WorldWideScience

Sample records for specific interface structure

  1. Potential-specific structure at the hematite-electrolyte interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBriarty, Martin E.; Stubbs, Joanne; Eng, Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2018-02-21

    The atomic-scale structure of interfaces between metal oxides and aqueous electrolytes controls their catalytic, geochemical, and corrosion behavior. Measurements that probe these interfaces in situ provide important details of ion and solvent arrangements, but atomically precise structural models do not exist for common oxide-electrolyte interfaces far from equilibrium. Using a novel cell, we measured the structure of the hematite (a-Fe2O3) (110$\\bar{2}$)-electrolyte interface under controlled electrochemical bias using synchrotron crystal truncation rod X ray scattering. At increasingly cathodic potentials, charge-compensating protonation of surface oxygen groups increases the coverage of specifically bound water while adjacent water layers displace outwardly and became disordered. Returning to open circuit potential leaves the surface in a persistent metastable protonation state. The flux of current and ions at applied potential is thus regulated by a unique interfacial electrolyte environment, suggesting that electrical double layer models should be adapted to the dynamically changing interfacial structure far from equilibrium.

  2. Pairwise structure alignment specifically tuned for surface pockets and interaction interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng

    2015-09-09

    To detect and evaluate the similarities between the three-dimensional (3D) structures of two molecules, various kinds of methods have been proposed for the pairwise structure alignment problem [6, 9, 7, 11]. The problem plays important roles when studying the function and the evolution of biological molecules. Recently, pairwise structure alignment methods have been extended and applied on surface pocket structures [10, 3, 5] and interaction interface structures [8, 4]. The results show that, even when there are no global similarities discovered between the global sequences and the global structures, biological molecules or complexes could share similar functions because of well conserved pockets and interfaces. Thus, pairwise pocket and interface structure alignments are promising to unveil such shared functions that cannot be discovered by the well-studied global sequence and global structure alignments. State-of-the-art methods for pairwise pocket and interface structure alignments [4, 5] are direct extensions of the classic pairwise protein structure alignment methods, and thus such methods share a few limitations. First, the goal of the classic protein structure alignment methods is to align single-chain protein structures (i.e., a single fragment of residues connected by peptide bonds). However, we observed that pockets and interfaces tend to consist of tens of extremely short backbone fragments (i.e., three or fewer residues connected by peptide bonds). Thus, existing pocket and interface alignment methods based on the protein structure alignment methods still rely on the existence of long-enough backbone fragments, and the fragmentation issue of pockets and interfaces rises the risk of missing the optimal alignments. Moreover, existing interface structure alignment methods focus on protein-protein interfaces, and require a "blackbox preprocessing" before aligning protein-DNA and protein-RNA interfaces. Therefore, we introduce the PROtein STucture Alignment

  3. Pairwise structure alignment specifically tuned for surface pockets and interaction interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng; Naveed, Hammad; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    that are not limited to backbone fragments, and by employing a maximum weighted bipartite matching solver from the beginning of the alignment process. In addition, our methods incorporate similarities of sequentially and structurally remote residues that potentially

  4. User Interface Technology for Formal Specification Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael; Philpot, Andrew; Pressburger, Thomas; Underwood, Ian; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Formal specification development and modification are an essential component of the knowledge-based software life cycle. User interface technology is needed to empower end-users to create their own formal specifications. This paper describes the advanced user interface for AMPHION1 a knowledge-based software engineering system that targets scientific subroutine libraries. AMPHION is a generic, domain-independent architecture that is specialized to an application domain through a declarative domain theory. Formal specification development and reuse is made accessible to end-users through an intuitive graphical interface that provides semantic guidance in creating diagrams denoting formal specifications in an application domain. The diagrams also serve to document the specifications. Automatic deductive program synthesis ensures that end-user specifications are correctly implemented. The tables that drive AMPHION's user interface are automatically compiled from a domain theory; portions of the interface can be customized by the end-user. The user interface facilitates formal specification development by hiding syntactic details, such as logical notation. It also turns some of the barriers for end-user specification development associated with strongly typed formal languages into active sources of guidance, without restricting advanced users. The interface is especially suited for specification modification. AMPHION has been applied to the domain of solar system kinematics through the development of a declarative domain theory. Testing over six months with planetary scientists indicates that AMPHION's interactive specification acquisition paradigm enables users to develop, modify, and reuse specifications at least an order of magnitude more rapidly than manual program development.

  5. Improving predictions of protein-protein interfaces by combining amino acid-specific classifiers based on structural and physicochemical descriptors with their weighted neighbor averages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio R de Moraes

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are involved in nearly all regulatory processes in the cell and are considered one of the most important issues in molecular biology and pharmaceutical sciences but are still not fully understood. Structural and computational biology contributed greatly to the elucidation of the mechanism of protein interactions. In this paper, we present a collection of the physicochemical and structural characteristics that distinguish interface-forming residues (IFR from free surface residues (FSR. We formulated a linear discriminative analysis (LDA classifier to assess whether chosen descriptors from the BlueStar STING database (http://www.cbi.cnptia.embrapa.br/SMS/ are suitable for such a task. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis indicates that the particular physicochemical and structural descriptors used for building the linear classifier perform much better than a random classifier and in fact, successfully outperform some of the previously published procedures, whose performance indicators were recently compared by other research groups. The results presented here show that the selected set of descriptors can be utilized to predict IFRs, even when homologue proteins are missing (particularly important for orphan proteins where no homologue is available for comparative analysis/indication or, when certain conformational changes accompany interface formation. The development of amino acid type specific classifiers is shown to increase IFR classification performance. Also, we found that the addition of an amino acid conservation attribute did not improve the classification prediction. This result indicates that the increase in predictive power associated with amino acid conservation is exhausted by adequate use of an extensive list of independent physicochemical and structural parameters that, by themselves, fully describe the nano-environment at protein-protein interfaces. The IFR classifier developed in this study

  6. Improving predictions of protein-protein interfaces by combining amino acid-specific classifiers based on structural and physicochemical descriptors with their weighted neighbor averages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Fábio R; Neshich, Izabella A P; Mazoni, Ivan; Yano, Inácio H; Pereira, José G C; Salim, José A; Jardine, José G; Neshich, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are involved in nearly all regulatory processes in the cell and are considered one of the most important issues in molecular biology and pharmaceutical sciences but are still not fully understood. Structural and computational biology contributed greatly to the elucidation of the mechanism of protein interactions. In this paper, we present a collection of the physicochemical and structural characteristics that distinguish interface-forming residues (IFR) from free surface residues (FSR). We formulated a linear discriminative analysis (LDA) classifier to assess whether chosen descriptors from the BlueStar STING database (http://www.cbi.cnptia.embrapa.br/SMS/) are suitable for such a task. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicates that the particular physicochemical and structural descriptors used for building the linear classifier perform much better than a random classifier and in fact, successfully outperform some of the previously published procedures, whose performance indicators were recently compared by other research groups. The results presented here show that the selected set of descriptors can be utilized to predict IFRs, even when homologue proteins are missing (particularly important for orphan proteins where no homologue is available for comparative analysis/indication) or, when certain conformational changes accompany interface formation. The development of amino acid type specific classifiers is shown to increase IFR classification performance. Also, we found that the addition of an amino acid conservation attribute did not improve the classification prediction. This result indicates that the increase in predictive power associated with amino acid conservation is exhausted by adequate use of an extensive list of independent physicochemical and structural parameters that, by themselves, fully describe the nano-environment at protein-protein interfaces. The IFR classifier developed in this study is now

  7. Improving Predictions of Protein-Protein Interfaces by Combining Amino Acid-Specific Classifiers Based on Structural and Physicochemical Descriptors with Their Weighted Neighbor Averages

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Fábio R.; Neshich, Izabella A. P.; Mazoni, Ivan; Yano, Inácio H.; Pereira, José G. C.; Salim, José A.; Jardine, José G.; Neshich, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are involved in nearly all regulatory processes in the cell and are considered one of the most important issues in molecular biology and pharmaceutical sciences but are still not fully understood. Structural and computational biology contributed greatly to the elucidation of the mechanism of protein interactions. In this paper, we present a collection of the physicochemical and structural characteristics that distinguish interface-forming residues (IFR) from free surface residues (FSR). We formulated a linear discriminative analysis (LDA) classifier to assess whether chosen descriptors from the BlueStar STING database (http://www.cbi.cnptia.embrapa.br/SMS/) are suitable for such a task. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicates that the particular physicochemical and structural descriptors used for building the linear classifier perform much better than a random classifier and in fact, successfully outperform some of the previously published procedures, whose performance indicators were recently compared by other research groups. The results presented here show that the selected set of descriptors can be utilized to predict IFRs, even when homologue proteins are missing (particularly important for orphan proteins where no homologue is available for comparative analysis/indication) or, when certain conformational changes accompany interface formation. The development of amino acid type specific classifiers is shown to increase IFR classification performance. Also, we found that the addition of an amino acid conservation attribute did not improve the classification prediction. This result indicates that the increase in predictive power associated with amino acid conservation is exhausted by adequate use of an extensive list of independent physicochemical and structural parameters that, by themselves, fully describe the nano-environment at protein-protein interfaces. The IFR classifier developed in this study is now

  8. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, F

    1983-02-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered.

  9. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, F.

    1983-01-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered. (Author) [pt

  10. Ionic Structure at Dielectric Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yufei

    The behavior of ions in liquids confined between macromolecules determines the outcome of many nanoscale assembly processes in synthetic and biological materials such as colloidal dispersions, emulsions, hydrogels, DNA, cell membranes, and proteins. Theoretically, the macromolecule-liquid boundary is often modeled as a dielectric interface and an important quantity of interest is the ionic structure in a liquid confined between two such interfaces. The knowledge gleaned from the study of ionic structure in such models can be useful in several industrial applications, such as biosensors, lithium-ion batteries double-layer supercapacitors for energy storage and seawater desalination. Electrostatics plays a critical role in the development of such functional materials. Many of the functions of these materials, result from charge and composition heterogeneities. There are great challenges in solving electrostatics problems in heterogeneous media with arbitrary shapes because electrostatic interactions remains unknown but depend on the particular density of charge distributions. Charged molecules in heterogeneous media affect the media's dielectric response and hence the interaction between the charges is unknown since it depends on the media and on the geometrical properties of the interfaces. To determine the properties of heterogeneous systems including crucial effects neglected in classical mean field models such as the hard core of the ions, the dielectric mismatch and interfaces with arbitrary shapes. The effect of hard core interactions accounts properly for short range interactions and the effect of local dielectric heterogeneities in the presence of ions and/or charged molecules for long-range interactions are both analyzed via an energy variational principle that enables to update charges and the medium's response in the same simulation time step. In particular, we compute the ionic structure in a model system of electrolyte confined by two planar dielectric

  11. Oxide Interfaces: emergent structure and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Roy [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-08-16

    This Final Report describes the scientific accomplishments that have been achieved with support from grant DE-FG02-06ER46273 during the period 6/1/2012– 5/31/2016. The overall goals of this program were focused on the behavior of epitaxial oxide heterostructures at atomic length scales (Ångstroms), and correspondingly short time-scales (fs -ns). The results contributed fundamentally to one of the currently most active frontiers in condensed matter physics research, namely to better understand the intricate relationship between charge, lattice, orbital and spin degrees of freedom that are exhibited by complex oxide heterostructures. The findings also contributed towards an important technological goal which was to achieve a better basic understanding of structural and electronic correlations so that the unusual properties of complex oxides can be exploited for energy-critical applications. Specific research directions included: probing the microscopic behavior of epitaxial interfaces and buried layers; novel materials structures that emerge from ionic and electronic reconfiguration at epitaxial interfaces; ultrahigh-resolution mapping of the atomic structure of heterointerfaces using synchrotron-based x-ray surface scattering, including direct methods of phase retrieval; using ultrafast lasers to study the effects of transient strain on coherent manipulation of multi-ferroic order parameters; and investigating structural ordering and relaxation processes in real-time.

  12. Interface structure between tetraglyme and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Araki, Yuki; Umeda, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Okazaki, Ken-ichi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Abe, Takeshi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2017-09-01

    Clarification of the details of the interface structure between liquids and solids is crucial for understanding the fundamental processes of physical functions. Herein, we investigate the structure of the interface between tetraglyme and graphite and propose a model for the interface structure based on the observation of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in liquids. The ordering and distorted adsorption of tetraglyme on graphite were observed. It is found that tetraglyme stably adsorbs on graphite. Density functional theory calculations supported the adsorption structure. In the liquid phase, there is a layered structure of the molecular distribution with an average distance of 0.60 nm between layers.

  13. Structural and functional analysis of multi-interface domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhao

    Full Text Available A multi-interface domain is a domain that can shape multiple and distinctive binding sites to contact with many other domains, forming a hub in domain-domain interaction networks. The functions played by the multiple interfaces are usually different, but there is no strict bijection between the functions and interfaces as some subsets of the interfaces play the same function. This work applies graph theory and algorithms to discover fingerprints for the multiple interfaces of a domain and to establish associations between the interfaces and functions, based on a huge set of multi-interface proteins from PDB. We found that about 40% of proteins have the multi-interface property, however the involved multi-interface domains account for only a tiny fraction (1.8% of the total number of domains. The interfaces of these domains are distinguishable in terms of their fingerprints, indicating the functional specificity of the multiple interfaces in a domain. Furthermore, we observed that both cooperative and distinctive structural patterns, which will be useful for protein engineering, exist in the multiple interfaces of a domain.

  14. Structure and properties of interfaces in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnell, D.; Ruehle, M.; Chowdhry, U.

    1995-01-01

    The motivation for the symposium was the observation that interfaces in crystallographically and compositionally complex systems often dictate the performance and reliability of devices that utilize functional ceramics. The current level of understanding of interface-property relations in silicon-based devices required over 30 years of intensive research. Similar issues influence the relationship between atomic bonding at interfaces and properties in functional ceramic systems. The current understanding of these complex interfaces does not allow correlation between atomic structure and interface properties, in spite of their importance to a number of emerging technologies (wireless communications, radar-based positioning systems, sensors, etc.). The objective of this symposium was to focus attention on these fundamental issues by featuring recent theoretical and experimental work from various disciplines that impact the understanding of interface chemistry, structure, and properties. The emphasis was on relating properties of surfaces and interfaces to structure through an understanding of atomic level phenomena. Interfaces of interest include metal/ceramic, ceramic/ceramic, ceramic/vapor, etc., in electronic, magnetic, optical, ferroelectric, piezoelectric, and dielectric applications. Sixty one papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  15. High resolution interface nanochemistry and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A summary is given of results on nanospectroscopy etc. during the previous three years, divided into the following subsections: development of methods and instrumentation for interface/boundary chemical analysis, interface and boundary structure in ceramic matrix composites, quantitative composition measurements of thin films and inclusions, theoretical calculations for electron energy loss near edge fine structure and grain boundary structure, and small probe radiation effects in ceramics. Materials studied include SiC whisker-reinforced Si3N4, SiC, Si oxides, Si, Si oxynitride, other ceramics. Methods mentioned include field emission, EELS (electron energy loss spectroscopy), nanospectroscopy, electron nanoprobe, etc

  16. Structural Secrets of Multiferroic Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerheim, H. L.; Klimenta, F.; Ernst, A.; Mohseni, K.; Ostanin, S.; Fechner, M.; Parihar, S.; Maznichenko, I. V.; Mertig, I.; Kirschner, J.

    2011-02-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of the geometric structure of ultrathin BaTiO3 films grown on Fe(001). Surface x-ray diffraction reveals that the films are terminated by a BaO layer, while the TiO2 layer is next to the top Fe layer. Cations in termination layers have incomplete oxygen shells inducing strong vertical relaxations. Onset of polarization is observed at a minimum thickness of two unit cells. Our findings are supported by first-principles calculations providing a quantitative insight into the multiferroic properties on the atomic scale.

  17. Magnetic structure of the spin valve interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, D.M.C.; Butler, W.H.; Zhang, X.; MacLaren, J.M.; Gurney, B.A.; Speriosu, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    Nonferromagnetic atoms present at Ni/Cu and Permalloy/Cu interfaces in sputtered spin valve magnetoresistive layered structures have been shown to cause reduced magnetoresistance. Here we show that a model in which the moments on the Ni atoms in the interfacial region of Ni/Cu are reduced substantially by interdiffusion with Cu is consistent with the experimental results. In contrast, we believe that moments persist at the permalloy/Cu interface, which first principle total energy calculations suggest will be disordered at finite temperatures. These reduced or disordered moments are expected to significantly reduce the GMR

  18. Generating Graphical User Interfaces from Precise Domain Specifications

    OpenAIRE

    Kamil Rybiński; Norbert Jarzębowski; Michał Śmiałek; Wiktor Nowakowski; Lucyna Skrzypek; Piotr Łabęcki

    2014-01-01

    Turning requirements into working systems is the essence of software engineering. This paper proposes automation of one of the aspects of this vast problem: generating user interfaces directly from requirements models. It presents syntax and semantics of a comprehensible yet precise domain specification language. For this language, the paper presents the process of generating code for the user interface elements. This includes model transformation procedures to generate window initiation code...

  19. Design of multi-specificity in protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth L Humphris

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Interactions in protein networks may place constraints on protein interface sequences to maintain correct and avoid unwanted interactions. Here we describe a "multi-constraint" protein design protocol to predict sequences optimized for multiple criteria, such as maintaining sets of interactions, and apply it to characterize the mechanism and extent to which 20 multi-specific proteins are constrained by binding to multiple partners. We find that multi-specific binding is accommodated by at least two distinct patterns. In the simplest case, all partners share key interactions, and sequences optimized for binding to either single or multiple partners recover only a subset of native amino acid residues as optimal. More interestingly, for signaling interfaces functioning as network "hubs," we identify a different, "multi-faceted" mode, where each binding partner prefers its own subset of wild-type residues within the promiscuous binding site. Here, integration of preferences across all partners results in sequences much more "native-like" than seen in optimization for any single binding partner alone, suggesting these interfaces are substantially optimized for multi-specificity. The two strategies make distinct predictions for interface evolution and design. Shared interfaces may be better small molecule targets, whereas multi-faceted interactions may be more "designable" for altered specificity patterns. The computational methodology presented here is generalizable for examining how naturally occurring protein sequences have been selected to satisfy a variety of positive and negative constraints, as well as for rationally designing proteins to have desired patterns of altered specificity.

  20. Atomic structures and compositions of internal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidman, D.N. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Merkle, K.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-03-01

    This research program addresses fundamental questions concerning the relationships between atomic structures and chemical compositions of metal/ceramic heterophase interfaces. The chemical composition profile across a Cu/MgO {l brace}111{r brace}-type heterophase interface, produced by the internal oxidation of a Cu(Mg) single phase alloy, is measured via atom-probe field-ion microscopy with a spatial resolution of 0.121 nm; this resolution is equal to the interplanar space of the {l brace}222{r brace} MgO planes. In particular, we demonstrate for the first time that the bonding across a Cu/MgO {l brace}111{r brace}-type heterophase interface, along a <111> direction common to both the Cu matrix and an MgO precipitate, has the sequence Cu{vert bar}O{vert bar}Mg{hor ellipsis} and not Cu{vert bar}Mg{vert bar}O{hor ellipsis}; this result is achieved without any deconvolution of the experimental data. Before determining this chemical sequence it was established, via high resolution electron microscopy, that the morphology of an MgO precipitate in a Cu matrix is an octahedron faceted on {l brace}111{r brace} planes with a cube-on-cube relationship between a precipitate and the matrix. First results are also presented for the Ni/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} interface; for this system selected area atom probe microscopy was used to analyze this interface; Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} precipitates are located in a field-ion microscope tip and a precipitate is brought into the tip region via a highly controlled electropolishing technique.

  1. Network Interface Specification for the T1 Microprocessor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    details of the data transfer functional units, interconnect structure, and network operation. Application Layer Communication Model Communication...use of the communication resources. 3.6 Network Virtualisation The CNS-1 is designed for single-user, batch-style processing; no timesharing or space...matches the count register (both the timer and count register are in the network interface and are user-accessible). Although this function is not strictly

  2. Structural Interfaces and Attachments in Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Birman, Victor; Genin, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Attachment of dissimilar materials in engineering and surgical practice is a perennial challenge. Bimaterial attachment sites are common locations for injury, repeated injury, and mechanical failure. Nature presents several highly effective solutions to the challenge of bimaterial attachment that differ from those found in engineering practice. Structural Interfaces and Attachments in Biology describes the attachment of dissimilar materials from multiple perspectives. The text will simultaneously elucidate natural bimaterial attachments and outline engineering principles underlying successful attachments to the communities of tissue engineers and surgeons. Included an in-depth analysis of the biology of attachments in the body and mechanisms by which robust attachments are formed, a review of current concepts of attaching dissimilar materials in surgical practice and a discussion of bioengineering approaches that are currently being developed. This book also: Provides the first comprehensive treatment of phys...

  3. Surgeon Design Interface for Patient-Specific Concentric Tube Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Tania K; Greer, Joseph D; Hsieh, Michael H; Okamura, Allison M

    2016-06-01

    Concentric tube robots have potential for use in a wide variety of surgical procedures due to their small size, dexterity, and ability to move in highly curved paths. Unlike most existing clinical robots, the design of these robots can be developed and manufactured on a patient- and procedure-specific basis. The design of concentric tube robots typically requires significant computation and optimization, and it remains unclear how the surgeon should be involved. We propose to use a virtual reality-based design environment for surgeons to easily and intuitively visualize and design a set of concentric tube robots for a specific patient and procedure. In this paper, we describe a novel patient-specific design process in the context of the virtual reality interface. We also show a resulting concentric tube robot design, created by a pediatric urologist to access a kidney stone in a pediatric patient.

  4. Modality-Specific Axonal Regeneration: Towards selective regenerative neural interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa eLotfi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces have been proposed as viable alternatives for the natural control of robotic prosthetic devices. However, sensory and motor axons at the neural interface are of mixed submodality types, which difficult the specific recording from motor axons and the eliciting of precise sensory modalities through selective stimulation. Here we evaluated the possibility of using type-specific neurotrophins to preferentially entice the regeneration of defined axonal populations from transected peripheral nerves into separate compartments. Segregation of mixed sensory fibers from dorsal root ganglion neurons was evaluated in vitro by compartmentalized diffusion delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, to preferentially entice the growth of TrkA+ nociceptive and TrkC+ proprioceptive subsets of sensory neurons, respectively. The average axon length in the NGF channel increased 2.5 fold compared to that in saline or NT-3, whereas the number of branches increased 3 fold in the NT-3 channels. These results were confirmed using a 3-D Y-shaped in vitro assay showing that the arm containing NGF was able to entice a 5-fold increase in axonal length of unbranched fibers. To address if such segregation can be enticed in vivo, a Y-shaped tubing was used to allow regeneration of the transected adult rat sciatic nerve into separate compartments filled with either NFG or NT-3. A significant increase in the number of CGRP+ pain fibers were attracted towards the sural nerve, while N-52+ large diameter axons were observed in the tibial and NT-3 compartments. This study demonstrates the guided enrichment of sensory axons in specific regenerative chambers, and supports the notion that neurotrophic factors can be used to segregate sensory and perhaps motor axons in separate peripheral interfaces.

  5. Transire, a Program for Generating Solid-State Interface Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    ARL-TR-8134 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Transire, a Program for Generating Solid-State Interface Structures by...Program for Generating Solid-State Interface Structures by Caleb M Carlin and Berend C Rinderspacher Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...

  6. EPICS system: system structure and user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, R.E.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bobbitt, J.S.; Lahey, T.E.; Kramper, B.J.; MacKinnon, B.A.

    1984-02-01

    This paper present the user's view of and the general organization of the EPICS control system at Fermilab. Various subsystems of the EPICS control system are discussed. These include the user command language, software protection, the device database, remote computer interfaces, and several application utilities. This paper is related to two other papers on EPICS: an overview paper and a detailed implementation paper

  7. Interface Fracture in Adhesively Bonded Shell Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2008-01-01

    Two methods for the prediction of crack propagation through the interface of adhesively bonded shells are discussed. One is based on a fracture mechanics approach; the other is based on a cohesive zone approach. Attention is focussed on predicting the shape of the crack front and the critical...

  8. Nanostructured interfaces with site-specific bioreceptors for immunosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Telmo O.; Almeida, Inês; Marquês, Joaquim T. [Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edifício C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Liu, Wei [NML, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Niu, Yu [NML, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Jin, Gang, E-mail: gajin@imech.ac.cn [NML, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); School of Engineering Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Viana, Ana S., E-mail: anaviana@fc.ul.pt [Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edifício C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Innovative and simple strategy to create sensitive immunosensing platforms. • Gold surface modification with dithiocarbamate nanoconjugates of protein A. • CS{sub 2} strongly adsorbed on gold able to block protein nonspecific adsorption. • High performance for antigen detection by properly oriented antibodies. - Abstract: In this work, we propose a simple and effective approach to build nanostructured immunosensor platforms. The one-step strategy relies on i) the in situ formation of dithiocarbamates from the reaction between carbon disulfide and amine groups, present on protein A, ii) their attachment to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), and iii) the linkage of the modified AuNPs to the electrode surface, which depends on the strong interaction between gold substrates and sulfur moieties. AuNPs and protein A are used to increase the surface coverage of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and promote the oriented immobilization of the antibodies on the immunosensing interface. The modified gold surfaces with biomolecules were thoroughly characterized by a combination of techniques: UV–vis spectrophotometry, conventional ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy. The immunosensor performance was assessed in real-time, by surface plasmon resonance and by the highly sensitive total internal reflection imaging ellipsometry, through the specific biorecognition between anti-IgG and the immobilized IgG molecules. We demonstrate that the presence of AuNPs improves the sensitivity of the anti-IgG specific detection, whereas the presence of co-adsorbed CS{sub 2} is responsible for blocking the undesired protein nonspecific adsorption to the gold substrate. Overall, we report a simple and innovative one-step method, to chemically modify gold surfaces with protein A and AuNPs, able to specifically detect antigen/antibody interactions with capability of preventing protein nonspecific adsorption.

  9. Structures and electronics of buried and unburied semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Itaru

    2011-01-01

    The structure of interfaces plays an important role in determining the electronic properties of semiconductor nanostructures. Here, such examples are shown and discussed using semiconductor nanostructures prepared by molecular beam epitaxy and colloidal synthesis.

  10. Mechanical properties along interfaces of bonded structures in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.H.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    Proper assessment of the mechanical properties along interfaces of bonded structures currently used in many fusion reactor designs is essential to compare the different fabrication techniques. A Mechanical Properties Microprobe (MPM) was used to measure hardness and Young's modules along the interfaces of Be/Cu bonded structure. The MPM was able to distinguish different fabrication techniques by a direct measurement of the hardness, Young's modules, and H/E 2 which reflects the ability of deformation of the interfacial region

  11. Relaxation Mechanisms, Structure and Properties of Semi-Coherent Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Shao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, using the Cu–Ni (111 semi-coherent interface as a model system, we combine atomistic simulations and defect theory to reveal the relaxation mechanisms, structure, and properties of semi-coherent interfaces. By calculating the generalized stacking fault energy (GSFE profile of the interface, two stable structures and a high-energy structure are located. During the relaxation, the regions that possess the stable structures expand and develop into coherent regions; the regions with high-energy structure shrink into the intersection of misfit dislocations (nodes. This process reduces the interface excess potential energy but increases the core energy of the misfit dislocations and nodes. The core width is dependent on the GSFE of the interface. The high-energy structure relaxes by relative rotation and dilatation between the crystals. The relative rotation is responsible for the spiral pattern at nodes. The relative dilatation is responsible for the creation of free volume at nodes, which facilitates the nodes’ structural transformation. Several node structures have been observed and analyzed. The various structures have significant impact on the plastic deformation in terms of lattice dislocation nucleation, as well as the point defect formation energies.

  12. JAIL: a structure-based interface library for macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Stefan; von Eichborn, Joachim; May, Patrick; Preissner, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The increasing number of solved macromolecules provides a solid number of 3D interfaces, if all types of molecular contacts are being considered. JAIL annotates three different kinds of macromolecular interfaces, those between interacting protein domains, interfaces of different protein chains and interfaces between proteins and nucleic acids. This results in a total number of about 184,000 database entries. All the interfaces can easily be identified by a detailed search form or by a hierarchical tree that describes the protein domain architectures classified by the SCOP database. Visual inspection of the interfaces is possible via an interactive protein viewer. Furthermore, large scale analyses are supported by an implemented sequential and by a structural clustering. Similar interfaces as well as non-redundant interfaces can be easily picked out. Additionally, the sequential conservation of binding sites was also included in the database and is retrievable via Jmol. A comprehensive download section allows the composition of representative data sets with user defined parameters. The huge data set in combination with various search options allow a comprehensive view on all interfaces between macromolecules included in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The download of the data sets supports numerous further investigations in macromolecular recognition. JAIL is publicly available at http://bioinformatics.charite.de/jail.

  13. Interface stability of granular filter structures under currents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, H.J.; Hoffmans, G.; Dorst, K.; Van de Sande, S.

    2012-01-01

    Granular filters are used for protection of structures against scour and erosion. For a proper functioning it is necessary that the interfaces between the filter structure, the subsoil and the water flowing above the filter structure are stable. Stability means that there is no transport of subsoil

  14. Direct experimental determination of the atomic structure at internal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, N.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Pennycook, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-07-01

    A crucial first step in understanding the effect that internal interfaces have on the properties of materials is the ability to determine the atomic structure at the interface. As interfaces can contain atomic disorder, dislocations, segregated impurities and interphases, sensitivity to all of these features is essential for complete experimental characterization. By combining Z-contrast imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), the ability to probe the structure, bonding and composition at interfaces with the necessary atomic resolution has been obtained. Experimental conditions can be controlled to provide, simultaneously, both incoherent imaging and spectroscopy. This enables interface structures observed in the image to be interpreted intuitively and the bonding in a specified atomic column to be probed directly by EELS. The bonding and structure information can then be correlated using bond-valence sum analysis to produce structural models. This technique is demonstrated for 25{degrees}, 36{degrees} and 67{degrees} symmetric and 45{degrees} and 25{degrees} asymmetric [001] tilt grain boundaries in SrTiO{sub 3} The structures of both types of boundary were found to contain partially occupied columns in the boundary plane. From these experimental results, a series of structural units were identified which could be combined, using continuity of gain boundary structure principles, to construct all [001] tilt boundaries in SrTiO{sub 3}. Using these models, the ability of this technique to address the issues of vacancies and dopant segregation at grain boundaries in electroceramics is discussed.

  15. High Performance Computing - Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laros, James H.,; Kelly, Suzanne M.; Pedretti, Kevin; Grant, Ryan; Olivier, Stephen Lecler; Levenhagen, Michael J.; DeBonis, David

    2014-08-01

    Measuring and controlling the power and energy consumption of high performance computing systems by various components in the software stack is an active research area [13, 3, 5, 10, 4, 21, 19, 16, 7, 17, 20, 18, 11, 1, 6, 14, 12]. Implementations in lower level software layers are beginning to emerge in some production systems, which is very welcome. To be most effective, a portable interface to measurement and control features would significantly facilitate participation by all levels of the software stack. We present a proposal for a standard power Application Programming Interface (API) that endeavors to cover the entire software space, from generic hardware interfaces to the input from the computer facility manager.

  16. The interface of protein structure, protein biophysics, and molecular evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberles, David A; Teichmann, Sarah A; Bahar, Ivet; Bastolla, Ugo; Bloom, Jesse; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Colwell, Lucy J; de Koning, A P Jason; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Echave, Julian; Elofsson, Arne; Gerloff, Dietlind L; Goldstein, Richard A; Grahnen, Johan A; Holder, Mark T; Lakner, Clemens; Lartillot, Nicholas; Lovell, Simon C; Naylor, Gavin; Perica, Tina; Pollock, David D; Pupko, Tal; Regan, Lynne; Roger, Andrew; Rubinstein, Nimrod; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Sjölander, Kimmen; Sunyaev, Shamil; Teufel, Ashley I; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Thornton, Joseph W; Weinreich, Daniel M; Whelan, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The interface of protein structural biology, protein biophysics, molecular evolution, and molecular population genetics forms the foundations for a mechanistic understanding of many aspects of protein biochemistry. Current efforts in interdisciplinary protein modeling are in their infancy and the state-of-the art of such models is described. Beyond the relationship between amino acid substitution and static protein structure, protein function, and corresponding organismal fitness, other considerations are also discussed. More complex mutational processes such as insertion and deletion and domain rearrangements and even circular permutations should be evaluated. The role of intrinsically disordered proteins is still controversial, but may be increasingly important to consider. Protein geometry and protein dynamics as a deviation from static considerations of protein structure are also important. Protein expression level is known to be a major determinant of evolutionary rate and several considerations including selection at the mRNA level and the role of interaction specificity are discussed. Lastly, the relationship between modeling and needed high-throughput experimental data as well as experimental examination of protein evolution using ancestral sequence resurrection and in vitro biochemistry are presented, towards an aim of ultimately generating better models for biological inference and prediction. PMID:22528593

  17. Interface Structure of MoO3 on Organic Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robin T.; Thibau, Emmanuel S.; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We have systematically studied interface structure formed by vapor-phase deposition of typical transition metal oxide MoO3 on organic semiconductors. Eight organic hole transport materials have been used in this study. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to measure the evolution of the physical, chemical and electronic structure of the interfaces at various stages of MoO3 deposition on these organic semiconductor surfaces. For the interface physical structure, it is found that MoO3 diffuses into the underlying organic layer, exhibiting a trend of increasing diffusion with decreasing molecular molar mass. For the interface chemical structure, new carbon and molybdenum core-level states are observed, as a result of interfacial electron transfer from organic semiconductor to MoO3. For the interface electronic structure, energy level alignment is observed in agreement with the universal energy level alignment rule of molecules on metal oxides, despite deposition order inversion. PMID:26880185

  18. Structural impact detection with vibro-haptic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hwee-Kwon; Park, Gyuhae; Todd, Michael D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new sensing paradigm for structural impact detection using vibro-haptic interfaces. The goal of this study is to allow humans to ‘feel’ structural responses (impact, shape changes, and damage) and eventually determine health conditions of a structure. The target applications for this study are aerospace structures, in particular, airplane wings. Both hardware and software components are developed to realize the vibro-haptic-based impact detection system. First, L-shape piezoelectric sensor arrays are deployed to measure the acoustic emission data generated by impacts on a wing. Unique haptic signals are then generated by processing the measured acoustic emission data. These haptic signals are wirelessly transmitted to human arms, and with vibro-haptic interface, human pilots could identify impact location, intensity and possibility of subsequent damage initiation. With the haptic interface, the experimental results demonstrate that human could correctly identify such events, while reducing false indications on structural conditions by capitalizing on human’s classification capability. Several important aspects of this study, including development of haptic interfaces, design of optimal human training strategies, and extension of the haptic capability into structural impact detection are summarized in this paper.

  19. Topology optimization of coated structures and material interface problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Aage, Niels; Sigmund, Ole

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for including coated structures and prescribed material interface properties into the minimum compliance topology optimization problem. Several elements of the method are applicable to a broader range of interface problems. The approach extends the standard SIMP......-step filtering/projection approach. The modeled coating thickness is derived analytically, and the coating is shown to be accurately controlled and applied in a highly uniform manner over the structure. An alternative interpretation of the model is to perform single-material design for additive manufacturing...

  20. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Computer Program Development Specification for Tactical Interface System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-31

    CNTL CNTL TO ONE VT~i.AE CR1 & TWELVE VT100 LCARD READER VIDEO TERMINALS, SIX LA12O) HARD- COPY TERMINALS, & VECTOR GRAPHICS RPO % TERMINAL 17%M DISK...this data into the TIS para - .. meter tables in the TISGBL common area. ICEHANDL will send test interface ICE to PSS in one of two modes: perio- dically...STOPCauss te TI sotwar toexit ,9.*9~ .r .~ * ~%.’h .9~ .. a .~ .. a. 1 , , p * % .’.-:. .m 7 P : SDSS-MMP-BI ." 31 July 1981 TCL commands authorized

  2. Preliminary Specifications for the PS Transverse Damper Control Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Blas, A

    2003-01-01

    The transverse feedback system foreseen for the PS in 2004 is composed of different units to be remotely controlled and monitored: the pick-up amplifiers, the DSPU, the fine delay, the driver and power amplifiers. A special VME unit being dedicated to the pick-up amplifier ("The VMOD-TRX: a device for communication with remote instrumentation", A. Barreira Sevillano, J. Belleman, PS/BD/Note 96-02), the new interface will have to deal with the remaining parts of the loop.

  3. Soil-Framed Structure Interaction Analysis - A New Interface Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dalili Shoaei

    Full Text Available AbstractInterfacial behavior between soil and shallow foundation has been found so influential to combined soil-footing performance and redistribution of forces in the superstructure. This study introduces a new thin-layer interface element formulated within the context of finite element method to idealize interfacial behavior of soil-framed structure interaction with new combination of degrees of freedom at top and bottom sides of the interface element, compatible with both isoparametric beam and quadrilateral element. This research also tends to conduct a parametric study on respective parameters of the new joint element. Presence of interface element showed considerable changes in the performance of the framed structure under quasi-static loading.

  4. Structure and chemistry of passivated SiC/SiO{sub 2} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston Dycus, J.; Xu, Weizong; LeBeau, James M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7907 (United States); Lichtenwalner, Daniel J.; Hull, Brett; Palmour, John W. [Power Devices R& D, Wolfspeed, A Cree Company, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Here, we report on the chemistry and structure of 4H-SiC/SiO{sub 2} interfaces passivated either by nitric oxide annealing or Ba deposition. Using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy, we find that Ba and N remain localized at SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface after processing. Further, we find that the passivating species can introduce significant changes to the near-interface atomic structure of SiC. Specifically, we quantify significant strain for nitric oxide annealed sample where Si dangling bonds are capped by N. In contrast, strain is not observed at the interface of the Ba treated samples. Finally, we place these results in the context of field effect mobility.

  5. Modeling of the atomic and electronic structures of interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Recent tight binding and Car-Parrinello simulations of grain boundaries in semiconductors are reviewed. A critique is given of some models of embrittlement that are based on electronic structure considerations. The structural unit model of grain boundary structure is critically assessed using some results for mixed tilt and twist grain boundaries. A new method of characterizing interfacial structure in terms of bond angle distribution functions is described. A new formulation of thermodynamic properties of interfaces is presented which focusses on the local atomic environment. Effective, temperature dependent N-body atomic interactions are derived for studying grain boundary structure at elevated temperature

  6. Molecular orientation and electronic structure at organic heterojunction interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Shu [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 Singapore (Singapore); Zhong, Jian Qiang; Wee, Andrew T.S. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Chen, Wei, E-mail: phycw@nus.edu.sg [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); National University of Singapore (Suzhou) Research Institute, Suzhou (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Molecular orientation at the organic heterojunction interfaces. • Energy level alignments at the organic heterojunction interfaces. • Gap-states mediated interfacial energy level alignment. - Abstract: Due to the highly anisotropic nature of π-conjugated molecules, the molecular orientation in organic thin films can significantly affect light absorption, charge transport, energy level alignment (ELA) and hence device performance. Synchrotron-based near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy represents a powerful technique for probing molecular orientation. The aim of this review paper is to provide a balanced assessment on the investigation of molecular orientation at the organic–organic heterojunction (OOH) interface by NEXAFS, as well as the gap-states mediated orientation dependent energy level alignment at OOH interfaces. We highlight recent progress in elucidating molecular orientation at OOH interfaces dominated by various interfacial interactions, gap-states controlled orientation dependent energy level alignments at OOH interfaces, and the manipulations of molecular orientation and ELA in OOH.

  7. Specific interface area in a thin layer system of two immiscible liquids with vapour generation at the contact interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V.; Gazdaliev, Ilias M.; Goldobin, Denis S.

    2017-06-01

    For well-stirred multiphase fluid systems the mean interface area per unit volume, or “specific interface area” SV, is a significant characteristic of the system state. In particular, it is important for the dynamics of systems of immiscible liquids experiencing interfacial boiling. We estimate the value of parameter SV as a function of the heat influx {\\dot{Q}}V to the system or the average system overheat above the interfacial boiling point. The derived results can be reformulated for the case of an endothermic chemical reaction between two liquid reagents with the gaseous form of one of the reaction products. The final results are restricted to the case of thin layers, where the potential gravitational energy of bubbles leaving the contact interface is small compared to their surface tension energy.

  8. Direct observation of ionic structure at solid-liquid interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siretanu, Igor; Ebeling, Daniel; Andersson, Martin Peter

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of ions and charge at solid-water interfaces plays an essential role in a wide range of processes in biology, geology and technology. While theoretical models of the solid-electrolyte interface date back to the early 20th century, a detailed picture of the structure of the electric...... double layer has remained elusive, largely because of experimental techniques have not allowed direct observation of the behaviour of ions, i.e. with subnanometer resolution. We have made use of recent advances in high-resolution Atomic Force Microscopy to reveal, with atomic level precision, the ordered...

  9. Specificity of molecular interactions in transient protein-protein interaction interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu-il; Lee, KiYoung; Lee, Kwang H; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Doheon

    2006-11-15

    In this study, we investigate what types of interactions are specific to their biological function, and what types of interactions are persistent regardless of their functional category in transient protein-protein heterocomplexes. This is the first approach to analyze protein-protein interfaces systematically at the molecular interaction level in the context of protein functions. We perform systematic analysis at the molecular interaction level using classification and feature subset selection technique prevalent in the field of pattern recognition. To represent the physicochemical properties of protein-protein interfaces, we design 18 molecular interaction types using canonical and noncanonical interactions. Then, we construct input vector using the frequency of each interaction type in protein-protein interface. We analyze the 131 interfaces of transient protein-protein heterocomplexes in PDB: 33 protease-inhibitors, 52 antibody-antigens, 46 signaling proteins including 4 cyclin dependent kinase and 26 G-protein. Using kNN classification and feature subset selection technique, we show that there are specific interaction types based on their functional category, and such interaction types are conserved through the common binding mechanism, rather than through the sequence or structure conservation. The extracted interaction types are C(alpha)-- H...O==C interaction, cation...anion interaction, amine...amine interaction, and amine...cation interaction. With these four interaction types, we achieve the classification success rate up to 83.2% with leave-one-out cross-validation at k = 15. Of these four interaction types, C(alpha)--H...O==C shows binding specificity for protease-inhibitor complexes, while cation-anion interaction is predominant in signaling complexes. The amine ... amine and amine...cation interaction give a minor contribution to the classification accuracy. When combined with these two interactions, they increase the accuracy by 3.8%. In the case of

  10. Database structures and interfaces for W7-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimann, P.; Bluhm, T.; Hennig, Ch.; Kroiss, H.; Kuehner, G.; Maier, J.; Riemann, H.; Zilker, M.

    2008-01-01

    The W7-X experiment of the IPP, under construction in Greifswald Germany, is designed to operate in a quasi-steady-state scenario. The database structures and interfaces used for discharge description and execution have to reflect this continuous mode of operation. In close collaboration between the control group of W7-X and the data acquisition group a combined design of the data structures used for describing the configuration and the operation of the experiment was developed. To guarantee access to this information from all participating stations a TCP/IP portal and a proxy server were developed. This portal enables especially the VxWorks real-time operating systems of the control stations to access the information in the object-oriented database. The database schema includes now a more functional description of the experiment and gives the physicists a more simplified view of the necessary definitions of operational parameters. The scheduling of the long discharges of W7-X will be done by predefining operational parameters in segments and scenarios, where a scenario is a fixed sequence of segments with a common physical background. To hide the specialized information contained in the basic parameters from the experiment leader or physicist an abstraction layer was introduced that only shows physically interesting information. An executable segment will be generated after verifying the consistency of the high-level parameters by using a transformation function for every basic parameter needed. Since the database contains all configurations and discharge definitions necessary to operate the experiment, it is very important to give the user a tool to manipulate this information in an intuitive way. A special editor (ConfiX) was designed and implemented for this task. At the moment the basic functionality for dealing with all kind of objects in the database is available. Future releases will extend the functionality to defining and editing configurations, segments

  11. Cathodoluminescence study of Si/SiO2 interface structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamoryarskaya, M.V.; Sokolov, V.I.; Plotnikov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of interface of thermal silicon oxide on p- and n-silicon with different content of activators (boron and phosphorus) was studied by using the method of the local cathodoluminescence (CL). The results of the CL study of the thick silicon oxide layers on silicon show that the content of the defects related with oxygen deficit decreases near the interface. In the same time, new bands in green and red range appear in CL spectra. The CL spectra of the layer with thickness 5-15 nm near interface are analogous to CL spectra of a composite of silicon nanoclusters and silicon oxide. The comparison of CL spectra of silicon oxide grown on p- and n-silicon shows that the film on p-silicon is characterized by higher concentration of silicon-deficit defects and silicon 'islands' near the surface. It may be the cause why the electrical hardness of silicon oxide on p-silicon is lower than the one on n-silicon. The integral electro-physical characteristics of silicon oxide also were measured. The bulk charge and the density of interface states of silicon oxide on p-silicon are higher than for oxide on n-silicon. The oxidization of n-silicon with nanostructure surface leads to the appearance of the CL bands related with oxygen deficit and silicon 'islands' in silicon oxide

  12. Electronic structure imperfections and chemical bonding at graphene interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Brian Joseph

    nanomaterial with lateral dimensions in the hundreds of microns if not larger, with a corresponding atomic vertical thickness poses significant difficulties. Graphene's unique structure is dominated by surface area or potentially hybridized interfaces; consequently, the true realization of this remarkable nanomaterial in device constructs relies on engineering graphene interfaces at the surface in order to controllably mold the electronic structure. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and the transmission mode analogue scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) are particularly useful tools to study the unoccupied states of graphene and graphene interfaces. In addition, polarized NEXAFS and STXM studies provide information on surface orientation, bond sterics, and the extent of substrate alignment before and after interfacial hybridization. The work presented in this dissertation is fundamentally informed by NEXAFS and STXM measurements on graphene/metal, graphene/dielectric, and graphene/organic interfaces. We start with a general review of the electronic structure of freestanding graphene and graphene interfaces in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we investigate freestanding single-layer graphene via STXM and NEXAFS demonstrating that electronic structure heterogeneities from synthesis and processing are ubiquitous in 2-dimensional graphene. We show the mapping of discrete charge transfer regions as a result of doped impurities that decorate the surfaces of graphene and that transfer processing imparts local electronic corrugations or ripples. In corroboration with density functional theory, definitive assignments to the spectral features, global steric orientations of the localized domains, and quantitative charge transfer schemes are evidenced. In the following chapters, we deliberately (Chapter 3) incorporate substitutional nitrogen into reduced graphene oxide to induce C--N charge redistribution and improve global conductivity, (Chapter 4

  13. Electronic structure of disordered alloys, surfaces and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Turek, Ilja; Kudrnovský, Josef; Šob, Mojmír; Weinberger, Peter

    1997-01-01

    At present, there is an increasing interest in the prediction of properties of classical and new materials such as substitutional alloys, their surfaces, and metallic or semiconductor multilayers. A detailed understanding based on a thus of the utmost importance for fu­ microscopic, parameter-free approach is ture developments in solid state physics and materials science. The interrela­ tion between electronic and structural properties at surfaces plays a key role for a microscopic understanding of phenomena as diverse as catalysis, corrosion, chemisorption and crystal growth. Remarkable progress has been made in the past 10-15 years in the understand­ ing of behavior of ideal crystals and their surfaces by relating their properties to the underlying electronic structure as determined from the first principles. Similar studies of complex systems like imperfect surfaces, interfaces, and mul­ tilayered structures seem to be accessible by now. Conventional band-structure methods, however, are of limited use ...

  14. Organic/metal interfaces. Electronic and structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhm, Steffen

    2008-07-17

    This work addresses several important topics of the field of organic electronics. The focus lies on organic/metal interfaces, which exist in all organic electronic devices. Physical properties of such interfaces are crucial for device performance. Four main topics have been covered: (i) the impact of molecular orientation on the energy levels, (ii) energy level tuning with strong electron acceptors, (iii) the role of thermodynamic equilibrium at organic/ organic homo-interfaces and (iv) the correlation of interfacial electronic structure and bonding distance. To address these issues a broad experimental approach was necessary: mainly ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy was used, supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, metastable atom electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray standing waves, to examine vacuum sublimed thin films of conjugated organic molecules (COMs) in ultrahigh vacuum. (i) A novel approach is presented to explain the phenomenon that the ionization energy in molecular assemblies is orientation dependent. It is demonstrated that this is due to a macroscopic impact of intramolecular dipoles on the ionization energy in molecular assemblies. Furthermore, the correlation of molecular orientation and conformation has been studied in detail for COMs on various substrates. (ii) A new approach was developed to tune hole injection barriers ({delta}{sub h}) at organic/metal interfaces by adsorbing a (sub-) monolayer of an organic electron acceptor on the metal electrode. Charge transfer from the metal to the acceptor leads to a chemisorbed layer, which reduces {delta}{sub h} to the COM overlayer. This concept was tested with three acceptors and a lowering of {delta}{sub h} of up to 1.2 eV could be observed. (iii) A transition from vacuum-level alignment to molecular level pinning at the homo-interface between a lying monolayer and standing multilayers of a COM was observed, which depended on the amount of a pre-deposited acceptor. The

  15. Evolution of dispersion fuel meat structure caused by interface reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhonghu; Ying Shihao

    2000-01-01

    In reactor operation, the resultant layers are formed by interdiffusion at the fuel particle-matrix interfaces of U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel. This results in the evolution of meat structure. On the basis of Monte-Carlo method, the author developed simulation method of fuel meat, and simulated the stochastic space locations of spherical fuel particles in the meat. The fuel volume fraction is 43%, and the particles are in definite size distribution. For the 13551 simulated particle samples, the evolution of meat structure is calculated with layer thickness ranging from 0 to 16 μm. The parameters of meat structure include the U 3 Si 2 fuel volume fraction, resultant layer volume fraction, Al matrix volume fraction, particle contact probability and overlap degree as functions of layer thickness

  16. Friction, slip and structural inhomogeneity of the buried interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Y; Wu, J; Martini, A; Li, Q

    2011-01-01

    An atomistic model of metallic contacts using realistic interatomic potentials is used to study the connection between friction, slip and the structure of the buried interface. Incommensurability induced by misalignment and lattice mismatch is modeled with contact sizes that are large enough to observe superstructures formed by the relative orientations of the surfaces. The periodicity of the superstructures is quantitatively related to inhomogeneous shear stress distributions in the contact area, and a reduced order model is used to clarify the connection between friction and structural inhomogeneity. Finally, the movement of atoms is evaluated before, during and after slip in both aligned and misaligned contacts to understand how the interfacial structure affects the mechanisms of slip and the corresponding frictional behavior

  17. Magnetic coupling at perovskite and rock-salt structured interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matvejeff, M., E-mail: mikko.matvejeff@picosun.com [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8581 Chiba (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, Kemistintie 1, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Ahvenniemi, E. [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, Kemistintie 1, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Takahashi, R.; Lippmaa, M. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8581 Chiba (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    We study magnetic coupling between hole-doped manganite layers separated by either a perovskite or a rock-salt barrier of variable thickness. Both the type and the quality of the interface have a strong impact on the minimum critical barrier thickness where the manganite layers become magnetically decoupled. A rock-salt barrier layer only 1 unit cell (0.5 nm) thick remains insulating and is able to magnetically de-couple the electrode layers. The technique can therefore be used for developing high-performance planar oxide electronic devices such as magnetic tunnel junctions and quantum well structures that depend on magnetically and electronically sharp heterointerfaces.

  18. Structure and Dynamics of Interfaces: Drops and Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, J. Adin, Jr.; Mann, Elizabeth K.; Meyer, William V.; Neumann, A. Wilhelm; Tavana, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    We aim to acquire measurements of the structure and dynamics of certain liquid-fluid interfaces using an ensemble of techniques in collaboration: (1) Total internal reflection (TIR) Surface light scattering spectroscopy (SLSS), (2) Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and (3) Drop-shape analysis. SLSS and BAM can be done on a shared interfacial footprint. Results using a 50-50 mixture of pentane-isohexane, which extends the range of NASA's Confined Vapor Bubble (CVB) experiment, yield surface tension results that differ from the expected Langmuir Fit. These results were confirmed using both the SLSS and drop-shape analysis approaches.

  19. Self-consistent electronic-structure calculations for interface geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, E.C.; Gonis, A.; MacLaren, J.M.; Zhang, X.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for computing self-consistent electronic structures and total energies of planar defects, such as interfaces, which are embedded in an otherwise perfect crystal. As in the Layer Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker approach, the solid is treated as a set of coupled layers of atoms, using Bloch's theorem to take advantage of the two-dimensional periodicity of the individual layers. The layers are coupled using the techniques of the Real-Space Multiple-Scattering Theory, avoiding artificial slab or supercell boundary conditions. A total-energy calculation on a Cu crystal, which has been split apart at a (111) plane, is used to illustrate the method

  20. Observation of carbon growth and interface structures in methanol solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Kimio

    2015-11-01

    In the deposition of carbon on the surface of a tungsten tip in methanol solution by electrolysis, the growth structure of the carbon films, the interface state, and the dissolution of carbon atoms into the tungsten matrix of the substrate have been investigated with the atomic events by field ion microscopy (FIM). The carbon films preferentially condense on the W{111} plane. The interfacial reaction at the carbon atom-tungsten substrate interface is vigorous and the carbon atoms also readily dissolve into the substrate matrix to form a tungsten-carbon complex. The reaction depth of the deposited carbon depends on the magnitude of electrolytic current and the treatment duration in the methanol solution. In this work, the resolution depth of carbon was found to be approximately 270 atomic layers below the top layer of the tungsten substrate by a field evaporation technique. In the case of a low electrolytic current, the tungsten substrate surface is entirely covered with carbon atoms having a pseudomorphic structure. The field-electron emission characteristics were also evaluated for various coverages of the carbon film formed on the substrate.

  1. Surface forces between rough and topographically structured interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Esben

    2017-01-01

    Within colloidal science, direct or indirect measurements of surface forces represent an important tool for developing a fundamental understanding of colloidal systems, as well as for predictions of the stability of colloidal suspensions. While the general understanding of colloidal interactions...... and manufactured materials, which possess topographical variations. Further, with technological advances in nanotechnology, fabrication of nano- or micro-structured surfaces has become increasingly important for many applications, which calls for a better understanding of the effect of surface topography...... on the interaction between interfaces. This paper presents a review of the current state of understanding of the effect of surface roughness on DLVO forces, as well as on the interactions between topographically structured hydrophobic surfaces in water. While the first case is a natural choice because it represents...

  2. Modification of surface/neuron interfaces for neural cell-type specific responses: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Cen; Kong, Xiangdong; Lee, In-Seop

    2016-01-01

    Surface/neuron interfaces have played an important role in neural repair including neural prostheses and tissue engineered scaffolds. This comprehensive literature review covers recent studies on the modification of surface/neuron interfaces. These interfaces are identified in cases both where the surfaces of substrates or scaffolds were in direct contact with cells and where the surfaces were modified to facilitate cell adhesion and controlling cell-type specific responses. Different sources of cells for neural repair are described, such as pheochromocytoma neuronal-like cell, neural stem cell (NSC), embryonic stem cell (ESC), mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS). Commonly modified methods are discussed including patterned surfaces at micro- or nano-scale, surface modification with conducting coatings, and functionalized surfaces with immobilized bioactive molecules. These approaches to control cell-type specific responses have enormous potential implications in neural repair. (paper)

  3. Better Educational Website Interface Design: The Implications from Gender-Specific Preferences in Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-chang

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated graduate students gender-specific preferences for certain website interface design features, intending to generate useful information for instructors in choosing and for website designers in creating educational websites. The features investigated in this study included colour value, major navigation buttons placement, and…

  4. Applying data distribution management and ownership management services of the HLA interface specification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, N.H.L.; Lukkien, J.J.; Brasse, M.H.H.; Huijbrechts, S.

    1999-01-01

    The HLA Interface Specification defines services for Data Distribution Management (DDM) and Ownership Management (OM). In addition to Declaration Management, DDM is introduced to provide value based filtering on the attribute values to be communicated. The main objectives of DDM are reduction of the

  5. Operator/regulator interface: Organizational structure and responsibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, J S [American Electric Power Service Corp. (United States)

    1997-09-01

    In the context of promotion of safety culture for the nuclear power plants the following aspects are briefly described: operator/regulator interface regulatory organization; policy making body; operating organization; regulatory interface.

