WorldWideScience

Sample records for specific structural probing

  1. Probe specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  2. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  3. Site-Specific Infrared Probes of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianqiang; Pazos, Ileana M.; Zhang, Wenkai; Culik, Robert M.; Gai, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has played an instrumental role in studying a wide variety of biological questions. However, in many cases it is impossible or difficult to rely on the intrinsic vibrational modes of biological molecules of interest, such as proteins, to reveal structural and/or environmental information in a site-specific manner. To overcome this limitation, many recent efforts have been dedicated to the development and application of various extrinsic vibrational probes that can be incorporated into biological molecules and used to site-specifically interrogate their structural and/or environmental properties. In this Review, we highlight some recent advancements of this rapidly growing research area. PMID:25580624

  4. Probing nuclear structure with nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauge, E.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this lecture is to show how nucleon scattering can be used to probe the structure of target nuclei, and how nucleon scattering observables can be interpreted in terms of nuclear structure using microscopic optical potentials. After a brief overview of the specificities of nucleon-nucleus scattering, and a quick reminder on scattering theory, the main part of this lecture is devoted to the construction of optical potentials in which the target nuclei structure information is folded with an effective interaction. Several examples of such microscopic optical model potentials are given. (author)

  5. Specification for soil multisensor and soil sampling cone penetrometer probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatate, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    Specification requirements for engineering, fabrication, and performance of cone penetrometer (CP) soil multisensor and sampling probes (CP-probes) which are required to support contract procurement for services are presented. The specification provides a documented technical basis of quality assurance that is required to use the probes in an operating Hanford tank farm. The documentation cited in this specification will be incorporated into an operational fielding plan that will address all activities associated with the use of the CP-probes. The probes discussed in this specification support the Hanford Tanks Initiative AX-104 Tank Plume Characterization Sub-task. The probes will be used to interrogate soils and vadose zone surrounding tank AX-104

  6. Probing Protein Structure and Folding in the Gas Phase by Electron Capture Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schennach, Moritz; Breuker, Kathrin

    2015-07-01

    The established methods for the study of atom-detailed protein structure in the condensed phases, X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, have recently been complemented by new techniques by which nearly or fully desolvated protein structures are probed in gas-phase experiments. Electron capture dissociation (ECD) is unique among these as it provides residue-specific, although indirect, structural information. In this Critical Insight article, we discuss the development of ECD for the structural probing of gaseous protein ions, its potential, and limitations.

  7. Probing nuclear structure with nucleons; Sonder la structure nucleaire avec des nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauge, E. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Service de Physique Nucl aire, 91 (France)

    2007-07-01

    The goal of this lecture is to show how nucleon scattering can be used to probe the structure of target nuclei, and how nucleon scattering observables can be interpreted in terms of nuclear structure using microscopic optical potentials. After a brief overview of the specificities of nucleon-nucleus scattering, and a quick reminder on scattering theory, the main part of this lecture is devoted to the construction of optical potentials in which the target nuclei structure information is folded with an effective interaction. Several examples of such microscopic optical model potentials are given. (author)

  8. Probing dopamine transporter structure and function by Zn2+-site engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loland, Claus Juul; Norgaard-Nielsen, Kristine; Gether, Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    , it will be described how we have used Zn2+-binding sites as a tool to probe the structure and function of Na+/Cl--coupled biogenic amine transporters with specific focus on the human DAT (hDAT). The work has not only led to the definition of the first structural constrains in the tertiary structure of this class...

  9. Far-red fluorescent probes for canonical and non-canonical nucleic acid structures: current progress and future implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suseela, Y V; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Pratihar, Sumon; Govindaraju, Thimmaiah

    2018-02-05

    The structural diversity and functional relevance of nucleic acids (NAs), mainly deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA), are indispensable for almost all living organisms, with minute aberrations in their structure and function becoming causative factors in numerous human diseases. The standard structures of NAs, termed canonical structures, are supported by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding. Under special physiological conditions, NAs adopt distinct spatial organisations, giving rise to non-canonical conformations supported by hydrogen bonding other than the Watson-Crick type; such non-canonical structures have a definite function in controlling gene expression and are considered as novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Development of molecular probes for these canonical and non-canonical DNA/RNA structures has been an active field of research. Among the numerous probes studied, probes with turn-on fluorescence in the far-red (600-750 nm) region are highly sought-after due to minimal autofluorescence and cellular damage. Far-red fluorescent probes are vital for real-time imaging of NAs in live cells as they provide good resolution and minimal perturbation of the cell under investigation. In this review, we present recent advances in the area of far-red fluorescent probes of DNA/RNA and non-canonical G-quadruplex structures. For the sake of continuity and completeness, we provide a brief overview of visible fluorescent probes. Utmost importance is given to design criteria, characteristic properties and biological applications, including in cellulo imaging, apart from critical discussion on limitations of the far-red fluorescent probes. Finally, we offer current and future prospects in targeting canonical and non-canonical NAs specific to cellular organelles, through sequence- and conformation-specific far-red fluorescent probes. We also cover their implications in chemical and molecular biology, with particular focus on decoding various disease

  10. Holographic Reconstruction of Photoelectron Diffraction and Its Circular Dichroism for Local Structure Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2018-06-01

    The local atomic structure around a specific element atom can be recorded as a photoelectron diffraction pattern. Forward focusing peaks and diffraction rings around them indicate the directions and distances from the photoelectron emitting atom to the surrounding atoms. The state-of-the-art holography reconstruction algorithm enables us to image the local atomic arrangement around the excited atom in a real space. By using circularly polarized light as an excitation source, the angular momentum transfer from the light to the photoelectron induces parallax shifts in these diffraction patterns. As a result, stereographic images of atomic arrangements are obtained. These diffraction patterns can be used as atomic-site-resolved probes for local electronic structure investigation in combination with spectroscopy techniques. Direct three-dimensional atomic structure visualization and site-specific electronic property analysis methods are reviewed. Furthermore, circular dichroism was also found in valence photoelectron and Auger electron diffraction patterns. The investigation of these new phenomena provides hints for the development of new techniques for local structure probing.

  11. Design - manufacturing and characterization of specific ultrasonic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.

    1985-01-01

    Optimization of ultrasonic examinations requires essentially to determine precisely parameters used for manufacturing of probes and to check characteristics of beams used. The system presented permits an automatic determination of dimensions of beams in conditions which are totally representative of those of their use. In the field of ultrasonic examinations a good estimate or knowledge of sound beams is of great help to solve difficult examination problems. The FRAMATOME's Centre d'Etude et de Recherche en Essais Non Destructifs (CEREND) : (Study and Research Center in Non-Destructive Testing) has developed and elaborated various techniques in order to improve ultrasonic examinations with specific probes. These techniques concern design, manufacturing and characterization of these probes

  12. A simple and sensitive fluorescent probe for specific detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan-Fei Kang

    A fluorescent probe, with simplicity of structure and convenience of synthesis, is capable of detecting ... Yan-Fei Kang et al. .... Pastore A, Federici G, Bertini E and Ptemonte F 2003 ... Urano Y 2010 New Strategies for Fluorescent Probe.

  13. Probing Zeolite Crystal Architecture and Structural Imperfections using Differently Sized Fluorescent Organic Probe Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Frank C; Schmidt, Joel E; Rombouts, Jeroen A; Lammertsma, Koop; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2017-05-05

    A micro-spectroscopic method has been developed to probe the accessibility of zeolite crystals using a series of fluorescent 4-(4-diethylaminostyryl)-1-methylpyridinium iodide (DAMPI) probes of increasing molecular size. Staining large zeolite crystals with MFI (ZSM-5) topology and subsequent mapping of the resulting fluorescence using confocal fluorescence microscopy reveal differences in structural integrity: the 90° intergrowth sections of MFI crystals are prone to develop structural imperfections, which act as entrance routes for the probes into the zeolite crystal. Polarization-dependent measurements provide evidence for the probe molecule's alignment within the MFI zeolite pore system. The developed method was extended to BEA (Beta) crystals, showing that the previously observed hourglass pattern is a general feature of BEA crystals with this morphology. Furthermore, the probes can accurately identify at which crystal faces of BEA straight or sinusoidal pores open to the surface. The results show this method can spatially resolve the architecture-dependent internal pore structure of microporous materials, which is difficult to assess using other characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. The Cell Probe Complexity of Succinct Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Anna; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2003-01-01

    In the cell probe model with word size 1 (the bit probe model), a static data structure problem is given by a map , where is a set of possible data to be stored, is a set of possible queries (for natural problems, we have ) and is the answer to question about data . A solution is given by a repre......In the cell probe model with word size 1 (the bit probe model), a static data structure problem is given by a map , where is a set of possible data to be stored, is a set of possible queries (for natural problems, we have ) and is the answer to question about data . A solution is given...

  15. Probing structural changes of self assembled i-motif DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Iljoon; Patil, Sachin; Fhayli, Karim; Alsaiari, Shahad K.; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2015-01-01

    We report an i-motif structural probing system based on Thioflavin T (ThT) as a fluorescent sensor. This probe can discriminate the structural changes of RET and Rb i-motif sequences according to pH change. This journal is

  16. Specificity tests of an oligonucleotide probe against food-outbreak salmonella for biosensor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I.-H.; Horikawa, S.; Xi, J.; Wikle, H. C.; Barbaree, J. M.; Chin, B. A.

    2017-05-01

    Phage based magneto-elastic (ME) biosensors have been shown to be able to rapidly detect Salmonella in various food systems to serve food pathogen monitoring purposes. In this ME biosensor platform, the free-standing strip-shaped magneto-elastic sensor is the transducer and the phage probe that recognizes Salmonella in food serves as the bio-recognition element. According to Sorokulova et al. at 2005, a developed oligonucleotide probe E2 was reported to have high specificity to Salmonella enterica Typhimurium. In the report, the specificity tests were focused in most of Enterobacterace groups outside of Salmonella family. Here, to understand the specificity of phage E2 to different Salmonella enterica serotypes within Salmonella Family, we further tested the specificity of the phage probe to thirty-two Salmonella serotypes that were present in the major foodborne outbreaks during the past ten years (according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). The tests were conducted through an Enzyme linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) format. This assay can mimic probe immobilized conditions on the magnetoelastic biosensor platform and also enable to study the binding specificity of oligonucleotide probes toward different Salmonella while avoiding phage/ sensor lot variations. Test results confirmed that this oligonucleotide probe E2 was high specific to Salmonella Typhimurium cells but showed cross reactivity to Salmonella Tennessee and four other serotypes among the thirty-two tested Salmonella serotypes.

  17. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Kwan, Johnson; Wang, Mei; O' Brien, Benjamin

    2011-03-08

    Probes that allow accurate delineation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in interphase or metaphase cell nuclei have become important clinical tools that deliver life-saving information about the gender or chromosomal make-up of a product of conception or the probability of an embryo to implant, as well as the definition of tumor-specific genetic signatures. Often such highly specific DNA probes are proprietary in nature and have been the result of extensive probe selection and optimization procedures. We describe a novel approach that eliminates costly and time consuming probe selection and testing by applying data mining and common bioinformatics tools. Similar to a rational drug design process in which drug-protein interactions are modeled in the computer, the rational probe design described here uses a set of criteria and publicly available bioinformatics software to select the desired probe molecules from libraries comprised of hundreds of thousands of probe molecules. Examples describe the selection of DNA probes for the human X and Y chromosomes, both with unprecedented performance, but in a similar fashion, this approach can be applied to other chromosomes or species.

  18. Highly specific detection of genetic modification events using an enzyme-linked probe hybridization chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M Z; Zhang, X F; Chen, X M; Chen, X; Wu, S; Xu, L L

    2015-08-10

    The enzyme-linked probe hybridization chip utilizes a method based on ligase-hybridizing probe chip technology, with the principle of using thio-primers for protection against enzyme digestion, and using lambda DNA exonuclease to cut multiple PCR products obtained from the sample being tested into single-strand chains for hybridization. The 5'-end amino-labeled probe was fixed onto the aldehyde chip, and hybridized with the single-stranded PCR product, followed by addition of a fluorescent-modified probe that was then enzymatically linked with the adjacent, substrate-bound probe in order to achieve highly specific, parallel, and high-throughput detection. Specificity and sensitivity testing demonstrated that enzyme-linked probe hybridization technology could be applied to the specific detection of eight genetic modification events at the same time, with a sensitivity reaching 0.1% and the achievement of accurate, efficient, and stable results.

  19. Simulation of Probe Position-Dependent Electron Energy-Loss Fine Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxley, M. P.; Kapetanakis, M. D.; Prange, Micah P.; Varela, M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2014-03-31

    We present a theoretical framework for calculating probe-position-dependent electron energy-loss near-edge structure for the scanning transmission electron microscope by combining density functional theory with dynamical scattering theory. We show how simpler approaches to calculating near-edge structure fail to include the fundamental physics needed to understand the evolution of near-edge structure as a function of probe position and investigate the dependence of near-edge structure on probe size. It is within this framework that density functional theory should be presented, in order to ensure that variations of near-edge structure are truly due to local electronic structure and how much from the diffraction and focusing of the electron beam.

  20. Assessing probe-specific dye and slide biases in two-color microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg Zelanna

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A primary reason for using two-color microarrays is that the use of two samples labeled with different dyes on the same slide, that bind to probes on the same spot, is supposed to adjust for many factors that introduce noise and errors into the analysis. Most users assume that any differences between the dyes can be adjusted out by standard methods of normalization, so that measures such as log ratios on the same slide are reliable measures of comparative expression. However, even after the normalization, there are still probe specific dye and slide variation among the data. We define a method to quantify the amount of the dye-by-probe and slide-by-probe interaction. This serves as a diagnostic, both visual and numeric, of the existence of probe-specific dye bias. We show how this improved the performance of two-color array analysis for arrays for genomic analysis of biological samples ranging from rice to human tissue. Results We develop a procedure for quantifying the extent of probe-specific dye and slide bias in two-color microarrays. The primary output is a graphical diagnostic of the extent of the bias which called ECDF (Empirical Cumulative Distribution Function, though numerical results are also obtained. Conclusion We show that the dye and slide biases were high for human and rice genomic arrays in two gene expression facilities, even after the standard intensity-based normalization, and describe how this diagnostic allowed the problems causing the probe-specific bias to be addressed, and resulted in important improvements in performance. The R package LMGene which contains the method described in this paper has been available to download from Bioconductor.

  1. Detecting 3D Vegetation Structure with the Galileo Space Probe: Can a Distant Probe Detect Vegetation Structure on Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Christopher E; Wolf, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sagan et al. (1993) used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993) could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993) noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis) as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 ± 0.003 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position) which reduced the observed anisotropy signal and we demonstrate that theoretically if the probe had a variable phase angle between 0-20°, there would have been a much larger predicted change in surface reflectance of 0.1 and under such a scenario three-dimensional vegetation structure on Earth could possibly have been detected. These results suggest that anisotropic effects may be useful to help determine whether exoplanets have three-dimensional vegetation structure in the future, but that further comparisons between empirical and theoretical results are first necessary.

  2. Detecting 3D Vegetation Structure with the Galileo Space Probe: Can a Distant Probe Detect Vegetation Structure on Earth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Doughty

    Full Text Available Sagan et al. (1993 used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993 could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993 noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 ± 0.003 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position which reduced the observed anisotropy signal and we demonstrate that theoretically if the probe had a variable phase angle between 0-20°, there would have been a much larger predicted change in surface reflectance of 0.1 and under such a scenario three-dimensional vegetation structure on Earth could possibly have been detected. These results suggest that anisotropic effects may be useful to help determine whether exoplanets have three-dimensional vegetation structure in the future, but that further comparisons between empirical and theoretical results are first necessary.

  3. Probing ion-specific effects on aqueous acetate solutions: Ion pairing versus water structure modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Tristan; Lange, Kathrin M; Conrad, Gerrit; Yamamoto, Kenji; Schwanke, Christoph; Hodeck, Kai F; Dantz, Marcus; Brandenburg, Tim; Suljoti, Edlira; Aziz, Emad F

    2014-05-01

    The effect of monovalent cations (Li(+), K(+), NH4 (+), Na(+)) on the water structure in aqueous chloride and acetate solutions was characterized by oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) of a liquid microjet. We show ion- and counterion dependent effects on the emission spectra of the oxygen K-edge, which we attribute to modifications of the hydrogen bond network of water. For acetates, ion pairing with carboxylates was also probed selectively by XAS and RIXS. We correlate our experimental results to speciation data and to the salting-out properties of the cations.

  4. Probing ion-specific effects on aqueous acetate solutions: Ion pairing versus water structure modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Petit

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of monovalent cations (Li+, K+, NH4+, Na+ on the water structure in aqueous chloride and acetate solutions was characterized by oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS, X-ray emission spectroscopy, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS of a liquid microjet. We show ion- and counterion dependent effects on the emission spectra of the oxygen K-edge, which we attribute to modifications of the hydrogen bond network of water. For acetates, ion pairing with carboxylates was also probed selectively by XAS and RIXS. We correlate our experimental results to speciation data and to the salting-out properties of the cations.

  5. Development of Thinopyrum ponticum-specific molecular markers and FISH probes based on SLAF-seq technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqin; Luo, Qiaoling; Teng, Wan; Li, Bin; Li, Hongwei; Li, Yiwen; Li, Zhensheng; Zheng, Qi

    2018-05-01

    Based on SLAF-seq, 67 Thinopyrum ponticum-specific markers and eight Th. ponticum-specific FISH probes were developed, and these markers and probes could be used for detection of alien chromatin in a wheat background. Decaploid Thinopyrum ponticum (2n = 10x = 70) is a valuable gene reservoir for wheat improvement. Identification of Th. ponticum introgression would facilitate its transfer into diverse wheat genetic backgrounds and its practical utilization in wheat improvement. Based on specific-locus-amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) technology, 67 new Th. ponticum-specific molecular markers and eight Th. ponticum-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes have been developed from a tiny wheat-Th. ponticum translocation line. These newly developed molecular markers allowed the detection of Th. ponticum DNA in a variety of materials specifically and steadily at high throughput. According to the hybridization signal pattern, the eight Th. ponticum-specific probes could be divided into two groups. The first group including five dispersed repetitive sequence probes could identify Th. ponticum chromatin more sensitively and accurately than genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Whereas the second group having three tandem repetitive sequence probes enabled the discrimination of Th. ponticum chromosomes together with another clone pAs1 in wheat-Th. ponticum partial amphiploid Xiaoyan 68.

  6. Protocol for chromosome-specific probe construction using PRINS, micromanipulation and DOP-PCR techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO Z. PASSAMANI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chromosome-specific probes have been widely used in molecular cytogenetics, being obtained with different methods. In this study, a reproducible protocol for construction of chromosome-specific probes is proposed which associates in situ amplification (PRINS, micromanipulation and degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR. Human lymphocyte cultures were used to obtain metaphases from male and female individuals. The chromosomes were amplified via PRINS, and subcentromeric fragments of the X chromosome were microdissected using microneedles coupled to a phase contrast microscope. The fragments were amplified by DOP-PCR and labeled with tetramethyl-rhodamine-5-dUTP. The probes were used in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH procedure to highlight these specific regions in the metaphases. The results show one fluorescent red spot in male and two in female X chromosomes and interphase nuclei.

  7. Detection of iron-depositing Pedomicrobium species in native biofilms from the Odertal National Park by a new, specific FISH probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Burga; Richert, Inga; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2009-10-01

    Iron-depositing bacteria play an important role in technical water systems (water wells, distribution systems) due to their intense deposition of iron oxides and resulting clogging effects. Pedomicrobium is known as iron- and manganese-oxidizing and accumulating bacterium. The ability to detect and quantify members of this species in biofilm communities is therefore desirable. In this study the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method was used to detect Pedomicrobium in iron and manganese incrusted biofilms. Based on comparative sequence analysis, we designed and evaluated a specific oligonucleotide probe (Pedo 1250) complementary to the hypervariable region 8 of the 16S rRNA gene for Pedomicrobium. Probe specificities were tested against 3 different strains of Pedomicrobium and Sphingobium yanoikuyae as non-target organism. Using optimized conditions the probe hybridized with all tested strains of Pedomicrobium with an efficiency of 80%. The non-target organism showed no hybridization signals. The new FISH probe was applied successfully for the in situ detection of Pedomicrobium in different native, iron-depositing biofilms. The hybridization results of native bioflims using probe Pedo_1250 agreed with the results of the morphological structure of Pedomicrobium bioflims based on scanning electron microscopy.

  8. Development of mercury (II) ion biosensors based on mercury-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lanying; Wen, Yanli; Xu, Li; Xu, Qin; Song, Shiping; Zuo, Xiaolei; Yan, Juan; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-15

    Mercury (II) ion (Hg(2+)) contamination can be accumulated along the food chain and cause serious threat to the public health. Plenty of research effort thus has been devoted to the development of fast, sensitive and selective biosensors for monitoring Hg(2+). Thymine was demonstrated to specifically combine with Hg(2+) and form a thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) structure, with binding constant even higher than T-A Watson-Crick pair in DNA duplex. Recently, various novel Hg(2+) biosensors have been developed based on T-rich Mercury-Specific Oligonucleotide (MSO) probes, and exhibited advanced selectivity and excellent sensitivity for Hg(2+) detection. In this review, we explained recent development of MSO-based Hg(2+) biosensors mainly in 3 groups: fluorescent biosensors, colorimetric biosensors and electrochemical biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Microscopic Analysis of Corn Fiber Using Corn Starch- and Cellulose-Specific Molecular Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Beery, K. E.; Xu, Q.; Ding, S.-Y.; Vinzant, T. B.; Abbas, C. A.; Himmel, M. E.

    2007-09-01

    Ethanol is the primary liquid transportation fuel produced from renewable feedstocks in the United States today. The majority of corn grain, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, has been historically processed in wet mills yielding products such as gluten feed, gluten meal, starch, and germ. Starch extracted from the grain is used to produce ethanol in saccharification and fermentation steps; however the extraction of starch is not 100% efficient. To better understand starch extraction during the wet milling process, we have developed fluorescent probes that can be used to visually localize starch and cellulose in samples using confocal microscopy. These probes are based on the binding specificities of two types of carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which are small substrate-specific protein domains derived from carbohydrate degrading enzymes. CBMs were fused, using molecular cloning techniques, to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or to the red fluorescent protein DsRed (RFP). Using these engineered probes, we found that the binding of the starch-specific probe correlates with starch content in corn fiber samples. We also demonstrate that there is starch internally localized in the endosperm that may contribute to the high starch content in corn fiber. We also surprisingly found that the cellulose-specific probe did not bind to most corn fiber samples, but only to corn fiber that had been hydrolyzed using a thermochemical process that removes the residual starch and much of the hemicellulose. Our findings should be of interest to those working to increase the efficiency of the corn grain to ethanol process.

  10. In Vivo Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Monitors Binding of Specific Probes to Cancer Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Chernomordik, Victor; Zielinski, Rafal; Capala, Jacek; Griffiths, Gary; Vasalatiy, Olga; Smirnov, Aleksandr V.; Knutson, Jay R.; Lyakhov, Ilya; Achilefu, Samuel; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Hassan, Moinuddin

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important factors in choosing a treatment strategy for cancer is characterization of biomarkers in cancer cells. Particularly, recent advances in Monoclonal Antibodies (MAB) as primary-specific drugs targeting tumor receptors show that their efficacy depends strongly on characterization of tumor biomarkers. Assessment of their status in individual patients would facilitate selection of an optimal treatment strategy, and the continuous monitoring of those biomarkers and their binding process to the therapy would provide a means for early evaluation of the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. In this study we have demonstrated for the first time in live animals that the fluorescence lifetime can be used to detect the binding of targeted optical probes to the extracellular receptors on tumor cells in vivo. The rationale was that fluorescence lifetime of a specific probe is sensitive to local environment and/or affinity to other molecules. We attached Near-InfraRed (NIR) fluorescent probes to Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 (HER2/neu)-specific Affibody molecules and used our time-resolved optical system to compare the fluorescence lifetime of the optical probes that were bound and unbound to tumor cells in live mice. Our results show that the fluorescence lifetime changes in our model system delineate HER2 receptor bound from the unbound probe in vivo. Thus, this method is useful as a specific marker of the receptor binding process, which can open a new paradigm in the “image and treat” concept, especially for early evaluation of the efficacy of the therapy. PMID:22384092

  11. In vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging monitors binding of specific probes to cancer biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Ardeshirpour

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors in choosing a treatment strategy for cancer is characterization of biomarkers in cancer cells. Particularly, recent advances in Monoclonal Antibodies (MAB as primary-specific drugs targeting tumor receptors show that their efficacy depends strongly on characterization of tumor biomarkers. Assessment of their status in individual patients would facilitate selection of an optimal treatment strategy, and the continuous monitoring of those biomarkers and their binding process to the therapy would provide a means for early evaluation of the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. In this study we have demonstrated for the first time in live animals that the fluorescence lifetime can be used to detect the binding of targeted optical probes to the extracellular receptors on tumor cells in vivo. The rationale was that fluorescence lifetime of a specific probe is sensitive to local environment and/or affinity to other molecules. We attached Near-InfraRed (NIR fluorescent probes to Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 (HER2/neu-specific Affibody molecules and used our time-resolved optical system to compare the fluorescence lifetime of the optical probes that were bound and unbound to tumor cells in live mice. Our results show that the fluorescence lifetime changes in our model system delineate HER2 receptor bound from the unbound probe in vivo. Thus, this method is useful as a specific marker of the receptor binding process, which can open a new paradigm in the "image and treat" concept, especially for early evaluation of the efficacy of the therapy.

  12. New concepts of fluorescent probes for specific detection of DNA sequences: bis-modified oligonucleotides in excimer and exciplex detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbaj, A; Bichenkova, Ev; Walsh, L; Savage, He; Sardarian, Ar; Etchells, Ll; Gulati, A; Hawisa, S; Douglas, Kt

    2009-12-01

    The detection of single base mismatches in DNA is important for diagnostics, treatment of genetic diseases, and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Highly sensitive, specific assays are needed to investigate genetic samples from patients. The use of a simple fluorescent nucleoside analogue in detection of DNA sequence and point mutations by hybridisation in solution is described in this study. The 5'-bispyrene and 3'-naphthalene oligonucleotide probes form an exciplex on hybridisation to target in water and the 5'-bispyrene oligonucleotide alone is an adequate probe to determine concentration of target present. It was also indicated that this system has a potential to identify mismatches and insertions. The aim of this work was to investigate experimental structures and conditions that permit strong exciplex emission for nucleic acid detectors, and show how such exciplexes can register the presence of mismatches as required in SNP analysis. This study revealed that the hybridisation of 5'-bispyrenyl fluorophore to a DNA target results in formation of a fluorescent probe with high signal intensity change and specificity for detecting a complementary target in a homogeneous system. Detection of SNP mutations using this split-probe system is a highly specific, simple, and accessible method to meet the rigorous requirements of pharmacogenomic studies. Thus, it is possible for the system to act as SNP detectors and it shows promise for future applications in genetic testing.

  13. Flexible deep brain neural probes based on a parylene tube structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Kim, Eric; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Jinsheng; Xu, Yong

    2018-01-01

    Most microfabricated neural probes have limited shank length, which prevents them from reaching many deep brain structures. This paper reports deep brain neural probes with ultra-long penetrating shanks based on a simple but novel parylene tube structure. The mechanical strength of the parylene tube shank is temporarily enhanced during implantation by inserting a metal wire. The metal wire can be removed after implantation, making the implanted probe very flexible and thus minimizing the stress caused by micromotions of brain tissues. Optogenetic stimulation and chemical delivery capabilities can be potentially integrated by taking advantage of the tube structure. Single-shank prototypes with a shank length of 18.2 mm have been developed. The microfabrication process comprises of deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of silicon, parylene conformal coating/refilling, and XeF2 isotropic silicon etching. In addition to bench-top insertion characterization, the functionality of developed probes has been preliminarily demonstrated by implanting into the amygdala of a rat and recording neural signals.

  14. Silver ions-mediated conformational switch: facile design of structure-controllable nucleic acid probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Jishan; Wang, Hao; Jin, Jianyu; Liu, Jinhua; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong; Yang, Ronghua

    2010-08-01

    Conformationally constraint nucleic acid probes were usually designed by forming an intramolecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. The disadvantages of these approaches are the inflexibility and instability in complex environment of the Watson-Crick-based duplex. We report that this hydrogen bonding pattern can be replaced by metal-ligation between specific metal ions and the natural bases. To demonstrate the feasibility of this principle, two linear oligonucleotides and silver ions were examined as models for DNA hybridization assay and adenosine triphosphate detection. The both nucleic acids contain target binding sequences in the middle and cytosine (C)-rich sequences at the lateral portions. The strong interaction between Ag(+) ions and cytosines forms stable C-Ag(+)-C structures, which promises the oligonucleotides to form conformationally constraint formations. In the presence of its target, interaction between the loop sequences and the target unfolds the C-Ag(+)-C structures, and the corresponding probes unfolding can be detected by a change in their fluorescence emission. We discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic opportunities that are provided by using Ag(+) ion complexes instead of traditional Watson-Crick-based duplex. In particular, the intrinsic feature of the metal-ligation motif facilitates the design of functional nucleic acids probes by independently varying the concentration of Ag(+) ions in the medium.

  15. [A new class of exciplex-formed probe detect of specific sequence DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing-Yong; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Lü, Hong-Yan; Wang, Li-Min

    2009-07-01

    The present research was to develop the exciplex-based fluorescence detection of DNA. A SNP-containing region of cytochrome P450 2C9 DNA systems was evaluated to define some of the structural and associated requirement of this new class of exciplex-formed probe, and a 24-base target was selected which contains single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in genes coding for cytochrome P450. The two probes were all 12-base to give coverage of a 24-base target region to ensure specificity within the human genome. Exciplex partners used in this study were prepared using analogous phosphoramide attachment to the 3'- or 5'-phosphate group of the appropriate oligonucleotide probes. The target effectively assembled its own detector by hybridization from components which were non-fluorescent at the detection wavelength, leading to the huge improvement in terms of decreased background. This research provides details of the effects of different partner, position of partners and different excitation wavelengths for the split-oligonucleotide probe system for exciplex-based fluorescence detection of DNA. This study demonstrates that the emission intensity of the excimer formed by new pyrene derivative is the highest in these excimer and exciplex, and the excimer is easy to be formed and not sensitive to the position of partners. However the exciplex formed by the new pyrene derivative and naphthalene emitted strongly at -505 nm with large Stokes shifts (120-130 nm), and the monomer emission at 390 and 410 nm is nearly zero. Excitation wavelength of 400 nm is the best for I(e505)/I(m410) (exciplex emission at 505 nm/monomer emission at 410 nm) of the exciplex. This method features lower background and high sensitivity. Moreover the exciplex is sensitive to the steric factor, different position of partners and microenvironment, so this exciplex system is promising and could be tried to identify the SNP genes.

  16. Estimating thermal diffusivity and specific heat from needle probe thermal conductivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity and specific heat can be estimated from thermal conductivity measurements made using a standard needle probe and a suitably high data acquisition rate. Thermal properties are calculated from the measured temperature change in a sample subjected to heating by a needle probe. Accurate thermal conductivity measurements are obtained from a linear fit to many tens or hundreds of temperature change data points. In contrast, thermal diffusivity calculations require a nonlinear fit to the measured temperature change occurring in the first few tenths of a second of the measurement, resulting in a lower accuracy than that obtained for thermal conductivity. Specific heat is calculated from the ratio of thermal conductivity to diffusivity, and thus can have an uncertainty no better than that of the diffusivity estimate. Our thermal conductivity measurements of ice Ih and of tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate, made using a 1.6 mm outer diameter needle probe and a data acquisition rate of 18.2 pointss, agree with published results. Our thermal diffusivity and specific heat results reproduce published results within 25% for ice Ih and 3% for THF hydrate. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Listener: a probe into information based material specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Karmon, Ayelet

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the thinking and making of the architectural research probe Listener. Developed as an interdisciplinary collaboration between textile design and architecture, Listener explores how information based fabrication technologies are challenging the material practices of architecture....... The paper investigates how textile design can be understood as a model for architectural production providing new strategies for material specification and allowing the thinking of material as inherently variegated and performative. The paper traces the two fold information based strategies present...

  18. Probing long-range structural order in SnPc/Ag(111) by umklapp process assisted low-energy angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauernik, Stephan; Hein, Petra; Gurgel, Max; Falke, Julian; Bauer, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is performed on tin-phthalocyanine (SnPc) adsorbed on silver Ag(111). Upon adsorption of SnPc, strongly dispersing bands are observed which are identified as secondary Mahan cones formed by surface umklapp processes acting on photoelectrons from the silver substrate as they transit through the ordered adsorbate layer. We show that the photoemission data carry quantitative structural information on the adsorbate layer similar to what can be obtained from a conventional low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) study. More specifically, we compare photoemission data and LEED data probing an incommensurate-to-commensurate structural phase transition of the adsorbate layer. Based on our results we propose that Mahan-cone spectroscopy operated in a pump-probe configuration can be used in the future to probe structural dynamics at surfaces with a temporal resolution in the sub-100-fs regime.

  19. Quantification of different Eubacterium spp. in human fecal samples with species-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiertz, A; Le Blay, G; Blaut, M

    2000-01-01

    Species-specific 16S rRNA-targeted, Cy3 (indocarbocyanine)-labeled oligonucleotide probes were designed and validated to quantify different Eubacterium species in human fecal samples. Probes were directed at Eubacterium barkeri, E. biforme, E. contortum, E. cylindroides (two probes), E. dolichum, E. hadrum, E. lentum, E. limosum, E. moniliforme, and E. ventriosum. The specificity of the probes was tested with the type strains and a range of common intestinal bacteria. With one exception, none of the probes showed cross-hybridization under stringent conditions. The species-specific probes were applied to fecal samples obtained from 12 healthy volunteers. E. biforme, E. cylindroides, E. hadrum, E. lentum, and E. ventriosum could be determined. All other Eubacterium species for which probes had been designed were under the detection limit of 10(7) cells g (dry weight) of feces(-1). The cell counts obtained are essentially in accordance with the literature data, which are based on colony counts. This shows that whole-cell in situ hybridization with species-specific probes is a valuable tool for the enumeration of Eubacterium species in feces.

  20. Protocols for 16S rDNA Array Analyses of Microbial Communities by Sequence-Specific Labeling of DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Rudi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of complex microbial communities are becoming increasingly important. Bottlenecks in these analyses, however, are the tools to actually describe the biodiversity. Novel protocols for DNA array-based analyses of microbial communities are presented. In these protocols, the specificity obtained by sequence-specific labeling of DNA probes is combined with the possibility of detecting several different probes simultaneously by DNA array hybridization. The gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA was chosen as the target in these analyses. This gene contains both universally conserved regions and regions with relatively high variability. The universally conserved regions are used for PCR amplification primers, while the variable regions are used for the specific probes. Protocols are presented for DNA purification, probe construction, probe labeling, and DNA array hybridizations.

  1. [A novel TaqMan® MGB probe for specifically detecting Streptococcus mutans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Lin, Jiu-Xiang; DU, Ning; Chen, Feng

    2013-10-18

    To design a new TaqMan® MGB probe for improving the specificity of Streptococcus mutans's detection. We extracted six DNA samples from different streptococcal strains for PCR reaction. Conventional nested PCR and TaqMan® MGB real-time PCR were applied independently. The first round of nested PCR was carried out with the bacterial universal primers, while a second PCR was conducted by using primers specific for the 16S rRNA gene of Streptococcus mutans. The TaqMan® MGB probe for Streptococcus mutans was designed from sequence analyses, and the primers were the same as nested PCR. Streptococcus mutans DNA with 2.5 mg/L was sequentially diluted at 5-fold intervals to 0.16 μg/L. Standard DNA samples were used to generate standard curves by TaqMan® MGB real-time PCR. In the nested PCR, the primers specific for Streptococcus mutans also detected Streptococcus gordonii with visible band of 282 bp, giving false-positive results. In the TaqMan® MGB real-time PCR reaction, only Streptococcus mutans was detected. The detection limitation of TaqMan® MGB real-time PCR for Streptococcus mutans 16S rRNA gene was 20 μg/L. We designed a new TaqMan® MGB probe, and successfully set up a PCR based method for detecting oral Streptococcus mutans. TaqMan® MGB real-time PCR is a both specific and sensitive bacterial detection method.

  2. Structural evaluation of thermocouple probes for 241-AZ-101 waste tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanjilal, S.K.

    1994-01-01

    This document reports on the structural analysis of the thermocouple probe to be installed in 241-AZ-101 waste tank. The thermocouple probe is analyzed for normal pump mixing operation and potential earthquake induced loads required by the Hanford Site Design Criteria SDC-4.1

  3. Structural evaluation of thermocouple probes for 241-AZ-101 waste tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanjilal, S.K.

    1994-12-06

    This document reports on the structural analysis of the thermocouple probe to be installed in 241-AZ-101 waste tank. The thermocouple probe is analyzed for normal pump mixing operation and potential earthquake induced loads required by the Hanford Site Design Criteria SDC-4.1.

  4. Potential-specific structure at the hematite-electrolyte interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBriarty, Martin E.; Stubbs, Joanne; Eng, Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2018-02-21

    The atomic-scale structure of interfaces between metal oxides and aqueous electrolytes controls their catalytic, geochemical, and corrosion behavior. Measurements that probe these interfaces in situ provide important details of ion and solvent arrangements, but atomically precise structural models do not exist for common oxide-electrolyte interfaces far from equilibrium. Using a novel cell, we measured the structure of the hematite (a-Fe2O3) (110$\\bar{2}$)-electrolyte interface under controlled electrochemical bias using synchrotron crystal truncation rod X ray scattering. At increasingly cathodic potentials, charge-compensating protonation of surface oxygen groups increases the coverage of specifically bound water while adjacent water layers displace outwardly and became disordered. Returning to open circuit potential leaves the surface in a persistent metastable protonation state. The flux of current and ions at applied potential is thus regulated by a unique interfacial electrolyte environment, suggesting that electrical double layer models should be adapted to the dynamically changing interfacial structure far from equilibrium.

  5. Proximity-activated nanoparticles: in vitro performance of specific structural modification by enzymatic cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam Smith, R; Sewell, Sarah L; Giorgio, Todd D

    2008-01-01

    The development and in vitro performance of a modular nanoscale system capable of specific structural modification by enzymatic activity is described in this work. Due to its small physical size and adaptable characteristics, this system has the potential for utilization in targeted delivery systems and biosensing. Nanoparticle probes were synthesized containing two distinct fluorescent species including a quantum dot base particle and fluorescently labeled cleavable peptide substrate. Activity of these probes was monitored by gel electrophoresis with quantitative cleavage measurements made by fluorometric analysis. The model proximity-activated nanoparticles studied here exhibit significant susceptibility to cleavage by matrix metalloprotease-7 (MMP-7) at physiologically relevant concentrations, with nearly complete cleavage of available substrate molecules after 24 hours. This response is specific to MMP-7 enzyme activity, as cleavage is completely inhibited with the addition of EDTA. Utilization of enzyme-specific modification is a sensitive approach with broad applications for targeted therapeutics and biosensing. The versatility of this nanoparticle system is highlighted in its modular design, as it has the capability to integrate characteristics for detection, biosensing, targeting, and payload delivery into a single, multifunctional nanoparticle structure. PMID:18488420

  6. Quantification of Different Eubacterium spp. in Human Fecal Samples with Species-Specific 16S rRNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Schwiertz, Andreas; Le Blay, Gwenaelle; Blaut, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Species-specific 16S rRNA-targeted, Cy3 (indocarbocyanine)-labeled oligonucleotide probes were designed and validated to quantify different Eubacterium species in human fecal samples. Probes were directed at Eubacterium barkeri, E. biforme, E. contortum, E. cylindroides (two probes), E. dolichum, E. hadrum, E. lentum, E. limosum, E. moniliforme, and E. ventriosum. The specificity of the probes was tested with the type strains and a range of common intestinal bacteria. With one exception, none...

  7. Development of Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the nucleotide sequences of a DNA probe Pig27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Hwang, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Young-Seok; Park, Jae-Yoon; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the P. intermedia-specific DNA probe. The P. intermedia-specific DNA probe was screened by inverted dot blot hybridization and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. The nucleotide sequences of the species-specific DNA probes were determined using a chain termination method. Southern blot analysis showed that the DNA probe, Pig27, detected only the genomic DNA of P. intermedia strains. PCR showed that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, had species-specificity for P. intermedia. The detection limits of the PCR primer sets were 0.4pg of the purified genomic DNA of P. intermedia ATCC 49046. These results suggest that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, could be useful in the detection of P. intermedia as well as in the development of a PCR kit in epidemiological studies related to periodontal diseases. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Probing the pomeron structure with quasi-real photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteaga-Romero, N.; Kessler, P.

    1986-03-01

    Following a recent suggestion of Ingelman and Schlein, we here consider the possibility of probing the gluonic structure of the pomeron with quasi-real photons, i.e. in reactions e p → e p + 2 jets + X taking place at an ep collider such as HERA

  9. New Concepts of Fluorescent Probes for Specific Detection of DNA Sequences: Bis-Modified Oligonucleotides in Excimer and Exciplex Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbaj A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of single base mismatches in DNA is important for diagnostics, treatment of genetic diseases, and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Highly sensitive, specific assays are needed to investigate genetic samples from patients. The use of a simple fluorescent nucleoside analogue in detection of DNA sequence and point mutations by hybridisation in solution is described in this study. The 5’-bispyrene and 3’-naphthalene oligonucleotide probes form an exciplex on hybridisation to target in water and the 5’-bispyrene oligonucleotide alone is an adequate probe to determine concentration of target present. It was also indicated that this system has a potential to identify mismatches and insertions. The aim of this work was to investigate experimental structures and conditions that permit strong exciplex emission for nucleic acid detectors, and show how such exciplexes can register the presence of mismatches as required in SNP analysis. This study revealed that the hybridisation of 5'-bispyrenyl fluorophore to a DNA target results in formation of a fluorescent probe with high signal intensity change and specificity for detecting a complementary target in a homogeneous system. Detection of SNP mutations using this split-probe system is a highly specific, simple, and accessible method to meet the rigorous requirements of pharmacogenomic studies. Thus, it is possible for the system to act as SNP detectors and it shows promise for future applications in genetic testing.

  10. Nuclear reactions as structure probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Bernard; Cugnon, Joseph; Roussel-Chomaz, Patricia; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Oliveira Santos, Francois de; Bauge, Eric; Poves, Alfredo; Keeley, Nicholas; Simenel, Cedric; Avez, Benoit; Lacroix, Denis; Baye, Daniel; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Pons, Alexandre

    2007-09-01

    This publication gathers courses which aim at giving a view on new experiments which are performed by using radioactive beams, notably low intensity beams, in different accelerators, and allow the structure of very exotic nuclei to be characterized. Experimental as well as theoretical aspects are thus addressed. The contributions propose: a brief history of nuclear reactions and of instruments used to study them from the discovery of nucleus to the DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation); an overview of nuclear reactions; experimental techniques; the theory of collisions at low energy; resonant elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and astrophysical reactions; to probe nuclear structure with nucleons; shell model and spectroscopic factors; analysis of transfer reactions and determination of spectroscopic factors; microscopic approaches of nuclear dynamics; theoretical aspects of dissociation reactions; experimental aspects of knockout reactions; research in oenology with the chemical characterisation of defective ageing of dry white wines

  11. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS): a novel probe for local structure of glassy solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, J.

    1979-01-01

    The extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is the oscillation in the absorption coefficient extending a few hundred eVs on the high energy side of an x-ray absorption edge. This mode of spectroscopy has recently been realized to be a powerful tool in probing the local atomic structure of all states of matter, particularly with the advent of intense synchrotron radiation. More importantly is the unique ability of EXAFS to probe the structure and dynamics around individual atomic species in a multi-atomic system. In this paper, the physical processes associated with the EXAFS phenomenon will be discussed. Experimental results obtained at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory on some oxide and metallic glasses will be presented. The local structure in these materials are elucidated using a Fourier transform technique

  12. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments.

  13. Karyotypic relationships among Equus grevyi, Equus burchelli and domestic horse defined using horse chromosome arm-specific probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, P; Kubickova, S; Zrnova, E; Horin, P; Vahala, J; Rubes, J

    2007-01-01

    Using laser microdissection we prepared a set of horse chromosome arm-specific probes. Most of the probes were generated from horse chromosomes, some of them were derived from Equus zebra hartmannae. The set of probes were hybridized onto E. grevyi chromosomes in order to establish a genome-wide chromosomal correspondence between this zebra and horse. The use of arm-specific probes provided us with more information on the mutual arrangement of the genomes than we could obtain by means of whole-chromosome paints generated by flow sorting, even if we used reciprocal painting with probe sets from both species. By comparison of our results and results of comparative mapping in E. burchelli, we also established the chromosomal correspondence between E. grevyi and E. burchelli, providing evidence for a very close karyotypic relationship between these two zebra species. Establishment of the comparative map for E. grevyi contributes to the knowledge of the karyotypic phylogeny in the Equidae family.

  14. Dephasing in semiconductor-superconductor structures by coupling to a voltage probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Flensberg, Karsten

    2000-01-01

    We study dephasing in semiconductor-superconductor structures caused by coupling to a voltage probe. We consider structures where the semiconductor consists of two scattering regions between which partial dephasing is possible. As a particular example we consider a situation with a double barrier...

  15. Probing the structure of heterogeneous diluted materials by diffraction tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuet, Pierre; Welcomme, Eléonore; Dooryhée, Eric; Susini, Jean; Hodeau, Jean-Louis; Walter, Philippe

    2008-06-01

    The advent of nanosciences calls for the development of local structural probes, in particular to characterize ill-ordered or heterogeneous materials. Furthermore, because materials properties are often related to their heterogeneity and the hierarchical arrangement of their structure, different structural probes covering a wide range of scales are required. X-ray diffraction is one of the prime structural methods but suffers from a relatively poor detection limit, whereas transmission electron analysis involves destructive sample preparation. Here we show the potential of coupling pencil-beam tomography with X-ray diffraction to examine unidentified phases in nanomaterials and polycrystalline materials. The demonstration is carried out on a high-pressure pellet containing several carbon phases and on a heterogeneous powder containing chalcedony and iron pigments. The present method enables a non-invasive structural refinement with a weight sensitivity of one part per thousand. It enables the extraction of the scattering patterns of amorphous and crystalline compounds with similar atomic densities and compositions. Furthermore, such a diffraction-tomography experiment can be carried out simultaneously with X-ray fluorescence, Compton and absorption tomographies, enabling a multimodal analysis of prime importance in materials science, chemistry, geology, environmental science, medical science, palaeontology and cultural heritage.

  16. Homogeneous versus heterogeneous probes for microbial ecological microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jin-Woo; Park, Yong-Ha

    2006-07-01

    Microbial ecological microarrays have been developed for investigating the composition and functions of microorganism communities in environmental niches. These arrays include microbial identification microarrays, which use oligonucleotides, gene fragments or microbial genomes as probes. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of each type of probe are reviewed. Oligonucleotide probes are currently useful for probing uncultivated bacteria that are not amenable to gene fragment probing, whereas the functional gene fragments amplified randomly from microbial genomes require phylogenetic and hierarchical categorization before use as microbial identification probes, despite their high resolution for both specificity and sensitivity. Until more bacteria are sequenced and gene fragment probes are thoroughly validated, heterogeneous bacterial genome probes will provide a simple, sensitive and quantitative tool for exploring the ecosystem structure.

  17. PNA-COMBO-FISH: From combinatorial probe design in silico to vitality compatible, specific labelling of gene targets in cell nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Patrick; Rößler, Jens; Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta [University of Heidelberg, Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schmitt, Eberhard, E-mail: eschmitt@kip.uni-heidelberg.de [University of Heidelberg, Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); University of Göttingen, Institute for Numerical and Applied Mathematics, Lotzestraße 16-18, D-37083 Göttingen (Germany); Hausmann, Michael, E-mail: hausmann@kip.uni-heidelberg.de [University of Heidelberg, Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Recently, advantages concerning targeting specificity of PCR constructed oligonucleotide FISH probes in contrast to established FISH probes, e.g. BAC clones, have been demonstrated. These techniques, however, are still using labelling protocols with DNA denaturing steps applying harsh heat treatment with or without further denaturing chemical agents. COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH) allows the design of specific oligonucleotide probe combinations in silico. Thus, being independent from primer libraries or PCR laboratory conditions, the probe sequences extracted by computer sequence data base search can also be synthesized as single stranded PNA-probes (Peptide Nucleic Acid probes). Gene targets can be specifically labelled with at least about 20 PNA-probes obtaining visibly background free specimens. By using appropriately designed triplex forming oligonucleotides, the denaturing procedures can completely be omitted. These results reveal a significant step towards oligonucleotide-FISH maintaining the 3D-nanostructure and even the viability of the cell target. The method is demonstrated with the detection of Her2/neu and GRB7 genes, which are indicators in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy. - Highlights: • Denaturation free protocols preserve 3D architecture of chromosomes and nuclei. • Labelling sets are determined in silico for duplex and triplex binding. • Probes are produced chemically with freely chosen backbones and base variants. • Peptide nucleic acid backbones reduce hindering charge interactions. • Intercalating side chains stabilize binding of short oligonucleotides.

  18. PNA-COMBO-FISH: From combinatorial probe design in silico to vitality compatible, specific labelling of gene targets in cell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Patrick; Rößler, Jens; Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Schmitt, Eberhard; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Recently, advantages concerning targeting specificity of PCR constructed oligonucleotide FISH probes in contrast to established FISH probes, e.g. BAC clones, have been demonstrated. These techniques, however, are still using labelling protocols with DNA denaturing steps applying harsh heat treatment with or without further denaturing chemical agents. COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH) allows the design of specific oligonucleotide probe combinations in silico. Thus, being independent from primer libraries or PCR laboratory conditions, the probe sequences extracted by computer sequence data base search can also be synthesized as single stranded PNA-probes (Peptide Nucleic Acid probes). Gene targets can be specifically labelled with at least about 20 PNA-probes obtaining visibly background free specimens. By using appropriately designed triplex forming oligonucleotides, the denaturing procedures can completely be omitted. These results reveal a significant step towards oligonucleotide-FISH maintaining the 3D-nanostructure and even the viability of the cell target. The method is demonstrated with the detection of Her2/neu and GRB7 genes, which are indicators in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy. - Highlights: • Denaturation free protocols preserve 3D architecture of chromosomes and nuclei. • Labelling sets are determined in silico for duplex and triplex binding. • Probes are produced chemically with freely chosen backbones and base variants. • Peptide nucleic acid backbones reduce hindering charge interactions. • Intercalating side chains stabilize binding of short oligonucleotides.

  19. Instant live-cell super-resolution imaging of cellular structures by nanoinjection of fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Simon; van de Linde, Sebastian; Lummer, Martina; Simonis, Matthias; Huser, Thomas; Sauer, Markus

    2015-02-11

    Labeling internal structures within living cells with standard fluorescent probes is a challenging problem. Here, we introduce a novel intracellular staining method that enables us to carefully control the labeling process and provides instant access to the inner structures of living cells. Using a hollow glass capillary with a diameter of <100 nm, we deliver functionalized fluorescent probes directly into the cells by (di)electrophoretic forces. The label density can be adjusted and traced directly during the staining process by fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate the potential of this technique by delivering and imaging a range of commercially available cell-permeable and nonpermeable fluorescent probes to cells.

  20. In situ optical sequencing and structure analysis of a trinucleotide repeat genome region by localization microscopy after specific COMBO-FISH nano-probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhlmüller, M.; Schwarz-Finsterle, J.; Fey, E.; Lux, J.; Bach, M.; Cremer, C.; Hinderhofer, K.; Hausmann, M.; Hildenbrand, G.

    2015-10-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions (like (CGG)n) of chromatin in the genome of cell nuclei can cause neurological disorders such as for example the Fragile-X syndrome. Until now the mechanisms are not clearly understood as to how these expansions develop during cell proliferation. Therefore in situ investigations of chromatin structures on the nanoscale are required to better understand supra-molecular mechanisms on the single cell level. By super-resolution localization microscopy (Spectral Position Determination Microscopy; SPDM) in combination with nano-probing using COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH), novel insights into the nano-architecture of the genome will become possible. The native spatial structure of trinucleotide repeat expansion genome regions was analysed and optical sequencing of repetitive units was performed within 3D-conserved nuclei using SPDM after COMBO-FISH. We analysed a (CGG)n-expansion region inside the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. The number of CGG repeats for a full mutation causing the Fragile-X syndrome was found and also verified by Southern blot. The FMR1 promotor region was similarly condensed like a centromeric region whereas the arrangement of the probes labelling the expansion region seemed to indicate a loop-like nano-structure. These results for the first time demonstrate that in situ chromatin structure measurements on the nanoscale are feasible. Due to further methodological progress it will become possible to estimate the state of trinucleotide repeat mutations in detail and to determine the associated chromatin strand structural changes on the single cell level. In general, the application of the described approach to any genome region will lead to new insights into genome nano-architecture and open new avenues for understanding mechanisms and their relevance in the development of heredity diseases.

  1. Activity-Based Probes for Isoenzyme- and Site-Specific Functional Characterization of Glutathione S -Transferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoddard, Ethan G. [Chemical Biology and Exposure; Killinger, Bryan J. [Chemical Biology and Exposure; Nair, Reji N. [Chemical Biology and Exposure; Sadler, Natalie C. [Chemical Biology and Exposure; Volk, Regan F. [Chemical Biology and Exposure; Purvine, Samuel O. [Chemical Biology and Exposure; Shukla, Anil K. [Chemical Biology and Exposure; Smith, Jordan N. [Chemical Biology and Exposure; Wright, Aaron T. [Chemical Biology and Exposure

    2017-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) comprise a highly diverse family of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes whose shared function is the conjugation of reduced glutathione to various endo- and xenobiotics. Although the conglomerate activity of these enzymes can be measured by colorimetric assays, measurement of the individual contribution from specific isoforms and their contribution to the detoxification of xenobiotics in complex biological samples has not been possible. For this reason, we have developed two activity-based probes that characterize active glutathione transferases in mammalian tissues. The GST active site is comprised of a glutathione binding “G site” and a distinct substrate binding “H site”. Therefore, we developed (1) a glutathione-based photoaffinity probe (GSH-ABP) to target the “G site”, and (2) a probe designed to mimic a substrate molecule and show “H site” activity (GST-ABP). The GSH-ABP features a photoreactive moiety for UV-induced covalent binding to GSTs and glutathione-binding enzymes. The GST-ABP is a derivative of a known mechanism-based GST inhibitor that binds within the active site and inhibits GST activity. Validation of probe targets and “G” and “H” site specificity was carried out using a series of competitors in liver homogenates. Herein, we present robust tools for the novel characterization of enzyme- and active site-specific GST activity in mammalian model systems.

  2. Real-Time Probing of Structural Dynamics by Interaction between Chromophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation of structural dynamics in excited-state cations probed in real-time by femtosecond timeresolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy. From photoelectron spectroscopy data on 1,3-dibromopropane we conclude that the pump pulse ionizes the molecule, populating an excited...

  3. Smart near-infrared fluorescence probes with donor-acceptor structure for in vivo detection of β-amyloid deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mengchao; Ono, Masahiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Liu, Boli; Saji, Hideo

    2014-03-05

    The deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the parenchymal and cortical brain is accepted as the main pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, early detection of AD still presents a challenge. With the assistance of molecular imaging techniques, imaging agents specifically targeting Aβ plaques in the brain may lead to the early diagnosis of AD. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a series of smart near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging probes with donor-acceptor architecture bridged by a conjugated π-electron chain for Aβ plaques. The chemical structure of these NIRF probes is completely different from Congo Red and Thioflavin-T. Probes with a longer conjugated π system (carbon-carbon double bond) displayed maximum emission in PBS (>650 nm), which falls in the best range for NIRF probes. These probes were proved to have affinity to Aβ plaques in fluorescent staining of brain sections from an AD patient and double transgenic mice, as well as in an in vitro binding assay using Aβ(1-42) aggregates. One probe with high affinity (K(i) = 37 nM, K(d) = 27 nM) was selected for in vivo imaging. It can penetrate the blood-brain barrier of nude mice efficiently and is quickly washed out of the normal brain. Moreover, after intravenous injection of this probe, 22-month-old APPswe/PSEN1 mice exhibited a higher relative signal than control mice over the same period of time, and ex vivo fluorescent observations confirmed the existence of Aβ plaques. In summary, this probe meets most of the requirements for a NIRF contrast agent for the detection of Aβ plaques both in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Typing for HLA-DPB1*03 and HLA-DPB1*06 using allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. Detection of "new" DPB1*06 variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1989-01-01

    DP gene typing using in vitro DNA amplification combined with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes has recently been reported. The resulting DNA amplification was specific for the HLA-DPB locus. Typing for the individual DPB alleles was exclusively dependent on the hybridizations of the probe...

  5. Recent Advances in Target Characterization and Identification by Photoaffinity Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang J. Chung

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Target identification of biologically active molecules such as natural products, synthetic small molecules, peptides, and oligonucleotides mainly relies on affinity chromatography, activity-based probes, or photoaffinity labeling (PAL. Amongst them, activity-based probes and PAL have offered great advantages in target identification technology due to their ability to form covalent bonds with the corresponding targets. Activity-based probe technology mainly relies on the chemical reactivity of the target proteins, thereby limiting the majority of the biological targets to enzymes or proteins which display reactive residues at the probe-binding site. In general, the probes should bear a reactive moiety such as an epoxide, a Michael acceptor, or a reactive alkyl halide in their structures. On the other hand, photoaffinity probes (PAPs are composed of a target-specific ligand and a photoactivatable functional group. When bound to the corresponding target proteins and activated with wavelength-specific light, PAPs generate highly reactive chemical species that covalently cross-link proximal amino acid residues. This process is better known as PAL and is widely employed to identify cellular targets of biologically active molecules. This review highlights recent advances in target identification by PAL, with a focus on the structure and chemistry of the photoaffinity probes developed in the recent decade, coupled to the target proteins identified using these probes.

