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Sample records for specific intermediate hosts

  1. Larval helminths in intermediate hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Poulin, R

    2005-01-01

    Density-dependent effects on parasite fitness have been documented from adult helminths in their definitive hosts. There have, however, been no studies on the cost of sharing an intermediate host with other parasites in terms of reduced adult parasite fecundity. Even if larval parasites suffer...... transmission to their bird definitive host by predation. In experimental infections, we found an intensity-dependent establishment success, with a decrease in the success rate of cercariae developing into infective metacercariae with an increasing dose of cercariae applied to each amphipod. In natural...... the two species. Our results thus indicate that the infracommunity of larval helminths in their intermediate host is interactive and that any density-dependent effect in the intermediate host may have lasting effects on individual parasite fitness....

  2. Effect of Intermediate Hosts on Emerging Zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing-An; Chen, Fangyuan; Fan, Shengjie

    2017-08-01

    Most emerging zoonotic pathogens originate from animals. They can directly infect humans through natural reservoirs or indirectly through intermediate hosts. As a bridge, an intermediate host plays different roles in the transmission of zoonotic pathogens. In this study, we present three types of pathogen transmission to evaluate the effect of intermediate hosts on emerging zoonotic diseases in human epidemics. These types are identified as follows: TYPE 1, pathogen transmission without an intermediate host for comparison; TYPE 2, pathogen transmission with an intermediate host as an amplifier; and TYPE 3, pathogen transmission with an intermediate host as a vessel for genetic variation. In addition, we established three mathematical models to elucidate the mechanisms underlying zoonotic disease transmission according to these three types. Stability analysis indicated that the existence of intermediate hosts increased the difficulty of controlling zoonotic diseases because of more difficult conditions to satisfy for the disease to die out. The human epidemic would die out under the following conditions: TYPE 1: [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]; TYPE 2: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]; and TYPE 3: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] Simulation with similar parameters demonstrated that intermediate hosts could change the peak time and number of infected humans during a human epidemic; intermediate hosts also exerted different effects on controlling the prevalence of a human epidemic with natural reservoirs in different periods, which is important in addressing problems in public health. Monitoring and controlling the number of natural reservoirs and intermediate hosts at the right time would successfully manage and prevent the prevalence of emerging zoonoses in humans.

  3. Data from: Two different strategies of host manipulation allow parasites to persist in intermediate-definitive host systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Lana; Langevelde, van F.

    2017-01-01

    Trophically-transmitted parasites start their development in an intermediate host, before they finish the development in their definitive host when the definitive host preys on the intermediate host. In intermediate-definitive host systems, two strategies of host manipulation have been evolved:

  4. Echinococcus multilocularis and Its Intermediate Host: A Model of Parasite-Host Interplay

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    Dominique Angèle Vuitton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Host-parasite interactions in the E. multilocularis-intermediate host model depend on a subtle balance between cellular immunity, which is responsible for host's resistance towards the metacestode, the larval stage of the parasite, and tolerance induction and maintenance. The pathological features of alveolar echinococcosis. the disease caused by E. multilocularis, are related both to parasitic growth and to host's immune response, leading to fibrosis and necrosis, The disease spectrum is clearly dependent on the genetic background of the host as well as on acquired disturbances of Th1-related immunity. The laminated layer of the metacestode, and especially its carbohydrate components, plays a major role in tolerance induction. Th2-type and anti-inflammatory cytokines, IL-10 and TGF-β, as well as nitric oxide, are involved in the maintenance of tolerance and partial inhibition of cytotoxic mechanisms. Results of studies in the experimental mouse model and in patients suggest that immune modulation with cytokines, such as interferon-α, or with specific antigens could be used in the future to treat patients with alveolar echinococcosis and/or to prevent this very severe parasitic disease.

  5. On the diversity of mollusc intermediate hosts of Angiostrongylus costaricensis Morera & Cespedes, 1971 in southern Brazil

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    Carlos Graeff Teixeira

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Veronicellid slugs are considered the most important intermediate hosts of Angiostrongylus costaricensis, an intra-arterial nematode of rodents. Studies undertaken in three localities in southern Brazil led to identification of molluscs other than veronicellid slugs as hosts of A. costaricensis: Limax maximus, Limax flavus and Bradybaena similaris. These data indicate a low host specificity of larval stages of A. costaricensis, as it has been reported to other congeneric species.

  6. The burrowing behaviour of Bulinus nyassanus , intermediate host ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is evidence that transmission of Schistosoma haematobium has increased in some areas in the southern part of Lake Malaŵi, where transmission occurs both along open shorelines and at inland sites. Transmission along open shores in the lake is via Bulinus nyassanus as intermediate host. Although the snail is ...

  7. Gut content studies of aquatic snail intermediate hosts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural diets of Bulinus (P) globosus, Bulinus rohlfsi and Biomphalaria pfeifferi, gastropod intermediate hosts of the Schistosoma parasite were investigated by examining their gut content. It was found that the diet of B. globosus consisted of rotifers, various forms of algae, diatoms, macrophytic tissue and spore-like materials ...

  8. The Potential Role Played by Various Livestock Intermediate Hosts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the potential role played by cattle, sheep, goats and pigs in the transmission of hydatidosis in Kenya. The fertility and viability status of the hydatid cysts collected from these livestock intermediate hosts, at slaughter, were used in this evaluation. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in ...

  9. Mesoscale spatiotemporal variability in a complex host-parasite system influenced by intermediate host body size

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    Sara M. Rodríguez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Parasites are essential components of natural communities, but the factors that generate skewed distributions of parasite occurrences and abundances across host populations are not well understood. Methods Here, we analyse at a seascape scale the spatiotemporal relationships of parasite exposure and host body-size with the proportion of infected hosts (i.e., prevalence and aggregation of parasite burden across ca. 150 km of the coast and over 22 months. We predicted that the effects of parasite exposure on prevalence and aggregation are dependent on host body-sizes. We used an indirect host-parasite interaction in which migratory seagulls, sandy-shore molecrabs, and an acanthocephalan worm constitute the definitive hosts, intermediate hosts, and endoparasite, respectively. In such complex systems, increments in the abundance of definitive hosts imply increments in intermediate hosts’ exposure to the parasite’s dispersive stages. Results Linear mixed-effects models showed a significant, albeit highly variable, positive relationship between seagull density and prevalence. This relationship was stronger for small (cephalothorax length >15 mm than large molecrabs (<15 mm. Independently of seagull density, large molecrabs carried significantly more parasites than small molecrabs. The analysis of the variance-to-mean ratio of per capita parasite burden showed no relationship between seagull density and mean parasite aggregation across host populations. However, the amount of unexplained variability in aggregation was strikingly higher in larger than smaller intermediate hosts. This unexplained variability was driven by a decrease in the mean-variance scaling in heavily infected large molecrabs. Conclusions These results show complex interdependencies between extrinsic and intrinsic population attributes on the structure of host-parasite interactions. We suggest that parasite accumulation—a characteristic of indirect host

  10. Maximum host survival at intermediate parasite infection intensities.

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    Martin Stjernman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although parasitism has been acknowledged as an important selective force in the evolution of host life histories, studies of fitness effects of parasites in wild populations have yielded mixed results. One reason for this may be that most studies only test for a linear relationship between infection intensity and host fitness. If resistance to parasites is costly, however, fitness may be reduced both for hosts with low infection intensities (cost of resistance and high infection intensities (cost of parasitism, such that individuals with intermediate infection intensities have highest fitness. Under this scenario one would expect a non-linear relationship between infection intensity and fitness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using data from blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus in southern Sweden, we investigated the relationship between the intensity of infection of its blood parasite (Haemoproteus majoris and host survival to the following winter. Presence and intensity of parasite infections were determined by microscopy and confirmed using PCR of a 480 bp section of the cytochrome-b-gene. While a linear model suggested no relationship between parasite intensity and survival (F = 0.01, p = 0.94, a non-linear model showed a significant negative quadratic effect (quadratic parasite intensity: F = 4.65, p = 0.032; linear parasite intensity F = 4.47, p = 0.035. Visualization using the cubic spline technique showed maximum survival at intermediate parasite intensities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that failing to recognize the potential for a non-linear relationship between parasite infection intensity and host fitness may lead to the potentially erroneous conclusion that the parasite is harmless to its host. Here we show that high parasite intensities indeed reduced survival, but this effect was masked by reduced survival for birds heavily suppressing their parasite intensities. Reduced survival among hosts with low

  11. Finding and recognition of the snail intermediate hosts by 3 species of echinostome cercariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, W; Körner, M; Hutterer, E; Wegner, M; Haberl, B

    1995-02-01

    Finding and recognition of snail second intermediate hosts was studied in cercariae of 3 echinostome species. The cercariae of the 3 species accumulated in snail-conditioned water (SCW) with 2 types of orientation mechanisms and responded to different small molecular weight ( snails and to disperse. Attachments occurred specifically to snail hosts in the 3 species and were stimulated by macromolecular mucus compounds, probably mainly by viscoelastic properties of the mucus. The results of this study show, that host-finding mechanisms and the stimulating host cues of snail invading echinostome cercariae differ considerably from those of schistosome miracidia.

  12. Galba truncatula and Fasciola hepatica: Genetic costructures and interactions with intermediate host dispersal.

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    Correa, Ana C; De Meeûs, Thierry; Dreyfuss, Gilles; Rondelaud, Daniel; Hurtrez-Boussès, Sylvie

    2017-11-01

    Antagonistic interactions between hosts and parasites are key structuring forces in natural populations. Demographic factors like extinction, migration and the effective population size shape host-parasite metapopulational dynamics. Therefore, to understand the evolution of host-parasite systems it is necessary to study the distribution of the genetic variation of both entities simultaneously. In this paper, we investigate the population genetics co-structure of parasites and hosts within a metapopulation of the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, and two of its intermediate hosts, the main intermediate host in Europe, Galba truncatula, and a new intermediate host, Omphiscola glabra, in Central France. Our results reveal an absence of specificity of flukes as regard to the two alternative hosts though O. glabra shows higher prevalence of F. hepatica. Host and parasites displayed contrasting population genetics structure with very small, highly inbred (selfing) and strongly isolated G. truncatula populations and much bigger, panmictic and more dispersive F. hepatica. This could indicate a local adaptation of the parasite and a local maladaptation of the host. We also unveil a parasite-mediated biased population genetics structure suggesting that infected G. truncatula disperse more; have higher dispersal survival than uninfected snails or, more likely, that immigrant snails are infected more often than local snails (local parasites are less adapted to local hosts). Finally, an absence, or at least an ambiguous signature of isolation by distance was observed in both host and parasite population. A very weak migration rate for G. truncatula provides a reasonable explanation for this ambiguous result. Alternatively, smaller sample sizes combined with modest migration rates might explain the difficulties to unveil the signal in F. hepatica. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Predictors of Echinococcus multilocularis prevalence in definitive and intermediate hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeuchi-Storm, Nao; Woolsey, Ian David; Jensen, Per Moestrup

    2015-01-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis (EM) is a pathogenic and potentially fatal cestode causing human alveolar echinococcosis (AE). A meta-analysis was conducted using a generalized estimation equation approach (GEE) to assess the effect of taxonomic, environmental and diagnostic variables on EM prevalence...... in different hosts. Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) had significantly higher prevalence of EM than domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris), with the diagnostic method playing an important factor in assessing prevalence. For intermediate hosts genera was significantly associated with EM prevalence although...... there was some indication of publication bias in this dataset. This study also highlights the possible importance of temperature and precipitation to EM transmission. This implies the possibility of a changing climate affecting the future distribution of the parasite....

  14. Intermediate hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Tenerife, Spain.

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    Aarón Martin-Alonso

    Full Text Available The nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the causative agent of human angiostrongyliasis, the main clinical manifestation of which is eosinophilic meningitis. Although this parasite has been found recently in its definitive rat host in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain, showing a widespread distribution over the north-east part of the island, there are no available data regarding which snail and/or slug species are acting as intermediate hosts on this island. Consequently, the objective of this work was to determine the possible role of three mollusc species, Plutonia lamarckii, Cornu aspersum and Theba pisana, as intermediate hosts of A. cantonensis in Tenerife. Between 2011 and 2014, 233 molluscs were collected from five biotopes where rats had been found previously to harbor either adult worms or antibodies against A. cantonensis, and the identification was carried out on the basis of morphological features and a LAMP technique. The prevalence of A. cantonensis larvae in the mollusc samples, based on morphological identification, was 19.3%, whereas 59 out of the 98 individuals (60.2% analyzed by LAMP were positive. Positive results were obtained for the three mollusc species analyzed and two of the positive samples, both obtained from P. lamarckii, were confirmed as positive by 18S rRNA and ITS1 PCR. Sequence analysis of 18S rRNA PCR products showed 100% similarity with previously published A. cantonensis sequences. These results may be relevant from a public health point of view, since all the biotopes from which the samples were obtained were in inhabited areas or areas with human activity, but it is also important from the perspective of a possible transmission to other accidental hosts, such as dogs and horses, animals that are present in some of the areas analyzed.

  15. Molecular assessment of trematode co-infection and intraspecific competition in molluscan intermediate hosts.

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    Thiele, Elizabeth A; Minchella, Dennis J

    2013-01-01

    In natural populations of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni, parasite distribution among snail intermediate hosts is generally overdispersed, such that a small proportion of hosts harbor the majority of parasite genotypes. Within these few infected snails, researchers have found that it can be common for hosts to harbor multiple parasite genotypes, creating circumstances in which co-infecting parasites are faced with potential competition over limited host resources. Much theoretical modeling has focused on parasite competition, especially regarding the influence of co-infection on parasite exploitation strategy evolution. However, particularly in the case of intra-molluscan intermediate stages, empirical investigations of parasite-parasite competition have often hinged on the untested assumption that co-exposure produces co-infection. That is, infected hosts exposed to multiple strains have been assumed to harbor multiple strains, regardless of the true nature of the infection outcome. Here we describe a real-time quantitative PCR method to distinguish the conditions of multiple- versus single-strain infection, as well as quantify the relative larval output of co-infecting strains. We applied the method to an empirical investigation of intraspecific parasite competition between S. mansoni strains within the intermediate snail host Biomphalaria glabrata, assessing co-exposure's effects on parasite infectivity and productivity and the concomitant effects on host fitness. Overall, there was no effect of parasite co-infection on snail life history traits relative to single-strain infection. Parasite infectivity significantly increased as a result of increasing overall miracidial dose, rather than co-exposure, though strain-specific productivity was significantly reduced in co-infections in manner consistent with resource competition. Moreover, we show that less than half of infected, co-exposed hosts had patent co-infections and demonstrate the utility of this

  16. Host diversity begets parasite diversity: Bird final hosts and trematodes in snail intermediate hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechinger, R.F.; Lafferty, K.D.

    2005-01-01

    An unappreciated facet of biodiversity is that rich communities and high abundance may foster parasitism. For parasites that sequentially use different host species throughout complex life cycles, parasite diversity and abundance in 'downstream' hosts should logically increase with the diversity and abundance of 'upstream' hosts (which carry the preceding stages of parasites). Surprisingly, this logical assumption has little empirical support, especially regarding metazoan parasites. Few studies have attempted direct tests of this idea and most have lacked the appropriate scale of investigation. In two different studies, we used time-lapse videography to quantify birds at fine spatial scales, and then related bird communities to larval trematode communities in snail populations sampled at the same small spatial scales. Species richness, species heterogeneity and abundance of final host birds were positively correlated with species richness, species heterogeneity and abundance of trematodes in host snails. Such community-level interactions have rarely been demonstrated and have implications for community theory, epidemiological theory and ecosystem management. ?? 2005 The Royal Society.

  17. Evidence to support horses as natural intermediate hosts for Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Thomas; Murphy, Alice J; Kiupel, Matti; Bell, Julia A; Rossano, Mary G; Mansfield, Linda S

    2005-10-10

    Opossums (Didelphis spp.) are the definitive host for the protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona, the causative agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Opossums shed sporocysts in feces that can be ingested by true intermediate hosts (cats, raccoons, skunks, armadillos and sea otters). Horses acquire the parasite by ingestion of feed or water contaminated by opossum feces. However, horses have been classified as aberrant intermediate hosts because the terminal asexual sarcocyst stage that is required for transmission to the definitive host has not been found in their tissues despite extensive efforts to search for them [Dubey, J.P., Lindsay, D.S., Saville, W.J., Reed, S.M., Granstrom, D.E., Speer, C.A., 2001b. A review of Sarcocystis neurona and equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Vet. Parasitol. 95, 89-131]. In a 4-month-old filly with neurological disease consistent with EPM, we demonstrate schizonts in the brain and spinal cord and mature sarcocysts in the tongue and skeletal muscle, both with genetic and morphological characteristics of S. neurona. The histological and electron microscopic morphology of the schizonts and sarcocysts were identical to published features of S. neurona [Stanek, J.F., Dubey, J.P., Oglesbee, M.J., Reed, S.M., Lindsay, D.S., Capitini, L.A., Njoku, C.J., Vittitow, K.L., Saville, W.J., 2002. Life cycle of Sarcocystis neurona in its natural intermediate host, the raccoon, Procyon lotor. J. Parasitol. 88, 1151-1158]. DNA from schizonts and sarcocysts from this horse produced Sarcocystis specific 334bp PCR products [Tanhauser, S.M., Yowell, C.A., Cutler, T.J., Greiner, E.C., MacKay, R.J., Dame, J.B., 1999. Multiple DNA markers differentiate Sarcocystis neurona and Sarcocystis falcatula. J. Parasitol. 85, 221-228]. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of these PCR products showed banding patterns characteristic of S. neurona. Sequencing, alignment and comparison of both schizont and sarcocyst DNA

  18. A multiplex PCR for the detection of Fasciola hepatica in the intermediate snail host Galba cubensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Annia; Vázquez, Antonio A; Hernández, Hilda; Sánchez, Jorge; Marcet, Ricardo; Figueredo, Mabel; Sarracent, Jorge; Fraga, Jorge

    2015-07-30

    Fasciolosis is a snail-borne trematode infection that has re-emerged as a human disease, and is considered a significant problem for veterinary medicine worldwide. The evaluation of the transmission risk of fasciolosis as well as the efficacy of the strategies for its control could be carried out through epidemiological surveillance of the snails that act as intermediate hosts of the parasites. The present study aimed to develop the first multiplex PCR to detect Fasciola hepatica in Galba cubensis, an important intermediate host of the parasite in the Americas and especially in the Caribbean basin. The multiplex PCR was optimized for the amplification of a 340 bp fragment of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of F. hepatica rDNA, while another set of primers was designed and used to amplify a conserved segment of the nuclear 18S rDNA of the snail (451 bp), as an internal control of the reaction. The assay was able to detect up to 100 pg of the parasite even at high concentrations of snail DNA, an analytical sensitivity that allows the detection of less than a single miracidium, which is the minimal biological infestation unit. A controlled laboratory-reared G. cubensis - F. hepatica system was used for the evaluation of the developed multiplex PCR, and 100% sensitivity and specificity was achieved. This assay constitutes a novel, useful and suitable technique for the survey of fasciolosis transmission through one of the main intermediate hosts in the Western hemisphere. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Second intermediate host land snails and definitive host animals of Brachylaima cribbi in southern Australia

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    Butcher A.R.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This study of infection of southern Australian land snails with Brachylaima cribbi metacercariae has shown that all commonly encountered native and introduced snails are susceptible second intermediate hosts. The range of infected snails is extensive with metacercariae-infected snails being present in all districts across southern Australia. C. virgata has the highest average natural metacercarial infection intensity of 6.1 metacercariae per infected snail. The susceptibility of birds, mammals and reptiles to B. cribbi infection was studied in South Australia by capturing, dissecting and examining the intestinal tract contents of animals which commonly eat land snails as a food source. Indigenous Australian little ravens (Corvus mellori, which are a common scavenger bird, and two other passeriform birds, the black bird (Turdus merula and the starling (Sturnus vulgaris, which are both introduced European birds, were found to have the highest infection rates of all animals examined. Other birds found infected with B. cribbi were an emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae, chickens (Gallus gallus and a pigeon (Columba livia. Natural infections were also detected in field mice (Mus domesticus and shingleback lizards (Tiliqua rugosa although the intensity of infection was lower than that observed in birds. Susceptibility studies of laboratory mice, rats and ducks showed that mice developed patent infections which persisted for several weeks, rats developed a short-lived infection of three weeks’ duration and ducks did not support infection. This study has shown for the first time that a brachylaimid can infect a wide host range of birds, mammals and reptiles in nature.

  20. Host Range Specificity in Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, R G; Subbarao, K V

    1999-12-01

    ABSTRACT Verticillium dahliae isolates from artichoke, bell pepper, cabbage, cauliflower, chili pepper, cotton, eggplant, lettuce, mint, potato, strawberry, tomato, and watermelon and V. albo-atrum from alfalfa were evaluated for their pathogenicity on all 14 hosts. One-month-old seedlings were inoculated with a spore suspension of about 10(7) conidia per ml using a root-dip technique and incubated in the greenhouse. Disease incidence and severity, plant height, and root and shoot dry weights were recorded 6 weeks after inoculation. Bell pepper, cabbage, cauliflower, cotton, eggplant, and mint isolates exhibited host specificity and differential pathogenicity on other hosts, whereas isolates from artichoke, lettuce, potato, strawberry, tomato, and watermelon did not. Bell pepper was resistant to all Verticillium isolates except isolates from bell pepper and eggplant. Thus, host specificity exists in some isolates of V. dahliae. The same isolates were characterized for vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) through complementation of nitrate nonutilizing (nit) mutants. Cabbage and cauliflower isolates did not produce nit mutants. The isolate from cotton belonged to VCG 1; isolates from bell pepper, eggplant, potato, and tomato, to VCG 4; and the remaining isolates, to VCG 2. These isolates were also analyzed using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. Forty random primers were screened, and eighteen of them amplified DNA from Verticillium. Based on RAPD banding patterns, cabbage and cauliflower isolates formed a unique group, distinct from other V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum groups. Minor genetic variations were observed among V. dahliae isolates from other hosts, regardless of whether they were host specific or not. There was no correlation among pathogenicity, VCGs, and RAPD banding patterns. Even though the isolates belonged to different VCGs, they shared similar RAPD profiles. These results suggest that management of Verticillium wilt in some crops

  1. Larval size in acanthocephalan parasites: Influence of intraspecific competition and effects on intermediate host behavioural changes

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    Dianne Lucile

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasites often face a trade-off between exploitation of host resources and transmission probabilities to the next host. In helminths, larval growth, a major component of adult parasite fitness, is linked to exploitation of intermediate host resources and is influenced by the presence of co-infecting conspecifics. In manipulative parasites, larval growth strategy could also interact with their ability to alter intermediate host phenotype and influence parasite transmission. Methods We used experimental infections of Gammarus pulex by Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala, to investigate larval size effects on host behavioural manipulation among different parasite sibships and various degrees of intra-host competition. Results Intra-host competition reduced mean P. laevis cystacanth size, but the largest cystacanth within a host always reached the same size. Therefore, all co-infecting parasites did not equally suffer from intraspecific competition. Under no intra-host competition (1 parasite per host, larval size was positively correlated with host phototaxis. At higher infection intensities, this relationship disappeared, possibly because of strong competition for host resources, and thus larval growth, and limited manipulative abilities of co-infecting larval acanthocephalans. Conclusions Our study indicates that behavioural manipulation is a condition-dependant phenomenon that needs the integration of parasite-related variables to be fully understood.

  2. Larval size in acanthocephalan parasites: influence of intraspecific competition and effects on intermediate host behavioural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianne, Lucile; Bollache, Loïc; Lagrue, Clément; Franceschi, Nathalie; Rigaud, Thierry

    2012-08-09

    Parasites often face a trade-off between exploitation of host resources and transmission probabilities to the next host. In helminths, larval growth, a major component of adult parasite fitness, is linked to exploitation of intermediate host resources and is influenced by the presence of co-infecting conspecifics. In manipulative parasites, larval growth strategy could also interact with their ability to alter intermediate host phenotype and influence parasite transmission. We used experimental infections of Gammarus pulex by Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala), to investigate larval size effects on host behavioural manipulation among different parasite sibships and various degrees of intra-host competition. Intra-host competition reduced mean P. laevis cystacanth size, but the largest cystacanth within a host always reached the same size. Therefore, all co-infecting parasites did not equally suffer from intraspecific competition. Under no intra-host competition (1 parasite per host), larval size was positively correlated with host phototaxis. At higher infection intensities, this relationship disappeared, possibly because of strong competition for host resources, and thus larval growth, and limited manipulative abilities of co-infecting larval acanthocephalans. Our study indicates that behavioural manipulation is a condition-dependant phenomenon that needs the integration of parasite-related variables to be fully understood.

  3. The first intermediate host of Paragonimus westermani in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwagami, Moritoshi; Rajapakse, R P V Jayanthe; Yatawara, Lalani; Kano, Shigeyuki; Agatsuma, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Freshwater snails (family Paludomidae, genus Paludomus) were collected from streams in Hedeniya and Peradeniya (the campus of Peradeniya University), Kandy district, Central Province, Sri Lanka, and found to harbor rediae and cercariae of a Paragonimus sp. These larvae were identified as Paragonimus westermani by using ITS2 DNA sequences. The infection rates of P. westermani in Paludomus sp. in Hedeniya and Peradeniya were 0.1% (one of 1014) and 0.2% (two of 1006), respectively. The snail has not been identified to species in the present study. This is the first report of the snail host of Paragonimus in Sri Lanka.

  4. Experimental test of host specificity in a behaviour-modifying trematode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez, R.N.; Fredensborg, Brian Lund

    2015-01-01

    Host behavioural modification by parasites is a common and well-documented phenomenon. However, knowledge on the complexity and specificity of the underlying mechanisms is limited, and host specificity among manipulating parasites has rarely been experimentally verified. We tested the hypothesis ...... controls. Euhaplorchis sp. A was able to infect and manipulate fish belonging to two different families, suggesting that ecological similarity rather than genetic relatedness determines host range in this species.......Host behavioural modification by parasites is a common and well-documented phenomenon. However, knowledge on the complexity and specificity of the underlying mechanisms is limited, and host specificity among manipulating parasites has rarely been experimentally verified. We tested the hypothesis...... that the ability to infect and manipulate host behaviour is restricted to phylogenetically closely related hosts. Our model system consisted of the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis sp. A and six potential fish intermediate hosts from the Order Cyprinodontiformes. Five co-occurring cyprinids were examined...

  5. Altered dopamine levels induced by the parasite Profilicollis antarcticus on its intermediate host, the crab Hemigrapsus crenulatus

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    JOSÉ MIGUEL ROJAS

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A serotonergic pathway is apparently involved in parasite-host interactions. Previous studies conducted in our laboratory showed increased rates in oxygen consumption and alterations in body posture in the crab Hemigrapsus crenulatus parasitized by the acanthocephalan, Profilicollis antarcticus. Such changes may be related to the functions described for biogenic amines in crustaceans. During the infective stage the acanthocephalans live freely in the hemocelomic cavity, suggesting that the possible alteration induced by biogenic amines may be related to their neurohormonal function in crustaceans. To test whether the presence of P. antarcticus produced neurohormonal changes in its intermediate host, H. crenulatus, we analyzed serotonin and dopamine levels in the host using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Two groups of 11 female crabs were studied; one group was artificially inoculated with two cystacanths while the other was used as the control. Our results show a dramatic increase in hemolymph dopamine, but not serotonin in H. crenulatus parasitized by the acanthocephalan P. antarcticus. Our results, along with those reported by Maynard (1996, suggest a parasite-specific strategy involved in the behavior alteration caused by the acanthocephalans on their intermediate host. The use of a biogenic amine as a mechanism of interaction by the parasites gives them an endless number of alternative potential actions on their intermediate hosts

  6. Small rodents as paratenic or intermediate hosts of carnivore parasites in Berlin, Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Krücken

    Full Text Available Rodents are important intermediate and paratenic hosts for carnivore parasites, including the important zoonotic agents Toxoplasma, Echinococcus and Toxocara. Monitoring of such parasites in rodents can be used to detect increasing risks for human and veterinary public health. Rodents were trapped at four sites in Berlin, two near the city center, two at the periphery. PCRs were conducted to detect Coccidia (target ITS-1 and specifically Toxoplasma gondii (repetitive element in brain and ascarids (ITS-2 in muscle or brain tissue. During necropsies, metacestodes were collected and identified using ITS-2 and 12S rRNA PCRs. An ELISA to detect antibodies against Toxocara canis ES antigens was performed. Within the 257 examined rodents, the most frequently observed parasite was Frenkelia glareoli predominantly found in Myodes glareolus. T. gondii was only detected in 12 rodents and Microtus spp. (although strongly underrepresented had a significantly increased chance of being positive. Neither Echinococcus nor typical Taenia parasites of dogs and cats were found but Mesocestoides litteratus and Taenia martis metacestodes were identified which can cause severe peritoneal or ocular cysticercosis in dogs, primates and humans. Using PCR, the ascarids T. canis (n = 8, Toxocara cati (4 and Parascaris sp. (1 were detected predominantly in muscles. Seroprevalence of T. canis was 14.2% and ELISA was thus more sensitive than PCR to detect infection with this parasite. Non-parametric multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis revealed that parasite communities could be grouped into an urban and a peri-urban cluster with high frequency of ascarid-positive rodents in urban and high frequency of F. glareoli in peri-urban sites. Prevalence rates of parasites in rodents with potential impact for human or veterinary public health are considerable and the monitoring of transmission cycles of carnivore parasites in intermediate rodent hosts is recommended to

  7. Is Galba schirazensis (Mollusca, Gastropoda) an intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica (Trematoda, Digenea) in Ecuador?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Yannick; Celi-Erazo, Maritza; Hurtrez-Boussès, Sylvie; Lounnas, Mannon; Pointier, Jean-Pierre; Saegerman, Claude; Losson, Bertrand; Benítez-Ortíz, Washington

    2017-01-01

    Fasciolosis is a widely distributed disease in livestock in South America but knowledge about the epidemiology and the intermediate hosts is relatively scarce in Ecuador. For three months, lymnaeid snails were sampled (n = 1482) in Pichincha Province at two sites located in a highly endemic area. Snails were identified (based on morphology and ITS-2 sequences) and the infection status was established through microscopic dissection and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technique. Techniques based on morphology were not useful to accurately name the collected snail species. Comparison with available DNA sequences showed that a single snail species was collected, Galba schirazensis. Live rediae were observed in 1.75% (26/1482) and Fasciola sp. DNA was detected in 6% (89/1482) of collected snails. The COX-1 region permitted identification of the parasite as Fasciola hepatica. The relative sensitivity and specificity of the microscope study, compared to PCR results, were 25.84% and 99.78%, respectively. The mean size of the snails recorded positive for F. hepatica through crushing and microscopy was significantly higher than the mean size of negative snails, but there was no such difference in PCR-positive snails. The role of G. schirazensis as an intermediate host of F. hepatica in Ecuador is discussed and the hypothesis of an adaptation of the parasite to this invasive snail is proposed. For the first time, an epidemiological survey based on molecular biology-based techniques assessed the possible role of lymnaeid snails in the epidemiology of fasciolosis in Ecuador. © Y. Caron et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  8. Is Galba schirazensis (Mollusca, Gastropoda an intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica (Trematoda, Digenea in Ecuador?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caron Yannick

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolosis is a widely distributed disease in livestock in South America but knowledge about the epidemiology and the intermediate hosts is relatively scarce in Ecuador. For three months, lymnaeid snails were sampled (n = 1482 in Pichincha Province at two sites located in a highly endemic area. Snails were identified (based on morphology and ITS-2 sequences and the infection status was established through microscopic dissection and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based technique. Techniques based on morphology were not useful to accurately name the collected snail species. Comparison with available DNA sequences showed that a single snail species was collected, Galba schirazensis. Live rediae were observed in 1.75% (26/1482 and Fasciola sp. DNA was detected in 6% (89/1482 of collected snails. The COX-1 region permitted identification of the parasite as Fasciola hepatica. The relative sensitivity and specificity of the microscope study, compared to PCR results, were 25.84% and 99.78%, respectively. The mean size of the snails recorded positive for F. hepatica through crushing and microscopy was significantly higher than the mean size of negative snails, but there was no such difference in PCR-positive snails. The role of G. schirazensis as an intermediate host of F. hepatica in Ecuador is discussed and the hypothesis of an adaptation of the parasite to this invasive snail is proposed. For the first time, an epidemiological survey based on molecular biology-based techniques assessed the possible role of lymnaeid snails in the epidemiology of fasciolosis in Ecuador.

  9. Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) are a natural intermediate host of Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almería, S; Ferrer, D; Pabón, M; Castellà, J; Mañas, S

    2002-08-22

    The present study was undertaken to determine if red foxes are natural intermediate and/or definitive host for Neospora caninum and to study the importance of infection of N. caninum in this species in North-eastern Spain. Faecal samples and brain tissues were obtained from 122 foxes from 21 rural areas of Catalonia. Faeces collected were examined for parasite eggs and coccidian oocysts using sucrose flotation. For PCR-based diagnosis of N. caninum in brain tissues, the specific genomic Nc5 region was selected as the target sequence for DNA amplification. To control for PCR failure and facilitate identification of truly negative samples, the competitor pNc5C molecule was added to all negative samples in a second round of PCR reactions. Of the 122 foxes analysed, 13 (10.7%) were positive by PCR for N. caninum. Signal intensities of all positive samples were relatively weak with the exception of one sample from a 3-month male animal, that also showed the highest repeatability. No differences were observed by sex, age or area of sampling analysis. Detection of stages of N. caninum in brain from naturally infected red foxes demonstrated that red foxes are a natural intermediate host for N. caninum. Faecal samples were analysed for the presence of N. caninum oocysts, however, no oocysts compatible with N. caninum were found. A widespread latent infection of red foxes in North-eastern Spain found in the present study indicates that red foxes could have a very important role in the epidemiology of neosporosis in our area.

  10. Survey of snail intermediate hosts of trematodes in Jos South Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Streams and irrigation schemes in selected areas of Jos South Local Government Area, Plateau State, Nigeria were surveyed for snail intermediate hosts of Trematodes. A total of 1045 snails were collected from streams with long handled scoop net and in some areas manually with hand in gloves. The snails were put in ...

  11. Wild Rodents as Experimental Intermediate Hosts of Lagochilascaris minor Leiper, 1909

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    Julieta Machado Paçô

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available A total of 25 specimens of Cavia porcellus (guinea pig, 5 Dasyprocta agouti (agouti, and 22 Calomys callosus (vesper mice were inoculated with infective eggs of Lagochilascaris minor. The inoculum was prepared with embryonated eggs and orally administered to each individual animal through an esophagus probe. In parallel, 100 specimens of Felis catus domesticus were individually fed with 55-70 nodules containing 3rd-stage larvae encysted in tissues of infected rodents. Animals were examined and necropsied at different time intervals. The migration and encystment of L3 larva was observed in viscera, skeletal muscle, adipose and subcutaneous tissues from all rodents. Adult worms localized at abscesses in the cervical region, rhino, and oropharynx were recovered from domestic cats inoculated with infected rodent tissues. Through this study we can conclude that: (1 wild rodents act as intermediate hosts, characterizing this ascarid heteroxenic cycle; (2 in natural conditions rodents could possibly act as either intermediate hosts or paratenic hosts of Lagochilascaris minor; (3 despite the occurrence of an auto-infecting cycle, in prime-infection of felines (definite hosts the cycle is only completed when intermediate hosts are provided; and (4 in the wild, rodents could serve as a source of infection for humans as they are frequently used as food in regions with the highest incidence of human lagochilascariasis.

  12. Cryptic species and their utilization of indigenous and non-indigenous intermediate hosts in the acanthocephalan Polymorphus minutus sensu lato (Polymorphidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittel, Maike; Grabner, Daniel; Wlecklik, Andre; Sures, Bernd; Leese, Florian; Taraschewski, Horst; Weigand, Alexander Martin

    2018-02-19

    The bird-infecting acanthocephalan Polymorphus minutus has been suggested to comprise different lineages or even cryptic species using different intermediate hosts. To clarify this open question, we investigated Polymorphus cf. minutus cystacanths originating from amphipod intermediate hosts from 27 sites in Germany and France. Parasites and hosts were identified using integrated datasets (COI and/or morphology for hosts and COI + ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 for parasites). Mitochondrial and nuclear data (ITS1) strongly support the existence of three cryptic species in Polymorphus cf. minutus (type 1-3). These three types reveal a high degree of intermediate host specificity, with Polymorphus type 1 only encountered in Gammarus fossarum type B, Polymorphus type 2 in Echinogammarus sp. and Echinogammarus berilloni, and Polymorphus type 3 in Gammarus pulex and Gammarus roeselii. Our results point to a so far neglected cryptic diversity of the genus Polymorphus in Central Europe. Furthermore, Polymorphus type 2 is most likely a non-native parasite in Germany that co-invaded with E. berilloni from the Mediterranean area. Potentially, type 3 originates from South-East Europe and migrated to Germany by G. roeselii, where it might have captured G. pulex as an intermediate host. Therefore, our findings can be seen in the context of ecological globalization in terms of the anthropogenic displacement of intermediate hosts and its impact on the genetic divergence of the parasites.

  13. Olfactory host finding, intermediate memory and its potential ecological adaptation in Nasonia vitripennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurmann, Daria; Collatz, Jana; Hagenbucher, Steffen; Ruther, Joachim; Steidle, Johannes L. M.

    2009-03-01

    Associative learning of host-associated chemical cues was studied in Nasonia vitripennis, a parasitoid of fly pupae in nests of hole-nesting birds. When females encountered a fly pupa and performed one sequence of host recognition behaviour including drilling the ovipositor into the host in the presence of the artificial odour furfurylheptanoate (FFH), they were afterwards arrested by FFH in olfactometer experiments. The response vanished after 4 days and could be blocked after 3 days by feeding wasps with ethacrynic acid prior and after the training. This indicates the formation of an intermediate form of memory by one host experience in N. vitripennis. Interestingly, the trained wasps avoided odours that were not present during the host encounter, although naive wasps did not react to these odours. This unique behaviour probably causes wasps to focus during host searching on those chemical cues they have experienced in the host environment. Studies in nests of hole-nesting birds revealed that about 30% of all nests contained only one fly pupa, and laboratory studies showed that N. vitripennis females are able to parasitise around 100 fly pupae in their life. It is discussed that under these conditions, the formation of a non-permanent intermediate memory for host-associated odours after one host encounter is adaptive to avoid costs involved with formation and maintenance of memory for misleading cues. The demonstration of associative olfactory learning in N. vitripennis, the first parasitoid species with sequenced genome, opens the gate to study molecular mechanisms of memory formation and its ecological adaptation in parasitoids.

  14. Molecular characterisation of intermediate snail hosts and the search for resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rollinson

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between schistosomes and their intermediate hosts is an extremely intricate one with strains and species of the parasite depending on particular species of snail, which in turn may vary in their susceptibility to the parasites. In order to gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of the disease we have been investigating the use of molecular markers for snail identification and for studying host-parasite relationships. In this paper we will draw on examples concerning schistosomiasis in West and East Africa to illustrate how a molecular analysis can be used as part of a "total evidence" approach to characterisation of Bulinus species and provide insights into parasite transmission. Particular emphasis is given to ribosomal RNA genes (rRNA, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPDs and the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase I (COI. Snails resistant to infection occur naturally and there is a genetic basis for this resistance. In Biomphalaria glabrata resistance to Schistosoma mansoni is known to be a polygenic trait and we have initiated a preliminary search for snail genomic regions linked to, or involved in, resistance by using a RAPD based approach in conjunction with progeny pooling methods. We are currently characterising a variety of STSs (sequence tagged sites associated with resistance. These can be used for local linkage and interval mapping to define genomic regions associated with the resistance trait. The development of such markers into simple dot-blot or specific PCR-based assays may have a direct and practical application for the identification of resistant snails in natural populations.

  15. Genetic variability and identification of the intermediate snail hosts of Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teofânia HDA Vidigal

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies based on shell or reproductive organ morphology and genetic considerations suggest extensive intraspecific variation in Biomphalaria snails. The high variability at the morphological and genetic levels, as well as the small size of some specimens and similarities between species complicate the correct identification of these snails. Here we review our work using methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification for analysis of genetic variation and identification of Biomphalaria snails from Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay. Arbitrarily primed-PCR revealed that the genome of B. glabrata exihibits a remarkable degree of intraespecific polymorphism. Low stringency-PCR using primers for 18S rRNA permited the identification of B. glabrata, B. tenagophila and B. occidentalis. The study of individuals obtained from geographically distinct populations exhibits significant intraspecific DNA polymorphism, however specimens from the same species, exhibit some species specific LSPs. We also showed that PCR-restriction fragment of length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of Biomphalaria rDNA, using DdeI permits the differentiation of the three intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni. The molecular biological techniques used in our studies are very useful for the generation of new knowledge concerning the systematics and population genetics of Biomphalaria snails.

  16. Large-scale determinants of intestinal schistosomiasis and intermediate host snail distribution across Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie; Utzinger, Jürg; Vounatsou, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    The geographical ranges of most species, including many infectious disease agents and their vectors and intermediate hosts, are assumed to be constrained by climatic tolerances, mainly temperature. It has been suggested that global warming will cause an expansion of the areas potentially suitable...... impacts of climatic changes. Snail species distribution models included several combinations of climatic and habitat-related predictors; the latter divided into "natural" and "human-impacted" habitat variables to measure anthropogenic influence. The predictive performance of the combined snail...... are more likely to contract and/or move into cooler areas in the south and east. Importantly, we also note that even though climate per se matters, the impact of humans on habitat play a crucial role in determining the distribution of the intermediate host snails in Africa. Thus, a future contraction...

  17. Comparative genomics reveals adaptive evolution of Asian tapeworm in switching to a new intermediate host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Sen; Luo, Yingfeng; Xiao, Lihua; Luo, Xuenong; Gao, Shenghan; Dou, Yongxi; Zhang, Huangkai; Guo, Aijiang; Meng, Qingshu; Hou, Junling; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Shaohua; Yang, Meng; Meng, Xuelian; Mei, Hailiang; Li, Hui; He, Zilong; Zhu, Xueliang; Tan, Xinyu; Zhu, Xing-quan; Yu, Jun; Cai, Jianping; Zhu, Guan; Hu, Songnian; Cai, Xuepeng

    2016-01-01

    Taenia saginata, Taenia solium and Taenia asiatica (beef, pork and Asian tapeworms, respectively) are parasitic flatworms of major public health and food safety importance. Among them, T. asiatica is a newly recognized species that split from T. saginata via an intermediate host switch ∼1.14 Myr ago. Here we report the 169- and 168-Mb draft genomes of T. saginata and T. asiatica. Comparative analysis reveals that high rates of gene duplications and functional diversifications might have partially driven the divergence between T. asiatica and T. saginata. We observe accelerated evolutionary rates, adaptive evolutions in homeostasis regulation, tegument maintenance and lipid uptakes, and differential/specialized gene family expansions in T. asiatica that may favour its hepatotropism in the new intermediate host. We also identify potential targets for developing diagnostic or intervention tools against human tapeworms. These data provide new insights into the evolution of Taenia parasites, particularly the recent speciation of T. asiatica. PMID:27653464

  18. Host specificity in bat ectoparasites: a natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Sampath S; Fernando, H Chandrika; Udagama-Randeniya, Preethi V

    2009-07-15

    We undertook a field study to determine patterns of specialisation of ectoparasites in cave-dwelling bats in Sri Lanka. The hypothesis tested was that strict host specificity (monoxeny) could evolve through the development of differential species preferences through association with the different host groups. Three species of cave-dwelling bats were chosen to represent a wide range of host-parasite associations (monoxeny to polyxeny), and both sympatric and allopatric roosting assemblages. Of the eight caves selected, six caves were "allopatric" roosts where two of each housed only one of the three host species examined: Rousettus leschenaulti (Pteropodidae), Rhinolophus rouxi and Hipposideros speoris (Rhinolophidae). The remaining two caves were "sympatric" roosts and housed all three host species. Thirty bats of each species were examined for ectoparasites in each cave, which resulted in a collection of nycteribiid and streblid flies, an ischnopsyllid bat flea, argasid and ixodid ticks, and mites belonging to three families. The host specificity of bat parasites showed a trend to monoxeny in which 70% of the 30 species reported were monoxenous. Odds ratios derived from chi(2)-tests revealed two levels of host preferences in less-specific parasites (i) the parasite was found on two host species under conditions of both host sympatry and host allopatry, with a preference for a single host in the case of host sympatry and (ii) the preference for a single host was very high, hence under conditions of host sympatry, it was confined to the preferred host only. However, under conditions of host allopatry, it utilized both hosts. There appears to be an increasing prevalence in host preferences of the parasites toward confinement to a single host species. The ecological isolation of the bat hosts and a long history of host-parasite co-existence could have contributed to an overall tendency of bat ectoparasites to become specialists, here reflected in the high percentage

  19. Host specificity and temporal and seasonal shifts in host preference of a web-spider parasitoid Zatypota percontatoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenko, Stanislav; Michalková, Veronika; Zwakhals, Kees; Pekár, Stano

    2011-01-01

    Current knowledge about polysphinctine parasite wasps' interactions with their spider hosts is very fragmented and incomplete. This study presents the host specificity of Zatypota percontatoria (Müller) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) and its adaptation to varying host availability. Two years of field observations show that Z. percontatoria is a stenophagous parasitoid that parasitizes only five closely related web-building spiders of the family Theridiidae (Araneae). Within the Theridiidae it attacks only species belonging to a small group of species, here called the "Theridion" group. These hosts have a similar biology, but are available at different levels of abundance and at different sizes over the season. Laboratory experiments showed that this wasp species ignores linyphiid, araneid or dictynid spiders and accepts only theridiid spiders of the "Theridion" group. In the field study, wasp females preferred older juvenile and sub-adult female spider instars with intermediate body size. Only 5% of the parasitized spiders were males. Parasitism in the natural population of theridiid spiders was on average 1.3%. Parasitism was most frequent on two species, Theridion varians Hahn in 2007 and Neottiura bimaculata Linnaeus in 2008. The parasitization rate was positively correlated with spider abundance. The wasp responded adaptively to seasonal changes in host abundance and host body size and shifted host preference according to the availability of suitable hosts during, as well as between, seasons. In spring and summer the highest percentage of parasitism was on T. varians and in autumn it was on N. bimaculata.

  20. Developmental stages of fish blood flukes, Cardicola forsteri and Cardicola opisthorchis (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae), in their polychaete intermediate hosts collected at Pacific bluefin tuna culture sites in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuo; Shirakashi, Sho; Tani, Kazuki; Shin, Sang Phil; Ishimaru, Katsuya; Honryo, Tomoki; Sugihara, Yukitaka; Uchida, Hiro'omi

    2017-02-01

    Farming of Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT), Thunnus orientalis, is a rapidly growing industry in Japan. Aporocotylid blood flukes of the genus Cardicola comprising C. orientalis, C. opisthorchis and C. forsteri are parasites of economic importance for PBT farming. Recently, terebellid polychaetes have been identified as the intermediate hosts for all these parasites. We collected infected polychaetes, Terebella sp., the intermediate host of C. opisthorchis, from ropes and floats attached to tuna cages in Tsushima, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. Also, Neoamphitrite vigintipes (formerly as Amphitrite sp. sensu Shirakashi et al., 2016), the intermediate host of C. forsteri, were collected from culture cages in Kushimoto, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan. The terebellid intermediate hosts harbored the sporocysts and cercariae in their body cavity. Developmental stages of these blood flukes were molecularly identified using species specific PCR primers. In this paper, we describe the cercaria and sporocyst stages of C. opisthorchis and C. forsteri and compare their morphological characteristics among three Cardicola blood flukes infecting PBT. We also discuss phylogenetic relations of the six genera of the terebellid intermediate hosts (Artacama, Lanassa, Longicarpus, Terebella, Nicolea and Neoamphitrite) of blood flukes infecting marine fishes, based on their morphological characters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. First identification of Echinococcus multilocularis in rodent intermediate hosts in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L. Miller

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcus multilocularis is a zoonotic tapeworm with a sylvatic lifecycle and an expanding range in Europe. Monitoring efforts following its first identification in 2011 in Sweden have focused on the parasite's definitive host, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes. However, identifying rodent intermediate hosts is important to recognize opportunities for parasite transmission. During 2013–2015, livers from a total of 1566 rodents from four regions in Sweden were examined for E. multilocularis metacestode lesions. Species identity of suspect parasite lesions was confirmed by PCR and sequencing. E. multilocularis positive lesions >6 mm in diameter were also examined histologically. One Microtus agrestis out of 187 (0.5%, 95%CI: 0–2.9%, 8/439 (1.8%, 95%CI: 0.8–3.6% Arvicola amphibius, 0/655 (0%, 95%CI: 0–0.6% Myodes glareolus, and 0/285 (0%, 95%CI: 0–1.3% Apodemus spp. contained E. multilocularis metacestode lesions. Presence of protoscoleces was confirmed in the infected M. agrestis and in three of eight infected A. amphibius. Six of the nine positive rodents were captured from the same field. This is the first report of E. multilocularis in intermediate hosts in Sweden. The cluster of positive rodents in one field shows that local parasite prevalence can be high in Sweden despite overall low national prevalence in foxes (<0.1%. The presence of protoscoleces in infected M. agrestis and A. amphibius indicate these species can serve as competent intermediate hosts in Sweden. However, their relative importance for E. multilocularis transmission in the Swedish environment is not yet possible to assess. In contrast, the negative findings in all M. glareolus and Apodemus spp. suggest that these species are of no importance.

  2. Hippobosca longipennis - a potential intermediate host of a species of Acanthocheilonema in dogs in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin Peter J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hippobosca longipennis (the 'dog louse fly' is a blood sucking ectoparasite found on wild carnivores such as cheetahs and lions and domesticated and feral dogs in Africa, the Middle East and Asia, including China. Known as an intermediate host for Acanthocheilonema dracunculoides and a transport host for Cheyletiella yasguri, it has also been suggested that H. longipennis may be a vector for other pathogens, including Acanthocheilonema sp.? nov., which was recently reported to infect up to 48% of dogs in northern India where this species of fly is known to commonly infest dogs. To test this hypothesis, hippoboscid flies feeding on dogs in Ladakh in northern India were collected and subjected to microscopic dissection. Results A total of 12 infective larvae were found in 10 out of 65 flies dissected; 9 from the head, 2 from the thorax and 1 from the abdomen. The larvae averaged 2, 900 (± 60 μm in length and 34 (± 5 μm in width and possessed morphological features characteristic of the family Onchocercidae. Genetic analysis and comparison of the 18S, ITS-2, 12S and cox-1 genes confirmed the identity of the larvae as the Acanthocheilonema sp.? nov. reported in dogs in Ladakh. Conclusion This study provides evidence for a potential intermediate host-parasite relationship between H. longipennis and the canine Acanthocheilonema sp.? nov. in northern India.

  3. Sarcocystis pantherophis, n. sp. from eastern rat snakes (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) definitive hosts and interferongamma gene knockout mice as experimental intermediate hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report a new species, Sarcocystis pantherophisi with the Eastern rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) as natural definitive host and the interferon gamma gene knockout (KO) mouse as the experimental intermediate host. Sporocysts (n=15) from intestinal contents of the snake were 17.3 x 10....

  4. Detection of Rat Lungworm in Intermediate, Definitive, and Paratenic Hosts Obtained from Environmental Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Henry S; da Silva, Alexandre J

    2013-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common parasite causing human eosinophilic meningitis worldwide. The geographical distribution of this disease has changed dramatically in the last few decades. Various methods have been used to detect A. cantonensis in host animals around the world. A survey of mollusks collected on the island of Hawai‘i in 2005 using PCR showed an infection rate of 24–78% depending on the mollusk species. In this study, samples from intermediate, definitive, and paratenic hosts were analyzed to further determine the presence of A. cantonensis in the United States. All samples were from Hawai‘i, except for the apple snails (Pomacea maculata) that were collected in New Orleans, Louisiana. Angiostrongylus cantonensis was detected in the majority of species examined, including the apple snails from New Orleans and flatworms (planarians) from Hawai‘i. Among the mollusks examined, the semi-slug Parmarion martensi had the highest parasite load, with an average larval burden of 445 larvae in 25 mg of tissue, as estimated by real-time PCR. In contrast, slime excreted from these highly infected mollusks contained no or very little A. cantonensis DNA. Analysis of definitive hosts (Rattus spp.) showed discrepancies between morphological and PCR-based identification; 54% of the rats were positive based on morphology, while 100% of tissue samples from these animals were positive by real-time PCR. This indicates that necropsies of rodents could underestimate the infection rates in definitive hosts of A. cantonensis. PMID:23901387

  5. Transplantation of Cardicola opisthorchis (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) sporocysts into the intermediate host, Terebella sp. (Polychaeta: Terebellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Yukitaka; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Iwanaga, Shunsuke; Kanai, Kinya

    2017-02-01

    Cardicola opisthorchis is a blood fluke pathogen significantly affecting cultured Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis in Japan. It is known that the intermediate host of C. opisthorchis is a terebellid polychaete Terebella sp. In order to study the intrapolychaete larval development of C. opisthorchis, we transplanted sporocysts, which contained a large number of cercariae, of C. opisthorchis obtained from Terebella sp. into sporocyst-free Terebella sp., which had been maintained at 20°C. The transplanted sporocysts switched from cercarial to sporocystal production by 17days after transplantation (d.a.t.) and daughter sporocysts were released into the polychaete body cavity at 25d.a.t. Subsequently, the released daughter sporocysts produced daughter sporocysts again. Thereafter, daughter sporocysts that contained cercariae appeared at 38d.a.t. and gradually increased. At 51d.a.t., 136 sporocysts that had multiplied from the original two transplanted sporocysts were observed in the body of one polychaete, and cercariae were released from daughter sporocysts inside the polychaete body cavity. Subsequently the cercariae were found to be released outside the polychaete at 57d.a.t. This is the first successful case of in situ observation of the development of a blood fluke within the intermediate host. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radix natalensis (Gastropoda: Lymnaeidae, a potential intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dar Y.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental infections of Egyptian Radix natalensis with French miracidia of Fasciola hepatica were carried out to determine if this snail might act as an intermediate host in the life cycle of this digenean in Egypt. Single exposures of R. natalensis to miracidia (2/snail and two successive exposures (a total of 4 miracidia/snail were performed using lymnaeids measuring 1 to 6 mm in height. Live larval forms of F. hepatica were noted in single- and double-exposed snails. In double exposures, a significant increase of snail survival on day 28 post-exposure (at 24 °C and an decrease in prevalence were noted when the height of snails at exposure was increasing. Cercariae of F. hepatica were shed by these snails (90.7/snail during a mean patent period of 24.3 days. All snails have released these cercariae during 2-13 waves of shedding. According to these results, R. natalensis can be considered a potential intermediate host of F. hepatica in Egypt.

  7. Predictors of Host Specificity among Behavior-Manipulating Parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredensborg, B. L.

    2014-01-01

    specifically, hosts’ behavioral modification that involves interaction with the central nervous system presumably restricts parasites to more closely related hosts than does manipulation of the host’s behavior via debilitation of the host’s physiology. The results of the analysis suggest that phylogenetic......-specialist that has a restricted ecological niche that it masters. Parasites that manipulate hosts’ behavior are often thought to represent resource-specialists based on a few spectacular examples of manipulation of the host’s behavior. However, the determinants of which, and how many, hosts a manipulating parasite...... of parasites and hosts. Using individual and multivariate analyses, I examined the effect of the host’s and parasite’s taxonomy, location of the parasite in the host, type of behavioral change, and the effect of debilitation on host-specificity, measured as the mean taxonomic relatedness of hosts...

  8. Estuarine fish and turtles as intermediate and paratenic hosts of Gnathostoma binucleatum in Nayarit, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Cesar Alvarez; Alba-Hurtado, Fernando

    2007-12-01

    Human gnathostomosis is a severe public health problem in the State of Nayarit, Mexico. Between 1995 and 2005, the registration of human cases numbered 6,328, which makes it one of the largest focal points of the disease in the country. The present study determined the presence of natural hosts of Gnathostoma binucleatum larvae at the Laguna de Agua Brava in Nayarit, Mexico. A total of 5,450 fish and 247 turtles were sampled. Muscular tissue was ground and observed against the light using a 100-W lamp to identify advanced third-stage larvae. The estuarine species Cathorops fuerthii, Pomadasys macracanthus, Mugil curema, and Dormitator latifrons were found positive for presence of larvae, and annual prevalence was 4.8, 1.83, 2.16, and 4.0%, respectively. The species Oreochromys aureus and Chanos chanos were negative. The species of estuarine turtles Kinosternum integrum and Trachemys scripta were positive with annual prevalence of 79.1 and 52.5%, respectively. The criteria of identification of the Gnathostoma species were: mean number of nuclei in intestinal larval cells (2.3), larval morphometry with optic microscopy, larval morphometry with scanning electron microscopy, and number and sequence of ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid of adult parasites obtained from experimental infection in dogs. The estuarine fish Pomadasys macracanthus and Mugil curema are reported as intermediate hosts for the first time and likewise the estuarine turtle Kinosternon integrum as a paratenic host.

  9. Specific developmental pathways underlie host specificity in the parasitic plant Orobanche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic angiosperms are an ecologically and economically important group of plants. However our understanding of the basis for host specificity in these plants is embryonic. Recently we investigated host specificity in the parasitic angiosperm Orobanche minor, and demonstrated that this host generalist parasite comprises genetically defined races that are physiologically adapted to specific hosts. Populations occurring naturally on red clover (Trifolium pratense) and sea carrot (Daucus carota subsp. gummifer) respectively, showed distinct patterns of host specificity at various developmental stages, and a higher fitness on their natural hosts, suggesting these races are locally adapted. Here we discuss the implications of our findings from a broader perspective. We suggest that differences in signal responsiveness and perception by the parasite, as well as qualitative differences in signal production by the host, may elicit host specificity in this parasitic plant. Together with our earlier demonstration that these O. minor races are genetically distinct based on molecular markers, our recent data provide a snapshot of speciation in action, driven by host specificity. Indeed, host specificity may be an underestimated catalyst for speciation in parasitic plants generally. We propose that identifying host specific races using physiological techniques will complement conventional molecular marker-based approaches to provide a framework for delineating evolutionary relationships among cryptic host-specific parasitic plants. PMID:20081361

  10. Localization of serotonin in the nervous system of Biomphalaria glabrata, an intermediate host for schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Nadia; Vallejo, Deborah; Miller, Mark W

    2012-10-01

    The digenetic trematode Schistosoma mansoni that causes the form of schistosomiasis found in the Western Hemisphere requires the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata as its primary intermediate host. It has been proposed that the transition from the free-living S. mansoni miracidium to parasitic mother sporocyst depends on uptake of biogenic amines, e.g. serotonin, from the snail host. However, little is known about potential sources of serotonin in B. glabrata tissues. This investigation examined the localization of serotonin-like immunoreactivity (5HTli) in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues of B. glabrata. Emphasis was placed on the cephalic and anterior pedal regions that are commonly the sites of S. mansoni miracidium penetration. The anterior foot and body wall were densely innervated by 5HTli fibers but no peripheral immunoreactive neuronal somata were detected. Within the CNS, clusters of 5HTli neurons were observed in the cerebral, pedal, left parietal, and visceral ganglia, suggesting that the peripheral serotonergic fibers originate from the CNS. Double-labeling experiments (biocytin backfill × serotonin immunoreactivity) of the tentacular nerve and the three major pedal nerves (Pd n. 10, Pd n. 11, and Pd n. 12) disclosed central neurons that project to the cephalopedal periphery. Overall, the central distribution of 5HTli neurons suggests that, as in other gastropods, serotonin regulates the locomotion, reproductive, and feeding systems of Biomphalaria. The projections to the foot and body wall indicate that serotonin may also participate in defensive, nociceptive, or inflammation responses. These observations identify potential sources of host-derived serotonin in this parasite-host system. Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Experimental Echinococcus multilocularis Infection in Intermediate Hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woolsey, Ian David

    . Utilising oral infection (by stomach tube) of uniform doses of E. multilocularis eggs and assessment of infection over time in four species from colonies of wild rodents (Microtus agrestis, Microtus arvalis, Myodes glareolus, Mesocricetus auratus) and two strains of laboratory rodents (Mus musculus (C57Bl/6...... immunological reasons behind the significantly greater growth observed in ecologically relevant species as opposed to their Muridae counterparts. Evidence of an upper limit of establishment of parasite eggs was obtained regardless of egg dose for the first time in an Arvicolinae species (M. agrestis......) and a window of protoscolex (the fertile stage of the metacestode) production was determined in a key intermediate host species (M. arvalis) providing useful information for subsequent work aiming to elucidate E. multilocularis epizootiology. This thesis and the resulting publications lays a foundation...

  12. Molecular confirmation of trematodes in the snail intermediate hosts from Ratchaburi Province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sothorn Anucherngchai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the prevalence of trematode infections in the snails intermediate host Tarebia granifera and Melanoides tuberculata collected from Ratchaburi Province by a molecular approach in order to construct a dendrogram to identify species at the cercarial stage. Methods: Specimens were collected from nine districts located in Ratchaburi Province using the stratified sampling method. The samples were examined for cercarial infection using the crushing method. All specimens were amplified by region of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2 based on the PCR technique, and the sequence data were aligned in order to construct the dendrogram by maximum likelihood with 10 000 bootstrap replicates. Results: Five cercarial types were observed comprising parapleurolophocercous cercaria, xiphidiocercaria, megarulous cercaria, furcocercous cercaria and transversotrema cercaria. The overall prevalence of cercarial infection was found to be 7.92% (63 / 795. The parapleurolophocercous cercaria was found in the highest level of prevalence followed by xiphidiocercaria, megarulous cercaria, furcocercous cercaria and transversotrema cercaria, respectively. The parapleurolophocercous cercaria samples were identified and separated into Haplorchis taichui and Haplorchis pumilio, while xiphidiocercaria were identified as Lecithodendriidae and megarulous cercaria were identified as Philophthalmus. The dendrogram separated the cercariae into five groups, which were comprised of parapleurolophocercous cercaria, xiphidiocercaria, megarulous cercaria, furcocercous cercaria and transversotrema cercaria using the sequence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis as an out-group. Conclusions: This is the first study to report on the prevalence of cercarial infection in Ratchaburi Province, Thailand. The high prevalence of cercariae was revealed by the infection in Tarebia granifera and Melanoides tuberculata. Thus, the sequence data of ITS2 can be used to investigate the

  13. An ecological study of Bithynia snails, the first intermediate host of Opisthorchis viverrini in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Chen; Ho, Richard Cheng Yong; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Namsanor, Jutamas; Sithithaworn, Paiboon

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the food-borne trematodiasis, liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, is a major public health concern in Southeast Asia. While epidemiology and parasitic incidence in humans are well studied, ecological information on the O. viverrini intermediate hosts remains limited. This study aimed to investigate the factors affecting the distribution and abundance of the first intermediate host, Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos snails. Water quality and snails were sampled in 31 sites in Muang District, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand from June 2012 to January 2013 to characterize the B.s. goniomphalos snail habitats. Species relative abundance and Shannon's diversity and evenness indices were employed to describe snail compositions and diversities across different habitat types. Statistical analyses were conducted to examine the extent to which the water quality variables and species interactions account for the relative abundance of B.s. goniomphalos snails. The results showed that the freshwater habitats of ponds, streams and rice paddies possessed significantly different abiotic water qualities, with water temperature and pH showing distinct statistical differences (P<0.05). Different habitats had different snail diversity and species evenness, with high B.s. goniomphalos snail abundance at rice paddy habitats. The differences in snail abundance might be due to the distinct sets of abiotic water qualities associated with each habitat types. The relative abundance of B.s. goniomphalos snails was found to be negatively correlated with that of Filopaludina martensi martensi snails (r=-0.46, P<0.05), underscoring the possible influence of species interaction on B.s. goniomphalos snail population. Field work observations revealed that rice planting seasons and irrigation could regulate snail population dynamics at rice paddy habitats. This study provides new ecological insights into the factors affecting Bithynia snail distribution and abundance. It bridges the

  14. Paragonimiasis and its intermediate hosts in a transmission focus in Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odermatt, P; Habe, S; Manichanh, S; Tran, D S; Duong, V; Zhang, Wei; Phommathet, K; Nakamura, S; Barennes, H; Strobel, M; Dreyfuss, G

    2007-08-01

    Human cases of paragonimiasis have been reported in Lao People's Democratic Republic from several provinces, however, detailed descriptions of a focus of transmission including parasites species and intermediate hosts are lacking. Field investigations were carried out between February and July 2004 in three neighboring villages of the province of Vientiane. Persons with chronic cough (more than three weeks) were identified during a door-to-door survey and three sputum samples were examined for Paragonimus spp. and tuberculosis on two consecutive days. Potential intermediate snail and crustacean hosts were sampled among the populations' water-contact sites and examined for metacercarial infections or cercarial shedding. Four dogs were infected with metacercaria and the species of the subsequently retrieved adult parasites were identified. 12.7% (15 cases) of all chronic cough patients (0.6% of the total population) suffered from paragonimiasis. Samples of five species of freshwater snails, two species of crabs and one species of prawn were collected from the Nam Sêt River. None of the snails were infected. Metacercariae of P. harinasutai, P. bangkokensis and P. heterotremus were found in Potamon lipkei crabs while an infection with P. westermani was observed in a Chulathelphusa brandti crab. No paragonimid metacercaria was found in the Macrobrachium dienbienphuense prawns Dang and Nguyen 1972. This study demonstrates the importance of Paragonimus spp. as an etiological agent in patients with chronic cough and suggests that similar transmission might be widespread in Lao People's Democratic Republic. We document herein the transmission of several Paragonimus species indicating that paragonimiasis is an active zoonosis in Lao People's Democratic Republic.

  15. Host-specific functional significance of Caenorhabditis gut commensals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Berg

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is an important contributor to host health and fitness. Given its importance, microbiota composition should not be left to chance. However, what determines this composition is far from clear, with results supporting contributions of both environmental factors and host genetics. To gauge the relative contributions of host genetics and environment, specifically the microbial diversity, we characterized the gut microbiotas of Caenorhabditis species spanning 200-300 million years of evolution, and raised on different composted soil environments. Comparisons were based on 16S rDNA deep sequencing data, as well as on functional evaluation of gut isolates. Worm microbiotas were distinct from those in their respective soil environment, and included bacteria previously identified as part of the C. elegans core microbiota. Microbiotas differed between experiments initiated with different soil communities, but within each experiment, worm microbiotas clustered according to host identity, demonstrating a dominant contribution of environmental diversity, but also a contribution of host genetics. The dominance of environmental contributions hindered identification of host-associated microbial taxa from 16S data. Characterization of gut isolates from C. elegans and C. briggsae, focusing on the core family Enterobacteriaceae, were also unable to expose phylogenetic distinctions between microbiotas of the two species. However, functional evaluation of the isolates revealed host-specific contributions, wherein gut commensals protected their own host from infection, but not a non-host. Identification of commensal host-specificity at the functional level, otherwise overlooked in standard sequence-based analyses, suggests that the contribution of host genetics to shaping of gut microbiotas may be greater than previously realized.

  16. Hydrology and density feedbacks control the ecology of intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis across habitats in seasonal climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Saez, Javier; Mande, Theophile; Ceperley, Natalie; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mari, Lorenzo; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-06-07

    We report about field and theoretical studies on the ecology of the aquatic snails (Bulinus spp. and Biomphalaria pfeifferi) that serve as obligate intermediate hosts in the complex life cycle of the parasites causing human schistosomiasis. Snail abundance fosters disease transmission, and thus the dynamics of snail populations are critically important for schistosomiasis modeling and control. Here, we single out hydrological drivers and density dependence (or lack of it) of ecological growth rates of local snail populations by contrasting novel ecological and environmental data with various models of host demography. Specifically, we study various natural and man-made habitats across Burkina Faso's highly seasonal climatic zones. Demographic models are ranked through formal model comparison and structural risk minimization. The latter allows us to evaluate the suitability of population models while clarifying the relevant covariates that explain empirical observations of snail abundance under the actual climatic forcings experienced by the various field sites. Our results link quantitatively hydrological drivers to distinct population dynamics through specific density feedbacks, and show that statistical methods based on model averaging provide reliable snail abundance projections. The consistency of our ranking results suggests the use of ad hoc models of snail demography depending on habitat type (e.g., natural vs. man-made) and hydrological characteristics (e.g., ephemeral vs. permanent). Implications for risk mapping and space-time allocation of control measures in schistosomiasis-endemic contexts are discussed.

  17. Predicting the spatial distribution of Biomphalaria straminea, a potential intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R. Habib

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases impacting human health in the tropics and sub-tropics. The geographic distribution of Schistosoma mansoni, the most widespread species, includes areas in Africa, the Middle East, South America and the Caribbean. Snails of the genus Biomphalaria act as intermediate host for S. mansoni. Biomphalaria straminea is not indigenous in China but was accidentally introduced to Hong Kong from South America and has spread to other habitats in the southern parts of the country. This species is known for its great dispersal capacity that highlights the importance of the snail as a potential host for S. mansoni in China. In this connection, although no such infection has been recorded in the field so far, the continuous expansion of China’s projects in endemic areas of Africa and import of the infection via returning workers or visitors deserve attention. The purpose of this study was to map and predict the spatial distribution of B. straminea in China. Snail occurrence data were assembled and investigated using MaxEnt software, along with climatic and environmental variables to produce a predictive risk map. Of the environmental variables tested, the precipitation of warmest quarter was the most contribution factor for snail’s spatial distribution. Risk areas were found in southeastern China and it is expected that they will guide policies and control programmes to potential areas area of snail abundance and used for spatial targeting of control interventions for this invasive species.