  6. A standard format and a graphical user interface for spin system specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biternas, A G; Charnock, G T P; Kuprov, Ilya

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a simple and general XML format for spin system description that is the result of extensive consultations within Magnetic Resonance community and unifies under one roof all major existing spin interaction specification conventions. The format is human-readable, easy to edit and easy to parse using standard XML libraries. We also describe a graphical user interface that was designed to facilitate construction and visualization of complicated spin systems. The interface is capable of generating input files for several popular spin dynamics simulation packages. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Parent-martensite interface structure in ferrous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, X.; Pond, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, a Topological Model of martensitic transformations has been presented wherein the habit plane is a semi-coherent structure, and the transformation mechanism is shown explicitly to be diffusionless. This approach is used here to model martensitic transformations in ferrous alloys. The habit plane comprises coherent (1 1 1) γ parallel (0 1 1) α terraces where the coherency strains are accommodated by a network of dislocations, originating in the martensite phase, and disconnections (transformation dislocations). The disconnections can move conservatively across the interface, thereby effecting the transformation. Since the disconnections exhibit step character, the overall habit plane deviates from the terrace plane. A range of network geometries is predicted corresponding to orientation relationships varying from Nishiyama-Wasserman to Kurdjumov-Sachs. This range of solutions includes habit planes close to {2 9 5}, {5 7 5} and {1 2 1}, in good agreement with experimental observations in various ferrous alloys

  8. The electrochemical transfer reactions and the structure of the iron|oxide layer|electrolyte interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrović, Željka; Metikoš-Huković, Mirjana; Babić, Ranko

    2012-01-01

    The thickness, barrier (protecting) and semiconducting properties of the potentiostatically formed oxide films on the pure iron electrode in an aqueous borate buffer solution were investigated by electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance (EQCN), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Mott–Schottky (MS) analysis. The thicknesses of the prepassive Fe(II)hydroxide layer (up to monolayer) nucleated on the bare iron surface and the passive Fe(II)/Fe(III) layer (up to 2 nm), deposited on the top of the first one, were determined using in situ gravimetry. Electronic properties of iron prepassive and passive films as well as ionic and electronic transfer reactions at the film|solution interface were discussed on the basis of a band structure model of the surface oxide film and the potential distribution at the interface. The anodic oxide film formation and cathodic decomposition are coupled processes and their reversible inter-conversion is mediated by the availability of free charge carriers on the electrode|solution interface. The structure of the reversible double layer at the iron oxide|solution interface was discussed based on the concept of the specific adsorption of the imidazolium cation on the negatively charged electrode surface at pH > pH pzc .

  9. Preventing tissue fibrosis by local biomaterials interfacing of specific cryptic extracellular matrix information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejs, Christine-Maria; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Ojala, Juha R. M.; Steele, Joseph A. M.; da Silva, Patricia Barros; Rynne-Vidal, Angela; Maynard, Stephanie A.; Hansel, Catherine S.; Rodríguez-Fernández, Clara; Mazo, Manuel M.; You, Amanda Y. F.; Wang, Alex J.; von Erlach, Thomas; Tryggvason, Karl; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Stevens, Molly M.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to the breakdown of tissue structures such as the basement membrane, promoting tissue fibrosis. Here we developed an electrospun membrane biofunctionalized with a fragment of the laminin β1-chain to modulate the expression of MMP2 in this context. We demonstrate that interfacing of the β1-fragment with the mesothelium of the peritoneal membrane via a biomaterial abrogates the release of active MMP2 in response to transforming growth factor β1 and rescues tissue integrity ex vivo and in vivo in a mouse model of peritoneal fibrosis. Importantly, our data demonstrate that the membrane inhibits MMP2 expression. Changes in the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related molecules further point towards a contribution of the modulation of EMT. Biomaterial-based presentation of regulatory basement membrane signals directly addresses limitations of current therapeutic approaches by enabling a localized and specific method to counteract MMP2 release applicable to a broad range of therapeutic targets. PMID:28593951

  10. Preventing tissue fibrosis by local biomaterials interfacing of specific cryptic extracellular matrix information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejs, Christine-Maria; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Ojala, Juha R. M.; Steele, Joseph A. M.; da Silva, Patricia Barros; Rynne-Vidal, Angela; Maynard, Stephanie A.; Hansel, Catherine S.; Rodríguez-Fernández, Clara; Mazo, Manuel M.; You, Amanda Y. F.; Wang, Alex J.; von Erlach, Thomas; Tryggvason, Karl; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Stevens, Molly M.

    2017-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to the breakdown of tissue structures such as the basement membrane, promoting tissue fibrosis. Here we developed an electrospun membrane biofunctionalized with a fragment of the laminin β1-chain to modulate the expression of MMP2 in this context. We demonstrate that interfacing of the β1-fragment with the mesothelium of the peritoneal membrane via a biomaterial abrogates the release of active MMP2 in response to transforming growth factor β1 and rescues tissue integrity ex vivo and in vivo in a mouse model of peritoneal fibrosis. Importantly, our data demonstrate that the membrane inhibits MMP2 expression. Changes in the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related molecules further point towards a contribution of the modulation of EMT. Biomaterial-based presentation of regulatory basement membrane signals directly addresses limitations of current therapeutic approaches by enabling a localized and specific method to counteract MMP2 release applicable to a broad range of therapeutic targets.

  11. PREFACE: Liquid-solid interfaces: structure and dynamics from spectroscopy and simulations Liquid-solid interfaces: structure and dynamics from spectroscopy and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2012-03-01

    /computational communities. On the experimental side, surface specific techniques, such as non-linear optical spectroscopy (sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG) and second harmonic generation (SHG)), surface sensitive x-ray scattering, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy provide information on layers of nanometric thickness at the interface. On the other hand, it is quite clear that the experiments require theoretical modelling in order to dissect the experimental results and to rationalize the different factors that contribute to the interfacial properties. In this respect molecular dynamics simulations are a major tool. While many successes have already been achieved with molecular dynamics simulations based on empirical force fields, first principles molecular dynamics simulations are now emerging as the other major approach where structure and reactivity are treated in a consistent way. Recent progress within the past 3-5 years on efficient treatments of basis sets and long range interactions in density functional theory (DFT) indeed extend such simulation capabilities to hundreds and thousands of atoms, thus allowing realistic models for interfaces to be tackled, maintaining first principles quality. Most of these simulations bring information on the structural organization of the solvent in the interfacial region between the solid and the liquid, but very few investigate the supplementary challenge of extracting vibrational spectroscopic fingerprints of the interface and, in particular, the direct modeling of the vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) non-linear spectra. The present special section reports an interesting contribution from the group of R Y Shen who pioneered VSFG optical experiments. They show how VSFG measurements can be used to unravel the behavior of interfacial water on alumina Al2O3 as a function of pH. The groups of A Hodgson and C Busse respectively provide complementary experiments based on low

  12. Structural similarity and category-specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian; Law, Ian; Paulson, Olaf B

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that category-specific recognition disorders for natural objects may reflect that natural objects are more structurally (visually) similar than artefacts and therefore more difficult to recognize following brain damage. On this account one might expect a positive relationshi...

  13. Specificity of Structural Assessment of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpower, David L.; Sharara, Harold; Goldsmith, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the specificity of information provided by structural assessment of knowledge (SAK). SAK is a technique which uses the Pathfinder scaling algorithm to transform ratings of concept relatedness into network representations (PFnets) of individuals' knowledge. Inferences about individuals' overall domain knowledge based on the…

  14. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated. PMID:25365457

  15. Toward smart aerospace structures: design of a piezoelectric sensor and its analog interface for flaw detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-10-31

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated.

  16. Molecular Processes Underlying the Structure and Assembly of Thin Films and Nanoparticles at Complex interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Geraldine [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2016-06-03

    differences in how water behaves at hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer (SAMS)/water interfaces relative to the organic liquid/water interfaces. Several monolayer films have been examined in these studies using a combination of vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS), contact angle measurements and AFM. At the hydrocarbon monolayer/water interface we find that water has a weak bonding interaction with the monolayer film that results in an orientation of water at the terminus of these hydrocarbon chains. The water-film interaction is still present for fluorinated films but it is found to be considerably weaker. Hydration and Surfactant Adsorption at Salt/Water Interfaces This set of studies has examined the molecular characteristics of the CaF2/water interface using VSFS. Our first studies detailed the structure and orientation of water molecules adsorbed at this mineral surfaces including studies of the surface in the presence of aqueous solutions of salts. These studies have been followed by a series of static and time-resolved studies of the adsorption of carboxylic acid containing organics at this surface, specifically carboxylic acid surfactants and acetic acid. In the latter we have developed a new method for time resolved studies that involve sequential wavelength tuning and automated control of spatial beam overlap at the target can probe amplitude changes of sum-frequency resonances in widely spaced infrared regions. This offers great advantages for the study of the synchronism of molecular processes at interfaces. This approach is particularly suitable to investigate the synchronization of interfacial processes such as surfactant adsorption at charged mineral surfaces. Macromolecular Assembly at Liquid/Liquid Interfaces Macromolecular assembly at the interface between water and a hydrophobic surface underlies some of the most important biological and environmental processes on the planet. Our work has examined polymer adsorption and assembly of

  17. Nanoengineered Interfaces, Coatings, and Structures by Plasma Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilev, Krasimir; Ramiasa, Melanie Macgregor

    2017-12-15

    Nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanobelts, nanoneedles, nanosheets, nanowires, nanopillars: the variety of nanostructured interfaces that can be created and modified using plasma processes is virtually endless.[...].

  18. Pathways to Structure-Property Relationships of Peptide-Materials Interfaces: Challenges in Predicting Molecular Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Tiffany R

    2017-07-18

    An in-depth appreciation of how to manipulate the molecular-level recognition between peptides and aqueous materials interfaces, including nanoparticles, will advance technologies based on self-organized metamaterials for photonics and plasmonics, biosensing, catalysis, energy generation and harvesting, and nanomedicine. Exploitation of the materials-selective binding of biomolecules is pivotal to success in these areas and may be particularly key to producing new hierarchically structured biobased materials. These applications could be accomplished by realizing preferential adsorption of a given biomolecule onto one materials composition over another, one surface facet over another, or one crystalline polymorph over another. Deeper knowledge of the aqueous abiotic-biotic interface, to establish clear structure-property relationships in these systems, is needed to meet this goal. In particular, a thorough structural characterization of the surface-adsorbed peptides is essential for establishing these relationships but can often be challenging to accomplish via experimental approaches alone. In addition to myriad existing challenges associated with determining the detailed molecular structure of any molecule adsorbed at an aqueous interface, experimental characterization of materials-binding peptides brings new, complex challenges because many materials-binding peptides are thought to be intrinsically disordered. This means that these peptides are not amenable to experimental techniques that rely on the presence of well-defined secondary structure in the peptide when in the adsorbed state. To address this challenge, and in partnership with experiment, molecular simulations at the atomistic level can bring complementary and critical insights into the origins of this abiotic/biotic recognition and suggest routes for manipulating this phenomenon to realize new types of hybrid materials. For the reasons outlined above, molecular simulation approaches also face

  19. A nonlinear interface model applied to masonry structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon, Frédéric; Raffa, Maria Letizia; Rizzoni, Raffaella

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a new imperfect interface model is presented. The model includes finite strains, micro-cracks and smooth roughness. The model is consistently derived by coupling a homogenization approach for micro-cracked media and arguments of asymptotic analysis. The model is applied to brick/mortar interfaces. Numerical results are presented.

  20. Structural basis for catalysis at the membrane-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrisne, Meagan Belcher; Petrou, Vasileios I; Clarke, Oliver B; Mancia, Filippo

    2017-11-01

    The membrane-water interface forms a uniquely heterogeneous and geometrically constrained environment for enzymatic catalysis. Integral membrane enzymes sample three environments - the uniformly hydrophobic interior of the membrane, the aqueous extramembrane region, and the fuzzy, amphipathic interfacial region formed by the tightly packed headgroups of the components of the lipid bilayer. Depending on the nature of the substrates and the location of the site of chemical modification, catalysis may occur in each of these environments. The availability of structural information for alpha-helical enzyme families from each of these classes, as well as several beta-barrel enzymes from the bacterial outer membrane, has allowed us to review here the different ways in which each enzyme fold has adapted to the nature of the substrates, products, and the unique environment of the membrane. Our focus here is on enzymes that process lipidic substrates. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Lipids edited by Russell E. Bishop. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. First-principles study of the structure properties of Al(111)/6H-SiC(0001) interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingjie; Xie, Jingpei; Wang, Changqing; Li, Liben; Wang, Aiqin; Mao, Aixia

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a systematic study on the energetic and electronic structure of the Al(111)/6H-SiC(0001) interfaces by using first-principles calculation with density functional theory (DFT). There are all three situations for no-vacuum layer of Al/SiC superlattics, and two cases of C-terminated and Si-terminated interfaces are compared and analyzed. Through the density of states analysis, the initial information of interface combination is obtained. Then the supercells are stretched vertically along the z-axis, and the fracture of the interface is obtained, and it is pointed out that C-terminated SiC and Al interfaces have a better binding property. And, the fracture positions of C-terminated and Si-terminated interfaces are different in the process of stretching. Then, the distance variation in the process of stretching, the charge density differences, and the distribution of the electrons near the interface are analyzed. Al these work makes the specific reasons for the interface fracture are obtained at last.

  2. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Boukabache

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures’ reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure’s integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated.

  3. PRince: a web server for structural and physicochemical analysis of protein-RNA interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Mishra, Abhishek; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2012-07-01

    We have developed a web server, PRince, which analyzes the structural features and physicochemical properties of the protein-RNA interface. Users need to submit a PDB file containing the atomic coordinates of both the protein and the RNA molecules in complex form (in '.pdb' format). They should also mention the chain identifiers of interacting protein and RNA molecules. The size of the protein-RNA interface is estimated by measuring the solvent accessible surface area buried in contact. For a given protein-RNA complex, PRince calculates structural, physicochemical and hydration properties of the interacting surfaces. All these parameters generated by the server are presented in a tabular format. The interacting surfaces can also be visualized with software plug-in like Jmol. In addition, the output files containing the list of the atomic coordinates of the interacting protein, RNA and interface water molecules can be downloaded. The parameters generated by PRince are novel, and users can correlate them with the experimentally determined biophysical and biochemical parameters for better understanding the specificity of the protein-RNA recognition process. This server will be continuously upgraded to include more parameters. PRince is publicly accessible and free for use. Available at http://www.facweb.iitkgp.ernet.in/~rbahadur/prince/home.html.

  4. A structural approach to constructing perspective efficient and reliable human-computer interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balint, L.

    1989-01-01

    The principles of human-computer interface (HCI) realizations are investigated with the aim of getting closer to a general framework and thus, to a more or less solid background of constructing perspective efficient, reliable and cost-effective human-computer interfaces. On the basis of characterizing and classifying the different HCI solutions, the fundamental problems of interface construction are pointed out especially with respect to human error occurrence possibilities. The evolution of HCI realizations is illustrated by summarizing the main properties of past, present and foreseeable future interface generations. HCI modeling is pointed out to be a crucial problem in theoretical and practical investigations. Suggestions concerning HCI structure (hierarchy and modularity), HCI functional dynamics (mapping from input to output information), minimization of human error caused system failures (error-tolerance, error-recovery and error-correcting) as well as cost-effective HCI design and realization methodology (universal and application-oriented vs. application-specific solutions) are presented. The concept of RISC-based and SCAMP-type HCI components is introduced with the aim of having a reduced interaction scheme in communication and a well defined architecture in HCI components' internal structure. HCI efficiency and reliability are dealt with, by taking into account complexity and flexibility. The application of fast computerized prototyping is also briefly investigated as an experimental device of achieving simple, parametrized, invariant HCI models. Finally, a concise outline of an approach of how to construct ideal HCI's is also suggested by emphasizing the open questions and the need of future work related to the proposals, as well. (author). 14 refs, 6 figs

  5. Effect of impurities on structural and electrochemical properties of the Ni-YSZ interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karin Vels; Wallenberg, R.; Chorkendorff, I.

    2003-01-01

    . The results were compared to earlier investigations of a less pure nickel/YSZ interface. The pure interface developed different structures depending on whether or not the samples were polarised. Despite,the purity of the nickel, impurities were found in the interfacial region. The pure electrodes......The changes in interface structure and chemical composition of a 99.995% pure nickel/yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) interface were examined after heat treatment at 1000degreesC in 97% H-2/3% H2O with and without polarisation. Impedance spectroscopy was used for electrochemical characterisation...

  6. How NASA KSC Controls Interfaces with the use of Motion Skeletons and Product Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Corey

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will show how NASA KSC controls interfaces for Modular Product Architecture (MPA) using Locator Skeletons, Interface Skeletons, and Product Structure, to be combined together within a Motion Skeleton. The user will learn how to utilize skeleton models to communicate interface data, as successfully done at NASA KSC in their use of Motion Skeletons to control interfaces for multi-launch systems. There will be discussion of the methodology used to control design requirements through WTParts, and how to utilize product structure for non-CAD documents.

  7. Interface characterization of InSb MOS structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapira, Y.; Bregman, J.; Calahorra, Z.; Goshen, R.

    1982-03-26

    The electrical properties of MOS devices are critically dependent on the oxide-semiconductor interface. The preparation of suitable insulating layers of oxide or other material is essential for the performance of such devices and it is particularly difficult in the case of III-V compound semiconductors. We report a method of preparing an insulating layer on InSb by a plasma oxidation process. The oxidation method will be described as well as results of the analysis of the oxide-semiconductor interface by electrical and compositional techniques. Capacitance-voltage characteristics reveal the existence of interface states which are distributed near the conduction and the valence bands with a higher density near the former. Depth profiling of the oxide by Ar/sup +/ sputtering and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) shows that the oxide is composed of a mixture of indium oxide with antimony oxide.

  8. ELSI: A unified software interface for Kohn-Sham electronic structure solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Victor Wen-zhe; Corsetti, Fabiano; García, Alberto; Huhn, William P.; Jacquelin, Mathias; Jia, Weile; Lange, Björn; Lin, Lin; Lu, Jianfeng; Mi, Wenhui; Seifitokaldani, Ali; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Yang, Chao; Yang, Haizhao; Blum, Volker

    2018-01-01

    Solving the electronic structure from a generalized or standard eigenproblem is often the bottleneck in large scale calculations based on Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. This problem must be addressed by essentially all current electronic structure codes, based on similar matrix expressions, and by high-performance computation. We here present a unified software interface, ELSI, to access different strategies that address the Kohn-Sham eigenvalue problem. Currently supported algorithms include the dense generalized eigensolver library ELPA, the orbital minimization method implemented in libOMM, and the pole expansion and selected inversion (PEXSI) approach with lower computational complexity for semilocal density functionals. The ELSI interface aims to simplify the implementation and optimal use of the different strategies, by offering (a) a unified software framework designed for the electronic structure solvers in Kohn-Sham density-functional theory; (b) reasonable default parameters for a chosen solver; (c) automatic conversion between input and internal working matrix formats, and in the future (d) recommendation of the optimal solver depending on the specific problem. Comparative benchmarks are shown for system sizes up to 11,520 atoms (172,800 basis functions) on distributed memory supercomputing architectures.

  9. Electronic structure of epitaxial chalcopyrite surfaces and interfaces for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    electron states was observed, which can be understood as a higher localization of electronic states and lower crystal quality. In addition, a strong rearrangement of the copper partial density of states was shown. The intimate knowledge of the electric structure was then exploited to demonstrate the valence band discontinuity between CuInSe 2 and CuIn 3 Se 5 . The analysis by photoemission yielded a valence band offset of 0.28 eV, again in reasonable agreement with theoretical results. The p-n-junction in chalcopyrite solar cells is situated near the absorber-buffer interface, which is therefore crucial for the device performance. In this thesis, ZnO deposited from metal-organic precursors on epitaxial CuInSe 2 was investigated as cadmium-free buffer material. In the course of contact formation, the interfacial region of the absorber becomes depleted of copper. Additionally, a thin intrinsic ZnSe layer is formed, prior to the growth of ZnO. The derived band alignments show no dependence on the surface orientation of the chalcopyrite substrate and are consistent with theoretical results. The conduction band lineup is favorable for the application in solar cells.

  10. User interfaces for computational science: A domain specific language for OOMMF embedded in Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Marijan; Pepper, Ryan A.; Fangohr, Hans

    2017-05-01

    Computer simulations are used widely across the engineering and science disciplines, including in the research and development of magnetic devices using computational micromagnetics. In this work, we identify and review different approaches to configuring simulation runs: (i) the re-compilation of source code, (ii) the use of configuration files, (iii) the graphical user interface, and (iv) embedding the simulation specification in an existing programming language to express the computational problem. We identify the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches and discuss their implications on effectiveness and reproducibility of computational studies and results. Following on from this, we design and describe a domain specific language for micromagnetics that is embedded in the Python language, and allows users to define the micromagnetic simulations they want to carry out in a flexible way. We have implemented this micromagnetic simulation description language together with a computational backend that executes the simulation task using the Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework (OOMMF). We illustrate the use of this Python interface for OOMMF by solving the micromagnetic standard problem 4. All the code is publicly available and is open source.

  11. User interfaces for computational science: A domain specific language for OOMMF embedded in Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijan Beg

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Computer simulations are used widely across the engineering and science disciplines, including in the research and development of magnetic devices using computational micromagnetics. In this work, we identify and review different approaches to configuring simulation runs: (i the re-compilation of source code, (ii the use of configuration files, (iii the graphical user interface, and (iv embedding the simulation specification in an existing programming language to express the computational problem. We identify the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches and discuss their implications on effectiveness and reproducibility of computational studies and results. Following on from this, we design and describe a domain specific language for micromagnetics that is embedded in the Python language, and allows users to define the micromagnetic simulations they want to carry out in a flexible way. We have implemented this micromagnetic simulation description language together with a computational backend that executes the simulation task using the Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework (OOMMF. We illustrate the use of this Python interface for OOMMF by solving the micromagnetic standard problem 4. All the code is publicly available and is open source.

  12. Modulation of Bacillus thuringiensis Phosphatidylinositol-Specific Phospholipase C Activity by Mutations in the Putative Dimerization Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, X.; Shao, C; Zhang, X; Zambonelli, C; Redfield, A; Head, J; Seaton, B; Roberts, M

    2009-01-01

    Cleavage of phosphatidylinositol (PI) to inositol 1,2-(cyclic)-phosphate (cIP) and cIP hydrolysis to inositol 1-phosphate by Bacillus thuringiensis phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C are activated by the enzyme binding to phosphatidylcholine (PC) surfaces. Part of this reflects improved binding of the protein to interfaces. However, crystallographic analysis of an interfacially impaired phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase (W47A/W242A) suggested protein dimerization might occur on the membrane. In the W47A/W242A dimer, four tyrosine residues from one monomer interact with the same tyrosine cluster of the other, forming a tight dimer interface close to the membrane binding regions. We have constructed mutant proteins in which two or more of these tyrosine residues have been replaced with serine. Phospholipid binding and enzymatic activity of these mutants have been examined to assess the importance of these residues to enzyme function. Replacing two tyrosines had small effects on enzyme activity. However, removal of three or four tyrosine residues weakened PC binding and reduced PI cleavage by the enzyme as well as PC activation of cIP hydrolysis. Crystal structures of Y247S/Y251S in the absence and presence of myo-inositol as well as Y246S/Y247S/Y248S/Y251S indicate that both mutant proteins crystallized as monomers, were very similar to one another, and had no change in the active site region. Kinetic assays, lipid binding, and structural results indicate that either (i) a specific PC binding site, critical for vesicle activities and cIP activation, has been impaired, or (ii) the reduced dimerization potential for Y246S/Y247S/Y248S and Y246S/Y247S/Y248S/Y251S is responsible for their reduced catalytic activity in all assay systems.

  13. Electronic structure of hybrid interfaces for polymer-based electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahlman, M; Crispin, A; Crispin, X; Henze, S K M; Jong, M P de; Osikowicz, W; Tengstedt, C; Salaneck, W R

    2007-01-01

    The fundamentals of the energy level alignment at anode and cathode electrodes in organic electronics are described. We focus on two different models that treat weakly interacting organic/metal (and organic/organic) interfaces: the induced density of interfacial states model and the so-called integer charge transfer model. The two models are compared and evaluated, mainly using photoelectron spectroscopy data of the energy level alignment of conjugated polymers and molecules at various organic/metal and organic/organic interfaces. We show that two different alignment regimes are generally observed: (i) vacuum level alignment, which corresponds to the lack of vacuum level offsets (Schottky-Mott limit) and hence the lack of charge transfer across the interface, and (ii) Fermi level pinning where the resulting work function of an organic/metal and organic/organic bilayer is independent of the substrate work function and an interface dipole is formed due to charge transfer across the interface. We argue that the experimental results are best described by the integer charge transfer model which predicts the vacuum level alignment when the substrate work function is above the positive charge transfer level and below the negative charge transfer level of the conjugated material. The model further predicts Fermi level pinning to the positive (negative) charge transfer level when the substrate work function is below (above) the positive (negative) charge transfer level. The nature of the integer charge transfer levels depend on the materials system: for conjugated large molecules and polymers, the integer charge transfer states are polarons or bipolarons; for small molecules' highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals and for crystalline systems, the relevant levels are the valence and conduction band edges. Finally, limits and further improvements to the integer charge transfer model are discussed as well as the impact on device design. (topical review)

  14. Structure and phase transitions at the interface between α-Al2O3 and Pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophus, Colin; Santala, Melissa K.; Asta, Mark; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2013-06-01

    The structure and thermodynamics of interfaces between (111) Pt and the basal plane of α-Al2O3 have been studied through a combination of high-resolution electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Within the framework of ab initio thermodynamics the structure and excess free energies are calculated as functions of temperature (T) and oxygen partial pressure (PO2), for three competing interface terminations. Comparisons between measurements and calculations establish that the interface is oxygen terminated, and a structural phase transition is predicted in the range of experimentally accessible T and PO2 from the calculated interfacial free energies.

  15. Specific "scientific" data structures, and their processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Karczmarczuk

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Programming physicists use, as all programmers, arrays, lists, tuples, records, etc., and this requires some change in their thought patterns while converting their formulae into some code, since the "data structures" operated upon, while elaborating some theory and its consequences, are rather: power series and Padé approximants, differential forms and other instances of differential algebras, functionals (for the variational calculus, trajectories (solutions of differential equations, Young diagrams and Feynman graphs, etc. Such data is often used in a [semi-]numerical setting, not necessarily "symbolic", appropriate for the computer algebra packages. Modules adapted to such data may be "just libraries", but often they become specific, embedded sub-languages, typically mapped into object-oriented frameworks, with overloaded mathematical operations. Here we present a functional approach to this philosophy. We show how the usage of Haskell datatypes and - fundamental for our tutorial - the application of lazy evaluation makes it possible to operate upon such data (in particular: the "infinite" sequences in a natural and comfortable manner.

  16. [Production, specificity and structure of immunoglobulins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goujard, C; Delfraissy, J F

    1991-03-21

    Immunoglobulin is a key factor of the immune response resulting from B-cell activation and associated with T-cell stimulation. Because of its structure, this antibody has a dual function: it specifically recognizes the inducer antigen in the variable region and eliminates it by a constant portion which is responsible for effector properties. Surface immunoglobulin, therefore, is the B-cell antigen receptor; it differs from the T-cell receptor in that it recognizes the antigen unbound to the major istocompatibility complex; binding the antigen results in direct signal transduction first in the cytoplasm, then in the nucleus. This receptor can be secreted in the body: it is made up of circulating immunoglobulins. Human immunoglobulins are divided into 5 classes, each of them with its own response kinetics, distribution and functions. The variability of the antibody response accounts for a genetic organization involving numerous genes which may be associated with each other, or mutate, or recombine during maturation of the lymphocytes. Altogether, this system has a theoretical capacity of response to three hundred million different antigens.

  17. Interface Pattern Selection Criterion for Cellular Structures in Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, R.; Tewari, S. N.; Kurtze, D.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to establish key scientific concepts that govern the selection of cellular and dendritic patterns during the directional solidification of alloys. We shall first address scientific concepts that are crucial in the selection of interface patterns. Next, the results of ground-based experimental studies in the Al-4.0 wt % Cu system will be described. Both experimental studies and theoretical calculations will be presented to establish the need for microgravity experiments.

  18. A Standard for Sharing and Accessing Time Series Data: The Heliophysics Application Programmers Interface (HAPI) Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriff, J. D.; King, T. A.; Weigel, R. S.; Faden, J.; Roberts, D. A.; Harris, B. T.; Lal, N.; Boardsen, S. A.; Candey, R. M.; Lindholm, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    We present the Heliophysics Application Programmers Interface (HAPI), a new interface specification that both large and small data centers can use to expose time series data holdings in a standard way. HAPI was inspired by the similarity of existing services at many Heliophysics data centers, and these data centers have collaborated to define a single interface that captures best practices and represents what everyone considers the essential, lowest common denominator for basic data access. This low level access can serve as infrastructure to support greatly enhanced interoperability among analysis tools, with the goal being simplified analysis and comparison of data from any instrument, model, mission or data center. The three main services a HAPI server must perform are 1. list a catalog of datasets (one unique ID per dataset), 2. describe the content of one dataset (JSON metadata), and 3. retrieve numerical content for one dataset (stream the actual data). HAPI defines both the format of the query to the server, and the response from the server. The metadata is lightweight, focusing on use rather than discovery, and the data format is a streaming one, with Comma Separated Values (CSV) being required and binary or JSON streaming being optional. The HAPI specification is available at GitHub, where projects are also underway to develop reference implementation servers that data providers can adapt and use at their own sites. Also in the works are data analysis clients in multiple languages (IDL, Python, Matlab, and Java). Institutions which have agreed to adopt HAPI include Goddard (CDAWeb for data and CCMC for models), LASP at the University of Colorado Boulder, the Particles and Plasma Interactions node of the Planetary Data System (PPI/PDS) at UCLA, the Plasma Wave Group at the University of Iowa, the Space Sector at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab (APL), and the tsds.org site maintained at George Mason University. Over the next year, the adoption of a

  19. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher; Waldron, Levi

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression...... changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein...... interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two...

  20. Direct Atomic Scale Observation of the Structure and Chemistry of Order/Disorder Interfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srinivasan, R; Banerjee, R; Hwang, J. Y; Viswanathan, G. B; Tiley, J; Fraser, H. L

    2008-01-01

    ... distributed ordered intermetallic precipitates within a disordered matrix. The structure and chemistry at the precipitate/matrix interface plays a critical role in determining the effectiveness of the strengthening mechanism...

  1. Interface properties of Fe/MgO/Cu-phthalocyanine metal-insulator-organic semiconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Nyunjong; Bae, Yujeong; Kim, Taehee; Ito, Eisuke; Hara, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid interface structures consisting of organic copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) and ferromagnetic metal Fe(001) with and without a MgO(001) cover were investigated by using surface sensitive techniques of X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy. A systematic study of the energy level alignment at the interfaces was carried out. For the hybrid interfaces considered here, our results indicate that the insertion of an artificially-grown ultra-thin oxide layer MgO(001) can prevent Femi level pinning and induce a rather large interface dipole, thereby resulting in remarkable CuPc Fermi level shifts when the thickness of the CuPc film is less than 3 nm. This study provides a better understanding of spin filtering in MgO-based organic spin devices and a new way to alter the interface electronic structure of metal/organic semiconductor hybrid systems.

  2. Structural adaptation of the subunit interface of oligomeric thermophilic and hyperthermophilic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugini, Elisa; Tronelli, Daniele; Bossa, Francesco; Pascarella, Stefano

    2009-04-01

    Enzymes from thermophilic and, particularly, from hyperthermophilic organisms are surprisingly stable. Understanding of the molecular origin of protein thermostability and thermoactivity attracted the interest of many scientist both for the perspective comprehension of the principles of protein structure and for the possible biotechnological applications through application of protein engineering. Comparative studies at sequence and structure levels were aimed at detecting significant differences of structural parameters related to protein stability between thermophilic and hyperhermophilic structures and their mesophilic homologs. Comparative studies were useful in the identification of a few recurrent themes which the evolution utilized in different combinations in different protein families. These studies were mostly carried out at the monomer level. However, maintenance of a proper quaternary structure is an essential prerequisite for a functional macromolecule. At the environmental temperatures experienced typically by hyper- and thermophiles, the subunit interactions mediated by the interface must be sufficiently stable. Our analysis was therefore aimed at the identification of the molecular strategies adopted by evolution to enhance interface thermostability of oligomeric enzymes. The variation of several structural properties related to protein stability were tested at the subunit interfaces of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic oligomers. The differences of the interface structural features observed between the hyperthermophilic and thermophilic enzymes were compared with the differences of the same properties calculated from pairwise comparisons of oligomeric mesophilic proteins contained in a reference dataset. The significance of the observed differences of structural properties was measured by a t-test. Ion pairs and hydrogen bonds do not vary significantly while hydrophobic contact area increases specially in hyperthermophilic interfaces. Interface

  3. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, W.B.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 angstrom Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 angstrom, 500 angstrom, and 300 angstrom per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 angstrom/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 angstrom/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study

  4. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, W.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  5. Honeycomb structured porous interfaces as templates for protein adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Hernandez, J; Munoz-Bonilla, A; Ibarboure, E; Bordege, V; Fernandez-Garcia, M, E-mail: jrodriguez@ictp.csic.es

    2010-11-01

    We prepared breath figure patterns decorated with a statistical glycopolymer, (styrene-co-2-{l_brace}[(D-glucosamin-2-N-yl)carbonyl]oxy{r_brace}ethyl methacrylate, S-HEMAGl). The preparation of the glycopolymer occurs in one single step by using styrene and S-HEMAGl. Blends of this copolymer and high molecular weight polystyrene were spin coated from THF solutions leading to the formation of surfaces with both controlled functionality and topography. AFM studies revealed that both the composition of the blend and the relative humidity play a key role on the size and distribution of the pores at the interface. The porous films shows the hydrophilic glycomonomer units are oriented towards the pore interface since upon soft annealing in water, the holes are partially swelled. The self-organization of the glycopolymer within the pores was additionally confirmed both by reaction of carbohydrate hydroxyl groups with rhodamine-isocyanate and by means of the lectin binding test using Concanavalin A (Con A).

  6. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silveira Carlos H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR. We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. Results We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI, ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. Conclusions The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine residues (with some exceptions. Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the

  7. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Cristina; Togawa, Roberto C; Neshich, Izabella A P; Mazoni, Ivan; Mancini, Adauto L; Minardi, Raquel C de Melo; da Silveira, Carlos H; Jardine, José G; Santoro, Marcelo M; Neshich, Goran

    2010-10-20

    Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR). We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes. The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine) residues (with some exceptions). Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the interfaces between the "miscellaneous-virus" subfamily

  8. Electron drag in ferromagnetic structures separated by an insulating interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozub, V. I.; Muradov, M. I.; Galperin, Y. M.

    2018-06-01

    We consider electron drag in a system of two ferromagnetic layers separated by an insulating interface. The source of it is expected to be magnon-electron interactions. Namely, we assume that the external voltage is applied to the "active" layer stimulating electric current through this layer. In its turn, the scattering of the current-carrying electrons by magnons leads to a magnon drag current within this layer. The 3-magnons interactions between magnons in the two layers (being of non-local nature) lead to magnon drag within the "passive" layer which, correspondingly, produce electron drag current via processes of magnon-electron scattering. We estimate the drag current and compare it to the phonon-induced one.

  9. Beyond the continuum: how molecular solvent structure affects electrostatics and hydrodynamics at solid-electrolyte interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonthuis, Douwe Jan; Netz, Roland R

    2013-10-03

    Standard continuum theory fails to predict several key experimental results of electrostatic and electrokinetic measurements at aqueous electrolyte interfaces. In order to extend the continuum theory to include the effects of molecular solvent structure, we generalize the equations for electrokinetic transport to incorporate a space dependent dielectric profile, viscosity profile, and non-electrostatic interaction potential. All necessary profiles are extracted from atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We show that the MD results for the ion-specific distribution of counterions at charged hydrophilic and hydrophobic interfaces are accurately reproduced using the dielectric profile of pure water and a non-electrostatic repulsion in an extended Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The distributions of Na(+) at both surface types and Cl(-) at hydrophilic surfaces can be modeled using linear dielectric response theory, whereas for Cl(-) at hydrophobic surfaces it is necessary to apply nonlinear response theory. The extended Poisson-Boltzmann equation reproduces the experimental values of the double-layer capacitance for many different carbon-based surfaces. In conjunction with a generalized hydrodynamic theory that accounts for a space dependent viscosity, the model captures the experimentally observed saturation of the electrokinetic mobility as a function of the bare surface charge density and the so-called anomalous double-layer conductivity. The two-scale approach employed here-MD simulations and continuum theory-constitutes a successful modeling scheme, providing basic insight into the molecular origins of the static and kinetic properties of charged surfaces, and allowing quantitative modeling at low computational cost.

  10. The Ni-YSZ interface - Structure, composition and electrochemical properties at 1000 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vels Jensen, Karin

    2002-06-01

    The anode/electrolyte interface in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is known to cause electrical losses. Geometrically simple Ni/Yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) interfaces were examined to gain information on the structural and chemical changes occurring during experiments at 1000 deg. C in an atmosphere of 97% H2/3% H{sub 2}O. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at open circuit voltage (OCV) and at anodic and cathodic polarisation (100 mV) was performed. A correlation of the electrical data with the structure development and the chemical composition was attempted. Nickel wires with different impurity content (99.8% Ni and 99.995% Ni) were used to examine the impact of impurities on the polarisation resistance and contact area morphology. The electro polished nickel wires were pressed against a polished 8 mol% YSZ surface. Extensive structural changes from a flat interface to a hill and valley structure were found to occur in the contact area with the impure nickel wire, and a ridge of impurities was built along the rim of the contact area. Impurity particles in the interfacial region were also observed. The impurity phase was described as an alkali silicate glassy phase. No differences were found between polarised and non-polarised samples. With pure nickel wires, however, the microstructures depended on the polarisation/non-polarisation conditions. At non-polarised conditions a hill and valley type structure was found. Anodic polarisation produced an up to 1 {mu}m thick interface layer consisting of nano-sized YSZ particles with some Ni present. At cathodic polarisation both a granulated structure and a hill and valley structure resembling the structure of non-polarised samples were found. Small impurity ridges were surrounding the contact areas on non-polarised and cathodically polarised samples. TOF-SIMS and XPS analyses showed the presence of impurities in both the impure and pure contact areas. The impedance spectroscopy revealed that depending on the

  11. S-LINK, a data link interface specification for the LHC era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bij, H.C. van der; McLaren, R.A.; Boyle, O.

    1996-01-01

    In the Technical Proposals for ATLAS, CMS and ALICE there is a requirement for several thousand data links. Although there is an obvious need for standardization, this seems difficult to achieve as the links run at different speeds, over different distances and have various constraints of power consumption, size and radiation hardness. An additional complication is that today we cannot decide which will be the most cost effective technology for the implementation of the final links. Furthermore, we must allow designers of boards at each end of the link, for example readout electronics and input buffers, to work in parallel with the development of the links. The S-LINK is a new concept which should provide the benefits of standardization without the limitations. The S-LINK specification defines, at both ends of the link, a simple FIFO-like user interface which remains independent of the technology used to implement the physical link. The physical link provides transfer of event data and control words, error detection, optional flow control and test facilities. This paper describes the S-LINK specification and gives examples of the use of the S-LINK, the physical links being designed, and the test equipment that is being developed

  12. The structure of the solid-liquid interface: atomic size effect; La structure de l'interface solide-liquide: effet de taille atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geysermans, P.; Pontikis, V. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 94 - Vitry-sur-Seine (France). Centre d' Etudes de Chimie Metallurgique

    2002-09-01

    The atomic structure of the solid-liquid heterophase interface was investigated by using molecular dynamics. Two kinds of systems were studied; the first one was crystalline copper with (100) and (111) surface terminations in contact with liquid aluminium, while in the second one the interface was modelled by two systems in contact made of Lennard-Jones particles with different size ({sigma}) and energy ({epsilon}) parameters. We found that at the interface the liquid was layered whatever the crystallographic orientation of the surface. The layering of the liquid is still preserved when the ratio of particles sites ({chi}={sigma}{sub 1}/{sigma}{sub 2}) changes while an epitaxial relationship is always found between the crystal and the first liquid layer. The average density of the latter is closely related to the {chi} value. (authors)

  13. Molecular dynamics study of structure and vibrational spectra at zwitterionoic lipid/aqueous KCl, NaCl, and CaCl2 solution interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Shirai, Shinnosuke; Okumura, Tomoaki; Morita, Akihiro

    2018-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of KCl, NaCl, and CaCl2 solution/dipalmytoylphosphatidylcholine lipid interfaces were performed to analyze heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (HD-VSFG) spectra in relation to the interfacial water structure. The present MD simulation well reproduces the experimental spectra and elucidates a specific cation effect on the interfacial structure. The K+, Na+, and Ca2+ cation species penetrate in the lipid layer more than the anions in this order, due to the electrostatic interaction with negative polar groups of lipid, and the electric double layer between the cations and anions cancels the intrinsic orientation of water at the water/lipid interface. These mechanisms explain the HD-VSFG spectrum of the water/lipid interface and its spectral perturbation by adding the ions. The lipid monolayer reverses the order of surface preference of the cations at the solution/lipid interface from that at the solution/air interface.

  14. Quantitative x-ray structure determination of superlattices and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, I.K.; Fullerton, E.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a general procedure for quantitative structural refinement of superlattice structures. To analyze a wide range of superlattices, the authors have derived a general kinematical diffraction formula that includes random, continuous and discrete fluctuations from the average structure. By implementing a non-linear fitting algorithm to fit the entire x-ray diffraction profile, refined parameters that describe the average superlattice structure, and deviations from this average are obtained. The structural refinement procedure is applied to a crystalline/crystalline Mo/Ni superlattices and crystalline/amorphous Pb/Ge superlattices. Roughness introduced artificially during growth in Mo/Ni superlattices is shown to be accurately reproduced by the refinement

  15. Smart nanogels at the air/water interface: structural studies by neutron reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Katarzyna; Sun, Huihui; Campbell, Richard A.; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Resmini, Marina

    2016-02-01

    The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes of nanogels as a function of the degree of cross-linking at the air/water interface.The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes

  16. Effects of interface edge configuration on residual stress in the bonded structures for a divertor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, K.; Nagata, K.; Shibui, M.; Tachikawa, N.; Araki, M.

    1998-01-01

    Residual stresses in the interface region, that developed at the cool down during the brazing, were evaluated for several bonded structures to assess the mechanical strength of the bonded interface, using thermoelasto-plastic stress analysis. Normal stress components of the residual stresses around the interface edge of graphite-copper (C-Cu) bonded structures were compared for three types of bonded features such as flat-type, monoblock-type and saddle-type. The saddle-type structure was found to be favorable for its relatively low residual stress, easy fabrication accuracy on bonded interface and armor replacement. Residual stresses around the interface edge in three armor materials/copper bonded structures for a divertor plate were also examined for the C-Cu, tungsten-copper (W-Cu) and molybdenum alloy-copper (TZM-Cu), varying the interface wedge angle from 45 to 135 . An optimal bonded configuration for the least value of residual stress was found to have a wedge angle of 45 for the C-Cu, and 135 for both the W-Cu and TZM-Cu bonded ones. (orig.)

  17. Interface structure of Be/DSCu diffusion bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, T.; Iwadachi, T. [NGK Insulators Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium is used as plasma facing components of the first wall on ITER. Dispersion-Strengthened Copper (DSCu) is used as heat sink material by joining to Be because DSCu has high thermal conductivity and strength. In this study, Be/DSCu diffusion bonding tests using the interlayer of Al, Ni, Nb, Ti, Zr and Be-Cu alloy have been conducted to choose the suitable interlayer materials. As a result of the shear strength tests, Be/DSCu joints by using Be-Cu alloy interlayer showed the strength of about 200 MPa. Diffusion bonding tests using Be-Cu alloy interlayer or no interlayer (direct bonding) at the range of temperature from 600degC to 850degC have been conducted to identify the effect of bonding temperature and time on interface formation and strength. The thickness of diffusion layer was proportional to a square root of bonding time by diffusion controlled process. The shear strength is controlled by the formation of intermetallic layer at Be side. (author)

  18. Elemental and structural studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W., E-mail: w.kaabar@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Daar, E. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bunk, O. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Laklouk, A. [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli (Libya); Bailey, M.; Jeynes, C. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gundogdu, O. [Umuttepe Campus, University of Kocaeli, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    Micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE) and Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) techniques were employed in the investigation of trace and essential elements distribution in normal and diseased human femoral head sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). PIGE was exploited in the determination of elements of low atomic number z<15 such as Na and F whereas elements with z>15 viz Ca, Z, P and S were determined by PIXE. Accumulations of key elements in the bone and cartilage sections were observed, significant S and Na concentrations being found in the cartilage region particularly in normal tissues. Zn showed enhanced concentrations at the bone-cartilage interface. At a synchrotron facility, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was utilized on a decalcified human femoral head section affected by OA, direct measurements being made of spatial alterations of collagen fibres. The SAXS results showed a slight decrease in the axial periodicity between normal collagen type I and that in diseased tissue in various sites, in contrast with the findings of others.

  19. Elemental and structural studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaabar, W.; Daar, E.; Bunk, O.; Farquharson, M.J.; Laklouk, A.; Bailey, M.; Jeynes, C.; Gundogdu, O.; Bradley, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE) and Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) techniques were employed in the investigation of trace and essential elements distribution in normal and diseased human femoral head sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). PIGE was exploited in the determination of elements of low atomic number z 15 viz Ca, Z, P and S were determined by PIXE. Accumulations of key elements in the bone and cartilage sections were observed, significant S and Na concentrations being found in the cartilage region particularly in normal tissues. Zn showed enhanced concentrations at the bone-cartilage interface. At a synchrotron facility, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was utilized on a decalcified human femoral head section affected by OA, direct measurements being made of spatial alterations of collagen fibres. The SAXS results showed a slight decrease in the axial periodicity between normal collagen type I and that in diseased tissue in various sites, in contrast with the findings of others.

  20. Controlling interface characteristics by adjusting core-shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, H.Y.; Cheng, S.Y.; Sheu, C.I.

    2004-01-01

    Most grain boundary layer ceramics comprise semiconductive/conductive grains and insulated grain boundaries. Such a structure can be theoretically regarded as a shell (grain boundary layer) surrounds a core (conductive or semiconductive grain). The core-shell structure of titanium (Ti)-strontium titanate (ST) is composed of three zones - ST, non-stoichiometric strontium-titanium oxide and Ti, in order from shell to core. It was successfully prepared using a hydrothermal method. The Ti-ST core-shell structure was sintered in a reducing atmosphere and then annealed in air to achieve the metal-insulator-metal structure (MIM structure). The resulting MIM structure, annealed in air, changes with the oxygen stoichiometry of the ST shell (insulator layer) at various temperatures, which is thus used to tune its electrical characteristics. The characteristics exhibit nonlinear behavior. Accordingly, the thickness of the insulator layer can be adjusted in various annealing atmospheres and at various temperatures to develop various interfacial devices, such as varistors, capacitors and thermistors, without the use of complex donor/acceptor doping technology

  1. TEM characterization of invariant line interfaces and structural ledges in a Mo-Si alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, S.Q.; Dahmen, U.; Maloy, S.A.; Heuer, A.H.

    1995-06-01

    Two distinct lath morphologies of Mo 5 Si 3 precipitates observed in MoSi 2 differ in their cross-sectional shape and lattice orientation. Type I laths exhibit a rectangular cross section, with interfaces parallel to low-index planes, while Type II laths are parallelogram-shaped, with their major interface at 13 degree to the Type I precipitate. The corresponding orientation relationships differ by a 1.8 degree rotation around the lath axis. In this study, the difference between the two characteristic morphologies and orientation relationships is shown to be the formation of an invariant line strain for Type II precipitates. On an atomic scale, both interfaces have a terrace and ledge structure but differ in the stacking sequence of interfacial ledges associated with partial dislocations. The structural unit model and the invariant line model predict identical interface geometries which agree closely with the observations

  2. Structure and chemistry of the Si(111)/AlN interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, G.; Couillard, M.; Botton, G. A.; Zhu, D.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the atomic structure and the chemistry of the Si(111)/AlN interface for an AlN film grown at low-temperature (735 °C) by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. A heterogeneous interface is formed from the alternation of crystallographically abrupt and partly amorphous regions. The polarity of the AlN film, along with the projected atomic structure of the crystalline interface, is retrieved using high-angle annular dark field imaging, and a model, based on these experimental observations, is proposed for the bonding at the interface. Electron energy-loss spectrum-imaging, however, also reveals a chemical intermixing, placing our growth conditions at the onset of SiNx interlayer formation.

  3. Lateral strength force of URM structures based on a constitutive model for interface element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Akhaveissy

    Full Text Available This paper presents the numerical implementation of a new proposed interface model for modeling the behavior of mortar joints in masonry walls. Its theoretical framework is fully based on the plasticity theory. The Von Mises criterion is used to simulate the behavior of brick and stone units. The interface laws for contact elements are formulated to simulate the softening behavior of mortar joints under tensile stress; a normal linear cap model is also used to limit compressive stress. The numerical predictions based on the proposed model for the behavior of interface elements correlate very highly with test data. A new explicit formula based on results of proposed interface model is also presented to estimate the strength of unreinforced masonry structures. The closed form solution predicts the ultimate lateral load of unreinforced masonry walls less error percentage than ATC and FEMA-307. Consequently, the proposed closed form solution can be used satisfactorily to analyze unreinforced masonry structures.

  4. Structure and Properties of the Fe/Y2O3 Interface from First Principles Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, Samrat; Stanek, Christopher R.; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2012-01-01

    Fundamentals of radiation damage are: (1) Formation of Frenkel pair (interstitial-vacancy pair) defects in the lattice; (2) Concentration of Frenkel pair defects >>> thermal equilibrium thermodynamic concentration; and (3) The radiation damage response of a material is determined by the fate of these excess Frenkel pair defects in the lattice. The objective is to understand the electronic and atomic structure of Fe/Y 2 O 3 interface and segregation behavior of the alloying elements at the interface. The significance of the results of this report are: (1) Provides a science based approach to design new radiation resistant materials. Obtained two controlling parameters - Dislocation density (composition, orientation relationship) and Oxygen partial pressure; (2) Applicable to any other metal/oxide interfaces (both functional and structural properties at the interface) - (a) Nano Catalysts: Oxide-supported metal catalysts Ni/ZrO 2 , (b) Thermal barrier coatings (Ni/Al 2 O 3 ), (c) Corrosion of metals and alloys.

  5. Wave structure and transfer mechanisms at the interface of liquid films (a bibliographic synthesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spindler, Bertrand.

    1978-10-01

    The flow of a liquid film occurs in many industrial apparatuses. The waves which propagate at the film interface increase the momentum, mass and heat transfer rates of the system. The interface structure is studied; the different patterns of waves with their parameters (shape, amplitude, wavelength, celerity, frequency) and phenomena such as droplet entrainment are examined. An explanation is then given for the increase of transfer rates [fr

  6. Structure Transformation and Coherent Interface in Large Lattice-Mismatched Nanoscale Multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale Al/W multilayers were fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy. Despite the large lattice mismatch and significantly different lattice structures between Al and W, a structural transition from face-centered cubic to body-centered cubic in Al layers was observed when the individual layer thickness was reduced from 5 nm to 1 nm, forming coherent Al/W interfaces. For potential mechanisms underlying the observed structure transition and forming of coherent interfaces, it was suggested that the reduction of interfacial energy and high stresses induced by large lattice-mismatch play a crucial role.

  7. Structure characterization of Ni/NiO and Ti/TiO2 interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamine, Brahim

    1983-01-01

    This research thesis reports the structure characterization of Ni-NiO and Ti-TiO 2 interfaces through an in-situ investigation of thin blade oxidation, of oxide germination and growth, and through a determination of mutual metal/oxide orientation relationships. Thin films of TiO 2 have also been characterized and the study of the influence of vacuum annealing on TiO 2 layer structure and morphology has been attempted. The examination of metal-oxide interface reveals a duplex structure of NiO and TiO 2 layers, and a preferential grain boundary oxidation of the underlying metal [fr

  8. Structure and Sequence Analyses of Clustered Protocadherins Reveal Antiparallel Interactions that Mediate Homophilic Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoludis, John M; Lau, Sze-Yi; Schärfe, Charlotta P I; Marks, Debora S; Weihofen, Wilhelm A; Gaudet, Rachelle

    2015-11-03

    Clustered protocadherin (Pcdh) proteins mediate dendritic self-avoidance in neurons via specific homophilic interactions in their extracellular cadherin (EC) domains. We determined crystal structures of EC1-EC3, containing the homophilic specificity-determining region, of two mouse clustered Pcdh isoforms (PcdhγA1 and PcdhγC3) to investigate the nature of the homophilic interaction. Within the crystal lattices, we observe antiparallel interfaces consistent with a role in trans cell-cell contact. Antiparallel dimerization is supported by evolutionary correlations. Two interfaces, located primarily on EC2-EC3, involve distinctive clustered Pcdh structure and sequence motifs, lack predicted glycosylation sites, and contain residues highly conserved in orthologs but not paralogs, pointing toward their biological significance as homophilic interaction interfaces. These two interfaces are similar yet distinct, reflecting a possible difference in interaction architecture between clustered Pcdh subfamilies. These structures initiate a molecular understanding of clustered Pcdh assemblies that are required to produce functional neuronal networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Is Neural Activity Detected by ERP-Based Brain-Computer Interfaces Task Specific?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus A Wenzel

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs that are based on event-related potentials (ERPs can estimate to which stimulus a user pays particular attention. In typical BCIs, the user silently counts the selected stimulus (which is repeatedly presented among other stimuli in order to focus the attention. The stimulus of interest is then inferred from the electroencephalogram (EEG. Detecting attention allocation implicitly could be also beneficial for human-computer interaction (HCI, because it would allow software to adapt to the user's interest. However, a counting task would be inappropriate for the envisaged implicit application in HCI. Therefore, the question was addressed if the detectable neural activity is specific for silent counting, or if it can be evoked also by other tasks that direct the attention to certain stimuli.Thirteen people performed a silent counting, an arithmetic and a memory task. The tasks required the subjects to pay particular attention to target stimuli of a random color. The stimulus presentation was the same in all three tasks, which allowed a direct comparison of the experimental conditions.Classifiers that were trained to detect the targets in one task, according to patterns present in the EEG signal, could detect targets in all other tasks (irrespective of some task-related differences in the EEG.The neural activity detected by the classifiers is not strictly task specific but can be generalized over tasks and is presumably a result of the attention allocation or of the augmented workload. The results may hold promise for the transfer of classification algorithms from BCI research to implicit relevance detection in HCI.

  10. interfaces of regeneration, structure, diversity and uses of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    Individuals attaining 150 cm and above in height but less than 10 cm in diameter at breast height (DBH) were ... Key words/phrases: Bonga Forest, regeneration, structure, threat, uses. ∗ Author to ... highly dissected plateau, with flat to moderately undulating ... and management of Ethiopian soils is given in. Mesfin Abebe ...

  11. Surface and interface electronic structure: Three year activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    The 3-year activity report covers surface structure and phonon anomalies (surface reconstruction on W(001) and Mo(001), adsorbate lateral ordering, surface Fermi contours and phonon anomalies on Pt(111) and Pd(001)), adsorbate vibrational damping, charge transfer in momentum space: W(011)-K, surface states and resonances (relativistic effects ampersand computations, surface resonances)

  12. Effect of interface/surface stress on the elastic wave band structure of two-dimensional phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Jiwei; Liu, Yongquan; Su, Xianyue

    2012-01-01

    In the present Letter, the multiple scattering theory (MST) for calculating the elastic wave band structure of two-dimensional phononic crystals (PCs) is extended to include the interface/surface stress effect at the nanoscale. The interface/surface elasticity theory is employed to describe the nonclassical boundary conditions at the interface/surface and the elastic Mie scattering matrix embodying the interface/surface stress effect is derived. Using this extended MST, the authors investigate the interface/surface stress effect on the elastic wave band structure of two-dimensional PCs, which is demonstrated to be significant when the characteristic size reduces to nanometers. -- Highlights: ► Multiple scattering theory including the interface/surface stress effect. ► Interface/surface elasticity theory to describe the nonclassical boundary conditions. ► Elastic Mie scattering matrix embodying the interface/surface stress effect. ► Interface/surface stress effect would be significant at the nanoscale.

  13. High Performance Computing - Power Application Programming Interface Specification Version 2.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laros, James H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grant, Ryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Levenhagen, Michael J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Olivier, Stephen Lecler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pedretti, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, H. Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Younge, Andrew J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Measuring and controlling the power and energy consumption of high performance computing systems by various components in the software stack is an active research area. Implementations in lower level software layers are beginning to emerge in some production systems, which is very welcome. To be most effective, a portable interface to measurement and control features would significantly facilitate participation by all levels of the software stack. We present a proposal for a standard power Application Programming Interface (API) that endeavors to cover the entire software space, from generic hardware interfaces to the input from the computer facility manager.