  6. Designing Probes for Immunodiagnostics: Structural Insights into an Epitope Targeting Burkholderia Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Riccardo; Matterazzo, Elena; Amabili, Marco; Peri, Claudio; Gori, Alessandro; Gagni, Paola; Chiari, Marcella; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Cretich, Marina; Bolognesi, Martino; Colombo, Giorgio; Gourlay, Louise J

    2017-10-13

    Structure-based epitope prediction drives the design of diagnostic peptidic probes to reveal specific antibodies elicited in response to infections. We previously identified a highly immunoreactive epitope from the peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (Pal) antigen from Burkholderia pseudomallei, which could also diagnose Burkholderia cepacia infections. Here, considering the high phylogenetic conservation within Burkholderia species, we ask whether cross-reactivity can be reciprocally displayed by the synthetic epitope from B. cenocepacia. We perform comparative analyses of the conformational preferences and diagnostic performances of the corresponding epitopes from the two Burkholderia species when presented in the context of the full-length proteins or as isolated peptides. The effects of conformation on the diagnostic potential and cross-reactivity of Pal peptide epitopes are rationalized on the basis of the 1.8 Å crystal structure of B. cenocepacia Pal and through computational analyses. Our results are discussed in the context of designing new diagnostic molecules for the early detection of infectious diseases.

  7. The (n,p) reaction as a probe of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, K.P.; Celler, A.

    1988-08-01

    An account is given of some results of studies of the (n,p) reaction on nuclear targets at TRIUMF. The (n,p) reaction, inducing spin flip transitions in isospin space, appears to exhibit a unique sensitivity to certain aspects of nuclear structure. The TRIUMF facility is the first to exploit the (n,p) reaction as a detailed probe of nuclear structure at energies above 65 MeV. In the (n,p) reaction Fermi transitions are absent, but there is a dramatic impact on Gamow-Teller and other collective transactions. Some nuclear transition matrix elements can be estimated on the basis of (n,p) measurements. Experiments have been carried out at TRIUMF on Li 6 , Fe 5 4, and Zr 9 0 targets. The calibration of the (n,p) reaction as a probe of the Gamow-Teller strength B + GT has been achieved for three targets. (L.L.) (45 refs., 10 figs.)

  8. Sandwich nucleic acid hybridization: a method with a universally usable labeled probe for various specific tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, H.; Leser, U.; Haus, M.; Gu, S.Y.; Pathmanathan, R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of recombinant m13 phages as hybridization probes offers a considerable advantage over the commonly used recombinant plasmids as the preparation of the DNA probe is very simple and it can easily be labeled directly, e.g. with isotopes with long half-life like 125 I and used for hybridization. However, as the application of nucleic acid hybridization for diagnostic and epidemiological purposes becomes almost unavoidable, the logistic problems of keeping numerous individually labeled hybridization probes increase considerably and may reach prohibitory levels in less well-equipped laboratories. In a new sandwich technique, the first step involves hybridization with an unlabeled recombinant m13 DNA carrying an insert of the desired specificity. In a second step a universally usable labeled probe directed against the m13 part of the recombinant phage DNA is applied. This reduces considerably the problem of preparing and keeping multiple labeled probes in stock. (Auth.)

  9. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  10. Probing ADAMTS13 substrate specificity using phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl C Desch

    Full Text Available Von Willebrand factor (VWF is a large, multimeric protein that regulates hemostasis by tethering platelets to the subendothelial matrix at sites of vascular damage. The procoagulant activity of plasma VWF correlates with the length of VWF multimers, which is proteolytically controlled by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. To probe ADAMTS13 substrate specificity, we created phage display libraries containing randomly mutated residues of a minimal ADAMTS13 substrate fragment of VWF, termed VWF73. The libraries were screened for phage particles displaying VWF73 mutant peptides that were resistant to proteolysis by ADAMTS13. These peptides exhibited the greatest mutation frequency near the ADAMTS13 scissile residues. Kinetic assays using mutant and wild-type substrates demonstrated excellent agreement between rates of cleavage for mutant phage particles and the corresponding mutant peptides. Cleavage resistance of selected mutations was tested in vivo using hydrodynamic injection of corresponding full-length expression plasmids into VWF-deficient mice. These studies confirmed the resistance to cleavage resulting from select amino acid substitutions and uncovered evidence of alternate cleavage sites and recognition by other proteases in the circulation of ADAMTS13 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the key role of specific amino acids residues including P3-P2' and P11', for substrate specificity and emphasize the importance in flowing blood of other ADAMTS13-VWF exosite interactions outside of VWF73.

  11. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper J. van Thor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/σI must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe” which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ΔF, in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.

  12. Fluorescent eosin probe in investigations of structural changes in glycated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdin, A. B.; Kochubey, V. I.; Mel'Nikov, A. G.

    2010-08-01

    The possibility of using the luminescent-kinetic probe method to investigate structural changes in bovine serum albumin (BSA) upon nonenzymatic thermal glycation is studied. An increase in the glycation time lead to a decrease in the intensity of the probe (eosin) fluorescence and to a long-wavelength shift of its maximum, as well as to an increase in the eosin phosphorescence intensity, which indicates that eosin binds to hydrophobic regions of protein at any times of incubation of BSA with glucose. From a decrease in the rate constant of the triplet-triplet energy transfer between the donor (eosin) and acceptor (anthracene) bound to proteins, it is found that the changes observed in the spectral characteristics of eosin are caused by structural changes in albumin globules as a result of glycosylation.

  13. TMG-chitotriomycin as a probe for the prediction of substrate specificity of β-N-acetylhexosaminidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Hiroto; Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Hatanaka, Tadashi; Nitoda, Teruhiko

    2013-06-28

    TMG-chitotriomycin (1) produced by the actinomycete Streptomyces annulatus NBRC13369 was examined as a probe for the prediction of substrate specificity of β-N-acetylhexosaminidases (HexNAcases). According to the results of inhibition assays, 14 GH20 HexNAcases from various organisms were divided into 1-sensitive and 1-insensitive enzymes. Three representatives of each group were investigated for their substrate specificity. The 1-sensitive HexNAcases hydrolyzed N-acetylchitooligosaccharides but not N-glycan-type oligosaccharides, whereas the 1-insensitive enzymes hydrolyzed N-glycan-type oligosaccharides but not N-acetylchitooligosaccharides, indicating that TMG-chitotriomycin can be used as a molecular probe to distinguish between chitin-degrading HexNAcases and glycoconjugate-processing HexNAcases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. HybProbes-based real-time PCR assay for specific identification of Streptomyces scabies and Streptomyces europaeiscabiei, the potato common scab pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, R; Falardeau, J; Avis, T J; Tambong, J T

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a HybProbes-based real-time PCR assay targeting the trpB gene for specific identification of Streptomyces scabies and Streptomyces europaeiscabiei. Four primer pairs and a fluorescent probe were designed and evaluated for specificity in identifying S. scabies and Streptomyces europaeiscabiei, the potato common scab pathogens. The specificity of the HybProbes-based real-time PCR assay was evaluated using 46 bacterial strains, 23 Streptomyces strains and 23 non-Streptomyces bacterial species. Specific and strong fluorescence signals were detected from all nine strains of S. scabies and Streptomyces europaeiscabiei. No fluorescence signal was detected from 14 strains of other Streptomyces species and all non-Streptomyces strains. The identification was corroborated by the melting curve analysis that was performed immediately after the amplification step. Eight of the nine S. scabies and S. europaeiscabiei strains exhibited a unique melting peak, at Tm of 69·1°C while one strain, Warba-6, had a melt peak at Tm of 65·4°C. This difference in Tm peaks could be attributed to a guanine to cytosine mutation in strain Warba-6 at the region spanning the donor HybProbe. The reported HybProbes assay provides a more specific tool for accurate identification of S. scabies and S. europaeiscabiei strains. This study reports a novel assay based on HybProbes chemistry for rapid and accurate identification of the potato common scab pathogens. Since the HybProbes chemistry requires two probes for positive identification, the assay is considered to be more specific than conventional PCR or TaqMan real-time PCR. The developed assay would be a useful tool with great potential in early diagnosis and detection of common scab pathogens of potatoes in infected plants or for surveillance of potatoes grown in soil environment. © 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Radioactive diffusion gaseous probe technique for study adsorbent structure inhomogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyuzin, A.Yu.; Korobkov, V.I.; Bekman, I.N.

    1990-01-01

    One of the versions of the method of diffusion gaseous probe - method of longitudinal shear in combination with autoradiography (ARG) - was used for characterising sorbents and catalysts, which are considered to be promising for reprocessing of sulfur-containing natural gases. Hydrogen sulfide, labelled with 35 S was used as diffusion radioactive probe. Zeolite granules of 4A type and granulated adsorbents on the basis of CR and AM aluminium oxides, which are industrial catalysts of Clauss reaction developed at SNEA company, were used as objects under investigation. It is shown that technique for fabrication of 4A zeolite granules leads to asymmetrical pore distribution over the granule diameter. Technique for AM granule fabrication leads to occuRrence of local inhomogeneities of the structure in the form of narrow coaxial rings with decreased or increased local adsorption ability. Granules of adsorbent of CR type are characterized by rather homogeneous structure. It is recommended to use the mentioned method for industrial adsorbent diagnosis

  16. Allele specific hybridization using oligonucleotide probes of very high specific activity: Discrimination of the human β/sup A/ and β/sup S/-globin genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studencki, A.B.; Wallace, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    The repair activity of E. coli DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) was used to prepare nonadecanucleotide hybridization probes which were complementary either to the normal human β-globin (β/sup A/) or to the sickle cell human β-globin (β/sup S/) gene. Template directed polymerization of highly radiolabeled α-/sup 32/P-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (3200, 5000 and/or 7800 Ci/mmol) onto nonamer and decamer primers produced probes with specific activities ranging from 1.0 - 2.0 x 10/sup 10/ dpm/μg. The extremely high specific activities of these probes made it possible to detect the β/sup A/ and β/sup S/ single copy gene sequences in as little as 1 μg of total human genomic DNA as well as to discriminate between the homozygous and heterozygous states. This means that it was possible to detect 0.5 - 1.0 x 10/sup -18/ moles of a given single copy sequence

  17. Time-resolved pump-probe X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of Gaq3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicke, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    of Gaq 3 was analyzed and presents one of the first time-resolved measurements at PETRA III. In addition to pump-probe XAFS spectroscopy, different phases of Gaq 3 and Alq 3 in form of powder, crystal, film and solution were analyzed by means of UV-VIS and fluorescence spectroscopy. Electronic and optical differences of the molecules related to the particular form could be revealed. Gaq 3 in benzyl alcohol solution and Gaq 3 in crystalline form exhibit very similar optical features, indicating similar structural properties. The various preparation techniques used to obtain the sample forms are presented in this thesis. Analyzing the differences among the diverse sample forms helps to answer the question on how the conclusions extracted from sample systems in liquid form can be transferred to the ones in crystal form or film form, the latter appearing in organic light emitting diodes. The future goal of this research project is the direct measurement of the excited state structure of Alq 3 as well as Gaq 3 , and similar sample systems by time-resolved X-ray crystallography. The sample crystals have to fulfill specific requirements especially for the laser induced photoexcitation process. In this thesis a newly developed preparation method for low roughness singe crystal slices is presented. These crystal slices can be used for future perspective time-resolved X-ray crystallography experiments.

  18. Probing ADAMTS13 Substrate Specificity using Phage Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Karl C.; Kretz, Colin; Yee, Andrew; Gildersleeve, Robert; Metzger, Kristin; Agrawal, Nidhi; Cheng, Jane; Ginsburg, David

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a large, multimeric protein that regulates hemostasis by tethering platelets to the subendothelial matrix at sites of vascular damage. The procoagulant activity of plasma VWF correlates with the length of VWF multimers, which is proteolytically controlled by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. To probe ADAMTS13 substrate specificity, we created phage display libraries containing randomly mutated residues of a minimal ADAMTS13 substrate fragment of VWF, termed VWF73. The libraries were screened for phage particles displaying VWF73 mutant peptides that were resistant to proteolysis by ADAMTS13. These peptides exhibited the greatest mutation frequency near the ADAMTS13 scissile residues. Kinetic assays using mutant and wild-type substrates demonstrated excellent agreement between rates of cleavage for mutant phage particles and the corresponding mutant peptides. Cleavage resistance of selected mutations was tested in vivo using hydrodynamic injection of corresponding full-length expression plasmids into VWF-deficient mice. These studies confirmed the resistance to cleavage resulting from select amino acid substitutions and uncovered evidence of alternate cleavage sites and recognition by other proteases in the circulation of ADAMTS13 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the key role of specific amino acids residues including P3-P2’ and P11’, for substrate specificity and emphasize the importance in flowing blood of other ADAMTS13–VWF exosite interactions outside of VWF73. PMID:25849793

  19. Ion spectral structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradas, C.; Zhang, J.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades several missions have recorded the presence of dynamic spectral features of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. Previous studies have reported single "nose-like" structures occurring alone and simultaneous nose-like structures (up to three). These ion structures are named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. They constitute the observational signatures of ion acceleration, transport, and loss in the global magnetosphere. The HOPE mass spectrometer onboard the Van Allen Probes measures energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet, where these ion structures are observed. We present a statistical study of nose-like structures, using 2-years measurements from the HOPE instrument. The results provide important details about the spatial distribution (dependence on geocentric distance), spectral features of the structures (differences among species), and geomagnetic conditions under which these structures occur.

  20. Development of specific oligonucleotide probes for the identification and in situ detection of hydrocarbon-degrading Alcanivorax strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syutsubo, K; Kishira, H; Harayama, S

    2001-06-01

    The genus Alcanivorax comprises diverse hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria. Novel 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide DNA probes (ALV735 and ALV735-b) were developed to quantify two subgroups of the Alcanivorax/Fundibacter group by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and the conditions for the single-mismatch discrimination of the probes were optimized. The specificity of the probes was improved further using a singly mismatched oligonucleotide as a competitor. The growth of Alcanivorax cells in crude oil-contaminated sea water under the biostimulation condition was investigated by FISH with the probe ALV735, which targeted the main cluster of the Alcanivorax/Fundibacter group. The size of the Alcanivorax population increased with increasing incubation time and accounted for 91% of the 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) count after incubation for 2 weeks. The probes developed in this study are useful for detecting Alcanivorax populations in petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microbial consortia.

  1. Development and use of fluorescent 16S rRNA-targeted probes for the specific detection of Methylophaga species by in situ hybridization in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, Monique; Regnault, Béatrice; Grimont, Patrick

    2003-09-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria are widespread in nature. They may play an important role in the cycling of carbon and in the metabolism of dimethylsulfide in a marine environment. Bacteria belonging to the genus Methylophaga are a unique group of aerobic, halophilic, non-methane-utilizing methylotrophs. Two 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were developed for the specific detection of Methylophaga species, marine methylobacteria, by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Probe MPH-730 was highly specific for all members of the genus Methylophaga while probe MPHm-994 targeted exclusively M. marina. The application of these probes were demonstrated by the detection of Methylophaga species in enrichment cultures from various marine sediments. All isolates recovered were visualized by using the genus specific probe MPH-730. The results were confirmed by 16S rDNA sequencing which demonstrated that all selected isolates belong to Methylophaga. Five isolates could be detected by the M. marina-specific probe MPHm-994 and were confirmed by rRNA gene restriction pattern (ribotyping). With the development of these specific probes, fluorescence in situ hybridization shows that the genus Methylophaga is widespread in marine samples.

  2. Sensing site-specific structural characteristics and chirality using vibrational circular dichroism of isotope labeled peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiderling, Timothy A

    2017-12-01

    Isotope labeling has a long history in chemistry as a tool for probing structure, offering enhanced sensitivity, or enabling site selection with a wide range of spectroscopic tools. Chirality sensitive methods such as electronic circular dichroism are global structural tools and have intrinsically low resolution. Consequently, they are generally insensitive to modifications to enhance site selectivity. The use of isotope labeling to modify vibrational spectra with unique resolvable frequency shifts can provide useful site-specific sensitivity, and these methods have been recently more widely expanded in biopolymer studies. While the spectral shifts resulting from changes in isotopic mass can provide resolution of modes from specific parts of the molecule and can allow detection of local change in structure with perturbation, these shifts alone do not directly indicate structure or chirality. With vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), the shifted bands and their resultant sign patterns can be used to indicate local conformations in labeled biopolymers, particularly if multiple labels are used and if their coupling is theoretically modeled. This mini-review discusses selected examples of the use of labeling specific amides in peptides to develop local structural insight with VCD spectra. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Chemical probes of metal cluster structure--Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, E.K.; Zhu, L.; Ho, J.; Riley, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical reactivity is one of the few methods currently available for investigating the geometrical structure of isolated transition metal clusters. In this paper we summarize what is currently known about the structures of clusters of four transition metals, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu, in the size range from 13 to 180 atoms. Chemical probes used to determine structural information include reactions with H 2 (D 2 ), H 2 0, NH 3 and N 2 . Measurements at both low coverage and at saturation are discussed

  4. Probing the structural basis of oxygen binding in a cofactor-independent dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunhua; Fielding, Elisha N; Condurso, Heather L; Bruner, Steven D

    2017-07-01

    The enzyme DpgC is included in the small family of cofactor-independent dioxygenases. The chemistry of DpgC is uncommon as the protein binds and utilizes dioxygen without the aid of a metal or organic cofactor. Previous structural and biochemical studies identified the substrate-binding mode and the components of the active site that are important in the catalytic mechanism. In addition, the results delineated a putative binding pocket and migration pathway for the co-substrate dioxygen. Here, structural biology is utilized, along with site-directed mutagenesis, to probe the assigned dioxygen-binding pocket. The key residues implicated in dioxygen trafficking were studied to probe the process of binding, activation and chemistry. The results support the proposed chemistry and provide insight into the general mechanism of dioxygen binding and activation.

  5. Multi-point probe for testing electrical properties and a method of producing a multi-point probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A multi-point probe for testing electrical properties of a number of specific locations of a test sample comprises a supporting body defining a first surface, a first multitude of conductive probe arms (101-101'''), each of the probe arms defining a proximal end and a distal end. The probe arms...... of contact with the supporting body, and a maximum thickness perpendicular to its perpendicular bisector and its line of contact with the supporting body. Each of the probe arms has a specific area or point of contact (111-111''') at its distal end for contacting a specific location among the number...... of specific locations of the test sample. At least one of the probe arms has an extension defining a pointing distal end providing its specific area or point of contact located offset relative to its perpendicular bisector....

  6. An algorithm and program for finding sequence specific oligo-nucleotide probes for species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tautz Diethard

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of species or species groups with specific oligo-nucleotides as molecular signatures is becoming increasingly popular for bacterial samples. However, it shows also great promise for other small organisms that are taxonomically difficult to tract. Results We have devised here an algorithm that aims to find the optimal probes for any given set of sequences. The program requires only a crude alignment of these sequences as input and is optimized for performance to deal also with very large datasets. The algorithm is designed such that the position of mismatches in the probes influences the selection and makes provision of single nucleotide outloops. Program implementations are available for Linux and Windows.

  7. Optogenetic interrogation of neural circuits: technology for probing mammalian brain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Gradinaru, Viviana; Adamantidis, Antoine R; Durand, Remy; Airan, Raag D; de Lecea, Luis; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of the neural substrates underlying complex animal behaviors depends on precise activity control tools, as well as compatible readout methods. Recent developments in optogenetics have addressed this need, opening up new possibilities for systems neuroscience. Interrogation of even deep neural circuits can be conducted by directly probing the necessity and sufficiency of defined circuit elements with millisecond-scale, cell type-specific optical perturbations, coupled with suitable readouts such as electrophysiology, optical circuit dynamics measures and freely moving behavior in mammals. Here we collect in detail our strategies for delivering microbial opsin genes to deep mammalian brain structures in vivo, along with protocols for integrating the resulting optical control with compatible readouts (electrophysiological, optical and behavioral). The procedures described here, from initial virus preparation to systems-level functional readout, can be completed within 4–5 weeks. Together, these methods may help in providing circuit-level insight into the dynamics underlying complex mammalian behaviors in health and disease. PMID:20203662

  8. Sequence- and structure-dependent DNA base dynamics: Synthesis, structure, and dynamics of site and sequence specifically spin-labeled DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaltenstein, A.; Robinson, B.H.; Hopkins, P.B.

    1989-01-01

    A nitroxide spin-labeled analogue of thymidine (1a), in which the methyl group is replaced by an acetylene-tethered nitroxide, was evaluated as a probe for structural and dynamics studies of sequence specifically spin-labeled DNA. Residue 1a was incorporated into synthetic deoxyoligonucleotides by using automated phosphite triester methods. 1 H NMR, CD, and thermal denaturation studies indicate that 1a (T) does not significantly alter the structure of 5'-d(CGCGAATT*CGCG) from that of the native dodecamer. EPR studies on monomer, single-stranded, and duplexed DNA show that 1a readily distinguishes environments of different rigidity. Comparison of the general line-shape features of the observed EPR spectra of several small duplexes (12-mer, 24-mer) with simulated EPR spectra assuming isotropic motion suggests that probe 1a monitors global tumbling of small duplexes. Increasing the length of the DNA oligomers results in significant deviation from isotropic motion, with line-shape features similar to those of calculated spectra of objects with isotropic rotational correlation times of 20-100 ns. EPR spectra of a spin-labeled GT mismatch and a T bulge in long DNAs are distinct from those of spin-labeled Watson-Crick paired DNAs, further demonstrating the value of EPR as a tool in the evaluation of local dynamic and structural features in macromolecules

  9. Probing the topological structure of the QCD vacuum with overlap fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilgenfritz, E.M.; Schierholz, G.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron; Streuer, T.; Weinberg, V.; Freie Univ. Berlin

    2005-12-01

    Overlap fermions implement exact chiral symmetry on the lattice and are thus an appropriate tool for investigating the chiral and topological structure of the QCD vacuum. We study various chiral and topological aspects on Luescher-Weisz-type quenched gauge field configurations using overlap fermions as a probe. Particular emphasis is placed upon the analysis of the spectral density and the localisation properties of the eigenmodes as well as on the local structure of topological charge fluctuations. (orig.)

  10. Probing structure-property relationships in perpendicularly magnetized Fe/Cu(001) using MXLD and XPD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, T.R.; Waddill, G.D. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States); Goodman, K.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic X-ray Linear Dichroism (MXLD) in Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Photoelectron Diffraction (XPD) of the Fe 3p core level have been used to probe the magnetic structure-property relationships of perpendicularly magnetized Fe/Cu(001), in an element-specific fashion. A strong MEXLD effect was observed in the high resolution photoelectron spectroscopy of the Fe 3p at {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} emission and was used to follow the loss of perpendicular ferromagnetic ordering as the temperature was raised toward room temperature. In parallel with this, {open_quotes}Forward Focussing{close_quotes} in XPD was used as a direct measure of geometric structure in the overlayer. These results and the implications of their correlation will be discussed. Additionally, an investigation of the effect of Mn doping of the Fe/Cu(001) will be described. These measurements were performed at the Spectromicroscopy Facility (Beamline 7.0.1) of the Advanced Light Source.

  11. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  12. A novel analysis strategy for HLA typing using a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, D I

    2017-11-01

    The technique of reverse sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOPs) is commonly used in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing. In the conventional method for data analysis (exact pattern matching, EPM), the larger is the number of mismatched probes, the longer the time for final typing assignment. A novel strategy, filtering and scoring (FnS), has been developed to easily assign the best-fit allele pair. In the FnS method, candidate alleles and allele pairs were filtered based on (1) subject's ethnicity, and (2) the measured partial reaction pattern with only definitely negative or positive probes. Then, the complete reaction pattern for all probes (CRPoAPs) were compared between the raw sample and expected residual allele pairs to obtain mismatch scores. To compare the FnS and EPM methods, each analysis time (minutes:seconds) for reverse SSOP HLA typing with intermediate resolution (n = 507) was measured. The analysis time with FnS method was shorter than that of the EPM method [00:21 (00:08-01:47) and 01:04 (00:15-23:45), respectively, P typing in a comprehensive and quantitative comparison between measured and expected CRPoAPs of candidate allele pairs. Therefore, this analysis strategy might be useful in a clinical setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Yano, F.; Nishida, A.; Takamizawa, H.; Tsunomura, T.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted.

  14. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Yano, F; Nishida, A; Takamizawa, H; Tsunomura, T; Nagai, Y; Hasegawa, M

    2009-11-01

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted.

  15. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  16. Probing Structural and Catalytic Characteristics of Galactose Oxidase Confined in Nanoscale Chemical Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikemoto, Hideki; Mossin, Susanne; Ulstrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Galactose oxidase (GAOX) is a special metalloenzyme in terms of its active site structure and catalytic mechanisms. This work reports a study where the enzyme confined in a nanoscale chemical environment provided by mesoporous silicas (MPS) is probed. Two types of MPS, i.e. SBA-15 and MCF, were...... synthesized and used to accommodate GAOX. SBA-15-ROD is rod-shaped particles with periodically ordered nanopores (9.5 nm), while MCF has a mesocellular foam-like structure with randomly distributed pores (23 nm) interconnected by smaller windows (8.8 nm). GAOX is non-covalently confined in SBA-15- ROD, while...... it is covalently immobilized in MCF. Relatively high loadings in the range of 50–60 mg g1 are achieved. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to probe the active site structures of the enzyme. The similar ESR spectra observed for GAOX in the free and immobilized states support that the electronic...

  17. Probing Induced Structural Changes in Biomimetic Bacterial Cell Membrane Interactions with Divalent Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Allison M [ORNL; Standaert, Robert F [ORNL; Jubb, Aaron M [ORNL; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Biological membranes, formed primarily by the self-assembly of complex mixtures of phospholipids, provide a structured scaffold for compartmentalization and structural processes in living cells. The specific physical properties of phospholipid species present in a given membrane play a key role in mediating these processes. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), a zwitterionic lipid present in bacterial, yeast, and mammalian cell membranes, is exceptional. In addition to undergoing the standard lipid polymorphic transition between the gel and liquid-crystalline phase, it can also assume an unusual polymorphic state, the inverse hexagonal phase (HII). Divalent cations are among the factors that drive the formation of the HII phase, wherein the lipid molecules form stacked tubular structures by burying the hydrophilic head groups and exposing the hydrophobic tails to the bulk solvent. Most biological membranes contain a lipid species capable of forming the HII state suggesting that such lipid polymorphic structural states play an important role in structural biological processes such as membrane fusion. In this study, the interactions between Mg2+ and biomimetic bacterial cell membranes composed of PE and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) were probed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and fluorescence spectroscopy. The lipid phase transitions were examined at varying ratios of PE to PG and upon exposure to physiologically relevant concentrations of Mg2+. An understanding of these basic interactions enhances our understanding of membrane dynamics and how membrane-mediated structural changes may occur in vivo.

  18. Transmission X-ray scattering as a probe for complex liquid-surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuto, Masafumi; Yang, Lin; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Kuzmenko, Ivan

    2016-01-28

    The need for functional materials calls for increasing complexity in self-assembly systems. As a result, the ability to probe both local structure and heterogeneities, such as phase-coexistence and domain morphologies, has become increasingly important to controlling self-assembly processes, including those at liquid surfaces. The traditional X-ray scattering methods for liquid surfaces, such as specular reflectivity and grazing-incidence diffraction, are not well suited to spatially resolving lateral heterogeneities due to large illuminated footprint. A possible alternative approach is to use scanning transmission X-ray scattering to simultaneously probe local intermolecular structures and heterogeneous domain morphologies on liquid surfaces. To test the feasibility of this approach, transmission small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (TSAXS/TWAXS) studies of Langmuir films formed on water meniscus against a vertically immersed hydrophilic Si substrate were recently carried out. First-order diffraction rings were observed in TSAXS patterns from a monolayer of hexagonally packed gold nanoparticles and in TWAXS patterns from a monolayer of fluorinated fatty acids, both as a Langmuir monolayer on water meniscus and as a Langmuir–Blodgett monolayer on the substrate. The patterns taken at multiple spots have been analyzed to extract the shape of the meniscus surface and the ordered-monolayer coverage as a function of spot position. These results, together with continual improvement in the brightness and spot size of X-ray beams available at synchrotron facilities, support the possibility of using scanning-probe TSAXS/TWAXS to characterize heterogeneous structures at liquid surfaces.

  19. Development of species-specific rDNA probes for Giardia by multiple fluorescent in situ hybridization combined with immunocytochemical identification of cyst wall antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsen, Stanley L; Jarroll, Edward; Wallis, Peter; van Keulen, Harry

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we describe the development of fluorescent oligonucleotide probes to variable regions in the small subunit of 16S rRNA in three distinct Giardia species. Sense and antisense probes (17-22 mer) to variable regions 1, 3, and 8 were labeled with digoxygenin or selected fluorochomes (FluorX, Cy3, or Cy5). Optimal results were obtained with fluorochome-labeled oligonucleotides for detection of rRNA in Giardia cysts. Specificity of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was shown using RNase digestion and high stringency to diminish the hybridization signal, and oligonucleotide probes for rRNA in Giardia lamblia, Giardia muris, and Giardia ardeae were shown to specifically stain rRNA only within cysts or trophozoites of those species. The fluorescent oligonucleotide specific for rRNA in human isolates of Giardia was positive for ten different strains. A method for simultaneous FISH detection of cysts using fluorescent antibody (genotype marker) and two oligonucleotide probes (species marker) permitted visualization of G. lamblia and G. muris cysts in the same preparation. Testing of an environmental water sample revealed the presence of FISH-positive G. lamblia cysts with a specific rDNA probe for rRNA, while negative cysts were presumed to be of animal or bird origin.

  20. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  1. Self-force as probe of internal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoyama, Soichiro; Poisson, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The self-force acting on a (scalar or electric) charge held in place outside a massive body contains information about the body's composition, and can therefore be used as a probe of internal structure. We explore this theme by computing the (scalar or electromagnetic) self-force when the body is a spherical ball of perfect fluid in hydrostatic equilibrium, under the assumption that its rest-mass density and pressure are related by a polytropic equation of state. The body is strongly self-gravitating, and all computations are performed in exact general relativity. The dependence on internal structure is best revealed by expanding the self-force in powers of r -1 0 , with r 0 denoting the radial position of the charge outside the body. To the leading order, the self-force scales as r -3 0 and depends only on the square of the charge and the body's mass; the leading self-force is universal. The dependence on internal structure is seen at the next order, r -5 0 , through a structure factor that depends on the equation of state. We compute this structure factor for relativistic polytropes, and show that for a fixed mass, it increases linearly with the body's radius in the case of the scalar self-force, and quadratically with the body's radius in the case of the electromagnetic self-force. In both cases we find that for a fixed mass and radius, the self-force is smaller if the body is more centrally dense, and larger if the mass density is more uniformly distributed. (paper)

  2. Graphical representation of ribosomal RNA probe accessibility data using ARB software package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amann Rudolf

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxon specific hybridization probes in combination with a variety of commonly used hybridization formats nowadays are standard tools in microbial identification. A frequently applied technology, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, besides single cell identification, allows the localization and functional studies of the microbial community composition. Careful in silico design and evaluation of potential oligonucleotide probe targets is therefore crucial for performing successful hybridization experiments. Results The PROBE Design tools of the ARB software package take into consideration several criteria such as number, position and quality of diagnostic sequence differences while designing oligonucleotide probes. Additionally, new visualization tools were developed to enable the user to easily examine further sequence associated criteria such as higher order structure, conservation, G+C content, transition-transversion profiles and in situ target accessibility patterns. The different types of sequence associated information (SAI can be visualized by user defined background colors within the ARB primary and secondary structure editors as well as in the PROBE Match tool. Conclusion Using this tool, in silico probe design and evaluation can be performed with respect to in situ probe accessibility data. The evaluation of proposed probe targets with respect to higher-order rRNA structure is of importance for successful design and performance of in situ hybridization experiments. The entire ARB software package along with the probe accessibility data is available from the ARB home page http://www.arb-home.de.

  3. Probing region-specific microstructure of human cortical areas using high angular and spatial resolution diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Manisha; Nauen, David W; Troncoso, Juan C; Mori, Susumu

    2015-01-15

    Regional heterogeneity in cortical cyto- and myeloarchitecture forms the structural basis of mapping of cortical areas in the human brain. In this study, we investigate the potential of diffusion MRI to probe the microstructure of cortical gray matter and its region-specific heterogeneity across cortical areas in the fixed human brain. High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data at an isotropic resolution of 92-μm and 30 diffusion-encoding directions were acquired using a 3D diffusion-weighted gradient-and-spin-echo sequence, from prefrontal (Brodmann area 9), primary motor (area 4), primary somatosensory (area 3b), and primary visual (area 17) cortical specimens (n=3 each) from three human subjects. Further, the diffusion MR findings in these cortical areas were compared with histological silver impregnation of the same specimens, in order to investigate the underlying architectonic features that constitute the microstructural basis of diffusion-driven contrasts in cortical gray matter. Our data reveal distinct and region-specific diffusion MR contrasts across the studied areas, allowing delineation of intracortical bands of tangential fibers in specific layers-layer I, layer VI, and the inner and outer bands of Baillarger. The findings of this work demonstrate unique sensitivity of diffusion MRI to differentiate region-specific cortical microstructure in the human brain, and will be useful for myeloarchitectonic mapping of cortical areas as well as to achieve an understanding of the basis of diffusion NMR contrasts in cortical gray matter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of salivary Lactobacillus rhamnosus species by DNA profiling and a specific probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, B; Groisillier, A; Badet, C; Dorignac, G; Lonvaud-Funel, A

    2001-03-01

    The Lactobacillus genus has been shown to be associated with the dental carious process, but little is known about the species related to the decay, although Lactobacillus rhamnosus is suspected to be the most implicated species. Conventional identification methods based on biochemical criteria lead to ambiguous results, since the Lactobacillus species found in saliva are phenotypically close. To clarify the role of this genus in the evolution of carious disease, this work aimed to find a rapid and reliable method for identifying the L. rhamnosus species. Methods based on hybridization with DNA probes and DNA amplification by PCR were used. The dominant salivary Lactobacillus species (reference strains from the ATCC) were selected for this purpose as well as some wild strains isolated from children's saliva. DNA profiling using semirandom polymorphic DNA amplification (semi-RAPD) generated specific patterns for L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469. The profiles of all L. rhamnosus strains tested were similar and could be grouped; these strains shared four common fragments. Wild strains first identified with classic methods shared common patterns with the L. rhamnosus species and could be reclassified. One fragment of the profile was purified, cloned, used as a probe and found to be specific to the L. rhamnosus species. These results may help to localize this species within its ecological niche and to elucidate the progression of the carious process.

  5. Charge-exchange giant resonances as probes of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.

    2001-09-01

    Giant resonances populated in charge-exchange reactions can reveal detailed information about nuclear structure properties, in spite of their apparent featurelessness. The (p,n) and (n,p) reactions - as well as their analog reactions - proceed via the same nuclear matrix element as beta decay. Thereby, they are useful for probing electroweak properties in nuclei, especially for those not accessible to beta decay. The nuclear physics aspects of double beta decay might be investigated in double charge-exchange reactions. detailed nuclear structure information, such as the presence of ground-state correlations, can be revealed via identification of 'first-forbidden' transitions. In addition, astrophysics aspects and halo properties of nuclei have been investigated in charge exchange. Finally, these experiments have questioned our knowledge of the absolute strength of the strong interaction

  6. Reproducible analysis of sequencing-based RNA structure probing data with user-friendly tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan; Sidiropoulos, Nikos; Vinther, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    time also made analysis of the data challenging for scientists without formal training in computational biology. Here, we discuss different strategies for data analysis of massive parallel sequencing-based structure-probing data. To facilitate reproducible and standardized analysis of this type of data...

  7. Investigation of RNA Structure by High-Throughput SHAPE-Based Probing Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Line Dahl

    of highthroughput SHAPE-based approaches to investigate RNA structure based on novel SHAPE reagents that permit selection of full-length cDNAs. The SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) method is applied to the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) plus strand RNA genome, and the data is used to construct a genome-wide structural...... that they are functional. The SHAPES method is further applied to the hepatitis C virus (HCV), where the data is used to refine known and predicted structures. Over the past years, the interest of studying RNA structure in their native environment has been increased, and to allow studying RNA structure inside living cells...... using the SHAPE Selection approach, I introduce a biotinylated probing reagent. This chemical can cross cell membranes and reacts with RNA inside the cells, allowing the structural conformations to be studied in the context of physiological relevant conditions in living cells. The methods and results...

  8. Investigation of SP94 Peptide as a Specific Probe for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Imaging and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanli; Hu, Yan; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Guobing; Li, Xiao; Zhao, Yanzhao; Tan, Hui; Shi, Hongcheng; Cheng, Dengfeng

    2016-01-01

    SP94 (SFSIIHTPILPL), a novel peptide, has shown specific binding to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. We aimed to investigate the capability of SP94 as a targeting probe for HCC imaging and therapy following labeling with technetium-99m (99mTc) and rhenium-188 (188Re). HYNIC-SP94 was prepared by solid phase synthesis and then labeled with 99mTc. Cell competitive binding, internalization assay, in vitro and in vivo stability, biodistribution and micro-single photon emission computed tomography /computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging studies were performed to investigate the capability of 99mTc tricine-EDDA/HYNIC-SP94 as a specific HCC imaging probe. Initial promising targeting results inspired evaluation of its therapeutic effect when labeled by 188Re. HYNIC-SP94 was then labeled again with 188Re to perform cell apoptosis, microSPECT/CT imaging evaluation and immunohistochemistry. Huh-7 cells exhibited typical apoptotic changes after 188Re irradiation. According to 99mTc tricine-EDDA/HYNIC-SP94 microSPECT/CT imaging, tumor uptake was significantly decreased compared with that of pre-treatment with 188Re-HYNIC-SP94. The immunohistochemistry also displayed obvious necrosis and apoptosis as well as inhibition of proliferation in the 188Re-HYNIC-SP94 treatment group. The results supported that 99mTc tricine-EDDA/HYNIC-SP94 is able to target HCC cells and 188Re-HYNIC- SP94 holds potential as a therapeutic agent for HCC, making 99mTc/188Re-HYNIC-SP94 a promising targeting probe for HCC imaging and therapy. PMID:27649935

  9. Probing the molecular determinants of aniline dioxygenase substrate specificity by saturation mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Ee L; Obbard, Jeffrey P; Zhao, Huimin

    2007-02-01

    Aniline dioxygenase is a multicomponent Rieske nonheme-iron dioxygenase enzyme isolated from Acinetobacter sp. strain YAA. Saturation mutagenesis of the substrate-binding pocket residues, which were identified using a homology model of the alpha subunit of the terminal dioxygenase (AtdA3), was used to probe the molecular determinants of AtdA substrate specificity. The V205A mutation widened the substrate specificity of aniline dioxygenase to include 2-isopropylaniline, for which the wild-type enzyme has no activity. The V205A mutation also made 2-isopropylaniline a better substrate for the enzyme than 2,4-dimethylaniline, a native substrate of the wild-type enzyme. The I248L mutation improved the activity of aniline dioxygenase against aniline and 2,4-dimethylaniline approximately 1.7-fold and 2.1-fold, respectively. Thus, it is shown that the alpha subunit of the terminal dioxygenase indeed plays a part in the substrate specificity as well as the activity of aniline dioxygenase. Interestingly, the equivalent residues of V205 and I248 have not been previously reported to influence the substrate specificity of other Rieske dioxygenases. These results should facilitate future engineering of the enzyme for bioremediation and industrial applications.

  10. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne' , Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  11. Probing the graphite band structure with resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, J.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Hudson, E.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over surface sensitive spectroscopies for probing the electronic structure of complex multi-elemental materials. Due to the long mean free path of photons in solids ({approximately}1000 {angstrom}), SXF is a bulk-sensitive probe. Also, since core levels are involved in absorption and emission, SXF is both element- and angular-momentum-selective. SXF measures the local partial density of states (DOS) projected onto each constituent element of the material. The chief limitation of SXF has been the low fluorescence yield for photon emission, particularly for light elements. However, third generation light sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), offer the high brightness that makes high-resolution SXF experiments practical. In the following the authors utilize this high brightness to demonstrate the capability of SXF to probe the band structure of a polycrystalline sample. In SXF, a valence emission spectrum results from transitions from valence band states to the core hole produced by the incident photons. In the non-resonant energy regime, the excitation energy is far above the core binding energy, and the absorption and emission events are uncoupled. The fluorescence spectrum resembles emission spectra acquired using energetic electrons, and is insensitive to the incident photon`s energy. In the resonant excitation energy regime, core electrons are excited by photons to unoccupied states just above the Fermi level (EF). The absorption and emission events are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways, depending in part on the localization of the empty electronic states in the material. Here the authors report spectral measurements from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  12. 3D site specific sample preparation and analysis of 3D devices (FinFETs) by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambham, Ajay Kumar; Kumar, Arul; Gilbert, Matthieu; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2013-09-01

    With the transition from planar to three-dimensional device architectures such as Fin field-effect-transistors (FinFETs), new metrology approaches are required to meet the needs of semiconductor technology. It is important to characterize the 3D-dopant distributions precisely as their extent, positioning relative to gate edges and absolute concentration determine the device performance in great detail. At present the atom probe has shown its ability to analyze dopant distributions in semiconductor and thin insulating materials with sub-nm 3D-resolution and good dopant sensitivity. However, so far most reports have dealt with planar devices or restricted the measurements to 2D test structures which represent only limited challenges in terms of localization and site specific sample preparation. In this paper we will discuss the methodology to extract the dopant distribution from real 3D-devices such as a 3D-FinFET device, requiring the sample preparation to be carried out at a site specific location with a positioning accuracy ∼50 nm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. DAFS study of site-specific local structure of Mn in manganese ferrite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsov, E.; Haskel, D.; Cady, A.; Yang, A.; Vittoria, C.; Zuo, X.; Harris, V.G.

    2006-01-01

    Manganese ferrite (MnFe 2 O 4 ) is a well-known magnetic material widely used in electronics for many years. It is well established that its magnetic behavior is strongly influenced by local structural properties of Mn ions, which are distributed between crystallographically inequivalent tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the unit cell. In order to understand and be able to tune properties of these structures, it is necessary to have detailed site-specific structural information on the system. Here we report on the application of diffraction-anomalous fine structure (DAFS) spectroscopy to resolve site-specific Mn local structures in manganese ferrite films. The DAFS measurements were done at undulator beamline 4-ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The DAFS spectra (Fig. 1) were measured at several Bragg reflections in the vicinity of the Mn absorption K-edge, having probed separately contributions from tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordinated Mn sites. The DAFS data analysis done with an iterative Kramers-Kroenig algorithm made it possible to solve separately the local structure around different inequivalent Mn sites in the unit cell. The reliability of the data treatment was checked carefully, and it was showed that the site-specific structural parameters obtained with DAFS allow us to describe fluorescence EXAFS spectrum measured independently. Fig. 2 shows individual site contributions to the imaginary part of the resonant scattering amplitude obtained from the treatment of the data of Fig. 1. The analysis of the refined site-specific absorption spectra was done using EXAFS methods based on theoretical standards. We provided direct evidence for the tetrahedral Mn-O bond distance being increased relative to the corresponding Fe-O distance in bulk manganese ferrites. The first coordination shell number was found to be reduced significantly for Mn atoms at these sites. This finding is consistent with the well-known tendency of Mn

  14. Single Molecular Level Probing of Structure and Dynamics of Papain Under Denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bhaswati; Chaudhury, Apala; Das, Nilimesh; Sen, Pratik

    2017-01-01

    Papain is a cysteine protease enzyme present in papaya and known to help in digesting peptide. Thus the structure and function of the active site of papain is of interest. The objective of present study is to unveil the overall structural transformation and the local structural change around the active site of papain as a function of chemical denaturant. Papain has been tagged at Cys-25 with a thiol specific fluorescence probe N-(7- dimethylamino-4-methylcoumarin-3-yl) iodoacetamide (DACIA). Guanidine hydrochloride (GnHCl) has been used as the chemical denaturant. Steady state, time-resolved, and single molecular level fluorescence techniques was applied to map the change in the local environment. It is found that papain undergoes a two-step denaturation in the presence of GnHCl. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopic (FCS) data indicate that the size (hydrodynamic diameter) of native papain is ~36.8 Å, which steadily increases to ~53 Å in the presence of 6M GnHCl. FCS study also reveals that the conformational fluctuation time of papain is 6.3 µs in its native state, which decreased to 2.7 µs in the presence of 0.75 M GnHCl. Upon further increase in GnHCl concentration the conformational fluctuation time increase monotonically till 6 M GnHCl, where the time constant is measured as 14 µs. On the other hand, the measurement of ellipticity, hence the helical structure, by circular dichroism spectroscopy is found to be incapable to capture such structural transformation. It is concluded that in the presence of small amount of GnHCl the active site of papain takes up a more compact structure (although the overall size increases) than in the native state, which has been designated as the intermediate state. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Probing the Structure of DNA Aptamers with a Classic Heterocycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Reid Bishop

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA aptamers are synthetic, single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides selectedby SELEX methods for their binding with specific ligands. Here we present ethidiumbinding results for three related DNA aptamers (PDB code: 1OLD, 1DB6, and 2ARGthat bind L-argininamide (L-Arm. The ligand bound form of each aptamer's structurehas been reported and each are found to be composed primarily of two domainsconsisting of a stem helical region and a loop domain that forms a binding pocket for thecognate ligand. Previous thermodynamic experiments demonstrated that the DNAaptamer 1OLD undergoes a large conformational ordering upon binding to L-Arm. Herewe extend those linkage binding studies by examining the binding of the heterocyclicintercalator ethidium to each of the three aptamers by fluorescence and absorptionspectrophotometric titrations. Our results reveal that ethidium binds to each aptamer with∆Go's in the range of -8.7 to -9.4 kcal/mol. The stoichiometry of binding is 2:1 for eachaptamer and is quantitatively diminished in the presence of L-Arm as is the overallfluorescence intensity of ethidium. Together, these results demonstrate that a portion ofthe bound ethidium is excluded from the aptamer in the presence of a saturating amountof L-Arm. These results demonstrate the utility of ethidium and related compounds forthe probing of non-conventional DNA structures and reveal an interesting fundamentalthermodynamic linkage in DNA aptamers. Results are discussed in the context of thethermodynamic stability and structure of each of the aptamers examined.

  16. Global universe anisotropy probed by the alignment of structures in the cosmic microwave background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiaux, Y; Vielva, P; Martínez-González, E; Vandergheynst, P

    2006-04-21

    We question the global universe isotropy by probing the alignment of local structures in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. The original method proposed relies on a steerable wavelet decomposition of the CMB signal on the sphere. The analysis of the first-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data identifies a mean preferred plane with a normal direction close to the CMB dipole axis, and a mean preferred direction in this plane, very close to the ecliptic poles axis. Previous statistical anisotropy results are thereby synthesized, but further analyses are still required to establish their origin.

  17. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Siewenie, Joan [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Xu, Hongwu [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Zhu, Jinlong [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154, USA and National Lab for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Page, Katharine, E-mail: pagekl@ornl.gov [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO{sub 2} measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H{sub 2} and natural gas uptake/storage.

  18. Surface topography acquisition method for double-sided near-right-angle structured surfaces based on dual-probe wavelength scanning interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2017-10-02

    This paper proposes an approach to measure double-sided near-right-angle structured surfaces based on dual-probe wavelength scanning interferometry (DPWSI). The principle and mathematical model is discussed and the measurement system is calibrated with a combination of standard step-height samples for both probes vertical calibrations and a specially designed calibration artefact for building up the space coordinate relationship of the dual-probe measurement system. The topography of the specially designed artefact is acquired by combining the measurement results with white light scanning interferometer (WLSI) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for reference. The relative location of the two probes is then determined with 3D registration algorithm. Experimental validation of the approach is provided and the results show that the method is able to measure double-sided near-right-angle structured surfaces with nanometer vertical resolution and micrometer lateral resolution.

  19. Novel PET and Near Infrared Imaging Probes for the Specific Detection of Bacterial Infections Associated With Cardiac Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemiya, Kiyoko; Ning, Xinghai; Seo, Wonewoo; Wang, Xiaojian; Mohammad, Rafi; Joseph, Giji; Titterington, Jane S; Kraft, Colleen S; Nye, Jonathan A; Murthy, Niren; Goodman, Mark M; Taylor, W Robert

    2018-04-13

    The aim of this study was to develop imaging agents to detect early stage infections in implantable cardiac devices. Bacteria ingest maltodextrins through the specific maltodextrin transporter. We developed probes conjugated with either a fluorescent dye (maltohexaose fluorescent dye probe [MDP]) or a F-18 (F18 fluoromaltohexaose) and determined their usefulness in a model of infections associated with implanted cardiac devices. Stainless steel mock-ups of medical devices were implanted subcutaneously in rats. On post-operative day 4, animals were injected with either Staphylococcus aureus around the mock-ups to induce a relatively mild infection or oil of turpentine to induce noninfectious inflammation. Animals with a sterile implant were used as control subjects. On post-operative day 6, either the MDP or F18 fluoromaltohexaose was injected intravenously, and the animals were scanned with the appropriate imaging device. Additional positron emission tomography imaging studies were performed with F18-fluorodeoxyglucose as a comparison of the specificity of our probes (n = 5 to 9 per group). The accumulation of the MDP in the infected rats was significantly increased at 1 h after injection when compared with the control and noninfectious inflammation groups (intensity ratio 1.54 ± 0.07 vs. 1.26 ± 0.04 and 1.20 ± 0.05, respectively; p F18 fluoromaltohexaose and F18 fluorodeoxyglucose significantly accumulated in the infected area 30 min after the injection (maximum standard uptake value ratio 4.43 ± 0.30 and 4.87 ± 0.28, respectively). In control rats, there was no accumulation of imaging probes near the device. In the noninfectious inflammation rats, no significant accumulation was observed with F18 fluoromaltohexaose, but F18 fluorodeoxyglucose accumulated in the mock-up area (maximum standard uptake value 2.53 ± 0.39 vs. 4.74 ± 0.46, respectively; p < 0.05). Our results indicate that maltohexaose-based imaging probes are potentially useful for the

  20. Development of eddy current probe for fiber orientation assessment in carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Zhao, Selina

    2018-04-01

    Measurement of the fiber orientation in a carbon fiber composite material is crucial in understanding the load carrying capability of the structure. As manufacturing conditions including resin flow and molding pressures can alter fiber orientation, verification of the as-designed fiber layup is necessary to ensure optimal performance of the structure. In this work, the development of an eddy current probe and data processing technique for analysis of fiber orientation in carbon fiber composites is presented. A proposed directional eddy current probe is modeled and its response to an anisotropic multi-layer conductor simulated. The modeling results are then used to finalize specifications of the eddy current probe. Experimental testing of the fabricated probe is presented for several samples including a truncated pyramid part with complex fiber orientation draped to the geometry for resin transfer molding. The inductively coupled single sided measurement enables fiber orientation characterization through the thickness of the part. The fast and cost-effective technique can be applied as a spot check or as a surface map of the fiber orientations across the structure. This paper will detail the results of the probe design, computer simulations, and experimental results.

  1. Electrical resistivity probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  2. SHAPE selection (SHAPES) enrich for RNA structure signal in SHAPE sequencing-based probing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Line Dahl; Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan; Salama, Sofie R

    2015-01-01

    transcriptase. Here, we introduce a SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) reagent, N-propanone isatoic anhydride (NPIA), which retains the ability of SHAPE reagents to accurately probe RNA structure, but also allows covalent coupling between the SHAPES reagent and a biotin molecule. We demonstrate that SHAPES...

  3. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves as Probes of Magnetospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The large number of gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope since its launch in 2008 dwarfs the handful that were previously known. The variety of observed light curves makes possible a tomography of both the ensemble-averaged field structure and the high-energy emission regions of a pulsar magnetosphere. Fitting the gamma-ray pulsar light curves with model magnetospheres and emission models has revealed that most of the high-energy emission, and the particles acceleration, takes place near or beyond the light cylinder, near the current sheet. As pulsar magnetosphere models become more sophisticated, it is possible to probe magnetic field structure and emission that are self-consistently determined. Light curve modeling will continue to be a powerful tool for constraining the pulsar magnetosphere physics.

  4. Selectivity on-target of bromodomain chemical probes by structure-guided medicinal chemistry and chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdeano, Carles; Ciulli, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Targeting epigenetic proteins is a rapidly growing area for medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in developing small molecules binding to bromodomains, the readers of acetyl-lysine modifications. A plethora of co-crystal structures has motivated focused fragment-based design and optimization programs within both industry and academia. These efforts have yielded several compounds entering the clinic, and many more are increasingly being used as chemical probes to interrogate bromodomain biology. High selectivity of chemical probes is necessary to ensure biological activity is due to an on-target effect. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of bromodomain-targeting compounds, focusing on the structural basis for their on-target selectivity or lack thereof. We also highlight chemical biology approaches to enhance on-target selectivity.

  5. Fluorescent quenching-based quantitative detection of specific DNA/RNA using a BODIPY® FL-labeled probe or primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Shinya; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Yamada, Kazutaka; Torimura, Masaki; Yokomaku, Toyokazu; Kamagata, Yoichi; Kurane, Ryuichiro

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a simple method for the quantitative detection of specific DNA or RNA molecules based on the finding that BODIPY® FL fluorescence was quenched by its interaction with a uniquely positioned guanine. This approach makes use of an oligonucleotide probe or primer containing a BODIPY® FL-modified cytosine at its 5′-end. When such a probe was hybridized with a target DNA, its fluorescence was quenched by the guanine in the target, complementary to the modified cytosine, and the quench rate was proportional to the amount of target DNA. This widely applicable technique will be used directly with larger samples or in conjunction with the polymerase chain reaction to quantify small DNA samples. PMID:11239011

  6. CdTe QDs-based prostate-specific antigen probe for human prostate cancer cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Wei; Guo Li; Wang Meng; Xu Shukun

    2009-01-01

    L-glutathione (GSH) stabilized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were directly prepared in aqueous solution. The as-prepared QDs were linked to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for the direct labeling and linked to immunoglobulin G (IgG) for the indirect labeling of fixed prostate cancer cells. The results indicated that QD-based probes were ideal fluorescent markers with excellent spectral properties and photostability and much better than organic dyes making them very suitable in target detection. Meanwhile, the indirect labeling showed much better specificity than the direct labeling. Furthermore, the prepared CdTe QDs did not show detectable effect on cell growth after having cultured for three days, which suggested that the L-glutathione capped CdTe had scarcely cytotoxicity.

  7. Grafting of a peptide probe for Prostate-Specific Antigen detection using diazonium electroreduction and click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzemińska, I; Sainte Rose Fanchine, S; Anquetin, G; Reisberg, S; Noël, V; Pham, M C; Piro, B

    2016-07-15

    The main objective of this work was to validate a label-free electrochemical method of protein detection using peptides as capture probes. As a proof-of-concept, we used a 7 amino acids sequence (HSSKLQL) specific for Prostate Specific Antigen. We investigated various electrografting conditions of two anilines (2-[(4-aminophenyl)sulfanyl]-8-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 4-azidoaniline) further converted in situ into their corresponding diazonium salts on glassy carbon electrodes. It was demonstrated that the best method to obtain a mixed layer is the simultaneous electroreduction of the two diazonium salts. 4-azidoaniline was used to covalently immobilize the ethynyl-functionalized peptide probe by click coupling, and the hydroxynaphthoquinone derivative plays the role of electrochemical transducer of the peptide-protein recognition. The proteolytic activity of PSA towards a small peptide substrate carrying streptavidin at its distal end was also investigated to design an original sensing architecture leading to a reagentless, label free, and "signal-on" PSA sensor. Without optimization, the limit of quantification can be estimated in the nM to pM range. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Inv Dup(15) chromosomes, using probes specific for the Pradar-Willi/Angelman syndrome region: Clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leana-Cox, J. (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Jenkins, L. (Kaiser Permanente Medical Group, San Jose, CA (United States)); Palmer, C.G.; Plattner, R. (Indiana School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Sheppard, L. (Palo Verde Laboratory, Inc., Chandler, AZ (United States)); Flejter, W.L. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Zackowski, J. (Univ. of Florida Health Science Center, Gainsville, FL (United States)); Tsien, F. (Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Schwartz, S. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-seven cases of inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup[15]) were investigated by FISH with two DNA probes specific for the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on proximal 15q. Sixteen of the marker chromosomes displayed two copies of each probe, while in the remaining 11 markers no hybridization was observed. A significant association was found between the presence of this region and an abnormal phenotype (P<.01). This is the largest study to date of inv dup(15) chromosomes, that uses molecular cytogenetic methods and is the first to report a significant association between the presence of a specific chromosomal region in such markers and an abnormal phenotype. 30 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. Growth of Cosmic Structure: Probing Dark Energy Beyond Expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; Mandelbaum, Rachel; May, Morgan; Raccanelli, Alvise; Reid, Beth; Rozo, Eduardo; Schmidt, Fabian; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze; Van Engelen, Alex; Wu, Hao-Yi; Zhao, Gongbo

    2014-01-01

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansion such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe

  10. Scanning probes for new energy materials: probing local structure and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balke, N.; Bonnell, D.; Ginger, D.S.; Kemerink, M.

    2012-01-01

    The design and control of materials properties, often at the nanoscale, are the foundation of many new strategies for energy generation, storage, and efficiency. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has evolved into a very large toolbox for the characterization of properties spanning size scales from

  11. Putative and unique gene sequence utilization for the design of species specific probes as modeled by Lactobacillus plantarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concept of utilizing putative and unique gene sequences for the design of species specific probes was tested. The abundance profile of assigned functions within the Lactobacillus plantarum genome was used for the identification of the putative and unique gene sequence, csh. The targeted gene (cs...

  12. Probing the structure of ribosome assembly intermediates in vivo using DMS and hydroxyl radical footprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulscher, Ryan M; Bohon, Jen; Rappé, Mollie C; Gupta, Sayan; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Sullivan, Michael; Ralston, Corie Y; Chance, Mark R; Woodson, Sarah A

    2016-07-01

    The assembly of the Escherichia coli ribosome has been widely studied and characterized in vitro. Despite this, ribosome biogenesis in living cells is only partly understood because assembly is coupled with transcription, modification and processing of the pre-ribosomal RNA. We present a method for footprinting and isolating pre-rRNA as it is synthesized in E. coli cells. Pre-rRNA synthesis is synchronized by starvation, followed by nutrient upshift. RNA synthesized during outgrowth is metabolically labeled to facilitate isolation of recent transcripts. Combining this technique with two in vivo RNA probing methods, hydroxyl radical and DMS footprinting, allows the structure of nascent RNA to be probed over time. Together, these can be used to determine changes in the structures of ribosome assembly intermediates as they fold in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Option-4 algorithm for Florida pocket depth probe: reduction in the variance of site-specific probeable crevice depth measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, H J; Rogers, P; Johnson, N W; Slaney, R

    1999-08-01

    Clinical periodontal measurement is plagued by many sources of error which result in aberrant values (outliers). This study sets out to compare probeable crevice depth measurements (PCD) selected by the option-4 algorithm against those recorded with a conventional double-pass method and to quantify any reduction in site-specific PCD variances. A single clinician recorded full-mouth PCD at 1 visit in 32 subjects (mean age 45.5 years) with moderately advanced chronic adult periodontitis. PCD was recorded over 2 passes at 6 sites per tooth with the Florida Pocket Depth Probes, a 3rd generation probe. The option-4 algorithm compared the 1st pass site-specific PCD value (PCD1) to the 2nd pass site-specific PCD value (PCD2) and, if the difference between these values was >1.00 mm, allowed the recording of a maximum of 2 further measurements (3rd and 4th pass measurements PCD3 and PCD4): 4 site-specific measure-meets were considered to be the maximum subject and tissue tolerance. The algorithm selected the 1st 2 measurements whose difference was difference Y) (Y=[(A-B)/A]X 100) and a 75% reduction in the median site-specific variance of PCD1/PCD2.

