ms), but with different spectral characteristics, low beta (14-20 Hz) for the phonological task and high beta (20-30 Hz) for the semantic task. In frontal areas (BA10), both tasks elicited power changes in the gamma band (30-50 Hz), but in different time windows, 500-700 ms for the phonological task and 350-550 ms for the semantic task. In the left inferior parietal area (BA40), both tasks elicited changes in the 20-30 Hz beta frequency band but in different time windows, 350-550 ms for the phonological task and 500-700 ms for the semantic task. Our findings suggest that, where spatial measures may indicate overlapping areas of involvement, additional beamforming techniques can demonstrate differential activation in time and frequency domains.

  12. Mononuclear Pd(II) complex as a new therapeutic agent: Synthesis, characterization, biological activity, spectral and DNA binding approaches

    Saeidifar, Maryam; Mirzaei, Hamidreza; Ahmadi Nasab, Navid; Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan

    2017-11-01

    The binding ability between a new water-soluble palladium(II) complex [Pd(bpy)(bez-dtc)]Cl (where bpy is 2,2‧-bipyridine and bez-dtc is benzyl dithiocarbamate), as an antitumor agent, and calf thymus DNA was evaluated using various physicochemical methods, such as UV-Vis absorption, Competitive fluorescence studies, viscosity measurement, zeta potential and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The Pd(II) complex was synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurements, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and electronic spectra studies. The anticancer activity against HeLa cell lines demonstrated lower cytotoxicity than cisplatin. The binding constants and the thermodynamic parameters were determined at different temperatures (300 K, 310 K and 320 K) and shown that the complex can bind to DNA via electrostatic forces. Furthermore, this result was confirmed by the viscosity and zeta potential measurements. The CD spectral results demonstrated that the binding of Pd(II) complex to DNA induced conformational changes in DNA. We hope that these results will provide a basis for further studies and practical clinical use of anticancer drugs.

  13. Rapid Chemometric X-Ray Fluorescence approaches for spectral Diagnostics of Cancer utilizing Tissue Trace Metals and Speciation profiles

    Okonda, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectroscopy is an analytical method for identification and quantification of elements in materials by measurement of their spectral energy and intensity. EDXRFS spectroscopic technique involves simultaneous non-invasive acquisition of both fluorescence and scatter spectra from samples for quantitative determination of trace elemental content in complex matrix materials. The objective is develop a chemometric-aided EDXRFS method for rapid diagnosis of cancer and its severity (staging) based on analysis of trace elements (Cu, Zn, Fe, Se and Mn), their speciation and multivariate alterations of the elements in cancerous body tissue samples as cancer biomarkers. The quest for early diagnosis of cancer is based on the fact that early intervention translates to higher survival rate and better quality of life. Chemometric aided EDXRFS cancer diagnostic model has been evaluated as a direct and rapid superior alternative for the traditional quantitative methods used in XRF such as FP method. PCA results of cultured samples indicate that it is possible to characterize cancer at early and late stage of development based on trace elemental profiles

  14. Extraction and prediction of indices for monsoon intraseasonal oscillations: an approach based on nonlinear Laplacian spectral analysis

    Sabeerali, C. T.; Ajayamohan, R. S.; Giannakis, Dimitrios; Majda, Andrew J.

    2017-11-01

    An improved index for real-time monitoring and forecast verification of monsoon intraseasonal oscillations (MISOs) is introduced using the recently developed nonlinear Laplacian spectral analysis (NLSA) technique. Using NLSA, a hierarchy of Laplace-Beltrami (LB) eigenfunctions are extracted from unfiltered daily rainfall data from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project over the south Asian monsoon region. Two modes representing the full life cycle of the northeastward-propagating boreal summer MISO are identified from the hierarchy of LB eigenfunctions. These modes have a number of advantages over MISO modes extracted via extended empirical orthogonal function analysis including higher memory and predictability, stronger amplitude and higher fractional explained variance over the western Pacific, Western Ghats, and adjoining Arabian Sea regions, and more realistic representation of the regional heat sources over the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Real-time prediction of NLSA-derived MISO indices is demonstrated via extended-range hindcasts based on NCEP Coupled Forecast System version 2 operational output. It is shown that in these hindcasts the NLSA MISO indices remain predictable out to ˜3 weeks.

  15. Microscopic approach of the spectral property of 1+ and high-spin states in 124Te nucleus

    Shi Zhuyi; Ni Shaoyong; Tong Hong; Zhao Xingzhi

    2004-01-01

    Using a microscopic sdIBM-2+2q·p· approach, the spectra of the low-spin and partial high-spin states in 124 Te nucleus are relatively successfully calculated. In particular, the 1 1 + , 1 2 + , 3 1 + , 3 2 + and 5 1 + states are successfully reproduced, the energy relationship resulting from this approach identifies that the 6 1 + , 8 1 + and 10 1 + states belong to the aligned states of the two protons. This can explain the recent experimental results that the collective structures may coexist with the single-particle states. So this approach becomes a powerful tool for successfully describing the spectra of general nuclei without clear symmetry and of isotopes located at transitional regions. Finally, the aligned-state structure and the broken-pair energy of the two-quasi-particle are discussed

  16. A mathematical model for generating bipartite graphs and its application to protein networks

    Nacher, J. C.; Ochiai, T.; Hayashida, M.; Akutsu, T.

    2009-12-01

    Complex systems arise in many different contexts from large communication systems and transportation infrastructures to molecular biology. Most of these systems can be organized into networks composed of nodes and interacting edges. Here, we present a theoretical model that constructs bipartite networks with the particular feature that the degree distribution can be tuned depending on the probability rate of fundamental processes. We then use this model to investigate protein-domain networks. A protein can be composed of up to hundreds of domains. Each domain represents a conserved sequence segment with specific functional tasks. We analyze the distribution of domains in Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana organisms and the statistical analysis shows that while (a) the number of domain types shared by k proteins exhibits a power-law distribution, (b) the number of proteins composed of k types of domains decays as an exponential distribution. The proposed mathematical model generates bipartite graphs and predicts the emergence of this mixing of (a) power-law and (b) exponential distributions. Our theoretical and computational results show that this model requires (1) growth process and (2) copy mechanism.

  17. A mathematical model for generating bipartite graphs and its application to protein networks

    Nacher, J C [Department of Complex Systems, Future University-Hakodate (Japan); Ochiai, T [Faculty of Engineering, Toyama Prefectural University (Japan); Hayashida, M; Akutsu, T [Bioinformatics Center, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University (Japan)

    2009-12-04

    Complex systems arise in many different contexts from large communication systems and transportation infrastructures to molecular biology. Most of these systems can be organized into networks composed of nodes and interacting edges. Here, we present a theoretical model that constructs bipartite networks with the particular feature that the degree distribution can be tuned depending on the probability rate of fundamental processes. We then use this model to investigate protein-domain networks. A protein can be composed of up to hundreds of domains. Each domain represents a conserved sequence segment with specific functional tasks. We analyze the distribution of domains in Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana organisms and the statistical analysis shows that while (a) the number of domain types shared by k proteins exhibits a power-law distribution, (b) the number of proteins composed of k types of domains decays as an exponential distribution. The proposed mathematical model generates bipartite graphs and predicts the emergence of this mixing of (a) power-law and (b) exponential distributions. Our theoretical and computational results show that this model requires (1) growth process and (2) copy mechanism.

  18. A mathematical model for generating bipartite graphs and its application to protein networks

    Nacher, J C; Ochiai, T; Hayashida, M; Akutsu, T

    2009-01-01

    Complex systems arise in many different contexts from large communication systems and transportation infrastructures to molecular biology. Most of these systems can be organized into networks composed of nodes and interacting edges. Here, we present a theoretical model that constructs bipartite networks with the particular feature that the degree distribution can be tuned depending on the probability rate of fundamental processes. We then use this model to investigate protein-domain networks. A protein can be composed of up to hundreds of domains. Each domain represents a conserved sequence segment with specific functional tasks. We analyze the distribution of domains in Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana organisms and the statistical analysis shows that while (a) the number of domain types shared by k proteins exhibits a power-law distribution, (b) the number of proteins composed of k types of domains decays as an exponential distribution. The proposed mathematical model generates bipartite graphs and predicts the emergence of this mixing of (a) power-law and (b) exponential distributions. Our theoretical and computational results show that this model requires (1) growth process and (2) copy mechanism.

  19. Bipartite field theories: from D-brane probes to scattering amplitudes

    Franco, Sebastián

    2012-11-01

    We introduce and initiate the investigation of a general class of 4d, {N}=1 quiver gauge theories whose Lagrangian is defined by a bipartite graph on a Riemann surface, with or without boundaries. We refer to such class of theories as Bipartite Field Theories (BFTs). BFTs underlie a wide spectrum of interesting physical systems, including: D3-branes probing toric Calabi-Yau 3-folds, their mirror configurations of D6-branes, cluster integrable systems in (0 + 1) dimensions and leading singularities in scattering amplitudes for {N}=4 SYM. While our discussion is fully general, we focus on models that are relevant for scattering amplitudes. We investigate the BFT perspective on graph modifications, the emergence of Calabi-Yau manifolds (which arise as the master and moduli spaces of BFTs), the translation between square moves in the graph and Seiberg duality and the identification of dual theories by means of the underlying Calabi-Yaus, the phenomenon of loop reduction and the interpretation of the boundary operator for cells in the positive Grassmannian as higgsing in the BFT. We develop a technique based on generalized Kasteleyn matrices that permits an efficient determination of the Calabi-Yau geometries associated to arbitrary graphs. Our techniques allow us to go beyond the planar limit by both increasing the number of boundaries of the graphs and the genus of the underlying Riemann surface. Our investigation suggests a central role for Calabi-Yau manifolds in the context of leading singularities, whose full scope is yet to be uncovered.

  20. Bipartite discrimination of independently prepared quantum states as a counterexample to a parallel repetition conjecture

    Akibue, Seiseki; Kato, Go

    2018-04-01

    For distinguishing quantum states sampled from a fixed ensemble, the gap in bipartite and single-party distinguishability can be interpreted as a nonlocality of the ensemble. In this paper, we consider bipartite state discrimination in a composite system consisting of N subsystems, where each subsystem is shared between two parties and the state of each subsystem is randomly sampled from a particular ensemble comprising the Bell states. We show that the success probability of perfectly identifying the state converges to 1 as N →∞ if the entropy of the probability distribution associated with the ensemble is less than 1, even if the success probability is less than 1 for any finite N . In other words, the nonlocality of the N -fold ensemble asymptotically disappears if the probability distribution associated with each ensemble is concentrated. Furthermore, we show that the disappearance of the nonlocality can be regarded as a remarkable counterexample of a fundamental open question in theoretical computer science, called a parallel repetition conjecture of interactive games with two classically communicating players. Measurements for the discrimination task include a projective measurement of one party represented by stabilizer states, which enable the other party to perfectly distinguish states that are sampled with high probability.

  1. Data Acquisition Based on Stable Matching of Bipartite Graph in Cooperative Vehicle-Infrastructure Systems.

    Tang, Xiaolan; Hong, Donghui; Chen, Wenlong

    2017-06-08

    Existing studies on data acquisition in vehicular networks often take the mobile vehicular nodes as data carriers. However, their autonomous movements, limited resources and security risks impact the quality of services. In this article, we propose a data acquisition model using stable matching of bipartite graph in cooperative vehicle-infrastructure systems, namely, DAS. Contents are distributed to roadside units, while vehicular nodes support supplementary storage. The original distribution problem is formulated as a stable matching problem of bipartite graph, where the data and the storage cells compose two sides of vertices. Regarding the factors relevant with the access ratio and delay, the preference rankings for contents and roadside units are calculated, respectively. With a multi-replica preprocessing algorithm to handle the potential one-to-many mapping, the matching problem is addressed in polynomial time. In addition, vehicular nodes carry and forward assistant contents to deliver the failed packets because of bandwidth competition. Furthermore, an incentive strategy is put forward to boost the vehicle cooperation and to achieve a fair bandwidth allocation at roadside units. Experiments show that DAS achieves a high access ratio and a small storage cost with an acceptable delay.

  2. Atmospheric weighting functions and surface partial derivatives for remote sensing of scattering planetary atmospheres in thermal spectral region: general adjoint approach

    Ustinov, Eugene A.

    2005-01-01

    An approach to formulation of inversion algorithms for remote sensing in the thermal spectral region in the case of a scattering planetary atmosphere, based on the adjoint equation of radiative transfer (Ustinov (JQSRT 68 (2001) 195; JQSRT 73 (2002) 29); referred to as Papers 1 and 2, respectively, in the main text), is applied to the general case of retrievals of atmospheric and surface parameters for the scattering atmosphere with nadir viewing geometry. Analytic expressions for corresponding weighting functions for atmospheric parameters and partial derivatives for surface parameters are derived. The case of pure atmospheric absorption with a scattering underlying surface is considered and convergence to results obtained for the non-scattering atmospheres (Ustinov (JQSRT 74 (2002) 683), referred to as Paper 3 in the main text) is demonstrated

  3. A Comparative Numerical Study of the Spectral Theory Approach of Nishimura and the Roots Method Based on the Analysis of BDMMAP/G/1 Queue

    Arunava Maity

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers an infinite-buffer queuing system with birth-death modulated Markovian arrival process (BDMMAP with arbitrary service time distribution. BDMMAP is an excellent representation of the arrival process, where the fractal behavior such as burstiness, correlation, and self-similarity is observed, for example, in ethernet LAN traffic systems. This model was first apprised by Nishimura (2003, and to analyze it, he proposed a twofold spectral theory approach. It seems from the investigations that Nishimura’s approach is tedious and difficult to employ for practical purposes. The objective of this paper is to analyze the same model with an alternative methodology proposed by Chaudhry et al. (2013 (to be referred to as CGG method. The CGG method appears to be rather simple, mathematically tractable, and easy to implement as compared to Nishimura’s approach. The Achilles tendon of the CGG method is the roots of the characteristic equation associated with the probability generating function (pgf of the queue length distribution, which absolves any eigenvalue algebra and iterative analysis. Both the methods are presented in stepwise manner for easy accessibility, followed by some illustrative examples in accordance with the context.

  4. Atom-number squeezing and bipartite entanglement of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates: analytical results

    Jin, G R; Wang, X W; Li, D; Lu, Y W, E-mail: grjin@bjtu.edu.c [Department of Physics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2010-02-28

    We investigate spin dynamics of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate with weak Josephson coupling. Analytical expressions of atom-number squeezing and bipartite entanglement are presented for atom-atom repulsive interactions. For attractive interactions, there is no number squeezing; however, the squeezing parameter is still useful to recognize the appearance of Schroedinger's cat state.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in bipartite medial cuneiform – a potential pitfall in diagnosis of midfoot injuries: a case series

    Elias Ilan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The bipartite medial cuneiform is an uncommon developmental osseous variant in the midfoot. To our knowledge, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI characteristics of a non-symptomatic bipartite medial cuneiform have not been described in the orthopaedic literature. It is important for orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons, musculoskeletal radiologists, and for podiatrists to identify this osseous variant as it may be mistakenly diagnosed as a fracture or not recognized as a source of non-traumatic or traumatic foot pain, which may sometimes even require surgical treatment. Case presentations In this report, we describe the characteristics of three cases of bipartite medial cuneiform on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and contrast its appearance to that of a medial cuneiform fracture. Conclusion A bipartite medial cuneiform is a rare developmental anomaly of the midfoot and may be the source of midfoot pain. Knowledge about its characteristic appearance on magnetic resonance imaging is important because it is a potential pitfall in diagnosis of midfoot injuries.

  6. On the balanced case of the Brualdi-Shen conjecture on 4-cycle decompositions of Eulerian bipartite tournaments

    Rafael Del Valle Vega

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Brualdi-Shen Conjecture on Eulerian Bipartite Tournaments states that any such graph can be decomposed into oriented 4-cycles. In this article we prove the balanced case of the mentioned conjecture. We show that for any $2n\\times 2n$ bipartite graph $G=(U\\cup V, E$ in which each vertex has $n$-neighbors with biadjacency matrix $M$ (or its transpose there is a proper edge coloring of a column permutation of $M$ denoted $M^{\\sigma}$ in which the nonzero entries of each of the $first$ $n$ columns are colored with elements from the set $\\{n+1, n+2, \\ldots, 2n\\}$ and the nonzero entries of each of the $last$  $n$ columns are colored with elements from the set $\\{1, 2, \\ldots, n\\}$ and if the nonzero entry $M^{\\sigma}_{r,j}$ is colored with color $i$ then $M^{\\sigma}_{r,i}$ must be a zero entry. Such a coloring will induce an oriented 4-cycle decomposition of the bipartite tournament corresponding to $M$. We achieve this by constructing an euler tour on the bipartite tournament which avoids traversing both pair of edges of any two internally disjoint $s$-$t$ 2-paths consecutively, where $s$ and $t$ belong to $V$.

  7. Spectral Analysis on Time-Course Expression Data: Detecting Periodic Genes Using a Real-Valued Iterative Adaptive Approach

    Kwadwo S. Agyepong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-course expression profiles and methods for spectrum analysis have been applied for detecting transcriptional periodicities, which are valuable patterns to unravel genes associated with cell cycle and circadian rhythm regulation. However, most of the proposed methods suffer from restrictions and large false positives to a certain extent. Additionally, in some experiments, arbitrarily irregular sampling times as well as the presence of high noise and small sample sizes make accurate detection a challenging task. A novel scheme for detecting periodicities in time-course expression data is proposed, in which a real-valued iterative adaptive approach (RIAA, originally proposed for signal processing, is applied for periodogram estimation. The inferred spectrum is then analyzed using Fisher’s hypothesis test. With a proper -value threshold, periodic genes can be detected. A periodic signal, two nonperiodic signals, and four sampling strategies were considered in the simulations, including both bursts and drops. In addition, two yeast real datasets were applied for validation. The simulations and real data analysis reveal that RIAA can perform competitively with the existing algorithms. The advantage of RIAA is manifested when the expression data are highly irregularly sampled, and when the number of cycles covered by the sampling time points is very reduced.

  8. Entanglement in bipartite pure states of an interacting boson gas obtained by local projective measurements

    Paraan, Francis N. C.; Korepin, Vladimir E.; Molina-Vilaplana, Javier; Bose, Sougato

    2011-01-01

    We quantify the extractable entanglement of excited states of a Lieb-Liniger gas that are obtained from coarse-grained measurements on the ground state in which the boson number in one of two complementary contiguous partitions of the gas is determined. Numerically exact results obtained from the coordinate Bethe ansatz show that the von Neumann entropy of the resulting bipartite pure state increases monotonically with the strength of repulsive interactions and saturates to the impenetrable-boson limiting value. We also present evidence indicating that the largest amount of entanglement can be extracted from the most probable projected state having half the number of bosons in a given partition. Our study points to a fundamental difference between the nature of the entanglement in free-bosonic and free-fermionic systems, with the entanglement in the former being zero after projection, while that in the latter (corresponding to the impenetrable-boson limit) being nonzero.

  9. Entanglement dynamics of high-dimensional bipartite field states inside the cavities in dissipative environments

    Tahira, Rabia; Ikram, Manzoor; Zubairy, M Suhail [Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Bougouffa, Smail [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Taibah University, PO Box 30002, Madinah (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-02-14

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden death of entanglement in a high-dimensional bipartite system subjected to dissipative environments with an arbitrary initial pure entangled state between two fields in the cavities. We find that in a vacuum reservoir, the presence of the state where one or more than one (two) photons in each cavity are present is a necessary condition for the sudden death of entanglement. Otherwise entanglement remains for infinite time and decays asymptotically with the decay of individual qubits. For pure two-qubit entangled states in a thermal environment, we observe that sudden death of entanglement always occurs. The sudden death time of the entangled states is related to the number of photons in the cavities, the temperature of the reservoir and the initial preparation of the entangled states.

  10. Entanglement dynamics of high-dimensional bipartite field states inside the cavities in dissipative environments

    Tahira, Rabia; Ikram, Manzoor; Zubairy, M Suhail; Bougouffa, Smail

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden death of entanglement in a high-dimensional bipartite system subjected to dissipative environments with an arbitrary initial pure entangled state between two fields in the cavities. We find that in a vacuum reservoir, the presence of the state where one or more than one (two) photons in each cavity are present is a necessary condition for the sudden death of entanglement. Otherwise entanglement remains for infinite time and decays asymptotically with the decay of individual qubits. For pure two-qubit entangled states in a thermal environment, we observe that sudden death of entanglement always occurs. The sudden death time of the entangled states is related to the number of photons in the cavities, the temperature of the reservoir and the initial preparation of the entangled states.

  11. Statistical Mechanics of a Simplified Bipartite Matching Problem: An Analytical Treatment

    Dell'Erba, Matías Germán

    2012-03-01

    We perform an analytical study of a simplified bipartite matching problem in which there exists a constant matching energy, and both heterosexual and homosexual pairings are allowed. We obtain the partition function in a closed analytical form and we calculate the corresponding thermodynamic functions of this model. We conclude that the model is favored at high temperatures, for which the probabilities of heterosexual and homosexual pairs tend to become equal. In the limits of low and high temperatures, the system is extensive, however this property is lost in the general case. There exists a relation between the matching energies for which the system becomes more stable under external (thermal) perturbations. As the difference of energies between the two possible matches increases the system becomes more ordered, while the maximum of entropy is achieved when these energies are equal. In this limit, there is a first order phase transition between two phases with constant entropy.

  12. Modeling the spread of vector-borne diseases on bipartite networks.

    Donal Bisanzio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vector-borne diseases for which transmission occurs exclusively between vectors and hosts can be modeled as spreading on a bipartite network. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In such models the spreading of the disease strongly depends on the degree distribution of the two classes of nodes. It is sufficient for one of the classes to have a scale-free degree distribution with a slow enough decay for the network to have asymptotically vanishing epidemic threshold. Data on the distribution of Ixodes ricinus ticks on mice and lizards from two independent studies are well described by a scale-free distribution compatible with an asymptotically vanishing epidemic threshold. The commonly used negative binomial, instead, cannot describe the right tail of the empirical distribution. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The extreme aggregation of vectors on hosts, described by the power-law decay of the degree distribution, makes the epidemic threshold decrease with the size of the network and vanish asymptotically.

  13. Influence of intrinsic decoherence on tripartite entanglement and bipartite fidelity of polar molecules in pendular states

    Han, Jia-Xing; Hu, Yuan; Jin, Yu [Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Measurement-Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Xueyuan Road No. 37, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Guo-Feng, E-mail: gf1978zhang@buaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Measurement-Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Xueyuan Road No. 37, Beijing 100191 (China); State Key Laboratory of Software Development Environment, Beihang University, Xueyuan Road No. 37, Beijing 100191 (China); State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-04-07

    An array of ultracold polar molecules trapped in an external electric field is regarded as a promising carrier of quantum information. Under the action of this field, molecules are compelled to undergo pendular oscillations by the Stark effect. Particular attention has been paid to the influence of intrinsic decoherence on the model of linear polar molecular pendular states, thereby we evaluate the tripartite entanglement with negativity, as well as fidelity of bipartite quantum systems for input and output signals using electric dipole moments of polar molecules as qubits. According to this study, we consider three typical initial states for both systems, respectively, and investigate the temporal evolution with variable values of the external field intensity, the intrinsic decoherence factor, and the dipole-dipole interaction. Thus, we demonstrate the sound selection of these three main parameters to obtain the best entanglement degree and fidelity.

  14. Response to defects in multipartite and bipartite entanglement of isotropic quantum spin networks

    Roy, Sudipto Singha; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar; Rakshit, Debraj; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2018-05-01

    Quantum networks are an integral component in performing efficient computation and communication tasks that are not accessible using classical systems. A key aspect in designing an effective and scalable quantum network is generating entanglement between its nodes, which is robust against defects in the network. We consider an isotropic quantum network of spin-1/2 particles with a finite fraction of defects, where the corresponding wave function of the network is rotationally invariant under the action of local unitaries. By using quantum information-theoretic concepts like strong subadditivity of von Neumann entropy and approximate quantum telecloning, we prove analytically that in the presence of defects, caused by loss of a finite fraction of spins, the network, composed of a fixed numbers of lattice sites, sustains genuine multisite entanglement and at the same time may exhibit finite moderate-range bipartite entanglement, in contrast to the network with no defects.

  15. Bipartite Networks of Universities and Companies: Recruiting New Graduates in Japan

    Takahashi, Katsuhide; Kobayashi, Yuh; Kondo, Yohei; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    We investigated the bipartite Universities-Companies Network in Japan in terms of companies' recruitment of new graduates. In Japan, graduates of universities are typically hired by companies upon their graduation. To examine socially accepted ideas about this recruiting system, we combined different types of data on education, recruitment and corporate finance. The hypothesis that graduates from prestigious universities have the advantage of entering excellent companies was verified by examining the determinants of ratio of graduates entering top-ranked companies. Through hierarchical clustering, we obtained classification trees and observed the stability of their structure, as well as interesting changes corresponding to the business climate. We also calculated weighted HITS hub and authority values for each university and company and identified the links between the results of this analysis and those above. Finally, analysis of all the data indicated that excellent companies recruiting many graduates from prestigious universities do not necessarily show superb performance in profit-making and growth.

  16. Quantum teleportation via noisy bipartite and tripartite accelerating quantum states: beyond the single mode approximation

    Zounia, M.; Shamirzaie, M.; Ashouri, A.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper quantum teleportation of an unknown quantum state via noisy maximally bipartite (Bell) and maximally tripartite (Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ)) entangled states are investigated. We suppose that one of the observers who would receive the sent state accelerates uniformly with respect to the sender. The interactions of the quantum system with its environment during the teleportation process impose noises. These (unital and nonunital) noises are: phase damping, phase flip, amplitude damping and bit flip. In expressing the modes of the Dirac field used as qubits, in the accelerating frame, the so-called single mode approximation is not imposed. We calculate the fidelities of teleportation, and discuss their behaviors using suitable plots. The effects of noise, acceleration and going beyond the single mode approximation are discussed. Although the Bell states bring higher fidelities than GHZ states, the global behaviors of the two quantum systems with respect to some noise types, and therefore their fidelities, are different.