  14. Interface structure and mechanics between graphene and metal substrates: a first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiping; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-12-01

    Graphene is a fascinating material not only for technological applications, but also as a test bed for fundamental insights into condensed matter physics due to its unique two-dimensional structure. One of the most intriguing issues is the understanding of the properties of graphene and various substrate materials. In particular, the interfaces between graphene and metal substrates are of critical importance in applications of graphene in integrated electronics, as thermal materials, and in electromechanical devices. Here we investigate the structure and mechanical interactions at a graphene-metal interface through density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations. We focus on copper (111) and nickel (111) surfaces adhered to a monolayer of graphene, and find that their cohesive energy, strength and electronic structure correlate directly with their atomic geometry. Due to the strong coupling between open d-orbitals, the nickel-graphene interface has a much stronger cohesive energy with graphene than copper. We also find that the interface cohesive energy profile features a well-and-shoulder shape that cannot be captured by simple pair-wise models such as the Lennard-Jones potential. Our results provide a detailed understanding of the interfacial properties of graphene-metal systems, and help to predict the performance of graphene-based nanoelectronics and nanocomposites. The availability of structural and energetic data of graphene-metal interfaces could also be useful for the development of empirical force fields for molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Cohesion strength and atomic structure of W-Cu graded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, C.P.; Fan, J.L.; Gong, H.R., E-mail: gonghr@csu.edu.cn

    2017-04-15

    W-Cu graded interface is a solution to big differences of properties between W and Cu, while the number and composition of graded layers in the literature are quite different. The present first principles calculation reveals that W-rich graded interfaces possess higher strength and lower interface energy than Cu-rich counterparts. It shows that the differences of thermal expansion and Young’s modulus between overlayer and substrate are decisive factors in the design of Cu-rich and W-rich graded interfaces, respectively. A graded structure of W{sub 8}Cu{sub 1}/W{sub 7}Cu{sub 2}/W{sub 6}Cu{sub 3}/Cu{sub 6}W{sub 3}/Cu{sub 8}W{sub 1} is therefore suggested theoretically.

  16. Landau levels in biased graphene structures with monolayer-bilayer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakhani, M.; Zarenia, M.; Vasilopoulos, P.; Ketabi, S. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-09-01

    The electron energy spectrum in monolayer-bilayer-monolayer and in bilayer-monolayer-bilayer graphene structures is investigated and the effects of a perpendicular magnetic field and electric bias are studied. Different types of monolayer-bilayer interfaces are considered as zigzag (ZZ) or armchair (AC) junctions which modify considerably the bulk Landau levels (LLs) when the spectra are plotted as a function of the center coordinate of the cyclotron orbit. Far away from the two interfaces, one obtains the well-known LLs for extended monolayer or bilayer graphene. The LL structure changes significantly at the two interfaces or junctions where the valley degeneracy is lifted for both types of junctions, especially when the distance between them is approximately equal to the magnetic length. Varying the nonuniform bias and the width of this junction-to-junction region in either structure strongly influence the resulting spectra. Significant differences exist between ZZ and AC junctions in both structures. The densities of states (DOSs) for unbiased structures are symmetric in energy whereas those for biased structures are asymmetric. An external bias creates interface LLs in the gaps between the LLs of the unbiased system in which the DOS can be quite small. Such a pattern of LLs can be probed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

  17. Structuring Formal Requirements Specifications for Reuse and Product Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimdahl, Mats P. E.

    2001-01-01

    In this project we have investigated how formal specifications should be structured to allow for requirements reuse, product family engineering, and ease of requirements change, The contributions of this work include (1) a requirements specification methodology specifically targeted for critical avionics applications, (2) guidelines for how to structure state-based specifications to facilitate ease of change and reuse, and (3) examples from the avionics domain demonstrating the proposed approach.

  18. Electronic structure of ferromagnet-insulator interfaces: Fe/MgO and Co/MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, M.

    2007-07-11

    In this thesis the electronic structure of Fe/MgO{sub x} and Co/MgO{sub x} ferromagnet-insulator interfaces, representing material systems which are widely used in magnetic tunnel junctions, is studied by means of spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The photoemission studies focus particularly on the response of the ferromagnetic electronic system in contact with MgO of varying stoichiometries, as this reflects the mechanisms of metal-oxide bonding at real ferromagnet-insulator interfaces. The correlation between chemical bonding and electronic structure formation is analyzed by combining information from core- and valence-band photoemission spectroscopy. The spectral features are compared to band structure calculations, which are performed using the SPR-KKR method. The Fe/MgO and Co/MgO systems are prepared by molecular beam epitaxy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions on well-defined (4 x 6) GaAs(001) substrates. A structural analysis by means of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) reveals their body-centered cubic crystalline structure, whereas the chemical characterization by Auger electron spectroscopy is used to quantify the chemical environment at the sample surfaces. The magnetic analysis, using the magneto-optical Kerr effect, reveals the uniaxial anisotropy of the ferromagnetic layers. A crucial parameter is given by the MgO degree of oxidation, which is addressed by means of core-level spectroscopy and quantified by suitable fitting procedures of the Mg 2p core level. The results of the photoemission experiments show, that the electronic structure of the Fe/MgO and Co/MgO ferromagnet/insulator interfaces and, consequently, the interfacial spin polarization are sensitively controlled by the interface chemistry. In particular, three distinct scenarios are identified: the nearly stoichiometric, the oxygen-deficient and the over-oxidized ferromagnet/MgO interface. Each case is defined by innate characteristics of the electronic structure at

  19. Advanced understanding on electronic structure of molecular semiconductors and their interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Kouki

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the electronic structure of organic semiconductors and their interfaces is critical to optimizing functionalities for electronics applications, by rational chemical design and appropriate combination of device constituents. The unique electronic structure of a molecular solid is characterized as (i) anisotropic electrostatic fields that originate from molecular quadrupoles, (ii) interfacial energy-level lineup governed by simple electrostatics, and (iii) weak intermolecular interactions that make not only structural order but also energy distributions of the frontier orbitals sensitive to atmosphere and interface growth. This article shows an overview on these features with reference to the improved understanding of the orientation-dependent electronic structure, comprehensive mechanisms of molecular doping, and energy-level alignment. Furthermore, the engineering of ionization energy by the control of the electrostatic fields and work function of practical electrodes by contact-induced doping is briefly described for the purpose of highlighting how the electronic structure impacts the performance of organic devices.

  20. Solvent Extraction: Structure of the Liquid-Liquid Interface Containing a Diamide Ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scoppola, Ernesto [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38000 Grenoble France; Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule, UMR 5257 CEA/CNRS/ENSCM/Université Montpellier, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze France; Watkins, Erik B. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38000 Grenoble France; Materials Synthesis and Integrated Devices, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 USA; Campbell, Richard A. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38000 Grenoble France; Konovalov, Oleg [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38430 Grenoble France; Girard, Luc [Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule, UMR 5257 CEA/CNRS/ENSCM/Université Montpellier, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze France; Dufrêche, Jean-Francois [Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule, UMR 5257 CEA/CNRS/ENSCM/Université Montpellier, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze France; Ferru, Geoffroy [Argonne National Labororatory, Lemont IL 60439 USA; Fragneto, Giovanna [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38000 Grenoble France; Diat, Olivier [Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule, UMR 5257 CEA/CNRS/ENSCM/Université Montpellier, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze France

    2016-06-20

    Knowledge of the (supra)molecular structure of an interface that contains amphiphilic ligand molecules is necessary for a full understanding of ion transfer during solvent extraction. Even if molecular dynamics already yield some insight in the molecular configurations in solution, hardly any experimental data giving access to distributions of both extractant molecules and ions at the liquid–liquid interface exist. Here, the combined application of X-ray and neutron reflectivity measurements represents a key milestone in the deduction of the interfacial structure and potential with respect to two different lipophilic ligands. Indeed, we show for the first time that hard trivalent cations can be repelled or attracted by the extractant-enriched interface according to the nature of the ligand.

  1. A first principles study of adhesion and electronic structure at Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yangzhen; Xing, Jiandong; Li, Yefei, E-mail: yefeili@126.com; Sun, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • The surface energy of graphite (0001) and Fe (110) has been calculated and the number of layers of graphite slab and Fe slab has been estimated. • The work of adhesion of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface with different interfacial separation d{sub 0} (1.7–3 Å) has been systematically discussed. • The total electron density and electron density difference of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) are used to study the bonding characteristics. • The Interfacial energy and fracture toughness of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) are estimated. - Abstract: Using first–principles calculations, we discuss the bulk properties of bcc Fe and graphite and that of the surface, the work of adhesion, and the electronic structure of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface. In this study, the experimental results of the bulk properties of bcc Fe and graphite reveal that our adopted parameters are reliable. Moreover, the results of surface energy demonstrate that nine atomic layers of graphite (0001) and five atomic layers of Fe (110) exhibit bulk–like interiors. The lattice mismatch of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface is about 6%. The results also exhibit that the Fe atom residing on top of the second layer of graphite slab (HCP structure) is the preferred stacking sequence. The work of adhesion (W{sub ad}) of the optimized Fe/graphite interface of HCP structure is 1.36 J/m{sup 2}. Electronic structures indicate that the bonding characteristics are a mixture of covalent and ionic bonds in the HCP interface. Moreover, the magnetic moment of atoms at the interface was studied using the spin polarized density of states.

  2. High Performance Computing - Power Application Programming Interface Specification Version 1.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laros III, James H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); DeBonis, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grant, Ryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kelly, Suzanne M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Levenhagen, Michael J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Olivier, Stephen Lecler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pedretti, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Measuring and controlling the power and energy consumption of high performance computing systems by various components in the software stack is an active research area [13, 3, 5, 10, 4, 21, 19, 16, 7, 17, 20, 18, 11, 1, 6, 14, 12]. Implementations in lower level software layers are beginning to emerge in some production systems, which is very welcome. To be most effective, a portable interface to measurement and control features would significantly facilitate participation by all levels of the software stack. We present a proposal for a standard power Application Programming Interface (API) that endeavors to cover the entire software space, from generic hardware interfaces to the input from the computer facility manager.

  3. Atomic structure and orientation relations of interfaces between Ag and ZnO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, W.P.; Hosson, de J.Th.M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations of Ag-ZnO interfaces, produced by internal oxidation of an Ag-Zn alloy. ZnO precipitates with the wurtzite structure were found exhibiting mainly one orientation relation with the Ag matrix. However, closely related ORs were found, rotated by small

  4. Allocating fuel breaks to optimally protect structures in the wildland-urban interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avi Bar-Massada; Volker C. Radeloff; Susan I. Stewart

    2011-01-01

    Wildland fire is a major concern in the wildland-urban interface (WUI), where human structures intermingle with wildland vegetation. Reducing wildfire risk in the WUI is more complicated than in wildland areas, owing to interactions between spatial patterns of housing and wildland fuels. Fuel treatments are commonly applied in wildlands surrounding WUI communities....

  5. Mesoscopic multiphase structures and the interfaces of block and graft copolymers in bulk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Yushu

    1996-01-01

    Microphase-separated structures of copolymers with various architectures and their polymer/polymer interfaces were studied. They are SP diblock, PSP triblock, and SPP graft copolymers, where S and P denote polystyrene and poly(2-vinylpyridine), respectively. Morphological observations were carried out by means of transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. Chain dimensions of component polymers were measured by small-angle neutron scattering and microphase-separated interfaces were observed by neutron reflectivity measurements using deuterium-labeled samples. It was clarified that morphological phase transitions among thermodynamically equilibrium structures for SP diblock and PSP triblock copolymers occur at almost the same compositions; however, those of SPP graft copolymers tend to occur at higher volume fraction of polystyrene, φ s , than those for block copolymers. As for alternating lamellar structures it turned out to be clear that lamellar domain spacings, D's, were scaled as the 2/3 power of the molecular weight of polymers irrespective of their architectures. S block chains of SP diblock and PSP triblock copolymers in lamellar structures were both confirmed to be deformed toward the direction perpendicular to the lamellar interfaces, but it revealed that their volumes were preserved. Further, S/P interfacial thicknesses of SP and PSP were essentially the same to each other and the values defined as the FWHM of the error functions which express the segment density distributions of the interfaces were determined to be about 4 nm. (author)

  6. Atomic-scale structures of interfaces between phyllosilicate edges and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.; Lu, X.; Meijer, E.J.; Wang, R.; Zhou, H.

    2012-01-01

    We report first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) studies on the structures of interfaces between phyllosilicate edges and water. Using FPMD, the substrates and solvents are simulated at the same first-principles level, and the thermal motions are sampled via molecular dynamics. Both the neutral

  7. Detection and characterization of usability problems in structured data entry interfaces in dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walji, M.F.; Kalenderian, E.; Tran, D.; Kookal, K.K.; Nguyen, V.; Tokede, O.; White, J.M.; Vaderhobli, R.; Ramoni, R.; Stark, P.C.; Kimmes, N.S.; Schoonheim-Klein, M.E.; Patel, V.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor usability is one of the major barriers for optimally using electronic health records (EHRs). Dentists are increasingly adopting EHRs, and are using structured data entry interfaces to enter data such that the data can be easily retrieved and exchanged. Until recently, dentists have

  8. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of PTPN12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available PTPN12 is an important tumor suppressor that plays critical roles in various physiological processes. However, the molecular basis underlying the substrate specificity of PTPN12 remains uncertain. Here, enzymological and crystallographic studies have enabled us to identify two distinct structural features that are crucial determinants of PTPN12 substrate specificity: the pY+1 site binding pocket and specific basic charged residues along its surface loops. Key structurally plastic regions and specific residues in PTPN12 enabled recognition of different HER2 phosphorylation sites and regulated specific PTPN12 functions. In addition, the structure of PTPN12 revealed a CDK2 phosphorylation site in a specific PTPN12 loop. Taken together, our results not only provide the working mechanisms of PTPN12 for desphosphorylation of its substrates but will also help in designing specific inhibitors of PTPN12.

  9. Adaptive contact elements for three-dimensional fluid-structure interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element method is developed for treating the mechanics of contact between two deformable bodies which occurs, for example, at fluid-structure interfaces. The method uses a family of adaptive contact elements, which are based upon the penalty method, to handle all of the possible contact configurations that can occur between the discretized contacting bodies. The contact element's nodal connectivity is allowed to change during the computations in order to accommodate finite sliding. The infusion of these elements in the interface results in satisfying the force equilibrium condition during contact. The methodology has been implemented into the NEPTUNE code. Results are presented for an illustrative problem

  10. Adaptive contact elements for three-dimensional fluid-structure interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element method is developed for treating the mechanics of contact between two deformable bodies which occurs, for example, at fluid-structure interfaces. The method uses a family of adaptive contact elements, which are based upon the penalty method, to handle all of the possible contact configurations that can occur between the discretized contacting bodies. The contact element's nodal connectivity is allowed to change during the computations in order to accommodate finite sliding. The infusion of these elements in the interface results in satisfying the force equilibrium condition during contact. The methodology has been implemented into the NEPTUNE code. Results are presented for an illustrative problem.

  11. Electronic structure and STM imaging of the KBr-InSb interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciochoń, Piotr, E-mail: ciochon.piotr@gmail.com; Olszowska, Natalia; Kołodziej, Jacek J.

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The structure of the InSb (001) surface covered with thin KBr layers is reported. • KBr growth does not perturb strongly the structure of a clean InSb surface. • A model of the system with KBr treated as a thin dielectric layer is proposed. • The atomic structure of the KBr-InSb interface is directly imaged using STM. - Abstract: We study the properties of the InSb (001) surface covered with ultrathin KBr films, with a thickness of 1–4 ML. KBr deposition does not strongly perturb the crystallographic structure of the InSb surface and the electronic structure of the substrate also remains unaffected by the overlayer. A simple model of the studied system is proposed, in which a thin KBr layer is treated as a dielectric film, modifying potential barrier for the electrons tunneling to/from the InSb substrate. Apparent step heights on the KBr film, measured using scanning tunneling microscope (STM), agree well with the predictions of the model and the atomically-resolved STM images show the structure of the InSb-KBr interface. Our results demonstrate that STM may be used as a tool for investigations of the semiconductor–insulator interfaces.

  12. 2D-HB-Network at the air-water interface: A structural and dynamical characterization by means of ab initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Simone; Serva, Alessandra; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre

    2018-05-01

    Following our previous work where the existence of a special 2-Dimensional H-Bond (2D-HB)-Network was revealed at the air-water interface [S. Pezzotti et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 8, 3133 (2017)], we provide here a full structural and dynamical characterization of this specific arrangement by means of both Density Functional Theory based and Force Field based molecular dynamics simulations. We show in particular that water at the interface with air reconstructs to maximize H-Bonds formed between interfacial molecules, which leads to the formation of an extended and non-interrupted 2-Dimensional H-Bond structure involving on average ˜90% of water molecules at the interface. We also show that the existence of such an extended structure, composed of H-Bonds all oriented parallel to the surface, constrains the reorientional dynamics of water that is hence slower at the interface than in the bulk. The structure and dynamics of the 2D-HB-Network provide new elements to possibly rationalize several specific properties of the air-water interface, such as water surface tension, anisotropic reorientation of interfacial water under an external field, and proton hopping.

  13. In-Situ TEM Study of Interface Sliding and Migration in an Ultrafine Lamellar Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, L M

    2005-12-06

    The instability of interfaces in an ultrafine TiAl-({gamma})/Ti{sub 3}Al-({alpha}{sub 2}) lamellar structure by straining at room temperature has been investigated using in-situ straining techniques performed in a transmission electron microscope. The purpose of this study is to obtain experimental evidence to support the creep mechanisms based upon the interface sliding in association with a cooperative movement of interfacial dislocations previously proposed to interpret the nearly linear creep behavior observed from ultrafine lamellar TiAl alloys. The results have revealed that both the sliding and migration of lamellar interfaces can take place simultaneously as a result of the cooperative movement of interfacial dislocations.

  14. Effects of graphene defect on electronic structures of its interface with organic semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qing-Dan; Wang, Chundong; Mo, Hin-Wai; Lo, Ming-Fai; Yuen, Muk Fung; Ng, Tsz-Wai, E-mail: tszwaing@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: apcslee@cityu.edu.hk; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Lee, Chun-Sing, E-mail: tszwaing@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: apcslee@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Dou, Wei-Dong [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Physics Department, Shaoxing University, Shaoxing 312000 (China); Tsang, Sai-Wing [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2015-03-30

    Electronic structures of copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F{sub 16}CuPc)/graphene with different defect density were studied with ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy. We showed that the charge transfer interaction and charge flow direction can be interestingly tuned by controlling the defect density of graphene through time-controlled H{sub 2} plasma treatment. By increasing the treatment time of H{sub 2} plasma from 30 s to 5 min, both the interface surface dipole and the electron transporting barrier at F{sub 16}CuPc/graphene interface are significantly reduced from 0.86 to 0.56 eV and 0.71 to 0.29 eV, respectively. These results suggested that graphene's defect control is a simple approach for tuning electronic properties of organic/graphene interfaces.

  15. Solid-melt interface structure and growth of Cu alloy single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimitsu, Hiroshi; Kamada, Kohji.

    1983-01-01

    Crystal-melt interface behavior during the growth of Cu-base solid solutions by the Bridgman method is discussed on the basis of experimental evidence obtained by neutron diffraction topography. Advantages of neutron diffraction topography for the characterization of large single crystals, such as dealt with in this paper, are emphasized. Evidence was odserved of extremely regular crystal growth along directions, irrespective of the macroscopic growth direction. This contrasts with the previously believed (110) normal growth which is a conclusion of growth theory based on molecular kinetics at the solid-melt interface. In consequence, we believe that the kinetics at the interface is a minor factor in the meltgrowth of metal single crystals. Revised melt-growth theory should include both the growth and the formation of the regular structure as evidenced by neutron diffraction topography. (author)

  16. The structure of the solid-liquid interface: atomic size effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geysermans, P.; Pontikis, V.

    2002-01-01

    The atomic structure of the solid-liquid heterophase interface was investigated by using molecular dynamics. Two kinds of systems were studied; the first one was crystalline copper with (100) and (111) surface terminations in contact with liquid aluminium, while in the second one the interface was modelled by two systems in contact made of Lennard-Jones particles with different size (σ) and energy (ε) parameters. We found that at the interface the liquid was layered whatever the crystallographic orientation of the surface. The layering of the liquid is still preserved when the ratio of particles sites (χ=σ 1 /σ 2 ) changes while an epitaxial relationship is always found between the crystal and the first liquid layer. The average density of the latter is closely related to the χ value. (authors)

  17. Energetic, structural and electronic properties of metal vacancies in strained AlN/GaN interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kioseoglou, J; Pontikis, V; Komninou, Ph; Pavloudis, Th; Chen, J; Karakostas, Th

    2015-04-01

    AlN/GaN heterostructures have been studied using density-functional pseudopotential calculations yielding the formation energies of metal vacancies under the influence of local interfacial strains, the associated charge distribution and the energies of vacancy-induced electronic states. Interfaces are built normal to the polar direction of the wurtzite structure by joining two single crystals of AlN and GaN that are a few atomic layers thick; thus, periodic boundary conditions generate two distinct heterophase interfaces. We show that the formation energy of vacancies is a function of their distance from the interfaces: the vacancy-interface interaction is found repulsive or attractive, depending on the type of the interface. When the interaction is attractive, the vacancy formation energy decreases with increasing the associated electric charge, and hence the equilibrium vacancy concentration at the interface is greater. This finding can reveal the well-known morphological differences existing between the two types of investigated interfaces. Moreover, we found that the electric charge is strongly localized around the Ga vacancy, while in the case of Al vacancies is almost uniformly distributed throughout the AlN/GaN heterostructure. Crucially, for the applications of heterostructures, metal vacancies introduce deep states in the calculated bandgap at energy levels from 0.5 to 1 eV above the valence band maximum (VBM). It is, therefore, predicted that vacancies could initiate 'green luminescence' i.e. light emission in the energy range of 2.5 eV stemming from electronic transitions between these extra levels, and the conduction band, or energy levels, due to shallow donors.

  18. Structure and chemical composition of layers adsorbed at interfaces with champagne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguié-Béghin, V; Adriaensen, Y; Péron, N; Valade, M; Rouxhet, P; Douillard, R

    2009-11-11

    The structure and the chemical composition of the layer adsorbed at interfaces involving champagne have been investigated using native champagne, as well as ultrafiltrate (UFch) and ultraconcentrate (UCch) obtained by ultrafiltration with a 10(4) nominal molar mass cutoff. The layer adsorbed at the air/liquid interface was examined by surface tension and ellipsometry kinetic measurements. Brewster angle microscopy demonstrated that the layer formed on polystyrene by adsorption or drop evaporation was heterogeneous, with a domain structure presenting similarities with the layer adsorbed at the air/liquid interface. The surface chemical composition of polystyrene with the adlayer was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The contribution of champagne constituents varied according to the liquid (native, UFch, and UCch) and to the procedure of adlayer formation (evaporation, adsorption, and adsorption + rinsing). However, their chemical composition was not significantly influenced either by ultrafiltration or by the procedure of deposition on polystyrene. Modeling this composition in terms of classes of model compounds gave approximately 35% (w/w) of proteins and 65% (w/w) of polysaccharides. In the adlayer, the carboxyl groups or esters represent about 18% of carbon due to nonpolypeptidic compounds, indicating the presence of either uronic acids in the complex structure of pectic polysaccharides or of polyphenolic esters. This structural and chemical information and its relationship with the experimental procedures indicate that proteins alone cannot be used as a realistic model for the macromolecules forming the adsorption layer of champagne. Polysaccharides, the other major macromolecular components of champagne wine, are assembled with proteins at the interfaces, in agreement with the heterogeneous character of the adsorbed layer at interfaces.

  19. Conforming to interface structured adaptive mesh refinement: 3D algorithm and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Anand; Soghrati, Soheil

    2018-03-01

    A new non-iterative mesh generation algorithm named conforming to interface structured adaptive mesh refinement (CISAMR) is introduced for creating 3D finite element models of problems with complex geometries. CISAMR transforms a structured mesh composed of tetrahedral elements into a conforming mesh with low element aspect ratios. The construction of the mesh begins with the structured adaptive mesh refinement of elements in the vicinity of material interfaces. An r-adaptivity algorithm is then employed to relocate selected nodes of nonconforming elements, followed by face-swapping a small fraction of them to eliminate tetrahedrons with high aspect ratios. The final conforming mesh is constructed by sub-tetrahedralizing remaining nonconforming elements, as well as tetrahedrons with hanging nodes. In addition to studying the convergence and analyzing element-wise errors in meshes generated using CISAMR, several example problems are presented to show the ability of this method for modeling 3D problems with intricate morphologies.

  20. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...... significant source of design errors. Awide range of interface specifications are possible, the simplest form is a syntactical check of parameter types.However, today it is possible to do more sophisticated forms involving semantic checks....

  1. Crystalline oxides on semiconductors: A structural transition of the interface phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, F. J.; Buongiorno-Nardelli, Marco; Billman, C. A.; McKee, R. A.

    2004-03-01

    The growth of crystalline oxides on silicon is facilitated by the preparation of a surface phase of alkaline earth silicide. We describe how the surface phase serves as a precursor of the final interface phase using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and density functional theory (DFT). RHEED intensity oscillations of the growth of BaSrO show layer-by-layer build up of the oxide on the interface. The 2x1 symmetry of the surface precursor persists up to 3 ML BaSrO coverage at which point a 1x1 pattern characteristic of the rock-salt structure of BaSrO is observed. Prior to 3 ML growth of alkaline earth oxide, DFT calculations and RHEED show that the surface precursor persists as the interface phase and induces large displacements in the growing oxide layer away from the rock-salt structure and having a 2x1 symmetry. These distortions of the rock-salt structure are energetically unfavorable and become more unfavorable as the oxide thickness increases. At 3 ML, the stability of the rock-salt structure drives a structural transformation of the film and the interface phase to a structure that is distinct from the surface precursor. Research sponsored jointly by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC and at the University of Tennessee under contract DE-FG02-01ER45937. Calculations have been performed on CCS supercomputers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  2. Structure and Properties of the Fe/Y2O3 Interface from First Principles Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Samrat [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-31

    Fundamentals of radiation damage are: (1) Formation of Frenkel pair (interstitial-vacancy pair) defects in the lattice; (2) Concentration of Frenkel pair defects >>> thermal equilibrium thermodynamic concentration; and (3) The radiation damage response of a material is determined by the fate of these excess Frenkel pair defects in the lattice. The objective is to understand the electronic and atomic structure of Fe/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface and segregation behavior of the alloying elements at the interface. The significance of the results of this report are: (1) Provides a science based approach to design new radiation resistant materials. Obtained two controlling parameters - Dislocation density (composition, orientation relationship) and Oxygen partial pressure; (2) Applicable to any other metal/oxide interfaces (both functional and structural properties at the interface) - (a) Nano Catalysts: Oxide-supported metal catalysts Ni/ZrO{sub 2}, (b) Thermal barrier coatings (Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), (c) Corrosion of metals and alloys.

  3. Structure of the Buried Metal-Molecule Interface in Organic Thin Film Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Rein; Sørensen, Thomas Just; Glyvradal, Magni

    2009-01-01

    By use of specular X-ray reflectivity (XR) the structure of a metal-covered organic thin film device is measured with angstrom resolution. The model system is a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film, sandwiched between a silicon substrate and a top electrode consisting of 25 Å titanium and 100 Å aluminum....... By comparison of XR data for the five-layer Pb2+ arachidate LB film before and after vapor deposition of the Ti/Al top electrode, a detailed account of the structural damage to the organic film at the buried metal-molecule interface is obtained. We find that the organized structure of the two topmost LB layers...

  4. Aqueous turbulence structure immediately adjacent to the air - water interface and interfacial gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binbin

    Air-sea interaction and the interfacial exchange of gas across the air-water interface are of great importance in coupled atmospheric-oceanic environmental systems. Aqueous turbulence structure immediately adjacent to the air-water interface is the combined result of wind, surface waves, currents and other environmental forces and plays a key role in energy budgets, gas fluxes and hence the global climate system. However, the quantification of turbulence structure sufficiently close to the air-water interface is extremely difficult. The physical relationship between interfacial gas exchange and near surface turbulence remains insufficiently investigated. This dissertation aims to measure turbulence in situ in a complex environmental forcing system on Lake Michigan and to reveal the relationship between turbulent statistics and the CO2 flux across the air-water interface. The major objective of this dissertation is to investigate the physical control of the interfacial gas exchange and to provide a universal parameterization of gas transfer velocity from environmental factors, as well as to propose a mechanistic model for the global CO2 flux that can be applied in three dimensional climate-ocean models. Firstly, this dissertation presents an advanced measurement instrument, an in situ free floating Particle Image Velocimetry (FPIV) system, designed and developed to investigate the small scale turbulence structure immediately below the air-water interface. Description of hardware components, design of the system, measurement theory, data analysis procedure and estimation of measurement error were provided. Secondly, with the FPIV system, statistics of small scale turbulence immediately below the air-water interface were investigated under a variety of environmental conditions. One dimensional wave-number spectrum and structure function sufficiently close to the water surface were examined. The vertical profiles of turbulent dissipation rate were intensively studied

  5. Role of wall-attached structures in the interface of the quiescent core region in turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jongmin; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-11-01

    The effects of low- and high-speed structures on the interface of the quiescent core region are explored using direct numerical simulation data of turbulent pipe flow. The quiescent core region is a uniform momentum zone located at the center of the pipe flow, which contains the highest streamwise momentum with a low level of turbulence. The interface of the quiescent core region can be identified from the probability density function of the streamwise modal velocity. In the vicinity of the interface of the quiescent core region, the streamwise velocity changes abruptly. The abrupt jump in velocity causes an increase of the velocity gradient. The interface of the quiescent core region is similar to the laminar superlayer in turbulent/non-turbulent interface. The interface of the quiescent core region contains the low- and high-speed structures. They can be classified into wall-attached and detached structures depending on the distance between the structures and the wall. The influence of the detached structures accounted for most of the number of detected structures is negligible due to its small volume. Conversely, the wall-attached structures adjacent to the interface have a huge influence on the statistical amount of the interface, such as entrainment characteristics. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2017-013369) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  6. Silicon Σ13(5 0 1) grain boundary interface structure determined by bicrystal Bragg rod X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, P.B.; Rhead, S.; Roy, M.; Nicklin, C.L.; Rawle, J.L.; Norris, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic structure of the silicon Σ13(5 0 1) symmetric tilt grain boundary interface has been determined using Bragg rod X-ray scattering. In contrast to conventional structural studies of grain boundary structure using transmission electron microscopy, this approach allows the non-destructive measurement of macroscopic samples. The interface was found to have a single structure that is fully fourfold coordinated. X-ray diffraction data were measured at Beamline I07 at the Diamond Light Source

  7. An investigation of the fluid-structure interaction of piston/cylinder interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Matteo

    The piston/cylinder lubricating interface represents one of the most critical design elements of axial piston machines. Being a pure hydrodynamic bearing, the piston/cylinder interface fulfills simultaneously a bearing and sealing function under oscillating load conditions. Operating in an elastohydrodynamic lubrication regime, it also represents one of the main sources of power loss due to viscous friction and leakage flow. An accurate prediction of the time changing tribological interface characteristics in terms of fluid film thickness, dynamic pressure field, load carrying ability and energy dissipation is necessary to create more efficient interface designs. The aim of this work is to deepen the understanding of the main physical phenomena defining the piston/cylinder fluid film and to discover the impact of surface elastic deformations and heat transfer on the interface behavior. For this purpose, a unique fully coupled multi-body dynamics model has been developed to capture the complex fluid-structure interaction phenomena affecting the non-isothermal fluid film conditions. The model considers the squeeze film effect due to the piston micro-motion and the change in fluid film thickness due to the solid boundaries elastic deformations caused by the fluid film pressure and by the thermal strain. The model has been verified comparing the numerical results with measurements taken on special designed test pumps. The fluid film calculated dynamic pressure and temperature fields have been compared. Further validation has been accomplished comparing piston/cylinder axial viscous friction forces with measured data. The model has been used to study the piston/cylinder interface behavior of an existing axial piston unit operating at high load conditions. Numerical results are presented in this thesis.

  8. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-21

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization.

  9. Interface engineering in inorganic hybrid structures towards improved photocatalysis (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yujie

    2016-10-01

    Designing new photocatalytic materials for improving photoconversion efficiency is a promising route to alleviate the steadily worsening environmental issues and energy crisis. Despite the invention of a large number of catalytic materials with well-defined structures, their overall efficiency in photocatalysis is still quite limited as the three key steps - light harvesting, charge generation and separation, and charge transfer to surface for redox reactions - have not been substantially improved. To improve each step in the complex process, there is a major trend to develop materials based on inorganic hybrid structures. In this case, interface engineering holds the promise for boosting the overall efficiency, given the key roles of interface structures in charge and energy transfer. In this talk, I will demonstrate several different approaches to designing inorganic hybrid structures with improved photocatalytic performance via interface engineering. The typical demonstrations include semiconductor-plasmonics systems for broad-spectrum light harvesting, metal-semiconductor interfaces for improved charge separation, semiconductor-MOF (metal-organic framework) configurations for activated surface reactions. It is anticipated that this series of works open a new window to rationally designing inorganic hybrid materials for photo-induced applications. References: (1) Bai, S.; Yang, L.; Wang, C.; Lin, Y.; Lu, J.; Jiang, J. and Xiong, Y.*, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 54, 14810-14814 (2015). (2) Bai, S.; Jiang, J.; Zhang, Q. and Xiong, Y.*, Chem. Soc. Rev. 44, 2893-2939 (2015). (3) Bai, S.; Li, X.; Kong, Q.; Long, R.; Wang, C.; Jiang, J. and Xiong, Y.*, Adv. Mater. 27, 3444-3452 (2015). (4) Bai, S.; Ge, J.; Wang, L.; Gong, M.; Deng, M.; Kong, Q.; Song, L.; Jiang, J.;* Zhang, Q.;* Luo, Y.; Xie, Y. and Xiong, Y.*, Adv. Mater. 26, 5689-5695 (2014). (5) Li, R.; Hu, J.; Deng, M.; Wang, H.; Wang, X.; Hu, Y.; Jiang, H. L.; Jiang, J.;* Zhang, Q.;* Xie, Y. and Xiong, Y.*, Adv. Mater

  10. Grasp specific and user friendly interface design for myoelectric hand prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Alireza; Lavranos, Jim; Howe, Rob; Choong, Peter; Oetomo, Denny

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the design and characterisation of a hand prosthesis and its user interface, focusing on performing the most commonly used grasps in activities of daily living (ADLs). Since the operation of a multi-articulated powered hand prosthesis is difficult to learn and master, there is a significant rate of abandonment by amputees in preference for simpler devices. In choosing so, amputees chose to live with fewer features in their prosthesis that would more reliably perform the basic operations. In this paper, we look simultaneously at a hand prosthesis design method that aims for a small number of grasps, a low complexity user interface and an alternative method to the current use of EMG as a preshape selection method through the use of a simple button; to enable amputees to get to and execute the intended hand movements intuitively, quickly and reliably. An experiment is reported at the end of the paper comparing the speed and accuracy with which able-bodied naive subjects are able to select the intended preshapes through the use of a simplified EMG method and a simple button. It is shown that the button was significantly superior in the speed of successful task completion and marginally superior in accuracy (success of first attempt).

  11. Correlating electronic and geometric structures of organic films and interfaces by means of synchrotron radiation based techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structure of organic thin films and interfaces plays a crucial role in the performance of optoelectronic devices using organic semiconductors, and is seriously dominated by the geometric film/interface structure due to the anisotropic spatial distribution of molecular orbitals. This paper briefly reviews the recent progress of the examination of correlating electronic structure and geometric structure of archetypal organic semiconductor thin films and interfaces by using spectroscopic experiments with synchrotron radiation such as angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray standing wave. (author)

  12. Probing alpha-helical and beta-sheet structures of peptides at solid/liquid interfaces with SFG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Wang, Jie; Sniadecki, Jason J; Even, Mark A; Chen, Zhan

    2005-03-29

    We demonstrated that sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy can distinguish different secondary structures of proteins or peptides adsorbed at solid/liquid interfaces. The SFG spectrum for tachyplesin I at the polystyrene (PS)/solution interface has a fingerprint peak corresponding to the B1/B3 mode of the antiparallel beta-sheet. This peak disappeared upon the addition of dithiothreitol, which can disrupt the beta-sheet structure. The SFG spectrum indicative of the MSI594 alpha-helical structure was observed at the PS/MSI594 solution interface. This research validates SFG as a powerful technique for revealing detailed secondary structures of interfacial proteins and peptides.

  13. Structural basis for IL-1α recognition by a modified DNA aptamer that specifically inhibits IL-1α signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gelinas, Amy D.; von Carlowitz, Ira; Janjic, Nebojsa; Pyle, Anna Marie (Yale); (SomaLogic)

    2017-10-09

    IL-1α is an essential cytokine that contributes to inflammatory responses and is implicated in various forms of pathogenesis and cancer. Here we report a naphthyl modified DNA aptamer that specifically binds IL-1α and inhibits its signaling pathway. By solving the crystal structure of the IL-1α/aptamer, we provide a high-resolution structure of this critical cytokine and we reveal its functional interaction interface with high-affinity ligands. The non-helical aptamer, which represents a highly compact nucleic acid structure, contains a wealth of new conformational features, including an unknown form of G-quadruplex. The IL-1α/aptamer interface is composed of unusual polar and hydrophobic elements, along with an elaborate hydrogen bonding network that is mediated by sodium ion. IL-1α uses the same interface to interact with both the aptamer and its cognate receptor IL-1RI, thereby suggesting a novel route to immunomodulatory therapeutics.

  14. Structural and mechanical design of tissue interfaces in the giant reed Arundo donax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüggeberg, Markus; Burgert, Ingo; Speck, Thomas

    2010-03-06

    The culms of the giant reed Arundo donax represent slender tube-like structures. Several nodes along the culm, a ring of sclerenchymatous fibres in the periphery of the culm wall and numerous isolated vascular bundles enclosed by fibre rings in the culm wall function as stiffening elements. The bundles are embedded in lignified parenchyma. Micromechanical analysis indicated differences in stiffness between the individual tissues of more than one order of magnitude. In case of abrupt transitions in stiffness at the interfaces, stress discontinuities arise under dynamic loads. This eventually leads to critical shear stresses at cell ends, and culm failure may be initiated at these points. Pronounced mechanical differences between individual tissues can be compromised by gradual transitions at their interfaces. Ultrastructural and spectroscopic investigations with high spatial resolution revealed a gradual transition of cell parameters (cell wall area fraction and cell length). However, cell wall parameters (cellulose microfibril angle and lignin content) showed abrupt transitions or remained almost constant across the interfaces between various tissues. The design principles found at the interfaces between tissues in the culm walls of A. donax are discussed as an adaptation strategy to mechanical loads at different levels of hierarchy.

  15. Structured Additive Regression Models: An R Interface to BayesX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Umlauf

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Structured additive regression (STAR models provide a flexible framework for model- ing possible nonlinear effects of covariates: They contain the well established frameworks of generalized linear models and generalized additive models as special cases but also allow a wider class of effects, e.g., for geographical or spatio-temporal data, allowing for specification of complex and realistic models. BayesX is standalone software package providing software for fitting general class of STAR models. Based on a comprehensive open-source regression toolbox written in C++, BayesX uses Bayesian inference for estimating STAR models based on Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation techniques, a mixed model representation of STAR models, or stepwise regression techniques combining penalized least squares estimation with model selection. BayesX not only covers models for responses from univariate exponential families, but also models from less-standard regression situations such as models for multi-categorical responses with either ordered or unordered categories, continuous time survival data, or continuous time multi-state models. This paper presents a new fully interactive R interface to BayesX: the R package R2BayesX. With the new package, STAR models can be conveniently specified using Rs formula language (with some extended terms, fitted using the BayesX binary, represented in R with objects of suitable classes, and finally printed/summarized/plotted. This makes BayesX much more accessible to users familiar with R and adds extensive graphics capabilities for visualizing fitted STAR models. Furthermore, R2BayesX complements the already impressive capabilities for semiparametric regression in R by a comprehensive toolbox comprising in particular more complex response types and alternative inferential procedures such as simulation-based Bayesian inference.

  16. Lattice structures and electronic properties of MO/MoSe2 interface from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Fu-Ling; Xue, Hong-Tao; Lu, Wen-Jiang; Liu, Jiang-Fei; Huang, Min

    2015-02-01

    Using first-principles plane-wave calculations within density functional theory, we theoretically studied the atomic structure, bonding energy and electronic properties of the perfect Mo (110)/MoSe2 (100) interface with a lattice mismatch less than 4.2%. Compared with the perfect structure, the interface is somewhat relaxed, and its atomic positions and bond lengths change slightly. The calculated interface bonding energy is about -1.2 J/m2, indicating that this interface is very stable. The MoSe2 layer on the interface has some interface states near the Fermi level, the interface states are mainly caused by Mo 4d orbitals, while the Se atom almost have no contribution. On the interface, Mo-5s and Se-4p orbitals hybridize at about -6.5 to -5.0 eV, and Mo-4d and Se-4p orbitals hybridize at about -5.0 to -1.0 eV. These hybridizations greatly improve the bonding ability of Mo and Se atom in the interface. By Bader charge analysis, we find electron redistribution near the interface which promotes the bonding of the Mo and MoSe2 layer.

  17. Multiscale mechanics of hierarchical structure/property relationships in calcified tissues and tissue/material interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, J. Lawrence; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette; Wang, Yong; Bumrerraj, Sauwanan; Nomura, Tsutomu; Eppell, Steven J.; Tabib-Azar, Massood

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a review plus new data that describes the role hierarchical nanostructural properties play in developing an understanding of the effect of scale on the material properties (chemical, elastic and electrical) of calcified tissues as well as the interfaces that form between such tissues and biomaterials. Both nanostructural and microstructural properties will be considered starting with the size and shape of the apatitic mineralites in both young and mature bovine bone. Microstructural properties for human dentin and cortical and trabecular bone will be considered. These separate sets of data will be combined mathematically to advance the effects of scale on the modeling of these tissues and the tissue/biomaterial interfaces as hierarchical material/structural composites. Interfacial structure and properties to be considered in greatest detail will be that of the dentin/adhesive (d/a) interface, which presents a clear example of examining all three material properties, (chemical, elastic and electrical). In this case, finite element modeling (FEA) was based on the actual measured values of the structure and elastic properties of the materials comprising the d/a interface; this combination provides insight into factors and mechanisms that contribute to premature failure of dental composite fillings. At present, there are more elastic property data obtained by microstructural measurements, especially high frequency ultrasonic wave propagation (UWP) and scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) techniques. However, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoindentation (NI) of cortical and trabecular bone and the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) among others have become available allowing correlation of the nanostructural level measurements with those made on the microstructural level

  18. Interfaces of nuclear structure studies-decay vs. in-beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grawe, H.; Gorska, M.; Hu, Z.; Roeckl, E.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Fahlander, C.; Rykaczewski, K.

    1999-05-01

    The common interface of β-decay and particle-decay experiments and in-beam studies following fusion, relativistic fission and projectile fragmentation is defined by the search for the best way to extract nuclear structure information. For a few examples selected from the exotic regions of nuclei around 100 Sn and between 68 Ni and 78 Ni it is demonstrated, that complementary spectroscopic data extracted by various methods lead to an understanding of the shell structure at these keypoints of the nuclidic chart. (orig.)

  19. Dye-sensitized solar cells: Atomic scale investigation of interface structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Wei; Zhang Fan; Meng Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) research is reviewed, focusing on atomic-scale investigations of the interface electronic structures and dynamical processes, including the structure of dye adsorption onto TiO 2 , ultrafast electron injection, hot-electron injection, multiple-exciton generation, and electron—hole recombination. Advanced experimental techniques and theoretical approaches are briefly summarized, and then progressive achievements in photovoltaic device optimization based on insights from atomic scale investigations are introduced. Finally, some challenges and opportunities for further improvement of dye solar cells are presented. (invited review — international conference on nanoscience and technology, china 2013)

  20. Chain-Branching Control of the Atomic Structure of Alkanethiol-Based Gold–Sulfur Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yun; Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong

    2011-01-01

    Density functional theory structure calculations at 0 K and simulations at 300 K of observed high-resolution in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images reveal three different atomic-interface structures for the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of three isomeric butanethiols on Au(111......): direct binding to the Au(111) surface without pitting, binding to adatoms above a regular surface with extensive pitting, and binding to adatoms with local surface vacancies and some pitting. Thermal motions are shown to produce some observed STM features, with a very tight energy balance controlling...

  1. Prediction of protein–protein interactions: unifying evolution and structure at protein interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of the chores in the living cell involve protein–protein interactions. Providing details of protein interactions at the residue level and incorporating them into protein interaction networks are crucial toward the elucidation of a dynamic picture of cells. Despite the rapid increase in the number of structurally known protein complexes, we are still far away from a complete network. Given experimental limitations, computational modeling of protein interactions is a prerequisite to proceed on the way to complete structural networks. In this work, we focus on the question 'how do proteins interact?' rather than 'which proteins interact?' and we review structure-based protein–protein interaction prediction approaches. As a sample approach for modeling protein interactions, PRISM is detailed which combines structural similarity and evolutionary conservation in protein interfaces to infer structures of complexes in the protein interaction network. This will ultimately help us to understand the role of protein interfaces in predicting bound conformations

  2. Structural insights into Rhino-Deadlock complex for germline piRNA cluster specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bowen; Lin, Yu An; Parhad, Swapnil S; Jin, Zhaohui; Ma, Jinbiao; Theurkauf, William E; Zhang, Zz Zhao; Huang, Ying

    2018-06-01

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) silence transposons in germ cells to maintain genome stability and animal fertility. Rhino, a rapidly evolving heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) family protein, binds Deadlock in a species-specific manner and so defines the piRNA-producing loci in the Drosophila genome. Here, we determine the crystal structures of Rhino-Deadlock complex in Drosophila melanogaster and simulans In both species, one Rhino binds the N-terminal helix-hairpin-helix motif of one Deadlock protein through a novel interface formed by the beta-sheet in the Rhino chromoshadow domain. Disrupting the interface leads to infertility and transposon hyperactivation in flies. Our structural and functional experiments indicate that electrostatic repulsion at the interaction interface causes cross-species incompatibility between the sibling species. By determining the molecular architecture of this piRNA-producing machinery, we discover a novel HP1-partner interacting mode that is crucial to piRNA biogenesis and transposon silencing. We thus explain the cross-species incompatibility of two sibling species at the molecular level. © 2018 The Authors.

  3. Atomic structures and compositions of internal interfaces. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidman, D.N. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Merkle, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-03-01

    This research program addresses fundamental questions concerning the relationships between atomic structures and chemical compositions of metal/ceramic heterophase interfaces. The chemical composition profile across a Cu/MgO {l_brace}111{r_brace}-type heterophase interface, produced by the internal oxidation of a Cu(Mg) single phase alloy, is measured via atom-probe field-ion microscopy with a spatial resolution of 0.121 nm; this resolution is equal to the interplanar space of the {l_brace}222{r_brace} MgO planes. In particular, we demonstrate for the first time that the bonding across a Cu/MgO {l_brace}111{r_brace}-type heterophase interface, along a <111> direction common to both the Cu matrix and an MgO precipitate, has the sequence Cu{vert_bar}O{vert_bar}Mg{hor_ellipsis} and not Cu{vert_bar}Mg{vert_bar}O{hor_ellipsis}; this result is achieved without any deconvolution of the experimental data. Before determining this chemical sequence it was established, via high resolution electron microscopy, that the morphology of an MgO precipitate in a Cu matrix is an octahedron faceted on {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes with a cube-on-cube relationship between a precipitate and the matrix. First results are also presented for the Ni/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} interface; for this system selected area atom probe microscopy was used to analyze this interface; Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} precipitates are located in a field-ion microscope tip and a precipitate is brought into the tip region via a highly controlled electropolishing technique.

  4. Evaluation of underground pipe-structure interface for surface impact load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shen, E-mail: swang@terrapower.com

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A simple method is proposed for the evaluation of underground pipelines for surface impact load considering the effect of a nearby pipe-structure interface. • The proposed simple method can be used to evaluate the magnitude of damage within a short period of time after accidental drop occurs. • The proposed method is applied in a practical example and compared by using finite element analysis. - Abstract: Nuclear safety related buried pipelines need to be assessed for the effects of postulated surface impact loads. In published solutions, the buried pipe is often considered within an elastic half space without interference with other underground structures. In the case that a surface impact occurs in short distance from an underground pipe-structure interface, this boundary condition will further complicate the buried pipe evaluation. Neglecting such boundary effect in the assessment may lead to underestimating potential damage of buried pipeline, and jeopardizing safety of the nuclear power plant. Comprehensive analysis of such structure-pipe-soil system is often subjected to availability of state-of-art finite element tools, as well as costly and time consuming. Simple, but practical conservative techniques have not been established. In this study, a mechanics based solution is proposed in order to assess the magnitude of damage to a buried pipeline beneath a heavy surface impact considering the effect of a nearby pipe-structure interface. The proposed approach provides an easy to use tool in the early stage of evaluation before the decision of applying more costly technique can be made by owner of the nuclear facility.

  5. Evaluation of underground pipe-structure interface for surface impact load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple method is proposed for the evaluation of underground pipelines for surface impact load considering the effect of a nearby pipe-structure interface. • The proposed simple method can be used to evaluate the magnitude of damage within a short period of time after accidental drop occurs. • The proposed method is applied in a practical example and compared by using finite element analysis. - Abstract: Nuclear safety related buried pipelines need to be assessed for the effects of postulated surface impact loads. In published solutions, the buried pipe is often considered within an elastic half space without interference with other underground structures. In the case that a surface impact occurs in short distance from an underground pipe-structure interface, this boundary condition will further complicate the buried pipe evaluation. Neglecting such boundary effect in the assessment may lead to underestimating potential damage of buried pipeline, and jeopardizing safety of the nuclear power plant. Comprehensive analysis of such structure-pipe-soil system is often subjected to availability of state-of-art finite element tools, as well as costly and time consuming. Simple, but practical conservative techniques have not been established. In this study, a mechanics based solution is proposed in order to assess the magnitude of damage to a buried pipeline beneath a heavy surface impact considering the effect of a nearby pipe-structure interface. The proposed approach provides an easy to use tool in the early stage of evaluation before the decision of applying more costly technique can be made by owner of the nuclear facility.

  6. Wetting, meniscus structure, and capillary interactions of microspheres bound to a cylindrical liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul Y; Dinsmore, Anthony D; Hoagland, David A; Russell, Thomas P

    2018-03-14

    Wetting, meniscus structure, and capillary interactions for polystyrene microspheres deposited on constant curvature cylindrical liquid interfaces, constructed from nonvolatile ionic or oligomeric liquids, were studied by optical interferometry and optical microscopy. The liquid interface curvature resulted from the preferential wetting of finite width lines patterned onto planar silicon substrates. Key variables included sphere diameter, nominal (or average) contact angle, and deviatoric interfacial curvature. Menisci adopted the quadrupolar symmetry anticipated by theory, with interfacial deformation closely following predicted dependences on sphere diameter and nominal contact angle. Unexpectedly, the contact angle was not constant locally around the contact line, the nominal contact angle varied among seemingly identical spheres, and the maximum interface deviation did not follow the predicted dependence on deviatoric interfacial curvature. Instead, this deviation was up to an order-of-magnitude larger than predicted. Trajectories of neighboring microspheres visually manifested quadrupole-quadrupole interactions, eventually producing square sphere packings that foreshadow interfacial assembly as a potential route to hierarchical 2D particle structures.

  7. A new relational database structure and online interface for the HITRAN database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Christian; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A new format for the HITRAN database is proposed. By storing the line-transition data in a number of linked tables described by a relational database schema, it is possible to overcome the limitations of the existing format, which have become increasingly apparent over the last few years as new and more varied data are being used by radiative-transfer models. Although the database in the new format can be searched using the well-established Structured Query Language (SQL), a web service, HITRANonline, has been deployed to allow users to make most common queries of the database using a graphical user interface in a web page. The advantages of the relational form of the database to ensuring data integrity and consistency are explored, and the compatibility of the online interface with the emerging standards of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) project is discussed. In particular, the ability to access HITRAN data using a standard query language from other websites, command line tools and from within computer programs is described. -- Highlights: • A new, interactive version of the HITRAN database is presented. • The data is stored in a structured fashion in a relational database. • The new HITRANonline interface offers increased functionality and easier error correction

  8. Structure, composition and function of interfaces in ceramic fibre/matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pippel, E.

    1993-01-01

    Improving the properties of fibre reinforced ceramics and glasses by optimizing their microstructure requires the knowledge of this structure down to the atomic level. In these materials energy-dissipative processes during fracture particularly act within an interface layer or layer system between fibre and matrix which can either be produced by fibre coating, or which develops during the processing of the composites. Examples are presented of the microstructural phenomena of such layers revealed by HVEM and HREM and complemented by microchemical information via a nanoscale EDXS equipment. The investigations are carried out on Nicalon fibres in Duran glass as well as on Tyranno, Nicalon and carbon fibres in different SiC-matrices. Finally, a process is discussed which may control the important interface parameters. (orig.)

  9. Engineering the Surface/Interface Structures of Titanium Dioxide Micro and Nano Architectures towards Environmental and Electrochemical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Yanyan; Mølhave, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    advances in the surface and interface engineering and applications in environmental and electrochemical applications. We analyze the advantages of surface/interface engineered TiO₂ micro and nano structures, and present the principles and growth mechanisms of TiO₂ nanostructures via different strategies...

  10. Specific-structured lipids: nutritional perspectives and production potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Høy, Carl-Erik; Balchen, Steen

    1997-01-01

    Structured lipids are referring to any triacylglycerols containing both long chain fatty acids (mostly essential fatty acids) and medium or short chain fatty acids. In case of specific-structured lipids (SSLs), each group of fatty acids locates specifically at sn-2 or -1.3 positions of the glycerol...... backbone. Recently the nutritional perspectives of this kind of lipids attract many interests. This causes an increasing interest in the production of them by lipase-catalyzed interesterification. One of the advantages of lipase method over chemical ones is that SSLs can be produced with particular fatty...

  11. Effect of Interface Structure on Thermal Boundary Conductance by using First-principles Density Functional Perturbation Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xue; ZHANG Yue; SHANG Jia-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    We choose a Si/Ge interface as a research object to investigate the infiuence of interface disorder on thermal boundary conductance. In the calculations, the diffuse mismatch model is used to study thermal boundary conductance between two non-metallic materials, while the phonon dispersion relationship is calculated by the first-principles density functional perturbation theory. The results show that interface disorder limits thermal transport. The increase of atomic spacing at the interface results in weakly coupled interfaces and a decrease in the thermal boundary conductance. This approach shows a simplistic method to investigate the relationship between microstructure and thermal conductivity.%We choose a Si/Ge interface as a research object to investigate the influence of interface disorder on thermal boundary conductance.In the calculations,the diffuse mismatch model is used to study thermal boundary conductance between two non-metallic materials,while the phonon dispersion relationship is calculated by the first-principles density functional perturbation theory.The results show that interface disorder limits thermal transport.The increase of atomic spacing at the interface results in weakly coupled interfaces and a decrease in the thermal boundary conductance.This approach shows a simplistic method to investigate the relationship between microstructure and thermal conductivity.It is well known that interfaces can play a dominant role in the overall thermal transport characteristics of structures whose length scale is less than the phonon mean free path.When heat flows across an interface between two different materials,there exists a temperature jump at the interface.Thermal boundary conductance (TBC),which describes the efficiency of heat flow at material interfaces,plays an importance role in the transport of thermal energy in nanometerscale devices,semiconductor superlattices,thin film multilayers and nanocrystalline materials.[1

  12. Structures in the communication between lexicographer and programmer: Database and interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Sven

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals exclusively with e-lexicography. It intends to answer the question how much a lexicographer in charge of a new e-dictionary project should know about lexicographical structures, and how this knowledge could be communicated to the IT programmer designing the underlying database...... and the corresponding user interfaces. With this purpose, it first defines the concepts of lexicographical database, e-dictionary and e-lexicographical structure. Then it discusses some of the new ways in which lexicographical structures express themselves in the digital environment. It stresses, above all......, their dynamic character and great complexity which make it extremely difficult and time-consuming for the lexicographer to get an overview of all the structures in an e-lexicographical project. Finally, and based upon the experience from the planning and design of five e-dictionaries, it shows how...