  14. A functional probe with bowtie aperture and bull's eye structure for nanolithograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuo; Wang Qiao; Guo Ying-Yan; Pan Shi; Li Xu-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The bowtie aperture surrounded by concentric gratings (the bull's eye structure) integrated on the near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) probe (aluminum coated fiber tip) for nanolithography has been investigated using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method. By modifying the parameters of the bowtie aperture and the concentric gratings, a maximal field enhancement factor of 391.69 has been achieved, which is 18 times larger than that obtained from the single bowtie aperture. Additionally, the light spot depends on the gap size of the bowtie aperture and can be confined to sub-wavelength. The superiority of the combination of the bowtie aperture and the bull's eye structure is confirmed, and the mechanism for the electric field enhancement in this derived structure is analyzed

  15. A functional probe with bowtie aperture and bull's eye structure for nanolithograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Xu-Feng; Wang, Qiao; Guo, Ying-Yan; Pan, Shi

    2012-10-01

    The bowtie aperture surrounded by concentric gratings (the bull's eye structure) integrated on the near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) probe (aluminum coated fiber tip) for nanolithography has been investigated using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method. By modifying the parameters of the bowtie aperture and the concentric gratings, a maximal field enhancement factor of 391.69 has been achieved, which is 18 times larger than that obtained from the single bowtie aperture. Additionally, the light spot depends on the gap size of the bowtie aperture and can be confined to sub-wavelength. The superiority of the combination of the bowtie aperture and the bull's eye structure is confirmed, and the mechanism for the electric field enhancement in this derived structure is analyzed.

  16. Database architecture and query structures for probe data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This report summarizes findings and implementations of probe vehicle data collection based on Bluetooth MAC address matching technology. Probe vehicle travel time data are studied in the following field deployment case studies: analysis of traffic ch...

  17. The 5S rRNA loop E: chemical probing and phylogenetic data versus crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontis, N B; Westhof, E

    1998-09-01

    A significant fraction of the bases in a folded, structured RNA molecule participate in noncanonical base pairing interactions, often in the context of internal loops or multi-helix junction loops. The appearance of each new high-resolution RNA structure provides welcome data to guide efforts to understand and predict RNA 3D structure, especially when the RNA in question is a functionally conserved molecule. The recent publication of the crystal structure of the "Loop E" region of bacterial 5S ribosomal RNA is such an event [Correll CC, Freeborn B, Moore PB, Steitz TA, 1997, Cell 91:705-712]. In addition to providing more examples of already established noncanonical base pairs, such as purine-purine sheared pairings, trans-Hoogsteen UA, and GU wobble pairs, the structure provides the first high-resolution views of two new purine-purine pairings and a new GU pairing. The goal of the present analysis is to expand the capabilities of both chemical probing and phylogenetic analysis to predict with greater accuracy the structures of RNA molecules. First, in light of existing chemical probing data, we investigate what lessons could be learned regarding the interpretation of this widely used method of RNA structure probing. Then we analyze the 3D structure with reference to molecular phylogeny data (assuming conservation of function) to discover what alternative base pairings are geometrically compatible with the structure. The comparisons between previous modeling efforts and crystal structures show that the intricate involvements of ions and water molecules in the maintenance of non-Watson-Crick pairs render the process of correctly identifying the interacting sites in such pairs treacherous, except in cases of trans-Hoogsteen A/U or sheared A/G pairs for the adenine N1 site. The phylogenetic analysis identifies A/A, A/C, A/U and C/A, C/C, and C/U pairings isosteric with sheared A/G, as well as A/A and A/C pairings isosteric with both G/U and G/G bifurcated pairings

  18. Plasma density measurement with ring-type cutoff probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.W.; You, S.J.; Na, B.K.; Kim, J.H.; Shin, Y.H.; Chang, H.Y.; Oh, W.Y.

    2013-01-01

    We proposed a cutoff probe with a ring-type detection tip enclosing a bar-type radiation tip. A comparative study between a proposed ring-type cutoff (RTC) probe and a conventional bar-type cutoff (BTC) probe showed that the RTC probe solved the problem of the BTC probe, the large measurement uncertainty of the electron density in a capacitively coupled plasma source. This improved characteristics of the RTC probe might have originated from the geometrical structure of the RTC probe concerning the monopole antennae radiation. This proposed cutoff probe can be expected to expand the applicable diagnostic range and to enhance the sensitivity of the cutoff probe. - Highlights: ► A cutoff probe with a ring type detection tip is proposed. ► Comparative experiment and simulation were conducted. ► The proposed probe showed a small uncertainty of measured plasma density. ► Improved characteristics might be originated from the geometrical structure

  19. Communication: Probing the absolute configuration of chiral molecules at aqueous interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotze, Stephan, E-mail: lotze@amolf.nl; Versluis, Jan [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Schijndel, Luuk van; Milroy, Lech G.; Voets, Ilja K. [Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, and Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bakker, Huib J., E-mail: bakker@amolf.nl [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-11-28

    We demonstrate that the enantiomers of chiral macromolecules at an aqueous interface can be distinguished with monolayer sensitivity using heterodyne-detected vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG). We perform VSFG spectroscopy with a polarization combination that selectively probes chiral molecular structures. By using frequencies far detuned from electronic resonances, we probe the chiral macromolecular structures with high surface specificity. The phase of the sum-frequency light generated by the chiral molecules is determined using heterodyne detection. With this approach, we can distinguish right-handed and left-handed helical peptides at a water-air interface. We thus show that heterodyne-detected VSFG is sensitive to the absolute configuration of complex, interfacial macromolecules and has the potential to determine the absolute configuration of enantiomers at interfaces.

  20. Aptamer-Based Dual-Functional Probe for Rapid and Specific Counting and Imaging of MCF-7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Yin, Xiao; Xu, Chi; Hu, Bin

    2018-02-06

    Development of multimodal detection technologies for accurate diagnosis of cancer at early stages is in great demand. In this work, we report a novel approach using an aptamer-based dual-functional probe for rapid, sensitive, and specific counting and visualization of MCF-7 cells by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and fluorescence imaging. The probe consists of a recognition unit of aptamer to catch cancer cells specifically, a fluorescent dye (FAM) moiety for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based "off-on" fluorescence imaging as well as gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) tag for both ICP-MS quantification and fluorescence quenching. Due to the signal amplification effect and low spectral interference of Au NPs in ICP-MS, an excellent linearity and sensitivity were achieved. Accordingly, a limit of detection of 81 MCF-7 cells and a relative standard deviation of 5.6% (800 cells, n = 7) were obtained. The dynamic linear range was 2 × 10 2 to 1.2 × 10 4 cells, and the recoveries in human whole blood were in the range of 98-110%. Overall, the established method provides quantitative and visualized information on MCF-7 cells with a simple and rapid process and paves the way for a promising strategy for biomedical research and clinical diagnostics.

  1. The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Carsey, F.; Lane, A.; Engelhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe mission is a glaciological investigation, scheduled for November 2000-2001, that will place a probe in a hot-water drilled hole in the West Antartic ice sheet. The objectives of the probe are to observe ice-bed interactions with a downward looking camera, and ice inclusions and structure, including hypothesized ice accretion, with a side-looking camera.

  2. Labelling of HBV-DNA probe using reagent made in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Quanshi

    1991-01-01

    The labelling hepatitis Bvirus DNA (HBV-DNA) probe was studied by using reagent made in China. The results showed that: (1) The dNTPs with high specific activity was necessary for the labelling of nigh specific activity HBV-DNA probe; (2) reaction of labelling HBV-DNA probe was completed in a few minutes; (3) 0.37 MBq 3 H dTTP (specific activity 1.554TBq/mmol) was enough to label 1 μg HBV-DNA and the specific activity of probe reached 3.4 x 10 cpm/μg; (4) 7 MBqα- 32 P dATP (specific activity > 111 TBq/mmol) can label HBV-DNA probe to specific activity 1.35 x 10 cpm/μg. It was concluded that the reagent made in China can be used for the study in molecular biology

  3. Probing transcription-specific outputs of β-catenin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, Tomas; Gay, Max; Steiner, Sarah; Draganova, Kalina; Zemke, Martina; Hoffmans, Raymond; Cinelli, Paolo; Aguet, Michel; Sommer, Lukas; Basler, Konrad

    2011-12-15

    β-Catenin, apart from playing a cell-adhesive role, is a key nuclear effector of Wnt signaling. Based on activity assays in Drosophila, we generated mouse strains where the endogenous β-catenin protein is replaced by mutant forms, which retain the cell adhesion function but lack either or both of the N- and the C-terminal transcriptional outputs. The C-terminal activity is essential for mesoderm formation and proper gastrulation, whereas N-terminal outputs are required later during embryonic development. By combining the double-mutant β-catenin with a conditional null allele and a Wnt1-Cre driver, we probed the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in dorsal neural tube development. While loss of β-catenin protein in the neural tube results in severe cell adhesion defects, the morphology of cells and tissues expressing the double-mutant form is normal. Surprisingly, Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity only moderately regulates cell proliferation, but is crucial for maintaining neural progenitor identity and for neuronal differentiation in the dorsal spinal cord. Our model animals thus allow dissecting signaling and structural functions of β-catenin in vivo and provide the first genetic tool to generate cells and tissues that entirely and exclusively lack canonical Wnt pathway activity. © 2011 by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

  4. Sensitive Phonon-Based Probe for Structure Identification of 1T' MoTe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Huang, Shengxi; Tatsumi, Yuki; Wu, Lijun; Guo, Huaihong; Bie, Ya-Qing; Ueno, Keiji; Yang, Teng; Zhu, Yimei; Kong, Jing; Saito, Riichiro; Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2017-06-28

    In this work, by combining transmission electron microscopy and polarized Raman spectroscopy for the 1T' MoTe 2 flakes with different thicknesses, we found that the polarization dependence of Raman intensity is given as a function of excitation laser wavelength, phonon symmetry, and phonon frequency, but has weak dependence on the flake thickness from few-layer to multilayer. In addition, the frequency of Raman peaks and the relative Raman intensity are sensitive to flake thickness, which manifests Raman spectroscopy as an effective probe for thickness of 1T' MoTe 2 . Our work demonstrates that polarized Raman spectroscopy is a powerful and nondestructive method to quickly identify the crystal structure and thickness of 1T' MoTe 2 simultaneously, which opens up opportunities for the in situ probe of anisotropic properties and broad applications of this novel material.

  5. Transient gain property of a weak probe field in an asymmetric semiconductor coupled double quantum well structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhigang; Zheng Zhiren; Yu Junhua

    2007-01-01

    The transient gain property of a weak probe field in an asymmetric semiconductor coupled double quantum well structure is reported. The transient process of the system, which is induced by the external coherent coupling field, shows the property of no inverse gain. We find that the transient behavior of the probe field can be tuned by the change of tunneling barrier. Both the amplitude of the transient gain and the frequency of the oscillation can be affected by the lifetime broadening

  6. Investigating the topological structure of quenched lattice QCD with overlap fermions using a multi-probing approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, You-Hao; Zhang, Jian-Bo; Xiong, Guang-Yi; Chen, Ying; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Yu-Bin; Ma, Jian-Ping

    2017-10-01

    The topological charge density and topological susceptibility are determined by a multi-probing approximation using overlap fermions in quenched SU(3) gauge theory. Then we investigate the topological structure of the quenched QCD vacuum, and compare it with results from the all-scale topological density. The results are consistent. Random permuted topological charge density is used to check whether these structures represent underlying ordered properties. The pseudoscalar glueball mass is extracted from the two-point correlation function of the topological charge density. We study 3 ensembles of different lattice spacing a with the same lattice volume 163×32. The results are compatible with the results of all-scale topological charge density, and the topological structures revealed by multi-probing are much closer to all-scale topological charge density than those from eigenmode expansion. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (11335001, 11275169, 11075167), It is also supported in part by the DFG and the NSFC (11261130311) through funds provided to the Sino-German CRC 110 "Symmetries and the Emergence of Structure in QCD". This work was also funded in part by National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (2015CB856700)

  7. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  8. PROBES, POPULATIONS, SAMPLES, MEASUREMENTS AND RELATIONS IN STEREOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T Dehoff

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This summary paper provides an overview of the content of stereology. The typical problem at hand centers around some three dimensional object that has an internal structure that determines its function, performance, or response. To understand and quantify the geometry of that structure it is necessary to probe it with geometric entities: points, lines, planes volumes, etc. Meaningful results are obtained only if the set of probes chosen for use in the assessment is drawn uniformly from the population of such probes for the structure as a whole. This requires an understanding of the population of each kind of probe. Interaction of the probes with the structure produce geometric events which are the focus of stereological measurements. In almost all applications the measurement that is made is a simple count of the number of these events. Rigorous application of these requirements for sample design produce unbiased estimates of geometric properties of features in the structure no matter how complex are the features or what their arrangement in space. It is this assumption-free characteristic of the methodology that makes it a powerful tool for characterizing the internal structure of three dimensional objects.

  9. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  10. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H.

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α- 32 P-labeled probe

  11. Interleukin-11 binds specific EF-hand proteins via their conserved structural motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Alexei S; Sokolov, Andrei S; Vologzhannikova, Alisa A; Permyakova, Maria E; Khorn, Polina A; Ismailov, Ramis G; Denessiouk, Konstantin A; Denesyuk, Alexander I; Rastrygina, Victoria A; Baksheeva, Viktoriia E; Zernii, Evgeni Yu; Zinchenko, Dmitry V; Glazatov, Vladimir V; Uversky, Vladimir N; Mirzabekov, Tajib A; Permyakov, Eugene A; Permyakov, Sergei E

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a hematopoietic cytokine engaged in numerous biological processes and validated as a target for treatment of various cancers. IL-11 contains intrinsically disordered regions that might recognize multiple targets. Recently we found that aside from IL-11RA and gp130 receptors, IL-11 interacts with calcium sensor protein S100P. Strict calcium dependence of this interaction suggests a possibility of IL-11 interaction with other calcium sensor proteins. Here we probed specificity of IL-11 to calcium-binding proteins of various types: calcium sensors of the EF-hand family (calmodulin, S100B and neuronal calcium sensors: recoverin, NCS-1, GCAP-1, GCAP-2), calcium buffers of the EF-hand family (S100G, oncomodulin), and a non-EF-hand calcium buffer (α-lactalbumin). A specific subset of the calcium sensor proteins (calmodulin, S100B, NCS-1, GCAP-1/2) exhibits metal-dependent binding of IL-11 with dissociation constants of 1-19 μM. These proteins share several amino acid residues belonging to conservative structural motifs of the EF-hand proteins, 'black' and 'gray' clusters. Replacements of the respective S100P residues by alanine drastically decrease its affinity to IL-11, suggesting their involvement into the association process. Secondary structure and accessibility of the hinge region of the EF-hand proteins studied are predicted to control specificity and selectivity of their binding to IL-11. The IL-11 interaction with the EF-hand proteins is expected to occur under numerous pathological conditions, accompanied by disintegration of plasma membrane and efflux of cellular components into the extracellular milieu.

  12. Probing zeolite internal structures using very low temperature 129Xe NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labouriau, A.; Crawford, S.N.; Earl, W.L.; Pietrass, T.; Weber, W.A.; Panjabi, G.; Gates, B.C.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, probing pore structure with 129 Xe NMR has received a bad reputation. This is due to the fact that the method is more complex than was originally suggested so the data is somewhat difficult to interpret. The authors find that the use of a wide temperature range (40--350 K) allows them to interpret 129 Xe chemical shifts in terms of van der Waals attraction between the xenon atom and oxygen in zeolite walls. Using rather simple models from the literature, they can extract useful pore size information as well as the van der Waals potential energy

  13. Revival structures of linear molecules in a field-free alignment condition as probed by high-order harmonic generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G. H.; Kim, H. T.; Park, J. Y.; Nam, C. H.; Kim, T. K.; Lee, J. H.; Ihee, H.

    2006-01-01

    Revival structures (rotational coherence) of three linear molecules (N 2 , O 2 , and CO 2 ) in a field free alignment condition have been investigated using high-order harmonic generation. The harmonic yields of these molecules were measured in a pump-probe manner by using a weak femtosecond (fs) laser pulse for field-free alignment of molecules and another intense fs laser pulse for harmonic generation. The harmonic intensities from 23rd to 29th order with respect to the time delay between the pump and the probe pulses showed revival structures in the condition of a field-free alignment of molecules. While the revival structure of a N 2 molecule had one-fourth the period of the full revival time and different degrees of modulation among different fractional revival times, the revival structures of O 2 and CO 2 molecules showed one-eighth the periods of the full revival time and similar degrees of modulation among all fractional revival times. The revival structures could be interpreted in terms of the nature of the highest occupied molecular orbital and the total nuclear spin.

  14. Accuracy of probing attachment levels using a new computerized cemento-enamel junction probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, R; Prakash, Shobha

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of clinical attachment level (CAL) represents the gold standard for diagnosing and monitoring periodontal disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of the newly introduced cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) probe in detecting CAL, using CEJ as a fixed reference point, and to compare the CEJ probe with the Florida stent probe (FSP) as well as with a standard manual probe, University of North Carolina-15 (UNC-15). Three examiners recorded the probing attachment level in 384 sites in case group (chronic periodontitis), and in 176 sites, in control group (healthy periodontal status), using the three probes. Subjects included both the sexes and ranged from 35 to 45 years. The experimental design was structured to balance the intra- and inter-examiner consistency at the same site during the two visits. CEJ probe showed higher intra-and inter-examiner consistency over both FSP and UNC-15 in both the case and control groups. Frequency distribution of differences of various magnitudes of repeated measurements ≤1 mm was in the higher range of 86.8% to 87.5% for CEJ probe. The FSP was more reproducible than UNC-15 in detecting relative attachment level (RAL). CEJ automated probe was found to have greatest potential for accuracy and consistency in detecting CAL than FSP and UNC-15. The automated probes appeared to be more reproducible than manual probes.

  15. Identifying members of the domain Archaea with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggraf, S; Mayer, T; Amann, R; Schadhauser, S; Woese, C R; Stetter, K O

    1994-09-01

    Two 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the archaeal kingdoms Euryachaeota and Crenarchaeota. Probe specificities were evaluated by nonradioactive dot blot hybridization against selected reference organisms. The successful application of fluorescent-probe derivatives for whole-cell hybridization required organism-specific optimizations of fixation and hybridization conditions to assure probe penetration and morphological integrity of the cells. The probes allowed preliminary grouping of three new hyperthermophilic isolates. Together with other group-specific rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes, these probes will facilitate rapid in situ monitoring of the populations present in hydrothermal systems and support cultivation attempts.

  16. Oxygen transport as a structure probe for heterogeneous polymeric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yushan

    Although permeability of small molecules is often measured as an important performance property, deeper analysis of the transport characteristics provides insight into polymer structure, especially if used in combination with other characterization techniques. Transport of small gas molecules senses the permeable amorphous structure and probes the nature of free volume. This work focuses on oxygen transport, supplemented with other methods of physical analysis, as a probe for: (1) the nature of free volume and crystalline morphology in the crystallized glassy state, (2) the nature of free volume and hierarchical structure in liquid crystalline polymers, and (3) the role of dispersed polyamide phase geometry on oxygen barrier properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET)/polyamide blends. In the first part, the improvement in oxygen-barrier properties of glassy polyesters by crystallization was examined. Examples included poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN), and a copolymer based on PET in which 55 mol% terephthalate was replaced with 4,4'-bibenzoate. Explanation of the unexpectedly high solubility of crystallized PEN required a two-phase transport model consisting of an impermeable crystalline phase of constant density and a permeable amorphous phase of variable density. The resulting relationship between oxygen solubility and amorphous phase density was consistent with free volume concepts of gas sorption. In the second part, oxygen barrier properties of liquid crystalline (LC) polyesters based on poly(diethylene glycol 4,4'-bibenzoate) (PDEGBB) were studied. This study extended the 2-phase transport model for oxygen transport of non-LC crystalline polymers to a smectic LCP. It was possible to systematically vary the solid state structure of (PDEGBB) from LC glass to crystallized LC glass. The results were consistent with a liquid crystalline state intermediate between the permeable amorphous glass and the impermeable 3-dimensional crystal. In this interpretation

  17. Specific identification of human papillomavirus type in cervical smears and paraffin sections by in situ hybridization with radioactive probes: a preliminary communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, J.; Gendelman, H.E.; Naghashfar, Z.; Gupta, P.; Rosenshein, N.; Sawada, E.; Woodruff, J.D.; Shah, K.

    1985-01-01

    Cervical Papanicolaou smears and paraffin sections of biopsy specimens obtained from women attending dysplasia clinics were examined for viral DNA sequences by in situ hybridization technique using 35 S-labeled cloned recombinant DNA probes of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, and 16. These and one unrelated DNA probe complementary to measles virus RNA were labeled by nick translation using either one or two 35 S-labeled nucleotides. Paraffin sections and cervical smears were collected on pretreated slides, hybridized with the probes under stringent or nonstringent conditions for 50 h, and autoradiographed. Additional cervical specimens from the same women were examined for the presence of genus-specific papillomavirus capsid antigen by the immunoperoxidase technique. Preliminary results may be summarized as follows. The infecting virus could be identified in smears as well as in sections. Viral DNA sequences were detected only when there were condylomatous cells in the specimen and in only a proportion of the condylomatous cells. Even under stringent conditions, some specimens reacted with both HPV-6 and HPV-11. In some instances, the cells did not hybridize with any of the three probes even when duplicate specimens contained frankly condylomatous, capsid antigen-positive cells. In situ hybridization of Papanicolaou smears or of tissue sections is a practical method for diagnosis and follow-up of specific papillomavirus infection using routinely collected material

  18. Effect of structure variation of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe on the performance of displacement-based electrochemical aptamer sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jie; Zhang, Ziping; Jin, Haizhu

    2016-03-15

    Electrochemical aptamer-based (E-AB) sensors employing electrode-immobilized, redox-tagged aptamer probes have emerged as a promising platform for the sensitive and quick detection of target analytes ranging from small molecules to proteins. Signal generation in this class of sensor is linked to change in electron transfer efficiency upon binding-induced change in flexibility/conformation of the aptamer probe. Because of this signaling mechanism, signal gains of these sensors can be improved by employing a displacement-based recognition system, which links target binding with a large-scale flexibility/conformation shift from the aptamer-DNA duplex to the single-stranded DNA or the native aptamer. Despite the relatively large number of displacement-based E-AB sensor samples, little attention has been paid to the structure variation of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe. Here we detail the effects of complementary length and position of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe on the performance of a model displacement-based E-AB sensor for ATP. We find that, greater background suppression and signal gain are observed with longer complementary length of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe. However, sensor equilibration time slows monotonically with increasing complementary length; and with too many target binding sites in aptamer sequence being occupied by the complementary DNA, the aptamer-target binding does not occur and no signal gain observed. We also demonstrate that signal gain of the displacement-based E-AB sensor is strongly dependent on the complementary position of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe, with complementary position located at the electrode-attached or redox-tagged end of the duplex probe, larger background suppression and signal increase than that of the middle position are observed. These results highlight the importance of rational structure design of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe and provide new insights into the optimization of displacement-based E-AB sensors. Copyright

  19. Trans-acting RNAs as molecular probes for monitoring time-dependent structural change of an RNA complex adapting two structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yuri; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2011-03-01

    As dynamic structural changes are pivotal for the functions of some classes of RNA molecule, it is important to develop methods to monitor structural changes in RNA in a time-dependent manner without chemical modification. Based on previous reports that trans-acting RNAs can be used as probes for analysis and control of 3D structures of target RNAs, we applied this method to monitor time-dependent structural changes in RNA. We designed and performed a proof-of-principle study using a simple model RNA complex that adopts two different structures as a target. The time-dependent structural changes in the target RNA were successfully monitored using two trans-acting RNAs, which stably form a ternary complex with the bimolecular target RNA and act as a catalyst to join two RNA fragments of the target complex, respectively. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-labeled DNA probe. Images PMID:16348233

  1. Structure of the human-heart fatty-acid-binding protein 3 in complex with the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Mika; Sugiyama, Shigeru, E-mail: sugiyama@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Lipid Active Structure Project, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ishida, Hanako; Niiyama, Mayumi [Lipid Active Structure Project, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuoka, Daisuke; Hara, Toshiaki [Lipid Active Structure Project, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Mizohata, Eiichi [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Murakami, Satoshi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagaw 226-8501 (Japan); Inoue, Tsuyoshi [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuoka, Shigeru; Murata, Michio [Lipid Active Structure Project, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure of human-heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein in complex with anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate was solved at 2.15 Å resolution revealing the detailed binding mechanism of the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP3), which is a cytosolic protein abundantly found in cardiomyocytes, plays a role in trafficking fatty acids throughout cellular compartments by reversibly binding intracellular fatty acids with relatively high affinity. The fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) is extensively utilized for examining the interaction of ligands with fatty-acid-binding proteins. The X-ray structure of FABP3 was determined in the presence of ANS and revealed the detailed ANS-binding mechanism. Furthermore, four water molecules were clearly identified in the binding cavity. Through these water molecules, the bound ANS molecule forms indirect hydrogen-bond interactions with FABP3. The adipocyte-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP4) exhibits 67% sequence identity with FABP3 and its crystal structure is almost the same as that of FABP3. However, FABP4 can bind with a higher affinity to ANS than FABP3. To understand the difference in their ligand specificities, a structural comparison was performed between FABP3–ANS and FABP4–ANS complexes. The result revealed that the orientation of ANS binding to FABP3 is completely opposite to that of ANS binding to FABP4, and the substitution of valine in FABP4 to leucine in FABP3 may result in greater steric hindrance between the side-chain of Leu115 and the aniline ring of ANS.

  2. Structure of the human-heart fatty-acid-binding protein 3 in complex with the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Mika; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Ishida, Hanako; Niiyama, Mayumi; Matsuoka, Daisuke; Hara, Toshiaki; Mizohata, Eiichi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Murata, Michio

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of human-heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein in complex with anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate was solved at 2.15 Å resolution revealing the detailed binding mechanism of the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP3), which is a cytosolic protein abundantly found in cardiomyocytes, plays a role in trafficking fatty acids throughout cellular compartments by reversibly binding intracellular fatty acids with relatively high affinity. The fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) is extensively utilized for examining the interaction of ligands with fatty-acid-binding proteins. The X-ray structure of FABP3 was determined in the presence of ANS and revealed the detailed ANS-binding mechanism. Furthermore, four water molecules were clearly identified in the binding cavity. Through these water molecules, the bound ANS molecule forms indirect hydrogen-bond interactions with FABP3. The adipocyte-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP4) exhibits 67% sequence identity with FABP3 and its crystal structure is almost the same as that of FABP3. However, FABP4 can bind with a higher affinity to ANS than FABP3. To understand the difference in their ligand specificities, a structural comparison was performed between FABP3–ANS and FABP4–ANS complexes. The result revealed that the orientation of ANS binding to FABP3 is completely opposite to that of ANS binding to FABP4, and the substitution of valine in FABP4 to leucine in FABP3 may result in greater steric hindrance between the side-chain of Leu115 and the aniline ring of ANS

  3. Electronic specific heat of transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, R.

    1964-07-01

    The experimental results that make it possible to define the band structure of transition metal carbides having an NaCI structure are still very few. We have measured the electronic specific heat of some of these carbides of varying electronic concentration (TiC, either stoichiometric or non-stoichiometric, TaC and mixed (Ti, Ta) - C). We give the main characteristics (metallography, resistivity, X-rays) of our samples and we describe the low temperature specific heat apparatus which has been built. In one of these we use helium as the exchange gas. The other is set up with a mechanical contact. The two use a germanium probe for thermometer. The measurement of the temperature using this probe is described, as well as the various measurement devices. The results are presented in the form of a rigid band model and show that the density of the states at the Fermi level has a minimum in the neighbourhood of the group IV carbides. (author) [fr

  4. Probing the (empirical quantum structure embedded in the periodic table with an effective Bohr model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Nardin Favaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic shell structure can be observed by inspecting the experimental periodic properties of the Periodic Table. The (quantum shell structure emerges from these properties and in this way quantum mechanics can be explicitly shown considering the (semi-quantitative periodic properties. These periodic properties can be obtained with a simple effective Bohr model. An effective Bohr model with an effective quantum defect (u was considered as a probe in order to show the quantum structure embedded in the Periodic Table. u(Z shows a quasi-smoothed dependence of Z, i.e., u(Z ≈ Z2/5 - 1.

  5. Probing of RNA structures in a positive sense RNA virus reveals selection pressures for structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Kyle E; Choudhary, Krishna; Aviran, Sharon; Perry, Keith L

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In single stranded (+)-sense RNA viruses, RNA structural elements (SEs) play essential roles in the infection process from replication to encapsidation. Using selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension sequencing (SHAPE-Seq) and covariation analysis, we explore the structural features of the third genome segment of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), RNA3 (2216 nt), both in vitro and in plant cell lysates. Comparing SHAPE-Seq and covariation analysis results revealed multiple SEs in the coat protein open reading frame and 3′ untranslated region. Four of these SEs were mutated and serially passaged in Nicotiana tabacum plants to identify biologically selected changes to the original mutated sequences. After passaging, loop mutants showed partial reversion to their wild-type sequence and SEs that were structurally disrupted by mutations were restored to wild-type-like structures via synonymous mutations in planta. These results support the existence and selection of virus open reading frame SEs in the host organism and provide a framework for further studies on the role of RNA structure in viral infection. Additionally, this work demonstrates the applicability of high-throughput chemical probing in plant cell lysates and presents a new method for calculating SHAPE reactivities from overlapping reverse transcriptase priming sites. PMID:29294088

  6. Theory of dual probes on graphene structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel

    This thesis concerns the development of theoretical and computational methods for multiprobe systems and their application to nanostructured graphene. Recent experimental advances emphasize the usefulness of multi-probe techniques when analyzing the electrical properties of nanoscale samples...

  7. Harnessing cell-to-cell variations to probe bacterial structure and biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Julie A.

    Advances in microscopy and biotechnology have given us novel insights into cellular biology and physics. While bacteria were long considered to be relatively unstructured, the development of fluorescence microscopy techniques, and spatially and temporally resolved high-throughput quantitative studies, have uncovered that the bacterial cell is highly organized, and its structure rigorously maintained. In this thesis I will describe our gateTool software, designed to harness cell-to-cell variations to probe bacterial structure, and discuss two exciting aspects of structure that we have employed gateTool to investigate: (i) chromosome organization and the cellular mechanisms for controlling DNA dynamics, and (ii) the study of cell wall synthesis, and how the genes in the synthesis pathway impact cellular shape. In the first project, we develop a spatial and temporal mapping of cell-cycle-dependent chromosomal organization, and use this quantitative map to discover that chromosomal loci segregate from midcell with universal dynamics. In the second project, I describe preliminary time- lapse and snapshot imaging analysis suggesting phentoypical coherence across peptidoglycan synthesis pathways.

  8. Family- and genus-level 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for ecological studies of methanotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, J; Ahmad, A; Steudler, P A; Pomerantz, W J; Cavanaugh, C M

    2001-10-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria play a major role in the global carbon cycle, degrade xenobiotic pollutants, and have the potential for a variety of biotechnological applications. To facilitate ecological studies of these important organisms, we developed a suite of oligonucleotide probes for quantitative analysis of methanotroph-specific 16S rRNA from environmental samples. Two probes target methanotrophs in the family Methylocystaceae (type II methanotrophs) as a group. No oligonucleotide signatures that distinguish between the two genera in this family, Methylocystis and Methylosinus, were identified. Two other probes target, as a single group, a majority of the known methanotrophs belonging to the family Methylococcaceae (type I/X methanotrophs). The remaining probes target members of individual genera of the Methylococcaceae, including Methylobacter, Methylomonas, Methylomicrobium, Methylococcus, and Methylocaldum. One of the family-level probes also covers all methanotrophic endosymbionts of marine mollusks for which 16S rRNA sequences have been published. The two known species of the newly described genus Methylosarcina gen. nov. are covered by a probe that otherwise targets only members of the closely related genus Methylomicrobium. None of the probes covers strains of the newly proposed genera Methylocella and "Methylothermus," which are polyphyletic with respect to the recognized methanotrophic families. Empirically determined midpoint dissociation temperatures were 49 to 57 degrees C for all probes. In dot blot screening against RNA from positive- and negative-control strains, the probes were specific to their intended targets. The broad coverage and high degree of specificity of this new suite of probes will provide more detailed, quantitative information about the community structure of methanotrophs in environmental samples than was previously available.

  9. pH-Induced Modulation of One- and Two-Photon Absorption Properties in a Naphthalene-Based Molecular Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, N Arul; Kongsted, Jacob; Ågren, Hans

    2013-08-13

    Presently, there is a great demand for small probe molecules that can be used for two-photon excitation microscopy (TPM)-based monitoring of intracellular and intraorganelle activity and pH. The candidate molecules should ideally possess a large two-photon absorption cross section with optical properties sensitive to pH changes. In the present work, we investigate the potential of a methoxy napthalene (MONAP) derivative for its suitability to serve as a pH sensor using TPM. Using an integrated approach rooted in hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics, the structures, dynamics, and the one- and two-photon properties of the probe in dimethylformamide solvent are studied. It is found that the protonated form is responsible for the optical property of MONAP at moderately low pH, for which the calculated pH-induced red shift is in good agreement with experiments. A 2-fold increase in the two-photon absorption cross section in the IR region of the spectrum is predicted for the moderately low pH form of the probe, suggesting that this can be a potential probe for pH monitoring of living cells. We also propose some design principles aimed at obtaining control of the absorption spectral range of the probe by structural tuning. Our work indicates that the integrated approach employed is capable of capturing the pH-induced changes in structure and optical properties of organic molecular probes and that such in silico tools can be used to draw structure-property relationships to design novel molecular probes suitable for a specific application.

  10. Radical probing of spliceosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Charnpal S; Kent, Oliver A; MacMillan, Andrew M

    2017-08-01

    Here we describe the synthesis and use of a directed hydroxyl radical probe, tethered to a pre-mRNA substrate, to map the structure of this substrate during the spliceosome assembly process. These studies indicate an early organization and proximation of conserved pre-mRNA sequences during spliceosome assembly. This methodology may be adapted to the synthesis of a wide variety of modified RNAs for use as probes of RNA structure and RNA-protein interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of PTPN12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available PTPN12 is an important tumor suppressor that plays critical roles in various physiological processes. However, the molecular basis underlying the substrate specificity of PTPN12 remains uncertain. Here, enzymological and crystallographic studies have enabled us to identify two distinct structural features that are crucial determinants of PTPN12 substrate specificity: the pY+1 site binding pocket and specific basic charged residues along its surface loops. Key structurally plastic regions and specific residues in PTPN12 enabled recognition of different HER2 phosphorylation sites and regulated specific PTPN12 functions. In addition, the structure of PTPN12 revealed a CDK2 phosphorylation site in a specific PTPN12 loop. Taken together, our results not only provide the working mechanisms of PTPN12 for desphosphorylation of its substrates but will also help in designing specific inhibitors of PTPN12.

  12. Probing the DNA Structural Requirements for Facilitated Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    DNA glycosylases perform a genome-wide search to locate damaged nucleotides among a great excess of undamaged nucleotides. Many glycosylases are capable of facilitated diffusion, whereby multiple sites along the DNA are sampled during a single binding encounter. Electrostatic interactions between positively charged amino acids and the negatively charged phosphate backbone are crucial for facilitated diffusion, but the extent to which diffusing proteins rely on the double-helical structure DNA is not known. Kinetic assays were used to probe the DNA searching mechanism of human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) and to test the extent to which diffusion requires B-form duplex DNA. Although AAG excises εA lesions from single-stranded DNA, it is not processive on single-stranded DNA because dissociation is faster than N-glycosidic bond cleavage. However, the AAG complex with single-stranded DNA is sufficiently stable to allow for DNA annealing when a complementary strand is added. This observation provides evidence of nonspecific association of AAG with single-stranded DNA. Single-strand gaps, bubbles, and bent structures do not impede the search by AAG. Instead, these flexible or bent structures lead to the capture of a nearby site of damage that is more efficient than that of a continuous B-form duplex. The ability of AAG to negotiate these helix discontinuities is inconsistent with a sliding mode of diffusion but can be readily explained by a hopping mode that involves microscopic dissociation and reassociation. These experiments provide evidence of relatively long-range hops that allow a searching protein to navigate around DNA binding proteins that would serve as obstacles to a sliding protein. PMID:25495964

  13. Identification and quantification of Bifidobacterium species isolated from food with genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes by colony hybridization and PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, P; Pfefferkorn, A; Teuber, M; Meile, L

    1997-04-01

    A Bifidobacterium genus-specific target sequence in the V9 variable region of the 16S rRNA has been elaborated and was used to develop a hybridization probe. The specificity of this probe, named lm3 (5'-CGGGTGCTI*CCCACTTTCATG-3'), was used to identify all known type strains and distinguish them from other bacteria. All of the 30 type strains of Bifidobacterium which are available at the German culture collection Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen, 6 commercially available production strains, and 34 closely related relevant strains (as negative controls) were tested. All tested bifidobacteria showed distinct positive signals by colony hybridization, whereas all negative controls showed no distinct dots except Gardnerella vaginalis DSM4944 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii DSM4902, which gave slight signals. Furthermore, we established a method for isolation and identification of bifidobacteria from food by using a PCR assay without prior isolation of DNA but breaking the cells with proteinase K. By this method, all Bifidobacterium strains lead to a DNA product of the expected size. We also established a quick assay to quantitatively measure Bifidobacterium counts in food and feces by dilution plating and colony hybridization. We were able to demonstrate that 2.1 x 10(6) to 2.3 x 10(7) colonies/g of sour milk containing bifidobacteria hybridized with the specific nucleotide probe. With these two methods, genus-specific colony hybridization and genus-specific PCR, it is now possible to readily and accurately detect any bifidobacteria in food and fecal samples and to discriminate between them and members of other genera.

  14. Linking probe thermodynamics to microarray quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shuzhao; Pozhitkov, Alexander; Brouwer, Marius

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the difference in probe properties holds the key to absolute quantification of DNA microarrays. So far, Langmuir-like models have failed to link sequence-specific properties to hybridization signals in the presence of a complex hybridization background. Data from washing experiments indicate that the post-hybridization washing has no major effect on the specifically bound targets, which give the final signals. Thus, the amount of specific targets bound to probes is likely determined before washing, by the competition against nonspecific binding. Our competitive hybridization model is a viable alternative to Langmuir-like models. (comment)

  15. Visualizing tributyltin (TBT) in bacterial aggregates by specific rhodamine-based fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xilang; Hao, Likai; She, Mengyao; Obst, Martin; Kappler, Andreas; Yin, Bing; Liu, Ping; Li, Jianli; Wang, Lanying; Shi, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the first examples of fluorescent and colorimetric probes for microscopic TBT imaging. The fluorescent probes are highly selective and sensitive to TBT and have successfully been applied for imaging of TBT in bacterial Rhodobacter ferrooxidans sp. strain SW2 cell-EPS-mineral aggregates and in cell suspensions of the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002 by using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Some experiences with absorption, phonon Raman, and luminescence spectroscopic probes of crystal structure of f-element compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Structural information is crucial to the study and understanding of the basic chemical properties of the f elements. X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques are usually used to obtain crystal structure information. However, the transuranium (5f) elements, because of their radioactivity and limited availability, present problems for standard XRD analysis. For some time now we have been developing and using various spectroscopic probes of crystal structure; an overview of our research in this area is presented here

  17. A Small Area In-Situ MEMS Test Structure to Accurately Measure Fracture Strength by Electrostatic Probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitsie, Fernando; Jensen, Brian D.; de Boer, Maarten

    1999-07-15

    We have designed, fabricated, tested and modeled a first generation small area test structure for MEMS fracture studies by electrostatic rather than mechanical probing. Because of its small area, this device has potential applications as a lot monitor of strength or fatigue of the MEMS structural material. By matching deflection versus applied voltage data to a 3-D model of the test structure, we develop high confidence that the local stresses achieved in the gage section are greater than 1 GPa. Brittle failure of the polycrystalline silicon was observed.

  18. A specific DNA probe which identifies Babesia bovis in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchpoo, W; Tan-ariya, P; Boonsaeng, V; Brockelman, C R; Wilairat, P; Panyim, S

    1992-05-01

    A genomic library of Babesia bovis DNA from the Mexican strain M was constructed in plasmid pUN121 and cloned in Escherichia coli. Several recombinants which hybridized strongly to radioactively labeled B. bovis genomic DNA in an in situ screening were selected and further analyzed for those which specifically hybridized to B. bovis DNA. It was found that pMU-B1 had the highest sensitivity, detecting 25 pg of purified B. bovis DNA, and 300 parasites in 10 microliters of whole infected blood, or 0.00025% parasitemia. pMU-B1 contained a 6.0 kb B. bovis DNA insert which did not cross-hybridize to Babesia bigemina, Trypanosoma evansi, Plasmodium falciparum, Anaplasma marginale, Boophilus microplus and cow DNA. In the Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA, pMU-B1 could differentiate between two B. bovis geographic isolates, Mexican strain M and Thai isolate TS4. Thus, the pMU-B1 probe will be useful in the diagnosis of Babesia infection in cattle and ticks, and in the differentiation of B. bovis strains.

  19. Development of a carbazole-based fluorescence probe for G-quadruplex DNA: The importance of side-group effect on binding specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Qi; Ren, Gui-Ying; Zhao, Shuang; Lian, Guang-Chang; Chen, Ting-Ting; Ci, Yang; Li, Hong-Yao

    2018-06-01

    G-quadruplex DNAs are highly prevalent in the human genome and involved in many important biological processes. However, many aspects of their biological mechanism and significance still need to be elucidated. Therefore, the development of fluorescent probes for G-quadruplex detection is important for the basic research. We report here on the development of small molecular dyes designed on the basis of carbazole scaffold by introducing styrene-like substituents at its 9-position, for the purpose of G-quadruplex recognition. Results revealed that the side group on the carbazole scaffold was very important for their ability to selectively recognize G-quadruplex DNA structures. 1a with the pyridine side group displayed excellent fluorescence signal turn-on property for the specific discrimination of G-quadruplex DNAs against other nucleic acids. The characteristics of 1a were further investigated with UV-vis spectrophotometry, fluorescence, circular dichroism, FID assay and molecular docking to validate the selectivity, sensitivity and detailed binding mode toward G-quadruplex DNAs.

  20. GeneChip microarrays-signal intensities, RNA concentrations and probe sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, Hans; Preibisch, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    GeneChip microarrays consist of hundreds of thousands of oligonucleotide probes. The transformation of their signal intensities into RNA transcript concentrations requires the knowledge of the response function of the measuring device. We analysed the 'apparatus' function of perfect match (PM) and mismatched (MM) oligonucleotide probes of GeneChip microarrays after changes of the target concentration using the results of a spiked-in experiment. In agreement with previous studies we found that a competitive two-species Langmuir-adsorption model describes the probe intensities well. Each PM and MM probe is characterized by two hybridization constants which specify the propensity of the probe to bind specific and non-specific transcripts. The affinity for non-specific hybridization is on average equal for PM and MM. The purine-pyrimidine asymmetry of base pair interaction strengths, however, causes a characteristic PM-MM intensity difference, the sign of which depends on the middle base of the probe. The affinity for specific hybridization of the PM exceeds that of the MM on average by nearly one order of magnitude because the central mismatched base only weakly contributes to the stability of the probe/target duplexes. For the first time we differentiate between the free energy parameters related to the 64 possible middle-triples of DNA/RNA oligomer duplexes with a central Watson-Crick pairing and a central mismatched pairing. Both the PM and MM probes respond to the concentration of specific transcripts, which can be estimated from the PM and MM probe intensities using the Langmuir-model. The analysis of the PM-MM intensity difference provides at least no loss of accuracy and precision of the estimated concentration compared with the PM-only estimates which in turn outperform the MM-only estimates. The results show that the processing of the PM-MM intensity difference requires the consideration of a background term due to non-specific hybridization, which is

  1. Void structure of O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere observed by the Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Ohtani, S.; Gkioulidou, M.; Takahashi, K.; Kistler, L. M.; Tanaka, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Helium Oxygen Proton Electron instrument observed a new type of enhancement of O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere during substorms. As the satellite moved outward in the premidnight sector, the flux of the O+ ions with energy 10 keV appeared first in the energy-time spectrograms. Then, the enhancement of the flux spread toward high and low energies. The enhanced flux of the O+ ions with the highest energy remained, whereas the flux of the ions with lower energy vanished near apogee, forming what we call the void structure. The structure cannot be found in the H+ spectrogram. We studied the generation mechanism of this structure by using numerical simulation. We traced the trajectories of O+ ions in the electric and magnetic fields from the global magnetohydrodynamics simulation and calculated the flux of O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere in accordance with the Liouville theorem. The simulated spectrograms are well consistent with the ones observed by Van Allen Probes. We suggest the following processes. (1) When magnetic reconnection starts, an intensive equatorward and tailward plasma flow appears in the plasma lobe. (2) The flow transports plasma from the lobe to the plasma sheet where the radius of curvature of the magnetic field line is small. (3) The intensive dawn-dusk electric field transports the O+ ions earthward and accelerates them nonadiabatically to an energy threshold; (4) the void structure appears at energies below the threshold.

  2. Identifying members of the domain Archaea with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Burggraf, S; Mayer, T; Amann, R; Schadhauser, S; Woese, C R; Stetter, K O

    1994-01-01

    Two 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the archaeal kingdoms Euryachaeota and Crenarchaeota. Probe specificities were evaluated by nonradioactive dot blot hybridization against selected reference organisms. The successful application of fluorescent-probe derivatives for whole-cell hybridization required organism-specific optimizations of fixation and hybridization conditions to assure probe penetration and morphological integrity of the cells. The probes allowed prelim...

  3. Asymmetric actuating structure generates negligible influence on the supporting base for high performance scanning probe microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi Yan, Gang; Bin Liu, Yong; Hua Feng, Zhi

    2014-02-01

    An asymmetric actuating structure generating negligible influence on the supporting base for high performance scanning probe microscopies is proposed in this paper. The actuator structure consists of two piezostacks, one is used for actuating while the other is for counterbalancing. In contrast with balanced structure, the two piezostacks are installed at the same side of the supporting base. The effectiveness of the structure is proved by some experiments with the actuators fixed to the free end of a cantilever. Experimental results show that almost all of the vibration modes of the cantilever are suppressed effectively at a wide frequency range of 90 Hz-10 kHz.

  4. Polarization-dependent pump-probe studies in atomic fine-structure levels: towards the production of spin-polarized electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokell, E.; Zamith, S.; Bouchene, M.A.; Girard, B.

    2000-01-01

    The precession of orbital and spin angular momentum vectors has been observed in a pump-probe study of the 4P fine-structure states of atomic potassium. A femtosecond pump pulse prepared a coherent superposition of the two fine-structure components. A time-delayed probe pulse then ionized the system after it had been allowed to evolve freely. Oscillations recorded in the ion signal reflect the evolution of the orientation of the orbital and spin angular momentum due to spin-orbit coupling. This interpretation gives physical insight into the cause of the half-period phase shift observed when the relative polarizations of the laser pulses were changed from parallel to perpendicular. Finally, it is shown that these changes in the orientation of the spin momentum vector of the system can be utilized to produce highly spin-polarized free electrons on the femtosecond scale. (author)

  5. Hydroxyl group as IR probe to detect the structure of ionic liquid-acetonitrile mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Deng, Geng; Zhou, Yu; Ashraf, Hamad; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2018-06-01

    Task-specific ionic liquids (ILs) are those with functional groups introduced in the cations or anions of ILs to bring about specific properties for various tasks. In this work, the hydrogen bonding interactions between a hydroxyl functionalized IL 1-(2-hydroxylethyl)-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C2OHMIM][BF4]) and acetonitrile were investigated in detail by infrared spectroscopy, excess spectroscopy, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy, combined with hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance and density functional theory calculations (DFT). The hydroxyl group rather than C2sbnd H is found to be the main interaction site in the cation. And the ν(Osbnd H) is more sensitive than v(C-Hs) to the environment, which has been taken as an intrinsic probe to reflect the structural change of IL. Examining the region of ν(Osbnd H), by combining excess spectroscopy and DFT calculation, a number of species were identified in the mixtures. Other than the hydrogen bond between a cation and an anion, the hydroxyl group allows the formation of a hydrogen bond between two like-charged cations. The Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonding interactions in the hydroxyl-mediated cation-cation complexes are cooperative, while Osbnd H⋯F and C2sbnd H⋯F hydrogen bonding interactions in cation-anion complexes are anti-cooperative. These in-depth studies on the properties of the ionic liquid-acetonitrile mixtures may shed light on exploring their applications as mixed solvents and understanding the nature of doubly ionic hydrogen bonds.

  6. Use of low energy alkali ion scattering as a probe of surface structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overbury, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is given of the use of low energy ion scattering as a probe of surface structure with emphasis on work done using alkali ions. Various schemes for extracting structural information from the ion energy and angle distributions are discussed in terms of advantages and disadvantages of each. The scattering potential which is the primary non-structural parameter needed for analysis, is discussed in terms of recent experimental results. The structure of clean and reconstructed surfaces are discussed, with examples of measurements of layer relaxations on the Mo(111) surface and missing row reconstructions on the Au(110) and Pt(110) surfaces. Studies of adsorbate covered surfaces are presented with respect to location of the adsorbate and its effect on the structure of the underlying substrate. Finally, examples are given which demonstrate the sensitivity of ion scattering to surface defects and disordering on reconstructed Au(110) and Pt(110) surfaces and unreconstructed Mo(111) surfaces, and to ordering of adsorbates on Mo(001). 47 refs., 12 figs

  7. Probe based manipulation and assembly of nanowires into organized mesostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, K.; Komulainen, J.; Kivijakola, J.; Lovera, P.; Iacopino, D.; Pudas, M.; Vähäkangas, J.; Röning, J.; Redmond, G.

    2008-12-01

    A convenient approach to patterning inorganic and organic nanowires using a novel probe manipulator is presented. The system utilizes an electrochemically etched tungsten wire probe mounted onto a 3D actuator that is directed by a 3D controller. When it is engaged by the user, the movement of the probe and the forces experienced by the tip are simultaneously reported in real time. Platinum nanowires are manipulated into organized mesostructures on silicon chip substrates. In particular, individual nanowires are systematically removed from aggregates, transferred to a chosen location, and manipulated into complex structures in which selected wires occupy specific positions with defined orientations. Rapid prototyping of complex mesostructures, by pushing, rotating and bending conjugated polymer, i.e., polyfluorene, nanowires into various configurations, is also achieved. By exploiting the strong internal axial alignment of polymer chains within the polyfluorene nanowires, mesostructures tailored to exhibit distinctly anisotropic optical properties, such as birefringence and photoluminescence dichroism, are successfully assembled on fused silica substrates.

  8. Probe based manipulation and assembly of nanowires into organized mesostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, K; Lovera, P; Iacopino, D; Redmond, G; Komulainen, J; Pudas, M; Vaehaekangas, J; Kivijakola, J; Roening, J

    2008-01-01

    A convenient approach to patterning inorganic and organic nanowires using a novel probe manipulator is presented. The system utilizes an electrochemically etched tungsten wire probe mounted onto a 3D actuator that is directed by a 3D controller. When it is engaged by the user, the movement of the probe and the forces experienced by the tip are simultaneously reported in real time. Platinum nanowires are manipulated into organized mesostructures on silicon chip substrates. In particular, individual nanowires are systematically removed from aggregates, transferred to a chosen location, and manipulated into complex structures in which selected wires occupy specific positions with defined orientations. Rapid prototyping of complex mesostructures, by pushing, rotating and bending conjugated polymer, i.e., polyfluorene, nanowires into various configurations, is also achieved. By exploiting the strong internal axial alignment of polymer chains within the polyfluorene nanowires, mesostructures tailored to exhibit distinctly anisotropic optical properties, such as birefringence and photoluminescence dichroism, are successfully assembled on fused silica substrates.

  9. 16S rRNA-targeted probes for specific detection of Thermoanaerobacterium spp., Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum, and Caldicellulosiruptor spp. by fluorescent in situ hybridization in biohydrogen producing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O-Thong, Sompong [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Bygningstorvet Bg 115, DK-2800, Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Thaksin University, Patthalung 93110 (Thailand); Prasertsan, Poonsuk [Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Faculty of Agro-Industry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat-Yai, Songkhla 90112 (Thailand); Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Bygningstorvet Bg 115, DK-2800, Kgs Lyngby (Denmark)

    2008-11-15

    16S rRNA gene targeted oligonucleotide probes for specific detection of genera Thermoanaerobacterium (Tbm1282), Caldicellulosiruptor (Ccs432), and specie Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum (Tbmthsacc184) were designed and used to monitor the spatial distribution of hydrogen producing bacteria in sludge and granules from anaerobic reactors. The designed probes were checked for their specificity and then validated using fluorescence in situ hybridization with target microorganisms and non-target microorganisms. Thermoanaerobacterium spp., T. thermosaccharolyticum and Caldicellulosiruptor spp. were detected with the probes designed with coverage of 75%, 100% and 93%, respectively. Thermophilic (60 C) hydrogen producing reactors, one fed with sucrose and another, fed with palm oil mill effluent comprised of following major groups of hydrogen producers: Thermoanaerobacterium spp. (49% and 36%), T. thermosaccharolyticum (16% and 10%), phylum Firmicutes (low G+C) gram positive bacteria (15% and 27%). Extreme-thermophilic (70 C) hydrogen producing reactors, one fed with xylose and another, fed with lignocellulosic hydrolysate comprised of following major groups of hydrogen producers: Caldicellulosiruptor spp. (40.5% and 20.5%), phylum Firmicutes (low G+C) gram positive bacteria (17% and 20%), Archaea (7% and 8.5%), and Thermoanaerobacterium spp. (0% and 5%). Results obtained, showed good applicability of the probes Tbm1282, Tbmthsacc184 and Ccs432 for specific detection and quantification of thermophilic and extreme-thermophilic hydrogen producers in complex environments. (author)

  10. Very High Specific Energy, Medium Power Li/CFx Primary Battery for Launchers and Space Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochard, Paul; Godillot, Gerome; Peres, Jean Paul; Corbin, Julien; Espinosa, Amaya

    2014-08-01

    Benchmark with existing technologies shows the advantages of the lithium-fluorinated carbon (Li/CFx) technology for use aboard future launchers in terms of a low Total Cost of Ownership (TCO), especially for high energy demanding missions such as re-ignitable upper stages for long GTO+ missions and probes for deep space exploration.This paper presents the new results obtained on this chemistry in terms of electrical and climatic performances, abuse tests and life tests. Studies - co-financed between CNES and Saft - looked at a pure CFx version with a specific energy up to 500 Wh/kg along with a medium power of 80 to 100 W/kg.

  11. Fetal sex determination in the first trimester of pregnancy using a Y chromosome-specific DNA probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Y.; Huang, S.; Chen, M.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, M.; Dong, J.; Ku, A.; Xu, S.

    1987-05-01

    Prenatal determination of fetal sex is important for the prevention of X-linked disorders such as hemophilia, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The complex procedures of prenatal diagnosis for X-linked disorders are unnecessary if the fetus is female, because usually no clinical symptoms ever appear in female. pY 3.4 probe used in this work for sex determination is a 3.4 kilobase human repeat sequence. The probe is specific for the Y chromosome of males and can be used for sex determination. The other prove pBLUR used in this paper as control is a widely dispersed, highly repeated human Alu family DNA sequence, represented equally in male and female DNA. On the basis of the relative densities of the autoradiographic spots produced by hybridization of fetal DNA with pY3.4 and pBLUR, the sex of fetus can be clearly identified. Further the authors can determine the radioactive intensity (cpm) of the hybridized DNA spots and the ratio of hybridization with Y3.4 to pBLUR (Y3.4/pBLUR x 10). Results show that the hybridization ratio of DNA from chorionic villi of male (1.03 +/- 0.24) is significantly higher than that of female (0.16 +/- 0.09). Therefore, sex determination of the fetus can be made, based on the ratio of pY3.4/pBLUR x 10. If necessary they can also use Southern hybridization with pY 3.4 probe of DNA isolated from chorionic villi to confirm the result of dot hybridization.

  12. Imaging dynamic redox processes with genetically encoded probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeriņa, Daria; Morgan, Bruce; Dick, Tobias P

    2014-08-01

    Redox signalling plays an important role in many aspects of physiology, including that of the cardiovascular system. Perturbed redox regulation has been associated with numerous pathological conditions; nevertheless, the causal relationships between redox changes and pathology often remain unclear. Redox signalling involves the production of specific redox species at specific times in specific locations. However, until recently, the study of these processes has been impeded by a lack of appropriate tools and methodologies that afford the necessary redox species specificity and spatiotemporal resolution. Recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes now allow dynamic real-time measurements, of defined redox species, with subcellular compartment resolution, in intact living cells. Here we discuss the available genetically encoded redox probes in terms of their sensitivity and specificity and highlight where uncertainties or controversies currently exist. Furthermore, we outline major goals for future probe development and describe how progress in imaging methodologies will improve our ability to employ genetically encoded redox probes in a wide range of situations. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Redox Signalling in the Cardiovascular System." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pump–probe microscopy: Visualization and spectroscopy of ultrafast dynamics at the nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumstrup, Erik M., E-mail: erik.grumstrup@montana.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59718 (United States); Gabriel, Michelle M.; Cating, Emma E.M.; Van Goethem, Erika M. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Papanikolas, John M., E-mail: john_papanikolas@unc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2015-09-08

    Highlights: • Diffraction limited pump–probe microscopy methods are described. • Spatial variation in dynamical phenomena across single structures. • Direct observation of carrier motion in individual nanostructures. - Abstract: Excited state dynamics at the nanoscale provide important insight into the influence of structural features such as interfaces, defects, and surfaces on material properties. Pump–probe microscopy combines the spatial resolution of far-field optical microscopy with the temporal resolution of ultrafast spectroscopy, and has emerged as a powerful technique for characterizing spatial variation in dynamical phenomena across nanometer length scales. It has helped correlate dynamical phenomena with specific structural features in a variety of materials, shedding light on how excited state behaviors can dramatically differ from one member of the ensemble to the next, and even at different points within a single structure. It has also enabled direct imaging of transport phenomena such as free carrier diffusion, exciton migration and plasmon propagation in nanostructures. This ability to observe individual objects provides unique insight into complex materials where heterogeneous behavior makes it difficult, if not impossible, to reach clear and quantitative conclusions.