  17. Spectral editing at ultra-fast magic-angle-spinning in solid-state NMR: facilitating protein sequential signal assignment by HIGHLIGHT approach

    Wang, Songlin; Matsuda, Isamu; Long, Fei; Ishii, Yoshitaka, E-mail: yishii@uic.edu [University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2016-02-15

    This study demonstrates a novel spectral editing technique for protein solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to simplify the spectrum drastically and to reduce the ambiguity for protein main-chain signal assignments in fast magic-angle-spinning (MAS) conditions at a wide frequency range of 40–80 kHz. The approach termed HIGHLIGHT (Wang et al., in Chem Comm 51:15055–15058, 2015) combines the reverse {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N-isotope labeling strategy and selective signal quenching using the frequency-selective REDOR pulse sequence under fast MAS. The scheme allows one to selectively observe the signals of “highlighted” labeled amino-acid residues that precede or follow unlabeled residues through selectively quenching {sup 13}CO or {sup 15}N signals for a pair of consecutively labeled residues by recoupling {sup 13}CO–{sup 15}N dipolar couplings. Our numerical simulation results showed that the scheme yielded only ∼15 % loss of signals for the highlighted residues while quenching as much as ∼90 % of signals for non-highlighted residues. For lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein, the 2D {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C{sub α} correlation and 2D {sup 13}C{sub α}/{sup 13}CO correlation SSNMR spectra by the HIGHLIGHT approach yielded signals only for six residues following and preceding the unlabeled lysine residues, respectively. The experimental dephasing curves agreed reasonably well with the corresponding simulation results for highlighted and quenched residues at spinning speeds of 40 and 60 kHz. The compatibility of the HIGHLIGHT approach with fast MAS allows for sensitivity enhancement by paramagnetic assisted data collection (PACC) and {sup 1}H detection. We also discuss how the HIGHLIGHT approach facilitates signal assignments using {sup 13}C-detected 3D SSNMR by demonstrating full sequential assignments of lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein (∼300 nmol), for which data collection required only 11 h. The HIGHLIGHT approach offers valuable

  18. Evaluation of the methodologies used to generate random pavement profiles based on the power spectral density: An approach based on the International Roughness Index

    Boris Jesús Goenaga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The pavement roughness is the main variable that produces the vertical excitation in vehicles. Pavement profiles are the main determinant of (i discomfort perception on users and (ii dynamic loads generated at the tire-pavement interface, hence its evaluation constitutes an essential step on a Pavement Management System. The present document evaluates two specific techniques used to simulate pavement profiles; these are the shaping filter and the sinusoidal approach, both based on the Power Spectral Density. Pavement roughness was evaluated using the International Roughness Index (IRI, which represents the most used index to characterize longitudinal road profiles. Appropriate parameters were defined in the simulation process to obtain pavement profiles with specific ranges of IRI values using both simulation techniques. The results suggest that using a sinusoidal approach one can generate random profiles with IRI values that are representative of different road types, therefore, one could generate a profile for a paved or an unpaved road, representing all the proposed categories defined by ISO 8608 standard. On the other hand, to obtain similar results using the shaping filter approximation a modification in the simulation parameters is necessary. The new proposed values allow one to generate pavement profiles with high levels of roughness, covering a wider range of surface types. Finally, the results of the current investigation could be used to further improve our understanding on the effect of pavement roughness on tire pavement interaction. The evaluated methodologies could be used to generate random profiles with specific levels of roughness to assess its effect on dynamic loads generated at the tire-pavement interface and user’s perception of road condition.

  19. A construção da memória organizacional utilizando o gerenciamento de processo nas pactuações da comissão intergestores bipartite do Sistema Único de SaúdeThe construction of the organizacional memory using the management of process in the agreements in the intermanagers' bipartite Commission in the SUS

    Lourdes de Costa Remor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo aborda o gerenciamento de processo e a sua implicação na construção da memória organizacional. Apresenta a relevância do conhecimento em uma organização e os danos causados quando eles não são incorporados à memória da organização. O gerenciamento de processo por organizar e sistematizar os trabalhos parece permitir a disseminação do conhecimento dentro da organização, tanto para os indivíduos quanto para os repositórios. E por fim, apresenta o processo da pactuação na Comissão Intergestores Bipartite, Fórum de negociação e tomada de decisão entre os Gestores: Municipais e Estadual do SUS.The article approaches the management process and the implication in the construction of the organization’s memory. It presents the relevance of the knowledge in an organization and the mischief caused when they are not incorporated to the memory of the organization. The management of the process by organizing and systematizing the works, and for that, it permits the dissemination of the knowledge inside the organization, so much for the individuals or for the repositories. And finally, it presents the process of the agreement in the Intergestores Bipartite Commission, Forum of negotiation and decision-making between the State and Municipal Agents of the SUS.

  20. Dynamics of bloggers’ communities: Bipartite networks from empirical data and agent-based modeling

    Mitrović, Marija; Tadić, Bosiljka

    2012-11-01

    We present an analysis of the empirical data and the agent-based modeling of the emotional behavior of users on the Web portals where the user interaction is mediated by posted comments, like Blogs and Diggs. We consider the dataset of discussion-driven popular Diggs, in which all comments are screened by machine-learning emotion detection in the text, to determine positive and negative valence (attractiveness and aversiveness) of each comment. By mapping the data onto a suitable bipartite network, we perform an analysis of the network topology and the related time-series of the emotional comments. The agent-based model is then introduced to simulate the dynamics and to capture the emergence of the emotional behaviors and communities. The agents are linked to posts on a bipartite network, whose structure evolves through their actions on the posts. The emotional states (arousal and valence) of each agent fluctuate in time, subject to the current contents of the posts to which the agent is exposed. By an agent’s action on a post its current emotions are transferred to the post. The model rules and the key parameters are inferred from the considered empirical data to ensure their realistic values and mutual consistency. The model assumes that the emotional arousal over posts drives the agent’s action. The simulations are preformed for the case of constant flux of agents and the results are analyzed in full analogy with the empirical data. The main conclusions are that the emotion-driven dynamics leads to long-range temporal correlations and emergent networks with community structure, that are comparable with the ones in the empirical system of popular posts. In view of pure emotion-driven agents actions, this type of comparisons provide a quantitative measure for the role of emotions in the dynamics on real blogs. Furthermore, the model reveals the underlying mechanisms which relate the post popularity with the emotion dynamics and the prevalence of negative

  1. On the Equivalence of Nonnegative Matrix Factorization and K-means- Spectral Clustering

    Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Simon, Horst D.; Jin, Rong

    2005-12-04

    We provide a systematic analysis of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) relating to data clustering. We generalize the usual X = FG{sup T} decomposition to the symmetric W = HH{sup T} and W = HSH{sup T} decompositions. We show that (1) W = HH{sup T} is equivalent to Kernel K-means clustering and the Laplacian-based spectral clustering. (2) X = FG{sup T} is equivalent to simultaneous clustering of rows and columns of a bipartite graph. We emphasizes the importance of orthogonality in NMF and soft clustering nature of NMF. These results are verified with experiments on face images and newsgroups.

  2. Transparency or spectral narrowing for two-mode squeezing and entanglement

    Hu Xiangming; Oh, C. H.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the nonadiabatic effects on the propagation of a two-mode squeezed field inside a medium of three-level Λ atoms that display the dark resonance. We identify the different effects for the two-mode quantum properties: (i) unconditional transparency for the sum squeezing and (ii) induced transparency or spectral narrowing for the difference squeezing depending on the relative widths of the initial correlation spectrum to the transparency window. These effects combine to induce transparency or spectrum narrowing for the bipartite entanglement. The potential applications range from quantum information to laser spectroscopy and frequency standards.

  3. Tomographic-spectral approach for dark matter detection in the cross-correlation between cosmic shear and diffuse γ-ray emission

    Camera, S. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Fornasa, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Fornengo, N.; Regis, M., E-mail: stefano.camera@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: fornasam@gmail.com, E-mail: fornengo@to.infn.it, E-mail: regis@to.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    We recently proposed to cross-correlate the diffuse extragalactic γ-ray background with the gravitational lensing signal of cosmic shear. This represents a novel and promising strategy to search for annihilating or decaying particle dark matter (DM) candidates. In the present work, we demonstrate the potential of a tomographic-spectral approach: measuring the cross-correlation in separate bins of redshift and energy significantly improves the sensitivity to a DM signal. Indeed, the technique proposed here takes advantage of the different scaling of the astrophysical and DM components with redshift and, simultaneously of their different energy spectra and different angular extensions. The sensitivity to a particle DM signal is extremely promising even when the DM-induced emission is quite faint. We first quantify the prospects of detecting DM by cross-correlating the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) diffuse γ-ray background with the cosmic shear expected from the Dark Energy Survey. Under the hypothesis of a significant subhalo boost, such a measurement can deliver a 5σ detection of DM, if the DM particle is lighter than 300 GeV and has a thermal annihilation rate. We then forecast the capability of the European Space Agency Euclid satellite (whose launch is planned for 2020), in combination with an hypothetical future γ-ray detector with slightly improved specifications compared to current telescopes. We predict that the cross-correlation of their data will allow a measurement of the DM mass with an uncertainty of a factor of 1.5–2, even for moderate subhalo boosts, for DM masses up to few hundreds of GeV and thermal annihilation rates.

  4. Tomographic-spectral approach for dark matter detection in the cross-correlation between cosmic shear and diffuse γ-ray emission

    Camera, S.; Fornasa, M.; Fornengo, N.; Regis, M.

    2015-06-01

    We recently proposed to cross-correlate the diffuse extragalactic γ-ray background with the gravitational lensing signal of cosmic shear. This represents a novel and promising strategy to search for annihilating or decaying particle dark matter (DM) candidates. In the present work, we demonstrate the potential of a tomographic-spectral approach: measuring the cross-correlation in separate bins of redshift and energy significantly improves the sensitivity to a DM signal. Indeed, the technique proposed here takes advantage of the different scaling of the astrophysical and DM components with redshift and, simultaneously of their different energy spectra and different angular extensions. The sensitivity to a particle DM signal is extremely promising even when the DM-induced emission is quite faint. We first quantify the prospects of detecting DM by cross-correlating the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) diffuse γ-ray background with the cosmic shear expected from the Dark Energy Survey. Under the hypothesis of a significant subhalo boost, such a measurement can deliver a 5σ detection of DM, if the DM particle is lighter than 300 GeV and has a thermal annihilation rate. We then forecast the capability of the European Space Agency Euclid satellite (whose launch is planned for 2020), in combination with an hypothetical future γ-ray detector with slightly improved specifications compared to current telescopes. We predict that the cross-correlation of their data will allow a measurement of the DM mass with an uncertainty of a factor of 1.5-2, even for moderate subhalo boosts, for DM masses up to few hundreds of GeV and thermal annihilation rates.

  5. Tomographic-spectral approach for dark matter detection in the cross-correlation between cosmic shear and diffuse γ-ray emission

    Camera, S.; Fornasa, M.; Fornengo, N.; Regis, M.

    2015-01-01

    We recently proposed to cross-correlate the diffuse extragalactic γ-ray background with the gravitational lensing signal of cosmic shear. This represents a novel and promising strategy to search for annihilating or decaying particle dark matter (DM) candidates. In the present work, we demonstrate the potential of a tomographic-spectral approach: measuring the cross-correlation in separate bins of redshift and energy significantly improves the sensitivity to a DM signal. Indeed, the technique proposed here takes advantage of the different scaling of the astrophysical and DM components with redshift and, simultaneously of their different energy spectra and different angular extensions. The sensitivity to a particle DM signal is extremely promising even when the DM-induced emission is quite faint. We first quantify the prospects of detecting DM by cross-correlating the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) diffuse γ-ray background with the cosmic shear expected from the Dark Energy Survey. Under the hypothesis of a significant subhalo boost, such a measurement can deliver a 5σ detection of DM, if the DM particle is lighter than 300 GeV and has a thermal annihilation rate. We then forecast the capability of the European Space Agency Euclid satellite (whose launch is planned for 2020), in combination with an hypothetical future γ-ray detector with slightly improved specifications compared to current telescopes. We predict that the cross-correlation of their data will allow a measurement of the DM mass with an uncertainty of a factor of 1.5–2, even for moderate subhalo boosts, for DM masses up to few hundreds of GeV and thermal annihilation rates

  6. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. II. Bipartite systems, physical processes, and heterodyne squeezed states

    dell'Anno, Fabio; de Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    Extending the scheme developed for a single mode of the electromagnetic field in the preceding paper [F. Dell’Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 69, 033812 (2004)], we introduce two-mode nonlinear canonical transformations depending on two heterodyne mixing angles. They are defined in terms of Hermitian nonlinear functions that realize heterodyne superpositions of conjugate quadratures of bipartite systems. The canonical transformations diagonalize a class of Hamiltonians describing nondegenerate and degenerate multiphoton processes. We determine the coherent states associated with the canonical transformations, which generalize the nondegenerate two-photon squeezed states. Such heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states are defined as the simultaneous eigenstates of the transformed, coupled annihilation operators. They are generated by nonlinear unitary evolutions acting on two-mode squeezed states. They are non-Gaussian, highly nonclassical, entangled states. For a quadratic nonlinearity the heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states define two-mode cubic phase states. The statistical properties of these states can be widely adjusted by tuning the heterodyne mixing angles, the phases of the nonlinear couplings, as well as the strength of the nonlinearity. For quadratic nonlinearity, we study the higher-order contributions to the susceptibility in nonlinear media and we suggest possible experimental realizations of multiphoton conversion processes generating the cubic-phase heterodyne squeezed states.

  7. Reaction factoring and bipartite update graphs accelerate the Gillespie Algorithm for large-scale biochemical systems.

    Sagar Indurkhya

    Full Text Available ODE simulations of chemical systems perform poorly when some of the species have extremely low concentrations. Stochastic simulation methods, which can handle this case, have been impractical for large systems due to computational complexity. We observe, however, that when modeling complex biological systems: (1 a small number of reactions tend to occur a disproportionately large percentage of the time, and (2 a small number of species tend to participate in a disproportionately large percentage of reactions. We exploit these properties in LOLCAT Method, a new implementation of the Gillespie Algorithm. First, factoring reaction propensities allows many propensities dependent on a single species to be updated in a single operation. Second, representing dependencies between reactions with a bipartite graph of reactions and species requires only storage for reactions, rather than the required for a graph that includes only reactions. Together, these improvements allow our implementation of LOLCAT Method to execute orders of magnitude faster than currently existing Gillespie Algorithm variants when simulating several yeast MAPK cascade models.

  8. Computing Maximum Cardinality Matchings in Parallel on Bipartite Graphs via Tree-Grafting

    Azad, Ariful; Buluc, Aydn; Pothen, Alex

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to obtain high performance when computing matchings on parallel processors because matching algorithms explicitly or implicitly search for paths in the graph, and when these paths become long, there is little concurrency. In spite of this limitation, we present a new algorithm and its shared-memory parallelization that achieves good performance and scalability in computing maximum cardinality matchings in bipartite graphs. This algorithm searches for augmenting paths via specialized breadth-first searches (BFS) from multiple source vertices, hence creating more parallelism than single source algorithms. Algorithms that employ multiple-source searches cannot discard a search tree once no augmenting path is discovered from the tree, unlike algorithms that rely on single-source searches. We describe a novel tree-grafting method that eliminates most of the redundant edge traversals resulting from this property of multiple-source searches. We also employ the recent direction-optimizing BFS algorithm as a subroutine to discover augmenting paths faster. Our algorithm compares favorably with the current best algorithms in terms of the number of edges traversed, the average augmenting path length, and the number of iterations. Here, we provide a proof of correctness for our algorithm. Our NUMA-aware implementation is scalable to 80 threads of an Intel multiprocessor and to 240 threads on an Intel Knights Corner coprocessor. On average, our parallel algorithm runs an order of magnitude faster than the fastest algorithms available. The performance improvement is more significant on graphs with small matching number.

  9. Reaction Factoring and Bipartite Update Graphs Accelerate the Gillespie Algorithm for Large-Scale Biochemical Systems

    Indurkhya, Sagar; Beal, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    ODE simulations of chemical systems perform poorly when some of the species have extremely low concentrations. Stochastic simulation methods, which can handle this case, have been impractical for large systems due to computational complexity. We observe, however, that when modeling complex biological systems: (1) a small number of reactions tend to occur a disproportionately large percentage of the time, and (2) a small number of species tend to participate in a disproportionately large percentage of reactions. We exploit these properties in LOLCAT Method, a new implementation of the Gillespie Algorithm. First, factoring reaction propensities allows many propensities dependent on a single species to be updated in a single operation. Second, representing dependencies between reactions with a bipartite graph of reactions and species requires only storage for reactions, rather than the required for a graph that includes only reactions. Together, these improvements allow our implementation of LOLCAT Method to execute orders of magnitude faster than currently existing Gillespie Algorithm variants when simulating several yeast MAPK cascade models. PMID:20066048

  10. Bank-firm credit network in Japan: an analysis of a bipartite network.

    Marotta, Luca; Miccichè, Salvatore; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Hideaki; Gallegati, Mauro; Mantegna, Rosario N

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the networked nature of the Japanese credit market. Our investigation is performed with tools of network science. In our investigation we perform community detection with an algorithm which is identifying communities composed of both banks and firms. We show that the communities obtained by directly working on the bipartite network carry information about the networked nature of the Japanese credit market. Our analysis is performed for each calendar year during the time period from 1980 to 2011. To investigate the time evolution of the networked structure of the credit market we introduce a new statistical method to track the time evolution of detected communities. We then characterize the time evolution of communities by detecting for each time evolving set of communities the over-expression of attributes of firms and banks. Specifically, we consider as attributes the economic sector and the geographical location of firms and the type of banks. In our 32-year-long analysis we detect a persistence of the over-expression of attributes of communities of banks and firms together with a slow dynamic of changes from some specific attributes to new ones. Our empirical observations show that the credit market in Japan is a networked market where the type of banks, geographical location of firms and banks, and economic sector of the firm play a role in shaping the credit relationships between banks and firms.

  11. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. II. Bipartite systems, physical processes, and heterodyne squeezed states

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-01-01

    Extending the scheme developed for a single mode of the electromagnetic field in the preceding paper [F. Dell'Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 69, 033812 (2004)], we introduce two-mode nonlinear canonical transformations depending on two heterodyne mixing angles. They are defined in terms of Hermitian nonlinear functions that realize heterodyne superpositions of conjugate quadratures of bipartite systems. The canonical transformations diagonalize a class of Hamiltonians describing nondegenerate and degenerate multiphoton processes. We determine the coherent states associated with the canonical transformations, which generalize the nondegenerate two-photon squeezed states. Such heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states are defined as the simultaneous eigenstates of the transformed, coupled annihilation operators. They are generated by nonlinear unitary evolutions acting on two-mode squeezed states. They are non-Gaussian, highly nonclassical, entangled states. For a quadratic nonlinearity the heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states define two-mode cubic phase states. The statistical properties of these states can be widely adjusted by tuning the heterodyne mixing angles, the phases of the nonlinear couplings, as well as the strength of the nonlinearity. For quadratic nonlinearity, we study the higher-order contributions to the susceptibility in nonlinear media and we suggest possible experimental realizations of multiphoton conversion processes generating the cubic-phase heterodyne squeezed states

  12. Simple sequence repeats and compositional bias in the bipartite Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000 genome

    Vandamme Peter

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ralstonia solanacearum is an important plant pathogen. The genome of R. solananearum GMI1000 is organised into two replicons (a 3.7-Mb chromosome and a 2.1-Mb megaplasmid and this bipartite genome structure is characteristic for most R. solanacearum strains. To determine whether the megaplasmid was acquired via recent horizontal gene transfer or is part of an ancestral single chromosome, we compared the abundance, distribution and compositon of simple sequence repeats (SSRs between both replicons and also compared the respective compositional biases. Results Our data show that both replicons are very similar in respect to distribution and composition of SSRs and presence of compositional biases. Minor variations in SSR and compositional biases observed may be attributable to minor differences in gene expression and regulation of gene expression or can be attributed to the small sample numbers observed. Conclusions The observed similarities indicate that both replicons have shared a similar evolutionary history and thus suggest that the megaplasmid was not recently acquired from other organisms by lateral gene transfer but is a part of an ancestral R. solanacearum chromosome.

  13. Bank-Firm Credit Network in Japan: An Analysis of a Bipartite Network

    Marotta, Luca; Miccichè, Salvatore; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Hideaki; Gallegati, Mauro; Mantegna, Rosario N.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the networked nature of the Japanese credit market. Our investigation is performed with tools of network science. In our investigation we perform community detection with an algorithm which is identifying communities composed of both banks and firms. We show that the communities obtained by directly working on the bipartite network carry information about the networked nature of the Japanese credit market. Our analysis is performed for each calendar year during the time period from 1980 to 2011. To investigate the time evolution of the networked structure of the credit market we introduce a new statistical method to track the time evolution of detected communities. We then characterize the time evolution of communities by detecting for each time evolving set of communities the over-expression of attributes of firms and banks. Specifically, we consider as attributes the economic sector and the geographical location of firms and the type of banks. In our 32-year-long analysis we detect a persistence of the over-expression of attributes of communities of banks and firms together with a slow dynamic of changes from some specific attributes to new ones. Our empirical observations show that the credit market in Japan is a networked market where the type of banks, geographical location of firms and banks, and economic sector of the firm play a role in shaping the credit relationships between banks and firms. PMID:25933413

  14. Reaction factoring and bipartite update graphs accelerate the Gillespie Algorithm for large-scale biochemical systems.

    Indurkhya, Sagar; Beal, Jacob

    2010-01-06

    ODE simulations of chemical systems perform poorly when some of the species have extremely low concentrations. Stochastic simulation methods, which can handle this case, have been impractical for large systems due to computational complexity. We observe, however, that when modeling complex biological systems: (1) a small number of reactions tend to occur a disproportionately large percentage of the time, and (2) a small number of species tend to participate in a disproportionately large percentage of reactions. We exploit these properties in LOLCAT Method, a new implementation of the Gillespie Algorithm. First, factoring reaction propensities allows many propensities dependent on a single species to be updated in a single operation. Second, representing dependencies between reactions with a bipartite graph of reactions and species requires only storage for reactions, rather than the required for a graph that includes only reactions. Together, these improvements allow our implementation of LOLCAT Method to execute orders of magnitude faster than currently existing Gillespie Algorithm variants when simulating several yeast MAPK cascade models.

  15. Spectral Imaging by Upconversion

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to obtain spectrally resolved images using upconversion. By this method an image is spectrally shifted from one spectral region to another wavelength. Since the process is spectrally sensitive it allows for a tailored spectral response. We believe this will allow standard...... silicon based cameras designed for visible/near infrared radiation to be used for spectral images in the mid infrared. This can lead to much lower costs for such imaging devices, and a better performance....

  16. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  17. Substitution dynamical systems spectral analysis

    Queffélec, Martine

    2010-01-01

    This volume mainly deals with the dynamics of finitely valued sequences, and more specifically, of sequences generated by substitutions and automata. Those sequences demonstrate fairly simple combinatorical and arithmetical properties and naturally appear in various domains. As the title suggests, the aim of the initial version of this book was the spectral study of the associated dynamical systems: the first chapters consisted in a detailed introduction to the mathematical notions involved, and the description of the spectral invariants followed in the closing chapters. This approach, combined with new material added to the new edition, results in a nearly self-contained book on the subject. New tools - which have also proven helpful in other contexts - had to be developed for this study. Moreover, its findings can be concretely applied, the method providing an algorithm to exhibit the spectral measures and the spectral multiplicity, as is demonstrated in several examples. Beyond this advanced analysis, many...

  18. Fault tolerance in protein interaction networks: stable bipartite subgraphs and redundant pathways.

    Arthur Brady

    Full Text Available As increasing amounts of high-throughput data for the yeast interactome become available, more system-wide properties are uncovered. One interesting question concerns the fault tolerance of protein interaction networks: whether there exist alternative pathways that can perform some required function if a gene essential to the main mechanism is defective, absent or suppressed. A signature pattern for redundant pathways is the BPM (between-pathway model motif, introduced by Kelley and Ideker. Past methods proposed to search the yeast interactome for BPM motifs have had several important limitations. First, they have been driven heuristically by local greedy searches, which can lead to the inclusion of extra genes that may not belong in the motif; second, they have been validated solely by functional coherence of the putative pathways using GO enrichment, making it difficult to evaluate putative BPMs in the absence of already known biological annotation. We introduce stable bipartite subgraphs, and show they form a clean and efficient way of generating meaningful BPMs which naturally discard extra genes included by local greedy methods. We show by GO enrichment measures that our BPM set outperforms previous work, covering more known complexes and functional pathways. Perhaps most importantly, since our BPMs are initially generated by examining the genetic-interaction network only, the location of edges in the protein-protein physical interaction network can then be used to statistically validate each candidate BPM, even with sparse GO annotation (or none at all. We uncover some interesting biological examples of previously unknown putative redundant pathways in such areas as vesicle-mediated transport and DNA repair.

  19. Fault tolerance in protein interaction networks: stable bipartite subgraphs and redundant pathways.

    Brady, Arthur; Maxwell, Kyle; Daniels, Noah; Cowen, Lenore J

    2009-01-01

    As increasing amounts of high-throughput data for the yeast interactome become available, more system-wide properties are uncovered. One interesting question concerns the fault tolerance of protein interaction networks: whether there exist alternative pathways that can perform some required function if a gene essential to the main mechanism is defective, absent or suppressed. A signature pattern for redundant pathways is the BPM (between-pathway model) motif, introduced by Kelley and Ideker. Past methods proposed to search the yeast interactome for BPM motifs have had several important limitations. First, they have been driven heuristically by local greedy searches, which can lead to the inclusion of extra genes that may not belong in the motif; second, they have been validated solely by functional coherence of the putative pathways using GO enrichment, making it difficult to evaluate putative BPMs in the absence of already known biological annotation. We introduce stable bipartite subgraphs, and show they form a clean and efficient way of generating meaningful BPMs which naturally discard extra genes included by local greedy methods. We show by GO enrichment measures that our BPM set outperforms previous work, covering more known complexes and functional pathways. Perhaps most importantly, since our BPMs are initially generated by examining the genetic-interaction network only, the location of edges in the protein-protein physical interaction network can then be used to statistically validate each candidate BPM, even with sparse GO annotation (or none at all). We uncover some interesting biological examples of previously unknown putative redundant pathways in such areas as vesicle-mediated transport and DNA repair.

  20. Spectral dimension in causal set quantum gravity

    Eichhorn, Astrid; Mizera, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate the spectral dimension in causal set quantum gravity by simulating random walks on causal sets. In contrast to other approaches to quantum gravity, we find an increasing spectral dimension at small scales. This observation can be connected to the nonlocality of causal set theory that is deeply rooted in its fundamentally Lorentzian nature. Based on its large-scale behaviour, we conjecture that the spectral dimension can serve as a tool to distinguish causal sets that approximate manifolds from those that do not. As a new tool to probe quantum spacetime in different quantum gravity approaches, we introduce a novel dimensional estimator, the causal spectral dimension, based on the meeting probability of two random walkers, which respect the causal structure of the quantum spacetime. We discuss a causal-set example, where the spectral dimension and the causal spectral dimension differ, due to the existence of a preferred foliation. (paper)

  1. A quantum logic network for implementing optimal symmetric universal and phase-covariant telecloning of a bipartite entangled state

    Meng Fanyu; Zhu Aidong

    2008-01-01

    A quantum logic network to implement quantum telecloning is presented in this paper. The network includes two parts: the first part is used to create the telecloning channel and the second part to teleport the state. It can be used not only to implement universal telecloning for a bipartite entangled state which is completely unknown, but also to implement the phase-covariant telecloning for one that is partially known. Furthermore, the network can also be used to construct a tele-triplicator. It can easily be implemented in experiment because only single- and two-qubit operations are used in the network.