  13. Adaptive Crack Modeling with Interface Solid Elements for Plain and Fiber Reinforced Concrete Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yijian; Meschke, Günther

    2017-07-08

    The effective analysis of the nonlinear behavior of cement-based engineering structures not only demands physically-reliable models, but also computationally-efficient algorithms. Based on a continuum interface element formulation that is suitable to capture complex cracking phenomena in concrete materials and structures, an adaptive mesh processing technique is proposed for computational simulations of plain and fiber-reinforced concrete structures to progressively disintegrate the initial finite element mesh and to add degenerated solid elements into the interfacial gaps. In comparison with the implementation where the entire mesh is processed prior to the computation, the proposed adaptive cracking model allows simulating the failure behavior of plain and fiber-reinforced concrete structures with remarkably reduced computational expense.

  14. Structural basis for substrate specificities of cellular deoxyribonucleoside kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, K.; Ramaswamy, S.; Ljungcrantz, C.

    2001-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases phosphorylate deoxyribonucleosides and activate a number of medically important nucleoside analogs. Here we report the structure of the Drosophila deoxyribonucleoside kinase with deoxycytidine bound at the nucleoside binding site and that of the human deoxyguanosine ki......; this is apparently due to the presence of Arg 118, which provides favorable hydrogen bonding interactions with the substrate. The two new structures provide an explanation for the substrate specificity of cellular deoxyribonucleoside kinases....

  15. Laser ablation synthesis of tantalum carbide particles with specific phase assemblage and special interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.S.; Shen, P. [National Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Kaohsiung (China); Chen, S.Y. [I-Shou University, Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, Kaohsiung (China)

    2015-07-15

    Pulsed laser ablation of bulk TaC in vacuum under a high power density was used to fabricate fine-sized tantalum carbide particles, i.e., γ-TaC{sub 1-x} with varied extent of carbon deficiency and α-Ta{sub 2}C surrounded by an amorphous phase of Ta-doped carbon clusters or lamellae according to X-ray and electron diffraction. The predominant γ-TaC{sub 1-x} has a high x value (∝0.4) and almost spherical shape when rapidly solidified as submicron-sized particulates, whereas x ∝ 0.2 and facetted with occasional {111} coalescence twin when condensed as nanoparticles. The minor α-Ta{sub 2}C occurred either as nanocondensates with hexagonal crystal form or as a stable epitaxial intergrowth with the γ-TaC{sub 1-x} particulate having close-packed planes in parallel with the precipitation process. The γ-TaC{sub 1-x} and α-Ta{sub 2}C nanocondensates were also coalesced approaching a secondary relationship, i.e., [011]{sub TaC1-x}//[01 anti 1]{sub Ta2C} and (100){sub TaC1-x}//(0001){sub Ta2C} having a fair coincidence site lattice at the interface. The refractory materials have a bimodal minimum band gap (ca. 3.8 and 2.3 eV) for potential optocatalytic and tribology applications at high temperatures. (orig.)

  16. Neuron-Type-Specific Utility in a Brain-Machine Interface: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Martha G; Bergquist, Austin J; Vargas-Perez, Hector; Nagai, Mary K; Zariffa, Jose; Marquez-Chin, Cesar; Popovic, Milos R

    2017-11-01

    Firing rates of single cortical neurons can be volitionally modulated through biofeedback (i.e. operant conditioning), and this information can be transformed to control external devices (i.e. brain-machine interfaces; BMIs). However, not all neurons respond to operant conditioning in BMI implementation. Establishing criteria that predict neuron utility will assist translation of BMI research to clinical applications. Single cortical neurons (n=7) were recorded extracellularly from primary motor cortex of a Long-Evans rat. Recordings were incorporated into a BMI involving up-regulation of firing rate to control the brightness of a light-emitting-diode and subsequent reward. Neurons were classified as 'fast-spiking', 'bursting' or 'regular-spiking' according to waveform-width and intrinsic firing patterns. Fast-spiking and bursting neurons were found to up-regulate firing rate by a factor of 2.43±1.16, demonstrating high utility, while regular-spiking neurons decreased firing rates on average by a factor of 0.73±0.23, demonstrating low utility. The ability to select neurons with high utility will be important to minimize training times and maximize information yield in future clinical BMI applications. The highly contrasting utility observed between fast-spiking and bursting neurons versus regular-spiking neurons allows for the hypothesis to be advanced that intrinsic electrophysiological properties may be useful criteria that predict neuron utility in BMI implementation.

  17. The structural basis of Arf effector specificity: the crystal structure of ARF6 in a complex with JIP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabet, Tatiana; Montagnac, Guillaume; Regazzoni, Karine; Raynal, Bertrand; El Khadali, Fatima; England, Patrick; Franco, Michel; Chavrier, Philippe; Houdusse, Anne; Ménétrey, Julie

    2009-09-16

    The JNK-interacting proteins, JIP3 and JIP4, are specific effectors of the small GTP-binding protein ARF6. The interaction of ARF6-GTP with the second leucine zipper (LZII) domains of JIP3/JIP4 regulates the binding of JIPs to kinesin-1 and dynactin. Here, we report the crystal structure of ARF6-GTP bound to the JIP4-LZII at 1.9 A resolution. The complex is a heterotetramer with dyad symmetry arranged in an ARF6-(JIP4)(2)-ARF6 configuration. Comparison of the ARF6-JIP4 interface with the equivalent region of ARF1 shows the structural basis of JIP4's specificity for ARF6. Using site-directed mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance, we further show that non-conserved residues at the switch region borders are the key structural determinants of JIP4 specificity. A structure-derived model of the association of the ARF6-JIP3/JIP4 complex with membranes shows that the JIP4-LZII coiled-coil should lie along the membrane to prevent steric hindrances, resulting in only one ARF6 molecule bound. Such a heterotrimeric complex gives insights to better understand the ARF6-mediated motor switch regulatory function.

  18. Electronic structure at metal-smiconductor surfaces and interfaces: effects of disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The main concern of this work is the study of the electronic structure at metal and semiconductor surfaces or interfaces, with special emphasis in the effects of disorder and local microstructure upon them. Various factors which determine this structure are presented and those of central importance are identified. A model that allows the efficient and exact calculation of the local density of states at disordered interfaces is described. This model is based on a tight-binding hamiltonian that has enough flexibility so as to allow an adequate description of real solids. The disorder is taken into account by including stochastic perturbations in the diagonal elements of the hamiltonian in a site orbital basis. These perturbations are taken at each layer from a lorentzian probability distribution. An exact expression for the calculation of the local density of states is derived and applied to a model surface built up from a type orbitals arranged in a simple cubic lattice. The effects of disorder on the local densities of states and on the existence of surface Tamm states are studied. The properties of the electronic states with this kind of model of disorder are considered. The self-consistent calculation of the electronic structure of the Si(111) - (1x1) surface is presented. The effects of disorder on the electronic properties such as the work function or the position of surface states within the gap are evaluated. The surface of the metallic compound NiSi 2 is also treated. The first self-consistent calculation of the electronic structure of its (111) surface is presented. The electronic structure of the Si/NiSi 2 (111) interfaces is calculated for the two types of junctions that can be grown experimentally. The origin of the difference between the Schottky barrier heights at both interfaces is discussed. The results are compared with available experimental data. The implications of this calculation on existing theories about the microscopic mechanism that causes

  19. Structural Determinants of Specific Lipid Binding to Potassium Channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weingarth, M.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330985655; Prokofyev, A.; van der Cruijsen, E.A.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330826743; Nand, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337731403; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238; Pongs, O.; Baldus, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314410864

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated specific lipid binding to the pore domain of potassium channels KcsA and chimeric KcsAKv1.3 on the structural and functional level using extensive coarse-grained and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, solid-state NMR, and single channel measurements. We show that, while

  20. Perceptual learning is specific to the trained structure of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Yamit; Daikhin, Luba; Ahissar, Merav

    2013-12-01

    What do we learn when we practice a simple perceptual task? Many studies have suggested that we learn to refine or better select the sensory representations of the task-relevant dimension. Here we show that learning is specific to the trained structural regularities. Specifically, when this structure is modified after training with a fixed temporal structure, performance regresses to pretraining levels, even when the trained stimuli and task are retained. This specificity raises key questions as to the importance of low-level sensory modifications in the learning process. We trained two groups of participants on a two-tone frequency discrimination task for several days. In one group, a fixed reference tone was consistently presented in the first interval (the second tone was higher or lower), and in the other group the same reference tone was consistently presented in the second interval. When following training, these temporal protocols were switched between groups, performance of both groups regressed to pretraining levels, and further training was needed to attain postlearning performance. ERP measures, taken before and after training, indicated that participants implicitly learned the temporal regularity of the protocol and formed an attentional template that matched the trained structure of information. These results are consistent with Reverse Hierarchy Theory, which posits that even the learning of simple perceptual tasks progresses in a top-down manner, hence can benefit from temporal regularities at the trial level, albeit at the potential cost that learning may be specific to these regularities.

  1. Interface properties of 4H-SiC MOS structures studied by a slow positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Ichimiya, A.; Yoshikawa, M.

    2004-01-01

    Interfacial defects existing near the SiO 2 /SiC interface are an important issue for fabrication of high performance SiC devices. We investigate a thermally grown SiO 2 /SiC layer of 4H-SiC MOS structure by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The Doppler broadening of annihilation quanta was measured as a function of the incident positron energy and the gate bias. Applying a negative gate bias, significant increases in S-parameters were observed. This indicates the migration of implanted positrons towards the SiO 2 /SiC interface and annihilation at interfacial defects. Ultraviolet (UV) ray irradiation was used to extract the influence of the positron trapping to the interfacial states. S-parameters in the interface region were reduced by UV irradiation. This shows that positron trapping probability decreased because the charge state of interfacial defects changed to positive. From the recovery of S-parameters after 24 hours, the interfacial states discharge slowly and exist in large quantities, because the changes of S-parameter by the UV irradiation are larger than changes induced by bias change. (orig.)

  2. Interface electron structure of Fe3Al/TiC composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Lai-xue; SUN Kang-ning; SUN Jia-tao; FAN Run-hua; REN Shuai

    2006-01-01

    Based on YU's solids and molecules emperical electron theory(EET), interface valence electron structure of TiC-Fe3Al composites was set up, and the valence electron density of different atomic states TiC and Fe3Al composites in various planes was determined. The results indicate that the electron density of (100)Fe3Al is consistent with that of (110)TiC in the first-class approximation, the absolute value of minimum electron density difference along the interface is 0.007 37 nm-2, and the relative value is 0.759%. (110)TiC//(100)Fe3Al preferred orientation is believed to benefit the formation of the cuboidal shape TiC. In the other hand, it shows that the particle growth is accompanied by the transport of electron, the deviation continuity of electron density intrinsically hinders the grain growth. The electron density of (100)TiC is not consistent with Fe3Al arbitrary crystallographic plane,thus it well explains that the increased titanium and carbon contents do not increase the size of large particles. The crystallographic orientation of (110)TiC//(100)FeAl will improve the mechanical properties. Therefore interface electron theory is an effective theoretical implement for designing excellent property of composites.

  3. A comparative study about electronic structures at rubrene/Ag and Ag/rubrene interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumona Sinha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The contact between the electrode and the organic semiconductor is one of the most crucial factors in determining the organic device performance. The development and production technology of different organic devices require the understanding of different types of metal/organic semiconducting thin film interfaces. Comparisons about the electronic structures at Rubrene/Ag and Ag/Rubrene interfaces have been studied using photoemission spectroscopy. The Ag on rubrene interfaces is found to show more interesting and complex natures than its counterpart. The vacuum level (VL was shifted about 0.51 eV from push back effect for deposition of 5 Å rubrene onto Ag film whereas the electronic features of silver was only suppressed and no energy shift was resulted. While the deposition of 5 Å Ag onto rubrene film leads to the diffusion of the Ag atoms, as a cluster with quantum size effect, inside the film. Angle dependent XPS measurement indicates that diffused metal clusters were present at entire probed depth of the film. Moreover these clusters dope the uppermost surface of the rubrene film which consequences a shift of the electronic states of thick organic film towards higher binding energy. The VL was found to shift about 0.31 eV toward higher binding energy whereas the shift was around 0.21 eV for the electronic states of rubrene layer.

  4. A comparative study about electronic structures at rubrene/Ag and Ag/rubrene interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Sumona, E-mail: sumona.net.09@gmail.com; Mukherjee, M. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2015-10-15

    The contact between the electrode and the organic semiconductor is one of the most crucial factors in determining the organic device performance. The development and production technology of different organic devices require the understanding of different types of metal/organic semiconducting thin film interfaces. Comparisons about the electronic structures at Rubrene/Ag and Ag/Rubrene interfaces have been studied using photoemission spectroscopy. The Ag on rubrene interfaces is found to show more interesting and complex natures than its counterpart. The vacuum level (VL) was shifted about 0.51 eV from push back effect for deposition of 5 Å rubrene onto Ag film whereas the electronic features of silver was only suppressed and no energy shift was resulted. While the deposition of 5 Å Ag onto rubrene film leads to the diffusion of the Ag atoms, as a cluster with quantum size effect, inside the film. Angle dependent XPS measurement indicates that diffused metal clusters were present at entire probed depth of the film. Moreover these clusters dope the uppermost surface of the rubrene film which consequences a shift of the electronic states of thick organic film towards higher binding energy. The VL was found to shift about 0.31 eV toward higher binding energy whereas the shift was around 0.21 eV for the electronic states of rubrene layer.

  5. The core structures of transformation dislocations at TiAl/Ti3Al interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penisson, J.M.; Loubradou, M.; Derder, C.; Bonnet, R.

    1993-01-01

    A Ti-40%Al alloy is investigated using High Resolution Electron Microscopy. The alloy structure consists mainly of alternate lamellae of γ(TiAl, L1 0 structure) and α 2 (Ti 3 Al, DO 19 structure) phases. These lamellae are parallel to each other and the interfaces between them are flat and parallel to the densest planes of the crystals. It is found that, among the variety of interfacial dislocations relieving the misfit, some have cores involving four (111) planes in height. The elastic displacement fields around these interfacial ledges, compared with the experimental atomic positions determined from HREM images, are in agreement with Burgers vector contents 1/6 left angle 112 right angle . (orig.)

  6. STRUCTURAL AND DESIGN SPECIFICS OF SPACE GRID SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Gasii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to identify main trends in the development of space grid structures. In order to reach the purpose it is necessary to conduct a review of the known structural concepts, nodal connections and specifics of the space grid structures and to make conclusions on feasibility improvement of the considered structural concepts that make it possible to develop new solutions without disadvantages residing in the analogues. Analysis of papers written by foreign and national scientists and devoted to theoretical, numerical and experimental studies of stress-strain state, influence of different factors on it and geometrical optimization and designing of space grid structures has been conducted in order to achieve the objectives. Space grid structures and, in particular, flat double-layer grid and most frequent nodes have been studied in the paper. The paper contains a short review of the history on development of space grid structures. It has been found that a rapid development of structural designs was caused by scientific and technical progress and, in particular, improvement of physical and mechanical properties of materials, development of calculation methods, application of software systems for simulating behavior of the structure under load, which significantly increased the calculation accuracy and reduced complexity of design. It has been also established that main parameters that have influence on effectiveness of a structural design are geometric dimensions of its modular elements, ratio of its depth to the span. The world experience on development of connection components has been studied in the paper. The paper presents general classification of nodal connections. Main advantages and disadvantages of existing space grid structures are highlighted and it allows to determine possible methods for their improvement. Theoretical research has permitted to establish that the main direction of spatial grid structures improvement

  7. Estimation of carrier mobility at organic semiconductor/insulator interface using an asymmetric capacitive test structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Agarwal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobility of carriers at the organic/insulator interface is crucial to the performance of organic thin film transistors. The present work describes estimation of mobility using admittance measurements performed on an asymmetric capacitive test structure. Besides the advantage of simplicity, it is shown that at low frequencies, the measured capacitance comes from a large area of channel making the capacitance-voltage characteristics insensitive to contact resistances. 2-D numerical simulation and experimental results obtained with Pentacene/Poly(4-vinyphenol system are presented to illustrate the operation and advantages of the proposed technique.

  8. Plasmonic Structure Enhanced Exciton Generation at the Interface between the Perovskite Absorber and Copper Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuen-Feng; Chiang, Chien-Hung; Wu, Chun-Guey

    2014-01-01

    The refractive index and extinction coefficient of a triiodide perovskite absorber (TPA) were obtained by fitting the transmittance spectra of TPA/PEDOT:PSS/ITO/glass using the transfer matrix method. Cu nanoplasmonic structures were designed to enhance the exciton generation in the TPA and to simultaneously reduce the film thickness of the TPA. Excitons were effectively generated at the interface between TPA and Cu nanoparticles, as observed through the 3D finite-difference time-domain method. The exciton distribution is advantageous for the exciton dissociation and carrier transport. PMID:25295290

  9. Physics of Schottky-barrier change by segregation and structural disorder at metal/Si interfaces: First-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, T.; Kobinata, K.

    2012-01-01

    Schottky-barrier changes by the segregation and structural disorder are studied using the first-principles calculations and adopting Au/Si interface. The Schottky barrier for electrons simply decreases as increasing the valency of segregated atoms from II to VI families, which variation is shown closely related to how the Si atoms are terminated at the interface. On the other hand, the structural disorders (defects) prefer to locate near the interface and the Schottky barrier for hole carriers does not change in cases of Si vacancy and Au substitution, while it increases in cases of Si and Au interstitials reflecting the appearance of Si dangling bonds.

  10. In situ surface X-ray diffraction studies of the copper-electrolyte interface. Atomic structure and homoepitaxial grwoth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golks, Frederik

    2011-05-19

    Copper electrodeposition is the predominantly used technique for on-chip wiring in the fabrication of ultra-large scale integrated (ULSI) microchips. In this 'damascene copper electroplating' process, multicomponent electrolytes containing organic additives realize void-free filling of trenches with high aspect ratio ('superconformal deposition'). Despite manifold studies, motivated by the continuous trend to shrink wiring dimensions and thus the demand of optimized plating baths, detailed knowledge on the growth mechanism - in presence and absence of additives - is still lacking. Using a recently developed hanging meniscus X-ray transmission cell, brilliant synchrotron x-rays and a fast, one-dimensional detector system, unique real-time in situ surface X-ray diffraction studies of copper electrodeposition were performed under realistic reaction conditions, approaching rates of technological relevance. Preparatory measurements of the electrochemical dissolution of Au(001) in chloride-containing electrolyte demonstrated the capability of this powerful technique, specifically the possibility to follow atomic-scale deposition or dissolution processes with a time resolution down to five milliseconds. The electrochemical as well as structural characterization of the Cu(001)- and Cu(111)-electrolyte interfaces provided detailed insight into the complex atomic-scale structures in presence of specifically adsorbed chloride on these surfaces. The interface of Cu(001) in chloride-containing electrolyte exhibits a continuous surface phase transition of a disordered Cl adlayer to a c(2 x 2) Cl adlayer with increasing potential. The latter was found to induce a small vertical corrugation of substrate atoms, which can be ascribed to lattice relaxations induced by the presence of coadsorbed water molecules and cations in the outer part of the electrochemical double layer. The study of the specific adsorption of chloride on Cu(111) from acidic aqueous

  11. In situ surface X-ray diffraction studies of the copper-electrolyte interface. Atomic structure and homoepitaxial grwoth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golks, Frederik

    2011-05-19

    Copper electrodeposition is the predominantly used technique for on-chip wiring in the fabrication of ultra-large scale integrated (ULSI) microchips. In this 'damascene copper electroplating' process, multicomponent electrolytes containing organic additives realize void-free filling of trenches with high aspect ratio ('superconformal deposition'). Despite manifold studies, motivated by the continuous trend to shrink wiring dimensions and thus the demand of optimized plating baths, detailed knowledge on the growth mechanism - in presence and absence of additives - is still lacking. Using a recently developed hanging meniscus X-ray transmission cell, brilliant synchrotron x-rays and a fast, one-dimensional detector system, unique real-time in situ surface X-ray diffraction studies of copper electrodeposition were performed under realistic reaction conditions, approaching rates of technological relevance. Preparatory measurements of the electrochemical dissolution of Au(001) in chloride-containing electrolyte demonstrated the capability of this powerful technique, specifically the possibility to follow atomic-scale deposition or dissolution processes with a time resolution down to five milliseconds. The electrochemical as well as structural characterization of the Cu(001)- and Cu(111)-electrolyte interfaces provided detailed insight into the complex atomic-scale structures in presence of specifically adsorbed chloride on these surfaces. The interface of Cu(001) in chloride-containing electrolyte exhibits a continuous surface phase transition of a disordered Cl adlayer to a c(2 x 2) Cl adlayer with increasing potential. The latter was found to induce a small vertical corrugation of substrate atoms, which can be ascribed to lattice relaxations induced by the presence of coadsorbed water molecules and cations in the outer part of the electrochemical double layer. The study of the specific adsorption of chloride on Cu(111) from acidic aqueous electrolyte revealed a

  12. Oligomerisation status and evolutionary conservation of interfaces of protein structural domain superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhwal, Anshul; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2013-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important in carrying out many biological processes and functions. These interactions may be either permanent or of temporary nature. Several studies have employed tools like solvent accessibility and graph theory to identify these interactions, but still more studies need to be performed to quantify and validate them. Although we now have many databases available with predicted and experimental results on protein-protein interactions, we still do not have many databases which focus on providing structural details of the interacting complexes, their oligomerisation state and homologues. In this work, protein-protein interactions have been thoroughly investigated within the structural regime and quantified for their strength using calculated pseudoenergies. The PPCheck server, an in-house webserver, has been used for calculating the pseudoenergies like van der Waals, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic energy based on distances between atoms of amino acids from two interacting proteins. PPCheck can be visited at . Based on statistical data, as obtained by studying established protein-protein interacting complexes from earlier studies, we came to a conclusion that an average protein-protein interface consisted of about 51 to 150 amino acid residues and the generalized energy per residue ranged from -2 kJ mol(-1) to -6 kJ mol(-1). We found that some of the proteins have an exceptionally higher number of amino acids at the interface and it was purely because of their elaborate interface or extended topology i.e. some of their secondary structure regions or loops were either inter-mixing or running parallel to one another or they were taking part in domain swapping. Residue networks were prepared for all the amino acids of the interacting proteins involved in different types of interactions (like van der Waals, hydrogen-bonding, electrostatic or intramolecular interactions) and were analysed between the query domain-interacting partner pair

  13. On the profile of frequency and voltage dependent interface states and series resistance in MIS structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doekme, Ilbilge [Science Education Department, Faculty of Kirsehir Education, Gazi University, Kirsehir (Turkey)]. E-mail: ilbilgedokme@gazi.edu.tr; Altindal, Semsettin [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Gazi University, 06500, Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-30

    The variation in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/{omega}-V) characteristics of Au/SiO{sub 2}/n-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure have been systematically investigated as a function of frequencies in the frequency range 0.5 kHz-10 MHz at room temperature. In addition, the forward and reverse bias current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of this structure were measured at room temperature. The high value of ideality factor was attributed to the high density of interface states localized at Si/SiO{sub 2} interface and interfacial oxide layer. The density of interface states (N{sub ss}) and the series resistance (R{sub ss}) were calculated from I-V and C-V measurements using different methods and the effect of them on C-V and G/{omega}-V characteristics were deeply researched. At the same energy position near the top of valance band, the calculated N{sub ss} values, obtained without taking into account the series resistance of the devices almost one order of magnitude larger than N{sub ss} values obtained by taking into account R{sub ss} values. It is found that the C-V and G/{omega}-V curves exhibit a peak at low frequencies and the peak values of C and G/{omega} decrease with increasing frequency. Also, the plots of R {sub s} as a function of bias give two peaks in the certain voltage range at low frequencies. These observations indicate that at low frequencies, the charges at interface states can easily follow an AC signal and the number of them increases with decreasing frequency. The I-V, C-V and G/{omega}-V characteristics of the MIS structure are affected not only with R {sub s} but also N {sub ss}. Experimental results show that both the R{sub s} and C{sub o} values should be taken into account in determining frequency-dependent electrical characteristics.

  14. High energy photoelectron spectroscopy in basic and applied science: Bulk and interface electronic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knut, Ronny; Lindblad, Rebecka [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Gorgoi, Mihaela [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Rensmo, Håkan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Karis, Olof, E-mail: olof.karis@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •We demonstrate how hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used to investigate interface properties of multilayers. •By combining HAXPES and statistical methods we are able to provide quantitative analysis of the interface diffusion process. •We show how photoionization cross sections can be used to map partial density of states contributions to valence states. •We use HAXPES to provide insight into the valence electronic structure of e.g. multiferroics and dye-sensitized solar cells. -- Abstract: With the access of new high-performance electron spectrometers capable of analyzing electron energies up to the order of 10 keV, the interest for photoelectron spectroscopy has grown and many new applications of the technique in areas where electron spectroscopies were considered to have limited use have been demonstrated over the last few decades. The technique, often denoted hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HX-PES or HAXPES), to distinguish the experiment from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy performed at lower energies, has resulted in an increasing interest in photoelectron spectroscopy in many areas. The much increased mean free path at higher kinetic energies, in combination with the elemental selectivity of the core level spectroscopies in general has led to this fact. It is thus now possible to investigate the electronic structure of materials with a substantially enhanced bulk sensitivity. In this review we provide examples from our own research using HAXPES which to date has been performed mainly at the HIKE facility at the KMC-1 beamline at HZB, Berlin. The review exemplifies the new opportunities using HAXPES to address both bulk and interface electronic properties in systems relevant for applications in magnetic storage, energy related research, but also in purely curiosity driven problems.

  15. High energy photoelectron spectroscopy in basic and applied science: Bulk and interface electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knut, Ronny; Lindblad, Rebecka; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Rensmo, Håkan; Karis, Olof

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We demonstrate how hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used to investigate interface properties of multilayers. •By combining HAXPES and statistical methods we are able to provide quantitative analysis of the interface diffusion process. •We show how photoionization cross sections can be used to map partial density of states contributions to valence states. •We use HAXPES to provide insight into the valence electronic structure of e.g. multiferroics and dye-sensitized solar cells. -- Abstract: With the access of new high-performance electron spectrometers capable of analyzing electron energies up to the order of 10 keV, the interest for photoelectron spectroscopy has grown and many new applications of the technique in areas where electron spectroscopies were considered to have limited use have been demonstrated over the last few decades. The technique, often denoted hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HX-PES or HAXPES), to distinguish the experiment from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy performed at lower energies, has resulted in an increasing interest in photoelectron spectroscopy in many areas. The much increased mean free path at higher kinetic energies, in combination with the elemental selectivity of the core level spectroscopies in general has led to this fact. It is thus now possible to investigate the electronic structure of materials with a substantially enhanced bulk sensitivity. In this review we provide examples from our own research using HAXPES which to date has been performed mainly at the HIKE facility at the KMC-1 beamline at HZB, Berlin. The review exemplifies the new opportunities using HAXPES to address both bulk and interface electronic properties in systems relevant for applications in magnetic storage, energy related research, but also in purely curiosity driven problems

  16. A structured and systematic model-based development method for automotive systems, considering the OEM/supplier interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckers, Kristian; Côté, Isabelle; Frese, Thomas; Hatebur, Denis; Heisel, Maritta

    2017-01-01

    The released ISO 26262 standard for automotive systems requires to create a hazard analysis and risk assessment and to create safety goals, to break down these safety goals into functional safety requirements in the functional safety concept, to specify technical safety requirements in the safety requirements specification, and to perform several validation and verification activities. Experience shows that the definition of technical safety requirements and the planning and execution of validation and verification activities has to be done jointly by OEMs and suppliers. In this paper, we present a structured and model-based safety development approach for automotive systems. The different steps are based on Jackson's requirement engineering. The elements are represented by UML notation extended with stereotypes. The UML model enables a rigorous validation of several constraints. We make use of the results of previously published work to be able to focus on the OEM/supplier interface. We illustrate our method using a three-wheeled-tilting control system (3WTC) as running example and case study. - Highlights: • Break down functional safety requirements into technical safety requirements. • Perform a hardware metric breakdown. • Ensure completeness of the requirements by using tables with predefined cells. • Define the interface to the suppliers and address functional safety.

  17. Deriving a Mutation Index of Carcinogenicity Using Protein Structure and Protein Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakas, Jarle; Pearl, Frances; Zvelebil, Marketa

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of Next Generation Sequencing the identification of mutations in the genomes of healthy and diseased tissues has become commonplace. While much progress has been made to elucidate the aetiology of disease processes in cancer, the contributions to disease that many individual mutations make remain to be characterised and their downstream consequences on cancer phenotypes remain to be understood. Missense mutations commonly occur in cancers and their consequences remain challenging to predict. However, this knowledge is becoming more vital, for both assessing disease progression and for stratifying drug treatment regimes. Coupled with structural data, comprehensive genomic databases of mutations such as the 1000 Genomes project and COSMIC give an opportunity to investigate general principles of how cancer mutations disrupt proteins and their interactions at the molecular and network level. We describe a comprehensive comparison of cancer and neutral missense mutations; by combining features derived from structural and interface properties we have developed a carcinogenicity predictor, InCa (Index of Carcinogenicity). Upon comparison with other methods, we observe that InCa can predict mutations that might not be detected by other methods. We also discuss general limitations shared by all predictors that attempt to predict driver mutations and discuss how this could impact high-throughput predictions. A web interface to a server implementation is publicly available at http://inca.icr.ac.uk/. PMID:24454733

  18. Chemical states and electronic structure of a HfO(-2)/Ge(001) interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kang-ill; McIntyre, Paul C.; Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Shiyu; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianetta, Piero; SLAC, SSRL; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept.

    2005-01-01

    We report the chemical bonding structure and valence band alignment at the HfO 2 /Ge (001) interface by systematically probing various core level spectra as well as valence band spectra using soft x-rays at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. We investigated the chemical bonding changes as a function of depth through the dielectric stack by taking a series of synchrotron photoemission spectra as we etched through the HfO 2 film using a dilute HF-solution. We found that a very non-stoichiometric GeO x layer exists at the HfO 2 /Ge interface. The valence band spectra near the Fermi level in each different film structure were carefully analyzed, and as a result, the valence band offset between Ge and GeO x was determined to be ΔE v (Ge-GeO x ) = 2.2 ± 0.15 eV, and that between Ge and HfO 2 , ΔE v (Ge-HfO 2 ) = 2.7 ± 0.15 eV

  19. Interface formation and defect structures in epitaxial La2Zr2O7 thin films on (111) Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, J.W.; Fompeyrine, J.; Guiller, A.; Norga, G.; Marchiori, C.; Siegwart, H.; Locquet, J.-P.

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the growth of epitaxial La 2 Zr 2 O 7 thin films on (111) Si. Although the interface structure can be strongly affected by the Si oxidation during the deposition process, epitaxial growth of La 2 Zr 2 O 7 was obtained. A detailed study by means of transmission electron microscopy reveals two types of structures (pyrochlore and fluorite) with the same average chemical composition but strong differences in reactivity and interface formation. The structural complexity of the ordered pyrochlore structure seems to prevent excess oxygen diffusion and interfacial SiO 2 formation

  20. Efficient direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion by in situ interface transformation of a tandem structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthias M.; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Lackner, David; Dimroth, Frank; Hannappel, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Photosynthesis is nature's route to convert intermittent solar irradiation into storable energy, while its use for an industrial energy supply is impaired by low efficiency. Artificial photosynthesis provides a promising alternative for efficient robust carbon-neutral renewable energy generation. The approach of direct hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical water splitting utilizes customized tandem absorber structures to mimic the Z-scheme of natural photosynthesis. Here a combined chemical surface transformation of a tandem structure and catalyst deposition at ambient temperature yields photocurrents approaching the theoretical limit of the absorber and results in a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 14%. The potentiostatically assisted photoelectrode efficiency is 17%. Present benchmarks for integrated systems are clearly exceeded. Details of the in situ interface transformation, the electronic improvement and chemical passivation are presented. The surface functionalization procedure is widely applicable and can be precisely controlled, allowing further developments of high-efficiency robust hydrogen generators.

  1. High fluence swift heavy ion structure modification of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface and gate insulator in 65 nm MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yao [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Lab of Microelectronics Sichuan Province, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Gao, Bo, E-mail: gaobo@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Lab of Microelectronics Sichuan Province, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Gong, Min [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Lab of Microelectronics Sichuan Province, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Willis, Maureen [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Yang, Zhimei [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Lab of Microelectronics Sichuan Province, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Guan, Mingyue [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Li, Yun [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Lab of Microelectronics Sichuan Province, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China)

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a study of the structure modification, induced by high fluence swift heavy ion radiation, of the SiO{sub 2}/Si structures and gate oxide interface in commercial 65 nm MOSFETs is performed. A key and novel point in this study is the specific use of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique instead of the conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) or scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques which are typically performed following the chemical etching of the sample to observe the changes in the structure. Using this method we show that after radiation, the appearance of a clearly visible thin layer between the SiO{sub 2} and Si is observed presenting as a variation in the TEM intensity at the interface of the two materials. Through measuring the EDX line scans we reveal that the Si:O ratio changed and that this change can be attributed to the migration of the Si towards interface after the Si-O bond is destroyed by the swift heavy ions. For the 65 nm MOSFET sample, the silicon substrate, the SiON insulator and the poly-silicon gate interfaces become blurred under the same irradiation conditions.

  2. Atomic Scale Structure-Chemistry Relationships at Oxide Catalyst Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBriarty, Martin E.

    Oxide catalysts are integral to chemical production, fuel refining, and the removal of environmental pollutants. However, the atomic-scale phenomena which lead to the useful reactive properties of catalyst materials are not sufficiently understood. In this work, the tools of surface and interface science and electronic structure theory are applied to investigate the structure and chemical properties of catalytically active particles and ultrathin films supported on oxide single crystals. These studies focus on structure-property relationships in vanadium oxide, tungsten oxide, and mixed V-W oxides on the surfaces of alpha-Al2O3 and alpha-Fe2O 3 (0001)-oriented single crystal substrates, two materials with nearly identical crystal structures but drastically different chemical properties. In situ synchrotron X-ray standing wave (XSW) measurements are sensitive to changes in the atomic-scale geometry of single crystal model catalyst surfaces through chemical reaction cycles, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals corresponding chemical changes. Experimental results agree with theoretical calculations of surface structures, allowing for detailed electronic structure investigations and predictions of surface chemical phenomena. The surface configurations and oxidation states of V and W are found to depend on the coverage of each, and reversible structural shifts accompany chemical state changes through reduction-oxidation cycles. Substrate-dependent effects suggest how the choice of oxide support material may affect catalytic behavior. Additionally, the structure and chemistry of W deposited on alpha-Fe 2O3 nanopowders is studied using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements in an attempt to bridge single crystal surface studies with real catalysts. These investigations of catalytically active material surfaces can inform the rational design of new catalysts for more efficient and sustainable chemistry.

  3. Surface and interface characterization of thin-film silicon solar cell structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, Dominic

    2013-02-21

    our Si L{sub 2,3} XES analysis. Spatially resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support this and even suggest the formation of sub-oxides or zinc silicate as an interface species. The electronic structure of the buried a-SiO{sub x}:H(B)/ZnO:Al and {mu}c-Si:H(B)/ZnO:Al interfaces are unraveled with ''depth resolved'' hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A surface band bending limited to the very surface of the silicon layers is found. The valence band maxima for the Si cover layers and the ZnO:Al TCO are determined and interface induced band bending for both interfaces are derived. At the a-SiO{sub x}:H(B)/ZnO:Al interface a tunnel barrier of (0.22 {+-} 0.31) eV and at {mu}c-Si:H(B)/ZnO:Al interface a tunnel barrier of (-0.08 {+-} 0.31) eV is determined. This explains a previously empirically found solar cell efficiency increase produced by introducing a {mu}c-Si:H(B) buffer layer between an a-Si p-i-n cell and the ZnO:Al/glass substrate.

  4. Coordination structure of adsorbed Zn(II) at Water-TiO2 interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, G.; Pan, G.; Zhang, M.; Waychunas, G.A.

    2011-01-15

    The local structure of aqueous metal ions on solid surfaces is central to understanding many chemical and biological processes in soil and aquatic environments. Here, the local coordination structure of hydrated Zn(II) at water-TiO{sub 2} interfaces was identified by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A nonintegral coordination number of average {approx}4.5 O atoms around a central Zn atom was obtained by EXAFS analysis. DFT calculations indicated that this coordination structure was consistent with the mixture of 4-coordinated bidentate binuclear (BB) and 5-coordinated bidentate mononuclear (BM) metastable equilibrium adsorption (MEA) states. The BB complex has 4-coordinated Zn, while the monodentate mononuclear (MM) complex has 6-coordinated Zn, and a 5-coordinated adsorbed Zn was found in the BM adsorption mode. DFT calculated energies showed that the lower-coordinated BB and BM modes were thermodynamically more favorable than the higher-coordinated MM MEA state. The experimentally observed XANES fingerprinting provided additional direct spectral evidence of 4- and 5-coordinated Zn-O modes. The overall spectral and computational evidence indicated that Zn(II) can occur in 4-, 5-, and 6-oxygen coordinated sites in different MEA states due to steric hindrance effects, and the coexistence of different MEA states formed the multiple coordination environments.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of structural transformation of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) at water/rutile interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guangzhi; Zhang, Meiyi; Zhou, Qin; Pan, Gang

    2015-09-01

    Concentration and salinity conditions are the dominant environmental factors affecting the behavior of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) on the surfaces of a variety of solid matrices (suspended particles, sediments, and natural minerals). However, the mechanism has not yet been examined at molecular scales. Here, the structural transformation of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) at water/rutile interfaces induced by changes of the concentration level of PFOS and salt condition was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. At low and intermediate concentrations all PFOS molecules directly interacted with the rutile (110) surface mainly by the sulfonate headgroups through electrostatic attraction, yielding a typical monolayer structure. As the concentration of PFOS increased, the molecules aggregated in a complex multi-layered structure, where an irregular assembling configuration was adsorbed on the monolayer structure by the van der Waals interactions between the perfluoroalkyl chains. When adding CaCl2 to the system, the multi-layered structure changed to a monolayer again, indicating that the addition of CaCl2 enhanced the critical concentration value to yield PFOS multilayer assemblies. The divalent Ca(2+) substituted for monovalent K(+) as the bridging counterion in PFOS adsorption. MD simulation may trigger wide applications in study of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) from atomic/molecular scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Stimulus specificity of a steady-state visual-evoked potential-based brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kian B.; Bradley, Andrew P.; Cunnington, Ross

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms of neural excitation and inhibition when given a visual stimulus are well studied. It has been established that changing stimulus specificity such as luminance contrast or spatial frequency can alter the neuronal activity and thus modulate the visual-evoked response. In this paper, we study the effect that stimulus specificity has on the classification performance of a steady-state visual-evoked potential-based brain-computer interface (SSVEP-BCI). For example, we investigate how closely two visual stimuli can be placed before they compete for neural representation in the cortex and thus influence BCI classification accuracy. We characterize stimulus specificity using the four stimulus parameters commonly encountered in SSVEP-BCI design: temporal frequency, spatial size, number of simultaneously displayed stimuli and their spatial proximity. By varying these quantities and measuring the SSVEP-BCI classification accuracy, we are able to determine the parameters that provide optimal performance. Our results show that superior SSVEP-BCI accuracy is attained when stimuli are placed spatially more than 5° apart, with size that subtends at least 2° of visual angle, when using a tagging frequency of between high alpha and beta band. These findings may assist in deciding the stimulus parameters for optimal SSVEP-BCI design.

  7. Escherichia coli Population Structure and Antibiotic Resistance at a Buffalo/Cattle Interface in Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercat, Mathilde; Clermont, Olivier; Massot, Méril; Ruppe, Etienne; de Garine-Wichatitsky, Michel; Miguel, Eve; Valls Fox, Hugo; Cornelis, Daniel; Andremont, Antoine; Denamur, Erick; Caron, Alexandre

    2015-12-28

    At a human/livestock/wildlife interface, Escherichia coli populations were used to assess the risk of bacterial and antibiotic resistance dissemination between hosts. We used phenotypic and genotypic characterization techniques to describe the structure and the level of antibiotic resistance of E. coli commensal populations and the resistant Enterobacteriaceae carriage of sympatric African buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer) and cattle populations characterized by their contact patterns in the southern part of Hwange ecosystem in Zimbabwe. Our results (i) confirmed our assumption that buffalo and cattle share similar phylogroup profiles, dominated by B1 (44.5%) and E (29.0%) phylogroups, with some variability in A phylogroup presence (from 1.9 to 12%); (ii) identified a significant gradient of antibiotic resistance from isolated buffalo to buffalo in contact with cattle and cattle populations expressed as the Murray score among Enterobacteriaceae (0.146, 0.258, and 0.340, respectively) and as the presence of tetracycline-, trimethoprim-, and amoxicillin-resistant subdominant E. coli strains (0, 5.7, and 38%, respectively); (iii) evidenced the dissemination of tetracycline, trimethoprim, and amoxicillin resistance genes (tet, dfrA, and blaTEM-1) in 26 isolated subdominant E. coli strains between nearby buffalo and cattle populations, that led us (iv) to hypothesize the role of the human/animal interface in the dissemination of genetic material from human to cattle and toward wildlife. The study of antibiotic resistance dissemination in multihost systems and at anthropized/natural interface is necessary to better understand and mitigate its multiple threats. These results also contribute to attempts aiming at using E. coli as a tool for the identification of pathogen transmission pathway in multihost systems. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Capillary-wave dynamics and interface structure modulation in binary Bose-Einstein condensate mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indekeu, Joseph O.; Van Thu, Nguyen; Lin, Chang-You; Phat, Tran Huu

    2018-04-01

    The localized low-energy interfacial excitations, or interfacial Nambu-Goldstone modes, of phase-segregated binary mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates are investigated analytically. To this end a double-parabola approximation (DPA) is performed on the Lagrangian density in Gross-Pitaevskii theory for a system in a uniform potential. This DPA entails a model in which analytic expressions are obtained for the excitations underlying capillary waves or ripplons for arbitrary strength K (>1 ) of the phase segregation. The dispersion relation ω (k ) ∝k3 /2 is derived directly from the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations in the limit that the wavelength 2 π /k is much larger than the interface width. The proportionality constant in the dispersion relation provides the static interfacial tension. A correction term in ω (k ) of order k5 /2 is calculated analytically within the DPA model. The combined result is tested against numerical diagonalization of the exact Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. Satisfactory agreement is obtained in the range of physically relevant wavelengths. The ripplon dispersion relation is relevant to state-of-the-art experiments using (quasi)uniform optical-box traps. Furthermore, within the DPA model explicit expressions are obtained for the structural deformation of the interface due to the passing of the capillary wave. It is found that the amplitude of the wave is enhanced by an amount that is quadratic in the ratio of the phase velocity ω /k to the sound velocity c . For generic mixtures consisting of condensates with unequal healing lengths, an additional modulation is predicted of the common value of the condensate densities at the interface.

  9. Structural zooming research and development of an interactive computer graphical interface for stress analysis of cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstle, Walter

    1989-01-01

    Engineering problems sometimes involve the numerical solution of boundary value problems over domains containing geometric feature with widely varying scales. Often, a detailed solution is required at one or more of these features. Small details in large structures may have profound effects upon global performance. Conversely, large-scale conditions may effect local performance. Many man-hours and CPU-hours are currently spent in modeling such problems. With the structural zooming technique, it is now possible to design an integrated program which allows the analyst to interactively focus upon a small region of interest, to modify the local geometry, and then to obtain highly accurate responses in that region which reflect both the properties of the overall structure and the local detail. A boundary integral equation analysis program, called BOAST, was recently developed for the stress analysis of cracks. This program can accurately analyze two-dimensional linear elastic fracture mechanics problems with far less computational effort than existing finite element codes. An interactive computer graphical interface to BOAST was written. The graphical interface would have several requirements: it would be menu-driven, with mouse input; all aspects of input would be entered graphically; the results of a BOAST analysis would be displayed pictorially but also the user would be able to probe interactively to get numerical values of displacement and stress at desired locations within the analysis domain; the entire procedure would be integrated into a single, easy to use package; and it would be written using calls to the graphic package called HOOPS. The program is nearing completion. All of the preprocessing features are working satisfactorily and were debugged. The postprocessing features are under development, and rudimentary postprocessing should be available by the end of the summer. The program was developed and run on a VAX workstation, and must be ported to the SUN

  10. Role of interface states on electron transport in a-Si:H/nc-Si:H multilayer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Asha; Kumari, Juhi; Agarwal, Pratima

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we report, I-V characteristic of a-Si:H/nc-Si:H multilayer structures in lateral as well as transverse direction. In lateral geometry, where the interfaces are parallel to the direction of electronic transport, residual photo conductivity (persistent photoconductivity) is observed after the light was turned off. On the other hand, in transverse geometry, where interfaces are along the direction of electronic transport, the space charge limited currents are affected and higher density of states is obtained. The PPC was more in the structures where numbers of such interface were more. These results have been understood in terms of the charge carriers trapped at the interface, which influence the electronic transport.

  11. Synchrotron-based photoemission study of electronic structure of the Cs/GaN ultrathin interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benemanskaya, G. V.; Kukushkin, S. A.; Dementev, P. A.; Lapushkin, M. N.; Timoshnev, S. N.; Smirnov, D. V.

    2018-03-01

    Electronic structure of the Cs/n-GaN nano-interface has been studied in situ via synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy by excitation in the energy range of 70-400 eV. The GaN sample was grown by an original method of epitaxy of low-defect unstressed nanoscaled films on AlGaN/SiC/Si substrate. Changes in the surface state spectra and in the Ga 3d, Cs 4d, Cs 5p, N 1s core level spectra have been revealed under different cesium coverages. The intrinsic surface states for the clean GaN surface at binding energies of ∼5.0 eV and ∼7.0 eV are attenuated during Cs adsorption. Simultaneously three Cs induced surface states are found to arise. Drastic changes in the surface state spectrum were ascertained and shown to be originated from the local interacting Ga dangling bonds and adsorbed Cs atoms initiating the electron redistribution effect with formation of the semiconductor-like Cs/n-GaN interface.

  12. A new relational database structure and online interface for the HITRAN database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Christian; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    A new format for the HITRAN database is proposed. By storing the line-transition data in a number of linked tables described by a relational database schema, it is possible to overcome the limitations of the existing format, which have become increasingly apparent over the last few years as new and more varied data are being used by radiative-transfer models. Although the database in the new format can be searched using the well-established Structured Query Language (SQL), a web service, HITRANonline, has been deployed to allow users to make most common queries of the database using a graphical user interface in a web page. The advantages of the relational form of the database to ensuring data integrity and consistency are explored, and the compatibility of the online interface with the emerging standards of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) project is discussed. In particular, the ability to access HITRAN data using a standard query language from other websites, command line tools and from within computer programs is described.

  13. Foldit Standalone: a video game-derived protein structure manipulation interface using Rosetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleffner, Robert; Flatten, Jeff; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Baker, David; Siegel, Justin B; Khatib, Firas; Cooper, Seth

    2017-09-01

    Foldit Standalone is an interactive graphical interface to the Rosetta molecular modeling package. In contrast to most command-line or batch interactions with Rosetta, Foldit Standalone is designed to allow easy, real-time, direct manipulation of protein structures, while also giving access to the extensive power of Rosetta computations. Derived from the user interface of the scientific discovery game Foldit (itself based on Rosetta), Foldit Standalone has added more advanced features and removed the competitive game elements. Foldit Standalone was built from the ground up with a custom rendering and event engine, configurable visualizations and interactions driven by Rosetta. Foldit Standalone contains, among other features: electron density and contact map visualizations, multiple sequence alignment tools for template-based modeling, rigid body transformation controls, RosettaScripts support and an embedded Lua interpreter. Foldit Standalone is available for download at https://fold.it/standalone , under the Rosetta license, which is free for academic and non-profit users. It is implemented in cross-platform C ++ and binary executables are available for Windows, macOS and Linux. scooper@ccs.neu.edu. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Molecular dynamic simulation of the atomic structure of aluminum solid–liquid interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Men, H; Fan, Z

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamic (MD) simulation was used to investigate the equilibrium atomic arrangement at aluminum solid–liquid (S/L) interfaces with {111}, {110} and {100} orientations. The simulation results reveal that the aluminum S/L interfaces are diffuse for all the orientations, and extend up to 7 atomic layers. Within the diffuse interfaces there exists substantial atomic ordering, which is manifested by atomic layering perpendicular to the interface and in-plane atomic ordering parallel to the interface. Atomic layering can be quantified by the atomic density profile (ρ(z)) while the in-plane atomic ordering can be described by the in-plane ordering parameter (S(z)). The detailed MD simulation suggests that atomic layering at the interface always occurs within 7 atomic layers independent of the interface orientation while the in-plane ordering is highly dependent on the interface orientations, with the {111} interface being less diffuse than the {100} and {110} interfaces. This study demonstrates clearly that the physical origin of the diffuse interface is atomic layering and in-plane atomic ordering at the S/L interfaces. It is suggested that the difference in atomic layering and in-plane ordering at the S/L interface with different orientations is responsible for the observed growth anisotropy. (papers)

  15. Phenotype- and genotype-specific structural alterations in spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Serena; Battistella, Giovanni; Huddleston, Hailey; Scharf, Rebecca; Fleysher, Lazar; Rumbach, Anna F; Frucht, Steven J; Blitzer, Andrew; Ozelius, Laurie J; Simonyan, Kristina

    2017-04-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia is a focal dystonia characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles that occur selectively during speaking. Although hereditary trends have been reported in up to 16% of patients, the causative etiology of spasmodic dysphonia is unclear, and the influences of various phenotypes and genotypes on disorder pathophysiology are poorly understood. In this study, we examined structural alterations in cortical gray matter and white matter integrity in relationship to different phenotypes and putative genotypes of spasmodic dysphonia to elucidate the structural component of its complex pathophysiology. Eighty-nine patients with spasmodic dysphonia underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging to examine cortical thickness and white matter fractional anisotropy in adductor versus abductor forms (distinct phenotypes) and in sporadic versus familial cases (distinct genotypes). Phenotype-specific abnormalities were localized in the left sensorimotor cortex and angular gyrus and the white matter bundle of the right superior corona radiata. Genotype-specific alterations were found in the left superior temporal gyrus, supplementary motor area, and the arcuate portion of the left superior longitudinal fasciculus. Our findings suggest that phenotypic differences in spasmodic dysphonia arise at the level of the primary and associative areas of motor control, whereas genotype-related pathophysiological mechanisms may be associated with dysfunction of regions regulating phonological and sensory processing. Identification of structural alterations specific to disorder phenotype and putative genotype provides an important step toward future delineation of imaging markers and potential targets for novel therapeutic interventions for spasmodic dysphonia. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Structure of the liquid-vapor interface of a dilute ternary alloy: Pb and In in Ga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bin; Li Dongxu; Rice, Stuart A.

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of experimental studies of how the competition between two solutes to segregate in the liquid-vapor interface of a dilute ternary alloy influences the composition and structure of that interface. The system studied has small amounts of Pb and In dissolved in Ga; it differs from a previous study of dilute alloys containing small amounts of Pb and Sn dissolved in Ga by the addition of a new variable, namely, the valence difference between the solute atoms Pb and In. This valence difference influences the electron density distribution in the alloy liquid-vapor interface in proportion to the excess concentrations of the solute species in the interface, and thereby should affect the structure of the interface. We find that for a ternary PbInGa alloy that contains 0.039 at. % Pb and 6.31 at. % In, the Pb that segregates in the liquid-vapor interface forms a two-dimensional hexagonal crystal phase that undergoes a first-order transition to a disordered phase at T=29.0±0.1 deg. C. The two-dimensional crystalline Pb forms about 0.6 of a full monolayer; the remainder of the outer stratum of the liquid-vapor interface is filled with two-dimensional liquid In. For a ternary PbInGa alloy that contains the same amount of Pb and 12.2 at. % In, the Pb that segregates in the liquid-vapor interface forms a two-dimensional liquid down to 26.0 deg. C, the lowest temperature at which data were taken. For temperatures in excess of 29.0 deg. C two-dimensional liquid Pb and two-dimensional liquid In coexist in the interface, with the fractional occupation of the monolayer by In exceeding the fractional occupation by Pb

  17. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Abol Hassan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity.

  18. Studies on electronic structure of interfaces between Ag and gelatin for stabilization of Ag nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Tadaaki; Uchida, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Extremely high stability of Ag nanoparticles in photographic materials has forced us to study the electronic structures of the interfaces between thin layers of Ag, Au, and Pt and their surface membranes in ambient atmosphere by photoelectron yield spectroscopy in air and Kelvin probe method. Owing to the Fermi level equalization between a metal layer and a membrane coming from air, the electron transfer took place from the membrane to Pt and Au layers and from an Ag layer to the membrane, giving the reason for poor stability of Ag nanoparticles in air. The control of the Fermi level of an Ag layer with respect to that of a gelatin membrane in air could be widely made according to Nernst's equation by changing the pH and pAg values of an aqueous gelatin solution used to form the membrane, and thus available to stabilize Ag nanoparticles in a gelatin matrix. (author)

  19. SFG study on potential-dependent structure of water at Pt electrode/electrolyte solution interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Hidenori; Okada, Tsubasa; Uosaki, Kohei [Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2008-10-01

    Structure of water at Pt/electrolyte solution interface was investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. Two broad peaks were observed in OH stretching region at ca. 3200 cm{sup -1} and ca. 3400 cm{sup -1}, which are known to be due to the symmetric OH stretching (U{sub 1}) of tetrahedrally coordinated, i.e., strongly hydrogen bonded 'ice-like' water, and the asymmetric OH stretching (U{sub 3}) of water molecules in a more random arrangement, i.e., weakly hydrogen bonded 'liquid-like' water, respectively. The SFG intensity strongly depended on electrode potential. Several possibilities are suggested for the potential dependence of the SFG intensity. (author)

  20. Electronic structure and electron dynamics at an organic molecule/metal interface: interface states of tetra-tert-butyl-imine/Au(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, Sebastian; Wolf, Martin; Tegeder, Petra; Luo Ying; Haag, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission (2PPE) spectroscopies have been used to investigated the electronic structure, electron dynamics and localization at the interface between tetra-tert-butyl imine (TBI) and Au(111). At a TBI coverage of one monolayer (ML), the two highest occupied molecular orbitals, HOMO and HOMO-1, are observed at an energy of -1.9 and -2.6 eV below the Fermi level (E F ), respectively, and coincide with the d-band features of the Au substrate. In the unoccupied electronic structure, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) has been observed at 1.6 eV with respect to E F . In addition, two delocalized states that arise from the modified image potential at the TBI/metal interface have been identified. Their binding energies depend strongly on the adsorption structure of the TBI adlayer, which is coverage dependent in the submonolayer (≤1 ML) regime. Thus the binding energy of the lower interface state (IS) shifts from 3.5 eV at 1.0 ML to 4.0 eV at 0.5 ML, which is accompanied by a pronounced decrease in its lifetime from 100 fs to below 10 fs. This is a result of differences in the wave function overlap with electronic states of the Au(111) substrate at different binding energies. This study shows that in order to fully understand the electronic structure of organic adsorbates at metal surfaces, not only adsorbate- and substrate-induced electronic states have to be considered but also ISs, which are the result of a potential formed by the interaction between the adsorbate and the substrate.