  14. A useful PET probe [11C]BU99008 with ultra-high specific radioactivity for small animal PET imaging of I2-imidazoline receptors in the hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazunori; Shimoda, Yoko; Yui, Joji; Zhang, Yiding; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Hatori, Akiko; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Ogawa, Masanao; Kurihara, Yusuke; Nengaki, Nobuki; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: A positron emission tomography (PET) probe with ultra-high specific radioactivity (SA) enables measuring high receptor specific binding in brain regions by avoiding mass effect of the PET probe itself. It has been reported that PET probe with ultra-high SA can detect small change caused by endogenous or exogenous ligand. Recently, Kealey et al. developed [ 11 C]BU99008, a more potent PET probe for I 2 -imidazoline receptors (I 2 Rs) imaging, with a conventional SA (mean 76 GBq/μmol) showed higher specific binding in the brain. Here, to detect small change of specific binding for I 2 Rs caused by endogenous or exogenous ligand in an extremely small region, such as hypothalamus in the brain, we synthesized and evaluated [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA as a useful PET probe for small-animal PET imaging of I 2 Rs. Methods: [ 11 C]BU99008 was prepared by [ 11 C]methylation of N-desmethyl precursor with [ 11 C]methyl iodide. Biodistribution, metabolite analysis, and brain PET studies were conducted in rats. Results: [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA in the range of 5400–16,600 GBq/μmol were successfully synthesized (n = 7), and had appropriate radioactivity for in vivo study. In the biodistribution study, the mean radioactivity levels in all investigated tissues except for the kidney did not show significant difference between [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA and that with conventional SA. In the metabolite analysis, the percentage of unchanged [ 11 C]BU99008 at 30 min after the injection of probes with ultra-high and conventional SA was similar in rat brain and plasma. In the PET study of rats' brain, radioactivity level (AUC 30–60 min ) in the hypothalamus of rats injected with [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA (64 [SUV ∙ min]) was significantly higher than that observed for that with conventional SA (50 [SUV ∙ min]). The specific binding of [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA (86% of total binding) for I 2 R was higher than that of

  15. Nitrile bonds as infrared probes of electrostatics in ribonuclease S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fafarman, Aaron T; Boxer, Steven G

    2010-10-28

    Three different nitrile-containing amino acids, p-cyanophenylalanine, m-cyanophenylalanine, and S-cyanohomocysteine, have been introduced near the active site of the semisynthetic enzyme ribonuclease S (RNase S) to serve as probes of electrostatic fields. Vibrational Stark spectra, measured directly on the probe-modified proteins, confirm the predominance of the linear Stark tuning rate in describing the sensitivity of the nitrile stretch to external electric fields, a necessary property for interpreting observed frequency shifts as a quantitative measure of local electric fields that can be compared with simulations. The X-ray structures of these nitrile-modified RNase variants and enzymatic assays demonstrate minimal perturbation to the structure and function, respectively, by the probes and provide a context for understanding the influence of the environment on the nitrile stretching frequency. We examine the ability of simulation techniques to recapitulate the spectroscopic properties of these nitriles as a means to directly test a computational electrostatic model for proteins, specifically that in the ubiquitous Amber-99 force field. Although qualitative agreement between theory and experiment is observed for the largest shifts, substantial discrepancies are observed in some cases, highlighting the ongoing need for experimental metrics to inform the development of theoretical models of electrostatic fields in proteins.

  16. Dynamical study of the radial structure of the fluctuations measured by a reciprocating Langmuir probe in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devynck, P.; Antar, G.; Wang, G.; Garbet, X.; Gunn, J.; Pascal, J.Y.

    1999-01-01

    The fluctuations in the Scrape Off Layer (S.O.L.) of Tore Supra are studied with a movable Langmuir probe biased to ion saturation current. The probe system consists of three probes separated poloidally (0.68 cm between two nearby probes). The probe has no magnetic connection to the mid plane limiter on which the plasma is leaning, but the radial profile of the ion saturation current fluctuations displays a dip at the limiter position. At the same location the ion saturation current displays a dip at the limiter position. At the same location the ion saturation current displays an inflexion point. A correlation analysis technique is developed to study the radial behaviour of the fluctuations. It reveals that this dip is associated with a reduction of the poloidal velocity of the fluctuations with no sign reversal. In the dip the mean poloidal correlation length of the fluctuations is also reduced. These observations are consistent with a reduction of the fluctuations by a shear of the radial electric field created at the limiter surface. The autocorrelation time is also calculated. It increases slightly in the dip and is found to be sensitive to both the convection time and lifetime of the turbulent structures, because these quantities are of the same order. (authors)

  17. Characterization of Radiation-Induced Clustering using Atom Probe Tomography in Nuclear Structural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyeong Geun; Lim, Sang Yeob; Chang, Kun Ok; Ha, Jin Hyung; Kwon, Jun Hyun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The degradations include the change in mechanical properties, which are related to the microstructure evolution caused by irradiation. The most widely used tool for the imaging irradiated microstructure is transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The composition of irradiation defects can be analyzed using X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) equipped in the TEM. However, composition characterization of the nano-sized irradiation defects in the matrix is limited due to the beam broadening of TEM and the overlapping of the probed volume during EDS analysis. Recently, Atom probe tomography (APT) has been introduced to the characterization of irradiation defects. APT provides sub-nano scale position of atoms and the chemical composition of a selected volume. SS316 irradiated with Fe ions at above 300 .deg. C caused significant clustering and segregation of Si and Ni at defect sinks. The neutron irradiated low alloy steel showed similar clustering of Ni and Si. The approach of using APT was demonstrated to be well suited for discovering the structure of irradiation defects and performing quantitative analysis in nuclear materials irradiated at high temperature.

  18. Hand and shoe monitor using air ionization probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fergus, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A hand and shoe radiation monitor is provided which includes a probe support body defining a plurality of cells, within each cell there being an ionization probe. The support body provides structural strength for protecting the ionization probes from force applied to the support body during a radiation monitoring event. There is also provided a fast response time amplifier circuit for the output from the ionization probes

  19. Modular Rake of Pitot Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Timothy A.; Henry, Michael W.; Homyk, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    The figure presents selected views of a modular rake of 17 pitot probes for measuring both transient and steady-state pressures in a supersonic wind tunnel. In addition to pitot tubes visible in the figure, the probe modules contain (1) high-frequency dynamic-pressure transducers connected through wires to remote monitoring circuitry and (2) flow passages that lead to tubes that, in turn, lead to remote steady-state pressure transducers. Prior pitot-probe rakes were fabricated as unitary structures, into which the individual pitot probes were brazed. Repair or replacement of individual probes was difficult, costly, and time-consuming because (1) it was necessary to remove entire rakes in order to unbraze individual malfunctioning probes and (2) the heat of unbrazing a failed probe and of brazing a new probe in place could damage adjacent probes. In contrast, the modules in the present probe are designed to be relatively quickly and easily replaceable with no heating and, in many cases, without need for removal of the entire rake from the wind tunnel. To remove a malfunctioning probe, one first removes a screw-mounted V-cross-section cover that holds the probe and adjacent probes in place. Then one removes a screw-mounted cover plate to gain access to the steady-state pressure tubes and dynamicpressure wires. Next, one disconnects the tube and wires of the affected probe. Finally, one installs a new probe in the reverse of the aforementioned sequence. The wire connections can be made by soldering, but to facilitate removal and installation, they can be made via miniature plugs and sockets. The connections between the probe flow passages and the tubes leading to the remote pressure sensors can be made by use of any of a variety of readily available flexible tubes that can be easily pulled off and slid back on for removal and installation, respectively.

  20. Nanomaterials and MRI molecular probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Toshiro

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the current state and future prospect of enhancing probes in MRI which enable to image specific cells and molecules mainly from the aspect of cell trafficking. Although MRI requires such probes for specific imaging, it has an advantage that anatomical images are simultaneously available even during surgical operation without radiation exposure, differing from X-CT, -transillumination and positron emission tomography (PET). In the development of novel MRI molecular probes, the recent topic concerns the cell trafficking biology where cells related with transplantation and immunological therapy can be traced. Although superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) has been used as a commercially available enhancer, this nanoparticle has problems like a difficulty to penetrate cell, cytotoxicity and others. For these, authors have developed the nanoparticle SPIO covered with silica shell, which can be chemically modified, e.g., by binding fluorescent pigments to possibly allow MR bimodal molecular imaging. For penetration of particles in cells, envelop of Sendai virus is used. PET-CT has been more popular these days; however, MRI is superior to CT for imaging soft tissues, and development of PET-MRI is actively under progress aiming the multi-modal imaging. At present, molecular probes for MRI are certainly not so many as those for PET and cooperative efforts to develop the probes are required in medical, technological and pharmaceutical fields. (R.T.)

  1. Structural similarity and category-specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian; Law, Ian; Paulson, Olaf B

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that category-specific recognition disorders for natural objects may reflect that natural objects are more structurally (visually) similar than artefacts and therefore more difficult to recognize following brain damage. On this account one might expect a positive relationshi...

  2. Nanolithography and nanochemistry utilizing scanning probe techniques: directed self-assembly of sub-micrometer-sized structures by scanning probe lithography defined templates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, D.; Sturms, J.P.E.; Schubert, U.S.

    2004-01-01

    The octadecyl trichlorosilane (OTS) monolayer was formed on Si carrier, and the template regulated by a local probe oxidation method from this was produced using a scanning probe lithography. The local probe oxidation was done by moving an AFM tip along an axle line. When the chip contacts a OTS

  3. Max Auwaerter Price lecture: building and probing atomic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternes, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The control of the geometric, electronic, and magnetic properties of atomic-scale nanostructures is a prerequisite for the understanding and fabrication of new materials and devices. Two routes lead towards this goal: Atomic manipulation of single atoms and molecules by scanning probe microscopy, or patterning using self-assembly. Atomic manipulation has been performed since almost 20 years, but it has been difficult to answer the simple question: how much force does it take to manipulate atoms and molecules on surfaces? To address this question, we used a combined atomic force and scanning tunneling microscope to simultaneously measure the force and the current between an adsorbate and a tip during atomic manipulation. We found that the force it takes to move an atom depends crucially on the binding between adsorbate and surface. Our results indicate that for moving metal atoms on metal surfaces, the lateral force component plays the dominant role. Measuring the forces during manipulation yielded the full potential energy landscape of the tip-sample interaction. Surprisingly, the potential energy barriers are comparable to diffusion barriers, which are obtained in the absence of a probe tip. Furthermore, we used the scanning tunneling microscope to assemble magnetic structures on a thin insulator. We found, that the spin of the atom is influenced by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the supporting surface which lifts the spin degeneracy of the ground state and enables the identification of individual atoms. The ground state of atoms with half-integer spin remains always degenerated at zero field due to Kramers theorem. We found that if these states differ by an orbital momentum of m = ±1 the localized spin is screened by the surrounding conducting electrons of the non-magnetic host and form a many-electron spin-singlet at sufficiently low temperature. (author)

  4. Design and application of noncontinuously binding probes used for haplotyping and genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont-Kingdon, Genevieve; Margraf, Rebecca L; Sumner, Kelli; Millson, Alison; Lyon, Elaine; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2008-06-01

    Many methods for genotyping use melting temperature (Tm) of sequence-specific probes. Usually the probes hybridize to a continuous stretch of DNA that contains the variant(s). In contrast, hybridization of noncontinuous probes to a template can form bulges. This report generates guidelines for the design of noncontinuous probes. We used software to predict hybridization structures and Tms from 10 noncontinuous probes and 54 different templates. Predicted Tms were compared to existing experimental data. The bulging template's sequences (omitted in the probe) ranged in size from 1 to 73 nucleotides. In 36 cases, we compared observed and predicted DeltaTms between alleles complementary to the probe and mismatched alleles. In addition, using software that predicts effects of bulges, we designed a probe and then tested it experimentally. The mean differences between predicted and observed Tms were 0.65 (2.51) degrees C with the Visual OMP software and 0.28 (1.67) degrees C with the MeltCalc software. DeltaTms were within a mean (SD) of 0.36 (1.23) degrees C (Visual OMP) and -0.01 (1.02) degrees C (MeltCalc) of observed values. An increase in the size of the template bulge resulted in a decrease in Tms. In 2 templates, the presence of a variant in the bulge influenced the experimental Tm of 2 noncontinuous probes, a result that was not predicted by the software programs. The use of software prediction should prove useful for the design of noncontinuous probes that can be used as tools for molecular haplotyping, multiplex genotyping, or masking sequence variants.

  5. Amyloid-β positron emission tomography imaging probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C; Långström, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    , a number of factors appear to preclude these probes from clinical utilization. As the available "amyloid specific" positron emission tomography imaging probes have failed to demonstrate diagnostic value and have shown limited utility for monitoring therapeutic interventions in humans, a debate...

  6. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  7. NeuroMEMS: Neural Probe Microtechnologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Musallam

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural probe technologies have already had a significant positive effect on our understanding of the brain by revealing the functioning of networks of biological neurons. Probes are implanted in different areas of the brain to record and/or stimulate specific sites in the brain. Neural probes are currently used in many clinical settings for diagnosis of brain diseases such as seizers, epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer’s, and dementia. We find these devices assisting paralyzed patients by allowing them to operate computers or robots using their neural activity. In recent years, probe technologies were assisted by rapid advancements in microfabrication and microelectronic technologies and thus are enabling highly functional and robust neural probes which are opening new and exciting avenues in neural sciences and brain machine interfaces. With a wide variety of probes that have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date, this review aims to provide an overview of the advances and recent progress in the microfabrication techniques of neural probes. In addition, we aim to highlight the challenges faced in developing and implementing ultralong multi-site recording probes that are needed to monitor neural activity from deeper regions in the brain. Finally, we review techniques that can improve the biocompatibility of the neural probes to minimize the immune response and encourage neural growth around the electrodes for long term implantation studies.

  8. Neutrons as a probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizumi, Masashi

    1993-01-01

    As an introduction to the symposium a brief overview will be given about the features of neutrons as a probe. First it will be pointed out that the utilization of neutrons as a probe for investigating the structural and dynamical properties of condensed matters is a benign gift eventuated from the release of atomic energy initiated by Enrico Fermi exactly half century ago. Features of neutrons as a probe are discussed in accordance with the four basic physical properties of neutrons as an elementary particle; (1) no electric charge (the interaction with matter is nuclear), (2) the mass of neutron is 1 amu, (3) spin is 1/2 and (4) neutrons have magnetic dipole moment. Overview will be given on the uniqueness of neutrons as a probe and on the variety in the way they are used in the wide research area from the pure science to the industrial applications. (author)

  9. Detection of G-Quadruplex Structures Formed by G-Rich Sequences from Rice Genome and Transcriptome Using Combined Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tianjun; Li, Weiguo; Ding, Zhan; Cheng, Shaofei; Liang, Kun; Liu, Xiangjun; Bing, Tao; Shangguan, Dihua

    2017-08-01

    Putative G-quadruplex (G4) forming sequences (PQS) are highly prevalent in the genome and transcriptome of various organisms and are considered as potential regulation elements in many biological processes by forming G4 structures. The formation of G4 structures highly depends on the sequences and the environment. In most cases, it is difficult to predict G4 formation by PQS, especially PQS containing G2 tracts. Therefore, the experimental identification of G4 formation is essential in the study of G4-related biological functions. Herein, we report a rapid and simple method for the detection of G4 structures by using a pair of complementary reporters, hemin and BMSP. This method was applied to detect G4 structures formed by PQS (DNA and RNA) searched in the genome and transcriptome of Oryza sativa. Unlike most of the reported G4 probes that only recognize part of G4 structures, the proposed method based on combined probes positively responded to almost all G4 conformations, including parallel, antiparallel, and mixed/hybrid G4, but did not respond to non-G4 sequences. This method shows potential for high-throughput identification of G4 structures in genome and transcriptome. Furthermore, BMSP was observed to drive some PQS to form more stable G4 structures or induce the G4 formation of some PQS that cannot form G4 in normal physiological conditions, which may provide a powerful molecular tool for gene regulation.

  10. Development of an event-specific hydrolysis probe quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for Embrapa 5.1 genetically modified common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treml, Diana; Venturelli, Gustavo L; Brod, Fábio C A; Faria, Josias C; Arisi, Ana C M

    2014-12-10

    A genetically modified (GM) common bean event, namely Embrapa 5.1, resistant to the bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV), was approved for commercialization in Brazil. Brazilian regulation for genetically modified organism (GMO) labeling requires that any food containing more than 1% GMO be labeled. The event-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method has been the primary trend for GMO identification and quantitation because of its high specificity based on the flanking sequence. This work reports the development of an event-specific assay, named FGM, for Embrapa 5.1 detection and quantitation by use of SYBR Green or hydrolysis probe. The FGM assay specificity was tested for Embrapa 2.3 event (a noncommercial GM common bean also resistant to BGMV), 46 non-GM common bean varieties, and other crop species including maize, GM maize, soybean, and GM soybean. The FGM assay showed high specificity to detect the Embrapa 5.1 event. Standard curves for the FGM assay presented a mean efficiency of 95% and a limit of detection (LOD) of 100 genome copies in the presence of background DNA. The primers and probe developed are suitable for the detection and quantitation of Embrapa 5.1.

  11. Using computer simulations to probe the structure and dynamics of biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.M.; Hirata, F.; Kim, K.; Zhang, P.

    1987-01-01

    The use of computer simulations to study internal motions and thermodynamic properties is receiving increased attention. One important use of the method is to provide a more fundamental understanding of the molecular information contained in various kinds of experiments on these complex systems. In the first part of this paper the authors review recent work in their laboratory concerned with the use of computer simulations for the interpretation of experimental probes of molecular structure and dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids. The interplay between computer simulations and three experimental techniques is emphasized: (1) nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation spectroscopy, (2) refinement of macro-molecular x-ray structures, and (3) vibrational spectroscopy. The treatment of solvent effects in biopolymer simulations is a difficult problem. It is not possible to study systematically the effect of solvent conditions, e.g. added salt concentration, on biopolymer properties by means of simulations alone. In the last part of the paper the authors review a more analytical approach they developed to study polyelectrolyte properties of solvated biopolymers. The results are compared with computer simulations

  12. Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Christopher; Barkley, Joel; Smith, Barbara S.

    2018-04-01

    Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging are probe-based imaging modalities with translational potential for use in detecting endometrial diseases. This deep-tissue imaging probe design allows for the retrofitting of commercially available endometrial sampling curettes. The imaging probe presented here has a 2.92-mm diameter and approximate length of 26 cm, which allows for entry into the human endometrial cavity, making it possible to use photoacoustic imaging and high-resolution ultrasound to characterize the uterus. We demonstrate the imaging probes' ability to provide structural information of an excised pig uterus using ultrasound imaging and detect photoacoustic signals at a radial depth of 1 cm.

  13. Nanobits - exchangable and customisable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, Izzet

    dimensions: tips suitable for imaging high-aspect ratio structures and sidewall profiles were designed. Tip diameters in the order of 30 nm were reproducibly obtained with the FIB milling and the smallest tip diameter achieved was ... process by providing direct picking up of the NanoBits by the AFM probe was investigated. Two different bending mechanisms were studied for out-of-plane bending studies: FIB irradiation- and the residual stress-driven bending in bimorph structures. With FIB irradiation studies, NanoBits were demonstrated...... of the structure which may be starting at 170°C. The fabricated NanoBits were assembled and their performance as AFM probes were tested at OFFIS. The NanoBits were successfully picked up by a microgripper, collected in a cartridge and mounted to an AFM probe. Performances of the assembled high-aspect-ratio Nano...

  14. The retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain: from molecular structure to biological activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzic, Jasmina S.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Isern, Nancy. G.; Jones, David N.M.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Zohar

    2011-01-01

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane protein that is involved in inflammatory diseases, cancer progression, and multiple human pathogens utilize CD147 for efficient infection. In several cancers, CD147 expression is so high that it is now used as a prognostic marker. The two primary isoforms of CD147 that are related to cancer progression have been identified, differing in their number of immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. These include CD147 Ig1-Ig2 that is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues and CD147 Ig0-Ig1-Ig2 that is retinal specific and implicated in retinoblastoma. However, little is known in regard to the retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain despite its potential role in retinoblastoma. We present the first crystal structure of the human CD147 Ig0 domain and show that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a crystallographic dimer with an I-type domain structure, which is maintained in solution. Furthermore, we have utilized our structural data together with mutagenesis to probe the biological activity of CD147-containing proteins both with and without the CD147 Ig0 domain within several model cell lines. Our findings reveal that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a potent stimulator of interleukin-6 and suggest that the CD147 Ig0 domain has its own receptor distinct from that of the other CD147 Ig-like domains, CD147 Ig1-Ig2. Finally, we show that the CD147 Ig0 dimer is the functional unit required for activity and can be disrupted by a single point mutation. PMID:21620857

  15. Structuring Formal Requirements Specifications for Reuse and Product Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimdahl, Mats P. E.

    2001-01-01

    In this project we have investigated how formal specifications should be structured to allow for requirements reuse, product family engineering, and ease of requirements change, The contributions of this work include (1) a requirements specification methodology specifically targeted for critical avionics applications, (2) guidelines for how to structure state-based specifications to facilitate ease of change and reuse, and (3) examples from the avionics domain demonstrating the proposed approach.

  16. Protein recognition by a pattern-generating fluorescent molecular probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pode, Zohar; Peri-Naor, Ronny; Georgeson, Joseph M.; Ilani, Tal; Kiss, Vladimir; Unger, Tamar; Markus, Barak; Barr, Haim M.; Motiei, Leila; Margulies, David

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescent molecular probes have become valuable tools in protein research; however, the current methods for using these probes are less suitable for analysing specific populations of proteins in their native environment. In this study, we address this gap by developing a unimolecular fluorescent probe that combines the properties of small-molecule-based probes and cross-reactive sensor arrays (the so-called chemical 'noses/tongues'). On the one hand, the probe can detect different proteins by generating unique identification (ID) patterns, akin to cross-reactive arrays. On the other hand, its unimolecular scaffold and selective binding enable this ID-generating probe to identify combinations of specific protein families within complex mixtures and to discriminate among isoforms in living cells, where macroscopic arrays cannot access. The ability to recycle the molecular device and use it to track several binding interactions simultaneously further demonstrates how this approach could expand the fluorescent toolbox currently used to detect and image proteins.

  17. Development of dansyl-modified oligonucleotide probes responding to structural changes in a duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Kowata, Keiko; Komatsu, Yasuo

    2013-11-15

    We have synthesized a nonnucleoside amidite block of dansyl fluorophore to prepare dansyl-modified oligonucleotides (ONTs). The fluorescence intensities of dansyl-ONT specifically increased by the presence of adjacent guanosine residues but, significantly reduced in a dansyl-flipping duplex. These changes were caused by solvatochromism effect due to the number of guanine which is hydrophobic functional group and the external environment of dansyl group. The fluorescence intensities could be plotted as a function of the ONTs concentrations and the increase in the fluorescence was observed to equimolar concentrations of target DNA. This duplex exhibited higher melting temperature relative to the corresponding duplexes containing other base pairs. Similar changes in fluorescence could be detected upon hybridization with complementary RNAs. Thus, the dansyl-modified ONTs provide sequence specific fluorescent probe of DNA and RNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure-function relationship of substituted bromomethylcoumarins in nucleoside specificity of RNA alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Stefanie; Kollar, Laura Bettina; Ochel, Antonia; Ghate, Manjunath; Helm, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Selective alkylation of RNA nucleotides is an important field of RNA biochemistry, e.g. in applications of fluorescent labeling or in structural probing experiments, yet detailed structure-function studies of labeling agents are rare. Here, bromomethylcoumarins as reactive compounds for fluorescent labeling of RNA are developed as an attractive scaffold on which electronic properties can be modulated by varying the substituents. Six different 4-bromomethyl-coumarins of various substitution patterns were tested for nucleotide specificity of RNA alkylation using tRNA from Escherichia coli as substrate. Using semi-quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis, reactions at mildly acidic and slightly alkaline pH were compared. For all tested compounds, coumarin conjugates with 4-thiouridine, pseudouridine, guanosine, and uridine were identified, with the latter largely dominating. This data set shows that selectivity of ribonucleotide alkylation depends on the substitution pattern of the reactive dye, and even more strongly on the modulation of the reaction conditions. The latter should be therefore carefully optimized when striving to achieve selectivity. Interestingly, the highest selectivity for labeling of a modified nucleoside, namely of 4-thiouridine, was achieved with a compound whose selectivity was somewhat less dependent on reaction conditions than the other compounds. In summary, bromomethylcoumarin derivatives are a highly interesting class of compounds, since their selectivity for 4-thiouridine can be efficiently tuned by variation of substitution pattern and reaction conditions.

  19. Evaluation of the Gen-Probe DNA probe for the detection of legionellae in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelstein, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    A commercial DNA probe kit designed to detect rRNA from legionellae was evaluated for its ability to correctly discriminate between legionellae and non-legionellae taken from culture plates. The probe kit, made by the Gen-Probe Corp. (San Diego, Calif.), was radiolabeled with 125 I, and probe bacterial RNA hybridization, detected in a simple one-tube system hybridization assay, was quantitated with a gamma counter. A total of 156 Legionella sp. strains were tested, of which 125 were Legionella pneumophila and the remainder were strains from 21 other Legionella spp. A total of 106 gram-negative non-legionellae, isolated from human respiratory tract (81%) and other body site (19%) specimens, were also tested; 14 genera and 28 species were represented. The probe easily distinguished all of the legionellae from the non-legionellae. The average legionellae/non-legionellae hybridization ratio was 42:1, and the lowest ratio was 2:1; a minor modification in the procedure increased the lowest ratio to 5:1. In addition to correctly identifying all Legionella species, the probe was able to separate some of the various species of Legionella. L. pneumophila strains hybridized more completely to the probe than did the other Legionella spp.; L. wadsworthii and L. oakridgensis hybridized only about 25% of the probe relative to L. pneumophila. Some strains of phenotypically identified L. pneumophila had much lower hybridization to the probe than other members of the species and may represent a new Legionella species. The simplicity of the technique and specificity of the probe make it a good candidate for confirming the identity of legionellae in culture

  20. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnazza, S; Gioffre, G; Felici, F; Guglielmino, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 10{sup 4} cells ml{sup -1}. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  1. [Development of a Fluorescence Probe for Live Cell Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Aya

    2017-01-01

    Probes that detect specific biological materials are indispensable tools for deepening our understanding of various cellular phenomena. In live cell imaging, the probe must emit fluorescence only when a specific substance is detected. In this paper, we introduce a new probe we developed for live cell imaging. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity is higher in tumor cells than in normal cells and is involved in the development of resistance to various anticancer drugs. We previously reported the development of a general strategy for the synthesis of probes for detection of GST enzymes, including fluorogenic, bioluminogenic, and 19 F-NMR probes. Arylsulfonyl groups were used as caging groups during probe design. The fluorogenic probes were successfully used to quantitate very low levels of GST activity in cell extracts and were also successfully applied to the imaging of microsomal MGST1 activity in living cells. The bioluminogenic and 19 F-NMR probes were able to detect GST activity in Escherichia coli cells. Oligonucleotide-templated reactions are powerful tools for nucleic acid sensing. This strategy exploits the target strand as a template for two functionalized probes and provides a simple molecular mechanism for multiple turnover reactions. We developed a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction-triggered fluorescent probe. The probe completed its reaction within 30 s of initiation and amplified the fluorescence signal from 0.5 pM target oligonucleotide by 1500 fold under isothermal conditions. Additionally, we applied the oligonucleotide-templated reaction for molecular releasing and peptide detection.

  2. Outer planet probe cost estimates: First impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehoff, J.

    1974-01-01

    An examination was made of early estimates of outer planetary atmospheric probe cost by comparing the estimates with past planetary projects. Of particular interest is identification of project elements which are likely cost drivers for future probe missions. Data are divided into two parts: first, the description of a cost model developed by SAI for the Planetary Programs Office of NASA, and second, use of this model and its data base to evaluate estimates of probe costs. Several observations are offered in conclusion regarding the credibility of current estimates and specific areas of the outer planet probe concept most vulnerable to cost escalation.

  3. Probing the electronic structure of M-graphene oxide (M = Ni, Co, NiCo) catalysts for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Binhua; Liu, Jinyin; Zhou, Litao [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Material (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science & Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Long, Dan, E-mail: legend_long@aliyun.com [Department of Radiology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou 310022 (China); Feng, Kun; Sun, Xuhui [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Material (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science & Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhong, Jun, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Material (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science & Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: An interaction between metal and graphene oxide was probed to enhance the hydrolysis efficiency of ammonia borane. - Highlights: • Various metal elements (M = Ni, Co, NiCo) were dispersed on graphene oxide (GO) for the hydrolysis of ammonia borane (AB). • The electronic structure of the hybrids has been probed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). • An interfacial interaction between metal and GO was observed which could be related to the hydrolysis performance. • The results provide new insight into the enhanced performance of the M-GO hybrids. - Abstract: Various metal elements (M = Ni, Co, NiCo) were dispersed on graphene oxide (GO) to form the M-GO hybrids by a facile way. The hybrids showed good catalytic activities in the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB, NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}), which were significantly enhanced when compared to the metal nanoparticles or GO alone. The electronic structure of the hybrids has been probed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The distribution of metal elements was clearly imaged with identical electronic structure. Moreover, an interfacial interaction between metal and GO was observed with the peak intensity proportional to the catalytic performance in the hydrolysis of AB. The results provide new insight into the enhanced performance of the M-GO hybrids and may help for the design of advanced catalysts.

  4. Probing Xe electronic structure by two-color HHG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccialà, D; Ciriolo, A G; De Silvestri, S; Devetta, M; Negro, M; Stagira, S; Vozzi, C; Pabst, S; Bruner, B D; Dudovich, N; Soifer, H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is probing the multi-electron behavior in xenon by two-color driven high harmonic generation. By changing the relative polarization of the two colors we were able to study different aspects of the multi-electron response. (paper)

  5. Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Christopher; Barkley, Joel; Smith, Barbara

    2018-04-01

    Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging are probe-based imaging modalities with translational potential for use in detecting endometrial diseases. This deep-tissue imaging probe design allows for the retrofitting of commercially available endometrial sampling curettes. The imaging probe presented here has a 2.92-mm diameter and approximate length of 26 cm, which allows for entry into the human endometrial cavity, making it possible to use photoacoustic imaging and high-resolution ultrasound to characterize the uterus. We demonstrate the imaging probes' ability to provide structural information of an excised pig uterus using ultrasound imaging and detect photoacoustic signals at a radial depth of 1 cm. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  6. Probing cell mechanical properties with microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowat, Amy

    2012-02-01

    Exploiting flow on the micron-scale is emerging as a method to probe cell mechanical properties with 10-1000x advances in throughput over existing technologies. The mechanical properties of cells and the cell nucleus are implicated in a wide range of biological contexts: for example, the ability of white blood cells to deform is central to immune response; and malignant cells show decreased stiffness compared to benign cells. We recently developed a microfluidic device to probe cell and nucleus mechanical properties: cells are forced to deform through a narrow constrictions in response to an applied pressure; flowing cells through a series of constrictions enables us to probe the ability of hundreds of cells to deform and relax during flow. By tuning the constriction width so it is narrower than the width of the cell nucleus, we can specifically probe the effects of nuclear physical properties on whole cell deformability. We show that the nucleus is the rate-limiting step in cell passage: inducing a change in its shape to a multilobed structure results in cells that transit more quickly; increased levels of lamin A, a nuclear protein that is key for nuclear shape and mechanical stability, impairs the passage of cells through constrictions. We are currently developing a new class of microfluidic devices to simultaneously probe the deformability of hundreds of cell samples in parallel. Using the same soft lithography techniques, membranes are fabricated to have well-defined pore distribution, width, length, and tortuosity. We design the membranes to interface with a multiwell plate, enabling simultaneous measurement of hundreds of different samples. Given the wide spectrum of diseases where altered cell and nucleus mechanical properties are implicated, such a platform has great potential, for example, to screen cells based on their mechanical phenotype against a library of drugs.

  7. Transverse vorticity measurements using an array of four hot-wire probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, J. F.; Klewickc, C. L.; Disimile, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the technique used to obtain a time series of the quasi-instantaneous transverse vorticity from a four wire array of probes is presented. The algorithmic structure which supports the technique is described in detail and demonstration data, from a large plane shear layer, are presented to provide a specific utilization of the technique. Sensitivity calculations are provided which allow one contribution to the inherent uncertainty of the technique to be evaluated.

  8. Where do pulse oximeter probes break?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crede, S; Van der Merwe, G; Hutchinson, J; Woods, D; Karlen, W; Lawn, J

    2014-06-01

    Pulse oximetry, a non-invasive method for accurate assessment of blood oxygen saturation (SPO2), is an important monitoring tool in health care facilities. However, it is often not available in many low-resource settings, due to expense, overly sophisticated design, a lack of organised procurement systems and inadequate medical device management and maintenance structures. Furthermore medical devices are often fragile and not designed to withstand the conditions of low-resource settings. In order to design a probe, better suited to the needs of health care facilities in low-resource settings this study aimed to document the site and nature of pulse oximeter probe breakages in a range of different probe designs in a low to middle income country. A retrospective review of job cards relating to the assessment and repair of damaged or faulty pulse oximeter probes was conducted at a medical device repair company based in Cape Town, South Africa, specializing in pulse oximeter probe repairs. 1,840 job cards relating to the assessment and repair of pulse oximeter probes were reviewed. 60.2 % of probes sent for assessment were finger-clip probes. For all probes, excluding the neonatal wrap probes, the most common point of failure was the probe wiring (>50 %). The neonatal wrap most commonly failed at the strap (51.5 %). The total cost for quoting on the broken pulse oximeter probes and for the subsequent repair of devices, excluding replacement components, amounted to an estimated ZAR 738,810 (USD $98,508). Improving the probe wiring would increase the life span of pulse oximeter probes. Increasing the life span of probes will make pulse oximetry more affordable and accessible. This is of high priority in low-resource settings where frequent repair or replacement of probes is unaffordable or impossible.

  9. Using Gas-Phase Guest-Host Chemistry to Probe the Structures of b Ions of Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Árpád; Harrison, Alex G.; Paizs, Béla

    2012-12-01

    Middle-sized b n ( n ≥ 5) fragments of protonated peptides undergo selective complex formation with ammonia under experimental conditions typically used to probe hydrogen-deuterium exchange in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Other usual peptide fragments like y, a, a*, etc., and small b n ( n ≤ 4) fragments do not form stable ammonia adducts. We propose that complex formation of b n ions with ammonia is characteristic to macrocyclic isomers of these fragments. Experiments on a protonated cyclic peptide and N-terminal acetylated peptides fully support this hypothesis; the protonated cyclic peptide does form ammonia adducts while linear b n ions of acetylated peptides do not undergo complexation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the proton-bound dimers of all-Ala b 4 , b 5 , and b 7 ions and ammonia indicate that the ionizing proton initially located on the peptide fragment transfers to ammonia upon adduct formation. The ammonium ion is then solvated by N+-H…O H-bonds; this stabilization is much stronger for macrocyclic b n isomers due to the stable cage-like structure formed and entropy effects. The present study demonstrates that gas-phase guest-host chemistry can be used to selectively probe structural features (i.e., macrocyclic or linear) of fragments of protonated peptides. Stable ammonia adducts of b 9 , b 9 -A, and b 9 -2A of A8YA, and b 13 of A20YVFL are observed indicating that even these large b-type ions form macrocyclic structures.

  10. Transmit-receive eddy current probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrutsky, L.S.; Sullivan, S.P.; Cecco, V.S.

    1997-01-01

    In the last two decades, due to increased inspection demands, eddy current instrumentation has advanced from single-frequency, single-output instruments to multifrequency, computer-aided systems. This has significantly increased the scope of eddy current testing, but, unfortunately, it has also increased the cost and complexity of inspections. In addition, this approach has not always improved defect detectability or signal-to-noise. Most eddy current testing applications are still performed with impedance probes, which have well known limitations. However, recent research at AECL has led to improved eddy current inspections through the design and development of transmit-receive (T/R) probes. T/R eddy current probes, with laterally displaced transmit and receive coils, present a number of advantages over impedance probes. They have improved signal-to-noise ratio in the presence of variable lift-off compared to impedance probes. They have strong directional properties, permitting probe optimization for circumferential or axial crack detection, and possess good phase discrimination to surface defects. They can significantly increase the scope of eddy current testing permitting reliable detection and sizing of cracks in heat exchanger tubing as well as in welded areas of both ferritic and non-ferromagnetic components. This presentation will describe the operating principles of T/R probes with the help of computer-derived normalized voltage diagrams. We will discuss their directional properties and analyze the advantages of using single and multiple T/R probes over impedance probes for specific inspection cases. Current applications to surface and tube testing and some typical inspection results will be described. (author)

  11. β-Isocyanoalanine as an IR probe: comparison of vibrational dynamics between isonitrile and nitrile-derivatized IR probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Michał; Ahn, Changwoo; Kossowska, Dorota; Park, Kwanghee; Kwak, Kyungwon; Han, Hogyu; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-07

    An infrared (IR) probe based on isonitrile (NC)-derivatized alanine 1 was synthesized and the vibrational properties of its NC stretching mode were investigated using FTIR and femtosecond IR pump-probe spectroscopy. It is found that the NC stretching mode is very sensitive to the hydrogen-bonding ability of solvent molecules. Moreover, its transition dipole strength is larger than that of nitrile (CN) in nitrile-derivatized IR probe 2. The vibrational lifetime of the NC stretching mode is found to be 5.5 ± 0.2 ps in both D2O and DMF solvents, which is several times longer than that of the azido (N3) stretching mode in azido-derivatized IR probe 3. Altogether these properties suggest that the NC group can be a very promising sensing moiety of IR probes for studying the solvation structure and dynamics of biomolecules.

  12. Eddy current technologies for thick metal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Toshiyuki; Endo, Hisashi

    2004-01-01

    One of approach of an eddy current testing (ECT) for thick metal structures is introduced. The detection limit of ECT is capable of enlarging thick more than 10 mm, which is ordinarily about 5 mm, by the design of probe. On the basis of results of numerical analysis, the defect detection in thick and shape is evaluated by the distribution of experimental ECT signals. The problems of ECT for thick metal structures and measures, approach to probe design, the specifications of probe, evaluation of experimental results and defect detection are described. By ECT fast simulator, good slit sharp is simulated in the case of 10 and 20 mm of EDM slit length and 5, 10 and 15 mm of slit height. (S.Y.)

  13. Whole genomic DNA probe for detection of Porphyromonas endodontalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, R; Makkar, S R; Sela, M N; Stevens, R

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a DNA probe for Porphyromonas endodontalis. Pure cultures of P. endodontalis were grown in TYP medium, in an anaerobic chamber. DNA was extracted from the P. endodontalis and labeled using the Genius System by Boehringer Mannheim. The labeled P. endodontalis DNA was used in dot-blot hybridization reactions with homologous (P. endodontalis) and unrelated bacterial samples. To determine specificity, strains of 40 other oral bacterial species (e.g. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, and Prevotella intermedia) were spotted and reacted with the P. endodontalis DNA probe. None of the panel of 40 oral bacteria hybridized with the P. endodontalis probe, whereas the blot of the homologous organism showed a strong positive reaction. To determine the sensitivity of the probe, dilutions of a P. endodontalis suspension of known concentration were blotted onto a nylon membrane and reacted with the probe. The results of our investigation indicate that the DNA probe that we have prepared specifically detects only P. endodontalis and can detect at least 3 x 10(4) cells.

  14. Structure and organ specificity of an anionic peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Abelskov, A K; Mattsson, O

    1996-01-01

    The predominant peroxidase (pI 3.5) (E.C. 1.11.1.7) of an Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was purified and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotides were designed and a specific probe was obtained. A cDNA clone was isolated from an Arabidopsis cell suspension cDNA library and completely ...

  15. International Conference on Spin Observables of Nuclear Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Charles; Walker, George; Spin Observables of Nuclear Probes

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings of the "International Conference on Spin Observables of Nuclear Probes" are presented in this volume. This conference was held in Telluride, Colorado, March 14 -17, 1988, and was the fourth in the Telluride series of nuclear physics conferences. A continuing theme in the Telluride conference series has been the complementarity of various intermediate-energy projectiles for elucidating the nucleon-nucleon interaction and nuclear structure. Earlier conferences have contributed significantly to an understanding of spin currents in nuclei, in particular the distribution of Gamow-Teller strength using charge-exchange reactions. The previous conference on "Antinucleon and Nucleon Nucleus Interactions" compared nuclear information from tra­ tional probes to recent results from antinucleon reactions. The 1988 conference on Spin Observables of Nuclear Probes, put special emphasis on spin observables and brought together experts using spin information to probe nuclear structure. Spin observabl...

  16. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the probe fluorescence in the study of human blood protein dynamic structure on SR beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobretsov, G.E.; Kurek, N.K.; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Yakimenko, M.N.; Clarke, D.T.; Jones, G.R.; Munro, I.H.

    2000-01-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy on the SRS of the Daresbury Laboratory was used for the study of the human serum lipoproteins and human blood albumins with fluorescent probes K-37 and K-35, developed in Russia. The probe K-37 was found sensitive to the difference in dynamic properties of the lipid objects. Two sets of the parameters were used for the description of lipid dynamic structure: (1) time-resolved fluorescence spectra and (2) time-resolved fluorescence depolarization as a function of rotational mobility of lipid molecules. Each measured dynamic parameter reflected the monotonous changes of dynamic properties in the range: lipid spheres-very low density lipoproteins-low density lipoproteins-high density lipoproteins-phospholipid liposomes. The range is characterized by the increase of the ratio polar/ nonpolar lipids. Thus, time-resolved fluorescence could be used to detect some structural modifications in lipoproteins related to atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular diseases development

  17. Biochemical characterization of the pancreatic cholecystokinin receptor using monofunctional photoactivatable probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, R.K.; Miller, L.J.; Powers, S.P.; Hadac, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Receptor characterization by affinity labeling can be enhanced by taking multiple complementary approaches. To extend our observations on the subunit structure of the rat pancreatic cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor (made using bifunctional cross-linking reagents), we synthesized two monofunctional photoactivatable receptor probes. CCK-8 was acylated with the iodinated aryl azide derivatives, methyl-3-azido-4-hydroxy-5-[ 125 I]iodobenzimidate and N-[4-(4'-azido-3'-[ 125 I]iodophenylazo)benzoyl]-3-aminopropionyl-N- oxy- succinimide. The products were purified by reverse-phase HPLC to a specific radioactivity of 2000 Ci/mmol. Both analogs demonstrated saturable and specific binding to rat pancreatic plasma membranes. Photoaffinity labeling of pancreatic membranes with these monofunctional probes identified an Mr 85,000-95,000 protein that was not part of a larger disulfide-linked complex. High affinity for CCK was demonstrated by the concentration-dependent inhibition of labeling observed with competing CCK-8 (IC50 = 1 nM). On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) this protein co-migrates with the major component we identified using a series of cross-linkable, iodinated decapeptide analogs of CCK, and is different from the major protein labeled using 125 I-Bolton Hunter-CCK-33. Thus, these results support the presence of an Mr 85,000-95,000 subunit in the pancreatic CCK receptor, while the small size of these photoaffinity probes and their monovalency suggest that this subunit may contain or be spatially apposed to the active binding site. These probes should be very useful in the further characterization of this and other receptors for this hormone

  18. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  19. Probing Ultrafast Electron Dynamics at Surfaces Using Soft X-Ray Transient Reflectivity Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L. Robert; Husek, Jakub; Biswas, Somnath; Cirri, Anthony

    The ability to probe electron dynamics with surface sensitivity on the ultrafast time scale is critical for understanding processes such as charge separation, injection, and surface trapping that mediate efficiency in catalytic and energy conversion materials. Toward this goal, we have developed a high harmonic generation (HHG) light source for femtosecond soft x-ray reflectivity. Using this light source we investigated the ultrafast carrier dynamics at the surface of single crystalline α-Fe2O3, polycrystalline α-Fe2O3, and the mixed metal oxide, CuFeO2. We have recently demonstrated that CuFeO2 in particular is a selective catalyst for photo-electrochemical CO2 reduction to acetate; however, the role of electronic structure and charge carrier dynamics in mediating catalytic selectivity has not been well understood. Soft x-ray reflectivity measurements probe the M2,3, edges of the 3d transition metals, which provide oxidation and spin state resolution with element specificity. In addition to chemical state specificity, these measurements are also surface sensitive, and by independently simulating the contributions of the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index, we can differentiate between surface and sub-surface contributions to the excited state spectrum. Accordingly, this work demonstrates the ability to probe ultrafast carrier dynamics in catalytic materials with element and chemical state specificity and with surface sensitivity.

  20. Polarized light scattering as a probe for changes in chromosome structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Daniel Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Measurements and calculations of polarized light scattering are applied to chromosomes. Calculations of the Mueller matrix, which completely describes how the polarization state of light is altered upon scattering, are developed for helical structures related to that of chromosomes. Measurements of the Mueller matrix are presented for octopus sperm heads, and dinoflagellates. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made. A working theory of polarized light scattering from helices is developed. The use of the first Born approximation vs the coupled dipole approximation are investigated. A comparison of continuous, calculated in this work, and discrete models is also discussed. By comparing light scattering measurements with theoretical predictions the average orientation of DNA in an octopus sperm head is determined. Calculations are made for the Mueller matrix of DNA plectonemic helices at UV, visible and X-ray wavelengths. Finally evidence is presented that the chromosomes of dinoflagellates are responsible for observed differential scattering of circularly-polarized light. This differential scattering is found to vary in a manner that is possibly correlated to the cell cycle of the dinoflagellates. It is concluded that by properly choosing the wavelength probe polarized light scattering can provide a useful tool to study chromosome structure.

  1. Estimating the similarity of alternative Affymetrix probe sets using transcriptional networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The usefulness of the data from Affymetrix microarray analysis depends largely on the reliability of the files describing the correspondence between probe sets, genes and transcripts. Particularly, when a gene is targeted by several probe sets, these files should give information about the similarity of each alternative probe set pair. Transcriptional networks integrate the multiple correlations that exist between all probe sets and supply much more information than a simple correlation coefficient calculated for two series of signals. In this study, we used the PSAWN (Probe Set Assignment With Networks) programme we developed to investigate whether similarity of alternative probe sets resulted in some specific properties. Findings PSAWNpy delivered a full textual description of each probe set and information on the number and properties of secondary targets. PSAWNml calculated the similarity of each alternative probe set pair and allowed finding relationships between similarity and localisation of probes in common transcripts or exons. Similar alternative probe sets had very low negative correlation, high positive correlation and similar neighbourhood overlap. Using these properties, we devised a test that allowed grouping similar probe sets in a given network. By considering several networks, additional information concerning the similarity reproducibility was obtained, which allowed defining the actual similarity of alternative probe set pairs. In particular, we calculated the common localisation of probes in exons and in known transcripts and we showed that similarity was correctly correlated with them. The information collected on all pairs of alternative probe sets in the most popular 3’ IVT Affymetrix chips is available in tabular form at http://bns.crbm.cnrs.fr/download.html. Conclusions These processed data can be used to obtain a finer interpretation when comparing microarray data between biological conditions. They are particularly well

  2. Estimating the similarity of alternative Affymetrix probe sets using transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Michel

    2013-03-21

    The usefulness of the data from Affymetrix microarray analysis depends largely on the reliability of the files describing the correspondence between probe sets, genes and transcripts. Particularly, when a gene is targeted by several probe sets, these files should give information about the similarity of each alternative probe set pair. Transcriptional networks integrate the multiple correlations that exist between all probe sets and supply much more information than a simple correlation coefficient calculated for two series of signals. In this study, we used the PSAWN (Probe Set Assignment With Networks) programme we developed to investigate whether similarity of alternative probe sets resulted in some specific properties. PSAWNpy delivered a full textual description of each probe set and information on the number and properties of secondary targets. PSAWNml calculated the similarity of each alternative probe set pair and allowed finding relationships between similarity and localisation of probes in common transcripts or exons. Similar alternative probe sets had very low negative correlation, high positive correlation and similar neighbourhood overlap. Using these properties, we devised a test that allowed grouping similar probe sets in a given network. By considering several networks, additional information concerning the similarity reproducibility was obtained, which allowed defining the actual similarity of alternative probe set pairs. In particular, we calculated the common localisation of probes in exons and in known transcripts and we showed that similarity was correctly correlated with them. The information collected on all pairs of alternative probe sets in the most popular 3' IVT Affymetrix chips is available in tabular form at http://bns.crbm.cnrs.fr/download.html. These processed data can be used to obtain a finer interpretation when comparing microarray data between biological conditions. They are particularly well adapted for searching 3' alternative

  3. Silver-gold core-shell nanoparticles containing methylene blue as SERS labels for probing and imaging of live cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, X.; Guo, Z.; Jin, Y.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, W.; Huang, D.

    2012-01-01

    We report on silver-gold core-shell nanostructures that contain Methylene Blue (MB) at the gold/x96silver interface. They can be used as reporter molecules in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) labels. The labels are stable and have strong SERS activity. TEM imaging revealed that these nanoparticles display bright and dark stripe structures. In addition, these labels can act as probes that can be detected and imaged through the specific Raman signatures of the reporters. We show that such SERS probes can identify cellular structures due to enhanced Raman spectra of intrinsic cellular molecules measured in the local optical fields of the core-shell nanostructures. They also provide structural information on the cellular environment as demonstrated for these nanoparticles as new SERS-active and biocompatible substrates for imaging of live cells. (author)

  4. Integrated microcantilevers for high-resolution sensing and probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinxin; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2012-01-01

    This topical review is focused on microcantilever-based sensing and probing functions that are realized by integrating a mechanically compliant cantilever with self-sensing and self-actuating elements, specific sensing materials as well as functionalized nano-tips. Such integrated cantilever devices have shown great promise in ultra-sensitive applications such as on-the-spot portable bio/chemical detection and in situ micro/nanoscale surface analysis and manipulation. The technical details of this review will be given in a sequence of cantilever sensors and, then, cantilever-tip probes. For the integrated cantilever sensors, the frequency-output style dynamic cantilevers are described first, with the contents including optimized resonance modes, sensing-group-modified nanostructures for specific bio/chemical mass adsorption and nanoscale sensing effects, etc. Thereafter, the static cantilever sensors for surface-stress detection are described in the sequence of the sensing mechanism, surface modification of the sensitive molecule layer and the model of specific reaction-induced surface-energy variation. After technical description of the cantilever sensors, the emphasis of the review moves to functionalized nano-tip equipped cantilever-tip probing devices. The probing functions are not only integrated on the cantilever but also integrated at the sharp apex of the tip. After description of single integrated cantilever probes and their applications in surface scanning and imaging, arrayed cantilever-tip devices and their simultaneous parallel operation for high throughput imaging and nanomechanical data storage are also addressed. With cantilever-tip probes as key elements, micro-analysis instruments are introduced that can be widely used for macro/nanoscale characterizations. (topical review)

  5. Fluorescently labeled dengue viruses as probes to identify antigen-specific memory B cells by multiparametric flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Marcia; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-01-01

    Low frequencies of memory B cells in the peripheral blood make it challenging to measure the functional and phenotypic characteristics of this antigen experienced subset of B cells without in vitro culture. To date, reagents are lacking to measure ex vivo frequencies of dengue virus (DENV)-specific memory B cells. We wanted to explore the possibility of using fluorescently labeled DENV as probes to detect antigen-specific memory B cells in the peripheral blood of DENV immune individuals. Alexa Fluor dye-labeled DENV yielded viable virus that could be stored at -80°C for long periods of time. Using a careful gating strategy and methods to decrease non-specific binding, we were able to identify a small frequency of B cells from dengue immune individuals that bound labeled DENV. Sorted DENV(+) B cells from immune, but not naïve donors secreted antibodies that bound DENV after in vitro stimulation. Overall, Alexa Fluor dye-labeled DENVs are useful reagents to enable the detection and characterization of memory B cells in DENV immune individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Carbon nanotubes as in vivo bacterial probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Neelkanth M; Ghosh, Debadyuti; Belcher, Angela M

    2014-09-17

    With the rise in antibiotic-resistant infections, non-invasive sensing of infectious diseases is increasingly important. Optical imaging, although safer and simpler, is less developed than other modalities such as radioimaging, due to low availability of target-specific molecular probes. Here we report carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as bacterial probes for fluorescence imaging of pathogenic infections. We demonstrate that SWNTs functionalized using M13 bacteriophage (M13-SWNT) can distinguish between F'-positive and F'-negative bacterial strains. Moreover, through one-step modification, we attach an anti-bacterial antibody on M13-SWNT, making it easily tunable for sensing specific F'-negative bacteria. We illustrate detection of Staphylococcus aureus intramuscular infections, with ~3.4 × enhancement in fluorescence intensity over background. SWNT imaging presents lower signal spread ~0.08 × and higher signal amplification ~1.4 × , compared with conventional dyes. We show the probe offers greater ~5.7 × enhancement in imaging of S. aureus infective endocarditis. These biologically functionalized, aqueous-dispersed, actively targeted, modularly tunable SWNT probes offer new avenues for exploration of deeply buried infections.

  7. Carbon nanotubes as in vivo bacterial probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Neelkanth M.; Ghosh, Debadyuti; Belcher, Angela M.

    2014-09-01

    With the rise in antibiotic-resistant infections, non-invasive sensing of infectious diseases is increasingly important. Optical imaging, although safer and simpler, is less developed than other modalities such as radioimaging, due to low availability of target-specific molecular probes. Here we report carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as bacterial probes for fluorescence imaging of pathogenic infections. We demonstrate that SWNTs functionalized using M13 bacteriophage (M13-SWNT) can distinguish between F‧-positive and F‧-negative bacterial strains. Moreover, through one-step modification, we attach an anti-bacterial antibody on M13-SWNT, making it easily tunable for sensing specific F‧-negative bacteria. We illustrate detection of Staphylococcus aureus intramuscular infections, with ~3.4 × enhancement in fluorescence intensity over background. SWNT imaging presents lower signal spread ~0.08 × and higher signal amplification ~1.4 × , compared with conventional dyes. We show the probe offers greater ~5.7 × enhancement in imaging of S. aureus infective endocarditis. These biologically functionalized, aqueous-dispersed, actively targeted, modularly tunable SWNT probes offer new avenues for exploration of deeply buried infections.

  8. Characterization of structural and electrostatic complexity in pentacene thin films by scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puntambekar, Kanan Prakash

    The advancement of organic electronics for applications in solar energy conversion, printed circuitry, displays, and solid-state lighting depends upon optimization of structure and properties for a variety of organic semiconductor interfaces. Organic semiconductor/insulator (O/I) and organic-metal (O/M) interfaces, in particular, are critical to the operation of organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) currently being developed for printed flexible electronics. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a powerful tool to isolate and characterize the bottlenecks to charge transport at these interfaces. This thesis establishes a direct correlation between the structural disorder and electrical complexity at these interfaces, using various SPM based methods and discusses the implications of such complexity on device performance. To examine the O/M interfaces, surface potentials of operating pentacene TFTs with two different contact geometries (bottom or top) were mapped by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM). The surface potential distribution was used to isolate the potential drops at the source and drain contacts. Simultaneously obtained topography and surface potential maps elucidated the correlation between the morphology and contact resistance at the O/M interface; the bottom contact TFTs were observed to be contact limited at large gate voltages, while the top contact TFTs were not contact limited. A direct correlation between structural defects and electric potential variations at the pentacene and silicon dioxide, a common insulator, is demonstrated. Lateral force microscopy (LFM) generates striking images of the polycrystalline microstructure of a monolayer thick pentacene film, allowing clear visualization of the grain boundary network. Further more, surface potential wells localized at the grain boundaries were observed by KFM, suggesting that the grain boundaries may serve as charge carrier (hole) traps. Line dislocations were also revealed in the second monolayer

  9. Probing the Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Runa

    2016-01-01

    Whether manifest in built structures or invisible infrastructures, architectures of control in the occupied Palestinian West Bank is structurally defined by endemic uncertainty. Shifting lines and frontiers are recorded on the terrain, creating elastic zones of uncertainty necessitating navigatio...... to the territory through its lines and laws, and how the very structure of the occupation has changed over the years, I seek to make visible the ways in which architectures of uncertainty compensate for the fleeting terrain that HH is probing.......Whether manifest in built structures or invisible infrastructures, architectures of control in the occupied Palestinian West Bank is structurally defined by endemic uncertainty. Shifting lines and frontiers are recorded on the terrain, creating elastic zones of uncertainty necessitating...

  10. Probing reaction dynamics with GDR decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beene, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The giant dipole resonance (GDR) has been a prolific source of information on the physics of the nucleus. Mostly it has taught us about nuclear structure, but recently experiments have utilized the GDR as a probe of nuclear reaction dynamics. In this report two examples of such investigations are discussed involving very different reactions and probing time scales that differ by a factor of ∼10 3

  11. The development of nanobody probes for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhiling; Lan Xiaoli; Zhang Yongxue

    2014-01-01

    The nanobody is a novel antibody fragment, which has beneficial biophysical and pharmacokinetic properties, such as the small molecular weight, high affinity and specificity for antigen. Nanobody is ideally suitable for molecular imaging as a targeting probe that could label antigen at nmol level in vitro. In animal models of xenografted tumor, atherosclerotic plaques and brain disorders, the target tissues were specifically and clearly detected and the high tumor-to-blood (T/B) ratios were obtained. Structural or chemical modified nanobodies will have higher affinity and retention to target tissues, and be convenient for the application of molecular imaging. With the development of the related research, nanobody-based molecular imaging will be gradually transformed into the clinical applications, and play an important role in early diagnosis and therapeutic assessment. (authors)

  12. ProSeeK: a web server for MLPA probe design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantano, Lorena; Armengol, Lluís; Villatoro, Sergi; Estivill, Xavier

    2008-11-28

    The technological evolution of platforms for detecting genome-wide copy number imbalances has allowed the discovery of an unexpected amount of human sequence that is variable in copy number among individuals. This type of human variation can make an important contribution to human diversity and disease susceptibility. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) is a targeted method to assess copy number differences for up to 40 genomic loci in one single experiment. Although specific MLPA assays can be ordered from MRC-Holland (the proprietary company of the MLPA technology), custom designs are also developed in many laboratories worldwide. After our own experience, an important drawback of custom MLPA assays is the time spent during the design of the specific oligonucleotides that are used as probes. Due to the large number of probes included in a single assay, a number of restrictions need to be met in order to maximize specificity and to increase success likelihood. We have developed a web tool for facilitating and optimising custom probe design for MLPA experiments. The algorithm only requires the target sequence in FASTA format and a set of parameters, that are provided by the user according to each specific MLPA assay, to identify the best probes inside the given region. To our knowledge, this is the first available tool for optimizing custom probe design of MLPA assays. The ease-of-use and speed of the algorithm dramatically reduces the turn around time of probe design. ProSeeK will become a useful tool for all laboratories that are currently using MLPA in their research projects for CNV studies.