  2. The family Rhabdoviridae: Mono- and bipartite negative-sense RNA viruses with diverse genome organization and common evolutionary origins

    Dietzgen, Ralf G.; Kondo, Hideki; Goodin, Michael M.; Kurath, Gael; Vasilakis, Nikos

    2017-01-01

    The family Rhabdoviridae consists of mostly enveloped, bullet-shaped or bacilliform viruses with a negative-sense, single-stranded RNA genome that infect vertebrates, invertebrates or plants. This ecological diversity is reflected by the diversity and complexity of their genomes. Five canonical structural protein genes are conserved in all rhabdoviruses, but may be overprinted, overlapped or interspersed with several novel and diverse accessory genes. This review gives an overview of the characteristics and diversity of rhabdoviruses, their taxonomic classification, replication mechanism, properties of classical rhabdoviruses such as rabies virus and rhabdoviruses with complex genomes, rhabdoviruses infecting aquatic species, and plant rhabdoviruses with both mono- and bipartite genomes.

  3. Spectral dimension of quantum geometries

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Oriti, Daniele; Thürigen, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The spectral dimension is an indicator of geometry and topology of spacetime and a tool to compare the description of quantum geometry in various approaches to quantum gravity. This is possible because it can be defined not only on smooth geometries but also on discrete (e.g., simplicial) ones. In this paper, we consider the spectral dimension of quantum states of spatial geometry defined on combinatorial complexes endowed with additional algebraic data: the kinematical quantum states of loop quantum gravity (LQG). Preliminarily, the effects of topology and discreteness of classical discrete geometries are studied in a systematic manner. We look for states reproducing the spectral dimension of a classical space in the appropriate regime. We also test the hypothesis that in LQG, as in other approaches, there is a scale dependence of the spectral dimension, which runs from the topological dimension at large scales to a smaller one at short distances. While our results do not give any strong support to this hypothesis, we can however pinpoint when the topological dimension is reproduced by LQG quantum states. Overall, by exploring the interplay of combinatorial, topological and geometrical effects, and by considering various kinds of quantum states such as coherent states and their superpositions, we find that the spectral dimension of discrete quantum geometries is more sensitive to the underlying combinatorial structures than to the details of the additional data associated with them. (paper)

  4. Multiple Substrate Usage of Coxiella burnetii to Feed a Bipartite Metabolic Network

    Ina Häuslein

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Coxiella burnetii causes Q-fever and is classified as a category B bio-weapon. Exploiting the development of the axenic growth medium ACCM-2, we have now used 13C-labeling experiments and isotopolog profiling to investigate the highly diverse metabolic network of C. burnetii. To this aim, C. burnetii RSA 439 NMII was cultured in ACCM-2 containing 5 mM of either [U-13C3]serine, [U-13C6]glucose, or [U-13C3]glycerol until the late-logarithmic phase. GC/MS-based isotopolog profiling of protein-derived amino acids, methanol-soluble polar metabolites, fatty acids, and cell wall components (e.g., diaminopimelate and sugars from the labeled bacteria revealed differential incorporation rates and isotopolog profiles. These data served to decipher the diverse usages of the labeled substrates and the relative carbon fluxes into the core metabolism of the pathogen. Whereas, de novo biosynthesis from any of these substrates could not be found for histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, phenylalanine, proline and valine, the other amino acids and metabolites under study acquired 13C-label at specific rates depending on the nature of the tracer compound. Glucose was directly used for cell wall biosynthesis, but was also converted into pyruvate (and its downstream metabolites through the glycolytic pathway or into erythrose 4-phosphate (e.g., for the biosynthesis of tyrosine via the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Glycerol efficiently served as a gluconeogenetic substrate and could also be used via phosphoenolpyruvate and diaminopimelate as a major carbon source for cell wall biosynthesis. In contrast, exogenous serine was mainly utilized in downstream metabolic processes, e.g., via acetyl-CoA in a complete citrate cycle with fluxes in the oxidative direction and as a carbon feed for fatty acid biosynthesis. In summary, the data reflect multiple and differential substrate usages by C. burnetii in a bipartite-type metabolic network

  5. Bipartite networks improve understanding of effects of waterbody size and angling method on angler–fish interactions

    Chizinski, Christopher J.; Martin, Dustin R.; Shizuka, Daizaburo; Pope, Kevin L.

    2018-01-01

    Networks used to study interactions could provide insights to fisheries. We compiled data from 27 297 interviews of anglers across waterbodies that ranged in size from 1 to 12 113 ha. Catch rates of fish species among anglers grouped by species targeted generally differed between angling methods (bank or boat). We constructed angler–catch bipartite networks (angling method specific) between anglers and fish and measured several network metrics. There was considerable variation in networks among waterbodies, with multiple metrics influenced by waterbody size. Number of species-targeting angler groups and number of fish species caught increased with increasing waterbody size. Mean number of links for species-targeting angler groups and fish species caught also increased with waterbody size. Connectance (realized proportion of possible links) of angler–catch interaction networks decreased slower for boat anglers than for bank anglers with increasing waterbody size. Network specialization (deviation of number of interactions from expected) was not significantly related to waterbody size or angling methods. Application of bipartite networks in fishery science requires careful interpretation of outputs, especially considering the numerous confounding factors prevalent in recreational fisheries.

  6. Enhancing non-local correlations in the bipartite partitions of two qubit-system with non-mutual interaction

    Mohamed, A.-B.A., E-mail: abdelbastm@yahoo.com [College of Sciences and Humanities, Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Aflaj (Saudi Arabia); Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut (Egypt); Joshi, A., E-mail: mcbamji@gmail.com [Physics Department, Adelphi University Garden City, NY 11530 (United States); Department of Physics and Optical Engineering, RHIT, Terra Haute IN 47803 (United States); Hassan, S.S., E-mail: shoukryhassan@hotmail.com [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, University of Bahrain, P.O. Box 32038 (Bahrain)

    2016-03-15

    Several quantum-mechanical correlations, notably, quantum entanglement, measurement-induced nonlocality and Bell nonlocality are studied for a two qubit-system having no mutual interaction. Analytical expressions for the measures of these quantum-mechanical correlations of different bipartite partitions of the system are obtained, for initially two entangled qubits and the two photons are in their vacuum states. It is found that the qubits-fields interaction leads to the loss and gain of the initial quantum correlations. The lost initial quantum correlations transfer from the qubits to the cavity fields. It is found that the maximal violation of Bell’s inequality is occurring when the quantum correlations of both the logarithmic negativity and measurement-induced nonlocality reach particular values. The maximal violation of Bell’s inequality occurs only for certain bipartite partitions of the system. The frequency detuning leads to quick oscillations of the quantum correlations and inhibits their transfer from the qubits to the cavity modes. It is also found that the dynamical behavior of the quantum correlation clearly depends on the qubit distribution angle.

  7. Maximal violation of a bipartite three-setting, two-outcome Bell inequality using infinite-dimensional quantum systems

    Pal, Karoly F.; Vertesi, Tamas

    2010-01-01

    The I 3322 inequality is the simplest bipartite two-outcome Bell inequality beyond the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality, consisting of three two-outcome measurements per party. In the case of the CHSH inequality the maximal quantum violation can already be attained with local two-dimensional quantum systems; however, there is no such evidence for the I 3322 inequality. In this paper a family of measurement operators and states is given which enables us to attain the maximum quantum value in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space. Further, it is conjectured that our construction is optimal in the sense that measuring finite-dimensional quantum systems is not enough to achieve the true quantum maximum. We also describe an efficient iterative algorithm for computing quantum maximum of an arbitrary two-outcome Bell inequality in any given Hilbert space dimension. This algorithm played a key role in obtaining our results for the I 3322 inequality, and we also applied it to improve on our previous results concerning the maximum quantum violation of several bipartite two-outcome Bell inequalities with up to five settings per party.

  8. Identifying the Gene Signatures from Gene-Pathway Bipartite Network Guarantees the Robust Model Performance on Predicting the Cancer Prognosis

    Li He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of improving the prediction of cancer prognosis in the clinical researches, various algorithms have been developed to construct the predictive models with the gene signatures detected by DNA microarrays. Due to the heterogeneity of the clinical samples, the list of differentially expressed genes (DEGs generated by the statistical methods or the machine learning algorithms often involves a number of false positive genes, which are not associated with the phenotypic differences between the compared clinical conditions, and subsequently impacts the reliability of the predictive models. In this study, we proposed a strategy, which combined the statistical algorithm with the gene-pathway bipartite networks, to generate the reliable lists of cancer-related DEGs and constructed the models by using support vector machine for predicting the prognosis of three types of cancers, namely, breast cancer, acute myeloma leukemia, and glioblastoma. Our results demonstrated that, combined with the gene-pathway bipartite networks, our proposed strategy can efficiently generate the reliable cancer-related DEG lists for constructing the predictive models. In addition, the model performance in the swap analysis was similar to that in the original analysis, indicating the robustness of the models in predicting the cancer outcomes.

  9. Controlling transfer of quantum correlations among bi-partitions of a composite quantum system by combining different noisy environments

    Zhang Xiu-Xing; Li Fu-Li

    2011-01-01

    The correlation dynamics are investigated for various bi-partitions of a composite quantum system consisting of two qubits and two independent and non-identical noisy environments. The two qubits have no direct interaction with each other and locally interact with their environments. Classical and quantum correlations including the entanglement are initially prepared only between the two qubits. We find that contrary to the identical noisy environment case, the quantum correlation transfer direction can be controlled by combining different noisy environments. The amplitude-damping environment determines whether there exists the entanglement transfer among bi-partitions of the system. When one qubit is coupled to an amplitude-damping environment and the other one to a bit-flip one, we find a very interesting result that all the quantum and the classical correlations, and even the entanglement, originally existing between the qubits, can be completely transferred without any loss to the qubit coupled to the bit-flit environment and the amplitude-damping environment. We also notice that it is possible to distinguish the quantum correlation from the classical correlation and the entanglement by combining different noisy environments. (general)

  10. The N Terminus of the Retinoblastoma Protein Inhibits DNA Replication via a Bipartite Mechanism Disrupted in Partially Penetrant Retinoblastomas

    Borysov, Sergiy I.; Nepon-Sixt, Brook S.

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein (RbN) harbors in-frame exon deletions in partially penetrant hereditary retinoblastomas and is known to impair cell growth and tumorigenesis. However, how such RbN deletions contribute to Rb tumor- and growth-suppressive functions is unknown. Here we establish that RbN directly inhibits DNA replication initiation and elongation using a bipartite mechanism involving N-terminal exons lost in cancer. Specifically, Rb exon 7 is necessary and sufficient to target and inhibit the replicative CMG helicase, resulting in the accumulation of inactive CMGs on chromatin. An independent N-terminal loop domain, which forms a projection, specifically blocks DNA polymerase α (Pol-α) and Ctf4 recruitment without affecting DNA polymerases ε and δ or the CMG helicase. Individual disruption of exon 7 or the projection in RbN or Rb, as occurs in inherited cancers, partially impairs the ability of Rb/RbN to inhibit DNA replication and block G1-to-S cell cycle transit. However, their combined loss abolishes these functions of Rb. Thus, Rb growth-suppressive functions include its ability to block replicative complexes via bipartite, independent, and additive N-terminal domains. The partial loss of replication, CMG, or Pol-α control provides a potential molecular explanation for how N-terminal Rb loss-of-function deletions contribute to the etiology of partially penetrant retinoblastomas. PMID:26711265

  11. Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin FEM: Spectral Response

    Abedi, R; Omidi, O; Clarke, P L

    2014-01-01

    Materials in nature demonstrate certain spectral shapes in terms of their material properties. Since successful experimental demonstrations in 2000, metamaterials have provided a means to engineer materials with desired spectral shapes for their material properties. Computational tools are employed in two different aspects for metamaterial modeling: 1. Mircoscale unit cell analysis to derive and possibly optimize material's spectral response; 2. macroscale to analyze their interaction with conventional material. We compare two different approaches of Time-Domain (TD) and Frequency Domain (FD) methods for metamaterial applications. Finally, we discuss advantages of the TD method of Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (FEM) for spectral analysis of metamaterials

  12. Partial least squares methods for spectrally estimating lunar soil FeO abundance: A stratified approach to revealing nonlinear effect and qualitative interpretation

    Li, Lin

    2008-12-01

    Partial least squares (PLS) regressions were applied to lunar highland and mare soil data characterized by the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) for spectral estimation of the abundance of lunar soil chemical constituents FeO and Al2O3. The LSCC data set was split into a number of subsets including the total highland, Apollo 16, Apollo 14, and total mare soils, and then PLS was applied to each to investigate the effect of nonlinearity on the performance of the PLS method. The weight-loading vectors resulting from PLS were analyzed to identify mineral species responsible for spectral estimation of the soil chemicals. The results from PLS modeling indicate that the PLS performance depends on the correlation of constituents of interest to their major mineral carriers, and the Apollo 16 soils are responsible for the large errors of FeO and Al2O3 estimates when the soils were modeled along with other types of soils. These large errors are primarily attributed to the degraded correlation FeO to pyroxene for the relatively mature Apollo 16 soils as a result of space weathering and secondary to the interference of olivine. PLS consistently yields very accurate fits to the two soil chemicals when applied to mare soils. Although Al2O3 has no spectrally diagnostic characteristics, this chemical can be predicted for all subset data by PLS modeling at high accuracies because of its correlation to FeO. This correlation is reflected in the symmetry of the PLS weight-loading vectors for FeO and Al2O3, which prove to be very useful for qualitative interpretation of the PLS results. However, this qualitative interpretation of PLS modeling cannot be achieved using principal component regression loading vectors.

  13. Approach for determining the contributions of phytoplankton, colored organic material, and nonalgal particles to the total spectral absorption in marine waters.

    Lin, Junfang; Cao, Wenxi; Wang, Guifeng; Hu, Shuibo

    2013-06-20

    Using a data set of 1333 samples, we assess the spectral absorption relationships of different wave bands for phytoplankton (ph) and particles. We find that a nonlinear model (second-order quadratic equations) delivers good performance in describing their spectral characteristics. Based on these spectral relationships, we develop a method for partitioning the total absorption coefficient into the contributions attributable to phytoplankton [a(ph)(λ)], colored dissolved organic material [CDOM; a(CDOM)(λ)], and nonalgal particles [NAP; a(NAP)(λ)]. This method is validated using a data set that contains 550 simultaneous measurements of phytoplankton, CDOM, and NAP from the NASA bio-Optical Marine Algorithm Dataset. We find that our method is highly efficient and robust, with significant accuracy: the relative root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) are 25.96%, 38.30%, and 19.96% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively. The performance is still satisfactory when the method is applied to water samples from the northern South China Sea as a regional case. The computed and measured absorption coefficients (167 samples) agree well with the RMSEs, i.e., 18.50%, 32.82%, and 10.21% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively. Finally, the partitioning method is applied directly to an independent data set (1160 samples) derived from the Bermuda Bio-Optics Project that contains relatively low absorption values, and we also obtain good inversion accuracy [RMSEs of 32.37%, 32.57%, and 11.52% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively]. Our results indicate that this partitioning method delivers satisfactory performance for the retrieval of a(ph), a(CDOM), and a(NAP). Therefore, this may be a useful tool for extracting absorption coefficients from in situ measurements or remotely sensed ocean-color data.

  14. Spectral gamuts and spectral gamut mapping

    Rosen, Mitchell R.; Derhak, Maxim W.

    2006-01-01

    All imaging devices have two gamuts: the stimulus gamut and the response gamut. The response gamut of a print engine is typically described in CIE colorimetry units, a system derived to quantify human color response. More fundamental than colorimetric gamuts are spectral gamuts, based on radiance, reflectance or transmittance units. Spectral gamuts depend on the physics of light or on how materials interact with light and do not involve the human's photoreceptor integration or brain processing. Methods for visualizing a spectral gamut raise challenges as do considerations of how to utilize such a data-set for producing superior color reproductions. Recent work has described a transformation of spectra reduced to 6-dimensions called LabPQR. LabPQR was designed as a hybrid space with three explicit colorimetric axes and three additional spectral reconstruction axes. In this paper spectral gamuts are discussed making use of LabPQR. Also, spectral gamut mapping is considered in light of the colorimetric-spectral duality of the LabPQR space.

  15. Rectangular spectral collocation

    Driscoll, Tobin A.

    2015-02-06

    Boundary conditions in spectral collocation methods are typically imposed by removing some rows of the discretized differential operator and replacing them with others that enforce the required conditions at the boundary. A new approach based upon resampling differentiated polynomials into a lower-degree subspace makes differentiation matrices, and operators built from them, rectangular without any row deletions. Then, boundary and interface conditions can be adjoined to yield a square system. The resulting method is both flexible and robust, and avoids ambiguities that arise when applying the classical row deletion method outside of two-point scalar boundary-value problems. The new method is the basis for ordinary differential equation solutions in Chebfun software, and is demonstrated for a variety of boundary-value, eigenvalue and time-dependent problems.

  16. Mean centering of ratio spectra and concentration augmented classical least squares in a comparative approach for quantitation of spectrally overlapped bands of antihypertensives in formulations

    Hegazy, Maha Abdel Monem; Fayez, Yasmin Mohammed

    2015-04-01

    Two different methods manipulating spectrophotometric data have been developed, validated and compared. One is capable of removing the signal of any interfering components at the selected wavelength of the component of interest (univariate). The other includes more variables and extracts maximum information to determine the component of interest in the presence of other components (multivariate). The applied methods are smart, simple, accurate, sensitive, precise and capable of determination of spectrally overlapped antihypertensives; hydrochlorothiazide (HCT), irbesartan (IRB) and candesartan (CAN). Mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR) and concentration residual augmented classical least-squares method (CRACLS) were developed and their efficiency was compared. CRACLS is a simple method that is capable of extracting the pure spectral profiles of each component in a mixture. Correlation was calculated between the estimated and pure spectra and was found to be 0.9998, 0.9987 and 0.9992 for HCT, IRB and CAN, respectively. The methods were successfully determined the three components in bulk powder, laboratory-prepared mixtures, and combined dosage forms. The results obtained were compared statistically with each other and to those of the official methods.

  17. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S.

    2001-10-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T c . The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64) 3 x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature. (orig.)

  18. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T c . The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64) 3 x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature

  19. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S

    2002-03-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T{sub c}. The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64){sup 3} x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature.

  20. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S. [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    2001-10-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T{sub c}. The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64){sup 3} x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature. (orig.)

  1. Reduction of multipartite qubit density matrixes to bipartite qubit density matrixes and criteria of partial separability of multipartite qubit density matrixes

    Zhong, Zai-Zhe

    2004-01-01

    The partial separability of multipartite qubit density matrixes is strictly defined. We give a reduction way from N-partite qubit density matrixes to bipartite qubit density matrixes, and prove a necessary condition that a N-partite qubit density matrix to be partially separable is its reduced density matrix to satisfy PPT condition.

  2. A Random Walk Approach to Query Informative Constraints for Clustering.

    Abin, Ahmad Ali

    2017-08-09

    This paper presents a random walk approach to the problem of querying informative constraints for clustering. The proposed method is based on the properties of the commute time, that is the expected time taken for a random walk to travel between two nodes and return, on the adjacency graph of data. Commute time has the nice property of that, the more short paths connect two given nodes in a graph, the more similar those nodes are. Since computing the commute time takes the Laplacian eigenspectrum into account, we use this property in a recursive fashion to query informative constraints for clustering. At each recursion, the proposed method constructs the adjacency graph of data and utilizes the spectral properties of the commute time matrix to bipartition the adjacency graph. Thereafter, the proposed method benefits from the commute times distance on graph to query informative constraints between partitions. This process iterates for each partition until the stop condition becomes true. Experiments on real-world data show the efficiency of the proposed method for constraints selection.

  3. Spectral statistics in chiral-orthogonal disordered systems

    Evangelou, S N; Katsanos, D E

    2003-01-01

    We describe the singularities in the averaged density of states and the corresponding statistics of the energy levels in two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) chiral symmetric and time-reversal invariant disordered systems, realized in bipartite lattices with real off-diagonal disorder. For off-diagonal disorder of zero mean, we obtain a singular density of states in 2D which becomes much less pronounced in 3D, while the level-statistics can be described by a semi-Poisson distribution with mostly critical fractal states in 2D and Wigner surmise with mostly delocalized states in 3D. For logarithmic off-diagonal disorder of large strength, we find behaviour indistinguishable from ordinary disorder with strong localization in any dimension but in addition one-dimensional 1/ vertical bar E vertical bar Dyson-like asymptotic spectral singularities. The off-diagonal disorder is also shown to enhance the propagation of two interacting particles similarly to systems with diagonal disorder. Although disordered models with chiral symmetry differ from non-chiral ones due to the presence of spectral singularities, both share the same qualitative localization properties except at the chiral symmetry point E=0 which is critical

  4. Detecting phase boundaries of quantum spin-1/2 XXZ ladder via bipartite and multipartite entanglement transitions

    Singha Roy, Sudipto; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar; Rakshit, Debraj; Sen(De), Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2017-12-01

    Phase transition in quantum many-body systems inevitably causes changes in certain physical properties which then serve as potential indicators of critical phenomena. Besides the traditional order parameters, characterization of quantum entanglement has proven to be a computationally efficient and successful method for detection of phase boundaries, especially in one-dimensional models. Here we determine the rich phase diagram of the ground states of a quantum spin-1/2 XXZ ladder by analyzing the variation of bipartite and multipartite entanglements. Our study characterizes the different ground state phases and notes the correspondence with known results, while highlighting the finer details that emerge from the behavior of ground state entanglement. Analysis of entanglement in the ground state provides a clearer picture of the complex ground state phase diagram of the system using only a moderate-size model.

  5. The family Rhabdoviridae: mono- and bipartite negative-sense RNA viruses with diverse genome organization and common evolutionary origins.

    Dietzgen, Ralf G; Kondo, Hideki; Goodin, Michael M; Kurath, Gael; Vasilakis, Nikos

    2017-01-02

    The family Rhabdoviridae consists of mostly enveloped, bullet-shaped or bacilliform viruses with a negative-sense, single-stranded RNA genome that infect vertebrates, invertebrates or plants. This ecological diversity is reflected by the diversity and complexity of their genomes. Five canonical structural protein genes are conserved in all rhabdoviruses, but may be overprinted, overlapped or interspersed with several novel and diverse accessory genes. This review gives an overview of the characteristics and diversity of rhabdoviruses, their taxonomic classification, replication mechanism, properties of classical rhabdoviruses such as rabies virus and rhabdoviruses with complex genomes, rhabdoviruses infecting aquatic species, and plant rhabdoviruses with both mono- and bipartite genomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of two-qutrit entanglement on quantum speed limit time of a bipartite V-type open system

    Behzadi, N., E-mail: n.behzadi@tabrizu.ac.ir [Research Institute for Fundamental Sciences, University of Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahansaz, B.; Ektesabi, A.; Faizi, E. [Physics Department, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    In the present paper, quantum speed limit (QSL) time of a bipartite V-type three-level atomic system under the effect of two-qutrit entanglement is investigated. Each party interacts with own independent reservoir. By considering two local unitarily equivalent Werner states and the Horodecki PPT state, as initial states, the QSL time is evaluated for each of them in the respective entangled regions. It is counterintuitively observed that the effect of entanglement on the QSL time driven from each of the initial Werner states are completely different when the degree of non-Markovianity is considerable. In addition, it is interesting that the effect of entanglement of the non-equivalent Horodecki state on the calculated QSL time displays an intermediate behavior relative to the cases obtained for the Werner states.

  7. Computer-assisted spectral design and synthesis

    Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Wang, Qiqi; Sun, Yinlong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computer-assisted approach for spectral design and synthesis. This approach starts with some initial spectrum, modifies it interactively, evaluates the change, and decides the optimal spectrum. Given a requested change as function of wavelength, we model the change function using a Gaussian function. When there is the metameric constraint, from the Gaussian function of request change, we propose a method to generate the change function such that the result spectrum has the same color as the initial spectrum. We have tested the proposed method with different initial spectra and change functions, and implemented an interactive graphics environment for spectral design and synthesis. The proposed approach and graphics implementation for spectral design and synthesis can be helpful for a number of applications such as lighting of building interiors, textile coloration, and pigment development of automobile paints, and spectral computer graphics.

  8. Ground states, magnetization plateaus and bipartite entanglement of frustrated spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg and Heisenberg triangular tubes

    Alécio, Raphael C.; Lyra, Marcelo L.; Strečka, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The ground-state phase diagram, magnetization process and bipartite entanglement of the frustrated spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg and Heisenberg triangular tube (three-leg ladder) are investigated in a non-zero external magnetic field. The exact ground-state phase diagram of the spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg tube with Heisenberg intra-rung and Ising inter-rung couplings consists of six distinct gapped phases, which manifest themselves in a magnetization curve as intermediate plateaus at zero, one-third and two-thirds of the saturation magnetization. Four out of six available ground states exhibit quantum entanglement between two spins from the same triangular unit evidenced by a non-zero concurrence. Density-matrix renormalization group calculations are used in order to construct the ground-state phase diagram of the analogous but purely quantum spin-1/2 Heisenberg tube with Heisenberg intra- and inter-rung couplings, which consists of four gapped and three gapless phases. The Heisenberg tube shows a continuous change of the magnetization instead of a plateau at zero magnetization, while the intermediate one-third and two-thirds plateaus may be present or not in the zero-temperature magnetization curve. - Highlights: • Ground-state properties of Ising-Heisenberg and full Heisenberg spin tubes are studied. • Phases with 1/3 and 2/3 magnetization plateaus are present in both models. • We unveil the region in the parameter space on which inter-rung quantum fluctuations are relevant. • The full Heisenberg tube exhibits quantum bipartite entanglement between intra- as well as inter-rung spins.

  9. From Ecology to Finance (and Back?): A Review on Entropy-Based Null Models for the Analysis of Bipartite Networks

    Straka, Mika J.; Caldarelli, Guido; Squartini, Tiziano; Saracco, Fabio

    2018-04-01

    Bipartite networks provide an insightful representation of many systems, ranging from mutualistic networks of species interactions to investment networks in finance. The analyses of their topological structures have revealed the ubiquitous presence of properties which seem to characterize many—apparently different—systems. Nestedness, for example, has been observed in biological plant-pollinator as well as in country-product exportation networks. Due to the interdisciplinary character of complex networks, tools developed in one field, for example ecology, can greatly enrich other areas of research, such as economy and finance, and vice versa. With this in mind, we briefly review several entropy-based bipartite null models that have been recently proposed and discuss their application to real-world systems. The focus on these models is motivated by the fact that they show three very desirable features: analytical character, general applicability, and versatility. In this respect, entropy-based methods have been proven to perform satisfactorily both in providing benchmarks for testing evidence-based null hypotheses and in reconstructing unknown network configurations from partial information. Furthermore, entropy-based models have been successfully employed to analyze ecological as well as economic systems. As an example, the application of entropy-based null models has detected early-warning signals, both in economic and financial systems, of the 2007-2008 world crisis. Moreover, they have revealed a statistically-significant export specialization phenomenon of country export baskets in international trade, a result that seems to reconcile Ricardo's hypothesis in classical economics with recent findings on the (empirical) diversification industrial production at the national level. Finally, these null models have shown that the information contained in the nestedness is already accounted for by the degree sequence of the corresponding graphs.