  1. Structure and property relations of macromolecular self-assemblies at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhihao

    Hydrophilic polymer chains, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), are attached to glass surfaces by silylation of the silanol groups on glass surfaces with the omega-(methoxyl terminated PEG) trimethoxysilanes. These tethered polymer chains resemble the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of PEG, which exhibit excellent biocompatibility and provide a model system for studying the interactions of proteins with polymer surfaces. The low molecular weight PEGs tend to extend, forming a brush-like monolayer, whereas the longer polymer chains tend to interpenetrate each other, forming a mushroom-like PEG monolayer at the interface. Interactions between a plasma protein, bovine serum albumin, and the PEG-SAMs are investigated in terms of protein adsorption and diffusion on the surfaces by the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The diffusion and aggregation behaviors of the protein on the two monolayers are found to be quite different despite the similarities in adsorption and desorption behaviors. The results are analyzed with a hypothesis of the hydrated surface dynamics. A method of covalently bonding phospholipid molecules to silica substrates followed by loading with free phospholipids is demonstrated to form well organized and stable phospholipid self-assembled monolayers. Surfaces of such SAMs structurally mimic the aqueous sides of phospholipid bilayer membranes. The dynamics of phospholipids and an adsorbed protein, lipase, in the SAMs are probed with FRAP, in terms of lateral diffusion of both phospholipids and protein molecules. The esterase activity of lipase on the SAM surfaces is confirmed by the hydrolysis reaction of a substrate, umbelliferone stearate, showing such lipid SAMs posess biomembrane functionality in terms of interfacial activation of the membranous enzymes. Dynamics of polyethylene oxide and polypropylene oxide tri-block copolymers, PEO-PPO-PEO and PPO-PEO-PPO, at the air/water interface upon thermal stimulation is studied by

  2. Fluctuation in Interface and Electronic Structure of Single-Molecule Junctions Investigated by Current versus Bias Voltage Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isshiki, Yuji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-03-14

    Structural and electronic detail at the metal-molecule interface has a significant impact on the charge transport across the molecular junctions, but its precise understanding and control still remain elusive. On the single-molecule scale, the metal-molecule interface structures and relevant charge transport properties are subject to fluctuation, which contain the fundamental science of single-molecule transport and implication for manipulability of the transport properties in electronic devices. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to investigate the fluctuation in the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage ( I- V) measurements in combination with first-principles simulation. Contrary to conventional molecular conductance studies, this I- V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface and the molecular orbital energy level. This statistical approach was employed to study fluctuation in single-molecule junctions of 1,4-butanediamine (DAB), pyrazine (PY), 4,4'-bipyridine (BPY), and fullerene (C 60 ). We demonstrate that molecular-dependent fluctuation of σ-, π-, and π-plane-type interfaces can be captured by analyzing the molecular orbital (MO) energy level under mechanical perturbation. While the MO level of DAB with the σ-type interface shows weak distance dependence and fluctuation, the MO level of PY, BPY, and C 60 features unique distance dependence and molecular-dependent fluctuation against the mechanical perturbation. The MO level of PY and BPY with the σ+π-type interface increases with the increase in the stretch distance. In contrast, the MO level of C 60 with the π-plane-type interface decreases with the increase in the stretching perturbation. This study provides an approach to resolve the structural and electronic fluctuation in the single-molecule junctions and insight into the molecular-dependent fluctuation in

  3. Protein Data Bank Japan (PDBj): updated user interfaces, resource description framework, analysis tools for large structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Akira R; Bekker, Gert-Jan; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Kawabata, Takeshi; Ikegawa, Yasuyo; Nakamura, Haruki

    2017-01-04

    The Protein Data Bank Japan (PDBj, http://pdbj.org), a member of the worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB), accepts and processes the deposited data of experimentally determined macromolecular structures. While maintaining the archive in collaboration with other wwPDB partners, PDBj also provides a wide range of services and tools for analyzing structures and functions of proteins. We herein outline the updated web user interfaces together with RESTful web services and the backend relational database that support the former. To enhance the interoperability of the PDB data, we have previously developed PDB/RDF, PDB data in the Resource Description Framework (RDF) format, which is now a wwPDB standard called wwPDB/RDF. We have enhanced the connectivity of the wwPDB/RDF data by incorporating various external data resources. Services for searching, comparing and analyzing the ever-increasing large structures determined by hybrid methods are also described. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Elastic waves at periodically-structured surfaces and interfaces of solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Every

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple treatment of elastic wave scattering at periodically structured surfaces and interfaces of solids, and the existence and nature of surface acoustic waves (SAW and interfacial (IW waves at such structures. Our treatment is embodied in phenomenological models in which the periodicity resides in the boundary conditions. These yield zone folding and band gaps at the boundary of, and within the Brillouin zone. Above the transverse bulk wave threshold, there occur leaky or pseudo-SAW and pseudo-IW, which are attenuated via radiation into the bulk wave continuum. These have a pronounced effect on the transmission and reflection of bulk waves. We provide examples of pseudo-SAW and pseudo-IW for which the coupling to the bulk wave continuum vanishes at isloated points in the dispersion relation. These supersonic guided waves correspond to embedded discrete eigenvalues within a radiation continuum. We stress the generality of the phenomena that are exhibited at widely different scales of length and frequency, and their relevance to situations as diverse as the guiding of seismic waves in mine stopes, the metrology of periodic metal interconnect structures in the semiconductor industry, and elastic wave scattering by an array of coplanar cracks in a solid.

  5. Comparison of interface structure of BCC metallic (Fe, V and Nb) films on MgO (100) substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, J.L. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, L.Y. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China); Fu, E.G., E-mail: efu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ding, X., E-mail: dingxd@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China); Yu, K.Y., E-mail: kyyu@cup.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Wang, Y.G. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Y.Q.; Baldwin, J.K. [Experimental Physical Sciences Directorate, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Wang, X.J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu, P. [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 150001 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • The difference of BCC metal/MgO(100) interface configuration with various lattice mismatches is identified by experiments and simulations in terms of dislocations and work of separation. • The strength of bonds along interface is found to be the fundamental factor to determine the interface configurations between BCC metal and MgO substrate. • The combination of experiments and simulations shows that the O-atop model is the actual match type between BCC metal and MgO substrate. - Abstract: This study systematically investigates the interface structure of three body-centered-cubic (BCC) metallic (Fe, V and Nb) films grown on MgO(100) substrates through experiments and simulations. Orientation relationships of their interfaces with the different lattice mismatches exhibit cube-on-cube configurations. The misfit dislocations at these three interfaces exhibit different characteristics. High resolution TEM (HRTEM), combined with first principle calculations, demonstrates the O-atop match type between metal atoms and MgO substrates for the first time. The fundamental mechanism in determining the interface configuration is discussed in terms of the work of separation and delocalization of atomic charge density.

  6. Interface Structure and Elements Diffusion of As-Cast and Annealed Ductile Iron/Stainless Steel Bimetal Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramadan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bimetal casting is considered to a promising technique for the production of high performance function materials. Heat treatment process for bimetal castings became an essential tool for improving interface structure and metallurgical diffusion bond. Molten iron alloy with carbon equivalent of 4.40 is poured into sand mold cavities containing solid 304 stainless steel strips insert. Specimens are heated to 7200C in an electrical heating furnace and holded at 720 0C for 60min and 180min. For as-cast specimens, a good coherent interface structure of ductile cast iron/304 stainless bimetal with four layers interfacial microstructure are obtained. Low temperature annealing at 720oC has a significat effect on the interface layers structure, where, three layers of interface structure are obtained after 180min annealing time because of the complete dissolving of thin layer of ferrite and multi carbides (Layer 2. Low temperature annealing shows a significant effect on the diffusion of C and otherwise shows slightly effect on the diffusion of Cr and Ni. Plearlite phase of Layer 3 is trsformed to spheroidal shape instead of lamallar shape in as-cast bimetals by low tempeature annealing at 720oC. The percent of the performed spheroidal cementit increases by increasing anneaaling time. Hardness of interface layers is changed by low temperauture annealing due to the significant carbon deffussion.

  7. Combinatorial design of a nanobody that specifically targets structured RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawez, F; Duray, E; Hu, Y; Vandenameele, J; Romão, E; Vincke, C; Dumoulin, M; Galleni, M; Muyldermans, S; Vandevenne, M

    2018-04-11

    Recent advances in transcriptome sequencing and analysis have revealed the complexity of the human genome. The majority (≈ 98%) of cellular transcripts is not translated into proteins and represents a vast, unchartered world of functional non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Most of them adopt a well-defined 3D structure to achieve their biological functions. However, only very few RNA structures are currently available which reflects the challenges associated with RNA crystallization. Nevertheless, these structures would represent a critical step in understanding functions of ncRNAs and their molecular mechanisms in the cell. The overall goal of this study is to develop an innovative and versatile tool to facilitate the functional study and crystallization of structured RNAs (stRNAs). In this work, we have engineered an antibody fragment from camelid heavy-chain antibody (nanobody) able to specifically bind with low nanomolar affinity to stRNA while no binding could be detected for single-stranded DNA/RNA, double-stranded DNA/RNA or a negatively charged protein. However, this nanobody recognizes different and non-related stRNAs, this observation suggests that it binds to an epitope shared by these stRNAs. Finally, our data also show that the binding of the nanobody doesn't alter the secondary structure content of the stRNA as well as its unfolding/refolding processes during heat treatment. This work constitutes a successful proof-of-concept demonstrating that nanobodies can be engineered to recognize RNA-related epitopes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. A brain-computer interface for potential non-verbal facial communication based on EEG signals related to specific emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashihara, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Unlike assistive technology for verbal communication, the brain-machine or brain-computer interface (BMI/BCI) has not been established as a non-verbal communication tool for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Face-to-face communication enables access to rich emotional information, but individuals suffering from neurological disorders, such as ALS and autism, may not express their emotions or communicate their negative feelings. Although emotions may be inferred by looking at facial expressions, emotional prediction for neutral faces necessitates advanced judgment. The process that underlies brain neuronal responses to neutral faces and causes emotional changes remains unknown. To address this problem, therefore, this study attempted to decode conditioned emotional reactions to neutral face stimuli. This direction was motivated by the assumption that if electroencephalogram (EEG) signals can be used to detect patients' emotional responses to specific inexpressive faces, the results could be incorporated into the design and development of BMI/BCI-based non-verbal communication tools. To these ends, this study investigated how a neutral face associated with a negative emotion modulates rapid central responses in face processing and then identified cortical activities. The conditioned neutral face-triggered event-related potentials that originated from the posterior temporal lobe statistically significantly changed during late face processing (600-700 ms) after stimulus, rather than in early face processing activities, such as P1 and N170 responses. Source localization revealed that the conditioned neutral faces increased activity in the right fusiform gyrus (FG). This study also developed an efficient method for detecting implicit negative emotional responses to specific faces by using EEG signals. A classification method based on a support vector machine enables the easy classification of neutral faces that trigger specific individual emotions. In

  9. Exposure to Hycanthone alters chromatin structure around specific gene functions and specific repeats in Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eRoquis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni is a parasitic plathyhelminth responsible for intestinal schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis, a disease affecting 67 million people worldwide and causing an important economic burden. The schistosomicides hycanthone, and its later proxy oxamniquine, were widely used for treatments in endemic areas during the 20th century. Recently, the mechanism of action, as well as the genetic origin of a stably and Mendelian inherited resistance for both drugs was elucidated in two strains. However, several observations suggested early on that alternative mechanisms might exist, by which resistance could be induced for these two drugs in sensitive lines of schistosomes. This induced resistance appeared rapidly, within the first generation, but was metastable (not stably inherited. Epigenetic inheritance could explain such a phenomenon and we therefore re-analyzed the historical data with our current knowledge of epigenetics. In addition, we performed new experiments such as ChIP-seq on hycanthone treated worms. We found distinct chromatin structure changes between sensitive worms and induced resistant worms from the same strain. No specific pathway was discovered, but genes in which chromatin structure modification were observed are mostly associated with transport and catabolism, which makes sense in the context of the elimination of the drug. Specific differences were observed in the repetitive compartment of the genome. We finally describe what types of experiments are needed to understand the complexity of heritability that can be based on genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms for drug resistance in schistosomes.

  10. Phase constitution and interface structure of nano-sized Ag-Cu/AlN multilayers: Experiment and ab initio modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigozzi, Giancarlo; Janczak-Rusch, Jolanta; Passerone, Daniele; Antonio Pignedoli, Carlo; Patscheider, Joerg; Jeurgens, Lars P. H. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Antusek, Andrej [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Paulinska 16, 917 24 Trnava (Slovakia); Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); University of Rzeszow, Institute of Physics, ul. Rejtana 16a, 35-959 Rzeszow (Poland); Bissig, Vinzenz [Kirsten Soldering AG, Hinterbergstrasse 32, CH-6330 Cham (Switzerland)

    2012-10-29

    Nano-sized Ag-Cu{sub 8nm}/AlN{sub 10nm} multilayers were deposited by reactive DC sputtering on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. Investigation of the phase constitution and interface structure of the multilayers evidences a phase separation of the alloy sublayers into nanosized grains of Ag and Cu. The interfaces between the Ag grains and the quasi-single-crystalline AlN sublayers are semi-coherent, whereas the corresponding Cu/AlN interfaces are incoherent. The orientation relationship between Ag and AlN is constant throughout the entire multilayer stack. These observations are consistent with atomistic models of the interfaces as obtained by ab initio calculations.

  11. Electronic structures and stability of Ni/Bi2Te3 and Co/Bi2Te3 interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Ka; Wang, Weichao; Alshareef, Husam N.; Gupta, Rahul P.; White, John B.; Gnade, Bruce E.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structures and stability for Ni/Bi 2Te3, NiTe/Bi2Te3, Co/Bi 2Te3 and CoTe2/Bi2Te3 interfaces by first-principles calculations. It is found that the surface termination strongly affects the band alignment. Ni and Co are found to form Ohmic contacts to Bi2Te3. The interface formation energy for Co/Bi2Te3 interfaces is much lower than that of Ni/Bi2Te3 interfaces. Furthermore, we found that NiTe on Bi2Te3 is more stable than Ni, while the formation energies for Co and CoTe2 on Bi2Te3 are comparable. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Electronic structures and stability of Ni/Bi2Te3 and Co/Bi2Te3 interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Ka; Wang Weichao; Alshareef, Husam N; Gupta, Rahul P; Gnade, Bruce E; Cho, Kyeongjae; White, John B

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structures and stability for Ni/Bi 2 Te 3 , NiTe/Bi 2 Te 3 , Co/Bi 2 Te 3 and CoTe 2 /Bi 2 Te 3 interfaces by first-principles calculations. It is found that the surface termination strongly affects the band alignment. Ni and Co are found to form Ohmic contacts to Bi 2 Te 3 . The interface formation energy for Co/Bi 2 Te 3 interfaces is much lower than that of Ni/Bi 2 Te 3 interfaces. Furthermore, we found that NiTe on Bi 2 Te 3 is more stable than Ni, while the formation energies for Co and CoTe 2 on Bi 2 Te 3 are comparable.

  13. Electronic structures and stability of Ni/Bi2Te3 and Co/Bi2Te3 interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Ka

    2010-03-04

    We investigate the electronic structures and stability for Ni/Bi 2Te3, NiTe/Bi2Te3, Co/Bi 2Te3 and CoTe2/Bi2Te3 interfaces by first-principles calculations. It is found that the surface termination strongly affects the band alignment. Ni and Co are found to form Ohmic contacts to Bi2Te3. The interface formation energy for Co/Bi2Te3 interfaces is much lower than that of Ni/Bi2Te3 interfaces. Furthermore, we found that NiTe on Bi2Te3 is more stable than Ni, while the formation energies for Co and CoTe2 on Bi2Te3 are comparable. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Confocal microscopic observation of structural changes in glass-ionomer cements and tooth interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, T F; Pagliari, D; Sidhu, S K; Naasan, M A

    1998-03-01

    This study aimed to develop techniques to allow dynamic imaging of a cavity before, during and after placement of glass-ionomer restorative materials. Cavities were cut in recently extracted third molars and the teeth longitudinally sectioned. Each hemisected tooth surface was placed in green modelling compound at 90 to the optical axis of the microscope. The cavity surface was imaged using a video rate confocal microscope in conjunction with an internally focusable microscope objective. The sample on the stage was pushed up to the objective lens which 'clamped' the cover glass onto it. Water, glycerine or oil was placed below the coverglass, with oil above. Internal tooth structures were imaged by changing the internal focus of the objective. The restorative material was then placed into the cavity. Video images were stored either onto video tape or digitally, using a frame grabber, computer and mass memory storage. Software controls produced time-lapse recordings of the interface over time. Preliminary experiments have examined the placement and early maturation of conventional glass-ionomer cements and a syringeable resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Initial contact of the cement matrix and glass particles was visible as the plastic material rolled past the enamel and dentine, before making a bond. Evidence for water movement from the dentine into the cement has also been seen. After curing, the early dimensional changes in the cements due to water flux were apparent using the time-lapse facility. This new technique enables examination of developing tooth/restoration interfaces and the tracking of movement in materials.

  15. Molecular mechanics and structure of the fluid-solid interface in simple fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gerald J.; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.

    2017-09-01

    Near a fluid-solid interface, the fluid spatial density profile is highly nonuniform at the molecular scale. This nonuniformity can have profound effects on the dynamical behavior of the fluid and has been shown to play an especially important role when modeling a wide variety of nanoscale heat and momentum transfer phenomena. We use molecular-mechanics arguments and molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations to develop a better understanding of the structure of the first fluid layer directly adjacent to the solid in the layering regime, as delineated by a nondimensional number that compares the effects of wall-fluid interaction to thermal energy. Using asymptotic analysis of the Nernst-Planck equation, we show that features of the fluid density profile close to the wall, such as the areal density of the first layer ΣFL (defined as the number of atoms in this layer per unit of fluid-solid interfacial area), can be expressed as polynomial functions of the fluid average density ρave. This is found to be in agreement with MD simulations, which also show that the width of the first layer hFL is a linear function of the average density and only a weak function of the temperature T . These results can be combined to show that, for system average densities corresponding to a dense fluid (ρave≥0.7 ), the ratio C ≡ΣFLρavehFL, representing a density enhancement with respect to the bulk fluid, depends only weakly on temperature and is essentially independent of density. Further MD simulations suggest that the above results, nominally valid for large systems (solid in contact with semi-infinite fluid), also describe fluid-solid interfaces under considerable nanoconfinement, provided ρave is appropriately defined.

  16. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N(2) bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N(2) bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N(2) sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, "semi-unfolded" ↔ "native" ↔ "globally unfolded" → "aggregated". This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  17. Structure of ionic liquid-water mixtures at interfaces: x-ray and neutron reflectometry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauw, Yansen; Rodopoulos, Theo; Horne, Mike; Follink, Bart; Hamilton, Bill; Knott, Robert; Nelson, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Fundamental studies on the effect of water in ionic liquids are necessary since the overall performance of ionic liquids in many industrial applications is often hampered by the presence of water.[1] Based on this understanding, the surface and interfacial structures of 1-butyl-1methylpyrrolidinium trifluoromethylsulfonylimide [C4mpyr][NTf2] ionic liquid-water mixtures were probed using x-ray and neutron reflectometry techniques. At the gas-liquid surface, a thick cation+water layer was detected next to the phase boundary, followed by an increasing presence of anion towards the bulk. The overall thickness of the surface exhibits non-monotonic trends with an increasing water content, which explains similar phenomenological trends in surface tension reported in the literature.[2] At an electrified interface, the interfacial structure of pure ionic liquids probed by neutron reflectometry shows similar trends to those predicted by a mean-field model.[3] However, the presence of water within the electrical double-layer is less obvious, although it is widely known that water reduces electrochemical window of ionic liquids. To shed light on this issue, further studies are currently in progress.

  18. A Brain–Computer Interface for Potential Nonverbal Facial Communication Based on EEG Signals Related to Specific Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji eKashihara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Unlike assistive technology for verbal communication, the brain–machine or brain–computer interface (BMI/BCI has not been established as a nonverbal communication tool for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients. Face-to-face communication enables access to rich emotional information, but individuals suffering from neurological disorders, such as ALS and autism, may not express their emotions or communicate their negative feelings. Although emotions may be inferred by looking at facial expressions, emotional prediction for neutral faces necessitates advanced judgment. The process that underlies brain neuronal responses to neutral faces and causes emotional changes remains unknown. To address this problem, therefore, this study attempted to decode conditioned emotional reactions to neutral face stimuli. This direction was motivated by the assumption that if electroencephalogram (EEG signals can be used to detect patients’ emotional responses to specific inexpressive faces, the results could be incorporated into the design and development of BMI/BCI-based nonverbal communication tools. To these ends, this study investigated how a neutral face associated with a negative emotion modulates rapid central responses in face processing and then identified cortical activities. The conditioned neutral face-triggered event-related potentials that originated from the posterior temporal lobe statistically significantly changed during late face processing (600–700 ms after stimulus, rather than in early face processing activities, such as P1 and N170 responses. Source localization revealed that the conditioned neutral faces increased activity in the right fusiform gyrus. This study also developed an efficient method for detecting implicit negative emotional responses to specific faces by using EEG signals.

  19. The atomic structure of the Si(111)-Pb buried interface grown on the Si(111)-(#sq root#3 x #sq root#3)-Pb reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howes, P.B.; Edwards, K.A.; Macdonald, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    that there are structural differences between the buried interfaces. We present surface X-ray diffraction measurements of the interface grown from the incommensurate Si(111)-(root 3 x root 3)-R30 degrees-Pb reconstruction and show that, in contrast to the starting surface, the interface comprises the junction between...

  20. Engineering the Surface/Interface Structures of Titanium Dioxide Micro and Nano Architectures towards Environmental and Electrochemical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 materials have been intensively studied in the past years because of many varied applications. This mini review article focuses on TiO2 micro and nano architectures with the prevalent crystal structures (anatase, rutile, brookite, and TiO2(B, and summarizes the major advances in the surface and interface engineering and applications in environmental and electrochemical applications. We analyze the advantages of surface/interface engineered TiO2 micro and nano structures, and present the principles and growth mechanisms of TiO2 nanostructures via different strategies, with an emphasis on rational control of the surface and interface structures. We further discuss the applications of TiO2 micro and nano architectures in photocatalysis, lithium/sodium ion batteries, and Li–S batteries. Throughout the discussion, the relationship between the device performance and the surface/interface structures of TiO2 micro and nano structures will be highlighted. Then, we discuss the phase transitions of TiO2 nanostructures and possible strategies of improving the phase stability. The review concludes with a perspective on the current challenges and future research directions.

  1. Play in two societies: pervasiveness of process, specificity of structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, M H; Haynes, O M; Pascual, L; Painter, K M; Galperín, C

    1999-01-01

    The present study compared Argentine (N = 39) and U.S. (N = 43) children and their mothers on exploratory, symbolic, and social play and interaction when children were 20 months of age. Patterns of cultural similarity and difference emerged. In both cultures, boys engaged in more exploratory play than girls, and girls engaged in more symbolic play than boys; mothers of boys engaged in more exploratory play than mothers of girls, and mothers of girls engaged in more symbolic play than mothers of boys. Moreover, in both cultures, individual variation in children's exploratory and symbolic play was specifically associated with individual variation in mothers' exploratory and symbolic play, respectively. Between cultures, U.S. children and their mothers engaged in more exploratory play, whereas Argentine children and their mothers engaged in more symbolic play. Moreover, Argentine mothers exceeded U.S. mothers in social play and verbal praise of their children. During an early period of mental and social growth, general developmental processes in play may be pervasive, but dyadic and cultural structures are apparently specific. Overall, Argentine and U.S. dyads utilized different modes of exploration, representation, and interaction--emphasizing "other-directed" acts of pretense versus "functional" and "combinatorial" exploration, for example--and these individual and dyadic allocentric versus idiocentric stresses accord with larger cultural concerns of collectivism versus individualism in the two societies.

  2. On the specification of structural equation models for ecological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, J.B.; Michael, Anderson T.; Han, O.; Scheiner, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    The use of structural equation modeling (SEM) is often motivated by its utility for investigating complex networks of relationships, but also because of its promise as a means of representing theoretical concepts using latent variables. In this paper, we discuss characteristics of ecological theory and some of the challenges for proper specification of theoretical ideas in structural equation models (SE models). In our presentation, we describe some of the requirements for classical latent variable models in which observed variables (indicators) are interpreted as the effects of underlying causes. We also describe alternative model specifications in which indicators are interpreted as having causal influences on the theoretical concepts. We suggest that this latter nonclassical specification (which involves another variable type-the composite) will often be appropriate for ecological studies because of the multifaceted nature of our theoretical concepts. In this paper, we employ the use of meta-models to aid the translation of theory into SE models and also to facilitate our ability to relate results back to our theories. We demonstrate our approach by showing how a synthetic theory of grassland biodiversity can be evaluated using SEM and data from a coastal grassland. In this example, the theory focuses on the responses of species richness to abiotic stress and disturbance, both directly and through intervening effects on community biomass. Models examined include both those based on classical forms (where each concept is represented using a single latent variable) and also ones in which the concepts are recognized to be multifaceted and modeled as such. To address the challenge of matching SE models with the conceptual level of our theory, two approaches are illustrated, compositing and aggregation. Both approaches are shown to have merits, with the former being preferable for cases where the multiple facets of a concept have widely differing effects in the

  3. Soft Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strzalkowski, Ireneusz

    1997-01-01

    This book presents an extended form of the 1994 Dirac Memorial Lecture delivered by Pierre Gilles de Gennes at Cambridge University. The main task of the presentation is to show the beauty and richness of structural forms and phenomena which are observed at soft interfaces between two media. They are much more complex than forms and phenomena existing in each phase separately. Problems are discussed including both traditional, classical techniques, such as the contact angle in static and dynamic partial wetting, as well as the latest research methodology, like 'environmental' scanning electron microscopes. The book is not a systematic lecture on phenomena but it can be considered as a compact set of essays on topics which particularly fascinate the author. The continuum theory widely used in the book is based on a deep molecular approach. The author is particularly interested in a broad-minded rheology of liquid systems at interfaces with specific emphasis on polymer melts. To study this, the author has developed a special methodology called anemometry near walls. The second main topic presented in the book is the problem of adhesion. Molecular processes, energy transformations and electrostatic interaction are included in an interesting discussion of the many aspects of the principles of adhesion. The third topic concerns welding between two polymer surfaces, such as A/A and A/B interfaces. Of great worth is the presentation of various unsolved, open problems. The kind of topics and brevity of description indicate that this book is intended for a well prepared reader. However, for any reader it will present an interesting picture of how many mysterious processes are acting in the surrounding world and how these phenomena are perceived by a Nobel Laureate, who won that prize mainly for his investigations in this field. (book review)

  4. Multi-scale structuration of the electrode-electrolyte interface for applications in bio-electro-catalysis; Structuration multi-echelle de l'interface electrode-electrolyte pour des applications en bioelectrocatalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, A. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., LACReM, ENSCPB, 33 - Pessac (France)

    2006-07-01

    In this work, two approaches have been combined to elaborate bio-functionalized interfaces having an original structure and well defined at several characteristic scales. These two approaches are 1)the growth of conducting or non conducting materials through organized structures and 2)the chemistry of non-covalent intermolecular bonds leading to the assembling of molecules towards interfacial structures having greatest size. With a deep physico-chemical characterization, it has been possible to understand the properties of these multi-scale structures and to propose different applications fields as for instance bio-electro-catalysis or photovoltaic cells. (O.M.)

  5. Structural and shear characteristics of adsorbed sodium caseinate and monoglyceride mixed monolayers at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Patino, Juan M; Cejudo Fernández, Marta; Carrera Sánchez, Cecilio; Rodríguez Niño, Ma Rosario

    2007-09-01

    The structural and shear characteristics of mixed monolayers formed by an adsorbed Na-caseinate film and a spread monoglyceride (monopalmitin or monoolein) on the previously adsorbed protein film have been analyzed. Measurements of the surface pressure (pi)-area (A) isotherm and surface shear viscosity (eta(s)) were obtained at 20 degrees C and at pH 7 in a modified Wilhelmy-type film balance. The structural and shear characteristics of the mixed films depend on the surface pressure and on the composition of the mixed film. At surface pressures lower than the equilibrium surface pressure of Na-caseinate (at picaseinate and monoglyceride coexist at the interface, with a structural polymorphism or a liquid expanded structure due to the presence of monopalmitin or monoolein in the mixture, respectively. At higher surface pressures, collapsed Na-caseinate residues may be displaced from the interface by monoglyceride molecules. For a Na-caseinate-monopalmitin mixed film the eta(s) value varies greatly with the surface pressure (or surface density) of the mixed monolayer at the interface. In general, the greater the surface pressure, the greater are the values of eta(s). However, the values of eta(s) for a Na-caseinate-monoolein mixed monolayer are very low and practically do not depend on the surface pressure. The collapsed Na-caseinate residues displaced from the interface by monoglyceride molecules at pi>pi(e)(CS) have important repercussions on the shear characteristics of the mixed films.

  6. Interface manipulation in GaxIn1-xAs/InP multiple layer structures grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rongen, R.T.H.; van Rijswijk, A.J.C.; Leijs, M.R.; Es, van C.M.; Vonk, H.; Wolter, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    In this study the control of interfacial layers in nanometre thin heterostructures is demonstrated by variation of the growth interruption sequence (GIS) at the binary - ternary interfaces. All samples have been prepared by chemical beam epitaxy simultaneously growing the structures on exact (100)

  7. Strain induced atomic structure at the Ir-doped LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M; Arras, R; Warot-Fonrose, B; Hungria, T; Lippmaa, M; Daimon, H; Casanove, M J

    2017-11-01

    The structure of Ir-doped LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 (001) interfaces was investigated on the atomic scale using probe-corrected transmission electron microscopy in high-angle annular dark-field scanning mode (HAADF-STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), combined with first-principles calculations. We report the evolution of the strain state experimentally measured in a 5 unit-cell thick LaAlO 3 film as a function of the Ir concentration in the topmost SrTiO 3 layer. It is shown that the LaAlO 3 layers remain fully elastically strained up to 3% of Ir doping, whereas a higher doping level seems to promote strain relaxation through enhanced cationic interdiffusion. The observed differences between the energy loss near edge structure (ELNES) of Ti-L 2,3 and O-K edges at non-doped and Ir-doped interfaces are consistent with the location of the Ir dopants at the interface, up to 3% of Ir doping. These findings, supported by the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, provide strong evidence that the effect of dopant concentrations on the properties of this kind of interface should not be analyzed without obtaining essential information from the fine structural and chemical analysis of the grown structures.

  8. Interface properties of bilayer structure Alq{sub 3}/Fe{sub 65}Co{sub 35}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhen, E-mail: wangzhen@chd.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710064 (China); Xu, Chunlong; Wang, Jinguo; Chang, Qiaoli [Department of Applied Physics, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710064 (China); Zuo, Yalu; Xi, Li [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Bilayer structure of Alq{sub 3}/FeCo was fabricated in a dual ultra high vacuum chamber. • Organic layer reacts partially with the FeCo film. • Electronic injection barrier is 0.76 eV in the interface. • The induced uniaxial anisotropy appears in Alq{sub 3}/FeCo. - Abstract: The interface between the organic and magnetic electrodes is a fundamental problem in organic spintronics devices. Therefore, bilayer structure of Alq{sub 3}/FeCo was fabricated in a dual ultra high vacuum chamber. The electronic structure of Alq{sub 3}–FeCo interface has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy with Argon ion etching technique. It was found that organic layer reacts partially with the FeCo film, forming complex binding of metallic carbide and/or oxidation state in the interfacial region. Electronic injection barrier is 0.76 eV in the interface. The structural variation of the contact region is proposed to be one of the possible factors resulting in spin-injection failure. The magnetic properties of FeCo film with different thicknesses on glass substrate and Alq{sub 3} layer are also investigated. The induced uniaxial anisotropy only presents in 3 nm FeCo thickness for glass/FeCo, while it appears in 3–5 nm FeCo for Alq{sub 3}/FeCo.

  9. Oxide nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened steel: crystallographic structure and interface with ferrite matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Oxide nanoparticles are quintessential for ensuring the extraordinary properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. In this study, the crystallographic structure of oxide nanoparticles, and their interface with the ferritic steel matrix in an Al-alloyed ODS steel, i.e. PM2000, were...

  10. Atomic and electronic structures of lattice mismatched Cu{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuzhi [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Mail Stop 66, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavaipatti, Balasubramaniam; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kim, Sung-Joo; Pan, Xiaoqing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ager, Joel W.; Wang, Lin-Wang, E-mail: lwwang@lbl.gov [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Mail Stop 66, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Joint Center of Artificial Photosynthesis, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-05-26

    Heterojunction interfaces between metal oxides are often highly lattice mismatched. The atomic and electronic structures of such interfaces, however, are not well understood. We have synthesized Cu{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} heterojunction thin films with 13% lattice mismatch and studied the interface via experimental methods and large-scale density function theory calculations of supercells containing ∼1300 atoms. We find that an interface of epitaxial quality is formed via a coincidence site lattice of 8 Cu{sub 2}O unit cells matching 9 TiO{sub 2} unit cells. Calculations reveal the existence of a dislocation core of the O sublattices at the interface and a random arrangement of one layer of interfacial Cu atoms. The interfacial electronic structure is found to be mostly determined by the interfacial Cu distribution, rather than by the O dislocation core. The conduction band minimum and valence band maximum states are spatially separated, and there is no strongly localized state near the core.

  11. An object-oriented scripting interface to a legacy electronic structure code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahn, Sune Rastad; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2002-01-01

    The authors have created an object-oriented scripting interface to a mature density functional theory code. The interface gives users a high-level, flexible handle on the code without rewriting the underlying number-crunching code. The authors also discuss design issues and the advantages...

  12. Deducing 2D Crystal Structure at the Solid/Liquid Interface with Atomic Resolution by Combined STM and SFG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Arthur; Ahn, Seokhoon; Matzger, Adam J.; Chen, Zhan

    2009-03-01

    Supplemented by computed models, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) can provide detailed structure of 2D crystals formed at the liquid/solid interface with atomic resolution. However, some structural information such as functional group orientations in such 2D crystals needs to be tested experimentally to ensure the accuracy of the deduced structures. Due to the limited sensitivity, many other experimental techniques such as Raman and infrared spectroscopy have not been allowed to provide such structural information of 2D crystals. Here we showed that Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (SFG) can measure average orientation of functional groups in such 2D crystals, or physisorbed monolayers, providing key experimental data to aid in the modeling and interpretation of the STM images. The usefulness of combining these two techniques is demonstrated with a phthalate diesters monolayer formed at the 1-phenyloctane/ highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) interface. The spatial orientation of the ester C=O of the monolayer was successfully determined using SFG.

  13. Structure-Based Virtual Ligand Screening on the XRCC4/DNA Ligase IV Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchon, Grégory; Bombarde, Oriane; Trivedi, Mansi; Négrel, Aurélie; Inard, Cyril; Giudetti, Brigitte; Baltas, Michel; Milon, Alain; Modesti, Mauro; Czaplicki, Georges; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    The association of DNA Ligase IV (Lig4) with XRCC4 is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in humans. DSBs cytotoxicity is largely exploited in anticancer therapy. Thus, NHEJ is an attractive target for strategies aimed at increasing the sensitivity of tumors to clastogenic anticancer treatments. However the high affinity of the XRCC4/Lig4 interaction and the extended protein-protein interface make drug screening on this target particularly challenging. Here, we conducted a pioneering study aimed at interfering with XRCC4/Lig4 assembly. By Molecular Dynamics simulation using the crystal structure of the complex, we first delineated the Lig4 clamp domain as a limited suitable target. Then, we performed in silico screening of ~95,000 filtered molecules on this Lig4 subdomain. Hits were evaluated by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry, Saturation Transfer Difference - NMR spectroscopy and interaction assays with purified recombinant proteins. In this way we identified the first molecule able to prevent Lig4 binding to XRCC4 in vitro. This compound has a unique tripartite interaction with the Lig4 clamp domain that suggests a starting chemotype for rational design of analogous molecules with improved affinity.

  14. NiO/Fe(001): Magnetic anisotropy, exchange bias, and interface structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mlynczak, E. [Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Niezapominajek 8, 30-239 Krakow (Poland); Luches, P. [S3, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Via G. Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Valeri, S. [S3, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Via G. Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Matematiche e Informatiche, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Korecki, J. [Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Niezapominajek 8, 30-239 Krakow (Poland); Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, al.Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2013-06-21

    The magnetic and structural properties of NiO/Fe epitaxial bilayers grown on MgO(001) were studied using magnetooptic Kerr effect (MOKE) and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). The bilayers were prepared under ultra high vacuum conditions using molecular beam epitaxy with oblique deposition. Two systems were compared: one showing the exchange bias (100ML-NiO/24ML-Fe), ML stands for a monolayer, and another where the exchange bias was not observed (50ML-NiO/50ML-Fe). For both, the magnetic anisotropy was found to be complex, yet dominated by the growth-induced uniaxial anisotropy. The training effect was observed for the 100ML-NiO/24ML-Fe system and quantitatively described using the spin glass model. The composition and magnetic state of the interfacial Fe layers were studied using {sup 57}Fe-CEMS. An iron oxide phase (Fe{sup 3+}{sub 4}Fe{sup 2+}{sub 1}O{sub 7}), as thick as 31 A, was identified at the NiO/Fe interface in the as-deposited samples. The ferrimagnetic nature of the interfacial iron oxide film explains the complex magnetic anisotropy observed in the samples.

  15. Revealing the Interface Structure and Bonding Mechanism of Coupling Agent Treated WPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuping Rao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the interfacial optimisation of wood plastic composites (WPC based on recycled wood flour and polyethylene by employing maleated and silane coupling agents. The effect of the incorporation of the coupling agents on the variation of chemical structure of the composites were investigated by Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and Solid state 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR analyses. The results revealed the chemical reactions that occurred between the coupling agents and raw materials, which thus contributed to the enhancement of compatibility and interfacial adhesion between the constituents of WPC. NMR results also indicated that there existed the transformation of crystalline cellulose to an amorphous state during the coupling agent treatments, reflecting the inferior resonance of crystalline carbohydrates. Fluorescence Microscope (FM and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM analyses showed the improvements of wood particle dispersion and wettability, compatibility of the constituents, and resin penetration, and impregnation of the composites after the coupling agent treatments. The optimised interface of the composites was attributed to interdiffusion, electrostatic adhesion, chemical reactions, and mechanical interlocking bonding mechanisms.

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Cool Flare Loops Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikuła, K.; Berlicki, A. [Astronomical Institute, University of Wrocław, Kopernika 11, 51–622 Wrocław (Poland); Heinzel, P.; Liu, W., E-mail: mikula@astro.uni.wroc.pl [Astronomical Institute, The Czech Academy of Sciences, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic)

    2017-08-10

    Flare loops were well observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) during the gradual phase of two solar flares on 2014 March 29 and 2015 June 22. Cool flare loops are visible in various spectral lines formed at chromospheric and transition-region temperatures and exhibit large downflows which correspond to the standard scenario. The principal aim of this work is to analyze the structure and dynamics of cool flare loops observed in Mg ii lines. Synthetic profiles of the Mg ii h line are computed using the classical cloud model and assuming a uniform background intensity. In this paper, we study novel IRIS NUV observations of such loops in Mg ii h and k lines and also show the behavior of hotter lines detected in the FUV channel. We obtained the spatial evolution of the velocities: near the loop top, the flow velocities are small and they are increasing toward the loop legs. Moreover, from slit-jaw image (SJI) movies, we observe some plasma upflows into the loops, which are also detectable in Mg ii spectra. The brightness of the loops systematically decreases with increasing flow velocity, and we ascribe this to the effect of Doppler dimming, which works for Mg ii lines. Emission profiles of Mg ii were found to be extremely broad, and we explain this through the large unresolved non-thermal motions.

  17. A theoretical study of structural and electronic properties of pentacene/Al(100) interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranya, G; Nair, Shiny; Natarajan, V; Kolandaivel, P; Senthilkumar, K

    2012-09-01

    The first principle calculations within the framework of density functional theory have been performed for the pentacene molecule deposited on the aluminum Al(100) substrate to study the structural and electronic properties of the pentacene/Al(100) interface. The most stable configuration was found at bridge site with 45° rotation of the pentacene molecule on Al(100) surface with a vertical distance of 3.4 Å within LDA and 3.8 Å within GGA functionals. The calculated adsorption energy reveals that the adsorption of pentacene molecule on Al(100) surface is physisorption. For the stable adsorption geometry the electronic properties such as density of states (DOS), partial density of states (PDOS), Mulliken population analysis and Schottky barrier height are studied. The analysis of atomic charge, DOS and PDOS show that the charge is transferred from the Al(100) surface to pentacene molecule, and the transferred charge is about -0.05 electrons. For the adsorbed system, the calculated Schottky barrier height for hole and electron transport is 0.27 and 1.55 eV, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Feasibility of task-specific brain-machine interface training for upper-extremity paralysis in patients with chronic hemiparetic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Atsuko; Kawakami, Michiyuki; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Hiramoto, Miho; Honaga, Kaoru; Abe, Kaoru; Mizuno, Katsuhiro; Ushiba, Junichi; Liu, Meigen

    2018-01-10

    Brain-machine interface training was developed for upper-extremity rehabilitation for patients with severe hemiparesis. Its clinical application, however, has been limited because of its lack of feasibility in real-world rehabilitation settings. We developed a new compact task-specific brain-machine interface system that enables task-specific training, including reach-and-grasp tasks, and studied its clinical feasibility and effectiveness for upper-extremity motor paralysis in patients with stroke. Prospective beforeâ€"after study. Twenty-six patients with severe chronic hemiparetic stroke. Participants were trained with the brain-machine interface system to pick up and release pegs during 40-min sessions and 40 min of standard occupational therapy per day for 10 days. Fugl-Meyer upper-extremity motor (FMA) and Motor Activity Log-14 amount of use (MAL-AOU) scores were assessed before and after the intervention. To test its feasibility, 4 occupational therapists who operated the system for the first time assessed it with the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology (QUEST) 2.0. FMA and MAL-AOU scores improved significantly after brain-machine interface training, with the effect sizes being medium and large, respectively (pmachine interface system is feasible for use in real-world clinical settings.

  19. Interface investigation of solution processed high- κ ZrO2/Si MOS structure by DLTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Mondal, Sandip; Rao, Ksr Koteswara

    The interfacial region is dominating due to the continuous downscaling and integration of high- k oxides in CMOS applications. The accurate characterization of high- k oxides/semiconductor interface has the significant importance towards its usage in memory and thin film devices. The interface traps at the high - k /semiconductor interface can be quantified by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) with better accuracy in contrast to capacitance-voltage (CV) and conductance technique. We report the fabrication of high- k ZrO2 films on p-Si substrate by a simple and inexpensive sol-gel spin-coating technique. Further, the ZrO2/Si interface is characterized through DLTS. The flat-band voltage (VFB) and the density of slow interface states (oxide trapped charges) extracted from CV characteristics are 0.37 V and 2x10- 11 C/cm2, respectively. The activation energy, interface state density and capture cross-section quantified by DLTS are EV + 0.42 eV, 3.4x1011 eV- 1 cm- 2 and 5.8x10- 18 cm2, respectively. The high quality ZrO2 films own high dielectric constant 15 with low leakage current density might be an appropriate insulating layer in future electronic application. The low value of interface state density and capture cross-section are the indication of high quality interface and the defect present at the interface may not affect the device performance to a great extent. The DLTS study provides a broad understanding about the traps present at the interface of spin-coated ZrO2/Si.

  20. Structural interface parameters are discriminatory in recognising near-native poses of protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sony Malhotra

    Full Text Available Interactions at the molecular level in the cellular environment play a very crucial role in maintaining the physiological functioning of the cell. These molecular interactions exist at varied levels viz. protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid interactions or protein-small molecules interactions. Presently in the field, these interactions and their mechanisms mark intensively studied areas. Molecular interactions can also be studied computationally using the approach named as Molecular Docking. Molecular docking employs search algorithms to predict the possible conformations for interacting partners and then calculates interaction energies. However, docking proposes number of solutions as different docked poses and hence offers a serious challenge to identify the native (or near native structures from the pool of these docked poses. Here, we propose a rigorous scoring scheme called DockScore which can be used to rank the docked poses and identify the best docked pose out of many as proposed by docking algorithm employed. The scoring identifies the optimal interactions between the two protein partners utilising various features of the putative interface like area, short contacts, conservation, spatial clustering and the presence of positively charged and hydrophobic residues. DockScore was first trained on a set of 30 protein-protein complexes to determine the weights for different parameters. Subsequently, we tested the scoring scheme on 30 different protein-protein complexes and native or near-native structure were assigned the top rank from a pool of docked poses in 26 of the tested cases. We tested the ability of DockScore to discriminate likely dimer interactions that differ substantially within a homologous family and also demonstrate that DOCKSCORE can distinguish correct pose for all 10 recent CAPRI targets.

  1. Structure, interface abruptness and strain relaxation in self-assisted grown InAs/GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigeri, Cesare, E-mail: frigeri@imem.cnr.it [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parma (Italy); Scarpellini, David [L–NESS and Dept. Materials Science, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Department of Industrial Engineering University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Fedorov, Alexey [LNESS and CNR-IFN, Como (Italy); Bietti, Sergio; Somaschini, Claudio [L–NESS and Dept. Materials Science, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Grillo, Vincenzo [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parma (Italy); CNR-S3-NANO Center, Modena (Italy); Esposito, Luca; Salvalaglio, Marco; Marzegalli, Anna; Montalenti, Francesco [L–NESS and Dept. Materials Science, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Sanguinetti, Stefano [L–NESS and Dept. Materials Science, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); LNESS and CNR-IFN, Como (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • We study 2 critical issues (interface abruptness and strain release) in InAs/GaAs NWs. • Structural and chemical interface sharpness ≤1.5 nm, better than in previous reports. • Simultaneous elastic and plastic relaxation is shown that agrees with FEM simulations. • Structural, chemical and strain release investigations were performed by STEM. • New MBE self-seeded method whereby InAs is grown by splitting In and As depositions. - Abstract: The structure, interface abruptness and strain relaxation in InAs/GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy in the Ga self-catalysed mode on (111) Si have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The nanowires had the zincblende phase. The InAs/GaAs interface was atomically and chemically sharp with a width around 1.5 nm, i.e. significantly smaller than previously reported values. This was achieved by the consumption of the Ga droplet and formation of a flat top facet of the GaAs followed by the growth of InAs by splitting the depositions of In and As. Both elastic and plastic strain relaxation took place simultaneously. Experimental TEM results about strain relaxation very well agree with linear elasticity theory calculations by the finite element methods.

  2. Structure, interface abruptness and strain relaxation in self-assisted grown InAs/GaAs nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigeri, Cesare; Scarpellini, David; Fedorov, Alexey; Bietti, Sergio; Somaschini, Claudio; Grillo, Vincenzo; Esposito, Luca; Salvalaglio, Marco; Marzegalli, Anna; Montalenti, Francesco; Sanguinetti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We study 2 critical issues (interface abruptness and strain release) in InAs/GaAs NWs. • Structural and chemical interface sharpness ≤1.5 nm, better than in previous reports. • Simultaneous elastic and plastic relaxation is shown that agrees with FEM simulations. • Structural, chemical and strain release investigations were performed by STEM. • New MBE self-seeded method whereby InAs is grown by splitting In and As depositions. - Abstract: The structure, interface abruptness and strain relaxation in InAs/GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy in the Ga self-catalysed mode on (111) Si have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The nanowires had the zincblende phase. The InAs/GaAs interface was atomically and chemically sharp with a width around 1.5 nm, i.e. significantly smaller than previously reported values. This was achieved by the consumption of the Ga droplet and formation of a flat top facet of the GaAs followed by the growth of InAs by splitting the depositions of In and As. Both elastic and plastic strain relaxation took place simultaneously. Experimental TEM results about strain relaxation very well agree with linear elasticity theory calculations by the finite element methods.

  3. Interface structure and properties of CNTs/Cu composites fabricated by electroless deposition and spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Hu, Zheng-Yang; Song, Qi; Yin, Shi-Pan

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we fabricated a novel copper matrix composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using electroless deposition (ED) and spark plasma sintering technique. Microstructure, mechanical, electric conductivity, and thermal properties of the CNTs/Cu composites were investigated. The results show that a favorable interface containing C-O and O-Cu bond was formed between CNTs and matrix when the CNTs were coated with nano-Cu by ED method. Thus, we accomplished the uniformly dispersed CNTs in the CNTs/Cu powders and compacted composites, which eventually leads to the enhancement of the mechanical properties of the CNTs/Cu composites in the macro-scale environment. However, the interface structure can hinder the movement of carriers and free electrons and increase the interface thermal resistance, which leads to modest decrease of electrical and thermal conductivity of the CNTs/Cu composites.

  4. Positron annihilation studies of the AlOx/SiO2/Si interface in solar cell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwardson, C. J.; Coleman, P. G.; Li, T.-T. A.; Cuevas, A.; Ruffell, S.

    2012-01-01

    Film and film/substrate interface characteristics of 30 and 60 nm-thick AlO x films grown on Si substrates by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD), and 30 nm-thick AlO x films by sputtering, have been probed using variable-energy positron annihilation spectroscopy (VEPAS) and Doppler-broadened spectra ratio curves. All samples were found to have an interface which traps positrons, with annealing increasing this trapping response, regardless of growth method. Thermal ALD creates an AlO x /SiO x /Si interface with positron trapping and annihilation occurring in the Si side of the SiO x /Si boundary. An induced positive charge in the Si next to the interface reduces diffusion into the oxides and increases annihilation in the Si. In this region there is a divacancy-type response (20 ± 2%) before annealing which is increased to 47 ± 2% after annealing. Sputtering seems to not produce samples with this same electrostatic shielding; instead, positron trapping occurs directly in the SiO x interface in the as-deposited sample, and the positron response to it increases after annealing as an SiO 2 layer is formed. Annealing the film has the effect of lowering the film oxygen response in all film types. Compared to other structural characterization techniques, VEPAS shows larger sensitivity to differences in film preparation method and between as-deposited and annealed samples.

  5. Steady distribution structure of point defects near crystal-melt interface under pulling stop of CZ Si crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, T.; Takahashi, T.; Shirai, K.

    2017-02-01

    In order to reveal a steady distribution structure of point defects of no growing Si on the solid-liquid interface, the crystals were grown at a high pulling rate, which Vs becomes predominant, and the pulling was suddenly stopped. After restoring the variations of the crystal by the pulling-stop, the crystals were then left in prolonged contact with the melt. Finally, the crystals were detached and rapidly cooled to freeze point defects and then a distribution of the point defects of the as-grown crystals was observed. As a result, a dislocation loop (DL) region, which is formed by the aggregation of interstitials (Is), was formed over the solid-liquid interface and was surrounded with a Vs-and-Is-free recombination region (Rc-region), although the entire crystals had been Vs rich in the beginning. It was also revealed that the crystal on the solid-liquid interface after the prolonged contact with the melt can partially have a Rc-region to be directly in contact with the melt, unlike a defect distribution of a solid-liquid interface that has been growing. This experimental result contradicts a hypothesis of Voronkov's diffusion model, which always assumes the equilibrium concentrations of Vs and Is as the boundary condition for distribution of point defects on the growth interface. The results were disscussed from a qualitative point of view of temperature distribution and thermal stress by the pulling-stop.

  6. Role of composition and structure on the properties of metal/multifunctional ceramic interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Fang-Yin; Nino, Juan C.; Hennig, Richard [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Jones, Jacob L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Sinnott, Susan B., E-mail: sinnott@matse.psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16801 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    The formation of intermetallic secondary phases, such as Pt{sub 3}Pb, has been observed experimentally at PbTiO{sub 3}/Pt and Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3}/Pt, or PZT/Pt, interfaces. Density functional theory calculations are used here to calculate the work of adhesion of these interfacial systems with and without the secondary intermetallic phase. The charge density maps of the interfaces reveal the electronic interactions at the interface and the impact of the secondary phase. In addition, Bader charge analysis provides a quantitative assessment of electron transfer from the perovskites to the Pt. Analysis of the band diagrams indicates an increase of the potential barrier associated with electron transfer due to the formation of the Pt{sub 3}Pb at PZT/Pt interfaces.

  7. Molecular modeling studies of structural properties of polyvinyl alcohol: a comparative study using INTERFACE force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosinski, Lukasz; Labus, Karolina

    2017-10-05

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a material with a variety of applications in separation, biotechnology, and biomedicine. Using combined Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques, we present an extensive comparative study of second- and third-generation force fields Universal, COMPASS, COMPASS II, PCFF, and the newly developed INTERFACE, as applied to this system. In particular, we show that an INTERFACE force field provides a possibility of composing a reliable atomistic model to reproduce density change of PVA matrix in a narrow temperature range (298-348 K) and calculate a thermal expansion coefficient with reasonable accuracy. Thus, the INTERFACE force field may be used to predict mechanical properties of the PVA system, being a scaffold for hydrogels, with much greater accuracy than latter approaches. Graphical abstract Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo studies indicate that it is possible to predict properties of the PVA in narrow temperature range by using the INTERFACE force field.

  8. Guide Structures in CD-ROM Dictionaries, with Specific Reference ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the appearance of that article, various academics have written articles and read ... The access and mediostructures of the Microsoft Encarta World English ... structures, inner access structure, inner search path, internet, mediostructure, ...

  9. Determinants of user acceptance of a specific social platform for older adults: An empirical examination of user interface characteristics and behavioral intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsai-Hsuan; Chang, Hsien-Tsung; Chen, Yan-Jiun; Chang, Yung-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    The use of the Internet and social applications has many benefits for the elderly, but numerous investigations have shown that the elderly do not perceive online social networks as a friendly social environment. Therefore, TreeIt, a social application specifically designed for the elderly, was developed for this study. In the TreeIt application, seven mechanisms promoting social interaction were designed to allow older adults to use social networking sites (SNSs) to increase social connection, maintain the intensity of social connections and strengthen social experience. This study's main objective was to investigate how user interface design affects older people's intention and attitude related to using SNSs. Fourteen user interface evaluation heuristics proposed by Zhang et al. were adopted as the criteria to assess user interface usability and further grouped into three categories: system support, user interface design and navigation. The technology acceptance model was adopted to assess older people's intention and attitude related to using SNSs. One hundred and one elderly persons were enrolled in this study as subjects, and the results showed that all of the hypotheses proposed in this study were valid: system support and perceived usefulness had a significant effect on behavioral intention; user interface design and perceived ease of use were positively correlated with perceived usefulness; and navigation exerted an influence on perceived ease of use. The results of this study are valuable for the future development of social applications for the elderly.

  10. Determinants of user acceptance of a specific social platform for older adults: An empirical examination of user interface characteristics and behavioral intention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Hsuan Tsai

    Full Text Available The use of the Internet and social applications has many benefits for the elderly, but numerous investigations have shown that the elderly do not perceive online social networks as a friendly social environment. Therefore, TreeIt, a social application specifically designed for the elderly, was developed for this study. In the TreeIt application, seven mechanisms promoting social interaction were designed to allow older adults to use social networking sites (SNSs to increase social connection, maintain the intensity of social connections and strengthen social experience. This study's main objective was to investigate how user interface design affects older people's intention and attitude related to using SNSs. Fourteen user interface evaluation heuristics proposed by Zhang et al. were adopted as the criteria to assess user interface usability and further grouped into three categories: system support, user interface design and navigation. The technology acceptance model was adopted to assess older people's intention and attitude related to using SNSs. One hundred and one elderly persons were enrolled in this study as subjects, and the results showed that all of the hypotheses proposed in this study were valid: system support and perceived usefulness had a significant effect on behavioral intention; user interface design and perceived ease of use were positively correlated with perceived usefulness; and navigation exerted an influence on perceived ease of use. The results of this study are valuable for the future development of social applications for the elderly.

  11. Determinants of user acceptance of a specific social platform for older adults: An empirical examination of user interface characteristics and behavioral intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsien-Tsung; Chen, Yan-Jiun; Chang, Yung-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    The use of the Internet and social applications has many benefits for the elderly, but numerous investigations have shown that the elderly do not perceive online social networks as a friendly social environment. Therefore, TreeIt, a social application specifically designed for the elderly, was developed for this study. In the TreeIt application, seven mechanisms promoting social interaction were designed to allow older adults to use social networking sites (SNSs) to increase social connection, maintain the intensity of social connections and strengthen social experience. This study’s main objective was to investigate how user interface design affects older people’s intention and attitude related to using SNSs. Fourteen user interface evaluation heuristics proposed by Zhang et al. were adopted as the criteria to assess user interface usability and further grouped into three categories: system support, user interface design and navigation. The technology acceptance model was adopted to assess older people’s intention and attitude related to using SNSs. One hundred and one elderly persons were enrolled in this study as subjects, and the results showed that all of the hypotheses proposed in this study were valid: system support and perceived usefulness had a significant effect on behavioral intention; user interface design and perceived ease of use were positively correlated with perceived usefulness; and navigation exerted an influence on perceived ease of use. The results of this study are valuable for the future development of social applications for the elderly. PMID:28837566

  12. Structure and Capacitance of Electrical Double Layers at the Graphene–Ionic Liquid Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to investigate the structure and capacitance of the electrical double layers (EDLs at the interface of vertically oriented graphene and ionic liquids [EMIM]+/[BF4]−. The distribution and migration of the ions in the EDL on the rough and non-rough electrode surfaces with different charge densities are compared and analyzed, and the effect of the electrode surface morphology on the capacitance of the EDL is clarified. The results suggest that alternate distributions of anions and cations in several consecutive layers are formed in the EDL on the electrode surface. When the electrode is charged, the layers of [BF4]− anions experience more significant migration than those of [EMIM]+ cations. These ion layers can be extended deeper into the bulk electrolyte solution by the stronger interaction of the rough electrode, compared to those on the non-rough electrode surface. The potential energy valley of ions on the neutral electrode surface establishes a potential energy difference to compensate the energy cost of the ion accumulation, and is capable of producing a potential drop across the EDL on the uncharged electrode surface. Due to the greater effective contact area between the ions and electrode, the rough electrode possesses a larger capacitance than the non-rough one. In addition, it is harder for the larger-sized [EMIM]+ cations to accumulate in the narrow grooves on the rough electrode, when compared with the smaller [BF4]−. Consequently, the double-hump-shaped C–V curve (which demonstrates the relationship between differential capacitance and potential drop across the EDL for the rough electrode is asymmetric, where the capacitance increases more significantly when the electrode is positively charged.