  18. Molecular characterization of Sarcocystis neurona strains from opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and intermediate hosts from Central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejmanek, Daniel; Miller, Melissa A; Grigg, Michael E; Crosbie, Paul R; Conrad, Patricia A

    2010-05-28

    Sarcocystis neurona is a significant cause of neurological disease in horses and other animals, including the threatened Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis). Opossums (Didelphis virginiana), the only known definitive hosts for S. neurona in North America, are an introduced species in California. S. neurona DNA isolated from sporocysts and/or infected tissues of 10 opossums, 6 horses, 1 cat, 23 Southern sea otters, and 1 harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) with natural infections was analyzed based on 15 genetic markers, including the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) region; the 25/396 marker; S. neurona surface antigen genes (snSAGs) 2, 3, and 4; and 10 different microsatellites. Based on phylogenetic analysis, most of the S. neurona strains segregated into three genetically distinct groups. Additionally, fifteen S. neurona samples from opossums and several intermediate hosts, including sea otters and horses, were found to be genetically identical across all 15 genetic markers, indicating that fatal encephalitis in Southern sea otters and equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) in horses is strongly linked to S. neurona sporocysts shed by opossums. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Rearing of Lymnaea columella (Say, 1817, intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica (Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Cecília Pereira de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica, Lymnaea columella, collected in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, was reared in our laboratory. The aim of the current study was to standardize a rearing and maintenance technique. Two kinds of diet were tested: fresh lettuce (A and rodent ration + 10% CaCO3 plus fresh lettuce (B. The age for the beginning of oviposition ranged from 27 to 57 days. Ten days after oviposition at 24.7°C, 100% eclosion occurred. The complete life cycle varied from 37 to 67 days. The average numbers of eggs per egg mass were 26.3 and 31.1 with diets (A and (B, respectively. The lettuce and ration fed snails presented a increased growth although the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05. The mortality rate varied from 40 to 64% after 90 days. The maximum longevity was 183 days, 21.5 mm length and 11 mm wide. The methodology to mass breed and maintain these snails was found to be suitable in the laboratory

  20. The striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) is an intermediate host for Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, M A; Yowell, C A; Sellon, D C; Hines, M; Ginn, P E; Marsh, A E; MacKay, R J; Dame, J B; Greiner, E C

    2001-06-01

    Striped skunks, initially negative for antibodies to Sarcocystis neurona, formed sarcocysts in skeletal muscles after inoculation with S. neurona sporocysts collected from a naturally infected Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana). Skunks developed antibodies to S. neurona by immunoblot and muscles containing sarcocysts were fed to laboratory-reared opossums which then shed sporulated Sarcocystis sporocysts in their faeces. Mean dimensions for sporocysts were 11.0 x 7.5 microm and each contained four sporozoites and a residuum. Sarcocysts from skunks and sporocysts from opossums fed infected skunk muscle were identified as S. neurona using PCR and DNA sequence analysis. A 2-month-old, S. neurona-naive pony foal was orally inoculated with 5 x 10(5) sporocysts. Commercial immunoblot for antibodies to S. neurona performed using CSF collected from the inoculated pony was low positive at 4 weeks p.i., positive at 6 weeks p.i., and strong positive at 8 weeks p.i. Gamma-interferon gene knockout mice inoculated with skunk/opossum derived sporocysts developed serum antibodies to S. neurona and clinical neurologic disease. Merozoites of S. neurona present in the lung, cerebrum, and cerebellum of mice were detected by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies to S. neurona. Based on the results of this study, the striped skunk is an intermediate host of S. neurona.

  1. Symbiotic specificity of tropical tree rhizobia for host legumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bala, A.; Giller, K.E.

    2001-01-01

    The host range and specificity is reported of a genetically diverse group of rhizobia isolated from nodules of Calliandra calothyrsus, Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala and Sesbania sesban. Nodule number and nitrogen content was measured in seedlings of herbaceous and woody legume species

  2. Distribution, habitats and role as intermediate host of the freshwater snail, Bulinus forskalii, in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.N. De Kock

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the geographical distribution and habitats of Bulinus forskalii, the snail intermediate host of the conical fluke of equids, Gastrodiscus aegyptiacus as reflected by the 1 209 samples in the database of the National Freshwater Snail Collection of South Africa. The 362 different loci on record represent an extensive distribution in KwaZulu-Natal Province, the Limpopo Province, the coastal areas of the Eastern Cape Province and the south-eastern part of the North West Province. Although it was recorded from all types of water-body represented in the database, the highest percentages of samples were recovered from dams (30.4 % and brooks (28.2 %. The majority of samples came from perennial habitats (59.1%, 60.7% from habitats with standing water, 54.0 % from habitats with clear water and 71.8 % from habitats of which the water was described as fresh. The majority of samples (39.5 % were collected in habitats of which the substratum was recorded as muddy. The highest percentage of samples, by far (81.5 %, was collected in habitats that fell within the mean yearly temperature interval ranging from 15-20 °C. An integrated decision tree constructed from the data in the database indicated that temperature and type of water-body played a decisive role in determining the presence of B. forskalii in a given area. The results of experimental exposure to miracidia of a local strain of both Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mattheei in the laboratory indicated that a local strain of B. forskalii was incompatible with both these strains of parasite. Research to clarify the role of B. forskalii in the transmission of both Calicophoron microbothrium and G. aegyptiacus in South Africa, is recommended.

  3. Posthodiplostomum cuticola (Digenea: Diplostomatidae) in intermediate fish hosts: factors contributing to the parasite infection and prey selection by the definitive bird host

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondračková, Markéta; Šimková, A.; Gelnar, M.; Jurajda, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 129, č. 6 (2004), s. 761-770 ISSN 0031-1820 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/02/0924; GA ČR GP524/03/P108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6093917 Keywords : fish assemblages * intermediate host * complex life-cycle Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.685, year: 2004

  4. Large-scale determinants of intestinal schistosomiasis and intermediate host snail distribution across Africa: does climate matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie; Utzinger, Jürg; Vounatsou, Penelope; Hürlimann, Eveline; Schur, Nadine; Saarnak, Christopher F L; Simoonga, Christopher; Mubita, Patricia; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Tchuem Tchuenté, Louis-Albert; Rahbek, Carsten; Kristensen, Thomas K

    2013-11-01

    The geographical ranges of most species, including many infectious disease agents and their vectors and intermediate hosts, are assumed to be constrained by climatic tolerances, mainly temperature. It has been suggested that global warming will cause an expansion of the areas potentially suitable for infectious disease transmission. However, the transmission of infectious diseases is governed by a myriad of ecological, economic, evolutionary and social factors. Hence, a deeper understanding of the total disease system (pathogens, vectors and hosts) and its drivers is important for predicting responses to climate change. Here, we combine a growing degree day model for Schistosoma mansoni with species distribution models for the intermediate host snail (Biomphalaria spp.) to investigate large-scale environmental determinants of the distribution of the African S. mansoni-Biomphalaria system and potential impacts of climatic changes. Snail species distribution models included several combinations of climatic and habitat-related predictors; the latter divided into "natural" and "human-impacted" habitat variables to measure anthropogenic influence. The predictive performance of the combined snail-parasite model was evaluated against a comprehensive compilation of historical S. mansoni parasitological survey records, and then examined for two climate change scenarios of increasing severity for 2080. Future projections indicate that while the potential S. mansoni transmission area expands, the snail ranges are more likely to contract and/or move into cooler areas in the south and east. Importantly, we also note that even though climate per se matters, the impact of humans on habitat play a crucial role in determining the distribution of the intermediate host snails in Africa. Thus, a future contraction in the geographical range size of the intermediate host snails caused by climatic changes does not necessarily translate into a decrease or zero-sum change in human

  5. Behavioural and physiological effects of the trophically transmitted cestode parasite, Cyathocephalus truncatus, on its intermediate host, Gammarus pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, N; Rigaud, T; Moret, Y; Hervant, F; Bollache, L

    2007-11-01

    Some parasites with complex life-cycles are able to manipulate the behaviour of their intermediate hosts in a way that increases their transmission to the next host. Gammarids infected by the tapeworm Cyathocephalus truncatus (Cestoda: Spathebothriidea) are known to be more predated by fish than uninfected ones, but potential behavioural manipulation by the parasite has never been investigated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that C. truncatus is able to manipulate the behaviour of one of its intermediate hosts, Gammarus pulex (Crustacea: Amphipoda). To assess if any behavioural change was linked to other phenotypic alterations, we also measured the immunity of infected and uninfected individuals and investigated the pathogenic effects of the parasite. Infected gammarids were significantly less photophobic than uninfected ones, but no effect of infection on the level of immune defence was found. The results on survival, swimming activity and oxygen consumption suggest that the parasite also has various pathogenic effects. However, the alteration in host phototaxis was not correlated to some of these pathogenic effects. Therefore, we propose that the modification in host reaction to light is a behavioural manipulation, explaining the previously observed increase of gammarid predation rate.

  6. Molecular diversity and host specificity of termite-associated Xylaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedegbe, Herbert J; Miambi, Edouard; Pando, Anne; Houngnandan, Pascal; Rouland-Lefevre, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    Studies have revealed that some Xylaria species were closely associated with fungus-growing termite nests. However this relationship rarely had been investigated and the host specificity of termite-associated Xylaria was not yet clearly established. Eighteen Xylaria rDNA-ITS sequences were obtained from fungus combs belonging to 11 Macrotermitinae species from eight regions. Low diversity was found between isolates, and nine sequences were retrieved. Termite-associated Xylaria were shown to be monophyletic, with three main clades, all including strains from various termite hosts and geographical localities. This new molecular study shows no species specificity with respect to fungus-growing termites, which suggests that there might be substrate specialization.

  7. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolow, Susanne H.; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; N’Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A.

    2015-01-01

    Reinfection after treatment is a problem that plagues efforts to control parasites with complex transmission pathways, such as schistosomiasis, which affects at least 220 million people worldwide and requires an obligate snail intermediate host. Our study highlights a potential ecological solution to this global health problem: We show that a species of river prawn indigenous to the west coast of Africa, Macrobrachium vollenhovenii, could offer a low-cost, sustainable form of snail control th...

  8. Host specificity in a diverse Neotropical tick community: an assessment using quantitative network analysis and host phylogeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esser, Helen; Herre, Edward A.; Blüthgen, Nico; Loaiza, Jose R.; Bermúdez, Sergio E.; Jansen, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Host specificity is a fundamental determinant of tick population and pathogen transmission dynamics, and therefore has important implications for human health. Tick host specificity is expected to be particularly high in the tropics, where communities of ticks, hosts and pathogens are

  9. The geographical distribution and habitats of three liver fluke intermediate hosts in South - Africa and the health implications involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. de Kock

    2008-09-01

    persons and authorities were totally unsuccessful. In view of statistics available for elsewhere in the world, it would be unwise to assume that no problems exist in this regard in South Africa. The number of people suffering from fasciolosis was already estimated at 2.4 million in 61 countries in 1995 and another 180 million at risk of becoming infected, with the highest prevalence’s reported from Bolivia, China, Ecuador, Egypt, France, Iran, Peru and Portugal. The results of recent serological assays for the detection of fasciolosis in cattle herds in selected areas in South Africa indicated positive cases from localities that closely correspond to the geographical distribution of the three Lymnaea species in this country. According to reports in the literature, the high prevalence of fasciolosis in livestock in the highlands of Ethiopia couldhave serious health implications for people in the area because they have to use the same water resources. In many rural areas in South Africa local populations also have no other options than to share natural water resources with their livestock. In most instances these water bodies harbour at least one of the Lymnaea species which can maintain the life cycle of fasciola. Under such conditions residents could daily be exposed to the risk of becoming infected. It is a matter of concern that epidemiological research with regard to human fasciolosis is such aneglected subject in South Africa. In our opinion epidemiological surveys should be conducted to determine the prevalence of human fasciolosis in specific areas which could be selected on the basis of using the geographical distribution of the three Linnaean species as guidelines. Efforts should also be made to conduct surveys to update the geographical distribution of the snail intermediate hosts and awareness programmes should be launched in rural areas at risk.

  10. Determining Intermediate Hosts for Opecoelidae and Microphallidae Species (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda) in the Southeastern Pacific Coast, Using Molecular Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Natalia Verónica; López, Zambra; González, María Teresa; Muñoz, Gabriela

    2017-02-01

    Metacercarial stages of digeneans were collected from decapod crustaceans inhabiting intertidal rocky zones in central Chile. The digeneans were identified through a molecular analysis based on the V4 region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene. We analyzed 356 crustaceans belonging to 10 species, 115 intertidal fish belonging to 6 species, and 4 specimens of 1 coastal bird species. In total, 74.1% of crustaceans were parasitized with metacercariae. We found 1 species of Opecoelidae. This species showed low genetic divergence (0% and 0.1%) with adult digeneans found in intertidal fish and with the species Helicometrina labrisomi infesting a subtidal fish from northern Chile (Labrisomus philippii). Additionally, we found 2 species of Microphallidae, 1 closely related to Maritrema (1.3% genetic distance) and the other related to Microphallus (5% genetic distance). Therefore, our findings showed that the decapod crustaceans are relevant hosts in food webs from the southeastern Pacific coast. Furthermore, we found 5 species of crustaceans as second intermediate hosts for H. labrisomi and 2 species as secondary intermediate hosts for 2 Microphallidae, which contribute to elucidate parts of their life cycles through molecular markers and extended the host distribution of H. labrisomi in the southeastern Pacific coast.

  11. Fasciola hepatica in Cuba: compatibility of different isolates with two intermediate snail hosts, Galba cubensis and Pseudosuccinea columella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, A A; Sánchez, J; Pointier, J-P; Théron, A; Hurtrez-Boussès, S

    2014-12-01

    In Cuba, only two lymnaeid snails, Galba cubensis and Pseudosuccinea columella, with different ecology and distribution patterns, are intermediate hosts for Fasciola hepatica. The compatibility of these two species as hosts was analysed through their rates of infection, the production of rediae and survivorship when exposed to F. hepatica miracidia. Ten populations of G. cubensis, eight of P. columella collected from various habitats and six isolates of F. hepatica sampled in slaughterhouses from different localities were tested. Our results clearly demonstrate that G. cubensis is a more compatible host for F. hepatica in Cuba when compared with P. columella. However, the role that P. columella may have in fascioliasis transmission under certain conditions should not be disregarded. Variation in infectivity among isolates of F. hepatica were also observed and may explain why some regions in Cuba are more commonly subjected to fascioliasis outbreaks.

  12. Diversity and host specificity of the Verminephrobacter–earthworm symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marie Braad; Davidson, Seana; Holmstrup, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria of the genus Verminephrobacter (Betaproteobacteria) were detected in the nephridia of 19 out of 23 investigated earthworm species (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae) by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). While all four Lumbricus species...... and three out of five Aporrectodea species were densely colonized by a mono-species culture of Verminephrobacter, other earthworm species contained mixed bacterial populations with varying proportions of Verminephrobacter; four species did not contain Verminephrobacter at all. The Verminephrobacter...... symbionts could be grouped into earthworm species-specific sequence clusters based on their 16S rRNA and RNA polymerase subunit B (rpoB) genes. Closely related host species harboured more closely related symbionts than did distantly related hosts. Co-diversification of the symbiotic partners could...

  13. Genetic Evidence of Contemporary Dispersal of the Intermediate Snail Host of Schistosoma japonicum: Movement of an NTD Host Is Facilitated by Land Use and Landscape Connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Head

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While the dispersal of hosts and vectors-through active or passive movement-is known to facilitate the spread and re-emergence of certain infectious diseases, little is known about the movement ecology of Oncomelania spp., intermediate snail host of the parasite Schistosoma japonicum, and its consequences for the spread of schistosomiasis in East and Southeast Asia. In China, despite intense control programs aimed at preventing schistosomiasis transmission, there is evidence in recent years of re-emergence and persistence of infection in some areas, as well as an increase in the spatial extent of the snail host. A quantitative understanding of the dispersal characteristics of the intermediate host can provide new insights into the spatial dynamics of transmission, and can assist public health officials in limiting the geographic spread of infection.Oncomelania hupensis robertsoni snails (n = 833 were sampled from 29 sites in Sichuan, China, genotyped, and analyzed using Bayesian assignment to estimate the rate of recent snail migration across sites. Landscape connectivity between each site pair was estimated using the geographic distance distributions derived from nine environmental models: Euclidean, topography, incline, wetness, land use, watershed, stream use, streams and channels, and stream velocity. Among sites, 14.4% to 32.8% of sampled snails were identified as recent migrants, with 20 sites comprising >20% migrants. Migration rates were generally low between sites, but at 8 sites, over 10% of the overall host population originated from one proximal site. Greater landscape connectivity was significantly associated with increased odds of migration, with the minimum path distance (as opposed to median or first quartile emerging as the strongest predictor across all environmental models. Models accounting for land use explained the largest proportion of the variance in migration rates between sites. A greater number of irrigation channels

  14. Identification of estuarine fish Dormitator latifrons as an intermediate host and Eleotris picta as a paratenic host for Gnathostoma binucleatum in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Camacho, Sylvia Páz; de la Cruz-Otero, Ma Del Carmen; Zazueta-Ramos, Magda Luz; Bojórquez-Contreras, Angel; Sicairos-Félix, Josefina; Campista-León, Samuel; Guzmán-Loreto, Roberto; Delgado-Vargas, Francisco; León-Règagnon, Virginia; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2008-11-01

    Gnathostomosis is a typical fish-borne zoonotic parasitosis and is currently a serious public health issue in Mexico. Among several Gnathostoma species present in wild animals in Mexico, Gnathostoma binucleatum is the only proven species responsible for human diseases, and the advanced third stage larvae (AL3) of G. binucleatum have been found in over 20 species of fish in this country. In Sinaloa State, two fish species, Dormitator latifrons and Eleotris picta, were heavily contaminated with G. binucleatum AL3. When we analyzed the relationship between the size of the fish and the density of infection with G. binucleatum AL3, the distribution patterns of AL3 were markedly different between these two fish species. Apparent size-dependent accumulation was observed in E. picta but not in D. latifrons, suggesting that E. picta is a paratenic host whereas D. latifrons is a second intermediate host.

  15. Aspergillus fumigatus Copper Export Machinery and Reactive Oxygen Intermediate Defense Counter Host Copper-Mediated Oxidative Antimicrobial Offense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Wiemann

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Fenton-chemistry-generating properties of copper ions are considered a potent phagolysosome defense against pathogenic microbes, yet our understanding of underlying host/microbe dynamics remains unclear. We address this issue in invasive aspergillosis and demonstrate that host and fungal responses inextricably connect copper and reactive oxygen intermediate (ROI mechanisms. Loss of the copper-binding transcription factor AceA yields an Aspergillus fumigatus strain displaying increased sensitivity to copper and ROI in vitro, increased intracellular copper concentrations, decreased survival in challenge with murine alveolar macrophages (AMΦs, and reduced virulence in a non-neutropenic murine model. ΔaceA survival is remediated by dampening of host ROI (chemically or genetically or enhancement of copper-exporting activity (CrpA in A. fumigatus. Our study exposes a complex host/microbe multifactorial interplay that highlights the importance of host immune status and reveals key targetable A. fumigatus counter-defenses.

  16. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolow, Susanne H; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H; Lafferty, Kevin D; Kuris, Armand M; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; N'Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A

    2015-08-04

    Eliminating human parasitic disease often requires interrupting complex transmission pathways. Even when drugs to treat people are available, disease control can be difficult if the parasite can persist in nonhuman hosts. Here, we show that restoration of a natural predator of a parasite's intermediate hosts may enhance drug-based schistosomiasis control. Our study site was the Senegal River Basin, where villagers suffered a massive outbreak and persistent epidemic after the 1986 completion of the Diama Dam. The dam blocked the annual migration of native river prawns (Macrobrachium vollenhoveni) that are voracious predators of the snail intermediate hosts for schistosomiasis. We tested schistosomiasis control by reintroduced river prawns in a before-after-control-impact field experiment that tracked parasitism in snails and people at two matched villages after prawns were stocked at one village's river access point. The abundance of infected snails was 80% lower at that village, presumably because prawn predation reduced the abundance and average life span of latently infected snails. As expected from a reduction in infected snails, human schistosomiasis prevalence was 18 ± 5% lower and egg burden was 50 ± 8% lower at the prawn-stocking village compared with the control village. In a mathematical model of the system, stocking prawns, coupled with infrequent mass drug treatment, eliminates schistosomiasis from high-transmission sites. We conclude that restoring river prawns could be a novel contribution to controlling, or eliminating, schistosomiasis.

  17. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolow, Susanne H.; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; D'Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A.

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating human parasitic disease often requires interrupting complex transmission pathways. Even when drugs to treat people are available, disease control can be difficult if the parasite can persist in nonhuman hosts. Here, we show that restoration of a natural predator of a parasite’s intermediate hosts may enhance drug-based schistosomiasis control. Our study site was the Senegal River Basin, where villagers suffered a massive outbreak and persistent epidemic after the 1986 completion of the Diama Dam. The dam blocked the annual migration of native river prawns (Macrobrachium vollenhoveni) that are voracious predators of the snail intermediate hosts for schistosomiasis. We tested schistosomiasis control by reintroduced river prawns in a before-after-control-impact field experiment that tracked parasitism in snails and people at two matched villages after prawns were stocked at one village’s river access point. The abundance of infected snails was 80% lower at that village, presumably because prawn predation reduced the abundance and average life span of latently infected snails. As expected from a reduction in infected snails, human schistosomiasis prevalence was 18 ± 5% lower and egg burden was 50 ± 8% lower at the prawn-stocking village compared with the control village. In a mathematical model of the system, stocking prawns, coupled with infrequent mass drug treatment, eliminates schistosomiasis from high-transmission sites. We conclude that restoring river prawns could be a novel contribution to controlling, or eliminating, schistosomiasis.                            

  18. Observation of intermediate bands in Eu3+ doped YPO4 host: Li+ ion effect and blue to pink light emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Kareem Parchur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the tuning of blue to pink colour generation from Li+ ion co-doped YPO4:5Eu nanoparticles prepared by polyol method at ∼100-120 °C with ethylene glycol (EG as a capping agent. Interaction of EG molecules capped on the surface of the nanoparticles and/or created oxygen vacancies induces formation of intermediate/mid gap bands in the host structure, which is supported by UV-Visible absorption data. Strong blue and pink colors can be observed in the cases of as-prepared and 500 °C annealed samples, respectively. Co-doping of Li+ enhances the emission intensities of intermediate band as well as Eu3+. On annealing as-prepared sample to 500 °C, the intermediate band emission intensity decreases, whereas Eu3+ emission intensity increases suggesting increase of extent of energy transfer from the intermediate band to Eu3+ on annealing. Emission intensity ratio of electric to magnetic dipole transitions of Eu3+ can be varied by changing excitation wavelength. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS study of as-prepared samples confirms the presence of oxygen vacancies and Eu3+ but absence of Eu2+. Dispersed particles in ethanol and polymer film show the strong blue color, suggesting that these materials will be useful as probes in life science and also in light emitting device applications.

  19. Fluorescent nanodiamond-bacteriophage conjugates maintain host specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Jimmy T; Alkahtani, Masfer H; Rampersaud, Isaac; Rampersaud, Arfaan; Scully, Marlan; Young, Ryland F; Hemmer, Philip; Zeng, Lanying

    2018-06-01

    Rapid identification of specific bacterial strains within clinical, environmental, and food samples can facilitate the prevention and treatment of disease. Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are being developed as biomarkers in biology and medicine, due to their excellent imaging properties, ability to accept surface modifications, and lack of toxicity. Bacteriophages, the viruses of bacteria, can have exquisite specificity for certain hosts. We propose to exploit the properties of FNDs and phages to develop phages conjugated with FNDs as long-lived fluorescent diagnostic reagents. In this study, we develop a simple procedure to create such fluorescent probes by functionalizing the FNDs and phages with streptavidin and biotin, respectively. We find that the FND-phage conjugates retain the favorable characteristics of the individual components and can discern their proper host within a mixture. This technology may be further explored using different phage/bacteria systems, different FND color centers and alternate chemical labeling schemes for additional means of bacterial identification and new single-cell/virus studies. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. New insight in lymnaeid snails (Mollusca, Gastropoda) as intermediate hosts of Fasciola hepatica (Trematoda, Digenea) in Belgium and Luxembourg

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study aims to assess the epidemiological role of different lymnaeid snails as intermediate hosts of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica in Belgium and Luxembourg. Methods During summer 2008, 7103 lymnaeid snails were collected from 125 ponds distributed in 5 clusters each including 25 ponds. Each cluster was located in a different biogeographic area of Belgium and Luxembourg. In addition, snails were also collected in sixteen other biotopes considered as temporary wet areas. These snails were identified as Galba truncatula (n = 2474) (the main intermediate host of F. hepatica in Europe) and Radix sp. (n = 4629). Moreover, several biological and non-biological variables were also recorded from the different biotopes. DNA was extracted from each snail collected using Chelex® technique. DNA samples were screened through a multiplex PCR that amplifies lymnaeid internal transcribed spacer 2 gene sequences (500–600 bp) (acting as an internal control) and a 124 bp fragment of repetitive DNA from Fasciola sp. Results Lymnaeid snails were found in 75 biotopes (53.2%). Thirty individuals of G. truncatula (1.31%) and 7 of Radix sp. (0.16%) were found to be positive for Fasciola sp. The seven positive Radix sp. snails all belonged to the species R. balthica (Linnaeus, 1758). Classification and regression tree analysis were performed in order to better understand links and relative importance of the different recorded factors. One of the best explanatory variables for the presence/absence of the different snail species seems to be the geographic location, whereas for the infection status of the snails no obvious relationship was linked to the presence of cattle. Conclusions Epidemiological implications of these findings and particularly the role of R. balthica as an alternative intermediate host in Belgium and Luxembourg were discussed. PMID:24524623

  1. Molecular and morphological characterization of the cercariae of Lecithodendrium linstowi (Dollfus, 1931), a trematode of bats, and incrimination of the first intermediate snail host, Radix balthica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enabulele, Egie E; Lawton, Scott P; Walker, Anthony J; Kirk, Ruth S

    2018-03-01

    Lecithodendrium linstowi is one of the most prevalent and abundant trematodes of bats, but the larval stages and intermediate hosts have not been identified. We present the first molecular and morphological characterization of the cercariae of L. linstowi based on a phylogenetic analysis of partial fragments of LSU and ITS2 rDNA. The first intermediate host was incriminated as Radix balthica by DNA barcoding using cox1 and ITS2 sequences, although the snail morphologically resembled Radix peregra, emphasizing the requirement for molecular identification of lymnaeids as important intermediate hosts of medical and veterinary impact. The application of molecular data in this study has enabled linkage of life cycle stages and accurate incrimination of the first intermediate host.

  2. Snail intermediate host/Schistosoma haematobium relationships from three transmission sites in Benin (West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibikounlé, Moudachirou; Mouahid, Gabriel; Mintsa Nguema, Rodrigue; Sakiti, Nestor; Massougbodji, Achille; Moné, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    The relationships between three strains of Schistosoma haematobium (Doh, Sô-Tchanhoué and Toho-Todougba; from Benin, West Africa) and their snail hosts were assessed by measurement of several life-history traits, including the infection rate; pre-patent period; cercarial production of each parasite strain; and growth, fecundity and survival of the host snails. Adaptations to its local snail host was found for the Toho-Todougba strain and included a short pre-patent period, a long patent period and production of more cercariae in its local snail host. In contrast, the life-history traits of the Doh and Sô-Tchanhoué strains indicated non-local adaptations, as some sympatric host-parasite combinations were not compatible, the highest infection rates occurred in the allopatric snail Bulinus wrighti, and the duration of cercarial production was short because of the high level of mortality of the snails. Furthermore, snail reproduction ceased following infection by each of the three parasite strains, and the life-history traits were not influenced by the miracidial dose.

  3. Field trials of various molluscicides (chiefly sodium pentachlorophenate) for the control of aquatic intermediate hosts of human bilharziasis *†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Willard H.; Dobrovolny, Charles G.; Berry, Elmer G.

    1958-01-01

    Field trials of various molluscicides—notably sodium pentachlorophenate, copper sulfate and dinitro-o-cyclohexylphenol—were carried out in Brazil in order to test their effectiveness against the aquatic intermediate hosts of human bilharziasis. Sodium pentachlorophenate was found to be the most effective in relation to cost and availability. Subsequent tests in Egypt, using sodium pentachlorophenate alone, while confirming the effectiveness of this molluscicide in bilharziasis control, have shown that the dosage and methods of application must be adapted to environmental conditions. PMID:13573120

  4. Occurrence and host specificity of a neogregarine protozoan in four milkweed butterfly hosts (Danaus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Paola A; Sternberg, Eleanore D; Lefèvre, Thierry; de Roode, Jacobus C; Altizer, Sonia

    2016-10-01

    Throughout their global range, wild monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) are infected with the protozoan Ophryocystis elektroscirrha (OE). In monarchs, OE infection reduces pupal eclosion, adult lifespan, adult body size and flight ability. Infection of other butterfly hosts with OE is rare or unknown, and the only previously published records of OE infection were on monarch and queen butterflies (D. gilippus). Here we explored the occurrence and specificity of OE and OE-like parasites in four Danaus butterfly species. We surveyed wild D. eresimus (soldier), D. gilippus (queen), D. petilia (lesser wanderer), and D. plexippus (monarch) from five countries to determine the presence of infection. We conducted five cross-infection experiments, on monarchs and queen butterflies and their OE and OE-like parasites, to determine infection probability and the impact of infection on their hosts. Our field survey showed that OE-like parasites were present in D. gilippus, D. petilia, and D. plexippus, but were absent in D. eresimus. Infection probability varied geographically such that D. gilippus and D. plexippus populations in Puerto Rico and Trinidad were not infected or had low prevalence of infection, whereas D. plexippus from S. Florida and Australia had high prevalence. Cross-infection experiments showed evidence for host specificity, in that OE strains from monarchs were more effective at infecting monarchs than queens, and monarchs were less likely to be infected by OE-like strains from queens and lesser wanderers relative to their own natal strains. Our study showed that queens are less susceptible to OE and OE-like infection than monarchs, and that the reduction in adult lifespan following infection is more severe in monarchs than in queens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Distribution of freshwater snails in the river Niger basin in Mali with special reference to the intermediate hosts of schistosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henry; Coulibaly, Godefroy; Furu, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Snail surveys were carried out in various parts of Mali. All areas surveyed are part of the Niger basin being either affluents or irrigation schemes fed by this river. The snail species present varied greatly between areas. The following potential hosts of schistosomes were recorded: Biomphalaria...... pfeifferi, Bulinus truncatus, B. globosus, B. umbilicatus, B. forskalii and B. senegalensis. In the large irrigation schemes, i.e. 'Office du Niger' and Baguinéda, only B. pfeifferi and B. truncatus appear to be intermediate hosts. Snail distribution appeared to some extent to be focal and high snail...... densities appeared to be associated with human water contact activities, which apparently create favourable biotopes for the snails. This is probably due to an alteration of the vegetation and an increase of the trophic status of the site by contamination with food remnants and other debris. The larger...

  6. Parasite performance and host alternation: is there a negative effect in host-specific and host-opportunistic parasites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN DER Mescht, Luther; Khokhlova, Irina S; Warburton, Elizabeth M; Krasnov, Boris R

    2017-07-01

    Environmental fluctuations are expected to require special adaptations only if they are associated with a decrease in fitness. We compared reproductive performance between fleas fed on alternating (preferred and non-preferred) hosts and fleas fed solely on either a preferred or a non-preferred host to determine whether (1) host alternation incurs an immediate negative effect, and, if yes, then (2) whether this effect is greater in a host specialist (Parapulex chephrenis) than in host generalists (Xenopsylla conformis and Synosternus cleopatrae). We also compared flea performance under alternating host regimes with different host order (initial feeding on either a preferred or a non-preferred host). An immediate negative effect of alternating hosts on reproductive performance was found in P. chephrenis only. These fleas produced 44·3% less eggs that were 3·6% smaller when they fed on alternating hosts as compared with a preferred host. In contrast, X. conformis and S. cleopatrae appeared to be able to adapt their reproductive strategy to host alternation by producing higher quality offspring (on average, 3·1% faster development and 2·1% larger size) without compromising offspring number. However, the former produced eggs that were slightly, albeit significantly, smaller when it fed on alternating hosts as compared with a preferred host. Moreover, host order affected reproductive performance in host generalists (e.g. 2·8% larger eggs when the first feeding was performed on a non-preferred host), but not in a host specialist. We conclude that immediate effects of environmental fluctuation on parasite fitness depend on the degree of host specialization.

  7. Seasonal and Spatial Environmental Influence on Opisthorchis viverrini Intermediate Hosts, Abundance, and Distribution: Insights on Transmission Dynamics and Sustainable Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Sunyoung Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Opisthorchis viverrini (Ov is a complex-life-cycle trematode affecting 10 million people in SEA (Southeast Asia. Human infection occurs when infected cyprinid fish are consumed raw or undercooked. Ov requires three hosts and presents two free-living parasitic stages. As a consequence Ov transmission and infection in intermediate and human hosts are strongly mediated by environmental factors and understanding how environmental variability influences intermediate host abundance is critical. The objectives of this study were 1 to document water parameters, intermediate hosts abundance and infection spatio-temporal variation, 2 to assess their causal relationships and identify windows of transmission risk.Fish and snails were collected monthly for one year at 12 sites in Lawa Lake, an Ov-endemic region of Khon Kaen Province in Northeast Thailand. Physicochemical water parameters [pH, temperature (Tp, dissolved oxygen (DO, Salinity, electrical conductivity (EC, total dissolved solid (TDS, nitrite nitrogen (NO2-N, lead (Pb, total coliform bacteria (TCB and fecal coliform bacteria (FCB] were measured. Multivariate analyses, linear models and kriging were used to characterize water parameter variation and its influence on host abundance and infection prevalence. We found that sampling sites could be grouped in three clusters and discriminated along a nitrogen-salinity gradient where higher levels in the lake's southern region predicted higher Bithynia relative abundance (P<0.05 and lower snail and fish species diversity (P<0.05. Highest Bithynia abundance occurred during rainy season (P<0.001, independently of site influence. Cyprinids were the most abundant fish family and higher cyprinid relative abundance was found in areas with higher Bithynia relative abundance (P<0.05. Ov infection in snails was anecdotal while Ov infection in fish was higher in the southern region (P<0.001 at sites showing high FCB.Our results indicate that water contamination

  8. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF LYMNAEIDAE (MOLLUSCA, BASOMMATOPHORA), INTERMEDIATE HOST OF Fasciola hepatica LINNAEUS, 1758 (TREMATODA, DIGENEA) IN BRAZIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Camilla; Scholte, Ronaldo Guilherme Carvalho; D'ávila, Sthefane; Caldeira, Roberta Lima; Carvalho, Omar dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Snails of the family Lymnaeidae act as intermediate hosts in the biological cycle of Fasciola hepatica, which is a biological agent of fasciolosis, a parasitic disease of medical importance for humans and animals. The present work aimed to update and map the spatial distribution of the intermediate host snails of F. hepatica in Brazil. Data on the distribution of lymnaeids species were compiled from the Collection of Medical Malacology (Fiocruz-CMM, CPqRR), Collection of Malacology (MZUSP), “SpeciesLink” (CRIA) network and through systematic surveys in the literature. Our maps of the distribution of lymnaeids show that Pseudosuccinea columella is the most common species and it is widespread in the South and Southeast with few records in the Midwest, North and Northeast regions. The distribution of the Galba viatrix, G. cubensis and G. truncatula showed a few records in the South and Southeast regions, they were not reported for the Midwest, North and Northeast. In addition, in the South region there are a few records for G. viatrix and one occurrence of Lymnaea rupestris. Our findings resulted in the first map of the spatial distribution of Lymnaeidae species in Brazil which might be useful to better understand the fasciolosis distribution and delineate priority areas for control interventions. PMID:24879003

  9. Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae): a possible second molluscan intermediate host of Echinostoma cinetorchis (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Younghun; Park, Yun-Kyu; Hwang, Myung-Gi; Soh, Chin-Thack

    2001-01-01

    More than 1,500 clams of Corbicula fluminea, the most favorable food source of freshwater bivalves in Korea, were collected from 5 localities to examine cercarial and metacercarial infection with Echinostoma cinetorchis. Although 3 clams infected with suspicious E. cinetorchis metacercariae out of 200 specimens collected at Kangjin, Chollanam-do were detected, no cercarial and metacercarial infections with E. cinetorchis were observed in field-collected Corbicula specimens. In the susceptibility experiments with laboratory-reared clams, those infected with miracidia of E. cinetorchis did not release their cercariae up to 60 days after infection. To confirm the identity of second intermediate host of E. cinetorchis experimentally, a total of 30 clams were exposed to the cercariae from Segmentina hemisphaerula that had been infected with miracidia of E. cinetorchis. The clams were susceptible to cercariae of E. cinetorchis with an infection rate of 93.3%. Metacercariae from clams taken more than 7 days after cercarial exposure were fed to rats (S/D strain), and adult worms of E. cinetorchis, characterized by 37-38 collar spines on the head crown, were recovered from the ileocecal regions. This is the first report of C. fluminea as a possible second intermediate host of E. cinetorchis. PMID:11775336

  10. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF LYMNAEIDAE (MOLLUSCA, BASOMMATOPHORA, INTERMEDIATE HOST OF Fasciola hepatica LINNAEUS, 1758 (TREMATODA, DIGENEA IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Medeiros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Snails of the family Lymnaeidae act as intermediate hosts in the biological cycle of Fasciola hepatica, which is a biological agent of fasciolosis, a parasitic disease of medical importance for humans and animals. The present work aimed to update and map the spatial distribution of the intermediate host snails of F. hepatica in Brazil. Data on the distribution of lymnaeids species were compiled from the Collection of Medical Malacology (Fiocruz-CMM, CPqRR, Collection of Malacology (MZUSP, “SpeciesLink” (CRIA network and through systematic surveys in the literature. Our maps of the distribution of lymnaeids show that Pseudosuccinea columella is the most common species and it is widespread in the South and Southeast with few records in the Midwest, North and Northeast regions. The distribution of the Galba viatrix, G. cubensis and G. truncatula showed a few records in the South and Southeast regions, they were not reported for the Midwest, North and Northeast. In addition, in the South region there are a few records for G. viatrix and one occurrence of Lymnaea rupestris. Our findings resulted in the first map of the spatial distribution of Lymnaeidae species in Brazil which might be useful to better understand the fasciolosis distribution and delineate priority areas for control interventions.

  11. Distribution and habitats of Lymnaea natalensis, snail intermediate host of the liver fluke Fasciola gigantica, in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the geographical distribution and the habitats of Lymnaea natalensis, the snail intermediate host of the liver fluke, Fasciola gigantica, as reflected by the collection sites of its 4 552 samples currently on record in the National Freshwater Snail Collection (NFSC of South Africa. Although this species was represented in a variety of waterbodies, the majority of samples(±70%came from rivers, brooks and dams and in 70.8% of the cases the water was described as permanent and in 71.8% as slow flowing or standing. The results of life-table studies conducted by various authors indicated that temperature should be a relatively unimportant factor in determining its geographical distribution, but that the availability of permanent water should be decisive for its presence in a given habitat. These results are in agreement with the finding that only 7.5% of the samples of this species in the NFSC were collected in habitats which were described as seasonal. Furthermore, it gives a logical explanation for the sporadic occurrence, or total absence of this species in the more arid regions of South Africa. Water impoundments and irrigation networks contribute to a large extent towards creating perennial habitats which would be suitable for L. natalensis. As intermediate host for one of the liver fluke species which already is an economic factor in South Africa, this certainly is an aspect which ought to be reckoned within the planning and construction of new irrigation schemes.

  12. Alk3 controls nephron number and androgen production via lineage-specific effects in intermediate mesoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, Valeria; Alday, Adrian; Chi, Lijun; Mishina, Yuji; Rosenblum, Norman D

    2011-07-01

    The mammalian kidney and male reproductive system are both derived from the intermediate mesoderm. The spatial and temporal expression of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 and BMP4 and their cognate receptor, activin like kinase 3 (ALK3), suggests a functional role for BMP-ALK3 signaling during formation of intermediate mesoderm-derivative organs. Here, we define cell autonomous functions for Alk3 in the kidney and male gonad in mice with CRE-mediated Alk3 inactivation targeted to intermediate mesoderm progenitors (Alk3(IMP null)). Alk3-deficient mice exhibit simple renal hypoplasia characterized by decreases in both kidney size and nephron number but normal tissue architecture. These defects are preceded by a decreased contribution of Alk3-deleted cells to the metanephric blastema and reduced expression of Osr1 and SIX2, which mark nephron progenitor cells. Mutant mice are also characterized by defects in intermediate mesoderm-derived genital tissues with fewer mesonephric tubules and testicular Leydig cells, epithelial vacuolization in the postnatal corpus epididymis, and decreased serum testosterone levels and reduced fertility. Analysis of ALK3-dependent signaling effectors revealed lineage-specific reduction of phospho-p38 MAPK in metanephric mesenchyme and phospho-SMAD1/5/8 in the testis. Together, these results demonstrate a requirement for Alk3 in distinct progenitor cell populations derived from the intermediate mesoderm.

  13. Host Specificity and Temporal and Seasonal Shifts in Host Preference of a Web-Spider Parasitoid Zatypota percontatoria

    OpenAIRE

    Korenko, Stanislav; Michalková, Veronika; Zwakhals, Kees; Pekár, Stano

    2011-01-01

    Current knowledge about polysphinctine parasite wasps' interactions with their spider hosts is very fragmented and incomplete. This study presents the host specificity of Zatypota percontatoria (Müller) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) and its adaptation to varying host availability. Two years of field observations show that Z. percontatoria is a stenophagous parasitoid that parasitizes only five closely related web-building spiders of the family Theridiidae (Araneae). Within the Theridiidae it a...

  14. When should a trophically and vertically transmitted parasite manipulate its intermediate host? The case of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lélu, Maud; Langlais, Michel; Poulle, Marie-Lazarine; Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle; Gandon, Sylvain

    2013-08-22

    Parasites with complex life cycles are expected to manipulate the behaviour of their intermediate hosts (IHs), which increase their predation rate and facilitate the transmission to definitive hosts (DHs). This ability, however, is a double-edged sword when the parasite can also be transmitted vertically in the IH. In this situation, as the manipulation of the IH behaviour increases the IH death rate, it conflicts with vertical transmission, which requires healthy and reproducing IHs. The protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, a widespread pathogen, combines both trophic and vertical transmission strategies. Is parasite manipulation of host behaviour still adaptive in this situation? We model the evolution of the IH manipulation by T. gondii to study the conflict between these two routes of transmission under different epidemiological situations. Model outputs show that manipulation is particularly advantageous for virulent strains and in epidemic situations, and that different levels of manipulation may evolve depending on the sex of the IH and the transmission routes considered. These results may help to understand the variability of strain characteristics encountered for T. gondii and may extend to other trophically transmitted parasites.

  15. Sarcocystis pantherophisi n. sp., from Eastern Rat Snakes (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) as Definitive Hosts and Interferon Gamma Gene Knockout Mice as Experimental Intermediate Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S K; Lindsay, D S; Mowery, J D; Rosenthal, B M; Dubey, J P

    2017-10-01

    Here, we report a new species, Sarcocystis pantherophisi n. sp., with the Eastern rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) as natural definitive host and the interferon gamma gene knockout (KO) mouse as the experimental intermediate host. Sporocysts (n = 15) from intestinal contents of the snake were 10.8 × 8.9 μm. Sporocysts were orally infective to KO mice but not to laboratory-raised albino outbred house mice (Mus musculus). The interferon gamma KO mice developed schizont-associated neurological signs, and schizonts were cultivated in vitro from the brain. Mature sarcocysts were found in skeletal muscles of KO mice examined 41 days postinoculation (PI). Sarcocysts were slender, up to 70 μm wide and up to 3.5 mm long. By light microscopy, sarcocysts appeared thin-walled (parasites that have snake-rodent life cycles. The parasite in the present study was molecularly and biologically similar to a previously reported isolate (designated earlier as Sarcocystis sp. ex Pantherophis alleghaniensis) from P. alleghaniensis, and it was structurally different from other Sarcocystis species so far described.

  16. Ancient host specificity within a single species of brood parasitic bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spottiswoode, Claire N; Stryjewski, Katherine Faust; Quader, Suhel; Colebrook-Robjent, John F R; Sorenson, Michael D

    2011-10-25

    Parasites that exploit multiple hosts often experience diversifying selection for host-specific adaptations. This can result in multiple strains of host specialists coexisting within a single parasitic species. A long-standing conundrum is how such sympatric host races can be maintained within a single parasitic species in the face of interbreeding among conspecifics specializing on different hosts. Striking examples are seen in certain avian brood parasites such as cuckoos, many of which show host-specific differentiation in traits such as host egg mimicry. Exploiting a Zambian egg collection amassed over several decades and supplemented by recent fieldwork, we show that the brood parasitic Greater Honeyguide Indicator indicator exhibits host-specific differentiation in both egg size and egg shape. Genetic analysis of honeyguide eggs and chicks show that two highly divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages are associated with ground- and tree-nesting hosts, respectively, indicating perfect fidelity to two mutually exclusive sets of host species for millions of years. Despite their age and apparent adaptive diversification, however, these ancient lineages are not cryptic species; a complete lack of differentiation in nuclear genes shows that mating between individuals reared by different hosts is sufficiently frequent to prevent speciation. These results indicate that host specificity is maternally inherited, that host-specific adaptation among conspecifics can be maintained without reproductive isolation, and that host specificity can be remarkably ancient in evolutionary terms.

  17. A Tidal Disruption Event in a Nearby Galaxy Hosting an Intermediate Mass Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, D; Cenko, S. B.; Covino, S.; Troja, E.; Pursimo, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Fox, O.; Kutyrev, A.; Campana, S.; Fugazza, D.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a bright point source flare in the Abell cluster A1795 with archival EUVE and Chandra observations. Assuming the EUVE emission is associated with the Chandra source, the X-ray 0.5-7 kiloelectronvolt flux declined by a factor of approximately 2300 over a time span of 6 years, following a power-law decay with index approximately equal to 2.44 plus or minus 0.40. The Chandra data alone vary by a factor of approximately 20. The spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a constant temperature of kiloteslas approximately equal to 0.09 kiloelectronvolts (approximately equal to 10 (sup 6) Kelvin). The flare is spatially coincident with the nuclear region of a faint, inactive galaxy with a photometric redshift consistent at the 1 sigma level with the cluster (redshift = 0.062476).We argue that these properties are indicative of a tidal disruption of a star by a black hole (BH) with log(M (sub BH) / M (sub 1 solar mass)) approximately equal to 5.5 plus or minus 0.5. If so, such a discovery indicates that tidal disruption flares may be used to probe BHs in the intermediate mass range, which are very difficult to study by other means.

  18. Indochinamon ou (Crustacea: Potamidae) as a new second intermediate host for Paragonimus harinasutai in Luang Prabang Province, Lao PDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Woon-Mok; Ryu, Jae-Sook; Min, Duk-Young; Song, Hyun-Ouk; Rim, Han-Jong; Vonghachack, Youthanavanh; Bouakhasith, Daluny; Banouvong, Virasack

    2009-03-01

    Paragonimus harinasutai metacercariae were found in a species of freshwater crab, Indochinamon ou, collected in a small stream of Namback District, Luang Prabang Province, Lao PDR. Adult flukes were recovered after experimental infection of the metacercariae to dogs. Metacercariae were round or slightly elliptical, 0.666 x 0.626 mm in average size, and had a thin cyst wall of about 20 microm in thickness, a black excretory bladder, convoluted ceca, and some pinkish materials in the body. Adults were somewhat elongated, 95.2 x 36.5 mm in average size, covered with single-tipped tegumental spines, had a smaller oral sucker than the ventral sucker, a moderately branched ovary, and 5-6 lobulated testes. Eggs were ovoid and bilaterally symmetrical in shape, 79 x 45 microm in average size, and had a uniformly thickened shell. By the present study, it has been confirmed that I. ou is a new second intermediate host for P. harinasutai.

  19. [Two new species of freshwater crabs (Decapoda: Potamidae) serving as intermediate hosts of Paragonimus in Fujian, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, You-zhu; Lin, Guo-hua; Li, You-song

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the natural resources of the freshwater crab which can serve as the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus in Pinghe and Youxi of Fujian Province. Freshwater crabs were collected. The morphological characteristics of the crabs and the habitats were observed. The crabs were dissected and examined for the presence of Paragonimus metacercariae. Two new species of crabs were described, named as Sinopotamon zhangzhouense sp. nov. and Bottapotamon youxiense sp. nov.. S. zhangzhouense sp. nov., holotype: male, carapace length 35.9 mm, breadth 42.8 mm, thickness 18.6 mm, collected from Pinghe County in southwest of Fujian. (24 degrees 14.206' N, 117 degrees 12.594' E). Distal segment of the first pleopod of male tended flattish, and showed palm nest-shaped concave, which divided into two point leafs, and longitudinal crack clearly identified in back. The end half of distal segment reversed to ventral outwardly. This species usually lived in the sluggish stream. The infection rate of Paragonimus westermani and P. cenocopiosus in S. zhangzhouense sp. nov. was 44.9% (35/78). B. youxiense sp. nov., holotype: male, carapace length 13.35 mm, breadth 16.63 mm, thickness 7.20 mm, collected from Youxi County in central Fujian (26 degrees 10.558' N, 118 degrees 22.012' E). The first pleopod of male was in slightly flat shape, ample and developed, as bow-like uplift. This species usually lived in the relatively flat terrain of stream. The infection rate of P. skrjabini metacercariae in B. youxiense sp. nov. was 92.1% (58/63). Two new species of freshwater crabs (S. zhangzhouense sp nov. and Ryouxiense sp. nov.) serving as the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus have been described.

  20. Interferometric diameters of five evolved intermediate-mass planet-hosting stars measured with PAVO at the CHARA Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, T. R.; Huber, D.; Mann, A. W.; Casagrande, L.; Grunblatt, S. K.; Justesen, A. B.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Bedding, T. R.; Ireland, M. J.; Schaefer, G. H.; Tuthill, P. G.

    2018-04-01

    Debate over the planet occurrence rates around intermediate-mass stars has hinged on the accurate determination of masses of evolved stars, and has been exacerbated by a paucity of reliable, directly-measured fundamental properties for these stars. We present long-baseline optical interferometry of five evolved intermediate-mass (˜ 1.5 M⊙) planet-hosting stars using the PAVO beam combiner at the CHARA Array, which we combine with bolometric flux measurements and parallaxes to determine their radii and effective temperatures. We measured the radii and effective temperatures of 6 Lyncis (5.12±0.16 R⊙, 4949±58 K), 24 Sextantis (5.49±0.18 R⊙, 4908±65 K), κ Coronae Borealis (4.77±0.07 R⊙, 4870±47 K), HR 6817 (4.45±0.08 R⊙, 5013±59 K), and HR 8641 (4.91±0.12 R⊙, 4950±68 K). We find disagreements of typically 15 % in angular diameter and ˜ 200 K in temperature compared to interferometric measurements in the literature, yet good agreement with spectroscopic and photometric temperatures, concluding that the previous interferometric measurements may have been affected by systematic errors exceeding their formal uncertainties. Modelling based on BaSTI isochrones using various sets of asteroseismic, spectroscopic, and interferometric constraints tends to favour slightly (˜ 15 %) lower masses than generally reported in the literature.

  1. ApoE4-specific Misfolded Intermediate Identified by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benfeard Williams

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD is associated with the APOE gene, which encodes for three variants of Apolipoprotein E, namely E2, E3, E4, differing only by two amino acids at positions 112 and 158. ApoE4 is known to be the strongest risk factor for AD onset, while ApoE3 and ApoE2 are considered to be the AD-neutral and AD-protective isoforms, respectively. It has been hypothesized that the ApoE isoforms may contribute to the development of AD by modifying the homeostasis of ApoE physiological partners and AD-related proteins in an isoform-specific fashion. Here we find that, despite the high sequence similarity among the three ApoE variants, only ApoE4 exhibits a misfolded intermediate state characterized by isoform-specific domain-domain interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. The existence of an ApoE4-specific intermediate state can contribute to the onset of AD by altering multiple cellular pathways involved in ApoE-dependent lipid transport efficiency or in AD-related protein aggregation and clearance. We present what we believe to be the first structural model of an ApoE4 misfolded intermediate state, which may serve to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ApoE4 in AD pathogenesis. The knowledge of the structure for the ApoE4 folding intermediate provides a new platform for the rational design of alternative therapeutic strategies to fight AD.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF A SAMPLE OF INTERMEDIATE-TYPE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. HOST BULGE PROPERTIES AND BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez, Erika; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Martinez, Benoni; Jimenez-Bailon, Elena [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Mendez-Abreu, Jairo; Lopez-Martin, Luis [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Fuentes-Carrera, Isaura [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional (ESFM-IPN), U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico); Chavushyan, Vahram [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Apdo. Postal 51-216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Leon-Tavares, Jonathan, E-mail: erika@astro.unam.mx [Aalto University Metsaehovi Radio Observatory, Metsaehovintie 114, 02540 Kylmaelae (Finland)

    2013-02-15

    We present a study of the host bulge properties and their relations with the black hole mass for a sample of 10 intermediate-type active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our sample consists mainly of early-type spirals, four of them hosting a bar. For 70{sup +10} {sub -17}% of the galaxies, we have been able to determine the type of the bulge, and find that these objects probably harbor a pseudobulge or a combination of classical bulge/pseudobulge, suggesting that pseudobulges might be frequent in intermediate-type AGNs. In our sample, 50% {+-} 14% of the objects show double-peaked emission lines. Therefore, narrow double-peaked emission lines seem to be frequent in galaxies harboring a pseudobulge or a combination of classical bulge/pseudobulge. Depending on the bulge type, we estimated the black hole mass using the corresponding M {sub BH}-{sigma}* relation and found them within a range of 5.69 {+-} 0.21 < log M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} < 8.09 {+-} 0.24. Comparing these M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} values with masses derived from the FWHM of H{beta} and the continuum luminosity at 5100 A from their SDSS-DR7 spectra (M {sub BH}), we find that 8 out of 10 (80{sup +7} {sub -17}%) galaxies have black hole masses that are compatible within a factor of 3. This result would support that M {sub BH} and M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} are the same for intermediate-type AGNs, as has been found for type 1 AGNs. However, when the type of the bulge is taken into account, only three out of the seven (43{sup +18} {sub -15}%) objects of the sample have their M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} and M {sub BH} compatible within 3{sigma} errors. We also find that estimations based on the M {sub BH}-{sigma}* relation for pseudobulges are not compatible in 50% {+-} 20% of the objects.

  3. Geographical variation in host-ant specificity of the parasitic butterfly Maculinea alcon in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als, Thomas Damm; Nash, David Richard; Boomsma, J. J.

    2002-01-01

    to be a more suitable host in populations where two host species are used simultaneously. Host-ant species has an influence on caterpillar size but this varies geographically. Analyses of pupae did not, however, show size differences between M. alcon raised in M. rubra and M. ruginodis nests.5....... The geographical mosaic of host specificity and demography of M. alcon in Denmark probably reflects the co-evolution of M. alcon with two alternative host species. This system therefore provides an interesting opportunity for studying details of the evolution of parasite specificity and the dynamics of host...

  4. Evolution and host specificity in the ectomycorrhizal genus Leccinum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, den H.C.; Zuccarello, G.C.; Kuyper, T.W.; Noordeloos, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Species of the ectomycorrhizal genus Leccinum are generally considered to be host specialists. We determined the phylogenetic relationships between species of Leccinum from Europe and North America based on second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

  5. Comparative Methods for Molecular Determination of Host-Specificity Factors in Plant-Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilam Borah

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Many plant-pathogenic fungi are highly host-specific. In most cases, host-specific interactions evolved at the time of speciation of the respective host plants. However, host jumps have occurred quite frequently, and still today the greatest threat for the emergence of new fungal diseases is the acquisition of infection capability of a new host by an existing plant pathogen. Understanding the mechanisms underlying host-switching events requires knowledge of the factors determining host-specificity. In this review, we highlight molecular methods that use a comparative approach for the identification of host-specificity factors. These cover a wide range of experimental set-ups, such as characterization of the pathosystem, genotyping of host-specific strains, comparative genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics, as well as gene prediction and functional gene validation. The methods are described and evaluated in view of their success in the identification of host-specificity factors and the understanding of their functional mechanisms. In addition, potential methods for the future identification of host-specificity factors are discussed.

  6. High Prevalence of Porocephalus crotali Infection on a Barrier Island (Cumberland Island) off the Coast of Georgia, with Identification of Novel Intermediate Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabsley, Michael J; Ellis, Angela E; Cleveland, Christopher A; Ruckdeschel, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Porocephalus crotali is a pentastomid parasite that uses crotaline snakes as definitive hosts and a variety of rodents as intermediate hosts. A study of definitive and intermediate pentastome hosts on Cumberland Island, Georgia, revealed high prevalence of P. crotali infection in crotalid snakes as well as several mammalian species. Despite the presence of numerous nymphs in some animals, clinical signs of disease were not observed. In intermediate hosts, the liver, mesentery, and reproductive organs were most commonly infected. No gross evidence of tissue damage was noted in association with the numerous encysted nymphal pentastomes, and histopathology demonstrated minimal reaction to the encysted nymphs. Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences confirmed the parasites were P. crotali. In contrast to many previous reports in rodents, the prevalence on this barrier island was high, and this is the first report of Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and any insectivore species as intermediate hosts. Although generally not considered pathogenic, the long-term consequences of high nymph intensities on individuals deserve attention.

  7. Sarcocystis jamaicensis n. sp., from Red-Tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) Definitive Host and IFN-γ Gene Knockout Mice as Experimental Intermediate Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S K; von Dohlen, A Rosypal; Mowery, J D; Scott, D; Rosenthal, B M; Dubey, J P; Lindsay, D S

    2017-10-01

    Here, we report a new species of Sarcocystis with red-tailed hawk (RTH, Buteo jamaicensis) as the natural definitive host and IFN-γ gene knockout (KO) mice as an experimental intermediate host in which sarcocysts form in muscle. Two RTHs submitted to the Carolina Raptor Center, Huntersville, North Carolina, were euthanized because they could not be rehabilitated and released. Fully sporulated 12.5 × 9.9-μm sized sporocysts were found in intestinal scrapings of both hawks. Sporocysts were orally fed to laboratory-reared outbred Swiss Webster mice (SW, Mus musculus) and also to KO mice. The sporocysts were infective for KO mice but not for SW mice. All SW mice remained asymptomatic, and neither schizonts nor sarcocysts were found in any SW mice euthanized on days 54, 77, 103 (n = 2) or 137 post-inoculation (PI). The KO mice developed neurological signs and were necropsied between 52 to 68 days PI. Schizonts/merozoites were found in all KO mice euthanized on days 52, 55 (n = 3), 59, 61 (n = 2), 66, and 68 PI and they were confined to the brain. The predominant lesion was meningoencephalitis characterized by perivascular cuffs, granulomas, and necrosis of the neural tissue. The schizonts/merozoites were located in neural tissue and were apparently extravascular. Brain homogenates from infected KO mice were infective to KO mice by subcutaneous inoculation and when seeded on to CV-1 cells. Microscopic sarcocysts were found in skeletal muscles of 5 of 8 KO mice euthanized between 55-61 days PI. Only a few sarcocysts were detected. Sarcocysts were microscopic, up to 3.5 mm long. When viewed with light microscopy, the sarcocyst wall appeared thin (<1 μm thick) and smooth. By transmission electron microscopy, the sarcocyst wall classified as "type 1j" (new designation). Molecular characterization using 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, ITS-1, and cox1 genes revealed a close relationship with Sarcocystis microti and Sarcocystis glareoli; both species infect birds as definitive hosts

  8. Host-specific races in the holoparasitic angiosperm Orobanche minor: implications for speciation in parasitic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorogood, C J; Rumsey, F J; Hiscock, S J

    2009-05-01

    Orobanche minor is a root-holoparasitic angiosperm that attacks a wide range of host species, including a number of commonly cultivated crops. The extent to which genetic divergence among natural populations of O. minor is influenced by host specificity has not been determined previously. Here, the host specificity of natural populations of O. minor is quantified for the first time, and evidence that this species may comprise distinct physiological races is provided. A tripartite approach was used to examine the physiological basis for the divergence of populations occurring on different hosts: (1) host-parasite interactions were cultivated in rhizotron bioassays in order to quantify the early stages of the infection and establishment processes; (2) using reciprocal-infection experiments, parasite races were cultivated on their natural and alien hosts, and their fitness determined in terms of biomass; and (3) the anatomy of the host-parasite interface was investigated using histochemical techniques, with a view to comparing the infection process on different hosts. Races occurring naturally on red clover (Trifolium pratense) and sea carrot (Daucus carota ssp. gummifer) showed distinct patterns of host specificity: parasites cultivated in cross-infection studies showed a higher fitness on their natural hosts, suggesting that races show local adaptation to specific hosts. In addition, histological evidence suggests that clover and carrot roots vary in their responses to infection. Different root anatomy and responses to infection may underpin a physiological basis for host specificity. It is speculated that host specificity may isolate races of Orobanche on different hosts, accelerating divergence and ultimately speciation in this genus. The rapid life cycle and broad host range of O. minor make this species an ideal model with which to study the interactions of parasitic plants with their host associates.

  9. Ocular oxyspirurosis of primates in zoos: intermediate host, worm morphology, and probable origin of the infection in the Moscow zoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova E.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last century, only two cases of ocular oxyspirurosis were recorded in primates, both in zoos, and two species were described: in Berlin, Germany, Oxyspirura (O. conjunctivalis from the lemurid Microcebus murinus, later also found in the lorisid Loris gracilis; in Jacksonville, Florida, O. (O. youngi from the cercopithecid monkey Erythrocebus patas. In the present case from the Moscow zoo, oxyspirurosis was recorded in several species of Old World lemuriforms and lorisiforms, and some South American monkeys. i The intermediate host was discovered to be a cockroach, as for O. (O. mansoni, a parasite of poultry. The complete sequence identity between ITS-1 rDNA from adult nematodes of the primate and that of the larval worms from the vector, Nauphoete cinerea, confirmed their conspecificity. ii Parasites from Moscow zoo recovered from Nycticebus c. coucang were compared morphologically to those from other zoos. The length and shape of the gubernaculum, used previously as a distinct character, were found to be variable. However, the vulvar bosses arrangement, the distal extremity of left spicule and the position of papillae of the first postcloacal pair showed that the worms in the different samples were not exactly identical and that each set seemed characteristic of a particular zoo. iii The presence of longitudinal cuticular crests in the infective stage as well as in adult worms was recorded. Together with several other morphological and biological characters (long tail and oesophagus, cockroach vector, this confirmed that Oxyspirura is not closely related to Thelazia, another ocular parasite genus. iv The disease in the Moscow zoo is thought to have started with Nycticebus pygmaeus imported fromVietnam, thus the suggestion was that Asiatic lorisids were at the origin of the Moscow set of cases. The natural host(s for the Berlin and Jacksonville cases remain unknown but they are unlikely to be the species found infected in zoos

  10. Molecular and morphological variation of Paragonimus westermani in Vietnam with records of new second intermediate crab hosts and a new locality in a northern province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doanh, N Pham; Tu, A Luu; Bui, T Dung; Loan, T Ho; Nonaka, Nariaki; Horii, Yoichiro; Blair, David; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2016-10-01

    Paragonimus westermani is one of the most medically important lung flukes and is widely distributed in Asia. It exhibits considerable variation in morphological, genetic and biological features. In central provinces of Vietnam, a high prevalence of metacercariae of this species has been reported from the crab intermediate host, Vietopotamon aluoiense. In this study, we detected P. westermani metacercariae in two additional crab hosts, Donopotamon haii in Quang Tri Province, central Vietnam and Indochinamon tannanti in Yen Bai Province in the north. The latter is a new locality for P. westermani in a northern region of Vietnam where P. heterotremus is the only species currently known to cause human paragonimiasis. Paragonimus westermani metacercariae found in Vietnam showed considerable morphological variation but slight genetic variation based on DNA sequences from the nuclear ribosomal ITS2 region and the mitochondrial 16S gene. Co-infection of the same individual crabs with P. westermani and P. heterotremus and/or some other Paragonimus species was found frequently, suggesting potential for co-infection in humans. The findings of the present study emphasize the need for highly specific molecular and immunodiagnostic methods to differentially diagnose between P. westermani and P. heterotremus infections.

  11. Purification and host specificity of predatory halobacteriovorax isolated from seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halobacteriovorax (formerly Bacteriovorax) are small predatory bacteria found in the marine environment and may serve as biocontrol agents against pathogens in fish and shellfish. Four strains of Halobacteriovorax originally isolated in Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 host cells were separated from t...

  12. Transmission of Calicophoron daubneyi and Fasciola hepatica in Galicia (Spain): Temporal follow-up in the intermediate and definitive hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Piñeiro, Javier; González-Warleta, Marta; Castro-Hermida, José Antonio; Córdoba, María; González-Lanza, Camino; Manga-González, Yolanda; Mezo, Mercedes

    2016-11-29

    Paramphistomosis caused by Calicophoron daubneyi and fasciolosis caused by Fasciola hepatica are common parasitic diseases of livestock animals. Transmission of the diseases depends on the presence of intermediate hosts, i.e. freshwater gastropods such as lymnaeids. We carried out a 2-year-long study of the dynamics of the snail population acting as the intermediate host for these parasites, considering the population structure in terms of size/age and infection status. In addition, we determined the kinetics of trematode egg excretion in grazing cows. Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) were used to analyze the associations between different response variables and snail size, sampling month and weather-related variables. Of the molluscan species examined, Galba truncatula, Radix peregra, Anisus (Anisus) leucostoma and Pisidium casertanum (n = 2802), only G. truncatula was infected with C. daubneyi or F. hepatica, at prevalence rates of 8.2% and 4.4% respectively. The probability of infection with C. daubneyi or F. hepatica was linearly related to snail size, although in different ways (negative for C. daubneyi and positive for F. hepatica). The total snail population increased in winter, when specimens of all size classes were found. Infected snails were more abundant during spring-autumn. Mature cercariae of both parasites were found in most seasons. In the statistical models, the sampling month accounted for a high percentage (71.9-78.2%) of the observed variability in snail abundance. The inclusion of climatic variables in the models moderately increased the percentage of deviance explained (77.7-91.9%). Excretion of C. daubneyi eggs in cow faeces was always higher than that of F. hepatica eggs. Particular care should be taken to prevent pastures and the surrounding environment being contaminated with parasite eggs during winter-spring, when the number of snails susceptible to miracidial infections is maximal. This is therefore the optimal time for treating

  13. Relationships among different facets of host specificity in three taxa of haematophagous ectoparasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mescht, Luther; Warburton, Elizabeth M; Khokhlova, Irina S; Vinarski, Maxim V; Korallo-Vinarskaya, Natalia P; Krasnov, Boris R

    2017-12-01

    Host specificity is a fundamental trait of a parasite species. Recently, multiple aspects of host specificity have been recognized, but the relationships between these facets are still poorly understood. Here, we studied pairwise relationships between basic, structural, phylogenetic and geographic host specificity in three taxa of haematophagous ectoparasitic arthropods that differ in tightness of their association with the host. We asked which metrics of host specificity are correlated within each parasite taxon and whether the patterns of the association between different facets of host specificity are similar among parasite taxa. Data on bat flies were taken from published surveys across the Neotropics while data on fleas and mites parasitic on small mammals were compiled from multiple published surveys across the Palaearctic. Basic, structural, phylogenetic and geographic specificity indices were calculated for 18 bat fly species recorded on 40 host species from 15 regions, 109 flea species recorded on 120 host species from 51 regions and 34 mite species recorded on 67 host species from 28 regions. Then, we tested for the correlation between any two measures of host specificity using model II regressions. We found that structural and basic specificity, as well as structural and geographic specificity, exhibited a positive association in all three taxa. However, basic and geographic specificity, as well as basic and phylogenetic specificity, were significantly positively associated in fleas but did not correlate in bat flies or mites. In addition, we found a significant negative association between structural and phylogenetic specificity in bat flies but no association in the remaining taxa. Moreover, geographic and phylogenetic specificity were not associated in any parasite taxon. Our results suggest that different facets of host specificity were shaped differently by natural selection in different taxa. Copyright © 2017 Australian Society for Parasitology

  14. Ionotropic Receptors Identified within the Tentacle of the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria glabrata, an Intermediate Host of Schistosoma mansoni.

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    Di Liang

    Full Text Available Biomphalaria glabrata (B. glabrata is an air-breathing aquatic mollusc found in freshwater habitats across the Western Hemisphere. It is most well-known for its recognized capacity to act as a major intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, the human blood fluke parasite. Ionotropic receptors (IRs, a variant family of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluR, have an evolutionary ancient function in detecting odors to initiate chemosensory signaling. In this study, we applied an array of methods towards the goal of identifying IR-like family members in B. glabrata, ultimately revealing two types, the iGluR and IR. Sequence alignment showed that three ligand-binding residues are conserved in most Biomphalaria iGluR sequences, while the IRs did exhibit a variable pattern, lacking some or all known glutamate-interactingresidues, supporting their distinct classification from the iGluRs. We show that B. glabrata contains 7 putative IRs, some of which are expressed within its chemosensory organs. To further investigate a role for the more ancient IR25a type in chemoreception, we tested its spatial distribution pattern within the snail cephalic tentacle by in situ hybridization. The presence of IR25a within presumptive sensory neurons supports a role for this receptor in olfactory processing, contributing to our understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in Biomphalaria olfactory processing.