  10. Adaptive Spectral Doppler Estimation

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    . The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to pro- vide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the ob- servation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested......In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence...... and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch’s method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set...

  11. Spectral-Product Methods for Electronic Structure Calculations (Preprint)

    Langhoff, P. W; Mills, J. E; Boatz, J. A

    2006-01-01

    .... The spectral-product approach to molecular electronic structure avoids the repeated evaluations of the one- and two-electron integrals required in construction of polyatomic Hamiltonian matrices...

  12. Spectral-Product Methods for Electronic Structure Calculations (Postprint)

    Langhoff, P. W; Hinde, R. J; Mills, J. D; Boatz, J. A

    2007-01-01

    .... The spectral-product approach to molecular electronic structure avoids the repeated evaluations of the one- and two-electron integrals required in construction of polyatomic Hamiltonian matrices...

  13. Extracting attosecond delays from spectrally overlapping interferograms

    Jordan, Inga; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2018-02-01

    Attosecond interferometry is becoming an increasingly popular technique for measuring the dynamics of photoionization in real time. Whereas early measurements focused on atomic systems with very simple photoelectron spectra, the technique is now being applied to more complex systems including isolated molecules and solids. The increase in complexity translates into an augmented spectral congestion, unavoidably resulting in spectral overlap in attosecond interferograms. Here, we discuss currently used methods for phase retrieval and introduce two new approaches for determining attosecond photoemission delays from spectrally overlapping photoelectron spectra. We show that the previously used technique, consisting in the spectral integration of the areas of interest, does in general not provide reliable results. Our methods resolve this problem, thereby opening the technique of attosecond interferometry to complex systems and fully exploiting its specific advantages in terms of spectral resolution compared to attosecond streaking.

  14. Introduction to spectral theory

    Levitan, B M

    1975-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the spectral theory of the Sturm- Liouville operator and to the spectral theory of the Dirac system. In addition, some results are given for nth order ordinary differential operators. Those parts of this book which concern nth order operators can serve as simply an introduction to this domain, which at the present time has already had time to become very broad. For the convenience of the reader who is not familar with abstract spectral theory, the authors have inserted a chapter (Chapter 13) in which they discuss this theory, concisely and in the main without proofs, and indicate various connections with the spectral theory of differential operators.

  15. Color Shift Failure Prediction for Phosphor-Converted White LEDs by Modeling Features of Spectral Power Distribution with a Nonlinear Filter Approach

    Jiajie Fan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available With the expanding application of light-emitting diodes (LEDs, the color quality of white LEDs has attracted much attention in several color-sensitive application fields, such as museum lighting, healthcare lighting and displays. Reliability concerns for white LEDs are changing from the luminous efficiency to color quality. However, most of the current available research on the reliability of LEDs is still focused on luminous flux depreciation rather than color shift failure. The spectral power distribution (SPD, defined as the radiant power distribution emitted by a light source at a range of visible wavelength, contains the most fundamental luminescence mechanisms of a light source. SPD is used as the quantitative inference of an LED’s optical characteristics, including color coordinates that are widely used to represent the color shift process. Thus, to model the color shift failure of white LEDs during aging, this paper first extracts the features of an SPD, representing the characteristics of blue LED chips and phosphors, by multi-peak curve-fitting and modeling them with statistical functions. Then, because the shift processes of extracted features in aged LEDs are always nonlinear, a nonlinear state-space model is then developed to predict the color shift failure time within a self-adaptive particle filter framework. The results show that: (1 the failure mechanisms of LEDs can be identified by analyzing the extracted features of SPD with statistical curve-fitting and (2 the developed method can dynamically and accurately predict the color coordinates, correlated color temperatures (CCTs, and color rendering indexes (CRIs of phosphor-converted (pc-white LEDs, and also can estimate the residual color life.

  16. Color Shift Failure Prediction for Phosphor-Converted White LEDs by Modeling Features of Spectral Power Distribution with a Nonlinear Filter Approach.

    Fan, Jiajie; Mohamed, Moumouni Guero; Qian, Cheng; Fan, Xuejun; Zhang, Guoqi; Pecht, Michael

    2017-07-18

    With the expanding application of light-emitting diodes (LEDs), the color quality of white LEDs has attracted much attention in several color-sensitive application fields, such as museum lighting, healthcare lighting and displays. Reliability concerns for white LEDs are changing from the luminous efficiency to color quality. However, most of the current available research on the reliability of LEDs is still focused on luminous flux depreciation rather than color shift failure. The spectral power distribution (SPD), defined as the radiant power distribution emitted by a light source at a range of visible wavelength, contains the most fundamental luminescence mechanisms of a light source. SPD is used as the quantitative inference of an LED's optical characteristics, including color coordinates that are widely used to represent the color shift process. Thus, to model the color shift failure of white LEDs during aging, this paper first extracts the features of an SPD, representing the characteristics of blue LED chips and phosphors, by multi-peak curve-fitting and modeling them with statistical functions. Then, because the shift processes of extracted features in aged LEDs are always nonlinear, a nonlinear state-space model is then developed to predict the color shift failure time within a self-adaptive particle filter framework. The results show that: (1) the failure mechanisms of LEDs can be identified by analyzing the extracted features of SPD with statistical curve-fitting and (2) the developed method can dynamically and accurately predict the color coordinates, correlated color temperatures (CCTs), and color rendering indexes (CRIs) of phosphor-converted (pc)-white LEDs, and also can estimate the residual color life.

  17. The nuisance of nuisance regression: spectral misspecification in a common approach to resting-state fMRI preprocessing reintroduces noise and obscures functional connectivity.

    Hallquist, Michael N; Hwang, Kai; Luna, Beatriz

    2013-11-15

    Recent resting-state functional connectivity fMRI (RS-fcMRI) research has demonstrated that head motion during fMRI acquisition systematically influences connectivity estimates despite bandpass filtering and nuisance regression, which are intended to reduce such nuisance variability. We provide evidence that the effects of head motion and other nuisance signals are poorly controlled when the fMRI time series are bandpass-filtered but the regressors are unfiltered, resulting in the inadvertent reintroduction of nuisance-related variation into frequencies previously suppressed by the bandpass filter, as well as suboptimal correction for noise signals in the frequencies of interest. This is important because many RS-fcMRI studies, including some focusing on motion-related artifacts, have applied this approach. In two cohorts of individuals (n=117 and 22) who completed resting-state fMRI scans, we found that the bandpass-regress approach consistently overestimated functional connectivity across the brain, typically on the order of r=.10-.35, relative to a simultaneous bandpass filtering and nuisance regression approach. Inflated correlations under the bandpass-regress approach were associated with head motion and cardiac artifacts. Furthermore, distance-related differences in the association of head motion and connectivity estimates were much weaker for the simultaneous filtering approach. We recommend that future RS-fcMRI studies ensure that the frequencies of nuisance regressors and fMRI data match prior to nuisance regression, and we advocate a simultaneous bandpass filtering and nuisance regression strategy that better controls nuisance-related variability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Learning theory of distributed spectral algorithms

    Guo, Zheng-Chu; Lin, Shao-Bo; Zhou, Ding-Xuan

    2017-01-01

    Spectral algorithms have been widely used and studied in learning theory and inverse problems. This paper is concerned with distributed spectral algorithms, for handling big data, based on a divide-and-conquer approach. We present a learning theory for these distributed kernel-based learning algorithms in a regression framework including nice error bounds and optimal minimax learning rates achieved by means of a novel integral operator approach and a second order decomposition of inverse operators. Our quantitative estimates are given in terms of regularity of the regression function, effective dimension of the reproducing kernel Hilbert space, and qualification of the filter function of the spectral algorithm. They do not need any eigenfunction or noise conditions and are better than the existing results even for the classical family of spectral algorithms. (paper)

  19. On Longitudinal Spectral Coherence

    Kristensen, Leif

    1979-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the longitudinal spectral coherence differs significantly from the transversal spectral coherence in its dependence on displacement and frequency. An expression for the longitudinal coherence is derived and it is shown how the scale of turbulence, the displacement between ...... observation sites and the turbulence intensity influence the results. The limitations of the theory are discussed....

  20. Spectral Clustering Predicts Tumor Tissue Heterogeneity Using Dynamic 18F-FDG PET: A Complement to the Standard Compartmental Modeling Approach.

    Katiyar, Prateek; Divine, Mathew R; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Pichler, Bernd J; Disselhorst, Jonathan A

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we described and validated an unsupervised segmentation algorithm for the assessment of tumor heterogeneity using dynamic 18 F-FDG PET. The aim of our study was to objectively evaluate the proposed method and make comparisons with compartmental modeling parametric maps and SUV segmentations using simulations of clinically relevant tumor tissue types. Methods: An irreversible 2-tissue-compartmental model was implemented to simulate clinical and preclinical 18 F-FDG PET time-activity curves using population-based arterial input functions (80 clinical and 12 preclinical) and the kinetic parameter values of 3 tumor tissue types. The simulated time-activity curves were corrupted with different levels of noise and used to calculate the tissue-type misclassification errors of spectral clustering (SC), parametric maps, and SUV segmentation. The utility of the inverse noise variance- and Laplacian score-derived frame weighting schemes before SC was also investigated. Finally, the SC scheme with the best results was tested on a dynamic 18 F-FDG measurement of a mouse bearing subcutaneous colon cancer and validated using histology. Results: In the preclinical setup, the inverse noise variance-weighted SC exhibited the lowest misclassification errors (8.09%-28.53%) at all noise levels in contrast to the Laplacian score-weighted SC (16.12%-31.23%), unweighted SC (25.73%-40.03%), parametric maps (28.02%-61.45%), and SUV (45.49%-45.63%) segmentation. The classification efficacy of both weighted SC schemes in the clinical case was comparable to the unweighted SC. When applied to the dynamic 18 F-FDG measurement of colon cancer, the proposed algorithm accurately identified densely vascularized regions from the rest of the tumor. In addition, the segmented regions and clusterwise average time-activity curves showed excellent correlation with the tumor histology. Conclusion: The promising results of SC mark its position as a robust tool for quantification of tumor

  1. Eigenvalue-eigenvector decomposition (EED) analysis of dissimilarity and covariance matrix obtained from total synchronous fluorescence spectral (TSFS) data sets of herbal preparations: Optimizing the classification approach

    Tarai, Madhumita; Kumar, Keshav; Divya, O.; Bairi, Partha; Mishra, Kishor Kumar; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2017-09-01

    The present work compares the dissimilarity and covariance based unsupervised chemometric classification approaches by taking the total synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy data sets acquired for the cumin and non-cumin based herbal preparations. The conventional decomposition method involves eigenvalue-eigenvector analysis of the covariance of the data set and finds the factors that can explain the overall major sources of variation present in the data set. The conventional approach does this irrespective of the fact that the samples belong to intrinsically different groups and hence leads to poor class separation. The present work shows that classification of such samples can be optimized by performing the eigenvalue-eigenvector decomposition on the pair-wise dissimilarity matrix.

  2. Eigenvalue-eigenvector decomposition (EED) analysis of dissimilarity and covariance matrix obtained from total synchronous fluorescence spectral (TSFS) data sets of herbal preparations: Optimizing the classification approach.

    Tarai, Madhumita; Kumar, Keshav; Divya, O; Bairi, Partha; Mishra, Kishor Kumar; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2017-09-05

    The present work compares the dissimilarity and covariance based unsupervised chemometric classification approaches by taking the total synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy data sets acquired for the cumin and non-cumin based herbal preparations. The conventional decomposition method involves eigenvalue-eigenvector analysis of the covariance of the data set and finds the factors that can explain the overall major sources of variation present in the data set. The conventional approach does this irrespective of the fact that the samples belong to intrinsically different groups and hence leads to poor class separation. The present work shows that classification of such samples can be optimized by performing the eigenvalue-eigenvector decomposition on the pair-wise dissimilarity matrix. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The spectral dimension of random trees

    Destri, Claudio; Donetti, Luca

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple yet rigorous approach to the determination of the spectral dimension of random trees, based on the study of the massless limit of the Gaussian model on such trees. As a by-product, we obtain evidence in favour of a new scaling hypothesis for the Gaussian model on generic bounded graphs and in favour of a previously conjectured exact relation between spectral and connectivity dimensions on more general tree-like structures

  4. An effective comparison involving a novel spectral approach and finite difference method for the Schrödinger equation involving the Riesz fractional derivative in the quantum field theory

    Patra, Asim

    2018-03-01

    This paper displays the approach of the time-splitting Fourier spectral (TSFS) technique for the linear Riesz fractional Schrödinger equation (RFSE) in the semi-classical regime. The splitting technique is shown to be unconditionally stable. Further a suitable implicit finite difference discretization of second order has been manifested for the RFSE where the Riesz derivative has been discretized via an approach of fractional centered difference. Moreover the stability analysis for the implicit scheme has also been presented here via von Neumann analysis. The L2-norm and L^{∞}-norm errors are calculated for \\vert u(x,t)\\vert2, Re(u(x,t)) and Im(u(x,t)) for various cases. The results obtained by the methods are further tabulated for the absolute errors for \\vert u(x,t)\\vert2. Furthermore the graphs are depicted showing comparison of \\vert u(x,t)\\vert2 by both techniques. The derivatives are taken here in the context of the Riesz fractional sense. Apart from that, the comparative study put forth in the following section via tables and graphs between the implicit second-order finite difference method (IFDM) and the TSFS method is for the purpose of investigating the efficiency of the results obtained. Moreover the stability analysis of the presented techniques manifesting their unconditional stability makes the proposed approach more competing and accurate.

  5. Singularity of classical and quantum correlations at critical points of the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model in bipartition and tripartition of spins

    Xiu-Xing, Zhang; Fu-Li, Li

    2012-01-01

    We study the classical correlation (CC) and quantum discord (QD) between two spin subgroups of the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick (LMG) model in both binary and trinary decompositions of spins. In the case of bipartition, we find that the classical correlations and all the quantum correlations including the QD, the entanglement of formation (EoF) and the logarithmic negativity (LN) are divergent in the same singular behavior at the critical point of the LMG model. In the case of tripartition, however, ...

  6. Estimation of spectral kurtosis

    Sutawanir

    2017-03-01

    Rolling bearings are the most important elements in rotating machinery. Bearing frequently fall out of service for various reasons: heavy loads, unsuitable lubrications, ineffective sealing. Bearing faults may cause a decrease in performance. Analysis of bearing vibration signals has attracted attention in the field of monitoring and fault diagnosis. Bearing vibration signals give rich information for early detection of bearing failures. Spectral kurtosis, SK, is a parameter in frequency domain indicating how the impulsiveness of a signal varies with frequency. Faults in rolling bearings give rise to a series of short impulse responses as the rolling elements strike faults, SK potentially useful for determining frequency bands dominated by bearing fault signals. SK can provide a measure of the distance of the analyzed bearings from a healthy one. SK provides additional information given by the power spectral density (psd). This paper aims to explore the estimation of spectral kurtosis using short time Fourier transform known as spectrogram. The estimation of SK is similar to the estimation of psd. The estimation falls in model-free estimation and plug-in estimator. Some numerical studies using simulations are discussed to support the methodology. Spectral kurtosis of some stationary signals are analytically obtained and used in simulation study. Kurtosis of time domain has been a popular tool for detecting non-normality. Spectral kurtosis is an extension of kurtosis in frequency domain. The relationship between time domain and frequency domain analysis is establish through power spectrum-autocovariance Fourier transform. Fourier transform is the main tool for estimation in frequency domain. The power spectral density is estimated through periodogram. In this paper, the short time Fourier transform of the spectral kurtosis is reviewed, a bearing fault (inner ring and outer ring) is simulated. The bearing response, power spectrum, and spectral kurtosis are plotted to

  7. Spectrally accurate contour dynamics

    Van Buskirk, R.D.; Marcus, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    We present an exponentially accurate boundary integral method for calculation the equilibria and dynamics of piece-wise constant distributions of potential vorticity. The method represents contours of potential vorticity as a spectral sum and solves the Biot-Savart equation for the velocity by spectrally evaluating a desingularized contour integral. We use the technique in both an initial-value code and a newton continuation method. Our methods are tested by comparing the numerical solutions with known analytic results, and it is shown that for the same amount of computational work our spectral methods are more accurate than other contour dynamics methods currently in use

  8. Spectral radius of graphs

    Stevanovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Spectral Radius of Graphs provides a thorough overview of important results on the spectral radius of adjacency matrix of graphs that have appeared in the literature in the preceding ten years, most of them with proofs, and including some previously unpublished results of the author. The primer begins with a brief classical review, in order to provide the reader with a foundation for the subsequent chapters. Topics covered include spectral decomposition, the Perron-Frobenius theorem, the Rayleigh quotient, the Weyl inequalities, and the Interlacing theorem. From this introduction, the

  9. Spectral unmixing using the concept of pure variables

    Kucheryavskiy, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive book presents an interdisciplinary approach to demonstrate how and why data analysis, signal processing, and chemometrics are essential to resolving the spectral unmixing problem.......This comprehensive book presents an interdisciplinary approach to demonstrate how and why data analysis, signal processing, and chemometrics are essential to resolving the spectral unmixing problem....

  10. Spectral unmixing: estimating partial abundances

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available techniques is complicated when considering very similar spectral signatures. Iron-bearing oxide/hydroxide/sulfate minerals have similar spectral signatures. The study focuses on how could estimates of abundances of spectrally similar iron-bearing oxide...

  11. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change

    Assmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    It has been traditional in phonetic research to characterize monophthongs using a set of static formant frequencies, i.e., formant frequencies taken from a single time-point in the vowel or averaged over the time-course of the vowel. However, over the last twenty years a growing body of research has demonstrated that, at least for a number of dialects of North American English, vowels which are traditionally described as monophthongs often have substantial spectral change. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change has been observed in speakers’ productions, and has also been found to have a substantial effect on listeners’ perception. In terms of acoustics, the traditional categorical distinction between monophthongs and diphthongs can be replaced by a gradient description of dynamic spectral patterns. This book includes chapters addressing various aspects of vowel inherent spectral change (VISC), including theoretical and experimental studies of the perceptually relevant aspects of VISC, the relationship between ar...

  12. A Wide-Field Fluorescence Microscope Extension for Ultrafast Screening of One-Bead One-Compound Libraries Using a Spectral Image Subtraction Approach.

    Heusermann, Wolf; Ludin, Beat; Pham, Nhan T; Auer, Manfred; Weidemann, Thomas; Hintersteiner, Martin

    2016-05-09

    The increasing involvement of academic institutions and biotech companies in drug discovery calls for cost-effective methods to identify new bioactive molecules. Affinity-based on-bead screening of combinatorial one-bead one-compound libraries combines a split-mix synthesis design with a simple protein binding assay operating directly at the bead matrix. However, one bottleneck for academic scale on-bead screening is the unavailability of a cheap, automated, and robust screening platform that still provides a quantitative signal related to the amount of target protein binding to individual beads for hit bead ranking. Wide-field fluorescence microscopy has long been considered unsuitable due to significant broad spectrum autofluorescence of the library beads in conjunction with low detection sensitivity. Herein, we demonstrate how such a standard microscope equipped with LED-based excitation and a modern CMOS camera can be successfully used for selecting hit beads. We show that the autofluorescence issue can be overcome by an optical image subtraction approach that yields excellent signal-to-noise ratios for the detection of bead-associated target proteins. A polymer capillary attached to a semiautomated bead-picking device allows the operator to efficiently isolate individual hit beads in less than 20 s. The system can be used for ultrafast screening of >200,000 bead-bound compounds in 1.5 h, thereby making high-throughput screening accessible to a wider group within the scientific community.

  13. Spectrally selective glazings

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  14. Beyond ectomycorrhizal bipartite networks: projected networks demonstrate contrasted patterns between early- and late-successional plants in Corsica.

    Adrien eTaudiere

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ectomycorrhizal (ECM symbiosis connects mutualistic plants and fungal species into bipartite networks. While links between one focal ECM plant and its fungal symbionts have been widely documented, systemic views of ECM networks are lacking, in particular, concerning the ability of fungal species to mediate indirect ecological interactions between ECM plant species (projected-ECM networks. We assembled a large dataset of plant-fungi associations at the species level and at the scale of Corsica using molecular data and unambiguously host-assigned records to: (i examine the correlation between the number of fungal symbionts of a plant species and the average specialization of these fungal species, (ii explore the structure of the plant-plant projected network and (iii compare plant association patterns in regard to their position along the ecological succession. Our analysis reveals no trade-off between specialization of plants and specialization of their partners and a saturation of the plant projected network. Moreover, there is a significantly lower-than-expected sharing of partners between early- and late-successional plant species, with fewer fungal partners for early-successional ones and similar average specialization of symbionts of early- and late-successional plants. Our work paves the way for ecological readings of Mediterranean landscapes that include the astonishing diversity of below-ground interactions.

  15. Complete nucleotide sequences of a new bipartite begomovirus from Malvastrum sp. plants with bright yellow mosaic symptoms in South Texas.

    Alabi, Olufemi J; Villegas, Cecilia; Gregg, Lori; Murray, K Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Two isolates of a novel bipartite begomovirus, tentatively named malvastrum bright yellow mosaic virus (MaBYMV), were molecularly characterized from naturally infected plants of the genus Malvastrum showing bright yellow mosaic disease symptoms in South Texas. Six complete DNA-A and five DNA-B genome sequences of MaBYMV obtained from the isolates ranged in length from 2,608 to 2,609 nucleotides (nt) and 2,578 to 2,605 nt, respectively. Both genome segments shared a 178- to 180-nt common region. In pairwise comparisons, the complete DNA-A and DNA-B sequences of MaBYMV were most similar (87-88 % and 79-81 % identity, respectively) and phylogenetically related to the corresponding sequences of sida mosaic Sinaloa virus-[MX-Gua-06]. Further analysis revealed that MaBYMV is a putative recombinant virus, thus supporting the notion that malvaceous hosts may be influencing the evolution of several begomoviruses. The design of new diagnostic primers enabled the detection of MaBYMV in cohorts of Bemisia tabaci collected from symptomatic Malvastrum sp. plants, thus implicating whiteflies as potential vectors of the virus.

  16. Spectral Tensor-Train Decomposition

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2016-01-01

    The accurate approximation of high-dimensional functions is an essential task in uncertainty quantification and many other fields. We propose a new function approximation scheme based on a spectral extension of the tensor-train (TT) decomposition. We first define a functional version of the TT...... adaptive Smolyak approach. The method is also used to approximate the solution of an elliptic PDE with random input data. The open source software and examples presented in this work are available online (http://pypi.python.org/pypi/TensorToolbox/)....

  17. Topical tags vs non-topical tags : Towards a bipartite classification?

    Basile, Valerio; Peroni, Silvio; Tamburini, Fabio; Vitali, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate whether it is possible to create a computational approach that allows us to distinguish topical tags (i.e. talking about the topic of a resource) and non-topical tags (i.e. describing aspects of a resource that are not related to its topic) in folksonomies, in a way that

  18. Improving the recommender algorithms with the detected communities in bipartite networks

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Duo; Xiao, Jinghua

    2017-04-01

    Recommender system offers a powerful tool to make information overload problem well solved and thus gains wide concerns of scholars and engineers. A key challenge is how to make recommendations more accurate and personalized. We notice that community structures widely exist in many real networks, which could significantly affect the recommendation results. By incorporating the information of detected communities in the recommendation algorithms, an improved recommendation approach for the networks with communities is proposed. The approach is examined in both artificial and real networks, the results show that the improvement on accuracy and diversity can be 20% and 7%, respectively. This reveals that it is beneficial to classify the nodes based on the inherent properties in recommender systems.

  19. CRISS power spectral density

    Vaeth, W.

    1979-04-01

    The correlation of signal components at different frequencies like higher harmonics cannot be detected by a normal power spectral density measurement, since this technique correlates only components at the same frequency. This paper describes a special method for measuring the correlation of two signal components at different frequencies: the CRISS power spectral density. From this new function in frequency analysis, the correlation of two components can be determined quantitatively either they stem from one signal or from two diverse signals. The principle of the method, suitable for the higher harmonics of a signal as well as for any other frequency combinations is shown for the digital frequency analysis technique. Two examples of CRISS power spectral densities demonstrates the operation of the new method. (orig.) [de

  20. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  1. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  2. Spectral analysis by correlation

    Fauque, J.M.; Berthier, D.; Max, J.; Bonnet, G.

    1969-01-01

    The spectral density of a signal, which represents its power distribution along the frequency axis, is a function which is of great importance, finding many uses in all fields concerned with the processing of the signal (process identification, vibrational analysis, etc...). Amongst all the possible methods for calculating this function, the correlation method (correlation function calculation + Fourier transformation) is the most promising, mainly because of its simplicity and of the results it yields. The study carried out here will lead to the construction of an apparatus which, coupled with a correlator, will constitute a set of equipment for spectral analysis in real time covering the frequency range 0 to 5 MHz. (author) [fr

  3. Spectral backward radiation profile

    Kwon, Sung Duck; Lee, Keun Hyun; Kim, Bo Ra; Yoon, Suk Soo

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasonic backward radiation profile is frequency-dependent when incident region has deptional gradient of acoustical properties or multi-layers. Until now, we have measured the profiles of principal frequencies of used transducers so that it was not easy to understand the change of the frequency component and spectrum of backward radiation from the profile. We tried to measure the spectral backward radiation profiles using DFP(digital filer package) Lecroy DSO. The very big changes in the shape and pattern of spectral backward radiation profiles leads to the conclusion that this new try could be very effective tool to evaluate frequency dependent surface area.