  13. ProSeeK: A web server for MLPA probe design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villatoro Sergi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The technological evolution of platforms for detecting genome-wide copy number imbalances has allowed the discovery of an unexpected amount of human sequence that is variable in copy number among individuals. This type of human variation can make an important contribution to human diversity and disease susceptibility. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA is a targeted method to assess copy number differences for up to 40 genomic loci in one single experiment. Although specific MLPA assays can be ordered from MRC-Holland (the proprietary company of the MLPA technology, custom designs are also developed in many laboratories worldwide. After our own experience, an important drawback of custom MLPA assays is the time spent during the design of the specific oligonucleotides that are used as probes. Due to the large number of probes included in a single assay, a number of restrictions need to be met in order to maximize specificity and to increase success likelihood. Results We have developed a web tool for facilitating and optimising custom probe design for MLPA experiments. The algorithm only requires the target sequence in FASTA format and a set of parameters, that are provided by the user according to each specific MLPA assay, to identify the best probes inside the given region. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first available tool for optimizing custom probe design of MLPA assays. The ease-of-use and speed of the algorithm dramatically reduces the turn around time of probe design. ProSeeK will become a useful tool for all laboratories that are currently using MLPA in their research projects for CNV studies.

  14. Detection of NASBA amplified bacterial tmRNA molecules on SLICSel designed microarray probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toome Kadri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a comprehensive technological solution for bacterial diagnostics using tmRNA as a marker molecule. A robust probe design algorithm for microbial detection microarray is implemented. The probes were evaluated for specificity and, combined with NASBA (Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification amplification, for sensitivity. Results We developed a new web-based program SLICSel for the design of hybridization probes, based on nearest-neighbor thermodynamic modeling. A SLICSel minimum binding energy difference criterion of 4 kcal/mol was sufficient to design of Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA specific microarray probes. With lower binding energy difference criteria, additional hybridization specificity tests on the microarray were needed to eliminate non-specific probes. Using SLICSel designed microarray probes and NASBA we were able to detect S. pneumoniae tmRNA from a series of total RNA dilutions equivalent to the RNA content of 0.1-10 CFU. Conclusions The described technological solution and both its separate components SLICSel and NASBA-microarray technology independently are applicative for many different areas of microbial diagnostics.

  15. Detection of NASBA amplified bacterial tmRNA molecules on SLICSel designed microarray probes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Scheler, Ott

    2011-02-28

    Abstract Background We present a comprehensive technological solution for bacterial diagnostics using tmRNA as a marker molecule. A robust probe design algorithm for microbial detection microarray is implemented. The probes were evaluated for specificity and, combined with NASBA (Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification) amplification, for sensitivity. Results We developed a new web-based program SLICSel for the design of hybridization probes, based on nearest-neighbor thermodynamic modeling. A SLICSel minimum binding energy difference criterion of 4 kcal\\/mol was sufficient to design of Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA specific microarray probes. With lower binding energy difference criteria, additional hybridization specificity tests on the microarray were needed to eliminate non-specific probes. Using SLICSel designed microarray probes and NASBA we were able to detect S. pneumoniae tmRNA from a series of total RNA dilutions equivalent to the RNA content of 0.1-10 CFU. Conclusions The described technological solution and both its separate components SLICSel and NASBA-microarray technology independently are applicative for many different areas of microbial diagnostics.

  16. Sensitive and specific fluorescent probes for functional analysis of the three major types of mammalian ABC transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Irina V; Pande, Praveen; Patton, Wayne F

    2011-01-01

    An underlying mechanism for multi drug resistance (MDR) is up-regulation of the transmembrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins. ABC transporters also determine the general fate and effect of pharmaceutical agents in the body. The three major types of ABC transporters are MDR1 (P-gp, P-glycoprotein, ABCB1), MRP1/2 (ABCC1/2) and BCRP/MXR (ABCG2) proteins. Flow cytometry (FCM) allows determination of the functional expression levels of ABC transporters in live cells, but most dyes used as indicators (rhodamine 123, DiOC(2)(3), calcein-AM) have limited applicability as they do not detect all three major types of ABC transporters. Dyes with broad coverage (such as doxorubicin, daunorubicin and mitoxantrone) lack sensitivity due to overall dimness and thus may yield a significant percentage of false negative results. We describe two novel fluorescent probes that are substrates for all three common types of ABC transporters and can serve as indicators of MDR in flow cytometry assays using live cells. The probes exhibit fast internalization, favorable uptake/efflux kinetics and high sensitivity of MDR detection, as established by multidrug resistance activity factor (MAF) values and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical analysis. Used in combination with general or specific inhibitors of ABC transporters, both dyes readily identify functional efflux and are capable of detecting small levels of efflux as well as defining the type of multidrug resistance. The assay can be applied to the screening of putative modulators of ABC transporters, facilitating rapid, reproducible, specific and relatively simple functional detection of ABC transporter activity, and ready implementation on widely available instruments.

  17. Quantification of syntrophic fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing bacteria in a mesophilic biogas reactor by oligonucleotide probe hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, K.H.; Ahring, B.K.; Raskin, L.

    1999-11-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S.wolfei LYB was closely related to S.wolfei subsp. solfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, or which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas.

  18. Feasibility evaluation of 3D photoacoustic imaging of blood vessel structure using multiple wavelengths with a handheld probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchimoto, Yo; Namita, Takeshi; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2018-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is anticipated for use in portraying blood vessel structures (e.g. neovascularization in inflamed regions). To reduce invasiveness and enhance ease handling, we developed a handheld photoacoustic imaging system using multiple wavelengths. The usefulness of the proposed system was investigated in phantom experiments and in vivo measurements. A silicon tube was embedded into chicken breast meat to simulate the blood vessel. The tube was filled with ovine blood. Then laser light was guided to the phantom surface by an optical fiber bundle close to the linear ultrasound probe. Photoacoustic images were obtained at 750-950 nm wavelengths. Strong photoacoustic signals from the boundary between blood and silicon tube are observed in these images. The shape of photoacoustic spectrum at the boundary resembles that of the HbO2 absorption spectrum at 750-920 nm. In photoacoustic images, similarity between photoacoustic spectrum and HbO2 absorption spectrum was evaluated by calculating the normalized correlation coefficient. Results show high correlation in regions of strong photoacoustic signals in photoacoustic images. These analyses demonstrate the feasibility of portraying blood vessel structures under practical conditions. To evaluate the feasibility of three-dimensional vascular imaging, in vivo experiments were conducted using three wavelengths. A right hand and ultrasound probe were set in degassed water. By scanning a probe, cross-sectional ultrasound and photoacoustic images were obtained at each location. Then, all ultrasound or photoacoustic images were piled up respectively. Then three-dimensional images were constructed. Resultant images portrayed blood vessel-like structures three-dimensionally. Furthermore, to distinguish blood vessels from other tissues (e.g. skin), distinguishing images of them were constructed by comparing photoacoustic signal intensity among three wavelengths. The resultant image portrayed blood vessels as

  19. Automated design of genomic Southern blot probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komiyama Noboru H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sothern blotting is a DNA analysis technique that has found widespread application in molecular biology. It has been used for gene discovery and mapping and has diagnostic and forensic applications, including mutation detection in patient samples and DNA fingerprinting in criminal investigations. Southern blotting has been employed as the definitive method for detecting transgene integration, and successful homologous recombination in gene targeting experiments. The technique employs a labeled DNA probe to detect a specific DNA sequence in a complex DNA sample that has been separated by restriction-digest and gel electrophoresis. Critically for the technique to succeed the probe must be unique to the target locus so as not to cross-hybridize to other endogenous DNA within the sample. Investigators routinely employ a manual approach to probe design. A genome browser is used to extract DNA sequence from the locus of interest, which is searched against the target genome using a BLAST-like tool. Ideally a single perfect match is obtained to the target, with little cross-reactivity caused by homologous DNA sequence present in the genome and/or repetitive and low-complexity elements in the candidate probe. This is a labor intensive process often requiring several attempts to find a suitable probe for laboratory testing. Results We have written an informatic pipeline to automatically design genomic Sothern blot probes that specifically attempts to optimize the resultant probe, employing a brute-force strategy of generating many candidate probes of acceptable length in the user-specified design window, searching all against the target genome, then scoring and ranking the candidates by uniqueness and repetitive DNA element content. Using these in silico measures we can automatically design probes that we predict to perform as well, or better, than our previous manual designs, while considerably reducing design time. We went on to

  20. Donated chemical probes for open science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Susanne; Ackloo, Suzanne; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Bauser, Marcus; Baryza, Jeremy L; Blagg, Julian; Böttcher, Jark; Bountra, Chas; Brown, Peter J; Bunnage, Mark E; Carter, Adrian J; Damerell, David; Dötsch, Volker; Drewry, David H; Edwards, Aled M; Edwards, James; Elkins, Jon M; Fischer, Christian; Frye, Stephen V; Gollner, Andreas; Grimshaw, Charles E; IJzerman, Adriaan; Hanke, Thomas; Hartung, Ingo V; Hitchcock, Steve; Howe, Trevor; Hughes, Terry V; Laufer, Stefan; Li, Volkhart Mj; Liras, Spiros; Marsden, Brian D; Matsui, Hisanori; Mathias, John; O'Hagan, Ronan C; Owen, Dafydd R; Pande, Vineet; Rauh, Daniel; Rosenberg, Saul H; Roth, Bryan L; Schneider, Natalie S; Scholten, Cora; Singh Saikatendu, Kumar; Simeonov, Anton; Takizawa, Masayuki; Tse, Chris; Thompson, Paul R; Treiber, Daniel K; Viana, Amélia Yi; Wells, Carrow I; Willson, Timothy M; Zuercher, William J; Knapp, Stefan; Mueller-Fahrnow, Anke

    2018-04-20

    Potent, selective and broadly characterized small molecule modulators of protein function (chemical probes) are powerful research reagents. The pharmaceutical industry has generated many high-quality chemical probes and several of these have been made available to academia. However, probe-associated data and control compounds, such as inactive structurally related molecules and their associated data, are generally not accessible. The lack of data and guidance makes it difficult for researchers to decide which chemical tools to choose. Several pharmaceutical companies (AbbVie, Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Janssen, MSD, Pfizer, and Takeda) have therefore entered into a pre-competitive collaboration to make available a large number of innovative high-quality probes, including all probe-associated data, control compounds and recommendations on use (https://openscienceprobes.sgc-frankfurt.de">https://openscienceprobes.sgc-frankfurt.dehttps://openscienceprobes.sgc-frankfurt.de/">/). Here we describe the chemical tools and target-related knowledge that have been made available, and encourage others to join the project. © 2018, Müller et al.

  1. Electric dipole moments of the fluorescent probes Prodan and Laurdan: experimental and theoretical evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vequi-Suplicy, Cíntia C; Coutinho, Kaline; Lamy, M Teresa

    2014-03-01

    Several experimental and theoretical approaches can be used for a comprehensive understanding of solvent effects on the electronic structure of solutes. In this review, we revisit the influence of solvents on the electronic structure of the fluorescent probes Prodan and Laurdan, focusing on their electric dipole moments. These biologically used probes were synthesized to be sensitive to the environment polarity. However, their solvent-dependent electronic structures are still a matter of discussion in the literature. The absorption and emission spectra of Prodan and Laurdan in different solvents indicate that the two probes have very similar electronic structures in both the ground and excited states. Theoretical calculations confirm that their electronic ground states are very much alike. In this review, we discuss the electric dipole moments of the ground and excited states calculated using the widely applied Lippert-Mataga equation, using both spherical and spheroid prolate cavities for the solute. The dimensions of the cavity were found to be crucial for the calculated dipole moments. These values are compared to those obtained by quantum mechanics calculations, considering Prodan in vacuum, in a polarizable continuum solvent, and using a hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics methodology. Based on the theoretical approaches it is evident that the Prodan dipole moment can change even in the absence of solute-solvent-specific interactions, which is not taken into consideration with the experimental Lippert-Mataga method. Moreover, in water, for electric dipole moment calculations, it is fundamental to consider hydrogen-bonded molecules.

  2. Probing ultrafast dynamics in electronic structure of epitaxial Gd(0 0 0 1) on W(1 1 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaulieu, Nathan [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Malinowski, Gregory [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Bendounan, Azzedine; Silly, Mathieu G.; Chauvet, Christian [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Krizmancic, Damjan [Instituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM)-CNR Laboratorio TASC, in Area Science Park S.S.14, Km 163.5, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Sirotti, Fausto [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: •Study of the magnetism of epitaxial Gd(0 0 0 1)/W(1 1 0). •Study of Gd(0 0 0 1) band structure as a function of the temperature. •Study of the Gd magnetism dynamics probing the M5 edge. -- Abstract: The electronic and magnetic properties of Gd have been studied using time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy employing laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe pulses. The static temperature evolution of the valence band and more precisely, the 5d6s exchange splitting is reported. Ultrafast demagnetization is measured using dichroic resonant Auger spectroscopy. Remarkably, a complete demagnetization is observed followed up by a non-monotonic recovery that could be associated to magnetization oscillations.

  3. A novel CXCR4-targeted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe (Peptide R-NIR750) specifically detects CXCR4 expressing tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagata, Sara; Portella, Luigi; Napolitano, Maria; Greco, Adelaide; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Luciano, Antonio; Gramanzini, Matteo; Auletta, Luigi; Arra, Claudio; Zannetti, Antonella; Scala, Stefania

    2017-05-31

    C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is over-expressed in multiple human cancers and correlates with tumor aggressiveness, poor prognosis and increased risk for distant metastases. Imaging agents for CXCR4 are thus highly desirable. We developed a novel CXCR4-targeted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe (Peptide R-NIR750) conjugating the new developed CXCR4 peptidic antagonist Peptide R with the NIR fluorescent dye VivoTag-S750. Specific CXCR4 binding was obtained in cells overexpressing human CXCR4 (B16-hCXCR4 and human melanoma cells PES43), but not in CXCR4 low expressing cells (FB-1). Ex vivo evaluation demonstrated that PepR-NIR750 specifically detects B16-hCXCR4-derived subcutaneous tumors and lung metastases. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) in vivo imaging was performed on mice carrying subcutaneous CHO and CHO-CXCR4 tumors. PepR-NIR750 accumulates only in CXCR4-positive expressing subcutaneous tumors. Additionally, an intense NIR fluorescence signal was detected in PES43-derived lung metastases of nude mice injected with PepR-NIR750 versus mice injected with VivoTag-S750. With a therapeutic intent, mice bearing PES43-derived lung metastases were treated with Peptide R. A the dramatic reduction in PES43-derived lung metastases was detected through a decrease of the PepR-NIR750 signal. PepR-NIR750 is a specific probe for non-invasive detection of human high CXCR4-expressing tumors and metastatic lesion and thus a valuable tool for cancer molecular imaging.

  4. Specificity of Structural Assessment of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpower, David L.; Sharara, Harold; Goldsmith, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the specificity of information provided by structural assessment of knowledge (SAK). SAK is a technique which uses the Pathfinder scaling algorithm to transform ratings of concept relatedness into network representations (PFnets) of individuals' knowledge. Inferences about individuals' overall domain knowledge based on the…

  5. In vivo fluorescence imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma using a novel GPC3-specific aptamer probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Menglong; Dong, Lili; Liu, Zhuang; Yang, Shuohui

    2018-01-01

    Background Glypican-3 (GPC3) is highly expressed in most of the hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), even in small HCCs. It may be used as a potential biomarker for early detection of HCC. The aptamer is a promising targeting agent with unique advantages over antibody. This study was to introduce a novel GPC3 specific aptamer (AP613-1), to verify its specific binding property in vitro, and to evaluate its targeting efficiency in vivo by performing near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging on an HCC xenograft model. Methods AP613-1 was generated from the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Flow cytometry and aptamer-based immunofluorescence imaging were performed to verify the binding affinity of AP613-1 to GPC3 in vitro. NIR Fluorescence images of nude mice with unilateral (n=12) and bilateral (n=4) subcutaneous xenograft tumors were obtained. Correlation between the tumor fluorescence intensities in vivo and ex vivo was analyzed. Results AP613-1 could specifically bind to GPC3 in vitro. In vivo and ex vivo tumors, fluorescence intensities were in excellent correlation (Pfluorescence intensity is significantly higher in tumors given Alexa Fluor 750 (AF750) labeled AP613-1 than in those given AF750 labeled initial ssDNA library both in vivo (Pfluorescence intensities than A549 tumors both in vivo (P=0.016) and ex vivo (P=0.004). Conclusions AP613-1 displays a specific binding affinity to GPC3 positive HCC. Fluorescently labeled AP613-1 could be used as an imaging probe to subcutaneous HCC in xenograft models. PMID:29675356

  6. [Oligonucleotide derivatives in the nucleic acid hybridization analysis. I. Covalent immobilization of oligonucleotide probes onto the nylon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, E V; Pyshnaia, I A; Pyshnyĭ, D V

    2010-01-01

    The features of UV-induced immobilization of oligonucleotides on a nylon membranes and the effectiveness of enzymatic labeling of immobilized probes at heterophase detection of nucleic acids are studied. Short terminal oligothymidilate (up to 10 nt) sequences are suggested to attach to the probe via a flexible ethylene glycol based linker. The presence of such fragment enhances the intensity of immobilization and reduces UV-dependent degradation of the targeted (sequence-specific) part of the probe by reducing the dose needed for the immobilization of DNA. The optimum dose of UV-irradiation is determined to be ~0.4 J/cm(2) at the wavelength 254 nm. This dose provides high level of hybridization signal for immobilized probes with various nucleotide composition of the sequence specific moiety. The amide groups of the polyamide are shown to play the key role in the photoinduced immobilization of nucleic acids, whereas the primary amino groups in the structure of PA is not the center responsible for the covalent binding of DNA by UV-irradiation, as previously believed. Various additives in the soaking solution during the membrane of UV-dependent immobilization of probes are shown to influence its effectiveness. The use of alternative to UV-irradiation system of radical generation are shown to provide the immobilization of oligonucleotides onto the nylon membrane.

  7. Bioresponsive probes for molecular imaging:Concepts and in vivo applications

    OpenAIRE

    Duijnhoven, van, SMJ Sander; Robillard, MS Marc; Langereis, S Sander; Grüll, H Holger

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a powerful tool to visualize and characterize biological processes at the cellular and molecular level in vivo. In most molecular imaging approaches, probes are used to bind to disease-specific biomarkers highlighting disease target sites. In recent years, a new subset of molecular imaging probes, known as bioresponsive molecular probes, has been developed. These probes generally benefit from signal enhancement at the site of interaction with its target. There are mainly ...

  8. Probing Amorphous Components in High Temperature TE Materials by in situ Total Scattering and the Pair Distribution Function (PDF) Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reardon, Hazel; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt; Blichfeld, Anders Bank

    -I clathrate Ba8Ga16Ge30. This suggests that local structure reorientations in the cage are likely to be the root cause of the degradation of the structure. This deepens our understanding of disordered clathrates, and provides evidence that the PDF technique is an effective method for probing local structure.......e., by measuring both the Bragg and diffuse scattering from a sample. This method has rarely been exploited by the non-oxide thermoelectrics community. , , Treating total scattering data by the Pair Distribution Function method is a logical approach to understanding defects, disorder and amorphous components...... to heating cycles, then we are closer to distinguishing how we may generate materials that do not undergo specific structure reorientation processes, and/or how we may mitigate them before they occur. Here, we will present a total scattering and PDF study that probes the local structure of the Type...

  9. Automated synthesis with HPLC purification of 18F-FMISO as specific molecular imaging probe of tumor hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingwei; Zhang Yingjian; Zhang Yongping

    2012-01-01

    An improved automated synthesis of 1-H-1-(3-[ 18 F] fluoro-2-hydroxypropyl)-2-nitro-imidazole ( 18 F-FMISO), a specific molecular imaging probe of tumor hypoxia, was developed using an upgraded Explora GN module integrated with Explora LC for HPLC purification in this study. The radiochemical synthesis of 18 F-FMISO was started with precursor 1-( 2'-nitro-1'-imidazolyl)-2-O-tetrahydropyranyl-3-O-tosyl-propanediol (NITTP) and included nucleophilic [ 18 F] radio-fluorination at 120℃ for 5 min and hydrolysis at 130℃ for 8 min. The automated synthesis of 18 F-FMISO, presenting fast, reliable and multi-run features, could be completed with the total synthesis time of less than 65 min and radiochemical yield of 25%∼35% (without decay correction). The quality control of 18 F-FMISO was identical with the radiopharmaceutical requirements, especially the radiochemical purity of greater than 99% and high chemical purity and specific activity own to HPLC purification. (authors)

  10. Specific-structured lipids: nutritional perspectives and production potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Høy, Carl-Erik; Balchen, Steen

    1997-01-01

    Structured lipids are referring to any triacylglycerols containing both long chain fatty acids (mostly essential fatty acids) and medium or short chain fatty acids. In case of specific-structured lipids (SSLs), each group of fatty acids locates specifically at sn-2 or -1.3 positions of the glycerol...... backbone. Recently the nutritional perspectives of this kind of lipids attract many interests. This causes an increasing interest in the production of them by lipase-catalyzed interesterification. One of the advantages of lipase method over chemical ones is that SSLs can be produced with particular fatty...

  11. Structure of a bacterial glycoside hydrolase family 63 enzyme in complex with its glycosynthase product, and insights into the substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takatsugu; Ichikawa, Megumi; Yokoi, Gaku; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Mori, Haruhide; Kitano, Yoshikazu; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Tonozuka, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Proteins belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 63 (GH63) are found in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Although the eukaryotic GH63 proteins have been identified as processing α-glucosidase I, the substrate specificities of the bacterial and archaeal GH63 proteins are not clear. Here, we converted a bacterial GH63 enzyme, Escherichia coli YgjK, to a glycosynthase to probe its substrate specificity. Two mutants of YgjK (E727A and D324N) were constructed, and both mutants showed glycosynthase activity. The reactions of E727A with β-D-glucosyl fluoride and monosaccharides showed that the largest amount of glycosynthase product accumulated when galactose was employed as an acceptor molecule. The crystal structure of E727A complexed with the reaction product indicated that the disaccharide bound at the active site was 2-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-α-D-galactopyranose (Glc12Gal). A comparison of the structures of E727A-Glc12Gal and D324N-melibiose showed that there were two main types of conformation: the open and closed forms. The structure of YgjK adopted the closed form when subsite -1 was occupied by glucose. These results suggest that sugars containing the Glc12Gal structure are the most likely candidates for natural substrates of YgjK. © 2013 FEBS.

  12. TaqMan MGB probe fluorescence real-time quantitative PCR for rapid detection of Chinese Sacbrood virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Mingxiao

    Full Text Available Sacbrood virus (SBV is a picorna-like virus that affects honey bees (Apis mellifera and results in the death of the larvae. Several procedures are available to detect Chinese SBV (CSBV in clinical samples, but not to estimate the level of CSBV infection. The aim of this study was develop an assay for rapid detection and quantification of this virus. Primers and probes were designed that were specific for CSBV structural protein genes. A TaqMan minor groove binder (MGB probe-based, fluorescence real-time quantitative PCR was established. The specificity, sensitivity and stability of the assay were assessed; specificity was high and there were no cross-reactivity with healthy larvae or other bee viruses. The assay was applied to detect CSBV in 37 clinical samples and its efficiency was compared with clinical diagnosis, electron microscopy observation, and conventional RT-PCR. The TaqMan MGB-based probe fluorescence real-time quantitative PCR for CSBV was more sensitive than other methods tested. This assay was a reliable, fast, and sensitive method that was used successfully to detect CSBV in clinical samples. The technology can provide a useful tool for rapid detection of CSBV. This study has established a useful protocol for CSBV testing, epidemiological investigation, and development of animal models.

  13. In situ detection of denitrifying bacteria by mRNA-targeted nucleic acid probes and catalyzed reporter deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Michael Vedel; Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten

    can be designed to target a broader range of denitrifying bacteria; however, they require two-pass CARD-FISH, which may result in (too) high background fluorescence. In a first application example, habitat-specific polynucleotide probes were used to quantify bacteria expressing narG and nos...... reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen gas, is essential for the removal of fixed nitrogen from natural and engineered ecosystems. However, community structure and activity dynamics of denitrifying bacteria in most systems are poorly understood, partially due to difficulties in identifying and quantifying...... and catalyzed fluorescent reporter deposition (CARD-FISH). The general feasibility of the approach was first tested with pure cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and various denitrifying and nitrate-reducing isolates. Detailed studies of probe specificity and hybridization conditions using Clone-FISH of nar...

  14. Multi-Stage Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Sugar-Conjugated β-Turn Structures to be Used as Probes in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, Chiara; Auberger, Nicolas; Rentier, Cédric; Papini, Anna Maria; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Lavielle, Solange; Vinh, Joëlle

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic sugar-modified peptides were identified as antigenic probes in the context of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a mechanistic study on the fragmentation of different glycosylated analogs of a synthetic antigenic probe able to detect antibodies in a subpopulation of multiple sclerosis patients. In particular the N-glucosylated type I' β-turn peptide structure called CSF114(Glc) was used as a model to find signature fragmentations exploring the potential of multi-stage mass spectrometry by MALDI-LTQ Orbitrap. Here we compare the fragmentation of the glucosylated form of the synthetic peptide CSF114(Glc), bearing a glucose moiety on an asparagine residue, with less or non- immunoreactive forms, bearing different sugar-modifications, such as CSF114(GlcNAc), modified with a residue of N-acetylglucosamine, and CSF114[Lys(7)(1-deoxyfructopyranosyl)], this last one modified with a 1-deoxyfructopyranosyl moiety on a lysine at position 7. The analysis was set up using a synthetic compound specifically deuterated on the C-1 to compare its fragmentation with the fragmentation of the undeuterated form, and thus ascertain with confidence the presence on an Asn(Glc) within a peptide sequence. At the end of the study, our analysis led to the identification of signature neutral losses inside the sugar moieties to characterize the different types of glycosylation/glycation. The interest of this study lies in the possibility of applyimg this approach to the discovery of biomarkers and in the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases. Graphical Abstract GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT TEXT HERE] -->.

  15. The method of inversion of magnetic island two-dimensional structure by magnetic probes and its application on HL-2A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Tengfei; Liu Yi; Ji Xiaoquan; Xu Yuan; Feng Beibin

    2011-01-01

    The new method that reconstructs the polar two-dimensional structure of the magnetic island using magnetic pickup coils data is introduced on HL-2A tokamak and dynamic analysis method that set up based on it for tearing mode is also introduced. In this experiment, the perturbation current which is the source of the perturbation magnetic field can be determined using the data measured by magnetic probes. Superimposing the perturbation flux and equilibrium flux reconnected by EFIT, the structure and the width of the magnetic islands can be obtained. Then two-dimensional structure maps are set up chronologically and recorded in turn. After that these maps are revealed in turn and magnetic island can be analyzed dynamically. This method is applied to analyzing tearing mode. The conclusion that magnetic island rotating direction is in accordance with electronic diamagnetic drift direction is reached. The relationship between the magnetic island width and the magnetic perturbation field is proved and the suppression of magnetic island by ECRH is also verified.It shows the immediacy of the method of inversion of magnetic island structure by magnetic probes and it is very useful for watching and controlling MHD instability. (authors)

  16. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications. PMID:27036751

  17. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Martin C., E-mail: Martin.Fischer@duke.edu; Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E. [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Warren, Warren S. [Departments of Chemistry, Biomedical Engineering, Physics, and Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications.

  18. Heat Transport as a Probe of Superconducting Gap Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, C.; Shakeripour, H.; Taillefer, L.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the superconducting gap provides important clues on the symmetry of the order parameter and the pairing mechanism. The presence of nodes in the gap function imposed by symmetry implies an unconventional order parameter, other than s-wave. Here we show how measurements of the thermal conductivity at very low temperature can be used to determine whether such nodes are present in a particular superconductor, and shed light on their nature and location. We focus on the residual linear term at T → 0. A finite value in zero magnetic field is strong evidence for symmetry-imposed nodes, and the dependence on impurity scattering can distinguish between a line of nodes or point nodes. Application of a magnetic field probes the low-energy quasiparticle excitations, whether associated with nodes or with a small value of the gap on some part of the Fermi surface, as in a multi-band superconductor. We frame our discussion around archetypal materials: Nb for s-wave, Tl 2 Ba 2 CuO 6+δ for d-wave, Sr 2 RuO 4 for p-wave, and NbSe 2 for multi-band superconductivity. In that framework, we discuss three heavy-fermion superconductors: CeIrIn 5 , CeCoIn 5 and UPt 3 .

  19. Direct Detection of Potential Pyrethroids in Yangtze River via an Imprinted Multilayer Phosphorescence Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Lv, Xiaodong; Dai, Jiangdong; Sun, Lin; Huo, Pengwei; Li, Chunxiang; Yan, Yongsheng

    2018-01-01

    A novel tailored multilayer probe for monitoring potential pyrethroids in the Yangtze River was proposed. The room-temperature phosphorescence method was applied to realize a detection strategy that is superior to the fluorescence method. Efficient Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots with uniform size of 4.6 nm were firstly coated with a mesoporous silica to obtain a suitable intermediate transition layer, then an imprinted layer containing bifenthrin specific recognition sites was anchored. Characterizations verified the multilayer structure convincingly and the detection process relied on the electron transfer-induced fluorescence quenching mechanism. Optional detection time and standard detection curve were obtained within a concentration range from 5.0 to 50 μmol L -1 . The stability was verified to be good after 12 replicates. Feasibility of the probe was proved by monitoring water samples from the Zhenjiang reach of the Yangtze River. The probe offers promise for direct bifenthrin detection in unknown environmental water with an accurate and stable phosphorescence analysis strategy.

  20. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  1. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  2. The influence of motivating operations on generalization probes of specific mands by children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragale, Christina L; O'Reilly, Mark F; Aguilar, Jeannie; Pierce, Nigel; Lang, Russell; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of motivating operations on the generalization of newly taught mands across settings and communication partners for 3 children with autism. Two conditions were implemented prior to generalization probes. In the first condition, participants were given access to a preferred item until they rejected the item (i.e., abolishing operation). In the second condition, the item was not available to participants prior to generalization probes (i.e., establishing operation). The effects of these conditions on the generalization of newly taught mands were evaluated in a multielement design. Results indicated differentiated responding during generalization probes in which more manding with the target mand was observed following the presession no-access condition than in the presession access condition. These results support the consideration of motivating operations when assessing generalization of target mands to various untrained contexts.

  3. Use of oligodeoxynucleotide signature probes for identification of physiological groups of methylotrophic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsien, H.C.; Bratina, B.J.; Tsuji, K.; Hanson, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotide sequences that uniquely complemented 16S rRNAs of each group of methylotrophs were synthesized and used as hybridization probes for the identification of methylotrophic bacteria possessing the serine and ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathways for formaldehyde fixation. The specificity of the probes was determined by hybridizing radiolabeled probes with slot-blotted RNAs of methylotrophs and other eubacteria followed by autoradiography. The washing temperature was determined experimentally to be 50 and 52 degrees C for 9-α (serine pathway) and 10-γ (RuMP pathway) probes, respectively. RNAs isolated from serine pathway methylotrophs bound to probe 9-α, and RNAs from RuMP pathway methylotrophs bound to probe 10-γ. Nonmethylotrophic eubacterial RNAs did not bind to either probe. The probes were also labeled with fluorescent dyes. Cells fixed to microscope slides were hybridized with these probes, washed, and examined in a fluorescence microscope equipped with appropriate filter sets. Cells of methylotrophic bacteria possessing the serine or RuMP pathway specifically bind probes designed for each group. Samples with a mixture of cells of type I and II methanotrophs were detected and differentiated with single probes or mixed probes labeled with different fluorescent dyes, which enabled the detection of both types of cells in the same microscopic field

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF MOTIVATING OPERATIONS ON GENERALIZATION PROBES OF SPECIFIC MANDS BY CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

    OpenAIRE

    Fragale, Christina L; O'Reilly, Mark F; Aguilar, Jeannie; Pierce, Nigel; Lang, Russell; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of motivating operations on the generalization of newly taught mands across settings and communication partners for 3 children with autism. Two conditions were implemented prior to generalization probes. In the first condition, participants were given access to a preferred item until they rejected the item (i.e., abolishing operation). In the second condition, the item was not available to participants prior to generalization probes (i.e., establishing operation)...

  5. Probing the structure of complex solids using a distributed computing approach-Applications in zeolite science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, Samuel A.; Coates, Rosie; Lewis, Dewi W.; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the viability of distributed computing techniques employing idle desktop computers in investigating complex structural problems in solids. Through the use of a combined Monte Carlo and energy minimisation method, we show how a large parameter space can be effectively scanned. By controlling the generation and running of different configurations through a database engine, we are able to not only analyse the data 'on the fly' but also direct the running of jobs and the algorithms for generating further structures. As an exemplar case, we probe the distribution of Al and extra-framework cations in the structure of the zeolite Mordenite. We compare our computed unit cells with experiment and find that whilst there is excellent correlation between computed and experimentally derived unit cell volumes, cation positioning and short-range Al ordering (i.e. near neighbour environment), there remains some discrepancy in the distribution of Al throughout the framework. We also show that stability-structure correlations only become apparent once a sufficiently large sample is used. - Graphical Abstract: Aluminium distributions in zeolites are determined using e-science methods. Highlights: → Use of e-science methods to search configurationally space. → Automated control of space searching. → Identify key structural features conveying stability. → Improved correlation of computed structures with experimental data.

  6. In situ study of radionuclide diffusion into clays with specific device: Autolab probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porcheron, J.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this shared cost contract between the French Atomic Energy Commissariat, Nuclear Safety and Protection Institute and the Commission of the European Communities was to build and use an experimental drilling probe, the AUTOLAB prob, which was designed to measure the diffusion into clay of radioactive pollutants originating from a high activity waste storage. The measurement was carried out in-situ during drilling. The probe is equipped a new operating mode which involves using the pressure of the drilling water as its source of energy. The probe is autonomous and can stay in the bore hole for an extensive period of time without requiring any monitoring and without introducing any pollution. The diffusion experiment was carried out in a bore-hole at the JRC in ISPRA (ITALY). Two diffusion experiments were carried out in identical conditions (clay, 85Sr tracer, water samples), one in Laboratory, (ISPRA JRC Radiochemistry Laboratory, ITALY), and the other in-situ. The results displayed that 85Sr diffusion was considerably faster in the in-situ experiment than in that conducted in Laboratory. The explanation for this phenomenon, which could be due to the balance of carbonates, has not yet been clearly established. This test shows the value of comparing laboratory tests with in-situ tests conducted accurately using well adapted equipment. 9 refs., 10 figs

  7. Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD0 of Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard ARASE: Specifications and Evaluation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, S.; Kasaba, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Kasahara, Y.; Imachi, T.; Yagitani, S.; Kojima, H.; Kurita, S.; Shoji, M.; Hori, T.; Shinbori, A.; Teramoto, M.; Miyoshi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Takahashi, N.; Nishimura, Y.; Matsuoka, A.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kumamoto, A.; Nomura, R.

    2017-12-01

    This paper summarizes the specifications and the evaluation results of Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD), which are the key parts of Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard the Arase satellite, in their initial operations and the beginning phase of the full observations. WPT consists of the two dipole antennas as electric field sensors with 32m tip-to-tip length, with a sphere probe (6 cm diameter) attached at each end of wires (length: 15-m). They are extended orthogonally in the spin plane which is roughly perpendicular to the Sun. It enables the PWE to measure the E-field from DC to 10 MHz. This system is almost compatible to the WPT of the Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) aboard BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter, except the material of the spherical probe (ERG: Aluminium alloy, MMO: Titanium-alloy). This paper shows the extended length evaluated by the Lorentz force (spacecraft velocity x B-field) and the antenna impedance as the basic information of the E-field measurement capability of the PWE E-field receivers, with the evaluation for the possible degradation of the probe surface coated by TiAlN as BepiColombo. EFD is the 2-channel low frequency electric receiver as a part of EWO (EFD/WFC/OFA), for the measurement of 2ch electric field in the spin-plane with the sampling rate of 512 Hz (dynamic range: +-200 mV/m, +-3 V/m) and the 4ch spacecraft potential with the sampling rate of 128 Hz (dynamic range: +-100 V), respectively, with the bias control capability fed to the WPT probes. The electric field in DC - 232Hz provides the capability to detect (1) the fundamental information of the plasma dynamics and accelerations and (2) the characteristics of MHD and ion waves with their Poynting vectors with the data measured by MGF and PWE/WFC-B connected to PWE/SCM. The spacecraft potential provides the electron density information with UHR frequency. This paper also introduces the data sets and their calibration status.

  8. Continuously tunable nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lucia R; Wang, Juexiao Sherry; Fang, John Z; Evans, Emily R; Pinto, Alessandro; Pekker, Irena; Boykin, Richard; Ngouenet, Celine; Webster, Philippa J; Beechem, Joseph; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-12-01

    In silico-designed nucleic acid probes and primers often do not achieve favorable specificity and sensitivity tradeoffs on the first try, and iterative empirical sequence-based optimization is needed, particularly in multiplexed assays. We present a novel, on-the-fly method of tuning probe affinity and selectivity by adjusting the stoichiometry of auxiliary species, which allows for independent and decoupled adjustment of the hybridization yield for different probes in multiplexed assays. Using this method, we achieved near-continuous tuning of probe effective free energy. To demonstrate our approach, we enforced uniform capture efficiency of 31 DNA molecules (GC content, 0-100%), maximized the signal difference for 11 pairs of single-nucleotide variants and performed tunable hybrid capture of mRNA from total RNA. Using the Nanostring nCounter platform, we applied stoichiometric tuning to simultaneously adjust yields for a 24-plex assay, and we show multiplexed quantitation of RNA sequences and variants from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples.

  9. Scanning probe lithography for nanoimprinting mould fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Gang; Xie Guoyong; Zhang Yongyi; Zhang Guoming; Zhang Yingying; Carlberg, Patrick; Zhu Tao; Liu Zhongfan

    2006-01-01

    We propose a rational fabrication method for nanoimprinting moulds by scanning probe lithography. By wet chemical etching, different kinds of moulds are realized on Si(110) and Si(100) surfaces according to the Si crystalline orientation. The structures have line widths of about 200 nm with a high aspect ratio. By reactive ion etching, moulds with patterns free from the limitation of Si crystalline orientation are also obtained. With closed-loop scan control of a scanning probe microscope, the length of patterned lines is more than 100 μm by integrating several steps of patterning. The fabrication process is optimized in order to produce a mould pattern with a line width about 10 nm. The structures on the mould are further duplicated into PMMA resists through the nanoimprinting process. The method of combining scanning probe lithography with wet chemical etching or reactive ion etching (RIE) provides a resistless route for the fabrication of nanoimprinting moulds

  10. Event structure and cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Jason F; Radvansky, Gabriel A; Lorsbach, Thomas C; Armendarez, Joseph J

    2015-09-01

    Recently, a great deal of research has demonstrated that although everyday experience is continuous in nature, it is parsed into separate events. The aim of the present study was to examine whether event structure can influence the effectiveness of cognitive control. Across 5 experiments we varied the structure of events within the AX-CPT by shifting the spatial location of cues and probes on a computer screen. When location shifts were present, a pattern of AX-CPT performance consistent with enhanced cognitive control was found. To test whether the location shift effects were caused by the presence of event boundaries per se, other aspects of the AX-CPT were manipulated, such as the color of cues and probes and the inclusion of a distractor task during the cue-probe delay. Changes in cognitive control were not found under these conditions, suggesting that the location shift effects were specifically related to the formation of separate event models. Together, these results can be accounted for by the Event Horizon Model and a representation-based theory of cognitive control, and suggest that cognitive control can be influenced by the surrounding environmental structure. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Internal structure of magnetic endosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, C.; Wilhelm, C.; Cousin, F.; Dupuis, V.; Gazeau, F.; Perzynski, R.

    2007-01-01

    The internal structure of biological vesicles filled with magnetic nanoparticles is investigated using the following complementary analyses: electronic transmission microscopy, dynamic probing by magneto-optical birefringence and structural probing by Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS). These magnetic vesicles are magnetic endosomes obtained via a non-specific interaction between cells and anionic magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Thanks to a magnetic purification process, they are probed at two different stages of their formation within HeLa cells: (i) adsorption of nanoparticles onto the cellular membrane and (ii) their subsequent internalisation within endosomes. Differences in the microenvironment of the magnetic nanoparticles at those two different stages are highlighted here. The dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles adsorbed onto cellular membranes and confined within endosomes is respectively 3 and 5 orders of magnitude slower than for isolated magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous media. Interestingly, SANS experiments show that magnetic endosomes have an internal structure close to decorated vesicles, with magnetic nanoparticles locally decorating the endosome membrane, inside their inner-sphere. These results, important for future biomedical applications, suggest that multiple fusions of decorated vesicles are the biological processes underlying the endocytosis of that kind of nanometric materials.

  12. Dramatically improved RNA in situ hybridization signals using LNA-modified probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune; Nielsen, Peter Stein; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2005-01-01

    . This increases the thermal stability of hybrids formed with RNA. The LNA-based probes detect specific RNAs in fixed yeast cells with an efficiency far better than conventional DNA oligonucleotide probes of the same sequence. Using this probe design, we were also able to detect poly(A)+ RNA accumulation within......In situ detection of RNA by hybridization with complementary probes is a powerful technique. Probe design is a critical parameter in successful target detection. We have evaluated the efficiency of fluorescent DNA oligonucleotides modified to contain locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues...

  13. Irradiation probe and laboratory for irradiated material evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutny, S.; Kupca, L.; Beno, P.; Stubna, M.; Mrva, V.; Chmelo, P.

    1975-09-01

    The survey and assessment are given of the tasks carried out in the years 1971 to 1975 within the development of methods for structural materials irradiation and of a probe for the irradiation thereof in the A-1 reactor. The programme and implementation of laboratory tests of the irradiation probe are described. In the actual reactor irradiation, the pulse tube length between the pressure governor and the irradiation probe is approximately 20 m, the diameter is 2.2 mm. Temperature reaches 800 degC while the pressure control system operates at 20 degC. The laboratory tests (carried out at 20 degC) showed that the response time of the pressure control system to a stepwise pressure change in the irradiation probe from 0 to 22 at. is 0.5 s. Pressure changes were also studied in the irradiation probe and in the entire system resulting from temperature changes in the irradiation probe. Temperature distribution in the body of the irradiation probe heating furnace was determined. (B.S.)

  14. Structural-relaxation phenomena in As–S glasses as probed by combined PAL/DBAR technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O., E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua [Institute of Materials of Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, 79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, 42200 (Poland); Ingram, A. [Faculty of Physics of Opole Technical University, 75 Ozimska Str., Opole, 45370 (Poland); Szatanik, R. [Institute of Physics of Opole University, 48 Oleska Str., Opole, 45052 (Poland); Shpotyuk, M. [Institute of Materials of Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, 79031 (Ukraine); Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandery Str., Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Golovchak, R. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Austin Peay State University, 601 College Str., Clarksville, TN, 37044 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Experimental techniques exploring phenomena of positron–electron interaction, namely the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation, are shown to be very informative tools to study radiation- and thermally-induced phenomena in chalcogenide glasses of binary As–S system. Time-dependent processes of free-volume voids agglomeration (expansion), fragmentation (refining) and disappearing (contraction) are identified as main stages of physical aging in S-rich glasses, while a competitive channel of coordination topological defects formation associated with void charging becomes significant in a vicinity of near-stoichiometric glass compositions under γ-irradiation. The data of combined positron lifetime and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation measurements are correlated with radiation-induced shift of fundamental optical absorption edge of the studied glasses. The meaningful model for γ-induced and relaxation-driven evolution in free-volume void structure of As–S glasses giving a unified insight on their structural-chemical nature is proposed. - Highlights: • Combined optical, PAL and DBAR probes to study structural relaxation in As–S glasses. • Void agglomeration, fragmentation and disappearing are main stages of physical aging. • Radiation-induced coordination defects are important in near-stoichiometric As–S. • Proposed model describes free-volume evolution in the void structure of As–S glasses.

  15. Structural-relaxation phenomena in As–S glasses as probed by combined PAL/DBAR technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Ingram, A.; Szatanik, R.; Shpotyuk, M.; Golovchak, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental techniques exploring phenomena of positron–electron interaction, namely the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation, are shown to be very informative tools to study radiation- and thermally-induced phenomena in chalcogenide glasses of binary As–S system. Time-dependent processes of free-volume voids agglomeration (expansion), fragmentation (refining) and disappearing (contraction) are identified as main stages of physical aging in S-rich glasses, while a competitive channel of coordination topological defects formation associated with void charging becomes significant in a vicinity of near-stoichiometric glass compositions under γ-irradiation. The data of combined positron lifetime and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation measurements are correlated with radiation-induced shift of fundamental optical absorption edge of the studied glasses. The meaningful model for γ-induced and relaxation-driven evolution in free-volume void structure of As–S glasses giving a unified insight on their structural-chemical nature is proposed. - Highlights: • Combined optical, PAL and DBAR probes to study structural relaxation in As–S glasses. • Void agglomeration, fragmentation and disappearing are main stages of physical aging. • Radiation-induced coordination defects are important in near-stoichiometric As–S. • Proposed model describes free-volume evolution in the void structure of As–S glasses

  16. Fast Plasma Potential Measurements Using an Emissive Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ready, Amanda; Clark, Michael; Endrizzi, Douglass; Forest, Cary; Peterson, Ethan

    2017-10-01

    A heated emissive probe was developed for making direct plasma potential (Vp) measurements in rapidly fluctuating plasmas. Previous experiments on the Big Red Ball (BRB) were hindered by sudden potential drops, making Langmuir measurements of the plasma potential difficult. DC heating of a tungsten filament to emission allowed for fast (4 MHz) floating potential measurements that closely matched Vp. Two BRB experiments currently use the emissive probe. The investigation of unmagnetized, collisionless shocks used plasma potential measurements to study the sub-structure of strong plasma shocks. A separate investigation of emulated magnetospheres in laboratory plasmas used the plasma potential to map the equilibria and instabilities in the electric field of such structures. Results showing electric field measurements and comparison with cold Langmuir measurements will be presented. Future plans for probe modifications and applications to other experiments on the BRB will also be shown.

  17. The interactions of the HELIOS probe with the solar wind plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, G.H.; Isensee, U.; Maassberg, H.

    1981-08-01

    HELIOS solar probe disturbs the solar wind plasma in the near vicinity. Around the probe, a space charge cloud is formed due to strong photoelectron emission and fade out of solar wind particles. The conducting and isolating parts of the surface are differently charged. These effects result in a very complex potential structure in the vicinity of the probe and on the surface. The interactions of the HELIOS probe with the solar wind plasma are described by models based on kinetic theory of plasma. The combination of these models yields an entire and consistent representation of the spacecraft charging and the potential structure. Electron spectra measured by plasma experiment E1 are analysed and compared with results of the theoretical models. (orig.) [de

  18. Probing the glycosidic linkage: secondary structures in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simons, John P; Cristina Stanca-Kaposta, E; Cocinero, Emilio J; Liu, B [Chemistry Department, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Davis, Benjamin G; Gamblin, David P [Chemistry Department, Chemical Research Laboratory, 12 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 4TA (United Kingdom); Kroemer, Romano T [Sanofi-Aventis, CRVA, 13 quai Jules Guesde, BP14, 94403 Vitry-sur-Seine (France)], E-mail: John.Simons@chem.ox.ac.uk

    2008-10-15

    The functional importance of carbohydrates in biological processes, particularly those involving specific molecular recognition, is immense. Characterizing the three-dimensional (3D) structures of carbohydrates and glycoproteins, and their interactions with other molecules, not least the ubiquitous solvent, water, is a key starting point for understanding these processes. The combination of laser-based electronic and vibrational spectroscopy of mass-selected carbohydrate molecules and their hydrated complexes, conducted under molecular beam conditions, with ab initio computation is providing a uniquely powerful means of characterizing 3D carbohydrate conformations; the structures of their hydrated complexes, the hydrogen-bonded networks they support (or which support them); and the factors that determine their conformational and structural preferences.

  19. Probing the glycosidic linkage: secondary structures in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, John P; Cristina Stanca-Kaposta, E; Cocinero, Emilio J; Liu, B; Davis, Benjamin G; Gamblin, David P; Kroemer, Romano T

    2008-01-01

    The functional importance of carbohydrates in biological processes, particularly those involving specific molecular recognition, is immense. Characterizing the three-dimensional (3D) structures of carbohydrates and glycoproteins, and their interactions with other molecules, not least the ubiquitous solvent, water, is a key starting point for understanding these processes. The combination of laser-based electronic and vibrational spectroscopy of mass-selected carbohydrate molecules and their hydrated complexes, conducted under molecular beam conditions, with ab initio computation is providing a uniquely powerful means of characterizing 3D carbohydrate conformations; the structures of their hydrated complexes, the hydrogen-bonded networks they support (or which support them); and the factors that determine their conformational and structural preferences.

  20. Gravity Probe B spacecraft description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Norman R; Burns, Kevin; Katz, Russell; Kirschenbaum, Jon; Mason, Gary; Shehata, Shawky

    2015-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B spacecraft, developed, integrated, and tested by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company and later Lockheed Martin Corporation, consisted of structures, mechanisms, command and data handling, attitude and translation control, electrical power, thermal control, flight software, and communications. When integrated with the payload elements, the integrated system became the space vehicle. Key requirements shaping the design of the spacecraft were: (1) the tight mission timeline (17 months, 9 days of on-orbit operation), (2) precise attitude and translational control, (3) thermal protection of science hardware, (4) minimizing aerodynamic, magnetic, and eddy current effects, and (5) the need to provide a robust, low risk spacecraft. The spacecraft met all mission requirements, as demonstrated by dewar lifetime meeting specification, positive power and thermal margins, precision attitude control and drag-free performance, reliable communications, and the collection of more than 97% of the available science data. (paper)

  1. Interfacial structure of soft matter probed by SFG spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shen; Tong, Yujin; Ge, Aimin; Qiao, Lin; Davies, Paul B

    2014-10-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, an interface-specific technique in contrast to, for example, attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy, which is only interface sensitive, has been employed to investigate the surface and interface structure of soft matter on a molecular scale. The experimental arrangement required to carry out SFG spectroscopy, with particular reference to soft matter, and the analytical methods developed to interpret the spectra are described. The elucidation of the interfacial structure of soft matter systems is an essential prerequisite in order to understand and eventually control the surface properties of these important functional materials. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Ultra-shallow junction (USJ) sheet resistance measurements with a non-penetrating four point probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, M.C.; Hillard, R.J.; Borland, J.O.

    2005-01-01

    An accurate method to measure the four point probe (4PP) sheet resistance (R S ) of ultra shallow junction (USJ) Source-Drain Extension structures is described. The method utilizes Elastic Material probes (EM-probes) to form non-penetrating contacts to the silicon surface [R.J. Hillard, P.Y. Hung, William Chism, C. Win Ye, W.H. Howland, L.C. Tan, C.E. Kalnas, Characterization and Metrology for ULSI Technology, AIP Conference proceedings 683 (2003) 802.]. The probe design is kinematic and the force is controlled to ensure elastic deformation of the probe material. The probe material is such that large direct tunneling currents can flow through the native oxide thereby forming a low impedance contact. Sheet resistance measurements on USJ implanted P+/N structures with Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) junction depths less than 15 nm have been measured. The method is demonstrated on implanted USJ structures and found to be consistent with expectations

  3. Raman Probe Based on Optically-Poled Double-Core Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara; Margulis, Walter; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    A Raman probe based on an optically-poled double-core fiber. In-fiber SHG allows for Raman spectroscopy of DMSO at 532nm when illuminating the fiber with 1064nm light. The fiber structure provides independent excitation and collection paths.......A Raman probe based on an optically-poled double-core fiber. In-fiber SHG allows for Raman spectroscopy of DMSO at 532nm when illuminating the fiber with 1064nm light. The fiber structure provides independent excitation and collection paths....

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux: the acid test, scintigraphy or the pH probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibert, J.J.; Byrne, W.J.; Euler, A.R.; Latture, T.; Leach, M.; Campbell, M.

    1983-01-01

    The best established technique for diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux in children is the 24 hr esophageal pH probe test. No simultaneous comparison of this technique with radionuclide scans has been reported. Therefore, simultaneous 1 hr pH monitoring and gastroesophageal scintigraphy were performed in 49 infants and children with suspected gastroesophageal reflux. Forty-seven of these patients also were later monitored by the 24 hr pH probe test. Upper gastrointestinal series were performed on all patients. All patients with a positive 1 hr pH monitoring also had positive simultaneous scintigraphy. All patients with positive scintigraphy and pH probe monitoring also had a positive upper gastrointestinal series for reflux. The sensitivity of gastroesophageal scintigraphy, when compared to the 24 hr probe as a standard, was 79%; its specificity was 93%. The sensitivity of the upper gastrointestinal series was 86%, when compared to the 24 hr pH probe test. However, its specificity was only 21%

  5. Building versatile bipartite probes for quantum metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Alessandro; De Pasquale, Antonella; Adesso, Gerardo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    We consider bipartite systems as versatile probes for the estimation of transformations acting locally on one of the subsystems. We investigate what resources are required for the probes to offer a guaranteed level of metrological performance, when the latter is averaged over specific sets of local transformations. We quantify such a performance via the average skew information (AvSk), a convex quantity which we compute in closed form for bipartite states of arbitrary dimensions, and which is shown to be strongly dependent on the degree of local purity of the probes. Our analysis contrasts and complements the recent series of studies focused on the minimum, rather than the average, performance of bipartite probes in local estimation tasks, which was instead determined by quantum correlations other than entanglement. We provide explicit prescriptions to characterize the most reliable states maximizing the AvSk, and elucidate the role of state purity, separability and correlations in the classification of optimal probes. Our results can help in the identification of useful resources for sensing, estimation and discrimination applications when complete knowledge of the interaction mechanism realizing the local transformation is unavailable, and access to pure entangled probes is technologically limited.

  6. Building versatile bipartite probes for quantum metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, Alessandro; Pasquale, Antonella De; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    We consider bipartite systems as versatile probes for the estimation of transformations acting locally on one of the subsystems. We investigate what resources are required for the probes to offer a guaranteed level of metrological performance, when the latter is averaged over specific sets of local transformations. We quantify such a performance via the average skew information (AvSk), a convex quantity which we compute in closed form for bipartite states of arbitrary dimensions, and which is shown to be strongly dependent on the degree of local purity of the probes. Our analysis contrasts and complements the recent series of studies focused on the minimum, rather than the average, performance of bipartite probes in local estimation tasks, which was instead determined by quantum correlations other than entanglement. We provide explicit prescriptions to characterize the most reliable states maximizing the AvSk, and elucidate the role of state purity, separability and correlations in the classification of optimal probes. Our results can help in the identification of useful resources for sensing, estimation and discrimination applications when complete knowledge of the interaction mechanism realizing the local transformation is unavailable, and access to pure entangled probes is technologically limited. (paper)

  7. Study of protein-probe complexation equilibria and protein-surfactant interaction using charge transfer fluorescence probe methyl ester of N,N-dimethylamino naphthyl acrylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahanta, Subrata; Balia Singh, Rupashree; Bagchi, Arnab [Department of Chemistry University of Calcutta 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Nath, Debnarayan [Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nguchhait@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry University of Calcutta 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2010-06-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate the interaction between intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) probe-Methyl ester of N,N-dimethylamino naphthyl acrylic acid (MDMANA) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) using absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopy. The nature of probe protein binding interaction, fluorescence resonance energy transfer from protein to probe and time resolved fluorescence decay measurement predict that the probe molecule binds strongly to the hydrophobic cavity of the protein. Furthermore, the interaction of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) with water soluble protein BSA has been investigated using MDMANA as fluorescenece probe. The changes in the spectral characteristics of charge transfer fluorescence probe MDMANA in BSA-SDS environment reflects well the nature of the protein-surfactant binding interaction such as specific binding, non-cooperative binding, cooperative binding and saturation binding.

  8. Non-Gaussianity as a Probe of the Physics of the Primordial Universe and the Astrophysics of the Low Redshift Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Komatsu, E; Afshordi, N; Bartolo, N; Baumann, D; Bond, J R; Buchbinder, E I; Byrnes, C T; Chen, X; Chung, D J H; Cooray, A; Creminelli, P; Dalal, N; Dore, O; Easther, R; Frolov, A V; Gorski, K M; Jackson, M G; Khoury, J; Kinney, W H; Kofman, L; Koyama, K; Leblond, L; Lehners, J L; Lidsey, J E; Liguori, M; Lim, E A; Linde, A; Lyth, D H; Maldacena, J; Matarrese, S; McAllister, L; McDonald, P; Mukohyama, S; Ovrut, B; Peiris, H V; Rath, C; Riotto, A; Rodriguez, Y; Sasaki, M; Scoccimarro, R; Seery, D; Sefusatti, E; Seljak, U; Senatore, L; Shandera, S; Shellard, E P S; Silverstein, E; Slosar, A; Smith, K M; Starobinsky, A A; Steinhardt, P J; Takahashi, F; Tegmark, M; Tolley, A J; Verde, L; Wandelt, B D; Wands, D; Weinberg, S; Wyman, M; Yadav, A P S; Zaldarriaga, M

    2009-01-01

    A new and powerful probe of the origin and evolution of structures in the Universe has emerged and been actively developed over the last decade. In the coming decade, non-Gaussianity, i.e., the study of non-Gaussian contributions to the correlations of cosmological fluctuations, will become an important probe of both the early and the late Universe. Specifically, it will play a leading role in furthering our understanding of two fundamental aspects of cosmology and astrophysics: (i) the physics of the very early universe that created the primordial seeds for large-scale structures, and (ii) the subsequent growth of structures via gravitational instability and gas physics at later times. To date, observations of fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe (LSS) have focused largely on the Gaussian contribution as measured by the two-point correlations (or the power spectrum) of density fluctuations. However, an even greater amount of information is contai...