  15. Implications of Changing Temperatures on the Growth, Fecundity and Survival of Intermediate Host Snails of Schistosomiasis: A Systematic Review

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    Chester Kalinda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has been predicted to increase the global mean temperature and to alter the ecological interactions among organisms. These changes may play critical roles in influencing the life history traits of the intermediate hosts (IHs. This review focused on studies and disease models that evaluate the potential effect of temperature rise on the ecology of IH snails and the development of parasites within them. The main focus was on IH snails of schistosome parasites that cause schistosomiasis in humans. A literature search was conducted on Google Scholar, EBSCOhost and PubMed databases using predefined medical subject heading terms, Boolean operators and truncation symbols in combinations with direct key words. The final synthesis included nineteen published articles. The studies reviewed indicated that temperature rise may alter the distribution, optimal conditions for breeding, growth and survival of IH snails which may eventually increase the spread and/or transmission of schistosomiasis. The literature also confirmed that the life history traits of IH snails and their interaction with the schistosome parasites are affected by temperature and hence a change in climate may have profound outcomes on the population size of snails, parasite density and disease epidemiology. We concluded that understanding the impact of temperature on the growth, fecundity and survival of IH snails may broaden the knowledge on the possible effects of climate change and hence inform schistosomiasis control programmes.

  16. [A new species of the genus Nanhaipotamon (Decapoda:Potamidae) serving as intermediate host of Paragonimus skrjabini].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guo-Hua; Cheng, You-Zhu; Chen, Shao-Hong

    2013-02-01

    To describe a new species of the genus Nanhaipotamon. Freshwater crabs were collected in the counties of Yongtai, Minqing, Youxi, Songxi, Zhenghe and Shouning, Fujian Province. The morphological characteristics of the crabs were described. The habitats were observed and crabs examined for the presence of Paragonimus metacerariae. A new species of freshwater crabs named as Nanhaipotamon fujianense sp. nov. was described: holotype (FJ6132-1): male, carapace length 18.44 mm, breadth 23.64 mm, thickness 12.61 mm; allotype (FJ6132-2): female, length 18.76 mm, breadth 25.25 mm, thicknes 14.31 mm, collected from Yongtai County in the middle of Fujian (N 25 degrees 44,778'; E118 degrees 32,278', and 232 m above sea lever). Distal segment of the first male pleopod with triangle convex inner-distal angle, and the axe-like expanded out-distal angle. The out-lateral border slightly sloped downwards. The segment length is 2.1 times as long as the subdistal segment. The crabs usually lived in the crevice of small stream. Paragonimus metacerariae were found in the crabs collected from Yongtai, Minqing, Youxi, Songxi and Zhenghe Counties. A new species of freshwater crab (Nanhaipotamon fujianense sp. nov.) has been recorded which serves as the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus skrjabini.

  17. Population dynamics of intermediate snail hosts of Fasciola hepatica and some environmental factors in San Juan y Martinez municipality, Cuba

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    Roberto Cañete

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The variation of abundances of intermediate snail hosts of Fasciola hepatica in Cuba (Fossaria cubensis and Pseudosuccinea columella was studied during one year under natural conditions at five sampling sites in San Juan y Martinez municipality, Pinar del Rio province, Cuba. The effect of some environmental variables on the lymnaeid abundances was also studied. A canonical correspondence analysis showed that both species do not generally occur together in the same habitat and that most factors affect them in an opposite fashion, although both of them correlate positively through time to the diversity of the habitats. F. cubensis prefers the sites that are in or closer to the city whereas P. columella is more abundant in rural sites. Lymnaeid abundances are mainly affected by nitrite and nitrate concentrations as well as by the abundance of the thiarid Tarebia granifera. F. cubensis is more abundant in polluted habitats with low densities (or absence of T. granifera whereas P. columella prefers cleaner habitats and can coexist with the thiarid, even at its higher densities. The implications of divergent preferences of the two lymnaeids for the control of fasciolosis are discussed.

  18. Distribution and habitats of the snail Lymnaea truncatula, intermediate host of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica, in South Africa

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    K.N. de Kock

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the geographical distribution and habitats of Lymnaea truncatula, the intermediate, snail host of the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, as reflected by the 723 samples in the database of the National Freshwater Snail Collection, Potchefstroom, South Africa. The 221 different loci (1/16-degree squares on record reflect an extensive but discontinuous distribution, except in Lesotho and in parts of the Mpumalanga, Gauteng and North West provinces of South Africa. Although recorded from 12 different types of waterbody, it was mostly (42.0 % recovered from swamps. Most samples (45.8 % were collected in habitats with slow-flowing water. A muddy substratum was recorded for 62.5 % of the samples. Most samples (86.3 % were collected in habitats with a mean annual air temperature of 10-20 o C, and more than 69 % came from localities with a mean annual rainfall of 600-900mm. An integrated decision tree constructed from the data indicated that temperature and types of waterbody play a decisive role in determining the presence of L. truncatula in a given area. A temperature index calculated for all mollusc species ranked L. truncatula second in a total of 53 species according to its association with low temperatures. It remains to be established whether its distribution is indeed discontinuous, and whether its preference for a particular habitat, amphibious habits and ability to aestivate could have resulted in some populations having been overlooked during surveys.

  19. Ionotropic Receptors Identified within the Tentacle of the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria glabrata, an Intermediate Host of Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Di; Wang, Tianfang; Rotgans, Bronwyn A; McManus, Donald P; Cummins, Scott F

    2016-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata (B. glabrata) is an air-breathing aquatic mollusc found in freshwater habitats across the Western Hemisphere. It is most well-known for its recognized capacity to act as a major intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, the human blood fluke parasite. Ionotropic receptors (IRs), a variant family of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluR), have an evolutionary ancient function in detecting odors to initiate chemosensory signaling. In this study, we applied an array of methods towards the goal of identifying IR-like family members in B. glabrata, ultimately revealing two types, the iGluR and IR. Sequence alignment showed that three ligand-binding residues are conserved in most Biomphalaria iGluR sequences, while the IRs did exhibit a variable pattern, lacking some or all known glutamate-interactingresidues, supporting their distinct classification from the iGluRs. We show that B. glabrata contains 7 putative IRs, some of which are expressed within its chemosensory organs. To further investigate a role for the more ancient IR25a type in chemoreception, we tested its spatial distribution pattern within the snail cephalic tentacle by in situ hybridization. The presence of IR25a within presumptive sensory neurons supports a role for this receptor in olfactory processing, contributing to our understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in Biomphalaria olfactory processing.

  20. Review - Host specificity of insect herbivores in tropical forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Vojtěch; Basset, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 272, č. 1568 (2005), s. 1083-1090 ISSN 0962-8452 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6007106; GA ČR(CZ) GD206/03/H034; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/04/0725; GA MŠk(CZ) ME 646 Grant - others:US Nationals Science Foundation(US) DEB-02-11591; Darwin Initiative for the Survival of Species(US) 162/10/030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : food web * herbivore guild * host plant range Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.510, year: 2005

  1. Host strain specific sex pheromone variation in Spodoptera frugiperda

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    Svatos Ales

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera; Noctuidae consists of two distinct strains with different host plant preferences for corn and rice. To assess whether pheromonal-mediated behavioral isolation accompanies the habitat isolation on different host plants, we compared the sex pheromone composition among females of the two strains. Pheromone glands were extracted with or without injection of pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN. To assess the mode of inheritance of this variation, we also analyzed the pheromone composition of F1 hybrid females. Results Relative to intra-strain variation, the pheromone composition of the two strains differed significantly. Corn strain females contained significantly more of the second most abundant pheromone compound Z11-16:Ac (m, and significantly less of most other compounds, than rice strain females. When females were injected with PBAN before their glands were extracted, the differences between the strains were less pronounced but still statistically significant. The pheromone composition of hybrid females showed a maternal inheritance of the major component Z9-14:Ac (M as well as of Z11-16:Ac (m. Most other compounds showed an inheritance indicating genetic dominance of the corn strain. The within-strain phenotypic correlations among the various components were consistent with their hypothesized biosynthetic pathway, and between-strain differences in the correlation structure suggested candidate genes that may explain the pheromone differences between the two strains. These include Δ9- and Δ11 desaturases, and possibly also a Δ7-desaturase, although the latter has not been identified in insects so far. Conclusion The two host strains of S. frugiperda produce systematically differing female sex pheromone blends. Previously-documented geographic variation in the sexual communication of this species did not take strain identity into account, and thus may be

  2. Sex-specific effects of a parasite evolving in a female-biased host population

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    Duneau David

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Males and females differ in many ways and might present different opportunities and challenges to their parasites. In the same way that parasites adapt to the most common host type, they may adapt to the characteristics of the host sex they encounter most often. To explore this hypothesis, we characterized host sex-specific effects of the parasite Pasteuria ramosa, a bacterium evolving in naturally, strongly, female-biased populations of its host Daphnia magna. Results We show that the parasite proliferates more successfully in female hosts than in male hosts, even though males and females are genetically identical. In addition, when exposure occurred when hosts expressed a sexual dimorphism, females were more infected. In both host sexes, the parasite causes a similar reduction in longevity and leads to some level of castration. However, only in females does parasite-induced castration result in the gigantism that increases the carrying capacity for the proliferating parasite. Conclusions We show that mature male and female Daphnia represent different environments and reveal one parasite-induced symptom (host castration, which leads to increased carrying capacity for parasite proliferation in female but not male hosts. We propose that parasite induced host castration is a property of parasites that evolved as an adaptation to specifically exploit female hosts.

  3. Geographical variation in host-ant specificity of the parasitic butterfly Maculinea alcon in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als, Thomas Damm; Nash, David Richard; Boomsma, J. J.

    2002-01-01

    1. Maculinea alcon uses three different species of Myrmica host ants along a north-south gradient in Europe. Based on this geographical variation in host ant use, Elmes et al. (1994) suggested that M. alcon might consist of three or more cryptic species or host races, each using a single and diff......1. Maculinea alcon uses three different species of Myrmica host ants along a north-south gradient in Europe. Based on this geographical variation in host ant use, Elmes et al. (1994) suggested that M. alcon might consist of three or more cryptic species or host races, each using a single...... and different host-ant species.2. Population-specific differences in allozyme genotypes of M. alcon in Denmark (Gadeberg Boomsma, 1997) have suggested that genetically differentiated forms may occur in a gradient across Denmark, possibly in relation to the use of different host ants.3. It was found that two....... The geographical mosaic of host specificity and demography of M. alcon in Denmark probably reflects the co-evolution of M. alcon with two alternative host species. This system therefore provides an interesting opportunity for studying details of the evolution of parasite specificity and the dynamics of host-race...

  4. Geographically structured host specificity is caused by the range expansions and host shifts of a symbiotic fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Benjamin E; Pringle, Anne

    2012-04-01

    The inability to associate with local species may constrain the spread of mutualists arriving to new habitats, but the fates of introduced, microbial mutualists are largely unknown. The deadly poisonous ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita phalloides (the death cap) is native to Europe and introduced to the East and West Coasts of North America. By cataloging host associations across the two continents, we record dramatic changes in specificity among the three ranges. On the East Coast, where the fungus is restricted in its distribution, it associates almost exclusively with pines, which are rarely hosts of A. phalloides in its native range. In California, where the fungus is widespread and locally abundant, it associates almost exclusively with oaks, mirroring the host associations observed in Europe. The most common host of the death cap in California is the endemic coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia), and the current distribution of A. phalloides appears constrained within the distribution of Q. agrifolia. In California, host shifts to native plants are also associated with a near doubling in the resources allocated to sexual reproduction and a prolonged fruiting period; mushrooms are twice as large as they are elsewhere and mushrooms are found throughout the year. Host and niche shifts are likely to shape the continuing range expansion of A. phalloides and other ectomycorrhizal fungi introduced across the world.

  5. Primary alveolar echinococcosis: course of larval development and antibody responses in intermediate host rodents with different genetic backgrounds after oral infection with eggs of Echinococcus multilocularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Jun; Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Oku, Yuzaburo; Yagi, Kinpei

    2010-09-01

    We investigated parasite establishment, subsequent larval development and antibody responses in gerbils, cotton rats and 4 inbred mouse strains until 16 weeks post inoculation (p.i.) with 200 eggs of Echinococcus multilocularis. The rate of parasite establishment in the liver determined at 4 weeks p.i. was highest in DBA/2, followed by AKR/N, C57BL/10 and C57BL/6 mice, whereas gerbils harboured few parasite foci. The accurate number of liver lesions in cotton rats could not be determined due to rapid growth and advanced multivesiculation of the parasite observed at 2 weeks p.i. The course of larval development was most advanced in DBA/2 mice with mature protoscolex formation at 16 weeks p.i., followed by AKR/N harbouring metacestodes with sparsely distributed immature protoscoleces. On the other hand, C57BL/6 and C57BL/10 mice had infertile metacestodes without any protoscolex formation. The parasite growth in mice was totally slower than those in gerbils and cotton rats. Specific IgG and IgM responses against 3 types of native crude antigens of larval E. multilocularis were evaluated using somatic extracts of and vesicle fluid of metacestode, and somatic extracts from purified protoscoleces. The 4 mouse strains demonstrated basically similar kinetics with apparent IgG and IgM increases at 9 weeks p.i. and thereafter, except C57BL/10, exhibited higher levels of IgM against crude antigens at some time point of infection. On the other hand, a follow-up determination of specific IgG and IgM levels against recombinant antigens from larval E. multilocularis revealed that each mouse strain showed different antibody-level kinetics. The findings in the present study demonstrate that the course of host-parasite interactions in primary alveolar echinococcosis, caused by larval E. multilocularis, clearly varies among intermediate host rodents with different genetic backgrounds.

  6. The Trw type IV secretion system of Bartonella mediates host-specific adhesion to erythrocytes.

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    Muriel Vayssier-Taussat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens typically infect only a limited range of hosts; however, the genetic mechanisms governing host-specificity are poorly understood. The alpha-proteobacterial genus Bartonella comprises 21 species that cause host-specific intraerythrocytic bacteremia as hallmark of infection in their respective mammalian reservoirs, including the human-specific pathogens Bartonella quintana and Bartonella bacilliformis that cause trench fever and Oroya fever, respectively. Here, we have identified bacterial factors that mediate host-specific erythrocyte colonization in the mammalian reservoirs. Using mouse-specific Bartonella birtlesii, human-specific Bartonella quintana, cat-specific Bartonella henselae and rat-specific Bartonella tribocorum, we established in vitro adhesion and invasion assays with isolated erythrocytes that fully reproduce the host-specificity of erythrocyte infection as observed in vivo. By signature-tagged mutagenesis of B. birtlesii and mutant selection in a mouse infection model we identified mutants impaired in establishing intraerythrocytic bacteremia. Among 45 abacteremic mutants, five failed to adhere to and invade mouse erythrocytes in vitro. The corresponding genes encode components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS Trw, demonstrating that this virulence factor laterally acquired by the Bartonella lineage is directly involved in adherence to erythrocytes. Strikingly, ectopic expression of Trw of rat-specific B. tribocorum in cat-specific B. henselae or human-specific B. quintana expanded their host range for erythrocyte infection to rat, demonstrating that Trw mediates host-specific erythrocyte infection. A molecular evolutionary analysis of the trw locus further indicated that the variable, surface-located TrwL and TrwJ might represent the T4SS components that determine host-specificity of erythrocyte parasitism. In conclusion, we show that the laterally acquired Trw T4SS diversified in the Bartonella lineage

  7. Asymmetric hybridization and gene flow between Joshua trees (Agavaceae: Yucca) reflect differences in pollinator host specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Tyler N; Gadek, Katherine E; Yoder, Jeremy B; Flatz, Ramona; Smith, Christopher I

    2013-01-01

    The angiosperms are by far the largest group of terrestrial plants. Their spectacular diversity is often attributed to specialized pollination. Obligate pollination mutualisms where both a plant and its pollinator are dependent upon one another for reproduction are thought to be prone to rapid diversification through co-evolution and pollinator isolation. However, few studies have evaluated the degree to which pollinators actually mediate reproductive isolation in these systems. Here, we examine evidence for hybridization and gene flow between two subspecies of Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia brevifolia and Yucca brevifolia jaegeriana) pollinated by two sister species of yucca moth. Previous work indicated that the pollinators differ in host specificity, and DNA sequence data suggested asymmetric introgression between the tree subspecies. Through intensive sampling in a zone of sympatry, a large number of morphologically intermediate trees were identified. These included trees with floral characters typical of Y. b. jaegeriana, but vegetative features typical of Y. b. brevifolia. The opposite combination-Y. b. brevifolia flowers with Y. b. jaegeriana vegetative morphology-never occurred. Microsatellite genotyping revealed a high frequency of genetically admixed, hybrid trees. Coalescent-based estimates of migration indicated significant gene flow between the subspecies and that the direction of gene flow matches differences in pollinator host fidelity. The data suggest that pollinator behaviour determines the magnitude and direction of gene flow between the two subspecies, but that specialized pollination alone is not sufficient to maintain species boundaries. Natural selection may be required to maintain phenotypic differences in the face of ongoing gene flow. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Stirred, not shaken: genetic structure of the intermediate snail host Oncomelania hupensis robertsoni in an historically endemic schistosomiasis area

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    Hauswald Anne-Kathrin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncomelania hupensis robertsoni is the sole intermediate host for Schistosoma japonicum in western China. Given the close co-evolutionary relationships between snail host and parasite, there is interest in understanding the distribution of distinct snail phylogroups as well as regional population structures. Therefore, this study focuses on these aspects in a re-emergent schistosomiasis area known to harbour representatives of two phylogroups - the Deyang-Mianyang area in Sichuan Province, China. Based on a combination of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, the following questions were addressed: 1 the phylogeography of the two O. h. robertsoni phylogroups, 2 regional and local population structure in space and time, and 3 patterns of local dispersal under different isolation-by-distance scenarios. Results The phylogenetic analyses confirmed the existence of two distinct phylogroups within O. h. robertsoni. In the study area, phylogroups appear to be separated by a mountain range. Local specimens belonging to the respective phylogroups form monophyletic clades, indicating a high degree of lineage endemicity. Molecular clock estimations reveal that local lineages are at least 0.69-1.58 million years (My old and phylogeographical analyses demonstrate that local, watershed and regional effects contribute to population structure. For example, Analyses of Molecular Variances (AMOVAs show that medium-scale watersheds are well reflected in population structures and Mantel tests indicate isolation-by-distance effects along waterways. Conclusions The analyses revealed a deep, complex and hierarchical structure in O. h. robertsoni, likely reflecting a long and diverse evolutionary history. The findings have implications for understanding disease transmission. From a co-evolutionary standpoint, the divergence of the two phylogroups raises species level questions in O. h. robertsoni and also argues for future studies relative to the

  9. Strongylopsalis mathurinii (Dermaptera e Alphitobius piceus (Coleoptera novos hospedeiros intermediários para Hymenolepis diminuta (Rudolphi, 1819 Strongylopsalis mathurinii (Dermaptera and Alphitobius piceus (Coleoptera, two new intermediate hosts for Hymenolepis diminuta (Rudolphi, 1819

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arandas Rego

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available O autor descreve o ciclo biológico de hymenolepis diminuta (Rud., 1819 em dois novos hospedeiros intermediários: Strongylopsalis mathurinii (Dermaptera e Alphitobius piceus (Coleoptera. O desenvolvimento larvar é similar em ambos os hospedeiros, embora algumas diferenças em detalhes tenham sido observadas, tais como os tempos de evolução e as dimensões dos cisticercóides; os cisticercóides obtidos dos dermápteros têm maiores dimensões relativas e o tempo de evolução pode ser de apenas 9 dias. O autor sugere que Strongylopsalis mathurinii, inseto freqüentemente encontrado na ração prensada dos roedores é um excelente hospedeiro intermediário, ideal para trabalhos experimentais com Hymenolepis diminuta.The author describes the larval development of Hymenolepis diminuta (Rud., 1819 in Strongylopsalis mathurinii (Dermaptera and Alphitobius piceus (Coleoptera, two new intermediate hosts. The pattern of development of the cysticercoids in both hosts is similar, although some differences in detail were observed. The cysticercoids developed in the earwigs are relatively larger than those obtained from the beetles. The total development may be completed in nine days in the earwigs instead of the usual twelve days. The author suggests that Strongylopsalis mathurinii a very commom insect living in rats food is a suitable host for experimental studies on H. diminuta development.

  10. The Apple Snail Pomacea maculata (Caenogastropoda: Ampullariidae) as the intermediate host of Stomylotrema gratiosus (Trematoda: Stomylotrematidae) in Brazil: the first report of a mollusc host of a Stomylotrematid Trematode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Hudson A; Cantanhede, Selma Patrícia D; Thiengo, Silvana C; de Melo, Alan L; Fernandez, Monica A

    2015-04-01

    Trematodes belonging to the family Stomylotrematidae are intestinal parasites of birds. Despite the worldwide distribution and diversity of host species, the first intermediate host remains unknown. For a survey of parasites of Pomacea maculata , snails were collected from the municipality of São Vicente Férrer, state of Maranhão, northeastern Brazil. In the present study, the xiphidiocercariae shed from these snails were used in the experimental infection of the water bug Belostoma plebejum. The insect mortality was observed 30 days post-infection, and the metacercariae recovered in the body cavity of B. plebejum were identified as Stomylotrema gratiosus. This is the first report of an ampullariid snail as intermediate host of stomylotrematid trematodes.

  11. Molluscicidal activity of Solanum elaeagnifolium seeds against Galba truncatula intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica: Identification of β-solamarine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeh, Fatma; Feki, Houda; Koubaa, Imed; Hamed, Nejia; Damak, Mohamed; Ayadi, Ali; Hammami, Hayet; Mezghani-Jarraya, Raoudha

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of fascioliasis in many developing countries urges the search for simple, cheap, and effective substances. In this view, plants provide interesting molluscicidal activities thanks to the secondary metabolites they produce. The genus Solanum is known for its potent effect on vector snails. The molluscicidal activity of Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav. (Solanaceae) seeds against Galba truncatula Müll. (Lymnaeidae), intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica L. (Fasciolidae), was evaluated. Solanum elaeagnifolium seeds were powdered and successively extracted using n-hexane, methylene chloride, acetone, and methanol, for 20 h each. After filtration, solvents were evaporated. An acid-base treatment was conducted on seed methanolic extract to isolate total alkaloids and β-solamarine. Total saponins fraction was obtained after successive macerations and evaporations. The molluscicidal activity was evaluated by subjecting snails, in groups of 10, for 48 h to 500 mL of extracts, fractions, and pure product aqueous solutions, each containing amounts, ranging from 1 to 50 mg of plant material in 5 mg increments. The methanolic extract of seeds, β-solamarine isolated for the first time from this plant and total saponins fraction showed very potent activities on snails, giving respective median lethal concentrations (LC50) of 1.18, 0.49, and 0.94 mg/L. Total alkaloids fraction obtained from the methanolic extract was less active giving an LC50 value of 14.67 mg/L. This study emphasizes that glycoalkaloids and saponins of Solanum elaeagnifolium are potent molluscicidal agents. Seed methanolic extract, β-solamarine, and total saponins fraction may be used as molluscicides.

  12. Distinct genetic diversity of Oncomelania hupensis, intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum in mainland China as revealed by ITS sequences.

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    Qin Ping Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oncomelania hupensis is the unique intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum, which causes schistosomiasis endemic in the Far East, and especially in mainland China. O. hupensis largely determines the parasite's geographical range. How O. hupensis's genetic diversity is distributed geographically in mainland China has never been well examined with DNA sequence data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigate the genetic variation among O. hupensis from different geographical origins using the combined complete internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 and ITS2 regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA. 165 O. hupensis isolates were obtained in 29 localities from 7 provinces across mainland China: lake/marshland and hill regions in Anhui, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi and Jiangsu provinces, located along the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River, and mountainous regions in Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. Phylogenetic and haplotype network analyses showed distinct genetic diversity and no shared haplotypes between populations from lake/marshland regions of the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River and populations from mountainous regions of Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. The genetic distance between these two groups is up to 0.81 based on Fst, and branch time was estimated as 2-6 Ma. As revealed in the phylogenetic tree, snails from Sichuan and Yunnan provinces were also clustered separately. Geographical separation appears to be an important factor accounting for the diversification of the two groups of O. hupensis in mainland China, and probably for the separate clades between snails from Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. In lake/marshland and hill regions along the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River, three clades were identified in the phylogenetic tree, but without any obvious clustering of snails from different provinces. CONCLUSIONS: O. hupensis in mainland China may have considerable genetic diversity, and a more

  13. Comparative transcriptomics reveal host-specific nucleotide variation in entomophthoralean fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Jensen, Annette Bruun; Eilenberg, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    of toxins that interfere with the host immune response. Phylogenetic comparison with the nonobligate generalist insect-pathogenic fungus Conidiobolus coronatus revealed a gene-family expansion of trehalase enzymes in E. muscae. The main sugar in insect haemolymph is trehalose, and efficient sugar......Obligate parasites are under strong selection to increase exploitation of their host to survive while evading detection by host immune defences. This has often led to elaborate pathogen adaptations and extreme host specificity. Specialization on one host, however, often incurs a trade......-off influencing the capacity to infect alternate hosts. Here, we investigate host adaptation in two morphologically indistinguishable and closely related obligate specialist insect-pathogenic fungi from the phylum Entomophthoromycota, Entomophthora muscae sensu stricto and E. muscae sensu lato, pathogens...

  14. Evidence for mating between isolates of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides with different host specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, C R; Spiegel, F W; TeBeest, D O; Trout, C

    1994-04-01

    Individual isolates of the ubiquitous plant pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (teleomorph Glomerella cingulata) can have very restricted host ranges. Isolates that share the same host range are considered to be genetically discrete units, and sexual compatibility has been reported to be limited to individuals that share the same host range. However, we have recently observed that some isolates of C. gloeosporioides that are specifically pathogenic to different, distantly-related hosts are sexually compatible. Ascospore progeny from one such cross were randomly isolated and outcrossing was verified by the reassortment of several RFLP markers among the progeny. In addition, the progeny were analyzed for pathogenicity to parental hosts. The implications of sexual compatibility between C. gloeosporioides isolates with different host specificities on the evolution of Colletotrichum species are discussed.

  15. Ectomycorrhizal host specificity in a changing world: can legacy effects explain anomalous current associations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofgren, Lotus; Nguyen, Nhu H; Kennedy, Peter G

    2018-02-07

    Despite the importance of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi in forest ecosystems, knowledge about the ecological and co-evolutionary mechanisms underlying ECM host associations remains limited. Using a widely distributed group of ECM fungi known to form tight associations with trees in the family Pinaceae, we characterized host specificity among three unique Suillus-host species pairs using a combination of field root tip sampling and experimental bioassays. We demonstrate that the ECM fungus S. subaureus can successfully colonize Quercus hosts in both field and glasshouse settings, making this species unique in an otherwise Pinaceae-specific clade. Importantly, however, we found that the colonization of Quercus by S. subaureus required co-planting with a Pinaceae host. While our experimental results indicate that gymnosperms are required for the establishment of new S. subaureus colonies, Pineaceae hosts are locally absent at both our field sites. Given the historical presence of Pineaceae hosts before human alteration, it appears the current S. subaureus-Quercus associations represent carryover from past host presence. Collectively, our results suggest that patterns of ECM specificity should be viewed not only in light of current forest community composition, but also as a legacy effect of host community change over time. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Use of black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus) in biological control of intermediate host snails of fish-borne zoonotic trematodes in nursery ponds in the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hung, Nguyen M.; Duc, Nguyen V.; Stauffer, Jay R.

    2013-01-01

    is often thought to be linked to fish culture in areas where the habit of eating raw fish is common. Juvenile fish produced in nurseries are often heavily infected with FZT and since fishes are sold to aquaculture facilities for growth, control of FZT in these fishes should be given priority. Controlling....... Here we report the first trials using it for biological control of intermediate host snails in nursery ponds stocked with 1-week old fry (10-12 mm in length) of Indian carp, Labeo rohita. Methods. Semi-field and field experiments were set up to test the effect of black carp on snail populations...... the first intermediate host (i.e., freshwater gastropods), would be an attractive approach, if feasible. The black carp, Mylopharyngodon piceus, is a well-known predator of freshwater snails and is already used successfully for biological control of snails in various parts of the world including Vietnam...

  17. R gene-controlled host specificity in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leguminous plants can enter into root nodule symbioses with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria known as rhizobia. An intriguing but still poorly understood property of the symbiosis is its host specificity, which is controlled at multiple levels involving both rhizobial and host genes. Here we report the...

  18. Solenopsis invicta virus 3: Further host-specificity tests with native Solenopsis ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A thorough understanding of host specificity is essential before pathogens can be used as biopesticides or self-sustaining biocontrol agents. In order to better define the host range of the recently discovered Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3), we collected and exposed colonies of two native fire...

  19. Host specificity, molecular phylogeny and morphological differences of Phyllodistomum pseudofolium Nybelin, 1926 and Phyllodistomum angulatum Linstow, 1907 (Trematoda: Gorgoderidae) with notes on Eurasian ruffe as final host for Phyllodistomum spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stunžėnas, Virmantas; Petkevičiūtė, Romualda; Poddubnaya, Larisa G; Stanevičiūtė, Gražina; Zhokhov, Alexander E

    2017-06-06

    Host-specificity patterns are not well-defined for trematodes of the genus Phyllodistomum Braun, 1899. The Eurasian ruffe, Gymnocephalus cernuus L., has been recorded as a definitive host for Phyllodistomum folium (Olfers, 1816), P. angulatum Linstow, 1907 and P. megalorchis Nybelin, 1926 and as the type-host for P. pseudofolium Nybelin (1926). A wide range of other host fishes have been recorded for these species as well. All present host records have been based on light microscopy and the life-cycles of P. pseudofolium, P. angulatum and P. megalorchis are unknown. The validity of P. pseudofolium and P. megalorchis require verification. In this study, rDNA sequences generated from adult Phyllodistomum spp., as well as from larval stages developing in Pisidium amnicum Müller, were analysed to establish the real number of Phyllodistomum species utilizing G. cernuus, and to associate larvae with the corresponding adult forms. Phylogenetic analyses of adult and larval stages of Phyllodistomum spp. based on ITS2 and partial 28S rDNA data allowed the confirmation of the validity of P. pseudofolium. A macrocercous cercaria, known as Phyllodistomum sp. from P. amnicum is genetically identical to adult P. pseudofolium. Phyllodistomum megalorchis obtained from its type-host, Lota lota L., showed no genetic differences from P. angulatum parasitizing Sander lucioperca L. In our analysis, P. pseudofolium, P. angulatum and P. macrocotyle formed a highly supported clade despite the fact that these species appear to be associated with distinct patterns of first intermediate host identity and cercarial morphology. Some morphological differences between gravid specimens of P. pseudofolium and P. angulatum were observed and their SEM tegumental surface topography is described. The results lead us to the perception that macroevolutionary host switching in the genus Phyllodistomum is independent of host phylogeny. This study suggests strict host-specificity (oioxeny) for P

  20. Plantas de cobertura de solo como hospedeiras alternativas de Colletotrichum guaranicola Cover crops as intermediate hosts to Colletotrichum guaranicola

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    L.J. Mileo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available As plantas de cobertura de solo usadas para suprimir o crescimento de plantas daninhas podem hospedar fungos fitopatogênicos. Para testar essa hipótese, elaborou-se este trabalho com o objetivo de avaliar o comportamento de nove espécies de plantas como possíveis hospedeiras do fungo Colletotrichum guaranicola. O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação sob delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com quatro repetições. Cada vaso com três plantas da mesma espécie representou uma unidade experimental. As espécies que constituíram os tratamentos foram: Arachis pintoi, Calopogonium mucunoides, Chamaecrista rotundifolia, Crotalaria striata, Desmodium ovalifolium, Flemingia congesta, Mucuna aterrima, Pueraria phaseoloides e Tephrosia candida. Quarenta dias após a semeadura, as plantas foram inoculadas com suspensão de esporos de C. guaranicola na concentração de 10(5 conídios mL¹, enquanto as plantas testemunhas receberam somente água. As plantas foram mantidas em câmara úmida por 48 horas. Diariamente, foram feitas observações por 15 dias após a inoculação, para visualizar sintomas da doença. As espécies que não apresentaram sintomas de C. guaranicola foram Arachis pintoi, Chamaecrista rotundifolia, Desmodium ovalifolium, Flemingia congesta e Tephrosia candida, e as que manifestaram sintomas após a inoculação foram Calopogonium mucunoides, Crotalaria striata, Mucuna aterrima e Pueraria phaseoloides, que podem ser fontes de inóculo do patógeno da antracnose para o guaranazeiro.Cover crops used to suppress weed growth can be intermediate hosts to phytopathogenic fungi. To test this hypothesis, nine species of cover crops were evaluated as hosts to Colletotrichum guaranicola. The experiment was arranged in a randomized design, with four replicates, and conducted under greenhouse conditions. Each vase with three plants of one species constituted one plot. The species treated were: Arachis pintoi, Calopogonium

  1. Host specificity shapes population structure of pinworm parasites in Caribbean reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Bryan G; Perkins, Susan L

    2013-09-01

    Host specificity is one of the potential factors affecting parasite diversification because gene flow may be facilitated or constrained by the number of host species that a parasite can exploit. We test this hypothesis using a costructure approach, comparing two sympatric pinworm parasites that differ in host specificity - Parapharyngodon cubensis and Spauligodon anolis - on the Puerto Rican Bank and St. Croix in the Caribbean. Spauligodon anolis specializes on Anolis lizards, whereas P. cubensis parasitizes Anolis lizards as well as many other species of lizards and snakes. We collected lizards from across the Puerto Rican Bank and St. Croix, sampled them for S. anolis and P. cubensis and generated nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data from the parasites. We used these data to show that P. cubensis is comprised of multiple cryptic species that exhibit limited population structure relative to S. anolis, which is consistent with our prediction based on their host specificity. We also provide evidence that the distribution of P. cubensis species is maintained by competitive exclusion, and in contrast to previous theoretical work, the parasites with the greatest number of host species also reach the highest prevalence rates. Overall, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that host specificity shapes parasite diversification, and suggest that even moderate differences in host specificity may contribute to substantial differences in diversification. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Unravelling mummies: cryptic diversity, host specificity, trophic and coevolutionary interactions in psyllid - parasitoid food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Aidan A G; Steinbauer, Martin J; Taylor, Gary S; Johnson, Scott N; Cook, James M; Riegler, Markus

    2017-06-06

    Parasitoids are hyperdiverse and can contain morphologically and functionally cryptic species, making them challenging to study. Parasitoid speciation can arise from specialisation on niches or diverging hosts. However, which process dominates is unclear because cospeciation across multiple parasitoid and host species has rarely been tested. Host specificity and trophic interactions of the parasitoids of psyllids (Hemiptera) remain mostly unknown, but these factors are fundamentally important for understanding of species diversity, and have important applied implications for biological control. We sampled diverse parasitoid communities from eight Eucalyptus-feeding psyllid species in the genera Cardiaspina and Spondyliaspis, and characterised their phylogenetic and trophic relationships using a novel approach that forensically linked emerging parasitoids with the presence of their DNA in post-emergence insect mummies. We also tested whether parasitoids have cospeciated with their psyllid hosts. The parasitoid communities included three Psyllaephagus morphospecies (two primary and, unexpectedly, one heteronomous hyperparasitoid that uses different host species for male and female development), and the hyperparasitoid, Coccidoctonus psyllae. However, the number of genetically delimited Psyllaephagus species was three times higher than the number of recognisable morphospecies, while the hyperparasitoid formed a single generalist species. In spite of this, cophylogenetic analysis revealed unprecedented codivergence of this hyperparasitoid with its primary parasitoid host, suggesting that this single hyperparasitoid species is possibly diverging into host-specific species. Overall, parasitoid and hyperparasitoid diversification was characterised by functional conservation of morphospecies, high host specificity and some host switching between sympatric psyllid hosts. We conclude that host specialisation, host codivergence and host switching are important factors driving

  3. Host-feeding behaviour of Dermacentor reticulatus and Dermacentor marginatus in mono-specific and inter-specific infestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczek, Alicja; Bartosik, Katarzyna; Zając, Zbigniew; Stanko, Michał

    2015-09-17

    Given the sympatric occurrence in some regions of Europe and the great epidemiological significance of D. reticulatus and D. marginatus species, we investigated the behaviour of these ticks during inter-specific and mono-specific host infestations. The investigations were conducted on rabbits at 20 ± 3 °C and humidity of 38 ± 1 %. The inter-specific infestations groups consisted of 20 females and ten males of D. marginatus and 20 females and ten males of D. reticulatus on each host, whereas mono-specific infestations involved 40 females and 20 males of each species. The investigations have demonstrated competition between the two tick species resulting in modification of the behaviour on the host and the feeding course in D. marginatus females by the presence of D. reticulatus. In the inter-specific group, D. marginatus females attached for a longer time (mean 2.74 ± 1.12 h) than in the mono-specific group (mean 1.24 ± 0.97 h) (p mono-specific group (13.15 ± 2.53 days) (p mono-specific infestation (p = 0.0155). In D. reticulatus females, no significant difference was found in the host attachment and feeding rates between the mono-specific and inter-specific groups. The differences in the behaviour of the females from both species during co-feeding reflect physiological adaptation to environmental conditions, which enables them to ingest blood and reproduce. During co-feeding of D. reticulatus and D. marginatus on the same host, two inter-specific systems with different physiological features are formed, which may influence the transmission of tick-borne pathogens.

  4. Phylogeny of Cirsium spp. in North America: Host Specificity Does Not Follow Phylogeny

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    Tracey A. Bodo Slotta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Weedy invasive Cirsium spp. are widespread in temperate regions of North America and some of their biological control agents have attacked native Cirsium spp. A phylogenetic tree was developed from DNA sequences for the internal transcribed spacer and external transcribed spacer regions from native and non-native Great Plains Cirsium spp. and other thistles to determine if host specificity follows phylogeny. The monophyly of Cirsium spp. and Carduus within the tribe Cardinae was confirmed with native North American and European lineages of the Cirsium spp. examined. We did not detect interspecific hybridization between the introduced invasive and the native North American Cirsium spp. Selected host-biological control agent interactions were mapped onto the phylogenic tree derived by maximum likelihood analysis to examine the co-occurrence of known hosts with biological control agents. Within Cirsium-Cardueae, the insect biological control agents do not associate with host phylogenetic lines. Thus, more comprehensive testing of species in host-specificity trials, rather than relying on a single representative of a given clade may be necessary; because the assumption that host-specificity follows phylogeny does not necessarily hold. Since the assumption does not always hold, it will also be important to evaluate ecological factors to provide better cues for host specificity.

  5. Species-specific genes under selection characterize the co-evolution of slavemaker and host lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmeyer, B; Elsner, D; Alleman, A; Foitzik, S

    2017-12-04

    selection in each species. These results point to species-specific adaptations rather than convergent trajectories during the evolution of the slavemaker and host lifestyles suggesting that the evolution of parasitism, even in closely related species, may be achieved in diverse ways.

  6. Cryptic host-specific diversity among western hemisphere broomrapes (Orobanche s.l., Orobanchaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Adam C; Colwell, Alison E L; Schneeweiss, Gerald M; Baldwin, Bruce G

    2016-11-01

    The broomrapes, Orobanche sensu lato (Orobanchaceae), are common root parasites found across Eurasia, Africa and the Americas. All species native to the western hemisphere, recognized as Orobanche sections Gymnocaulis and Nothaphyllon, form a clade that has a centre of diversity in western North America, but also includes four disjunct species in central and southern South America. The wide ecological distribution coupled with moderate taxonomic diversity make this clade a valuable model system for studying the role, if any, of host-switching in driving the diversification of plant parasites. Two spacer regions of ribosomal nuclear DNA (ITS + ETS), three plastid regions and one low-copy nuclear gene were sampled from 163 exemplars of Orobanche from across the native geographic range in order to infer a detailed phylogeny. Together with comprehensive data on the parasites' native host ranges, associations between phylogenetic lineages and host specificity are tested. Within the two currently recognized species of O. sect. Gymnocaulis, seven strongly supported clades were found. While commonly sympatric, members of these clades each had unique host associations. Strong support for cryptic host-specific diversity was also found in sect. Nothaphyllon, while other taxonomic species were well supported. We also find strong evidence for multiple amphitropical dispersals from central North America into South America. Host-switching is an important driver of diversification in western hemisphere broomrapes, where host specificity has been grossly underestimated. More broadly, host specificity and host-switching probably play fundamental roles in the speciation of parasitic plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Do host species evolve a specific response to slave-making ants?

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    Delattre Olivier

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social parasitism is an important selective pressure for social insect species. It is particularly the case for the hosts of dulotic (so called slave-making ants, which pillage the brood of host colonies to increase the worker force of their own colony. Such raids can have an important impact on the fitness of the host nest. An arms race which can lead to geographic variation in host defenses is thus expected between hosts and parasites. In this study we tested whether the presence of a social parasite (the dulotic ant Myrmoxenus ravouxi within an ant community correlated with a specific behavioral defense strategy of local host or non-host populations of Temnothorax ants. Social recognition often leads to more or less pronounced agonistic interactions between non-nestmates ants. Here, we monitored agonistic behaviors to assess whether ants discriminate social parasites from other ants. It is now well-known that ants essentially rely on cuticular hydrocarbons to discriminate nestmates from aliens. If host species have evolved a specific recognition mechanism for their parasite, we hypothesize that the differences in behavioral responses would not be fully explained simply by quantitative dissimilarity in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles, but should also involve a qualitative response due to the detection of particular compounds. We scaled the behavioral results according to the quantitative chemical distance between host and parasite colonies to test this hypothesis. Results Cuticular hydrocarbon profiles were distinct between species, but host species did not show a clearly higher aggression rate towards the parasite than toward non-parasite intruders, unless the degree of response was scaled by the chemical distance between intruders and recipient colonies. By doing so, we show that workers of the host and of a non-host species in the parasitized site displayed more agonistic behaviors (bites and ejections towards parasite

  8. Do host species evolve a specific response to slave-making ants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Social parasitism is an important selective pressure for social insect species. It is particularly the case for the hosts of dulotic (so called slave-making) ants, which pillage the brood of host colonies to increase the worker force of their own colony. Such raids can have an important impact on the fitness of the host nest. An arms race which can lead to geographic variation in host defenses is thus expected between hosts and parasites. In this study we tested whether the presence of a social parasite (the dulotic ant Myrmoxenus ravouxi) within an ant community correlated with a specific behavioral defense strategy of local host or non-host populations of Temnothorax ants. Social recognition often leads to more or less pronounced agonistic interactions between non-nestmates ants. Here, we monitored agonistic behaviors to assess whether ants discriminate social parasites from other ants. It is now well-known that ants essentially rely on cuticular hydrocarbons to discriminate nestmates from aliens. If host species have evolved a specific recognition mechanism for their parasite, we hypothesize that the differences in behavioral responses would not be fully explained simply by quantitative dissimilarity in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles, but should also involve a qualitative response due to the detection of particular compounds. We scaled the behavioral results according to the quantitative chemical distance between host and parasite colonies to test this hypothesis. Results Cuticular hydrocarbon profiles were distinct between species, but host species did not show a clearly higher aggression rate towards the parasite than toward non-parasite intruders, unless the degree of response was scaled by the chemical distance between intruders and recipient colonies. By doing so, we show that workers of the host and of a non-host species in the parasitized site displayed more agonistic behaviors (bites and ejections) towards parasite than toward non

  9. Malagasy bats shelter a considerable genetic diversity of pathogenic Leptospira suggesting notable host-specificity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomard, Yann; Dietrich, Muriel; Wieseke, Nicolas; Ramasindrazana, Beza; Lagadec, Erwan; Goodman, Steven M; Dellagi, Koussay; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a disease of global concern with major impact in tropical regions. Despite the importance of this zoonosis for human health, the evolutionary and ecological drivers shaping bacterial communities in host reservoirs remain poorly investigated. Here, we describe Leptospira communities hosted by Malagasy bats, composed of mostly endemic species, in order to characterize host-pathogen associations and investigate their evolutionary histories. We screened 947 individual bats (representing 31 species, 18 genera and seven families) for Leptospira infection and subsequently genotyped positive samples using three different bacterial loci. Molecular identification showed that these Leptospira are notably diverse and include several distinct lineages mostly belonging to Leptospira borgpetersenii and L. kirschneri. The exploration of the most probable host-pathogen evolutionary scenarios suggests that bacterial genetic diversity results from a combination of events related to the ecology and the evolutionary history of their hosts. Importantly, based on the data set presented herein, the notable host-specificity we have uncovered, together with a lack of geographical structuration of bacterial genetic diversity, indicates that the Leptospira community at a given site depends on the co-occurring bat species assemblage. The implications of such tight host-specificity on the epidemiology of leptospirosis are discussed. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Human and Animal Isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica Show Significant Serotype-Specific Colonization and Host-Specific Immune Defense Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaake, Julia; Kronshage, Malte; Uliczka, Frank; Rohde, Manfred; Knuuti, Tobias; Strauch, Eckhard; Fruth, Angelika; Wos-Oxley, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a human pathogen that is ubiquitous in livestock, especially pigs. The bacteria are able to colonize the intestinal tract of a variety of mammalian hosts, but the severity of induced gut-associated diseases (yersiniosis) differs significantly between hosts. To gain more information about the individual virulence determinants that contribute to colonization and induction of immune responses in different hosts, we analyzed and compared the interactions of different human- and animal-derived isolates of serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8, and O:9 with murine, porcine, and human intestinal cells and macrophages. The examined strains exhibited significant serotype-specific cell binding and entry characteristics, but adhesion and uptake into different host cells were not host specific and were independent of the source of the isolate. In contrast, survival and replication within macrophages and the induced proinflammatory response differed between murine, porcine, and human macrophages, suggesting a host-specific immune response. In fact, similar levels of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) were secreted by murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with all tested isolates, but the equivalent interleukin-8 (IL-8) response of porcine bone marrow-derived macrophages was strongly serotype specific and considerably lower in O:3 than in O:8 strains. In addition, all tested Y. enterocolitica strains caused a considerably higher level of secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by porcine than by murine macrophages. This could contribute to limiting the severity of the infection (in particular of serotype O:3 strains) in pigs, which are the primary reservoir of Y. enterocolitica strains pathogenic to humans. PMID:23959720

  11. First in Vivo Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Transcriptomes Reveal Mechanisms of Host Exploitation, Host-Specific Gene Expression, and Expressed Genotype Shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Amy R. Ellison; Graziella V. DiRenzo; Caitlin A. McDonald; Karen R. Lips; Kelly R. Zamudio

    2017-01-01

    For generalist pathogens, host species represent distinct selective environments, providing unique challenges for resource acquisition and defense from host immunity, potentially resulting in host-dependent differences in pathogen fitness. Gene expression modulation should be advantageous, responding optimally to a given host and mitigating the costs of generalism. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a fungal pathogen of amphibians, shows variability in pathogenicity among isolates, and with...

  12. Distribution of intermediate host snails of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis in relation to environmental factors during the dry season in the Tchologo region, Côte d'Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauth, Stefanie J.; Wandel, Nathalie; Traoré, Seïdinan I.; Vounatsou, Penelope; Hattendorf, Jan; Achi, Louise Y.; McNeill, Kristopher; N'Goran, Eliézer K.; Utzinger, Jürg

    2017-10-01

    Snail-borne trematodiases, such as fascioliasis and schistosomiasis, belong to the neglected tropical diseases; yet, millions of people and livestock are affected. The spatial and temporal distribution of intermediate host snails plays an important role in the epidemiology and control of trematodiases. Snail distribution is influenced by numerous environmental and anthropomorphic factors. The aim of this study was to assess the distribution and constitution of the snail fauna during the dry season in constructed and natural water bodies in the Tchologo region, northern Côte d'Ivoire, and to relate these findings to environmental factors and human infections. Snails were collected using standard procedures and environmental parameters were assessed from a total of 50 water bodies in and around 30 randomly selected villages. A canonical correspondence analysis was performed to establish the relationship between snail occurrence and environmental factors. Furthermore, a total of 743 people from the same 30 villages and nearby settlements were invited for stool and urine examination for the diagnosis of Fasciola spp., Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni. Snails of medical importance of the genera Biomphalaria, Bulinus, Lymnaea and Physa were found. Differences in snail occurrence from sites sampled in December 2014 and snails sampled in February 2015, as well as between the northern and southern part of the study area, were revealed. Various environmental factors, such as temperature and human activities, were related to the occurrence of intermediate host snail species in the region. Only 2.3% of human participants tested positive for schistosomiasis, while no Fasciola eggs were found in stool samples. We conclude that intermediate host snails of Fasciola and Schistosoma co-occur in water bodies in the Tchologo region and that the distribution of these snails correlates not only with environmental factors, but also with the presence of humans and animals

  13. Modelling the spatial and seasonal distribution of suitable habitats of schistosomiasis intermediate host snails using Maxent in Ndumo area, KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa

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    Tawanda Manyangadze

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomiasis is a snail-borne disease endemic in sub-Saharan Africa transmitted by freshwater snails. The distribution of schistosomiasis coincides with that of the intermediate hosts as determined by climatic and environmental factors. The aim of this paper was to model the spatial and seasonal distribution of suitable habitats for Bulinus globosus and Biomphalaria pfeifferi snail species (intermediate hosts for Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni, respectively in the Ndumo area of uMkhanyakude district, South Africa. Methods Maximum Entropy (Maxent modelling technique was used to predict the distribution of suitable habitats for B. globosus and B. pfeifferi using presence-only datasets with ≥ 5 and ≤ 12 sampling points in different seasons. Precipitation, maximum and minimum temperatures, Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, Normalised Difference Water Index (NDWI, pH, slope and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI were the background variables in the Maxent models. The models were validated using the area under the curve (AUC and omission rate. Results The predicted suitable habitats for intermediate snail hosts varied with seasons. The AUC for models in all seasons ranged from 0.71 to 1 and the prediction rates were between 0.8 and 0.9. Although B. globosus was found at more localities in the Ndumo area, there was also evidence of cohabiting with B. pfiefferi at some of the locations. NDWI had significant contribution to the models in all seasons. Conclusion The Maxent model is robust in snail habitat suitability modelling even with small dataset of presence-only sampling sites. Application of the methods and design used in this study may be useful in developing a control and management programme for schistosomiasis in the Ndumo area.

  14. The spatial and seasonal distribution of Bulinus truncatus, Bulinus forskalii and Biomphalaria pfeifferi, the intermediate host snails of schistosomiasis, in N’Djamena, Chad

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    Wendelin Moser

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of epidemiological and malacological data pertaining to schistosomiasis in Chad. In view of a recently articulated elimination agenda, a deeper understanding of the spatio-temporal distribution of schistosomiasis inter- mediate host snails is pivotal. We conducted cross-sectional malacological surveys during the dry season (April/May 2013 and after the short rainy season (October 2013 in N’Djamena, the capital of Chad. Snails were identified at the genus and species level using morphological keys and molecular DNA barcoding approaches. Those belonging to Bulinus and Biomphalaria were examined for cercarial shedding. Snail habitats were characterised and their predictive potential for the presence of schistosomiasis intermediate host snails explored. Seasonal patterns were studied using geographical information system and kriging in order to interpolate snail abundance data to make predictions at non-sampled locations across N’Djamena. Overall, 413 Bulinus truncatus, 369 Bulinus forskalii and 108 Biomphalaria pfeifferi snails were collected and subjected to cercarial shedding. During the dry season, one Bu. truncatus of 119 snails collected shed Schistosoma spp. cer- cariae (0.84%, while S. mansoni was shed by one of 108 Bi. pfeifferi snails (0.93%. None of the snails collected after the rainy season shed Schistosoma spp. cercariae. The abundance of Bu. truncatus and Bu. forskalii showed an inverse U-shape relationship with the square term of conductivity, i.e. low abundance at the lowest and highest levels of conductivity and high abundance at intermediate levels. Bi. pfeifferi showed a negative, linear association with pH in the dry seasons. It is planned to link these intermediate host snail data to infection data in human populations with the goal to draw a predictive risk map that can be utilised for control and elimination of schistosomiasis in N’Djamena.

  15. Use of black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus) in biological control of intermediate host snails of fish-borne zoonotic trematodes in nursery ponds in the Red River Delta, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen M; Duc, Nguyen V; Stauffer, Jay R; Madsen, Henry

    2013-05-16

    The risks of fish-borne zoonotic trematodes (FZT) to human health constitute an important problem in Vietnam. The infection of humans with these trematodes, such as small liver trematodes (Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini), intestinal trematodes (Heterophyidae) and others is often thought to be linked to fish culture in areas where the habit of eating raw fish is common. Juvenile fish produced in nurseries are often heavily infected with FZT and since fishes are sold to aquaculture facilities for growth, control of FZT in these fishes should be given priority. Controlling the first intermediate host (i.e., freshwater gastropods), would be an attractive approach, if feasible. The black carp, Mylopharyngodon piceus, is a well-known predator of freshwater snails and is already used successfully for biological control of snails in various parts of the world including Vietnam. Here we report the first trials using it for biological control of intermediate host snails in nursery ponds stocked with 1-week old fry (10-12 mm in length) of Indian carp, Labeo rohita. Semi-field and field experiments were set up to test the effect of black carp on snail populations. In the semi-field experiment a known quantity of snails was initially introduced into a pond which was subsequently stocked with black carp. In the field trial in nursery ponds, density of snails was estimated prior to a nursing cycle and at the end of the cycle (after 9 weeks). The results showed that black carp affect the density of snail populations in both semi-field and field conditions. The standing crop of snails in nursery ponds, however, was too high for 2 specimens to greatly reduce snail density within the relatively short nursing cycle. We conclude that the black carp can be used in nursery ponds in Northern Vietnam for snail control. Juvenile black carp weighing 100 - 200 g should be used because this size primarily prey on intermediate hosts of FZT and other studies have shown that it

  16. The taruca (Hippocamelus antisensis) and the red brocket deer (Mazama americana) as intermediate hosts of Taenia hydatigena in Peru, morphological and molecular evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Puerta, Luis A; Pacheco, Joel; Gonzales-Viera, Omar; Lopez-Urbina, Maria T; Gonzalez, Armando E

    2015-09-15

    In the present report metacestodes were collected from the mesentery of a taruca (Hippocamelus antisensis) and from the omentum of a red brocket deer (Mazama americana) in Peru. Various metacestodes parameters, including rostellar hook characteristics, were measured. Molecular analysis was performed to amplify the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene from metacestode isolates. Metacestodes were identified as T. hydatigena by morphology and molecular methods. This constitutes the first molecular detection of T. hydatigena metacestodes in the taruca and the red brocket deer and demonstrates that these animal species are natural intermediate hosts for this parasite. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Growth and ontogeny of the tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus in its copepod first host affects performance in its stickleback second intermediate host

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    Benesh Daniel P

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For parasites with complex life cycles, size at transmission can impact performance in the next host, thereby coupling parasite phenotypes in the two consecutive hosts. However, a handful of studies with parasites, and numerous studies with free-living, complex-life-cycle animals, have found that larval size correlates poorly with fitness under particular conditions, implying that other traits, such as physiological or ontogenetic variation, may predict fitness more reliably. Using the tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus, we evaluated how parasite size, age, and ontogeny in the copepod first host interact to determine performance in the stickleback second host. Methods We raised infected copepods under two feeding treatments (to manipulate parasite growth, and then exposed fish to worms of two different ages (to manipulate parasite ontogeny. We assessed how growth and ontogeny in copepods affected three measures of fitness in fish: infection probability, growth rate, and energy storage. Results Our main, novel finding is that the increase in fitness (infection probability and growth in fish with larval size and age observed in previous studies on S. solidus seems to be largely mediated by ontogenetic variation. Worms that developed rapidly (had a cercomer after 9 days in copepods were able to infect fish at an earlier age, and they grew to larger sizes with larger energy reserves in fish. Infection probability in fish increased with larval size chiefly in young worms, when size and ontogeny are positively correlated, but not in older worms that had essentially completed their larval development in copepods. Conclusions Transmission to sticklebacks as a small, not-yet-fully developed larva has clear costs for S. solidus, but it remains unclear what prevents the evolution of faster growth and development in this species.

  18. Host specific glycans are correlated with susceptibility to infection by lagoviruses, but not with their virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana M; Breiman, Adrien; Lora, Mónica; Le Moullac-Vaidye, Béatrice; Galanina, Oxana; Nyström, Kristina; Marchandeau, Stephane; Le Gall-Reculé, Ghislaine; Strive, Tanja; Neimanis, Aleksija; Bovin, Nicolai V; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Esteves, Pedro J; Abrantes, Joana; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2017-11-29

    The rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) and the European brown hare syndrome virus (EBHSV) are two lagoviruses from the family Caliciviridae that cause fatal diseases in two leporid genera, Oryctolagus and Lepus , respectively. In the last few years, several examples of host jumps of lagoviruses among leporids were recorded. In addition, a new pathogenic genotype of RHDV emerged and many non-pathogenic strains of lagoviruses have been described. The molecular mechanisms behind host shifts and the emergence of virulence are unknown. Since RHDV uses glycans of the histo-blood group antigen type as attachment factors to initiate infection, we studied if glycan specificities of the new pathogenic RHDV genotype, non-pathogenic lagoviruses and EBHSV potentially play a role in determining host range and virulence of lagoviruses. We observed binding to A, B or H antigens of the histo-blood group family for all strains known to primarily infect European rabbits ( Oryctolagus cuniculus ), that have recently been classified as GI strains. Yet, we could not explain the emergence of virulence since similar glycan specificities were found between several pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. By contrast, EBHSV, recently classified as GII.1, bound to terminal β-linked N-acetylglucosamine residues of O-glycans. Expression of these attachment factors in the upper respiratory and digestive tracts in three lagomorph species ( Oryctolagus cuniculus, Lepus europaeus and Sylvilagus floridanus ) showed species-specific patterns regarding the susceptibility to infection by these viruses, indicating that species-specific glycan expression is likely a major contributor to lagoviruses host specificity and range. IMPORTANCE Lagoviruses constitute a genus of the Caliciviridae family, comprising highly pathogenic viruses, RHDV and EBHSV, which infect rabbits and hares, respectively. Recently, non-pathogenic strains were discovered and new pathogenic strains have emerged. In addition, host

  19. Intermediate hosts of the trematode Collyriclum faba (Plagiochiida: Collyriclidae) identified by an integrated morphological and genetic approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heneberg, P.; Faltýnková, Anna; Bizos, J.; Mala, M.; Žiak, J.; Literák, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, FEB 8 2015 (2015), s. 85 ISSN 1756-3305 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cercariae * DNA analysis * fluke * host -parasite interaction * Hydrobiidae * life cycle * Littorinimorpha Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2015

  20. Consistency in the host specificity and host sensitivity of the Bacteroides HF183 marker for sewage pollution tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, W; Masters, N; Toze, S

    2012-10-01

    The host specificity (H-SPF) and host sensitivity (H-SNV) values of the sewage-associated HF183 Bacteroides marker in the current study were compared with the previously published studies in South East Queensland (SEQ), Australia, by testing a large number of wastewater and faecal DNA samples (n=293) from 11 target and nontarget host groups. This was carried out to obtain information on the consistency in the H-SPF and H-SNV values of the HF183 marker for sewage pollution tracking in SEQ. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was used to determine the presence/absence of the HF183 marker in wastewater and faecal DNA samples. Among the human composite wastewater (n=59) from sewage treatment plants and individual human (n=20) faecal DNA samples tested, 75 (95%) were PCR positive for the HF183 marker. The overall H-SNV of this marker in target host group was 0·95 (maximum of 1·00). Among the 214 nontarget animal faecal DNA samples tested, 201 (94%) samples were negative for the HF183 marker. Six chicken, five dog and two bird faecal DNA samples, however, were positive for the marker. The overall H-SPF of the HF183 marker to differentiate between target and nontarget faecal DNA samples was 0·94 (maximum of 1·00). The H-SNV (0·95) and H-SPF (0·94) values obtained in this study was slightly lower than previous studies (H-SNV value of 1·00 in 2007 and 1·00 in 2009; H-SPF value of 1·00 in 2007 and 0·99 in 2009). Nonetheless, the overall high H-SNV (0·98) and H-SPF (0·97) values of the HF183 marker over the past 4 years (i.e. 2007-2011) suggest that the HF183 marker can be reliably used for the detection of sewage pollution in environmental waters in SEQ. In the current study, the HF183 marker was detected in small number nontarget animal faecal samples. Care should be taken to interpret results obtained from catchments or waterways that might be potentially contaminated with dog faecal matter or poultry litter. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied

  1. Evolution of life cycle, colony morphology, and host specificity in the family Hydractiniidae (Hydrozoa, Cnidaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglietta, Maria Pia; Cunningham, Clifford W

    2012-12-01

    Biased transitions are common throughout the tree of life. The class hydrozoa is no exception, having lost the feeding medusa stage at least 70 times. The family hydractiniidae includes one lineage with pelagic medusae (Podocoryna) and several without (e.g., Hydractinia). The benthic colony stage also varies widely in host specificity and in colony form. The five-gene phylogeny presented here requires multiple transitions between character states for medusae, host specificity, and colony phenotype. Significant phylogenetic correlations exist between medusoid form, colony morphology, and host specificity. Species with nonfeeding medusae are usually specialized on a single host type, and reticulate colonies are correlated with nonmotile hosts. The history of feeding medusae is less certain. Podocoryna is nested within five lineages lacking medusae. This requires either repeated losses of medusae, or the remarkable re-evolution of a feeding medusa after at least 150 million years. Traditional ancestral reconstruction favors medusa regain, but a likelihood framework testing biased transitions cannot distinguish between multiple losses versus regain. A hypothesis of multiple losses of feeding medusae requires transient selection pressure favoring such a loss. Populations of species with feeding medusae are always locally rare and lack of feeding medusae does not result in restricted species distribution around the world. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. Deciphering bartonella diversity, recombination, and host specificity in a rodent community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Buffet

    Full Text Available Host-specificity is an intrinsic feature of many bacterial pathogens, resulting from a long history of co-adaptation between bacteria and their hosts. Alpha-proteobacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella infect the erythrocytes of a wide range of mammal orders, including rodents. In this study, we performed genetic analysis of Bartonella colonizing a rodent community dominated by bank voles (Myodes glareolus and wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus in a French suburban forest to evaluate their diversity, their capacity to recombine and their level of host specificity. Following the analysis of 550 rodents, we detected 63 distinct genotypes related to B. taylorii, B. grahamii, B. doshiae and a new B. rochalimae-like species. Investigating the most highly represented species, we showed that B. taylorii strain diversity was markedly higher than that of B. grahamii, suggesting a possible severe bottleneck for the latter species. The majority of recovered genotypes presented a strong association with either bank voles or wood mice, with the exception of three B. taylorii genotypes which had a broader host range. Despite the physical barriers created by host specificity, we observed lateral gene transfer between Bartonella genotypes associated with wood mice and Bartonella adapted to bank voles, suggesting that those genotypes might co-habit during their life cycle.

  3. Host specific differences alter the requirement for certain Salmonella genes during swine colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Bradley L; Bearson, Shawn M D

    2011-06-02

    The pathogenic potential of Salmonella is determined during the complex interaction between pathogen and host, requiring optimal regulation of multiple bacterial genetic systems within variable in vivo environments. The mouse model of systemic disease has been an extremely productive model to investigate the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Although the mouse model is a widely used paradigm for studying the pathogenesis of systemic disease caused by Salmonella, investigations concerning food safety interventions should employ natural hosts to examine gastrointestinal colonization by Salmonella. Recent research has demonstrated specific differences in the attenuation of certain S. Typhimurium mutants in mice compared to swine. This variation in pathogenesis between the mouse model and pigs for the S. Typhimurium mutants is presumably dependent upon either the requirements for specific gene products during systemic disease (mouse) versus gastrointestinal colonization (pig) or host specific differences. In addition, host specific diversity in Salmonella colonization of swine has also been described in comparison to other food-producing animals, including cattle and chickens. Differences in Salmonella colonization and pathogenesis across diverse animal species highlight the importance of species-specific studies of gastrointestinal colonization for the development of Salmonella interventions to enhance pork safety. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Insights into the relationships of Palearctic and Nearctic lymnaeids (Mollusca : Gastropoda by rDNA ITS-2 sequencing and phylogeny of stagnicoline intermediate host species of Fasciola hepatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bargues M.D.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Fascioliasis by Fasciola hepatica is the vector-borne disease presenting the widest latitudinal, longitudinal and altitudinal distribution known. F. hepatica shows a great adaptation power to new environmental conditions which is the consequence of its own capacities together with the adaptation and colonization abilities of its specific vector hosts, freshwater snails of the family Lymnaeidae. Several lymnaeid species only considered as secondary contributors to the liver fluke transmission have, however, played a very important role in the geographic expansion of this disease. Many of them belong to the so-called "stagnicoline" type group. Stagnicolines have, therefore, a very important applied interest in the Holarctic region, to which they are geographically restricted. The present knowledge on the genetics of stagnicolines and on their parasite-host interrelationships is, however, far from being sufficient. The present paper analyses the relationships between Palaearctic and Nearctic stagnicoline species on the base of the new light furnished by the results obtained in nuclear rDNA ITS-2 sequencing and corresponding phylogenetic studies of the lymnaeid taxa Lymnaea (Stagnicola occulta, L. (S. palustris palustris (topotype specimens and L.(S. p. turricula from Europe. Natural infections with F. hepatica have been reported in all of them. Surprisingly, ITS-2 length and G C content of L. occulta were similar and perfectly fitted within the respective ranges known in North American stagnicolines. Nucleotide differences and genetic distances were higher between L. occulta and the other European stagnicolines than between L. occulta and the North American ones. The ITS-2 sequence of L. p. turricula from Poland differed from the other genotypes known from turricula in Europe. The phylogenetic trees using the maximum-parsimony, distance and maximum-likelihood methods confirmed (i the inclusion of L. occulta in the branch of North American

  5. Discovery of intermediate hosts for two species of blood flukes Cardicola orientalis and Cardicola forsteri (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) infecting Pacific bluefin tuna in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakashi, Sho; Tani, Kazuki; Ishimaru, Katsuya; Shin, Sang Phil; Honryo, Tomoki; Uchida, Hiro'omi; Ogawa, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Fish blood flukes (Aporocotylidae) are important pathogens of farmed finfish around the world. Among them, Cardicola spp. infecting farmed tuna are considered to be serious threats to tuna farming and have received tremendous attention. We conducted periodical samplings at a tuna farming site in Japan between January and May, 2015 to determine the life cycle of Cardicola spp. We collected over 4700 terebellid polychaetes from ropes, floats and frames of tuna culture cages and found nearly 400 infected worms. Sporocysts and cercariae found in Nicolea gracilibranchis were genetically identified as Cardicola orientalis by 28S and ITS2 ribosomal DNA sequences. This was the first discovery of the intermediate host for this parasite species. Infection prevalence and the abundance of N. gracilibranchis significantly varied between sampling points and the highest number of infected terebellids were collected from ropes. We also demonstrated morphologically and molecularly that asexual stages found in a single Amphitrite sp. (Terebellidae) and adult worms isolated from farmed juvenile tuna were Cardicola forsteri. This is the first report of C. forsteri in Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT) Thunnus orientalis in Japan. Our results demonstrated that all three species of Cardicola orientalis, C. forsteri and Cardicola opisthorchis exist in Japanese farmed PBTs and that they all use terebellid polychaetes as the intermediate hosts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomphalaria straminea and Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Planorbidae) as new intermediate hosts of the fish eyefluke Austrodiplostomum compactum (Trematoda: Diplostomidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, H A; Melo, A L

    2013-08-01

    Austrodiplostomum compactum has been involved in cases of ocular diplostomiasis in several species of fish in Brazil, but the molluscan intermediate hosts of the parasite remain unknown. In the present study, malacological surveys were carried out at Pampulha Reservoir, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, between January 2009 and July 2012. A total of 16,119 specimens of Biomphalaria spp. were collected and examined, of which 68/14,948 specimens (0.45%) of Biomphalaria straminea and 6/541 (1.11%) of Biomphalaria glabrata were found harboring a strigeid cercariae. Groups of 5 specimens of Cyprinius carpio were experimentally infected with these cercariae (100 larvae/fish), and metacercariae were recovered from the eyes of the fish, 65 days after infection, with a mean intensity of infection of 10.4 (8-13) metacercariae/fish. Morphological study on cercariae and metacercariae identified them as A. compactum . This is the first record of cercariae of A. compactum in Brazil, and B. straminea and B. glabrata as new intermediate hosts for the parasite.

  7. Investigation of the open-circuit voltage in wide-bandgap InGaP-host InP quantum dot intermediate-band solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Taketo; Tayagaki, Takeshi; Nagato, Yuki; Okano, Yoshinobu; Sugaya, Takeyoshi

    2018-04-01

    To analyze the open-circuit voltage (V oc) in intermediate-band solar cells, we investigated the current-voltage characteristics in wide-bandgap InGaP-based InP quantum dot (QD) solar cells. From the temperature dependence of the current-voltage curves, we show that the V oc in InP QD solar cells increases with decreasing temperature. We use a simple diode model to extract V oc at the zero-temperature limit, V 0, and the temperature coefficient C of the solar cells. Our results show that, while the C of InP QD solar cells is slightly larger than that of the reference InGaP solar cells, V 0 significantly decreases and coincides with the bandgap energy of the InP QDs rather than that of the InGaP host. This V 0 indicates that the V oc reduction in the InP QD solar cells is primarily caused by the breaking of the Fermi energy separation between the QDs and the host semiconductor in intermediate-band solar cells, rather than by enhanced carrier recombination.