  4. Investigating Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering of continuous-variable bipartite states by non-Gaussian pseudospin measurements

    Xiang, Yu; Xu, Buqing; Mišta, Ladislav; Tufarelli, Tommaso; He, Qiongyi; Adesso, Gerardo

    2017-10-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering is an asymmetric form of correlations which is intermediate between quantum entanglement and Bell nonlocality, and can be exploited as a resource for quantum communication with one untrusted party. In particular, steering of continuous-variable Gaussian states has been extensively studied theoretically and experimentally, as a fundamental manifestation of the EPR paradox. While most of these studies focused on quadrature measurements for steering detection, two recent works revealed that there exist Gaussian states which are only steerable by suitable non-Gaussian measurements. In this paper we perform a systematic investigation of EPR steering of bipartite Gaussian states by pseudospin measurements, complementing and extending previous findings. We first derive the density-matrix elements of two-mode squeezed thermal Gaussian states in the Fock basis, which may be of independent interest. We then use such a representation to investigate steering of these states as detected by a simple nonlinear criterion, based on second moments of the correlation matrix constructed from pseudospin operators. This analysis reveals previously unexplored regimes where non-Gaussian measurements are shown to be more effective than Gaussian ones to witness steering of Gaussian states in the presence of local noise. We further consider an alternative set of pseudospin observables, whose expectation value can be expressed more compactly in terms of Wigner functions for all two-mode Gaussian states. However, according to the adopted criterion, these observables are found to be always less sensitive than conventional Gaussian observables for steering detection. Finally, we investigate continuous-variable Werner states, which are non-Gaussian mixtures of Gaussian states, and find that pseudospin measurements are always more effective than Gaussian ones to reveal their steerability. Our results provide useful insights on the role of non

  5. Spectral Approaches to Learning Predictive Representations

    2012-09-01

    representation and a value function. In practice, we would like to be able to find a good set of features, without prior knowledge of the system model. Kolter ...http://www.cs.ucr.edu/ eamonn/TSDMA/index.html. 7.1 [55] J. Zico Kolter and Andrew Y. Ng. Regularization and feature selection in least-squares temporal

  6. Spectral approach to optical resonator theory

    Feit, M.D.; Fleck, J.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A new computational method for unloaded optical resonators is developed based on the discrete Fourier analysis of informaton generated by repated iterations of the optical field corresponding to transits between reflectors. The method is a straightforward extension of the propagating beam method developed earlier for optical fibers for extracting modal properties from numerical solutions to the paraxial scalar wave equation. The method requires computation of a field correlation function, whose Fourier transform reveals the eigenmodes as resonant peaks. Analysis of the location and breadth of these peaks determines the resonator eigenvalues When the eigenvalues are known, additional discrete Fourier transforms of the field are used to generate the mode eigenfunctions. This new method makes possible the unambiguous identification and accurate characterization of the entire spectrum of transverse resonator modes

  7. Spectral Ensemble Kalman Filters

    Mandel, Jan; Kasanický, Ivan; Vejmelka, Martin; Fuglík, Viktor; Turčičová, Marie; Eben, Kryštof; Resler, Jaroslav; Juruš, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2014), EMS2014-446 [EMS Annual Meeting /14./ & European Conference on Applied Climatology (ECAC) /10./. 06.10.2014-10.10.2014, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Grant - others:NSF DMS-1216481 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : data assimilation * spectral filter Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  8. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    Sherwood, D.G.; Wilson, J.F.; Salton, R.B.; Fensterer, H.F.

    1981-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements from the reactor core for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The apparatus includes drivemechanisms for moving the displacer elements relative to the core and guide mechanisms for guiding the displayer rods through the reactor vessel

  9. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    Sherwood, D.G.; Wilson, J.F.; Salton, R.B.; Fensterer, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements from the reactor core for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The apparatus includes drive mechanisms for moving the displacer elements relative to the core and guide mechanisms for guiding the displacer rods through the reactor vessel. (author)

  10. A Simple Spectral Observer

    Lizeth Torres

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The principal aim of a spectral observer is twofold: the reconstruction of a signal of time via state estimation and the decomposition of such a signal into the frequencies that make it up. A spectral observer can be catalogued as an online algorithm for time-frequency analysis because is a method that can compute on the fly the Fourier transform (FT of a signal, without having the entire signal available from the start. In this regard, this paper presents a novel spectral observer with an adjustable constant gain for reconstructing a given signal by means of the recursive identification of the coefficients of a Fourier series. The reconstruction or estimation of a signal in the context of this work means to find the coefficients of a linear combination of sines a cosines that fits a signal such that it can be reproduced. The design procedure of the spectral observer is presented along with the following applications: (1 the reconstruction of a simple periodical signal, (2 the approximation of both a square and a triangular signal, (3 the edge detection in signals by using the Fourier coefficients, (4 the fitting of the historical Bitcoin market data from 1 December 2014 to 8 January 2018 and (5 the estimation of a input force acting upon a Duffing oscillator. To round out this paper, we present a detailed discussion about the results of the applications as well as a comparative analysis of the proposed spectral observer vis-à-vis the Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT, which is a well-known method for time-frequency analysis.

  11. Singularities of classical and quantum correlations at critical points of the Lipkin–Meshkov–Glick model in bipartitions and tripartitions of spins

    Zhang, Xiu-xing; Li, Fu-li

    2013-01-01

    By using the lowest order expansion in the number of spins, we study the classical correlation (CC) and quantum correlations (QCs) between two spin subgroups of the Lipkin–Meshkov–Glick (LMG) model in both binary and trinary decompositions of spins. In the case of bipartitions, we find that the CC and all the QCs are divergent in the same singular behavior at the critical point of the LMG model. In the case of tripartitions, however, the CC is still divergent but the QCs remain finite at the critical point. The present result shows that the CC is very robust but the QCs are much frangible to the environment disturbance.

  12. Krein Spectral Triples and the Fermionic Action

    Dungen, Koen van den

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the space of spinors on a Lorentzian manifold, we define Krein spectral triples, which generalise spectral triples from Hilbert spaces to Krein spaces. This Krein space approach allows for an improved formulation of the fermionic action for almost-commutative manifolds. We show by explicit calculation that this action functional recovers the correct Lagrangians for the cases of electrodynamics, the electro-weak theory, and the Standard Model. The description of these examples does not require a real structure, unless one includes Majorana masses, in which case the internal spaces also exhibit a Krein space structure.

  13. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    Darin P Clark

    Full Text Available Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID. In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM. Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with

  14. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction

    Clark, Darin P.

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  15. Noncommutativity from spectral flow

    Heinzl, Thomas; Ilderton, Anton [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-27

    We investigate the transition from second- to first-order systems. Quantum mechanically, this transforms configuration space into phase space and hence introduces noncommutativity in the former. This transition may be described in terms of spectral flow. Gaps in the energy or mass spectrum may become large which effectively truncates the available state space. Using both operator and path integral languages we explicitly discuss examples in quantum mechanics (light-front) quantum field theory and string theory.

  16. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    Wilson, J.F.; Sherwood, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises a reactive core having fuel assemblies accommodating both water displacer elements and neutron absorbing control rods for selectively changing the volume of water-moderator in the core. The fuel assemblies with displacer and control rods are arranged in alternating fashion so that one displacer element drive mechanism may move displacer elements in more than one fuel assembly without interfering with the movement of control rods of a corresponding control rod drive mechanisms. (author)

  17. Spectral zone selection methodology for pebble bed reactors

    Mphahlele, Ramatsemela; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Gougar, Hans D.

    2011-01-01

    A methodology is developed for determining boundaries of spectral zones for pebble bed reactors. A spectral zone is defined as a region made up of a number of nodes whose characteristics are collectively similar and that are assigned the same few-group diffusion constants. The spectral zones are selected in such a manner that the difference (error) between the reference transport solution and the diffusion code solution takes a minimum value. This is achieved by choosing spectral zones through optimally minimizing this error. The objective function for the optimization algorithm is the total reaction rate error, which is defined as the sum of the leakage, absorption and fission reaction rates errors in each zone. The selection of these spectral zones is such that the core calculation results based on diffusion theory are within an acceptable tolerance as compared to a proper transport reference solution. Through this work, a consistent approach for identifying spectral zones that yield more accurate diffusion results is introduced.

  18. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Carrier nature of speech; modulation spectrum; spectral dynamics ... the relationships between phonetic values of sounds and their short-term spectral envelopes .... the number of free parameters that need to be estimated from training data.

  19. Symmetric extension of bipartite quantum states and its use in quantum key distribution with two-way postprocessing

    Myhr, Geir Ove

    2010-01-01

    Just like we can divide the set of bipartite quantum states into separable states and entangled states, we can divide it into states with and without a symmetric extension. The states with a symmetric extension - which includes all the separable states - behave classically in many ways, while the states without a symmetric extension - which are all entangled - have the potential to exhibit quantum effects. The set of states with a symmetric extension is closed under local quantum operations assisted by one-way classical communication (1-LOCC) just like the set of separable states is closed under local operations assisted by two-way classical communication (LOCC). Because of this, states with a symmetric extension often play the same role in a one-way communication setting as the separable states play in a two-way communication setting. We show that any state with a symmetric extension can be decomposed into a convex combination of states that have a pure symmetric extension. A necessary condition for a state to have a pure symmetric extension is that the spectra of the local and global density matrices are equal. This condition is also sufficient for two qubits, but not for any larger systems. We present a conjectured necessary and sufficient condition for two-qubit states with a symmetric extension. Proofs are provided for some classes of states: rank-two states, states on the symmetric subspace, Bell-diagonal states and states that are invariant under S x S, where S is a phase gate. We also show how the symmetric extension problem for multi-qubit Bell-diagonal states can be simplified and the simplified problem implemented as a semidefinite program. Quantum key distribution protocols such as the six-state protocol and the BB84 protocol effectively gives Alice and Bob Bell-diagonal states that they measure in the standard basis to obtain a raw key which they may then process further to obtain a secret error-free key. When the raw key has a high error rate, the

  20. Symmetric extension of bipartite quantum states and its use in quantum key distribution with two-way postprocessing

    Myhr, Geir Ove

    2010-11-08

    Just like we can divide the set of bipartite quantum states into separable states and entangled states, we can divide it into states with and without a symmetric extension. The states with a symmetric extension - which includes all the separable states - behave classically in many ways, while the states without a symmetric extension - which are all entangled - have the potential to exhibit quantum effects. The set of states with a symmetric extension is closed under local quantum operations assisted by one-way classical communication (1-LOCC) just like the set of separable states is closed under local operations assisted by two-way classical communication (LOCC). Because of this, states with a symmetric extension often play the same role in a one-way communication setting as the separable states play in a two-way communication setting. We show that any state with a symmetric extension can be decomposed into a convex combination of states that have a pure symmetric extension. A necessary condition for a state to have a pure symmetric extension is that the spectra of the local and global density matrices are equal. This condition is also sufficient for two qubits, but not for any larger systems. We present a conjectured necessary and sufficient condition for two-qubit states with a symmetric extension. Proofs are provided for some classes of states: rank-two states, states on the symmetric subspace, Bell-diagonal states and states that are invariant under S x S, where S is a phase gate. We also show how the symmetric extension problem for multi-qubit Bell-diagonal states can be simplified and the simplified problem implemented as a semidefinite program. Quantum key distribution protocols such as the six-state protocol and the BB84 protocol effectively gives Alice and Bob Bell-diagonal states that they measure in the standard basis to obtain a raw key which they may then process further to obtain a secret error-free key. When the raw key has a high error rate, the

  1. Spectral properties of nuclear matter

    Bozek, P

    2006-01-01

    We review self-consistent spectral methods for nuclear matter calculations. The in-medium T-matrix approach is conserving and thermodynamically consistent. It gives both the global and the single-particle properties the system. The T-matrix approximation allows to address the pairing phenomenon in cold nuclear matter. A generalization of nuclear matter calculations to the super.uid phase is discussed and numerical results are presented for this case. The linear response of a correlated system going beyond the Hartree-Fock+ Random-Phase-Approximation (RPA) scheme is studied. The polarization is obtained by solving a consistent Bethe-Salpeter (BS) equation for the coupling of dressed nucleons to an external field. We find that multipair contributions are important for the spin(isospin) response when the interaction is spin(isospin) dependent

  2. Understanding Soliton Spectral Tunneling as a Spectral Coupling Effect

    Guo, Hairun; Wang, Shaofei; Zeng, Xianglong

    2013-01-01

    Soliton eigenstate is found corresponding to a dispersive phase profile under which the soliton phase changes induced by the dispersion and nonlinearity are instantaneously counterbalanced. Much like a waveguide coupler relying on a spatial refractive index profile that supports mode coupling...... between channels, here we suggest that the soliton spectral tunneling effect can be understood supported by a spectral phase coupler. The dispersive wave number in the spectral domain must have a coupler-like symmetric profile for soliton spectral tunneling to occur. We show that such a spectral coupler...

  3. Case report of right hamate hook fracture in a patient with previous fracture history of left hamate hook: is it hamate bipartite?

    Norton Sandra

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hamate hook fracture is a common fracture in golfers and others who play sports that involve rackets or sticks such as tennis or hockey. This patient had a previous hamate fracture in the opposing wrist along with potential features of hamate bipartite. Case presentation A 19 year old male presented with a complaint of right wrist pain on the ulnar side of the wrist with no apparent mechanism of injury. The pain came on gradually one week before being seen in the office and he reported no prior care for the complaint. His history includes traumatic left hamate hook fracture with surgical excision. Conclusion The patient was found to have marked tenderness over the hamate and with a prior fracture to the other wrist, computed tomography of the wrist was ordered revealing a fracture to the hamate hook in the right wrist. He was referred for surgical evaluation and the hook of the hamate was excised. Post-surgically, the patient was able to return to normal activity within eight weeks. This case is indicative of fracture rather than hamate bipartite. This fracture should be considered in a case of ulnar sided wrist pain where marked tenderness is noted over the hamate, especially after participation in club or racket sports.

  4. Bipartite non-classical correlations for a lossy two connected qubit-cavity systems: trace distance discord and Bell's non-locality

    Mohamed, Abdel-Baset A.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, some non-classical correlations are investigated for bipartite partitions of two qubits trapped in two spatially separated cavities connected by an optical fiber. The results show that the trace distance discord and Bell's non-locality introduce other quantum correlations beyond the entanglement. Moreover, the correlation functions of the trace distance discord and the Bell's non-locality are very sensitive to the initial correlations, the coupling strengths, and the dissipation rates of the cavities. The fluctuations of the correlation functions between their initial values and gained (loss) values appear due to the unitary evolution of the system. These fluctuations depend on the chosen initial correlations between the two subsystems. The maximal violations of Bell's inequality occur when the logarithmic negativity and the trace distance discord reach certain values. It is shown that the robustness of the non-classical correlations, against the dissipation rates of the cavities, depends on the bipartite partitions reduced density matrices of the system, and is also greatly enhanced by choosing appropriate coupling strengths.

  5. Slow-Light-Enhanced Spectral Interferometers, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We proposoe a research program aimed at developing spectral interferometers with dramatically enhanced performance. A key aspect of our approach is to place a highly...

  6. Darboux invariants of integrable equations with variable spectral parameters

    Shin, H J

    2008-01-01

    The Darboux transformation for integrable equations with variable spectral parameters is introduced. Darboux invariant quantities are calculated, which are used in constructing the Lax pair of integrable equations. This approach serves as a systematic method for constructing inhomogeneous integrable equations and their soliton solutions. The structure functions of variable spectral parameters determine the integrability and nonlinear coupling terms. Three cases of integrable equations are treated as examples of this approach

  7. Using GIS servers and interactive maps in spectral data sharing and administration: Case study of Ahvaz Spectral Geodatabase Platform (ASGP)

    Karami, Mojtaba; Rangzan, Kazem; Saberi, Azim

    2013-10-01

    With emergence of air-borne and space-borne hyperspectral sensors, spectroscopic measurements are gaining more importance in remote sensing. Therefore, the number of available spectral reference data is constantly increasing. This rapid increase often exhibits a poor data management, which leads to ultimate isolation of data on disk storages. Spectral data without precise description of the target, methods, environment, and sampling geometry cannot be used by other researchers. Moreover, existing spectral data (in case it accompanied with good documentation) become virtually invisible or unreachable for researchers. Providing documentation and a data-sharing framework for spectral data, in which researchers are able to search for or share spectral data and documentation, would definitely improve the data lifetime. Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS) are main candidates for spectral data management and their efficiency is proven by many studies and applications to date. In this study, a new approach to spectral data administration is presented based on spatial identity of spectral samples. This method benefits from scalability and performance of RDBMS for storage of spectral data, but uses GIS servers to provide users with interactive maps as an interface to the system. The spectral files, photographs and descriptive data are considered as belongings of a geospatial object. A spectral processing unit is responsible for evaluation of metadata quality and performing routine spectral processing tasks for newly-added data. As a result, by using internet browser software the users would be able to visually examine availability of data and/or search for data based on descriptive attributes associated to it. The proposed system is scalable and besides giving the users good sense of what data are available in the database, it facilitates participation of spectral reference data in producing geoinformation.

  8. On spectral pollution

    Llobet, X.; Appert, K.; Bondeson, A.; Vaclavik, J.

    1990-01-01

    Finite difference and finite element approximations of eigenvalue problems, under certain circumstances exhibit spectral pollution, i.e. the appearance of eigenvalues that do not converge to the correct value when the mesh density is increased. In the present paper this phenomenon is investigated in a homogeneous case by means of discrete dispersion relations: the polluting modes belong to a branch of the dispersion relation that is strongly distorted by the discretization method employed, or to a new, spurious branch. The analysis is applied to finite difference methods and to finite element methods, and some indications about how to avoiding polluting schemes are given. (author) 5 figs., 10 refs

  9. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    Doshi, P.K.; George, R.A.; Dollard, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift arrangement for controlling a nuclear reactor includes a plurality of reactor coolant displacer members which are inserted into a reactor core at the beginning of the core life to reduce the volume of reactor coolant-moderator in the core at start-up. However, as the reactivity of the core declines with fuel depletion, selected displacer members are withdrawn from the core at selected time intervals to increase core moderation at a time when fuel reactivity is declining. (author)

  10. Spectral signatures of chirality

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    We present a new way of measuring chirality, via the spectral shift of photonic band gaps in one-dimensional structures. We derive an explicit mapping of the problem of oblique incidence of circularly polarized light on a chiral one-dimensional photonic crystal with negligible index contrast...... to the formally equivalent problem of linearly polarized light incident on-axis on a non-chiral structure with index contrast. We derive analytical expressions for the first-order shifts of the band gaps for negligible index contrast. These are modified to give good approximations to the band gap shifts also...

  11. Spectral shift reactor

    Carlson, W.R.; Piplica, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    A spectral shift pressurized water reactor comprising apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements having differing neutron absorbing capabilities for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The displacer elements comprise substantially hollow cylindrical low neutron absorbing rods and substantially hollow cylindrical thick walled stainless rods. Since the stainless steel displacer rods have greater neutron absorbing capability, they can effect greater reactivity change per rod. However, by arranging fewer stainless steel displacer rods in a cluster, the reactivity worth of the stainless steel displacer rod cluster can be less than a low neutron absorbing displacer rod cluster. (author)

  12. Optimization of spectral printer modeling based on a modified cellular Yule-Nielsen spectral Neugebauer model.

    Liu, Qiang; Wan, Xiaoxia; Xie, Dehong

    2014-06-01

    The study presented here optimizes several steps in the spectral printer modeling workflow based on a cellular Yule-Nielsen spectral Neugebauer (CYNSN) model. First, a printer subdividing method was developed that reduces the number of sub-models while maintaining the maximum device gamut. Second, the forward spectral prediction accuracy of the CYNSN model for each subspace of the printer was improved using back propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) estimated n values. Third, a sequential gamut judging method, which clearly reduced the complexity of the optimal sub-model and cell searching process during printer backward modeling, was proposed. After that, we further modified the use of the modeling color metric and comprehensively improved the spectral and perceptual accuracy of the spectral printer model. The experimental results show that the proposed optimization approaches provide obvious improvements in aspects of the modeling accuracy or efficiency for each of the corresponding steps, and an overall improvement of the optimized spectral printer modeling workflow was also demonstrated.

  13. Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Patsourakos, S.; Tripathi, D.

    2015-01-01

    The detailed shapes of spectral line profiles provide valuable information about the emitting plasma, especially when the plasma contains an unresolved mixture of velocities, temperatures, and densities. As a result of finite spectral resolution, the intensity measured by a spectrometer is the average intensity across a wavelength bin of non-zero size. It is assigned to the wavelength position at the center of the bin. However, the actual intensity at that discrete position will be different if the profile is curved, as it invariably is. Standard fitting routines (spline, Gaussian, etc.) do not account for this difference, and this can result in significant errors when making sensitive measurements. Detection of asymmetries in solar coronal emission lines is one example. Removal of line blends is another. We have developed an iterative procedure that corrects for this effect. It can be used with any fitting function, but we employ a cubic spline in a new analysis routine called Intensity Conserving Spline Interpolation (ICSI). As the name implies, it conserves the observed intensity within each wavelength bin, which ordinary fits do not. Given the rapid convergence, speed of computation, and ease of use, we suggest that ICSI be made a standard component of the processing pipeline for spectroscopic data.

  14. Nonparametric Collective Spectral Density Estimation and Clustering

    Maadooliat, Mehdi

    2017-04-12

    In this paper, we develop a method for the simultaneous estimation of spectral density functions (SDFs) for a collection of stationary time series that share some common features. Due to the similarities among the SDFs, the log-SDF can be represented using a common set of basis functions. The basis shared by the collection of the log-SDFs is estimated as a low-dimensional manifold of a large space spanned by a pre-specified rich basis. A collective estimation approach pools information and borrows strength across the SDFs to achieve better estimation efficiency. Also, each estimated spectral density has a concise representation using the coefficients of the basis expansion, and these coefficients can be used for visualization, clustering, and classification purposes. The Whittle pseudo-maximum likelihood approach is used to fit the model and an alternating blockwise Newton-type algorithm is developed for the computation. A web-based shiny App found at

  15. Nonparametric Collective Spectral Density Estimation and Clustering

    Maadooliat, Mehdi; Sun, Ying; Chen, Tianbo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a method for the simultaneous estimation of spectral density functions (SDFs) for a collection of stationary time series that share some common features. Due to the similarities among the SDFs, the log-SDF can be represented using a common set of basis functions. The basis shared by the collection of the log-SDFs is estimated as a low-dimensional manifold of a large space spanned by a pre-specified rich basis. A collective estimation approach pools information and borrows strength across the SDFs to achieve better estimation efficiency. Also, each estimated spectral density has a concise representation using the coefficients of the basis expansion, and these coefficients can be used for visualization, clustering, and classification purposes. The Whittle pseudo-maximum likelihood approach is used to fit the model and an alternating blockwise Newton-type algorithm is developed for the computation. A web-based shiny App found at

  16. Spectral evolution of galaxies

    Rocca-Volmerange, B.

    1989-01-01

    A recent striking event in Observational Cosmology is the discovery of a large population of galaxies at extreme cosmological distances (extended from spectral redshifts ≅ 1 to ≥ 3) corresponding to a lookback time of 80% of the Universe's age. However when galaxies are observed at such remote epochs, their appearances are affected by at least two simultaneous effects which are respectively a cosmological effect and the intrinsic evolution of their stellar populations which appear younger than in our nearby galaxies. The fundamental problem is first to disentangle the respective contributions of these two effects to apparent magnitudes and colors of distant galaxies. Other effects which are likely to modify the appearance of galaxies are amplification by gravitational lensing and interaction with environment will also be considered. (author)

  17. Spectral Line Shapes. Proceedings

    Zoppi, M.; Ulivi, L.

    1997-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the 13th International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes which was held in Firenze,Italy from June 16-21, 1996. The topics covered a wide range of subjects emphasizing the physical processes associated with the formation of line profiles: high and low density plasma; atoms and molecules in strong laser fields, Dopple-free and ultra-fine spectroscopy; the line shapes generated by the interaction of neutrals, atoms and molecules, where the relavant quantities are single particle properties, and the interaction-induced spectroscopy. There were 131 papers presented at the conference, out of these, 6 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  18. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  19. Scatter networks: a new approach for analysing information scatter

    Adamic, Lada A; Suresh, K; Shi Xiaolin

    2007-01-01

    Information on any given topic is often scattered across the Web. Previously this scatter has been characterized through the inequality of distribution of facts (i.e. pieces of information) across webpages. Such an approach conceals how specific facts (e.g. rare facts) occur in specific types of pages (e.g. fact-rich pages). To reveal such regularities, we construct bipartite networks, consisting of two types of vertices: the facts contained in webpages and the webpages themselves. Such a representation enables the application of a series of network analysis techniques, revealing structural features such as connectivity, robustness and clustering. Not only does network analysis yield new insights into information scatter, but we also illustrate the benefit of applying new and existing analysis techniques directly to a bipartite network as opposed to its one-mode projection. We discuss the implications of each network feature to the users' ability to find comprehensive information online. Finally, we compare the bipartite graph structure of webpages and facts with the hyperlink structure between the webpages

  20. Spectral Theory of Chemical Bonding

    Langhoff, P. W; Boatz, J. A; Hinde, R. J; Sheehy, J. A

    2004-01-01

    .... Wave function antisymmetry in the aggregate atomic spectral-product basis is enforced by unitary transformation performed subsequent to formation of the Hamiltonian matrix, greatly simplifying its construction...

  1. [Review of digital ground object spectral library].

    Zhou, Xiao-Hu; Zhou, Ding-Wu

    2009-06-01

    A higher spectral resolution is the main direction of developing remote sensing technology, and it is quite important to set up the digital ground object reflectance spectral database library, one of fundamental research fields in remote sensing application. Remote sensing application has been increasingly relying on ground object spectral characteristics, and quantitative analysis has been developed to a new stage. The present article summarized and systematically introduced the research status quo and development trend of digital ground object reflectance spectral libraries at home and in the world in recent years. Introducing the spectral libraries has been established, including desertification spectral database library, plants spectral database library, geological spectral database library, soil spectral database library, minerals spectral database library, cloud spectral database library, snow spectral database library, the atmosphere spectral database library, rocks spectral database library, water spectral database library, meteorites spectral database library, moon rock spectral database library, and man-made materials spectral database library, mixture spectral database library, volatile compounds spectral database library, and liquids spectral database library. In the process of establishing spectral database libraries, there have been some problems, such as the lack of uniform national spectral database standard and uniform standards for the ground object features as well as the comparability between different databases. In addition, data sharing mechanism can not be carried out, etc. This article also put forward some suggestions on those problems.