  9. In-flight calibration of mesospheric rocket plasma probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havnes, Ove; Hartquist, Thomas W.; Kassa, Meseret; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2011-01-01

    Many effects and factors can influence the efficiency of a rocket plasma probe. These include payload charging, solar illumination, rocket payload orientation and rotation, and dust impact induced secondary charge production. As a consequence, considerable uncertainties can arise in the determination of the effective cross sections of plasma probes and measured electron and ion densities. We present a new method for calibrating mesospheric rocket plasma probes and obtaining reliable measurements of plasma densities. This method can be used if a payload also carries a probe for measuring the dust charge density. It is based on that a dust probe's effective cross section for measuring the charged component of dust normally is nearly equal to its geometric cross section, and it involves the comparison of variations in the dust charge density measured with the dust detector to the corresponding current variations measured with the electron and/or ion probes. In cases in which the dust charge density is significantly smaller than the electron density, the relation between plasma and dust charge density variations can be simplified and used to infer the effective cross sections of the plasma probes. We illustrate the utility of the method by analysing the data from a specific rocket flight of a payload containing both dust and electron probes.

  10. In-flight calibration of mesospheric rocket plasma probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havnes, Ove [Institute for Physics and Technology, University of Tromsoe, N-9037 Tromsoe (Norway); University Studies Svalbard (UNIS), N-9170 Longyearbyen, Svalbard (Norway); Hartquist, Thomas W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Kassa, Meseret [Institute for Physics and Technology, University of Tromsoe, N-9037 Tromsoe (Norway); Morfill, Gregor E. [Max-Planck-Institute fuer extraterrestrische Physik, D-85741Garching (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Many effects and factors can influence the efficiency of a rocket plasma probe. These include payload charging, solar illumination, rocket payload orientation and rotation, and dust impact induced secondary charge production. As a consequence, considerable uncertainties can arise in the determination of the effective cross sections of plasma probes and measured electron and ion densities. We present a new method for calibrating mesospheric rocket plasma probes and obtaining reliable measurements of plasma densities. This method can be used if a payload also carries a probe for measuring the dust charge density. It is based on that a dust probe's effective cross section for measuring the charged component of dust normally is nearly equal to its geometric cross section, and it involves the comparison of variations in the dust charge density measured with the dust detector to the corresponding current variations measured with the electron and/or ion probes. In cases in which the dust charge density is significantly smaller than the electron density, the relation between plasma and dust charge density variations can be simplified and used to infer the effective cross sections of the plasma probes. We illustrate the utility of the method by analysing the data from a specific rocket flight of a payload containing both dust and electron probes.

  11. In-flight calibration of mesospheric rocket plasma probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havnes, Ove; Hartquist, Thomas W; Kassa, Meseret; Morfill, Gregor E

    2011-07-01

    Many effects and factors can influence the efficiency of a rocket plasma probe. These include payload charging, solar illumination, rocket payload orientation and rotation, and dust impact induced secondary charge production. As a consequence, considerable uncertainties can arise in the determination of the effective cross sections of plasma probes and measured electron and ion densities. We present a new method for calibrating mesospheric rocket plasma probes and obtaining reliable measurements of plasma densities. This method can be used if a payload also carries a probe for measuring the dust charge density. It is based on that a dust probe's effective cross section for measuring the charged component of dust normally is nearly equal to its geometric cross section, and it involves the comparison of variations in the dust charge density measured with the dust detector to the corresponding current variations measured with the electron and/or ion probes. In cases in which the dust charge density is significantly smaller than the electron density, the relation between plasma and dust charge density variations can be simplified and used to infer the effective cross sections of the plasma probes. We illustrate the utility of the method by analysing the data from a specific rocket flight of a payload containing both dust and electron probes.

  12. Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD) of Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard the Arase satellite: specifications and initial evaluation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaba, Yasumasa; Ishisaka, Keigo; Kasahara, Yoshiya; Imachi, Tomohiko; Yagitani, Satoshi; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Matsuda, Shoya; Shoji, Masafumi; Kurita, Satoshi; Hori, Tomoaki; Shinbori, Atsuki; Teramoto, Mariko; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Nakagawa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Naoko; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Matsuoka, Ayako; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Nomura, Reiko

    2017-12-01

    This paper summarizes the specifications and initial evaluation results of Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD), the key components for the electric field measurement of the Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard the Arase (ERG) satellite. WPT consists of two pairs of dipole antennas with 31-m tip-to-tip length. Each antenna element has a spherical probe (60 mm diameter) at each end of the wire (15 m length). They are extended orthogonally in the spin plane of the spacecraft, which is roughly perpendicular to the Sun and enables to measure the electric field in the frequency range of DC to 10 MHz. This system is almost identical to the WPT of Plasma Wave Investigation aboard the BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter, except for the material of the spherical probe (ERG: Al alloy, MMO: Ti alloy). EFD is a part of the EWO (EFD/WFC/OFA) receiver and measures the 2-ch electric field at a sampling rate of 512 Hz (dynamic range: ± 200 mV/m) and the 4-ch spacecraft potential at a sampling rate of 128 Hz (dynamic range: ± 100 V and ± 3 V/m), with the bias control capability of WPT. The electric field waveform provides (1) fundamental information about the plasma dynamics and accelerations and (2) the characteristics of MHD and ion waves in various magnetospheric statuses with the magnetic field measured by MGF and PWE-MSC. The spacecraft potential provides information on thermal electron plasma variations and structure combined with the electron density obtained from the upper hybrid resonance frequency provided by PWE-HFA. EFD has two data modes. The continuous (medium-mode) data are provided as (1) 2-ch waveforms at 64 Hz (in apoapsis mode, L > 4) or 256 Hz (in periapsis mode, L < 4), (2) 1-ch spectrum within 1-232 Hz with 1-s resolution, and (3) 4-ch spacecraft potential at 8 Hz. The burst (high-mode) data are intermittently obtained as (4) 2-ch waveforms at 512 Hz and (5) 4-ch spacecraft potential at 128 Hz and downloaded with the WFC

  13. Development of transient internal probe (TIP) magnetic field diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, J.P.; Bohnet, M.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) is designed to permit measurement of internal magnetic fields, in hot, high density plasmas. The concept consists of accelerating a probe to high velocities (2.2 Km/s) in order to minimize probe exposure time to plasma. Faraday rotation within the probe is used to measure the local magnetic field. An Argon laser illuminates the probe consisting of a Faraday-rotator material with a retro-reflector that returns the incident light to the detection system. Performance results of the light gas gun and optical detection system will be shown. To date, the gas gun has been extensively tested consistently achieving velocities between 2 and 3 km/s. The probe and detection scheme have been tested by dropping the probe through a static magnetic field. Magnetic field resolution of 20 gauss and spatial resolution of 5 mm has been achieved. System frequency response is 10Mhz. Work is currently being conducted to integrate the diagnostic system with laboratory plasma experiments. Specifically a gas interfaced system has been developed to prevent helium muzzle gas from entering the plasma chamber with the probe. Additionally the probe must be separated from the sabot which protects the probe during acceleration in the gas gun. Data will be presented showing the results of various separation techniques

  14. Tandem Oligonucleotide Probe Annealing and Elongation To Discriminate Viral Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Uhd, Jesper; Miotke, Laura

    2017-01-01

    opportunities in transcriptome analysis, virology, and other fields. Herein, we report for the first time a "click" chemistry approach to oligonucleotide probe elongation as a novel approach to specifically detect a viral sequence. We hybridized a library of short, terminally labeled probes to Ebola virus RNA...

  15. Detecting the effects of toxic agents on spermatogenesis using DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, N.B.

    1987-01-01

    Advances in the molecular biology of spermatogenesis suggest that DNA probes can be used to monitor the effects of toxic agents in male germ cells of mammals. Molecular hybridization analyses with DNA probes can provide a reproducible methodology capable of detecting changes ranging from massive deletions to single base pair substitutions in the genome of exposed individuals. A constantly increasing number of DNA probes that can be used to detect such alterations in human sperm DNA exist for both ubiquitously expressed proteins and for genes solely expressed in the testis. In this chapter, the currently available testicular stage-specific and/or cell type-specific DNA probes and the techniques by which they can be utilized in reproductive toxicology studies are discussed. The advantages, limitations, and future technological advances of this novel biological marker system for the human male reproductive system are also considered

  16. Radioactive Probes on Ferromagnetic Surfaces

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    On the (broad) basis of our studies of nonmagnetic radioactive probe atoms on magnetic surfaces and at interfaces, we propose to investigate the magnetic interaction of magnetic probe atoms with their immediate environment, in particular of rare earth (RE) elements positioned on and in ferromagnetic surfaces. The preparation and analysis of the structural properties of such samples will be performed in the UHV chamber HYDRA at the HMI/Berlin. For the investigations of the magnetic properties of RE atoms on surfaces Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) measurements and Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) in the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN) are proposed.

  17. Wet-chemical etching of atom probe tips for artefact free analyses of nanoscaled semiconductor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkonyan, D; Fleischmann, C; Veloso, A; Franquet, A; Bogdanowicz, J; Morris, R J H; Vandervorst, W

    2018-03-01

    We introduce an innovative specimen preparation method employing the selectivity of a wet-chemical etching step to improve data quality and success rates in the atom probe analysis of contemporary semiconductor devices. Firstly, on the example of an SiGe fin embedded in SiO 2 we demonstrate how the selective removal of SiO 2 from the final APT specimen significantly improves accuracy and reliability of the reconstructed data. With the oxide removal, we eliminate the origin of shape artefacts, i.e. the formation of a non-hemispherical tip shape, that are typically observed in the reconstructed volume of complex systems. Secondly, using the same approach, we increase success rates to ∼90% for the damage-free, 3D site-specific localization of short (250 nm), vertical Si nanowires at the specimen apex. The impact of the abrupt emitter radius change that is introduced by this specimen preparation method is evaluated as being minor using field evaporation simulation and comparison of different reconstruction schemes. The Ge content within the SiGe fin as well as the 3D boron distribution in the Si NW as resolved by atom probe analysis are in good agreement with TEM/EDS and ToF-SIMS analysis, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Luminescence of Lanthanoides (Rare-earth elements) – Probes of structural variations in minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, C.

    2015-01-01

    This cumulative PhD thesis summarises several individual studies on the luminescence of REE (rare-earth elements; i.e., trivalent lanthanoides), which are typically incorporated in accessory minerals such as zircon, titanite, monazite–(Ce) and xenotime–(Y). A main objective of these studies is to examine the powerfulness of REE luminescence-spectroscopy as structural probe. In particular, this concerns the potential use of REE3+ emissions in characterising structural disorder of their accessory host minerals as caused by radiation damage and/or compositional heterogeneity. Especially the former (i.e., mineral disorder due to radiation damage) is of interest to Earth and materials scientists, for instance for the understanding of changed physicochemical properties of initially crystalline materials that are affected by structural damage as caused by the radioactive decay of actinides. Moreover, a substantial contribution of the studies presented lies in the field of basic properties of the REE luminescence of natural accessory minerals. First, the investigations have addressed the identification of diverse REE species in diverse natural host minerals (which is done using synthetic REE-doped analogues). Second, factors that may bias the quantitative estimation of spectroscopic parameters have been studied, including effects of experimental parameters (crystal orientation and temperature) and the samples’ compositional heterogeneity. The results will be particularly useful to the growing community of Earth scientists who apply REE luminescence-spectroscopy in studying geological materials. (author) [de

  19. Perceiving the vertical distances of surfaces by means of a hand-held probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, T C; Turvey, M T

    1991-05-01

    Nine experiments were conducted on the haptic capacity of people to perceive the distances of horizontal surfaces solely on the basis of mechanical stimulation resulting from contacting the surfaces with a vertically held rod. Participants touched target surfaces with rods inside a wooden cabinet and reported the perceived surface location with an indicator outside the cabinet. The target surface, rod, and the participant's hand were occluded, and the sound produced in exploration was muffled. Properties of the probe (length, mass, moment of inertia, center of mass, and shape) were manipulated, along with surface distance and the method and angle of probing. Results suggest that for the most common method of probing, namely, tapping, perceived vertical distance is specific to a particular relation among the rotational inertia of the probe, the distance of the point of contact with the surface from the probe's center of percussion, and the inclination at contact of the probe to the surface. They also suggest that the probe length and the distance probed are independently perceivable. The results were discussed in terms of information specificity versus percept-percept coupling and parallels between selective attention in haptic and visual perception.

  20. Electronic structure of Pt-Co cathode catalysts in membrane electrolyte assembly observed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy with different probing depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Hidai, S.; Niwa, H.; Harada, Y.; Oshima, M.; Ofuchi, H.; Nakamori, Y.; Aoki, T.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic structures of Pt-Co cathode and Pt-Ru anode catalysts in membrane electrolyte assemblies (MEAs) for polymer electrolyte fuel cell have been investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and the changes of electronic structures accompanied with degradation have been observed by comparison between spectra obtained by fluorescence-yield (FY) and conversion-electron-yield (CEY) methods, probing depths of which are several hundreds μm and ∼100 nm, respectively. The Co K XANES spectra of the as-fabricated MEA show that the Co atoms in the cathode are metallic and oxidized Co ions exist at the interface between the cathode and electrolyte. The spectra of the long-time operated MEA suggest that the oxidation of Co makes progress with degradation of the cathode catalysts. In contrast to the Co K XANES spectra, the line shape of the Ru K XANES spectra is unchanged even after the long-time operation.

  1. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    OpenAIRE

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-l...

  2. Caspase-1 Specific Light-Up Probe with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics for Inhibitor Screening of Coumarin-Originated Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hao; Yang, Haitao; Huang, Shuai; Wang, Fujia; Wang, Dong-Mei; Liu, Bin; Tang, Yi-Da; Zhang, Chong-Jing

    2018-04-18

    Caspase-1 is a key player in pyroptosis and inflammation. Caspase-1 inhibition is found to be beneficial to various diseases. Coumarin-originated natural products have an anti-inflammation function, but their direct inhibition effect to caspase-1 remains unexplored. To evaluate their interactions, the widely used commercial coumarin-based probe (Ac-YVAD-AMC) is not suitable, as the background signal from coumarin-originated natural products could interfere with the screening results. Therefore, fluorescent probes using a large Stokes shift could help solve this problem. In this work, we chose the fluorophore of tetraphenylethylene-thiophene (TPETH) with aggregation-induced emission characteristics and a large Stokes shift of about 200 nm to develop a molecular probe. Bioconjugation between TPETH and hydrophilic peptides (DDYVADC) through a thiol-ene reaction generated a light-up probe, C1-P3. The probe has little background signal in aqueous media and exerts a fluorescent turn-on effect in the presence of caspase-1. Moreover, when evaluating the inhibition potency of coumarin-originated natural products, the new probe could generate a true and objective result but not for the commercial probe (Ac-YVAD-AMC), which is evidenced by HPLC analysis. The quick light-up response and accurate screening results make C1-P3 very useful in fundamental study and inhibitior screening toward caspase-1.

  3. Simulation-aided design and fabrication of nanoprobes for scanning probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Bernard Haochih; Chang, Day-Bin

    2011-01-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a flexible and effective method to design and fabricate scanning probes for atomic force microscopy applications. Computer simulations were adopted to evaluate design specifications and desired performance of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes; the fabrication processes were guided by feedback from simulation results. Through design-simulation-fabrication iterations, tipless cantilevers and tapping mode probes were successfully made with errors as low as 2% in designed resonant frequencies. For tapping mode probes, the probe tip apex achieved a 10 nm radius of curvature without additional sharpening steps; tilt-compensated probes were also fabricated for better scanning performance. This method provides AFM users improved probe quality and practical guidelines for customized probes, which can support the development of novel scanning probe microscopy (SPM) applications. -- Research highlights: → We developed a design-simulation-fabrication strategy for customized AFM/SPM probes and demonstrated the results of tipless cantilever, sharpened probe tip, and tilt-compensated probe. → This simulation-aided method improved the geometry control and performance prediction of AFM probes; the error in resonant frequency was reduced to ∼2%. → Integration of simulation in design and fabrication of AFM probes expedites development of new probes and consequently promotes novel SPM applications.

  4. Influence of probe motion on laser probe temperature in circulating blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehrlein, C; Splinter, R; Littmann, L; Tuntelder, J R; Tatsis, G P; Svenson, R H

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of probe motion on laser probe temperature in various blood flow conditions. Laser probe temperatures were measured in an in vitro blood circulation model consisting of 3.2 nm-diameter plastic tubes. A 2.0 mm-diameter metal probe attached to a 300 microns optical quartz fiber was coupled to an argon laser. Continuous wave 4 watts and 8 watts of laser power were delivered to the fiber tip corresponding to a 6.7 +/- 0.5 and 13.2 +/- 0.7 watts power setting at the laser generator. The laser probe was either moved with constant velocity or kept stationary. A thermocouple inserted in the lateral portion of the probe was used to record probe temperatures. Probe temperature changes were found with the variation of laser power, probe velocity, blood flow, and duration of laser exposure. Probe motion significantly reduced probe temperatures. After 10 seconds of 4 watts laser power the probe temperature in stagnant blood decreased from 303 +/- 18 degrees C to 113 +/- 17 degrees C (63%) by moving the probe with a velocity of 5 cm/sec. Blood flow rates of 170 ml/min further decreased the probe temperature from 113 +/- 17 degrees C to 50 +/- 8 degrees C (56%). At 8 watts of laser power a probe temperature reduction from 591 +/- 25 degrees C to 534 +/- 36 degrees C (10%) due to 5 cm/sec probe velocity was noted. Probe temperatures were reduced to 130 +/- 30 degrees C (78%) under the combined influence of 5 cm/sec probe velocity and 170 ml/min blood flow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Probing the crossover in CO desorption from single crystal to nanoparticulate Ru model catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Shane; Strebel, Christian Ejersbo; Vendelbo, Søren Bastholm

    2011-01-01

    Crossover in CO desorption behavior and nanoscale structure probed with STM from ruthenium single crystals to PVD and mass-selected nanoparticles.......Crossover in CO desorption behavior and nanoscale structure probed with STM from ruthenium single crystals to PVD and mass-selected nanoparticles....

  6. Understanding specificity in metabolic pathways-Structural biology of human nucleotide metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welin, Martin; Nordlund, Paer

    2010-01-01

    Interactions are the foundation of life at the molecular level. In the plethora of activities in the cell, the evolution of enzyme specificity requires the balancing of appropriate substrate affinity with a negative selection, in order to minimize interactions with other potential substrates in the cell. To understand the structural basis for enzyme specificity, the comparison of structural and biochemical data between enzymes within pathways using similar substrates and effectors is valuable. Nucleotide metabolism is one of the largest metabolic pathways in the human cell and is of outstanding therapeutic importance since it activates and catabolises nucleoside based anti-proliferative drugs and serves as a direct target for anti-proliferative drugs. In recent years the structural coverage of the enzymes involved in human nucleotide metabolism has been dramatically improved and is approaching completion. An important factor has been the contribution from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at Karolinska Institutet, which recently has solved 33 novel structures of enzymes and enzyme domains in human nucleotide metabolism pathways and homologs thereof. In this review we will discuss some of the principles for substrate specificity of enzymes in human nucleotide metabolism illustrated by a selected set of enzyme families where a detailed understanding of the structural determinants for specificity is now emerging.

  7. Detection of malachite green in fish based on magnetic fluorescent probe of CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Le; Lin, Zheng-Zhong; Zeng, Jun; Zhong, Hui-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Mei; Huang, Zhi-Yong

    2018-05-01

    A magnetic fluorescent probe of CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs was prepared using CdTe QDs and Fe3O4 nanoparticles as co-nucleus and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as specific recognition sites based on a reverse microemulsion method. With the specific enrichment and magnetic separation properties, the probe of CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs was used to detect malachite green (MG) in fish samples. The TEM analysis showed that the particles of CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs were spherical with average diameter around 53 nm, and a core-shell structure was well-shaped with several Fe3O4 nanoparticles and CdTe QDs embedded in each of the microsphere. Quick separation of the probes from solutions could be realized with a magnet, indicating the excellent magnetic property of CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs. The probe exhibited high specific adsorption towards MG and excellent fluorescence emission at λem 598 nm. The fluorescence of CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs could be linearly quenched by MG at the concentrations from 0.025 to 1.5 μmol L-1. The detection limit was 0.014 μmol L-1. The average recovery of spiked MG in fish samples was 105.2%. The result demonstrated that the as-prepared CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs could be used as a probe to the detection of trace MG in fish samples.

  8. In Situ Atom Probe Deintercalation of Lithium-Manganese-Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Björn; Maier, Johannes; Arlt, Jonas; Nowak, Carsten

    2017-04-01

    Atom probe tomography is routinely used for the characterization of materials microstructures, usually assuming that the microstructure is unaltered by the analysis. When analyzing ionic conductors, however, gradients in the chemical potential and the electric field penetrating dielectric atom probe specimens can cause significant ionic mobility. Although ionic mobility is undesirable when aiming for materials characterization, it offers a strategy to manipulate materials directly in situ in the atom probe. Here, we present experimental results on the analysis of the ionic conductor lithium-manganese-oxide with different atom probe techniques. We demonstrate that, at a temperature of 30 K, characterization of the materials microstructure is possible without measurable Li mobility. Also, we show that at 298 K the material can be deintercalated, in situ in the atom probe, without changing the manganese-oxide host structure. Combining in situ atom probe deintercalation and subsequent conventional characterization, we demonstrate a new methodological approach to study ionic conductors even in early stages of deintercalation.

  9. A new theoretical probe for the magnetic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windmill, J.F.C. E-mail: jwindmill@plymouth.ac.uk; Clegg, W.W.; Jenkins, D.F.L.; Davey, P.J

    2001-05-01

    The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is established as a valuable tool for the analysis of magnetic structures. The standard design of MFM incorporates a silicon tip coated with a magnetic material. However, these tips are subject to several inherent problems, e.g. changing characteristics over time due to damage or magnetic hysteresis. A new theoretical electromagnetic MFM probe is introduced here. Although electromagnetic MFM has been discussed before by Zhou et al. (J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 17 (1999) 2233), the design presented here is a different approach. Two different probe iterations and their magnetic field intensity distribution are modelled. The probe imaging capability is compared using the reciprocity principle (Wright and Hill, Appl. Phys. Lett. 68 (1996) 1726) to image the simulated force interaction between a sample and the probe fields. Thus, images of a sample's magnetic distribution are produced by the convolution of the different probe gradient field distributions and the sample magnetisation. Both perpendicular and longitudinal magnetisation patterns were simulated with the different probe iterations. This clearly showed the improvement of the second probe iteration, particularly for longitudinal patterns. The practical use of the new probe is also discussed, and future work outlined.

  10. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both 32 P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis

  11. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  12. Thermodynamic basis for engineering high-affinity, high-specificity binding-induced DNA clamp nanoswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idili, Andrea; Plaxco, Kevin W; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Ricci, Francesco

    2013-12-23

    Naturally occurring chemoreceptors almost invariably employ structure-switching mechanisms, an observation that has inspired the use of biomolecular switches in a wide range of artificial technologies in the areas of diagnostics, imaging, and synthetic biology. In one mechanism for generating such behavior, clamp-based switching, binding occurs via the clamplike embrace of two recognition elements onto a single target molecule. In addition to coupling recognition with a large conformational change, this mechanism offers a second advantage: it improves both affinity and specificity simultaneously. To explore the physics of such switches we have dissected here the thermodynamics of a clamp-switch that recognizes a target DNA sequence through both Watson-Crick base pairing and triplex-forming Hoogsteen interactions. When compared to the equivalent linear DNA probe (which relies solely on Watson-Crick interactions), the extra Hoogsteen interactions in the DNA clamp-switch increase the probe's affinity for its target by ∼0.29 ± 0.02 kcal/mol/base. The Hoogsteen interactions of the clamp-switch likewise provide an additional specificity check that increases the discrimination efficiency toward a single-base mismatch by 1.2 ± 0.2 kcal/mol. This, in turn, leads to a 10-fold improvement in the width of the "specificity window" of this probe relative to that of the equivalent linear probe. Given these attributes, clamp-switches should be of utility not only for sensing applications but also, in the specific field of DNA nanotechnology, for applications calling for a better control over the building of nanostructures and nanomachines.

  13. Probing Field Distributions on Waveguide Structures with an Atomic Force/Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgonjen, E.G.; Borgonjen, E.G.; Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    A 'stand-alone' Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope combined with an Atomic force Microscope, using a micro-fabricated silicon-nitride probe, is applied to the imaging of field distribution in integrated optical ridge waveguides. The electric field on the waveguide is locally probed by coupling to

  14. SNAP: Small Next-generation Atmospheric Probe Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayanagi, K. M.; Dillman, R. A.; Atkinson, D. H.; Li, J.; Saikia, S.; Simon, A. A.; Spilker, T. R.; Wong, M. H.; Hope, D.

    2017-12-01

    We present a concept for a small, atmospheric probe that could be flexibly added to future missions that orbit or fly-by a giant planet as a secondary payload, which we call the Small Next-generation Atmospheric Probe (SNAP). SNAP's main scientific objectives are to determine the vertical distribution of clouds and cloud-forming chemical species, thermal stratification, and wind speed as a function of depth. As a case study, we present the advantages, cost and risk of adding SNAP to the future Uranus Orbiter and Probe flagship mission; in combination with the mission's main probe, SNAP would perform atmospheric in-situ measurements at a second location, and thus enable and enhance the scientific objectives recommended by the 2013 Planetary Science Decadal Survey and the 2014 NASA Science Plan to determine atmospheric spatial variabilities. We envision that the science objectives can be achieved with a 30-kg entry probe 0.5m in diameter (less than half the size of the Galileo probe) that reaches 5-bar pressure-altitude and returns data to Earth via the carrier spacecraft. As the baseline instruments, the probe will carry an Atmospheric Structure Instrument (ASI) that measures the temperature, pressure and acceleration, a carbon nanotube-based NanoChem atmospheric composition sensor, and an Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) to conduct a Doppler Wind Experiment (DWE). We also catalog promising technologies currently under development that will strengthen small atmospheric entry probe missions in the future. While SNAP is applicable to multiple planets, we examine the feasibility, benefits and impacts of adding SNAP to the Uranus Orbiter and Probe flagship mission. Our project is supported by NASA PSDS3 grant NNX17AK31G.

  15. Modeling Atom Probe Tomography: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vurpillot, F., E-mail: francois.vurpillot@univ-rouen.fr [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Université de Rouen, Saint Etienne du Rouvray 76801 (France); Oberdorfer, C. [Institut für Materialwissenschaft, Lehrstuhl für Materialphysik, Universität Stuttgart, Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Improving both the precision and the accuracy of Atom Probe Tomography reconstruction requires a correct understanding of the imaging process. In this aim, numerical modeling approaches have been developed for 15 years. The injected ingredients of these modeling tools are related to the basic physic of the field evaporation mechanism. The interplay between the sample nature and structure of the analyzed sample and the reconstructed image artefacts have pushed to gradually improve and make the model more and more sophisticated. This paper reviews the evolution of the modeling approach in Atom Probe Tomography and presents some future potential directions in order to improve the method. - Highlights: • The basics of field evaporation. • The main aspects of Atom Probe Tomography modeling. • The intrinsic limitations of the current method and future potential directions to improve the understanding of tip to image ion projection.

  16. Probing the 3-D Structure, Dynamics, and Stability of Bacterial Collagenase Collagen Binding Domain (apo- versus holo-) by Limited Proteolysis MALDI-TOF MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sides, Cynthia R.; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O.; Philominathan, Sagaya Theresa Leena; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Pairing limited proteolysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to probe clostridial collagenase collagen binding domain (CBD) reveals the solution dynamics and stability of the protein, as these factors are crucial to CBD effectiveness as a drug-delivery vehicle. MS analysis of proteolytic digests indicates initial cleavage sites, thereby specifying the less stable and highly accessible regions of CBD. Modulation of protein structure and stability upon metal binding is shown through MS analysis of calcium-bound and cobalt-bound CBD proteolytic digests. Previously determined X-ray crystal structures illustrate that calcium binding induces secondary structure transformation in the highly mobile N-terminal arm and increases protein stability. MS-based detection of exposed residues confirms protein flexibility, accentuates N-terminal dynamics, and demonstrates increased global protein stability exported by calcium binding. Additionally, apo- and calcium-bound CBD proteolysis sites correlate well with crystallographic B-factors, accessibility, and enzyme specificity. MS-observed cleavage sites with no clear correlations are explained either by crystal contacts of the X-ray crystal structures or by observed differences between Molecules A and B in the X-ray crystal structures. The study newly reveals the absence of the βA strand and thus the very dynamic N-terminal linker, as corroborated by the solution X-ray scattering results. Cobalt binding has a regional effect on the solution phase stability of CBD, as limited proteolysis data implies the capture of an intermediate-CBD solution structure when cobalt is bound.

  17. Probing Mantle Heterogeneity Across Spatial Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, A.; Moulik, P.; Lekic, V.

    2017-12-01

    Inferences of mantle heterogeneity in terms of temperature, composition, grain size, melt and crystal structure may vary across local, regional and global scales. Probing these scale-dependent effects require quantitative comparisons and reconciliation of tomographic models that vary in their regional scope, parameterization, regularization and observational constraints. While a range of techniques like radial correlation functions and spherical harmonic analyses have revealed global features like the dominance of long-wavelength variations in mantle heterogeneity, they have limited applicability for specific regions of interest like subduction zones and continental cratons. Moreover, issues like discrepant 1-D reference Earth models and related baseline corrections have impeded the reconciliation of heterogeneity between various regional and global models. We implement a new wavelet-based approach that allows for structure to be filtered simultaneously in both the spectral and spatial domain, allowing us to characterize heterogeneity on a range of scales and in different geographical regions. Our algorithm extends a recent method that expanded lateral variations into the wavelet domain constructed on a cubed sphere. The isolation of reference velocities in the wavelet scaling function facilitates comparisons between models constructed with arbitrary 1-D reference Earth models. The wavelet transformation allows us to quantify the scale-dependent consistency between tomographic models in a region of interest and investigate the fits to data afforded by heterogeneity at various dominant wavelengths. We find substantial and spatially varying differences in the spectrum of heterogeneity between two representative global Vp models constructed using different data and methodologies. Applying the orthonormality of the wavelet expansion, we isolate detailed variations in velocity from models and evaluate additional fits to data afforded by adding such complexities to long

  18. Breaking symmetry in the structure determination of (large) symmetric protein dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaponenko, Vadim; Altieri, Amanda S.; Li, Jess; Byrd, R. Andrew [National Cancer Institute, Structural Biophysics Laboratory (United States)], E-mail: rabyrd@ncifcrf.gov

    2002-10-15

    We demonstrate a novel methodology to disrupt the symmetry in the NMR spectra of homodimers. A paramagnetic probe is introduced sub-stoichiometrically to create an asymmetric system with the paramagnetic probe residing on only one monomer within the dimer. This creates sufficient magnetic anisotropy for resolution of symmetry-related overlapped resonances and, consequently, detection of pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings specific to each monomeric component. These pseudocontact shifts can be readily incorporated into existing structure refinement calculations and enable determination of monomer orientation within the dimeric protein. This methodology can be widely used for solution structure determination of symmetric dimers.

  19. A fluorescent probe for ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroni, D; Biavardi, E; Genovese, D; Rampazzo, E; Prodi, L; Dalcanale, E

    2015-08-18

    A nanostructure formed by the insertion in silica nanoparticles of a pyrene-derivatized cavitand, which is able to specifically recognize ecstasy in water, is presented. The absence of effects from interferents and an efficient electron transfer process occurring after complexation of ecstasy, makes this system an efficient fluorescent probe for this popular drug.

  20. A Chemical Probe that Labels Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Hirata

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A small-molecule fluorescent probe specific for human pluripotent stem cells would serve as a useful tool for basic cell biology research and stem cell therapy. Screening of fluorescent chemical libraries with human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and subsequent evaluation of hit molecules identified a fluorescent compound (Kyoto probe 1 [KP-1] that selectively labels human pluripotent stem cells. Our analyses indicated that the selectivity results primarily from a distinct expression pattern of ABC transporters in human pluripotent stem cells and from the transporter selectivity of KP-1. Expression of ABCB1 (MDR1 and ABCG2 (BCRP, both of which cause the efflux of KP-1, is repressed in human pluripotent stem cells. Although KP-1, like other pluripotent markers, is not absolutely specific for pluripotent stem cells, the identified chemical probe may be used in conjunction with other reagents.

  1. The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanany, Shaul; Inflation Probe Mission Study Team

    2018-01-01

    The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins will map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background over the entire sky with unprecedented sensitivity. It will search for gravity wave signals from the inflationary epoch, thus probing quantum gravity and constraining the energy scale of inflation; it will test the standard model of particle physics by measuring the number of light particles in the Universe and the mass of the neutrino; it will elucidate the nature of dark matter and search for new forms of matter in the early Universe; it will constrain star formation history over cosmic time; and it will determine the mechanisms of structure formation from galaxy cluster to stellar scales. I will review the status of design of this probe-scale mission.

  2. Expanding probe repertoire and improving reproducibility in human genomic hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Stephanie N.; Shirley, Ben C.; Knoll, Joan H. M.; Rogan, Peter K.

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic DNA hybridization relies on probes composed of single copy (sc) genomic sequences. Sc sequences in probe design ensure high specificity and avoid cross-hybridization to other regions of the genome, which could lead to ambiguous results that are difficult to interpret. We examine how the distribution and composition of repetitive sequences in the genome affects sc probe performance. A divide and conquer algorithm was implemented to design sc probes. With this approach, sc probes can include divergent repetitive elements, which hybridize to unique genomic targets under higher stringency experimental conditions. Genome-wide custom probe sets were created for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and microarray genomic hybridization. The scFISH probes were developed for detection of copy number changes within small tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes. The microarrays demonstrated increased reproducibility by eliminating cross-hybridization to repetitive sequences adjacent to probe targets. The genome-wide microarrays exhibited lower median coefficients of variation (17.8%) for two HapMap family trios. The coefficients of variations of commercial probes within 300 nt of a repetitive element were 48.3% higher than the nearest custom probe. Furthermore, the custom microarray called a chromosome 15q11.2q13 deletion more consistently. This method for sc probe design increases probe coverage for FISH and lowers variability in genomic microarrays. PMID:23376933

  3. Probe microanalysis of aragonitic structures in marine organisms as a means of measuring population structure and mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thresher, R.E.; Sie, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments began in 1987 with a view to using ontogenetic variation in the chemical composition of fish otoliths ('ear bones' - the first calcified tissue to develop in embryonic fishes) as an indicator of movement/migration patterns. Acquiring such data dictated the use of a probe microanalyzer, which could be scanned along the growth axis of an otolith and provide discrete information on otolith composition at different stages in the life of the animal. The suitability of electron and proton probe analyzers is examined and the optimal operating parameters determined for both, when dealing with biogenic aragonite matrices. 1 refs

  4. Estimating Highway Volumes Using Vehicle Probe Data - Proof of Concept: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yi [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Young, Stanley E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sadabadi, Kaveh [University of Maryland; SekuBa, PrzemysBaw [University of Maryland; Markow, Denise [I95 Corridor Coalition

    2018-03-13

    This paper examines the feasibility of using sampled commercial probe data in combination with validated continuous counter data to accurately estimate vehicle volume across the entire roadway network, for any hour during the year. Currently either real time or archived volume data for roadways at specific times are extremely sparse. Most volume data are average annual daily traffic (AADT) measures derived from the Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS). Although methods to factor the AADT to hourly averages for typical day of week exist, actual volume data is limited to a sparse collection of locations in which volumes are continuously recorded. This paper explores the use of commercial probe data to generate accurate volume measures that span the highway network providing ubiquitous coverage in space, and specific point-in-time measures for a specific date and time. The paper examines the need for the data, fundamental accuracy limitations based on a basic statistical model that take into account the sampling nature of probe data, and early results from a proof of concept exercise revealing the potential of probe type data calibrated with public continuous count data to meet end user expectations in terms of accuracy of volume estimates.

  5. Heat Transfer Analysis and Modification of Thermal Probe for Gas-Solid Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented work aims to measure the gas-solid two-phase mass flow-rate in pneumatic conveyor, and a novel modified thermal probe is applied. A new analysis of the local heat transfer coefficients of thermal probe is presented, while traditional investigations focus on global coefficients. Thermal simulations are performed in Fluent 6.2 and temperature distributions of the probe are presented. The results indicate that the probe has obviously stable and unstable heat transfer areas. Based on understanding of probe characteristics, a modified probe structure is designed, which makes the probe output signal more stable and widens the measuring range. The experiments are carried out in a special designed laboratory scale pneumatic conveyor, and the modified probe shows an unambiguous improvement of the performance compared with the traditional one.

  6. Developments in Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Taras; Chu, Ricky; David, Nigel; Broun, David

    2009-05-01

    Low temperature scanning Hall probe microscopy is a sensitive means of imaging magnetic structures with high spatial resolution and magnetic flux sensitivity approaching that of a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device. We have developed a scanning Hall probe microscope with novel features, including highly reliable coarse positioning, in situ optimization of sensor-sample alignment and capacitive transducers for linear, long range positioning measurement. This has been motivated by the need to reposition accurately above fabricated nanostructures such as small superconducting rings. Details of the design and performance will be presented as well as recent progress towards time-resolved measurements with sub nanosecond resolution.

  7. A Gradient-Field Pulsed Eddy Current Probe for Evaluation of Hidden Material Degradation in Conductive Structures Based on Lift-Off Invariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Jing, Haoqing; Zainal Abidin, Ilham Mukriz; Yan, Bei

    2017-04-25

    Coated conductive structures are widely adopted in such engineering fields as aerospace, nuclear energy, etc. The hostile and corrosive environment leaves in-service coated conductive structures vulnerable to Hidden Material Degradation (HMD) occurring under the protection coating. It is highly demanded that HMD can be non-intrusively assessed using non-destructive evaluation techniques. In light of the advantages of Gradient-field Pulsed Eddy Current technique (GPEC) over other non-destructive evaluation methods in corrosion evaluation, in this paper the GPEC probe for quantitative evaluation of HMD is intensively investigated. Closed-form expressions of GPEC responses to HMD are formulated via analytical modeling. The Lift-off Invariance (LOI) in GPEC signals, which makes the HMD evaluation immune to the variation in thickness of the protection coating, is introduced and analyzed through simulations involving HMD with variable depths and conductivities. A fast inverse method employing magnitude and time of the LOI point in GPEC signals for simultaneously evaluating the conductivity and thickness of HMD region is proposed, and subsequently verified by finite element modeling and experiments. It has been found from the results that along with the proposed inverse method the GPEC probe is applicable to evaluation of HMD in coated conductive structures without much loss in accuracy.

  8. G-stack modulated probe intensities on expression arrays - sequence corrections and signal calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasold Mario

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The brightness of the probe spots on expression microarrays intends to measure the abundance of specific mRNA targets. Probes with runs of at least three guanines (G in their sequence show abnormal high intensities which reflect rather probe effects than target concentrations. This G-bias requires correction prior to downstream expression analysis. Results Longer runs of three or more consecutive G along the probe sequence and in particular triple degenerated G at its solution end ((GGG1-effect are associated with exceptionally large probe intensities on GeneChip expression arrays. This intensity bias is related to non-specific hybridization and affects both perfect match and mismatch probes. The (GGG1-effect tends to increase gradually for microarrays of later GeneChip generations. It was found for DNA/RNA as well as for DNA/DNA probe/target-hybridization chemistries. Amplification of sample RNA using T7-primers is associated with strong positive amplitudes of the G-bias whereas alternative amplification protocols using random primers give rise to much smaller and partly even negative amplitudes. We applied positional dependent sensitivity models to analyze the specifics of probe intensities in the context of all possible short sequence motifs of one to four adjacent nucleotides along the 25meric probe sequence. Most of the longer motifs are adequately described using a nearest-neighbor (NN model. In contrast, runs of degenerated guanines require explicit consideration of next nearest neighbors (GGG terms. Preprocessing methods such as vsn, RMA, dChip, MAS5 and gcRMA only insufficiently remove the G-bias from data. Conclusions Positional and motif dependent sensitivity models accounts for sequence effects of oligonucleotide probe intensities. We propose a positional dependent NN+GGG hybrid model to correct the intensity bias associated with probes containing poly-G motifs. It is implemented as a single-chip based calibration

  9. Purification of specific structured lipids by distillation: Effects on acyl migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Skands, A.; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The cause and effects of acyl migration during the purification of specific structured lipids by distillation were studied in a conventional batch deodorizer with stripping steam. The mixture of specific structured lipids produced by lipase-catalyzed acidolysis between rapeseed oil and capric acid...... influenced the rate of acyl migration, and their combinations made the effect more severe. However, diacylglycerols were found to be the main reason for acyl migration. In the distillation of the specific structured lipid product mixture, distillation temperature and time were the main factors to determine...... the degree of acyl migration and the extent of separation of free fatty acids. The results indicate that more efficient separation technology should be used to improve the quality of the purified structured lipids. in order to reduce the distillation temperature, vacuum should be made as low as possible...

  10. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M.A.; Yu, C.M.; Raley, N.F.

    1999-03-16

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gases in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters. 9 figs.

  11. Versatile robotic probe calibration for position tracking in ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bø, Lars Eirik; Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Lindseth, Frank; Hernes, Toril A N

    2015-01-01

    Within the field of ultrasound-guided procedures, there are a number of methods for ultrasound probe calibration. While these methods are usually developed for a specific probe, they are in principle easily adapted to other probes. In practice, however, the adaptation often proves tedious and this is impractical in a research setting, where new probes are tested regularly. Therefore, we developed a method which can be applied to a large variety of probes without adaptation. The method used a robot arm to move a plastic sphere submerged in water through the ultrasound image plane, providing a slow and precise movement. The sphere was then segmented from the recorded ultrasound images using a MATLAB programme and the calibration matrix was computed based on this segmentation in combination with tracking information. The method was tested on three very different probes demonstrating both great versatility and high accuracy. (paper)

  12. Versatile robotic probe calibration for position tracking in ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eirik Bø, Lars; Fagertun Hofstad, Erlend; Lindseth, Frank; Hernes, Toril A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Within the field of ultrasound-guided procedures, there are a number of methods for ultrasound probe calibration. While these methods are usually developed for a specific probe, they are in principle easily adapted to other probes. In practice, however, the adaptation often proves tedious and this is impractical in a research setting, where new probes are tested regularly. Therefore, we developed a method which can be applied to a large variety of probes without adaptation. The method used a robot arm to move a plastic sphere submerged in water through the ultrasound image plane, providing a slow and precise movement. The sphere was then segmented from the recorded ultrasound images using a MATLAB programme and the calibration matrix was computed based on this segmentation in combination with tracking information. The method was tested on three very different probes demonstrating both great versatility and high accuracy.

  13. Geometric approach to the design of an imaging probe to evaluate the iridocorneal angle structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xun Jie Jeesmond; V. K., Shinoj; Murukeshan, V. M.; Baskaran, M.; Aung, Tin

    2017-06-01

    Photographic imaging methods allow the tracking of anatomical changes in the iridocorneal angle structures and the monitoring of treatment responses overtime. In this work, we aim to design an imaging probe to evaluate the iridocorneal angle structures using geometrical optics. We first perform an analytical analysis on light propagation from the anterior chamber of the eye to the exterior medium using Snell's law. This is followed by adopting a strategy to achieve uniform near field irradiance, by simplifying the complex non-rotational symmetric irradiance distribution of LEDs tilted at an angle. The optimization is based on the geometric design considerations of an angled circular ring array of 4 LEDs (or a 2 × 2 square LED array). The design equation give insights on variable parameters such as the illumination angle of the LEDs, ring array radius, viewing angle of the LEDs, and the working distance. A micro color CCD video camera that has sufficient resolution to resolve the iridocorneal angle structures at the required working distance is then chosen. The proposed design aspects fulfil the safety requirements recommended by the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection.

  14. Fabrication of a novel nano-probe slide for near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Sang-Youp; Jeang, Eun-Hee; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Park, Seung-Han; Cho, Kyu-Man

    2004-01-01

    A novel probe structure, which can act as a planar nano-probe slide for near-field microscopy, was proposed and fabricated. Sub-wavelength apertures on a Si substrate are successfully produced by means of standard photolithography techniques with properly selected masks. In particular, the anisotropic etching characteristics of Si substrate and the hardness of the Si 3 N 4 film are utilized. Probe-to-probe scanning of the fabricated near-field nano-probe slide shows sub-wavelength confinement of light and comparable throughput to the conventional optical fiber probe. We also show that the nano-probe slide can serve as a supporting base and a sub-wavelength aperture to obtain the near-field photoluminescence spectra of a limited number of CdSe nanocrystals.

  15. An OGA-Resistant Probe Allows Specific Visualization and Accurate Identification of O-GlcNAc-Modified Proteins in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wang, Jiajia; Wen, Liuqing; Zhu, He; Li, Shanshan; Huang, Kenneth; Jiang, Kuan; Li, Xu; Ma, Cheng; Qu, Jingyao; Parameswaran, Aishwarya; Song, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Peng George

    2016-11-18

    O-linked β-N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is an essential and ubiquitous post-translational modification present in nucleic and cytoplasmic proteins of multicellular eukaryotes. The metabolic chemical probes such as GlcNAc or GalNAc analogues bearing ketone or azide handles, in conjunction with bioorthogonal reactions, provide a powerful approach for detecting and identifying this modification. However, these chemical probes either enter multiple glycosylation pathways or have low labeling efficiency. Therefore, selective and potent probes are needed to assess this modification. We report here the development of a novel probe, 1,3,6-tri-O-acetyl-2-azidoacetamido-2,4-dideoxy-d-glucopyranose (Ac 3 4dGlcNAz), that can be processed by the GalNAc salvage pathway and transferred by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) to O-GlcNAc proteins. Due to the absence of a hydroxyl group at C4, this probe is less incorporated into α/β 4-GlcNAc or GalNAc containing glycoconjugates. Furthermore, the O-4dGlcNAz modification was resistant to the hydrolysis of O-GlcNAcase (OGA), which greatly enhanced the efficiency of incorporation for O-GlcNAcylation. Combined with a click reaction, Ac 3 4dGlcNAz allowed the selective visualization of O-GlcNAc in cells and accurate identification of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins with LC-MS/MS. This probe represents a more potent and selective tool in tracking, capturing, and identifying O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in cells and cell lysates.

  16. Rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes in foods, by a combination of PCR and DNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingianni, A; Floris, M; Palomba, P; Madeddu, M A; Quartuccio, M; Pompei, R

    2001-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a frequent contaminant of water and foods. Its rapid detection is needed before some foods can be prepared for marketing. In this work L. monocytogenes has been searched for in foods, by a combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a DNA probe. Both PCR and the probe were prepared for recognizing a specific region of the internalin gene, which is responsible for the production of one of the most important pathogenic factors of Listeria. The combined use of PCR and the DNA probe was used for the detection of L. monocytogenes in over 180 environmental and food samples. Several detection methods were compared in this study, namely conventional culture methods; direct PCR; PCR after an enrichment step; a DNA probe alone; a DNA probe after enrichment and another commercially available gene-probe. Finally PCR and the DNA probe were used in series on all the samples collected. When the DNA probe was associated with the PCR, specific and accurate detection of listeria in the samples could be obtained in about a working-day. The present molecular method showed some advantages in terms of rapidity and specificity in comparison to the other aforementioned tests. In addition, it resulted as being easy to handle, even for non-specialized personnel in small diagnostic microbiology laboratories. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Probing polypeptide GalNAc-transferase isoform substrate specificities by in vitro analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Yun; Joshi, Hiren J; Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram

    2015-01-01

    N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc)-type (mucin-type) O-glycosylation is an abundant and highly diverse modification of proteins. This type of O-glycosylation is initiated in the Golgi by a large family of up to 20 homologous polypeptide GalNAc-T isoenzymes that transfer GalNAc to Ser, Thr...... and possibly Tyr residues. These GalNAc residues are then further elongated by a large set of glycosyltransferases to build a variety of complex O-glycan structures. What determines O-glycan site occupancy is still poorly understood, although it is clear that the substrate specificities of individual...... isoenzymes and the repertoire of GalNAc-Ts in cells are key parameters. The GalNAc-T isoenzymes are differentially expressed in cells and tissues in principle allowing cells to produce unique O-glycoproteomes dependent on the specific subset of isoforms present. In vitro analysis of acceptor peptide...

  18. Magnetic Probe Construction using Thick-film Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; Sakakibara, S.; Kubota, Y.; Yamada, H.

    2001-01-01

    Thick-film technology has been successfully adapted for the design and fabrication of magnetic probes of a new type suitable for use in the simultaneous ultra-high vacuum and high-temperature environment of a nuclear fusion device. The maximum usable temperature is expected to be around 900 degrees C. This new probe has a specific sensitivity (coupling area per unit volume) an order of magnitude higher than a conventional coil. The new probe in one implementation is capable of simultaneously measuring magnetic field in three orthogonal directions about a single spatial point and in two frequency ranges. Low-frequency coils have a measured coupling area of 296-323 cm squared and a frequency response of about 300 kHz. High-frequency coils have a design coupling area of 12-15 cm squared

  19. Modeling the Insertion Mechanics of Flexible Neural Probes Coated with Sacrificial Polymers for Optimizing Probe Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Singh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Single-unit recording neural probes have significant advantages towards improving signal-to-noise ratio and specificity for signal acquisition in brain-to-computer interface devices. Long-term effectiveness is unfortunately limited by the chronic injury response, which has been linked to the mechanical mismatch between rigid probes and compliant brain tissue. Small, flexible microelectrodes may overcome this limitation, but insertion of these probes without buckling requires supporting elements such as a stiff coating with a biodegradable polymer. For these coated probes, there is a design trade-off between the potential for successful insertion into brain tissue and the degree of trauma generated by the insertion. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model (FEM to simulate insertion of coated neural probes of varying dimensions and material properties into brain tissue. Simulations were performed to predict the buckling and insertion forces during insertion of coated probes into a tissue phantom with material properties of brain. The simulations were validated with parallel experimental studies where probes were inserted into agarose tissue phantom, ex vivo chick embryonic brain tissue, and ex vivo rat brain tissue. Experiments were performed with uncoated copper wire and both uncoated and coated SU-8 photoresist and Parylene C probes. Model predictions were found to strongly agree with experimental results (<10% error. The ratio of the predicted buckling force-to-predicted insertion force, where a value greater than one would ideally be expected to result in successful insertion, was plotted against the actual success rate from experiments. A sigmoidal relationship was observed, with a ratio of 1.35 corresponding to equal probability of insertion and failure, and a ratio of 3.5 corresponding to a 100% success rate. This ratio was dubbed the “safety factor”, as it indicated the degree to which the coating

  20. The 3-D solar radioastronomy and the structure of the corona and the solar wind. [solar probes of solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, J. L.; Caroubalos, C.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanism causing solar radio bursts (1 and 111) is examined. It is proposed that a nonthermal energy source is responsible for the bursts; nonthermal energy is converted into electromagnetic energy. The advantages are examined for an out-of-the-ecliptic solar probe mission, which is proposed as a means of stereoscopically viewing solar radio bursts, solar magnetic fields, coronal structure, and the solar wind.

  1. Excited state hydrogen bonding fluorescent probe: Role of structure and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Debarati, E-mail: debaratidey07@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Vidyasagar College, 39 Sankar Ghosh Lane, Kolkata 700006 (India); Sarangi, Manas Kumar [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ray, Angana; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay [Computational Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Maity, Dilip Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University College of Science and Technology, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2016-05-15

    An environment sensitive fluorescent probe, 11-benzoyl-dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (BDBPZ), has been synthesized and characterized that acts via excited state hydrogen bonding (ESHB). On interaction with hydrogen bond donating solvents the fluorescence intensity of BDBPZ increases abruptly with a concomitant bathochromic shift. The extent of fluorescence increment and the red-shift of λ{sub max} depend on hydrogen bond donating ability of the solvent associated. ESHB restricts the free rotation of the benzoyl group and hence blocks the non-radiative deactivation pathway. BDBPZ forms an exciplex with organic amine in nonpolar medium that readily disappears on increasing the polarity of the solvent. In polar environment the fluorescence of both the free molecule and excited state hydrogen bonded species are quenched on addition of amine unlike its parent dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (DBPZ), that remains very much inaccessible towards the solvent as well as quencher molecules due to its structure. This newly synthesized derivative BDBPZ is much more interactive due to the benzoyl group that is flanked outside the skeletal aromatic rings of DBPZ, which helps to sense the environment properly and thus shows better ESHB capacity than DBPZ.

  2. Labeled estrogens as mammary tumor probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feenstra, A.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis estrogens labeled with a gamma or positron emitting nuclide, called estrogen-receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals are investigated as mammary tumour probes. The requirements for estrogen-receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals are formulated and the literature on estrogens labeled for this purpose is reviewed. The potential of mercury-197/197m and of carbon-11 as label for estrogen-receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals is investigated. The synthesis of 197 Hg-labeled 4-mercury-estradiol and 2-mercury-estradiol and their properties in vitro and in vivo are described. It appears that though basically carbon-11 labeled compounds are very promising as mammary tumour probes, their achievable specific activity has to be increased. (Auth.)

  3. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomons, Mark; Martins, Bruno V. C.; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe

  4. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomons, Mark [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Martins, Bruno V. C.; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A., E-mail: rwolkow@ualberta.ca [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe.

  5. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, Mark; Martins, Bruno V C; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe.

  6. Probing hydrogen bonding interactions and proton transfer in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Beining

    Scope and method of study. Hydrogen bonding is a fundamental element in protein structure and function. Breaking a single hydrogen bond may impair the stability of a protein. It is therefore important to probe dynamic changes in hydrogen bonding interactions during protein folding and function. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is highly sensitive to hydrogen bonding interactions. However, it lacks quantitative correlation between the vibrational frequencies and the number, type, and strength of hydrogen bonding interactions of ionizable and polar residues. We employ quantum physics theory based ab initio calculations to study the effects of hydrogen bonding interactions on vibrational frequencies of Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues and to develop vibrational spectral markers for probing hydrogen bonding interactions using infrared spectroscopy. In addition, proton transfer process plays a crucial role in a wide range of energy transduction, signal transduction, and enzymatic reactions. We study the structural basis for proton transfer using photoactive yellow protein as an excellent model system. Molecular dynamics simulation is employed to investigate the structures of early intermediate states. Quantum theory based ab initio calculations are used to study the impact of hydrogen bond interactions on proton affinity and proton transfer. Findings and conclusions. Our extensive density function theory based calculations provide rich structural, spectral, and energetic information on hydrogen bonding properties of protonated side chain groups of Asp/Glu and Tyr. We developed vibrational spectral markers and 2D FTIR spectroscopy for structural characterization on the number and the type of hydrogen bonding interactions of the COOH group of Asp/Glu and neutral phenolic group of Tyr. These developments greatly enhance the power of time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy as a major experimental tool for structural characterization of functionally important

  7. Ultrasonic immersion probes characterization for use in nondestructive testing according to EN 12668-2:2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C E R; Alvarenga, A V; Costa-Felix, R P B

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound is often used as a Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) technique to analyze components and structures to detect internal and surface flaws. To guarantee reliable measurements, it is necessary to calibrate instruments and properly assess related uncertainties. An important device of an ultrasonic instrument system is its probe, which characterization should be performed according to EN 12668-2. Concerning immersion probes beam profile, the parameters to be assessed are beam divergence, focal distance, width, and zone length. Such parameters are determined by scanning a reflector or a hydrophone throughout the transducer beam. Within the present work, a methodology developed at Inmetro's Laboratory of Ultrasound to evaluate relevant beam parameters is presented, based on hydrophone scan. Water bath and positioning system to move the hydrophone were used to perform the scan. Studied probes were excited by a signal generator, and the waterborne signals were detected by the hydrophone and acquired using an oscilloscope. A user-friendly virtual instrument was developed in LabVIEW to automate the system. The initial tests were performed using 1 and 2.25 MHz-ultrasonic unfocused probes (Oe 1.27 cm), and results were consistent with the manufacturer's specifications. Moreover, expanded uncertainties were lower than 6% for all parameters under consideration.

  8. Ultrasonic immersion probes characterization for use in nondestructive testing according to EN 12668-2:2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C. E. R.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Felix, R. P. B.

    2011-02-01

    Ultrasound is often used as a Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) technique to analyze components and structures to detect internal and surface flaws. To guarantee reliable measurements, it is necessary to calibrate instruments and properly assess related uncertainties. An important device of an ultrasonic instrument system is its probe, which characterization should be performed according to EN 12668-2. Concerning immersion probes beam profile, the parameters to be assessed are beam divergence, focal distance, width, and zone length. Such parameters are determined by scanning a reflector or a hydrophone throughout the transducer beam. Within the present work, a methodology developed at Inmetro's Laboratory of Ultrasound to evaluate relevant beam parameters is presented, based on hydrophone scan. Water bath and positioning system to move the hydrophone were used to perform the scan. Studied probes were excited by a signal generator, and the waterborne signals were detected by the hydrophone and acquired using an oscilloscope. A user-friendly virtual instrument was developed in LabVIEW to automate the system. The initial tests were performed using 1 and 2.25 MHz-ultrasonic unfocused probes (Ø 1.27 cm), and results were consistent with the manufacturer's specifications. Moreover, expanded uncertainties were lower than 6% for all parameters under consideration.

  9. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  10. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation. • The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. • AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring stem cell differentiation in a non-invasive manner. - Abstract: A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  11. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xiaobin [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Shi, Xuetao, E-mail: mrshixuetao@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Ostrovidov, Serge [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Wu, Hongkai, E-mail: chhkwu@ust.hk [Department of Chemistry & Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Nakajima, Ken [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation. • The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. • AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring stem cell differentiation in a non-invasive manner. - Abstract: A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  12. Multivariate statistical analysis of atom probe tomography data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    The application of spectrum imaging multivariate statistical analysis methods, specifically principal component analysis (PCA), to atom probe tomography (APT) data has been investigated. The mathematical method of analysis is described and the results for two example datasets are analyzed and presented. The first dataset is from the analysis of a PM 2000 Fe-Cr-Al-Ti steel containing two different ultrafine precipitate populations. PCA properly describes the matrix and precipitate phases in a simple and intuitive manner. A second APT example is from the analysis of an irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel. Fine, nm-scale Cu-enriched precipitates having a core-shell structure were identified and qualitatively described by PCA. Advantages, disadvantages, and future prospects for implementing these data analysis methodologies for APT datasets, particularly with regard to quantitative analysis, are also discussed.