  8. Evolution of codon usage in Zika virus genomes is host and vector specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Azeem Mehmood; Nasrullah, Izza; Qamar, Raheel; Tong, Yigang

    2016-01-01

    The codon usage patterns of viruses reflect the evolutionary changes that allow them to optimize their survival and adapt their fitness to the external environment and, most importantly, their hosts. Here we report the genotype-specific codon usage patterns of Zika virus (ZIKV) strains from the current and previous outbreaks. Several genotype-specific and common codon usage traits were noted in the ZIKV coding sequences, indicating their independent evolutionary origins from a common ancestor. The overall influence of natural selection was more profound than that of mutation pressure, acting on a specific set of viral genes in the Asian-genotype ZIKV strains from the recent outbreak. An interplay between codon adaptation and deoptimization may have allowed the virus to adapt to multiple host and vectors and is reported for the first time in ZIKV genomes. Combining our codon analysis with geographical data on Aedes populations in the Americas suggested that ZIKV has evolved host- and vector-specific codon usage patterns to maintain successful replication and transmission chains within multiple hosts and vectors. PMID:27729643

  9. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program: Host Specificity of Microbial Flora from Eurasian Watermilfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    Test. Table 6 Fraction of Replicates in Which Endophytic GFU Were Detected in Plant Species Fraction of Replicates Having- Endophytic CFU* Plant...which endophytic GFU were detected at end of host- specificity experiments/total number of replicates examined. 0I 0 0 ~ o ’ 0 4 - 0 -4 u~~- z Uc - -4

  10. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang; Yan Ma; Muxin Yang; Ping Jiang; Fuping Yuan; Xiaolei Wu

    2017-01-01

    The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS) with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been ...

  11. Melanoides tuberculata (Mollusca: Thiaridae as an intermediate host of Centrocestus formosanus (Trematoda: Heterophyidae in Brazil Melanoides tuberculata (Mollusca: Thiaridae como hospedeiro intermediário de Centrocestus formosanus (Trematoda: Heterophyidae no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Alves Pinto

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pleurolophocercous cercariae emerged from naturally infected Melanoides tuberculata from Minas Gerais State, Brazil, were used to perform experimental infection of laboratory-reared Poecilia reticulata. Mature metacercariae were obtained from the gills of fishes and force-fed to Mus musculus. The adult parasites which recovered from small intestines of mice were identified as Centrocestus formosanus. This is the first report of M. tuberculata as intermediate host of this heterophyid in Brazil.Cercárias do tipo pleurolofocerca emergidas de Melanoides tuberculata naturalmente infectados coletados na represa da Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil, foram utilizadas para a infecção experimental de Poecilia reticulata criados em laboratório. Metacercárias maduras foram obtidas nas brânquias dos peixes e administradas por via oral a Mus musculus. Parasitos adultos recuperados no intestino delgado dos camundongos foram identificados como Centrocestus formosanus. Este é o primeiro relato de M. tuberculata como hospedeiro intermediário deste parasito no Brasil.

  12. Molecular characterization of host-specific biofilm formation in a vertebrate gut symbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A Frese

    Full Text Available Although vertebrates harbor bacterial communities in their gastrointestinal tract whose composition is host-specific, little is known about the mechanisms by which bacterial lineages become selected. The goal of this study was to characterize the ecological processes that mediate host-specificity of the vertebrate gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri, and to systematically identify the bacterial factors that are involved. Experiments with monoassociated mice revealed that the ability of L. reuteri to form epithelial biofilms in the mouse forestomach is strictly dependent on the strain's host origin. To unravel the molecular basis for this host-specific biofilm formation, we applied a combination of transcriptome analysis and comparative genomics and identified eleven genes of L. reuteri 100-23 that were predicted to play a role. We then determined expression and importance of these genes during in vivo biofilm formation in monoassociated mice. This analysis revealed that six of the genes were upregulated in vivo, and that genes encoding for proteins involved in epithelial adherence, specialized protein transport, cell aggregation, environmental sensing, and cell lysis contributed to biofilm formation. Inactivation of a serine-rich surface adhesin with a devoted transport system (the SecA2-SecY2 pathway completely abrogated biofilm formation, indicating that initial adhesion represented the most significant step in biofilm formation, likely conferring host specificity. In summary, this study established that the epithelial selection of bacterial symbionts in the vertebrate gut can be both specific and highly efficient, resulting in biofilms that are exclusively formed by the coevolved strains, and it allowed insight into the bacterial effectors of this process.

  13. Suppression of graft-versus-host reactivity by a single host-specific blood transfusion to prospective donors of hemopoietic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knulst, A.C.; Bril-Bazuin, C.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Benner, R.

    1991-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses against recipient's histocompatibility antigens can occur early in the course of a graft-versus-host reaction in lethally irradiated allogeneically reconstituted mice. This reactivity could be suppressed by a single host-specific blood transfusion to the

  14. Toxoplasma gondii infection specifically increases the levels of key host microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti M Zeiner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii can infect and replicate in virtually any nucleated cell in many species of warm-blooded animals; thus, it has evolved the ability to exploit well-conserved biological processes common to its diverse hosts. Here we have investigated whether Toxoplasma modulates the levels of host microRNAs (miRNAs during infection.Using microarray profiling and a combination of conventional molecular approaches we report that Toxoplasma specifically modulates the expression of important host microRNAs during infection. We show that both the primary transcripts for miR-17 approximately 92 and miR-106b approximately 25 and the pivotal miRNAs that are derived from miR-17 approximately 92 display increased abundance in Toxoplasma-infected primary human cells; a Toxoplasma-dependent up-regulation of the miR-17 approximately 92 promoter is at least partly responsible for this increase. The abundance of mature miR-17 family members, which are derived from these two miRNA clusters, remains unchanged in host cells infected with the closely related apicomplexan Neospora caninum; thus, the Toxoplasma-induced increase in their abundance is a highly directed process rather than a general host response to infection.Altered levels of miR-17 approximately 92 and miR-106b approximately 25 are known to play crucial roles in mammalian cell regulation and have been implicated in numerous hyperproliferative diseases although the mechanisms driving their altered expression are unknown. Hence, in addition to the implications of these findings on the host-pathogen interaction, Toxoplasma may represent a powerful probe for understanding the normal mechanisms that regulate the levels of key host miRNAs.

  15. Site-specific programming of the host epithelial transcriptome by the gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Felix; Nookaew, Intawat; Sommer, Nina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The intestinal epithelium separates us from the microbiota but also interacts with it and thus affects host immune status and physiology. Previous studies investigated microbiota-induced responses in the gut using intact tissues or unfractionated epithelial cells, thereby limiting....... The microbial impact on host gene expression was highly site specific, as epithelial responses to the microbiota differed between cell fractions. Specific transcriptional regulators were enriched in each fraction. In general, the gut microbiota induced a more rapid response in the colon than in the ileum...... conclusions about regional differences in the epithelium. Here, we sought to investigate microbiota-induced transcriptional responses in specific fractions of intestinal epithelial cells. To this end, we used microarray analysis of laser capture microdissection (LCM)-harvested ileal and colonic tip and crypt...

  16. Host-Specific and Segment-Specific Evolutionary Dynamics of Avian and Human Influenza A Viruses: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiyeon; Omori, Ryosuke; Ueno, Keisuke; Iida, Sayaka; Ito, Kimihito

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary dynamics of influenza viruses is essential to control both avian and human influenza. Here, we analyze host-specific and segment-specific Tajima's D trends of influenza A virus through a systematic review using viral sequences registered in the National Center for Biotechnology Information. To avoid bias from viral population subdivision, viral sequences were stratified according to their sampling locations and sampling years. As a result, we obtained a total of 580 datasets each of which consists of nucleotide sequences of influenza A viruses isolated from a single population of hosts at a single sampling site within a single year. By analyzing nucleotide sequences in the datasets, we found that Tajima's D values of viral sequences were different depending on hosts and gene segments. Tajima's D values of viruses isolated from chicken and human samples showed negative, suggesting purifying selection or a rapid population growth of the viruses. The negative Tajima's D values in rapidly growing viral population were also observed in computer simulations. Tajima's D values of PB2, PB1, PA, NP, and M genes of the viruses circulating in wild mallards were close to zero, suggesting that these genes have undergone neutral selection in constant-sized population. On the other hand, Tajima's D values of HA and NA genes of these viruses were positive, indicating HA and NA have undergone balancing selection in wild mallards. Taken together, these results indicated the existence of unknown factors that maintain viral subtypes in wild mallards.

  17. Are cryptic host species also cryptic to parasites? Host specificity and geographical distribution of acanthocephalan parasites infecting freshwater Gammarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westram, A M; Baumgartner, C; Keller, I; Jokela, J

    2011-07-01

    Many parasites infect multiple host species. In coevolving host-parasite interactions, theory predicts that parasites should be adapted to locally common hosts, which could lead to regional shifts in host preferences. We studied the interaction between freshwater Gammarus (Crustacea, Amphipoda) and their acanthocephalan parasites using a large-scale field survey and experiments, combined with molecular identification of cryptic host and parasite species. Gammarus pulex is a common host for multiple species of Acanthocephala in Europe but, in Switzerland, is less common than two cryptic members of the Gammarus fossarum species complex (type A and type B). We found that natural populations of these cryptic species were frequently infected by Pomphorhynchus tereticollis and Polymorphus minutus. Four additional parasite species occurred only locally. Parasites were more common in G. fossarum type B than in type A. Infection experiments using several host and parasite sources confirmed consistently lower infection rates in G. pulex than in G. fossarum type A, suggesting a general difference in susceptibility between the two species. In conclusion, we could show that cryptic host species differ in their interactions with parasites, but that these differences were much less dramatic than differences between G. fossarum (type A) and G. pulex. Our data suggest that the acanthocephalans in Switzerland have adapted to the two most common Gammarus species in this region where host species frequencies differ from near-by regions in Europe. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mesophotic coral depth acclimatization is a function of host-specific symbiont physiology

    KAUST Repository

    Ziegler, Maren

    2015-02-06

    Mesophotic coral ecosystems receive increasing attention owing to their potential as deep coral refuges in times of global environmental change. Here, the mechanisms of coral holobiont photoacclimatization over a 60 m depth gradient in the central Red Sea were examined for the four coral genera Porites, Leptoseris, Pachyseris, and Podabacia. General acclimatization strategies were common to all host-symbiont combinations, e.g., Symbiodinium cell densities and photoprotective (PP) to light-harvesting pigment ratios both significantly decreased with water depth. Porites harbored Symbiodinium type C15 over the whole 60 m depth range, while Pachyseris and Podabacia had limited vertical distributions and hosted mainly Symbiodinium type C1. Symbiodinium type C15 had generally higher xanthophyll de-epoxidation rates and lower maximum quantum yields than C1, and also exhibited a strong photoacclimatory signal over depth that relates to the large distribution range of Porites. Interestingly, the coral host had an effect on Symbiodinium pigment composition. When comparing Symbiodinium type C1 in Podabacia and Pachyseris, the ß-carotene chl a−1, the peridinin chl a−1, and diadinoxanthin chl a−1 ratios were significantly different between host species. Our data support a view that depth acclimatization of corals in the mesophotics is facilitated by Symbiodinium physiology, which in turn is host-specific.

  19. An active intermediate host role for man in the life cycle of Echinococcus granulosus in Turkana, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, C N

    1983-03-01

    Hydatid material removed at operation from 97 Turkana was compared for fertility and viability with hydatid material removed from camels, cattle, sheep, and goats. The results showed that the human material was extremely fertile and viable, as was material from the camels, goats, and sheep. Cattle cysts were invariably sterile, and the protoscoleces, when present, were comparatively less viable. The high incidence and fertility of hydatid cysts in the Turkana, together with the lack of burial customs thus allowing dogs to have ready access to infected human corpses, means that the Turkana are potential biological participants in the cyclic transmission of Echinococcus granulosus in this region. This is a unique situation, for elsewhere in the world man is regarded as an accidental host who plays no role in the parasite's life cycle.

  20. Ancient, globally distributed lineage of Sarcocystis from sporocysts of the Eastern rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) and its relation to neurological sequalae in intermediate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shiv K; Lindsay, David S; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dubey, Jitender P

    2016-07-01

    There is an emerging concern that snakes are definitive hosts of certain species of Sarcocystis that cause muscular sarcocystosis in human and non-human primates. Other species of Sarcocystis are known to cycle among snakes and rodents, but have been poorly characterized in the USA and elsewhere. Although neurological sequalae are known for certain species of Sarcocystis, no such neurological symptoms are known to typify parasites that naturally cycle in rodents. Here, sporocysts of a species of Sarcocystis were found in the intestinal contents of a rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) from Maryland, USA. The sporocysts were orally infective for interferon gamma gene knockout (KO) mice, but not to Swiss Webster outbred mice. The KO mice developed neurological signs, and were necropsied between 33 and 52 days post-inoculation. Only schizonts/merozoites were found, and they were confined to the brain. The predominant lesion was meningoencephalitis characterized by perivascular cuffs, granulomas, and necrosis of the neuropil. The schizonts and merozoites were located in neuropil, and apparently extravascular. Brain homogenates from infected KO mice were infective to KO mice and CV-1 cell line. DNA extracted from the infected mouse brain, and infected cell cultures revealed the highest identity with Sarcocystis species that employ snakes as definitive hosts. This is the first report of Sarcocystis infection in the endangered rat snake (P. alleghaniensis) and the first report of neurological sarcocystosis in mice induced by feeding sporocysts from a snake. These data underscore the likelihood that parasites in this genus that employ snakes as their definitive hosts constitute an ancient, globally distributed monophyletic group. These data also raise the possibility that neurological sequalae may be more common in intermediate hosts of Sarcocystis spp. than has previously been appreciated.

  1. Excretory/secretory products in the Echinococcus granulosus metacestode: is the intermediate host complacent with infection caused by the larval form of the parasite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Guilherme B Dos; Monteiro, Karina M; da Silva, Edileuza Danieli; Battistella, Maria Eduarda; Ferreira, Henrique B; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2016-12-01

    The genus Echinococcus consists of parasites that have a life cycle with two mammalian hosts. Their larval stage, called the hydatid cyst, develops predominantly in the liver and lungs of intermediate hosts. The hydatid cyst is the causative agent of cystic hydatid disease and the species Echinococcus granulosus, G1 haplotype, is responsible for the vast majority of cases in humans, cattle and sheep. Protein characterization in hydatid cysts is essential for better understanding of the host-parasite relationship and the fertility process of Echinococcus. The aims of this work were the identification and quantitative comparison of proteins found in hydatid fluid from fertile and infertile cysts from E. granulosus, in order to highlight possible mechanisms involved in cyst fertility or infertility. Hydatid fluid samples containing proteins from both E. granulosus and Bos taurus were analysed by LC-MS/MS. Our proteomic analysis of fertile and infertile cysts allowed identification of a total of 498 proteins, of which 153 proteins were exclusively identified in the fertile cyst, 271 in the infertile cyst, and 74 in both. Functional in silico analysis allowed us to highlight some important aspects: (i) clues about the possible existence of an "arms race" involving parasite and host responses in fertile and infertile cysts; (ii) a number of proteins in hydatid fluid without functional annotation or with possible alternative functions; (iii) the presence of extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Copyright © 2016 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Host specificity and growth of kelp gametophytes symbiotic with filamentous red algae (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Charlene B.; Garbary, David J.; Kim, Kwang Young; Chiasson, David M.

    2004-02-01

    Kelp gametophytes were previously observed in nature living endophytically in red algal cell walls. Here we examine the interactions of two kelp species and six red algae in culture. Gametophytes of Nereocystis luetkeana (Mertens) Postels et Ruprecht became endophytic in the cell walls of Griffithsia pacifica Kylin and Antithamnion defectum Kylin, and grew epiphytically in high abundance on G. japonica Okamura and Aglaothamnion oosumiense Itono. Alaria esculenta (Linnaeus) Greville from the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia became endophytic in Aglaothamnion oosumiense, Antithamnion defectum, Callithamnion sp., G. japonica, G. pacifica, and Pleonosporium abysicola Gardner, all from the Pacific Ocean. Some cultures were treated with phloroglucinol before infection to thicken the cell walls. The endophytic gametophytes were smaller and grew more slowly than gametophytes epiphytic on the same host. N. luetkeana failed to become endophytic in some of the potential hosts, and this may reflect host specificity, or culture artifacts. This work improves our understanding of the process of infection of red algae by kelp gametophytes, and broadens our knowledge of host specificity in endophytic symbioses.

  3. Patterns of Abundance and Host Specificity of Bat Ectoparasites in the Central Balkans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burazerovic, J; Orlova, M; Obradovic, M; Cirovic, D; Tomanovic, S

    2018-01-10

    Bats are hosts to a number of ectoparasites-acarines (ticks, chiggers, other mites), bat flies, and fleas. Bat ectoparasites might have significant ecological and public health importance as they may be potential vectors of zoonotic agents. It is important to identify their distribution, diversity, and host-parasite associations. Bat ectoparasites in the central Balkans have been largely understudied. The present research was conducted in 45 localities at the territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina, former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia. In total, 1,143 individuals of 18 species of bats have been examined for the presence and abundance of ectoparasite species during 3 yr of research. In total, 21 ectoparasite species have been identified: three species of ticks, seven species of mites (including one species of chigger), eight species of bat flies, and three species of fleas. In total, 80 host-parasite associations have been identified. The largest number of ectoparasites parasitized primarily only one host species. The highest total number of hosts was identified for ectoparasite species Ixodes vespertilionis Koch, Nycteribia schmidlii Schiner, and Spinturnix myoti Kolenati. The spinturnicid mite Spinturnix psi Kolenati was the most abundant ectoparasite species and together with Penicilidia dufouri Westwood the most widely distributed species of bat ectoparasite, being present at 21 localities in the central Balkans. The presented data include the first systematic records of patterns of prevalence, mean intensity, mean abundance, and host specificity for bat ectoparasites in the central Balkans. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Growing diversity of trypanosomatid parasites of flies (Diptera: Brachycera): Frequent cosmopolitism and moderate host specificity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Týč, Jiří; Votýpka, Jan; Klepetková, H.; Šuláková, H.; Jirků, Milan; Lukeš, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 1 (2013), s. 255-264 ISSN 1055-7903 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/09/H026 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200961204 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Host specificity * Geographic distribution * Diversity * Phylogeny * Trypanosomatida * Leishmania Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.018, year: 2013

  5. Evidence of host specificity and congruence between phylogenies of bitterling and freshwater mussels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, H.-Z.; Zhu, Y.-R.; Smith, C.; Reichard, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2006), s. 428-434 ISSN 1021-5506 Grant - others:NSFC(CN) 30470237; NSFC(CN) 40432003; Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences(CN) KZCX3-SW-126 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : bitterling * host specificity * coevolution * phylogeny Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.943, year: 2006 http://zoolstud.sinica.edu.tw/Journals/45.3/428.pdf

  6. Low host specificity of root-associated fungi at an Arctic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botnen, Synnøve; Vik, Unni; Carlsen, Tor; Eidesen, Pernille B; Davey, Marie L; Kauserud, Håvard

    2014-02-01

    In High Arctic ecosystems, plant growth and reproduction are limited by low soil moisture and nutrient availability, low soil and air temperatures, and a short growing season. Mycorrhizal associations facilitate plant nutrient acquisition and water uptake and may therefore be particularly ecologically important in nutrition-poor and dry environments, such as parts of the Arctic. Similarly, endophytic root associates are thought to play a protective role, increasing plants' stress tolerance, and likely have an important ecosystem function. Despite the importance of these root-associated fungi, little is known about their host specificity in the Arctic. We investigated the host specificity of root-associated fungi in the common, widely distributed arctic plant species Bistorta vivipara, Salix polaris and Dryas octopetala in the High Arctic archipelago Svalbard. High-throughput sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) amplified from whole root systems generated no evidence of host specificity and no spatial autocorrelation within two 3 m × 3 m sample plots. The lack of spatial structure at small spatial scales indicates that Common Mycelial Networks (CMNs) are rare in marginal arctic environments. Moreover, no significant differences in fungal OTU richness were observed across the three plant species, although their root system characteristics (size, biomass) differed considerably. Reasons for lack of host specificity could be that association with generalist fungi may allow arctic plants to more rapidly and easily colonize newly available habitats, and it may be favourable to establish symbiotic relationships with fungi possessing different physiological attributes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The phylogenetic study on Thelohanellus species (Myxosporea) in relation to host specificity and infection site tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang Phil; Nguyen, Van Giap; Jeong, Jae Mook; Jun, Jin Woo; Kim, Ji Hyung; Han, Jee Eun; Baeck, Gun Wook; Park, Se Chang

    2014-03-01

    Thelohanellus kitauei (Myxobolidae) infects cyprinid fish. The evolution of species derived from common ancestors results in the sharing of biological features. To reveal the origin of T. kitauei biological features, the correlation between phylogeny and biological features of Myxobolidae was investigated by Bayesian inference tree and Bayesian tip association significance testing. The results demonstrated that host specificity and infection site tropism were correlated with the phylogeny of Myxobolidae, and that the biological features of T. kitauei originated from the ancient Myxobolidae as exhibited by the non-specific infection site tropism and the ability to infect cyprinids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence and differential host-specificity of two avian blood parasite genera in the Australo-Papuan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadell, J.S.; Gering, E.; Austin, J.; Dumbacher, J.P.; Peirce, M.A.; Pratt, T.K.; Atkinson, C.T.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    The degree to which widespread avian blood parasites in the genera Plasmodium and Haemoproteus pose a threat to novel hosts depends in part on the degree to which they are constrained to a particular host or host family. We examined the host distribution and host-specificity of these parasites in birds from two relatively understudied and isolated locations: Australia and Papua New Guinea. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we detected infection in 69 of 105 species, representing 44% of individuals surveyed (n = 428). Across host families, prevalence of Haemoproteus ranged from 13% (Acanthizidae) to 56% (Petroicidae) while prevalence of Plasmodium ranged from 3% (Petroicidae) to 47% (Ptilonorhynchidae). We recovered 78 unique mitochondrial lineages from 155 sequences. Related lineages of Haemoproteus were more likely to derive from the same host family than predicted by chance at shallow (average LogDet genetic distance = 0, n = 12, P = 0.001) and greater depths (average distance = 0.014, n = 11, P parasite phylogeny. Within two major Haemoproteus subclades identified in a maximum likelihood phylogeny, host-specificity was evident up to parasite genetic distances of 0.029 and 0.007 based on logistic regression. We found no significant host relationship among lineages of Plasmodium by any method of analysis. These results support previous evidence of strong host-family specificity in Haemoproteus and suggest that lineages of Plasmodium are more likely to form evolutionarily-stable associations with novel hosts.

  9. Host-Specific and Segment-Specific Evolutionary Dynamics of Avian and Human Influenza A Viruses: A Systematic Review

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Kiyeon

    2016-01-13

    Understanding the evolutionary dynamics of influenza viruses is essential to control both avian and human influenza. Here, we analyze host-specific and segment-specific Tajima’s D trends of influenza A virus through a systematic review using viral sequences registered in the National Center for Biotechnology Information. To avoid bias from viral population subdivision, viral sequences were stratified according to their sampling locations and sampling years. As a result, we obtained a total of 580 datasets each of which consists of nucleotide sequences of influenza A viruses isolated from a single population of hosts at a single sampling site within a single year. By analyzing nucleotide sequences in the datasets, we found that Tajima’s D values of viral sequences were different depending on hosts and gene segments. Tajima’s D values of viruses isolated from chicken and human samples showed negative, suggesting purifying selection or a rapid population growth of the viruses. The negative Tajima’s D values in rapidly growing viral population were also observed in computer simulations. Tajima’s D values of PB2, PB1, PA, NP, and M genes of the viruses circulating in wild mallards were close to zero, suggesting that these genes have undergone neutral selection in constant-sized population. On the other hand, Tajima’s D values of HA and NA genes of these viruses were positive, indicating HA and NA have undergone balancing selection in wild mallards. Taken together, these results indicated the existence of unknown factors that maintain viral subtypes in wild mallards.

  10. IRSN's opinion on the 300-AQ-061 specification for packaging intermediate-activity effluents by vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-07-01

    This document comments a specification submitted by AREVA for the vitrification of rinsing effluents produced by shutting-down operations of the UP2-400 plant. After a description of the context created by the dismantling of this plant (decontamination operations, project of packaging effluents in an alumino-borosilicate matrix, contaminated compounds), this report discusses the assessment of the 300 AQ 61 specification proposed by AREVA. The quality of the process is related to the incorporation and to the homogeneous distribution of the radioactive material in a vitreous network. The report comments the specification with respect to the content assessed values for the different compounds and species, and with respect to the vitrification process parameters

  11. Host specificity and colony impacts of the fire ant pathogen, Solenopsis invicta virus 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Sanford D; Valles, Steven M; Oi, David H

    2013-09-01

    An understanding of host specificity is essential before pathogens can be used as biopesticides or self-sustaining biocontrol agents. In order to define the host range of the recently discovered Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3), we exposed laboratory colonies of 19 species of ants in 14 genera and 4 subfamilies to this virus. Despite extreme exposure during these tests, active, replicating infections only occurred in Solenopsis invicta Buren and hybrid (S. invicta×S. richteri) fire ant colonies. The lack of infections in test Solenopsis geminata fire ants from the United States indicates that SINV-3 is restricted to the saevissima complex of South American fire ants, especially since replicating virus was also found in several field-collected samples of the black imported fire ant, Solenopsis richteri Forel. S. invicta colonies infected with SINV-3 declined dramatically with average brood reductions of 85% or more while colonies of other species exposed to virus remained uninfected and healthy. The combination of high virulence and high host specificity suggest that SINV-3 has the potential for use as either a biopesticide or a self-sustaining biocontrol agent. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Registro de Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822 (Mollusca, Gastropoda no Brasil: caramujo hospedeiro intermediário da angiostrongilíase Occurrence of Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822 (Mollusca, Gastropoda in Brazil: intermediate snail host of angiostrongyliasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horácio Manuel Santana Teles

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available A introdução de Achatina fulica é assinalada em Itariri, SP, Brasil. Essa espécie de caramujo terrestre foi importada para cultivo, visando à comercialização para consumo humano como "escargot". O encontro de exemplares em vida livre mostra a dispersão de A. fulica e, conseqüentemente, o risco de transmissão de Angiostrongylus cantonensis, nematóide parasita do homem e de outros vertebrados. Além disso, o caramujo é uma praga importante da agricultura.Achatina fulica, the intermediate snail host of angiostrongyliasis and also an agricultural pest, is being bred in Brazil for human consumption as "escargot". The snail has escaped from its artificial breeding sites and its dispersal in Itariri county, State of S. Paulo, is reported here for the first time. A. fulica is a transmitter of the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis, nematode which causes meningoencephalic angiostrongyliasis; the risks of human contamination are commented on.

  13. A Codon-Based Model of Host-Specific Selection in Parasites, with an Application to the Influenza A Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Ronald; Christiansen, Freddy Bugge

    2003-01-01

    Parasites sometimes expand their host range by acquiring a new host species. Following a host change event, the selective regime acting on a given parasite gene may change due to host-specific adaptive alterations of protein functionality or host-specific immune-mediated selection. We present...... a codon-based model that attempts to include these effects by allowing the position-specific substitution process to change in conjunction with a host change event. Following maximum-likelihood parameter estimation, we employ an empirical Bayesian procedure to identify candidate sites, potentially...... involved in hostspecific adaptation. We discuss the applicability of the model to the more general problem of ascertaining whether the selective regime differs between two groups of related organisms. The utility of the model is illustrated on a dataset of nucleoprotein sequences from the influenza A virus...

  14. The gills of reef fish support a distinct microbiome influenced by host-specific factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratte, Zoe A; Besson, Marc; Hollman, Rebecca D; Stewart, Frank J

    2018-02-16

    Teleost fish represent the most diverse of the vertebrate groups and play important roles in food webs, as ecosystem engineers, and as vectors for microorganisms. However, the microbial ecology of fishes remains underexplored for most host taxa, and for certain niches on the fish body. This is particularly true for the gills, the key sites for respiration and waste exchange in fishes. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the gill microbiome. We focus on ecologically diverse taxa from coral reefs around Moorea, sampling the gill and intestines of adults and juveniles representing 15 families. Gill microbiome composition differed significantly from that of the gut in both adults and juveniles, with fish-associated niches having lower alpha diversity and higher beta diversity compared to seawater, sediment, and algae-associated microbiomes. Of ∼45,000 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) detected across all samples, 11% and 13% were detected only in the gill and intestine, respectively. OTUs most enriched in the gill included members of the gammaproteobacterial genus Shewanella and family Endozoicimonaceae. In adult fish, both gill and intestinal microbiomes varied significantly among host species grouped by diet category. Gill and intestinal microbiomes from the same individual were more similar to one another compared to gill and intestinal microbiomes from different individuals. These results demonstrate that distinct body sites are jointly influenced by host-specific organizing factors operating at the level of the host individual. The results also identify taxonomic signatures unique to the gill and intestine, confirming fish-associated niches as distinct reservoirs of marine microbial diversity. Importance Fish breath and excrete waste through their gills. The gills are also potential sites of pathogen invasion and colonization by other microbes. However, we know little about the microbial communities that live on the gill and the factors shaping their

  15. Host specificity and reproductive success of yucca moths (Tegeticula spp. Lepidoptera: Prodoxidae) mirror patterns of gene flow between host plant varieties of the Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia: Agavaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher Irwin; Drummond, Christopher S; Godsoe, William; Yoder, Jeremy B; Pellmyr, Olle

    2009-12-01

    Coevolution between flowering plants and their pollinators is thought to have generated much of the diversity of life on Earth, but the population processes that may have produced these macroevolutionary patterns remain unclear. Mathematical models of coevolution in obligate pollination mutualisms suggest that phenotype matching between plants and their pollinators can generate reproductive isolation. Here, we test this hypothesis using a natural experiment that examines the role of natural selection on phenotype matching between yuccas and yucca moths (Tegeticula spp.) in mediating reproductive isolation between two varieties of Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia var. brevifolia and Y. brevifolia var. jaegeriana). Using passive monitoring techniques, DNA barcoding, microsatellite DNA genotyping, and sibship reconstruction, we track host specificity and the fitness consequences of host choice in a zone of sympatry. We show that the two moth species differ in their degree of host specificity and that oviposition on a foreign host plant results in the production of fewer offspring. This difference in host specificity between the two moth species mirrors patterns of chloroplast introgression from west to east between host varieties, suggesting that natural selection acting on pollinator phenotypes mediates gene flow and reproductive isolation between Joshua-tree varieties.

  16. A new multiplex PCR assay to distinguish among three cryptic Galba species, intermediate hosts of Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alda, Pilar; Lounnas, Manon; Vázquez, Antonio Alejandro; Ayaqui, Rolando; Calvopiña, Manuel; Celi-Erazo, Maritza; Dillon, Robert T; Jarne, Philippe; Loker, Eric S; Muñiz Pareja, Flavia Caroll; Muzzio-Aroca, Jenny; Nárvaez, Alberto Orlando; Noya, Oscar; Robles, Luiggi Martini; Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar; Uribe, Nelson; David, Patrice; Pointier, Jean-Pierre; Hurtrez-Boussès, Sylvie

    2018-02-15

    A molecular tool described here allows in one step for specific discrimination among three cryptic freshwater snail species (genus Galba) involved in fasciolosis transmission, a worldwide infectious disease of humans and livestock. The multiplex PCR approach taken targets for each species a distinctive, known microsatellite locus which is amplified using specific primers designed to generate an amplicon of a distinctive size that can be readily separated from the amplicons of the other two species on an agarose gel. In this way, the three Galba species (G. cubensis, G. schirazensis, and G. truncatula) can be differentiated from one another, including even if DNA from all three were present in the same reaction. The accuracy of this new molecular tool was tested and validated by comparing multiplex PCR results with species identification based on sequences at mitochondrial and nuclear markers. This new method is accurate, inexpensive, simple, rapid, and can be adapted to handle large sample sizes. It will be helpful for monitoring invasion of Galba species and for developing strategies to limit the snail species involved in the emergence or re-emergence of fasciolosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A host-inducible cytochrome P-450 from a host-specific caterpillar: molecular cloning and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M B; Schuler, M A; Berenbaum, M R

    1992-11-15

    Cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases (P-450s) play a critical role in the detoxification of natural and synthetic toxins in a wide range of organisms. We have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones encoding a P-450, CYP6B1, from larvae of Papilio polyxenes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae), the black swallowtail butterfly. This P-450, cloned from a herbivorous insect, is highly inducible by xanthotoxin, a secondary metabolite abundant in the host plants of this specialized herbivore. On Northern blots, mRNAs crossreactive with CYP6B1 were detected in three Papilio species that, like the black swallowtail, have high levels of xanthotoxin-metabolic P-450 activity and encounter xanthotoxin or related compounds in their host plants; in contrast, no crossreactive mRNAs were detectable in three papilinid species that never encounter xanthotoxin in their host plants and lack detectable xanthotoxin-metabolic activity. These results provide evidence that new P-450s can arise as herbivores colonize different host plants and support the hypothesis that interactions between herbivores and their toxin-producing host plants have contributed to the diversification of the P-450 superfamily.

  18. A host-inducible cytochrome P-450 from a host-specific caterpillar: molecular cloning and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M B; Schuler, M A; Berenbaum, M R

    1992-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases (P-450s) play a critical role in the detoxification of natural and synthetic toxins in a wide range of organisms. We have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones encoding a P-450, CYP6B1, from larvae of Papilio polyxenes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae), the black swallowtail butterfly. This P-450, cloned from a herbivorous insect, is highly inducible by xanthotoxin, a secondary metabolite abundant in the host plants of this specialized herbivore. On Northern blots, mRNAs crossreactive with CYP6B1 were detected in three Papilio species that, like the black swallowtail, have high levels of xanthotoxin-metabolic P-450 activity and encounter xanthotoxin or related compounds in their host plants; in contrast, no crossreactive mRNAs were detectable in three papilinid species that never encounter xanthotoxin in their host plants and lack detectable xanthotoxin-metabolic activity. These results provide evidence that new P-450s can arise as herbivores colonize different host plants and support the hypothesis that interactions between herbivores and their toxin-producing host plants have contributed to the diversification of the P-450 superfamily. Images PMID:1279697

  19. Redundancy, resilience and host specificity of the ruminal microbiota: Implications for engineering improved ruminal fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul James Weimer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ruminal microbial community is remarkably diverse, containing hundreds of different bacterial and archaeal species, plus many species of fungi and protozoa. Molecular studies have identified a core microbiome dominated by phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but also containing many other taxa. The rumen provides an ideal laboratory for studies on microbial ecology and the demonstration of ecological principles. In particular, the microbial community demonstrates both redundancy (overlap of function among multiple species and resilience (resistance to, and capacity to recover from, perturbation. These twin properties provide remarkable stability that maintains digestive function for the host across a range of feeding and management conditions, but they also provide a challenge to engineering the rumen for improved function (e.g., improved fiber utilization or decreased methane production. Direct ruminal dosing or feeding of probiotic strains often fails to establish the added strains, due to intensive competition and amensalism from the indigenous residents that are well-adapted to the historical conditions within each rumen. Known exceptions include introduced strains that can fill otherwise unoccupied niches, as in the case of specialist bacteria that degrade phytotoxins such as mimosine or fluoroacetate. An additional complicating factor in manipulating the ruminal fermentation is the individuality or host specificity of the microbiota, in which individual animals contain a particular community whose species composition is capable of reconstituting itself, even following a near-total exchange of ruminal contents from another herd mate maintained on the same diet. Elucidation of the interactions between the microbial community and the individual host that establish and maintain this specificity may provide insights into why individual hosts vary in production metrics (e.g., feed efficiency or milk fat synthesis, and how to improve herd

  20. Enemy-free space and habitat-specific host specialization in a butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund, Christer; Friberg, Magne

    2008-08-01

    The majority of herbivorous insects have relatively specialized food habits. This suggests that specialization has some advantage(s) over generalization. Traditionally, feeding specialization has been thought to be linked to digestive or other food-related physiological advantages, but recent theory suggests that generalist natural enemies of herbivorous insects can also provide a major selective pressure for restricted host plant range. The European swallowtail butterfly Papilio machaon utilizes various plants in the Apiaceae family as hosts, but is an ecological specialist being monophagous on Angelica archangelica in southern Sweden. This perennial monocarp grows in three seaside habitat types: (1) on the barren rocky shore in the absence of any surrounding vegetation, (2) on the rocky shore with some surrounding vegetation, and (3) on species-rich meadows. The rocky shore habitat harbors few invertebrate generalist predators, whereas a number of invertebrate predators abound in the meadowland habitat. Here, we test the importance of enemy-free space for feeding specialization in Papilio machaon by assessing survival of larvae placed by hand on A. archangelica in each of the three habitat types, and by assessing the habitat-specificity of adult female egg-laying behavior by recording the distribution of eggs laid by free-flying adult females among the three habitat types. Larval survival was substantially higher in the rocky shore habitat than in the meadowland and significantly higher on host plants without surrounding vegetation on the rocky shore. Eggs laid by free-flying females were found in all three habitat types, but were significantly more frequent in the rocky shore habitat, suggesting that females prefer to lay eggs in the habitat type where offspring survival is highest. These results show that larval survivorship on the same host plant species can be strongly habitat-specific, and suggest that enemy-free space is an underlying factor that drives

  1. Genetic diversity, temporal dynamics, and host specificity in blood parasites of passerines in north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xi; Dong, Lu; Zhang, Chenglin; Zhang, Yanyun

    2015-12-01

    Avian blood parasites have been preliminarily studied in East Asia, but no data are available from long-term monitoring. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, genetic diversity, and temporal dynamics of Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, and Leucocytozoon in two passerine communities (one forest and one urban) in north China from 2008 to 2013, as well as the association between infected lineages and host specificities. Out of 633 birds from 40 species, 157 individuals (24.8 %) were infected; overall prevalence was 26.7 % and 16.8 % in two sites, respectively. The dominant avian blood parasite genus in the forest park changed yearly between Plasmodium and Haemoproteus, while the Leucocytozoon maintained a low infection level. Forty-four haplotypes were identified by sequencing a 432-bp fragment of the cytochrome b (cyt b) gene; more than 70 % were novel (six Plasmodium lineages, 16 Haemoproteus lineages, and nine Leucocytozoon lineages). Based on our data gathered over consecutive years, we found that the highly observed lineages of Haemoproteus showed higher host diversities than those of Plasmodium, and the most infected lineage EMEL01 (100 % identity with SGS1) take on the highest host diversity but low temporal diversity of the two genera, implying that this lineage infected a great diversity of species in certain years, but maintained a lower infection level or even disappeared in other years. The results suggest that genetic diversity of avian blood parasites in East Asia is high and provides scope for further research. In addition, compared with overall analysis, yearly prevalence monitoring is important in uncovering the temporal dynamic and host specificity variations over time.

  2. Soilborne fungi have host affinity and host-specific effects on seed germination and survival in a lowland tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Janzen-Connell (JC) hypothesis provides a powerful framework for explaining the maintenance of tree diversity in tropical forests. Its central tenet -- that recruits experience high mortality near conspecifics and at high densities -- assumes a degree of host specialization in interactions betwe...

  3. Ocorrência de Lymnaea columella (Gastropoda: Lymnaeidae, hospedeiro intermediário da Fasciola hepatica, para o Estado da Paraíba, Brasil Occurrence of Lymnaea columella (Gastropoda: Lymnaeidae, first intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica, for the state of Paraíba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Pegado Abílio

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Foi registrada a ocorrência de Lymnaea columella (Gastropoda: Lymnaeidae, primeiro hospedeiro intermediário da Fasciola hepatica, para o Estado da Paraíba, Brasil, associado a macrófitas aquáticas.The occurrence of Lymnaea Columella (Gastropoda: Lymnaeidae, first intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica, is recorded for the first time in the state of Paraíba, Brazil, associeted with aquatic macrophytes.

  4. Host Range Specificity of Scymnus camptodromus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), A Predator of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbu, Samita; Cassidy, Katie; Keena, Melody; Tobin, Patrick; Hoover, Kelli

    2016-02-01

    Scymnus (Neopullus) camptodromus Yu and Liu (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was brought to the United States from China as a potential biological control agent for hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). Scymnus camptodromus phenology is closely synchronized with that of A. tsugae and has several characteristics of a promising biological control agent. As a prerequisite to field release, S. camptodromus was evaluated for potential nontarget impacts. In host range studies, the predator was given the choice of sympatric adelgid and nonadelgid prey items. Nontarget testing showed that S. camptodromus will feed to some degree on other adelgid species, but highly prefers A. tsugae. We also evaluated larval development of S. camptodromus on pine bark adelgid (Pineus strobi (Hartig)) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) and larch adelgid (Adelges laricis Vallot) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae); a small proportion of predator larvae was able to develop to adulthood on P. strobi or A. laricis alone. Scymnus camptodromus showed no interest in feeding on woolly alder aphid (Paraprociphilus tessellatus Fitch) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) or woolly apple aphid (Eriosoma lanigerum (Hausmann)) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), and minimal interest in cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii Glover) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in choice and no-choice experiments. Scymnus camptodromus females did not oviposit on any host material other than A. tsugae-infested hemlock. Under the circumstances of the study, S. camptodromus appears to be a specific predator of A. tsugae, with minimal risk to nontarget species. Although the predator can develop on P. strobi, the likelihood that S. camptodromus would oviposit on pine hosts of this adelgid is small.

  5. Molecular phylogeny of the mycorrhizal desert truffles (Terfezia and Tirmania), host specificity and edaphic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Jesús; Manjón, José Luis; Martin, Francis

    2002-01-01

    Terfezia and Tirmania, so called desert truffles, are mycorrhizal fungi mostly endemic to arid and semi-arid areas of the Mediterranean Region, where they are associated with Helianthemum species. The aim of this work was to study the phylogenetic relationships in these pezizalean hypogeous fungi. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of the nuclear rDNA were studied for several morphological species, Terfezia arenaria, T. boudieri, T. claveryi, T. leptoderma, T. terfezioides (=Mattirolomyces terfezioides), Tirmania nivea and T. pinoyi. The sequences were analyzed with distance and parsimony methods. Phylogenetic analyses indicated a close genetic relationship between Tirmania and Terfezia. They may have arisen from a single evolutionary lineage of pezizalean fungi that developed the hypogeous habit as an adaptation to heat and drought in Mediterranean ecosystems. This analysis also supports the re-establishment of the genus Mattirolomyces. The genera Tirmania and Terfezia were monophyletic, and morphological species corresponded to phylogenetic species. The Tirmania clade comprises desert truffles with smooth spores and amyloid asci, which were found in deserts. The Terfezia clade grouped species found in semi-arid habitats having ornamented and spherical spores. These species are adapted to exploit different types of soil (either acid or basic soils) in association with specific hosts (either basophilous or acidophilous species). Although other factors might also play a role, host specialization and edaphic tolerances (fungus and/or host tolerances) might be the key in the species diversity of these genera.

  6. Host Specificity in the Honeybee Parasitic Mite, Varroa spp. in Apis mellifera and Apis cerana.

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    Alexis L Beaurepaire

    Full Text Available The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is a major global threat to the Western honeybee Apis mellifera. This mite was originally a parasite of A. cerana in Asia but managed to spill over into colonies of A. mellifera which had been introduced to this continent for honey production. To date, only two almost clonal types of V. destructor from Korea and Japan have been detected in A. mellifera colonies. However, since both A. mellifera and A. cerana colonies are kept in close proximity throughout Asia, not only new spill overs but also spill backs of highly virulent types may be possible, with unpredictable consequences for both honeybee species. We studied the dispersal and hybridisation potential of Varroa from sympatric colonies of the two hosts in Northern Vietnam and the Philippines using mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA markers. We found a very distinct mtDNA haplotype equally invading both A. mellifera and A. cerana in the Philippines. In contrast, we observed a complete reproductive isolation of various Vietnamese Varroa populations in A. mellifera and A. cerana colonies even if kept in the same apiaries. In light of this variance in host specificity, the adaptation of the mite to its hosts seems to have generated much more genetic diversity than previously recognised and the Varroa species complex may include substantial cryptic speciation.

  7. Introduced ascidians harbor highly diverse and host-specific symbiotic microbial assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, James S; Erwin, Patrick M; Shenkar, Noa; López-Legentil, Susanna

    2017-09-08

    Many ascidian species have experienced worldwide introductions, exhibiting remarkable success in crossing geographic borders and adapting to local environmental conditions. To investigate the potential role of microbial symbionts in these introductions, we examined the microbial communities of three ascidian species common in North Carolina harbors. Replicate samples of the globally introduced species Distaplia bermudensis, Polyandrocarpa anguinea, and P. zorritensis (n = 5), and ambient seawater (n = 4), were collected in Wrightsville Beach, NC. Microbial communities were characterized by next-generation (Illumina) sequencing of partial (V4) 16S rRNA gene sequences. Ascidians hosted diverse symbiont communities, consisting of 5,696 unique microbial OTUs (at 97% sequenced identity) from 47 bacterial and three archaeal phyla. Permutational multivariate analyses of variance revealed clear differentiation of ascidian symbionts compared to seawater bacterioplankton, and distinct microbial communities inhabiting each ascidian species. 103 universal core OTUs (present in all ascidian replicates) were identified, including taxa previously described in marine invertebrate microbiomes with possible links to ammonia-oxidization, denitrification, pathogenesis, and heavy-metal processing. These results suggest ascidian microbial symbionts exhibit a high degree of host-specificity, forming intimate associations that may contribute to host adaptation to new environments via expanded tolerance thresholds and enhanced holobiont function.

  8. Host Specificity in the Honeybee Parasitic Mite, Varroa spp. in Apis mellifera and Apis cerana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaurepaire, Alexis L; Truong, Tuan A; Fajardo, Alejandro C; Dinh, Tam Q; Cervancia, Cleofas; Moritz, Robin F A

    2015-01-01

    The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is a major global threat to the Western honeybee Apis mellifera. This mite was originally a parasite of A. cerana in Asia but managed to spill over into colonies of A. mellifera which had been introduced to this continent for honey production. To date, only two almost clonal types of V. destructor from Korea and Japan have been detected in A. mellifera colonies. However, since both A. mellifera and A. cerana colonies are kept in close proximity throughout Asia, not only new spill overs but also spill backs of highly virulent types may be possible, with unpredictable consequences for both honeybee species. We studied the dispersal and hybridisation potential of Varroa from sympatric colonies of the two hosts in Northern Vietnam and the Philippines using mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA markers. We found a very distinct mtDNA haplotype equally invading both A. mellifera and A. cerana in the Philippines. In contrast, we observed a complete reproductive isolation of various Vietnamese Varroa populations in A. mellifera and A. cerana colonies even if kept in the same apiaries. In light of this variance in host specificity, the adaptation of the mite to its hosts seems to have generated much more genetic diversity than previously recognised and the Varroa species complex may include substantial cryptic speciation.

  9. Comparative host specificity of human- and pig- associated Staphylococcus aureus clonal lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshnee Moodley

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion is a crucial step in colonization of the skin. In this study, we investigated the differential adherence to human and pig corneocytes of six Staphylococcus aureus strains belonging to three human-associated [ST8 (CC8, ST22 (CC22 and ST36(CC30] and two pig-associated [ST398 (CC398 and ST433(CC30] clonal lineages, and their colonization potential in the pig host was assessed by in vivo competition experiments. Corneocytes were collected from 11 humans and 21 pigs using D-squame® adhesive discs, and bacterial adherence to corneocytes was quantified by a standardized light microscopy assay. A previously described porcine colonization model was used to assess the potential of the six strains to colonize the pig host. Three pregnant, S. aureus-free sows were inoculated intravaginally shortly before farrowing with different strain mixes [mix 1 human and porcine ST398; mix 2 human ST36 and porcine ST433; and mix 3 human ST8, ST22, ST36 and porcine ST398] and the ability of individual strains to colonize the nasal cavity of newborn piglets was evaluated for 28 days after birth by strain-specific antibiotic selective culture. In the corneocyte assay, the pig-associated ST433 strain and the human-associated ST22 and ST36 strains showed significantly greater adhesion to porcine and human corneocytes, respectively (p<0.0001. In contrast, ST8 and ST398 did not display preferential host binding patterns. In the in vivo competition experiment, ST8 was a better colonizer compared to ST22, ST36, and ST433 prevailed over ST36 in colonizing the newborn piglets. These results are partly in agreement with previous genetic and epidemiological studies indicating the host specificity of ST22, ST36 and ST433 and the broad-host range of ST398. However, our in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed an unexpected ability of ST8 to adhere to porcine corneocytes and persist in the nasal cavity of pigs.

  10. Parallel Patterns of Host-Specific Morphology and Genetic Admixture in Sister Lineages of a Commensal Barnacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers-Saucedo, Christine; Chan, Benny K K; Zardus, John D; Wares, John P

    2017-06-01

    Symbiotic relationships are often species specific, allowing symbionts to adapt to their host environments. Host generalists, on the other hand, have to cope with diverse environments. One coping strategy is phenotypic plasticity, defined by the presence of host-specific phenotypes in the absence of genetic differentiation. Recent work indicates that such host-specific phenotypic plasticity is present in the West Pacific lineage of the commensal barnacle Chelonibia testudinaria (Linnaeus, 1758). We investigated genetic and morphological host-specific structure in the genetically distinct Atlantic sister lineage of C. testudinaria. We collected adult C. testudinaria from loggerhead sea turtles, horseshoe crabs, and blue crabs along the eastern U.S. coast between Delaware and Florida and in the Gulf of Mexico off Mississippi. We find that shell morphology, especially shell thickness, is host specific and comparable in similar host species between the Atlantic and West Pacific lineages. We did not detect significant genetic differentiation related to host species when analyzing data from 11 nuclear microsatellite loci and mitochondrial sequence data, which is comparable to findings for the Pacific lineage. The most parsimonious explanation for these parallel patterns between distinct lineages of C. testudinaria is that C. testudinaria maintained phenotypic plasticity since the lineages diverged 4-5 mya.

  11. Host plant-specific remodeling of midgut physiology in the generalist insect herbivore Trichoplusia ni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herde, Marco; Howe, Gregg A

    2014-07-01

    Species diversity in terrestrial ecosystems is influenced by plant defense compounds that alter the behavior, physiology, and host preference of insect herbivores. Although it is established that insects evolved the ability to detoxify specific allelochemicals, the mechanisms by which polyphagous insects cope with toxic compounds in diverse host plants are not well understood. Here, we used defended and non-defended plant genotypes to study how variation in chemical defense affects midgut responses of the lepidopteran herbivore Trichoplusia ni, which is a pest of a wide variety of native and cultivated plants. The genome-wide midgut transcriptional response of T. ni larvae to glucosinolate-based defenses in the crucifer Arabidopsis thaliana was characterized by strong induction of genes encoding Phase I and II detoxification enzymes. In contrast, the response of T. ni to proteinase inhibitors and other jasmonate-regulated defenses in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) was dominated by changes in the expression of digestive enzymes and, strikingly, concomitant repression of transcripts encoding detoxification enzymes. Unbiased proteomic analyses of T. ni feces demonstrated that tomato defenses remodel the complement of T.ni digestive enzymes, which was associated with increased amounts of serine proteases and decreased lipase protein abundance upon encountering tomato defense chemistry. These collective results indicate that T. ni adjusts its gut physiology to the presence of host plant-specific chemical defenses, and further suggest that plants may exploit this digestive flexibility as a defensive strategy to suppress the production of enzymes that detoxify allelochemicals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The EG95 antigen of Echinococcus spp. contains positively selected amino acids, which may influence host specificity and vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Karen Luisa; Gottstein, Bruno; Ayala, Francisco Jose

    2009-01-01

    Echinococcosis is a worldwide zoonotic parasitic disease of humans and various herbivorous domestic animals (intermediate hosts) transmitted by the contact with wild and domestic carnivores (definitive hosts), mainly foxes and dogs. Recently, a vaccine was developed showing high levels of protection against one parasite haplotype (G1) of Echinococcus granulosus, and its potential efficacy against distinct parasite variants or species is still unclear. Interestingly, the EG95 vaccine antigen is a secreted glycosylphosphatydilinositol (GPI)-anchored protein containing a fibronectin type III domain, which is ubiquitous in modular proteins involved in cell adhesion. EG95 is highly expressed in oncospheres, the parasite life cycle stage which actively invades the intermediate hosts. After amplifying and sequencing the complete CDS of 57 Echinococcus isolates belonging to 7 distinct species, we uncovered a large amount of genetic variability, which may influence protein folding. Two positively selected sites are outside the vaccine epitopes, but are predicted to alter protein conformation. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses indicate that EG95 isoform evolution is convergent with regard to the number of beta-sheets and alpha-helices. We conclude that having a variety of EG95 isoforms is adaptive for Echinococcus parasites, in terms of their ability to invade different hosts, and we propose that a mixture of isoforms could possibly maximize vaccine efficacy.

  13. Infection, specificity and host manipulation of Australapatemon sp (Trematoda, Strigeidae) in two sympatric species of leeches (Hirudinea)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karvonen, A.; Faltýnková, Anna; Choo, J. M.; Valtonen, E. T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 144, č. 10 (2017), s. 1346-1355 ISSN 0031-1820 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : complex life cycle * Digenea * host manipulation * host-parasite relationship * spatiotemporal variation * specificity * Trematoda Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 2.713, year: 2016

  14. The role of host specificity in explaining the invasion success of the freshwater mussel Anodonta woodiana in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Douda, K.; Vrtílek, Milan; Slavík, O.; Reichard, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2012), s. 127-137 ISSN 1387-3547 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600930802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : aquatic habitat * Bivalvia * host-parasite relationship * host specificity * Mollusca Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.509, year: 2012

  15. Strain-Specific Features of Extracellular Polysaccharides and Their Impact on Lactobacillus plantarum-Host Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Chiao; Caggianiello, Graziano; van Swam, Iris I; Taverne, Nico; Meijerink, Marjolein; Bron, Peter A; Spano, Giuseppe; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2016-07-01

    Lactobacilli are found in diverse environments and are widely applied as probiotic, health-promoting food supplements. Polysaccharides are ubiquitously present on the cell surface of lactobacilli and are considered to contribute to the species- and strain-specific probiotic effects that are typically observed. Two Lactobacillus plantarum strains, SF2A35B and Lp90, have an obvious ropy phenotype, implying high extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production levels. In this work, we set out to identify the genes involved in EPS production in these L. plantarum strains and to demonstrate their role in EPS production by gene deletion analysis. A model L. plantarum strain, WCFS1, and its previously constructed derivative that produced reduced levels of EPS were included as reference strains. The constructed EPS-reduced derivatives were analyzed for the abundance and sugar compositions of their EPS, revealing cps2-like gene clusters in SF2A35B and Lp90 responsible for major EPS production. Moreover, these mutant strains were tested for phenotypic characteristics that are of relevance for their capacity to interact with the host epithelium in the intestinal tract, including bacterial surface properties as well as survival under the stress conditions encountered in the gastrointestinal tract (acid and bile stress). In addition, the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) signaling and immunomodulatory capacities of the EPS-negative derivatives and their respective wild-type strains were compared, revealing strain-specific impacts of EPS on the immunomodulatory properties. Taken together, these experiments illustrate the importance of EPS in L. plantarum strains as a strain-specific determinant in host interaction. This study evaluates the role of extracellular polysaccharides that are produced by different strains of Lactobacillus plantarum in the determination of the cell surface properties of these bacteria and their capacity to interact with their environment, including their

  16. RNAi screen reveals host cell kinases specifically involved in Listeria monocytogenes spread from cell to cell.

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    Ryan Chong

    Full Text Available Intracellular bacterial pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes and Rickettsia conorii display actin-based motility in the cytosol of infected cells and spread from cell to cell through the formation of membrane protrusions at the cell cortex. Whereas the mechanisms supporting cytosolic actin-based motility are fairly well understood, it is unclear whether specific host factors may be required for supporting the formation and resolution of membrane protrusions. To address this gap in knowledge, we have developed high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and computer-assisted image analysis procedures to quantify pathogen spread in human epithelial cells. We used the approach to screen a siRNA library covering the human kinome and identified 7 candidate kinases whose depletion led to severe spreading defects in cells infected with L. monocytogenes. We conducted systematic validation procedures with redundant silencing reagents and confirmed the involvement of the serine/threonine kinases, CSNK1A1 and CSNK2B. We conducted secondary assays showing that, in contrast with the situation observed in CSNK2B-depleted cells, L. monocytogenes formed wild-type cytosolic tails and displayed wild-type actin-based motility in the cytosol of CSNK1A1-depleted cells. Furthermore, we developed a protrusion formation assay and showed that the spreading defect observed in CSNK1A1-depleted cells correlated with the formation of protrusion that did not resolve into double-membrane vacuoles. Moreover, we developed sending and receiving cell-specific RNAi procedures and showed that CSNK1A was required in the sending cells, but was dispensable in the receiving cells, for protrusion resolution. Finally, we showed that the observed defects were specific to Listeria monocytogenes, as Rickettsia conorii displayed wild-type cell-to-cell spread in CSNK1A1- and CSNK2B-depleted cells. We conclude that, in addition to the specific host factors supporting cytosolic actin

  17. The population density of Lymnaea columella (Say, 1817) (Mollusca, Lymnaeidae) an intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica (Linnaeus, 1758), in the Caparaó microregion, ES, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Almeida, S C G; Freitas, D F; Carneiro, M B; Camargo, P F; Azevedo, J C; Martins, I V F

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the population density of Lymnaea columella, an intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica, in various aquatic habitats and in drinking water in the area of the Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Espírito Santo, on Caparaó Microregion, municipality of Alegre, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Monthly samplings were performed at certain points between drainage areas and drinking water in cattle and goat production systems during the years 2010 to 2013. The mean temperature, precipitation and the frequency of samples of L. columella were analysed graphically according the monthly average during the study period. A total of 2,038 molluscs were collected, 1558 of which were L. columella, that predominated in all sampled points. The highest average of specimens observed for L. columella was in the years 2010 and 2013 (51.0), and occurred decreased in 2011 (19.8). The temperature and precipitation averaged is 23.7 °C and 141 mm/year, respectively. Rainfall peak occurred in March (2011, 2013) and November (2012), during these periods the population of L. columella growth. There was no significant difference in the relationship between the specimens observed with seasons (dry-wet), thus the population of L. columella remained stable and can be found throughout the year.

  18. Optimum conditions for growth in liquid medium of Oscillatoria formosa Bory used as the principal food in laboratory culture of intermediate hosts for schistosomosis and fasciolosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Filipa M.

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The rearing of snails, intermediate hosts of Schistosoma haematobium, S. intercalatum, S. bovis and Fasciola hepatica is the first step to maintain the life cycle of these parasites in laboratory in order to have biological material for the different studies, namely on the systematic biology and immunodiagnostic of schistosomosis and fasciolosis. According to the traditional method, the alga Oscillatoria formosa Bory (Cyanobacteria, principal food source for the snails, was cultivated in soil extract (Sampaio Xavier et al., 1968. However, it was sometimes very difficult to find the proper soil extract and the material was also contaminated by protozoa and fungi. In our work, using a new medium having as a base the Mineral Medium II (modified from Hughes et al., 1958 we found that O. formosa had a better growth response than in the soil extract medium. Snails fed on O. formosa reached three times the size of others at the same age, and they also reached sex maturity earlier, having more egg-masses per snail and, in addition, the rate of survival as well as the number of generations per year under laboratory conditions significantly increased. This culture was also easier to perform, and the axenic conditions easier to maintain.

  19. A study of the molluscicidal and larvicidal activities of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) leaf extract and its main cucurbitacins against the mollusc Galba truncatula, intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawech, Rachid; Njeh, Fatma; Hamed, Nejia; Damak, Mohamed; Ayadi, Ali; Hammami, Hayet; Mezghani-Jarraya, Raoudha

    2017-07-01

    The molluscicidal and larvicidal activities of the medicinal plant Citrullus colocynthis leaf extracts and its main cucurbitacins were tested against the mollusc gastropod Galba truncatula, the intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica. Our findings proved for the first time that the molluscicidal activity was correlated with the presence of terpenoids. A significant molluscicidal value was found in the ethyl acetate extract (LC50 = 12.6 mg L -1 ). Further fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of two main compounds identified to cucurbitacin E 1 and 2-O-β-d-glucocucurbitacin E 2. Their molluscicidal activities were also investigated and they possessed close activities with LC 50 = 9.55 and 10.61 mg L -1 for compounds 2 and 1, respectively. The ethyl acetate extract and both pure compounds proved the highest larvicidal activities, with a deterioration rate exceeding 89.2% (89.2-100%) and with no toxic effects against associated fauna. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Efficacy of condensed tannins against larval Hymenolepis diminuta (Cestoda) in vitro and in the intermediate host Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera) in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Suraj; Meyling, Nicolai V; Williams, Andrew R; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Fryganas, Christos; Kapel, Christian M O; Fredensborg, Brian L

    2015-01-15

    Natural anti-parasitic compounds in plants such as condensed tannins (CT) have anthelmintic properties against a range of gastrointestinal nematodes, but for other helminths such effects are unexplored. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of CT from three different plant extracts in a model system employing the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, in its intermediate host, Tenebrio molitor. An in vitro study examined infectivity of H. diminuta cysticercoids (excystation success) isolated from infected beetles exposed to different concentrations of CT extracts from pine bark (PB) (Pinus sps), hazelnut pericarp (HN) (Corylus avellana) or white clover flowers (WC) (Trifolium repens), in comparison with the anthelmintic drug praziquantel (positive control). In the in vitro study, praziquantel and CT from all three plant extracts had dose-dependent inhibitory effects on cysticercoid excystation. The HN extract was most effective at inhibiting excystation, followed by PB and WC. An in vivo study was carried out on infected beetles (measured as cysticercoid establishment) fed different doses of PB, HN and praziquantel. There was a highly significant inhibitory effect of HN on cysticercoid development (p=0.0002). Overall, CT showed a promising anti-cestodal effect against the metacestode stage of H. diminuta. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Patchy promiscuity: machine learning applied to predict the host specificity ofSalmonella entericaandEscherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupolova, Nadejda; Dallman, Tim J; Holden, Nicola J; Gally, David L

    2017-10-01

    Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli are bacterial species that colonize different animal hosts with sub-types that can cause life-threatening infections in humans. Source attribution of zoonoses is an important goal for infection control as is identification of isolates in reservoir hosts that represent a threat to human health. In this study, host specificity and zoonotic potential were predicted using machine learning in which Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers were built based on predicted proteins from whole genome sequences. Analysis of over 1000 S. enterica genomes allowed the correct prediction (67 -90 % accuracy) of the source host for S . Typhimurium isolates and the same classifier could then differentiate the source host for alternative serovars such as S . Dublin. A key finding from both phylogeny and SVM methods was that the majority of isolates were assigned to host-specific sub-clusters and had high host-specific SVM scores. Moreover, only a minor subset of isolates had high probability scores for multiple hosts, indicating generalists with genetic content that may facilitate transition between hosts. The same approach correctly identified human versus bovine E. coli isolates (83 % accuracy) and the potential of the classifier to predict a zoonotic threat was demonstrated using E. coli O157. This research indicates marked host restriction for both S. enterica and E. coli , with only limited isolate subsets exhibiting host promiscuity by gene content. Machine learning can be successfully applied to interrogate source attribution of bacterial isolates and has the capacity to predict zoonotic potential.

  2. mtDNA phylogeny of Japanese ant crickets (Orthoptera : Myrmecophilidae): Diversification in host specificity and habitat use

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu, Takashi; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Ueda, Shouhei; Itino, Takao

    2008-01-01

    Ant crickets (Myrmecophilidae, Orthoptera) are typical ant guests. Although ten species (all belonging to genus Myrmecophilus) have recently been described from Japan, their phylogeny and the extent of host specificity are not known. Here, we reconstruct mtDNA phylogeny of 48 individuals from six species to examine their host specificity, habitat use, and congruence of mtDNA lineages with the morphological species. The cytb phylogeny reveals seven well-supported lineages that in part do not c...

  3. Bacterial leaf symbiosis in angiosperms: host specificity without co-speciation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Lemaire

    Full Text Available Bacterial leaf symbiosis is a unique and intimate interaction between bacteria and flowering plants, in which endosymbionts are organized in specialized leaf structures. Previously, bacterial leaf symbiosis has been described as a cyclic and obligate interaction in which the endosymbionts are vertically transmitted between plant generations and lack autonomous growth. Theoretically this allows for co-speciation between leaf nodulated plants and their endosymbionts. We sequenced the nodulated Burkholderia endosymbionts of 54 plant species from known leaf nodulated angiosperm genera, i.e. Ardisia, Pavetta, Psychotria and Sericanthe. Phylogenetic reconstruction of bacterial leaf symbionts and closely related free-living bacteria indicates the occurrence of multiple horizontal transfers of bacteria from the environment to leaf nodulated plant species. This rejects the hypothesis of a long co-speciation process between the bacterial endosymbionts and their host plants. Our results indicate a recent evolutionary process towards a stable and host specific interaction confirming the proposed maternal transmission mode of the endosymbionts through the seeds. Divergence estimates provide evidence for a relatively recent origin of bacterial leaf symbiosis, dating back to the Miocene (5-23 Mya. This geological epoch was characterized by cool and arid conditions, which may have triggered the origin of bacterial leaf symbiosis.

  4. Host specificity of North American Rhabdias spp. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae): combining field data and experimental infections with a molecular phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Gabriel J; Janovy, John

    2013-04-01

    Lungworms of the cosmopolitan genus Rhabdias are among the most common parasites of amphibians and squamate reptiles. The present study used experimental infections, field studies, and a molecular phylogeny to determine the host specificity of 6 Rhabdias spp. that infect snakes and anurans from North America. The molecular phylogeny suggests Rhabdias ranae from Nebraska and Mississippi may represent separate, cryptic species. In addition, the phylogeny strongly supports separate clades for anuran and snake lungworms. Field studies and experimental infections indicate that snake lungworms are generalist snake parasites; however, laboratory experiments also suggest that lizards can be infected under some environmental conditions. Lungworms from anurans were found not to infect salamanders or reptiles, in nature or in the laboratory; anuran lungworm species ranged from strict host specificity, e.g., R. ranae from Nebraska, to relative generalist, e.g., Rhabdias joaquinensis from Nebraska. Overall, host specificity for species of Rhabdias does not provide support for the evolution of progressive specialization over time. For most species of lungworms, host specificity in nature appears to be limited by both ecological and physiological factors, which vary between species and their hosts. Furthermore, some lungworms, e.g., Rhabdias bakeri from Missouri, appear to be tracking host resources instead of host phylogenies, an example of ecological fitting.

  5. Host-specific microbial communities in three sympatric North Sea sponges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naim, Mohd Azrul; Morillo, Jose A.; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of next generation technology sequencing has deepened our knowledge of marine sponge-associated microbiota with the identification of at least 32 phyla of bacteria and archaea from a large number of sponge species. In this study we assessed the diversity of the microbial communi...... in North Sea sponges. These Chlamydiae-affiliated OTUs may represent novel lineages at least at the genus level as they are only 86-92% similar to known sequences. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....... communities hosted by three sympatric sponges living in a semi-enclosed North-Sea environment using pyrosequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA gene fragments. The three sponges harbour species-specific communities each dominated by a different class of Proteobacteria. An α...

  6. Virulence genes and the evolution of host specificity in plant-pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Does, H Charlotte; Rep, Martijn

    2007-10-01

    In the fungal kingdom, the ability to cause disease in plants appears to have arisen multiple times during evolution. In many cases, the ability to infect particular plant species depends on specific genes that distinguish virulent fungi from their sometimes closely related nonvirulent relatives. These genes encode host-determining "virulence factors," including small, secreted proteins and enzymes involved in the synthesis of toxins. These virulence factors typically are involved in evolutionary arms races between plants and pathogens. We briefly summarize current knowledge of these virulence factors from several fungal species in terms of function, phylogenetic distribution, sequence variation, and genomic location. Second, we address some issues that are relevant to the evolution of virulence in fungi toward plants; in particular, horizontal gene transfer and the genomic organization of virulence genes.

  7. A population growth trend analysis for Neotricula aperta, the snail intermediate host of Schistosoma mekongi, after construction of the Pak-Mun dam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W Attwood

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Pak-Mun dam is a controversial hydro-power project on the Mun River in Northeast Thailand. The dam is sited in a habitat of the freshwater snail Neotricula aperta, which is the intermediate host for the parasitic blood-fluke Schistosoma mekongi causing Mekong schistosomiasis in humans in Cambodia and Laos. Few data are available which can be used to assess the effects of water resource development on N. aperta. The aim of this study was to obtain data and to analyze the possible impact of the dam on N. aperta population growth.Estimated population densities were recorded for an N. aperta population in the Mun River 27 km upstream of Pak-Mun, from 1990 to 2011. The Pak-Mul dam began to operate in 1994. Population growth was modeled using a linear mixed model expression of a modified Gompertz stochastic state-space exponential growth model. The N. aperta population was found to be quite stable, with the estimated growth parameter not significantly different from zero. Nevertheless, some marked changes in snail population density were observed which were coincident with changes in dam operation policy.The study found that there has been no marked increase in N. aperta population growth following operation of the Pak-Mun dam. The analysis did indicate a large and statistically significant increase in population density immediately after the dam came into operation; however, this increase was not persistent. The study has provided the first vital baseline data on N. aperta population behavior near to the Pak-Mun dam and suggests that the operation policy of the dam may have an impact on snail population density. Nevertheless, additional studies are required for other N. aperta populations in the Mun River and for an extended time series, to confirm or refine the findings of this work.

  8. A population growth trend analysis for Neotricula aperta, the snail intermediate host of Schistosoma mekongi, after construction of the Pak-Mun dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, Stephen W; Upatham, E Suchart

    2013-11-01

    The Pak-Mun dam is a controversial hydro-power project on the Mun River in Northeast Thailand. The dam is sited in a habitat of the freshwater snail Neotricula aperta, which is the intermediate host for the parasitic blood-fluke Schistosoma mekongi causing Mekong schistosomiasis in humans in Cambodia and Laos. Few data are available which can be used to assess the effects of water resource development on N. aperta. The aim of this study was to obtain data and to analyze the possible impact of the dam on N. aperta population growth. Estimated population densities were recorded for an N. aperta population in the Mun River 27 km upstream of Pak-Mun, from 1990 to 2011. The Pak-Mul dam began to operate in 1994. Population growth was modeled using a linear mixed model expression of a modified Gompertz stochastic state-space exponential growth model. The N. aperta population was found to be quite stable, with the estimated growth parameter not significantly different from zero. Nevertheless, some marked changes in snail population density were observed which were coincident with changes in dam operation policy. The study found that there has been no marked increase in N. aperta population growth following operation of the Pak-Mun dam. The analysis did indicate a large and statistically significant increase in population density immediately after the dam came into operation; however, this increase was not persistent. The study has provided the first vital baseline data on N. aperta population behavior near to the Pak-Mun dam and suggests that the operation policy of the dam may have an impact on snail population density. Nevertheless, additional studies are required for other N. aperta populations in the Mun River and for an extended time series, to confirm or refine the findings of this work.