  2. Bipartite life cycle of coral reef fishes promotes increasing shape disparity of the head skeleton during ontogeny: an example from damselfishes (Pomacentridae

    Vandewalle Pierre

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative studies of the variation of disparity during ontogeny exhibited by the radiation of coral reef fishes are lacking. Such studies dealing with the variation of disparity, i.e. the diversity of organic form, over ontogeny could be a first step in detecting evolutionary mechanisms in these fishes. The damselfishes (Pomacentridae have a bipartite life-cycle, as do the majority of demersal coral reef fishes. During their pelagic dispersion phase, all larvae feed on planktonic prey. On the other hand, juveniles and adults associated with the coral reef environment show a higher diversity of diets. Using geometric morphometrics, we study the ontogenetic dynamic of shape disparity of different head skeletal units (neurocranium, suspensorium and opercle, mandible and premaxilla in this fish family. We expected that larvae of different species might be relatively similar in shapes. Alternatively, specialization may become notable even in the juvenile and adult phase. Results The disparity levels increase significantly throughout ontogeny for each skeletal unit. At settlement, all larval shapes are already species-specific. Damselfishes show high levels of ontogenetic allometry during their post-settlement growth. The divergence of allometric patterns largely explains the changes in patterns and levels of shape disparity over ontogeny. The rate of shape change and the length of ontogenetic trajectories seem to be less variable among species. We also show that the high levels of shape disparity at the adult stage are correlated to a higher level of ecological and functional diversity in this stage. Conclusion Diversification throughout ontogeny of damselfishes results from the interaction among several developmental novelties enhancing disparity. The bipartite life-cycle of damselfishes exemplifies a case where the variation of environmental factors, i.e. the transition from the more homogeneous oceanic environment to the

  3. Bipartite life cycle of coral reef fishes promotes increasing shape disparity of the head skeleton during ontogeny: an example from damselfishes (Pomacentridae)

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantitative studies of the variation of disparity during ontogeny exhibited by the radiation of coral reef fishes are lacking. Such studies dealing with the variation of disparity, i.e. the diversity of organic form, over ontogeny could be a first step in detecting evolutionary mechanisms in these fishes. The damselfishes (Pomacentridae) have a bipartite life-cycle, as do the majority of demersal coral reef fishes. During their pelagic dispersion phase, all larvae feed on planktonic prey. On the other hand, juveniles and adults associated with the coral reef environment show a higher diversity of diets. Using geometric morphometrics, we study the ontogenetic dynamic of shape disparity of different head skeletal units (neurocranium, suspensorium and opercle, mandible and premaxilla) in this fish family. We expected that larvae of different species might be relatively similar in shapes. Alternatively, specialization may become notable even in the juvenile and adult phase. Results The disparity levels increase significantly throughout ontogeny for each skeletal unit. At settlement, all larval shapes are already species-specific. Damselfishes show high levels of ontogenetic allometry during their post-settlement growth. The divergence of allometric patterns largely explains the changes in patterns and levels of shape disparity over ontogeny. The rate of shape change and the length of ontogenetic trajectories seem to be less variable among species. We also show that the high levels of shape disparity at the adult stage are correlated to a higher level of ecological and functional diversity in this stage. Conclusion Diversification throughout ontogeny of damselfishes results from the interaction among several developmental novelties enhancing disparity. The bipartite life-cycle of damselfishes exemplifies a case where the variation of environmental factors, i.e. the transition from the more homogeneous oceanic environment to the coral reef offering a wide

  4. Spectrally adapted red flare tracers with superior spectral performance

    Ramy Sadek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of bright light, with vivid color, is the primary purpose of signaling, illuminating devices, and fire control purposes. This study, reports on the development of red flame compositions with enhanced performance in terms of luminous intensity, and color quality. The light intensity and the imprint spectra of developed red flame compositions to standard NATO red tracer (R-284 NATO were measured using digital luxmeter, and UV–Vis. spectrometer. The main giving of this study is that the light intensity of standard NATO red tracer was increased by 72%, the color quality was also improved by 60% (over the red band from 650 to 780 nm. This enhanced spectral performance was achieved by means of deriving the combustion process to maximize the formation of red color emitting species in the combustion flame. Thanks to the optimum ratio of color source to color intensifier using aluminum metal fuel; this approach offered the highest intensity and color quality. Upon combustion, aluminum was found to maximize the formation SrCL (the main reactive red color emitting species and to minimize the interfering incandescent emission resulted from MgO and SrO. Quantification of active red color emitting species in the combustion flame was conducted using chemical equilibrium thermodynamic code named ICT. The improvement in red flare performance, established the rule that the color intensifier should be in the range from 10 to 15 Wt % of the total composition.

  5. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF EXCHANGE RATES

    ALEŠA LOTRIČ DOLINAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Using spectral analysis is very common in technical areas but rather unusual in economics and finance, where ARIMA and GARCH modeling are much more in use. To show that spectral analysis can be useful in determining hidden periodic components for high-frequency finance data as well, we use the example of foreign exchange rates

  6. PARALLEL SPATIOTEMPORAL SPECTRAL CLUSTERING WITH MASSIVE TRAJECTORY DATA

    Y. Z. Gu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Massive trajectory data contains wealth useful information and knowledge. Spectral clustering, which has been shown to be effective in finding clusters, becomes an important clustering approaches in the trajectory data mining. However, the traditional spectral clustering lacks the temporal expansion on the algorithm and limited in its applicability to large-scale problems due to its high computational complexity. This paper presents a parallel spatiotemporal spectral clustering based on multiple acceleration solutions to make the algorithm more effective and efficient, the performance is proved due to the experiment carried out on the massive taxi trajectory dataset in Wuhan city, China.

  7. Spectral long-range interaction of temporal incoherent solitons.

    Xu, Gang; Garnier, Josselin; Picozzi, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    We study the interaction of temporal incoherent solitons sustained by a highly noninstantaneous (Raman-like) nonlinear response. The incoherent solitons exhibit a nonmutual interaction, which can be either attractive or repulsive depending on their relative initial distance. The analysis reveals that incoherent solitons exhibit a long-range interaction in frequency space, which is in contrast with the expected spectral short-range interaction described by the usual approach based on the Raman-like spectral gain curve. Both phenomena of anomalous interaction and spectral long-range behavior of incoherent solitons are described in detail by a long-range Vlasov equation.

  8. A spectral algorithm for the seriation problem

    Atkins, J.E. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Boman, E.G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Hendrickson, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Given a set of objects and a correlation function f reflecting the desire for two items to be near each other, find all sequences {pi} of the items so that correlation preferences are preserved; that is if {pi}(i) < {pi}(j) < {pi}(k) then f(i,j) {ge} f(i,k) and f(j,k) {ge} f(i,k). This seriation problem has numerous applications, for instance, solving it yields a solution to the consecutive ones problem. We present a spectral algorithm for this problem that has a number of interesting features. Whereas most previous applications of spectral techniques provided bounds or heuristics, our result is an algorithm for a nontrivial combinatorial problem. Our analysis introduces powerful tools from matrix theory to the theoretical computer science community. Also, spectral methods are being applied as heuristics for a variety of sequencing problems and our result helps explain and justify these applications. Although the worst case running time for our approach is not competitive with that of existing methods for well posed problem instances, unlike combinatorial approaches our algorithm remains a credible heuristic for the important cases where there are errors in the data.

  9. Optimal spectral tracking - with application to speed dependent neural modulation of tibialis anterior during human treadmill walking

    Brittain, John-Stuart; Catton, Celia; Conway, Bernard A.

    2009-01-01

    ) during healthy treadmill locomotion. The approach adopts adaptive filter theory while retaining a spectral focus, thus remaining compatible with much of the current literature. Spectral tracking procedures are evaluated using both surrogate and neurophysiological time-series. Confidence intervals...

  10. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  11. Nonlinear physical systems spectral analysis, stability and bifurcations

    Kirillov, Oleg N

    2013-01-01

    Bringing together 18 chapters written by leading experts in dynamical systems, operator theory, partial differential equations, and solid and fluid mechanics, this book presents state-of-the-art approaches to a wide spectrum of new and challenging stability problems.Nonlinear Physical Systems: Spectral Analysis, Stability and Bifurcations focuses on problems of spectral analysis, stability and bifurcations arising in the nonlinear partial differential equations of modern physics. Bifurcations and stability of solitary waves, geometrical optics stability analysis in hydro- and magnetohydrodynam

  12. Large scale 2D spectral compressed sensing in continuous domain

    Cai, Jian-Feng

    2017-06-20

    We consider the problem of spectral compressed sensing in continuous domain, which aims to recover a 2-dimensional spectrally sparse signal from partially observed time samples. The signal is assumed to be a superposition of s complex sinusoids. We propose a semidefinite program for the 2D signal recovery problem. Our model is able to handle large scale 2D signals of size 500 × 500, whereas traditional approaches only handle signals of size around 20 × 20.

  13. Large scale 2D spectral compressed sensing in continuous domain

    Cai, Jian-Feng; Xu, Weiyu; Yang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    We consider the problem of spectral compressed sensing in continuous domain, which aims to recover a 2-dimensional spectrally sparse signal from partially observed time samples. The signal is assumed to be a superposition of s complex sinusoids. We propose a semidefinite program for the 2D signal recovery problem. Our model is able to handle large scale 2D signals of size 500 × 500, whereas traditional approaches only handle signals of size around 20 × 20.

  14. Spectral factorization using the delta operator

    Rostgaard, Morten; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Ravn, Ole

    1994-01-01

    In recent years many papers have been published abouth the gamma-operator, mostly caused by the better numerical properties and the rapprochement between continuous and discrete time. A major problem within the LQG-design of a delta-based input-output relation has been how to spectral-factorize...... solution to the spectral factorization problem. The key idea is to use the gamma-operator resembled by its behavior to the differential operator....... in an efficient way. The discrete-time method of Kuccera will not be applied since numerical word-length characteristics will be poor for fast sampling rates. In this paper a new approach is considered. A new gamma-operator (Tustin operator) is introduced, in order to make an iterative and numerical stable...

  15. Functional analysis, spectral theory, and applications

    Einsiedler, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides a careful treatment of functional analysis and some of its applications in analysis, number theory, and ergodic theory. In addition to discussing core material in functional analysis, the authors cover more recent and advanced topics, including Weyl’s law for eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator, amenability and property (T), the measurable functional calculus, spectral theory for unbounded operators, and an account of Tao’s approach to the prime number theorem using Banach algebras. The book further contains numerous examples and exercises, making it suitable for both lecture courses and self-study. Functional Analysis, Spectral Theory, and Applications is aimed at postgraduate and advanced undergraduate students with some background in analysis and algebra, but will also appeal to everyone with an interest in seeing how functional analysis can be applied to other parts of mathematics.

  16. Spectral affinity in protein networks.

    Voevodski, Konstantin; Teng, Shang-Hua; Xia, Yu

    2009-11-29

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks enable us to better understand the functional organization of the proteome. We can learn a lot about a particular protein by querying its neighborhood in a PPI network to find proteins with similar function. A spectral approach that considers random walks between nodes of interest is particularly useful in evaluating closeness in PPI networks. Spectral measures of closeness are more robust to noise in the data and are more precise than simpler methods based on edge density and shortest path length. We develop a novel affinity measure for pairs of proteins in PPI networks, which uses personalized PageRank, a random walk based method used in context-sensitive search on the Web. Our measure of closeness, which we call PageRank Affinity, is proportional to the number of times the smaller-degree protein is visited in a random walk that restarts at the larger-degree protein. PageRank considers paths of all lengths in a network, therefore PageRank Affinity is a precise measure that is robust to noise in the data. PageRank Affinity is also provably related to cluster co-membership, making it a meaningful measure. In our experiments on protein networks we find that our measure is better at predicting co-complex membership and finding functionally related proteins than other commonly used measures of closeness. Moreover, our experiments indicate that PageRank Affinity is very resilient to noise in the network. In addition, based on our method we build a tool that quickly finds nodes closest to a queried protein in any protein network, and easily scales to much larger biological networks. We define a meaningful way to assess the closeness of two proteins in a PPI network, and show that our closeness measure is more biologically significant than other commonly used methods. We also develop a tool, accessible at http://xialab.bu.edu/resources/pnns, that allows the user to quickly find nodes closest to a queried vertex in any protein

  17. Spectral affinity in protein networks

    Teng Shang-Hua

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI networks enable us to better understand the functional organization of the proteome. We can learn a lot about a particular protein by querying its neighborhood in a PPI network to find proteins with similar function. A spectral approach that considers random walks between nodes of interest is particularly useful in evaluating closeness in PPI networks. Spectral measures of closeness are more robust to noise in the data and are more precise than simpler methods based on edge density and shortest path length. Results We develop a novel affinity measure for pairs of proteins in PPI networks, which uses personalized PageRank, a random walk based method used in context-sensitive search on the Web. Our measure of closeness, which we call PageRank Affinity, is proportional to the number of times the smaller-degree protein is visited in a random walk that restarts at the larger-degree protein. PageRank considers paths of all lengths in a network, therefore PageRank Affinity is a precise measure that is robust to noise in the data. PageRank Affinity is also provably related to cluster co-membership, making it a meaningful measure. In our experiments on protein networks we find that our measure is better at predicting co-complex membership and finding functionally related proteins than other commonly used measures of closeness. Moreover, our experiments indicate that PageRank Affinity is very resilient to noise in the network. In addition, based on our method we build a tool that quickly finds nodes closest to a queried protein in any protein network, and easily scales to much larger biological networks. Conclusion We define a meaningful way to assess the closeness of two proteins in a PPI network, and show that our closeness measure is more biologically significant than other commonly used methods. We also develop a tool, accessible at http://xialab.bu.edu/resources/pnns, that allows the user to

  18. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data

    Huang, Norden E.; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C. C.; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H.; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R.; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-01-01

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert–Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through c...

  19. Referee Networks and Their Spectral Properties

    Slanina, F.; Zhang, Y.-Ch.

    2005-09-01

    The bipartite graph connecting products and reviewers of that product is studied empirically in the case of amazon.com. We find that the network has power-law degree distribution on the side of reviewers, while on the side of products the distribution is better fitted by stretched exponential. The spectrum of normalised adjacency matrix shows power-law tail in the density of states. Establishing the community structures by finding localised eigenstates is not straightforward as the localised and delocalised states are mixed throughout the whole support of the spectrum.

  20. Spectral Fuzzing: Evaluation & Feedback

    Abdelnur , Humberto; State , Radu; Jorge Lucangeli , Obes; Festor , Olivier

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an instrumentation framework for assessing and improving fuzzing, a powerful technique to rapidly detect software vulnerabilities. We address the major current limitation of fuzzing techniques, namely the absence of evaluation metrics and the absence of automated quality assessment techniques for fuzzing approaches. We treat the fuzzing process as a signal and show how derived measures like power and entropy can give an insightful perspective on a fuzzing process. We demon...

  1. Spectral characterization of natural backgrounds

    Winkelmann, Max

    2017-10-01

    As the distribution and use of hyperspectral sensors is constantly increasing, the exploitation of spectral features is a threat for camouflaged objects. To improve camouflage materials at first the spectral behavior of backgrounds has to be known to adjust and optimize the spectral reflectance of camouflage materials. In an international effort, the NATO CSO working group SCI-295 "Development of Methods for Measurements and Evaluation of Natural Background EO Signatures" is developing a method how this characterization of backgrounds has to be done. It is obvious that the spectral characterization of a background will be quite an effort. To compare and exchange data internationally the measurements will have to be done in a similar way. To test and further improve this method an international field trial has been performed in Storkow, Germany. In the following we present first impressions and lessons learned from this field campaign and describe the data that has been measured.

  2. Adiabatic theorem and spectral concentration

    Nenciu, G.

    1981-01-01

    The spectral concentration of arbitrary order, for the Stark effect is proved to exist for a large class of Hamiltonians appearing in nonrelativistic and relativistic quantum mechanics. The results are consequences of an abstract theorem about the spectral concentration for self-ad oint operators. A general form of the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics, generalizing an earlier result of the author as well as some results of Lenard, is also proved [ru

  3. EXOPLANETARY DETECTION BY MULTIFRACTAL SPECTRAL ANALYSIS

    Agarwal, Sahil; Wettlaufer, John S. [Program in Applied Mathematics, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Sordo, Fabio Del [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Owing to technological advances, the number of exoplanets discovered has risen dramatically in the last few years. However, when trying to observe Earth analogs, it is often difficult to test the veracity of detection. We have developed a new approach to the analysis of exoplanetary spectral observations based on temporal multifractality, which identifies timescales that characterize planetary orbital motion around the host star and those that arise from stellar features such as spots. Without fitting stellar models to spectral data, we show how the planetary signal can be robustly detected from noisy data using noise amplitude as a source of information. For observation of transiting planets, combining this method with simple geometry allows us to relate the timescales obtained to primary and secondary eclipse of the exoplanets. Making use of data obtained with ground-based and space-based observations we have tested our approach on HD 189733b. Moreover, we have investigated the use of this technique in measuring planetary orbital motion via Doppler shift detection. Finally, we have analyzed synthetic spectra obtained using the SOAP 2.0 tool, which simulates a stellar spectrum and the influence of the presence of a planet or a spot on that spectrum over one orbital period. We have demonstrated that, so long as the signal-to-noise-ratio ≥ 75, our approach reconstructs the planetary orbital period, as well as the rotation period of a spot on the stellar surface.

  4. Spectral tunneling of lattice nonlocal solitons

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Torner, Lluis; Vysloukh, Victor A.

    2010-01-01

    We address spectral tunneling of walking spatial solitons in photorefractive media with nonlocal diffusion component of the nonlinear response and an imprinted shallow optical lattice. In contrast to materials with local nonlinearities, where solitons traveling across the lattice close to the Bragg angle suffer large radiative losses, in photorefractive media with diffusion nonlinearity resulting in self-bending, solitons survive when their propagation angle approaches and even exceeds the Bragg angle. In the spatial frequency domain this effect can be considered as tunneling through the band of spatial frequencies centered around the Bragg frequency where the spatial group velocity dispersion is positive.

  5. Characterizing CDOM Spectral Variability Across Diverse Regions and Spectral Ranges

    Grunert, Brice K.; Mouw, Colleen B.; Ciochetto, Audrey B.

    2018-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) has focused on CDOM absorption (aCDOM) at a reference wavelength, as its magnitude provides insight into the underwater light field and large-scale biogeochemical processes. CDOM spectral slope, SCDOM, has been treated as a constant or semiconstant parameter in satellite retrievals of aCDOM despite significant regional and temporal variabilities. SCDOM and other optical metrics provide insights into CDOM composition, processing, food web dynamics, and carbon cycling. To date, much of this work relies on fluorescence techniques or aCDOM in spectral ranges unavailable to current and planned satellite sensors (e.g., global variability in SCDOM and fit deviations in the aCDOM spectra using the recently proposed Gaussian decomposition method. From this, we investigate if global variability in retrieved SCDOM and Gaussian components is significant and regionally distinct. We iteratively decreased the spectral range considered and analyzed the number, location, and magnitude of fitted Gaussian components to understand if a reduced spectral range impacts information obtained within a common spectral window. We compared the fitted slope from the Gaussian decomposition method to absorption-based indices that indicate CDOM composition to determine the ability of satellite-derived slope to inform the analysis and modeling of large-scale biogeochemical processes. Finally, we present implications of the observed variability for remote sensing of CDOM characteristics via SCDOM.

  6. Interpretation of archaeological small-scale features in spectral images

    Grøn, Ole; Palmer, Susanna; Stylegar, Frans-Arne

    2011-01-01

    The paper's focus is the use of spectral images for the distinction of small archaeological anomalies on the basis of the authors work. Special attention is given to the ground-truthing perspective in the discussion of a number of cases from Norway. Different approaches to pattern-recognition are......The paper's focus is the use of spectral images for the distinction of small archaeological anomalies on the basis of the authors work. Special attention is given to the ground-truthing perspective in the discussion of a number of cases from Norway. Different approaches to pattern...

  7. The yeast Ty3 retrotransposon contains a 5'-3' bipartite primer-binding site and encodes nucleocapsid protein NCp9 functionally homologous to HIV-1 NCp7.

    Gabus, C; Ficheux, D; Rau, M; Keith, G; Sandmeyer, S; Darlix, J L

    1998-08-17

    Retroviruses, including HIV-1 and the distantly related yeast retroelement Ty3, all encode a nucleoprotein required for virion structure and replication. During an in vitro comparison of HIV-1 and Ty3 nucleoprotein function in RNA dimerization and cDNA synthesis, we discovered a bipartite primer-binding site (PBS) for Ty3 composed of sequences located at opposite ends of the genome. Ty3 cDNA synthesis requires the 3' PBS for primer tRNAiMet annealing to the genomic RNA, and the 5' PBS, in cis or in trans, as the reverse transcription start site. Ty3 RNA alone is unable to dimerize, but formation of dimeric tRNAiMet bound to the PBS was found to direct dimerization of Ty3 RNA-tRNAiMet. Interestingly, HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7 and Ty3 NCp9 were interchangeable using HIV-1 and Ty3 RNA template-primer systems. Our findings impact on the understanding of non-canonical reverse transcription as well as on the use of Ty3 systems to screen for anti-NCp7 drugs.

  8. Onboard spectral imager data processor

    Otten, Leonard J.; Meigs, Andrew D.; Franklin, Abraham J.; Sears, Robert D.; Robison, Mark W.; Rafert, J. Bruce; Fronterhouse, Donald C.; Grotbeck, Ronald L.

    1999-10-01

    Previous papers have described the concept behind the MightySat II.1 program, the satellite's Fourier Transform imaging spectrometer's optical design, the design for the spectral imaging payload, and its initial qualification testing. This paper discusses the on board data processing designed to reduce the amount of downloaded data by an order of magnitude and provide a demonstration of a smart spaceborne spectral imaging sensor. Two custom components, a spectral imager interface 6U VME card that moves data at over 30 MByte/sec, and four TI C-40 processors mounted to a second 6U VME and daughter card, are used to adapt the sensor to the spacecraft and provide the necessary high speed processing. A system architecture that offers both on board real time image processing and high-speed post data collection analysis of the spectral data has been developed. In addition to the on board processing of the raw data into a usable spectral data volume, one feature extraction technique has been incorporated. This algorithm operates on the basic interferometric data. The algorithm is integrated within the data compression process to search for uploadable feature descriptions.

  9. Intersection numbers of spectral curves

    Eynard, B.

    2011-01-01

    We compute the symplectic invariants of an arbitrary spectral curve with only 1 branchpoint in terms of integrals of characteristic classes in the moduli space of curves. Our formula associates to any spectral curve, a characteristic class, which is determined by the laplace transform of the spectral curve. This is a hint to the key role of Laplace transform in mirror symmetry. When the spectral curve is y=\\sqrt{x}, the formula gives Kontsevich--Witten intersection numbers, when the spectral curve is chosen to be the Lambert function \\exp{x}=y\\exp{-y}, the formula gives the ELSV formula for Hurwitz numbers, and when one chooses the mirror of C^3 with framing f, i.e. \\exp{-x}=\\exp{-yf}(1-\\exp{-y}), the formula gives the Marino-Vafa formula, i.e. the generating function of Gromov-Witten invariants of C^3. In some sense this formula generalizes ELSV, Marino-Vafa formula, and Mumford formula.

  10. Spectral filtering for plant production

    Young, R.E.; McMahon, M.J.; Rajapakse, N.C.; Becoteau, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Research to date suggests that spectral filtering can be an effective alternative to chemical growth regulators for altering plant development. If properly implemented, it can be nonchemical and environmentally friendly. The aqueous CuSO{sub 4}, and CuCl{sub 2} solutions in channelled plastic panels have been shown to be effective filters, but they can be highly toxic if the solutions contact plants. Some studies suggest that spectral filtration limited to short EOD intervals can also alter plant development. Future research should be directed toward confirmation of the influence of spectral filters and exposure times on a broader range of plant species and cultivars. Efforts should also be made to identify non-noxious alternatives to aqueous copper solutions and/or to incorporate these chemicals permanently into plastic films and panels that can be used in greenhouse construction. It would also be informative to study the impacts of spectral filters on insect and microbal populations in plant growth facilities. The economic impacts of spectral filtering techniques should be assessed for each delivery methodology.

  11. Spectral Imaging of Portolan Charts

    France, Fenella G.; Wilson, Meghan A.; Ghez, Anita

    2018-05-01

    Spectral imaging of Portolan Charts, early nautical charts, provided extensive new information about their construction and creation. The origins of the portolan chart style have been a continual source of perplexity to numerous generations of cartographic historians. The spectral imaging system utilized incorporates a 50 megapixel mono-chrome camera with light emitting diode (LED) illumination panels that cover the range from 365 nm to 1050 nm to capture visible and non-visible information. There is little known about how portolan charts evolved, and what influenced their creation. These early nautical charts began as working navigational tools of medieval mariners, initially made in the 1300s in Italy, Portugal and Spain; however the origin and development of the portolan chart remained shrouded in mystery. Questions about these early navigational charts included whether colorants were commensurate with the time period and geographical location, and if different, did that give insight into trade routes, or possible later additions to the charts? For example; spectral data showed the red pigment on both the 1320 portolan chart and the 1565 Galapagos Islands matched vermillion, an opaque red pigment used since antiquity. The construction of these charts was also of great interest. Spectral imaging with a range of illumination modes revealed the presence of a "hidden circle" often referred to in relation to their construction. This paper will present in-depth analysis of how spectral imaging of the Portolans revealed similarities and differences, new hidden information and shed new light on construction and composition.

  12. Robust power spectral estimation for EEG data.

    Melman, Tamar; Victor, Jonathan D

    2016-08-01

    Typical electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings often contain substantial artifact. These artifacts, often large and intermittent, can interfere with quantification of the EEG via its power spectrum. To reduce the impact of artifact, EEG records are typically cleaned by a preprocessing stage that removes individual segments or components of the recording. However, such preprocessing can introduce bias, discard available signal, and be labor-intensive. With this motivation, we present a method that uses robust statistics to reduce dependence on preprocessing by minimizing the effect of large intermittent outliers on the spectral estimates. Using the multitaper method (Thomson, 1982) as a starting point, we replaced the final step of the standard power spectrum calculation with a quantile-based estimator, and the Jackknife approach to confidence intervals with a Bayesian approach. The method is implemented in provided MATLAB modules, which extend the widely used Chronux toolbox. Using both simulated and human data, we show that in the presence of large intermittent outliers, the robust method produces improved estimates of the power spectrum, and that the Bayesian confidence intervals yield close-to-veridical coverage factors. The robust method, as compared to the standard method, is less affected by artifact: inclusion of outliers produces fewer changes in the shape of the power spectrum as well as in the coverage factor. In the presence of large intermittent outliers, the robust method can reduce dependence on data preprocessing as compared to standard methods of spectral estimation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gamma-ray spectral map of standard pottery. Pt. 1

    Yellin, J.

    1984-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum of a neutron activated Standard Pottery is analyzed completely by means of spectral line shape fitting. A detailed spectral map of the standard is presented as it is typically used in pottery analysis. The spectrum obtained by a planar geometry Ge(Li) detector converts the energy range 11 to 409 keV. The map is intended to serve as a guide to the uninitiated user of Standard Pottery as well as a basis of comparison with other standards employed in pottery provenience work. It is shown that the process of calibrating detectors for spectral line interference can be greatly aided by means of a general approach to spectrum analysis and that much usefull information can be obtained by a general approach to pottery spectrum analysis. (orig.)

  14. Examination of Spectral Transformations on Spectral Mixture Analysis

    Deng, Y.; Wu, C.

    2018-04-01

    While many spectral transformation techniques have been applied on spectral mixture analysis (SMA), few study examined their necessity and applicability. This paper focused on exploring the difference between spectrally transformed schemes and untransformed scheme to find out which transformed scheme performed better in SMA. In particular, nine spectrally transformed schemes as well as untransformed scheme were examined in two study areas. Each transformed scheme was tested 100 times using different endmember classes' spectra under the endmember model of vegetation- high albedo impervious surface area-low albedo impervious surface area-soil (V-ISAh-ISAl-S). Performance of each scheme was assessed based on mean absolute error (MAE). Statistical analysis technique, Paired-Samples T test, was applied to test the significance of mean MAEs' difference between transformed and untransformed schemes. Results demonstrated that only NSMA could exceed the untransformed scheme in all study areas. Some transformed schemes showed unstable performance since they outperformed the untransformed scheme in one area but weakened the SMA result in another region.

  15. Berlin Reflectance Spectral Library (BRSL)

    Henckel, D.; Arnold, G.; Kappel, D.; Moroz, L. V.; Markus, K.