  13. Specialized probes based on hydroxyapatite calcium for heart tissues research by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, Mikhail; Golubok, Alexander; Gulyaev, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    The new specialized AFM-probes with hydroxyapatite structures for atomic force microscopy of heart tissues calcification were created and studied. A process of probe fabrication is demonstrated. The adhesive forces between specialized hydroxyapatite probe and endothelium/subendothelial layers were investigated. It was found that the adhesion forces are significantly higher for the subendothelial layers. We consider that it is connected with the formation and localization of hydroxyapatite in the area of subendothelial layers of heart tissues. In addition, the roughness analysis and structure visualization of the endothelial surface of the heart tissue were carried out. The results show high efficiency of created specialized probes at study a calcinations process of the aortic heart tissues.

  14. Perceptual learning is specific to the trained structure of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Yamit; Daikhin, Luba; Ahissar, Merav

    2013-12-01

    What do we learn when we practice a simple perceptual task? Many studies have suggested that we learn to refine or better select the sensory representations of the task-relevant dimension. Here we show that learning is specific to the trained structural regularities. Specifically, when this structure is modified after training with a fixed temporal structure, performance regresses to pretraining levels, even when the trained stimuli and task are retained. This specificity raises key questions as to the importance of low-level sensory modifications in the learning process. We trained two groups of participants on a two-tone frequency discrimination task for several days. In one group, a fixed reference tone was consistently presented in the first interval (the second tone was higher or lower), and in the other group the same reference tone was consistently presented in the second interval. When following training, these temporal protocols were switched between groups, performance of both groups regressed to pretraining levels, and further training was needed to attain postlearning performance. ERP measures, taken before and after training, indicated that participants implicitly learned the temporal regularity of the protocol and formed an attentional template that matched the trained structure of information. These results are consistent with Reverse Hierarchy Theory, which posits that even the learning of simple perceptual tasks progresses in a top-down manner, hence can benefit from temporal regularities at the trial level, albeit at the potential cost that learning may be specific to these regularities.

  15. Plasma gradient effects on double-probe measurements in the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects on double-probe electric field measurements induced by electron density and temperature gradients are investigated. We show that on some occasions such gradients may lead to marked spurious electric fields if the probes are assumed to lie at the same probe potential with respect to the plasma. The use of a proper bias current will decrease the magnitude of such an error. When the probes are near the plasma potential, the magnitude of these error signals, ∆E, can vary as ∆E ~ Te(∆ne/ne+0.5∆Te, where Te is the electron temperature, ∆ne/ne the relative electron density variation between the two sensors, and ∆Te the electron temperature difference between the two sensors. This not only implies that the error signals will increase linearly with the density variations but also that such signatures grow with Te, i.e., such effects are 10 times larger in a 10-eV plasma than in a 1-eV plasma. This type of error is independent of the probe separation distance provided the gradient scale length is much larger than this distance. The largest errors occur when the probes are near to the plasma potential. At larger positive probe potentials with respect to the plasma potential, the error becomes smaller if the probes are biased, as is usually the case with spherical double-probe experiments in the tenuous magnetospheric plasmas. The crossing of a plasma boundary (like the plasmapause or magnetopause yields an error signal of a single peak. During the crossing of a small structure (e.g., a double layer the error signal appears as a bipolar signature. Our analysis shows that errors in double-probe measurements caused by plasma gradients are not significant at large scale (»1 km plasma boundaries, and may only be important in cases where small-scale (<1 km, internal gradient structures exist. Bias currents tailored for each plasma parameter regime (i.e., variable bias current would o1q1improve the double-probe response to gradient

  16. Probing the electronic structure of redox species and direct determination of intrinsic reorganization energies of electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2000-01-01

    An experimental technique capable of directly determining the intrinsic reorganization energies of bimolecular electron transfer reactions is described. Appropriate solution phase redox species are prepared in the gas phase using electrospray ionization and probed using photodetachment spectroscopy. Five metal complex anions involved in the Fe 2+ -Fe 3+ redox couple are investigated and the intramolecular reorganization energies are measured directly from spectral features due to removing the most loosely bound 3d electron from the Fe(II)-complexes. The photodetachment spectra also yield electronic structure information about the Fe 2+ -Fe 3+ redox couple and provide a common electronic structure origin for the reducing capability of the Fe(II)-complexes, the most common redox reagents. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  17. Refinement of glucagon-like peptide 1 docking to its intact receptor using mid-region photolabile probes and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence J; Chen, Quan; Lam, Polo C-H; Pinon, Delia I; Sexton, Patrick M; Abagyan, Ruben; Dong, Maoqing

    2011-05-06

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor is an important drug target within the B family of G protein-coupled receptors. Its natural agonist ligand, GLP1, has incretin-like actions and the receptor is a recognized target for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite recent solution of the structure of the amino terminus of the GLP1 receptor and several close family members, the molecular basis for GLP1 binding to and activation of the intact receptor remains unclear. We previously demonstrated molecular approximations between amino- and carboxyl-terminal residues of GLP1 and its receptor. In this work, we study spatial approximations with the mid-region of this peptide to gain insights into the orientation of the intact receptor and the ligand-receptor complex. We have prepared two new photolabile probes incorporating a p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine into positions 16 and 20 of GLP1(7-36). Both probes bound to the GLP1 receptor specifically and with high affinity. These were each fully efficacious agonists, stimulating cAMP accumulation in receptor-bearing CHO cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Each probe specifically labeled a single receptor site. Protease cleavage and radiochemical sequencing identified receptor residue Leu(141) above transmembrane segment one as its site of labeling for the position 16 probe, whereas the position 20 probe labeled receptor residue Trp(297) within the second extracellular loop. Establishing ligand residue approximation with this loop region is unique among family members and may help to orient the receptor amino-terminal domain relative to its helical bundle region.

  18. Design and Application of Hybrid Magnetic Field-Eddy Current Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Wallace, Terryl; Newman, Andy; Leser, Paul; Simpson, John

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of magnetic field sensors into eddy current probes can result in novel probe designs with unique performance characteristics. One such example is a recently developed electromagnetic probe consisting of a two-channel magnetoresistive sensor with an embedded single-strand eddy current inducer. Magnetic flux leakage maps of ferrous materials are generated from the DC sensor response while high-resolution eddy current imaging is simultaneously performed at frequencies up to 5 megahertz. In this work the design and optimization of this probe will be presented, along with an application toward analysis of sensory materials with embedded ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles. The sensory material is designed to produce a paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition in the FSMA particles under strain. Mapping of the stray magnetic field and eddy current response of the sample with the hybrid probe can thereby image locations in the structure which have experienced an overstrain condition. Numerical modeling of the probe response is performed with good agreement with experimental results.

  19. Research on mutual influence of Cherenkov-type probes within the ISTTOK tokamak chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowski, L., E-mail: lech.jakubowski@ncbj.gov.pl [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Plyusnin, V.V. [Association Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Malinowski, K.; Sadowski, M.J.; Zebrowski, J.; Rabinski, M. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Figueiredo, H. [Association Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Jakubowski, M.J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), 05-400 Otwock (Poland)

    2014-12-11

    The paper describes an influence of a Cherenkov-type probe, which is used for measurements of fast electron streams inside the ISTTOK chamber, on other probes and behaviour of a plasma ring. The reported study shows that such a probe situated near the plasma column has a strong influence on signals from another Cherenkov probe, and can cause a considerable reduction of electron-induced signals. This effect does not depend on positions of the probes in relation to the limiter. Measurements of hard X-ray (HXR) emission show that the deeply immersed Cherenkov probe can also influence on the limiter . Under specific experimental conditions such a Cherenkov probe can play the role of a new limiter and change the plasma configuration.

  20. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  1. A novel electrochemical sensing strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of Salmonella by rolling circle amplification and DNA–AuNPs probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Dan; Yan, Yurong; Lei, Pinhua; Shen, Bo [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics (Ministry of Education), College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Cheng, Wei [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics (Ministry of Education), College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); The Center for Clinical Molecular Medical detection, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Ju, Huangxian [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics (Ministry of Education), College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ding, Shijia, E-mail: dingshijia@163.com [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics (Ministry of Education), College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China)

    2014-10-10

    A novel electrochemical sensing strategy was developed for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Salmonella by combining the rolling circle amplification with DNA–AuNPs probe. - Highlights: • This paper presented a novel sensing strategy for the rapid and ultrasensitive detection for Salmonella. • Combination of rolling circle amplification and DNA–AuNPs probe is the first time for Salmonella electrochemical detection. • The method displayed excellent sensitivity and specificity for detection of Salmonella. • The fabricated biosensor was successfully applied to detect Salmonella in milk samples. - Abstract: A novel electrochemical sensing strategy was developed for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Salmonella by combining the rolling circle amplification with DNA–AuNPs probe. The target DNA could be specifically captured by probe 1 on the sensing interface. Then the circularization mixture was added to form a typical sandwich structure. In the presence of dNTPs and phi29 DNA polymerase, the RCA was initiated to produce micrometer-long single-strand DNA. Finally, the detection probe (DNA–AuNPs) could recognize RCA product to produce enzymatic electrochemical signal. Under optimal conditions, the calibration curve of synthetic target DNA had good linearity from 10 aM to 10 pM with a detection limit of 6.76 aM (S/N = 3). The developed method had been successfully applied to detect Salmonella as low as 6 CFU mL{sup −1} in real milk sample. This proposed strategy showed great potential for clinical diagnosis, food safety and environmental monitoring.

  2. A novel electrochemical sensing strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of Salmonella by rolling circle amplification and DNA–AuNPs probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Dan; Yan, Yurong; Lei, Pinhua; Shen, Bo; Cheng, Wei; Ju, Huangxian; Ding, Shijia

    2014-01-01

    A novel electrochemical sensing strategy was developed for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Salmonella by combining the rolling circle amplification with DNA–AuNPs probe. - Highlights: • This paper presented a novel sensing strategy for the rapid and ultrasensitive detection for Salmonella. • Combination of rolling circle amplification and DNA–AuNPs probe is the first time for Salmonella electrochemical detection. • The method displayed excellent sensitivity and specificity for detection of Salmonella. • The fabricated biosensor was successfully applied to detect Salmonella in milk samples. - Abstract: A novel electrochemical sensing strategy was developed for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Salmonella by combining the rolling circle amplification with DNA–AuNPs probe. The target DNA could be specifically captured by probe 1 on the sensing interface. Then the circularization mixture was added to form a typical sandwich structure. In the presence of dNTPs and phi29 DNA polymerase, the RCA was initiated to produce micrometer-long single-strand DNA. Finally, the detection probe (DNA–AuNPs) could recognize RCA product to produce enzymatic electrochemical signal. Under optimal conditions, the calibration curve of synthetic target DNA had good linearity from 10 aM to 10 pM with a detection limit of 6.76 aM (S/N = 3). The developed method had been successfully applied to detect Salmonella as low as 6 CFU mL −1 in real milk sample. This proposed strategy showed great potential for clinical diagnosis, food safety and environmental monitoring

  3. A Highly Specific Gold Nanoprobe for Live-Cell Single-Molecule Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Cécile; Si, Satyabrata; Gautier, Jérémie; Soto-Ribeiro, Martinho; Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard; Gautreau, Alexis; Giannone, Grégory; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim

    2013-04-01

    Single molecule tracking in live cells is the ultimate tool to study subcellular protein dynamics, but it is often limited by the probe size and photostability. Due to these issues, long-term tracking of proteins in confined and crowded environments, such as intracellular spaces, remains challenging. We have developed a novel optical probe consisting of 5-nm gold nanoparticles functionalized with a small fragment of camelid antibodies that recognize widely used GFPs with a very high affinity, which we call GFP-nanobodies. These small gold nanoparticles can be detected and tracked using photothermal imaging for arbitrarily long periods of time. Surface and intracellular GFP-proteins were effectively labeled even in very crowded environments such as adhesion sites and cytoskeletal structures both in vitro and in live cell cultures. These nanobody-coated gold nanoparticles are probes with unparalleled capabilities; small size, perfect photostability, high specificity, and versatility afforded by combination with the vast existing library of GFP-tagged proteins.

  4. Traversing probe system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  5. Traversing probe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashburn, D.N.; Stevens, R.H.; Woodall, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride. 10 claims, 6 figures

  6. Identification of Cannabis sativa L. using the 1-kbTHCA synthase-fluorescence in situ hybridization probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeangkhwoa, Pattraporn; Bandhaya, Achirapa; Umpunjun, Puangpaka; Chuenboonngarm, Ngarmnij; Panvisavas, Nathinee

    2017-03-01

    This study reports a successful application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique in the identification of Cannabis sativa L. cells recovered from fresh and dried powdered plant materials. Two biotin-16-dUTP-labeled FISH probes were designed from the Cannabis-specific tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) gene and the ITS region of the 45S rRNA gene. Specificity of probe-target hybridization was tested against the target and 4 non-target plant species, i.e., Humulus lupulus, Mitragyna speciosa, Papaver sp., and Nicotiana tabacum. The 1-kb THCA synthase hybridization probe gave Cannabis-specific hybridization signals, unlike the 700-bp Cannabis-ITS hybridization probe. Probe-target hybridization was also confirmed against 20 individual Cannabis plant samples. The 1-kb THCA synthase and 700-bp Cannabis-ITS hybridization probes clearly showed 2 hybridization signals per cell with reproducibility. The 1-kb THCA synthase probe did not give any FISH signal when tested against H. lupulus, its closely related member of the Canabaceae family. It was also showed that 1-kb THCA synthase FISH probe can be applied to identify small amount of dried powdered Cannabis material with an addition of rehydration step prior to the experimental process. This study provided an alternative identification method for Cannabis trace. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Influence of probe geometry on the response of an electrostatic probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Torben; Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1999-01-01

    The response of an electrostatic probe is examined with reference to the probe geometry. The study involves the evaluation of the probe lambda function, from which response-related characteristic parameters can be derived. These parameters enable the probe detection sensitivity Se and spatial...

  8. Isostructural fluorescent and radioactive probes for monitoring neural stem and progenitor cell transplants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, Paul [McMaster Nuclear Reactor, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Gleave, Jacqueline A. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Lemon, Jennifer A. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Reid, Leslie C. [Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Pacey, Laura K.K. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Farncombe, Troy H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Boreham, Douglas R. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Zubieta, Jon [Department of Chemistry, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244-4100 (United States); Babich, John W. [Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals Inc., Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Doering, Laurie C. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Valliant, John F. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada)], E-mail: valliant@mcmaster.ca

    2008-02-15

    A construct for tagging neurospheres and monitoring cell transplantations was developed using a new technology for producing luminescent and radiolabeled probes that have identical structures. The HIV1-Tat basic domain derivatives NAcGRKKRRQRRR(SAACQ)G (SAACQ-1) and [NAcGRKKRRQRRR(Re(CO){sub 3}SAACQ)G]{sup +} (ReSAACQ-1) were prepared in excellent yields using the single amino acid chelate-quinoline (SAACQ) ligand and its Re(I) complex and conventional automated peptide synthesis methods. The distribution of the luminescent Re probe, using epifluorescence microscopy, showed that it localized primarily in the cell nucleus with a significant degree of association on the nuclear envelope. A smaller amount was found to be dispersed in the cytoplasm. The {sup 99m}Tc analogue was then prepared in 43{+-}7% (n=12) yield and very high effective specific activity. Following incubation, average uptake of the probe in neurospheres ranged between 10 and 20 Bq/cell. As determined by colorimetric assays, viability for cells labeled with high effective specific activity {sup 99m}TcSAACQ-1 was 97{+-}4% at 2 h postlabeling and 85{+-}25% at 24 h postlabeling for incubation activities ranging from 245 to 8900 Bq/cell. DNA analysis showed that at these levels, there was no significant difference between the extent of DNA damage in the treated cells versus control cells. A series of preliminary SPECT/CT studies of transplants in mice were performed, which showed that the strategy is convenient and feasible and that it is possible to routinely assess procedures noninvasively and determine the number of cells transplanted.

  9. Characteristics Testing of the ECT Bobbin Probe for S/G Tube Inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Min Woo; Lee, Hee Jong; Cho, Chan Hee; Yoo, Hyun Joo [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The bobbin probe technique is basically one of the important ECT methods for the steam generator tube integrity assessment that is practiced during each plant outage. The bobbin probe also is the essential component which consists of the whole ECT examination system, and provides a decisive data for the evaluation of tube integrity in compliance with acceptance criteria described in specific procedures. The selection of probe is especially important because the quality of acquired ECT data is determined by the probe design characteristics, such as geometry and operation frequency, and has an important effect on examination results. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has recently defined the procedures for the qualification of eddy current hardware and technique. These procedures provide two basic methods for qualification. Flawed tube removed from operation, or artificial flaw is required for the original qualification of technique combined with related flaw mechanism. In case where the original qualification has been completed, the concept of equivalency may be used to extend the original qualification to similar probe designs. The qualified acquisition technique may be modified to substitute or replace instruments or probes without re-qualification provided that the range of essential variables defined in the examination technique specification sheet are met. In this case, both the original and replaced instrument or probe shall be characterized utilizing EPRI Guideline supplement 'H1'. This study is the result of the comparative performance evaluation of bobbin coil eddy current probes manufactured by KEPRI and a foreign manufacturer. As a result of this study, although there were minor differences between the two probe types, it was evaluated that the two probes were almost identical in the significant performance characteristics described in the EPRI guideline

  10. Measurement of locus copy number by hybridisation with amplifiable probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, John A. L.; Sismani, Carolina; Patsalis, Philippos C.; Cross, Gareth

    2000-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance in genome analysis, it is only recently that systematic approaches have been developed to assess copy number at specific genetic loci, or to examine genomic DNA for submicroscopic deletions of unknown location. In this report we show that short probes can be recovered and amplified quantitatively following hybridisation to genomic DNA. This simple observation forms the basis of a new approach to determining locus copy number in complex genomes. The power and specificity of multiplex amplifiable probe hybridisation is demonstrated by the simultaneous assessment of copy number at a set of 40 human loci, including detection of deletions causing Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Prader–Willi/Angelman syndromes. Assembly of other probe sets will allow novel, technically simple approaches to a wide variety of genetic analyses, including the potential for extension to high resolution genome-wide screens for deletions and amplifications. PMID:10606661

  11. Measurement of locus copy number by hybridisation with amplifiable probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Sismani, C; Patsalis, P C; Cross, G

    2000-01-15

    Despite its fundamental importance in genome analysis, it is only recently that systematic approaches have been developed to assess copy number at specific genetic loci, or to examine genomic DNA for submicro-scopic deletions of unknown location. In this report we show that short probes can be recovered and amplified quantitatively following hybridisation to genomic DNA. This simple observation forms the basis of a new approach to determining locus copy number in complex genomes. The power and specificity of multiplex amplifiable probe hybridisation is demonstrated by the simultaneous assessment of copy number at a set of 40 human loci, including detection of deletions causing Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Prader-Willi/Angelman syndromes. Assembly of other probe sets will allow novel, technically simple approaches to a wide variety of genetic analyses, including the potential for extension to high resolution genome-wide screens for deletions and amplifications.

  12. Picosecond electron probe for direct investigation of lattice temperature and structural phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourou, G.; Williamson, S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have directly observed the laser-induced melt metamorphosis of thin aluminum films. The time required for the melt to evolve is dependent on the degree to which the Al specimen is superheated. The temperature of this superheated state can also be monitored on the picosecond time scale. The picosecond electron probe not only reveals information about the structure of a material but also about the lattice temperature. The change in lattice parameter that is observed as a shift in diffracted ring diameter is directly related to the thermal expansion coefficient. Also, based on the Debye-Waller effect, a reduction in the intensity of the diffraction rings can be observed due to increased lattice vibration. Presently, a 1-kHz-1-mJ/pulse Nd:YAG laser is being used to measure the temperature overshoot of laser-induced Al films. The high repetition rate permits signal averaging to be employed thereby increasing the sensitivity of the thermometric technique

  13. Magnetic nanostructures: radioactive probes and recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prandolini, M J

    2006-01-01

    The miniaturization of magnetic sensors and storage devices down to the nano-scale leads to drastic changes in magnetic phenomena compared with the same devices with a larger size. Excited-nuclear-probe (radioactive probe) techniques are ideal for investigating these new magnetic nanostructures. By observing the magnetic hyperfine fields (and in some cases the electric-field-gradients (EFGs)) at the nuclei of radioactive probes, microscopic information about the magnetic environment of the probes is acquired. The magnetic hyperfine field is particularly sensitive to the s-spin polarization of the conduction electrons and to the orbital magnetic moment of the probe atom. Three methods of inserting radioactive probes into magnetic nanostructures are presented; neutron activation, recoil implantation and 'soft-landing', followed by descriptions of their application to selected examples. In some cases, these methods offer the simultaneous creation and observation of new magnetic materials at the atomic scale. This review focuses firstly on the induced magnetism in noble-metal spacer layers between either ferromagnetic (FM) or FM/antiferromagnetic (AFM) layers in a trilayer structure. Using the method of low-temperature nuclear orientation, the s-spin polarization of noble-metal probes was measured and was found to be very sensitive to the magnetic properties at both the FM and AFM interfaces. Secondly, the recoil implantation of radioactive Fe probes into rare-earth hosts and d-band alloys and subsequent measurement using time-differential perturbed angular distribution offer the possibility of controlling the chemical composition and number of nearest-neighbours. This method was used to prepare local 3d-magnetic clusters in a non-magnetic matrix and to observe their magnetic behaviour. Finally, non-magnetic radioactive probes were 'soft-landed' onto Ni surfaces and extremely lattice-expanded ultrathin Ni films. By measuring the magnetic hyperfine fields and EFGs at

  14. Reactive probing of macroscopically quantum mechanical SQUID rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prance, R.J.; Clark, T.D.; Whiteman, R.; Diggins, J.; Ralph, J.F.; Prance, H.; Spiller, T.P.; Widom, A.; Srivastava, Y.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that the energy level structure of ultra small capacitance SQUID rings can be probed adiabatically at radio frequency using both dynamical and quasistatic reactive techniques. ((orig.))

  15. Plasmonic direct writing lithography with a macroscopical contact probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuerong; Liu, Ling; Wang, Changtao; Chen, Weidong; Liu, Yunyue; Li, Ling

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we design a plasmonic direct writing lithography system with a macroscopical contact probe to achieve nanometer scale spots. The probe with bowtie-shaped aperture array adopts spring hinge and beam deflection method (BDM) to realize near-field lithography. Lithography results show that a macroscopical plasmonic contact probe can achieve a patterning resolution of around 75 nm at 365 nm wavelength, and demonstrate that the lithography system is promising for practical applications due to beyond the diffraction limit, low cost, and simplification of system configuration. CST calculations provide a guide for the design of recording structure and the arrangement of placing polarizer.

  16. The Oxford Probe: an open access five-hole probe for aerodynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, B. F.; Povey, T.

    2017-03-01

    The Oxford Probe is an open access five-hole probe designed for experimental aerodynamic measurements. The open access probe can be manufactured by the end user via additive manufacturing (metal or plastic). The probe geometry, drawings, calibration maps, and software are available under a creative commons license. The purpose is to widen access to aerodynamic measurement techniques in education and research environments. There are many situations in which the open access probe will allow results of comparable accuracy to a well-calibrated commercial probe. We discuss the applications and limitations of the probe, and compare the calibration maps for 16 probes manufactured in different materials and at different scales, but with the same geometrical design.

  17. The Oxford Probe: an open access five-hole probe for aerodynamic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, B F; Povey, T

    2017-01-01

    The Oxford Probe is an open access five-hole probe designed for experimental aerodynamic measurements. The open access probe can be manufactured by the end user via additive manufacturing (metal or plastic). The probe geometry, drawings, calibration maps, and software are available under a creative commons license. The purpose is to widen access to aerodynamic measurement techniques in education and research environments. There are many situations in which the open access probe will allow results of comparable accuracy to a well-calibrated commercial probe. We discuss the applications and limitations of the probe, and compare the calibration maps for 16 probes manufactured in different materials and at different scales, but with the same geometrical design. (paper)

  18. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  19. Phase structure of the Born-Infeld-anti-de Sitter black holes probed by non-local observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Xiao-Xiong [Chongqing Jiaotong University, School of Material Science and Engineering, Chongqing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Liu, Xian-Ming [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Hubei University for Nationalities, Center for Theoretical Physics, School of Sciences, Enshi, Hubei (China); Li, Li-Fang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    With the non-local observables such as two point correlation function and holographic entanglement entropy, we probe the phase structure of the Born-Infeld-anti-de Sitter black holes. For the case bQ > 0.5, where b is the Born-Infeld parameter and Q is the charge of the black hole, the phase structure is found to be similar to that of the Van der Waals phase transition, namely the black hole undergoes a first order phase transition and a second order phase transition before it reaches a stable phase. While for the case bQ < 0.5, a new phase branch emerges besides the Van der Waals phase transition. For the first order phase transition, the equal area law is checked, and for the second order phase transition, the critical exponent of the heat capacity is obtained. All these results are found to be the same as that observed in the entropy-temperature plane. (orig.)

  20. Probe Techniques. Introductory Remarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emeleus, K. G. [School of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    1968-04-15

    In this brief introduction to the session on probes, the history of theii development is first touched on briefly. Reference is then made to the significance of the work to be described by Medicus, for conductivity and recombination calculations, and by Lam and Su, for a wide range of medium and higher pressure plasmas. Finally, a number of other probe topics are mentioned, including multiple probes; probes in electronegative plasmas; resonance probes; probes in noisy discharges; probes as oscillation detectors; use of probes where space-charge is not negligible. (author)

  1. Summary of the working group on penetrating probes in collider experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlam, T.

    1984-01-01

    The penetrating probes are discussed for detection and measurement of signals which carry information directly from the interior of a quark-gluon plasma. These probes include muons, electron pairs, photons, and, at very high energies, jets. Research needed in the area of the detectors required for these measurements, specifically charged particle tracking detectors, is discussed

  2. Probe-diverse ptychography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, I., E-mail: isaac.russellpeterson@rmit.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, the University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Harder, R. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Robinson, I.K. [Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    We propose an extension of ptychography where the target sample is scanned separately through several probes with distinct amplitude and phase profiles and a diffraction image is recorded for each probe and each sample translation. The resulting probe-diverse dataset is used to iteratively retrieve high-resolution images of the sample and all probes simultaneously. The method is shown to yield significant improvement in the reconstructed sample image compared to the image obtained using the standard single-probe ptychographic phase-retrieval scheme.

  3. Intra-operative probe for brain cancer: feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu Thi, M. H.; Charon, Y.; Duval, M. A.; Lefebvre, F.; Menard, L.; Pitre, S.; Pinot, L.; Siebert, R.

    2007-07-01

    The present work aims a new medical probe for surgeons devoted to brain cancers, in particular glioblastoma multiforme. Within the last years, our group has started the development of a new intra-operative beta imaging probe. More recently, we took an alternative approach for the same application: a fluorescence probe. In both cases the purpose is to differentiate normal from tumor brain tissue. In a first step, we developed set-ups capable to measure autofluorescence. They are based on a dedicated epi-fluorescence design and on specific fiber optic probes. Relative signal amplitude, spectral shape and fluorescence lifetime measurements are foreseen to distinguish normal and cancer tissue by analyzing fluorophores like NADH, lipopigments and porphyrines. The autofluorescence spectra are recorded in the 460-640 nm range with a low resolution spectrometer. For lifetime measurements a fast detector (APD) is used together with a TCSPC-carte. Intrinsic wavelength- and time-resolutions are a few nm and 200 ps, respectively. Different samples have been analyzed to validate our new detection system and to allow a first configuration of our medical fluorescence probe. First results from the tissue measurements are shown.

  4. Design and Evaluation of Novel Polymyxin Fluorescent Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Polymyxins (polymyxin B and colistin are cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics that serve as a last-line defence against Gram-negative “superbugs”. In the present study, two novel fluorescent polymyxin probes were designed through regio-selective modifications of the polymyxin B core structure at the N-terminus and the hydrophobic motif at positions 6 and 7. The resulting probes, FADDI-285 and FADDI-286 demonstrated comparable antibacterial activity (MICs 2–8 mg/L to polymyxin B and colistin (MICs 0.5–8 mg/L against a panel of gram-negative clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These probes should prove to be of considerable utility for imaging cellular uptake and mechanistic investigations of these important last-line antibiotics.

  5. Multi-Probe Investigation of Proteomic Structure of Pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; Vogelstein, B; Wheeler, K E

    2008-01-01

    Complete genome sequences are available for understanding biotransformation, environmental resistance and pathogenesis of microbial, cellular and pathogen systems. The present technological and scientific challenges are to unravel the relationships between the organization and function of protein complexes at cell, microbial and pathogens surfaces, to understand how these complexes evolve during the bacterial, cellular and pathogen life cycles, and how they respond to environmental changes, chemical stimulants and therapeutics. In particular, elucidating the molecular structure and architecture of human pathogen surfaces is essential to understanding mechanisms of pathogenesis, immune response, physicochemical interactions, environmental resistance and development of countermeasures against bioterrorist agents. The objective of this project was to investigate the architecture, proteomic structure, and function of bacterial spores through a combination of high-resolution in vitro atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based immunolabeling with threat-specific antibodies. Particular attention in this project was focused on spore forming Bacillus species including the Sterne vaccine strain of Bacillus anthracis and the spore forming near-neighbor of Clostridium botulinum, C. novyi-NT. Bacillus species, including B. anthracis, the causative agent of inhalation anthrax are laboratory models for elucidating spore structure/function. Even though the complete genome sequence is available for B. subtilis, cereus, anthracis and other species, the determination and composition of spore structure/function is not understood. Prof. B. Vogelstein and colleagues at the John Hopkins University have recently developed a breakthrough bacteriolytic therapy for cancer treatment (1). They discovered that intravenously injected Clostridium novyi-NT spores germinate exclusively within the avascular regions of tumors in mice and destroy advanced cancerous lesions. The bacteria were also

  6. Templated Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Specific Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Xiao; Li, Meihui; Liu, Xiyan; Zhao, Xiulan; Zhang, Daqi; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Juan; Li, Yan

    2016-04-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown great potential in various applications attributed to their unique structure-dependent properties. Therefore, the controlled preparation of chemically and structurally pristine SWNTs is a crucial issue for their advanced applications (e.g., nanoelectronics) and has been a great challenge for two decades. Epitaxial growth from well-defined seeds has been shown to be a promising strategy to control the structure of SWNTs. Segments of carbon nanotubes, including short pipes from cutting of preformed nanotubes and caps from opening of fullerenes or cyclodehydrogenation of polycyclic hydrocarbon precursors, have been used as the seeds to grow SWNTs. Single-chirality SWNTs were obtained with both presorted chirality-pure SWNT segments and end caps obtained from polycyclic hydrocarbon molecules with designed structure. The main challenges of nanocarbon-segment-seeded processes are the stability of the seeds, yield, and efficiency. Catalyst-mediated SWNT growth is believed to be more efficient. The composition and morphology of the catalyst nanoparticles have been widely reported to affect the chirality distribution of SWNTs. However, chirality-specific SWNT growth is hard to achieve by alternating catalysts. The specificity of enzyme-catalyzed reactions brings us an awareness of the essentiality of a unique catalyst structure for the chirality-selective growth of SWNTs. Only catalysts with the desired atomic arrangements in their crystal planes can act as structural templates for chirality-specific growth of SWNTs. We have developed a new family of catalysts, tungsten-based intermetallic compounds, which have high melting points and very special crystal structures, to facilitate the growth of SWNTs with designed chirality. By the use of W6Co7 catalysts, (12,6) SWNTs were directly grown with purity higher than 92%. Both high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements and density functional theory simulations

  7. The Chemically-Specific Structure of an Amorphous Molybdenum Germanium Alloy by Anomalous X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, H. A.

    2002-06-11

    Since its inception in the late 1970s, anomalous x-ray scattering (AXS) has been employed for chemically-specific structure determination in a wide variety of noncrystalline materials. These studies have successfully produced differential distribution functions (DDFs) which provide information about the compositionally-averaged environment of a specific atomic species in the sample. Despite the wide success in obtaining DDFs, there are very few examples of successful extraction of the fully-chemically-specific partial pair distribution functions (PPDFs), the most detailed description of an amorphous sample possible by x-ray scattering. Extracting the PPDFs is notoriously difficult since the matrix equation involved is ill-conditioned and thus extremely sensitive to errors present in the experimental quantities that enter the equation. Instead of addressing this sensitivity by modifying the data through mathematical methods, sources of error have been removed experimentally: A focusing analyzer crystal was combined with a position-sensitive linear detector to experimentally eliminate unwanted inelastic scattering intensity over most of the reciprocal space range probed. This instrumentation has been used in data collection for the extraction of PPDFs from amorphous (a)-MoGe{sub 3}. This composition arises as a phase separation endpoint in the Ge-rich region of the vapor-deposited Mo-Ge amorphous alloy system but is not present at equilibrium. Since the first Ge-rich compound in the Mo-Ge equilibrium system is MoGe{sub 2}, previous workers have speculated that perhaps a unique MoGe{sub 3} compound exists in the amorphous system. Rather than indicating a distinct MoGe{sub 3} compound with definitive local structure, however, the coordination results are more consistent with a densely-packed alloy having a wide range of solid solubility. Significant improvement in the quality and reliability of experimental PPDFs from a-MoGe{sub 3} by AXS has been achieved solely

  8. Fabrication of all diamond scanning probes for nanoscale magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    Appel Patrick; Neu Elke; Ganzhorn Marc; Barfuss Arne; Batzer Marietta; Gratz Micha; Tschoepe Andreas; Maletinsky Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The electronic spin of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond forms an atomically sized, highly sensitive sensor for magnetic fields. To harness the full potential of individual NV centers for sensing with high sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution, NV centers have to be incorporated into scanning probe structures enabling controlled scanning in close proximity to the sample surface. Here, we present an optimized procedure to fabricate single-crystal, all-diamond scanning probes s...

  9. GeoChip 3.0 as a high-thoughput tool for analyzing microbial community composition, structure, and functional activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Z.; Deng, Y.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Tu, Q.; Xu, M.; Hemme, C.L.; Li, X.; Wu, L.; Gentry, T.J.; Yin, Y.; Liebich, J.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2010-04-01

    A new generation of functional gene arrays (FGAs; GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with {approx}28,000 probes covering approximately 57,000 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles, energy metabolism, antibiotic resistance, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. GeoChip 3.0 also has several other distinct features, such as a common oligo reference standard (CORS) for data normalization and comparison, a software package for data management and future updating and the gyrB gene for phylogenetic analysis. Computational evaluation of probe specificity indicated that all designed probes would have a high specificity to their corresponding targets. Experimental analysis with synthesized oligonucleotides and genomic DNAs showed that only 0.0036-0.025% false-positive rates were observed, suggesting that the designed probes are highly specific under the experimental conditions examined. In addition, GeoChip 3.0 was applied to analyze soil microbial communities in a multifactor grassland ecosystem in Minnesota, USA, which showed that the structure, composition and potential activity of soil microbial communities significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful tool for studying microbial community functional structure, and linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes and functioning.

  10. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Accardo, Angelo

    2014-06-10

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data. 2014 International Union of Crystallography.

  11. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Accardo, Angelo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Limongi, Tania; Marinaro, Giovanni; Riekel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data. 2014 International Union of Crystallography.

  12. Synthesis and detection of 3'-OH terminal biotin-labeled DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brakel, C.L.; Engelhardt, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nick translation has been used to prepare biotin-dUTP-containing DNA probes. These stable DNA probes have been identified, following hybridization to target DNA, by fluorescence using antibiotin antibodies or by enzyme reactions in which the enzyme has been linked to avidin or streptavidin. It is probable that this technology will be applicable to certain diagnostic determinations and that, with sufficient sensitivity, this technology might provide a system for obtaining rapid and specific diagnoses in situations presently requiring time-consuming growth assays. The sensitivity of this assay can be increased in two ways: (1) by increasing the amount of biotin contained in the DNA probes, and (2) by increasing the response to individual biotin molecules in the DNA probes. This report demonstrates that terminal deoxynucleotide transferase can be employed to increase the biotin content of DNA probes. We also introduce a new streptavidin-linked enzyme system that produces a greater response to biotinylated DNA probes than does streptavidin-linked horseradish peroxidase

  13. Quantification of syntrophic fatty acid-beta-oxidizing bacteria in a mesophilic biogas reactor by oligonucleotide probe hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.W.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Raskin, L.

    1999-01-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYE, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S, wolfei LYE was closely related...... fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria-and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities...

  14. The retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain: from molecular structure to biological activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redzic, Jasmina S.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Isern, Nancy G.; Jones, David N.M.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2011-06-18

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane protein that is involved in inflammatory diseases, cancer progression, and multiple human pathogens utilize CD147 for efficient infection. In several cancers, CD147 expression is so high that it is now used as a prognostic marker. The two primary isoforms of CD147 that are related to cancer progression have been identified, differing in their number of immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. These include CD147 Ig1-Ig2 that is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues and CD147 Ig0-Ig1-Ig2 that is retinal specific and implicated in retinoblastoma. However, little is known in regard to the retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain despite its potential role in retinoblastoma. Thus, here we have extensively characterized the CD147 Ig0 domain by elucidating its three-dimensional structure through crystallography and its solution behavior through several biophysical methods that include nuclear magnetic resonance. Furthermore, we have utilized this data together with mutagenesis to probe the biological activity of CD147-containing proteins both with and without the CD147 Ig0 domain within several model cell lines. Our findings reveal that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a potent stimulator of interleukin-6, which is a well-known contributor to retinoblastoma and suggest that the CD147 Ig0 domain has its own receptor distinct from that of the other CD147 Ig-like domains, CD147 Ig1-Ig2. Furthermore, we show that the CD147 Ig0 dimer is the functional unit required for activity and can be disrupted by a single point mutation.

  15. Evaluation of Flat Surface Temperature Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beges, G.; Rudman, M.; Drnovsek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is elaboration of elements related to metrological analysis in the field of surface temperature measurement. Surface temperature measurements are applicable in many fields. As examples, safety testing of electrical appliances and a pharmaceutical production line represent case studies for surface temperature measurements. In both cases correctness of the result of the surface temperature has an influence on final product safety and quality and thus conformity with specifications. This paper deals with the differences of flat surface temperature probes in measuring the surface temperature. For the purpose of safety testing of electrical appliances, surface temperature measurements are very important for safety of the user. General requirements are presented in European standards, which support requirements in European directives, e.g., European Low Voltage Directive 2006/95/EC and pharmaceutical requirements, which are introduced in official state legislation. This paper introduces a comparison of temperature measurements of an attached thermocouple on the measured surface and measurement with flat surface temperature probes. As a heat generator, a so called temperature artifact is used. It consists of an aluminum plate with an incorporated electrical heating element with very good temperature stability in the central part. The probes and thermocouple were applied with different forces to the surface in horizontal and vertical positions. The reference temperature was measured by a J-type fine-wire (0.2 mm) thermocouple. Two probes were homemade according to requirements in the European standard EN 60335-2-9/A12, one with a fine-wire (0.2 mm) thermocouple and one with 0.5mm of thermocouple wire diameter. Additional commercially available probes were compared. Differences between probes due to thermal conditions caused by application of the probe were found. Therefore, it can happen that measurements are performed with improper equipment or

  16. Measurements of plasma density fluctuations and electric wave fields using spherical electrostatic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, A.I.; Bostroem, R.

    1995-04-01

    Spherical electrostatic probes are in wide use for the measurements of electric fields and plasma density. This report concentrates on the measurements of fluctuations of these quantities rather than background values. Potential problems with the technique include the influence of density fluctuations on electric field measurements and vice versa, effects of varying satellite potential, and non-linear rectification in the probe and satellite sheaths. To study the actual importance of these and other possible effects, we simulate the response of the probe-satellite system to various wave phenomena in the plasma by applying approximate analytical as well as numerical methods. We use a set of non-linear probe equations, based on probe characteristics experimentally obtained in space, and therefore essentially independent of any specific probe theory. This approach is very useful since the probe theory for magnetized plasmas is incomplete. 47 refs

  17. Possible concepts for an in situ Saturn probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustenis, Athena; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Mousis, Olivier; Atkinson, David H.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Reh, Kim R.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Atreya, Sushil; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cavalie, Thibault; Colaprete, Anthony; Gautier, Daniel; Guillot, Tristan; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Marty, Bernard; Morse, Andy; Sims, Jon; Spilker, Tom; Spilker, Linda

    2014-05-01

    In situ exploration of Saturn's atmosphere would bring insights in two broad themes: the formation history of our solar system and the processes at play in planetary atmospheres. The science case for in situ measurements at Saturn are developed in [1] and two companion abstracts (see Mousis et al., and Atkinson et al.). They are summarized here. Measurements of Saturn's bulk chemical and isotopic composition would place important constraints on the volatile reservoirs in the protosolar nebula and hence on the formation mechanisms. An in situ probe, penetrating from the upper atmosphere (μbar level) into the convective weather layer to a minimum depth of 10 bar, would also contribute to our knowledge of Saturn's atmospheric structure, dynamics, composition, chemistry and cloud-forming processes. Different mission architectures are envisaged, all based on an entry probe that would descend through Saturn's stratosphere and troposphere under parachute down to a minimum of 10 bars [1]. Future studies will focus on the trade-offs between science return and the added design complexity of a probe that could operate at pressures larger than 10 bars. Accelerometry measurements may also be performed during the entry phase in the higher part of the stratosphere prior to starting measurements under parachute. A carrier system would be required to deliver the probe along its interplanetary trajectory to the desired atmospheric entry point at Saturn. The entry site would be carefully selected. Three possible mission configurations are currently under study (with different risk/cost trades): • Configuration 1: Probe + Carrier. After probe delivery, the carrier would follow its path and be destroyed during atmospheric entry, but could perform pre-entry science. The carrier would not be used as a radio relay, but the probe would transmit its data to the ground system via a direct-to-Earth (DTE) RF link; • Configuration 2: Probe + Carrier/Relay. The probe would detach from the

  18. In Situ Live-Cell Nucleus Fluorescence Labeling with Bioinspired Fluorescent Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Pan; Wang, Houyu; Song, Bin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2017-08-01

    Fluorescent imaging techniques for visualization of nuclear structure and function in live cells are fundamentally important for exploring major cellular events. The ideal cellular labeling method is capable of realizing label-free, in situ, real-time, and long-term nucleus labeling in live cells, which can fully obtain the nucleus-relative information and effectively alleviate negative effects of alien probes on cellular metabolism. However, current established fluorescent probes-based strategies (e.g., fluorescent proteins-, organic dyes-, fluorescent organic/inorganic nanoparticles-based imaging techniques) are unable to simultaneously realize label-free, in situ, long-term, and real-time nucleus labeling, resulting in inevitable difficulties in fully visualizing nuclear structure and function in live cells. To this end, we present a type of bioinspired fluorescent probes, which are highly efficacious for in situ and label-free tracking of nucleus in long-term and real-time manners. Typically, the bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, served as fluorescent probes, can be readily synthesized in situ within live cell nucleus without any further modifications under physiological conditions (37 °C, pH ∼7.4). Compared with other conventional nuclear dyes (e.g., propidium iodide (PI), Hoechst), superior spectroscopic properties (e.g., quantum yield of ∼35.8% and high photostability) and low cytotoxicity of PDA-based probes enable long-term (e.g., 3 h) fluorescence tracking of nucleus. We also demonstrate the generality of this type of bioinspired fluorescent probes in different cell lines and complex biological samples.

  19. Spectrally-resolved response properties of the three most advanced FRET based fluorescent protein voltage probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Mutoh

    Full Text Available Genetically-encoded optical probes for membrane potential hold the promise of monitoring electrical signaling of electrically active cells such as specific neuronal populations in intact brain tissue. The most advanced class of these probes was generated by molecular fusion of the voltage sensing domain (VSD of Ci-VSP with a fluorescent protein (FP pair. We quantitatively compared the three most advanced versions of these probes (two previously reported and one new variant, each involving a spectrally distinct tandem of FPs. Despite these different FP tandems and dissimilarities within the amino acid sequence linking the VSD to the FPs, the amplitude and kinetics of voltage dependent fluorescence changes were surprisingly similar. However, each of these fluorescent probes has specific merits when considering different potential applications.

  20. Atom-probe field-ion-microscope mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Osamu

    1983-01-01

    The titled analyzer, called simply atom-probe, has been developed by combining a field ion microscope (FIM) and a mass spectrometer, and is divided into the time-of-flight type, magnetic sector type, and quadrupole type depending on the types of mass spectrometers. In this paper, the author first describes on the principle and construction of a high resolution, time-of-flight atom-probe developed and fabricated in his laboratory. The feature of the atom-probe lies in the analysis of atoms and molecules in hyper-fine structure region one by one utilizing the high resolution of FIM. It also has the advantages of directly determining the composition by a ratio of the numbers of respective ions because of a constant detection sensitivity regardless of mass numbers, of the resolution as high as single atom layer in depth direction, and of detecting the positional relationship among detected ions by the order of detection in a sample. To determine the composition in a hyperfine structure region, the limited small number of atoms and molecules in the region must be identified distinctly one by one. In the analyzed result of Ni-silicide formed by heating Si evaporated on a Ni tip at 1000 K for 5 minutes, each isotope was not only clearly separated, but also their abundance ratio was very close to the natural abundance ratio. The second half of the paper reports on the analysis of TiC promising for a cold cathode material, adsorption of CO and alcohol, and the composition and structure of silicides, as a few application examples. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  1. Structural basis for substrate specificities of cellular deoxyribonucleoside kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, K.; Ramaswamy, S.; Ljungcrantz, C.

    2001-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases phosphorylate deoxyribonucleosides and activate a number of medically important nucleoside analogs. Here we report the structure of the Drosophila deoxyribonucleoside kinase with deoxycytidine bound at the nucleoside binding site and that of the human deoxyguanosine ki......; this is apparently due to the presence of Arg 118, which provides favorable hydrogen bonding interactions with the substrate. The two new structures provide an explanation for the substrate specificity of cellular deoxyribonucleoside kinases....

  2. High spatial resolution Kelvin probe force microscopy with coaxial probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M; Satzinger, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a widely used technique to measure the local contact potential difference (CPD) between an AFM probe and the sample surface via the electrostatic force. The spatial resolution of KPFM is intrinsically limited by the long range of the electrostatic interaction, which includes contributions from the macroscopic cantilever and the conical tip. Here, we present coaxial AFM probes in which the cantilever and cone are shielded by a conducting shell, confining the tip–sample electrostatic interaction to a small region near the end of the tip. We have developed a technique to measure the true CPD despite the presence of the shell electrode. We find that the behavior of these probes agrees with an electrostatic model of the force, and we observe a factor of five improvement in spatial resolution relative to unshielded probes. Our discussion centers on KPFM, but the field confinement offered by these probes may improve any variant of electrostatic force microscopy. (paper)

  3. Structure and orbital ordering of ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} probed by atomic resolution electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindfors-Vrejoiu, Ionela; Engelmayer, Johannes; Loosdrecht, Paul H.M. van [II. Physikalisches Institut, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Jin, Lei; Jia, Chun-Lin [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-5) and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Himcinschi, Cameliu [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Hensling, Felix; Waser, Rainer; Dittmann, Regina [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-7), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Orbital ordering has been less investigated in epitaxial thin films, due to the difficulty to evidence directly the occurrence of this phenomenon in thin film samples. Atomic resolution electron microscopy enabled us to observe the structural details of the ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} films. The transition to orbital ordering of epitaxial layers as thin as ∼4 nm was probed by temperature-dependent Raman scattering spectroscopy of multilayer samples. From the occurrence and temperature dependence of the 700 cm{sup -1} Raman active mode it can be inferred that the structural phase transition associated with orbital ordering takes place in ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} films at about 130 K. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. When beauty is only skin deep; optimizing the sensitivity of specular neutron reflectivity for probing structure beneath the surface of thin filmsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkrzak, Charles F.; Carpenter, Elisabeth; Heinrich, Frank; Berk, Norman F.

    2011-11-01

    Specular neutron reflectometry has become an established probe of the nanometer scale structure of materials in thin film and multilayered form. It has contributed especially to our understanding of soft condensed matter of interest in polymer science, organic chemistry, and biology and of magnetic hard condensed matter systems. In this paper we examine a number of key factors which have emerged that can limit the sensitivity of neutron reflection as such a probe. Among these is loss of phase information, and we discuss how knowledge about material surrounding a film of interest can be applied to help resolve the problem. In this context we also consider what role the quantum phenomenon of interaction-free measurement might play in enhancing the statistical efficiency for obtaining reflectivity or transmission data.

  5. Effects of Angular Variation on Split D Differential Eddy Current Probe Response (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-10

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2016-0327 EFFECTS OF ANGULAR VARIATION ON SPLIT D DIFFERENTIAL EDDY CURRENT PROBE RESPONSE (POSTPRINT) Ryan D...March 2014 – 22 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EFFECTS OF ANGULAR VARIATION ON SPLIT D DIFFERENTIAL EDDY CURRENT PROBE RESPONSE (POSTPRINT... Current Probe Response Ryan D. Mooers1, a) and John C. Aldrin2 1United States Air Force Research Labs, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Structural

  6. Radionuclide evaluation of left ventricular function with nonimaging probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, J P; Blaufox, M D

    1979-10-01

    Portable nonimaging probes have been developed that can evaluate left ventricular function using radionuclide techniques. Two modes of data acquisition are possible with these probe systems, first-pass and gated. Precordial radiocardiograms obtained after a bolus injection can be used to determine cardiac output, pulmonary transit time, pulmonary blood volume, left ventricle ejection fraction, and left-to-right shunts. Gated techniques can be used to determine left ventricular ejection fraction and sytolic time intervals. Probe-determined indices of left ventricular function agree excellently with comparable measurements determined by conventional camera-computer methods as well as by invasive techniques. These have begun to be used in a preliminary manner in a variety of clinical problems associated with left ventricular dysfunction. This review discusses the types of probe systems available, the methods used in positioning them, and details the specifics of their data acquisition and processing capacity. The major criticisms of probe methods are that they are nonimaging and that they measure global rather than regional left ventricular function. In spite of these criticisms, probe systems, because of their portability, high sensitivity, and relatively low cost are useful supplements to conventional camera-computer systems for the measurement of parameters of left ventricular performance using radionuclide techniques.

  7. Incorporation of gene-specific variability improves expression analysis using high-density DNA microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spitznagel Edward

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assessment of data reproducibility is essential for application of microarray technology to exploration of biological pathways and disease states. Technical variability in data analysis largely depends on signal intensity. Within that context, the reproducibility of individual probe sets has not been hitherto addressed. Results We used an extraordinarily large replicate data set derived from human placental trophoblast to analyze probe-specific contribution to variability of gene expression. We found that signal variability, in addition to being signal-intensity dependant, is probe set-specific. Importantly, we developed a novel method to quantify the contribution of this probe set-specific variability. Furthermore, we devised a formula that incorporates a priori-computed, replicate-based information on probe set- and intensity-specific variability in determination of expression changes even without technical replicates. Conclusion The strategy of incorporating probe set-specific variability is superior to analysis based on arbitrary fold-change thresholds. We recommend its incorporation to any computation of gene expression changes using high-density DNA microarrays. A Java application implementing our T-score is available at http://www.sadovsky.wustl.edu/tscore.html.

  8. Insights from quantitative metaproteomics and protein-stable isotope probing into microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergen, Martin; Jehmlich, Nico; Taubert, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Bastida, Felipe; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Schmidt, Frank; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Seifert, Jana

    2013-10-01

    The recent development of metaproteomics has enabled the direct identification and quantification of expressed proteins from microbial communities in situ, without the need for microbial enrichment. This became possible by (1) significant increases in quality and quantity of metagenome data and by improvements of (2) accuracy and (3) sensitivity of modern mass spectrometers (MS). The identification of physiologically relevant enzymes can help to understand the role of specific species within a community or an ecological niche. Beside identification, relative and absolute quantitation is also crucial. We will review label-free and label-based methods of quantitation in MS-based proteome analysis and the contribution of quantitative proteome data to microbial ecology. Additionally, approaches of protein-based stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) for deciphering community structures are reviewed. Information on the species-specific metabolic activity can be obtained when substrates or nutrients are labeled with stable isotopes in a protein-SIP approach. The stable isotopes ((13)C, (15)N, (36)S) are incorporated into proteins and the rate of incorporation can be used for assessing the metabolic activity of the corresponding species. We will focus on the relevance of the metabolic and phylogenetic information retrieved with protein-SIP studies and for detecting and quantifying the carbon flux within microbial consortia. Furthermore, the combination of protein-SIP with established tools in microbial ecology such as other stable isotope probing techniques are discussed.

  9. DESIGN OF THE CONTACT POTENTIALS DIFFERENCE PROBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. U. Pantsialeyeu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The contact potential difference probes distinguished by great variety and produced mostly in the laboratory for specific experimental applications. As a rule, they consist of commercially available instrumentation, and have a number of disadvantages: large dimensions, complexity and high cost, small sensitivity, operating speed, noiseproof, etc. The purpose of this paper is to describe the basic approaches to design of the small dimension, complete contact potential difference probes, providing high sensitivity, operating speed, and noise immunity. In this paper the contact potential difference probe, which is a electrometer with dynamic capacitor plate at about 0.1–5 mm2 . These probes are could be used in scanning systems, such as a Scanning Kelvin Probe, as well as for controlling system of manufacturing processes, e.g. under friction. The design of such contact potential difference probes conducted using modern electronic components, unique circuitry and design solutions described in detail at paper. The electromechanical modulator applied for mechanical vibrations of the reference sample. To provide a high amplitude and phase stability the upgraded generator with Wien bridge was used instead traditional oscillation sensor. The preamplifier made on the base of modern operational amplifiers with femtoampere current input. The power of the preamplifier designed with «floating ground». It allows keeping the relation constant potential to the probe components when changing over a wide range the compensation voltage. The phase detector-integrator based on the electronic antiphase switches with the modulation frequency of the contact potential difference and the integrator. Fullwave phase detection would greatly increase the sensitivity of the probe. In addition, the application of the phase detection allows suppressing noise and crosstalk at frequencies different from the modulation frequency. The preamplifier and the reference sample

  10. Optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticle probes in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gufeng; Stender, Anthony S.; Sun, Wei; and Fang, Ning

    2009-12-17

    Precise imaging of cellular and subcellular structures and dynamic processes in live cells is crucial for fundamental research in life sciences and in medical applications. Non-fluorescent nanoparticles are an important type of optical probe used in live-cell imaging due to their photostability, large optical cross-sections, and low toxicity. Here, we provide an overview of recent developments in the optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticle probes in live cells.

  11. Bacterial contamination of ultrasound probes in different radiological institutions before and after specific hygiene training: do we have a general hygienical problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartoretti, Thomas; Sartoretti, Elisabeth; Bucher, Candid; Doert, Aleksis; Binkert, Christoph; Hergan, Klaus; Meissnitzer, Matthias; Froehlich, Johannes; Kolokythas, Orpheus; Matoori, Simon; Orasch, Christina; Kos, Sebastian; Sartoretti-Schefer, Sabine; Gutzeit, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Aim was to investigate hygienic conditions of ultrasound probes before and after hygiene training in radiology institutions in comparison to bacterial contamination in public places. In three radiology departments, bacterial contamination was evaluated using baseline agar plates for cultures taken from 36 ultrasound probes. Afterwards teams were trained by a hygiene service centre and 36 ultrasound probes were routinely disinfected with regular disinfecting wipes and then evaluated. In comparison, bacterial contamination in public places (bus poles, n = 11; toilet seats, n = 10) were analysed. Plates were routinely incubated and the number of colony forming units (CFU) analysed. Cultures taken from the probes showed a median of 53 CFU before and 0 CFU after training (p contamination of ultrasound probes prior to hygiene training proved to be high and showed higher bacterial load than toilets seats or bus poles. Radiologists should be aware that the lack of hygiene in the field of ultrasound diagnostics puts patients at risk of healthcare-associated infections. • Hospital-associated infections are a problem for patient care. • Hygiene training of staff prevents bacterial contamination of ultrasound probes. • Disinfection of ultrasound probes is an easy method to protect patients.

  12. Design of a micro-cartridge system for the robotic assembly of exchangeable AFM-probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartenwerfer, Malte; Eichhorn, Volkmar; Fatikow, Sergej

    2013-01-01

    demand an even higher lateral resolution of the measurements. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a common tool for this characterization and a standard instrument for all kinds of research and development disciplines. However, the characterization of three dimensional high-aspect ratio and sidewall...... structures remains a hardly accomplishable task. Novel exchangeable and customizable scanning probe tips, so-called NanoBits, can be attached to standard AFM cantilevers offering unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of the tips to the surface topology of the specific application. The ultimate...

  13. A repetitive probe for FISH analysis of bovine interphase nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribiu Edmond

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to generate repetitive DNA sequence probes for the analysis of interphase nuclei by fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH. Such probes are useful for the diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities in bovine preimplanted embryos. Of the seven probes (E1A, E4A, Ba, H1A, W18, W22, W5 that were generated and partially sequenced, five corresponded to previously described Bos taurus repetitive DNA (E1A, E4A, Ba, W18, W5, one probe (W22 shared no homology with other DNA sequences and one (H1A displayed a significant homology with Rattus norvegicus mRNA for secretin receptor transmembrane domain 3. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation was performed on metaphase bovine fibroblast cells and showed that five of the seven probes hybridised most centromeres (E1A, E4A, Ba, W18, W22, one labelled the arms of all chromosomes (W5 and the H1A probe was specific to three chromosomes (ch14, ch20, and ch25. Moreover, FISH with H1A resulted in interpretable signals on interphase nuclei in 88% of the cases, while the other probes yielded only dispersed overlapping signals.

  14. SYTO probes: markers of apoptotic cell demise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Skommer, Joanna

    2007-10-01

    As mechanistic studies on tumor cell death advance towards their ultimate translational goal, there is a need for specific, rapid, and high-throughput analytical tools to detect diverse cell demise modes. Patented DNA-binding SYTO probes, for example, are gaining increasing interest as easy-to-use markers of caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. They are proving convenient for tracking apoptosis in diverse hematopoietic cell lines and primary tumor samples, and, due to their spectral characteristics, appear to be useful for the development of multiparameter flow cytometry assays. Herein, several protocols for multiparametric assessment of apoptotic events using SYTO probes are provided. There are protocols describing the use of green fluorescent SYTO 16 and red fluorescent SYTO 17 dyes in combination with plasma membrane permeability markers. Another protocol highlights the multiparametric use of SYTO 16 dye in conjunction with the mitochondrial membrane potential sensitive probe, tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and the plasma membrane permeability marker, 7-aminoactinomycin D (7-AAD).