  13. Systematic determination of the mosaic structure of bacterial genomes: species backbone versus strain-specific loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gendrault-Jacquemard A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public databases now contain multitude of complete bacterial genomes, including several genomes of the same species. The available data offers new opportunities to address questions about bacterial genome evolution, a task that requires reliable fine comparison data of closely related genomes. Recent analyses have shown, using pairwise whole genome alignments, that it is possible to segment bacterial genomes into a common conserved backbone and strain-specific sequences called loops. Results Here, we generalize this approach and propose a strategy that allows systematic and non-biased genome segmentation based on multiple genome alignments. Segmentation analyses, as applied to 13 different bacterial species, confirmed the feasibility of our approach to discern the 'mosaic' organization of bacterial genomes. Segmentation results are available through a Web interface permitting functional analysis, extraction and visualization of the backbone/loops structure of documented genomes. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we performed a precise analysis of the mosaic organization of three E. coli strains and functional characterization of the loops. Conclusion The segmentation results including the backbone/loops structure of 13 bacterial species genomes are new and available for use by the scientific community at the URL: http://genome.jouy.inra.fr/mosaic.

  14. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao; Xie, Xinjian

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51 eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance

  15. Electronic structure and lattice dynamics at the interface of single layer FeSe and SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Balatsky, Alexander; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with the superconducting energy gap opening at temperatures close to or above the liquid nitrogen boiling point in the single-layer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 has attracted significant interest. It suggests that the interface effects can be utilized to enhance the superconductivity. It has been shown recently that the coupling between the electrons in FeSe and vibrational modes at the interface play an important role. Here we report on a detailed study of electronic structure and lattice dynamics in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 interface by using the state-of-art electronic structure method within the density functional theory. The nature of the vibrational modes at the interface and their coupling to the electronic degrees of freedom are analyzed. In addition, the effect of hole and electron doping in SrTiO3 on the electron-mode coupling strength is also considered. This work was carried out under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. DOE at LANL under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396, and was supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  16. The role of {sup 60}Co gamma-ray irradiation on the interface states and series resistance in MIS structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tascioglu, Ilke [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey); Tataroglu, Adem, E-mail: ademt@gazi.edu.t [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey); Ozbay, Akif; Altindal, Semsettin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    The effect of gamma-ray exposure on the metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures has been investigated using the electrical characteristics at room temperature. The MIS structures are irradiated with {sup 60}Co gamma-ray source. The energy distribution of interface states was determined from the forward bias I-V characteristics by taking into account the bias dependence of the effective barrier height and ideality factor. The value of series resistance decreases with increasing dose. Experimental results confirmed that gamma-ray irradiation have a significant effect on electrical characteristics of MIS structures.

  17. Specific material effects of wear-particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis at the bone–implant interface: A rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Longhofer

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Different biomaterials in particulate form exert different forms of adverse effects in terms of the amount of osteolysis and inflammatory reactions on bone tissue at the bone–implant interface. It provides information for engineering more appropriate materials for arthroplasty components.

  18. Production of specific-structured lipids by enzymatic interesterification in a pilot continuous enzyme bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Balchen, Steen; Høy, Carl-Erik

    1998-01-01

    Production of specific-structured lipids (interesterified lipids with a specific structure) by enzymatic interesterification was carried out in a continuous enzyme bed pilot scale reactor. Commercial immobilized lipase (Lipozyme IM) was used and investigations of acyl migration, pressure drop...

  19. Structural stability of characteristic interface for NiTi/Nb Nanowire: First-Principle study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G. F.; Zheng, H. Z.; Shu, X. Y.; Peng, P.

    2016-01-01

    Compared with some other conventional interface models, the interface of NiTi(211)/Nb(220) in NiTiNb metal nanocomposite had been simulated and analyzed carefully. Results show that only several interface models, i.e., NiTi(100)/Nb(100)(Ni⃡Nb), NiTi(110)/Nb(110) and NiTi(211)/Nb(220), can be formed accordingly with their negative formation enthalpy. Therein the cohesive energy Δ E and Griffith rupture work W of NiTi(211)/Nb(220) interface model are the lowest among them. Density of states shows that there exists only one electronic bonding peak for NiTi(211)/Nb(220) interface model at -2.5 eV. Electron density difference of NiTi(211)/ Nb(220) shows that the Nb-Nb, Nb-Ti and Nb-Ni bonding characters seem like so peaceful as a fabric twisting every atom, which is different from conventional metallic bonding performance. Such appearance can be deduced that the metallic bonding between Nb-Nb, Nb-Ti and Nb-Ni in NiTi(211)/Nb(220) may be affected by its nanostructure called nanometer size effect. Thus, our findings open an avenue for detailed and comprehensive studies of nanocomposite.

  20. Microsphere Wetting, Meniscus Structure, and Capillary Interactions on a Curved Liquid Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; Dinsmore, Anthony; Hoagland, David; Russell, Thomas

    A small spherical microparticle on a cylindrically curved liquid interface locally induces a quadrupolar interface deformation to maintain a constant contact angle about its wetted periphery. Measured by optical profilometry, this deformation was compared to a recent theoretical expression, and good agreement was noted for contact line shape, particle vertical position, and deformation vs. (distance, angle, particle size, interfacial curvature). Interface quadrupoles lead to particle capillary interactions in analogy to 2D electrostatic quadrupoles, and as one consequence, spheres on a cylindrical interface assemble tetragonally, i.e., into a square lattice. This assembly was monitored in the optical microscope, with particles interacting as predicted, into a square lattice aligned with the underlying cylindrical axis. These particles and assemblies were driven to the middle of the curved interface by capillary interaction with pinned liquid contact lines on each side of the liquid cylindrical section used in the experiments. These phenomena can inform the directed interfacial assembly of micro-sized spherical objects, with potential application in fabrication of functional devices and materials, encapsulation, and emulsification.

  1. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Piepenstock, M.; Diederich, A.

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both...... in subphase water molecules and in the alkyl chains of the lipid surface monolayer, was utilized to determine the interface structure on the molecular length scale. In all cases studied, the protein forms monomolecular layers underneath the interface with thickness values of apprx 40 ANG . A systematic...... dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state...

  2. [Structure and dynamics of microemulsions in bulk, at interfaces, and in confined geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The authors have been constructing a special purpose small angle neutron scattering spectrometer (SAND) in collaboration with IPNS of Argonne National Laboratory and Texaco Research Laboratories in Beacon, New York. The spectrometer, having a moderate neutron flux, will be uniquely suited for detailed studies of complex fluids in their various phases. This spectrometer will be fully available to general users of the small angle scattering community after a year of testing and upon installation of the auxiliary equipment. The general research objective of the MIT group is to continue studies of the microstructural relationship to phase-behavior in three-component microemulsion systems. Specifically, they shall study the (1) variation of bulk structures when a microemulsion undergoes a non-wetting to wetting transition, (2) correlating interfacial reflectivity measurements of these wetting transitions to the SANS results, (3) use the contrast variation technique they recently developed for measuring the mean and Gaussian curvatures of the surfactant sheet to study the structural inversion of water-in-oil to oil-in-water microemulsions and the transition of disordered bicontinuous microemulsion to ordered lamellar phases, (4) investigation of the effects of spatial confinement on the phase behavior and structure of bicontinuous microemulsions, and finally (5) they shall continue the study of the recently discovered non-exponential relaxation of droplet density fluctuations near the critical and percolation points in water-in-oil droplet microemulsions

  3. A estrutura da representação social da morte na interface com as religiosidades em equipes multiprofissionais de saúde The structure of social representation of death in the interface with the religiosities of healthcare professionals groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandro Medeiros do Nascimento

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O estudo objetivou acessar a estrutura da representação social da morte em equipes multiprofissionais de saúde na interface com a religiosidade, no que esta interfere nas significações atribuídas à morte por esta população em específico. Utilizou-se um instrumento com questões abertas e fechadas sobre a morte e o morrer, bem como sobre a vivência religiosa singular dos participantes. Protocolos escritos foram capturados em uma amostra de 80 profissionais (49 médicos, 13 psicólogas, 18 enfermeiras pertencentes a 10 equipes multiprofissionais de saúde. Estes foram analisados através de Análise de Conteúdo e de Análise de Estrutura de Similaridade (SSA e interpretados pela Teoria das Representações Sociais. Os dados revelaram uma interferência expressiva das crenças religiosas na estruturação da representação da Morte.The study aims to investigate the structure of social representation of death in a Healthcare professional group establishing an interface with religiosity and how the latter interferes in the meaning attributed to death by this specific population. Open and closed questions on death or the act of dying, and on the singular religious experience of the participants were applied. Written protocols were collected from a sample of 80 professionals (49 physicians, 13 psychologists, and 18 nurses, which were analyzed according to content analysis and non-metric multidimensional analysis, SSA (Similarity Structure Analysis, and interpreted according to the theory of Social Representations, revealing a significant interference of religious believes in the structure of death representation.

  4. Specific interface area and self-stirring in a two-liquid system experiencing intense interfacial boiling below the bulk boiling temperatures of both components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldobin, Denis S.; Pimenova, Anastasiya V.

    2017-04-01

    We present an approach to theoretical assessment of the mean specific interface area (δ S/δ V) for a well-stirred system of two immiscible liquids experiencing interfacial boiling. The assessment is based on the balance of transformations of mechanical energy and the laws of the momentum and heat transfer in the turbulent boundary layer. The theory yields relations between the specific interface area and the characteristics of the system state. In particular, this allows us to derive the equations of self-cooling dynamics of the system in the absence of external heat supply. The results provide possibility for constructing a self-contained mathematical description of the process of interfacial boiling. In this study, we assume the volume fractions of two components to be similar as well as the values of their kinematic viscosity and molecular heat diffusivity.

  5. Band structure engineering and vacancy induced metallicity at the GaAs-AlAs interface

    KAUST Repository

    Upadhyay Kahaly, M.

    2011-09-20

    We study the epitaxial GaAs-AlAs interface of wide gap materials by full-potential density functional theory. AlAsthin films on a GaAs substrate and GaAsthin films on an AlAs substrate show different trends for the electronic band gap with increasing film thickness. In both cases, we find an insulating state at the interface and a negligible charge transfer even after relaxation. Differences in the valence and conduction band edges suggest that the energy band discontinuities depend on the growth sequence. Introduction of As vacancies near the interface induces metallicity, which opens great potential for GaAs-AlAs heterostructures in modern electronics.

  6. Interface structure and composition of MoO3/GaAs(0 0 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Anirban; Ashraf, Tanveer; Grafeneder, Wolfgang; Koch, Reinhold

    2018-04-01

    We studied growth, structure, stress, oxidation state as well as surface and interface structure and composition of thermally-evaporated thin MoO3 films on the technologically important III/V-semiconductor substrate GaAs(0 0 1). The MoO3 films grow with Mo in the 6+  oxidation state. The electrical resistance is tunable by the oxygen partial pressure during deposition from transparent insulating to semi-transparant halfmetallic. In the investigated growth temperature range (room temperature to 200 °C) no diffraction spots are detected by x-ray diffraction. However, high resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals the formation of MoO3 nanocrystal grains with diameters of 5–8 nm. At the interface a  ≈3 nm-thick intermediate layer has formed, where the single-crystal lattice of GaAs gradually transforms to the nanocrystalline MoO3 structure. This interpretation is corroborated by our in situ and real-time stress measurements evidencing a two-stage growth process as well as by elemental interface analysis revealing coexistance of Ga, As, Mo, and oxygen in a intermediate layer of 3–4 nm.

  7. Probing buried solid-solid interfaces in magnetic multilayer structures and other nanostructures using spectroscopy excited by soft x-ray standing waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.-H.; Mun, B.S.; Mannella, N.; Sell, B.; Ritchey, S.B.; Fadley, C.S.; Pham, L.; Nambu, A.; Watanabe, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Buried solid-solid interfaces are becoming increasingly more important in all aspects of nanoscience, and we here dis- cuss the st applications of a new method for selectively studying them with the vuv/soft x-ray spectroscopies. As specific examples, magnetic multilayer structures represent key elements of current developments in spintronics, including giant magnetoresistance, exchange bias, and magnetic tunnel resistance. The buried interfaces in such structures are of key importance to their performance, but have up to now been difficult to study selectively with these spectroscopies. This novel method involves excitation of photoelectrons or fluorescent x-rays with soft x-ray standing waves created by Bragg reflection from a multilayer mirror substrate on which the sample is grown. We will discuss core and valence photoemission, as well soft x-ray emission, results from applying this method to multilayer structures relevant to both giant magnetoresistance (Fe/Cr-[2]) and magnetic tunnel junctions (Al 2 O 3 /FeCo) , including magnetic dichroism measurements. Work supported by the Director, Of e of Science, Of e of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division, U.S. Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF000

  8. The thermal structure of an air–water interface at low wind speeds

    OpenAIRE

    Handler, R. A.; Smith, G. B.; Leighton, R. I.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution infrared imagery of an air–water interface at wind speeds of 1 to 4 ms−1 wasobtained. Spectral analysis of the data reveals several important features of the thermal structureof the so-called cool skin. At wind speeds for which wind waves are not generated, the interfacialboundary layer appears to be composed of buoyant plumes that are stretched by the surfaceshear as they reach the interface. The plumes appear to form overlapping laminae with ahead–tail...

  9. Electronic, structural and chemical effects of charge-transfer at organic/inorganic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, R.; Vázquez de Parga, A. L.; Gallego, J. M.

    2017-07-01

    During the last decade, interest on the growth and self-assembly of organic molecular species on solid surfaces spread over the scientific community, largely motivated by the promise of cheap, flexible and tunable organic electronic and optoelectronic devices. These efforts lead to important advances in our understanding of the nature and strength of the non-bonding intermolecular interactions that control the assembly of the organic building blocks on solid surfaces, which have been recently reviewed in a number of excellent papers. To a large extent, such studies were possible because of a smart choice of model substrate-adsorbate systems where the molecule-substrate interactions were purposefully kept low, so that most of the observed supramolecular structures could be understood simply by considering intermolecular interactions, keeping the role of the surface always relatively small (although not completely negligible). On the other hand, the systems which are more relevant for the development of organic electronic devices include molecular species which are electron donors, acceptors or blends of donors and acceptors. Adsorption of such organic species on solid surfaces is bound to be accompanied by charge-transfer processes between the substrate and the adsorbates, and the physical and chemical properties of the molecules cannot be expected any longer to be the same as in solution phase. In recent years, a number of groups around the world have started tackling the problem of the adsorption, self- assembly and electronic and chemical properties of organic species which interact rather strongly with the surface, and for which charge-transfer must be considered. The picture that is emerging shows that charge transfer can lead to a plethora of new phenomena, from the development of delocalized band-like electron states at molecular overlayers, to the existence of new substrate-mediated intermolecular interactions or the strong modification of the chemical

  10. Theoretical research on the propagation of the crack normal to and dwelling on the interface of the cermet cladding material structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junru, Yang; Chuanjuan, Song; Minglan, Wang; Yeukan, Zhang; Jing, Sun [College of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao (China)

    2016-01-15

    The interface crack propagation problem in the cermet cladding material structure was studied. A comparative propagation property parameter (CP) suitable to judge the propagation direction of the interface crack in the cermet cladding material structure was proposed. The interface crack propagation criterion was established. Theoretical models of the CPs for the crack normal to and dwelling on the interface deflecting separately into the clad, the interface and the substrate were built, and the relations between the CPs and the load action angle, the clad thickness ratio and the load were investigated with an example. The research results show that, under the research conditions, the interface crack will more easily propagate into the clad layer than into the substrate.

  11. Theoretical research on the propagation of the crack normal to and dwelling on the interface of the cermet cladding material structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junru, Yang; Chuanjuan, Song; Minglan, Wang; Yeukan, Zhang; Jing, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The interface crack propagation problem in the cermet cladding material structure was studied. A comparative propagation property parameter (CP) suitable to judge the propagation direction of the interface crack in the cermet cladding material structure was proposed. The interface crack propagation criterion was established. Theoretical models of the CPs for the crack normal to and dwelling on the interface deflecting separately into the clad, the interface and the substrate were built, and the relations between the CPs and the load action angle, the clad thickness ratio and the load were investigated with an example. The research results show that, under the research conditions, the interface crack will more easily propagate into the clad layer than into the substrate

  12. SPECIFIC PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION IN THE STRUCTURE OF THE PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Abramova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the specific characteristics of professional communication teachers in the course of his career. Characterized by the basic communication skillsfor professional communication teachers, distinguished social and psychological characteristics of professional educator.

  13. Atomic structure and thermal stability of interfaces between metallic glass and embedding nano-crystallites revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, X.Z.; Yang, G.Q.; Xu, B.; Qi, C.; Kong, L.T., E-mail: konglt@sjtu.edu.cn; Li, J.F.

    2015-10-25

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the atomic structure and thermal stability of interfaces formed between amorphous Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} matrix and embedding B2 CuZr nano-crystallites. The interfaces are found to be rather abrupt, and their widths show negligible dependence on the nano-crystallite size. Local atomic configuration in the interfacial region is dominated by geometry characterized by Voronoi polyhedra <0,5,2,6> and <0,4,4,6>, and the contents of these polyhedra also exhibit apparent size dependence, which in turn results in an increasing trend in the interfacial energy against the nano-crystallite size. Annealing of the interface models at elevated temperatures will also enrich these characterizing polyhedra. While when the temperature is as high as the glass transition temperature of the matrix, growth of the nano-crystallites will be appreciable. The growth activation energy also shows size dependence, which is lower for larger nano-crystallites, suggesting that large nano-crystallites are prone to grow upon thermal disturbance. - Highlights: • Special clusters characterizing the local geometry are abundant in the interfaces. • Their content varies with the size of the embedding nano-crystallite. • In turn, size dependences in interfacial thermodynamics and kinetics are observed.

  14. Oxide nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened steel: crystallographic structure and interface with ferrite matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    Oxide nanoparticles are quintessential for ensuring the extraordinary properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. In this study, the crystallographic structure of oxide nanoparticles, and their interface with the ferritic steel matrix in an Al-alloyed ODS steel, i.e. PM2000, were systematically investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The majority of oxide nanoparticles were identified to be orthorhombic YAlO3. During hot consolidation and extrusion, they develop a coherent interface and a near cuboid-on-cube orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix in the material. After annealing at 1200 °C for 1 h, however, the orientation relationship between the oxide nanoparticles and the matrix becomes arbitrary, and their interface mostly incoherent. Annealing at 1300 °C leads to considerable coarsening of oxide nanoparticles, and a new orientation relationship of pseudo-cube-on-cube between oxide nanoparticles and ferrite matrix develops. The reason for the developing interfaces and orientation relationships between oxide nanoparticles and ferrite matrix under different conditions is discussed.

  15. Interface Engineering with MoS2 -Pd Nanoparticles Hybrid Structure for a Low Voltage Resistive Switching Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Feng; Tian, He; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Zhang, Tian-Yu; Mao, Wei-Quan; Qiao, Yan-Cong; Pang, Yu; Li, Yu-Xing; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2018-01-01

    Metal oxide-based resistive random access memory (RRAM) has attracted a lot of attention for its scalability, temperature robustness, and potential to achieve machine learning. However, a thick oxide layer results in relatively high program voltage while a thin one causes large leakage current and a small window. Owing to these fundamental limitations, by optimizing the oxide layer itself a novel interface engineering idea is proposed to reduce the programming voltage, increase the uniformity and on/off ratio. According to this idea, a molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 )-palladium nanoparticles hybrid structure is used to engineer the oxide/electrode interface of hafnium oxide (HfO x )-based RRAM. Through its interface engineering, the set voltage can be greatly lowered (from -3.5 to -0.8 V) with better uniformity under a relatively thick HfO x layer (≈15 nm), and a 30 times improvement of the memory window can be obtained. Moreover, due to the atomic thickness of MoS 2 film and high transmittance of ITO, the proposed RRAM exhibits high transparency in visible light. As the proposed interface-engineering RRAM exhibits good transparency, low SET voltage, and a large resistive switching window, it has huge potential in data storage in transparent circuits and wearable electronics with relatively low supply voltage. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Proximity effect in superconductor/ferromagnet hetero-structures as a function of interface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Julio; Patino, Edgar J.

    2014-03-01

    Superconductor/ferromagnet heterostructures are currently a subject of strong research due to novel phenomena resulting from the proximity effect. Among the most investigated ones are the oscillations of the critical temperature as function of the ferromagnet thickness. The oscillatory behavior of Tc is theoretically explained as to be result of the generation of the FFLO (Fulde-Ferrel-Larkin-Ovchinnikov) state of Cooper pairs under the presence of the exchange field of the ferromagnet. With the advancement of experimental techniques for S/F bilayers growth new questions regarding the effect of the interface transparency can to be addressed. For instance the influence of the interface roughness on the proximity effect. For studying this phenomenon Nb/Co and Nb/Cu/Co samples were sputtered on SiO2 substrates with different roughness. Characterization of these samples show a significant variation of Tc with the interface roughness. This results point towards a possible relationship between transparency and roughness of the interface. Proyecto Semilla Facultad de Ciencias Universidad de los Andes.

  17. Band structure engineering and vacancy induced metallicity at the GaAs-AlAs interface

    KAUST Repository

    Upadhyay Kahaly, M.; Nazir, Safdar; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2011-01-01

    We study the epitaxial GaAs-AlAs interface of wide gap materials by full-potential density functional theory. AlAsthin films on a GaAs substrate and GaAsthin films on an AlAs substrate show different trends for the electronic band gap

  18. Fine structure at the diffusion welded interface of Fe3Al/Q235 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    iron lattice sites (Fair and Wood 1994). 3.2 TEM morphology at the diffusion joint of. Fe3Al/Q235. For the welding of dissimilar materials, the element diffusion and phase formed at the interface of dissimilar. Table 1. Chemical composition and thermophysical properties of Fe3Al intermetallic compound. Chemical composition ...

  19. Molecular scale structure and dynamics at an ionic liquid/electrode interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichert, Peter; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Brandt van Driel, Tim

    2018-01-01

    After a century of research, the potential-dependent ion distribution at electrode/electrolyte interfaces is still under debate. In particular for solvent-free electrolytes such as room-temperature ionic liquids, classical theories for the electrical double layer are not applicable. Using a combi...

  20. Atomic and electronic structure of doped Si (111 ) (2 √{3 }×2 √{3 }) R 30∘ -Sn interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Seho; Ming, Fangfei; Huang, Ying-Tzu; Smith, Tyler S.; Peng, Xiyou; Tu, Weisong; Mulugeta, Daniel; Diehl, Renee D.; Snijders, Paul C.; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Weitering, Hanno H.

    2018-05-01

    The hole-doped Si (111 ) (2 √ 3 ×2 √ 3 ) R 30∘ -Sn interface exhibits a symmetry-breaking insulator-insulator transition below 100 K that appears to be triggered by electron tunneling into the empty surface-state bands. No such transition is seen in electron-doped systems. To elucidate the nature and driving force of this phenomenon, the structure of the interface must be resolved. Here we report on an extensive experimental and theoretical study, including scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS), dynamical low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) analysis, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, to elucidate the structure of this interface. We consider six different structure models, three of which have been proposed before, and conclude that only two of them can account for the majority of experimental data. One of them is the model according to Törnevik et al. [C. Törnevik et al., Phys. Rev. B 44, 13144 (1991), 10.1103/PhysRevB.44.13144] with a total Sn coverage of 14/12 monolayers (ML). The other is the "revised trimer model" with a total Sn coverage of 13/12 ML, introduced in this work. These two models are very difficult to discriminate on the basis of DFT or LEED alone, but STS data clearly point toward the Törnevik model as the most viable candidate among the models considered here. The STS data also provide additional insights regarding the electron-injection-driven phase transformation. Similar processes may occur at other metal/semiconductor interfaces, provided they are nonmetallic and can be doped. This could open up a new pathway toward the creation of novel surface phases with potentially very interesting and desirable electronic properties.

  1. Structural Insights into the Quadruplex-Duplex 3' Interface Formed from a Telomeric Repeat: A Potential Molecular Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo Krauss, Irene; Ramaswamy, Sneha; Neidle, Stephen; Haider, Shozeb; Parkinson, Gary N

    2016-02-03

    We report here on an X-ray crystallographic and molecular modeling investigation into the complex 3' interface formed between putative parallel stranded G-quadruplexes and a duplex DNA sequence constructed from the human telomeric repeat sequence TTAGGG. Our crystallographic approach provides a detailed snapshot of a telomeric 3' quadruplex-duplex junction: a junction that appears to have the potential to form a unique molecular target for small molecule binding and interference with telomere-related functions. This unique target is particularly relevant as current high-affinity compounds that bind putative G-quadruplex forming sequences only rarely have a high degree of selectivity for a particular quadruplex. Here DNA junctions were assembled using different putative quadruplex-forming scaffolds linked at the 3' end to a telomeric duplex sequence and annealed to a complementary strand. We successfully generated a series of G-quadruplex-duplex containing crystals, both alone and in the presence of ligands. The structures demonstrate the formation of a parallel folded G-quadruplex and a B-form duplex DNA stacked coaxially. Most strikingly, structural data reveals the consistent formation of a TAT triad platform between the two motifs. This triad allows for a continuous stack of bases to link the quadruplex motif with the duplex region. For these crystal structures formed in the absence of ligands, the TAT triad interface occludes ligand binding at the 3' quadruplex-duplex interface, in agreement with in silico docking predictions. However, with the rearrangement of a single nucleotide, a stable pocket can be produced, thus providing an opportunity for the binding of selective molecules at the interface.

  2. Computational and experimental analyses of the wave propagation through a bar structure including liquid-solid interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Jin [UST Graduate School, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Hui Nam [Division of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Doo Byung; Park, Jin Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    In this research, we study the propagation of longitudinal and transverse waves through a metal rod including a liquid layer using computational and experimental analyses. The propagation characteristics of longitudinal and transverse waves obtained by the computational and experimental analyses were consistent with the wave propagation theory for both cases, that is, the homogeneous metal rod and the metal rod including a liquid layer. The fluid-structure interaction modeling technique developed for the computational wave propagation analysis in this research can be applied to the more complex structures including solid-liquid interfaces.

  3. Structural and Chemical Analysis of the Zirconia-Veneering Ceramic Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, M; Yoshihara, K; Nagaoka, N; Nakanishi, M; De Munck, J; Minakuchi, S; Vanmeensel, K; Zhang, F; Yoshida, Y; Vleugels, J; Naert, I; Van Meerbeek, B

    2016-01-01

    The interfacial interaction of veneering ceramic with zirconia is still not fully understood. This study aimed to characterize morphologically and chemically the zirconia-veneering ceramic interface. Three zirconia-veneering conditions were investigated: 1) zirconia-veneering ceramic fired on sandblasted zirconia, 2) zirconia-veneering ceramic on as-sintered zirconia, and 3) alumina-veneering ceramic (lower coefficient of thermal expansion [CTE]) on as-sintered zirconia. Polished cross-sectioned ceramic-veneered zirconia specimens were examined using field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (Feg-SEM). In addition, argon-ion thinned zirconia-veneering ceramic interface cross sections were examined using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) at high resolution. Finally, the zirconia-veneering ceramic interface was quantitatively analyzed for tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation and residual stress using micro-Raman spectroscopy (µRaman). Feg-SEM revealed tight interfaces for all 3 veneering conditions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) disclosed an approximately 1.0-µm transformed zone at sandblasted zirconia, in which distinct zirconia grains were no longer observable. Straight grain boundaries and angular grain corners were detected up to the interface of zirconia- and alumina-veneering ceramic with as-sintered zirconia. EDS mapping disclosed within the zirconia-veneering ceramic a few nanometers thick calcium/aluminum-rich layer, touching the as-sintered zirconia base, with an equally thick silicon-rich/aluminum-poor layer on top. µRaman revealed t-ZrO2-to-m-ZrO2 phase transformation and residual compressive stress at the sandblasted zirconia surface. The difference in CTE between zirconia- and the alumina-veneering ceramic resulted in residual tensile stress within the zirconia immediately adjacent to its interface with the veneering ceramic. The rather minor chemical

  4. Chip-package nano-structured copper and nickel interconnections with metallic and polymeric bonding interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankur

    developed to address the IC packaging requirements beyond the ITRS projections and to introduce innovative design and fabrication concepts that will further advance the performance of the chip, the package, and the system board. The nano-structured interconnect technology simultaneously packages all the ICs intact in wafer form with quantum jump in the number of interconnections with the lowest electrical parasitics. The intrinsic properties of nano materials also enable several orders of magnitude higher interconnect densities with the best mechanical properties for the highest reliability and yet provide higher current and heat transfer densities. Nano-structured interconnects provides the ability to assemble the packaged parts on the system board without the use of underfill materials and to enable advanced analog/digital testing, reliability testing, and burn-in at wafer level. This thesis investigates the electrical and mechanical performance of nanostructured interconnections through modeling and test vehicle fabrication. The analytical models evaluate the performance improvements over solder and compliant interconnections. Test vehicles with nano-interconnections were fabricated using low cost electro-deposition techniques and assembled with various bonding interfaces. Interconnections were fabricated at 200 micron pitch to compare with the existing solder joints and at 50 micron pitch to demonstrate fabrication processes at fine pitches. Experimental and modeling results show that the proposed nano-interconnections could enhance the reliability and potentially meet all the system performance requirements for the emerging micro/nano-systems.

  5. The Development of Target-Specific Pose Filter Ensembles To Boost Ligand Enrichment for Structure-Based Virtual Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jie; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Hu, Huabin; Wu, Song; Wang, Xiang Simon

    2017-06-26

    Structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) has become an indispensable technique for hit identification at the early stage of drug discovery. However, the accuracy of current scoring functions is not high enough to confer success to every target and thus remains to be improved. Previously, we had developed binary pose filters (PFs) using knowledge derived from the protein-ligand interface of a single X-ray structure of a specific target. This novel approach had been validated as an effective way to improve ligand enrichment. Continuing from it, in the present work we attempted to incorporate knowledge collected from diverse protein-ligand interfaces of multiple crystal structures of the same target to build PF ensembles (PFEs). Toward this end, we first constructed a comprehensive data set to meet the requirements of ensemble modeling and validation. This set contains 10 diverse targets, 118 well-prepared X-ray structures of protein-ligand complexes, and large benchmarking actives/decoys sets. Notably, we designed a unique workflow of two-layer classifiers based on the concept of ensemble learning and applied it to the construction of PFEs for all of the targets. Through extensive benchmarking studies, we demonstrated that (1) coupling PFE with Chemgauss4 significantly improves the early enrichment of Chemgauss4 itself and (2) PFEs show greater consistency in boosting early enrichment and larger overall enrichment than our prior PFs. In addition, we analyzed the pairwise topological similarities among cognate ligands used to construct PFEs and found that it is the higher chemical diversity of the cognate ligands that leads to the improved performance of PFEs. Taken together, the results so far prove that the incorporation of knowledge from diverse protein-ligand interfaces by ensemble modeling is able to enhance the screening competence of SBVS scoring functions.

  6. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein Engineered to Mimic the α4-α4 Binding Pocket in α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reveals Interface Specific Interactions Important for Binding and Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are attractive drug targets for psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and smoking cessation aids. Recently, a third agonist binding site between two α4 subunits in the (α4)(3)(β2)(2) receptor subpopulation was discovered. In particular, three......-yl)-1,4-diazepane], highlights the roles of the three residues in determining binding affinities and functional properties of ligands at the α4-α4 interface. Confirmed by mutational studies, our structures suggest a unique ligand-specific role of residue H142 on the α4 subunit. In the cocrystal...... that could not be predicted based on wild-type Ls-AChBP structures in complex with the same agonists. The results show that an unprecedented correlation between binding in engineered AChBPs and functional receptors can be obtained and provide new opportunities for structure-based design of drugs targeting...

  7. Spectroelectrochemical evidence for the effect of phase structure and interface on charge behavior in poly(3-hexylthiophene): Fullerene active layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Rong; Ni, Haitao; Wang, Zhaodong; Liu, Yurong; Liu, Hongdong; Yang, Xin; Cheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The steady-state absorption spectra of P3HT"·"+, P3HT"·"−, PCBM"+ and PCBM"− were obtained. • The effect of morphology of active layer on charge generation was identified. • Non-equilibrium transport of electron and hole was confirmed in PSCs. - Abstract: To investigate the correlation between morphology of active layer and performance of polymer solar cells (PSCs). Poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C_6_1-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) were selected as research object and five PSCs based on active layers with varied morphology were fabricated. The results showed that P3HT crystalline phase and donor-acceptor (D-A) interface had an important influence on PSCs performance, which was revealed by structure characterization and J-V measurement. To further understanding the effect of phase structure and D-A interface on charge behavior. Spectroelectrochemistry measurement (SEC) was performed to characterize the steady-state optical absorption of P3HT, PCBM cation and anion in varied active layers, and the spectra difference of cations and anions was analyzed. The results were found that D-A interface could promote charge generation. P3HT crystalline phase and PCBM aggregation phase were beneficial for improving the charge transport ability. Meanwhile, the non-equilibrium transport of electron and hole in PSCs was corroborated by SEC.

  8. Carrier density modulation by structural distortions at modified LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoofs, Frank; Vickers, Mary E; Egilmez, Mehmet; Fix, Thomas; Kleibeuker, Josée E; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Blamire, Mark G; Carpenter, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the fundamental conduction mechanism of LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 (LAO/STO) interfaces, heterostructures were modified with a single unit cell interface layer of either an isovalent titanate ATiO 3 (A = Ca, Sr, Sn, Ba) or a rare earth modified Sr 0.5 RE 0.5 TiO 3 (RE = La, Nd, Sm, Dy) between the LAO and the STO. A strong coupling between the lattice strain induced in the LAO layer by the interfacial layers and the sheet carrier density in the STO substrate is observed. The observed crystal distortion of the LAO is large and it is suggested that it couples into the sub-surface STO, causing oxygen octahedral rotation and deformation. We propose that the ‘structural reconstruction’ which occurs in the STO surface as a result of the stress in the LAO is the enabling trigger for two-dimensional conduction at the LAO/STO interface by locally changing the band structure and releasing trapped carriers. (paper)

  9. On the specification of structural equation models for ecological systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grace, James B.; Anderson, T. Michael; Olff, Han; Scheiner, Samuel M.

    The use of structural equation modeling (SEM) is often motivated by its utility for investigating complex networks of relationships, but also because of its promise as a means of representing theoretical Concepts using latent variables. In this paper, we discuss characteristics of ecological theory

  10. Structural and electronic properties of the transition layer at the SiO2/4H-SiC interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using first-principles methods, we generate an amorphous SiO2/4H-SiC interface with a transition layer. Based this interface model, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the interfacial transition layer. The calculated Si 2p core-level shifts for this interface are comparable to the experimental data, indicating that various SiCxOy species should be present in this interface transition layer. The analysis of the electronic structures reveals that the tetrahedral SiCxOy structures cannot introduce any of the defect states at the interface. Interestingly, our transition layer also includes a C-C=C trimer and SiO5 configurations, which lead to the generation of interface states. The accurate positions of Kohn-Sham energy levels associated with these defects are further calculated within the hybrid functional scheme. The Kohn-Sham energy levels of the carbon trimer and SiO5 configurations are located near the conduction and valence band of bulk 4H-SiC, respectively. The result indicates that the carbon trimer occurred in the transition layer may be a possible origin of near interface traps. These findings provide novel insight into the structural and electronic properties of the realistic SiO2/SiC interface.

  11. Abundant Trimethylornithine Lipids and Specific Gene Sequences Are Indicative of Planctomycete Importance at the Oxic/Anoxic Interface in Sphagnum-Dominated Northern Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eli K; Villanueva, Laura; Hopmans, Ellen C; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Mets, Anchelique; Dedysh, Svetlana N; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2015-09-01

    Northern wetlands make up a substantial terrestrial carbon sink and are often dominated by decay-resistant Sphagnum mosses. Recent studies have shown that planctomycetes appear to be involved in degradation of Sphagnum-derived debris. Novel trimethylornithine (TMO) lipids have recently been characterized as abundant lipids in various Sphagnum wetland planctomycete isolates, but their occurrence in the environment has not yet been confirmed. We applied a combined intact polar lipid (IPL) and molecular analysis of peat cores collected from two northern wetlands (Saxnäs Mosse [Sweden] and Obukhovskoye [Russia]) in order to investigate the preferred niche and abundance of TMO-producing planctomycetes. TMOs were present throughout the profiles of Sphagnum bogs, but their concentration peaked at the oxic/anoxic interface, which coincided with a maximum abundance of planctomycete-specific 16S rRNA gene sequences. The sequences detected at the oxic/anoxic interface were affiliated with the Isosphaera group, while sequences present in the anoxic peat layers were related to an uncultured planctomycete group. Pyrosequencing-based analysis identified Planctomycetes as the major bacterial group at the oxic/anoxic interface at the Obukhovskoye peat (54% of total 16S rRNA gene sequence reads), followed by Acidobacteria (19% reads), while in the Saxnäs Mosse peat, Acidobacteria were dominant (46%), and Planctomycetes contributed to 6% of the total reads. The detection of abundant TMO lipids in planctomycetes isolated from peat bogs and the lack of TMO production by cultures of acidobacteria suggest that planctomycetes are the producers of TMOs in peat bogs. The higher accumulation of TMOs at the oxic/anoxic interface and the change in the planctomycete community with depth suggest that these IPLs could be synthesized as a response to changing redox conditions at the oxic/anoxic interface. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. The dimer interfaces of protease and extra-protease domains influence the activation of protease and the specificity of GagPol cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Steven C; Gulnik, Sergei; Everitt, Lori; Kaplan, Andrew H

    2003-01-01

    Activation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease is an essential step in viral replication. As is the case for all retroviral proteases, enzyme activation requires the formation of protease homodimers. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which retroviral proteases become active within their precursors. Using an in vitro expression system, we have examined the determinants of activation efficiency and the order of cleavage site processing for the protease of HIV-1 within the full-length GagPol precursor. Following activation, initial cleavage occurs between the viral p2 and nucleocapsid proteins. This is followed by cleavage of a novel site located in the transframe domain. Mutational analysis of the dimer interface of the protease produced differential effects on activation and specificity. A subset of mutations produced enhanced cleavage at the amino terminus of the protease, suggesting that, in the wild-type precursor, cleavages that liberate the protease are a relatively late event. Replacement of the proline residue at position 1 of the protease dimer interface resulted in altered cleavage of distal sites and suggests that this residue functions as a cis-directed specificity determinant. In summary, our studies indicate that interactions within the protease dimer interface help determine the order of precursor cleavage and contribute to the formation of extended-protease intermediates. Assembly domains within GagPol outside the protease domain also influence enzyme activation.

  13. Structural and mechanistic investigations on Salmonella typhimurium acetate kinase (AckA: identification of a putative ligand binding pocket at the dimeric interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittori Sagar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium can utilize acetate as the sole source of carbon and energy. Acetate kinase (AckA and phosphotransacetylase (Pta, key enzymes of acetate utilization pathway, regulate flux of metabolites in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, TCA cycle, glyoxylate bypass and fatty acid metabolism. Results Here we report kinetic characterization of S. typhimurium AckA (StAckA and structures of its unliganded (Form-I, 2.70 Å resolution and citrate-bound (Form-II, 1.90 Å resolution forms. The enzyme showed broad substrate specificity with kcat/Km in the order of acetate > propionate > formate. Further, the Km for acetyl-phosphate was significantly lower than for acetate and the enzyme could catalyze the reverse reaction (i.e. ATP synthesis more efficiently. ATP and Mg2+ could be substituted by other nucleoside 5′-triphosphates (GTP, UTP and CTP and divalent cations (Mn2+ and Co2+, respectively. Form-I StAckA represents the first structural report of an unliganded AckA. StAckA protomer consists of two domains with characteristic βββαβαβα topology of ASKHA superfamily of proteins. These domains adopt an intermediate conformation compared to that of open and closed forms of ligand-bound Methanosarcina thermophila AckA (MtAckA. Spectroscopic and structural analyses of StAckA further suggested occurrence of inter-domain motion upon ligand-binding. Unexpectedly, Form-II StAckA structure showed a drastic change in the conformation of residues 230–300 compared to that of Form-I. Further investigation revealed electron density corresponding to a citrate molecule in a pocket located at the dimeric interface of Form-II StAckA. Interestingly, a similar dimeric interface pocket lined with largely conserved residues could be identified in Form-I StAckA as well as in other enzymes homologous to AckA suggesting that ligand binding at this pocket may influence the function of these

  14. Fracture mechanism of a dispersion-hardened molybdenum alloy with strong structural interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, A.D.; Malashenko, I.S.; Moiseev, V.F.; Pechkovskij, Eh.P.; Sul'zhenko, V.K.; Trefilov, V.I.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Ehlektrosvarki)

    1978-01-01

    Fracture mechanism in the two-phase Mo-15wt.%Nb-3.5 vol.% TiN alloy known to be of ''brittle matrix-strong interfaces'' type has been investigated depending on tensile test temperature. Several temperature intervals of fracture have been found, each of them having its own peculiarities. A scheme is suggested for fracture mechanism changes in dispersion-hardened alloys with strong interfaces. At low test temperatures brittle cleavage fracture takes place. With temperature increase fracture mechanisms change in the following way: brittle intergranular fracture; fracture of ''microvoid coalescence'' type; fracture typical for reinforced materials with ductile matrix; intergran laru fracture. Particles of strengthening phase have been shown to play different roles depending on the test temperature in the fracture of the alloys studied

  15. Compositional and structural studies of the bone-cartilage interface using PIXE and SAXS techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W., E-mail: W.kaabar@surrey.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Laklouk, A. [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli-Libya (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Bunk, O. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Baily, M. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Farquharson, M.J. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bradley, David [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-21

    Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission ({mu}-PIXE) analysis has been employed in investigating the presence of number of essential anions and cations in thin sections of diseased human articular cartilage affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Distribution maps for Ca, P, K and S in diseased sections show marked alterations in the concentrations of these at the bone-cartilage interface compared to normal tissue. For a decalcified section of human articular cartilage, organisational changes of the collagen network were investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The established gradual reorientation of collagen fibres from vertical to the surface of the joint to normal to the bone-cartilage interface is observed to be heavily disrupted in OA.

  16. Compositional and structural studies of the bone-cartilage interface using PIXE and SAXS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaabar, W.; Laklouk, A.; Bunk, O.; Baily, M.; Farquharson, M.J.; Bradley, David

    2010-01-01

    Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) analysis has been employed in investigating the presence of number of essential anions and cations in thin sections of diseased human articular cartilage affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Distribution maps for Ca, P, K and S in diseased sections show marked alterations in the concentrations of these at the bone-cartilage interface compared to normal tissue. For a decalcified section of human articular cartilage, organisational changes of the collagen network were investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The established gradual reorientation of collagen fibres from vertical to the surface of the joint to normal to the bone-cartilage interface is observed to be heavily disrupted in OA.

  17. Interface structure in a Fe-Ni friction stir welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayer, R.; Jin, H.W.; Mueller, R.R.; Ling, S.; Ford, S.

    2005-01-01

    Friction stir welding of commercially pure iron and nickel was carried out using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool. The macroscopic flow of the two phases generally corresponded to that predicted by the mixing models proposed in the literature. The interface region, however, revealed striations of the phases suggesting a complex flow pattern. Transmission electron microscopy and high resolution Auger analyses revealed that the width of the inter-diffusion zone was about 1.5 μm in single pass and 1.8 μm in double pass joints. The measured concentration profiles could be fitted using calculated profiles generated with static diffusion rates reported for iron and nickel. The diffusion profiles also indicated stabilization of the austenite phase at the interface, which it is proposed are the result of high levels of plastic strain

  18. Imaging specific cellular glycan structures using glycosyltransferases via click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengliang L; Person, Anthony D; Anderson, Matthew; Burroughs, Barbara; Tatge, Timothy; Khatri, Kshitij; Zou, Yonglong; Wang, Lianchun; Geders, Todd; Zaia, Joseph; Sackstein, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a polysaccharide fundamentally important for biologically activities. T/Tn antigens are universal carbohydrate cancer markers. Here, we report the specific imaging of these carbohydrates using a mesenchymal stem cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The staining specificities were demonstrated by comparing imaging of different glycans and validated by either removal of target glycans, which results in loss of signal, or installation of target glycans, which results in gain of signal. As controls, representative key glycans including O-GlcNAc, lactosaminyl glycans and hyaluronan were also imaged. HS staining revealed novel architectural features of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of HUVEC cells. Results from T/Tn antigen staining suggest that O-GalNAcylation is a rate-limiting step for O-glycan synthesis. Overall, these highly specific approaches for HS and T/Tn antigen imaging should greatly facilitate the detection and functional characterization of these biologically important glycans. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Structure, interface, and luminescence of (011-bar1) ZnO nanofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Jung-Hsiung; Yeh, Sung-Wei; Huang, Hsing-Lu; Gan, Dershin

    2010-01-01

    ZnO nanofilms of (011-bar1) texture have been prepared by ion beam sputtering on the (001) surface of single-crystal NaCl. The orientation relationship between them is determined by transmission electron microscopy. Analyses of electron diffraction patterns and interface confirm that the ZnO (011-bar1) plane is the interface with the NaCl (001) surface. The photoluminescence spectrum from the ZnO (011-bar1) surface shows a near-band-edge UV emission and a broad green emission. The result indicates that the inherent high surface defects of oxygen vacancies on the (011-bar1) surface are the probable origin of the green emission.

  20. Equilibrium structure of the plasma sheet boundary layer-lobe interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, H.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.; Dusenbery, P. B.

    1990-01-01

    Observations are presented which show that plasma parameters vary on a scale length smaller than the ion gyroradius at the interface between the plasma sheet boundary layer and the lobe. The Vlasov equation is used to investigate the properties of such a boundary layer. The existence, at the interface, of a density gradient whose scale length is smaller than the ion gyroradius implies that an electrostatic potential is established in order to maintain quasi-neutrality. Strongly sheared (scale lengths smaller than the ion gyroradius) perpendicular and parallel (to the ambient magnetic field) electron flows develop whose peak velocities are on the order of the electron thermal speed and which carry a net current. The free energy of the sheared flows can give rise to a broadband spectrum of electrostatic instabilities starting near the electron plasma frequency and extending below the lower hybrid frequency.

  1. Environmental materials and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    A workshop that explored materials and interfaces research needs relevant to national environmental concerns was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purposes of the workshop were to refine the scientific research directions being planned for the Materials and Interface Program in the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) and further define the research and user equipment to the included as part of the proposed Environmental and Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL). Three plenary information sessions served to outline the background, objectives, and status of the MSRC and EMSL initiatives; selected specific areas with environmentally related materials; and the status of capabilities and facilities planned for the EMSL. Attention was directed to four areas where materials and interface science can have a significant impact on prevention and remediation of environmental problems: in situ detection and characterization of hazardous wastes (sensors), minimization of hazardous waste (separation membranes, ion exchange materials, catalysts), waste containment (encapsulation and barrier materials), and fundamental understanding of contaminant transport mechanisms. During all other sessions, the participants were divided into three working groups for detailed discussion and the preparation of a written report. The working groups focused on the areas of interface structure and chemistry, materials and interface stability, and materials synthesis. These recommendations and suggestions for needed research will be useful for other researchers in proposing projects and for suggesting collaborative work with MSRC researchers. 1 fig

  2. Mobile Interfaces: Liquids as a Perfect Structural Material for Multifunctional, Antifouling Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinthal, A; Aizenberg, J

    2014-01-14

    Life creates some of its most robust, extreme surface materials not from solids but from liquids: a purely liquid interface, stabilized by underlying nanotexture, makes carnivorous plant leaves ultraslippery, the eye optically perfect and dirt-resistant, our knees lubricated and pressure-tolerant, and insect feet reversibly adhesive and shape-adaptive. Novel liquid surfaces based on this idea have recently been shown to display unprecedented omniphobic, self-healing, anti-ice, antifouling, optical, and adaptive properties. In this Perspective, we present a framework and a path forward for developing and designing such liquid surfaces into sophisticated, versatile multifunctional materials. Drawing on concepts from solid materials design and fluid dynamics, we outline how the continuous dynamics, responsiveness, and multiscale patternability of a liquid surface layer can be harnessed to create a wide range of unique, active interfacial functions able to operate in harsh, changing environments not achievable with static solids. We discuss how, in partnership with the underlying substrate, the liquid surface can be programmed to adaptively and reversibly reconfigure from a defect-free, molecularly smooth, transparent interface through a range of finely tuned liquid topographies in response to environmental stimuli. With nearly unlimited design possibilities and unmatched interfacial properties, liquid materials as long-term stable interfaces yet in their fully liquid state may potentially transform surface design everywhere from medicine to architecture to energy infrastructure.

  3. Structural and magnetic depth profiles of magneto-ionic heterostructures beyond the interface limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, DA; Grutter, AJ; Arenholz, E; Liu, K; Kirby, BJ; Borchers, JA; Maranville, BB

    2016-07-22

    Electric field control of magnetism provides a promising route towards ultralow power information storage and sensor technologies. The effects of magneto-ionic motion have been prominently featured in the modification of interface characteristics. Here, we demonstrate magnetoelectric coupling moderated by voltage-driven oxygen migration beyond the interface in relatively thick AlOx/GdOx/Co(15 nm) films. Oxygen migration and Co magnetization are quantitatively mapped with polarized neutron reflectometry under electro-thermal conditioning. The depth-resolved profiles uniquely identify interfacial and bulk behaviours and a semi-reversible control of the magnetization. Magnetometry measurements suggest changes in the microstructure which disrupt long-range ferromagnetic ordering, resulting in an additional magnetically soft phase. X-ray spectroscopy confirms changes in the Co oxidation state, but not in the Gd, suggesting that the GdOx transmits oxygen but does not source or sink it. These results together provide crucial insight into controlling magnetism via magneto-ionic motion, both at interfaces and throughout the bulk of the films.

  4. Insights into structural and dynamical features of water at halloysite interfaces probed by DFT and classical molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, Davide; Pedone, Alfonso; Mancini, Giordano; Duce, Celia; Tiné, Maria Rosaria; Barone, Vincenzo

    2016-01-21

    Density functional theory calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the structure and dynamics of water molecules on kaolinite surfaces and confined in the interlayer of a halloysite model of nanometric dimension. The first technique allowed us to accurately describe the structure of the tetrahedral-octahedral slab of kaolinite in vacuum and in interaction with water molecules and to assess the performance of two widely employed empirical force fields to model water/clay interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the hydrogen bond network structure and dynamics of water adsorbed on kaolinite surfaces and confined in the halloysite interlayer. The results are in nice agreement with the few experimental data available in the literature, showing a pronounced ordering and reduced mobility of water molecules at the hydrophilic octahedral surfaces of kaolinite and confined in the halloysite interlayer, with respect to water interacting with the hydrophobic tetrahedral surfaces and in the bulk. Finally, this investigation provides new atomistic insights into the structural and dynamical properties of water-clay interfaces, which are of fundamental importance for both natural processes and industrial applications.

  5. New Analytical Methods for the Surface/ Interface and the Micro-Structures in Advanced Nanocomposite Materials by Synchrotron Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nakamae

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytical methods of surface/interface structure and micro-structure in advanced nanocomposite materials by using the synchrotron radiation are introduced. Recent results obtained by the energy-tunable and highly collimated brilliant X-rays, in-situ wide angle/small angle X-ray diffraction with high accuracy are reviewed. It is shown that small angle X-ray scattering is one of the best methods to characterize nanoparticle dispersibility, filler aggregate/agglomerate structures and in-situ observation of hierarchical structure deformation in filled rubber under cyclic stretch. Grazing Incidence(small and wide angle X-ray Scattering are powerful to analyze the sintering process of metal nanoparticle by in-situ observation as well as the orientation of polymer molecules and crystalline orientation at very thin surface layer (ca 7nm of polymer film. While the interaction and conformation of adsorbed molecule at interface can be investigated by using high energy X-ray XPS with Enough deep position (ca 9 micron m.

  6. Impact of biogenic amine molecular weight and structure on surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun

    2016-02-01

    The oligoamines, such as ethylenediamine to pentaethylenetetramine, and the aliphatic biogenic amines, such as putrescine, spermidine and spermine, strongly interact with anionic surfactants, such as sodium dodecylsulfate, SDS. It has been shown that this results in pronounced surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface and the transition from monolayer to multilayer adsorption which depends upon solution pH and oligoamine structure. In the neutron reflectivity, NR, and surface tension, ST, results presented here the role of the oligoamine structure on the adsorption of SDS is investigated more fully using a range of different biogenic amines. The effect of the extent of the intra-molecular spacing between amine groups on the adsorption has been extended by comparing results for cadavarine with putrescine and ethylenediamine. The impact of more complex biogenic amine structures on the adsorption has been investigated with the aromatic phenethylamine, and the heterocyclic amines histamine and melamine. The results provide an important insight into how surfactant adsorption at interfaces can be manipulated by the addition of biogenic amines, and into the role of solution pH and oligoamine structure in modifying the interaction between the surfactant and oligoamine. The results impact greatly upon potential applications and in understanding some of the important biological functions of biogenic amines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Exhaustive Classification of the Invariant Solutions for a Specific Nonlinear Model Describing Near Planar and Marginally Long-Wave Unstable Interfaces for Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangari, Fatemeh

    2018-05-01

    Problems of thermodynamic phase transition originate inherently in solidification, combustion and various other significant fields. If the transition region among two locally stable phases is adequately narrow, the dynamics can be modeled by an interface motion. This paper is devoted to exhaustive analysis of the invariant solutions for a modified Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation in two spatial and one temporal dimensions is presented. This nonlinear partial differential equation asymptotically characterizes near planar interfaces, which are marginally long-wave unstable. For this purpose, by applying the classical symmetry method for this model the classical symmetry operators are attained. Moreover, the structure of the Lie algebra of symmetries is discussed and the optimal system of subalgebras, which yields the preliminary classification of group invariant solutions is constructed. Mainly, the Lie invariants corresponding to the infinitesimal symmetry generators as well as associated similarity reduced equations are also pointed out. Furthermore, the nonclassical symmetries of this nonlinear PDE are also comprehensively investigated.

  8. Secondary structure of spiralin in solution, at the air/water interface, and in interaction with lipid monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Sabine; Blaudez, Daniel; Desbat, Bernard; Dufourcq, Jean; Wróblewski, Henri

    2002-05-03

    The surface of spiroplasmas, helically shaped pathogenic bacteria related to the mycoplasmas, is crowded with the membrane-anchored lipoprotein spiralin whose structure and function are unknown. In this work, the secondary structure of spiralin under the form of detergent-free micelles (average Stokes radius, 87.5 A) in water and at the air/water interface, alone or in interaction with lipid monolayers was analyzed. FT-IR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic data indicate that spiralin in solution contains about 25+/-3% of helices and 38+/-2% of beta sheets. These measurements are consistent with a consensus predictive analysis of the protein sequence suggesting about 28% of helices, 32% of beta sheets and 40% of irregular structure. Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) revealed that, in water, the micelles slowly disaggregate to form a stable and homogeneous layer at the air/water interface, exhibiting a surface pressure up to 10 mN/m. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PMIRRAS) spectra of interfacial spiralin display a complex amide I band characteristic of a mixture of beta sheets and alpha helices, and an intense amide II band. Spectral simulations indicate a flat orientation for the beta sheets and a vertical orientation for the alpha helices with respect to the interface. The combination of tensiometric and PMIRRAS measurements show that, when spiroplasma lipids are used to form a monolayer at the air/water interface, spiralin is adsorbed under this monolayer and its antiparallel beta sheets are mainly parallel to the polar-head layer of the lipids without deep perturbation of the fatty acid chains organization. Based upon these results, we propose a 'carpet model' for spiralin organization at the spiroplasma cell surface. In this model, spiralin molecules anchored into the outer leaflet of the lipid bilayer by their N-terminal lipid moiety are composed of two colinear domains (instead of a single globular domain) situated at

  9. Crystal structures of the human G3BP1 NTF2-like domain visualize FxFG Nup Repeat Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vognsen, Tina Reinholdt; Möller, Ingvar Rúnar; Kristensen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Ras GTPase Activating Protein SH3 Domain Binding Protein (G3BP) is a potential anti-cancer drug target implicated in several cellular functions. We have used protein crystallography to solve crystal structures of the human G3BP1 NTF2-like domain both alone and in complex with an FxFG Nup repeat...... peptide. Despite high structural similarity, the FxFG binding site is located between two alpha helices in the G3BP1 NTF2-like domain and not at the dimer interface as observed for nuclear transport factor 2. ITC studies showed specificity towards the FxFG motif but not FG and GLFG motifs. The unliganded...

  10. IGDS/TRAP Interface Program (ITIP). Detailed Design Specification (DDS). [network flow diagrams for coal gasification studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, S.; Johnson, W.; Lewis, R.; Rich, R.