  9. Seasonal variation in abiotic factors and ferulic acid toxicity in snail-attractant pellets against the intermediate host snail Lymnaea acuminata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrahari, P; Singh, D K

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory evaluation was made to access the seasonal variations in abiotic environmental factors temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, electrical conductivity and ferulic acid toxicity in snail-attractant pellets (SAP) against the intermediate host snail Lymnaea acuminata in each month of the years 2010 and 2011. On the basis of a 24-h toxicity assay, it was noted that lethal concentration values of 4.03, 3.73% and 4.45% in SAP containing starch and 4.16, 4.23% and 4.29% in SAP containing proline during the months of May, June and September, respectively, were most effective in killing the snails, while SAP containing starch/proline + ferulic acid was least effective in the month of January/February (24-h lethal concentration value was 7.67%/7.63% in SAP). There was a significant positive correlation between lethal concentration value of ferulic acid containing SAP and levels of dissolved O2 /pH of water in corresponding months. On the contrary, a negative correlation was observed between lethal concentration value and dissolved CO2 /temperature of test water in the same months. To ascertain that such a relationship between toxicity and abiotic factors is not co-incidental, the nervous tissue of treated (40% and 80% of 24-h lethal concentration value) and control group of snails was assayed for the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in each of the 12 months of the same year. There was a maximum inhibition of 58.43% of AChE, in snails exposed to 80% of the 24-h lethal concentration value of ferulic acid + starch in the month of May. This work shows conclusively that the best time to control snail population with SAP containing ferulic acid is during the months of May, June and September. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. An updated concept and revised composition for Hamacreadium Linton, 1910 (Opecoelidae: Plagioporinae) clarifies a previously obscured pattern of host-specificity among species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Storm B; Cutmore, Scott C; Ward, Selina; Cribb, Thomas H

    2017-04-12

    The present concept of the trematode genus Hamacreadium Linton, 1910 encompasses considerable morphological variability and includes species reported from a broad range of fishes. These include herbivores and planktivores, despite the life-cycle of the type-species, Hamacreadium mutabile Linton, 1910, being known to use fishes as intermediate hosts. Reports of H. mutabile are numerous, spanning the west Atlantic, east Pacific and Indo-west Pacific, whereas other nominal species are infrequently reported and several inadequately described. Following a comprehensive review, a strict revised morphological definition is proposed for the genus. Several nominal species are excluded, but, conversely, finer distinctions are recognised among the species concluded to genuinely belong in the genus. Justified records for species retained in the genus are overwhelmingly from fishes of the families Lutjanidae Gill (snappers) and Lethrinidae Bonaparte (emperors), revealing a previously concealed pattern of host-specificity. For H. mutabile, it is argued that only records from western Atlantic lutjanid fishes should be considered genuine; those from plausible Indo-Pacific fishes most likely represent different species. In addition to H. mutabile, eight species are recognised: Hamacreadium cribbi Bray & Justine, 2016, Hamacreadium hainanense Shen, 1990, Hamacreadium interruptum Nagaty, 1941, Hamacreadium lethrini Yamaguti, 1934, Hamacreadium longivesiculum (Yamaguti, 1952) n. comb., Hamacreadium lutiani (Shen, 1990) n. comb., Hamacreadium morgani Baz,1946 and Hamacreadium phyllorchis (Bilqees, 1976) Cribb, 2005. A key to species of Hamacreadium and comprehensive lists of all host-locality records are included.

  11. First molecular identification of Australapatemon burti (Miller, 1923) (Trematoda: Digenea: Strigeidae) from an intermediate host Radix labiata (Rossmaessler) (Gastropoda: Lymnaeidae) in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenova, Olga V; Bespalaya, Yulia V; Bolotov, Ivan N; Kondakov, Alexander V; Sokolova, Svetlana E

    2016-07-01

    The strigeid digenean species Australapatemon burti (Miller, 1923) (Trematoda: Digenea: Strigeidae) was originally described from North America, but recorded in the Neotropical region (Drago et al. 2007; Hernández-Mena et al. 2014; Blasco-Costa et al. 2016) and in Central Europe (Faltýnková et al. 2007). In Europe, this species is rare, and there is not much information about its range (Faltýnková et al. 2007; Soldánová et al. 2012). Australapatemon burti has a complex life cycle with three larval stages, two of which (sporocyst and cercaria) use several species of freshwater snails, and the third stage (metacercaria) use non-specific host hirudineans (Dubois 1968; Davies & Ostrowski de Núñez 2012; Blasco-Costa et al. 2016). Adult flukes are parasitic in the intenstines of various waterfowl species, such as ducks and swans (Drago et al. 2007; Hernández-Mena et al. 2014). Currently, the molecular data on this parasite species includes only nucleotide sequences of four adult specimens from Mexico (Hernández-Mena et al. 2014). Their hosts were Mexican duck, Anas diazi Ridgway, American Wigeon, Anas americana Gmelin, Cinnamon Teal, Anas cyanoptera Vieillot, and Ruddy Duck, Oxyura jamaicensis (Gmelin) (Anserformes: Anatidae).

  12. Host-specific interactions with environmental factors shape the distribution of symbiodinium across the Great Barrier Reef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Tonk

    Full Text Available The endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium within coral reef invertebrates are critical to the survival of the holobiont. The genetic variability of Symbiodinium may contribute to the tolerance of the symbiotic association to elevated sea surface temperatures (SST. To assess the importance of factors such as the local environment, host identity and biogeography in driving Symbiodinium distributions on reef-wide scales, data from studies on reef invertebrate-Symbiodinium associations from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR were compiled.The resulting database consisted of 3717 entries from 26 studies. It was used to explore ecological patterns such as host-specificity and environmental drivers structuring community complexity using a multi-scalar approach. The data was analyzed in several ways: (i frequently sampled host species were analyzed independently to investigate the influence of the environment on symbiont distributions, thereby excluding the influence of host specificity, (ii host species distributions across sites were added as an environmental variable to determine the contribution of host identity on symbiont distribution, and (iii data were pooled based on clade (broad genetic groups dividing the genus Symbiodinium to investigate factors driving Symbiodinium distributions using lower taxonomic resolution. The results indicated that host species identity plays a dominant role in determining the distribution of Symbiodinium and environmental variables shape distributions on a host species-specific level. SST derived variables (especially SSTstdev most often contributed to the selection of the best model. Clade level comparisons decreased the power of the predictive model indicating that it fails to incorporate the main drivers behind Symbiodinium distributions.Including the influence of different host species on Symbiodinium distributional patterns improves our understanding of the drivers behind the complexity of Symbiodinium

  13. Density-dependent sex ratio and sex-specific preference for host traits in parasitic bat flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentiványi, Tamara; Vincze, Orsolya; Estók, Péter

    2017-08-29

    Deviation of sex ratios from unity in wild animal populations has recently been demonstrated to be far more prevalent than previously thought. Ectoparasites are prominent examples of this bias, given that their sex ratios vary from strongly female- to strongly male-biased both among hosts and at the metapopulation level. To date our knowledge is very limited on how and why these biased sex ratios develop. It was suggested that sex ratio and sex-specific aggregation of ectoparasites might be shaped by the ecology, behaviour and physiology of both hosts and their parasites. Here we investigate a highly specialised, hematophagous bat fly species with strong potential to move between hosts, arguably limited inbreeding effects, off-host developmental stages and extended parental care. We collected a total of 796 Nycteribia kolenatii bat flies from 147 individual bats using fumigation and subsequently determined their sex. We report a balanced sex ratio at the metapopulation level and a highly variable sex ratio among infrapopulations ranging from 100% male to 100% female. We show that infrapopulation sex ratio is not random and is highly correlated with infrapopulation size. Sex ratio is highly male biased in small and highly female biased in large infrapopulations. We show that this pattern is most probably the result of sex-specific preference in bat flies for host traits, most likely combined with a higher mobility of males. We demonstrate that female bat flies exert a strong preference for high host body condition and female hosts, while the distribution of males is more even. Our results suggest that locally biased sex ratios can develop due to sex-specific habitat preference of parasites. Moreover, it is apparent that the sex of both hosts and parasites need to be accounted for when a better understanding of host-parasite systems is targeted.

  14. Host-specific interactions with environmental factors shape the distribution of symbiodinium across the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonk, Linda; Sampayo, Eugenia M; Weeks, Scarla; Magno-Canto, Marites; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2013-01-01

    The endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium) within coral reef invertebrates are critical to the survival of the holobiont. The genetic variability of Symbiodinium may contribute to the tolerance of the symbiotic association to elevated sea surface temperatures (SST). To assess the importance of factors such as the local environment, host identity and biogeography in driving Symbiodinium distributions on reef-wide scales, data from studies on reef invertebrate-Symbiodinium associations from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) were compiled. The resulting database consisted of 3717 entries from 26 studies. It was used to explore ecological patterns such as host-specificity and environmental drivers structuring community complexity using a multi-scalar approach. The data was analyzed in several ways: (i) frequently sampled host species were analyzed independently to investigate the influence of the environment on symbiont distributions, thereby excluding the influence of host specificity, (ii) host species distributions across sites were added as an environmental variable to determine the contribution of host identity on symbiont distribution, and (iii) data were pooled based on clade (broad genetic groups dividing the genus Symbiodinium) to investigate factors driving Symbiodinium distributions using lower taxonomic resolution. The results indicated that host species identity plays a dominant role in determining the distribution of Symbiodinium and environmental variables shape distributions on a host species-specific level. SST derived variables (especially SSTstdev) most often contributed to the selection of the best model. Clade level comparisons decreased the power of the predictive model indicating that it fails to incorporate the main drivers behind Symbiodinium distributions. Including the influence of different host species on Symbiodinium distributional patterns improves our understanding of the drivers behind the complexity of Symbiodinium

  15. Host specificity and genetic differentiation of Melampsora epitea (rust on willows)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado Pasten, Sergio [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Plant Pathology and Biocontrol Unit

    2001-07-01

    Rust caused by Melampsora epitea is considered the most serious and widespread disease on willows. When severe, rust can defoliate willows prematurely leading to serious yield losses and rootstock death. Studying the infection process, we found that M. epitea requires no specific recognition signals to germinate, grow, or penetrate the host stomata, regardless of whether interaction with the host plant is compatible or incompatible; instead, plant defense mechanisms are determined by substomatal events. Isolates of the Swedish rust population were classified (pathotyped) by their virulence patterns on a standard set of willow clones (willow differential). Thirty-seven pathotypes of M. epitea were identified and grouped into three formae speciales. For global monitoring of the virulence of M. epitea, an internationally useful naming system was proposed. Partly to confirm the value of such a naming system, the pathotype compositions of two distant M. epitea populations (from Sweden and Chile) were compared using the willow differential. The results indicated that long-distance inocula exchange likely plays an active role in the population dynamics and evolution of pathotype structure for M. epitea. To study the genetics underlying pathotype dynamics, molecular tools, such as AFLP, were used. The resulting dendrogram revealed no clustering based on geographic origin, and because geographic distance among pathogen populations correlated poorly with genetic distance, apparently geographically distant populations have developed collectively as a metapopulation instead of separately. However, the result shows that M. epitea has high levels of gene and genotypic variation within populations, which is consistent with the occurrence of sexual reproduction. The low between-population variation, despite variation in local selection pressures, accords with massive long-distance migration of rust spores.

  16. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta are natural hosts of specific Staphylococcus aureus lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne van den Berg

    Full Text Available Currently, there is no animal model known that mimics natural nasal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in humans. We investigated whether rhesus macaques are natural nasal carriers of S. aureus. Nasal swabs were taken from 731 macaques. S. aureus isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, spa repeat sequencing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST, and compared with human strains. Furthermore, the isolates were characterized by several PCRs. Thirty-nine percent of 731 macaques were positive for S. aureus. In general, the macaque S. aureus isolates differed from human strains as they formed separate PFGE clusters, 50% of the isolates were untypeable by agr genotyping, 17 new spa types were identified, which all belonged to new sequence types (STs. Furthermore, 66% of macaque isolates were negative for all superantigen genes. To determine S. aureus nasal colonization, three nasal swabs from 48 duo-housed macaques were taken during a 5 month period. In addition, sera were analyzed for immunoglobulin G and A levels directed against 40 staphylococcal proteins using a bead-based flow cytometry technique. Nineteen percent of the animals were negative for S. aureus, and 17% were three times positive. S. aureus strains were easily exchanged between macaques. The antibody response was less pronounced in macaques compared to humans, and nasal carrier status was not associated with differences in serum anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. In conclusion, rhesus macaques are natural hosts of S. aureus, carrying host-specific lineages. Our data indicate that rhesus macaques are useful as an autologous model for studying S. aureus nasal colonization and infection prevention.

  17. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been found to play an important role for this HSSS due to load transfer and strain partitioning between two phases, and a higher strain rate could cause even higher strain partitioning in the softer austenite grains, delaying the deformation instability. Deformation twins are observed in the austenite grains at all strain rates to facilitate the uniform tensile deformation. The B2 phase (FeAl intermetallic compound is less deformable at higher strain rates, resulting in easier brittle fracture in B2 particles, smaller dimple size and a higher density of phase interfaces in final fracture surfaces. Thus, more energy need be consumed during the final fracture for the experiments conducted at higher strain rates, resulting in better tensile toughness.

  18. Experimental evolution of parasitoid infectivity on symbiont-protected hosts leads to the emergence of genotype specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouchet, Romain; Vorburger, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Host-parasitoid interactions may lead to strong reciprocal selection for traits involved in host defense and parasitoid counterdefense. In aphids, individuals harboring the facultative bacterial endosymbiont, Hamiltonella defensa, exhibit enhanced resistance to parasitoid wasps. We used an experimental evolution approach to investigate the ability of the parasitoid wasp, Lysiphlebus fabarum, to adapt to the presence of H. defensa in its aphid host Aphis fabae. Sexual populations of the parasitoid were exposed for 11 generations to a single clone of A. fabae, either free of H. defensa or harboring artificial infections with three different isolates of H. defensa. Parasitoids adapted rapidly to the presence of H. defensa in their hosts, but this adaptation was in part specific to the symbiont isolate they were evolving against and did not result in an improved infectivity on all symbiont-protected hosts. Comparisons of life-history traits among the evolved lines of parasitoids did not reveal any evidence for costs of adaptation to H. defensa in terms of correlated responses that could constrain such adaptation. These results show that parasitoids readily evolve counter-adaptations to heritable defensive symbionts of their hosts, but that different symbiont strains impose different evolutionary challenges. The symbionts thus mediate the host-parasite interaction by inducing line-by-line genetic specificity. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  19. Filarial-specific antibody response in East African bancroftian filariasis: effects of host infection, clinical disease, and filarial endemicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaoko, Walter G; Simonsen, Paul E; Meyrowitsch, Dan W

    2006-01-01

    The effect of host infection, chronic clinical disease, and transmission intensity on the patterns of specific antibody responses in Bancroftian filariasis was assessed by analyzing specific IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, and IgE profiles among adults from two communities with high and low Wuchereria...

  20. Host Specificity of Amblyomma cajennense (Fabricius, 1787 (Acari: Ixodidae with Comments on the Drop-off Rhythm

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    Cristina Marques Lisbôa Lopes

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The parasitic specificity of larval, nymph and adult Amblyomma cajennense on six different host species: Oryctolagus cuniculus, Rattus norvegicus, Gallus gallus domesticus, Anas platyrhynchus, Coturnix coturnix and Streptopelia decorata is described. In terms of the numbers of larvae and nymphs recovered, O. cuniculus was the best host species. The modal day for drop-off of larvae and nymphs was day three for the mammal hosts, but variable in the birds. We conclude that adult A. cajennense have a strong degree of specificity due to the fact that the tick failed to complete its life cycle on any of the evaluated hosts. The immature stages, on the other hand, showed a low level of specificity, most especially in the larval stage, indicating the existence of secondary hosts which probably serve as dispersers in the wild. The results also indicated a variable drop-off rhythm for larvae and nymphs in two periods, diurnal (6-18 hr and nocturnal (18-6 hr, which differed depending upon the host.

  1. Genotype-specific interactions and the trade-off between host and parasite fitness

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    Shykoff Jacqui A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of parasite traits is inextricably linked to their hosts. For instance one common definition of parasite virulence is the reduction in host fitness due to infection. Thus, traits of infection must be viewed in both protagonists and may be under shared genetic and physiological control. We investigated these questions on the oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsis (= parasitica, a natural pathogen of the Brassicaceae Arabidopsis thaliana. Results We performed a controlled cross inoculation experiment confronting six lines of the host plant with seven strains of the parasite in order to evaluate genetic variation for phenotypic traits of infection among hosts, parasites, and distinct combinations. Parasite infection intensity and transmission were highly variable among parasite strains and host lines but depended also on the interaction between particular genotypes of the protagonists, and genetic variation for the infection phenotype of parasites from natural populations was found even at a small spatial scale within population. Furthermore, increased parasite fitness led to a significant decrease in host fitness only on a single host line (Gb, although a trade-off between these two traits was expected because host and parasite share the same resource pool for their respective reproduction. We propose that different levels of compatibility dependent on genotype by genotype interactions might lead to different amounts of resources available for host and parasite reproduction. This variation in compatibility could thus mask the expected negative relationship between host and parasite fitness, as the total resource pool would not be constant. Conclusion These results highlight the importance of host variation in the determination of parasite fitness traits. This kind of interaction may in turn decouple the relationship between parasite transmission and its negative effect on host fitness, altering theoretical predictions

  2. The South-to-North Water Diversion Project: effect of the water diversion pattern on transmission of Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, You-Sheng; Wang, Wei; Li, Hong-Jun; Shen, Xue-Hui; Xu, Yong-Liang; Dai, Jian-Rong

    2012-03-20

    The South-to-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP) is the largest national water conservancy project in China. However, the Eastern Route Project (ERP) of SNWDP will refer to the habitats of Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum. The present study was aimed at investigating the effects of some factors relating to the water diversion pattern on the spread north of O. hupensis and transmission of S. japonicum. Marked snails were attached to the floating debris, and then placed on the water surface, the passage of snails through water pumps was observed. Some marked living adult snails were placed under water in the 5 spots, 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days later, their survival and transfer under water were investigated. 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 and 128 juvenile snails, with a male: female ratio of about 1, were caged, 1 year later, their reproductions were calculated. The snails attached on the floating debris at 100-, 50- and 20-cm-distance from the inlet pipe of the big pump (with a diameter of 80 cm), could be absorbed into the pumps, with passing rates of 2.45%, 3.93% and 43.46%, respectively, compared with 72.07% and 91.00% for the snails at 20 cm and 10 cm-distance from the inlet pipe of the small pump (with a diameter of 20 cm). A total of 36,600 marked living snails were put into 5 ponds and ditches, with the water depths of 1-1.6 m, 15-120 days later, no marked ones were found along the ponds and ditches or in the straw packages. The juvenile snails did not reproduce until their density reached up to 8 snails (ratio of male: female of 1)/0.16 m2. During the construction of ERP of SNWDP, the risk of northward spread of schistosomiasis japonica will be decreased or eliminated as long as long-term reliable interventions for snail control are implemented.

  3. Evidence for accretion in the lower crust at fast- and intermediate-spreading ridges based on olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, V.; Shaw, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Here we present volatile (CO2, H2O, F, S, Cl), major, and trace element data from >200 olivine-hosted, glassy, melt inclusions and glasses erupted on three different mid-ocean ridges (East Pacific Rise, EPR; Juan de Fuca Ridge, JdFR; and Gakkel Ridge). We provide geochemical constraints on both the compositional variations and the depths of crystallization beneath ridge axes using vapor-saturation pressures derived from volatile concentrations. Vapor-saturation pressures calculated from equilibrium CO2-H2O concentrations suggest crystallization occurs over a range of depths from below the crust-mantle transition to the seafloor for both the fast-spreading EPR and the intermediate-spreading JdFR. Depths inferred from minimum pressures estimates indicate that most melt inclusions cluster between 1 and 2.5 km on the EPR (~70%) and between 2 and 3.5 km on the JdFR (~60%), consistent with crystallization in or near the seismically-determined shallow melt lenses. However, 30 to 40% of the melt inclusions are equilibrated at relatively deep depths, suggesting that a significant amount of crystallization occurs in the lower crust. In comparison, equilibrium pressures in melt inclusions from the ultra-slow-spreading Gakkel ridge, where the oceanic crust is much thinner, indicate that significant crystallization occurs in both the upper mantle and throughout crust. These results are inconsistent with the exclusively shallow depths of crystallization anticipated for purely top-down, gabbro glacier models of crustal accretion on mid-ocean ridges and instead, require models in which crystallization occurs throughout the oceanic crust and uppermost mantle (e.g., staked sill or melt-rock reaction models). Combining our pressure estimates with major and trace element concentrations from several different ridges, results in a detailed picture of how melt compositions vary within the ocean crust and across spreading rates. Major element and volatile concentrations from the EPR are

  4. The South-to-North Water Diversion Project: effect of the water diversion pattern on transmission of Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang You-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The South-to-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP is the largest national water conservancy project in China. However, the Eastern Route Project (ERP of SNWDP will refer to the habitats of Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum. The present study was aimed at investigating the effects of some factors relating to the water diversion pattern on the spread north of O. hupensis and transmission of S. japonicum. Methods Marked snails were attached to the floating debris, and then placed on the water surface, the passage of snails through water pumps was observed. Some marked living adult snails were placed under water in the 5 spots, 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days later, their survival and transfer under water were investigated. 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 and 128 juvenile snails, with a male: female ratio of about 1, were caged, 1 year later, their reproductions were calculated. Results The snails attached on the floating debris at 100-, 50- and 20-cm-distance from the inlet pipe of the big pump (with a diameter of 80 cm, could be absorbed into the pumps, with passing rates of 2.45%, 3.93% and 43.46%, respectively, compared with 72.07% and 91.00% for the snails at 20 cm and 10 cm-distance from the inlet pipe of the small pump (with a diameter of 20 cm. A total of 36,600 marked living snails were put into 5 ponds and ditches, with the water depths of 1-1.6 m, 15-120 days later, no marked ones were found along the ponds and ditches or in the straw packages. The juvenile snails did not reproduce until their density reached up to 8 snails (ratio of male: female of 1/0.16 m2. Conclusions During the construction of ERP of SNWDP, the risk of northward spread of schistosomiasis japonica will be decreased or eliminated as long as long-term reliable interventions for snail control are implemented.

  5. Chromosomal rearrangements formed by rrn recombination do not improve replichore balance in host-specific Salmonella enterica serovars.

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    T David Matthews

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of the ∼2,600 serovars of Salmonella enterica have a broad host range as well as a conserved gene order. In contrast, some Salmonella serovars are host-specific and frequently exhibit large chromosomal rearrangements from recombination between rrn operons. One hypothesis explaining these rearrangements suggests that replichore imbalance introduced from horizontal transfer of pathogenicity islands and prophages drives chromosomal rearrangements in an attempt to improve balance.This hypothesis was directly tested by comparing the naturally-occurring chromosomal arrangement types to the theoretically possible arrangement types, and estimating their replichore balance using a calculator. In addition to previously characterized strains belonging to host-specific serovars, the arrangement types of 22 serovar Gallinarum strains was also determined. Only 48 out of 1,440 possible arrangement types were identified in 212 host-specific strains. While the replichores of most naturally-occurring arrangement types were well-balanced, most theoretical arrangement types had imbalanced replichores. Furthermore, the most common types of rearrangements did not change replichore balance.The results did not support the hypothesis that replichore imbalance causes these rearrangements, and suggest that the rearrangements could be explained by aspects of a host-specific lifestyle.

  6. Specific Mutations in H5N1 Mainly Impact the Magnitude and Velocity of the Host Response in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tchitchek, Nicholas; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Josset, Laurence; Gralinski, Lisa; Becavin, Christophe; Tilton, Susan C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Ferris, Martin T.; Totura, Allison L.; Li, Chengjun; Neumann, Gabriele; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Baric, Ralph; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Katze, Michael G.

    2013-07-29

    Influenza infection causes respiratory disease that can lead to death. The complex interplay between virus-encoded and host-specific pathogenicity regulators is not well-understood. By analyzing a collection of mouse lung samples infected by A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1; VN1203) influenza, we characterized a signature of transcripts and proteins associated with the kinetics of the host response. Using a new geometrical representation method and two criteria, we show that infection concentrations and four specific mutations in VN1203 mainly impact on the magnitude and velocity of the host response kinetics, rather than on specific sets of genes up- and down-regulated. We observed similar kinetic effects using A/California/04/2009 (H1N1)-infected samples, and we show that these effects correlate with mice morbidity and viral titer measurements. Speed and extent of changes in the host response between days 1 and 2 post-infection were attenuated for each VN1203 mutant compared to the wild-type, except for PB1-F2 deletion at a high dose, which was associated with high virulence. This indicates that the host response in that time frame is critical and that immunomodulatory therapeutics should specifically be applied during the early days post-infection.

  7. A novel Capsicum gene inhibits host-specific disease resistance to Phytophthora capsici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Gregory; Monroy-Barbosa, Ariadna; Bosland, Paul W

    2013-05-01

    A novel disease resistance inhibitor gene (inhibitor of P. capsici resistance [Ipcr]), found in the chile pepper (Capsicum annuum) variety 'New Mexico Capsicum Accession 10399' (NMCA10399), inhibits resistance to Phytophthora capsici but not to other species of Phytophthora. When a highly P. capsici-resistant variety was hybridized with NMCA10399, the resultant F1 populations, when screened, were completely susceptible to P. capsici for root rot and foliar blight disease syndromes, despite the dominance inheritance of P. capsici resistance in chile pepper. The F2 population displayed a 3:13 resistant-to-susceptible (R:S) ratio. The testcross population displayed a 1:1 R:S ratio, and a backcross population to NMCA10399 displayed complete susceptibility. These results demonstrate the presence of a single dominant inhibitor gene affecting P. capsici resistance in chile pepper. Moreover, when lines carrying the Ipcr gene were challenged against six Phytophthora spp., the nonhost resistance was not overcome. Therefore, the Ipcr gene is interfering with host-specific resistance but not the pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular pattern nonhost responses.

  8. Molecular analysis of echinostome metacercariae from their second intermediate host found in a localised geographic region reveals genetic heterogeneity and possible cryptic speciation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waraporn Noikong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Echinostome metacercariae are the infective stage for humans and animals. The identification of echinostomes has been based until recently on morphology but molecular techniques using sequences of ribosomal RNA and mitochondrial DNA have indicated major clades within the group. In this study we have used the ITS2 region of ribosomal RNA and the ND1 region of mitochondrial DNA to identify metacercariae from snails collected from eight well-separated sites from an area of 4000 km2 in Lamphun Province, Thailand. The derived sequences have been compared to those collected from elsewhere and have been deposited in the nucleotide databases. There were two aims of this study; firstly, to determine the species of echinostome present in an endemic area, and secondly, to assess the intra-specific genetic diversity, as this may be informative with regard to the potential for the development of anthelmintic resistance and with regard to the spread of infection by the definitive hosts. Our results indicate that the most prevalent species are most closely related to E. revolutum, E. trivolvis, E. robustum, E. malayanum and Euparyphium albuferensis. Some sites harbour several species and within a site there could be considerable intra-species genetic diversity. There is no significant geographical structuring within this area. Although the molecular techniques used in this study allowed the assignment of the samples to clades within defined species, however, within these groupings there were significant differences indicating that cryptic speciation may have occurred. The degree of genetic diversity present would suggest the use of targeted regimes designed to minimise the selection of anthelmintic resistance. The apparent lack of geographic structuring is consistent with the transmission of the parasites by the avian hosts.

  9. Survival and persistence of fecal host-specific Bacteroidales cells and their DNA assessed by PMA-qPCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, S.; Bombardelli, F.; Wuertz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding and managing microbial pollutions in water is one of the foremost challenges of establishing effective managements and remediation strategies to impaired water bodies polluted by uncharacterized fecal sources. Quantitative microbial source tracking (MST) approaches using fecal Bacteroidales and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays to measure gene copies of host-specific 16S rRNA genetic markers are promising because they can allow for identifying and quantifying fecal loadings from a particular animal host and understanding the fate and transport of host-specific Bacteroidales over a range of conditions in water bodies. Similar to the case of traditional fecal indicator bacteria, a relatively long persistence of target DNA may hamper applied MST studies, if genetic markers cannot be linked to recent fecal pollution in water. We report a successful approach to removing the qPCR signal derived from free DNA and dead host-specific Bacteroidales cells by selectively binding the DNA and consequently inhibiting PCR amplification using light- activated propidium monoazide (PMA). Optimal PMA-qPCR conditions were determined as 100 µM of PMA concentration and a 10-min light exposure time at different solids concentrations in order to mimic a range of water samples. Under these conditions, PMA-qPCR resulted in the selective exclusion of DNA from heat- treated cells of non-culturable Bacteroidales in human feces and wastewater influent and effluent samples. Also, the persistence of feces-derived host-specific Bacteroidales DNA and their cells (determined by universal, human-, cow- and dog-specific Bacteroidales qPCR assays) in seawater was investigated in microcosms at environmental conditions. The average T99 (two log reduction) value for host-specific viable Bacteroidales cells was 28 h, whereas that for total host-specific Bacteroidales DNA was 177 h. Natural sunlight did not have a strong influence on the fate of fecal Bacteroidales cells and their DNA, presumably

  10. Host Specificity of Argopistes tsekooni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a Potential Biological Control Agent of Chinese Privet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan Zhuo Zhang; James Hanula; Jiang Hua Sun

    2008-01-01

    Chinese privet, Ligustrum sinense Lour., is a perennial semi-evergreen shrub that is aserious invasive weed in the United States. Classical biological control offers the best hope forcontrolling it in an economic, effective, and persistent way. Host...

  11. Host-Specificity and Dynamics in Bacterial Communities Associated with Bloom-Forming Freshwater Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagatini, Inessa Lacativa; Eiler, Alexander; Bertilsson, Stefan; Klaveness, Dag; Tessarolli, Letícia Piton; Vieira, Armando Augusto Henriques

    2014-01-01

    Many freshwater phytoplankton species have the potential to form transient nuisance blooms that affect water quality and other aquatic biota. Heterotrophic bacteria can influence such blooms via nutrient regeneration but also via antagonism and other biotic interactions. We studied the composition of bacterial communities associated with three bloom-forming freshwater phytoplankton species, the diatom Aulacoseira granulata and the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. Experimental cultures incubated with and without lake bacteria were sampled in three different growth phases and bacterial community composition was assessed by 454-Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Betaproteobacteria were dominant in all cultures inoculated with lake bacteria, but decreased during the experiment. In contrast, Alphaproteobacteria, which made up the second most abundant class of bacteria, increased overall during the course of the experiment. Other bacterial classes responded in contrasting ways to the experimental incubations causing significantly different bacterial communities to develop in response to host phytoplankton species, growth phase and between attached and free-living fractions. Differences in bacterial community composition between cyanobacteria and diatom cultures were greater than between the two cyanobacteria. Despite the significance, major differences between phytoplankton cultures were in the proportion of the OTUs rather than in the absence or presence of specific taxa. Different phytoplankton species favoring different bacterial communities may have important consequences for the fate of organic matter in systems where these bloom forming species occur. The dynamics and development of transient blooms may also be affected as bacterial communities seem to influence phytoplankton species growth in contrasting ways. PMID:24465807

  12. Host-specificity and dynamics in bacterial communities associated with Bloom-forming freshwater phytoplankton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inessa Lacativa Bagatini

    Full Text Available Many freshwater phytoplankton species have the potential to form transient nuisance blooms that affect water quality and other aquatic biota. Heterotrophic bacteria can influence such blooms via nutrient regeneration but also via antagonism and other biotic interactions. We studied the composition of bacterial communities associated with three bloom-forming freshwater phytoplankton species, the diatom Aulacoseira granulata and the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. Experimental cultures incubated with and without lake bacteria were sampled in three different growth phases and bacterial community composition was assessed by 454-Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Betaproteobacteria were dominant in all cultures inoculated with lake bacteria, but decreased during the experiment. In contrast, Alphaproteobacteria, which made up the second most abundant class of bacteria, increased overall during the course of the experiment. Other bacterial classes responded in contrasting ways to the experimental incubations causing significantly different bacterial communities to develop in response to host phytoplankton species, growth phase and between attached and free-living fractions. Differences in bacterial community composition between cyanobacteria and diatom cultures were greater than between the two cyanobacteria. Despite the significance, major differences between phytoplankton cultures were in the proportion of the OTUs rather than in the absence or presence of specific taxa. Different phytoplankton species favoring different bacterial communities may have important consequences for the fate of organic matter in systems where these bloom forming species occur. The dynamics and development of transient blooms may also be affected as bacterial communities seem to influence phytoplankton species growth in contrasting ways.

  13. Plant-associated odor perception and processing in two parasitoid species with different degrees of host specificity: Implications for host location strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prithwiraj; Morawo, Tolulope; Fadamiro, Henry

    2017-08-01

    Microplitis croceipes and Cotesia marginiventris (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) are parasitoids of lepidopteran larvae with different degrees of host specificity. Both parasitoid species rely on host-related plant volatiles as odor cues to locate their herbivore hosts. To better understand mechanisms of odor processing in parasitoids, we tested responses of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the antennal sensilla placodea of female parasitoids to select plant volatiles and mixtures. The compounds tested include two green leaf volatiles (i.e., cis-3-hexenol and hexanal) and three herbivore-induced plant volatiles (i.e., cis-3-hexenyl butyrate, cis-3-hexenyl acetate and linalool). Single-sensillum recording showed that the test compounds elicited activity in large and small amplitude neurons housed in the short sensilla placodea of both parasitoid species. In general, C. marginiventris showed greater OSN responses to a low dose while M. croceipes showed greater responses to a high dose of test compounds. Binary mixtures of cis-3-hexenol and linalool inhibited OSN activity in M. croceipes, but not in C. marginiventris. These differences may have implications for odor discrimination in the two parasitoid species. In addition, anterograde neurobiotin stainings were performed to map glomerular projections of OSNs in the antennal lobe of the parasitoids. In M. croceipes, a mixture of cis-3-hexenol and linalool inhibited activity of the glomerulus activated by cis-3-hexenol alone. In C. marginiventris, a mixture of cis-3-hexenol and cis-3-hexenyl acetate showed intense labeling in their respective glomeruli, possibly suggesting a synergistic interaction. These differences in detection and coding of single compounds and mixtures may impact host location strategies in the two parasitoid species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cleavage of host cytokeratin-6 by lysine-specific gingipain induces gingival inflammation in periodontitis patients.

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    Salunya Tancharoen

    Full Text Available Lysine-specific gingipain (Kgp is a virulence factor secreted from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis, a major etiological bacterium of periodontal disease. Keratin intermediate filaments maintain the structural integrity of gingival epithelial cells, but are targeted by Kgp to produce a novel cytokeratin 6 fragment (K6F. We investigated the release of K6F and its induction of cytokine secretion.K6F present in the gingival crevicular fluid of periodontal disease patients and in gingipain-treated rat gingival epithelial cell culture supernatants was measured by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer-based rapid quantitative peptide analysis using BLOTCHIP. K6F in gingival tissues was immunostained, and cytokeratin 6 protein was analyzed by immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry. Activation of MAPK in gingival epithelial cells was evaluated by immunoblotting. ELISA was used to measure K6F and the cytokines release induced by K6F. Human gingival fibroblast migration was assessed using a Matrigel invasion chamber assay.We identified K6F, corresponding to the C-terminus region of human cytokeratin 6 (amino acids 359-378, in the gingival crevicular fluid of periodontal disease patients and in the supernatant from gingival epithelial cells cultured with Kgp. K6F antigen was distributed from the basal to the spinous epithelial layers in gingivae from periodontal disease patients. Cytokeratin 6 on gingival epithelial cells was degraded by Kgp, but not by Arg-gingipain, P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide or Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide. K6F, but not a scrambled K6F peptide, induced human gingival fibroblast migration and secretion of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. These effects of K6F were mediated by activation of p38 MAPK and Jun N-terminal kinase, but not p42/44 MAPK or p-Akt.Kgp degrades gingival epithelial cell cytokeratin 6 to K6F that, on

  15. Assessing the diversity, host-specificity and infection patterns of apicomplexan parasites in reptiles from Oman, Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, João P; Harris, D James; Carranza, Salvador; Goméz-Díaz, Elena

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the processes that shape parasite diversification, their distribution and abundance provides valuable information on the dynamics and evolution of disease. In this study, we assessed the diversity, distribution, host-specificity and infection patterns of apicomplexan parasites in amphibians and reptiles from Oman, Arabia. Using a quantitative PCR approach we detected three apicomplexan parasites (haemogregarines, lankesterellids and sarcocystids). A total of 13 haemogregarine haplotypes were identified, which fell into four main clades in a phylogenetic framework. Phylogenetic analysis of six new lankesterellid haplotypes revealed that these parasites were distinct from, but phylogenetically related to, known Lankesterella species and might represent new taxa. The percentage of infected hosts (prevalence) and the number of haemogregarines in the blood (parasitaemia) varied significantly between gecko species. We also found significant differences in parasitaemia between haemogregarine parasite lineages (defined by phylogenetic clustering of haplotypes), suggesting differences in host-parasite compatibility between these lineages. For Pristurus rupestris, we found significant differences in haemogregarine prevalence between geographical areas. Our results suggest that host ecology and host relatedness may influence haemogregarine distributions and, more generally, highlight the importance of screening wild hosts from remote regions to provide new insights into parasite diversity.

  16. Infection by Toxoplasma gondii Specifically Induces Host c-Myc and the Genes This Pivotal Transcription Factor Regulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Magdalena; Shastri, Anjali J.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection has previously been described to cause dramatic changes in the host transcriptome by manipulating key regulators, including STATs, NF-κB, and microRNAs. Here, we report that Toxoplasma tachyzoites also mediate rapid and sustained induction of another pivotal regulator of host cell transcription, c-Myc. This induction is seen in cells infected with all three canonical types of Toxoplasma but not the closely related apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum. Coinfection of cells with both Toxoplasma and Neospora still results in an increase in the level of host c-Myc, showing that c-Myc is actively upregulated by Toxoplasma infection (rather than repressed by Neospora). We further demonstrate that this upregulation may be mediated through c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and is unlikely to be a nonspecific host response, as heat-killed Toxoplasma parasites do not induce this increase and neither do nonviable parasites inside the host cell. Finally, we show that the induced c-Myc is active and that transcripts dependent on its function are upregulated, as predicted. Hence, c-Myc represents an additional way in which Toxoplasma tachyzoites have evolved to specifically alter host cell functions during intracellular growth. PMID:24532536

  17. Host-specific phenotypic plasticity of the turtle barnacle Chelonibia testudinaria: a widespread generalist rather than a specialist.

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    Chi Chiu Cheang

    Full Text Available Turtle barnacles are common epibionts on marine organisms. Chelonibia testudinaria is specific on marine turtles whereas C. patula is a host generalist, but rarely found on turtles. It has been questioned why C. patula, being abundant on a variety of live substrata, is almost absent from turtles. We evaluated the genetic (mitochondrial COI, 16S and 12S rRNA, and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP and morphological differentiation of C. testudinaia and C. patula from different hosts, to determine the mode of adaptation exhibited by Chelonibia species on different hosts. The two taxa demonstrate clear differences in shell morphology and length of 4-6(th cirri, but very similar in arthropodal characters. Moreover, we detected no genetic differentiation in mitochondrial DNA and AFLP analyses. Outlier detection infers insignificant selection across loci investigated. Based on combined morphological and molecular evidence, we proposed that C. testudinaria and C. patula are conspecific, and the two morphs with contrasting shell morphologies and cirral length found on different host are predominantly shaped by developmental plasticity in response to environmental setting on different hosts. Chelonibia testudinaria is, thus, a successful general epibiotic fouler and the phenotypic responses postulated can increase the fitness of the animals when they attach on hosts with contrasting life-styles.

  18. Use of tactual materials on the achievement of content specific vocabulary and terminology acquisition within an intermediate level science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Brian H.

    In this quasi-experimental study, the researcher investigated the effectiveness of three tactual strategies and one non-tactual strategy of content specific vocabulary acquisition. Flash cards, task cards, and learning wheels served as the tactual strategies, and vocabulary review sheets served as a non-tactual strategy. The sample (n=85) consisted of all middle school students in a small high performing middle school located in the northern suburbs of New York City. All of the vocabulary words and terms came from the New York State Intermediate Level Science Core Curriculum. Pre-tests and post-tests were used to collect the data. A repeated measures ANOVA was conducted on the gain scores from each of the treatments. Multiple paired sample t-tests were conducted to analyze the results. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine if there was a variance between the academic achievement levels of the students, gender, and grade level for each of the treatments. All of the treatments significantly improved the science achievement of the students, but significance was found between them. Significance was found between the achievement groups with the above average students attaining a higher mean on the pre-test and post-test for each treatment, whereas the below average students had the lowest mean on both assessments. The sixth grade students showed significant improvement over the seventh grade students while using the flash cards (p=.004) and learning wheel (p=.007). During the learning wheel treatment, the males scored significantly better (p=.021) than the females on the pre-test and post-test. During the worksheet treatment, significance (p=.034) was found between gender and achievement group. The below average male students had the greatest gain from the pre-test to the post-test, but the post-test mean was still the lowest of the groups. Limitations, implications for future research and current practice are discussed. Key words are: flash cards, task cards

  19. Lack of host specificity leads to independent assortment of dipterocarps and ectomycorrhizal fungi across a soil fertility gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peay, Kabir G; Russo, Sabrina E; McGuire, Krista L; Lim, Zhenyu; Chan, Ju Ping; Tan, Sylvester; Davies, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    Plants interact with a diversity of microorganisms, and there is often concordance in their community structures. Because most community-level studies are observational, it is unclear if such concordance arises because of host specificity, in which microorganisms or plants limit each other's occurrence. Using a reciprocal transplant experiment, we tested the hypothesis that host specificity between trees and ectomycorrhizal fungi determines patterns of tree and fungal soil specialisation. Seedlings of 13 dipterocarp species with contrasting soil specialisations were seeded into plots crossing soil type and canopy openness. Ectomycorrhizal colonists were identified by DNA sequencing. After 2.5 years, we found no evidence of host specificity. Rather, soil environment was the primary determinant of ectomycorrhizal diversity and composition on seedlings. Despite their close symbiosis, our results show that ectomycorrhizal fungi and tree communities in this Bornean rain forest assemble independently of host-specific interactions, raising questions about how mutualism shapes the realised niche. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  20. Host specificity and genealogy of Polyplax serrata on Apodemus species: a case of parasite duplication or colonisation?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefka, Jan; Hypša, Václav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 6 (2008), s. 731-741 ISSN 0020-7519 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : parasite duplication * host specificity * genealogy * speciation * Polyplax * Apodemus Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.752, year: 2008

  1. Mannose-specific interactions of Lactobacillus plantarum in the intestine : bacterial genes, molecular host responses and potential probiotic effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pretzer, G.

    2008-01-01

    One potential mechanism by which probiotic microorganisms may exert beneficial health effects to the host is the inhibition of intestinal infections by competitive exclusion of pathogenic bacteria. This concept may also be applicable for mannose-specific adhesion to the epithelial surface, which has

  2. Host-specificity of monoxenous trypanosomatids: statistical analysis of the distribution and transmission patterns of the parasites from Neotropical Heteroptera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozminsky, E.; Kraeva, N.; Ishemgulova, A.; Dobáková, Eva; Lukeš, Julius; Kment, P.; Yurchenko, V.; Votýpka, J.; Maslov, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 166, č. 5 (2015), s. 551-568 ISSN 1434-4610 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosomatids * Heteroptera * host-parasite specificity * biodiversity * Spliced Leader RNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.898, year: 2015

  3. DYNAMICS OF AQUATIC FECAL CONTAMINATION, FECAL SOURCE IDENTIFICATION, AND CORRELATION OF BACTEROIDALES HOST-SPECIFIC MARKERS DETECTION WITH FECAL PATHOGENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecal pollution impairs the health and productivity of coastal waters and causes human disease. PCR of host-specific 16S rDNA sequences from anaerobic Bacteroidales bacteria offers a promising method of tracking fecal contamination and identifying its source(s). Before Bacteroida...

  4. Extracellular vesicles from parasitic helminths contain specific excretory/secretory proteins and are internalized in intestinal host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marcilla

    Full Text Available The study of host-parasite interactions has increased considerably in the last decades, with many studies focusing on the identification of parasite molecules (i.e. surface or excretory/secretory proteins (ESP as potential targets for new specific treatments and/or diagnostic tools. In parallel, in the last few years there have been significant advances in the field of extracellular vesicles research. Among these vesicles, exosomes of endocytic origin, with a characteristic size ranging from 30-100 nm, carry several atypical secreted proteins in different organisms, including parasitic protozoa. Here, we present experimental evidence for the existence of exosome-like vesicles in parasitic helminths, specifically the trematodes Echinostoma caproni and Fasciola hepatica. These microvesicles are actively released by the parasites and are taken up by host cells. Trematode extracellular vesicles contain most of the proteins previously identified as components of ESP, as confirmed by proteomic, immunogold labeling and electron microscopy studies. In addition to parasitic proteins, we also identify host proteins in these structures. The existence of extracellular vesicles explains the secretion of atypical proteins in trematodes, and the demonstration of their uptake by host cells suggests an important role for these structures in host-parasite communication, as described for other infectious agents.

  5. Genetic variation and host-parasite specificity of Striga resistance and tolerance in rice: the need for predictive breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenburg, Jonne; Cissoko, Mamadou; Kayongo, Nicholas; Dieng, Ibnou; Bisikwa, Jenipher; Irakiza, Runyambo; Masoka, Isaac; Midega, Charles A O; Scholes, Julie D

    2017-05-01

    The parasitic weeds Striga asiatica and Striga hermonthica cause devastating yield losses to upland rice in Africa. Little is known about genetic variation in host resistance and tolerance across rice genotypes, in relation to virulence differences across Striga species and ecotypes. Diverse rice genotypes were phenotyped for the above traits in S. asiatica- (Tanzania) and S. hermonthica-infested fields (Kenya and Uganda) and under controlled conditions. New rice genotypes with either ecotype-specific or broad-spectrum resistance were identified. Resistance identified in the field was confirmed under controlled conditions, providing evidence that resistance was largely genetically determined. Striga-resistant genotypes contributed to yield security under Striga-infested conditions, although grain yield was also determined by the genotype-specific yield potential and tolerance. Tolerance, the physiological mechanism mitigating Striga effects on host growth and physiology, was unrelated to resistance, implying that any combination of high, medium or low levels of these traits can be found across rice genotypes. Striga virulence varies across species and ecotypes. The extent of Striga-induced host damage results from the interaction between parasite virulence and genetically determined levels of host-plant resistance and tolerance. These novel findings support the need for predictive breeding strategies based on knowledge of host resistance and parasite virulence. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. The Bacteriome of Bat Flies (Nycteribiidae) from the Malagasy Region: a Community Shaped by Host Ecology, Bacterial Transmission Mode, and Host-Vector Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, David A; Duron, Olivier; Cordonin, Colette; Gomard, Yann; Ramasindrazana, Beza; Mavingui, Patrick; Goodman, Steven M; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-01-08

    The Nycteribiidae are obligate blood-sucking Diptera (Hippoboscoidea) flies that parasitize bats. Depending on species, these wingless flies exhibit either high specialism or generalism toward their hosts, which may in turn have important consequences in terms of their associated microbial community structure. Bats have been hypothesized to be reservoirs of numerous infectious agents, some of which have recently emerged in human populations. Thus, bat flies may be important in the epidemiology and transmission of some of these bat-borne infectious diseases, acting either directly as arthropod vectors or indirectly by shaping pathogen communities among bat populations. In addition, bat flies commonly have associations with heritable bacterial endosymbionts that inhabit insect cells and depend on maternal transmission through egg cytoplasm to ensure their transmission. Some of these heritable bacteria are likely obligate mutualists required to support bat fly development, but others are facultative symbionts with unknown effects. Here, we present bacterial community profiles that were obtained from seven bat fly species, representing five genera, parasitizing bats from the Malagasy region. The observed bacterial diversity includes Rickettsia, Wolbachia, and several Arsenophonus-like organisms, as well as other members of the Enterobacteriales and a widespread association of Bartonella bacteria from bat flies of all five genera. Using the well-described host specificity of these flies and data on community structure from selected bacterial taxa with either vertical or horizontal transmission, we show that host/vector specificity and transmission mode are important drivers of bacterial community structure. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Shigella Manipulates Host Immune Responses by Delivering Effector Proteins with Specific Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Hiroshi; Mimuro, Hitomi; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium deploys multiple defense systems against microbial infection to sense bacterial components and danger alarms, as well as to induce intracellular signal transduction cascades that trigger both the innate and the adaptive immune systems, which are pivotal for bacterial elimination. However, many enteric bacterial pathogens, including Shigella, deliver a subset of virulence proteins (effectors) via the type III secretion system (T3SS) that enable bacterial evasion from host immune systems; consequently, these pathogens are able to efficiently colonize the intestinal epithelium. In this review, we present and select recently discovered examples of interactions between Shigella and host immune responses, with particular emphasis on strategies that bacteria use to manipulate inflammatory outputs of host-cell responses such as cell death, membrane trafficking, and innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:25999954

  8. Shigella manipulates host immune responses by delivering effector proteins with specific roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi eAshida

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium deploys multiple defense systems against microbial infection to sense bacterial components and danger alarms, as well as to induce intracellular signal transduction cascades that trigger both the innate and adaptive immune system, which are pivotal for bacterial elimination. However, many enteric bacterial pathogens, including Shigella, deliver a subset of virulence proteins (effectors via the type III secretion system (T3SS that enable bacterial evasion from host immune systems; consequently, these pathogens are able to efficiently colonize the intestinal epithelium. In this review, we present select recently discovered examples of interactions between Shigella and host immune responses, with particular emphasis on strategies that bacteria use to manipulate inflammatory outputs of host cell responses such as cell death, membrane trafficking, and innate and adaptive immune responses.

  9. Metabolomic Profiling of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens-Induced Root Nodules Reveals Both Host Plant-Specific and Developmental Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Lardi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is a nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont, which can grow inside root-nodule cells of the agriculturally important soybean and other host plants. Our previous studies described B. diazoefficiens host-specific global expression changes occurring during legume infection at the transcript and protein level. In order to further characterize nodule metabolism, we here determine by flow injection–time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis the metabolome of (i nodules and roots from four different B. diazoefficiens host plants; (ii soybean nodules harvested at different time points during nodule development; and (iii soybean nodules infected by two strains mutated in key genes for nitrogen fixation, respectively. Ribose (soybean, tartaric acid (mungbean, hydroxybutanoyloxybutanoate (siratro and catechol (cowpea were among the metabolites found to be specifically elevated in one of the respective host plants. While the level of C4-dicarboxylic acids decreased during soybean nodule development, we observed an accumulation of trehalose-phosphate at 21 days post infection (dpi. Moreover, nodules from non-nitrogen-fixing bacteroids (nifA and nifH mutants showed specific metabolic alterations; these were also supported by independent transcriptomics data. The alterations included signs of nitrogen limitation in both mutants, and an increased level of a phytoalexin in nodules induced by the nifA mutant, suggesting that the tissue of these nodules exhibits defense and stress reactions.

  10. Cryptic diversity, high host specificity and reproductive synchronization in army ant-associated Vatesus beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Beeren, Christoph; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Kronauer, Daniel J C

    2016-02-01

    Army ants and their arthropod symbionts represent one of the most species-rich animal associations on Earth, and constitute a fascinating example of diverse host-symbiont interaction networks. However, despite decades of research, our knowledge of army ant symbionts remains fragmentary due to taxonomic ambiguity and the inability to study army ants in the laboratory. Here, we present an integrative approach that allows us to reliably determine species boundaries, assess biodiversity, match different developmental stages and sexes, and to study the life cycles of army ant symbionts. This approach is based on a combination of community sampling, DNA barcoding, morphology and physiology. As a test case, we applied this approach to the staphylinid beetle genus Vatesus and its different Eciton army ant host species at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. DNA barcoding led to the discovery of cryptic biodiversity and, in combination with extensive community sampling, revealed strict host partitioning with no overlap in host range. Using DNA barcoding, we were also able to match the larval stages of all focal Vatesus species. In combination with studies of female reproductive physiology, this allowed us to reconstruct almost the complete life cycles of the different beetle species. We show that Vatesus beetles are highly adapted to the symbiosis with army ants, in that their reproduction and larval development are synchronized with the stereotypical reproductive and behavioural cycles of their host colonies. Our approach can now be used to study army ant-symbiont communities more broadly, and to obtain novel insights into co-evolutionary and ecological dynamics in species-rich host-symbiont systems. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Mesoniviruses are mosquito-specific viruses with extensive geographic distribution and host range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The family Mesoniviridae (order Nidovirales) comprises of a group of positive-sense, single-stranded RNA ([+]ssRNA) viruses isolated from mosquitoes. Findings Thirteen novel insect-specific virus isolates were obtained from mosquitoes collected in Indonesia, Thailand and the USA. By electron microscopy, the virions appeared as spherical particles with a diameter of ~50 nm. Their 20,129 nt to 20,777 nt genomes consist of positive-sense, single-stranded RNA with a poly-A tail. Four isolates from Houston, Texas, and one isolate from Java, Indonesia, were identified as variants of the species Alphamesonivirus-1 which also includes Nam Dinh virus (NDiV) from Vietnam and Cavally virus (CavV) from Côte d’Ivoire. The eight other isolates were identified as variants of three new mesoniviruses, based on genome organization and pairwise evolutionary distances: Karang Sari virus (KSaV) from Java, Bontag Baru virus (BBaV) from Java and Kalimantan, and Kamphaeng Phet virus (KPhV) from Thailand. In comparison with NDiV, the three new mesoniviruses each contained a long insertion (180 – 588 nt) of unknown function in the 5’ region of ORF1a, which accounted for much of the difference in genome size. The insertions contained various short imperfect repeats and may have arisen by recombination or sequence duplication. Conclusions In summary, based on their genome organizations and phylogenetic relationships, thirteen new viruses were identified as members of the family Mesoniviridae, order Nidovirales. Species demarcation criteria employed previously for mesoniviruses would place five of these isolates in the same species as NDiV and CavV (Alphamesonivirus-1) and the other eight isolates would represent three new mesonivirus species (Alphamesonivirus-5, Alphamesonivirus-6 and Alphamesonivirus-7). The observed spatiotemporal distribution over widespread geographic regions and broad species host range in mosquitoes suggests that mesoniviruses may be common in

  12. COI and ITS2 sequences delimit species, reveal cryptic taxa and host specificity of fig-associated Sycophila (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwei; Zhou, Xin; Feng, Gui; Hu, Haoyuan; Niu, Liming; Hebert, Paul D N; Huang, Dawei

    2010-01-01

    Although the genus Sycophila has broad host preferences, some species are specifically associated with figs as nonpollinator wasps. Because of their sexual dimorphism, morphological plasticity, cryptic mating behaviour and poorly known biology, species identifications are often uncertain. It is particularly difficult to match conspecific females and males. In this study, we employed two molecular markers, mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS2, to identify Sycophila from six Chinese fig species. Morphological studies revealed 25 female and male morphs, while sequence results for both genes were consistent in supporting the presence of 15 species, of which 13 were host specialists and two used dual hosts. A single species of Sycophila was respectively found on four fig species, but six species were isolated from Ficus benjamina and a same number was reared from Ficus microcarpa. Sequence results revealed three male morphs in one species and detected two species that were overlooked by morphological analysis. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Host specificity and the structure of helminth parasite communities of fishes in a Neotropical river in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo; Novelo-Turcotte, María Teresa; Caspeta-Mandujano, Juan Manuel; Vazquez-Hurtado, Gabriela; Quiroz-Martínez, Benjamin; Mercado-Silva, Norman; Favila, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In a tropical locality of Río La Antigua, Veracruz, Mexico, 11 fish species, represented by 244 individual fish from six freshwater fish families living sympatrically and synchronically, were examined for helminth parasites. A total of 36 taxa of helminths were recorded, 24 autogenic and 12 allogenic forms, including 6 monogeneans, 14 trematodes, 1 cestode, and 15 nematodes. Most helminth taxa were recovered for 10/11 of the component communities we analyzed. The results contribute empirical evidence that host specificity is an important force in the development of helminth communities of freshwater fishes. Each fish family has their own set of parasites, host species belonging to the same taxon share parasite species. High component community similarity among related host species was recorded, demonstrated by high prevalence and abundance, as well as dominance, of autogenic specialist species in each component community. Most autogenic helminth species are numerically and reproductively successful in relatively few host species. Autogenic helminths common in one host species are not common in others. Our findings give empirical support to the idea that low levels of sharing of parasites favor animal coexistence and high species richness, because large phylogenetic differences allow potentially competing animals to consume the same resources without being sensitive of another’s parasites. PMID:28004635

  14. Plant-feeding nematodes in coastal sand dunes: occurrence, host specificity and effects on plant growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, E.P.; Duyts, Henk; Karssen, G.; Van der Stoel, C.D.; Van der Putten, Wim H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Coastal sand dunes have a well-established abiotic gradient from beach to land and a corresponding spatial gradient of plant species representing succession in time. Here, we relate the distribution of plant-feeding nematodes with dominant plant species in the field to host specialization and

  15. Lineage-specific transcriptional profiles of Symbiodinium spp. unaltered by heat stress in a coral host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshis, Daniel J; Ladner, Jason T; Oliver, Thomas A; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2014-06-01

    Dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium form an endosymbiosis with reef building corals, in which photosynthetically derived nutrients comprise the majority of the coral energy budget. An extraordinary amount of functional and genetic diversity is contained within the coral-associated Symbiodinium, with some phylotypes (i.e., genotypic groupings), conferring enhanced stress tolerance to host corals. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies have enabled transcriptome-wide profiling of the stress response of the cnidarian coral host; however, a comprehensive understanding of the molecular response to stress of coral-associated Symbiodinium, as well as differences among physiologically susceptible and tolerant types, remains largely unexplored. Here, we examine the transcriptome-wide response to heat stress via RNA-Seq of two types of Symbiodinium, the putatively thermotolerant type D2 and the more susceptible type C3K, resident within the same coral host species, Acropora hyacinthus. Contrary to previous findings with coral hosts, we find no detectable change in gene expression across the dinoflagellate transcriptome after 3 days of elevated thermal exposure, despite physical evidence of symbiosis breakdown. However, hundreds of genes identified as orthologs between the C and D types exhibited significant expression differences within treatments (i.e., attributable solely to type, not heat exposure). These include many genes related to known thermotolerance mechanisms including heat shock proteins and chloroplast membrane components. Additionally, both the between-treatment similarities and between-type differences remained pervasive after 12-18 months of common garden acclimation and in mixed Symbiodinium assemblages within the same coral host colony. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Staphylorchis cymatodes (Gorgoderidae: Anaporrhutinae) from carcharhiniform, orectolobiform and myliobatiform elasmobranchs of Australasia: low host specificity, wide distribution and morphological plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutmore, Scott C; Bennett, Michael B; Cribb, Thomas H

    2010-12-01

    Anaporrhutine gorgoderids (Digenea: Gorgoderidae: Anaporrhutinae) found in the body cavity of six species of elasmobranchs from the orders Carcharhiniformes, Myliobatiformes and Orectolobiformes from Australian waters were found to belong to the genus Staphylorchis. Although these specimens were morphologically variable, sequences of ITS2 and 28S ribosomal DNA from specimens from three host families and two host orders were identical. Based on morphological and molecular data these specimens were identified as the type-species of the genus, Staphylorchis cymatodes. New measurements are provided for S. cymatodes, and for the first time genetic data are presented for this species. In addition to providing new morphological and molecular data for S. cymatodes, the previously described species S. gigas, S. parisi and S. scoliodonii, are here synonymised with S. cymatodes. This implies that S. cymatodes, as conceived here, has remarkably low host-specificity, being recorded from eight elasmobranch species from four families and three orders, has a wide geographical distribution in the Indo-west Pacific from off India, in the Bay of Bengal, to Moreton Bay in the Coral Sea, and is morphologically plastic, with body size, size of specific organs and body shape differing dramatically between specimens from different host species. The genus Staphylorchis now contains only two valid species, S. cymatodes and S. pacifica. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Specific allogeneic unresponsiveness in the adult host: present-day experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapaport, F.T.; Bachvaroff, R.J.; Cronkite, E.; Chanana, A.; Sato, T.; Asari, H.; Waltzer, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a long-term intensive effort to apply the induction of adult allogensic unresponsiveness to the transplantation problem, two techniques to control the variability in the persistence of immunologically competent postthymic cells iin the treated host and/or the inoculum of autologous marrow returned to the host after irradiation are described. The first consisted of exposing the peripheral blood of prospective recipients to a 5-week course of extra-corporeal irradiation (ECIB), the other of exposing the stored autologous marrow scheduled to repopulate a given recipient to methyl-prednisolone (MPd) and DNase prior to renifusion into the recipient. Serial analysis of bone marrow cell samples at various intervals before and after treatment was undertaken. The significance of the disappearance of a particular population of nonnuclear cells from the samples, and the association of such disappearance with increased success in the induction of allogeneic unresponsiveness is discussed

  18. Specific allogeneic unresponsiveness in the adult host: present-day experimental models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapaport, F.T.; Bachvaroff, R.J.; Cronkite, E.; Chanana, A.; Sato, T.; Asari, H.; Waltzer, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a long-term intensive effort to apply the induction of adult allogensic unresponsiveness to the transplantation problem, two techniques to control the variability in the persistence of immunologically competent postthymic cells iin the treated host and/or the inoculum of autologous marrow returned to the host after irradiation are described. The first consisted of exposing the peripheral blood of prospective recipients to a 5-week course of extra-corporeal irradiation (ECIB), the other of exposing the stored autologous marrow scheduled to repopulate a given recipient to methyl-prednisolone (MPd) and DNase prior to renifusion into the recipient. Serial analysis of bone marrow cell samples at various intervals before and after treatment was undertaken. The significance of the disappearance of a particular population of nonnuclear cells from the samples, and the association of such disappearance with increased success in the induction of allogeneic unresponsiveness is discussed. (ACR)

  19. Caribbean corals house shared and host-specific microbial symbionts over time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Nathaniel D; Vollmer, Steven V

    2016-08-01

    The rise of coral diseases has triggered a surge of interest in coral microbial communities. But to fully understand how the coral microbiome may cause or respond to disease, we must first understand structure and variation in the healthy coral microbiome. We used 16S rRNA sequencing to characterize the microbiomes of 100 healthy coral colonies from six Caribbean coral species (Acropora cervicornis, A. palmata, Diploria labyrinthiformis, Diploria strigosa, Porites astreoides and P. furcata) across four reefs and three time points over 1 year. We found host species to be the strongest driver of coral microbiome structure across site and time. Analysis of the core microbiome revealed remarkable similarity in the bacterial taxa represented across coral hosts and many bacterial phylotypes shared across all corals sampled. Some of these widespread bacterial taxa have been identified in Pacific corals, indicating that a core coral microbiome may extend across oceans. Core bacterial phylotypes that were unique to each coral were taxonomically diverse, suggesting that different coral hosts provide persistent, divergent niches for bacteria. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Interplay of host specificity and biogeography in the population structure of a cosmopolitan endoparasite: microsatellite study of Ligula intestinalis (Cestoda)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefka, Jan; Hypša, Václav; Scholz, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 6 (2009), s. 1187-1206 ISSN 0962-1083 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073; GA ČR GA524/08/0885; GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : cryptic speciation * geographical isolation * host specificity * microsatellites * parasite * population structure Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 5.960, year: 2009

  1. A Carbohydrate Moiety of Secreted Stage-Specific Glycoprotein 4 Participates in Host Cell Invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi Extracellular Amastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar T. V. Florentino

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas’ disease. It is known that amastigotes derived from trypomastigotes in the extracellular milieu are infective in vitro and in vivo. Extracellular amastigotes (EAs have a stage-specific surface antigen called Ssp-4, a GPI-anchored glycoprotein that is secreted by the parasites. By immunoprecipitation with the Ssp-4-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb 2C2 and 1D9, we isolated the glycoprotein from EAs. By mass spectrometry, we identified the core protein of Ssp-4 and evaluated mRNA expression and the presence of Ssp-4 carbohydrate epitopes recognized by mAb1D9. We demonstrated that the carbohydrate epitope recognized by mAb1D9 could promote host cell invasion by EAs. Although infectious EAs express lower amounts of Ssp-4 compared with less-infectious EAs (at the mRNA and protein levels, it is the glycosylation of Ssp-4 (identified by mAb1D9 staining only in infectious strains and recognized by galectin-3 on host cells that is the determinant of EA invasion of host cells. Furthermore, Ssp-4 is secreted by EAs, either free or associated with parasite vesicles, and can participate in host-cell interactions. The results presented here describe the possible role of a carbohydrate moiety of T. cruzi surface glycoproteins in host cell invasion by EA forms, highlighting the potential of these moieties as therapeutic and vaccine targets for the treatment of Chagas’ disease.

  2. Ocorrência no Brasil de Thiara (Melanoides tuberculata (O.F. Muller, 1774 (Gastropoda, Prosobranchia, primeiro hospedeiro intermediário de Clonorchis sinensis (Cobbold, 1875 (Trematoda, Plathyhelmintes Occurrence of Thiara (Melanoides tuberculata (O.F. Mullher, 1774 (Gastropoda, Prosobranchia in Brazil, first intermediate host of Clonorchis sinensis (Cobbold, 1875 (Trematoda, Plathyhelmintes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Faria Vaz

    1986-08-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se a introdução em nosso meio de Thiara (Melanoides tuberculata possivelmente anterior a 1967, quando pela primeira vez foi coletada em Santos. Essa espécie pode comportar-se como primeiro hospedeiro intermediário de Paragonimus westermani e de Clonorchis sinensis. Somente o último trematódeo tem alguma possibilidade de vir a parasitar o homem, em nosso meio.Introduction of Thiara (Melanoides tuberculata in Brazil, is reported. This introduction may go back prior to 1967 when some specimens were collected at Santos, S.Paulo (Brazil. T. (M. tuberculata is an intermediate host of Paragonimus westermani and Clonorchis sinensis, both pathogenic for man. Only this last trematode has some potential for human infection in Brazil.

  3. Stage-dependent behavioural changes but early castration induced by the acanthocephalan parasite Polymorphus minutus in its Gammarus pulex intermediate host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Yann; Cézilly, Frank; Rigaud, Thierry

    2018-03-01

    Multidimensionality in parasite-induced phenotypic alterations (PIPA) has been observed in a large number of host-parasite associations, particularly in parasites with complex life cycles. However, it is still unclear whether such a syndrome is due to the successive activation of independent PIPAs, or results from the synchronous disruption of a single mechanism. The aim of the present study was to investigate the onset and progression of two PIPAs (a behavioural alteration: reversion of geotaxis, and castration) occurring in the crustacean amphipod Gammarus pulex infected with the acanthocephalan Polymorphus minutus, at different parasite developmental stages. Modifications of geotaxis in hosts differed according to the parasite developmental stage. Whereas the cystacanth stage induced a negative geotaxis (exposing the gammarid to predation by birds, the definitive hosts), the acanthella stage, not yet infective for the definitive host, induced a stronger positive geotaxis (presumably protecting gammarids from bird predation). In contrast, castration was almost total at the acanthella stage, with no significant variation in the intensity according to parasite maturation. Finally, no significant correlation was found between the intensity of behavioural changes and the intensity of castration. We discuss our results in relation with current views on the evolution of multidimensionality in PIPA.

  4. Low host specificity and abundance of frugivorous lepidoptera in the lowland rain forests of Papua New Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Sam

    Full Text Available We studied a community of frugivorous Lepidoptera in the lowland rainforest of Papua New Guinea. Rearing revealed 122 species represented by 1,720 individuals from 326 woody plant species. Only fruits from 52% (171 of the plant species sampled were attacked. On average, Lepidoptera were reared from 1 in 89 fruits and a kilogram of fruit was attacked by 1.01 individuals. Host specificity of Lepidoptera was notably low: 69% (33 of species attacked plants from >1 family, 8% (4 fed on single family, 6% (3 on single genus and 17% (8 were monophagous. The average kilogram of fruits was infested by 0.81 individual from generalist species (defined here as feeding on >1 plant genus and 0.07 individual from specialist species (feeding on a single host or congeneric hosts. Lepidoptera preferred smaller fruits with both smaller mesocarp and seeds. Large-seeded fruits with thin mesocarp tended to host specialist species whereas those with thick, fleshy mesocarp were often infested with both specialist and generalist species. The very low incidence of seed damage suggests that pre-dispersal seed predation by Lepidoptera does not play a major role in regulating plant populations via density-dependent mortality processes outlined by the Janzen-Connell hypothesis.

  5. Alguns dados bioecológicos de Pomacea haustrum (Reeve, 1856, predador-competidor de hospedeiros intermediários de Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, 1907 Some bioecological data regarding Pomacea haustrum (Reeve, 1856 predator-competitor of intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, 1907

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Milward-de-Andrade

    1978-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram feitas observações no laboratório e no campo, em Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil, com a finalidade de se obter informações biológicas e ecológicas sobre Pomacea haustrum (Reeve, 1856, molusco pilídeo, competidor-predador de hospedeiros intermediários de Schistosoma mansoni Sambon 1907.Observations carried out in the laboratory and the field (Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil offered the following biological and ecological informations Pomacea haustrum (Reeve, 1853, mollusk pilid, predator and competitor of Schistosoma mansoni intermediary host.