  15. An Aptamer Bio-barCode (ABC) assay using SPR, RNase H, and probes with RNA and gold-nanorods for anti-cancer drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Jacky Fong-Chuen; Yang, Chengbin; Tsang, Hing Lun; Lau, Pui Man; Yong, Ken-Tye; Ho, Ho Pui; Kong, Siu Kai

    2017-10-07

    With modifications to an ultra-sensitive bio-barcode (BBC) assay, we have developed a next generation aptamer-based bio-barcode (ABC) assay to detect cytochrome-c (Cyto-c), a cell death marker released from cancer cells, for anti-cancer drug screening. An aptamer is a short single-stranded DNA selected from a synthetic DNA library that is capable of binding to its target with high affinity and specificity based on its unique DNA sequence and 3D structure after folding. Similar to the BBC assay, Cyto-c is captured by a micro-magnetic particle (MMP) coated with capturing antibodies (Ab) and an aptamer specifically against Cyto-c to form sandwich structures ([MMP-Ab]-[Cyto-c]-[Aptamer]). After washing and melting, our aptamers, acting as a DNA bio-barcode, are released from the sandwiches and hybridized with the probes specially designed for RNase H for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing. In an aptamer-probe duplex, RNase H digests the RNA in the probe and releases the intact aptamer for another round of hybridization and digestion. With signal enhancement effects from gold-nanorods (Au-NRs) on probes for SPR sensing, the detection limit was found to be 1 nM for the aptamer and 80 pM for Cyto-c. Without the time-consuming DNA amplification steps by PCR, the detection process of this new ABC assay can be completed within three hours. As a proof-of-concept, phenylarsine oxide was found to be a potent agent to kill liver cancer cells with multi-drug resistance at the nano-molar level. This approach thus provides a fast, sensitive and robust tool for anti-cancer drug screening.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of time-resolved fluorescence probes for evaluation of competitive binding to melanocortin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleti, Ramesh; Vagner, Josef; Dehigaspitiya, Dilani Chathurika; Moberg, Valerie E; Elshan, N G R D; Tafreshi, Narges K; Brabez, Nabila; Weber, Craig S; Lynch, Ronald M; Hruby, Victor J; Gillies, Robert J; Morse, David L; Mash, Eugene A

    2013-09-01

    Probes for use in time-resolved fluorescence competitive binding assays at melanocortin receptors based on the parental ligands MSH(4), MSH(7), and NDP-α-MSH were prepared by solid phase synthesis methods, purified, and characterized. The saturation binding of these probes was studied using HEK-293 cells engineered to overexpress the human melanocortin 4 receptor (hMC4R) as well as the human cholecystokinin 2 receptor (hCCK2R). The ratios of non-specific binding to total binding approached unity at high concentrations for each probe. At low probe concentrations, receptor-mediated binding and uptake was discernable, and so probe concentrations were kept as low as possible in determining Kd values. The Eu-DTPA-PEGO-MSH(4) probe exhibited low specific binding relative to non-specific binding, even at low nanomolar concentrations, and was deemed unsuitable for use in competition binding assays. The Eu-DTPA-PEGO probes based on MSH(7) and NDP-α-MSH exhibited Kd values of 27±3.9nM and 4.2±0.48nM, respectively, for binding with hMC4R. These probes were employed in competitive binding assays to characterize the interactions of hMC4R with monovalent and divalent MSH(4), MSH(7), and NDP-α-MSH constructs derived from squalene. Results from assays with both probes reflected only statistical enhancements, suggesting improper ligand spacing on the squalene scaffold for the divalent constructs. The Ki values from competitive binding assays that employed the MSH(7)-based probe were generally lower than the Ki values obtained when the probe based on NDP-α-MSH was employed, which is consistent with the greater potency of the latter probe. The probe based on MSH(7) was also competed with monovalent, divalent, and trivalent MSH(4) constructs that previously demonstrated multivalent binding in competitive binding assays against a variant of the probe based on NDP-α-MSH. Results from these assays confirm multivalent binding, but suggest a more modest increase in avidity for these

  17. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2012-01-22

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed 'toehold exchange' probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg(2+) to 47 mM Mg(2+), and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 µM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination.

  18. Study of borehole probing methods to improve the ground characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimipour, Ali

    Collecting geological information allows for optimizing ground control measures in underground structures. This includes understanding of the joints and discontinuities and rock strength to develop rock mass classifications. An ideal approach to collect such information is through correlating the drilling data from the roofbolters to assess rock strength and void location and properties. The current instrumented roofbolters are capable of providing some information on these properties but not fully developed for accurate ground characterization. To enhance existing systems additional instrumentation and testing was conducted in laboratory and field conditions. However, to define the geology along the boreholes, the use of probing was deemed to be most efficient approach for locating joints and structures in the ground and evaluation of rock strength. Therefore, this research focuses on selection and evaluation of proper borehole probes that can offer a reliable assessment of rock mass structure and rock strength. In particular, attention was paid to borehole televiewer to characterize rock mass structures and joints and development of mechanical rock scratcher for determination of rock strength. Rock bolt boreholes are commonly drilled in the ribs and the roof of underground environments. They are often small (about 1.5 inches) and short (mostly 2-3 meter). Most of them are oriented upward and thus, mostly dry or perhaps wet but not filled with water. No suitable system is available for probing in such conditions to identify the voids/joints and specifically to measure rock strength for evaluation of rock mass and related optimization of ground support design. A preliminary scan of available borehole probes proved that the best options for evaluation of rock structure is through analysis of borehole images, captured by optical televiewers. Laboratory and field trials with showed that these systems can be used to facilitate measurement of the location, frequency and

  19. Fluoromodule-based reporter/probes designed for in vivo fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Chakraborty, Subhasish K.; Sampath, Padma; Rojas, Juan J.; Hou, Weizhou; Saurabh, Saumya; Thorne, Steve H.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Optical imaging of whole, living animals has proven to be a powerful tool in multiple areas of preclinical research and has allowed noninvasive monitoring of immune responses, tumor and pathogen growth, and treatment responses in longitudinal studies. However, fluorescence-based studies in animals are challenging because tissue absorbs and autofluoresces strongly in the visible light spectrum. These optical properties drive development and use of fluorescent labels that absorb and emit at longer wavelengths. Here, we present a far-red absorbing fluoromodule–based reporter/probe system and show that this system can be used for imaging in living mice. The probe we developed is a fluorogenic dye called SC1 that is dark in solution but highly fluorescent when bound to its cognate reporter, Mars1. The reporter/probe complex, or fluoromodule, produced peak emission near 730 nm. Mars1 was able to bind a variety of structurally similar probes that differ in color and membrane permeability. We demonstrated that a tool kit of multiple probes can be used to label extracellular and intracellular reporter–tagged receptor pools with 2 colors. Imaging studies may benefit from this far-red excited reporter/probe system, which features tight coupling between probe fluorescence and reporter binding and offers the option of using an expandable family of fluorogenic probes with a single reporter gene. PMID:26348895

  20. An MR/MRI compatible core holder with the RF probe immersed in the confining fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerian, M.; Balcom, B. J.

    2018-01-01

    An open frame RF probe for high pressure and high temperature MR/MRI measurements was designed, fabricated, and tested. The open frame RF probe was installed inside an MR/MRI compatible metallic core holder, withstanding a maximum pressure and temperature of 5000 psi and 80 °C. The open frame RF probe was tunable for both 1H and 19F resonance frequencies with a 0.2 T static magnetic field. The open frame structure was based on simple pillars of PEEK polymer upon which the RF probe was wound. The RF probe was immersed in the high pressure confining fluid during operation. The open frame structure simplified fabrication of the RF probe and significantly reduced the amount of polymeric materials in the core holder. This minimized the MR background signal detected. Phase encoding MRI methods were employed to map the spin density of a sulfur hexafluoride gas saturating a Berea core plug in the core holder. The SF6 was imaged as a high pressure gas and as a supercritical fluid.

  1. Routinely automated production of 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F] fluorothymidine as a specific molecular imaging probe of tumor cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingwei; Zhang Yingjian; Zhang Yongping

    2011-01-01

    This work was aimed at developing a routine for automated production of 3'-deoxy-3'-[ 18 F]fluorothymidine ( 18 F-FLT), a specific molecular imaging probe of tumor cell proliferation, using one-pot two-step strategy and an upgraded Explora GN module integrated with a semi-preparative HPLC system. Firstly, the nucleophilic [ 18 F] radiofluorination of precursor BDNT with activated 18 F ion was carried out at 120 degree C for 5 min to yield the labeled intermediate 18 F-BDFT. Secondly, the acidic hydrolysis of 18 F-BDFT was run at 110 degree C for 5 min to produce 18 F-FLT after addition of HCl, and 18 F-FLT was purified by HPLC. This automated production of 18 F-FLT is of fast, reliable and multi-run features, being completed within 65 min with radiochemical yield of 15%-25% (without decay correction). The quality control of 18 F-FLT was identical with the radiopharmaceutical requirements, especiallly the radiochemical purity of greater than 99% and high chemical purity and specific activity own to HPLC purification. (authors)

  2. Probing the Binding Interfaces of Protein Complexes Using Gas-Phase H/D Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mistarz, Ulrik H; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F

    2016-01-01

    Fast gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange mediated by ND3 gas and measured by mass spectrometry (gas-phase HDX-MS) is a largely unharnessed, fast, and sensitive method for probing primary- and higher-order polypeptide structure. Labeling of heteroatom-bound non-amide hydrogens in a sub-milliseco......Fast gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange mediated by ND3 gas and measured by mass spectrometry (gas-phase HDX-MS) is a largely unharnessed, fast, and sensitive method for probing primary- and higher-order polypeptide structure. Labeling of heteroatom-bound non-amide hydrogens in a sub......-millisecond time span after electrospray ionization by ND3 gas can provide structural insights into protein conformers present in solution. Here, we have explored the use of gas-phase HDX-MS for probing the higher-order structure and binding interfaces of protein complexes originating from native solution...

  3. Nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation as a unique electronic, structural and thermodynamic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Toellner, Thomas S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Leu, Bogdan M.

    2012-01-01

    (SMS). However, to place these two techniques into some perspective with respect to other methods that yield related information, they display their version of a frequently used map of momentum and energy transfer diagram in figure 17.1. Here, various probes like electrons, neutrons, or light, i.e., Brillouin or Raman, and relatively newer forms of X-ray scattering are placed according to their range of energy and momentum transfer taking place during the measurements. Accordingly, NRIXS is a method that needs to be considered as a complementary probe to inelastic neutron and X-ray scattering, while SMS occupies a unique space due to its sensitivity to magnetism, structural deformations, valence, and spin states.

  4. PRIMEGENSw3: a web-based tool for high-throughput primer and probe design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Garima; Srivastava, Gyan Prakash; Xu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Highly specific and efficient primer and probe design has been a major hurdle in many high-throughput techniques. Successful implementation of any PCR or probe hybridization technique depends on the quality of primers and probes used in terms of their specificity and cross-hybridization. Here we describe PRIMEGENSw3, a set of web-based utilities for high-throughput primer and probe design. These utilities allow users to select genomic regions and to design primer/probe for selected regions in an interactive, user-friendly, and automatic fashion. The system runs the PRIMEGENS algorithm in the back-end on the high-performance server with the stored genomic database or user-provided custom database for cross-hybridization check. Cross-hybridization is checked not only using BLAST but also by checking mismatch positions and energy calculation of potential hybridization hits. The results can be visualized online and also can be downloaded. The average success rate of primer design using PRIMEGENSw3 is ~90 %. The web server also supports primer design for methylated sequences, which is used in epigenetic studies. Stand-alone version of the software is also available for download at the website.

  5. Behavior of Triple Langmuir Probes in Non-Equilibrium Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Ratcliffe, Alicia C.

    2018-01-01

    The triple Langmuir probe is an electrostatic probe in which three probe tips collect current when inserted into a plasma. The triple probe differs from a simple single Langmuir probe in the nature of the voltage applied to the probe tips. In the single probe, a swept voltage is applied to the probe tip to acquire a waveform showing the collected current as a function of applied voltage (I-V curve). In a triple probe three probe tips are electrically coupled to each other with constant voltages applied between each of the tips. The voltages are selected such that they would represent three points on the single Langmuir probe I-V curve. Elimination of the voltage sweep makes it possible to measure time-varying plasma properties in transient plasmas. Under the assumption of a Maxwellian plasma, one can determine the time-varying plasma temperature T(sub e)(t) and number density n(sub e)(t) from the applied voltage levels and the time-histories of the collected currents. In the present paper we examine the theory of triple probe operation, specifically focusing on the assumption of a Maxwellian plasma. Triple probe measurements have been widely employed for a number of pulsed and timevarying plasmas, including pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs), dense plasma focus devices, plasma flows, and fusion experiments. While the equilibrium assumption may be justified for some applications, it is unlikely that it is fully justifiable for all pulsed and time-varying plasmas or for all times during the pulse of a plasma device. To examine a simple non-equilibrium plasma case, we return to basic governing equations of probe current collection and compute the current to the probes for a distribution function consisting of two Maxwellian distributions with different temperatures (the two-temperature Maxwellian). A variation of this method is also employed, where one of the Maxwellians is offset from zero (in velocity space) to add a suprathermal beam of electrons to the tail of the

  6. Fluorescence detection of natural RNA using rationally designed "clickable" oligonucleotide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Anders; Kjems, Jørgen; Astakhova, Kira

    2014-01-01

    Herein a reliable approach to the design of effective fluorescent probes for RNA detection is described. The fluorescence signalling of hybridization by internally positioned polyaromatic hydrocarbons and rhodamine dyes was achieved with a low fluorescence background signal, high fluorescence qua...... quantum yields at ambient and elevated temperature, high selectivity and signal specificity of the probes when binding to miR-7 and circRNA targets....

  7. Tools to probe the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagage, P.O.; Augueres, J.L.; Amiaux, J.; Cara, Ch.; Fontignie, J.; Rio, Y.; Fermon, C.; Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; De Vismes, A.; Cordier, B.; Fesquet, M.; Ferrando, Ph.; Authier, M.; Pantin, E.; Glicenstein, J.F.; Boulade, O.; Refregier, A.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Agnese, P.; Rodriguez, L.; Agnese, P.; Pigot, C.; Duband, L.; Limousin, O.; Delagnes, E.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Carton, P.H.; Starck, J.L.; Bournaud, F.; Teyssier, R.; Audit, E.; Brun, A.S.; Leca, P.; Menache, Ch.; Pomarede, D.; Thooris, B.; Meis, C.

    2009-01-01

    This special issue of Clefs CEA journal is entirely devoted to astrophysics and to the exploration and probing of the Universe. The second part of this dossier, described here, makes a status of the tools used to probe the universe: telescopes, imaging spectrometers, data processing and simulation. Content: A - Telescopes of the future: 1. Seeing further out: JWST: looking back on a past 13 billion years old, Space specifics: the learning curve to know-how, Fabricating a corona-graph mask, SVOM, a satellite to detect the explosions of the first stars to be formed in the Universe; 2. Seeing more precisely: SIMBOL-X, pioneering formation flying, ELT/METIS, a 42-meter giant, One hundred telescopes for the CTA arrays; 3. Seeing wider: Euclid, mapping the extragalactic sky, ANTARES: the neutrino, another cosmic messenger; B - The new generation of imaging spectrometers: Observing the Universe in the submillimeter spectral region, The X-ray Universe, Space cryo-coolers, Out in the extreme, tumultuous Universe, Probing the Sun with GOLF-NG, Focus: From light to imagery; C - Data analysis in astrophysics; D - Numerical simulation in astrophysics: Information technology and theoretical predictions in astrophysics, Supercomputers for a better understanding of the Universe, The visualization of astrophysical simulations, Godunov, a numerical platform for education and research

  8. Structural Basis for Specific Inhibition of tRNA Synthetase by an ATP Competitive Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Pengfei; Han, Hongyan; Wang, Jing; Chen, Kaige; Chen, Xin; Guo, Min

    2015-06-18

    Pharmaceutical inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases demand high species and family specificity. The antimalarial ATP-mimetic cladosporin selectively inhibits Plasmodium falciparum LysRS (PfLysRS). How the binding to a universal ATP site achieves the specificity is unknown. Here we report three crystal structures of cladosporin with human LysRS, PfLysRS, and a Pf-like human LysRS mutant. In all three structures, cladosporin occupies the class defining ATP-binding pocket, replacing the adenosine portion of ATP. Three residues holding the methyltetrahydropyran moiety of cladosporin are critical for the specificity of cladosporin against LysRS over other class II tRNA synthetase families. The species-exclusive inhibition of PfLysRS is linked to a structural divergence beyond the active site that mounts a lysine-specific stabilizing response to binding cladosporin. These analyses reveal that inherent divergence of tRNA synthetase structural assembly may allow for highly specific inhibition even through the otherwise universal substrate binding pocket and highlight the potential for structure-driven drug development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Absolute Molecular Orientation of Isopropanol at Ceria (100) Surfaces: Insight into Catalytic Selectivity from the Interfacial Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doughty, Benjamin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Goverapet Srinivasan, Sriram [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Indian Inst. of Technology (IIT), Rajasthan (India); Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Dongkyu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Ho Nyung [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ma, Ying-Zhong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lutterman, Daniel A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-12

    The initial mechanistic steps underlying heterogeneous chemical catalysis can be described in a framework where the composition, structure, and orientation of molecules adsorbed to reactive interfaces are known. However, extracting this vital information is the limiting step in most cases due in part to challenges in probing the interfacial monolayer with enough chemical specificity to characterize the surface molecular constituents. These challenges are exacerbated at complex or spatially heterogeneous interfaces where competing processes and a distribution of local environments can uniquely drive chemistry. To address these limitations, this work presents a distinctive combination of materials synthesis, surface specific optical experiments, and theory to probe and understand molecular structure at catalytic interfaces. Specifically, isopropanol was adsorbed to surfaces of the model CeO2 catalyst that were synthesized with only the (100) facet exposed. Vibrational sum-frequency generation was used to probe the molecular monolayer, and with the guidance of density functional theory calculations, was used to extract the structure and absolute molecular orientation of isopropanol at the CeO2 (100) surface. Our results show that isopropanol is readily deprotonated at the surface, and through the measured absolute molecular orientation of isopropanol, we obtain new insight into the selectivity of the (100) surface to form propylene. Our findings reveal key insight into the chemical and physical phenomena taking place at pristine interfaces thereby pointing to intuitive structural arguments to describe catalytic selectivity in more complex systems.

  10. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  11. An Ultrasonic Wheel-Array Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, B. W.; Brotherhood, C. J.; Freemantle, R. J.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes the development and modeling of an ultrasonic array wheel probe scanning system. The system operates at 10 MHz using a 64 element array transducer which is 50 mm in length and located in a fluid filled wheel. The wheel is coupled to the test structure dry, or with a small amount of liquid couplant. When the wheel is rolled over the surface of the test structure a defect map (C-Scan) is generated in real-time. The tyre is made from a soft, durable polymer which has very little acoustic loss. Two application studies are presented; the inspection of sealant layers in an aluminum aircraft wing structure and the detection of embedded defects in a thick section carbon composite sample.

  12. Probing Photoinduced Structural Phase Transitions by Fast or Ultra-Fast Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailleau, Hervé Collet, Eric; Buron-Le Cointe, Marylise; Lemée-Cailleau, Marie-Hélène Koshihara, Shin-Ya

    A new frontier in the field of structural science is the emergence of the fast and ultra-fast X-ray science. Recent developments in time-resolved X-ray diffraction promise direct access to the dynamics of electronic, atomic and molecular motions in condensed matter triggered by a pulsed laser irradiation, i.e. to record "molecular movies" during the transformation of matter initiated by light pulse. These laser pump and X-ray probe techniques now provide an outstanding opportunity for the direct observation of a photoinduced structural phase transition as it takes place. The use of X-ray short-pulse of about 100ps around third-generation synchrotron sources allows structural investigations of fast photoinduced processes. Other new X-ray sources, such as laser-produced plasma ones, generate ultra-short pulses down to 100 fs. This opens the way to femtosecond X-ray crystallography, but with rather low X-ray intensities and more limited experimental possibilities at present. However this new ultra-fast science rapidly progresses around these sources and new large-scale projects exist. It is the aim of this contribution to overview the state of art and the perspectives of fast and ultra-fast X-ray scattering techniques to study photoinduced phase transitions (here, the word ultra-fast is used for sub-picosecond time resolution). In particular we would like to largely present the contribution of crystallographic methods in comparison with optical methods, such as pump-probe reflectivity measurements, the reader being not necessary familiar with X-ray scattering. Thus we want to present which type of physical information can be obtained from the positions of the Bragg peaks, their intensity and their shape, as well as from the diffuse scattering beyond Bragg peaks. An important physical feature is to take into consideration the difference in nature between a photoinduced phase transition and conventional homogeneous photoinduced chemical or biochemical processes where

  13. Nanolithography and nanochemistry: probe-related patterning techniques and chemical modification for nanometer-sized devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, D.; Schubert, U.S.

    2004-01-01

    The size regime for devices produced by photolithographic techniques is limited. Therefore, other patterning techniques have been intensively studied to create smaller structures. Scanning-probe-based patterning techniques, such as dip-pen lithography, local force-induced patterning, and local-probe

  14. Surface chemical reactions probed with scanning force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werts, M.P L; van der Vegte, E.W.; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    In this letter we report the study of surface chemical reactions with scanning force microscopy (SFM) with chemical specificity. Using chemically modified SFM probes, we can determine the local surface reaction conversion during a chemical surface modification. The adhesion forces between a

  15. Site-specific electronic structure analysis by channeling EELS and first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Muto, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Yu; Ikeno, Hirokazu; Yoshioka, Satoru; Tanaka, Isao

    2006-01-01

    Site-specific electronic structures were investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) under electron channeling conditions. The Al-K and Mn-L(2,3) electron energy loss near-edge structure (ELNES) of, respectively, NiAl2O4 and Mn3O4 were measured. Deconvolution of the raw spectra with the instrumental resolution function restored the blunt and hidden fine features, which allowed us to interpret the experimental spectral features by comparing with theoretical spectra obtained by first-principles calculations. The present method successfully revealed the electronic structures specific to the differently coordinated cationic sites.

  16. Phenotype- and genotype-specific structural alterations in spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Serena; Battistella, Giovanni; Huddleston, Hailey; Scharf, Rebecca; Fleysher, Lazar; Rumbach, Anna F; Frucht, Steven J; Blitzer, Andrew; Ozelius, Laurie J; Simonyan, Kristina

    2017-04-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia is a focal dystonia characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles that occur selectively during speaking. Although hereditary trends have been reported in up to 16% of patients, the causative etiology of spasmodic dysphonia is unclear, and the influences of various phenotypes and genotypes on disorder pathophysiology are poorly understood. In this study, we examined structural alterations in cortical gray matter and white matter integrity in relationship to different phenotypes and putative genotypes of spasmodic dysphonia to elucidate the structural component of its complex pathophysiology. Eighty-nine patients with spasmodic dysphonia underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging to examine cortical thickness and white matter fractional anisotropy in adductor versus abductor forms (distinct phenotypes) and in sporadic versus familial cases (distinct genotypes). Phenotype-specific abnormalities were localized in the left sensorimotor cortex and angular gyrus and the white matter bundle of the right superior corona radiata. Genotype-specific alterations were found in the left superior temporal gyrus, supplementary motor area, and the arcuate portion of the left superior longitudinal fasciculus. Our findings suggest that phenotypic differences in spasmodic dysphonia arise at the level of the primary and associative areas of motor control, whereas genotype-related pathophysiological mechanisms may be associated with dysfunction of regions regulating phonological and sensory processing. Identification of structural alterations specific to disorder phenotype and putative genotype provides an important step toward future delineation of imaging markers and potential targets for novel therapeutic interventions for spasmodic dysphonia. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Dynamical instability of a spin spiral in an interacting Fermi gas as a probe of the Stoner transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conduit, G. J.; Altman, E.

    2010-10-01

    We propose an experiment to probe ferromagnetic phenomena in an ultracold Fermi gas, while alleviating the sensitivity to three-body loss and competing many-body instabilities. The system is initialized in a small pitch spin spiral, which becomes unstable in the presence of repulsive interactions. To linear order the exponentially growing collective modes exhibit critical slowing down close to the Stoner transition point. Also, to this order, the dynamics are identical on the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic sides of the transition. However, we show that scattering off the exponentially growing modes qualitatively alters the collective mode structure. The critical slowing down is eliminated and in its place a new unstable branch develops at large wave vectors. Furthermore, long-wavelength instabilities are quenched on the paramagnetic side of the transition. We study the experimental observation of the instabilities, specifically addressing the trapping geometry and how phase-contrast imaging will reveal the emerging domain structure. These probes of the dynamical phenomena could allow experiments to detect the transition point and distinguish between the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic regimes.

  18. Dynamical instability of a spin spiral in an interacting Fermi gas as a probe of the Stoner transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conduit, G. J.; Altman, E.

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experiment to probe ferromagnetic phenomena in an ultracold Fermi gas, while alleviating the sensitivity to three-body loss and competing many-body instabilities. The system is initialized in a small pitch spin spiral, which becomes unstable in the presence of repulsive interactions. To linear order the exponentially growing collective modes exhibit critical slowing down close to the Stoner transition point. Also, to this order, the dynamics are identical on the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic sides of the transition. However, we show that scattering off the exponentially growing modes qualitatively alters the collective mode structure. The critical slowing down is eliminated and in its place a new unstable branch develops at large wave vectors. Furthermore, long-wavelength instabilities are quenched on the paramagnetic side of the transition. We study the experimental observation of the instabilities, specifically addressing the trapping geometry and how phase-contrast imaging will reveal the emerging domain structure. These probes of the dynamical phenomena could allow experiments to detect the transition point and distinguish between the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic regimes.

  19. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accardo, Angelo [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); Di Fabrizio, Enzo [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); BIONEM Lab at University Magna Graecia, Campus Salvatore Venuta, Viale Europa 88100, Germaneto-Catanzaro (Italy); Limongi, Tania [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Marinaro, Giovanni [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Riekel, Christian, E-mail: riekel@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-06-10

    A comprehensive review about the use of micro- and nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces as a tool for in situ X-ray scattering investigations of soft matter and biological materials. Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data.

  20. Probing Carrier Transport and Structure-Property Relationship of Highly Ordered Organic Semiconductors at the Two-Dimensional Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhan; Qiao, Jingsi; Gao, Si; Hu, Fengrui; He, Daowei; Wu, Bing; Yang, Ziyi; Xu, Bingchen; Li, Yun; Shi, Yi; Ji, Wei; Wang, Peng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min; Xu, Hangxun; Xu, Jian-Bin; Wang, Xinran

    2016-01-08

    One of the basic assumptions in organic field-effect transistors, the most fundamental device unit in organic electronics, is that charge transport occurs two dimensionally in the first few molecular layers near the dielectric interface. Although the mobility of bulk organic semiconductors has increased dramatically, direct probing of intrinsic charge transport in the two-dimensional limit has not been possible due to excessive disorders and traps in ultrathin organic thin films. Here, highly ordered single-crystalline mono- to tetralayer pentacene crystals are realized by van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy on hexagonal BN. We find that the charge transport is dominated by hopping in the first conductive layer, but transforms to bandlike in subsequent layers. Such an abrupt phase transition is attributed to strong modulation of the molecular packing by interfacial vdW interactions, as corroborated by quantitative structural characterization and density functional theory calculations. The structural modulation becomes negligible beyond the second conductive layer, leading to a mobility saturation thickness of only ∼3  nm. Highly ordered organic ultrathin films provide a platform for new physics and device structures (such as heterostructures and quantum wells) that are not possible in conventional bulk crystals.

  1. DMS-MaPseq for genome-wide or targeted RNA structure probing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubradt, Meghan; Gupta, Paromita; Persad, Sitara; Lambowitz, Alan M; Weissman, Jonathan S; Rouskin, Silvi

    2017-01-01

    Coupling of structure-specific in vivo chemical modification to next-generation sequencing is transforming RNA secondary structure studies in living cells. The dominant strategy for detecting in vivo chemical modifications uses reverse transcriptase truncation products, which introduce biases and necessitate population-average assessments of RNA structure. Here we present dimethyl sulfate (DMS) mutational profiling with sequencing (DMS-MaPseq), which encodes DMS modifications as mismatches using a thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase. DMS-MaPseq yields a high signal-to-noise ratio, can report multiple structural features per molecule, and allows both genome-wide studies and focused in vivo investigations of even low-abundance RNAs. We apply DMS-MaPseq for the first analysis of RNA structure within an animal tissue and to identify a functional structure involved in noncanonical translation initiation. Additionally, we use DMS-MaPseq to compare the in vivo structure of pre-mRNAs with their mature isoforms. These applications illustrate DMS-MaPseq's capacity to dramatically expand in vivo analysis of RNA structure.

  2. The Relationship Between Human Nucleolar Organizer Regions and Nucleoli, Probed by 3D-ImmunoFISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sluis, Marjolein; van Vuuren, Chelly; McStay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    3D-immunoFISH is a valuable technique to compare the localization of DNA sequences and proteins in cells where three-dimensional structure has been preserved. As nucleoli contain a multitude of protein factors dedicated to ribosome biogenesis and form around specific chromosomal loci, 3D-immunoFISH is a particularly relevant technique for their study. In human cells, nucleoli form around transcriptionally active ribosomal gene (rDNA) arrays termed nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) positioned on the p-arms of each of the acrocentric chromosomes. Here, we provide a protocol for fixing and permeabilizing human cells grown on microscope slides such that nucleolar proteins can be visualized using antibodies and NORs visualized by DNA FISH. Antibodies against UBF recognize transcriptionally active rDNA/NORs and NOP52 antibodies provide a convenient way of visualizing the nucleolar volume. We describe a probe designed to visualize rDNA and introduce a probe comprised of NOR distal sequences, which can be used to identify or count individual NORs.

  3. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Khlopov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  4. Rapid detection and identification of pathogenic mycobacteria by combining radiometric and nucleic acid probe methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellner, P.D.; Kiehn, T.E.; Cammarata, R.; Hosmer, M.

    1988-01-01

    The combination of radiometric methodology (BACTEC 12B) and probe technology for recovery and identification of mycobacteria was studied in two large hospital laboratories. The sediment from vials with positive growth indices was tested with DNA probes specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, and Mycobacterium intracellulare. The sensitivity of the radiometric method and the specificity of the probes resulted in a marked reduction in the time to the final report. Biochemical testing could be eliminated on isolates giving a positive reaction with one of the probes. Some 176 isolates of M. tuberculosis, 110 of M. avium, and 5 of M. intracellulare were recovered. Two-thirds of these isolates were detected and identified within 2 weeks of inoculation and the remainder was detected by 4 weeks, a reduction of 5 to 7 weeks to the final report

  5. Crystal Structure of a UDP-glucose-specific Glycosyltransferase from a Mycobacterium Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulton, Zara; McAlister, Adrian; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Brammananth, Rajini; Zaker-Tabrizi, Leyla; Perugini, Matthew A.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Coppel, Ross L.; Crellin, Paul K.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis (Monash); (Melbourne)

    2008-10-24

    Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are a large and ubiquitous family of enzymes that specifically transfer sugar moieties to a range of substrates. Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a large number of GTs, many of which are implicated in cell wall synthesis, yet the majority of these GTs remain poorly characterized. Here, we report the high resolution crystal structures of an essential GT (MAP2569c) from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (a close homologue of Rv1208 from M. tuberculosis) in its apo- and ligand-bound forms. The structure adopted the GT-A fold and possessed the characteristic DXD motif that coordinated an Mn{sup 2+} ion. Atypical of most GTs characterized to date, MAP2569c exhibited specificity toward the donor substrate, UDP-glucose. The structure of this ligated complex revealed an induced fit binding mechanism and provided a basis for this unique specificity. Collectively, the structural features suggested that MAP2569c may adopt a 'retaining' enzymatic mechanism, which has implications for the classification of other GTs in this large superfamily.

  6. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  7. Structural Determinants of Specific Lipid Binding to Potassium Channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weingarth, M.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330985655; Prokofyev, A.; van der Cruijsen, E.A.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330826743; Nand, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337731403; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238; Pongs, O.; Baldus, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314410864

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated specific lipid binding to the pore domain of potassium channels KcsA and chimeric KcsAKv1.3 on the structural and functional level using extensive coarse-grained and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, solid-state NMR, and single channel measurements. We show that, while

  8. Comparison of CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) frequency in colon cancer using different probe- and gene-specific scoring alternatives on recommended multi-gene panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Marianne; Hagland, Hanne R; Søreide, Kjetil

    2014-01-01

    In colorectal cancer a distinct subgroup of tumours demonstrate the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). However, a consensus of how to score CIMP is not reached, and variation in definition may influence the reported CIMP prevalence in tumours. Thus, we sought to compare currently suggested definitions and cut-offs for methylation markers and how they influence CIMP classification in colon cancer. Methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA), with subsequent fragment analysis, was used to investigate methylation of tumour samples. In total, 31 CpG sites, located in 8 different genes (RUNX3, MLH1, NEUROG1, CDKN2A, IGF2, CRABP1, SOCS1 and CACNA1G) were investigated in 64 distinct colon cancers and 2 colon cancer cell lines. The Ogino gene panel includes all 8 genes, in addition to the Weisenberger panel of which only 5 of the 8 genes included were investigated. In total, 18 alternative combinations of scoring of CIMP positivity on probe-, gene-, and panel-level were analysed and compared. For 47 samples (71%), the CIMP status was constant and independent of criteria used for scoring; 34 samples were constantly scored as CIMP negative, and 13 (20%) consistently scored as CIMP positive. Only four of 31 probes (13%) investigated showed no difference in the numbers of positive samples using the different cut-offs. Within the panels a trend was observed that increasing the gene-level stringency resulted in a larger difference in CIMP positive samples than increasing the probe-level stringency. A significant difference between positive samples using 'the most stringent' as compared to 'the least stringent' criteria (20% vs 46%, respectively; pCIMP depending on the cut-offs and genes included in a panel was found, with twice as many positives samples by least compared to most stringent definition used.

  9. Generation of species-specific DNA probes for Leishmania aethiopica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laskay, T.; Kiessling, R.; Rinke deWit, T. F.; Wirth, D. F.

    1991-01-01

    We report here the cloning of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) sequences from Leishmania aethiopica in order to develop a specific and sensitive method for the identification of the parasite. Analysis of the cloned kDNA sequences showed different taxonomic specificities demonstrating sequence diversity within

  10. Characterization of ion-irradiation-induced nanodot structures on InP surfaces by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnaser, Hubert; Radny, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    Surfaces of InP were bombarded by 1.9 keV Ar(+) ions under normal incidence. The total accumulated ion fluence the samples were exposed to was varied from 1 × 10(17) cm(-2) to 3 × 10(18)cm(-2) and ion flux densities f of (0.4-2) × 10(14) cm(-2) s(-1) were used. Nanodot structures were found to evolve on the surface from these ion irradiations, their dimensions however, depend on the specific bombardment conditions. The resulting surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). As a function of ion fluence, the mean radius, height, and spacing of the dots can be fitted by power-law dependences. In order to determine possible local compositional changes in these nanostructures induced by ion impact, selected samples were prepared for atom probe tomography (APT). The results indicate that by APT the composition of individual InP nanodots evolving under ion bombardment could be examined with atomic spatial resolution. At the InP surface, the values of the In/P concentration ratio are distinctly higher over a distance of ~1 nm and amount to 1.3-1.8. However, several aspects critical for the analyses were identified: (i) because of the small dimensions of these nanostructures a successful tip preparation proved very challenging. (ii) The elemental compositions obtained from APT were found to be influenced pronouncedly by the laser pulse energy; typically, low energies result in the correct stoichiometry whereas high ones lead to an inhomogeneous evaporation from the tips and deviations from the nominal composition. (iii) Depending again on the laser energy, a prolific emission of Pn cluster ions was observed, with n ≤ 11. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johannes Bernardus Charles; Khatib, M.G.; Koelmans, W.W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data

  12. A benzothiazole-based fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid detection and imaging in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khac Hong; Hao, Yuanqiang; Zeng, Ke; Fan, Shengnan; Li, Fen; Yuan, Suke; Ding, Xuejing; Xu, Maotian; Liu, You-Nian

    2018-06-01

    A benzothiazole-based turn-on fluorescent probe with a large Stokes shift (190 nm) has been developed for hypochlorous acid detection. The probe displays prompt fluorescence response for HClO with excellent selectivity over other reactive oxygen species as well as a low detection limit of 0.08 μM. The sensing mechanism involves the HClO-induced specific oxidation of oxime moiety of the probe to nitrile oxide, which was confirmed by HPLC-MS technique. Furthermore, imaging studies demonstrated that the probe is cell permeable and can be applied to detect HClO in living cells.

  13. Atomic force microscopy study of the structure function relationships of the biofilm-forming bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Kreth, Jens; Zhu, Lin; Qi, Fengxia; Pelling, Andrew E.; Shi, Wenyuan; Gimzewski, James K.

    2006-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has garnered much interest in recent years for its ability to probe the structure, function and cellular nanomechanics inherent to specific biological cells. In particular, we have used AFM to probe the important structure-function relationships of the bacterium Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans is the primary aetiological agent in human dental caries (tooth decay), and is of medical importance due to the virulence properties of these cells in biofilm initiation and formation, leading to increased tolerance to antibiotics. We have used AFM to characterize the unique surface structures of distinct mutants of S. mutans. These mutations are located in specific genes that encode surface proteins, thus using AFM we have resolved characteristic surface features for mutant strains compared to the wild type. Ultimately, our characterization of surface morphology has shown distinct differences in the local properties displayed by various S. mutans strains on the nanoscale, which is imperative for understanding the collective properties of these cells in biofilm formation.

  14. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  15. Fluorescent Reporters and Biosensors for Probing the Dynamic Behavior of Protein Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. González-Vera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Probing the dynamic activities of protein kinases in real-time in living cells constitutes a major challenge that requires specific and sensitive tools tailored to meet the particular demands associated with cellular imaging. The development of genetically-encoded and synthetic fluorescent biosensors has provided means of monitoring protein kinase activities in a non-invasive fashion in their native cellular environment with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we review existing technologies to probe different dynamic features of protein kinases and discuss limitations where new developments are required to implement more performant tools, in particular with respect to infrared and near-infrared fluorescent probes and strategies which enable improved signal-to-noise ratio and controlled activation of probes.

  16. Smart optical probes for near-infrared fluorescence imaging of Alzheimer's disease pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Skoch, Jesse; Hills, Ivory D.; Swager, Timothy M.; Nesterov, Evgueni E.

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent probes for amyloid-beta (Aβ) are an exciting option for molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease research and may translate to clinical diagnostics. However, Aβ-targeted optical probes often suffer from poor specificity and slow clearance from the brain. We are designing smart optical probes that emit characteristic fluorescence signal only when bound to Aβ. We synthesized a family of dyes and tested Aβ-binding sensitivity with fluorescence spectroscopy and tissue-staining. Select compounds exhibited Aβ-dependent changes in fluorescence quantum yield, lifetime, and emission spectra that may be imaged microscopically or in vivo using new lifetime and spectral fluorescence imaging techniques. Smart optical probes that turn on when bound to Aβ will improve amyloid detection and may enable quantitative molecular imaging in vivo. (orig.)

  17. A new fluorescent pH probe for imaging lysosomes in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hong-Shui; Huang, Shu-Ya; Xu, Yu; Dai, Xi; Miao, Jun-Ying; Zhao, Bao-Xiang

    2014-01-15

    A new rhodamine B-based pH fluorescent probe has been synthesized and characterized. The probe responds to acidic pH with short response time, high selectivity and sensitivity, and exhibits a more than 20-fold increase in fluorescence intensity within the pH range of 7.5-4.1 with the pKa value of 5.72, which is valuable to study acidic organelles in living cells. Also, it has been successfully applied to HeLa cells, for its low cytotoxicity, brilliant photostability, good membrane permeability and no 'alkalizing effect' on lysosomes. The results demonstrate that this probe is a lysosome-specific probe, which can selectively stain lysosomes and monitor lysosomal pH changes in living cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Activity, specificity, and probe design for the smallpox virus protease K7L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshin, Alexander E; Drag, Marcin; Gombosuren, Naran; Wei, Ge; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Satterthwait, Arnold C; Strongin, Alex Y; Liddington, Robert C; Salvesen, Guy S

    2012-11-16

    The K7L gene product of the smallpox virus is a protease implicated in the maturation of viral proteins. K7L belongs to protease Clan CE, which includes distantly related cysteine proteases from eukaryotes, pathogenic bacteria, and viruses. Here, we describe its recombinant high level expression, biochemical mechanism, substrate preference, and regulation. Earlier studies inferred that the orthologous I7L vaccinia protease cleaves at an AG-X motif in six viral proteins. Our data for K7L suggest that the AG-X motif is necessary but not sufficient for optimal cleavage activity. Thus, K7L requires peptides extended into the P7 and P8 positions for efficient substrate cleavage. Catalytic activity of K7L is substantially enhanced by homodimerization, by the substrate protein P25K as well as by glycerol. RNA and DNA also enhance cleavage of the P25K protein but not of synthetic peptides, suggesting that nucleic acids augment the interaction of K7L with its protein substrate. Library-based peptide preference analyses enabled us to design an activity-based probe that covalently and selectively labels K7L in lysates of transfected and infected cells. Our study thus provides proof-of-concept for the design of inhibitors and probes that may contribute both to a better understanding of the role of K7L in the virus life cycle and the design of novel anti-virals.

  19. Design, validation and annotation of transcriptome-wide oligonucleotide probes for the oligochaete annelid Eisenia fetida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Gong

    Full Text Available High density oligonucleotide probe arrays have increasingly become an important tool in genomics studies. In organisms with incomplete genome sequence, one strategy for oligo probe design is to reduce the number of unique probes that target every non-redundant transcript through bioinformatic analysis and experimental testing. Here we adopted this strategy in making oligo probes for the earthworm Eisenia fetida, a species for which we have sequenced transcriptome-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Our objectives were to identify unique transcripts as targets, to select an optimal and non-redundant oligo probe for each of these target ESTs, and to annotate the selected target sequences. We developed a streamlined and easy-to-follow approach to the design, validation and annotation of species-specific array probes. Four 244K-formatted oligo arrays were designed using eArray and were hybridized to a pooled E. fetida cRNA sample. We identified 63,541 probes with unsaturated signal intensities consistently above the background level. Target transcripts of these probes were annotated using several sequence alignment algorithms. Significant hits were obtained for 37,439 (59% probed targets. We validated and made publicly available 63.5K oligo probes so the earthworm research community can use them to pursue ecological, toxicological, and other functional genomics questions. Our approach is efficient, cost-effective and robust because it (1 does not require a major genomics core facility; (2 allows new probes to be easily added and old probes modified or eliminated when new sequence information becomes available, (3 is not bioinformatics-intensive upfront but does provide opportunities for more in-depth annotation of biological functions for target genes; and (4 if desired, EST orthologs to the UniGene clusters of a reference genome can be identified and selected in order to improve the target gene specificity of designed probes. This approach is

  20. Scalable Fabrication Framework of Implantable Ultrathin and Flexible Probes with Biodegradable Sacrificial Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiangbing; Wang, Yuan; Qing, Quan

    2017-12-13

    For long-term biocompatibility and performance, implanted probes need to further reduce their size and mechanical stiffness to match that of the surrounding cells, which, however, makes accurate and minimally invasive insertion operations difficult due to lack of rigidity and brings additional complications in assembling and surgery. Here, we report a scalable fabrication framework of implantable probes utilizing biodegradable sacrificial layers to address this challenge. Briefly, the integrated biodegradable sacrificial layer can dissolve in physiological fluids shortly after implantation, which allows the in situ formation of functional ultrathin film structures off of the initial small and rigid supporting backbone. We show that the dissolution of this layer does not affect the viability and excitability of neuron cells in vitro. We have demonstrated two types of probes that can be used out of the box, including (1) a compact probe that spontaneously forms three-dimensional bend-up devices only after implantation and (2) an ultraflexible probe as thin as 2 μm attached to a small silicon shaft that can be accurately delivered into the tissue and then get fully released in situ without altering its shape and position because the support is fully retracted. We have obtained a >93% yield of the bend-up structure, and its geometry and stiffness can be systematically tuned. The robustness of the ultraflexible probe has been tested in tissue-mimicking agarose gels with <1% fluctuation in the test resistance. Our work provides a general strategy to prepare ultrasmall and flexible implantable probes that allow high insertion accuracy and minimal surgical damages with the best biocompatibility.

  1. Atom Probe Analysis of Ex Situ Gas-Charged Stable Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Daniel; Bagot, Paul A J; Moody, Michael P

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we report on the atom probe tomography analysis of two metallic hydrides formed by pressurized charging using an ex situ hydrogen charging cell, in the pressure range of 200-500 kPa (2-5 bar). Specifically we report on the deuterium charging of Pd/Rh and V systems. Using this ex situ system, we demonstrate the successful loading and subsequent atom probe analysis of deuterium within a Pd/Rh alloy, and demonstrate that deuterium is likely present within the oxide-metal interface of a native oxide formed on vanadium. Through these experiments, we demonstrate the feasibility of ex situ hydrogen analysis for hydrides via atom probe tomography, and thus a practical route to three-dimensional imaging of hydrogen in hydrides at the atomic scale.

  2. Deep Interior: Probing the Structure of Primitive Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, Erik; Scheeres, Daniel; Safaeinili, Ali

    Deep Interior is a mature Discovery-class mission concept focused on probing the geophysical behavior of primitive bodies, from the mechanics of their exterior materials to the structures of their interiors. Its theme is to discover how small bodies work - to learn the natural origin and evolution of asteroids, comets and other primitive bodies through radar reflection tomography and through detailed observations of the local and global effects of cratering. Learning the structure and mechanical response of asteroids and comets is also a precursor to resource utilization and hazardous asteroid mitigation. Overall the mission is aligned with NASA strategic sub-goal 3C, to advance scientific knowledge of the origin and history of the solar system ... and the hazards and resources present as humans explore space. Deep Interior deploys no complex landers or sub-spacecraft; the scientific instruments are a radar and a camera. A blast cratering experiments triggered by grenades leads to a low cost seismological investigation which complements the radar investigation. A desired addition is an imaging spectrometer. The science instruments are high heritage, as are the navigation techniques for orbiting and station-keeping. The mission conducts the following investigations at one or more asteroids: Radar Reflection Tomography (RRT). The first science phase is to operate a penetrating radar during each several-month rendezvous, deployed in reflection mode in the manner of ongoing radar investigations underway by Mars Express, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and Kaguya. The RRT technique (Safaeinili et al., MAPS 2002) is analogous to performing a "CAT scan" from orbit: closely sampled radar echoes are processed to yield volumetric maps of mechanical and compositional boundaries, and to measure interior dielectric properties. Deep Interior utilizes a polar orbit (or station keeping) while the asteroid spins underneath; the result is to "peel the apple" with thousands of unique

  3. Multifunctional gadolinium-based dendritic macromolecules as liver targeting imaging probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kui; Liu, Gang; He, Bin; Wu, Yao; Gong, Qingyong; Song, Bin; Ai, Hua; Gu, Zhongwei

    2011-04-01

    The quest for highly efficient and safe contrast agents has become the key factor for successful application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The gadolinium (Gd) based dendritic macromolecules, with precise and tunable nanoscopic sizes, are excellent candidates as multivalent MRI probes. In this paper, a novel series of Gd-based multifunctional peptide dendritic probes (generation 2, 3, and 4) possessing highly controlled structures and single molecular weight were designed and prepared as liver MRI probes. These macromolecular Gd-ligand agents exhibited up to 3-fold increase in T(1) relaxivity comparing to Gd-DTPA complexes. No obvious in vitro cytotoxicity was observed from the measured concentrations. These dendritic probes were further functionalized with multiple galactosyl moieties and led to much higher cell uptake in vitro as demonstrated in T(1)-weighted scans. During in vivo animal studies, the probes provided better signal intensity (SI) enhancement in mouse liver, especially at 60 min post-injection, with the most efficient enhancement from the galactosyl moiety decorated third generation dendrimer. The imaging results were verified with analysis of Gd content in liver tissues. The design strategy of multifunctional Gd-ligand peptide dendritic macromolecules in this study may be used for developing other sensitive MRI probes with targeting capability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Site-Specific Characterization of Cytochrome P450cam Conformations by Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basom, Edward J; Maj, Michał; Cho, Minhaeng; Thielges, Megan C

    2016-06-21

    Conformational changes are central to protein function but challenging to characterize with both high spatial and temporal precision. The inherently fast time scale and small chromophores of infrared (IR) spectroscopy are well-suited for characterization of potentially rapidly fluctuating environments, and when frequency-resolved probes are incorporated to overcome spectral congestion, enable characterization of specific sites in proteins. We selectively incorporated p-cyanophenylalanine (CNF) as a vibrational probe at five distinct locations in the enzyme cytochrome P450cam and used IR spectroscopy to characterize the environments in substrate and/or ligand complexes reflecting those in the catalytic cycle. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to provide a structural basis for spectral interpretation. Together the experimental and simulation data suggest that the CN frequencies are sensitive to both long-range influences, resulting from the particular location of a residue within the enzyme, as well as short-range influences from hydrogen bonding and packing interactions. The IR spectra demonstrate that the environments and effects of substrate and/or ligand binding are different at each position probed and also provide evidence that a single site can experience multiple environments. This study illustrates how IR spectroscopy, when combined with the spectral decongestion and spatial selectivity afforded by CNF incorporation, provides detailed information about protein structural changes that underlie function.

  5. Restoration of high-resolution AFM images captured with broken probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. F.; Corrigan, D.; Forman, C.; Jarvis, S.; Kokaram, A.

    2012-03-01

    A type of artefact is induced by damage of the scanning probe when the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) captures a material surface structure with nanoscale resolution. This artefact has a dramatic form of distortion rather than the traditional blurring artefacts. Practically, it is not easy to prevent the damage of the scanning probe. However, by using natural image deblurring techniques in image processing domain, a comparatively reliable estimation of the real sample surface structure can be generated. This paper introduces a novel Hough Transform technique as well as a Bayesian deblurring algorithm to remove this type of artefact. The deblurring result is successful at removing blur artefacts in the AFM artefact images. And the details of the fibril surface topography are well preserved.

  6. Genotypic characterization of Rickettsiae by DNA probes generated from Rickettsia Prowazekii DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demkin, V.V.; Rydkina, E.B.; Likhoded, L.Ya.; Ignatovich, V.F.; Genig, V.A.; Balayeva, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    Southern blot analysis of HindIII-cleaved rickettsial DNA was used for genotypic characterization of the typhus group (TG) species (R. prowazekii, R. typhi, R. canada) and a few species were of the spotted fever group (SFG)rickettsiae (R. sibirica, R. conorii, R. akari). Four different DNA probes were employed. PBH11 and PBH13 probes were morphospecific HindIII fragment of R prowazekii DNA. MW218 probe contained the gene for 51 K antigen and MW264 probe contained the citrate synthase gene of R. prowazekii. All the probes hybridized with the tested TG and SFG rickettsial DNAs, forming from 1 to 5 bands, but they did not with R. tsutsudamushi or C. burnetii DNAs. All the probes demonstrated specific hybridization pattern with TG species and R. akari. PBH11. PBH13 and MW264 probes clearly distinguished R. sibirica and R. conorii from the other tested rickettsiae, but not from each other. However, these two species differed slightly with MW218 probe. Several strains of each species were analyzed in this way and except for strains of R. conorii identical intra-species pattern were obtained. These data lead us to consider the obtained hybridization patterns as criteria for genotypic identification. (author)

  7. A method for probing the mutational landscape of amyloid structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Charles W; Waldispühl, Jérôme; Lis, Mieszko; Halfmann, Randal; Devadas, Srinivas; Lindquist, Susan; Berger, Bonnie

    2011-07-01

    Proteins of all kinds can self-assemble into highly ordered β-sheet aggregates known as amyloid fibrils, important both biologically and clinically. However, the specific molecular structure of a fibril can vary dramatically depending on sequence and environmental conditions, and mutations can drastically alter amyloid function and pathogenicity. Experimental structure determination has proven extremely difficult with only a handful of NMR-based models proposed, suggesting a need for computational methods. We present AmyloidMutants, a statistical mechanics approach for de novo prediction and analysis of wild-type and mutant amyloid structures. Based on the premise of protein mutational landscapes, AmyloidMutants energetically quantifies the effects of sequence mutation on fibril conformation and stability. Tested on non-mutant, full-length amyloid structures with known chemical shift data, AmyloidMutants offers roughly 2-fold improvement in prediction accuracy over existing tools. Moreover, AmyloidMutants is the only method to predict complete super-secondary structures, enabling accurate discrimination of topologically dissimilar amyloid conformations that correspond to the same sequence locations. Applied to mutant prediction, AmyloidMutants identifies a global conformational switch between Aβ and its highly-toxic 'Iowa' mutant in agreement with a recent experimental model based on partial chemical shift data. Predictions on mutant, yeast-toxic strains of HET-s suggest similar alternate folds. When applied to HET-s and a HET-s mutant with core asparagines replaced by glutamines (both highly amyloidogenic chemically similar residues abundant in many amyloids), AmyloidMutants surprisingly predicts a greatly reduced capacity of the glutamine mutant to form amyloid. We confirm this finding by conducting mutagenesis experiments. Our tool is publically available on the web at http://amyloid.csail.mit.edu/. lindquist_admin@wi.mit.edu; bab@csail.mit.edu.

  8. STM-SQUID probe microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Tadayuki; Tachiki, Minoru; Itozaki, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a STM-SQUID probe microscope. A high T C SQUID probe microscope was combined with a scanning tunneling microscope for investigation of samples at room temperature in air. A high permeability probe needle was used as a magnetic flux guide to improve the spatial resolution. The probe with tip radius of less than 100 nm was prepared by microelectropolishing. The probe was also used as a scanning tunneling microscope tip. Topography of the sample surface could be measured by the scanning tunneling microscope with high spatial resolution prior to observation by SQUID microscopy. The SQUID probe microscope image could be observed while keeping the distance from the sample surface to the probe tip constant. We observed a topographic image and a magnetic image of Ni fine pattern and also a magnetically recorded hard disk. Furthermore we have investigated a sample vibration method of the static magnetic field emanating from a sample with the aim of achieving a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio

  9. Characterization of coating probe with Ti-DLC for electrical scanning probe microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shia Xiaolei; Guo Liqiu; Bai Yang; Qiao Lijie

    2011-01-01

    In electrical scanning probe microscope (ESPM) applications, the wear and conductivity of the probe are undoubtedly serious concerns since they affect the integrity of the measurements. This study investigates the characterization of Ti doped diamond-like-carbon (DLC) as coating material on a silicon cantilever for ESPM. We deposited a layer of Ti-DLC thin film on the surface of Si cantilever by magnetron sputtering. The morphology and composition of the Ti-DLC films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. We also compared the wear resistance, electric conductivity and scanning image quality of the Ti-DLC-coated probes with those of commercially available conductive probes. The results showed that the electric conductivity and the scanning image quality of the Ti-DLC-coated probes were the same as the commercial conductive probes, while the wear resistance and service life was significantly better.

  10. A Common Probe Design for Multiple Planetary Destinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, H. H.; Allen, G. A., Jr.; Alunni, A. I.; Amato, M. J.; Atkinson, D. H.; Bienstock, B. J.; Cruz, J. R.; Dillman, R. A.; Cianciolo, A. D.; Elliott, J. O.; hide

    2018-01-01

    Atmospheric probes have been successfully flown to planets and moons in the solar system to conduct in situ measurements. They include the Pioneer Venus multi-probes, the Galileo Jupiter probe, and Huygens probe. Probe mission concepts to five destinations, including Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, have all utilized similar-shaped aeroshells and concept of operations, namely a 45-degree sphere cone shape with high density heatshield material and parachute system for extracting the descent vehicle from the aeroshell. Each concept designed its probe to meet specific mission requirements and to optimize mass, volume, and cost. At the 2017 International Planetary Probe Workshop (IPPW), NASA Headquarters postulated that a common aeroshell design could be used successfully for multiple destinations and missions. This "common probe"� design could even be assembled with multiple copies, properly stored, and made available for future NASA missions, potentially realizing savings in cost and schedule and reducing the risk of losing technologies and skills difficult to sustain over decades. Thus the NASA Planetary Science Division funded a study to investigate whether a common probe design could meet most, if not all, mission needs to the five planetary destinations with extreme entry environments. The Common Probe study involved four NASA Centers and addressed these issues, including constraints and inefficiencies that occur in specifying a common design. Study methodology: First, a notional payload of instruments for each destination was defined based on priority measurements from the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Steep and shallow entry flight path angles (EFPA) were defined for each planet based on qualification and operational g-load limits for current, state-of-the-art instruments. Interplanetary trajectories were then identified for a bounding range of EFPA. Next, 3-degrees-of-freedom simulations for entry trajectories were run using the entry state

  11. Broadening the applications of the atom probe technique by ultraviolet femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hono, K., E-mail: kazuhiro.hono@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Ohkubo, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Chen, Y.M.; Kodzuka, M. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Oh-ishi, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Sepehri-Amin, H. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Li, F. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Kinno, T. [Corporate R and D Center, Toshiba Corporation, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 212-8582 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Tomiya, S.; Kanitani, Y. [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Sony Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0021 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Laser assisted field evaporation using ultraviolet (UV) wavelength gives rise to better mass resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in atom probe mass spectra of metals, semiconductors and insulators compared to infrared and green lasers. Combined with the site specific specimen preparation techniques using the lift-out and annular Ga ion milling in a focused ion beam machine, a wide variety of materials including insulating oxides can be quantitatively analyzed by the three-dimensional atom probe using UV laser assisted field evaporation. After discussing laser irradiation conditions for optimized atom probe analyses, recent atom probe tomography results on oxides, semiconductor devices and grain boundaries of sintered magnets are presented. -- Research highlights: {yields} Application of ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond pulsed laser in a three dimensional atom probe (3DAP). {yields} Improved mass resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in atom probe mass spectra using UV laser. {yields} UV laser facilitates 3DAP analysis of insulating oxides. {yields} Quantitative analysis of wide variety of materials including insulating oxides using UV femotosecond laser.