    1981-01-01

    The software modules which comprise the IGDS/TRAP Interface Program are described. A hierarchical input processing output (HIPO) chart for each user command is given. The description consists of: (1) function of the user command; (2) calling sequence; (3) moduls which call this use command; (4) modules called by this user command; (5) IGDS commands used by this user command; and (6) local usage of global registers. Each HIPO contains the principal functions performed within the module. Also included with each function are a list of the inputs which may be required to perform the function and a list of the outputs which may be created as a result of performing the function.

  11. An open-access microfluidic model for lung-specific functional studies at an air-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalayanda, Divya D; Puleo, Christopher; Fulton, William B; Sharpe, Leilani M; Wang, Tza-Huei; Abdullah, Fizan

    2009-10-01

    In an effort to improve the physiologic relevance of existing in vitro models for alveolar cells, we present a microfluidic platform which provides an air-interface in a dynamic system combining microfluidic and suspended membrane culture systems. Such a system provides the ability to manipulate multiple parameters on a single platform along with ease in cell seeding and manipulation. The current study presents a comparison of the efficacy of the hybrid system with conventional platforms using assays analyzing the maintenance of function and integrity of A549 alveolar epithelial cell monolayer cultures. The hybrid system incorporates bio-mimetic nourishment on the basal side of the epithelial cells along with an open system on the apical side of the cells exposed to air allowing for easy access for assays.

  12. Studies of extractant molecules in solution and at liquid-liquid interfaces: structural and mechanistic aspects of synergy effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baaden, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations reported herein provide new important insights into cation recognition and complexation in solution as well as liquid-liquid extraction, with a particular focus on the microscopic events taking place at the interface between two immiscible liquids. Preliminary studies concerned the representation of the trivalent rare earth cations La 3+ , Eu 3+ and Yb 3+ in force field simulations, probing structural and energetic features on an experimentally characterized model system based on substituted pyridine dicarboxamide ligands. Complexation of such cations by a novel calixarene derivative was investigated showing unexpected features, such as the position of the cation in the complex. Independent experimental studies published subsequently support these findings. Another part of the work is related to industrial liquid-liquid extraction systems using tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as co-solvent, extractant, surfactant and synergist. We investigate 1) concentration effects simulating up to 60 TBP at a water/chloroform interface, 2) acidity using a neutral and ionic model of HNO 3 and 3) synergistic aspects of mixed TBP/calixarene extraction systems. These simulations provide the first microscopic insights into such issues. We finally addressed the topic of solute transfer across the water/chloroform interface. The potential of mean force for such a process has been calculated by both standard methods and novel approaches [fr

  13. Molecular-structure control of ultrafast electron injection at cationic porphyrin-CdTe quantum dot interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-03-05

    Charge transfer (CT) at donor (D)/acceptor (A) interfaces is central to the functioning of photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. Understanding and controlling this process on the molecular level has been proven to be crucial for optimizing the performance of many energy-challenge relevant devices. Here, we report the experimental observations of controlled on/off ultrafast electron transfer (ET) at cationic porphyrin-CdTe quantum dot (QD) interfaces using femto- and nanosecond broad-band transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. The time-resolved data demonstrate how one can turn on/off the electron injection from porphyrin to the CdTe QDs. With careful control of the molecular structure, we are able to tune the electron injection at the porphyrin-CdTe QD interface from zero to very efficient and ultrafast. In addition, our data demonstrate that the ET process occurs within our temporal resolution of 120 fs, which is one of the fastest times recorded for organic photovoltaics. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  14. Molecular dynamics studies of simple membrane-water interfaces: Structure and functions in the beginnings of cellular life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of the structure and functions of a simple membrane are performed in order to examine whether membranes provide an environment capable of promoting protobiological evolution. Our model membrane is composed of glycerol 1-monooleate. It is found that the bilayer surface fluctuates in time and space, occasionally creating thinning defects in the membrane. These defects are essential for passive transport of simple ions across membranes because they reduce the Born barrier to this process by approximately 40%. Negative ions are transferred across the bilayer more readily than positive ions due to favorable interactions with the electric field at the membrane-water interface. Passive transport of neutral molecules is, in general, more complex than predicted by the solubility-diffusion model. In particular, molecules which exhibit sufficient hydrophilicity and lipophilicity concentrate near membrane surfaces and experience 'interfacial resistance' to transport. The membrane-water interface forms an environment suitable for heterogeneous catalysis. Several possible mechanisms leading to an increase of reaction rates at the interface are discussed. We conclude that vesicles have many properties that make them very good candidates for earliest protocells. Some potentially fruitful directions of experimental and theoretical research on this subject are proposed.

  15. Analysis of interface states and series resistance at MIS structure irradiated under {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tataroglu, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ademt@gazi.edu.tr; Altindal, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-10-11

    In this research, we investigated the effect of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray exposure on the electrical properties of Au/SnO{sub 2}/n-Si (MIS) structures using current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The fabricated devices were exposed to {gamma}-ray doses ranging from 0 to 300 kGy at a dose rate of 2.12 kGy h{sup -1} in water at room temperature. The density of interface states N{sub ss} as a function of E{sub c}-E{sub ss} is deduced from the forward bias I-V data for each dose by taking into account the bias dependence effective barrier height and series resistance of device at room temperature. Experimental results show that the {gamma}-irradiation gives rise to an increase in the zero bias barrier height {phi}{sub BO}, as the ideality factor n and N{sub ss} decrease with increasing radiation dose. In addition, the values of series resistance were determined using Cheung's method. The R{sub s} increases with increasing radiation dose. The results show that the main effect of the radiation is the generation of interface states with energy level within the forbidden band gap at the insulator/semiconductor interface.

  16. Organic layers at metal/electrolyte interfaces: molecular structure and reactivity of viologen monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, Stephan; Pham, Duc T; Huemann, Sascha; Gentz, Knud; Zoerlein, Caroline; Wandelt, Klaus; Broekmann, Peter; Hunger, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of viologens (1,1'-disubstituted-4,4'-bipyridinium molecules) on a chloride-modified copper electrode has been studied using a combination of cyclic voltammetry (CV), in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and ex-situ photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Two prototypes of viologens could be identified with respect to their redox behavior upon adsorption, namely those which retain (non-reactive adsorption) and those which change their redox state (reactive adsorption) upon interaction with the chloride-modified copper surface at given potential. The first class of viologens represented by 1,1'-dibenzyl-4,4'-bipyridinium molecules (dibenzyl-viologens, abbreviated as DBV) can be adsorbed and stabilized on this electrode surface in their di-cationic state at potentials more positive than the reduction potential of the solution species. XPS N1s core level shifts verify that the adsorbed DBV molecules on the electrode are in their oxidized di-cationic state. Electrostatic attraction between the partially solvated viologen di-cations and the anionic chloride layer is discussed as the main driving force for the DBV stabilization on the electrode surface. Analysis of the N1s and O1s core level shifts points to a non-reactive DBV adsorption leaving the DBV ads 2+ solvation shell partly intact. The laterally ordered DBV ads 2+ monolayer turns out to be hydrophilic with at least four water molecules per viologen present within this cationic organic film. The analysis of the Cl2p core level reveals that no further chloride species are present at the surface besides those which are specifically adsorbed, i.e. which are in direct contact with the metallic copper surface underneath the organic layer. The reduction of these adsorbed DBV ads 2+ surface species takes place only in the same potential regime where the solvated DBV aq 2+ bulk solution species react and is accompanied by a pronounced structural change from the di-cationic 'cavitand'-structure to a

  17. Local electronic structure at organic–metal interface studied by UPS, MAES, and first-principles calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, M., E-mail: cmaoki@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Masuda, S.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding and controlling local electronic structures at organic–metal interfaces are crucial for fabricating novel organic-based electronics, as in the case of heterojunctions in semiconductor devices. Here, we report recent studies of valence electronic states at organic–metal interfaces (especially those near the Fermi level of a metal substrate) by the combined analysis of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS), metastable atom electron spectroscopy (MAES), and first-principles calculations. New electronic states in the HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital)–LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) gap formed at an organic–metal interface are classified as a chemisorption-induced gap state (CIGS) and a complex-based gap state (CBGS). The CIGS is further characterized by an asymptotic feature of the metal wave function in the chemisorbed species. The CIGSs in alkanethiolates on Pt(1 1 1) and C{sub 60} on Pt(1 1 1) can be regarded as damping and propagating types, respectively. The CBGSs in K-doped dibenzopentacene (DBP) are composed of DBP-derived MOs and K sp states and distributed over the complex film. No metallic structures were found in the K{sub 1}DBP and K{sub 3}DBP phases, suggesting that they are Mott–Hubbard insulators due to strong electron correlation. The local electronic structures of a pentacene film bridged by Au electrodes under bias voltages were examined by an FET-like specimen. The pentacene-derived bands were steeply shifted at the positively biased electrode, reflecting the p-type character of the film.

  18. Local Structure and Ionic Conduction at Interfaces of Electrode and Solid Electrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Hirotsohi; Oga, Yusuke; Saruwatari, Isamu; Moriguchi, Isamu

    2012-01-01

    All solid state batteries are attracting interests as next generation energy storage devices. However, little is known on interfaces between active materials and solid electrolytes, which may affect performance of the devices. In this study, interfacial phenomena between electrodes and solid electrolytes of all solid state batteries were investigated by using nano-composites of Li 2SiO 3-TiO 2, Li 2SiO 3-LiTiO 2, and Li 2SiO 3-FePO 4. Studies on ionic conductivity of these composites revealed...

  19. Atomic and electronic structure of a copper/graphene interface as prepared and 1.5 years after

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Bazylewski, P. F.; Kukharenko, A. I.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Ponosov, Yu. S.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Cholakh, S. O.; Lee, Y. H.; Chang, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    We report the results of X-ray spectroscopy and Raman measurements of as-prepared graphene on a high quality copper surface and the same materials after 1.5 years under different conditions (ambient and low humidity). The obtained results were compared with density functional theory calculations of the formation energies and electronic structures of various structural defects in graphene/Cu interfaces. For evaluation of the stability of the carbon cover, we propose a two-step model. The first step is oxidation of the graphene, and the second is perforation of graphene with the removal of carbon atoms as part of the carbon dioxide molecule. Results of the modeling and experimental measurements provide evidence that graphene grown on high-quality copper substrate becomes robust and stable in time (1.5 years). However, the stability of this interface depends on the quality of the graphene and the number of native defects in the graphene and substrate. The effect of the presence of a metallic substrate with defects on the stability and electronic structure of graphene is also discussed

  20. Energy band structure and electrical properties of Ga-oxide/GaN interface formed by remote oxygen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Taishi; Taoka, Noriyuki; Ohta, Akio; Truyen, Nguyen Xuan; Yamada, Hisashi; Takahashi, Tokio; Ikeda, Mitsuhisa; Makihara, Katsunori; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Shimizu, Mitsuaki; Miyazaki, Seiichi

    2018-06-01

    The energy band structure of a Ga-oxide/GaN structure formed by remote oxygen plasma exposure and the electrical interface properties of the GaN metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) capacitors with the SiO2/Ga-oxide/GaN structures with postdeposition annealing (PDA) at various temperatures have been investigated. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy clarified that the formed Ga-oxide layer is neither a single nor polycrystalline phase with high crystallinity. We found that the energy band offsets at the conduction band minimum and at the valence band maximum between the Ga-oxide layer and the GaN surface were 0.4 and 1.2 ± 0.2 eV, respectively. Furthermore, capacitance–voltage (C–V) characteristics revealed that the interface trap density (D it) is lower than the evaluation limit of Terman method without depending on the PDA temperatures, and that the SiO2/Ga-oxide stack can work as a protection layer to maintain the low D it, avoiding the significant decomposition of GaN at the high PDA temperature of 800 °C.

  1. Docking-based modeling of protein-protein interfaces for extensive structural and functional characterization of missense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradas-Bautista, Didier; Fernández-Recio, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are providing genomic information for an increasing number of healthy individuals and patient populations. In the context of the large amount of generated genomic data that is being generated, understanding the effect of disease-related mutations at molecular level can contribute to close the gap between genotype and phenotype and thus improve prevention, diagnosis or treatment of a pathological condition. In order to fully characterize the effect of a pathological mutation and have useful information for prediction purposes, it is important first to identify whether the mutation is located at a protein-binding interface, and second to understand the effect on the binding affinity of the affected interaction/s. Computational methods, such as protein docking are currently used to complement experimental efforts and could help to build the human structural interactome. Here we have extended the original pyDockNIP method to predict the location of disease-associated nsSNPs at protein-protein interfaces, when there is no available structure for the protein-protein complex. We have applied this approach to the pathological interaction networks of six diseases with low structural data on PPIs. This approach can almost double the number of nsSNPs that can be characterized and identify edgetic effects in many nsSNPs that were previously unknown. This can help to annotate and interpret genomic data from large-scale population studies, and to achieve a better understanding of disease at molecular level.

  2. Docking-based modeling of protein-protein interfaces for extensive structural and functional characterization of missense mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Barradas-Bautista

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies are providing genomic information for an increasing number of healthy individuals and patient populations. In the context of the large amount of generated genomic data that is being generated, understanding the effect of disease-related mutations at molecular level can contribute to close the gap between genotype and phenotype and thus improve prevention, diagnosis or treatment of a pathological condition. In order to fully characterize the effect of a pathological mutation and have useful information for prediction purposes, it is important first to identify whether the mutation is located at a protein-binding interface, and second to understand the effect on the binding affinity of the affected interaction/s. Computational methods, such as protein docking are currently used to complement experimental efforts and could help to build the human structural interactome. Here we have extended the original pyDockNIP method to predict the location of disease-associated nsSNPs at protein-protein interfaces, when there is no available structure for the protein-protein complex. We have applied this approach to the pathological interaction networks of six diseases with low structural data on PPIs. This approach can almost double the number of nsSNPs that can be characterized and identify edgetic effects in many nsSNPs that were previously unknown. This can help to annotate and interpret genomic data from large-scale population studies, and to achieve a better understanding of disease at molecular level.

  3. Potential fluctuations due to randomly distributed charges at the semiconductor-insulator interface in MIS-structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanchev, I.

    2003-01-01

    A new expression for the Fourier transform of the binary correlation function of the random potential near the semiconductor-insulator interface is derived. The screening from the metal electrode in MIS-structure is taken into account introducing an effective insulator thickness. An essential advantage of this correlation function is the finite dispersion of the random potential to which it leads in distinction with the so far known correlation functions leading to a divergent dispersion. The dispersion, an important characteristic of the random potential distribution, determining the amplitude of the potential fluctuations is calculated

  4. Potential fluctuations due to randomly distributed charges at the semiconductor-insulator interface in mis-structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanchev, I; Slavcheva, G.

    1993-01-01

    A new expression for the Fourier transform of the binary correlation function of the random potential near the semiconductor-insulator interface is derived. The screening from the metal electrode in MIS-structure is taken into account introducing an effective insulator thickness. An essential advantage of this correlation function is the finite dispersion of the random potential Γ 2 to which it leads in distinction with the so far known correlation functions leading to divergent dispersion. The important characteristic of the random potential distribution Γ 2 determining the amplitude of the potential fluctuations is calculated. 7 refs. (orig.)

  5. Methods for histochemical demonstration of vascular structures at the muscle-bone interface from cryostate sections of demineralized tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S

    1981-01-01

    In tissue decalcified with MgNa2EDTA at a neutral pH activity for ATPase can used be for demonstration of the vascular structures at the muscle-bone interface. The GOMORI method for alkaline phosphatase is only of value, when fresh unfixed tissue is to be examined. The azo-dye method for alkaline...... phosphatase failed to give satisfactory results, and so did the alpha-amylase PAS method. 5'-nucleotidase activity is present in both capillaries and in cells lining the surfaces of bones, while larger blood vessels are poorly stained....

  6. Charge trapping at organic/self-assembly molecule interfaces studied by electrical switching behaviour in a crosspoint structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yun; Pan Lijia; Pu Lin; Shi Yi; Liu Chuan; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2012-01-01

    Charge trapping at organic/self-assembly molecule (SAM) interfaces is studied by the electrical switching behaviour in a crosspoint structure, where interfacial charge trapping tunes the potential barrier of the SAM layer. The sample with rubrene exhibits the write-once read-many-times memory effect, which is due to the interfacial charges trapped at deep states. On the other hand, the sample with 2-amino-4,5-dicyanoimidazole presents recyclable conduction transition, which results from the trapped charges distributed at shallow states. Moreover, the percentage of the charges trapped at shallow states can be estimated from electrical transition levels. (paper)

  7. Charge trapping at organic/self-assembly molecule interfaces studied by electrical switching behaviour in a crosspoint structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Liu, Chuan; Pan, Lijia; Pu, Lin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Shi, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Charge trapping at organic/self-assembly molecule (SAM) interfaces is studied by the electrical switching behaviour in a crosspoint structure, where interfacial charge trapping tunes the potential barrier of the SAM layer. The sample with rubrene exhibits the write-once read-many-times memory effect, which is due to the interfacial charges trapped at deep states. On the other hand, the sample with 2-amino-4,5-dicyanoimidazole presents recyclable conduction transition, which results from the trapped charges distributed at shallow states. Moreover, the percentage of the charges trapped at shallow states can be estimated from electrical transition levels.

  8. Potential fluctuations due to the randomly distributed charges at the semiconductor-insulator interface in MIS-structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavcheva, G.; Yanchev, I.

    1991-01-01

    A new expression for the Fourier transform of the binary correlation function of the random potential near the semiconductor-insulator interface is derived. The screening due to the image charge with respect to the metal electrode in MIS-structure is taken into account, introducing an effective insulator thickness. An essential advantage of this correlation function is the finite dispersion of the random potential Γ 2 to which it leads in distinction with the so far known correlation functions leading to divergent dispersion. The important characteristic of the random potential distribution Γ 2 determining the amplitude of the potential fluctuations is calculated. (author). 7 refs, 1 fig

  9. Real time, high resolution studies of protein adsorption and structure at the solid-liquid interface using dual polarization interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Neville J; Peel, Louise L; Swann, Marcus J; Cross, Graham H; Reeves, Andrew; Brand, Stuart; Lu, Jian R

    2004-01-01

    A novel method for the analysis of thin biological films, called dual polarization interferometry (DPI), is described. This high resolution (<1 A), laboratory-based technique allows the thickness and refractive index (density) of biological molecules adsorbing or reacting at the solid-liquid interface to be measured in real time (up to 10 measurements per second). Results from the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on to a silicon oxynitride chip surface are presented to demonstrate how time dependent molecular behaviour can be examined using DPI. Mechanistic and structural information relating to the adsorption process is obtained as a function of the solution pH

  10. Potential fluctuations due to randomly distributed charges at the semiconductor-insulator interface in MIS-structures

    CERN Document Server

    Yanchev, I

    2003-01-01

    A new expression for the Fourier transform of the binary correlation function of the random potential near the semiconductor-insulator interface is derived. The screening from the metal electrode in MIS-structure is taken into account introducing an effective insulator thickness. An essential advantage of this correlation function is the finite dispersion of the random potential to which it leads in distinction with the so far known correlation functions leading to a divergent dispersion. The dispersion, an important characteristic of the random potential distribution, determining the amplitude of the potential fluctuations is calculated.

  11. Potential fluctuations due to randomly distributed charges at the semiconductor-insulator interface in MIS-structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanchev, I

    2003-07-01

    A new expression for the Fourier transform of the binary correlation function of the random potential near the semiconductor-insulator interface is derived. The screening from the metal electrode in MIS-structure is taken into account introducing an effective insulator thickness. An essential advantage of this correlation function is the finite dispersion of the random potential to which it leads in distinction with the so far known correlation functions leading to a divergent dispersion. The dispersion, an important characteristic of the random potential distribution, determining the amplitude of the potential fluctuations is calculated.

  12. Effect of bovine serum albumin on the functionality and structure of catanionic surfactant at air–buffer interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiti, Kajari; Bhattacharya, Subhash C.; Moulik, Satya P.; Panda, Amiya K.

    2013-01-01

    Interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with the solvent spread monolayer of a catanionic surfactant, octadecyltrimethylammonium dodecylsulfate, (C 18 TA + DS − ) at the air–buffer interface was investigated by measuring the surface pressure with time and change in surface area. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was used as reference. Kinetics of BSA desorption from the interface to the buffer subphase, that of C 18 TA + DS − and DPPC through their interaction with BSA, were also studied at different BSA concentrations (in the subphase) and surface pressures. Surface pressure (π)–area (A) isotherms (at pH = 5.4, μ = 0.01, T = 298 K) revealed that the coacervate/DPPC monolayer becomes expanded in the presence of BSA at low π while their protein bound species are released into the subphase at high π. Film morphology, studied by epifluorescence microscopy (EFM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), reveals that the sizes of the domains of both DPPC and coacervate decrease in the presence of BSA. Presence of BSA in the coacervate and DPPC monolayer was supported from AFM data analysis. Highlights: ► Effect of BSA on the functionality and structure of C 18 TA + DS − /DPPC at the air–buffer interface was studied. ► BSA molecules coadsorb at lower surface pressure, while they abstract amphiphiles at higher surface pressure into the bulk. ► Kinetic studies of adsorption/desorption of BSA at/from the interface were performed. ► Organized amphiphiles are perturbed in the presence of BSA.

  13. Actinide-specific complexing agents: their structural and solution chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, K.N.; Freeman, G.E.; Kappel, M.J.

    1983-07-01

    The synthesis of a series of tetracatecholate ligands designed to be specific for Pu(IV) and other actinide(IV) ions has been achieved. Although these compounds are very effective as in vivo plutonium removal agents, potentiometric and voltammetric data indicate that at neutral pH full complexation of the Pu(IV) ion by all four catecholate groups does not occur. Spectroscopic results indicate that the tetracatecholates, 3,4,3-LICAMS and 3,4,3-LICAMC, complex Am(III). The Am(IV)/(III)-catecholate couple (where catecholate = 3,4,3-LICAMS or 3,4,3-LICAMC) is not observed, but may not be observable due to the large currents associated with ligand oxidation. However, within the potential range where ligand oxidation does not occur, these experiments indicate that the reduction potential of free Am(IV)/(III) is probably greater than or equal to + 2.6 V vs NHE or higher. Proof of the complexation of americium in the trivalent oxidation state by 3,4,3-LICAMS and 3,4,3-LICAMC elimates the possibility of tetracatholates stabilizing Am(IV) in vivo

  14. The Okhansk Meteorite: Specifics of Composition, Structure, and Genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Bakhtin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Okhansk meteorite fell on August 18, 1887 near the village of Tabor, about 15 km away from the town of Okhansk in Perm province and weighed 186.5 kg (the total weight of collected fragments, according to P.I. Krotov, was more than 245 kg. The shock wave from the meteorite entry knocked down animals and riders on horses. Despite the fact that it was significantly stronger than that caused by the Chelyabinsk meteorite of 2013, all information about this meteorite has completely erased from people's memory. It has been shown that the meteorite is an ordinary olivine-bronzite chondrite. Its main silicate minerals are olivine, bronzite, plagioclase, and diopside. The main ore minerals are kamacite and troilite. The meteorite contains silicate glass in large amounts. The analysis of the composition and structure of the Okhansk meteorite has demonstrated that it was formed at the early stages of accretion of the melted substance of the protosolar nebula without undergoing endogenous, temperature, or pressure changes.

  15. Crack path predictions and experiments in plane structures considering anisotropic properties and material interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.O. Judt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In many engineering applications special requirements are directed to a material's fracture behavior and the prediction of crack paths. Especially if the material exhibits anisotropic elastic properties or fracture toughnesses, e.g. in textured or composite materials, the simulation of crack paths is challenging. Here, the application of path independent interaction integrals (I-integrals, J-, L- and M-integrals is beneficial for an accurate crack tip loading analysis. Numerical tools for the calculation of loading quantities using these path-invariant integrals are implemented into the commercial finite element (FE-code ABAQUS. Global approaches of the integrals are convenient considering crack tips approaching other crack faces, internal boundaries or material interfaces. Curved crack faces require special treatment with respect to integration contours. Numerical crack paths are predicted based on FE calculations of the boundary value problem in connection with an intelligent adaptive re-meshing algorithm. Considering fracture toughness anisotropy and accounting for inelastic effects due to small plastic zones in the crack tip region, the numerically predicted crack paths of different types of specimens with material interfaces and internal boundaries are compared to subcritically grown paths obtained from experiments.

  16. Leaf extraction and analysis framework graphical user interface: segmenting and analyzing the structure of leaf veins and areoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Charles A; Symonova, Olga; Mileyko, Yuriy; Hilley, Troy; Weitz, Joshua S

    2011-01-01

    Interest in the structure and function of physical biological networks has spurred the development of a number of theoretical models that predict optimal network structures across a broad array of taxonomic groups, from mammals to plants. In many cases, direct tests of predicted network structure are impossible given the lack of suitable empirical methods to quantify physical network geometry with sufficient scope and resolution. There is a long history of empirical methods to quantify the network structure of plants, from roots, to xylem networks in shoots and within leaves. However, with few exceptions, current methods emphasize the analysis of portions of, rather than entire networks. Here, we introduce the Leaf Extraction and Analysis Framework Graphical User Interface (LEAF GUI), a user-assisted software tool that facilitates improved empirical understanding of leaf network structure. LEAF GUI takes images of leaves where veins have been enhanced relative to the background, and following a series of interactive thresholding and cleaning steps, returns a suite of statistics and information on the structure of leaf venation networks and areoles. Metrics include the dimensions, position, and connectivity of all network veins, and the dimensions, shape, and position of the areoles they surround. Available for free download, the LEAF GUI software promises to facilitate improved understanding of the adaptive and ecological significance of leaf vein network structure.

  17. Turbulence structure and CO2 transfer at the air-sea interface and turbulent diffusion in thermally-stratified flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, S.

    1996-01-01

    A supercomputer is a nice tool for simulating environmental flows. The Center for Global Environmental Research (CGER) of the National Institute for Environmental Studies purchased a supercomputer SX-3 of CGER about three years ago, and it has been used for various environmental simulations since. Although one of the main purposes for which the supercomputer was used was to simulate global warming with a general circulation model (GCM), our research organization used the supercomputer for more fundamental work to investigate heat and mass transfer mechanisms in environmental flows. Our motivations for this work was the fact that GCMs involve a number of uncertain submodels related to heat and mass transfer in turbulent atmospheric and oceanic flows. It may be easy to write research reports by running GCMs which were developed in western countries, but it is difficult for numerical scientists to do original work with such second-hand GCMs. In this sense, we thought that it would be more original to study the fundamentals of heat and mass transfer mechanisms in environmental flows rather than to run a GCM. Therefore, we tried to numerically investigate turbulence structure and scalar transfer both at the air-sea interface and in thermally stratified flows, neither of which were well modeled by GCMs. We also employed laboratory experiments to clarify the turbulence structure and scalar transfer mechanism, since numerical simulations are not sufficiently powerful to clarify all aspects of turbulence structure and scalar transfer mechanisms. A numerical technique is a promising tool to complement measurements of processes that cannot be clarified by turbulence measurements in environmental flows. It should also be noted that most of the interesting phenomena in environmental flows can be elucidated by laboratory or field measurements but not by numerical simulations alone. Thus, it is of importance to combine laboratory or field measurements with numerical simulations

  18. Molecular dynamics study of growth and interface structure during aluminum deposition on Ni(1 0 0) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    er, Laboratory of Radiation and Matter, Faculty of Science and Technology, 26000 Settat (Morocco); Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" data-affiliation=" (Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory of Radiation and Matter, Faculty of Science and Technology, 26000 Settat (Morocco); Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" >Hassani, A.; Makan, A.; er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" data-affiliation=" (Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" >Sbiaai, K.; er, Laboratory of Radiation and Matter, Faculty of Science and Technology, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" data-affiliation=" (Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory of Radiation and Matter, Faculty of Science and Technology, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" >Tabyaoui, A.; er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" data-affiliation=" (Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" >Hasnaoui, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aluminum thin film growth on Ni(1 0 0) substrate was investigated. • Molecular dynamics simulation based on EAM interaction potential was considered. • Hexagonal and fourfold structures coexisted in the first layer. • Interface mismatch was revealed by wavy effect occurring in both lateral directions. • Film growth followed a layer-by-layer mode only in the first three deposited layers. - Abstract: We investigate aluminum thin film growth on Ni(1 0 0) substrate by means of molecular dynamics simulation. Embedded Atom Method interaction potential is considered. The simulation is performed at 300 K using an incident energy of 1 eV. The substrate-grown film interface shows the coexistence of hexagonal and fourfold structures in the first layer during the initial stage of deposition. As the deposition proceeds, the hexagonal geometry transforms to fourfold one which becomes dominant toward the end of deposition. The coverage of this layer exceeded 100%. Moreover, the deposited Al atoms with fourfold geometry adopt the lattice parameter of Ni as the thickness of deposited film increases. The interface mismatch investigation revealed that the roughness is dictated by how the Al(1 1 1) fits to the Ni(1 0 0) substrate, which may be reflected by a wavy effect occurring in both lateral directions. Furthermore, the film grows by a layer-by-layer mode with a coverage rate greater than 66.7% in the first three layers, while it follows an island mode with a coverage rate lower than the previous value (66.7%) beyond the third layer. Overall, a detailed analysis of each layer growth has established a relationship between the number of deposited atoms and the coverage rate of each layer

  19. First-principles investigation of the structure and synergistic chemical bonding of Ag and Mg at the Al | Ω interface in a Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lipeng; Irving, Douglas L.; Zikry, Mohammed A.; Brenner, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Density functional theory was used to characterize the atomic structure and bonding of the Al | Ω interface in a Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy. The most stable interfacial structure was found to be connected by Al-Al bonds with a hexagonal Al lattice on the surface of the Ω phase sitting on the vacant hollow sites of the Al {1 1 1} matrix plane. The calculations predict that when substituted separately for Al at this interface, Ag and Mg do not enhance the interface stability through chemical bonding. Combining Ag and Mg, however, was found to chemically stabilize this interface, with the lowest-energy structure examined being a bi-layer with Ag atoms adjacent to the Al matrix and Mg adjacent to the Ω phase. This study provides an atomic arrangement for the interfacial bi-layer observed experimentally in this alloy.

  20. Plasma kinetic effects on atomistic mix in one dimension and at structured interfaces (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Brian; Yin, Lin; Cooley, James; Haack, Jeffrey; Douglas, Melissa

    2017-10-01

    The Marble campaign seeks to develop a platform for studying mix evolution in turbulent, inhomogeneous, high-energy-density plasmas at the NIF. Marble capsules contain engineered CD foams, the pores of which are filled with hydrogen and tritium. During implosion, hydrodynamic stirring and plasma diffusivity mix tritium fuel into the surrounding CD plasma, leading to both DD and DT fusion neutron production. In this presentation, building upon prior work, kinetic particle-in-cell simulations using the VPIC code are used to examine kinetic effects on thermonuclear burn in Marble-like settings. Departures from Maxwellian distributions are observed near the interface and TN burn rates and inferred temperatures from synthetic neutron time of flight diagnostics are compared with those from treating the background species as Maxwellian. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory and supported by the ASC and Science programs.

  1. Atomic Scale Chemical and Structural Characterization of Ceramic Oxide Heterostructure Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R. K.

    2003-04-16

    The research plan was divided into three tasks: (a) growth of oxide heterostructures for interface engineering using standard thin film deposition techniques, (b) atomic level characterization of oxide heterostructure using such techniques as STEM-2 combined with AFM/STM and conventional high-resolution microscopy (HRTEM), and (c) property measurements of aspects important to oxide heterostructures using standard characterization methods, including dielectric properties and dynamic cathodoluminescence measurements. Each of these topics were further classified on the basis of type of oxide heterostructure. Type I oxide heterostructures consisted of active dielectric layers, including the materials Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} (BST), Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}. Type II heterostructures consisted of ferroelectric active layers such as lanthanum manganate and Type III heterostructures consist of phosphor oxide active layers such as Eu-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  2. Micro and Nano-structure Development and Multiscale Physics at Sliding Metal Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigney; David; A.

    2006-06-01

    This final report describes research on the response of ductile materials to extreme loading conditions and high strain rates during impact combined with sliding friction. The work has involved a collaboration among two groups at Los Alamos National Laboratory and a tribology research grouup at The Ohio State University. The project involved experimental work and computer simulations at both laboratories and continuum mechanics analysis at OSU, supplemented by testing at AWE, Harwell, UK. Results demonstrated the importance of vorticity and mechanical mixing near the sliding interface in the development of nanocrystalline tribomaterial that is far from equilibrium. The work also revealed that strain rate sensitivity is an important materials property for determining the development of the velocity profile during sliding. As such, it is a property that is key to understanding the evolution of sliding behavior.

  3. Effect of Alternating Current on the Cathodic Protection and Interface Structure of X80 Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiru Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study employs potential-monitoring techniques, cyclic voltammetry tests, alternating current (AC voltammetry methods, and surface characterization to investigate the AC corrosion of cathodically protected X80 pipeline steel. In a non-passive neutral solution at pH 7.2, a sufficiently negative potential completely protects steel at an AC current density of 100 A/m2. In an alkaline solution at pH 9.6, more serious AC corrosion occurs at more negative cathodic protection (CP potential, whereas without CP the steel suffers negligible corrosion. In addition, the interface capacitance increases with AC amplitude. Based on these results, the AC corrosion mechanisms that function under various conditions are analyzed and described.

  4. Structure, specific surface area and thermal conductivity of the snowpack around Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domine, Florent; Gallet, Jean-Charles; Bock, Josué; Morin, Samuel

    2012-07-01

    The structure of the snowpack near Barrow was studied in March-April 2009. Vertical profiles of density, specific surface area (SSA) and thermal conductivity were measured on tundra, lakes and landfast ice. The average thickness was 41 cm on tundra and 21 cm on fast ice. Layers observed were diamond dust or recent wind drifts on top, overlaying wind slabs, occasional faceted crystals and melt-freeze crusts, and basal depth hoar layers. The top layer had a SSA between 45 and 224 m2 kg-1. All layers at Barrow had SSAs higher than at many other places because of the geographical and climatic characteristics of Barrow. In particular, a given snow layer was remobilized several times by frequent winds, which resulted in SSA increases each time. The average snow area index (SAI, the dimensionless vertically integrated SSA) on tundra was 3260, higher than in the Canadian High Arctic or in the Alaskan taiga. This high SAI, combined with low snow temperatures, imply that the Barrow snowpack efficiently traps persistent organic pollutants, as illustrated with simple calculations for PCB 28 and PCB 180. The average thermal conductivity was 0.21 Wm-1 K-1, and the average thermal resistance on tundra was 3.25 m2 K W-1. This low value partly explains why the snow-ground interface was cold, around -19°C. The high SAI and low thermal resistance values illustrate the interplay between climate, snow physical properties, and their potential impact on atmospheric chemistry, and the need to describe these relationships in models of polar climate and atmospheric chemistry, especially in a climate change context.

  5. Interactive displays natural human-interface technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Achintya K

    2014-01-01

    One of the first books to provide an in-depth discussion of the technologies, applications and trends in the rapidly emerging field of interactive displays (touch, gesture & voice) The book will cover the technologies, applications and trends in the field of interactive displays, namely interfaces based on touch, gesture and voice and those using a combination of these technologies. The book will be split into 4 main parts with each being dedicated to a specific user interface. Part 1 ''Touch Interfaces'' will provide a review of the currently deployed touch-screen technologies and applications. It will also cover the recent developments towards achieving thinner, lightweight and cost-reduced touch screen panels in the future via integration of touch functionalities. Part 2 ''Gesture Interfaces'' will examine techniques and applications in stereoscopic 3D computer vision, structured-light 3D computer vision and time-of-flight 3D computer vision in gesture interfaces. Part 3 ''Voice Interfaces'' will revie...

  6. Electrical and structural properties of surfaces and interfaces in Ti/Al/Ni Ohmic contacts to p-type implanted 4H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivona, M.; Greco, G.; Bongiorno, C.; Lo Nigro, R.; Scalese, S.; Roccaforte, F.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the electrical and structural properties of Ti/Al/Ni Ohmic contacts to p-type implanted silicon carbide (4H-SiC) were studied employing different techniques. With increasing the annealing temperature, an improvement of the electrical properties of the contacts is highlighted, until an Ohmic behavior is obtained at 950 °C, with a specific contact resistance ρc = 2.3 × 10-4 Ω cm2. A considerable intermixing of the metal layers occurred upon annealing, as a consequence of the formation of different phases, both in the uppermost part of the stack (mainly Al3Ni2) and at the interface with SiC, where the formation of preferentially aligned TiC is observed. The formation of an Ohmic contact was associated with the occurrence of the reaction and the disorder at the interface, where the current transport is dominated by the thermionic field emission mechanism with a barrier height of 0.56 eV.

  7. LoopX: A Graphical User Interface-Based Database for Comprehensive Analysis and Comparative Evaluation of Loops from Protein Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadumuri, Rajashekar Varma; Vadrevu, Ramakrishna

    2017-10-01

    Due to their crucial role in function, folding, and stability, protein loops are being targeted for grafting/designing to create novel or alter existing functionality and improve stability and foldability. With a view to facilitate a thorough analysis and effectual search options for extracting and comparing loops for sequence and structural compatibility, we developed, LoopX a comprehensively compiled library of sequence and conformational features of ∼700,000 loops from protein structures. The database equipped with a graphical user interface is empowered with diverse query tools and search algorithms, with various rendering options to visualize the sequence- and structural-level information along with hydrogen bonding patterns, backbone φ, ψ dihedral angles of both the target and candidate loops. Two new features (i) conservation of the polar/nonpolar environment and (ii) conservation of sequence and conformation of specific residues within the loops have also been incorporated in the search and retrieval of compatible loops for a chosen target loop. Thus, the LoopX server not only serves as a database and visualization tool for sequence and structural analysis of protein loops but also aids in extracting and comparing candidate loops for a given target loop based on user-defined search options.

  8. Electrical Crystallization Mechanism and Interface Characteristics of Nano wire Zn O/Al Structures Fabricated by the Solution Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Y.W.; Hung, F.Y.; Lui, T.Sh.; Chen, Y.T.; Xiao, R.S.; Chen, K.J.

    2012-01-01

    Both solution nano wire Zn O and sputtered Al thin film on SiO 2 as the wire-film structure and the Al film were a conductive channel for electrical-induced crystallization (EIC). Direct current (DC) raised the temperature of the Al film and improved the crystallization of the nano structure. The effects of EIC not only induced Al atomic interface diffusion, but also doped Al on the roots of Zn O wires to form aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO)/Zn O wires. The Al doping concentration and the distance of the Zn O wire increased with increasing the electrical duration. Also, the electrical current-induced temperature was ∼211 degree C (solid-state doped process) and so could be applied to low-temperature optoelectronic devices.

  9. Long-Range Domain Structure and Symmetry Engineering by Interfacial Oxygen Octahedral Coupling at Heterostructure Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Zhaoliang; Green, R.J.; Gauquelin, N.; Macke, S.; Li, Lin; Gonnissen, J.; Sutarto, R.; Houwman, Evert Pieter; Zhong, Z.; van Aert, S.; Verbeeck, J.; Sawatzky, G.A.; Huijben, Mark; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    In epitaxial thin film systems, the crystal structure and its symmetry deviate from the bulk counterpart due to various mechanisms such as epitaxial strain and interfacial structural coupling, which is accompanyed by a change in their properties. In perovskite materials, the crystal symmetry can be

  10. First-principles investigation of the effect of oxidation on the electronic structure and magnetic properties at the FeRh/MgO (0 0 1) interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhraoui, T., E-mail: tsakhrawi@yahoo.com [Laboratoire de la Matière Condensée et des Nanosciences, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, IPCMS, UMR 7504, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Said, M. [Laboratoire de la Matière Condensée et des Nanosciences, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Alouani, M. [Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, IPCMS, UMR 7504, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Density functional theory is used to study the interface between the FeRh alloy and MgO. • We focus on the effect of the oxidation on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of the FeRh/MgO (0 0 1) interface. • We show the change on the structure of the Fe-d states. • We examine the charge transfer and the local spin density modification after interface oxidation. - Abstract: The effect of interfacial oxidation on electronic structure and magnetic properties at the FeRh/MgO (0 0 1) interface is studied by ab initio methods. The results show the formation of an interfacial FeO-like layer between the FeRh and the MgO barrier, which has a direct impact on Fe e{sub g} states at the interface. It is shown that these e{sub g} states are more affected than that the t{sub 2g} states at the Fermi level due to the strong hybridization of these states with the p-states of oxygen. Thus, the oxidation modifies crucially the electronic structure and the magnetic properties as compared to those of an ideal interface. In particular, it was found that spin polarization of the ferromagnetic state is substantially enhanced. A simple two-current Julliere model shows that the TMR increases with oxidation.

  11. Surface and interface electronic structure: Third year progress report, December 1, 1988--November 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: linewidths of surface states and resonances; surface bonds and fermi surface of Pd(001); state-resonance transition of Ta(011); and electronic structure of W(010)-2H. 5 figs

  12. Structure and Interface Properties of Nanophase Ceramics: Multimillion Particle Molecular-Dynamics Simulations on Parallel Computer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalia, Rajiv

    1997-01-01

    Large-scale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate: (1) sintering process, structural correlations, and mechanical behavior including dynamic fracture in microporous and nanophase Si3N4...

  13. Band offsets and electronic structures of interface between In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As and InP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Genwang [School of Physical Science and Engineering and Key Laboratory of Materials Physics of Ministry of Education of China, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); College of Science, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wang, Changhong; Wang, Weichao [College of Electronic Information and Optical Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Liang, Erjun, E-mail: ejliang@zzu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Engineering and Key Laboratory of Materials Physics of Ministry of Education of China, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China)

    2016-02-07

    III–V semiconductor interfacing with high-κ gate oxide is crucial for the high mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field transistor device. With density functional theory calculations, we explored the band offsets and electronic structures of the In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/InP interfaces with various interfacial bondings. Among six different bonding interfaces, we found that P-In(Ga) bonding interface showed the highest stability. Local density of states calculations was adopted to calculate the band offsets. Except for the metallic interface, we noticed that neither valence band offset nor conduction band offset depended on the interfacial bondings. For the most stable P-In(Ga) interface, we did not observe any gap states. Furthermore, we explored the P-In(Ga) interfaces with interfacial P-As exchange defects, which slightly modified the interface stability and the band offsets but did not produce any gap states. These findings provide solid evidence that InP could serve as a promising interfacial passivation layer between III–V material and high-κ oxide in the application of high mobility devices.

  14. Structural modification by swift heavy ion at metal/Si interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisodia, Veenu; Jain, R.K.; Bhattacharaya, D.; Kabiraj, D.; Jain, I.P. E-mail: ipjain46@sify.com

    2003-06-01

    Transition metal silicides produced by swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation have found applications in ultra-large-scale integrated circuits due to their small contact resistivities and higher thermal and chemical stabilities. In the present work, the mixing in Ni/Si and Ti/Si systems was studied under irradiation with Au ions. A layer of Ni (15 nm) and Ti (18 nm) was deposited by e-gun evaporation on Si (1 0 0) substrate at 10{sup -8} Torr vacuum. The samples were irradiated with 95 Mev Au ions at room temperature to a fluence of 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} and 1 pna beam current. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and X-Ray reflectivity have been employed to characterize the samples. The large electronic excitation due to SHI irradiation produces defects in the system. It is expected that SHI irradiation followed by thermal annealing in Ni/Si system will provide the required energy to the atoms to diffuse across the interface resulting in mixing.

  15. Hoffmeister Series Ions Protect Diphtheria Toxoid from Structural Damages at Solvent/Water Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro S. de Araujo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available During the W1/O phase (in the W1/O/W2 process of protein microencapsulation within poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA, hydrophobic interfaces are expanded where interfacial adsorption occurs followed by protein unfolding and aggregation. Spectroscopic and immunological techniques were used to ascertain the effects of the Hoffmeister series ions on Diphtheria toxoid (Dtxd stability during the W1/O phase. A correlation was established between salts used in aqueous solutions and the changes in Dtxd solubility and conformation. The Dtxd α-helical content was quite stable thus leading to the conclusion that encapsulation was followed by protein aggregation, with minor exposition of hydrophobic residues and a small change at the S-S dihedral angle. Dtxd aggregation is 95% avoided by the chaotropic SCN-. This was used to prepare a stable Dtxd and immunologically recognized/PLGA formulation in the presence of 30 mM SNC-. The recovery increased by 10.42% or 23.2% when microencapsulation was within the -COOMe or -COOH (12kDa PLGA, respectively. In conclusion, the aim of this work was achieved, which was to obtain the maximum of Dtxd stability after contact with CH2Cl2 to begin its PLGA microencapsulation within ideal conditions. This was a technological breakthrough because a simple solution like salt addition avoided heterologous proteins usage.

  16. Influence of interface on structure and magnetic properties of Fe₅₀B₅₀ nanoglass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoesser, A.; Kilmametov, A. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Ghafari, M., E-mail: mohammad.ghafari@kit.edu, E-mail: skamali@ucdavis.edu; Gleiter, H. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Sakurai, Y.; Itou, M.; Kohara, S. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hahn, H. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Joint Research Laboratory Nanomaterials, TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Kamali, S., E-mail: mohammad.ghafari@kit.edu, E-mail: skamali@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    In contrast to rapidly quenched metallic glasses, nanoglasses consist of two components, namely amorphous nanograins and interfacial regions with distinctively different properties. Various physical methods have been employed to obtain information on the atomistic and magnetic properties of such materials. For the case of a Fe₅₀B₅₀ nanoglass, using high-energy X-ray diffraction, it was found that the short-range order of the nanograins is similar to that of a crystalline FeB alloy. Magnetic Compton scattering shows that the total magnetic moment is the sum of the magnetic moment of the nanograins and the weak magnetic moment of the interfacial regions (μ{sub Interface}=+0.08 μB). The measured moment of boron agrees (μ{sub Boron}= -0.08 μB) with linear Muffin-Tin calculations. From the results of Mössbauer and magnetic Compton scattering, it can be concluded that the boron atoms segregate in the interfacial regions, resulting in a reduced boron concentration in the nanograins.

  17. Interface-induced spin Hall magnetoresistance enhancement in Pt-based tri-layer structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shun-Yu; Li, Hong-Lin; Chong, Cheong-Wei; Chang, Yu-Ying; Lee, Min-Kai; Huang, Jung-Chun-Andrew

    2018-01-08

    In this study, we integrated bilayer structure of covered Pt on nickel zinc ferrite (NZFO) and CoFe/Pt/NZFO tri-layer structure by pulsed laser deposition system for a spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) study. In the bilayer structure, the angular-dependent magnetoresistance (MR) results indicate that Pt/NZFO has a well-defined SMR behavior. Moreover, the spin Hall angle and the spin diffusion length, which were 0.0648 and 1.31 nm, respectively, can be fitted by changing the Pt thickness in the longitudinal SMR function. Particularly, the MR ratio of the bilayer structure (Pt/NZFO) has the highest changing ratio (about 0.135%), compared to the prototype structure Pt/Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 (YIG) because the NZFO has higher magnetization. Meanwhile, the tri-layer samples (CoFe/Pt/NZFO) indicate that the MR behavior is related with CoFe thickness as revealed in angular-dependent MR measurement. Additionally, comparison between the tri-layer structure with Pt/NZFO and CoFe/Pt bilayer systems suggests that the SMR ratio can be enhanced by more than 70%, indicating that additional spin current should be injected into Pt layer.

  18. 3D printed, bio-inspired prototypes and analytical models for structured suture interfaces with geometrically-tuned deformation and failure behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Erica; Li, Yaning; Ortiz, Christine; Boyce, Mary C.

    2014-12-01

    Geometrically structured interfaces in nature possess enhanced, and often surprising, mechanical properties, and provide inspiration for materials design. This paper investigates the mechanics of deformation and failure mechanisms of suture interface designs through analytical models and experiments on 3D printed polymer physical prototypes. Suture waveforms with generalized trapezoidal geometries (trapezoidal, rectangular, anti-trapezoidal, and triangular) are studied and characterized by several important geometric parameters: the presence or absence of a bonded tip region, the tip angle, and the geometry. It is shown that a wide range (in some cases as great as an order of magnitude) in stiffness, strength, and toughness is achievable dependent on tip bonding, tip angle, and geometry. Suture interfaces with a bonded tip region exhibit a higher initial stiffness due to the greater load bearing by the skeletal teeth, a double peak in the stress-strain curve corresponding to the failure of the bonded tip and the failure of the slanted interface region or tooth, respectively, and an additional failure and toughening mechanism due to the failure of the bonded tip. Anti-trapezoidal geometries promote the greatest amplification of properties for suture interfaces with a bonded tip due the large tip interface area. The tip angle and geometry govern the stress distributions in the teeth and the ratio of normal to shear stresses in the interfacial layers, which together determine the failure mechanism of the interface and/or the teeth. Rectangular suture interfaces fail by simple shearing of the interfaces. Trapezoidal and triangular suture interfaces fail by a combination of shear and tensile normal stresses in the interface, leading to plastic deformation, cavitation events, and subsequent stretching of interface ligaments with mostly elastic deformation in the teeth. Anti-trapezoidal suture interfaces with small tip angles have high stress concentrations in the teeth

  19. Formation of Mn3O4(001) on MnO(001): Surface and interface structural stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Veronika; Podloucky, Raimund; Franchini, Cesare; Allegretti, Francesco; Xu, Bo; Parteder, Georg; Ramsey, Michael G.; Surnev, Svetlozar; Netzer, Falko P.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopies, high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy, spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory calculations are employed to study the growth of (001) oriented Mn 3 O 4 surfaces on a Pd(100)-supported MnO(001) substrate, with the Hausmannite planar lattice constants aligned along the [110] direction of the underlying MnO(001) support. We show that despite the rather large lattice mismatch, abrupt interfaces may exist between rocksalt MnO and Hausmannite. We argue that this process is facilitated by the relatively low computed strain energy and we propose realistic models for the interface. An atop site registry between the Mn(O) atoms of the oxygen rich Mn 3 O 4 termination and the MnO(001) O(Mn) atoms underneath is found to be the energetically most favorable configuration. The significant planar expansion is accompanied by a large compression of the Mn 3 O 4 vertical lattice constant, yielding structural distortion of the O-Mn-O octahedral axis. Spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction experiments show that the conversion reaction proceeds easily in both directions, thus indicating the reversible redox character of the transition

  20. Structure and method for controlling band offset and alignment at a crystalline oxide-on-semiconductor interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    2003-11-25

    A crystalline oxide-on-semiconductor structure and a process for constructing the structure involves a substrate of silicon, germanium or a silicon-germanium alloy and an epitaxial thin film overlying the surface of the substrate wherein the thin film consists of a first epitaxial stratum of single atomic plane layers of an alkaline earth oxide designated generally as (AO).sub.n and a second stratum of single unit cell layers of an oxide material designated as (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m so that the multilayer film arranged upon the substrate surface is designated (AO).sub.n (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m wherein n is an integer repeat of single atomic plane layers of the alkaline earth oxide AO and m is an integer repeat of single unit cell layers of the A'BO.sub.3 oxide material. Within the multilayer film, the values of n and m have been selected to provide the structure with a desired electrical structure at the substrate/thin film interface that can be optimized to control band offset and alignment.

  1. Electronic structure of the indium tin oxide/nanocrystalline anatase (TiO2)/ruthenium-dye interfaces in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, J. E.; Rayan, M. K.; Beerbom, M. M.; Schlaf, R.

    2008-10-01

    The electronic structure of two interfaces commonly found in dye-sensitized photovoltaic cells based on nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 ("Grätzel cells") was investigated using photoemission spectroscopy (PES). X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) measurements were carried out on the indium tin oxide (ITO)/TiO2 and the TiO2/cis-bis(isothiocyanato)bis(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylato)-ruthenium(II)bis-tetrabutylammonium dye ("N719" or "Ruthenium 535-bisTBA") interfaces. Both contacts were investigated using a multistep deposition procedure where the entire structure was prepared in vacuum using electrospray deposition. In between deposition steps the surface was characterized with XPS and UPS resulting in a series of spectra, allowing the determination of the orbital and band lineup at the interfaces. The results of these efforts confirm previous PES measurements on TiO2/dye contacts prepared under ambient conditions, suggesting that ambient contamination might not have significant influence on the electronic structure at the dye/TiO2 interface. The results also demonstrate that there may be a significant barrier for electron injection at the sputtered ITO/TiO2 interface and that this interface should be viewed as a semiconductor heterojunction rather than as metal-semiconductor (Schottky) contact.

  2. An Overview of Recent Patents on Musculoskeletal Interface Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rohit T.; Browe, Daniel P.; Lowe, Christopher J.; Freeman, Joseph W.

    2018-01-01

    Interface tissue engineering involves the development of engineered grafts that promote integration between multiple tissue types. Musculoskeletal tissue interfaces are critical to the safe and efficient transmission of mechanical forces between multiple musculoskeletal tissues e.g. between ligament and bone tissue. However, these interfaces often do not physiologically regenerate upon injury, resulting in impaired tissue function. Therefore, interface tissue engineering approaches are considered to be particularly relevant for the structural restoration of musculoskeletal tissues interfaces. In this article we provide an overview of the various strategies used for engineering musculoskeletal tissue interfaces with a specific focus on the recent important patents that have been issued for inventions that were specifically designed for engineering musculoskeletal interfaces as well as those that show promise to be adapted for this purpose. PMID:26577344

  3. Effect of the change in the interface structure of Pd(100)/SrTiO{sub 3} for quantum-well induced ferromagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuragi, Shunsuke, E-mail: sakuragi@az.appi.keio.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-0061 (Japan); Ogawa, Tomoyuki [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sato, Tetsuya [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-0061 (Japan)

    2017-02-01

    Measurements of temperature dependent magnetization of Pd(100) ultrathin films on SrTiO{sub 3}(100) substrates which shows quantum-well induced ferromagnetism were performed. We observed the jump in magnetization of Pd(100) due to the structural phase transition of SrTiO{sub 3}, and then, the disappearance of ferromagnetism after temperature-cycle repetition. X-ray reflectivity measurement revealed that the density of a few layers in the Pd film decreased near the Pd/SrTiO{sub 3} interface after temperature cycles. This suggests that the structural change affects the quantum-well induced ferromagnetism, and lowering of the crystallinity of Pd at the interface has a negative effect on quantum-well induced ferromagnetism of Pd(100) ultrathin films. - Highlights: • Interface manipulation of quantum-well induced ferromagnetism was performed. • Ferromagnetic Pd(100) ultrathin films on SrTiO{sub 3} substrate were prepared. • The structural phase transition of SrTiO{sub 3} degraded gradually the interface structure. • Change in the interface structure caused change in the magnetic moment of Pd. • Magnetic change was interpreted by modulation in the effective thickness of the film.

  4. Molecular structure and Equilibrium forces of bovine submaxillary mucin adsorbed at a solid-liquid interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zappone, Bruno; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Madsen, Jan Busk

    2015-01-01

    prepared by additional chromatographic purification of commercially available products. The mucin molecule was found to have a z-average hydrodynamic diameter of ca. 35 nm in phosphate buffered solution, without any particular secondary or tertiary structure. The contour length of the mucin is larger than...