    2017-09-01

    The Berlin Reflectance Spectral Library (BRSL) provides a collection of reflectance spectra between 0.3 and 17 µm. It was originally dedicated to support space missions to small solar system bodies. Meanwhile the library includes selections of biconical reflectance spectra for spectral data analysis of other planetary bodies as well. The library provides reference spectra of well-characterized terrestrial analogue materials and meteorites for interpretation of remote sensing reflectance spectra of planetary surfaces. We introduce the BRSL, summarize the data available, and access to use them for further relevant applications.

  16. Spectral ellipsometry of nanodiamond composite

    Yastrebov, S.G.; Ivanov-Omskij, V.I.; Gordeev, S.K.; Garriga, M.; Alonso, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    Methods of spectral ellipsometry were applied for analysis of optical properties of nanodiamond based composite in spectral region 1.4-5 eV. The nanocomposite was synthesized by molding of ultradispersed nanodiamond powder in the course of heterogeneous chemical reaction of decomposition of methane, forming pyrocarbon interconnecting nanodiamond grains. The energy of σ + π plasmon of pyrocarbon component of nanodiamond composite was restored which proves to be ∼ 24 eV; using this value, an estimation was done of pyrocarbon matrix density, which occurs to be 2 g/cm 3 [ru

  17. Towards spectral geometric methods for Euclidean quantum gravity

    Panine, Mikhail; Kempf, Achim

    2016-04-01

    The unification of general relativity with quantum theory will also require a coming together of the two quite different mathematical languages of general relativity and quantum theory, i.e., of differential geometry and functional analysis, respectively. Of particular interest in this regard is the field of spectral geometry, which studies to which extent the shape of a Riemannian manifold is describable in terms of the spectra of differential operators defined on the manifold. Spectral geometry is hard because it is highly nonlinear, but linearized spectral geometry, i.e., the task to determine small shape changes from small spectral changes, is much more tractable and may be iterated to approximate the full problem. Here, we generalize this approach, allowing, in particular, nonequal finite numbers of shape and spectral degrees of freedom. This allows us to study how well the shape degrees of freedom are encoded in the eigenvalues. We apply this strategy numerically to a class of planar domains and find that the reconstruction of small shape changes from small spectral changes is possible if enough eigenvalues are used. While isospectral nonisometric shapes are known to exist, we find evidence that generically shaped isospectral nonisometric shapes, if existing, are exceedingly rare.

  18. Biologically-inspired data decorrelation for hyper-spectral imaging

    Ghita Ovidiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hyper-spectral data allows the construction of more robust statistical models to sample the material properties than the standard tri-chromatic color representation. However, because of the large dimensionality and complexity of the hyper-spectral data, the extraction of robust features (image descriptors is not a trivial issue. Thus, to facilitate efficient feature extraction, decorrelation techniques are commonly applied to reduce the dimensionality of the hyper-spectral data with the aim of generating compact and highly discriminative image descriptors. Current methodologies for data decorrelation such as principal component analysis (PCA, linear discriminant analysis (LDA, wavelet decomposition (WD, or band selection methods require complex and subjective training procedures and in addition the compressed spectral information is not directly related to the physical (spectral characteristics associated with the analyzed materials. The major objective of this article is to introduce and evaluate a new data decorrelation methodology using an approach that closely emulates the human vision. The proposed data decorrelation scheme has been employed to optimally minimize the amount of redundant information contained in the highly correlated hyper-spectral bands and has been comprehensively evaluated in the context of non-ferrous material classification

  19. Semiconductor Laser Multi-Spectral Sensing and Imaging

    Han Q. Le

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-spectral laser imaging is a technique that can offer a combination of the laser capability of accurate spectral sensing with the desirable features of passive multispectral imaging. The technique can be used for detection, discrimination, and identification of objects by their spectral signature. This article describes and reviews the development and evaluation of semiconductor multi-spectral laser imaging systems. Although the method is certainly not specific to any laser technology, the use of semiconductor lasers is significant with respect to practicality and affordability. More relevantly, semiconductor lasers have their own characteristics; they offer excellent wavelength diversity but usually with modest power. Thus, system design and engineering issues are analyzed for approaches and trade-offs that can make the best use of semiconductor laser capabilities in multispectral imaging. A few systems were developed and the technique was tested and evaluated on a variety of natural and man-made objects. It was shown capable of high spectral resolution imaging which, unlike non-imaging point sensing, allows detecting and discriminating objects of interest even without a priori spectroscopic knowledge of the targets. Examples include material and chemical discrimination. It was also shown capable of dealing with the complexity of interpreting diffuse scattered spectral images and produced results that could otherwise be ambiguous with conventional imaging. Examples with glucose and spectral imaging of drug pills were discussed. Lastly, the technique was shown with conventional laser spectroscopy such as wavelength modulation spectroscopy to image a gas (CO. These results suggest the versatility and power of multi-spectral laser imaging, which can be practical with the use of semiconductor lasers.

  20. Semiconductor laser multi-spectral sensing and imaging.

    Le, Han Q; Wang, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Multi-spectral laser imaging is a technique that can offer a combination of the laser capability of accurate spectral sensing with the desirable features of passive multispectral imaging. The technique can be used for detection, discrimination, and identification of objects by their spectral signature. This article describes and reviews the development and evaluation of semiconductor multi-spectral laser imaging systems. Although the method is certainly not specific to any laser technology, the use of semiconductor lasers is significant with respect to practicality and affordability. More relevantly, semiconductor lasers have their own characteristics; they offer excellent wavelength diversity but usually with modest power. Thus, system design and engineering issues are analyzed for approaches and trade-offs that can make the best use of semiconductor laser capabilities in multispectral imaging. A few systems were developed and the technique was tested and evaluated on a variety of natural and man-made objects. It was shown capable of high spectral resolution imaging which, unlike non-imaging point sensing, allows detecting and discriminating objects of interest even without a priori spectroscopic knowledge of the targets. Examples include material and chemical discrimination. It was also shown capable of dealing with the complexity of interpreting diffuse scattered spectral images and produced results that could otherwise be ambiguous with conventional imaging. Examples with glucose and spectral imaging of drug pills were discussed. Lastly, the technique was shown with conventional laser spectroscopy such as wavelength modulation spectroscopy to image a gas (CO). These results suggest the versatility and power of multi-spectral laser imaging, which can be practical with the use of semiconductor lasers.

  1. Acquisition and visualization techniques for narrow spectral color imaging.

    Neumann, László; García, Rafael; Basa, János; Hegedüs, Ramón

    2013-06-01

    This paper introduces a new approach in narrow-band imaging (NBI). Existing NBI techniques generate images by selecting discrete bands over the full visible spectrum or an even wider spectral range. In contrast, here we perform the sampling with filters covering a tight spectral window. This image acquisition method, named narrow spectral imaging, can be particularly useful when optical information is only available within a narrow spectral window, such as in the case of deep-water transmittance, which constitutes the principal motivation of this work. In this study we demonstrate the potential of the proposed photographic technique on nonunderwater scenes recorded under controlled conditions. To this end three multilayer narrow bandpass filters were employed, which transmit at 440, 456, and 470 nm bluish wavelengths, respectively. Since the differences among the images captured in such a narrow spectral window can be extremely small, both image acquisition and visualization require a novel approach. First, high-bit-depth images were acquired with multilayer narrow-band filters either placed in front of the illumination or mounted on the camera lens. Second, a color-mapping method is proposed, using which the input data can be transformed onto the entire display color gamut with a continuous and perceptually nearly uniform mapping, while ensuring optimally high information content for human perception.

  2. Spectral properties of doped bilayer cuprates at finite temperatures

    teresting results. For the overdoped samples, these results show a splitting of electronic states near ... self-consistent perturbation approach is used to calculate the electronic spectral function for differ- ent values of hole .... Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Government of India, for financial support via ...

  3. Spanish Literature and Spectrality : Notes on a Haunted Canon

    Valdivia, Pablo

    In Spanish Literature, Crisis and Spectrality: Notes on a Haunted Canon, Prof. Dr. Pablo Valdivia analyses the contradictions and complexities of the Spanish traditional canon from a transnational approach. Valdivia explores this particular canon as a 'haunted house' by focusing on the specific

  4. Observed spectral features of dust

    Willner, S.P.

    1984-01-01

    The author concentrates on the observed properties of dust spectral features. Identifications, based on laboratory data, are given whenever plausible ones exist. There are a very large number of papers in the literature of even such a young field as infrared spectroscopy, and therefore the author refers only to the most recent paper on a topic or to another review. (Auth.)

  5. Rayleigh imaging in spectral mammography

    Berggren, Karl; Danielsson, Mats; Fredenberg, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Spectral imaging is the acquisition of multiple images of an object at different energy spectra. In mammography, dual-energy imaging (spectral imaging with two energy levels) has been investigated for several applications, in particular material decomposition, which allows for quantitative analysis of breast composition and quantitative contrast-enhanced imaging. Material decomposition with dual-energy imaging is based on the assumption that there are two dominant photon interaction effects that determine linear attenuation: the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering. This assumption limits the number of basis materials, i.e. the number of materials that are possible to differentiate between, to two. However, Rayleigh scattering may account for more than 10% of the linear attenuation in the mammography energy range. In this work, we show that a modified version of a scanning multi-slit spectral photon-counting mammography system is able to acquire three images at different spectra and can be used for triple-energy imaging. We further show that triple-energy imaging in combination with the efficient scatter rejection of the system enables measurement of Rayleigh scattering, which adds an additional energy dependency to the linear attenuation and enables material decomposition with three basis materials. Three available basis materials have the potential to improve virtually all applications of spectral imaging.

  6. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next, the frequency ...

  7. Spectral ansatz in quantum electrodynamics

    Atkinson, D.; Slim, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    An ansatz of Delbourgo and Salam for the spectral representation of the vertex function in quantum electrodynamics. The Ward-Takahashi identity is respected, and the electron propagator does not have a ghost. The infra-red and ultraviolet behaviours of the electron propagator in this theory are considered, and a rigorous existence theorem for the propagator in the Yennie gauge is presented

  8. Spectral Diagonal Ensemble Kalman Filters

    Kasanický, Ivan; Mandel, Jan; Vejmelka, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 4 (2015), s. 485-497 ISSN 1023-5809 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Grant - others:NSF(US) DMS-1216481 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : data assimilation * ensemble Kalman filter * spectral representation Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.321, year: 2015

  9. Biomarkers and Biological Spectral Imaging

    2001-01-23

    G. Sowa, H. H. Mantsch, National Research Council Canada; S. L. Zhang, Unilever Research (USA) 85 Brain tissue charcterization using spectral imaging...image registration and of the expert staff of Hill Top Research in Winnipeg for hosting the hydration study. Financial assistance from Unilever Research

  10. COHERENT DETECTION FOR SPECTRAL AMPLITUDE-CODED OPTICAL LABEL SWITCHING SYSTEMS

    Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2010-01-01

    Coherent detection for spectrally encoded optical labels is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for three label tones spectrally spaced at 1 GHz. The proposed method utilizes a frequency swept local oscillator in a coherent receiver supported by digital signal processing for improved...... flexibility and upgradeability while reducing label detection subsystem complexity as compared with the conventional optical autocorrelation based approaches....

  11. Spatial and spectral effects in subcritical system pulsed experiments

    Dulla, S.; Nervo, M.; Ravetto, P.; Carta, M.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate neutronic models are needed for the interpretation of pulsed experiments in subcritical systems. In this work, the extent of spatial and spectral effects in the pulse propagation phenomena is investigated and the analysis is applied to the GUINEVERE experiment. The multigroup cross section data is generated by the Monte Carlo SERPENT code and the neutronic evolution following the source pulse is simulated by a kinetic diffusion code. The results presented show that important spatial and spectral aspects need to be properly accounted for and that a detailed energy approach may be needed to adequately capture the physical features of the system to the pulse injection. (authors)

  12. Composite spectral functions for solving Volterra's population model

    Ramezani, M.; Razzaghi, M.; Dehghan, M.

    2007-01-01

    An approximate method for solving Volterra's population model for population growth of a species in a closed system is proposed. Volterra's model is a nonlinear integro-differential equation, where the integral term represents the effect of toxin. The approach is based upon composite spectral functions approximations. The properties of composite spectral functions consisting of few terms of orthogonal functions are presented and are utilized to reduce the solution of the Volterra's model to the solution of a system of algebraic equations. The method is easy to implement and yields very accurate result

  13. Snapshot spectral and polarimetric imaging; target identification with multispectral video

    Bartlett, Brent D.; Rodriguez, Mikel D.

    2013-05-01

    As the number of pixels continue to grow in consumer and scientific imaging devices, it has become feasible to collect the incident light field. In this paper, an imaging device developed around light field imaging is used to collect multispectral and polarimetric imagery in a snapshot fashion. The sensor is described and a video data set is shown highlighting the advantage of snapshot spectral imaging. Several novel computer vision approaches are applied to the video cubes to perform scene characterization and target identification. It is shown how the addition of spectral and polarimetric data to the video stream allows for multi-target identification and tracking not possible with traditional RGB video collection.

  14. Spectral Analysis of Moderately Charged Rare-Gas Atoms

    Jorge Reyna Almandos

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a review concerning the spectral analysis of several ions of neon, argon, krypton and xenon, with impact on laser studies and astrophysics that were mainly carried out in our collaborative groups between Argentina and Brazil during many years. The spectra were recorded from the vacuum ultraviolet to infrared regions using pulsed discharges. Semi-empirical approaches with relativistic Hartree–Fock and Dirac-Fock calculations were also included in these investigations. The spectral analysis produced new classified lines and energy levels. Lifetimes and oscillator strengths were also calculated.

  15. Two-body threshold spectral analysis, the critical case

    Skibsted, Erik; Wang, Xue Ping

    We study in dimension $d\\geq2$ low-energy spectral and scattering asymptotics for two-body $d$-dimensional Schrödinger operators with a radially symmetric potential falling off like $-\\gamma r^{-2},\\;\\gamma>0$. We consider angular momentum sectors, labelled by $l=0,1,\\dots$, for which $\\gamma......>(l+d/2 -1)^2$. In each such sector the reduced Schrödinger operator has infinitely many negative eigenvalues accumulating at zero. We show that the resolvent has a non-trivial oscillatory behaviour as the spectral parameter approaches zero in cones bounded away from the negative half-axis, and we derive...

  16. Spectral coherent combination of ultrashort pulses

    Ursescu, D.; Banici, R.; Ionel, L.; Rusen, L.; Sandel, S.; Blanaru, C.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The coherent beam combination was chosen in several laser systems, including ELI, as a solution to increase the final attainable intensity. However, the coherent beam combination it is also a difficult technique while it has to combine coherently in space and in time several beams amplified in different laser chains. That means in particular that the beams should be in phase in every point of the amplified beam so the spatial beam profiling techniques have to be mastered with high accuracy for all the combined beams. Here it is proposed an alternative coherent beam combination than the use of identical ultrashort pulses. The idea is to spectrally combine laser pulses with complementary spectra. Collinear and non-collinear approaches have been modelled. Ongoing experimental development, including the demonstration of the rephasing for two spectrally complementary ultrashort pulses will be presented. Acknowledgements. The research leading to these results has received funding from the EC's Seventh Framework Programme (LASERLAB-EUROPE, grant agreement no. 228334).

  17. Spectrally resolved single-molecule electrometry

    Ruggeri, F.; Krishnan, M.

    2018-03-01

    Escape-time electrometry is a recently developed experimental technique that offers the ability to measure the effective electrical charge of a single biomolecule in solution with sub-elementary charge precision. The approach relies on measuring the average escape-time of a single charged macromolecule or molecular species transiently confined in an electrostatic fluidic trap. Comparing the experiments with the predictions of a mean-field model of molecular electrostatics, we have found that the measured effective charge even reports on molecular conformation, e.g., folded or disordered state, and non-uniform charge distribution in disordered proteins or polyelectrolytes. Here we demonstrate the ability to use the spectral dimension to distinguish minute differences in electrical charge between individual molecules or molecular species in a single simultaneous measurement, under identical experimental conditions. Using one spectral channel for referenced measurement, this kind of photophysical distinguishability essentially eliminates the need for accurate knowledge of key experimental parameters, otherwise obtained through intensive characterization of the experimental setup. As examples, we demonstrate the ability to detect small differences (˜5%) in the length of double-stranded DNA fragments as well as single amino acid exchange in an intrinsically disordered protein, prothymosin α.

  18. Function of snake mobbing in spectral tarsiers.

    Gursky, Sharon

    2006-04-01

    Numerous species are known for their tendency to approach and confront their predators as a group. This behavior is known as mobbing. Snakes seem to be one of the more consistent recipients of this type of predator-directed behavior. This paper explores individual differences (sex and age) in the mobbing behavior of the spectral tarsier toward live and model snakes. This study was conducted at Tangkoko Nature Reserve (Sulawesi, Indonesia) during 2003-2004. During this research, 11 natural mobbing events and 31 artificially induced mobbing events were observed. The mean number of individuals at a mobbing was 5.7. The duration of mobbing events was strongly correlated with the number of assembled mobbers. Adults were more likely than other age classes to participate in mobbings. Males were more likely than females to participate in mobbings. Mobbing groups often contained more than one adult male, despite the fact that no spectral tarsier group contains more than one adult male. No difference in body size between extragroup males and resident males was observed, refuting the "attract the mightier" hypothesis. The number of mobbers did not affect whether the tarsier or the snake retreated first, countering the "move-on" hypothesis. The "perception advertisement" hypothesis was tentatively supported, in that live snakes were rarely seen in the area following mobbing calls, in comparison to when tarsiers either ignored the snake or alarm call. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Spectral decomposition of nonlinear systems with memory

    Svenkeson, Adam; Glaz, Bryan; Stanton, Samuel; West, Bruce J.

    2016-02-01

    We present an alternative approach to the analysis of nonlinear systems with long-term memory that is based on the Koopman operator and a Lévy transformation in time. Memory effects are considered to be the result of interactions between a system and its surrounding environment. The analysis leads to the decomposition of a nonlinear system with memory into modes whose temporal behavior is anomalous and lacks a characteristic scale. On average, the time evolution of a mode follows a Mittag-Leffler function, and the system can be described using the fractional calculus. The general theory is demonstrated on the fractional linear harmonic oscillator and the fractional nonlinear logistic equation. When analyzing data from an ill-defined (black-box) system, the spectral decomposition in terms of Mittag-Leffler functions that we propose may uncover inherent memory effects through identification of a small set of dynamically relevant structures that would otherwise be obscured by conventional spectral methods. Consequently, the theoretical concepts we present may be useful for developing more general methods for numerical modeling that are able to determine whether observables of a dynamical system are better represented by memoryless operators, or operators with long-term memory in time, when model details are unknown.

  20. Multitaper spectral analysis of atmospheric radar signals

    V. K. Anandan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Multitaper spectral analysis using sinusoidal taper has been carried out on the backscattered signals received from the troposphere and lower stratosphere by the Gadanki Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST radar under various conditions of the signal-to-noise ratio. Comparison of study is made with sinusoidal taper of the order of three and single tapers of Hanning and rectangular tapers, to understand the relative merits of processing under the scheme. Power spectra plots show that echoes are better identified in the case of multitaper estimation, especially in the region of a weak signal-to-noise ratio. Further analysis is carried out to obtain three lower order moments from three estimation techniques. The results show that multitaper analysis gives a better signal-to-noise ratio or higher detectability. The spectral analysis through multitaper and single tapers is subjected to study of consistency in measurements. Results show that the multitaper estimate is better consistent in Doppler measurements compared to single taper estimates. Doppler width measurements with different approaches were studied and the results show that the estimation was better in the multitaper technique in terms of temporal resolution and estimation accuracy.

  1. Spectral identification of plant communities for mapping of semi-natural grasslands

    Jacobsen, Anne; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Ejrnæs, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    identification of plant communities was based on a hierarchical approach relating the test sites to i) management (Ma) and ii) flora (Fl) using spectral consistency and separability as the main criteria. Evaluation of spectral consistency was based on unsupervised clustering of test sites of Ma classes 1 to 7...... as a measure of plant community heterogeneity within management classes. The spectral analysis as well as the maximum likelihood classification indicated that the source of spectral variation within management classes might be related to vegetation composition....

  2. Spectral synchronicity in brain signals

    de Jesus Euan Campos, Carolina; Ombao, Hernando; Ortega, Joaquí n

    2018-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of identifying brain regions with similar oscillatory patterns detected from electroencephalograms. We introduce the hierarchical spectral merger (HSM) clustering method where the feature of interest is the spectral curve and the similarity metric used is the total variance distance. The HSM method is compared with clustering using features derived from independent-component analysis. Moreover, the HSM method is applied to 2 different electroencephalogram datasets. The first was recorded at resting state where the participant was not engaged in any cognitive task; the second was recorded during a spontaneous epileptic seizure. The results of the analyses using the HSM method demonstrate that clustering could evolve over the duration of the resting state and during epileptic seizure.

  3. Spectral synchronicity in brain signals

    de Jesus Euan Campos, Carolina

    2018-05-04

    This paper addresses the problem of identifying brain regions with similar oscillatory patterns detected from electroencephalograms. We introduce the hierarchical spectral merger (HSM) clustering method where the feature of interest is the spectral curve and the similarity metric used is the total variance distance. The HSM method is compared with clustering using features derived from independent-component analysis. Moreover, the HSM method is applied to 2 different electroencephalogram datasets. The first was recorded at resting state where the participant was not engaged in any cognitive task; the second was recorded during a spontaneous epileptic seizure. The results of the analyses using the HSM method demonstrate that clustering could evolve over the duration of the resting state and during epileptic seizure.

  4. Spectral computations for bounded operators

    Ahues, Mario; Limaye, Balmohan

    2001-01-01

    Exact eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and principal vectors of operators with infinite dimensional ranges can rarely be found. Therefore, one must approximate such operators by finite rank operators, then solve the original eigenvalue problem approximately. Serving as both an outstanding text for graduate students and as a source of current results for research scientists, Spectral Computations for Bounded Operators addresses the issue of solving eigenvalue problems for operators on infinite dimensional spaces. From a review of classical spectral theory through concrete approximation techniques to finite dimensional situations that can be implemented on a computer, this volume illustrates the marriage of pure and applied mathematics. It contains a variety of recent developments, including a new type of approximation that encompasses a variety of approximation methods but is simple to verify in practice. It also suggests a new stopping criterion for the QR Method and outlines advances in both the iterative refineme...

  5. Development of spectral analysis math models and software program and spectral analyzer, digital converter interface equipment design

    Hayden, W. L.; Robinson, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    Spectral analyses of angle-modulated communication systems is studied by: (1) performing a literature survey of candidate power spectrum computational techniques, determining the computational requirements, and formulating a mathematical model satisfying these requirements; (2) implementing the model on UNIVAC 1230 digital computer as the Spectral Analysis Program (SAP); and (3) developing the hardware specifications for a data acquisition system which will acquire an input modulating signal for SAP. The SAP computational technique uses extended fast Fourier transform and represents a generalized approach for simple and complex modulating signals.

  6. Modal planes are spectral triples

    Gayral, Victor; Iochum, Bruno; Schuecker, Thomas; Gracia-Bondia, Jose M.; Varilly, Joseph C.

    2003-09-01

    Axioms for nonunital spectral triples, extending those introduced in the unital case by Connes, are proposed. As a guide, and for the sake of their importance in noncommutative quantum field theory, the spaces R 2N endowed with Moyal products are intensively investigated. Some physical applications, such as the construction of noncommutative Wick monomials and the computation of the Connes-Lott functional action, are given for these noncommutative hyperplanes. (author)

  7. Chebyshev and Fourier spectral methods

    Boyd, John P

    2001-01-01

    Completely revised text focuses on use of spectral methods to solve boundary value, eigenvalue, and time-dependent problems, but also covers Hermite, Laguerre, rational Chebyshev, sinc, and spherical harmonic functions, as well as cardinal functions, linear eigenvalue problems, matrix-solving methods, coordinate transformations, methods for unbounded intervals, spherical and cylindrical geometry, and much more. 7 Appendices. Glossary. Bibliography. Index. Over 160 text figures.

  8. Spectral mapping of thermal conductivity through nanoscale ballistic transport

    Hu, Yongjie; Zeng, Lingping; Minnich, Austin J.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Chen, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Controlling thermal properties is central to many applications, such as thermoelectric energy conversion and the thermal management of integrated circuits. Progress has been made over the past decade by structuring materials at different length scales, but a clear relationship between structure size and thermal properties remains to be established. The main challenge comes from the unknown intrinsic spectral distribution of energy among heat carriers. Here, we experimentally measure this spectral distribution by probing quasi-ballistic transport near nanostructured heaters down to 30 nm using ultrafast optical spectroscopy. Our approach allows us to quantify up to 95% of the total spectral contribution to thermal conductivity from all phonon modes. The measurement agrees well with multiscale and first-principles-based simulations. We further demonstrate the direct construction of mean free path distributions. Our results provide a new fundamental understanding of thermal transport and will enable materials design in a rational way to achieve high performance.

  9. Spectral analysis of the turbulent mixing of two fluids

    Steinkamp, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    The authors describe a spectral approach to the investigation of fluid instability, generalized turbulence, and the interpenetration of fluids across an interface. The technique also applies to a single fluid with large variations in density. Departures of fluctuating velocity components from the local mean are far subsonic, but the mean Mach number can be large. Validity of the description is demonstrated by comparisons with experiments on turbulent mixing due to the late stages of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, when the dynamics become approximately self-similar in response to a constant body force. Generic forms for anisotropic spectral structure are described and used as a basis for deriving spectrally integrated moment equations that can be incorporated into computer codes for scientific and engineering analyses.

  10. Spectral theory of infinite-area hyperbolic surfaces

    Borthwick, David

    2016-01-01

    This text introduces geometric spectral theory in the context of infinite-area Riemann surfaces, providing a comprehensive account of the most recent developments in the field. For the second edition the context has been extended to general surfaces with hyperbolic ends, which provides a natural setting for development of the spectral theory while still keeping technical difficulties to a minimum. All of the material from the first edition is included and updated, and new sections have been added. Topics covered include an introduction to the geometry of hyperbolic surfaces, analysis of the resolvent of the Laplacian, scattering theory, resonances and scattering poles, the Selberg zeta function, the Poisson formula, distribution of resonances, the inverse scattering problem, Patterson-Sullivan theory, and the dynamical approach to the zeta function. The new sections cover the latest developments in the field, including the spectral gap, resonance asymptotics near the critical line, and sharp geometric constan...

  11. Archiving Spectral Libraries in the Planetary Data System

    Slavney, S.; Guinness, E. A.; Scholes, D.; Zastrow, A.