  6. A Synchrotron-Based Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting Analysis of Amyloid Fibrils and Prefibrillar Intermediates with Residue-Specific Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, Alexandra L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kiselar, Janna [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Ilchenko, Serguei [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Komatsu, Hiroaki [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chance, Mark R. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Axelsen, Paul H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-11-09

    The structural models of the fibrils formed by the 40-residue amyloid-β (Aβ40) peptide in Alzheimer’s disease typically consist of linear polypeptide segments, oriented approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the fibril, and joined together as parallel in-register β-sheets to form filaments. However, various models differ in the number of filaments that run the length of a fibril, and in the topological arrangement of these filaments. In addition to questions about the structure of Aβ40 monomers in fibrils, there are important unanswered questions about their structure in prefibrillar intermediates, which are of interest because they may represent the most neurotoxic form of Aβ40. To assess different models of fibril structure and to gain insight into the structure of prefibrillar intermediates, the relative solvent accessibility of amino acid residue side chains in fibrillar and prefibrillar Aβ40 preparations was characterized in solution by hydroxyl radical footprinting and structural mass spectrometry. A key to the application of this technology was the development of hydroxyl radical reactivity measures for individual side chains of Aβ40. When we combined mass-per-length measurements performed by dark-field electron microscopy, we determined that the results of our study were consistent with the core filament structure represented by two- and three-filament solid state nuclear magnetic resonance-based models of the Aβ40 fibril (such as 2LMN, 2LMO, 2LMP, and 2LMQ), with minor refinements, but they are inconsistent with the more recently proposed 2M4J model. Our results also demonstrate that individual Aβ40 fibrils exhibit structural heterogeneity or polymorphism, where regions of two-filament structure alternate with regions of three-filament structure. The footprinting approach utilized in this study will be valuable for characterizing various fibrillar and nonfibrillar forms of the Aβ peptide.

  7. Evaluation of the host specificity of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a larval parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host-specificity determination prior to the introduction of non-native natural enemies (predators and parasitoids) is a critical component of the risk assessment for modern classical biological control programs. In the present study, we assessed the host specificity of a newly described parasitoid,...

  8. Wolbachia age-sex-specific density in Aedes albopictus: a host evolutionary response to cytoplasmic incompatibility?

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    Pablo Tortosa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Wolbachia bacteria have invaded many arthropod species by inducing Cytoplasmic Incompatibility (CI. These symbionts represent fascinating objects of study for evolutionary biologists, but also powerful potential biocontrol agents. Here, we assess the density dynamics of Wolbachia infections in males and females of the mosquito Aedes albopitcus, an important vector of human pathogens, and interpret the results within an evolutionary framework.Wolbachia densities were measured in natural populations and in age controlled mosquitoes using quantitative PCR. We show that the density dynamics of the wAlbA Wolbachia strain infecting Aedes albopictus drastically differ between males and females, with a very rapid decay of infection in males only.Theory predicts that Wolbachia and its hosts should cooperate to improve the transmission of infection to offspring, because only infected eggs are protected from the effects of CI. However, incompatible matings effectively lower the fertility of infected males, so that selection acting on the host genome should tend to reduce the expression of CI in males, for example, by reducing infection density in males before sexual maturation. The rapid decay of one Wolbachia infection in Aedes albopictus males, but not in females, is consistent with this prediction. We suggest that the commonly observed reduction in CI intensity with male age reflects a similar evolutionary process. Our results also highlight the importance of monitoring infection density dynamics in both males and females to assess the efficiency of Wolbachia-based control strategies.

  9. Isolation and characterization of Bacteroides host strain HB-73 used to detect sewage specific phages in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavel, Kannappan; Fujioka, Roger; Ebdon, James; Taylor, Huw

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that Escherichia coli and enterococci are unreliable indicators of fecal contamination in Hawaii because of their ability to multiply in environmental soils. In this study, the method of detecting Bacteroides phages as specific markers of sewage contamination in Hawaii's recreational waters was evaluated because these sewage specific phages cannot multiply under environmental conditions. Bacteroides hosts (GB-124, GA-17), were recovered from sewage samples in Europe and were reported to be effective in detecting phages from sewage samples obtained in certain geographical areas. However, GB-124 and GA-17 hosts were ineffective in detecting phages from sewage samples obtained in Hawaii. Bacteroides host HB-73 was isolated from a sewage sample in Hawaii, confirmed as a Bacteroides sp. and shown to recover phages from multiple sources of sewage produced in Hawaii at high concentrations (5.2-7.3 x 10(5) PFU/100 mL). These Bacteroides phages were considered as potential markers of sewage because they also survived for three days in fresh stream water and two days in marine water. Water samples from Hawaii's coastal swimming beaches and harbors, which were known to be contaminated with discharges from streams, were shown to contain moderate (20-187 CFU/100 mL) to elevated (173-816 CFU/100 mL) concentrations of enterococci. These same samples contained undetectable levels (Hawaii and the most likely source of these enterococci is from environmental soil rather than from sewage. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Survey of immunoglobulin A protease activity among selected species of Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma: specificity for host immunoglobulin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapatais-Zoumbos, K; Chandler, D K; Barile, M F

    1985-03-01

    Because immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the predominant immunoglobulin at mucosal surfaces, IgA proteases produced by pathogenic bacteria are considered potential virulence factors for organisms that cause disease or gain entry at mucous membranes. To determine the role of IgA protease in the pathogenicity of mycoplasmal disease, a variety of human and animal mycoplasma and ureaplasma species were examined for IgA protease activity with human, murine, porcine, and canine IgA. None of the mycoplasma species examined showed detectable IgA protease activity with any of the IgAs tested. Twenty-eight strains of Ureaplasma urealyticum isolated from human urogenital tissues cleaved human IgA1, but no cleavage of human IgA2 or murine, porcine, or canine IgA was observed. Ureaplasmas isolated from nonhuman hosts (feline, canine, avian, and bovine [Ureaplasma diversum]) did not cleave human IgA1. Two strains of canine ureaplasmas were able to cleave canine IgA, but not murine IgA. Thus, ureaplasmas from other species can produce IgA protease, but the specificity of the enzyme was restricted to the IgA of the appropriate host. This finding suggests that IgA proteases could play a role in the selective host specificity of mucosal pathogens.

  11. Genome-Wide Comparison of Magnaporthe Species Reveals a Host-Specific Pattern of Secretory Proteins and Transposable Elements.

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    Meghana Deepak Shirke

    Full Text Available Blast disease caused by the Magnaporthe species is a major factor affecting the productivity of rice, wheat and millets. This study was aimed at generating genomic information for rice and non-rice Magnaporthe isolates to understand the extent of genetic variation. We have sequenced the whole genome of the Magnaporthe isolates, infecting rice (leaf and neck, finger millet (leaf and neck, foxtail millet (leaf and buffel grass (leaf. Rice and finger millet isolates infecting both leaf and neck tissues were sequenced, since the damage and yield loss caused due to neck blast is much higher as compared to leaf blast. The genome-wide comparison was carried out to study the variability in gene content, candidate effectors, repeat element distribution, genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and SNPs. The analysis of repeat element footprints revealed some genes such as naringenin, 2-oxoglutarate 3-dioxygenase being targeted by Pot2 and Occan, in isolates from different host species. Some repeat insertions were host-specific while other insertions were randomly shared between isolates. The distributions of repeat elements, secretory proteins, CAZymes and SNPs showed significant variation across host-specific lineages of Magnaporthe indicating an independent genome evolution orchestrated by multiple genomic factors.

  12. Increased sampling reveals novel lineages of Entamoeba: consequences of genetic diversity and host specificity for taxonomy and molecular detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensvold, C Rune; Lebbad, Marianne; Victory, Emma L; Verweij, Jaco J; Tannich, Egbert; Alfellani, Mohammed; Legarraga, Paulette; Clark, C Graham

    2011-07-01

    To expand the representation for phylogenetic analysis, ten additional complete Entamoeba small-subunit rRNA gene sequences were obtained from humans, non-human primates, cattle and a tortoise. For some novel sequences no corresponding morphological data were available, and we suggest that these organisms should be referred to as ribosomal lineages (RL) rather than being assigned species names at present. To investigate genetic diversity and host specificity of selected Entamoeba species, a total of 91 new partial small subunit rRNA gene sequences were obtained, including 49 from Entamoeba coli, 18 from Entamoeba polecki, and 17 from Entamoeba hartmanni. We propose a new nomenclature for significant variants within established Entamoeba species. Based on current data we propose that the uninucleated-cyst-producing Entamoeba infecting humans is called Entamoeba polecki and divided into four subtypes (ST1-ST4) and that Entamoeba coli is divided into two subtypes (ST1-ST2). New hosts for several species were detected and, while host specificity and genetic diversity of several species remain to be clarified, it is clear that previous reliance on cultivated material has given us a misleading and incomplete picture of variation within the genus Entamoeba. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Host specificity and genealogy of the louse Polyplax serrata on field mice, Apodemus species: a case of parasite duplication or colonisation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefka, Jan; Hypsa, Václav

    2008-05-01

    The genealogy, population structure and population dynamics of the sucking louse Polyplax serrata were analysed across four host species of the genus Apodemus. An analysis of 126 sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I using phylogenetic approaches and haplotype networking revealed a clear structure of European samples, forming three distinct and genetically distant clades with different host specificities. Although a clear connection was detected between the host and parasite genealogies/phylogenies, a uniform pattern of co-speciation was not found. For example, a dramatic shift in the degree of host specificity was demonstrated for two related louse lineages living in sympatry and sharing one of their host species. While one of the louse lineages frequently parasitised two different host taxa (Apodemus sylvaticus and Apodemus flavicollis), the other louse lineage was strictly specific to A. flavicollis. The estimate of divergence time between the two louse lineages indicates that they may have arisen due to parasite duplication on A. flavicollis.

  14. Mitochondrial COI and morphological specificity of the mealy aphids (Hyalopterus ssp. collected from different hosts in Europe (Hemiptera, Aphididae

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    Rimantas Rakauskas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Forty three European population samples of mealy aphids from various winter and summer host plants were attributed to respective species of Hyalopterus by means of their partial sequences of mitochondrial COI gene. Used Hyalopterus samples emerged as monophyletic relative to outgroup and formed three major clades representing three host specific mealy aphid species in the Neighbor joining, Maximum parsimony, Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference trees. H. pruni and H. persikonus emerged as a sister species, whilst H. amygdali was located basally. Samples representing different clades in the molecular trees were used for canonical discrimination analysis based on twenty two morphological characters. Length of the median dorsal head hair enabled a 97.3 % separation of H. amygdali from the remaining two species. No single character enabled satisfactory discrimination between apterous viviparous females of H. pruni and H. persikonus. A modified key for the morphological identification of Hyalopterus species is suggested and their taxonomic status discussed.

  15. Molecular characterization of Babesia peircei and Babesia ugwidiensis provides insight into the evolution and host specificity of avian piroplasmids

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    Michael J. Yabsley

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There are 16 recognized species of avian-infecting Babesia spp. (Piroplasmida: Babesiidae. While the classification of piroplasmids has been historically based on morphological differences, geographic isolation and presumed host and/or vector specificities, recent studies employing gene sequence analysis have provided insight into their phylogenetic relationships and host distribution and specificity. In this study, we analyzed the sequences of the 18S rRNA gene and ITS-1 and ITS-2 regions of two Babesia species from South African seabirds: Babesia peircei from African penguins (Spheniscus demersus and Babesia ugwidiensis from Bank and Cape cormorants (Phalacrocorax neglectus and P. capensis, respectively. Our results show that avian Babesia spp. are not monophyletic, with at least three distinct phylogenetic groups. B. peircei and B. ugwidiensis are closely related, and fall within the same phylogenetic group as B. ardeae (from herons Ardea cinerea, B. poelea (from boobies Sula spp. and B. uriae (from murres Uria aalge. The validity of B. peircei and B. ugwidiensis as separate species is corroborated by both morphological and genetic evidence. On the other hand, our results indicate that B. poelea might be a synonym of B. peircei, which in turn would be a host generalist that infects seabirds from multiple orders. Further studies combining morphological and molecular methods are warranted to clarify the taxonomy, phylogeny and host distribution of avian piroplasmids. Keywords: Africa, Babesia, Piroplasmida, Phalacrocoracidae, Spheniscidae, Tick-borne pathogen

  16. Brucella melitensis global gene expression study provides novel information on growth phase-specific gene regulation with potential insights for understanding Brucella:host initial interactions

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    Garner Harold R

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucella spp. are the etiological agents of brucellosis, a zoonotic infectious disease that causes abortion in animals and chronic debilitating illness in humans. Natural Brucella infections occur primarily through an incompletely defined mechanism of adhesion to and penetration of mucosal epithelium. In this study, we characterized changes in genome-wide transcript abundance of the most and the least invasive growth phases of B. melitensis cultures to HeLa cells, as a preliminary approach for identifying candidate pathogen genes involved in invasion of epithelial cells. Results B. melitensis at the late logarithmic phase of growth are more invasive to HeLa cells than mid-logarithmic or stationary growth phases. Microarray analysis of B. melitensis gene expression identified 414 up- and 40 down-regulated genes in late-log growth phase (the most invasive culture compared to the stationary growth phase (the least invasive culture. As expected, the majority of up-regulated genes in late-log phase cultures were those associated with growth, including DNA replication, transcription, translation, intermediate metabolism, energy production and conversion, membrane transport, and biogenesis of the cell envelope and outer membrane; while the down-regulated genes were distributed among several functional categories. Conclusion This Brucella global expression profile study provides novel information on growth phase-specific gene expression. Further characterization of some genes found differentially expressed in the most invasive culture will likely bring new insights into the initial molecular interactions between Brucella and its host.

  17. Atual distribuição geográfica dos moluscos hospedeiros intermediários do Schistosoma mansoni em Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil Current geographic distribution of intermediate hosts mollusca of Schistosoma mansoni in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Pereira de Souza

    1981-12-01

    Full Text Available Procedeu-se ao levantamento malacológico do município de Belo Horizonte, MG, com o objetivo de avaliar a distribuição, densidade e taxa de infecção dos moluscos hospedeiros intermediários do Schistosoma mansoni. Foram coletadas 3.261 Biomphalaria glabrata em 1979-81, das quais 100 (3,1% estavam infectadas com S. mansoni. Registrou-se a existência de 36 criadouros (35,0% de B. glabrata em 102 locais pesquisados, sendo 23 na bacia hidrográfica de Pampulha e 13 na do ribeirão do Arrudas. Foram encontrados 2 criadouros de B. tenagophila e 2 de B. straminea. Registrou-se também a presenca de exemplares de Pomacea haustrum, Physa sp e Drepanotrema cimex. Compararam-se os dados obtidos atualmente com os publicados em 1967. Houve reducao de mais de 50% no número de criadouros de B.glabrata, principalmente em decorrencias da expansão e progresso da cidade. Na zona periférica a esquistossomose continua endêmica, havendo necessidade de novas obras de saneamento básico para se conseguir o controle da doença.Malacological surveys were conducted in Belo Horizonte with a view to obtain new data on the distribution and density of schistosomose bearing snails and their natural rate of infection by Schistosoma mansoni. Of 3.261 Biomphalaria glabrata collected during 1979-81, 100 (3,1% were found naturally infected. One hundred and two water collections were surveyed and 36 (35% were found harboring the mentioned snail species (23 of them in the watershed of Pampulha, 13 in the tributaires of the Arrudas creek. The species B. tenagophila was found in two waterbodies, and B. straminea in two other. Other snail species collected were Pomacea haustrum, Physa sp and Drepanotrema cimex. Data of this survey were compared with data published in 1967 and 50% reduction in the snail breeding places was observed. This reduction was due mainly to public works and engineering activities accompanying the growth of city. Schistosomiasis is still present in the

  18. Pathogen specific T-lymphocytes for the reconstitution of the immunocompromised host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Pira, Giuseppina; Kapp, Markus; Manca, Fabrizio; Einsele, Hermann

    2009-10-01

    Cellular immune functions are impaired in hemopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplantation or in cancer and autoimmune diseases treated with intensified immunosuppression. Thus, control of opportunistic pathogens is lost and severe infections break out. Defective cellular immunity can be restored upon endogenous immunoreconstitution or, if delayed, exogenous immunoreconstitution with pathogen specific T-lymphocytes selected or expanded from appropriate donors can be applied. Here we describe how recent developments in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have accelerated progresses of clinical trials in this attractive field. In particular, methods for the identification of appropriate antigens, for selection and expansion of specific T-cells and for safer manipulation of cellular products have been applied with promising advances. Finally, the development of biobanks of specific T-cells is described as an attractive perspective to reconstruct pathogen specific cellular immunity.

  19. Shared and host-specific microbiome diversity and functioning of grapevine and accompanying weed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Abdul; Trognitz, Friederike; Compant, Stéphane; Antonielli, Livio; Sessitsch, Angela

    2017-04-01

    Weeds and crop plants select their microbiota from the same pool of soil microorganisms, however, the ecology of weed microbiomes is poorly understood. We analysed the microbiomes associated with roots and rhizospheres of grapevine and four weed species (Lamium amplexicaule L., Veronica arvensis L., Lepidium draba L. and Stellaria media L.) growing in proximity in the same vineyard using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We also isolated and characterized 500 rhizobacteria and root endophytes from L. draba and grapevine. Microbiome data analysis revealed that all plants hosted significantly different microbiomes in the rhizosphere as well as in root compartment, however, differences were more pronounced in the root compartment. The shared microbiome of grapevine and the four weed species contained 145 OTUs (54.2%) in the rhizosphere, but only nine OTUs (13.2%) in the root compartment. Seven OTUs (12.3%) were shared in all plants and compartments. Approximately 56% of the major OTUs (>1%) showed more than 98% identity to bacteria isolated in this study. Moreover, weed-associated bacteria generally showed a higher species richness in the rhizosphere, whereas the root-associated bacteria were more diverse in the perennial plants grapevine and L. draba. Overall, weed isolates showed more plant growth-promoting characteristics compared with grapevine isolates. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Diversity and host specificity of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in native and introduced squirrel species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmannová, Lada; Romeo, Claudia; Štohanzlová, Lucie; Jirsová, Dagmar; Mazzamuto, Maria Vittoria; Wauters, Lucas Armand; Ferrari, Nicola; Modrý, David

    2016-10-01

    Introduction of alien species into new areas can have detrimental effects on native ecosystems and impact the native species. The present study aims to identify coccidia infecting native and introduced squirrels in Italy, to gain insight into possible transmission patterns and role of monoxenous coccidia in mediating the competition between alien and native hosts. We collected 540 faecal samples of native red squirrels, Sciurus vulgaris, invasive alien grey squirrels, S. carolinensis, and introduced Pallas's squirrels, Callosciurus erythraeus. Total prevalence of Eimeria spp. was 95.6% in S. vulgaris, 95.7% in S. carolinensis and only 4.1% in C. erythraeus. Morphological examination revealed 3 Eimeria morphotypes. Phylogenetic analyses of Eimeria DNA based on 18S, ITS, cox I markers displayed fairly distinct monophyletic clades in the microscopically indistinguishable E2 morphotype, proving indisputable distinction between the isolates from red and grey squirrels. Grey squirrels successfully introduced E. lancasterensis from their native range, but this species does not spill over to native red squirrels. Similarly, there is no evidence for the transmission of E. sciurorum from red to grey squirrels. The possible transmission and the potential role of monoxenous coccidia in mediating the competition between native and invasive squirrels in Italy were not confirmed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Sialylation of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) Anchors of Mammalian Prions Is Regulated in a Host-, Tissue-, and Cell-specific Manner*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Srivastava, Saurabh; Klimova, Nina; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2016-01-01

    Prions or PrPSc are proteinaceous infectious agents that consist of misfolded, self-replicating states of the prion protein or PrPC. PrPC is posttranslationally modified with N-linked glycans and a sialylated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Conformational conversion of PrPC gives rise to glycosylated and GPI-anchored PrPSc. The question of the sialylation status of GPIs within PrPSc has been controversial. Previous studies that examined scrapie brains reported that both sialo- and asialo-GPIs were present in PrPSc, with the majority being asialo-GPIs. In contrast, recent work that employed cultured cells claimed that only PrPC with sialylo-GPIs could be recruited into PrPSc, whereas PrPC with asialo-GPIs inhibited conversion. To resolve this controversy, we analyzed the sialylation status of GPIs within PrPSc generated in the brain, spleen, or cultured N2a or C2C12 myotube cells. We found that recruiting PrPC with both sialo- and asialo-GPIs is a common feature of PrPSc. The mixtures of sialo- and asialo-GPIs were observed in PrPSc universally regardless of prion strain as well as host, tissue, or type of cells that produced PrPSc. Remarkably, the proportion of sialo- versus asialo-GPIs was found to be controlled by host, tissue, and cell type but not prion strain. In summary, this study found no strain-specific preferences for selecting PrPC with sialo- versus asialo-GPIs. Instead, this work suggests that the sialylation status of GPIs within PrPSc is regulated in a cell-, tissue-, or host-specific manner and is likely to be determined by the specifics of GPI biosynthesis. PMID:27317661

  2. Specific chlamydial inclusion membrane proteins associate with active Src family kinases in microdomains that interact with the host microtubule network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mital, Jeffrey; Miller, Natalie J; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Hackstadt, Ted

    2010-09-01

    Chlamydiae are Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause diseases with significant medical and economic impact. Chlamydia trachomatis replicates within a vacuole termed an inclusion, which is extensively modified by the insertion of a number of bacterial effector proteins known as inclusion membrane proteins (Incs). Once modified, the inclusion is trafficked in a dynein-dependent manner to the microtubule-organizing centre (MTOC), where it associates with host centrosomes. Here we describe a novel structure on the inclusion membrane comprised of both host and bacterial proteins. Members of the Src family of kinases are recruited to the chlamydial inclusion in an active form. These kinases display a distinct, localized punctate microdomain-like staining pattern on the inclusion membrane that colocalizes with four chlamydial inclusion membrane proteins (Incs) and is enriched in cholesterol. Biochemical studies show that at least two of these Incs stably interact with one another. Furthermore, host centrosomes associate with these microdomain proteins in C. trachomatis-infected cells and in uninfected cells exogenously expressing one of the chlamydial effectors. Together, the data suggest that a specific structure on the C. trachomatis inclusion membrane may be responsible for the known interactions of chlamydiae with the microtubule network and resultant effects on centrosome stability.

  3. Ecology and host specificity of laelapine mites (Acari: Laelapidae) of small mammals in an Atlantic forest area of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Hatano, Fernanda; Gettinger, Donald; Bergallo, Helena G

    2002-02-01

    Mesostigmatic mites of the Laelapinae Berlese, 1892 (Acari: Laelapidae) are nidicolous arthropods that commonly occur in the fur of Neotropical small mammmals. In this 2-yr study, the laelapine acarofauna associated with the small mammal community in an area of Atlantic forest on Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro State, was examined, including observations on patterns of host specificity, mite dispersal, ecology, and food habits. A total of 1,347 laelapines was sampled from the pelage of 6 species of small mammals (Marmosops incanus, Nectomys squamipes, Oryzomys russatus, Rhipidomys n. sp., Oxymycterus dasytrichus, and Trinomys dimidiatus), all of which occurred exclusively in monoxenous associations with their hosts. No evidence of a blood meal was observed in the gut of the mites. With the exception of the 2 species of Tur, mite populations on hosts were entirely or nearly restricted to adult females. These results, together with some morphological characteristics of laelapines, reinforce the hypotheses that Neotropical laelapine mites are not ectoparasitic, and that females disperse by phoresy.

  4. Bacteriophages with potential for inactivation of fish pathogenic bacteria: survival, host specificity and effect on bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla; Silva, Yolanda J; Santos, Ana L; Cunha, Angela; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide

    2011-01-01

    Phage therapy may represent a viable alternative to antibiotics to inactivate fish pathogenic bacteria. Its use, however, requires the awareness of novel kinetics phenomena not applied to conventional drug treatments. The main objective of this work was to isolate bacteriophages with potential to inactivate fish pathogenic bacteria, without major effects on the structure of natural bacterial communities of aquaculture waters. The survival was determined in marine water, through quantification by the soft agar overlay technique. The host specificity was evaluated by cross infection. The ecological impact of phage addition on the structure of the bacterial community was evaluated by DGGE of PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. The survival period varied between 12 and 91 days, with a higher viability for Aeromonas salmonicida phages. The phages of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and of A. salmonicida infected bacteria of different families with a high efficacy of plating. The specific phages of pathogenic bacteria had no detectable impact on the structure of the bacterial community. In conclusion, V. parahaemolyticus and A. salmonicida phages show good survival time in marine water, have only a moderated impact on the overall bacterial community structure and the desired specificity for host pathogenic bacteria, being potential candidates for therapy of fish infectious diseases in marine aquaculture systems.

  5. Bacteriophages with Potential for Inactivation of Fish Pathogenic Bacteria: Survival, Host Specificity and Effect on Bacterial Community Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda J. Silva

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Phage therapy may represent a viable alternative to antibiotics to inactivate fish pathogenic bacteria. Its use, however, requires the awareness of novel kinetics phenomena not applied to conventional drug treatments. The main objective of this work was to isolate bacteriophages with potential to inactivate fish pathogenic bacteria, without major effects on the structure of natural bacterial communities of aquaculture waters. The survival was determined in marine water, through quantification by the soft agar overlay technique. The host specificity was evaluated by cross infection. The ecological impact of phage addition on the structure of the bacterial community was evaluated by DGGE of PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. The survival period varied between 12 and 91 days, with a higher viability for Aeromonas salmonicida phages. The phages of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and of A. salmonicida infected bacteria of different families with a high efficacy of plating. The specific phages of pathogenic bacteria had no detectable impact on the structure of the bacterial community. In conclusion, V. parahaemolyticus and A. salmonicida phages show good survival time in marine water, have only a moderated impact on the overall bacterial community structure and the desired specificity for host pathogenic bacteria, being potential candidates for therapy of fish infectious diseases in marine aquaculture systems.

  6. Host specificity of ambrosia and bark beetles (Col., Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae) in a New Guinea rainforest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hulcr, Jiří; Mogia, M.; Isua, B.; Novotný, Vojtěch

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 6 (2007), s. 762-772 ISSN 0307-6946 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/03/H034 Grant - others:University of South Bohemia(CZ) 57/2004/P-B; National Science Foundation(US) DEB 02-11591; National Science Foundation(US) PEET DEB-0328920 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; O - operačné programy ; O - operačné programy Keywords : host specificity * Mycetophagy * Mycophagy Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.741, year: 2007

  7. Host Ranges of Listeria-Specific Bacteriophages from the Turkey Processing Plant Environment in the United States ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Won; Siletzky, Robin M.; Kathariou, Sophia

    2008-01-01

    Even though at least 400 Listeria phages have been isolated from various sources, limited information is available on phages from the food processing plant environment. Phages in the processing plant environment may play critical roles in determining the Listeria population that becomes established in the plant. In this study, we pursued the isolation of Listeria-specific phages from environmental samples from four turkey processing plants in the United States. These environmental samples were also utilized to isolate Listeria spp. Twelve phages were isolated and classified into three groups in terms of their host range. Of these, nine (group 1) showed a wide host range, including multiple serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes, as well as other Listeria spp. (L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, and L. ivanovii). The remaining phages mostly infected L. monocytogenes serotype 4b as well as L. innocua, L. ivanovii, and/or L. welshimeri. All but one of the strains of the serotype 4b complex (4b, 4d, 4e) from the processing plant environment could be readily infected by the wide-host-range phages isolated from the environment of the processing plants. However, many strains of other serotypes (1/2a [or 3a] and 1/2b [or 3b]), which represented the majority of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from the environmental samples, were resistant to infection by these phages. Experiments with two phage-resistant strains showed reduced phage adsorption onto the host cells. These findings suggest that phage resistance may be an important component of the ecology of L. monocytogenes in the turkey processing plants. PMID:18791016

  8. Host ranges of Listeria-specific bacteriophages from the turkey processing plant environment in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Won; Siletzky, Robin M; Kathariou, Sophia

    2008-11-01

    Even though at least 400 Listeria phages have been isolated from various sources, limited information is available on phages from the food processing plant environment. Phages in the processing plant environment may play critical roles in determining the Listeria population that becomes established in the plant. In this study, we pursued the isolation of Listeria-specific phages from environmental samples from four turkey processing plants in the United States. These environmental samples were also utilized to isolate Listeria spp. Twelve phages were isolated and classified into three groups in terms of their host range. Of these, nine (group 1) showed a wide host range, including multiple serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes, as well as other Listeria spp. (L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, and L. ivanovii). The remaining phages mostly infected L. monocytogenes serotype 4b as well as L. innocua, L. ivanovii, and/or L. welshimeri. All but one of the strains of the serotype 4b complex (4b, 4d, 4e) from the processing plant environment could be readily infected by the wide-host-range phages isolated from the environment of the processing plants. However, many strains of other serotypes (1/2a [or 3a] and 1/2b [or 3b]), which represented the majority of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from the environmental samples, were resistant to infection by these phages. Experiments with two phage-resistant strains showed reduced phage adsorption onto the host cells. These findings suggest that phage resistance may be an important component of the ecology of L. monocytogenes in the turkey processing plants.

  9. Predictors of Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality in Elderly Men With Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Akash; Chen, M.-H.; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Dosoretz, Daniel; Salenius, Sharon; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical factors associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), adjusting for comorbidity, in elderly men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy alone or in conjunction with external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 1,978 men of median age 71 (interquartile range, 66-75) years with intermediate-risk disease (Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 20 ng/mL or less, tumor category T2c or less). Fine and Gray's multivariable competing risks regression was used to assess whether prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD), age, treatment, year of brachytherapy, PSA level, or tumor category was associated with the risk of PCSM. Results: After a median follow-up of 3.2 (interquartile range, 1.7-5.4) years, the presence of CVD was significantly associated with a decreased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.20; 95% CI 0.04-0.99; p = 0.05), whereas an increasing PSA level was significantly associated with an increased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio 1.14; 95% CI 1.02-1.27; p = 0.02). In the absence of CVD, cumulative incidence estimates of PCSM were higher (p = 0.03) in men with PSA levels above as compared with the median PSA level (7.3 ng/mL) or less; however, in the setting of CVD there was no difference (p = 0.27) in these estimates stratified by the median PSA level (6.9 ng/mL). Conclusions: In elderly men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, CVD status is a negative predictor of PCSM and affects the prognostic capacity of pretreatment PSA level. These observations support the potential utility of prerandomization stratification by comorbidity to more accurately assess prognostic factors and treatment effects within this population.

  10. Rhinovirus 3C protease facilitates specific nucleoporin cleavage and mislocalisation of nuclear proteins in infected host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin J Walker

    Full Text Available Human Rhinovirus (HRV infection results in shut down of essential cellular processes, in part through disruption of nucleocytoplasmic transport by cleavage of the nucleoporin proteins (Nups that make up the host cell nuclear pore. Although the HRV genome encodes two proteases (2A and 3C able to cleave host proteins such as Nup62, little is known regarding the specific contribution of each. Here we use transfected as well as HRV-infected cells to establish for the first time that 3C protease is most likely the mediator of cleavage of Nup153 during HRV infection, while Nup62 and Nup98 are likely to be targets of HRV2A protease. HRV16 3C protease was also able to elicit changes in the appearance and distribution of the nuclear speckle protein SC35 in transfected cells, implicating it as a key mediator of the mislocalisation of SC35 in HRV16-infected cells. In addition, 3C protease activity led to the redistribution of the nucleolin protein out of the nucleolus, but did not affect nuclear localisation of hnRNP proteins, implying that complete disruption of nucleocytoplasmic transport leading to relocalisation of hnRNP proteins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in HRV-infected cells almost certainly requires 2A in addition to 3C protease. Thus, a specific role for HRV 3C protease in cleavage and mislocalisation of host cell nuclear proteins, in concert with 2A, is implicated for the first time in HRV pathogenesis.

  11. Host-pathogen interactions in specific pathogen-free chickens following aerogenous infection with Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia abortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmar, Isabelle; Berndt, Angela; Yin, Lizi; Chiers, Koen; Sachse, Konrad; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2015-03-15

    Although Chlamydia (C.) psittaci infections are recognized as an important factor causing economic losses and impairing animal welfare in poultry production, the specific mechanisms leading to severe clinical outcomes are poorly understood. In the present study, we comparatively investigated pathology and host immune response, as well as systemic dissemination and expression of essential chlamydial genes in the course of experimental aerogeneous infection with C. psittaci and the closely related C. abortus, respectively, in specific pathogen-free chicks. Clinical signs appeared sooner and were more severe in the C. psittaci-infected group. Compared to C. abortus infection, more intense systemic dissemination of C. psittaci correlated with higher and faster infiltration of immune cells, as well as more macroscopic lesions and epithelial pathology, such as hyperplasia and erosion. In thoracic air sac tissue, mRNA expression of immunologically relevant factors, such as IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-22, LITAF and iNOS was significantly stronger up-regulated in C. psittaci- than in C. abortus-infected birds between 3 and 14 days post-infection. Likewise, transcription rates of the chlamydial genes groEL, cpaf and ftsW were consistently higher in C. psittaci during the acute phase. These findings illustrate that the stronger replication of C. psittaci in its natural host also evoked a more intense immune response than in the case of C. abortus infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biological adhesion of the flatworm Macrostomum lignano relies on a duo-gland system and is mediated by a cell type-specific intermediate filament protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerer, Birgit; Pjeta, Robert; Wunderer, Julia; Rodrigues, Marcelo; Arbore, Roberto; Schärer, Lukas; Berezikov, Eugene; Hess, Michael W; Pfaller, Kristian; Egger, Bernhard; Obwegeser, Sabrina; Salvenmoser, Willi; Ladurner, Peter

    2014-02-12

    Free-living flatworms, in both marine and freshwater environments, are able to adhere to and release from a substrate several times within a second. This reversible adhesion relies on adhesive organs comprised of three cell types: an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell, which is a modified epidermal cell responsible for structural support. However, nothing is currently known about the molecules that are involved in this adhesion process. In this study we present the detailed morphology of the adhesive organs of the free-living marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. About 130 adhesive organs are located in a horse-shoe-shaped arc along the ventral side of the tail plate. Each organ consists of exactly three cells, an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell. The necks of the two gland cells penetrate the anchor cell through a common pore. Modified microvilli of the anchor cell form a collar surrounding the necks of the adhesive- and releasing glands, jointly forming the papilla, the outer visible part of the adhesive organs. Next, we identified an intermediate filament (IF) gene, macif1, which is expressed in the anchor cells. RNA interference mediated knock-down resulted in the first experimentally induced non-adhesion phenotype in any marine animal. Specifically, the absence of intermediate filaments in the anchor cells led to papillae with open tips, a reduction of the cytoskeleton network, a decline in hemidesmosomal connections, and to shortened microvilli containing less actin. Our findings reveal an elaborate biological adhesion system in a free-living flatworm, which permits impressively rapid temporary adhesion-release performance in the marine environment. We demonstrate that the structural integrity of the supportive cell, the anchor cell, is essential for this adhesion process: the knock-down of the anchor cell-specific intermediate filament gene resulted in the inability of the animals to adhere. The RNAi

  13. Helicobacter pylori modulates host cell responses by CagT4SS-dependent translocation of an intermediate metabolite of LPS inner core heptose biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Eugenia; Bats, Simon H.; Murillo, Tatiana; Speidel, Yvonne; Coombs, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Highly virulent Helicobacter pylori cause proinflammatory signaling inducing the transcriptional activation and secretion of cytokines such as IL-8 in epithelial cells. Responsible in part for this signaling is the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) that codetermines the risk for pathological sequelae of an H. pylori infection such as gastric cancer. The Cag type IV secretion system (CagT4SS), encoded on the cagPAI, can translocate various molecules into cells, the effector protein CagA, peptidoglycan metabolites and DNA. Although these transported molecules are known to contribute to cellular responses to some extent, a major part of the cagPAI-induced signaling leading to IL-8 secretion remains unexplained. We report here that biosynthesis of heptose-1,7-bisphosphate (HBP), an important intermediate metabolite of LPS inner heptose core, contributes in a major way to the H. pylori cagPAI-dependent induction of proinflammatory signaling and IL-8 secretion in human epithelial cells. Mutants defective in the genes required for synthesis of HBP exhibited a more than 95% reduction of IL-8 induction and impaired CagT4SS-dependent cellular signaling. The loss of HBP biosynthesis did not abolish the ability to translocate CagA. The human cellular adaptor TIFA, which was described before to mediate HBP-dependent activity in other Gram-negative bacteria, was crucial in the cagPAI- and HBP pathway-induced responses by H. pylori in different cell types. The active metabolite was present in H. pylori lysates but not enriched in bacterial supernatants. These novel results advance our mechanistic understanding of H. pylori cagPAI-dependent signaling mediated by intracellular pattern recognition receptors. They will also allow to better dissect immunomodulatory activities by H. pylori and to improve the possibilities of intervention in cagPAI- and inflammation-driven cancerogenesis. PMID:28715499

  14. Host-specific serological response to Angiostrongylus vasorum infection in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillis-Germitsch, N.; Kapel, Christian; Thamsborg, Stig Milan

    2017-01-01

    Angiostrongylus vasorum is a cardiovascular nematode increasingly found in dogs and foxes in endemic foci throughout Europe. The present study evaluates ELISAs for detection of circulating antigens and specific antibodies against A. vasorum in foxes. Blood and worm burdens (WBs) from carcasses...... of 215 Swiss wild red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and from 75 farmed foxes of different age groups experimentally inoculated once or repeatedly with infective doses of 50, 100 or 200 third-stage larvae were obtained. Antigen detection in the naturally infected Swiss foxes had 91·2% sensitivity and 89...

  15. Diversity of the skin microbiota of fishes: evidence for host species specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Andrea; Tao, Zhen; Bullard, Stephen A; Arias, Covadonga R

    2013-09-01

    Skin microbiota of Gulf of Mexico fishes were investigated by ribosomal internal spacer analysis (RISA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A total of 102 fish specimens representing six species (Mugil cephalus, Lutjanus campechanus, Cynoscion nebulosus, Cynoscion arenarius, Micropogonias undulatus, and Lagodon rhomboides) were sampled at regular intervals throughout a year. The skin microbiota from each individual fish was analyzed by RISA and produced complex profiles with 23 bands on average. Similarities between RISA profiles ranged from 97.5% to 4.0%. At 70% similarity, 11 clusters were defined, each grouping individuals from the same fish species. Multidimensional scaling and analysis of similarity correlated the RISA-defined clusters with geographic locality, date, and fish species. Global R values indicated that fish species was the most indicative variable for group separation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences (from pooled samples of 10 individual fish for each fish species) showed that the Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum in skin microbiota, followed by the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria. The distribution and abundance of bacterial sequences were different among all species analyzed. Aeribacillus was found in all fish species representing 19% of all clones sequenced, while some genera were fish species-specific (Neorickettsia in M. cephalus and Microbacterium in L. campechanus). Our data provide evidence for the existence of specific skin microbiota associated with particular fish species. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Eudicot plant-specific sphingolipids determine host selectivity of microbial NLP cytolysins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarčič, Tea; Albert, Isabell; Böhm, Hannah; Hodnik, Vesna; Pirc, Katja; Zavec, Apolonija B; Podobnik, Marjetka; Pahovnik, David; Žagar, Ema; Pruitt, Rory; Greimel, Peter; Yamaji-Hasegawa, Akiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Gömann, Jasmin; Mortimer, Jenny C; Fang, Lin; Mamode-Cassim, Adiilah; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Oecking, Claudia; Feussner, Ivo; Mongrand, Sébastien; Anderluh, Gregor; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2017-12-15

    Necrosis and ethylene-inducing peptide 1-like (NLP) proteins constitute a superfamily of proteins produced by plant pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes. Many NLPs are cytotoxins that facilitate microbial infection of eudicot, but not of monocot plants. Here, we report glycosylinositol phosphorylceramide (GIPC) sphingolipids as NLP toxin receptors. Plant mutants with altered GIPC composition were more resistant to NLP toxins. Binding studies and x-ray crystallography showed that NLPs form complexes with terminal monomeric hexose moieties of GIPCs that result in conformational changes within the toxin. Insensitivity to NLP cytolysins of monocot plants may be explained by the length of the GIPC head group and the architecture of the NLP sugar-binding site. We unveil early steps in NLP cytolysin action that determine plant clade-specific toxin selectivity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  17. Biology, host specificity tests, and risk assessment of the sawfly Heteroperreyia hubrichi, a potential biological control agent of Schinus terebinthifolius in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract. Heteroperreyia hubrichi Malaise (Hymenoptera: Pergidae), a foliage feeding sawfly of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae), was studied to assess its suitability as a classical biological control agent of this invasive weed in Hawaii. Nochoice host-specificity tests we...

  18. Biogeography, Host Specificity, and Molecular Phylogeny of the Basidiomycetous Yeast Phaffia rhodozyma and Its Sexual Form, Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libkind, Diego; Ruffini, Alejandra; van Broock, Maria; Alves, Leonor; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2007-01-01

    Phaffia rhodozyma (sexual form, Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous) is a basidiomycetous yeast that has been found in tree exudates in the Northern Hemisphere at high altitudes and latitudes. This yeast produces astaxanthin, a carotenoid pigment with biotechnological importance because it is used in aquaculture for fish pigmentation. We isolated X. dendrorhous from the Southern Hemisphere (Patagonia, Argentina), where it was associated with fruiting bodies of Cyttaria hariotii, an ascomycetous parasite of Nothofagus trees. We compared internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-based phylogenies of P. rhodozyma and its tree host (Betulaceae, Corneaceae, Fagaceae, and Nothofagaceae) and found them to be generally concordant, suggesting that different yeast lineages colonize different trees and providing an explanation for the phylogenetic distance observed between the type strains of P. rhodozyma and X. dendrorhous. We hypothesize that the association of Xanthophyllomyces with Cyttaria derives from a previous association of the yeast with Nothofagus, and the sister relationship between Nothofagaceae and Betulaceae plus Fagaceae correlates with the phylogeny of X. dendrorhous strains originating from these three plant families. The two most basal strains of X. dendrorhous are those isolated from Cornus, an ancestral genus in the phylogenetic analysis of the host trees. Thus, we question previous conclusions that P. rhodozyma and X. dendrorhous represent different species since the polymorphisms detected in the ITS and intergenic spacer sequences can be attributed to intraspecific variation associated with host specificity. Our study provides a deeper understanding of Phaffia biogeography, ecology, and molecular phylogeny. Such knowledge is essential for the comprehension of many aspects of the biology of this organism and will facilitate the study of astaxanthin production within an evolutionary and ecological framework. PMID:17189439

  19. Biogeography, host specificity, and molecular phylogeny of the basidiomycetous yeast Phaffia rhodozyma and its sexual form, Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libkind, Diego; Ruffini, Alejandra; van Broock, Maria; Alves, Leonor; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2007-02-01

    Phaffia rhodozyma (sexual form, Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous) is a basidiomycetous yeast that has been found in tree exudates in the Northern Hemisphere at high altitudes and latitudes. This yeast produces astaxanthin, a carotenoid pigment with biotechnological importance because it is used in aquaculture for fish pigmentation. We isolated X. dendrorhous from the Southern Hemisphere (Patagonia, Argentina), where it was associated with fruiting bodies of Cyttaria hariotii, an ascomycetous parasite of Nothofagus trees. We compared internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-based phylogenies of P. rhodozyma and its tree host (Betulaceae, Corneaceae, Fagaceae, and Nothofagaceae) and found them to be generally concordant, suggesting that different yeast lineages colonize different trees and providing an explanation for the phylogenetic distance observed between the type strains of P. rhodozyma and X. dendrorhous. We hypothesize that the association of Xanthophyllomyces with Cyttaria derives from a previous association of the yeast with Nothofagus, and the sister relationship between Nothofagaceae and Betulaceae plus Fagaceae correlates with the phylogeny of X. dendrorhous strains originating from these three plant families. The two most basal strains of X. dendrorhous are those isolated from Cornus, an ancestral genus in the phylogenetic analysis of the host trees. Thus, we question previous conclusions that P. rhodozyma and X. dendrorhous represent different species since the polymorphisms detected in the ITS and intergenic spacer sequences can be attributed to intraspecific variation associated with host specificity. Our study provides a deeper understanding of Phaffia biogeography, ecology, and molecular phylogeny. Such knowledge is essential for the comprehension of many aspects of the biology of this organism and will facilitate the study of astaxanthin production within an evolutionary and ecological framework.

  20. Baculovirus DNA Replication-Specific Expression Factors Trigger Apoptosis and Shutoff of Host Protein Synthesis during Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Friesen, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important antivirus defense. To define the poorly understood pathways by which invertebrates respond to viruses by inducing apoptosis, we have identified replication events that trigger apoptosis in baculovirus-infected cells. We used RNA silencing to ablate factors required for multiplication of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). Transfection with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) complementary to the AcMNPV late expression factors (lefs) that are designated as replicative lefs (lef-1, lef-2, lef-3, lef-11, p143, dnapol, and ie-1/ie-0) blocked virus DNA synthesis and late gene expression in permissive Spodoptera frugiperda cells. dsRNAs specific to designated nonreplicative lefs (lef-8, lef-9, p47, and pp31) blocked late gene expression without affecting virus DNA replication. Thus, both classes of lefs functioned during infection as defined. Silencing the replicative lefs prevented AcMNPV-induced apoptosis of Spodoptera cells, whereas silencing the nonreplicative lefs did not. Thus, the activity of replicative lefs or virus DNA replication is sufficient to trigger apoptosis. Confirming this conclusion, AcMNPV-induced apoptosis was suppressed by silencing the replicative lefs in cells from a divergent species, Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing replicative but not nonreplicative lefs also abrogated AcMNPV-induced shutdown of host protein synthesis, suggesting that virus DNA replication triggers inhibition of host biosynthetic processes and that apoptosis and translational arrest are linked. Our findings suggest that baculovirus DNA replication triggers a host cell response similar to the DNA damage response in vertebrates, which causes translational arrest and apoptosis. Pathways for detecting virus invasion and triggering apoptosis may therefore be conserved between insects and mammals. PMID:19706708

  1. Baculovirus DNA replication-specific expression factors trigger apoptosis and shutoff of host protein synthesis during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kimberly L W; Friesen, Paul D

    2009-11-01

    Apoptosis is an important antivirus defense. To define the poorly understood pathways by which invertebrates respond to viruses by inducing apoptosis, we have identified replication events that trigger apoptosis in baculovirus-infected cells. We used RNA silencing to ablate factors required for multiplication of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). Transfection with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) complementary to the AcMNPV late expression factors (lefs) that are designated as replicative lefs (lef-1, lef-2, lef-3, lef-11, p143, dnapol, and ie-1/ie-0) blocked virus DNA synthesis and late gene expression in permissive Spodoptera frugiperda cells. dsRNAs specific to designated nonreplicative lefs (lef-8, lef-9, p47, and pp31) blocked late gene expression without affecting virus DNA replication. Thus, both classes of lefs functioned during infection as defined. Silencing the replicative lefs prevented AcMNPV-induced apoptosis of Spodoptera cells, whereas silencing the nonreplicative lefs did not. Thus, the activity of replicative lefs or virus DNA replication is sufficient to trigger apoptosis. Confirming this conclusion, AcMNPV-induced apoptosis was suppressed by silencing the replicative lefs in cells from a divergent species, Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing replicative but not nonreplicative lefs also abrogated AcMNPV-induced shutdown of host protein synthesis, suggesting that virus DNA replication triggers inhibition of host biosynthetic processes and that apoptosis and translational arrest are linked. Our findings suggest that baculovirus DNA replication triggers a host cell response similar to the DNA damage response in vertebrates, which causes translational arrest and apoptosis. Pathways for detecting virus invasion and triggering apoptosis may therefore be conserved between insects and mammals.

  2. Host-specific induction of Escherichia coli fitness genes during human urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; Hazen, Tracy H; Brumbaugh, Ariel R; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Smith, Sara N; Ernst, Robert D; Rasko, David A; Mobley, Harry L T

    2014-12-23

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the predominant etiological agent of uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI), manifested by inflammation of the urinary bladder, in humans and is a major global public health concern. Molecular pathogenesis of UPEC has been primarily examined using murine models of UTI. Translational research to develop novel therapeutics against this major pathogen, which is becoming increasingly antibiotic resistant, requires a thorough understanding of mechanisms involved in pathogenesis during human UTIs. Total RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) and comparative transcriptional analysis of UTI samples to the UPEC isolates cultured in human urine and laboratory medium were used to identify novel fitness genes that were specifically expressed during human infection. Evidence for UPEC genes involved in ion transport, including copper efflux, nickel and potassium import systems, as key fitness factors in uropathogenesis were generated using an experimental model of UTI. Translational application of this study was investigated by targeting Cus, a bacterial copper efflux system. Copper supplementation in drinking water reduces E. coli colonization in the urinary bladder of mice. Additionally, our results suggest that anaerobic processes in UPEC are involved in promoting fitness during UTI in humans. In summary, RNA-seq was used to establish the transcriptional signature in UPEC during naturally occurring, community acquired UTI in women and multiple novel fitness genes used by UPEC during human infection were identified. The repertoire of UPEC genes involved in UTI presented here will facilitate further translational studies to develop innovative strategies against UTI caused by UPEC.

  3. Strong stability and host specific bacterial community in faeces of ponies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina M Blackmore

    Full Text Available The horse, as a hindgut fermenter, is reliant on its intestinal bacterial population for efficient diet utilisation. However, sudden disturbance of this population can result in severe colic or laminitis, both of which may require euthanasia. This study therefore aimed to determine the temporal stability of the bacterial population of faecal samples from six ponies maintained on a formulated high fibre diet. Bacterial 16S rRNA terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP analyses of 10 faecal samples collected from 6 ponies at regular intervals over 72 hour trial periods identified a significant pony-specific profile (P<0.001 with strong stability. Within each pony, a significantly different population was found after 11 weeks on the same diet (P<0.001 and with greater intra-individual similarity. Total short chain fatty acid (SCFA concentration increased in all ponies, but other changes (such as bacterial population diversity measures, individual major SCFA concentration were significant and dependent on the individual. This study is the first to report the extent of stability of microbes resident in the intestinal tract as represented with such depth and frequency of faecal sampling. In doing so, this provides a baseline from which future trials can be planned and the extent to which results may be interpreted.

  4. The length of a lantibiotic hinge region has profound influence on antimicrobial activity and host specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang eZhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized (methyllanthionine containing peptides which can efficiently inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. As lantibiotics kill bacteria efficiently and resistance to them is difficult to be obtained, they have the potential to be used in many applications, e.g. in pharmaceutical industry or food industry. Nisin can inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to lipid II and by making pores in their membrane. The C-terminal part of nisin is known to play an important role during translocation over the membrane and forming pore complexes. However, as the thickness of bacterial membranes varies between different species and environmental conditions, this property could have an influence on the pore forming activity of nisin. To investigate this, the so-called hinge region of nisin (residues NMK was engineered to vary from one to six amino acid residues and specific activity against different indicators was compared. Antimicrobial activity in liquid culture assays showed that wild type nisin is most active, while truncation of the hinge region dramatically reduced the activity of the peptide. However, one or two amino acids extensions showed only slightly reduced activity against most indicator strains. Notably, some variants (+2, +1, -1, -2 exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than nisin in agar well diffusion assays against Lactococcus lactis MG1363, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis VE14089, Bacillus sporothermodurans IC4 and Bacillus cereus 4153 at certain temperatures.

  5. Predicting fecal sources in waters with diverse pollution loads using general and molecular host-specific indicators and applying machine learning methods

    OpenAIRE

    Casanovas Massana, Arnau; Gómez Doñate, Marta; Sánchez, David; Belanche Muñoz, Luis Antonio; Muniesa, Maite; Blanch, Anicet R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we use a machine learning software (Ichnaea) to generate predictive models for water samples with different concentrations of fecal contamination (point source, moderate and low). We applied several MST methods (host-specific Bacteroides phages, mitochondrial DNA genetic markers, Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium dentium markers, and bifidobacterial host-specific qPCR), and general indicators (Escherichia colt, enterococci and somatic coliphages) to evaluate the s...

  6. Stage-Specific Changes in Plasmodium Metabolism Required for Differentiation and Adaptation to Different Host and Vector Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhav Srivastava

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp. encounter markedly different (nutritional environments during their complex life cycles in the mosquito and human hosts. Adaptation to these different host niches is associated with a dramatic rewiring of metabolism, from a highly glycolytic metabolism in the asexual blood stages to increased dependence on tricarboxylic acid (TCA metabolism in mosquito stages. Here we have used stable isotope labelling, targeted metabolomics and reverse genetics to map stage-specific changes in Plasmodium berghei carbon metabolism and determine the functional significance of these changes on parasite survival in the blood and mosquito stages. We show that glutamine serves as the predominant input into TCA metabolism in both asexual and sexual blood stages and is important for complete male gametogenesis. Glutamine catabolism, as well as key reactions in intermediary metabolism and CoA synthesis are also essential for ookinete to oocyst transition in the mosquito. These data extend our knowledge of Plasmodium metabolism and point towards possible targets for transmission-blocking intervention strategies. Furthermore, they highlight significant metabolic differences between Plasmodium species which are not easily anticipated based on genomics or transcriptomics studies and underline the importance of integration of metabolomics data with other platforms in order to better inform drug discovery and design.

  7. Antifungal, molluscicidal and larvicidal assessment of anemonin and Clematis flammula L. extracts against mollusc Galba truncatula, intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Rakia; Khanous, Lamia; Khadim Allah, Safa; Hamdi, Besma; Ayadi, Ali; Damak, Mohamed; Hammami, Hayet; Mezghani-Jarraya, Raoudha

    2017-10-01

    study emphasizes the important molluscicidal and antiparasitic effects of flower ethyl acetate extracts and anemonin compound as well as the considerable antifungal activities of methanolic extracts. These results improve the therapeutic virtues of C. flammula aerial part extracts. Copyright © 2017 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Vertebrate host specificity and experimental vectors of Plasmodium (Novyella) kempi sp. n. from the eastern wild turkey in Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, B M; Barnes, H J; Rowley, W A

    1983-07-01

    Vertebrate host specificity, experimental laboratory vectors, and a description of Plasmodium (Novyella) kempi sp. n. from eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris Vieillot) in Iowa are presented. Plasmodium kempi is infective for domestic turkeys, bobwhites (Colinus virginianus), chukars (Alectoris graeca), guinea fowl (Numida meleagris), peacocks (Pavo cristatus), and canaries (Serinus canaria), produces a transient infection in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and domestic geese (Anser anser), but will not infect ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), pigeons (Columba livia), Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix), leghorn white chickens (Gallus gallus), or starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Oocysts and (or) sporozoites were recovered from 68% (84/124) and 98% (60/61) of the Culex pipiens pipiens and C. tarsalis examined, respectively. Oocysts developed faster and sporozoites invaded the salivary glands sooner in C. tarsalis (6 days) than in C. p. pipiens (7 days). Culex tarsalis transmitted P. kempi more effectively than C. p. pipiens, although both species were capable of transmitting the parasite by natural feeding. Oocysts developed and sporozoites also were produced in C. restuans, but its ability to transmit the parasite was not determined. Aedes aegypti (Rockefeller strain) and A. triseriatus were refractive to P. kempi. Plasmodium kempi produces trophozoites with large refractile globules and fine cytoplasmic extensions, mature schizonts in the form of a condensed fan containing four to eight nuclei (usually 5), and elongate gametocytes with irregular borders. All stages are confined almost exclusively to mature erythrocytes, with no effect on host cell size or position of host cell nucleus. Plasmodium kempi is most similar morphologically to P. (Novyella) hexamerium and P. (Novyella) vaughani. It differs from P. hexamerium in having large refractile globules in trophozoites and immature schizonts, an inability to infect starlings, an absence of

  9. Endophytic Fungal Communities Associated with Vascular Plants in the High Arctic Zone Are Highly Diverse and Host-Plant Specific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    Full Text Available This study assessed the diversity and distribution of endophytic fungal communities associated with the leaves and stems of four vascular plant species in the High Arctic using 454 pyrosequencing with fungal-specific primers targeting the ITS region. Endophytic fungal communities showed high diversity. The 76,691 sequences obtained belonged to 250 operational taxonomic units (OTUs. Of these OTUs, 190 belonged to Ascomycota, 50 to Basidiomycota, 1 to Chytridiomycota, and 9 to unknown fungi. The dominant orders were Helotiales, Pleosporales, Capnodiales, and Tremellales, whereas the common known fungal genera were Cryptococcus, Rhizosphaera, Mycopappus, Melampsora, Tetracladium, Phaeosphaeria, Mrakia, Venturia, and Leptosphaeria. Both the climate and host-related factors might shape the fungal communities associated with the four Arctic plant species in this region. These results suggested the presence of an interesting endophytic fungal community and could improve our understanding of fungal evolution and ecology in the Arctic terrestrial ecosystems.

  10. The specific host plant DNA detection suggests a potential migration of Apolygus lucorum from cotton to mungbean fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wang

    Full Text Available The polyphagous mirid bug Apolygus lucorum (Heteroptera: Miridae has more than 200 species of host plants and is an insect pest of important agricultural crops, including cotton (Gossypium hirsutum and mungbean (Vigna radiata. Previous field trials have shown that A. lucorum adults prefer mungbean to cotton plants, indicating the considerable potential of mungbean as a trap crop in cotton fields. However, direct evidence supporting the migration of A. lucorum adults from cotton to mungbean is lacking. We developed a DNA-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR approach to reveal the movement of A. lucorum between neighboring mungbean and cotton fields. Two pairs of PCR primers specific to cotton or mungbean were designed to target the trnL-trnF region of chloroplast DNA. Significant differences in the detectability half-life (DS50 were observed between these two host plants, and the mean for cotton (8.26 h was approximately two times longer than that of mungbean (4.38 h, requiring weighted mean calculations to compare the detectability of plant DNA in the guts of field-collected bugs. In field trials, cotton DNA was detected in the guts of the adult A. lucorum individuals collected in mungbean plots, and the cotton DNA detection rate decreased successively from 5 to 15 m away from the mungbean-cotton midline. In addition to the specific detection of cotton- and mungbean-fed bugs, both cotton and mungbean DNA were simultaneously detected within the guts of single individuals caught from mungbean fields. This study successfully established a tool for molecular gut-content analyses and clearly demonstrated the movement of A. lucorum adults from cotton to neighboring mungbean fields, providing new insights into understanding the feeding characteristics and landscape-level ecology of A. lucorum under natural conditions.

  11. HY-Specific Induced Regulatory T Cells Display High Specificity and Efficacy in the Prevention of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Heinrichs, Jessica; Haarberg, Kelley; Semple, Kenrick; Veerapathran, Anandharaman; Liu, Chen; Anasetti, Claudio; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2015-07-15

    Naturally derived regulatory T cells (Tregs) may prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) while preserving graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity. However, clinical application of naturally derived regulatory T cells has been severely hampered by their scarce availability and nonselectivity. To overcome these limitations, we took alternative approaches to generate Ag-specific induced Tregs (iTregs) and tested their efficacy and selectivity in the prevention of GVHD in preclinical models of bone marrow transplantation. We selected HY as a target Ag because it is a naturally processed, ubiquitously expressed minor histocompatibility Ag (miHAg) with a proven role in GVHD and GVL effect. We generated HY-specific iTregs (HY-iTregs) from resting CD4 T cells derived from TCR transgenic mice, in which CD4 cells specifically recognize HY peptide. We found that HY-iTregs were highly effective in preventing GVHD in male (HY(+)) but not female (HY(-)) recipients using MHC II-mismatched, parent→F1, and miHAg-mismatched murine bone marrow transplantation models. Interestingly, the expression of target Ag (HY) on the hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic compartment alone was sufficient for iTregs to prevent GVHD. Furthermore, treatment with HY-iTregs still preserved the GVL effect even against pre-established leukemia. We found that HY-iTregs were more stable in male than in female recipients. Furthermore, HY-iTregs expanded extensively in male but not female recipients, which in turn significantly reduced donor effector T cell expansion, activation, and migration into GVHD target organs, resulting in effective prevention of GVHD. This study demonstrates that iTregs specific for HY miHAgs are highly effective in controlling GVHD in an Ag-dependent manner while sparing the GVL effect. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Outcomes of men with an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level as their sole preoperative intermediate- or high-risk feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Farzana A; Sundi, Debasish; Pierorazio, Phillip M; Ball, Mark W; Humphreys, Elizabeth B; Han, Misop; Epstein, Jonathan I; Partin, Alan W; Carter, H Ballentine; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Schaeffer, Edward M; Ross, Ashley E

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the post-prostatectomy and long-term outcomes of men presenting with an elevated pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (>10 ng/mL), but otherwise low-risk features (biopsy Gleason score ≤6 and clinical stage ≤T2a). PSA-incongruent intermediate-risk (PII) cases were defined as those patients with preoperative PSA >10 and ≤20 ng/mL but otherwise low-risk features, and PSA-incongruent high-risk (PIH) cases were defined as men with PSA >20 ng/mL but otherwise low-risk features. Our institutional radical prostatectomy database (1992-2012) was queried and the results were stratified into D'Amico low-, intermediate- and high risk, PSA-incongruent intermediate-risk and PSA-incongruent high-risk cases. Prostate cancer (PCa) features and outcomes were evaluated using appropriate comparative tests. Multivariable analyses were adjusted for age, race and year of surgery. Of the total cohort of 17 608 men, 1132 (6.4%) had PII-risk disease and 183 (1.0%) had PIH-risk disease. Compared with the low-risk group, the odds of upgrading at radical prostatectomy (RP) were 2.20 (95% CI 1.93-2.52; P PSA density (PSAD): men in the PII group who had a PSAD PSA >20 ng/mL or men with PSA >10 and ≤20 ng/mL with a PSAD ≥0.15 ng/mL/g, but otherwise low-risk PCa, are at greater risk of adverse pathological and oncological outcomes and may be inappropriate candidates for active surveillance. These men are at greater risk of having anterior tumours that are undersampled at biopsy, so if treatment is deferred, ancillary testing such as anterior zone sampling or magnetic resonance imaging should be strongly encouraged. Men with elevated PSA levels >10 and ≤20 ng/mL but low PSAD have outcomes similar to those in the low-risk group, and consideration of surveillance is appropriate in these cases. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU International.

  13. Inhibition of Host Cell Lysosome Spreading by Trypanosoma cruzi Metacyclic Stage-Specific Surface Molecule gp90 Downregulates Parasite Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João Paulo Ferreira; Sant'ana, Guilherme Hideki Takahashi; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2017-09-01

    Successful infection by Trypanosoma cruzi , the agent of Chagas' disease, is critically dependent on host cell invasion by metacyclic trypomastigote (MT) forms. Two main metacyclic stage-specific surface molecules, gp82 and gp90, play determinant roles in target cell invasion in vitro and in oral T. cruzi infection in mice. The structure and properties of gp82, which is highly conserved among T. cruzi strains, are well known. Information on gp90 is still rather sparse. Here, we attempted to fill that gap. gp90, purified from poorly invasive G strain MT and expressing gp90 at high levels, inhibited HeLa cell lysosome spreading and the gp82-mediated internalization of a highly invasive CL strain MT expressing low levels of a diverse gp90 molecule. A recombinant protein containing the conserved C-terminal domain of gp90 exhibited the same properties as the native G strain gp90: it counteracted the host cell lysosome spreading induced by recombinant gp82 and exhibited an inhibitory effect on HeLa cell invasion by CL strain MT. Assays to identify the gp90 sequence associated with the property of downregulating MT invasion, using synthetic peptides spanning the gp90 C-terminal domain, revealed the sequence GVLYTADKEW. These data, plus the findings that lysosome spreading was induced upon HeLa cell interaction with CL strain MT, but not with G strain MT, and that in mixed infection CL strain MT internalization was inhibited by G strain MT, suggest that the inhibition of target cell lysosome spreading is the mechanism by which the gp90 molecule exerts its downregulatory role. Copyright © 2017 Rodrigues et al.

  14. Sex-specific effects of parasitism on survival and reproduction of a rodent host in a subtropical montane region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hsuan-Yi; Shaner, Pei-Jen L

    2015-03-01

    Parasites can generate complex life history trade-offs in a host. In this study, we experimentally reduced the infection level of intestinal helminth parasites in the Taiwan field mouse (Apodemus semotus) to test (1) whether parasite richness and load are biased towards male or female mice (sex-biased parasitism) and (2) whether the effects of parasitism on the host's survival and reproduction are different between the sexes (sex-specific effects of parasitism). Our findings indicate that neither parasite richness (number of helminth taxa found in a fecal sample) nor parasite load (number of helminth eggs per gram of fecal material) was sexually biased in our A. semotus study population. These results are in agreement with those of previous studies on endoparasites in Apodemus spp., but are in contrast to those on ectoparasites in Apodemus spp. Parasite removal reduced the survival rate of reproducing females, possibly by allowing reproducing females to increase maternal investment in their current litters at the cost of their own future survival. Single-litter mothers with reduced parasitism had a higher body mass than the untreated single-litter mothers, suggesting an increased maternal investment. In addition, the reproductively more active A. semotus, particularly the females, carried higher parasite loads, suggesting a trade-off between reproduction and parasite defense. By demonstrating that parasites can affect life history trade-offs in A. semotus, our results highlight the importance of maintaining variation in life history traits under parasitism risks and illustrate the subtle demographic processes (e.g. reduced future survival among healthy reproducing females) that might be driven by parasitism.

  15. Brugia malayi excreted/secreted proteins at the host/parasite interface: stage- and gender-specific proteomic profiling.

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    Sasisekhar Bennuru

    Full Text Available Relatively little is known about the filarial proteins that interact with the human host. Although the filarial genome has recently been completed, protein profiles have been limited to only a few recombinants or purified proteins of interest. Here, we describe a large-scale proteomic analysis using microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry to identify the excretory-secretory (ES products of the L3, L3 to L4 molting ES, adult male, adult female, and microfilarial stages of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi. The analysis of the ES products from adult male, adult female, microfilariae (Mf, L3, and molting L3 larvae identified 852 proteins. Annotation suggests that the functional and component distribution was very similar across each of the stages studied; however, the Mf contributed a higher proportion to the total number of identified proteins than the other stages. Of the 852 proteins identified in the ES, only 229 had previous confirmatory expressed sequence tags (ESTs in the available databases. Moreover, this analysis was able to confirm the presence of 274 "hypothetical" proteins inferred from gene prediction algorithms applied to the B. malayi (Bm genome. Not surprisingly, the majority (160/274 of these "hypothetical" proteins were predicted to be secreted by Signal IP and/or SecretomeP 2.0 analysis. Of major interest is the abundance of previously characterized immunomodulatory proteins such as ES-62 (leucyl aminopeptidase, MIF-1, SERPIN, glutathione peroxidase, and galectin in the ES of microfilariae (and Mf-containing adult females compared to the adult males. In addition, searching the ES protein spectra against the Wolbachia database resulted in the identification of 90 Wolbachia-specific proteins, most of which were metabolic enzymes that have not been shown to be immunogenic. This proteomic analysis extends our knowledge of the ES and provides insight into the host-parasite interaction.

  16. Commensal Bacteroides species induce colitis in host-genotype-specific fashion in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Seth M.; Bijanki, Vinieth N.; Nava, Gerardo M.; Sun, Lulu; Malvin, Nicole P.; Donermeyer, David L.; Dunne, W. Michael; Allen, Paul M.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal microbiota is important for induction of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is associated with complex shifts in microbiota composition, but it is unclear whether specific bacterial subsets induce IBD and, if so, whether their proportions in the microbiota are altered during disease. Here we fulfilled Koch’s postulates in host-genotype-specific fashion using a mouse model of IBD with human-relevant disease-susceptibility mutations. From screening experiments we isolated common commensal Bacteroides species, introduced them into antibiotic-pretreated mice, and quantitatively re-isolated them in culture. The bacteria colonized IBD-susceptible and non-susceptible mice equivalently, but induced disease exclusively in susceptible animals. Conversely, commensal Enterobacteriaceae were >100-fold enriched during spontaneous disease but an Enterobacteriaceae isolate failed to induce disease in antibiotic-pretreated mice despite robust colonization. We thus demonstrate that IBD-associated microbiota alterations do not necessarily reflect underlying disease etiology. These findings establish important experimental criteria and a conceptual framework for understanding microbial contributions to IBD. PMID:21575910

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi Evades the Complement System as an Efficient Strategy to Survive in the Mammalian Host: The Specific Roles of Host/Parasite Molecules and Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Toloza, Galia; Ferreira, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    American Trypanosomiasis is an important neglected reemerging tropical parasitism, infecting about 8 million people worldwide. Its agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, exhibits multiple mechanisms to evade the host immune response and infect host cells. An important immune evasion strategy of T. cruzi infective stages is its capacity to inhibit the complement system activation on the parasite surface, avoiding opsonizing, immune stimulating and lytic effects. Epimastigotes, the non-infective form of the parasite, present in triatomine arthropod vectors, are highly susceptible to complement-mediated lysis while trypomastigotes, the infective form, present in host bloodstream, are resistant. Thus T. cruzi susceptibility to complement varies depending on the parasite stage (amastigote, trypomastigotes or epimastigote) and on the T. cruzi strain. To avoid complement-mediated lysis, T. cruzi trypomastigotes express on the parasite surface a variety of complement regulatory proteins, such as glycoprotein 58/68 (gp58/68), T. cruzi complement regulatory protein (TcCRP), trypomastigote decay-accelerating factor (T-DAF), C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning (CRIT) and T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT). Alternatively, or concomitantly, the parasite captures components with complement regulatory activity from the host bloodstream, such as factor H (FH) and plasma membrane-derived vesicles (PMVs). All these proteins inhibit different steps of the classical (CP), alternative (AP) or lectin pathways (LP). Thus, TcCRP inhibits the CP C3 convertase assembling, gp58/68 inhibits the AP C3 convertase, T-DAF interferes with the CP and AP convertases assembling, TcCRT inhibits the CP and LP, CRIT confers ability to resist the CP and LP, FH is used by trypomastigotes to inhibit the AP convertases and PMVs inhibit the CP and LP C3 convertases. Many of these proteins have similar molecular inhibitory mechanisms. Our laboratory has contributed to elucidate the role of TcCRT in the host-parasite interplay

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi Evades the Complement System as an Efficient Strategy to Survive in the Mammalian Host: The Specific Roles of Host/Parasite Molecules and Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galia Ramírez-Toloza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available American Trypanosomiasis is an important neglected reemerging tropical parasitism, infecting about 8 million people worldwide. Its agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, exhibits multiple mechanisms to evade the host immune response and infect host cells. An important immune evasion strategy of T. cruzi infective stages is its capacity to inhibit the complement system activation on the parasite surface, avoiding opsonizing, immune stimulating and lytic effects. Epimastigotes, the non-infective form of the parasite, present in triatomine arthropod vectors, are highly susceptible to complement-mediated lysis while trypomastigotes, the infective form, present in host bloodstream, are resistant. Thus T. cruzi susceptibility to complement varies depending on the parasite stage (amastigote, trypomastigotes or epimastigote and on the T. cruzi strain. To avoid complement-mediated lysis, T. cruzi trypomastigotes express on the parasite surface a variety of complement regulatory proteins, such as glycoprotein 58/68 (gp58/68, T. cruzi complement regulatory protein (TcCRP, trypomastigote decay-accelerating factor (T-DAF, C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning (CRIT and T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT. Alternatively, or concomitantly, the parasite captures components with complement regulatory activity from the host bloodstream, such as factor H (FH and plasma membrane-derived vesicles (PMVs. All these proteins inhibit different steps of the classical (CP, alternative (AP or lectin pathways (LP. Thus, TcCRP inhibits the CP C3 convertase assembling, gp58/68 inhibits the AP C3 convertase, T-DAF interferes with the CP and AP convertases assembling, TcCRT inhibits the CP and LP, CRIT confers ability to resist the CP and LP, FH is used by trypomastigotes to inhibit the AP convertases and PMVs inhibit the CP and LP C3 convertases. Many of these proteins have similar molecular inhibitory mechanisms. Our laboratory has contributed to elucidate the role of TcCRT in the host

  19. In vivo fitness correlates with host-specific virulence of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in sockeye salmon and rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaranda, M.M.D.; Wargo, A.R.; Kurath, G.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between virulence and overall within-host fitness of the fish rhabdovirus Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was empirically investigated in vivo for two virus isolates belonging to different IHNV genogroups that exhibit opposing host-specific virulence. U group isolates are more virulent in sockeye salmon and M group isolates are more virulent in rainbow trout. In both single and mixed infections in the two fish hosts, the more virulent IHNV type exhibited higher prevalence and higher viral load than the less virulent type. Thus, a positive correlation was observed between higher in vivo fitness and higher host-specific virulence in sockeye salmon and rainbow trout. Comparisons of mean viral loads in single and mixed infections revealed no evidence for limitation due to competition effects between U and M viruses in either rainbow trout or sockeye salmon co-infections.

  20. The influenza fingerprints: NS1 and M1 proteins contribute to specific host cell ultrastructure signatures upon infection by different influenza A viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrier, Olivier; Moules, Vincent; Carron, Coralie; Cartet, Gaeelle [Equipe VirCell, Laboratoire de Virologie et Pathologie Humaine, VirPath EMR 4610, Universite de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Faculte de medecine RTH Laennec, rue Guillaume Paradin, F-69008 Lyon (France); Frobert, Emilie [Laboratoire de Virologie, Centre de Biologie et de Pathologie Est, Hospices Civils de Lyon, 59 boulevard Pinel, F-69677 Bron Cedex, Lyon (France); Yver, Matthieu; Traversier, Aurelien [Equipe VirCell, Laboratoire de Virologie et Pathologie Humaine, VirPath EMR 4610, Universite de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Faculte de medecine RTH Laennec, rue Guillaume Paradin, F-69008 Lyon (France); Wolff, Thorsten [Division of Influenza/Respiratory Viruses, Robert Koch Institute, Nordufer 20, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Riteau, Beatrice [Laboratoire de Virologie et Pathologie Humaine, VirPath EMR 4610, Universite de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Faculte de medecine RTH Laennec, rue Guillaume Paradin, F-69008 Lyon (France); Naffakh, Nadia [Institut Pasteur, Unite de Genetique Moleculaire des Virus Respiratoires, URA CNRS 3015, EA302 Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); and others

    2012-10-10

    Influenza A are nuclear replicating viruses which hijack host machineries in order to achieve optimal infection. Numerous functional virus-host interactions have now been characterized, but little information has been gathered concerning their link to the virally induced remodeling of the host cellular architecture. In this study, we infected cells with several human and avian influenza viruses and we have analyzed their ultrastructural modifications by using electron and confocal microscopy. We discovered that infections lead to a major and systematic disruption of nucleoli and the formation of a large number of diverse viral structures showing specificity that depended on the subtype origin and genomic composition of viruses. We identified NS1 and M1 proteins as the main actors in the remodeling of the host ultra-structure and our results suggest that each influenza A virus strain could be associated with a specific cellular fingerprint, possibly correlated to the functional properties of their viral components.

  1. Host specificity and experimental assessment of the early establishment of the mistletoe Phoradendron crassifolium (Pohl ex DC. Eichler (Santalaceae in a fragment of Atlantic Forest in southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Aparecida Messias

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mistletoe establishment relies heavily on a seed reaching a proper host plant. Small frugivorous birds usually disperse large numbers of mistletoe seeds. However, in the field, mistletoes are absent from some potential available hosts. We investigated whether the mistletoe Phoradendron crassifolium has some preferences for specific host trees in a fragment of Atlantic Forest in southeast Brazil. We surveyed 397 tree individuals of 50 species within 25 families. Seven of those species (14% bore P. crassifolium infections. Although prevalence at the individual level was low (11.6%, there were marked deviations in infection levels among species and families. Most (87% of the infections (40 of 46 occurred in species belonging to the families Anacardiaceae (Lithraea molleoides and Tapirira guianensis and Siparunaceae (Siparuna guianensis, which nevertheless accounted for only 26% of the potential individual hosts (103 of 397. We also performed an experiment simulating bird behavior. We inoculated 480 mistletoe seeds to the bark of four potential hosts in field, following the fate of the seeds for five months. No differences in host preference were observed. The low specificity detected at the local level was confirmed by a survey of exsiccata collected over the geographical distribution of the mistletoe, suggesting that P. crassifolium prevalence is more dependent on dispersal limitation than on mistletoe-host compatibility.

  2. Activity of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii N.E.B. (Euphorbiaceae latex against Lymnaea columella (Say, 1817 (Pulmonata: Lymnaeidae, intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica, Linnaeus, 1758 (Trematoda: Fasciolidae. 2: limited field-testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Carvalho de Vasconcellos

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The molluscicidal evaluation of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii (Crown of thorns against Lymnaea columella snails, intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica, in irrigation ditches of the Pisciculture Station at Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, was studied under limited field conditions. An aqueous solution of the latex at 5 mg/l was tested in two irrigation ditches (experimental and control ditches, after initial sampling of the snail population present. Twenty-four hours after application of the product, it was verified that 97.4% of free L. columella snails and 100% of snails of the same species captive in cages and used as sentinels at three points equidistant from the application site in the experimental ditch, died. For Biomphalaria tenagophila and Melanoides tuberculata snails, present in the experimental ditch, the mortality was 100%, for the species Pomacea spp. the mortality was 40%. No mortality was verified in the free mollusks, or in the sentinels in the ditch used as control. E. splendens var. hislopii latex is thus an efficient natural molluscicide, which may be used as an alternative control agent against L. columella.

  3. Melanoides tuberculata as intermediate host of Centrocestus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nishigori, 1924) in Tunisia. G Najet, D Sabah, H Hayet. Abstract. Melanoides tuberculata that naturally harbored trematode larvae were collected at the irrigation system in Ain Soltan's oasis (southwest of Tunisia), during malacological surveys ...

  4. Melanoides tuberculata as intermediate host of Centrocestus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... 2Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory (LGMH) - Faculty of Medicine of Sfax, Tunisia. 3Parasitology-Mycology Laboratory- Faculty of Medicine of Sfax, Tunisia. .... Anales del instituto de Biologia de la Universidad Nacional. Autonoma de Mexico, Serie Zoologia. 63: 1-11. Bayssade-Dufour C, Albaret, JL, ...

  5. Host specific diversity in Lactobacillus johnsonii as evidenced by a major chromosomal inversion and phage resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinane, Caitriona M; Kent, Robert M; Norberg, Sarah; Hill, Colin; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2011-04-20

    Genetic diversity and genomic rearrangements are a driving force in bacterial evolution and niche adaptation. We sequenced and annotated the genome of Lactobacillus johnsonii DPC6026, a strain isolated from the porcine intestinal tract. Although the genome of DPC6026 is similar in size (1.97 mbp) and GC content (34.8%) to the sequenced human isolate L. johnsonii NCC 533, a large symmetrical inversion of approximately 750 kb differentiated the two strains. Comparative analysis among 12 other strains of L. johnsonii including 8 porcine, 3 human and 1 poultry isolate indicated that the genome architecture found in DPC6026 is more common within the species than that of NCC 533. Furthermore a number of unique features were annotated in DPC6026, some of which are likely to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and contribute to protection against phage infection. A putative type III restriction-modification system was identified, as were novel Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) elements. Interestingly, these particular elements are not widely distributed among L. johnsonii strains. Taken together these data suggest intra-species genomic rearrangements and significant genetic diversity within the L. johnsonii species and indicate towards a host-specific divergence of L. johnsonii strains with respect to genome inversion and phage exposure.

  6. Host specific diversity in Lactobacillus johnsonii as evidenced by a major chromosomal inversion and phage resistance mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitriona M Guinane

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity and genomic rearrangements are a driving force in bacterial evolution and niche adaptation. We sequenced and annotated the genome of Lactobacillus johnsonii DPC6026, a strain isolated from the porcine intestinal tract. Although the genome of DPC6026 is similar in size (1.97 mbp and GC content (34.8% to the sequenced human isolate L. johnsonii NCC 533, a large symmetrical inversion of approximately 750 kb differentiated the two strains. Comparative analysis among 12 other strains of L. johnsonii including 8 porcine, 3 human and 1 poultry isolate indicated that the genome architecture found in DPC6026 is more common within the species than that of NCC 533. Furthermore a number of unique features were annotated in DPC6026, some of which are likely to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT and contribute to protection against phage infection. A putative type III restriction-modification system was identified, as were novel Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR elements. Interestingly, these particular elements are not widely distributed among L. johnsonii strains. Taken together these data suggest intra-species genomic rearrangements and significant genetic diversity within the L. johnsonii species and indicate towards a host-specific divergence of L. johnsonii strains with respect to genome inversion and phage exposure.

  7. Repeatedly Evolved Host-Specific Ectosymbioses between Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria and Amphipods Living in a Cave Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, Jan; Ramette, Alban; Dattagupta, Sharmishtha

    2012-01-01

    Ectosymbioses between invertebrates and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are widespread in sulfidic marine environments and have evolved independently in several invertebrate phyla. The first example from a freshwater habitat, involving Niphargus ictus amphipods and filamentous Thiothrix ectosymbionts, was recently reported from the sulfide-rich Frasassi caves in Italy. Subsequently, two new Niphargus species, N. frasassianus and N. montanarius, were discovered within Frasassi and found to co-occur with N. ictus. Using a variety of microscopic and molecular techniques, we found that all three Frasassi-dwelling Niphargus species harbor Thiothrix ectosymbionts, which belong to three distinct phylogenetic clades (named T1, T2, and T3). T1 and T3 Thiothrix dominate the N. frasassianus ectosymbiont community, whereas T2 and T3 are prevalent on N. ictus and N. montanarius. Relative distribution patterns of the three ectosymbionts are host species-specific and consistent over different sampling locations and collection years. Free-living counterparts of T1–T3 are rare or absent in Frasassi cave microbial mats, suggesting that ectosymbiont transmission among Niphargus occurs primarily through inter- or intraspecific inoculations. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the Niphargus-Thiothrix association has evolved independently at least two times. While ectosymbioses with T1 and T2 may have been established within Frasassi, T3 ectosymbionts seem to have been introduced to the cave system by Niphargus. PMID:23209690

  8. Repeatedly evolved host-specific ectosymbioses between sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and amphipods living in a cave ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bauermeister

    Full Text Available Ectosymbioses between invertebrates and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are widespread in sulfidic marine environments and have evolved independently in several invertebrate phyla. The first example from a freshwater habitat, involving Niphargus ictus amphipods and filamentous Thiothrix ectosymbionts, was recently reported from the sulfide-rich Frasassi caves in Italy. Subsequently, two new Niphargus species, N. frasassianus and N. montanarius, were discovered within Frasassi and found to co-occur with N. ictus. Using a variety of microscopic and molecular techniques, we found that all three Frasassi-dwelling Niphargus species harbor Thiothrix ectosymbionts, which belong to three distinct phylogenetic clades (named T1, T2, and T3. T1 and T3 Thiothrix dominate the N. frasassianus ectosymbiont community, whereas T2 and T3 are prevalent on N. ictus and N. montanarius. Relative distribution patterns of the three ectosymbionts are host species-specific and consistent over different sampling locations and collection years. Free-living counterparts of T1-T3 are rare or absent in Frasassi cave microbial mats, suggesting that ectosymbiont transmission among Niphargus occurs primarily through inter- or intraspecific inoculations. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the Niphargus-Thiothrix association has evolved independently at least two times. While ectosymbioses with T1 and T2 may have been established within Frasassi, T3 ectosymbionts seem to have been introduced to the cave system by Niphargus.

  9. Genetic diversity and host specificity varies across three genera of blood parasites in ducks of the Pacific Americas Flyway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Andrew B.; Smith, Matthew M.; Meixell, Brandt W.; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Ramey, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Birds of the order Anseriformes, commonly referred to as waterfowl, are frequently infected by Haemosporidia of the genera Haemoproteus, Plasmodium, and Leucocytozoon via dipteran vectors. We analyzed nucleotide sequences of the Cytochrome b (Cytb) gene from parasites of these genera detected in six species of ducks from Alaska and California, USA to characterize the genetic diversity of Haemosporidia infecting waterfowl at two ends of the Pacific Americas Flyway. In addition, parasite Cytb sequences were compared to those available on a public database to investigate specificity of genetic lineages to hosts of the order Anseriformes. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity of Haemoproteus Cytb sequences was lower than was detected for Plasmodium and Leucocytozoon parasites. Although waterfowl are presumed to be infected by only a single species of Leucocytozoon, L. simondi, diversity indices were highest for haplotypes from this genus and sequences formed five distinct clades separated by genetic distances of 4.9%–7.6%, suggesting potential cryptic speciation. All Haemoproteus andLeucocytozoon haplotypes derived from waterfowl samples formed monophyletic clades in phylogenetic analyses and were unique to the order Anseriformes with few exceptions. In contrast, waterfowl-origin Plasmodium haplotypes were identical or closely related to lineages found in other avian orders. Our results suggest a more generalist strategy for Plasmodiumparasites infecting North American waterfowl as compared to those of the generaHaemoproteus and Leucocytozoon.

  10. Taxonomy, host specificity and dietary implications of Hurleytrematoides (Digenea: Monorchiidae) from chaetodontid fishes on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, M K A; Cribb, T H

    2011-09-01

    Five new and five previously described species of Hurleytrematoides are reported from 19 of 34 chaetodontid species examined from the Great Barrier Reef; new species are H. faliexae n. sp., H. galzini n. sp., H. loi n. sp., H. morandi n. sp., and H. sasali n. sp. Previously described species are H. coronatum, H. fijiensis, H. prevoti, H. bartolii, and H. zebrasomae. The genus is rediagnosed in the light of morphological variation of the new species; the degree of spination and shape of the terminal genitalia distinguish individual species. Species of Hurleytrematoides infect almost every clade of the family Chaetodontidae found on the Great Barrier Reef, but obligate corallivores are not infected. All ten species were found at Heron Island on the southern Great Barrier Reef, but only six at Lizard Island on the northern Great Barrier Reef. For three of the four species not present at Lizard Island, the absence appears to be statistically significant. Although all species are apparently restricted to chaetodontids on the GBR, specificity within the family varies from oioxenous to euryxenous; a core/satellite host paradigm explains the distribution of several species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cell Membrane Protein Expression from Phenotypically Diverse Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Demonstrates Host-Specific Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Karthik Shantharam; Pascovici, Dana; Penesyan, Anahit; Goel, Apurv; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Paulsen, Ian T; Packer, Nicolle H; Molloy, Mark P

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, nosocomial, highly adaptable opportunistic pathogen especially prevalent in immuno-compromised cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The bacterial cell surface proteins are important contributors to virulence, yet the membrane subproteomes of phenotypically diverse P. aeruginosa strains are poorly characterized. We carried out mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteome analysis of the membrane proteins of three novel P. aeruginosa strains isolated from the sputum of CF patients and compared protein expression to the widely used laboratory strain, PAO1. Microbes were grown in planktonic growth condition using minimal M9 media, and a defined synthetic lung nutrient mimicking medium (SCFM) limited passaging. Two-dimensional LC-MS/MS using iTRAQ labeling enabled quantitative comparisons among 3171 and 2442 proteins from the minimal M9 medium and in the SCFM, respectively. The CF isolates showed marked differences in membrane protein expression in comparison with PAO1 including up-regulation of drug resistance proteins (MexY, MexB, MexC) and down-regulation of chemotaxis and aerotaxis proteins (PA1561, PctA, PctB) and motility and adhesion proteins (FliK, FlgE, FliD, PilJ). Phenotypic analysis using adhesion, motility, and drug susceptibility assays confirmed the proteomics findings. These results provide evidence of host-specific microevolution of P. aeruginosa in the CF lung and shed light on the adaptation strategies used by CF pathogens.

  12. Rat splenocytes inhibit antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation through a reactive nitrogen intermediate (RNI)-dependent mechanism and exhibit increased RNI production in response to IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, C S; Strejan, G H

    1993-09-01

    Rat splenocytes inhibited antigen-specific proliferation of primed lymph node cells in vitro. This inhibition resided in the plastic-adherent splenocyte fraction and was radioresistant, suggesting that the effect was due to macrophages. While this suppression was more evident if spleen cells were derived from immunized rats, spleen cells from normal rats were just as suppressive when added to cocultures at higher numbers. Proliferative responses were greatly enhanced in the presence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, a specific inhibitor of the nitric oxide synthetic pathway, and significant levels of nitrite (NO2-), a product of this pathway, were detected in culture supernatants in association with suppressed responses, supporting the notion that suppression was mediated by the L-arginine-dependent production of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI). When the splenocytes were physically separated from the responding lymph node cell population, high levels of NO2- were still detected but proliferative responses were no longer inhibited, suggesting that cell proximity or contact is necessary for delivery of the suppressive signal. Adherent splenocytes cultured alone produced low levels of NO2-. Addition of 1 to 50 U/ml IFN-gamma induced a dose-dependent increase in NO2- production, with the maximal level approximating that found in suppressed cocultures; TNF-alpha, IL-2, or LPS did not synergize with IFN-gamma to enhance NO2- production. These findings suggest that by activating macrophages to upregulate RNI synthesis, IFN-gamma-producing T cells may exert a negative influence over their own proliferation.

  13. Gene expression of a green fluorescent protein homolog as a host-specific biomarker of heat stress within a reef-building coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Keune, C; Dove, S

    2008-01-01

    Recent incidences of mass coral bleaching indicate that major reef building corals are increasingly suffering thermal stress associated with climate-related temperature increases. The development of pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry has enabled rapid detection of the onset of thermal stress within coral algal symbionts, but sensitive biomarkers of thermal stress specific to the host coral have been slower to emerge. Differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR) was used to produce fingerprints of gene expression for the reef-building coral Acropora millepora exposed to 33 degrees C. Changes in the expression of 23 out of 399 putative genes occurred within 144 h. Down-regulation of one host-specific gene (AmA1a) occurred within just 6 h. Full-length sequencing revealed the product of this gene to be an all-protein chromatophore (green fluorescent protein [GFP]-homolog). RT-PCR revealed consistent down-regulation of this GFP-homolog for three replicate colonies within 6 h at both 32 degrees C and 33 degrees C but not at lower temperatures. Down-regulation of this host gene preceded significant decreases in the photosynthetic activity of photosystem II (dark-adapted F (v)/F (m)) of algal symbionts as measured by PAM fluorometry. Gene expression of host-specific genes such as GFP-homologs may therefore prove to be highly sensitive indicators for the onset of thermal stress within host coral cells.

  14. The Tail Associated Protein of Acinetobacter baumannii Phage ΦAB6 Is the Host Specificity Determinant Possessing Exopolysaccharide Depolymerase Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Jiun Lai

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a non-fermenting, gram-negative bacterium. In recent years, the frequency of A. baumannii infections has continued to increase, and multidrug-resistant strains are emerging in hospitalized patients. Therefore, as therapeutic options become limited, the potential of phages as natural antimicrobial agents to control infections is worth reconsidering. In our previous study, we isolated ten virulent double-stranded DNA A. baumannii phages, ϕAB1-9 and ϕAB11, and found that each has a narrow host range. Many reports indicate that receptor-binding protein of phage mediates host recognition; however, understanding of the specific interactions between A. baumannii and phages remains very limited. In this study, host determinants of A. baumannii phages were investigated. Sequence comparison of ϕAB6 and ϕAB1 revealed high degrees of conservation among their genes except the tail fiber protein (ORF41 in ϕAB1 and ORF40 in ϕAB6. Furthermore, we found that ORF40ϕAB6 has polysaccharide depolymerase activity capable of hydrolyzing the A. baumannii exopolysaccharide and is a component of the phage tail apparatus determining host specificity. Thus, the lytic phages and their associated depolymerase not only have potential as alternative therapeutic agents for treating A. baumannii infections but also provide useful and highly specific tools for studying host strain exopolysaccharides and producing glycoconjugate vaccines.

  15. Wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein is a host-specific long-distance transport determinant in oat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viral determinants involved in systemic infection of hosts by monocot-infecting plant viruses are poorly understood. Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, genus Tritimovirus, family Potyviridae) exclusively infects monocotyledonous crops such as wheat, oat, barley, maize, triticale, and rye. Previously, ...

  16. Bacillus thuringiensis Is an Environmental Pathogen and Host-Specificity Has Developed as an Adaptation to Human-Generated Ecological Niches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argôlo-Filho, Ronaldo Costa; Loguercio, Leandro Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has been used successfully as a biopesticide for more than 60 years. More recently, genes encoding their toxins have been used to transform plants and other organisms. Despite the large amount of research on this bacterium, its true ecology is still a matter of debate, with two major viewpoints dominating: while some understand Bt as an insect pathogen, others see it as a saprophytic bacteria from soil. In this context, Bt’s pathogenicity to other taxa and the possibility that insects may not be the primary targets of Bt are also ideas that further complicate this scenario. The existence of conflicting research results, the difficulty in developing broader ecological and genetics studies, and the great genetic plasticity of this species has cluttered a definitive concept. In this review, we gathered information on the aspects of Bt ecology that are often ignored, in the attempt to clarify the lifestyle, mechanisms of transmission and target host range of this bacterial species. As a result, we propose an integrated view to account for Bt ecology. Although Bt is indeed a pathogenic bacterium that possesses a broad arsenal for virulence and defense mechanisms, as well as a wide range of target hosts, this seems to be an adaptation to specific ecological changes acting on a versatile and cosmopolitan environmental bacterium. Bt pathogenicity and host-specificity was favored evolutionarily by increased populations of certain insect species (or other host animals), whose availability for colonization were mostly caused by anthropogenic activities. These have generated the conditions for ecological imbalances that favored dominance of specific populations of insects, arachnids, nematodes, etc., in certain areas, with narrower genetic backgrounds. These conditions provided the selective pressure for development of new hosts for pathogenic interactions, and so, host specificity of certain strains. PMID:26462580

  17. Community Sampling and Integrative Taxonomy Reveal New Species and Host Specificity in the Army Ant-Associated Beetle Genus Tetradonia (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Aleocharinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Beeren, Christoph; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Kronauer, Daniel J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Army ant colonies host a diverse community of arthropod symbionts. Among the best-studied symbiont communities are those of Neotropical army ants of the genus Eciton. It is clear, however, that even in these comparatively well studied systems, a large proportion of symbiont biodiversity remains unknown. Even more striking is our lack of knowledge regarding the nature and specificity of these host-symbiont interactions. Here we surveyed the diversity and host specificity of rove beetles of the genus Tetradonia Wasmann, 1894 (Staphylinidae: Aleocharinae). Systematic community sampling of 58 colonies of the six local Eciton species at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, combined with an integrative taxonomic approach, allowed us to uncover species diversity, host specificity, and co-occurrence patterns of symbionts in unprecedented detail. We used an integrative taxonomic approach combining morphological and genetic analyses, to delineate species boundaries. Mitochondrial DNA barcodes were analyzed for 362 Tetradonia specimens, and additional nuclear markers for a subset of 88 specimens. All analyses supported the presence of five Tetradonia species, including two species new to science. Host specificity is highly variable across species, ranging from generalists such as T. laticeps, which parasitizes all six local Eciton species, to specialists such as T. lizonae, which primarily parasitizes a single species, E. hamatum. Here we provide a dichotomous key along with diagnostic molecular characters for identification of Tetradonia species at La Selva Biological Station. By reliably assessing biodiversity and providing tools for species identification, we hope to set the baseline for future studies of the ecological and evolutionary dynamics in these species-rich host-symbiont networks. PMID:27829037

  18. The Mouse Intestinal Bacterial Collection (miBC) provides host-specific insight into cultured diversity and functional potential of the gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Pukall, Rüdiger; Abt, Birte

    2016-01-01

    BC), a public repository of bacterial strains and associated genomes from the mouse gut, and studied host-specificity of colonization and sequence-based relevance of the resource. The collection includes several strains representing novel species, genera and even one family. Genomic analyses showed that certain...

  19. DNA Fingerprinting To Improve Data Collection Efficiency and Yield in a Host-Specificity Test of a Weed Biological Control Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    An open-field test was conducted in southern France to assess the host-specificity of Ceratapion basicorne, a candidate for biological control of yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis; YST). Test plants were infested by naturally occurring populations of C. basicorne but were also exposed to s...

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies vitamin B5 biosynthesis as a host specificity factor in Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Samuel K; Didelot, Xavier; Meric, Guillaume; Torralbo, Alicia; Jolley, Keith A; Kelly, David J; Bentley, Stephen D; Maiden, Martin C J; Parkhill, Julian; Falush, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    Genome-wide association studies have the potential to identify causal genetic factors underlying important phenotypes but have rarely been performed in bacteria. We present an association mapping method that takes into account the clonal population structure of bacteria and is applicable to both core and accessory genome variation. Campylobacter is a common cause of human gastroenteritis as a consequence of its proliferation in multiple farm animal species and its transmission via contaminated meat and poultry. We applied our association mapping method to identify the factors responsible for adaptation to cattle and chickens among 192 Campylobacter isolates from these and other host sources. Phylogenetic analysis implied frequent host switching but also showed that some lineages were strongly associated with particular hosts. A seven-gene region with a host association signal was found. Genes in this region were almost universally present in cattle but were frequently absent in isolates from chickens and wild birds. Three of the seven genes encoded vitamin B5 biosynthesis. We found that isolates from cattle were better able to grow in vitamin B5-depleted media and propose that this difference may be an adaptation to host diet.

  1. The Mouse Intestinal Bacterial Collection (miBC) provides host-specific insight into cultured diversity and functional potential of the gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Pukall, Rüdiger; Abt, Birte

    2016-01-01

    BC), a public repository of bacterial strains and associated genomes from the mouse gut, and studied host-specificity of colonization and sequence-based relevance of the resource. The collection includes several strains representing novel species, genera and even one family. Genomic analyses showed that certain...... of intestinal microbiomes and their interactions with diet and host. It is thus important to study in detail the diversity and functions of gut microbiota members, including those colonizing the mouse intestine. To address these issues, we aimed at establishing the Mouse Intestinal Bacterial Collection (mi...... and molecular studies. The resource is available at www.dsmz.de/miBC....

  2. Dispersão de Biomphalaria straminea, hospedeira intermediária do Schistosoma mansoni, através da distribuição de peixes The spreading of Biomphalaria straminea, intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni through the distribution of fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato de R. Corrêa

    1970-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi focalizado, pela primeira vez o encontro de B. straminea no Estado de São Paulo. Esta espécie vem juntar-se aos planorbídeos já assinalados em nosso Estado. Foram descritos os criadouros, onde a B. straminea foi coletada, localizados em tanques de criação de peixes nas Estações de Piscicultura de Barra Bonita e Americana, Estado de São Paulo, e em um aquário particular na capital dêsse Estado. Fêz-se referência ao transporte de peixes oriundos de zonas do país onde ocorre aquela espécie, Amazonas e Ceará, como responsável pela introdução daquele molusco no Estado. Destacou-se êsse achado pelo perigo que representa a distribuição de peixes da maneira como vem sendo feita atualmente em nosso país, tendo sido julgado necessário o estabelecimento de quarentena para aquêles vindos de zonas infestadas por espécies hospedeiras intermediárias do S. mansoni. Foram relatadas as medidas de combate aos caramujos efetuadas imediatamente após aquela descoberta e os resultados obtidos. Conclui-se que a dispersão passiva da B. straminea pelo transporte de peixes, deve ampliar a distribuição geográfica dêsse planorbídeo, já assinalado na Venezuela, Guianas e no Brasil, sendo que neste último ocorre em tôdas as Unidades Federativas, exceto, no Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, Rio de Janeiro e Territórios.Up the present, the works of collecting planorbids done in 226 municipalities for the elaboration of the geographical distribution chart in the State of São Paulo (Brazil, showed the presence of two intermediate host species of Schistosoma mansoni: Biomphalaria tenagophila and Biompralaria glabrata. Although the technicians from the Psiculture Stations, have not found snails in the water inside the containers used for the transportation of fishes, the ecological conditions of B. straminea in the latest researches are such as to indicate that they have been introduced, in our State through fish transportation imported

  3. Host species and habitat affect nodulation by specific Frankia genotypes in two species of Alnus in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Damon Anderson; Roger W. Ruess; David D. Myrold; D. Lee. Taylor

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the genetic structure (nifD-K spacer RFLP haplotypes) of Frankia assemblages symbiotic with two species of Alnus (A. tenuifolia and A. viridis) in four successional habitats in interior Alaska. We used one habitat in which both hosts occurred to...

  4. Genetic variation in Asterionella formosa (Bacillariophyceae) is it linked to frequent epidemics of host-specific parasitic fungi?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bruin, A.; Ibelings, B.W.; Rijkeboer, M.; Brehm, Michaela; Van Donk, E.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding of the genetic basis for susceptibility and resistance is still lacking for most aquatic host-parasite systems, for instance, for phytoplankton and their fungal parasites. Fungal parasites can have significant effects on phytoplankton populations, mainly through their ability to

  5. Phytoalexin detoxification genes and gene products: Implication for the evolution of host specific traits for pathogenicity. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanEtten, H.

    1997-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research were to determine which differences among PDA genes were associated with different levels of virulence on pea and to clone and characterize a MAK gene. The authors also proposed to characterize the pisatin detoxifying system in pea pathogens in addition to N. haematococca to assess whether pathogens of a common host had evolved similar pathogenicity genes

  6. Phytoalexin detoxification genes and gene products: Implication for the evolution of host specific traits for pathogenicity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanEtten, H.

    1997-06-01

    The overall objectives of this research were to determine which differences among PDA genes were associated with different levels of virulence on pea and to clone and characterize a MAK gene. The authors also proposed to characterize the pisatin detoxifying system in pea pathogens in addition to N. haematococca to assess whether pathogens of a common host had evolved similar pathogenicity genes.

  7. Alloreactivity of virus-specific T cells: possible implication of graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-leukemia effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Shigeo; Kapp, Markus; Einsele, Hermann

    2013-10-14

    Immune reconstitution of functional virus-specific T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been intensively investigated. However, the possible role of crossreactivity of these virus-specific T cells against allogeneic targets is still unclear. Theoretically, as in the field of organ transplantation, virus-specific T cells possess crossreactivity potential after allogeneic HSCT. Such crossreactivity is assumed to play a role in graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-leukemia effects. In this article, we aim to give a comprehensive overview of current understanding about crossreactivity of virus-specific T cells.

  8. Mitochondrial COI and morphological evidence for host specificity of the black cherry aphids Myzus cerasi (Fabricius, 1775) collected from different cherry tree species in Europe (Hemiptera, Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakauskas, Rimantas; Havelka, Jekaterina; Zaremba, Audrius; Bernotienė, Rasa

    2014-01-01

    Partial sequences of the mitochondrial COI gene of forty eight European and two Turkish population samples of Myzus cerasi from different winter hosts (Prunus spp.) were subjected to phylogenetic analyses. The analysed M. cerasi samples emerged as paraphyletic relative to a Myzus borealis sample used as an out-group, and formed two major clades in neighbor joining, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference trees, corresponding to subspecies living specifically on Prunus avium and P. cerasus. Multivariate discriminant analysis (method of canonical variates) was applied to find out if morphological variation of samples correlated with mitochondrial COI and host plant information. Mean scores on the first two canonical variables clustered samples fully in accordance with their COI haplotypes and host plants confirming the existence of two morphologically similar winter host - specific subspecies of M. cerasi in Europe. No single morphological character enabled satisfactory discrimination between apterous viviparous females of the two subspecies. A three-character linear discriminant function enabled 92.37% correct identification of apterous viviparous females of M. cerasi cerasi (n = 118) and 93.64% of M. cerasi pruniavium (n = 110). A key for the morphological identification of the two subspecies is presented and their taxonomic status is discussed.

  9. Mitochondrial COI and morphological evidence for host specificity of the black cherry aphids Myzus cerasi (Fabricius, 1775 collected from different cherry tree species in Europe (Hemiptera, Aphididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimantas Rakauskas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Partial sequences of the mitochondrial COI gene of forty eight European and two Turkish population samples of Myzus cerasi from different winter hosts (Prunus spp. were subjected to phylogenetic analyses. The analysed M. cerasi samples emerged as paraphyletic relative to a Myzus borealis sample used as an out-group, and formed two major clades in neighbor joining, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference trees, corresponding to subspecies living specifically on Prunus avium and P. cerasus. Multivariate discriminant analysis (method of canonical variates was applied to find out if morphological variation of samples correlated with mitochondrial COI and host plant information. Mean scores on the first two canonical variables clustered samples fully in accordance with their COI haplotypes and host plants confirming the existence of two morphologically similar winter host - specific subspecies of M.cerasi in Europe. No single morphological character enabled satisfactory discrimination between apterous viviparous females of the two subspecies. A three-character linear discriminant function enabled 92.37% correct identification of apterous viviparous females of M. cerasi cerasi (n=118 and 93.64% of M. cerasi pruniavium (n=110. A key for the morphological identification of the two subspecies is presented and their taxonomic status is discussed.

  10. Endophytic bacterial communities in three arctic plants from low arctic fell tundra are cold-adapted and host-plant specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissinen, Riitta M; Männistö, Minna K; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2012-11-01

    Endophytic bacteria inhabit internal plant tissues, and have been isolated from a large diversity of plants, where they form nonpathogenic relationships with their hosts. This study combines molecular and culture-dependent approaches to characterize endophytic bacterial communities of three arcto-alpine plant species (Oxyria digyna, Diapensia lapponica and Juncus trifidus) sampled in the low Arctic (69°03'N). Analyses of a 325 bacterial endophyte isolates, as well as seven clone libraries, revealed a high diversity. In particular, members of the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, and Proteobacteria were found. The compositions of the endophytic bacterial communities were dependent on host-plant species as well as on snow cover at sampling sites. Several bacterial genera were found to be associated tightly with specific host-plant species. In particular, Sphingomonas spp. were characteristic for D. lapponica and O. digyna, and their phylogenetic grouping corresponded to the host plant. Most of the endophyte isolates grew well and retained activity at +4 °C, and isolate as well as clone library sequences were often highly similar to sequences from bacteria from cold environments. Taken together, this study shows that arctic plants harbour a diverse community of bacterial endophytes, a portion of which seems to be tightly associated with specific plant species. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Host Specificity for Bacterial, Archaeal and Fungal Communities Determined for High- and Low-Microbial Abundance Sponge Species in Two Genera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Chaib De Mares

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sponges are engaged in intimate symbioses with a diversity of microorganisms from all three domains of life, namely Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. Sponges have been well studied and categorized for their bacterial communities, some displaying a high microbial abundance (HMA, while others show low microbial abundance (LMA. However, the associated Archaea and Eukarya have remained relatively understudied. We assessed the bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic diversities in the LMA sponge species Dysidea avara and Dysidea etheria by deep amplicon sequencing, and compared the results to those in the HMA sponges Aplysina aerophoba and Aplysina cauliformis. D. avara and A. aerophoba are sympatric in the Mediterranean Sea, while D. etheria and A. cauliformis are sympatric in the Caribbean Sea. The bacterial communities followed a host-specific pattern, with host species identity explaining most of the variation among samples. We identified OTUs shared by the Aplysina species that support a more ancient association of these microbes, before the split of the two species studied here. These shared OTUs are suitable targets for future studies of the microbial traits that mediate interactions with their hosts. Even though the archaeal communities were not as rich as the bacterial ones, we found a remarkable diversification and specificity of OTUs of the family Cenarchaeaceae and the genus Nitrosopumilus in all four sponge species studied. Similarly, the differences in fungal communities were driven by sponge identity. The structures of the communities of small eukaryotes such as dinophytes and ciliophores (alveolates, and stramenopiles, could not be explained by either sponge host, sponge genus or geographic location. Our analyses suggest that the host specificity that was previously described for sponge bacterial communities also extends to the archaeal and fungal communities, but not to other microbial eukaryotes.

  12. Molluscicidal action of the latex of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii N.E.B. ("Christ's Crown" (Euphorbiaceae against Lymnaea columella (Say, 1817 (Pulmonata: Lymnaeidae, intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica Linnaeus, 1758 (Trematode: Fasciolidae: 1- test in laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Carvalho de Vasconcellos

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The latex action of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii (Christ's Crown against snails Lymnaea columella, intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica, derived from irrigation ditches of the Station of Pisciculture at Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, was studied in the laboratory. Lab bioassays, using aqueous solutions of the latex, varying between 0.1 and 10 mg/l, have proven molluscicidal activity of the product collected on the same day the tests were performed, during the four seasons of the year, finding the following lethal concentrations (LC90: 1.51 mg/l in the spring; 0.55 mg/l in the summer; 0.74 mg/l in the fall and 0.93 mg/l in winter, after 24 h exposure of the snails, showing significant differences among the seasons of the year (ANOVA test, F = 11.01, G.L.= 3/33, p < 0.05, as well as among the concentrations (ANOVA test, F = 27.38, G.L.= 11/33, p < 0.05. In the summer, mortality reached 100% from concentration at 0.6 mg/l, the same during fall and in winter as of 1 mg/l, while in spring it only reached 100% mortality as of 2 mg/l. Mortality in the controls was low, reaching 5% in the summer and winter and 10% in the fall and spring. None of the samples died. During the assay, with an aqueous solution of the latex at a concentration of 5 mg/l, in order to check the time of duration of the product effect, in the laboratory, it was observed that the molluscicidal activity remained stable up to the 15th day after the beginning of the test with 100% mortality of L. columella, gradually losing its effect until the 23rd day, when we no longer observed animal mortality. In the control group, there was a random daily variation in mortality rate ranging 0-50% after 48 h of observation for 30 days.

  13. Host-ectoparasite specificity in a small mammal community in an area of Atlantic Rain Forest (Ilha Grande, State of Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Brum Bittencourt

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The analyses of the ectoparasite species associated with a small mammal community on Ilha Grande, a coastal island in southern of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, evaluated the level of host-ectoparasite specificity. Was used the Jaccard index for qualitative data to analyse the similarity. The lowest value of similarity occurred between Proechimys iheringi and Marmosops incanus and between Sciurus aestuans and Nectomys squamipes (Cj = 0.08 and the highest between P. iheringi and Oxymycterus sp. (Cj = 0.33. This index showed a low value of similarity across the ectoparasite community. The only exception from this pattern of high host specificity occurred with P. iheringi and Oxymycterus sp., which shared five species of ectoparasites. The similarity values, for most of the cases, is smaller than 0.2.

  14. Virus-Inspired Nanogenes Free from Man-Made Materials for Host-Specific Transfection and Bio-Aided MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing-Yi; Zhang, Ming-Kang; Ding, Xian-Guang; Qiu, Wen-Xiu; Yu, Wu-Yang; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2018-04-20

    Many viruses have a lipid envelope derived from the host cell membrane that contributes much to the host specificity and the cellular invasion. This study puts forward a virus-inspired technology that allows targeted genetic delivery free from man-made materials. Genetic therapeutics, metal ions, and biologically derived cell membranes are nanointegrated. Vulnerable genetic therapeutics contained in the formed "nanogene" can be well protected from unwanted attacks by blood components and enzymes. The surface envelope composed of cancer cell membrane fragments enables host-specific targeting of the nanogene to the source cancer cells and homologous tumors while effectively inhibiting recognition by macrophages. High transfection efficiency highlights the potential of this technology for practical applications. Another unique merit of this technology arises from the facile combination of special biofunction of metal ions with genetic therapy. Typically, Gd(III)-involved nanogene generates a much higher T 1 relaxation rate than the clinically used Gd magnetic resonance imaging agent and harvests the enhanced MRI contrast at tumors. This virus-inspired technology points out a distinctive new avenue for the disease-specific transport of genetic therapeutics and other biomacromolecules. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Predicting fecal sources in waters with diverse pollution loads using general and molecular host-specific indicators and applying machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas-Massana, Arnau; Gómez-Doñate, Marta; Sánchez, David; Belanche-Muñoz, Lluís A; Muniesa, Maite; Blanch, Anicet R

    2015-03-15

    In this study we use a machine learning software (Ichnaea) to generate predictive models for water samples with different concentrations of fecal contamination (point source, moderate and low). We applied several MST methods (host-specific Bacteroides phages, mitochondrial DNA genetic markers, Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium dentium markers, and bifidobacterial host-specific qPCR), and general indicators (Escherichia coli, enterococci and somatic coliphages) to evaluate the source of contamination in the samples. The results provided data to the Ichnaea software, that evaluated the performance of each method in the different scenarios and determined the source of the contamination. Almost all MST methods in this study determined correctly the origin of fecal contamination at point source and in moderate concentration samples. When the dilution of the fecal pollution increased (below 3 log10 CFU E. coli/100 ml) some of these indicators (bifidobacterial host-specific qPCR, some mitochondrial markers or B. dentium marker) were not suitable because their concentrations decreased below the detection limit. Using the data from source point samples, the software Ichnaea produced models for waters with low levels of fecal pollution. These models included some MST methods, on the basis of their best performance, that were used to determine the source of pollution in this area. Regardless the methods selected, that could vary depending on the scenario, inductive machine learning methods are a promising tool in MST studies and may represent a leap forward in solving MST cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. NleB/SseK effectors fromCitrobacter rodentium,Escherichia coli, andSalmonella entericadisplay distinct differences in host substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Qaidi, Samir; Chen, Kangming; Halim, Adnan; Siukstaite, Lina; Rueter, Christian; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Clausen, Henrik; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2017-07-07

    Many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use a syringe-like apparatus called a type III secretion system to inject virulence factors into host cells. Some of these effectors are enzymes that modify host proteins to subvert their normal functions. NleB is a glycosyltransferase that modifies host proteins with N -acetyl-d-glucosamine to inhibit antibacterial and inflammatory host responses. NleB is conserved among the attaching/effacing pathogens enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and Citrobacter rodentium Moreover, Salmonella enterica strains encode up to three NleB orthologs named SseK1, SseK2, and SseK3. However, there are conflicting reports regarding the activities and host protein targets among the NleB/SseK orthologs. Therefore, here we performed in vitro glycosylation assays and cell culture experiments to compare the activities and substrate specificities of these effectors. SseK1, SseK3, EHEC NleB1, EPEC NleB1, and C rodentium NleB blocked TNF-mediated NF-κB pathway activation, whereas SseK2 and NleB2 did not. C. rodentium NleB, EHEC NleB1, and SseK1 glycosylated host GAPDH. C. rodentium NleB, EHEC NleB1, EPEC NleB1, and SseK2 glycosylated the FADD (Fas-associated death domain protein). SseK3 and NleB2 were not active against either substrate. We also found that EHEC NleB1 glycosylated two GAPDH arginine residues, Arg 197 and Arg 200 , and that these two residues were essential for GAPDH-mediated activation of TNF receptor-associated factor 2 ubiquitination. These results provide evidence that members of this highly conserved family of bacterial virulence effectors target different host protein substrates and exhibit distinct cellular modes of action to suppress host responses. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Hidden diversity and host specificity in cycliophorans; a phylogeographic analysis along the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obst, Matthias; Funch, Peter; Gonzalo, Giribet

    2005-01-01

    .0504). However, itwas low for commensals onNephrops norvegicus(6 haplotypes,h= 0.3899, ππ= 0.0035), andintermediate for cycliophorans onHomarus gammarus(5 haplotypes,h= 0.3020, ππ= 0.0140).Although two of the host lobsters co-inhabit the coastal waters of Europe, a strong geneticstructure (78.45% of the observed...... ability of the cycliophoranchordoid larva. Demographic and phylogenetic analyses suggest old and possibly crypticpopulations present onH. americanusandH. gammarus, while the latter may have experiencedrecent bottlenecks, perhaps during Pleistocene glaciations. Populations onN. norvegicusappear...

  18. Epithelial Intermediate Filaments: Guardians against Microbial Infection?

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    Florian Geisler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are abundant cytoskeletal components of epithelial tissues. They have been implicated in overall stress protection. A hitherto poorly investigated area of research is the function of intermediate filaments as a barrier to microbial infection. This review summarizes the accumulating knowledge about this interaction. It first emphasizes the unique spatial organization of the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton in different epithelial tissues to protect the organism against microbial insults. We then present examples of direct interaction between viral, bacterial, and parasitic proteins and the intermediate filament system and describe how this affects the microbe-host interaction by modulating the epithelial cytoskeleton, the progression of infection, and host response. These observations not only provide novel insights into the dynamics and function of intermediate filaments but also indicate future avenues to combat microbial infection.

  19. Molecular approaches identify known species, reveal cryptic species and verify host specificity of Chinese Philotrypesis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mei-Jiao; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Bian, Sheng-Nan; Li, Yan-Wei; Niu, Li-Ming; Hu, Hao-Yuan; Wu, Wen-Shan; Murphy, Robert W; Huang, Da-Wei

    2012-07-01

    Philotrypesis, a major component of the fig wasp community (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), is a model taxon for studying male fighting and mating behaviour. Its extreme sexual dimorphism and male polymorphism render species identification uncertain and in-depth research on its ecology, behaviour and other evolutionary topics challenging. The fig wasps' enclosed habitat within the syconia makes their mating behaviour inaccessible, to the extent of matching conspecific females and males. In this study, we combine morphological and molecular analyses to identify species of Philotrypesis sampled from south China and to associate their extraordinarily dimorphic genders and labile male morphologies. Morphological evaluations of females identify 22 species and 28 male morphs. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2 data detect 21 species using females, and 15 species among the males. Most of the males match the species as delimited by females. Both markers reveal cryptic species in P. quadrisetosa on Ficus vasculosa. Most species of wasps live on one species of fig but three species co-occur in two hosts (F. microcarpa and F. benjamina), which indicates host switching. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Innate immunity in HIV-1 infection: epithelial and non-specific host factors of mucosal immunity- a workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittayananta, W; Weinberg, A; Malamud, D; Moyes, D; Webster-Cyriaque, J; Ghosh, S

    2016-04-01

    The interplay between HIV-1 and epithelial cells represents a critical aspect in mucosal HIV-1 transmission. Epithelial cells lining the oral cavity cover subepithelial tissues, which contain virus-susceptible host cells including CD4(+) T lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages, and dendritic cells. Oral epithelia are among the sites of first exposure to both cell-free and cell-associated virus HIV-1 through breast-feeding and oral-genital contact. However, oral mucosa is considered to be naturally resistant to HIV-1 transmission. Oral epithelial cells have been shown to play a crucial role in innate host defense. Nevertheless, it is not clear to what degree these local innate immune factors contribute to HIV-1 resistance of the oral mucosa. This review paper addressed the following issues that were discussed at the 7th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS held in Hyderabad, India, during November 6-9, 2014: (i) What is the fate of HIV-1 after interactions with oral epithelial cells?; (ii) What are the keratinocyte and other anti-HIV effector oral factors, and how do they contribute to mucosal protection?; (iii) How can HIV-1 interactions with oral epithelium affect activation and populations of local immune cells?; (iv) How can HIV-1 interactions alter functions of oral epithelial cells? © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Brucella TIR-like protein TcpB/Btp1 specifically targets the host adaptor protein MAL/TIRAP to promote infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenna; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Yang, Mingjuan; Gao, Junguang; Zhan, Shaoxia; Xinying, Du; Huang, Liuyu; Li, Wenfeng; Chen, Zeliang; Li, Juan

    2016-08-26

    Brucella spp. are known to avoid host immune recognition and weaken the immune response to infection. Brucella like accomplish this by employing two clever strategies, called the stealth strategy and hijacking strategy. The TIR domain-containing protein (TcpB/Btp1) of Brucella melitensis is thought to be involved in inhibiting host NF-κB activation by binding to adaptors downstream of Toll-like receptors. However, of the five TIR domain-containing adaptors conserved in mammals, whether MyD88 or MAL, even other three adaptors, are specifically targeted by TcpB has not been identified. Here, we confirmed the effect of TcpB on B.melitensis virulence in mice and found that TcpB selectively targets MAL. By using siRNA against MAL, we found that TcpB from B.melitensis is involved in intracellular survival and that MAL affects intracellular replication of B.melitensis. Our results confirm that TcpB specifically targets MAL/TIRAP to disrupt downstream signaling pathways and promote intra-host survival of Brucella spp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  3. Distribution of freshwater snails in family-based VAC ponds and associated waterbodies with special reference to intermediate hosts of fish-borne zoonotic trematodes in Nam Dinh Province, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dung, Bui Thi; Madsen, Henry; The, Dang Tat

    2010-10-01

    .6% of all infections followed by echinostome cercariae (35.0%) and xiphidiocercariae (17.3%). Bithynia fuschiana and M. tuberculata had the most diverse trematode fauna. C. sinensis was not recorded in this study. The VAC pond system in this area, is very important for transmission of minute intestinal trematodes while they play little role in transmission of C. sinensis as its intermediate hosts, bithynid snails, rarely occur in these ponds. From a public health perspective this is positive as the effects of infections with intestinal trematodes are considered mild. On the other hand it is possible that even such subtle effects could have importance in public health as transmission is very intense in the area. And this in combination with the aquaculture importance, reduced marketability of fishes with high metacercariae loads, warrants that control efforts against these trematodes are initiated to reduce transmission in this production system. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Host Specificity of Epiplema albida: A Potential Biological Control Agent for Sri Lankan Privet in the Mascarene Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H. Shaw

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Epiplema albida (Hampson (Lepidoptera: Uraniidae, Epipleminae from Sri Lanka, was studied to assess its safety for use as a biological control agent for Sri Lankan privet, Ligustrum robustum subsp. walkeri (Oleaceae in La Réunion and other Mascarene Islands. Larval no-choice feeding tests using newly hatched larvae, larval development tests, and multiple choice oviposition tests were used. Adult females of E. albida are shown to have highly selective oviposition behaviour and the species is physiologically restricted to very few hosts for feeding and development. The risk to key test plants in La Réunion is minimal, so this species can be considered for use as a biological control agent there, but would need further evaluation for potential use elsewhere.

  5. The structures of bacteriophages K1E and K1-5 explain processive degradation of polysaccharide capsules and evolution of new host specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiman, Petr G; Battisti, Anthony J; Bowman, Valorie D; Stummeyer, Katharina; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Scholl, Dean; Molineux, Ian J

    2007-08-17

    External polysaccharides of many pathogenic bacteria form capsules protecting the bacteria from the animal immune system and phage infection. However, some bacteriophages can digest these capsules using glycosidases displayed on the phage particle. We have utilized cryo-electron microscopy to determine the structures of phages K1E and K1-5 and thereby establish the mechanism by which these phages attain and switch their host specificity. Using a specific glycosidase, both phages penetrate the capsule and infect the neuroinvasive human pathogen Escherichia coli K1. In addition to the K1-specific glycosidase, each K1-5 particle carries a second enzyme that allows it to infect E. coli K5, whose capsule is chemically different from that of K1. The enzymes are organized into a multiprotein complex attached via an adapter protein to the virus portal vertex, through which the DNA is ejected during infection. The structure of the complex suggests a mechanism for the apparent processivity of degradation that occurs as the phage drills through the polysaccharide capsule. The enzymes recognize the adapter protein by a conserved N-terminal sequence, providing a mechanism for phages to acquire different enzymes and thus to evolve new host specificities.

  6. Lineage-specific serology confirms Brazilian Atlantic forest lion tamarins, Leontopithecus chrysomelas and Leontopithecus rosalia, as reservoir hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi II (TcII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Charlotte L; Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Xavier, Samanta C C; Barros, Juliana H; Lima, Valdirene S; Jansen, Ana M; Miles, Michael A

    2016-11-15

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease in humans, has a vast reservoir of mammalian hosts in the Americas, and is classified into six genetic lineages, TcI-TcVI, with a possible seventh, TcBat. Elucidating enzootic cycles of the different lineages is important for understanding the ecology of this parasite, the emergence of new outbreaks of Chagas disease and for guiding control strategies. Direct lineage identification by genotyping is hampered by limitations of parasite isolation and culture. An indirect method is to identify lineage-specific serological reactions in infected individuals; here we describe its application with sylvatic Brazilian primates. Synthetic peptides representing lineage-specific epitopes of the T. cruzi surface protein TSSA were used in ELISA with sera from Atlantic Forest Leontopithecus chrysomelas (golden-headed lion tamarin), L. rosalia (golden lion tamarin), Amazonian Sapajus libidinosus (black-striped capuchin) and Alouatta belzebul (red-handed howler monkey). The epitope common to lineages TcII, TcV and TcVI was recognised by sera from 15 of 26 L. chrysomelas and 8 of 13 L. rosalia. For 12 of these serologically identified TcII infections, the identity of the lineage infection was confirmed by genotyping T. cruzi isolates. Of the TcII/TcV/TcVI positive sera 12 of the 15 L. chrysomelas and 2 of the 8 L. rosalia also reacted with the specific epitope restricted to TcV and TcVI. Sera from one of six S. libidinous recognised the TcIV/TcIII epitopes. This lineage-specific serological surveillance has verified that Atlantic Forest primates are reservoir hosts of at least TcII, and probably TcV and TcVI, commonly associated with severe Chagas disease in the southern cone region of South America. With appropriate reagents, this novel methodology is readily applicable to a wide range of mammal species and reservoir host discovery.

  7. Apoptosis Triggers Specific, Rapid, and Global mRNA Decay with 3′ Uridylated Intermediates Degraded by DIS3L2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall P. Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a tightly coordinated cell death program that damages mitochondria, DNA, proteins, and membrane lipids. Little is known about the fate of RNA as cells die. Here, we show that mRNAs, but not noncoding RNAs, are rapidly and globally degraded during apoptosis. mRNA decay is triggered early in apoptosis, preceding membrane lipid scrambling, genomic DNA fragmentation, and apoptotic changes to translation initiation factors. mRNA decay depends on mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and is amplified by caspase activation. 3′ truncated mRNA decay intermediates with nontemplated uridylate-rich tails are generated during apoptosis. These tails are added by the terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTases ZCCHC6 and ZCCHC11, and the uridylated transcript intermediates are degraded by the 3′ to 5′ exonuclease DIS3L2. Knockdown of DIS3L2 or the TUTases inhibits apoptotic mRNA decay, translation arrest, and cell death, whereas DIS3L2 overexpression enhances cell death. Our results suggest that global mRNA decay is an overlooked hallmark of apoptosis.

  8. Contrasting root associated fungi of three common oak-woodland plant species based on molecular identification: host specificity or non-specific amplification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douhan, Greg W; Petersen, Carolyn; Bledsoe, Caroline S; Rizzo, David M

    2005-07-01

    An increasingly popular approach used to identify arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in planta is to amplify a portion of AM fungal small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU-rDNA) from whole root DNA extractions using the primer pair AM1-NS31, followed by cloning and sequencing. We used this approach to study the AM fungal community composition of three common oak-woodland plant species: a grass (Cynosurus echinatus), blue oak (Quercus douglasii), and a forb (Torilis arvensis). Significant diversity of AM fungi were found in the roots of C. echinatus, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating a high degree of AM fungal diversity from the roots of various hosts. In contrast, clones from Q. douglasii and T. arvensis were primarily from non-AM fungi of diverse origins within the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. This work demonstrates that caution must be taken when using this molecular approach to determine in planta AM fungal diversity if non-sequence based methods such as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, or temperature gradient gel electrophoresis are used.

  9. Fluorescence properties and sequestration of peripheral anionic site specific ligands in bile acid hosts: Effect on acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mullah Muhaiminul; Aguan, Kripamoy; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2016-05-01

    The increase in fluorescence intensity of model acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors like propidium iodide (PI) and ethidium bromide (EB) is due to sequestration of the probes in primary micellar aggregates of bile acid (BA) host medium with moderate binding affinity of ca. 10(2)-10(3)M(-1). Multiple regression analysis of solvent dependent fluorescence behavior of PI indicates the decrease in total nonradiative decay rate due to partial shielding of the probe from hydrogen bond donation ability of the aqueous medium in bile acid bound fraction. Both PI and EB affects AChE activity through mixed inhibition and consistent with one site binding model; however, PI (IC50=20±1μM) shows greater inhibition in comparison with EB (IC50=40±3μM) possibly due to stronger interaction with enzyme active site. The potency of AChE inhibition for both the compounds is drastically reduced in the presence of bile acid due to the formation of BA-inhibitor complex and subsequent reduction of active inhibitor fraction in the medium. Although the inhibition mechanism still remains the same, the course of catalytic reaction critically depends on equilibrium binding among several species present in the solution; particularly at low inhibitor concentration. All the kinetic parameters for enzyme inhibition reaction are nicely correlated with the association constant for BA-inhibitor complex formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The C-terminus of Wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein is involved in differential infection of wheat and maize through host-specific long-distance transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; French, Roy

    2014-02-01

    Viral determinants and mechanisms involved in extension of host range of monocot-infecting viruses are poorly understood. Viral coat proteins (CP) serve many functions in almost every aspect of the virus life cycle. The role of the C-terminal region of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) CP in virus biology was examined by mutating six negatively charged aspartic acid residues at positions 216, 289, 290, 326, 333, and 334. All of these amino acid residues are dispensable for virion assembly, and aspartic acid residues at positions 216, 333, and 334 are expendable for normal infection of wheat and maize. However, mutants D289N, D289A, D290A, DD289/290NA, and D326A exhibited slow cell-to-cell movement in wheat, which resulted in delayed onset of systemic infection, followed by a rapid recovery of genomic RNA accumulation and symptom development. Mutants D289N, D289A, and D326A inefficiently infected maize, eliciting milder symptoms, while D290A and DD289/290NA failed to infect systemically, suggesting that the C-terminus of CP is involved in differential infection of wheat and maize. Mutation of aspartic acid residues at amino acid positions 289, 290, and 326 severely debilitated virus ingress into the vascular system of maize but not wheat, suggesting that these amino acids facilitate expansion of WSMV host range through host-specific long-distance transport.

  11. Dual-label flow cytometry-based host cell adhesion assay to ascertain the prospect of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum in niche-specific antibacterial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sandipan; Ramesh, Aiyagari

    2017-12-01

    Host cell adhesion assays that provide quantitative insight on the potential of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to inhibit adhesion of intestinal pathogens can be leveraged for the development of niche-specific anti-adhesion therapy. Herein, we report a dual-colour flow cytometry (FCM) analysis to assess the ability of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum strains to impede adhesion of Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus onto HT-29 cells. FCM in conjunction with a hierarchical cluster analysis could discern the anti-adhesion potential of L. plantarum strains, wherein the efficacy of L. plantarum DF9 was on a par with the probiotic L. rhamnosus GG. Combination of FCM with principal component analysis illustrated the relative influence of LAB strains on adhesion parameters kd and em of the pathogen and identified probiotic LAB suitable for anti-adhesion intervention. The analytical merit of the FCM analysis was captured in host cell adhesion assays that measured relative elimination of adhered LAB vis-à-vis pathogens, on exposure to either LAB bacteriocins or therapeutic antibiotics. It is envisaged that the dual-colour FCM-based adhesion assay described herein would enable a fundamental understanding of the host cell adhesion process and stimulate interest in probiotic LAB as safe anti-adhesion therapeutic agents against gastrointestinal pathogens.

  12. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Strain-Specific β-TrCP Degradation via Rotavirus NSP1 Hijacking a Host Cullin-3-Rbx1 Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyuan Ding

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses (RVs are the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children, accounting for half a million deaths annually worldwide. RV encodes non-structural protein 1 (NSP1, a well-characterized interferon (IFN antagonist, which facilitates virus replication by mediating the degradation of host antiviral factors including IRF3 and β-TrCP. Here, we utilized six human and animal RV NSP1s as baits and performed tandem-affinity purification coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry to comprehensively characterize NSP1-host protein interaction network. Multiple Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL complexes were identified. Importantly, inhibition of cullin-3 (Cul3 or RING-box protein 1 (Rbx1, by siRNA silencing or chemical perturbation, significantly impairs strain-specific NSP1-mediated β-TrCP degradation. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that NSP1 localizes to the Golgi with the host Cul3-Rbx1 CRL complex, which targets β-TrCP and NSP1 for co-destruction at the proteasome. Our study uncovers a novel mechanism that RV employs to promote β-TrCP turnover and provides molecular insights into virus-mediated innate immunity inhibition.

  13. The TCR ligand-inducible expression of CD73 marks γδ lineage commitment and a metastable intermediate in effector specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coffey, Francis; Lee, Sang-Yun; Buus, Terkild B

    2014-01-01

    cells, suggesting this is a common occurrence during development. Moreover, CD73 induction appears to mark a metastable intermediate stage before acquisition of effector function, suggesting that γδ lineage and effector fate are specified sequentially. These findings have important implications......Numerous studies indicate that γδ T cell receptor (γδTCR) expression alone does not reliably mark commitment of early thymic progenitors to the γδ fate. This raises the possibility that the γδTCR is unable to intrinsically specify fate and instead requires additional environmental factors......, including TCR-ligand engagement. We use single cell progenitor assays to reveal that ligand acts instructionally to direct adoption of the γδ fate. Moreover, we identify CD73 as a TCR ligand-induced cell surface protein that distinguishes γδTCR-expressing CD4(-)CD8(-) progenitors that have committed...

  14. Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerry, Christian; Hessle, Pontus; Lewis, Melanie J; Paton, Lois; Woof, Jenny M; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Recently we have discovered an IgG degrading enzyme of the endemic pig pathogen S. suis designated IgdE that is highly specific for porcine IgG. This protease is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family assigned C113 in the MEROPS peptidase database. Bioinformatical analyses revealed putative members of the IgdE protease family in eight other Streptococcus species. The genes of the putative IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus were cloned for production of recombinant protein into expression vectors. Recombinant proteins of all four IgdE family proteases were proteolytically active against IgG of the respective Streptococcus species hosts, but not against IgG from other tested species or other classes of immunoglobulins, thereby linking the substrate specificity to the known host tropism. The novel IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi showed IgG subtype specificity, i.e. IgdE from S. agalactiae and S. pseudoporcinus cleaved human IgG1, while IgdE from S. equi was subtype specific for equine IgG7. Porcine IgG subtype specificities of the IgdE family proteases of S. porcinus and S. pseudoporcinus remain to be determined. Cleavage of porcine IgG by IgdE of S. pseudoporcinus is suggested to be an evolutionary remaining activity reflecting ancestry of the human pathogen to the porcine pathogen S. porcinus. The IgG subtype specificity of bacterial proteases indicates the special importance of these IgG subtypes in counteracting infection or colonization and opportunistic streptococci neutralize such antibodies through expression of IgdE family proteases as putative immune evasion factors. We suggest that IgdE family proteases might be valid vaccine targets against streptococci of both human and veterinary medical concerns and could also be of therapeutic as well as biotechnological use.

  15. Composição e sazonalidade dos moluscos do alto rio Paraná, Brasil, e sua potencialidade como hospedeiros intermediários de digenéticos - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i3.5018 Composition and seasonality of mollusks from the upper Paraná river, Brazil, and their potentiality as intermediate hosts for digeneans - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i3.5018

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Cezar Pavanelli

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho analisa a composição e a sazonalidade das espécies de moluscos potenciais hospedeiros intermediários de trematódeos digenéticos, bem como fornece informações a respeito das possíveis infecções por diplostomídeos nesta comunidade, em ambientes lênticos da planície de inundação do alto rio Paraná. Foram coletadas e analisadas dez espécies de moluscos, e houve nítida sazonalidade na densidade e abundância dos moluscos, correlacionada significativamente com a temperatura da água. Os maiores valores observados foram entre os meses de novembro de 2002 a fevereiro de 2003. Apenas Biomphalaria peregrina caracterizou-se como hospedeiro para Diplostomidae, pois nesta espécie foram encontradas 32 cercárias de Hysteromorpha triloba em março de 2003.This study analyzes the composition and seasonality of mollusk species as potential intermediate hosts for digenean trematodes, and also supplies information regarding the possible infections by diplostomidae in that community, in lentic environments of the upper Paraná river floodplain. Ten species of mollusks were collected and analyzed, with noticeable seasonality in the density and abundance of mollusks, significantly correlated with water temperature. The highest values observed were in the period between November 2002 and February 2003. Only Biomphalaria peregrina was characterized as a host for diplostomidae, given that 32 cercariae of Hysteromorpha triloba were found in this species in March 2003.

  16. Distinct Metabolic Requirements of Exhausted and Functional Virus-Specific CD8 T Cells in the Same Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Schurich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available T cells undergo profound metabolic changes to meet the increased energy demands of maintaining an antiviral response. We postulated that differences in metabolic reprogramming would shape the efficacy of CD8 T cells mounted against persistent viral infections. We found that the poorly functional PD-1hi T cell response against hepatitis B virus (HBV had upregulated the glucose transporter, Glut1, an effect recapitulated by oxygen deprivation to mimic the intrahepatic environment. Glut1hi HBV-specific T cells were dependent on glucose supplies, unlike the more functional cytomegalovirus (CMV-specific T cells that could utilize oxidative phosphorylation in the absence of glucose. The inability of HBV-specific T cells to switch to oxidative phosphorylation was accompanied by increased mitochondrial size and lower mitochondrial potential, indicative of mitochondrial dysfunction. Interleukin (IL-12, which recovers HBV-specific T cell effector function, increased their mitochondrial potential and reduced their dependence on glycolysis. Our findings suggest that mitochondrial defects limit the metabolic plasticity of exhausted HBV-specific T cells.

  17. Variations in attack behaviours between Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. tachinoides in a gallery forest suggest host specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salou, E; Rayaisse, J B; Kaba, D; Djohan, V; Yoni, W; Barry, I; Dofini, F; Bouyer, J; Solano, P

    2016-12-01

    Tsetse flies Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. tachinoides are among the major vectors of sleeping sickness (Human African Trypanosomiasis-HAT) and nagana (African Animal Trypanosomiasis - AAT) in West Africa. Both riparian species occur sympatrically in gallery forests of south west Burkina Faso, but little is known of their interspecies relationships although different authors think there may be some competition between them. The aim of this study was to check if sympatric species have different strategies when approaching a host. A man placed in a sticky cube (1 m × 1 m × 1 m) and a sticky black-blue-black target (1 m × 1 m) were used to capture tsetse along the Comoe river banks in a Latin Square design. The number and the height at which tsetse were caught by each capture method were recorded according to species and sex. Glossina p. gambiensis was more attracted to human bait than to the target, but both species were captured at a significantly higher height on the target compared with the human bait (P  0.05). However, catches on human bait showed a significant difference in height between G. tachinoides and G. p. gambiensis (22.5 and 30.6 cm, respectively, P < 0.001). This study showed that these sympatric species had different attack behaviours to humans, which is not the case with the target. The implications of these findings are discussed. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  18. The population genetics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different patient populations exhibits high-level host specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mansfeld, R.; Jongerden, I.P.; Bootsma, M.C.; Buiting, A.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Willems, R.J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether highly prevalent P. aeruginosa sequence types (ST) in Dutch cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are specifically linked to CF patients we investigated the population structure of P. aeruginosa from different clinical backgrounds. We first selected the optimal genotyping

  19. How Specific is Non-Hypersensitive Host and Nonhost Resistance of Barley to Rust and Mildew Fungi?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niks, R.E.