    2017-12-01

    Spectral libraries are becoming popular candidates for archiving in PDS. With the increase in the number of individual investigators funded by programs such as NASA's PDART, the PDS Geosciences Node is receiving many requests for support from proposers wishing to archive various forms of laboratory spectra. To accommodate the need for a standardized approach to archiving spectra, the Geosciences Node has designed the PDS Spectral Library Data Dictionary, which contains PDS4 classes and attributes specifically for labeling spectral data, including a classification scheme for samples. The Reflectance Experiment Laboratory (RELAB) at Brown University, which has long been a provider of spectroscopy equipment and services to the science community, has provided expert input into the design of the dictionary. Together the Geosciences Node and RELAB are preparing the whole of the RELAB Spectral Library, consisting of many thousands of spectra collected over the years, to be archived in PDS. An online interface for searching, displaying, and downloading selected spectra is planned, using the Spectral Library metadata recorded in the PDS labels. The data dictionary and online interface will be extended to include spectral libraries submitted by other data providers. The Spectral Library Data Dictionary is now available from PDS at https://pds.nasa.gov/pds4/schema/released/. It can be used in PDS4 labels for reflectance spectra as well as for Raman, XRF, XRD, LIBS, and other types of spectra. Ancillary data such as images, chemistry, and abundance data are also supported. To help generate PDS4-compliant labels for spectra, the Geosciences Node provides a label generation program called MakeLabels (http://pds-geosciences.wustl.edu/tools/makelabels.html) which creates labels from a template, and which can be used for any kind of PDS4 label. For information, contact the Geosciences Node at geosci@wunder.wustl.edu.

  12. Abundance estimation of spectrally similar minerals

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates a spectral unmixing method for estimating the partial abundance of spectrally similar minerals in complex mixtures. The method requires formulation of a linear function of individual spectra of individual minerals. The first...

  13. Calibration with near-continuous spectral measurements

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Rasmussen, Michael; Madsen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    In chemometrics traditional calibration in case of spectral measurements express a quantity of interest (e.g. a concentration) as a linear combination of the spectral measurements at a number of wavelengths. Often the spectral measurements are performed at a large number of wavelengths and in thi...... by an example in which the octane number of gasoline is related to near infrared spectral measurements. The performance is found to be much better that for the traditional calibration methods....

  14. Spectral functions and transport coefficients from the functional renormalization group

    Tripolt, Ralf-Arno

    2015-06-03

    In this thesis we present a new method to obtain real-time quantities like spectral functions and transport coefficients at finite temperature and density using the Functional Renormalization Group approach. Our non-perturbative method is thermodynamically consistent, symmetry preserving and based on an analytic continuation from imaginary to real time on the level of the flow equations. We demonstrate the applicability of this method by calculating mesonic spectral functions as well as the shear viscosity for the quark-meson model. In particular, results are presented for the pion and sigma spectral function at finite temperature and chemical potential, with a focus on the regime near the critical endpoint in the phase diagram of the quark-meson model. Moreover, the different time-like and space-like processes, which give rise to a complex structure of the spectral functions, are discussed. Finally, based on the momentum dependence of the spectral functions, we calculate the shear viscosity and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio using the corresponding Green-Kubo formula.

  15. CMB spectral distortions as solutions to the Boltzmann equations

    Ota, Atsuhisa, E-mail: a.ota@th.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    We propose to re-interpret the cosmic microwave background spectral distortions as solutions to the Boltzmann equation. This approach makes it possible to solve the second order Boltzmann equation explicitly, with the spectral y distortion and the momentum independent second order temperature perturbation, while generation of μ distortion cannot be explained even at second order in this framework. We also extend our method to higher order Boltzmann equations systematically and find new type spectral distortions, assuming that the collision term is linear in the photon distribution functions, namely, in the Thomson scattering limit. As an example, we concretely construct solutions to the cubic order Boltzmann equation and show that the equations are closed with additional three parameters composed of a cubic order temperature perturbation and two cubic order spectral distortions. The linear Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect whose momentum dependence is different from the usual y distortion is also discussed in the presence of the next leading order Kompaneets terms, and we show that higher order spectral distortions are also generated as a result of the diffusion process in a framework of higher order Boltzmann equations. The method may be applicable to a wider class of problems and has potential to give a general prescription to non-equilibrium physics.

  16. Hyperspectral image classifier based on beach spectral feature

    Liang, Zhang; Lianru, Gao; Bing, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The seashore, especially coral bank, is sensitive to human activities and environmental changes. A multispectral image, with coarse spectral resolution, is inadaptable for identify subtle spectral distinctions between various beaches. To the contrary, hyperspectral image with narrow and consecutive channels increases our capability to retrieve minor spectral features which is suit for identification and classification of surface materials on the shore. Herein, this paper used airborne hyperspectral data, in addition to ground spectral data to study the beaches in Qingdao. The image data first went through image pretreatment to deal with the disturbance of noise, radiation inconsistence and distortion. In succession, the reflection spectrum, the derivative spectrum and the spectral absorption features of the beach surface were inspected in search of diagnostic features. Hence, spectra indices specific for the unique environment of seashore were developed. According to expert decisions based on image spectrums, the beaches are ultimately classified into sand beach, rock beach, vegetation beach, mud beach, bare land and water. In situ surveying reflection spectrum from GER1500 field spectrometer validated the classification production. In conclusion, the classification approach under expert decision based on feature spectrum is proved to be feasible for beaches

  17. Regularized image denoising based on spectral gradient optimization

    Lukić, Tibor; Lindblad, Joakim; Sladoje, Nataša

    2011-01-01

    Image restoration methods, such as denoising, deblurring, inpainting, etc, are often based on the minimization of an appropriately defined energy function. We consider energy functions for image denoising which combine a quadratic data-fidelity term and a regularization term, where the properties of the latter are determined by a used potential function. Many potential functions are suggested for different purposes in the literature. We compare the denoising performance achieved by ten different potential functions. Several methods for efficient minimization of regularized energy functions exist. Most are only applicable to particular choices of potential functions, however. To enable a comparison of all the observed potential functions, we propose to minimize the objective function using a spectral gradient approach; spectral gradient methods put very weak restrictions on the used potential function. We present and evaluate the performance of one spectral conjugate gradient and one cyclic spectral gradient algorithm, and conclude from experiments that both are well suited for the task. We compare the performance with three total variation-based state-of-the-art methods for image denoising. From the empirical evaluation, we conclude that denoising using the Huber potential (for images degraded by higher levels of noise; signal-to-noise ratio below 10 dB) and the Geman and McClure potential (for less noisy images), in combination with the spectral conjugate gradient minimization algorithm, shows the overall best performance

  18. Phylogenetic Structure of Foliar Spectral Traits in Tropical Forest Canopies

    Kelly M. McManus

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Spectranomics approach to tropical forest remote sensing has established a link between foliar reflectance spectra and the phylogenetic composition of tropical canopy tree communities vis-à-vis the taxonomic organization of biochemical trait variation. However, a direct relationship between phylogenetic affiliation and foliar reflectance spectra of species has not been established. We sought to develop this relationship by quantifying the extent to which underlying patterns of phylogenetic structure drive interspecific variation among foliar reflectance spectra within three Neotropical canopy tree communities with varying levels of soil fertility. We interpreted the resulting spectral patterns of phylogenetic signal in the context of foliar biochemical traits that may contribute to the spectral-phylogenetic link. We utilized a multi-model ensemble to elucidate trait-spectral relationships, and quantified phylogenetic signal for spectral wavelengths and traits using Pagel’s lambda statistic. Foliar reflectance spectra showed evidence of phylogenetic influence primarily within the visible and shortwave infrared spectral regions. These regions were also selected by the multi-model ensemble as those most important to the quantitative prediction of several foliar biochemical traits. Patterns of phylogenetic organization of spectra and traits varied across sites and with soil fertility, indicative of the complex interactions between the environmental and phylogenetic controls underlying patterns of biodiversity.

  19. USGS Spectral Library Version 7

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Pearson, Neil C.; Wise, Richard A.; Benzel, William M.; Lowers, Heather A.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Klein, Anna J.

    2017-04-10

    We have assembled a library of spectra measured with laboratory, field, and airborne spectrometers. The instruments used cover wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the far infrared (0.2 to 200 microns [μm]). Laboratory samples of specific minerals, plants, chemical compounds, and manmade materials were measured. In many cases, samples were purified, so that unique spectral features of a material can be related to its chemical structure. These spectro-chemical links are important for interpreting remotely sensed data collected in the field or from an aircraft or spacecraft. This library also contains physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures. Four different spectrometer types were used to measure spectra in the library: (1) Beckman™ 5270 covering the spectral range 0.2 to 3 µm, (2) standard, high resolution (hi-res), and high-resolution Next Generation (hi-resNG) models of Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) field portable spectrometers covering the range from 0.35 to 2.5 µm, (3) Nicolet™ Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) interferometer spectrometers covering the range from about 1.12 to 216 µm, and (4) the NASA Airborne Visible/Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer AVIRIS, covering the range 0.37 to 2.5 µm. Measurements of rocks, soils, and natural mixtures of minerals were made in laboratory and field settings. Spectra of plant components and vegetation plots, comprising many plant types and species with varying backgrounds, are also in this library. Measurements by airborne spectrometers are included for forested vegetation plots, in which the trees are too tall for measurement by a field spectrometer. This report describes the instruments used, the organization of materials into chapters, metadata descriptions of spectra and samples, and possible artifacts in the spectral measurements. To facilitate greater application of the spectra, the library has also been convolved to selected spectrometer and imaging spectrometers sampling and

  20. Spectral properties of generalized eigenparameter dependent ...

    Jost function, spectrum, the spectral singularities, and the properties of the principal vectors corresponding to the spectral singularities of L, if. ∞Σn=1 n(∣1 - an∣ + ∣bnl) < ∞. Mathematics Subject Classication (2010): 34L05, 34L40, 39A70, 47A10, 47A75. Key words: Discrete equations, eigenparameter, spectral analysis, ...

  1. Calibrating spectral images using penalized likelihood

    Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Glasbey, C.

    2003-01-01

    A new method is presented for automatic correction of distortions and for spectral calibration (which band corresponds to which wavelength) of spectral images recorded by means of a spectrograph. The method consists of recording a bar-like pattern with an illumination source with spectral bands

  2. Adinkras, Dessins, Origami, and Supersymmetry Spectral Triples

    Marcolli, Matilde; Zolman, Nick

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the spectral geometry and spectral action functionals associated to 1D Supersymmetry Algebras, using the classification of these superalgebras in terms of Adinkra graphs and the construction of associated dessin d'enfant and origami curves. The resulting spectral action functionals are computed in terms of the Selberg (super) trace formula.

  3. A fast, noniterative approach for accelerated high-temporal resolution cine-CMR using dynamically interleaved streak removal in the power-spectral encoded domain with low-pass filtering (DISPEL) and modulo-prime spokes (MoPS).

    Kawaji, Keigo; Patel, Mita B; Cantrell, Charles G; Tanaka, Akiko; Marino, Marco; Tamura, Satoshi; Wang, Hui; Wang, Yi; Carroll, Timothy J; Ota, Takeyoshi; Patel, Amit R

    2017-07-01

    To introduce a pair of accelerated non-Cartesian acquisition principles that when combined, exploit the periodicity of k-space acquisition, and thereby enable acquisition of high-temporal cine Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR). The mathematical formulation of a noniterative, undersampled non-Cartesian cine acquisition and reconstruction is presented. First, a low-pass filtering step that exploits streaking artifact redundancy is provided (i.e., Dynamically Interleaved Streak removal in the Power-spectrum Encoded domain with Low-pass filtering [DISPEL]). Next, an effective radial acquisition for the DISPEL approach that exploits the property of prime numbers is described (i.e., Modulo-Prime Spoke [MoPS]). Both DISPEL and MoPS are examined using numerical simulation of a digital heart phantom to show that high-temporal cine-CMR is feasible without removing physiologic motion vs aperiodic interleaving using Golden Angles. The combined high-temporal cine approach is next examined in 11 healthy subjects for a time-volume curve assessment of left ventricular systolic and diastolic performance vs conventional Cartesian cine-CMR reference. The DISPEL method was first shown using simulation under different streak cycles to allow separation of undersampled radial streaking artifacts from physiologic motion with a sufficiently frequent streak-cycle interval. Radial interleaving with MoPS is next shown to allow interleaves with pseudo-Golden-Angle variants, and be more compatible with DISPEL against irrational and nonperiodic rotation angles, including the Golden-Angle-derived rotations. In the in vivo data, the proposed method showed no statistical difference in the systolic performance, while diastolic parameters sensitive to the cine's temporal resolution were statistically significant (P cine). We demonstrate a high-temporal resolution cine-CMR using DISPEL and MoPS, whose streaking artifact was separated from physiologic motion. © 2017 American Association of Physicists

  4. Sparse Pseudo Spectral Projection Methods with Directional Adaptation for Uncertainty Quantification

    Winokur, J.; Kim, D.; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Le Maî tre, O. P.; Knio, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We investigate two methods to build a polynomial approximation of a model output depending on some parameters. The two approaches are based on pseudo-spectral projection (PSP) methods on adaptively constructed sparse grids, and aim at providing a

  5. Spectral and energy efficiency analysis of uplink heterogeneous networks with small-cells on edge

    Shakir, Muhammad Zeeshan; Tabassum, Hina; Qaraqe, Khalid A.; Serpedin, Erchin; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2014-01-01

    by considering fast power control where the mobile users transmit with adaptive power to compensate the path loss, shadowing and fading. In particular, we develop a moment generating function (MGF) based approach to derive analytical bounds on the area spectral

  6. Spectral multitude and spectral dynamics reflect changing conjugation length in single molecules of oligophenylenevinylenes

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Kousuke; Ogino, Kenji; Vacha, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule study of phenylenevinylene oligomers revealed distinct spectral forms due to different conjugation lengths which are determined by torsional defects. Large spectral jumps between different spectral forms were ascribed to torsional flips of a single phenylene ring. These spectral changes reflect the dynamic nature of electron delocalization in oligophenylenevinylenes and enable estimation of the phenylene torsional barriers. © 2012 The Owner Societies.

  7. Spectral methods. Fundamentals in single domains

    Canuto, C.

    2006-01-01

    Since the publication of ''Spectral Methods in Fluid Dynamics'' 1988, spectral methods have become firmly established as a mainstream tool for scientific and engineering computation. The authors of that book have incorporated into this new edition the many improvements in the algorithms and the theory of spectral methods that have been made since then. This latest book retains the tight integration between the theoretical and practical aspects of spectral methods, and the chapters are enhanced with material on the Galerkin with numerical integration version of spectral methods. The discussion of direct and iterative solution methods is also greatly expanded. (orig.)

  8. Spectral modeling of radiation in combustion systems

    Pal, Gopalendu

    Radiation calculations are important in combustion due to the high temperatures encountered but has not been studied in sufficient detail in the case of turbulent flames. Radiation calculations for such problems require accurate, robust, and computationally efficient models for the solution of radiative transfer equation (RTE), and spectral properties of radiation. One more layer of complexity is added in predicting the overall heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems due to nonlinear interactions between turbulent fluctuations and radiation. The present work is aimed at the development of finite volume-based high-accuracy thermal radiation modeling, including spectral radiation properties in order to accurately capture turbulence-radiation interactions (TRI) and predict heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems correctly and efficiently. The turbulent fluctuations of temperature and chemical species concentrations have strong effects on spectral radiative intensities, and TRI create a closure problem when the governing partial differential equations are averaged. Recently, several approaches have been proposed to take TRI into account. Among these attempts the most promising approaches are the probability density function (PDF) methods, which can treat nonlinear coupling between turbulence and radiative emission exactly, i.e., "emission TRI". The basic idea of the PDF method is to treat physical variables as random variables and to solve the PDF transport equation stochastically. The actual reacting flow field is represented by a large number of discrete stochastic particles each carrying their own random variable values and evolving with time. The mean value of any function of those random variables, such as the chemical source term, can be evaluated exactly by taking the ensemble average of particles. The local emission term belongs to this class and thus, can be evaluated directly and exactly from particle ensembles. However, the local absorption term

  9. East African cassava mosaic-like viruses from Africa to Indian ocean islands: molecular diversity, evolutionary history and geographical dissemination of a bipartite begomovirus

    De Bruyn Alexandre

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cassava (Manihot esculenta is a major food source for over 200 million sub-Saharan Africans. Unfortunately, its cultivation is severely hampered by cassava mosaic disease (CMD. Caused by a complex of bipartite cassava mosaic geminiviruses (CMG species (Family: Geminivirideae; Genus: Begomovirus CMD has been widely described throughout Africa and it is apparent that CMG's are expanding their geographical distribution. Determining where and when CMG movements have occurred could help curtail its spread and reveal the ecological and anthropic factors associated with similar viral invasions. We applied Bayesian phylogeographic inference and recombination analyses to available and newly described CMG sequences to reconstruct a plausible history of CMG diversification and migration between Africa and South West Indian Ocean (SWIO islands. Results The isolation and analysis of 114 DNA-A and 41 DNA-B sequences demonstrated the presence of three CMG species circulating in the Comoros and Seychelles archipelagos (East African cassava mosaic virus, EACMV; East African cassava mosaic Kenya virus, EACMKV; and East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus, EACMCV. Phylogeographic analyses suggest that CMG’s presence on these SWIO islands is probably the result of at least four independent introduction events from mainland Africa occurring between 1988 and 2009. Amongst the islands of the Comoros archipelago, two major migration pathways were inferred: One from Grande Comore to Mohéli and the second from Mayotte to Anjouan. While only two recombination events characteristic of SWIO islands isolates were identified, numerous re-assortments events were detected between EACMV and EACMKV, which seem to almost freely interchange their genome components. Conclusions Rapid and extensive virus spread within the SWIO islands was demonstrated for three CMG complex species. Strong evolutionary or ecological interaction between CMG species may explain

  10. Cultural and environmental effects on the spectral development patterns of corn and soybeans: Field data analysis

    Crist, E. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    An overall approach to crop spectral understanding is presented which serves to maintain a strong link between actual plant responses and characteristics and spectral observations from ground based and spaceborne sensors. A specific technique for evaluating field reflectance data, as a part of the overall approach, is also described. Results of the application of this technique to corn and soybeans reflectance data collected by and at Purdue/LARS indicate that a number of common cultural and environmental factors can significantly affect the temporal spectral development patterns of these crops in tasseled cap greenness (a transformed variable of LANDSAT MSS signals).

  11. Planck 2013 results. IX. HFI spectral response

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; North, C; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) spectral response was determined through a series of ground based tests conducted with the HFI focal plane in a cryogenic environment prior to launch. The main goal of the spectral transmission tests was to measure the relative spectral response (including out-of-band signal rejection) of all HFI detectors. This was determined by measuring the output of a continuously scanned Fourier transform spectrometer coupled with all HFI detectors. As there is no on-board spectrometer within HFI, the ground-based spectral response experiments provide the definitive data set for the relative spectral calibration of the HFI. The spectral response of the HFI is used in Planck data analysis and component separation, this includes extraction of CO emission observed within Planck bands, dust emission, Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources, and intensity to polarization leakage. The HFI spectral response data have also been used to provide unit conversion and colour correction analysis tools. Ver...

  12. Spectral representation in stochastic quantization

    Nakazato, Hiromichi.

    1988-10-01

    A spectral representation of stationary 2-point functions is investigated based on the operator formalism in stochastic quantization. Assuming the existence of asymptotic non-interacting fields, we can diagonalize the total Hamiltonian in terms of asymptotic fields and show that the correlation length along the fictious time is proportional to the physical mass expected in the usual field theory. A relation between renormalization factors in the operator formalism is derived as a byproduct and its validity is checked with the perturbative results calculated in this formalism. (orig.)

  13. Curvature Effect and the Spectral Softening Phenomenon Detected ...

    soft spectral evolution, indicating that this spectral softening is not a rare phenomenon .... of time, there exists a temporal steep decay phase accompanied by spectral softening. (d) In most cases, the temporal power law index α and the spectral.

  14. SPECTRAL RECONSTRUCTION BASED ON SVM FOR CROSS CALIBRATION

    H. Gao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chinese HY-1C/1D satellites will use a 5nm/10nm-resolutional visible-near infrared(VNIR hyperspectral sensor with the solar calibrator to cross-calibrate with other sensors. The hyperspectral radiance data are composed of average radiance in the sensor’s passbands and bear a spectral smoothing effect, a transform from the hyperspectral radiance data to the 1-nm-resolution apparent spectral radiance by spectral reconstruction need to be implemented. In order to solve the problem of noise cumulation and deterioration after several times of iteration by the iterative algorithm, a novel regression method based on SVM is proposed, which can approach arbitrary complex non-linear relationship closely and provide with better generalization capability by learning. In the opinion of system, the relationship between the apparent radiance and equivalent radiance is nonlinear mapping introduced by spectral response function(SRF, SVM transform the low-dimensional non-linear question into high-dimensional linear question though kernel function, obtaining global optimal solution by virtue of quadratic form. The experiment is performed using 6S-simulated spectrums considering the SRF and SNR of the hyperspectral sensor, measured reflectance spectrums of water body and different atmosphere conditions. The contrastive result shows: firstly, the proposed method is with more reconstructed accuracy especially to the high-frequency signal; secondly, while the spectral resolution of the hyperspectral sensor reduces, the proposed method performs better than the iterative method; finally, the root mean square relative error(RMSRE which is used to evaluate the difference of the reconstructed spectrum and the real spectrum over the whole spectral range is calculated, it decreses by one time at least by proposed method.

  15. Optimisation of material discrimination using spectral CT

    Nik, S.J.; Meyer, J.; Watts, R.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Spectral computed tomography (CT) using novel X-ray photon counting detectors (PCDs) with energy resolving capabilities is capable of providing energy-selective images. This extra energy information may allow materials such as iodine and calcium, or water and fat to be distinguished. PCDs have energy thresholds, enabling the classification of photons into multiple energy bins. The inform tion content of spectral CT images depends on how the photons are grouped together. [n this work, a method is presented to optimise energy windows for maximum material discrimination. Given a combination of thicknesses, the reference number of expected photons in each energy bin is computed using the Bee Lambert equation. A similar calculation is performed for an exhaustive range of thicknesses and the number of photons in each case is com pared to the reference, allowing a statistical map of the uncertainty in thickness parameters to be constructed. The 63%-confidence region in the two-dimensional thickness space is a representation of how optimal the bins are for material separation. The model is demonstrated with 0.1 mm of iodine and 2.2 mm of calcium using two adjacent bins encompassing the entire energy range. Bins bordering at the iodine k-edge of 33.2 keY are found to be optimal. When compared to two abutted energy bins with equal incident counts as used in the literature (bordering at 54 keY), the thickness uncertainties are reduced from approximately 4% to less than I % (see Figure). This approach has been developed for two materials and is expandable to an arbitrary number of materials and bins.

  16. Outlier Detection with Space Transformation and Spectral Analysis

    Dang, Xuan-Hong; Micenková, Barbora; Assent, Ira

    2013-01-01

    which rely on notions of distances or densities, this approach introduces a novel concept based on local quadratic entropy for evaluating the similarity of a data object with its neighbors. This information theoretic quantity is used to regularize the closeness amongst data instances and subsequently......Detecting a small number of outliers from a set of data observations is always challenging. In this paper, we present an approach that exploits space transformation and uses spectral analysis in the newly transformed space for outlier detection. Unlike most existing techniques in the literature...... benefits the process of mapping data into a usually lower dimensional space. Outliers are then identified by spectral analysis of the eigenspace spanned by the set of leading eigenvectors derived from the mapping procedure. The proposed technique is purely data-driven and imposes no assumptions regarding...

  17. Partial Transposition on Bipartite System

    Xi-Jun, Ren; Yong-Jian, Han; Yu-Chun, Wu; Guang-Can, Guo

    2008-01-01

    Many properties of partial transposition are unclear as yet. Here we carefully consider the number of the negative eigenvalues of ρ T (ρ's partial transposition) when ρ is a two-partite state. There is strong evidence to show that the number of negative eigenvalues of ρ T is N(N − 1)/2 at most when ρ is a state in Hilbert space C N C N . For the special case, the 2 × 2 system, we use this result to give a partial proof of the conjecture |ρ T | T ≥ 0. We find that this conjecture is strongly connected with the entanglement of the state corresponding to the negative eigenvalue of ρ T or the negative entropy of ρ

  18. Entanglement transfer between bipartite systems

    Bougouffa, Smail; Ficek, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    The problem of a controlled transfer of an entanglement initially encoded into two two-level atoms that are successively sent through two single-mode cavities is investigated. The atoms and the cavity modes form a four-qubit system and we demonstrate the conditions under which the initial entanglement encoded into the atoms can be completely transferred to other pairs of qubits. We find that in the case of non-zero detuning between the atomic transition frequencies and the cavity mode frequencies, no complete transfer of the initial entanglement is possible to any of the other pairs of qubits. In the case of exact resonance and equal coupling strengths of the atoms to the cavity modes, an initial maximally entangled state of the atoms can be completely transferred to the cavity modes. Complete transfer of the entanglement is restricted to the cavity modes, with transfer to the other pairs being limited to 50%. We find that complete transfer of an initial entanglement to other pairs of qubits may take place if the initial state is not the maximally entangled state and the atoms couple to the cavity modes with unequal strengths. Depending on the ratio between the coupling strengths, optimal entanglement can be created between the atoms and one of the cavity modes.

  19. Spectral reconstruction for shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS).

    Guo, Shuxia; Chernavskaia, Olga; Popp, Jürgen; Bocklitz, Thomas

    2018-08-15

    Fluorescence emission is one of the major obstacles to apply Raman spectroscopy in biological investigations. It is usually several orders more intense than Raman scattering and hampers further analysis. In cases where the fluorescence emission is too intense to be efficiently removed via routine mathematical baseline correction algorithms, an alternative approach is needed. One alternative approach is shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS), where two Raman spectra are recorded with two slightly different excitation wavelengths. Ideally, the fluorescence emission at the two excitations does not change while the Raman spectrum shifts according to the excitation wavelength. Hence the fluorescence is removed in the difference of the two recorded Raman spectra. For better interpretability a spectral reconstruction procedure is necessary to recover the fluorescence-free Raman spectrum. This is challenging due to the intensity variations between the two recorded Raman spectra caused by unavoidable experimental changes as well as the presence of noise. Existent approaches suffer from drawbacks like spectral resolution loss, fluorescence residual, and artefacts. In this contribution, we proposed a reconstruction method based on non-negative least squares (NNLS), where the intensity variations between the two measurements are utilized in the reconstruction model. The method achieved fluorescence-free reconstruction on three real-world SERDS datasets without significant information loss. Thereafter, we quantified the performance of the reconstruction based on artificial datasets from four aspects: reconstructed spectral resolution, precision of reconstruction, signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), and fluorescence residual. The artificial datasets were constructed with varied Raman to fluorescence intensity ratio (RFIR), SNR, full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), excitation wavelength shift, and fluorescence variation between the two spectra. It was demonstrated that

  20. Charmonium correlators and spectral functions at finite temperature

    Ding,H.T.; Kaczmarek, O.; Karsch, F.; Satz, H.

    2008-09-01

    We present an operational approach to address the in-medium behavior of charmonium and analyze the reliability of maximum entropy method (MEM). We study the dependences of the ratio of correlators to the reconstructed one and the free one on the resonance's width and the continuum's threshold. Furthermore, we discuss the issue of the default model dependence of the spectral function obtained from MEM.