    2014-01-01

    Full nonhost resistance can be defined as immunity, displayed by an entire plant species against all genotypes of a plant pathogen. Interesting biological questions are, whether the genes responsible for the nonhost status of a plant species have a general or a specific effectiveness to heterologous

  20. The population genetics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different patient populations exhibits high-level host specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa van Mansfeld

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether highly prevalent P. aeruginosa sequence types (ST in Dutch cystic fibrosis (CF patients are specifically linked to CF patients we investigated the population structure of P. aeruginosa from different clinical backgrounds. We first selected the optimal genotyping method by comparing pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, multilocus sequence typing (MLST and multilocus variable number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA. METHODS: Selected P. aeruginosa isolates (n = 60 were genotyped with PFGE, MLST and MLVA to determine the diversity index (DI and congruence (adjusted Rand and Wallace coefficients. Subsequently, isolates from patients admitted to two different ICUs (n = 205, from CF patients (n = 100 and from non-ICU, non-CF patients (n = 58, of which 19 were community acquired were genotyped with MLVA to determine distribution of genotypes and genetic diversity. RESULTS: Congruence between the typing methods was >79% and DIs were similar and all >0.963. Based on costs, ease, speed and possibilities to compare results between labs an adapted MLVA scheme called MLVA9-Utrecht was selected as the preferred typing method. In 363 clinical isolates 252 different MLVA types (MTs were identified, indicating a highly diverse population (DI  = 0.995; CI  = 0.993-0.997. DI levels were similarly high in the diverse clinical sources (all >0.981 and only eight genotypes were shared. MTs were highly specific (>80% for the different patient populations, even for similar patient groups (ICU patients in two distinct geographic regions, with only three of 142 ICU genotypes detected in both ICUs. The two major CF clones were unique to CF patients. CONCLUSION: The population structure of P. aeruginosa isolates is highly diverse and population specific without evidence for a core lineage in which major CF, hospital or community clones co-cluster. The two genotypes highly prevalent among Dutch CF patients appeared unique to CF patients

  1. Host Ranges of Listeria-Specific Bacteriophages from the Turkey Processing Plant Environment in the United States ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae-Won; Siletzky, Robin M.; Kathariou, Sophia

    2008-01-01

    Even though at least 400 Listeria phages have been isolated from various sources, limited information is available on phages from the food processing plant environment. Phages in the processing plant environment may play critical roles in determining the Listeria population that becomes established in the plant. In this study, we pursued the isolation of Listeria-specific phages from environmental samples from four turkey processing plants in the United States. These environmental samples wer...

  2. Site-specific deletions of chromosomally located DNA segments with the multimer resolution system of broad-host-range plasmid RP4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Claus; Eberl, Leo; Sanchezromero, Juan M.

    1995-01-01

    The multimer resolution system (mrs) of the broad-host-range plasmid RP4 has been exploited to develop a general method that permits the precise excision of chromosomal segments in a variety of gram-negative bacteria. The procedure is based on the site-specific recombination between two directly...... of the parA expression system suggested that just a few molecules of the resolvase are required to achieve the site-specific recombination event, Transient expression of parA from a plasmid unable to replicate in the target bacterium was instrumental to effect differential deletions within complex hybrid...... transposons inserted in the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida, This strategy permits the stable inheritance of heterologous DNA segments virtually devoid of the sequences used initially to select their insertion....

  3. Host virus and pneumococcus-specific immune responses in high-count monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and chronic lymphocytic leukemia: implications for disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Ignacio; Muñoz-Criado, Santiago; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Nieto, Wendy G; Romero, Alfonso; Fernández-Navarro, Paulino; Alcoceba, Miguel; Contreras, Teresa; González, Marcos; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2017-07-01

    Patients diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) display a high incidence of infections due to an associated immunodeficiency that includes hypogammaglobulinemia. A higher risk of infections has also been recently reported for high-count monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, while no information is available in low-count monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis. Here, we evaluated the status of the humoral immune system in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n=58), as well as in low- (n=71) and high- (n=29) count monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis versus healthy donors (n=91). Total free plasma immunoglobulin titers and specific levels of antibodies against cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, influenza and S.pneumoniae were measured by nephelometry and ELISA-based techniques, respectively. Overall, our results show that both CLL and high-count monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis patients, but not low-count monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis subjects, present with relatively high levels of antibodies specific for the latent viruses investigated, associated with progressively lower levels of S.pneumoniae -specific immunoglobulins. These findings probably reflect asymptomatic chronic reactivation of humoral immune responses against host viruses associated with expanded virus-specific antibody levels and progressively decreased protection against other micro-organisms, denoting a severe humoral immunodeficiency state not reflected by the overall plasma immunoglobulin levels. Alternatively, these results could reflect a potential role of ubiquitous viruses in the pathogenesis of the disease. Further analyses are necessary to establish the relevance of such asymptomatic humoral immune responses against host viruses in the expansion of the tumor B-cell clone and progression from monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis to CLL. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  4. Tissue-specific and SRSF1-dependent splicing of fibronectin, a matrix protein that controls host cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Mejia, Isabel Cristina; De Toledo, Marion; Della Seta, Flavio; Fafet, Patrick; Rebouissou, Cosette; Deleuze, Virginie; Blanchard, Jean Marie; Jorgensen, Christian; Tazi, Jamal; Vignais, Marie-Luce

    2013-01-01

    Cell invasion targets specific tissues in physiological placental implantation and pathological metastasis, which raises questions about how this process is controlled. We compare dermis and endometrium capacities to support trophoblast invasion, using matching sets of human primary fibroblasts in a coculture assay with human placental explants. Substituting endometrium, the natural trophoblast target, with dermis dramatically reduces trophoblast interstitial invasion. Our data reveal that endometrium expresses a higher rate of the fibronectin (FN) extra type III domain A+ (EDA+) splicing isoform, which displays stronger matrix incorporation capacity. We demonstrate that the high FN content of the endometrium matrix, and not specifically the EDA domain, supports trophoblast invasion by showing that forced incorporation of plasma FN (EDA–) promotes efficient trophoblast invasion. We further show that the serine/arginine-rich protein serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) is more highly expressed in endometrium and, using RNA interference, that it is involved in the higher EDA exon inclusion rate in endometrium. Our data therefore show a mechanism by which tissues can be distinguished, for their capacity to support invasion, by their different rates of EDA inclusion, linked to their SRSF1 protein levels. In the broader context of cancer pathology, the results suggest that SRSF1 might play a central role not only in the tumor cells, but also in the surrounding stroma. PMID:23966470

  5. Host Glycan Sugar-Specific Pathways in Streptococcus pneumonia: Galactose as a Key Sugar in Colonisation and Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, Laura; Oliveira, Joana; Veríssimo, André; Vinga, Susana; Lourenço, Eva C.; Ventura, M. Rita; Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem; Fernandes, Vitor E.; Andrew, Peter W.; Yesilkaya, Hasan; Neves, Ana Rute

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is a strictly fermentative organism that relies on glycolytic metabolism to obtain energy. In the human nasopharynx S. pneumoniae encounters glycoconjugates composed of a variety of monosaccharides, which can potentially be used as nutrients once depolymerized by glycosidases. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesise that the pneumococcus would rely on these glycan-derived sugars to grow. Here, we identified the sugar-specific catabolic pathways used by S. pneumoniae during growth on mucin. Transcriptome analysis of cells grown on mucin showed specific upregulation of genes likely to be involved in deglycosylation, transport and catabolism of galactose, mannose and N acetylglucosamine. In contrast to growth on mannose and N-acetylglucosamine, S. pneumoniae grown on galactose re-route their metabolic pathway from homolactic fermentation to a truly mixed acid fermentation regime. By measuring intracellular metabolites, enzymatic activities and mutant analysis, we provide an accurate map of the biochemical pathways for galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine catabolism in S. pneumoniae. Intranasal mouse infection models of pneumococcal colonisation and disease showed that only mutants in galactose catabolic genes were attenuated. Our data pinpoint galactose as a key nutrient for growth in the respiratory tract and highlights the importance of central carbon metabolism for pneumococcal pathogenesis. PMID:25826206

  6. Day-to-Day Dynamics of Commensal Escherichia coli in Zimbabwean Cows Evidence Temporal Fluctuations within a Host-Specific Population Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot, Méril; Couffignal, Camille; Clermont, Olivier; D'Humières, Camille; Chatel, Jérémie; Plault, Nicolas; Andremont, Antoine; Mentré, France

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To get insights into the temporal pattern of commensal Escherichia coli populations, we sampled the feces of four healthy cows from the same herd in the Hwange District of Zimbabwe daily over 25 days. The cows had not received antibiotic treatment during the previous 3 months. We performed viable E. coli counts and characterized the 326 isolates originating from the 98 stool samples at a clonal level, screened them for stx and eae genes, and tested them for their antibiotic susceptibilities. We observed that E. coli counts and dominant clones were different among cows, and very few clones were shared. No clone was shared by three or four cows. Clone richness and evenness were not different between cows. Within each host, the variability in the E. coli count was evidenced between days, and no clone was found to be dominant during the entire sampling period, suggesting the existence of clonal interference. Dominant clones tended to persist longer than subdominant ones and were mainly from phylogenetic groups A and B1. Five E. coli clones were found to contain both the stx1 and stx2 genes, representing 6.3% of the studied isolates. All cows harbored at least one Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strain. Resistance to tetracycline, penicillins, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides was rare and observed in three clones that were shed at low levels in two cows. This study highlights the fact that the commensal E. coli population, including the STEC population, is host specific, is highly dynamic over a short time frame, and rarely carries antibiotic resistance determinants in the absence of antibiotic treatment. IMPORTANCE The literature about the dynamics of commensal Escherichia coli populations is very scarce. Over 25 days, we followed the total E. coli counts daily and characterized the sampled clones in the feces of four cows from the same herd living in the Hwange District of Zimbabwe. This study deals with the day-to-day dynamics of both quantitative and

  7. Day-to-Day Dynamics of Commensal Escherichia coli in Zimbabwean Cows Evidence Temporal Fluctuations within a Host-Specific Population Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot, Méril; Couffignal, Camille; Clermont, Olivier; D'Humières, Camille; Chatel, Jérémie; Plault, Nicolas; Andremont, Antoine; Caron, Alexandre; Mentré, France; Denamur, Erick

    2017-07-01

    To get insights into the temporal pattern of commensal Escherichia coli populations, we sampled the feces of four healthy cows from the same herd in the Hwange District of Zimbabwe daily over 25 days. The cows had not received antibiotic treatment during the previous 3 months. We performed viable E. coli counts and characterized the 326 isolates originating from the 98 stool samples at a clonal level, screened them for stx and eae genes, and tested them for their antibiotic susceptibilities. We observed that E. coli counts and dominant clones were different among cows, and very few clones were shared. No clone was shared by three or four cows. Clone richness and evenness were not different between cows. Within each host, the variability in the E. coli count was evidenced between days, and no clone was found to be dominant during the entire sampling period, suggesting the existence of clonal interference. Dominant clones tended to persist longer than subdominant ones and were mainly from phylogenetic groups A and B1. Five E. coli clones were found to contain both the stx 1 and stx 2 genes, representing 6.3% of the studied isolates. All cows harbored at least one Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strain. Resistance to tetracycline, penicillins, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides was rare and observed in three clones that were shed at low levels in two cows. This study highlights the fact that the commensal E. coli population, including the STEC population, is host specific, is highly dynamic over a short time frame, and rarely carries antibiotic resistance determinants in the absence of antibiotic treatment. IMPORTANCE The literature about the dynamics of commensal Escherichia coli populations is very scarce. Over 25 days, we followed the total E. coli counts daily and characterized the sampled clones in the feces of four cows from the same herd living in the Hwange District of Zimbabwe. This study deals with the day-to-day dynamics of both quantitative and

  8. The host plant Pinus pinaster exerts specific effects on phosphate efflux and polyphosphate metabolism of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum: a radiotracer, cytological staining and31P NMR spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Aquino, Margarita; Becquer, Adeline; Le Guernevé, Christine; Louche, Julien; Amenc, Laurie K; Staunton, Siobhan; Quiquampoix, Hervé; Plassard, Claude

    2017-02-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) association can improve plant phosphorus (P) nutrition. Polyphosphates (polyP) synthesized in distant fungal cells after P uptake may contribute to P supply from the fungus to the host plant if they are hydrolyzed to phosphate in ECM roots then transferred to the host plant when required. In this study, we addressed this hypothesis for the ECM fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum grown in vitro and incubated without plant or with host (Pinus pinaster) and non-host (Zea mays) plants, using an experimental system simulating the symbiotic interface. We used 32 P labelling to quantify P accumulation and P efflux and in vivo and in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and cytological staining to follow the fate of fungal polyP. Phosphate supply triggered a massive P accumulation as newly synthesized long-chain polyP in H. cylindrosporum if previously grown under P-deficient conditions. P efflux from H. cylindrosporum towards the roots was stimulated by both host and non-host plants. However, the host plant enhanced 32 P release compared with the non-host plant and specifically increased the proportion of short-chain polyP in the interacting mycelia. These results support the existence of specific host plant effects on fungal P metabolism able to provide P in the apoplast of ectomycorrhizal roots. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Lineage-specific serology confirms Brazilian Atlantic forest lion tamarins, Leontopithecus chrysomelas and Leontopithecus rosalia, as reservoir hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi II (TcII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte L. Kerr

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease in humans, has a vast reservoir of mammalian hosts in the Americas, and is classified into six genetic lineages, TcI-TcVI, with a possible seventh, TcBat. Elucidating enzootic cycles of the different lineages is important for understanding the ecology of this parasite, the emergence of new outbreaks of Chagas disease and for guiding control strategies. Direct lineage identification by genotyping is hampered by limitations of parasite isolation and culture. An indirect method is to identify lineage-specific serological reactions in infected individuals; here we describe its application with sylvatic Brazilian primates. Methods Synthetic peptides representing lineage-specific epitopes of the T. cruzi surface protein TSSA were used in ELISA with sera from Atlantic Forest Leontopithecus chrysomelas (golden-headed lion tamarin, L. rosalia (golden lion tamarin, Amazonian Sapajus libidinosus (black-striped capuchin and Alouatta belzebul (red-handed howler monkey. Results The epitope common to lineages TcII, TcV and TcVI was recognised by sera from 15 of 26 L. chrysomelas and 8 of 13 L. rosalia. For 12 of these serologically identified TcII infections, the identity of the lineage infection was confirmed by genotyping T. cruzi isolates. Of the TcII/TcV/TcVI positive sera 12 of the 15 L. chrysomelas and 2 of the 8 L. rosalia also reacted with the specific epitope restricted to TcV and TcVI. Sera from one of six S. libidinous recognised the TcIV/TcIII epitopes. Conclusions This lineage-specific serological surveillance has verified that Atlantic Forest primates are reservoir hosts of at least TcII, and probably TcV and TcVI, commonly associated with severe Chagas disease in the southern cone region of South America. With appropriate reagents, this novel methodology is readily applicable to a wide range of mammal species and reservoir host discovery.

  10. High grade intraepithelial neoplasia of prostate is associated with values of prostate specific antigen related parameters intermediate between prostate cancer and normal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obralic, Nermina; Kulovac, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    High grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is widely regarded as the precancerous. The aim of this study was to determine PSA related parameters in patients with initial PSA values 2-10 ng/mL and diagnosis of HGPIN without finding carcinoma at the time of their first needle biopsy. Study groups consisted of 100 men who were diagnosed HGPIN, 84 with cancer and 183 with benign hyperplasia on first biopsy of prostate. Total PSA and free PSA were measured and ratio free/total PSA and PSA density calculated. Mean values of these parameters were compared, and receiver operating characteristic curves were used for comparison of PSA related parameters to discriminate groups of patients.Total PSA, free PSA level and PSA density in patients with HGPIN (6.388 ng/mL) did not differ significantly compared to prostate carcinoma (6.976 ng/mL) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (6.07 ng/mL) patients. Patients with HGPIN had significantly higher ratio free/total PSA than those with prostate carcinoma (0.168 vs 0.133), but significantly lower than patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (0.168 vs 0.185). Ratio of free/total PSA significantly discriminate HGPIN from prostate carcinoma with sensitivity 84.52 and specify 45.00 at cut-off point of ≤ 0.18. Values of PSA, free PSA and ratio free/total PSA in cases of HGPIN appear to be intermediate between prostate cancer and normal levels. Ratio of free/total PSA may help in decision to repeat biopsies in the presence of HGPIN on biopsy, without concomitant prostate cancer, in patients suitable for curative treatment, with normal digito-rectal examination and trans-rectal sonography.

  11. High grade intraepithelial neoplasia of prostate is associated with values of prostate specific antigen related parameters intermediate between prostate cancer and normal levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermina Obralic

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available High grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN is widely regarded as the precancerous. The aim of this study was to determine PSA related parameters in patients with initial PSA values 2-10 ng/mL and diagnosis of HGPIN without finding carcinoma at the time of their first needle biopsy. Study groups consisted of 100 men who were diagnosed HGPIN, 84 with cancer and 183 with benign hyperplasia on first biopsy of prostate. Total PSA and free PSA were measured and ratio free/total PSA and PSA density calculated. Mean values of these parameters were compared, and receiver operating characteristic curves were used for comparison of PSA related parameters to discriminate groups of patients. Total PSA, free PSA level and PSA density in patients with HGPIN (6.388 ng/mL did not differ significantly compared to prostate carcinoma (6.976 ng/mL or benign prostatic hyperplasia (6.07 ng/mL patients. Patients with HGPIN had significantly higher ratio free/total PSA than those with prostate carcinoma (0.168 vs 0.133, but significantly lower than patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (0.168 vs 0.185. Ratio of free/total PSA significantly discriminate HGPIN from prostate carcinoma with sensitivity 84.52 and specify 45.00 at cut-off point of ≤ 0.18. Values of PSA, free PSA and ratio free/total PSA in cases of HGPIN appear to be intermediate between prostate cancer and normal levels. Ratio of free/total PSA may help in decision to repeat biopsies in the presence of HGPIN on biopsy, without concomitant prostate cancer, in patients suitable for curative treatment, with normal digito-rectal examination and trans-rectal sonography.

  12. Host-specific serological response to Angiostrongylus vasorum infection in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes): implications for parasite epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis-Germitsch, N; Kapel, C M O; Thamsborg, S M; Deplazes, P; Schnyder, M

    2017-08-01

    Angiostrongylus vasorum is a cardiovascular nematode increasingly found in dogs and foxes in endemic foci throughout Europe. The present study evaluates ELISAs for detection of circulating antigens and specific antibodies against A. vasorum in foxes. Blood and worm burdens (WBs) from carcasses of 215 Swiss wild red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and from 75 farmed foxes of different age groups experimentally inoculated once or repeatedly with infective doses of 50, 100 or 200 third-stage larvae were obtained. Antigen detection in the naturally infected Swiss foxes had 91·2% sensitivity and 89·4% specificity, whereas the corresponding figures for antibody detection were 42·2 and 92·0%. The experimentally infected foxes became positive for circulating antigens 5-10 weeks post-inoculation (wpi) and remained highly positive up to 22 wpi, irrespectively of further challenge inoculation. The antibody responses in the same foxes were highly variable: high optical density (OD) values were reached 5-7 wpi in all animals, followed by a decrease in over half of the animals despite accumulating and consequently high WBs resulting in persistent infections. After each challenge, a slight increase of OD values was observed 7 weeks later. We hypothesize that infected foxes develop a variable and non-protective immunity. Such parasite tolerance allows long-term survival of A. vasorum in the animals, and may explain why the parasite appears to spread rapidly within a fox population, an epidemiological dynamic that is evident in many parts of Europe where A. vasorum has been found over the last decades.

  13. Cytological and transcriptional dynamics analysis of host plant revealed stage-specific biological processes related to compatible rice-Ustilaginoidea virens interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinquan Chao

    Full Text Available Rice false smut, a fungal disease caused by Ustilaginoidea virens is becoming a severe detriment to rice production worldwide. However, little is known about the molecular response of rice to attacks by the smut pathogen. In this article, we define the initial infection process as having three stages: initial colonization on the pistil (stage 1, S1, amplification on the anther (stage 2, S2 and sporulation in the anther chambers (stage 3, S3. Based on the transcriptome of rice hosts in response to U. virens in two separate years, we identified 126, 204, and 580 specific regulated genes in their respective stages S1, S2, and S3, respectively, by excluding common expression patterns in other openly biotic/abiotic databases using bioinformatics. As the disease progresses, several stage-specific biological processes (BP terms were distinctively enriched: "Phosphorylation" in stage S1, "PCD" in S2, and "Cell wall biogenesis" in S3, implying a concise signal cascade indicative of the tactics that smut pathogens use to control host rice cells during infection. 113 regulated genes were coexpressed among the three stages. They shared highly conserved promoter cis-element in the promoters in response to the regulation of WRKY and Myb for up-regulation, and ABA and Ca2+ for down regulation, indicating their potentially critical roles in signal transduction during rice-U. virens interaction. We further analyzed seven highly regulated unique genes; four were specific to pollen development, implying that pollen-related genes play critical roles in the establishment of rice susceptibility to U. virens. To my knowledge, this is the first report about probing of molecular response of rice to smut pathogen infection, which will greatly expand our understanding of the molecular events surrounding infection by rice false smut.

  14. A novel Zika virus mouse model reveals strain specific differences in virus pathogenesis and host inflammatory immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Tripathi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito borne flavivirus, which was a neglected tropical pathogen until it emerged and spread across the Pacific Area and the Americas, causing large human outbreaks associated with fetal abnormalities and neurological disease in adults. The factors that contributed to the emergence, spread and change in pathogenesis of ZIKV are not understood. We previously reported that ZIKV evades cellular antiviral responses by targeting STAT2 for degradation in human cells. In this study, we demonstrate that Stat2-/- mice are highly susceptible to ZIKV infection, recapitulate virus spread to the central nervous system (CNS, gonads and other visceral organs, and display neurological symptoms. Further, we exploit this model to compare ZIKV pathogenesis caused by a panel of ZIKV strains of a range of spatiotemporal history of isolation and representing African and Asian lineages. We observed that African ZIKV strains induce short episodes of severe neurological symptoms followed by lethality. In comparison, Asian strains manifest prolonged signs of neuronal malfunctions, occasionally causing death of the Stat2-/- mice. African ZIKV strains induced higher levels of inflammatory cytokines and markers associated with cellular infiltration in the infected brain in mice, which may explain exacerbated pathogenesis in comparison to those of the Asian lineage. Interestingly, viral RNA levels in different organs did not correlate with the pathogenicity of the different strains. Taken together, we have established a new murine model that supports ZIKV infection and demonstrate its utility in highlighting intrinsic differences in the inflammatory response induced by different ZIKV strains leading to severity of disease. This study paves the way for the future interrogation of strain-specific changes in the ZIKV genome and their contribution to viral pathogenesis.

  15. Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Spoerry

    Full Text Available Recently we have discovered an IgG degrading enzyme of the endemic pig pathogen S. suis designated IgdE that is highly specific for porcine IgG. This protease is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family assigned C113 in the MEROPS peptidase database. Bioinformatical analyses revealed putative members of the IgdE protease family in eight other Streptococcus species. The genes of the putative IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus were cloned for production of recombinant protein into expression vectors. Recombinant proteins of all four IgdE family proteases were proteolytically active against IgG of the respective Streptococcus species hosts, but not against IgG from other tested species or other classes of immunoglobulins, thereby linking the substrate specificity to the known host tropism. The novel IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi showed IgG subtype specificity, i.e. IgdE from S. agalactiae and S. pseudoporcinus cleaved human IgG1, while IgdE from S. equi was subtype specific for equine IgG7. Porcine IgG subtype specificities of the IgdE family proteases of S. porcinus and S. pseudoporcinus remain to be determined. Cleavage of porcine IgG by IgdE of S. pseudoporcinus is suggested to be an evolutionary remaining activity reflecting ancestry of the human pathogen to the porcine pathogen S. porcinus. The IgG subtype specificity of bacterial proteases indicates the special importance of these IgG subtypes in counteracting infection or colonization and opportunistic streptococci neutralize such antibodies through expression of IgdE family proteases as putative immune evasion factors. We suggest that IgdE family proteases might be valid vaccine targets against streptococci of both human and veterinary medical concerns and could also be of therapeutic as well as biotechnological use.

  16. Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerry, Christian; Hessle, Pontus; Lewis, Melanie J.; Paton, Lois; Woof, Jenny M.

    2016-01-01

    Recently we have discovered an IgG degrading enzyme of the endemic pig pathogen S. suis designated IgdE that is highly specific for porcine IgG. This protease is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family assigned C113 in the MEROPS peptidase database. Bioinformatical analyses revealed putative members of the IgdE protease family in eight other Streptococcus species. The genes of the putative IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus were cloned for production of recombinant protein into expression vectors. Recombinant proteins of all four IgdE family proteases were proteolytically active against IgG of the respective Streptococcus species hosts, but not against IgG from other tested species or other classes of immunoglobulins, thereby linking the substrate specificity to the known host tropism. The novel IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi showed IgG subtype specificity, i.e. IgdE from S. agalactiae and S. pseudoporcinus cleaved human IgG1, while IgdE from S. equi was subtype specific for equine IgG7. Porcine IgG subtype specificities of the IgdE family proteases of S. porcinus and S. pseudoporcinus remain to be determined. Cleavage of porcine IgG by IgdE of S. pseudoporcinus is suggested to be an evolutionary remaining activity reflecting ancestry of the human pathogen to the porcine pathogen S. porcinus. The IgG subtype specificity of bacterial proteases indicates the special importance of these IgG subtypes in counteracting infection or colonization and opportunistic streptococci neutralize such antibodies through expression of IgdE family proteases as putative immune evasion factors. We suggest that IgdE family proteases might be valid vaccine targets against streptococci of both human and veterinary medical concerns and could also be of therapeutic as well as biotechnological use. PMID:27749921

  17. PCR-TTGE analysis of 16S rRNA from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gut microbiota reveals host-specific communities of active bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Paola; Magne, Fabien; Araneda, Cristian; Fuentes, Pamela; Barros, Luis; Opazo, Rafael; Espejo, Romilio; Romero, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the relative contributions of host genetics and diet in shaping the gut microbiota of rainbow trout. Full sibling fish from four unrelated families, each consisting of individuals derived from the mating of one male and one female belonging to a breeding program, were fed diets containing either vegetable proteins or vegetable oils for two months in comparison to a control diet consisting of only fish protein and fish oil. Two parallel approaches were applied on the same samples: transcriptionally active bacterial populations were examined based on RNA analysis and were compared with bacterial populations obtained from DNA analysis. Comparison of temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) profiles from DNA and RNA showed important differences, indicating that active bacterial populations were better described by RNA analysis. Results showed that some bacterial groups were significantly (P<0.05) associated with specific families, indicating that microbiota composition may be influenced by the host. In addition, the effect of diet on microbiota composition was dependent on the trout family.

  18. Open-field host specificity test of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandolfo, D.; McKay, F.; Medal, J.C.; Cuda, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    An open-field experiment was conducted to assess the suitability of the South American leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth for biological control of Solanum viarum Dunal in the USA. An open-field test with eggplant, Solanum melongena L., was conducted on the campus of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and a S. viarum control plot was established 40 km from the campus. One hundred adult beetles were released in each plot at the beginning of the experiment during the vegetative stage of the plants, and forty additional beetles were released in the S. melongena plot at the flowering stage. All the plants in each plot were checked twice a week and the number of adults, immatures, and eggs recorded. Results showed almost a complete rejection of eggplant by G. boliviana. No noticeable feeding damage was ever recorded on eggplant. The experiment was ended when the eggplants started to senesce or were severely damaged by whiteflies and spider mites. The results of this open-field experiment corroborate previous quarantine/laboratory host-specificity tests indicating that a host range expansion of G. boliviana to include eggplant is highly unlikely. Gratiana boliviana was approved for field release in May 2003 in the USA. To date, no non-target effects have been observed either on eggplant or native species of Solanum. (author) [es

  19. PCR-TTGE analysis of 16S rRNA from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gut microbiota reveals host-specific communities of active bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Navarrete

    Full Text Available This study assessed the relative contributions of host genetics and diet in shaping the gut microbiota of rainbow trout. Full sibling fish from four unrelated families, each consisting of individuals derived from the mating of one male and one female belonging to a breeding program, were fed diets containing either vegetable proteins or vegetable oils for two months in comparison to a control diet consisting of only fish protein and fish oil. Two parallel approaches were applied on the same samples: transcriptionally active bacterial populations were examined based on RNA analysis and were compared with bacterial populations obtained from DNA analysis. Comparison of temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE profiles from DNA and RNA showed important differences, indicating that active bacterial populations were better described by RNA analysis. Results showed that some bacterial groups were significantly (P<0.05 associated with specific families, indicating that microbiota composition may be influenced by the host. In addition, the effect of diet on microbiota composition was dependent on the trout family.

  20. A tail of two phages: Genomic and functional analysis of Listeria monocytogenes phages vB_LmoS_188 and vB_LmoS_293 reveal the receptor-binding proteins involved in host specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidan eCasey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The physical characteristics of bacteriophages establish them as viable candidates for downstream development of pathogen detection assays and biocontrol measures. To utilize phages for such purposes, a detailed knowledge of their host interaction mechanisms is a prerequisite. There is currently a wealth of knowledge available concerning Gram-negative phage-host interaction, but little by comparison for Gram-positive phages and Listeria phages in particular. In this research, the lytic spectrum of two recently isolated Listeria monocytogenes phages (vB_LmoS_188 and vB_LmoS_293 was determined, and the genomic basis for their observed serotype 4b/4e host-specificity was investigated using comparative genomics. The late tail genes of these phages were identified to be highly conserved when compared to other serovar 4-specific Listeria phages. Spontaneous mutants of each of these phages with broadened host specificities were generated. Their late tail gene sequences were compared with their wild-type counterparts resulting in the putative identification of the products of ORF 19 of vB_LmoS_188 and ORF 20 of vB_LmoS_293 as the receptor binding proteins of these phages. The research findings also indicate that conserved baseplate architectures and host interaction mechanisms exist for Listeria siphoviruses with differing host-specificities, and further contribute to the current knowledge of phage-host interactions with regard to Listeria phages.

  1. Resistance to Plasmopara viticola in a grapevine segregating population is associated with stilbenoid accumulation and with specific host transcriptional responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delledonne Massimo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Downy mildew, caused by the oomycete Plasmopara viticola, is a serious disease in Vitis vinifera, the most commonly cultivated grapevine species. Several wild Vitis species have instead been found to be resistant to this pathogen and have been used as a source to introgress resistance into a V. vinifera background. Stilbenoids represent the major phytoalexins in grapevine, and their toxicity is closely related to the specific compound. The aim of this study was to assess the resistance response to P. viticola of the Merzling × Teroldego cross by profiling the stilbenoid content of the leaves of an entire population and the transcriptome of resistant and susceptible individuals following infection. Results A three-year analysis of the population's response to artificial inoculation showed that individuals were distributed in nine classes ranging from total resistance to total susceptibility. In addition, quantitative metabolite profiling of stilbenoids in the population, carried out using HPLC-DAD-MS, identified three distinct groups differing according to the concentrations present and the complexity of their profiles. The high producers were characterized by the presence of trans-resveratrol, trans-piceid, trans-pterostilbene and up to thirteen different viniferins, nine of them new in grapevine. Accumulation of these compounds is consistent with a resistant phenotype and suggests that they may contribute to the resistance response. A preliminary transcriptional study using cDNA-AFLP selected a set of genes modulated by the oomycete in a resistant genotype. The expression of this set of genes in resistant and susceptible genotypes of the progeny population was then assessed by comparative microarray analysis. A group of 57 genes was found to be exclusively modulated in the resistant genotype suggesting that they are involved in the grapevine-P. viticola incompatible interaction. Functional annotation of these transcripts

  2. An Ethnic-Specific Polymorphism in the Catalytic Subunit of Glutamate-Cysteine Ligase Impairs the Production of Glutathione Intermediates In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Truc M.; Willis, Alecia S.; Barr, Frederick E.; Cunningham, Gary R.; Canter, Jeffrey A.; Owens, Sarah E.; Apple, Rachel K.; Ayodo, George; Reich, David; Summar, Marshall L.

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione plays a crucial role in free radical scavenging, oxidative injury, and cellular homeostasis. Previously, we identified a non-synonymous polymorphism (P462S) in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC), the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis. This polymorphism is present only in individuals of African descent. Presently, we report that this ethnic-specific polymorphism (462S) encodes an enzyme with significantly decreased in vitro ac...

  3. Red Queen dynamics in multi-host and multi-parasite interaction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabajante, Jomar F; Tubay, Jerrold M; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Ebert, Dieter; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-04-22

    In host-parasite systems, dominant host types are expected to be eventually replaced by other hosts due to the elevated potency of their specific parasites. This leads to changes in the abundance of both hosts and parasites exhibiting cycles of alternating dominance called Red Queen dynamics. Host-parasite models with less than three hosts and parasites have been demonstrated to exhibit Red Queen cycles, but natural host-parasite interactions typically involve many host and parasite types resulting in an intractable system with many parameters. Here we present numerical simulations of Red Queen dynamics with more than ten hosts and specialist parasites under the condition of no super-host nor super-parasite. The parameter region where the Red Queen cycles arise contracts as the number of interacting host and parasite types increases. The interplay between inter-host competition and parasite infectivity influences the condition for the Red Queen dynamics. Relatively large host carrying capacity and intermediate rates of parasite mortality result in never-ending cycles of dominant types.

  4. The role of the host-specific grasshopper Cornops aquaticum (Orthoptera: Acrididae as consumer of native Eichhornia crassipes (Pontederiaceae floating meadows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celeste Franceschini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cornops aquaticum is a widely distributed semiaquatic grasshopper in the Neotropics. The development, feeding and oviposition of C. aquaticum take place on Pontederiaceae, especially on species of Eichhornia. Several aspects of the feeding of C. aquaticum are studied because is one of the most important herbivores of the highly invasive floating Eichhornia crassipes in native areas. The aims of this paper were: (1 to quantify the amount of E. crassipes consumed by C. aquaticum, (2 to determine the growth rate and the conversion efficiency of food ingested by this grasshopper, and (3 to determine the possible effect of consumption on E. crassipes productivity. Thirty individuals from each specific age class were used in the experiment: nymphs A, nymphs B, adult males and adult females. Insects were individually confined in plastic pots with a leaf of E. crassipes. We estimated feeding by individual, consumption index (CI, relative growth rate (GR and efficiency of conversion of ingested food to body substance (ECI. The impact of C. aquaticum consumption on E. crassipes floating meadows was assessed with the abundance of the grasshopper, and the available data on primary production of the host plant at the study site. Food intake of C. aquaticum was 11.23% of plant productivity. Food consumption, growth rate and food conversion efficiency of this grasshopper varied according to the specific age classes. Damage caused by C. aquaticum is high in comparison with the damage caused by other semiaquatic and grassland grasshoppers, however it is not enough to prevent the growth and coverage of native E. crassipes floating meadows because abundance of grasshoppers are realtively low and the growth rate and productivity of the host plant is high. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (3: 1407-1418. Epub 2011 September 01.

  5. The role of the host-specific grasshopper Cornops aquaticum (Orthoptera: Acrididae) as consumer of native Eichhornia crassipes (Pontederiaceae) floating meadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, María Celeste; De Wysiecki, María Laura; Poi de Neiff, Alicia; Galassi, María Eugenia; Martínez Fedra, Solange

    2011-09-01

    Cornops aquaticum is a widely distributed semiaquatic grasshopper in the Neotropics. The development, feeding and oviposition of C. aquaticum take place on Pontederiaceae, especially on species of Eichhornia. Several aspects of the feeding of C. aquaticum are studied because is one of the most important herbivores of the highly invasive floating Eichhornia crassipes in native areas. The aims of this paper were: (1) to quantify the amount of E. crassipes consumed by C. aquaticum, (2) to determine the growth rate and the conversion efficiency of food ingested by this grasshopper, and (3) to determine the possible effect of consumption on E. crassipes productivity. Thirty individuals from each specific age class were used in the experiment: nymphs A, nymphs B, adult males and adult females. Insects were individually confined in plastic pots with a leaf of E. crassipes. We estimated feeding by individual, consumption index (CI), relative growth rate (GR) and efficiency of conversion of ingested food to body substance (ECI). The impact of C. aquaticum consumption on E. crassipes floating meadows was assessed with the abundance of the grasshopper, and the available data on primary production of the host plant at the study site. Food intake of C. aquaticum was 11.23% of plant productivity. Food consumption, growth rate and food conversion efficiency of this grasshopper varied according to the specific age classes. Damage caused by C. aquaticum is high in comparison with the damage caused by other semiaquatic and grassland grasshoppers, however it is not enough to prevent the growth and coverage of native E. crassipes floating meadows because abundance of grasshoppers are realtively low and the growth rate and productivity of the host plant is high.

  6. The host response to the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917: Specific up-regulation of the proinflammatory chemokine MCP-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ukena Sya N

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of live microorganisms to influence positively the course of intestinal disorders such as infectious diarrhea or chronic inflammatory conditions has recently gained increasing interest as a therapeutic alternative. In vitro and in vivo investigations have demonstrated that probiotic-host eukaryotic cell interactions evoke a large number of responses potentially responsible for the effects of probiotics. The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of the E. coli Nissle 1917-host interaction by analyzing the gene expression pattern initiated by this probiotic in human intestinal epithelial cells. Methods Gene expression profiles of Caco-2 cells treated with E. coli Nissle 1917 were analyzed with microarrays. A second human intestinal cell line and also pieces of small intestine from BALB/c mice were used to confirm regulatory data of selected genes by real-time RT-PCR and cytometric bead array (CBA to detect secretion of corresponding proteins. Results Whole genome expression analysis revealed 126 genes specifically regulated after treatment of confluent Caco-2 cells with E. coli Nissle 1917. Among others, expression of genes encoding the proinflammatory molecules monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 ligand 2 (MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 alpha (MIP-2α and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 beta (MIP-2β was increased up to 10 fold. Caco-2 cells cocultured with E. coli Nissle 1917 also secreted high amounts of MCP-1 protein. Elevated levels of MCP-1 and MIP-2α mRNA could be confirmed with Lovo cells. MCP-1 gene expression was also up-regulated in mouse intestinal tissue. Conclusion Thus, probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 specifically upregulates expression of proinflammatory genes and proteins in human and mouse intestinal epithelial cells.

  7. Interaction between Biomphalaria pfeifferi, the snail intermediate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biological control of snail intermediate host of human schistosome parasites has been suggested. In this study, the effect of Indoplanobis exustus a planorbid snail and possible competitor snail of Biomphalaria pfeifferi on the fecundity and growth rate of the later was evaluated. The results showed a significant difference in ...

  8. Host specificity in Fusarium oxysporum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, P.

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a fungal pathogen that can cause severe wilt disease and root rot in various plant species. Every individual strain is restricted to causing disease in only one or a few plant species. In this thesis, we focused on identifying novel virulence factors (‘effectors’) secreted by

  9. An ethnic-specific polymorphism in the catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase impairs the production of glutathione intermediates in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Truc M; Willis, Alecia S; Barr, Frederick E; Cunningham, Gary R; Canter, Jeffrey A; Owens, Sarah E; Apple, Rachel K; Ayodo, George; Reich, David; Summar, Marshall L

    2010-09-01

    Glutathione plays a crucial role in free radical scavenging, oxidative injury, and cellular homeostasis. Previously, we identified a non-synonymous polymorphism (P462S) in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCLC), the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis. This polymorphism is present only in individuals of African descent. Presently, we report that this ethnic-specific polymorphism (462S) encodes an enzyme with significantly decreased in vitro activity when expressed by either a bacterial or mammalian cell expression system. In addition, overexpression of the 462P wild-type GCLC enzyme results in higher intracellular glutathione concentrations than overexpression of the 462S isoform. We also demonstrate that apoptotically stimulated mammalian cells overexpressing the 462S enzyme have increased caspase activation and increased DNA laddering compared to cells overexpressing the wild-type 462P enzyme. Finally, we genotyped several African and African-descent populations and demonstrate that the 462S polymorphism is in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium, with no individuals homozygous for the 462S polymorphism identified. These findings describe a glutathione production pathway polymorphism present in individuals of African descent with significantly decreased in vitro activity.

  10. Identification, Validation and Utilization of Novel Nematode-Responsive Root-Specific Promoters in Arabidopsis for Inducing Host-Delivered RNAi Mediated Root-Knot Nematode Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kakrana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The root-knot nematode (RKN, Meloidogyne incognita, is an obligate, sedentary endoparasite that infects a large number of crops and severely affects productivity. The commonly used nematode control strategies have their own limitations. Of late, RNA interference (RNAi has become a popular approach for the development of nematode resistance in plants. Transgenic crops capable of expressing dsRNAs, specifically in roots for disrupting the parasitic process, offer an effective and efficient means of producing resistant crops. We identified nematode-responsive and root-specific (NRRS promoters by using microarray data from the public domain and known conserved cis-elements. A set of 51 NRRS genes was identified which was narrowed down further on the basis of presence of cis-elements combined with minimal expression in the absence of nematode infection. The comparative analysis of promoters from the enriched NRRS set, along with earlier reported nematode-responsive genes, led to the identification of specific cis-elements. The promoters of two candidate genes were used to generate transgenic plants harboring promoter GUS constructs and tested in planta against nematodes. Both promoters showed preferential expression upon nematode infection, exclusively in the root in one and galls in the other. One of these NRRS promoters was used to drive the expression of splicing factor, a nematode-specific gene, for generating host-delivered RNAi-mediated nematode-resistant plants. Transgenic lines expressing dsRNA of splicing factor under the NRRS promoter exhibited upto a 32% reduction in number of galls compared to control plants.

  11. Host diversity begets parasite diversity: bird final hosts and trematodes in snail intermediate hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechinger, R.F.; Lafferty, K.D.

    2005-01-01

    It is postulated that disease is a product of adverse habitats. Overpopulation causes overutilization of food supplies, which results in malnutrition and a decrease in resistance to diseases. Examples of such ecological relationships in populations of Canada geese, California quail, red grouse, deer, rabbits, voles, mice and lemmings are presented.

  12. Influenza A Virus Infection Predisposes Hosts to Secondary Infection with Different Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes with Similar Outcome but Serotype-Specific Manifestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma-Chawla, Niharika; Sender, Vicky; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D.; Volckmar, Julia; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are major causes of respiratory tract infections, particularly during coinfection. The synergism between these two pathogens is characterized by a complex network of dysregulated immune responses, some of which last until recovery following IAV infection. Despite the high serotype diversity of S. pneumoniae and the serotype replacement observed since the introduction of conjugate vaccines, little is known about pneumococcal strain dependency in the enhanced susceptibility to severe secondary S. pneumoniae infection following IAV infection. Thus, we studied how preinfection with IAV alters host susceptibility to different S. pneumoniae strains with various degrees of invasiveness using a highly invasive serotype 4 strain, an invasive serotype 7F strain, and a carrier serotype 19F strain. A murine model of pneumococcal coinfection during the acute phase of IAV infection showed a significantly increased degree of pneumonia and mortality for all tested pneumococcal strains at otherwise sublethal doses. The incidence and kinetics of systemic dissemination, however, remained bacterial strain dependent. Furthermore, we observed strain-specific alterations in the pulmonary levels of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, and inflammatory mediators ultimately affecting immunopathology. During the recovery phase following IAV infection, bacterial growth in the lungs and systemic dissemination were enhanced in a strain-dependent manner. Altogether, this study shows that acute IAV infection predisposes the host to lethal S. pneumoniae infection irrespective of the pneumococcal serotype, while the long-lasting synergism between IAV and S. pneumoniae is bacterial strain dependent. These results hold implications for developing tailored therapeutic treatment regimens for dual infections during future IAV outbreaks. PMID:27647871

  13. Meso- and bathy-pelagic fish parasites at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR): Low host specificity and restricted parasite diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimpel, Sven; Busch, Markus Wilhelm; Sutton, Tracey; Palm, Harry Wilhelm

    2010-04-01

    Seven meso- and bathy-pelagic fish species from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) were firstly studied for fish parasites and feeding ecology. With a total of seven parasite species, the 247 meso- and bathy-pelagic deep-sea fish specimens belonging to the families Melamphaidae (3 spp.), Myctophidae (3 spp.) and Stomiidae (1 sp.) revealed low parasite diversity. The genetically identified nematodes Anisakis simplex (s.s.) and Anisakis pegreffii from the body cavity, liver and muscles of Myctophum punctatum were the most abundant parasites, reaching a prevalence of 91.4% and mean intensity of 3.1 (1-14). Anisakis sp. (unidentified) infected Chauliodus sloani and Poromitra crassiceps. Bothriocephalidean and tetraphyllidean cestode larvae infected Benthosema glaciale, the latter also occurring in C. sloani and Scopelogadus beanii, at low prevalences. Adult parasites at low infection rates included the digenean Lethadena sp. (2.9%), and the two copepod species Sarcotretes scopeli (5.7%) and Tautochondria dolichoura (5.3-11.4%). The myctophid Lampanyctus macdonaldi and the melamphaid Scopelogadus mizolepis mizolepis were free of parasites. Analyses of the stomach contents revealed crustaceans, especially copepods and euphausiids for the myctophids and also amphipods for the melamphaids as predominant prey items. While all stomachs showing distinct content comprising often unidentified 'tissue' (possibly gelatinous zooplankton), only C. sloani preyed upon fish. Though this feeding habit would enable transfer of a variety of crustacean-transmitted parasites into the fish, the parasite fauna in the meso- and bathy-pelagic fish was species poor. All observed parasites showed low host specificity, demonstrating no distinct pattern of host-parasite co-evolution. The MAR is no barrier for the parasite distribution in the North Atlantic meso- and bathy-pelagial.

  14. Stage-specific excretory-secretory small heat shock proteins from the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti--putative links to host's intestinal mucosal defense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Geisinger, Frank; Ajonina-Ekoti, Irene; Soblik, Hanns; Steen, Hanno; Mitreva, Makedonka; Erttmann, Klaus D; Perbandt, Markus; Liebau, Eva; Brattig, Norbert W

    2011-09-01

    In a search for molecules involved in the interaction between intestinal nematodes and mammalian mucosal host cells, we performed MS to identify excretory-secretory proteins from Strongyloides ratti. In the excretory-secretory proteins of the parasitic female stage, we detected, in addition to other peptides, peptides homologous with the Caenorhabditis elegans heat shock protein (HSP)-17, named Sra-HSP-17.1 (∼ 19 kDa) and Sra-HSP-17.2 (∼ 18 kDa), with 49% amino acid identity. The full-length cDNAs (483 bp and 474 bp, respectively) were identified, and the genomic organization was analyzed. To allow further characterization, the proteins were recombinantly expressed and purified. Profiling of transcription by quantitative real-time-PCR and of protein by ELISA in various developmental stages revealed parasitic female-specific expression. Sequence analyses of both the DNA and amino acid sequences showed that the two proteins share a conserved α-crystallin domain and variable N-terminals. The Sra-HSP-17s showed the highest homology with the deduced small HSP sequence of the human pathogen Strongyloides stercoralis. We observed strong immunogenicity of both proteins, leading to strong IgG responses following infection of rats. Flow cytometric analysis indicated the binding of Sra-HSP-17s to the monocyte-macrophage lineage but not to peripheral lymphocytes or neutrophils. A rat intestinal epithelial cell line showed dose-dependent binding to Sra-HSP-17.1, but not to Sra-HSP-17.2. Exposed monocytes released interleukin-10 but not tumor necrosis factor-α in response to Sra-HSP-17s, suggesting the possible involvement of secreted female proteins in host immune responses. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  15. Multiple markers pyrosequencing reveals highly diverse and host-specific fungal communities on the mangrove trees Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfi, Yonathan; Buée, Marc; Marchand, Cyril; Levasseur, Anthony; Record, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Fungi are important actors in ecological processes and trophic webs in mangroves. Although saprophytic fungi occurring in the intertidal part of mangrove have been well studied, little is known about the diversity and structure of the fungal communities in this ecosystem or about the importance of functional groups like pathogens and mutualists. Using tag-encoded 454 pyrosequencing of the ITS1, ITS2, nu-ssu-V5 and nu-ssu-V7 regions, we studied and compared the fungal communities found on the marine and aerial parts of Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa trees in a mangrove in New Caledonia. A total of 209,544 reads were analysed, corresponding to several thousand molecular operational taxonomic units (OTU). There is a marked zonation in the species distribution, with most of the OTU being found specifically in one of the microhabitat studied. Ascomycetes are the dominant phylum (82%), Basidiomycetes are very rare (3%), and 15% of the sequences correspond to unknown taxa. Our results indicate that host specificity is a key factor in the distribution of the highly diverse fungal communities, in both the aerial and intertidal parts of the trees. This study also validates the usefulness of multiple markers in tag-encoded pyrosequencing to consolidate and refine the assessment of the taxonomic diversity. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Petrogenesis of Cretaceous (133-84 Ma) intermediate dykes and host granites in southeastern China: Implications for lithospheric extension, continental crustal growth, and geodynamics of Palaeo-Pacific subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinbao; Zhao, Zhidan; Hou, Qingye; Niu, Yaoling; Mo, Xuanxue; Sheng, Dan; Wang, Lili

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents U-Pb zircon geochronology, petrology, and major and trace element, Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotopic geochemistry of Cretaceous granites and intermediate dykes in the Quanzhou and Xiamen regions of southeastern China. These data are used to investigate igneous petrogenesis and Cretaceous tectonic evolution, and interpret the geodynamics of Palaeo-Pacific slab subduction. Granites in Quanzhou and Xiamen range in age from 133 Ma to 87 Ma, have high SiO2 and K2O contents, low abundances in P2O5, and an A/CNK index that ranges from 0.97 to 1.09, indicating that they are high-K calc-alkaline metaluminous I-type rocks. Slightly negative ɛ Nd (t) values (- 1.2 to - 4.4), young Nd model ages (0.87 Ga to 1.20 Ga) and positive ɛ Hf (t) values (- 0.5 to + 9.9) of zircon grains indicate that the granites were derived from magmas that melted amphibolite in the middle-lower crust, and which may have assimilated country rocks during emplacement in shallow chambers. The intermediate dykes have no genetic link to the granites and magma mixing was negligible. Eight dyke samples have low SiO2 and high MgO, Ni and Cr contents. Negative ε Nd (t) values (- 1.5 to - 2.7) and positive ε Hf (t) values (2.7 to 7.6) suggest that the dykes were derived from residual basic lower crust after mafic-crystal accumulation. Two samples of adakite-like dykes are characterised by high Sr/Y ratios (89 to 100) and high SiO2, low K2O, Ni, Cr contents. In combination with slightly negative ε Nd (t) values (- 1.7 to - 1.8) and positive ε Hf (t) values (2.9 to 4.3), the adakite-like dykes were derived from cumulate basic lower crust which had a mixed source between depleted mantle- and crust-derived melts. Based on our data, combined with previously published work, we suggest that extension-induced middle-lower crustal melting and underplating of mantle-derived basaltic melts were the principal driving mechanisms for Cretaceous granitic magmatism in coastal Fujian Province. Extension

  17. NleB/SseK effectors from Citrobacter rodentium, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella enterica display distinct differences in host substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Qaidi, Samir; Chen, Kangming; Halim, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    factor (TNF) Receptor-Associated Factor 2 (TRAF2) ubiquitination. These results provide evidence that members of this highly conserved family of bacterial virulence effectors target different host protein substrates and exhibit distinct cellular modes of action to suppress host responses.......Many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use a syringe-like apparatus called a type III secretion system to inject virulence factors into host cells. Some of these effectors are enzymes that modify host proteins to subvert their normal functions. NleB is a glycosyltransferase that modifies host...... proteins with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine to inhibit antibacterial and inflammatory host responses. NleB is conserved among the attaching/effacing pathogens enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and Citrobacter rodentium. Moreover, Salmonella enterica strains encode up to three Nle...

  18. Multi-faceted proteomic characterization of host protein complement of Rift Valley fever virus virions and identification of specific heat shock proteins, including HSP90, as important viral host factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Jonathan E; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Benedict, Ashwini; Costantino, Julie; Ward, Michael; Peyser, Brian D; Retterer, Cary J; Tressler, Lyal E; Wanner, Laura M; McGovern, Hugh F; Zaidi, Anum; Anthony, Scott M; Kota, Krishna P; Bavari, Sina; Hakami, Ramin M

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is a potentially fatal disease of humans and domestic animals caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Infection with RVFV in ruminants can cause near 100% abortion rates and recent outbreaks in naïve human populations have suggested case fatality rates of greater than thirty percent. To elucidate the roles that host proteins play during RVFV infection, proteomic analysis of RVFV virions was conducted using complementary analytical approaches, followed by functional validation studies of select identified host factors. Coupling the more traditional Gel LC/MS/MS approach (SDS PAGE followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry) with an alternative technique that preserves protein complexes allowed the protein complement of these viral particles to be thoroughly examined. In addition to viral proteins present within the virions and virion-associated host proteins, multiple macromolecular complexes were identified. Bioinformatic analysis showed that host chaperones were among over-represented protein families associated with virions, and functional experiments using siRNA gene silencing and small molecule inhibitors identified several of these heat shock proteins, including heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), as important viral host factors. Further analysis indicated that HSP inhibition effects occur during the replication/transcription phase of the virus life cycle, leading to significant lowering of viral titers without compromising the functional capacity of released virions. Overall, these studies provide much needed further insight into interactions between RVFV and host cells, increasing our understanding of the infection process and suggesting novel strategies for anti-viral development. In particular, considering that several HSP90 inhibitors have been advancing through clinical trials for cancer treatment, these results also highlight the exciting potential of repurposing HSP90 inhibitors to treat RVF.

  19. Multi-faceted proteomic characterization of host protein complement of Rift Valley fever virus virions and identification of specific heat shock proteins, including HSP90, as important viral host factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Nuss

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever is a potentially fatal disease of humans and domestic animals caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV. Infection with RVFV in ruminants can cause near 100% abortion rates and recent outbreaks in naïve human populations have suggested case fatality rates of greater than thirty percent. To elucidate the roles that host proteins play during RVFV infection, proteomic analysis of RVFV virions was conducted using complementary analytical approaches, followed by functional validation studies of select identified host factors. Coupling the more traditional Gel LC/MS/MS approach (SDS PAGE followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with an alternative technique that preserves protein complexes allowed the protein complement of these viral particles to be thoroughly examined. In addition to viral proteins present within the virions and virion-associated host proteins, multiple macromolecular complexes were identified. Bioinformatic analysis showed that host chaperones were among over-represented protein families associated with virions, and functional experiments using siRNA gene silencing and small molecule inhibitors identified several of these heat shock proteins, including heat shock protein 90 (HSP90, as important viral host factors. Further analysis indicated that HSP inhibition effects occur during the replication/transcription phase of the virus life cycle, leading to significant lowering of viral titers without compromising the functional capacity of released virions. Overall, these studies provide much needed further insight into interactions between RVFV and host cells, increasing our understanding of the infection process and suggesting novel strategies for anti-viral development. In particular, considering that several HSP90 inhibitors have been advancing through clinical trials for cancer treatment, these results also highlight the exciting potential of repurposing HSP90 inhibitors to treat RVF.

  20. Role of net charge on catalytic domain and influence of cell wall binding domain on bactericidal activity, specificity, and host range of phage lysins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lieh Yoon; Yang, Chen; Perego, Marta; Osterman, Andrei; Liddington, Robert

    2011-09-30

    The recombinant lysins of lytic phages, when applied externally to Gram-positive bacteria, can be efficient bactericidal agents, typically retaining high specificity. Their development as novel antibacterial agents offers many potential advantages over conventional antibiotics. Protein engineering could exploit this potential further by generating novel lysins fit for distinct target populations and environments. However, access to the peptidoglycan layer is controlled by a variety of secondary cell wall polymers, chemical modifications, and (in some cases) S-layers and capsules. Classical lysins require a cell wall-binding domain (CBD) that targets the catalytic domain to the peptidoglycan layer via binding to a secondary cell wall polymer component. The cell walls of Gram-positive bacteria generally have a negative charge, and we noticed a correlation between (positive) charge on the catalytic domain and bacteriolytic activity in the absence of the CBD (nonclassical behavior). We investigated a physical basis for this correlation by comparing the structures and activities of pairs of lysins where the lytic activity of one of each pair was CBD-independent. We found that by engineering a reversal of sign of the net charge of the catalytic domain, we could either eliminate or create CBD dependence. We also provide evidence that the S-layer of Bacillus anthracis acts as a molecular sieve that is chiefly size-dependent, favoring catalytic domains over full-length lysins. Our work suggests a number of facile approaches for fine-tuning lysin activity, either to enhance or reduce specificity/host range and/or bactericidal potential, as required.

  1. Eurytrema coelomaticum (Giard & Billet (Digenea, Dicrocoeliidae em Bradybaena similaris (Férussac (Gastropoda, Xanthonychidae: alterações nos depósitos de cálcio e na função reprodutiva do primeiro hospedeiro intermediário Eurytrema coelomaticum (Giard & Billet (Digenea, Dicrocoeliidae em Bradybaena similaris (Férussac (Gastropoda, Xanthonychidae: alterations in calcium deposits and in the reproductive function of its first intermediate host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange V. Paschoal

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the parasitism by the digenetic trematode Eurytrema coelomaticum (Giard & Billet, 1892 over the calcium mobilization and the reproductive function of its first intermediate host, the snail Bradybaena similaris (Férussac, 1821 was experimentally studied in infected and uninfected snails maintained in laboratory under controlled conditions of nutrition, humidity and temperature. The calcium of the shells of infected and uninfected snails was quantified by using a technique of volumetric complexation. The amount of calcium present in the tissue was evaluated by using the histochemistry techniques of Dahl and von Kossa. The alteration in the reproductive function was evaluated through the egg production, and by histological follow up of the snails gametogenesis, in the infected and uninfected snails. The Student's test "t" showed that there was no significant difference in relation to size, weight and calcium concentration in the shells of infected and uninfected snails. The analysis of nonlinear regression, polynomial of 4th order, showed an highly positive relation to weight and size of shell to infected and uninfected snails, and an weakly significant relation to calcium concentration in the shells and shells size of infected snails. The histochemistry techniques demonstrated a large calcium deposition in the cells of the digestive glands of the infected snails when compared to the uninfected ones. The histological study of the ovotestis of the infected snails demonstrated that the gametogenesis of these snails was abnormal. The ovulogenesis was the most alterated and at 45 days post-infection the histological sections showed no ovocytes present in the ovotestis.

  2. The role of the host-specific grasshopper Cornops aquaticum (Orthoptera: Acrididae as consumer of native Eichhornia crassipes (Pontederiaceae floating meadows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celeste Franceschini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cornops aquaticum is a widely distributed semiaquatic grasshopper in the Neotropics. The development, feeding and oviposition of C. aquaticum take place on Pontederiaceae, especially on species of Eichhornia. Several aspects of the feeding of C. aquaticum are studied because is one of the most important herbivores of the highly invasive floating Eichhornia crassipes in native areas. The aims of this paper were: (1 to quantify the amount of E. crassipes consumed by C. aquaticum, (2 to determine the growth rate and the conversion efficiency of food ingested by this grasshopper, and (3 to determine the possible effect of consumption on E. crassipes productivity. Thirty individuals from each specific age class were used in the experiment: nymphs A, nymphs B, adult males and adult females. Insects were individually confined in plastic pots with a leaf of E. crassipes. We estimated feeding by individual, consumption index (CI, relative growth rate (GR and efficiency of conversion of ingested food to body substance (ECI. The impact of C. aquaticum consumption on E. crassipes floating meadows was assessed with the abundance of the grasshopper, and the available data on primary production of the host plant at the study site. Food intake of C. aquaticum was 11.23% of plant productivity. Food consumption, growth rate and food conversion efficiency of this grasshopper varied according to the specific age classes. Damage caused by C. aquaticum is high in comparison with the damage caused by other semiaquatic and grassland grasshoppers, however it is not enough to prevent the growth and coverage of native E. crassipes floating meadows because abundance of grasshoppers are realtively low and the growth rate and productivity of the host plant is high. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (3: 1407-1418. Epub 2011 September 01.Cornops aquaticum es una tucura semiacuática Neotropical que vive asociada a las Pontederiaceae y constituye uno de los más importantes herbívoros de

  3. Endophytic bacterial communities in three arctic plants from low arctic fell tundra are cold-adapted and host-plant specific

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nissinen, Riitta M.; Mannisto, Minna K.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria inhabit internal plant tissues, and have been isolated from a large diversity of plants, where they form nonpathogenic relationships with their hosts. This study combines molecular and culture-dependent approaches to characterize endophytic bacterial communities of three

  4. Assessing unintended effects of a mammary-specific transgene at the whole animal level in host and non-target animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Merritt; Murray, James D; Maga, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-01

    Risk assessment in transgenic plants is intrinsically different than that for transgenic animals; however both require the verification of proper transgene function and in conjunction, an estimate of any unintended effects caused by expression of the transgene. This work was designed to gather data regarding methodologies to detect pleiotropic effects at the whole animal level using a line of transgenic goats that produce the antimicrobial protein human lysozyme (hLZ) in their milk with the goal of using the milk to treat childhood diarrhea. Metabolomics was used to determine the serum metabolite profile of both the host (lactating does) and non-target organism (kid goats raised on control or hLZ milk) prior to weaning (60 days), at weaning (90 days) and 1 month post-weaning (120 days). In addition, intestinal histology of the kid goats was also carried out. Histological analysis of intestinal segments of the pre-weaning group revealed significantly wider duodenal villi (p = 0.014) and significantly longer villi (p = 0.028) and deeper crypts (p = 0.030) in the ileum of kid goats consuming hLZ milk. Serum metabolomics was capable of detecting differences over time but revealed no significant differences in metabolites between control and hLZ fed kids after correction for false discovery rate. Serum metabolomics of control or hLZ lactating does showed only one significant difference in an unknown metabolite (q = 0.0422). The results as a whole indicate that consumption of hLZ milk results in positive or insignificant intestinal morphology and metabolic changes. This work contributes to the establishment of the safety and durability of the hLZ mammary-specific transgene.

  5. Insect-Specific Flaviviruses: A Systematic Review of Their Discovery, Host Range, Mode of Transmission, Superinfection Exclusion Potential and Genomic Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Blitvich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There has been a dramatic increase in the number of insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs discovered in the last decade. Historically, these viruses have generated limited interest due to their inability to infect vertebrate cells. This viewpoint has changed in recent years because some ISFs have been shown to enhance or suppress the replication of medically important flaviviruses in co-infected mosquito cells. Additionally, comparative studies between ISFs and medically important flaviviruses can provide a unique perspective as to why some flaviviruses possess the ability to infect and cause devastating disease in humans while others do not. ISFs have been isolated exclusively from mosquitoes in nature but the detection of ISF-like sequences in sandflies and chironomids indicates that they may also infect other dipterans. ISFs can be divided into two distinct phylogenetic groups. The first group currently consists of approximately 12 viruses and includes cell fusing agent virus, Kamiti River virus and Culex flavivirus. These viruses are phylogenetically distinct from all other known flaviviruses. The second group, which is apparently not monophyletic, currently consists of nine viruses and includes Chaoyang virus, Nounané virus and Lammi virus. These viruses phylogenetically affiliate with mosquito/vertebrate flaviviruses despite their apparent insect-restricted phenotype. This article provides a review of the discovery, host range, mode of transmission, superinfection exclusion ability and genomic organization of ISFs. This article also attempts to clarify the ISF nomenclature because some of these viruses have been assigned more than one name due to their simultaneous discoveries by independent research groups.

  6. Intermediate algebra a textworkbook

    CERN Document Server

    McKeague, Charles P

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra: A Text/Workbook, Second Edition focuses on the principles, operations, and approaches involved in intermediate algebra. The publication first takes a look at basic properties and definitions, first-degree equations and inequalities, and exponents and polynomials. Discussions focus on properties of exponents, polynomials, sums, and differences, multiplication of polynomials, inequalities involving absolute value, word problems, first-degree inequalities, real numbers, opposites, reciprocals, and absolute value, and addition and subtraction of real numbers. The text then ex

  7. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  8. The ectoparasitic wasp Eulophus pennicornis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) uses instar-specific endocrine disruption strategies to suppress the development of its host Lacanobia oleracea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, John P; Bell, Howard A; Audsley, Neil; Marris, Gay C; Kirkbride-Smith, Anne; Bryning, Gareth; Frisco, Caroline; Cusson, Michel

    2006-01-01

    To successfully complete its development, the gregarious ectoparasitoid Eulophus pennicornis must inhibit the moult of its host, Lacanobia oleracea. In the present study, we examined the possibility that moult- and metamorphosis-associated endocrine events may be disrupted in caterpillars parasitized as newly moulted last (sixth) instars. Juvenile hormone (JH) titres on days 2 and 5 of the final stadium were significantly higher (> 100 fold) in parasitized than in non-parasitized hosts, in which JH was essentially absent. Elevated JH levels were associated with reduced haemolymph JH esterase (JHE) activity (down by 99.8%) and enhanced in vitro JH biosynthesis by the corpora allata (CA) (up to 4.5 fold). Wasp adults and/or larvae, in which we measured high levels of JH III (up to 2.7 ng/g), but little or no JH I or JH II, were not seen as likely sources of JH in parasitized hosts, in which we found mostly JH I and JH II. In addition, removal of parasitoid eggs or larvae after oviposition did not prevent the rise in JH titres seen in parasitoid-laden hosts, suggesting that wasp venom may be responsible for the observed hormonal dysfunction. Host haemolymph 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-E) levels were largely unaffected by parasitism during the final stadium although they were observed to increase earlier and decrease more rapidly in parasitized insects. We compare these results with those reported earlier for L. oleracea larvae parasitized by E. pennicornis as penultimate (fifth) instars, which display significantly depressed 20-E titres relative to control larvae. We conclude that E. pennicornis employs host endocrine-disruption strategies that differ according to whether the host is parasitized as a penultimate or final-stadium larva.

  9. Anopheles (Kerteszia cruzii (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE IN PERIDOMICILIARY AREA DURING ASYMPTOMATIC MALARIA TRANSMISSION IN THE ATLANTIC FOREST: MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION OF BLOOD-MEAL SOURCES INDICATES HUMANS AS PRIMARY INTERMEDIATE HOSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kirchgatter

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Anopheles (Kerteszia cruzii has been implicated as the primary vector of human and simian malarias out of the Brazilian Amazon and specifically in the Atlantic Forest regions. The presence of asymptomatic human cases, parasite-positive wild monkeys and the similarity between the parasites infecting them support the discussion whether these infections can be considered as a zoonosis. Although many aspects of the biology of An. cruzii have already been addressed, studies conducted during outbreaks of malaria transmission, aiming at the analysis of blood feeding and infectivity, are missing in the Atlantic Forest. This study was conducted in the location of Palestina, Juquitiba, where annually the majority of autochthonous human cases are notified in the Atlantic Forest of the state of São Paulo. Peridomiciliary sites were selected for collection of mosquitoes in a perimeter of up to 100 m around the residences of human malaria cases. The mosquitoes were analyzed with the purpose of molecular identification of blood-meal sources and to examine the prevalence of Plasmodium. A total of 13,441 females of An. (Ker. cruzii were collected. The minimum infection rate was calculated at 0.03% and 0.01%, respectively, for P. vivax and P. malariae and only human blood was detected in the blood-fed mosquitoes analyzed. This data reinforce the hypothesis that asymptomatic human carriers are the main source of anopheline infection in the peridomiciliary area, making the probability of zoonotic transmission less likely to happen.

  10. Anopheles (Kerteszia) cruzii (Diptera: Culicidae) in peridomiciliary area during asymptomatic malaria transmission in the Atlantic Forest: molecular identification of blood-meal sources indicates humans as primary intermediate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgatter, Karin; Tubaki, Rosa Maria; Malafronte, Rosely dos Santos; Alves, Isabel Cristina; Lima, Giselle Fernandes Maciel de Castro; Guimarães, Lilian de Oliveira; Zampaulo, Robson de Almeida; Wunderlich, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Anopheles (Kerteszia) cruzii has been implicated as the primary vector of human and simian malarias out of the Brazilian Amazon and specifically in the Atlantic Forest regions. The presence of asymptomatic human cases, parasite-positive wild monkeys and the similarity between the parasites infecting them support the discussion whether these infections can be considered as a zoonosis. Although many aspects of the biology of An. cruzii have already been addressed, studies conducted during outbreaks of malaria transmission, aiming at the analysis of blood feeding and infectivity, are missing in the Atlantic Forest. This study was conducted in the location of Palestina, Juquitiba, where annually the majority of autochthonous human cases are notified in the Atlantic Forest of the state of São Paulo. Peridomiciliary sites were selected for collection of mosquitoes in a perimeter of up to 100 m around the residences of human malaria cases. The mosquitoes were analyzed with the purpose of molecular identification of blood-meal sources and to examine the prevalence of Plasmodium. A total of 13,441 females of An. (Ker.) cruzii were collected. The minimum infection rate was calculated at 0.03% and 0.01%, respectively, for P. vivax and P. malariae and only human blood was detected in the blood-fed mosquitoes analyzed. This data reinforce the hypothesis that asymptomatic human carriers are the main source of anopheline infection in the peridomiciliary area, making the probability of zoonotic transmission less likely to happen.

  11. Weed host specificity of the aphid, Aphis spiraecola: developmental and reproductive performance of aphids in relation to plant growth and leaf chemicals of the Siam weed, Chromolaena odorata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwala, B K; Das, Jhuma

    2012-01-01

    Density, distribution, and nutritional quality of plants are the causal basis of host plant selection in aphids. Nutritional qualities of a plant vary according to its growth stage and also in response to seasonal variation. How host plant growth stages shape aphid performance was studied in Aphis spiraecola Patch (Homoptera: Aphididae) on the perennial Siam weed, Chromolaena odorata (L.) King and Robinson (Asterales: Asteraceae). This plant species is the preferred host in the hot and humid tropical parts of northeast and southern India. Variations in developmental and reproductive performances in apterous viviparous female aphids were recorded in relation to differences in leaf chemicals in different growth stages of C. odorata. Aphids reproduced at higher rates in the vegetative stage of C. odorata when developmental time was shortest, and fecundity was higher in a longer reproductive time. Intrinsic rate of increase and net reproductive rate were also recorded to be higher in the vegetative stage of the weed host. In the vegetative stage, leaves contained higher quantity of proteins and nitrogen, which are v