  5. Investigations of the electronic, magnetic and crystalline structure of perovskite oxides and an oxide-oxide interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisch, Christoph Werner

    2013-01-01

    manganese atoms and their surrounding oxygen octahedra while the rather passive lanthanum (or strontium in STO) mainly donates it's three electrons to MnO 6 (or TiO 6 ). These corner-shared units are not only the building blocks of a tightly bound 3D network; they are also responsible for the transport and magnetic properties. It is thus easy to see, how perturbations like doping, strain, cation size mismatch, anion vacancies or the Jahn-Teller effect can affect the properties of these samples. Another way to look at the perovskites is to think of a stack of alternating layers. Both concepts are used in this work, whenever they fit. In SrTiO 3 for example, charge neutral [Sr 2+ O 2- ] and [Ti 4+ O 2 2- ] layers follow upon each other when viewed along the [001] direction. In this picture LaMnO 3 consists of an array of positively charged [La 3+ O 2- ] and negatively charged [Mn 3+ O 2 2- ] layers. When these two materials meet at an interface (even with vacuum), a polar discontinuity is created which must lead to some form of structural or electronic reconstruction. For an interface between for instance LaAlO 3 and SrTiO 3 it is important to know which layers meet there, since the SrO-AlO 2 interface is insulating while the TiO 2 -LaO interface is conducting. The first set of experiments (chapter 5) described in the underlying work deals with the termination of STO and the changes found on the surface for different preparation conditions. The knowledge and control of the exact termination of the substrate is of importance for the overlayers. Atomic control of the arrangement at the surface is the key for obtaining high-quality overlayers with the desired properties. The second and third part of the experiments was performed on doped manganites, overlayers on STO. The electronic, magnetic and crystal structure is in detail examined for the Cerium doped lanthanum manganite LCeMO in chapter 6. With this knowledge in mind, the electronic and crystalline structures of

  6. A density functional perturbative approach for simple fluids: the structure of a nonuniform Lennard-Jones fluid at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soon-Chul; Lee, Song Hi

    2004-01-01

    A density functional perturbation approximation (DFPT), which is based both on the fundamental-measure theory (FMT) to the hard-sphere repulsion and on the weighted-density approximations (WDAs) to the attractive contribution, has been proposed for studying the structural properties of model fluids with an attractive part of the potential. The advantage of the present theory is the simplicity of the calculation of the weight function due to the attractive contribution. It has been applied to predict the equilibrium particle density distributions and adsorption isotherms of Lennard-Jones fluids at interfaces. The theoretical results show that the present theory describes quite well the adsorption isotherms of a Lennard-Jones ethane in a graphite slit pore as well as the equilibrium particle density distributions of a Lennard-Jones fluid near a planar slit pore

  7. Computational and Experimental Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Gologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, Geoffrey [Alfred Univ., NY (United States)

    2017-04-05

    United States Department of Energy grant DE-FG02-10ER16128, “Computational and Spectroscopic Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Geologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces” (Geoffrey M. Bowers, P.I.) focused on developing a molecular-scale understanding of processes that occur in fluids and at solid-fluid interfaces using the combination of spectroscopic, microscopic, and diffraction studies with molecular dynamics computer modeling. The work is intimately tied to the twin proposal at Michigan State University (DOE DE-FG02-08ER15929; same title: R. James Kirkpatrick, P.I. and A. Ozgur Yazaydin, co-P.I.).

  8. DFT calculations of strain and interface effects on electronic structures and magnetic properties of L10-FePt/Ag heterojunction of GMR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramchu, Sittichain; Jaroenjittichai, Atchara Punya; Laosiritaworn, Yongyut

    2018-03-01

    In this work, density functional theory (DFT) was employed to investigate the effect of strain and interface on electronic structures and magnetic properties of L10-FePt/Ag heterojunction. Two possible interface structures of L10-FePt(001)/Ag(001), that is, interface between Fe and Ag layers (Fe/Ag) and between Pt and Ag layers (Pt/Ag), were inspected. It was found that Pt/Ag interface is more stable than Fe/Ag interface due to its lower formation energy. Further, under the lattice mismatch induced tensile strain, the enhancement of magnetism for both Fe/Ag and Pt/Ag interface structures has been found to have progressed, though the magnetic moments of "interfacial" Fe and Pt atoms have been found to have decreased. To explain this further, the local density of states (LDOS) analysis suggests that interaction between Fe (Pt) and Ag near Fe/Ag (Pt/Ag) interface leads to spin symmetry breaking of the Ag atom and hence induces magnetism magnitude. In contrast, the magnetic moments of interfacial Fe and Pt atoms reduce because of the increase in the electronic states near the Fermi level of the minority-spin electrons. In addition, the significant enhancements of the LDOS near the Fermi levels of the minority-spin electrons signify the boosting of the transport properties of the minority-spin electrons and hence the spin-dependent electron transport at this ferromagnet/metal interface. From this work, it is expected that this clarification of the interfacial magnetism may inspire new innovation on how to improve spin-dependent electron transport for enhancing the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) ratio of potential GMR-based spintronic devices.

  9. DFT calculations of strain and interface effects on electronic structures and magnetic properties of L10-FePt/Ag heterojunction of GMR applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sittichain Pramchu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, density functional theory (DFT was employed to investigate the effect of strain and interface on electronic structures and magnetic properties of L10-FePt/Ag heterojunction. Two possible interface structures of L10-FePt(001/Ag(001, that is, interface between Fe and Ag layers (Fe/Ag and between Pt and Ag layers (Pt/Ag, were inspected. It was found that Pt/Ag interface is more stable than Fe/Ag interface due to its lower formation energy. Further, under the lattice mismatch induced tensile strain, the enhancement of magnetism for both Fe/Ag and Pt/Ag interface structures has been found to have progressed, though the magnetic moments of “interfacial” Fe and Pt atoms have been found to have decreased. To explain this further, the local density of states (LDOS analysis suggests that interaction between Fe (Pt and Ag near Fe/Ag (Pt/Ag interface leads to spin symmetry breaking of the Ag atom and hence induces magnetism magnitude. In contrast, the magnetic moments of interfacial Fe and Pt atoms reduce because of the increase in the electronic states near the Fermi level of the minority-spin electrons. In addition, the significant enhancements of the LDOS near the Fermi levels of the minority-spin electrons signify the boosting of the transport properties of the minority-spin electrons and hence the spin-dependent electron transport at this ferromagnet/metal interface. From this work, it is expected that this clarification of the interfacial magnetism may inspire new innovation on how to improve spin-dependent electron transport for enhancing the giant magnetoresistance (GMR ratio of potential GMR-based spintronic devices.

  10. The design and implementation of a visual user interface for a structured model management system

    OpenAIRE

    O'Dell, David D.

    1988-01-01

    In the scheme of an integrated decision support system, model management holds a position comparable with data management. Unfortunately, the development and formalizing of model management techniques historically have lagged far behind data management concepts, although the increased interest in spreadsheets has rekindled an interest in models as productivity enhancing tools. Model management systems offer one way of integrating models into the overall structure of an organizational informat...

  11. Signatures of Quantum Transport Through Two-Dimensional Structures With Correlated and Anti-Correlated Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Low, Tony; Ansari, Davood

    2008-01-01

    Electronic transport through a 2D deca-nanometer length channel with correlated and anti-correlated surfaces morphologies is studied using the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green function technique. Due to the pseudo-periodicity of these structures, the energy-resolved transmission possesses pseudo-bands and pseudo-gaps. Channels with correlated surfaces exhibit wider pseudo-bands than their anti-correlated counterparts. By surveying channels with various combinations of material parameters, we fou...

  12. The structure of the interface in the solvent mediated interaction of dipolar surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhavakhidze, P.G.; Levadny, V.G.

    1987-08-01

    Interaction of two dipolar surfaces separated by a polar medium is considered within the framework of nonlocal electrostatics. The dipolar surface layers are modelled as regular lattices with fixed orientation of dipoles which are immersed into the solvent; solvent response is characterized by nonlocal dielectric function. The model is elaborated in order to reveal the role of the dipolar layer discreteness in the electric field produced by one surface and the interaction between two surfaces (which gives rise to the so called ''hydration'' or ''structural'' force acting between mineral surfaces and phospholipid bilayers). The discreteness effects are present only for commensurate lattices. Their special mutual arrangement then may lead to considerable reduction of structural forces, viz. the usual repulsion regime may change at short distances to attraction. Conditions are considered when repulsion is entirely replaced by attraction, i.e. the ''hydration barrier'' disappears. In appended note we discuss the role of solvation of surface dipolar groups. We propose an explanation of why two modes of decay (one with oscillative fine structure) may be present in the dependence of the force upon distance if the surface dipolar groups are immersed deep enough in the solvent and how the long-range oscillative mode disappears when the surface is but weakly solvated. (author). 35 refs, 5 figs

  13. The structure of the interface in the solvent-mediated interaction of dipolar surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhavakhidze, P.G.; Kornyshev, A.A.; Levadny, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    Interaction of two dipolar surfaces separated by a polar medium is considered within the framework of nonlocal electrostatics. The dipolar-surface layers are modelled as regular lattices with fixed orientation of dipoles which are immersed into the solvent; solvent response is characterized by nonlocal dielectric function. The model is elaborated in order to reveal the role of the dypolar-layer discreteness in the electric field produced by one surface and the interaction between two surfaces (which gives rise to the so-called ''hydration'' or ''structural'' force acting between mineral surfaces and phospholipid bilayers). The discreteness effects are present only for commensurate lattices. Their special mutual arrangement then may lead to considerable reduction of structural forces, viz. the usual repulsion regime may change at short distances to attraction. Conditions are considered when repulsion is entirely replaced by attraction, i.e. the ''hydration barrier'' disappears. In appended note it is discussed the role of solvation of surface dipolar groups. It is proposed an explanation of why two modes of decay (one with oscillative fine structure) may be present in the dependence of the force upon distance, if the surface dipolar groups are immersed deep enough in the solvent, and how the long-range oscillative mode disappears when the surface is but weakly solvated

  14. Brugia malayi excreted/secreted proteins at the host/parasite interface: stage- and gender-specific proteomic profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasisekhar Bennuru

    Full Text Available Relatively little is known about the filarial proteins that interact with the human host. Although the filarial genome has recently been completed, protein profiles have been limited to only a few recombinants or purified proteins of interest. Here, we describe a large-scale proteomic analysis using microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry to identify the excretory-secretory (ES products of the L3, L3 to L4 molting ES, adult male, adult female, and microfilarial stages of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi. The analysis of the ES products from adult male, adult female, microfilariae (Mf, L3, and molting L3 larvae identified 852 proteins. Annotation suggests that the functional and component distribution was very similar across each of the stages studied; however, the Mf contributed a higher proportion to the total number of identified proteins than the other stages. Of the 852 proteins identified in the ES, only 229 had previous confirmatory expressed sequence tags (ESTs in the available databases. Moreover, this analysis was able to confirm the presence of 274 "hypothetical" proteins inferred from gene prediction algorithms applied to the B. malayi (Bm genome. Not surprisingly, the majority (160/274 of these "hypothetical" proteins were predicted to be secreted by Signal IP and/or SecretomeP 2.0 analysis. Of major interest is the abundance of previously characterized immunomodulatory proteins such as ES-62 (leucyl aminopeptidase, MIF-1, SERPIN, glutathione peroxidase, and galectin in the ES of microfilariae (and Mf-containing adult females compared to the adult males. In addition, searching the ES protein spectra against the Wolbachia database resulted in the identification of 90 Wolbachia-specific proteins, most of which were metabolic enzymes that have not been shown to be immunogenic. This proteomic analysis extends our knowledge of the ES and provides insight into the host-parasite interaction.

  15. The CAD-score web server: contact area-based comparison of structures and interfaces of proteins, nucleic acids and their complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olechnovič, Kliment; Venclovas, Ceslovas

    2014-07-01

    The Contact Area Difference score (CAD-score) web server provides a universal framework to compute and analyze discrepancies between different 3D structures of the same biological macromolecule or complex. The server accepts both single-subunit and multi-subunit structures and can handle all the major types of macromolecules (proteins, RNA, DNA and their complexes). It can perform numerical comparison of both structures and interfaces. In addition to entire structures and interfaces, the server can assess user-defined subsets. The CAD-score server performs both global and local numerical evaluations of structural differences between structures or interfaces. The results can be explored interactively using sortable tables of global scores, profiles of local errors, superimposed contact maps and 3D structure visualization. The web server could be used for tasks such as comparison of models with the native (reference) structure, comparison of X-ray structures of the same macromolecule obtained in different states (e.g. with and without a bound ligand), analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural ensemble or structures obtained in the course of molecular dynamics simulation. The web server is freely accessible at: http://www.ibt.lt/bioinformatics/cad-score. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. A triclinic crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal domain of HIV-1 capsid protein with four molecules in the asymmetric unit reveals a novel packing interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampel, Ayala; Yaniv, Oren; Berger, Or; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud; Frolow, Felix

    2013-01-01

    The triclinic structure of the HIV-1 capsid protein contains four molecules in the asymmetric unit that form a novel packing interface that could conceivably resemble an intermediate structure that is involved in the early steps of HIV-1 assembly. The Gag precursor is the major structural protein of the virion of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Capsid protein (CA), a cleavage product of Gag, plays an essential role in virus assembly both in Gag-precursor multimerization and in capsid core formation. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of CA contains 20 residues that are highly conserved across retroviruses and constitute the major homology region (MHR). Genetic evidence implies a role for the MHR in interactions between Gag precursors during the assembly of the virus, but the structural basis for this role remains elusive. This paper describes a novel triclinic structure of the HIV-1 CA CTD at 1.6 Å resolution with two canonical dimers of CA CTD in the asymmetric unit. The canonical dimers form a newly identified packing interface where interactions of four conserved MHR residues take place. This is the first structural indication that these MHR residues participate in the putative CTD–CTD interactions. These findings suggest that the molecules forming this novel interface resemble an intermediate structure that participates in the early steps of HIV-1 assembly. This interface may therefore provide a novel target for antiviral drugs

  17. Heteromolecular metal–organic interfaces: Electronic and structural fingerprints of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Schröder, Sonja; Kumpf, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a study of molecular donor–acceptor blends adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1). • Geometric and electronic structure of blends and pristine phases are compared. • The surface bonding of the acceptor is strengthened, that of the donor weakened. • But counter intuitively, the acceptor (donor) bond length becomes larger (smaller). • This contradiction is resolved by a model based on charge transfer via the surface. - Abstract: Beside the fact that they attract highest interest in the field of organic electronics, heteromolecular structures adsorbed on metal surfaces, in particular donor–acceptor blends, became a popular field in fundamental science, possibly since some surprising and unexpected behaviors were found for such systems. One is the apparent breaking of a rather fundamental rule in chemistry, namely that stronger chemical bonds go along with shorter bond lengths, as it is, e.g., well-known for the sequence from single to triple bonds. In this review we summarize the results of heteromolecular monolayer structures adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1), which – regarding this rule – behave in a counterintuitive way. The charge acceptor moves away from the substrate while its electronic structure indicates a stronger chemical interaction, indicated by a shift of the formerly lowest unoccupied molecular orbital toward higher binding energies. The donor behaves in the opposite way, it gives away charge, hence, electronically the bonding to the surface becomes weaker, but at the same time it also approaches the surface. It looks as if the concordant link between electronic and geometric structure was broken. But both effects can be explained by a substrate-mediated charge transfer from the donor to the acceptor. The charge reorganization going along with this transfer is responsible for both, the lifting-up of the acceptor molecule and the filling of its LUMO, and also for the reversed effects at the donor molecules. In the end, both molecules

  18. The dimer interface of the membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase hemopexin domain: crystal structure and biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochowicz, Anna; Goettig, Peter; Evans, Richard; Visse, Robert; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Palmisano, Ralf; Ito, Noriko; Richter, Klaus; Maskos, Klaus; Franke, Daniel; Svergun, Dmitri; Nagase, Hideaki; Bode, Wolfram; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2011-03-04

    Homodimerization is an essential step for membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) to activate proMMP-2 and to degrade collagen on the cell surface. To uncover the molecular basis of the hemopexin (Hpx) domain-driven dimerization of MT1-MMP, a crystal structure of the Hpx domain was solved at 1.7 Å resolution. Two interactions were identified as potential biological dimer interfaces in the crystal structure, and mutagenesis studies revealed that the biological dimer possesses a symmetrical interaction where blades II and III of molecule A interact with blades III and II of molecule B. The mutations of amino acids involved in the interaction weakened the dimer interaction of Hpx domains in solution, and incorporation of these mutations into the full-length enzyme significantly inhibited dimer-dependent functions on the cell surface, including proMMP-2 activation, collagen degradation, and invasion into the three-dimensional collagen matrix, whereas dimer-independent functions, including gelatin film degradation and two-dimensional cell migration, were not affected. These results shed light on the structural basis of MT1-MMP dimerization that is crucial to promote cellular invasion.

  19. Grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis of buried interfaces in periodically structured crystalline silicon thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhauer, David; Preidel, Veit; Becker, Christiane [Young Investigator Group Nanostructured Silicon for Photovoltaic and Photonic Implementations (Nano-SIPPE), Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Pollakowski, Beatrix; Beckhoff, Burkhard [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany); Baumann, Jonas; Kanngiesser, Birgit [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Amkreutz, Daniel; Rech, Bernd [Institut Silizium Photovoltaik, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Back, Franziska; Rudigier-Voigt, Eveline [SCHOTT AG, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    We present grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXRF) experiments on 3D periodically textured interfaces of liquid phase crystallized silicon thin-film solar cells on glass. The influence of functional layers (SiO{sub x} or SiO{sub x}/SiC{sub x}) - placed between glass substrate and silicon during crystallization - on the final carbon and oxygen contaminations inside the silicon was analyzed. Baring of the buried structured silicon surface prior to GIXRF measurement was achieved by removal of the original nano-imprinted glass substrate by wet-chemical etching. A broad angle of incidence distribution was determined for the X-ray radiation impinging on this textured surface. Optical simulations were performed in order to estimate the incident radiation intensity on the structured surface profile considering total reflection and attenuation effects. The results indicate a much lower contamination level for SiO{sub x} compared to the SiO{sub x}/SiC{sub x} interlayers, and about 25% increased contamination when comparing structured with planar silicon layers, both correlating with the corresponding solar cell performances. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Magnetic properties of novel dynamic self-assembled structures generated on the liquid/air interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I.S.

    2007-01-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical studies of magnetic properties of recently discovered dynamic multi-segment self-organized structures ('magnetic snakes'). Magnetic order and response of such snakes are determined by a novel unconventional mechanism provided by a self-induced surface wave. It gives rise to a nontrivial magnetic order: the segments of the snake exhibit long-range antiferromagnetic order mediated by the surface waves, while each segment is composed of ferromagnetically aligned chains of microparticles. Magnetic properties of the snakes are probed by in-plane magnetic field. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain the experimental observations

  1. Electronic and geometric structure of electro-optically active organic films and associated interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanco, J.; Haber, T.; Resel, R.; Netzer, F.P.; Ramsey, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties of sexiphenyl and sexithiophene films grown under ultra-high vacuum conditions on a variety of well-controlled substrate surfaces have been examined. We show that, in contradiction with the general notion, the ionisation potential of the organic films is not a material constant. Considering the variable ionisation potential, the validity of the Schottky-Mott relationship, which expresses a dependence of the band alignment on the substrate work function, is analysed. We also briefly discuss the relevance of the built-in potential behaviour in organic films for the band-bending concept

  2. Interface structure and electronic properties of SrTiO3 and YBa2Cu3O7-δ crystals and thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiess, S.

    2007-01-01

    Two new extensions of the X-ray standing wave (XSW) technique, made possible by the intense highly collimated X-ray beams from undulators at the ESRF, are described in this thesis. First, the XSW method was applied in a structural study to solve the nucleation mechanism of the high temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ on the (001) surface of SrTiO 3 . Second, the valence electronic structures of SrTiO 3 and YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ were investigated. Finally, recent developments in the field of photoelectron spectroscopy in the hard X-ray region are described. The X-ray standing wave method is used in combination with fluorescence, Auger or photoelectron spectroscopy and lends very high spatial resolution power to these analytical techniques. Previously, the XSW method has been used for structure determination of surfaces and interfaces. The currently available X-ray intensities permit extensions to the XSW technique. Two recently established applications, described in this thesis, are XSW real space imaging and XSW valence electronic structure analysis. XSW real space imaging was employed to analyse the atomic structure of 0.5 and 1.0 layers of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ deposited on SrTiO 3 (001). Three-dimensional images of the atomic distributions were reconstructed for each of the elements from experimentally determined Fourier components of the atomic distribution functions. The images confirmed the formation of a perovskite precursor phase prior to the formation of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ phase during the growth of the first monolayer of the film. XSW valence electronic structure analysis applied to SrTiO 3 identified the valence band contributions arising from the strontium, titanium, and oxygen sites of the crystal lattice. Relations between the site-specific valence electronic structure and the lattice structure were established. The experimental results agree very well with predictions by state-of-the-art ab initio calculations. X-ray absorption cross sections for

  3. Multi-interface roughness effects on electron mobility in a Ga0.5In0.5P/GaAs multisubband coupled quantum well structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, Trinath; Shore, K Alan

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the effect of interface roughness scattering on low temperature electron mobility μ n mediated by intersubband interactions in a multisubband coupled Ga 0.5 In 0.5 P/GaAs quantum well structure. We consider a barrier δ-doped double quantum well system in which the subband electron mobility is limited by the interface roughness scattering μ IR n and ionized impurity scattering μ imp n . We analyse the effect of the intersubband interaction and coupling of subband wavefunctions through the barrier on the intrasubband and intersubband transport scattering rates. We show that the intersubband interaction controls the roughness potential of different interfaces through the dielectric screening matrix. In the case of lowest subband occupancy, the mobility is mainly governed by the interface roughness of the central barrier. Whereas when two subbands are occupied, the interface roughness of the outer barrier predominates due to intersubband effects. The influence of the intersubband interaction also exhibits interesting results on the well width up to which the interface roughness dominates in a double quantum well structure

  4. Selecting highly structure-specific antibodies using structured synthetic mimics of the cystine knot protein sclerostin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Back, J.W.; Frisch, C.; Van Pee, K.; Boschert, V.; van Vught, R.; Puijk, W.; Mueller, T. D.; Knappik, A.; Timmerman, P.

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies directed against specific regions of a protein have traditionally been raised against full proteins, protein domains or simple unstructured peptides, containing contiguous stretches of primary sequence. We have used a new approach of selecting antibodies against restrained peptides

  5. Cross-Bridge Kelvin resistor structures for reliable measurement of low contact resistances and contact interface characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavitski, N.; Klootwijk, J.H.; van Zeijl, H.W.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The parasitic factors that strongly influence the measurement accuracy of Cross-Bridge Kelvin Resistor (CBKR) structures for low specific contact resistances (�?�c) have been extensively discussed during last few decades and the minimum of the �?�c value, which could be accurately extracted, was

  6. Nanomanufacturing of titania interfaces with controlled structural and functional properties by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podestà, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.podesta@mi.infn.it, E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it; Borghi, Francesca; Indrieri, Marco; Bovio, Simone; Piazzoni, Claudio; Milani, Paolo, E-mail: alessandro.podesta@mi.infn.it, E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it [Centro Interdisciplinare Materiali e Interfacce Nanostrutturati (C.I.Ma.I.Na.), Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-12-21

    Great emphasis is placed on the development of integrated approaches for the synthesis and the characterization of ad hoc nanostructured platforms, to be used as templates with controlled morphology and chemical properties for the investigation of specific phenomena of great relevance in interdisciplinary fields such as biotechnology, medicine, and advanced materials. Here, we discuss the crucial role and the advantages of thin film deposition strategies based on cluster-assembling from supersonic cluster beams. We select cluster-assembled nanostructured titania (ns-TiO{sub 2}) as a case study to demonstrate that accurate control over morphological parameters can be routinely achieved, and consequently, over several relevant interfacial properties and phenomena, like surface charging in a liquid electrolyte, and proteins and nanoparticles adsorption. In particular, we show that the very good control of nanoscale morphology is obtained by taking advantage of simple scaling laws governing the ballistic deposition regime of low-energy, mass-dispersed clusters with reduced surface mobility.

  7. Nano carbon supported platinum catalyst interaction behavior with perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and their interface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2016-01-01

    behavior of Nafion ionomer on platinized carbon nano fibers (CNFs), carbon nano tubes (CNTs) and amorphous carbon (Vulcan). The interaction is affected by the catalyst surface oxygen groups as well as porosity. Comparisons between the carbon supports and platinized equivalents are carried out. It reveals......The interaction between perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and supported platinum catalyst is essential. It directly influences platinum accessibility, stability of carbon support and platinum, proton conductivity and electron conductivity in an electrode. In this study, we compare the adsorption...... that the platinization step modifies the surface nature of the carbon supports in terms of specific surface area, crystallinity and especially porosity; therefore, ionomer adsorption over carbon is not always representative for the ionomer adsorption over carbon supported catalyst, though indicative. Moreover...

  8. Nanomanufacturing of titania interfaces with controlled structural and functional properties by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podestà, Alessandro; Borghi, Francesca; Indrieri, Marco; Bovio, Simone; Piazzoni, Claudio; Milani, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Great emphasis is placed on the development of integrated approaches for the synthesis and the characterization of ad hoc nanostructured platforms, to be used as templates with controlled morphology and chemical properties for the investigation of specific phenomena of great relevance in interdisciplinary fields such as biotechnology, medicine, and advanced materials. Here, we discuss the crucial role and the advantages of thin film deposition strategies based on cluster-assembling from supersonic cluster beams. We select cluster-assembled nanostructured titania (ns-TiO 2 ) as a case study to demonstrate that accurate control over morphological parameters can be routinely achieved, and consequently, over several relevant interfacial properties and phenomena, like surface charging in a liquid electrolyte, and proteins and nanoparticles adsorption. In particular, we show that the very good control of nanoscale morphology is obtained by taking advantage of simple scaling laws governing the ballistic deposition regime of low-energy, mass-dispersed clusters with reduced surface mobility

  9. Nanomanufacturing of titania interfaces with controlled structural and functional properties by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podestà, Alessandro; Borghi, Francesca; Indrieri, Marco; Bovio, Simone; Piazzoni, Claudio; Milani, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Great emphasis is placed on the development of integrated approaches for the synthesis and the characterization of ad hoc nanostructured platforms, to be used as templates with controlled morphology and chemical properties for the investigation of specific phenomena of great relevance in interdisciplinary fields such as biotechnology, medicine, and advanced materials. Here, we discuss the crucial role and the advantages of thin film deposition strategies based on cluster-assembling from supersonic cluster beams. We select cluster-assembled nanostructured titania (ns-TiO2) as a case study to demonstrate that accurate control over morphological parameters can be routinely achieved, and consequently, over several relevant interfacial properties and phenomena, like surface charging in a liquid electrolyte, and proteins and nanoparticles adsorption. In particular, we show that the very good control of nanoscale morphology is obtained by taking advantage of simple scaling laws governing the ballistic deposition regime of low-energy, mass-dispersed clusters with reduced surface mobility.

  10. Electronic structure evolution and energy level alignment at C60/4,4'-cyclohexylidenebis[N,N-bis(4-methylphenyl) benzenamine]/MoOx/indium tin oxide interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoliang; Yi, Shijuan; Wang, Chenggong; Wang, Congcong; Gao, Yongli

    2014-04-01

    The electronic structure evolution and energy level alignment have been investigated at interfaces comprising fullerene (C60)/4,4'-cyclohexylidenebis[N,N-bis(4-methylphenyl) benzenamine] (TAPC)/ molybdenum oxide (MoOx)/ indium tin oxide with ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. With deposition of TAPC upon MoOx, a dipole of 1.58 eV was formed at the TAPC/MoOx interface due to electron transfer from TAPC to MoOx. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) onset of TAPC was pinned closed to the Fermi level, leading to a p-doped region and thus increasing the carrier concentration at the very interface. The downward band bending and the resulting built-in field in TAPC were favorable for the hole transfer toward the TAPC/MoOx interface. The rigid downward shift of energy levels of TAPC indicated no significant interface chemistry at the interface. With subsequent deposition of C60 on TAPC, a dipole of 0.27 eV was observed at the C60/TAPC heterojunction due to the electron transfer from TAPC to C60. This led to a drop of the HOMO of TAPC near the C60/TAPC interface, and hence further enhanced the band bending in TAPC. The band bending behavior was also observed in C60, similarly creating a built-in field in C60 film and improving the electron transfer away from the C60/TAPC interface. It can be deduced from the interface analysis that a promising maximum open circuit voltage of 1.5 eV is achievable in C60/TAPC-based organic photovoltaic cells.

  11. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  12. Interfacial electronic structures revealed at the rubrene/CH3NH3PbI3 interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Gengwu; Zheng, Guanhaojie; Zhao, Bin; Song, Fei; Zhang, Xiaonan; Shen, Kongchao; Yang, Yingguo; Xiong, Yimin; Gao, Xingyu; Cao, Liang; Qi, Dong-Chen

    2017-03-01

    The electronic structures of rubrene films deposited on CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 perovskite have been investigated using in situ ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that rubrene molecules interacted weakly with the perovskite substrate. Due to charge redistribution at their interface, a downward 'band bending'-like energy shift of ∼0.3 eV and an upward band bending of ∼0.1 eV were identified at the upper rubrene side and the CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 substrate side, respectively. After the energy level alignment was established at the rubrene/CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 interface, its highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-valence band maximum (VBM) offset was found to be as low as ∼0.1 eV favoring the hole extraction with its lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO)-conduction band minimum (CBM) offset as large as ∼1.4 eV effectively blocking the undesired electron transfer from perovskite to rubrene. As a demonstration, simple inverted planar solar cell devices incorporating rubrene and rubrene/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) hole transport layers (HTLs) were fabricated in this work and yielded a champion power conversion efficiency of 8.76% and 13.52%, respectively. Thus, the present work suggests that a rubrene thin film could serve as a promising hole transport layer for efficient perovskite-based solar cells.

  13. Effects of a Thin Ru-Doped PVP Interface Layer on Electrical Behavior of Ag/n-Si Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badali, Yosef; Nikravan, Afsoun; Altındal, Şemsettin; Uslu, İbrahim

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study is to improve the electrical property of Ag/n-Si metal-semiconductor (MS) structure by growing an Ru-doped PVP interlayer between Ag and n-Si using electrospinning technique. To illustrate the utility of the Ru-doped PVP interface layer, current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of Ag/n-Si (MS) and Ag/Ru-doped PVP/n-Si metal-polymer-semiconductor (MPS) structures was carried out. In addition, the main electrical parameters of the fabricated Ag/Ru-doped PVP/n-Si structures were investigated as a function of frequency and electric field using impedance spectroscopy method (ISM). The capacitance-voltage (C-V) plot showed an anomalous peak in the depletion region due to the special density distribution of interface traps/states (D it /N ss) and interlayer. Both the values of series resistance (R s) and N ss were drawn as a function of voltage and frequency between 0.5 kHz and 5 MHz at room temperature and they had a peak behavior in the depletion region. Some important parameters of the sample such as the donor concentration atoms (N D), Fermi energy (E F ), thickness of the depletion region (W D), barrier height (Φ B0 ) and R s were determined from the C -2 versus V plot for each frequency. The values of N D , W D , Φ B0 and R s were changed from 1 × 1015 cm-3, 9.61 × 10-5 cm, 0.94 eV and 19,055 Ω (at 0.5 kHz) to 0.13 × 1015 cm-3, 27.4 × 10-4 cm, 1.04 eV and 70 Ω (at 5 MHz), respectively. As a result of the experiments, it is observed that the change in electrical parameters becomes more effective at lower frequencies due to the N ss and their relaxation time (τ), dipole and surface polarizations.

  14. Does Gender-Specific Differential Item Functioning Affect the Structure in Vocational Interest Inventories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinicke, Andrea; Pässler, Katja; Hell, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates consequences of eliminating items showing gender-specific differential item functioning (DIF) on the psychometric structure of a standard RIASEC interest inventory. Holland's hexagonal model was tested for structural invariance using a confirmatory methodological approach (confirmatory factor analysis and randomization…

  15. Design of external sensors board based on Bluetooth interface of smart phones for structural health monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Zhou, Yaping; Zhao, Xuefeng; Li, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping

    2016-04-01

    As an important part of new information technology, the Internet of Things(IoT) is based on intelligent perception, recognition technology, ubiquitous computing, ubiquitous network integration, and it is known as the third wave of the development of information industry in the world after the computer and the Internet. And Smart Phones are the general term for a class of mobile phones with a separate operating system and operational memory, in which the third-party service programs including software, games, navigation, et.al, can be installed. Smart Phones, with not only sensors but also actuators, are widely used in the IoT world. As the current hot issues in the engineering area, Structural health monitoring (SHM) is also facing new problems about design ideas in the IoT environment. The development of IoT, wireless sensor network and mobile communication technology, provides a good technical platform for SHM. Based on these facts, this paper introduces a kind of new idea for Structural Health Monitoring using Smart Phones Technique. The system is described in detail, and the external sensor board based on Bluetooth interface is designed, the test based on Smart Phones is finished to validate the implementation and feasibility. The research is preliminary and more tests need to be carried out before it can be of practical use.

  16. Interfacial Interactions and Nano structure Changes in DPPG/HD Monolayer at the Air/Water Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, H.; Zhang, P.; Sun, R.; Hao, Ch.; Wang, J.; Zhu, H.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, P.; Li, Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) plays a crucial role in regulating surface tension during normal respiration cycles by decreasing the work associated with lung expansion and therefore decreases the metabolic energy consumed. Monolayer surfactant films composed of a mixture of phospholipids and spreading additives are of optional utility for applications in lung surfactant-based therapies. A simple, minimal model of such a lung surfactant system, composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phosphor-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DPPG) and hexadecanol (HD), was prepared, and the surface pressure-area π-A) isotherms and nano structure characteristics of the binary mixture were investigated at the air/water interface using a combination of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Based on the regular solution theory, the miscibility and stability of the two components in the monolayer were analyzed in terms of compression modulusC_s"-1) , excess Gibbs free energy (δG"π_exc) , activity coefficients (γ), and interaction parameterζ. The results of this paper provide valuable insight into basic thermodynamics and nano structure of mixed DPPG/HD monolayers; it is helpful to understand the thermodynamic behavior of HD as spreading additive in LS monolayer with a view toward characterizing potential improvements to LS performance brought about by addition of HD to lung phospholipids

  17. Structured illumination of the interface between centriole and peri-centriolar material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jingyan; Glover, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The increase in centrosome size in mitosis was described over a century ago, and yet it is poorly understood how centrioles, which lie at the core of centrosomes, organize the pericentriolar material (PCM) in this process. Now, structured illumination microscopy reveals in Drosophila that, before clouds of PCM appear, its proteins are closely associated with interphase centrioles in two tube-like layers: an inner layer occupied by centriolar microtubules, Sas-4, Spd-2 and Polo kinase; and an outer layer comprising Pericentrin-like protein (Dplp), Asterless (Asl) and Plk4 kinase. Centrosomin (Cnn) and γ-tubulin associate with this outer tube in G2 cells and, upon mitotic entry, Polo activity is required to recruit them together with Spd-2 into PCM clouds. Cnn is required for Spd-2 to expand into the PCM during this maturation process but can itself contribute to PCM independently of Spd-2. By contrast, the centrioles of spermatocytes elongate from a pre-existing proximal unit during the G2 preceding meiosis. Sas-4 is restricted to the microtubule-associated, inner cylinder and Dplp and Cnn to the outer cylinder of this proximal part. γ-Tubulin and Asl associate with the outer cylinder and Spd-2 with the inner cylinder throughout the entire G2 centriole. Although they occupy different spatial compartments on the G2 centriole, Cnn, Spd-2 and γ-tubulin become diminished at the centriole upon entry into meiosis to become part of PCM clouds. PMID:22977736

  18. A computational DFT study of structural transitions in textured solid-fluid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsyshin, Petr; Parry, Andrew O.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2015-11-01

    Fluids adsorbed at walls, in capillary pores and slits, and in more exotic, sculpted geometries such as grooves and wedges can exhibit many new phase transitions, including wetting, pre-wetting, capillary-condensation and filling, compared to their bulk counterparts. As well as being of fundamental interest to the modern statistical mechanical theory of inhomogeneous fluids, these are also relevant to nanofluidics, chemical- and bioengineering. In this talk we will show using a microscopic Density Functional Theory (DFT) for fluids how novel, continuous, interfacial transitions associated with the first-order prewetting line, can occur on steps, in grooves and in wedges, that are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple geometries. We will also discuss practical aspects of DFT calculations, and demonstrate how this statistical-mechanical framework is capable of yielding complex fluid structure, interfacial tensions, and regions of thermodynamic stability of various fluid configurations. As a side note, this demonstrates that DFT is an excellent tool for the investigations of complex multiphase systems. We acknowledge financial support from the European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031.

  19. Predicting workload profiles of brain-robot interface and electromygraphic neurofeedback with cortical resting-state networks: personal trait or task-specific challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fels, Meike; Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Novel rehabilitation strategies apply robot-assisted exercises and neurofeedback tasks to facilitate intensive motor training. We aimed to disentangle task-specific and subject-related contributions to the perceived workload of these interventions and the related cortical activation patterns. Approach. We assessed the perceived workload with the NASA Task Load Index in twenty-one subjects who were exposed to two different feedback tasks in a cross-over design: (i) brain-robot interface (BRI) with haptic/proprioceptive feedback of sensorimotor oscillations related to motor imagery, and (ii) control of neuromuscular activity with feedback of the electromyography (EMG) of the same hand. We also used electroencephalography to examine the cortical activation patterns beforehand in resting state and during the training session of each task. Main results. The workload profile of BRI feedback differed from EMG feedback and was particularly characterized by the experience of frustration. The frustration level was highly correlated across tasks, suggesting subject-related relevance of this workload component. Those subjects who were specifically challenged by the respective tasks could be detected by an interhemispheric alpha-band network in resting state before the training and by their sensorimotor theta-band activation pattern during the exercise. Significance. Neurophysiological profiles in resting state and during the exercise may provide task-independent workload markers for monitoring and matching participants’ ability and task difficulty of neurofeedback interventions.

  20. Site-specific electronic structure analysis by channeling EELS and first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Muto, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Yu; Ikeno, Hirokazu; Yoshioka, Satoru; Tanaka, Isao

    2006-01-01

    Site-specific electronic structures were investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) under electron channeling conditions. The Al-K and Mn-L(2,3) electron energy loss near-edge structure (ELNES) of, respectively, NiAl2O4 and Mn3O4 were measured. Deconvolution of the raw spectra with the instrumental resolution function restored the blunt and hidden fine features, which allowed us to interpret the experimental spectral features by comparing with theoretical spectra obtained by first-principles calculations. The present method successfully revealed the electronic structures specific to the differently coordinated cationic sites.

  1. IntelliCable Interface Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-14

    44 Offset 00 – Battery Data Block size ...in case of an emergency (Primary Batteries ) 03 – 05 Low – Can be periodically refilled but has limit capacity /fuel (Fuel Cells) 06 – 10 Renewable...includes (solar blankets, AC Adapters, Primary Batteries , etc. Offset Size Values Description Notes 00 1 Byte Block Dependant (fah max) Source

  2. Purification of specific structured lipids by distillation: Effects on acyl migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Skands, A.; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The cause and effects of acyl migration during the purification of specific structured lipids by distillation were studied in a conventional batch deodorizer with stripping steam. The mixture of specific structured lipids produced by lipase-catalyzed acidolysis between rapeseed oil and capric acid...... influenced the rate of acyl migration, and their combinations made the effect more severe. However, diacylglycerols were found to be the main reason for acyl migration. In the distillation of the specific structured lipid product mixture, distillation temperature and time were the main factors to determine...... the degree of acyl migration and the extent of separation of free fatty acids. The results indicate that more efficient separation technology should be used to improve the quality of the purified structured lipids. in order to reduce the distillation temperature, vacuum should be made as low as possible...

  3. The Influence of Interfaces on Properties of Thin-Film Inorganic Structural Isomers Containing SnSe-NbSe2 Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemayehu, Matti B; Falmbigl, Matthias; Ta, Kim; Johnson, David C

    2015-04-28

    Inorganic isomers ([SnSe]1+δ)m(NbSe2)n([SnSe]1+δ)p(NbSe2)q([SnSe]1+δ)r(NbSe2)s where m, n, p, q, r, and s are integers and m + p + r = n + q + s = 4 were prepared using the modulated elemental reactant technique. This series of all six possible isomers provides an opportunity to study the influence of interface density on properties while maintaining the same unit cell size and composition. As expected, all six compounds were observed to have the same atomic compositions and an almost constant c-axis lattice parameter of ≈4.90(5) nm, with a slight trend in the c-axis lattice parameter correlated with the different number of interfaces in the isomers: two, four and six. The structures of the constituents in the ab-plane were independent of one another, confirming the nonepitaxial relationship between them. The temperature dependent electrical resistivities revealed metallic behavior for all the six compounds. Surprisingly, the electrical resistivity at room temperature decreases with increasing number of interfaces. Hall measurements suggest this results from changes in carrier concentration, which increases with increasing thickness of the thickest SnSe block in the isomer. Carrier mobility scales with the thickness of the thickest NbSe2 block due to increased interfacial scattering as the NbSe2 blocks become thinner. The observed behavior suggests that the two constituents serve different purposes with respect to electrical transport. SnSe acts as a charge donor and NbSe2 acts as the charge transport layer. This separation of function suggests that such heterostructures can be designed to optimize performance through choice of constituent, layer thickness, and layer sequence. A simplistic model, which predicts the properties of the complex isomers from a weighted sum of the properties of building blocks, was developed. A theoretical model is needed to predict the optimal compound for specific properties among the many potential compounds that can be prepared.

  4. 3-Dimensional atomic scale structure of the ionic liquid-graphite interface elucidated by AM-AFM and quantum chemical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alister J.; Elbourne, Aaron; Stefanovic, Ryan; Addicoat, Matthew A.; Warr, Gregory G.; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Atkin, Rob

    2014-06-01

    In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level structure immersed in a viscous liquid and (d) it has been demonstrated that the IL structure at solid surfaces is a consequence of both thermodynamic and kinetic effects. The lateral structure of the PAN-graphite interface is highly ordered and consists of remarkably well-defined domains of a rhomboidal superstructure composed of propylammonium cations preferentially aligned along two of the three directions in the underlying graphite lattice. The nanostructure is primarily determined by the cation. Van der Waals interactions between the propylammonium chains and the surface mean that the cation is enriched in the surface layer, and is much less mobile than the anion. The presence of a heterogeneous lateral structure at an ionic liquid-solid interface has wide ranging ramifications for ionic liquid applications, including lubrication, capacitive charge storage and electrodeposition.In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level

  5. Directed surfaces structures and interfaces for enhanced electrocatalyst activity, selectivity, and stability for energy conversion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo, Thomas F. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering. Shriram Center

    2016-04-20

    IrO3/IrOx catalyst significantly outperforms rutile IrO2 and RuO2, the only other OER catalysts to have reasonable stability and activity in acidic electrolyte, and in fact demonstrates the best activity for any known OER catalyst measured in either acidic or in alkaline electrolyte. For alkaline conditions we have demonstrated that the combined effect of cerium as a dopant and gold as a metal support, significantly enhances the OER activity of electrodeposited NiOx films. This NiCeOx-Au catalyst delivers high OER activity in alkaline media, and is among the most active OER electrocatalysts reported to date (Nature Energy, accepted 2016). These studies of new catalysts for the OER, both in acid and in base, are fundamental to enabling new technologies of interest for the DOE, including the production of sustainable fuels and chemicals. ORR: One method to significantly reduce the Pt loading in fuel cell devices is to increase the ORR activity of Pt based systems. To this end we have synthesized a high surface area supported meso-structured PtxNi alloy thin film with a double gyroid morphology that both exhibits high activity and stability for the ORR (submitted, 2016). We have furthermore developed a Ru-core, Pt-shell system that improves the per Pt site activity by more than a factor of 2 (ChemElectroChem, 2014). Further refinement, optimizing Pt-shell thickness and reducing particle sintering during processing, enabled us to obtain a mass activity that is 2 times higher than commercial Pt/C from TKK. These are important contributions to the DOE goal of reducing Pt loading since an improved understanding of how to increase mass activity and stability helps enable low Pt content fuel cells.

  6. Structural studies of Pseudomonas and Chromobacterium ω-aminotransferases provide insights into their differing substrate specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayer, Christopher; Isupov, Michail N.; Westlake, Aaron; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    The X-ray structures of two ω-aminotransferases from P. aeruginosa and C. violaceum in complex with an inhibitor offer the first detailed insight into the structural basis of the substrate specificity of these industrially important enzymes. The crystal structures and inhibitor complexes of two industrially important ω-aminotransferase enzymes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum have been determined in order to understand the differences in their substrate specificity. The two enzymes share 30% sequence identity and use the same amino acceptor, pyruvate; however, the Pseudomonas enzyme shows activity towards the amino donor β-alanine, whilst the Chromobacterium enzyme does not. Both enzymes show activity towards S-α-methylbenzylamine (MBA), with the Chromobacterium enzyme having a broader substrate range. The crystal structure of the P. aeruginosa enzyme has been solved in the holo form and with the inhibitor gabaculine bound. The C. violaceum enzyme has been solved in the apo and holo forms and with gabaculine bound. The structures of the holo forms of both enzymes are quite similar. There is little conformational difference observed between the inhibitor complex and the holoenzyme for the P. aeruginosa aminotransferase. In comparison, the crystal structure of the C. violaceum gabaculine complex shows significant structural rearrangements from the structures of both the apo and holo forms of the enzyme. It appears that the different rigidity of the protein scaffold contributes to the substrate specificity observed for the two ω-aminotransferases

  7. Site-specific optimisation of the countermeasure structure on rehabilitation of radioactive contaminated territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatsalo, B.I.; Okhrimenko, D.V.; Lisyanski, B.G.; Okhrimenko, I.V.; Mirzeabassov, O.A.

    2000-01-01

    The use of 'soft' countermeasures (CMs) (agricultural CMs, some administrative ones, except for relocation/resettlement and some 'strong' measures on restriction of living conditions) allows considering the radiological and economic parameters for assessing their effectiveness. In this case cost-benefit analysis (CBA) or some its modification are used. However, the determination of various radiological and economic parameters (and their combination) is not enough for making final decisions on countermeasure implementation. All radiological, ecological and economic characteristics and other expert knowledge, corresponding standards and regulations should be taken into account, and many of them may not be used very often in analytical methods directly. The approaches to evaluating strong' CMs are based, as a rule, on expert judgements (MAUA, M-Crit). However, in practice they can lead to any result given in advance or to a choice of an weighted solution which does not comply with opinions by most experts due to considerable range of expert opinions and subjective weights for chosen attributes/criteria. Implementation of CMs on rehabilitation of contaminated territories should be based on the radiation protection principles. However, these principles are declared only when realising CMs on rehabilitation of contaminated territories after the Chernobyl accident. In practice some national or departmental standards are used and principles of justification'/'optimisation' are not examined. Taking into consideration a complex character of tasks on CM analysis and comparison of various alternatives it is quite necessary to use up-to-date computer decision support systems (DSSs). One of the systems which is directly intended for site-specific rehabilitation of territories subjected to radioactive contamination after the Chernobyl accident is the PRANA DSS. A key block of PRANA is 'analysis and optimisation of CMs structure'. It is intended for : -determination of territories

  8. Site-specific optimisation of the countermeasure structure on rehabilitation of radioactive contaminated territories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatsalo, B.I.; Okhrimenko, D.V.; Lisyanski, B.G.; Okhrimenko, I.V.; Mirzeabassov, O.A. [Obninsk Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering, Obninsk, Kaluga (Russian Federation)

    2000-05-01

    The use of 'soft' countermeasures (CMs) (agricultural CMs, some administrative ones, except for relocation/resettlement and some 'strong' measures on restriction of living conditions) allows considering the radiological and economic parameters for assessing their effectiveness. In this case cost-benefit analysis (CBA) or some its modification are used. However, the determination of various radiological and economic parameters (and their combination) is not enough for making final decisions on countermeasure implementation. All radiological, ecological and economic characteristics and other expert knowledge, corresponding standards and regulations should be taken into account, and many of them may not be used very often in analytical methods directly. The approaches to evaluating strong' CMs are based, as a rule, on expert judgements (MAUA, M-Crit). However, in practice they can lead to any result given in advance or to a choice of an weighted solution which does not comply with opinions by most experts due to considerable range of expert opinions and subjective weights for chosen attributes/criteria. Implementation of CMs on rehabilitation of contaminated territories should be based on the radiation protection principles. However, these principles are declared only when realising CMs on rehabilitation of contaminated territories after the Chernobyl accident. In practice some national or departmental standards are used and principles of justification'/'optimisation' are not examined. Taking into consideration a complex character of tasks on CM analysis and comparison of various alternatives it is quite necessary to use up-to-date computer decision support systems (DSSs). One of the systems which is directly intended for site-specific rehabilitation of territories subjected to radioactive contamination after the Chernobyl accident is the PRANA DSS. A key block of PRANA is 'analysis and optimisation of CMs structure

  9. Heterojunction interface double layer and consequences for photovoltaic cells, specifically Cdsub(z)Znsub(1-z)S/Cu2S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeer, K.W.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that an interface dislocation field at a heterojunction with substantial lattice mismatch needs charge compensation which can cause a double layer producing a potential spike at the interface. Tunneling through such a spike reduces the current through the interface. Reasonable agreement between theory and experiment is obtained for Cdsub(z)Znsub(1-z)S/Cu 2 S photovoltaic cells. (author)

  10. Computational and Spectroscopic Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Geologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, R. James; Kalinichev, Andrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Research supported by this grant focuses on molecular scale understanding of central issues related to the structure and dynamics of geochemically important fluids, fluid-mineral interfaces, and confined fluids using computational modeling and experimental methods. Molecular scale knowledge about fluid structure and dynamics, how these are affected by mineral surfaces and molecular-scale (nano-) confinement, and how water molecules and dissolved species interact with surfaces is essential to understanding the fundamental chemistry of a wide range of low-temperature geochemical processes, including sorption and geochemical transport. Our principal efforts are devoted to continued development of relevant computational approaches, application of these approaches to important geochemical questions, relevant NMR and other experimental studies, and application of computational modeling methods to understanding the experimental results. The combination of computational modeling and experimental approaches is proving highly effective in addressing otherwise intractable problems. In 2006-2007 we have significantly advanced in new, highly promising research directions along with completion of on-going projects and final publication of work completed in previous years. New computational directions are focusing on modeling proton exchange reactions in aqueous solutions using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), metadynamics (MTD), and empirical valence bond (EVB) approaches. Proton exchange is critical to understanding the structure, dynamics, and reactivity at mineral-water interfaces and for oxy-ions in solution, but has traditionally been difficult to model with molecular dynamics (MD). Our ultimate objective is to develop this capability, because MD is much less computationally demanding than quantum-chemical approaches. We have also extended our previous MD simulations of metal binding to natural organic matter (NOM) to a much longer time scale (up to 10 ns) for

  11. Crystal structure of inulosucrase from Lactobacillus: insights into the substrate specificity and product specificity of GH68 fructansucrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijning, Tjaard; Anwar, Munir A; Böger, Markus; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Leemhuis, Hans; Kralj, Slavko; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2011-09-09

    Fructansucrases (FSs) catalyze a transfructosylation reaction with sucrose as substrate to produce fructo-oligosaccharides and fructan polymers that contain either β-2,1 glycosidic linkages (inulin) or β-2,6 linkages (levan). Levan-synthesizing FSs (levansucrases) have been most extensively investigated, while detailed information on inulosucrases is limited. Importantly, the molecular basis of the different product specificities of levansucrases and inulosucrases is poorly understood. We have elucidated the three-dimensional structure of a truncated active bacterial GH68 inulosucrase, InuJ of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC533 (residues 145-708), in its apo form, with a bound substrate (sucrose), and with a transfructosylation product. The sucrose binding pocket and the sucrose binding mode are virtually identical with those of GH68 levansucrases, confirming that both enzyme types use the same fully conserved structural framework for the binding and cleavage of the donor substrate sucrose in the active site. The binding mode of the first transfructosylation product 1-kestose (Fru-β(2-1)-Fru-α(2-1)-Glc, where Fru=fructose and Glc=glucose) in subsites -1 to +2 shows for the first time how inulin-type fructo-oligosaccharide bind in GH68 FS and how an inulin-type linkage can be formed. Surprisingly, observed interactions with the sugar in subsites +1 and +2 are provided by residues that are also present in levansucrases. The binding mode of 1-kestose and the presence of a more distant sucrose binding site suggest that residues beyond the +2 subsite, in particular residues from the nonconserved 1B-1C loop, determine product linkage type specificity in GH68 FSs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct electronic communication at bio-interfaces assisted by layered-metal-hydroxide slab arrays with controlled nano-micro structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Zhe; He, Jing

    2011-10-28

    The electronic transfer (eT) at bio-interfaces has been achieved by orientating 2D inorganic slabs in a regular arrangement with the slab ab-planes vertical to the electrode substrate. The eT rate is effectively promoted by tuning the nano-micro scale structures of perpendicular LDH arrays. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  13. SFG analysis of the molecular structures at the surfaces and buried interfaces of PECVD ultralow-dielectric constant pSiCOH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Myers, John N.; Huang, Huai; Shobha, Hosadurga; Chen, Zhan; Grill, Alfred

    2016-02-01

    PECVD deposited porous SiCOH with ultralow dielectric constant has been successfully integrated as the insulator in advanced interconnects to decrease the RC delay. The effects of NH3 plasma treatment and the effectiveness of the dielectric repair on molecular structures at the surface and buried interface of a pSiCOH film deposited on top of a SiCNH film on a Si wafer were fully characterized using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), supplemented by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. After exposure to NH3 plasma for 18 s, about 40% of the methyl groups were removed from the pSiCOH surface, and the average orientation of surface methyl groups tilted more towards the surface. The repair method used here effectively repaired the molecular structures at the pSiCOH surface but did not totally recover the entire plasma-damaged layer. Additionally, simulated SFG spectra with various average orientations of methyl groups at the SiCNH/pSiCOH buried interface were compared with the experimental SFG spectra collected using three different laser input angles to determine the molecular structural information at the SiCNH/pSiCOH buried interface after NH3 plasma treatment and repair. The molecular structures including the coverage and the average orientation of methyl groups at the buried interface were found to be unchanged by NH3 plasma treatment and repair.

  14. Structure-specific selection of earthquake ground motions for the reliable design and assessment of structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsanos, E. I.; Sextos, A. G.

    2018-01-01

    A decision support process is presented to accommodate selecting and scaling of earthquake motions as required for the time domain analysis of structures. Code-compatible suites of seismic motions are provided being, at the same time, prequalified through a multi-criterion approach to induce...... was subjected to numerous suites of motions that were highly ranked according to both the proposed approach (δsv–sc) and the conventional one (δconv), that is commonly used for earthquake records selection and scaling. The findings from numerous linear response history analyses reveal the superiority...

  15. Structural Basis for Specific Inhibition of tRNA Synthetase by an ATP Competitive Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Pengfei; Han, Hongyan; Wang, Jing; Chen, Kaige; Chen, Xin; Guo, Min

    2015-06-18

    Pharmaceutical inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases demand high species and family specificity. The antimalarial ATP-mimetic cladosporin selectively inhibits Plasmodium falciparum LysRS (PfLysRS). How the binding to a universal ATP site achieves the specificity is unknown. Here we report three crystal structures of cladosporin with human LysRS, PfLysRS, and a Pf-like human LysRS mutant. In all three structures, cladosporin occupies the class defining ATP-binding pocket, replacing the adenosine portion of ATP. Three residues holding the methyltetrahydropyran moiety of cladosporin are critical for the specificity of cladosporin against LysRS over other class II tRNA synthetase families. The species-exclusive inhibition of PfLysRS is linked to a structural divergence beyond the active site that mounts a lysine-specific stabilizing response to binding cladosporin. These analyses reveal that inherent divergence of tRNA synthetase structural assembly may allow for highly specific inhibition even through the otherwise universal substrate binding pocket and highlight the potential for structure-driven drug development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A structural study of solid electrolyte interface on negative electrode of lithium-Ion battery by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Tadashi; Watanabe, Jiro; Nakao, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Seiichi

    2014-11-01

    For the last decades, the performance of the lithium-ion battery (LIB) has been significantly improved and its applications have been expanding rapidly. However, its performance has yet to be enhanced.In the lithium-ion battery development, it is important to elucidate the electrode structure change in detail during the charge and discharge cycling. In particular, solid electrolyte interface (SEI) formed by decomposition of the electrolytes on the graphite negative electrode surface should play an important role for battery properties. Therefore, it is essential to control the structure and composition of SEI to improve the battery performance. Here, we conducted a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) study to elucidate the structures of the SEI during the charge and discharge process using LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 [1] cathode and graphite anode. [2] Since SEI is a lithium-containing compound with high activity, it was observed without being exposed to the atmosphere. The electrodes including SEI were sampled after dismantling batteries with cutoff voltages of 3V and 4.2V for the charge process and 3V for the discharge process. Fig.1 shows SEM images of the graphite electrode surface during the charge and discharge process. The change of the SEI structure during the process was clearly observed. Further, TEM images showed that the SEI grew thicker during the charge process and becomes thinner when discharged. These results with regard to the reversible SEI structure could give a new insight for the battery development.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i21/DFU056F1F1DFU056F1Fig. 1.SEM images of the graphite electrode surface:(a) before charge process;(b) with charge-cutoff voltage of 3.0V; (c) with charge-cutoff voltage of 4.2V; (d) with discharge-cutoff voltage of 3.0V. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Using Low-Frequency Earthquakes to Investigate Slow Slip Processes and Plate Interface Structure Beneath the Olympic Peninsula, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestler, Shelley

    This dissertation seeks to further understand the LFE source process, the role LFEs play in generating slow slip, and the utility of using LFEs to examine plate interface structure. The work involves the creation and investigation of a 2-year-long catalog of low-frequency earthquakes beneath the Olympic Peninsula, Washington. In the first chapter, we calculate the seismic moments for 34,264 low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) beneath the Olympic Peninsula, WA. LFE moments range from 1.4x1010- 1.9x1012 N-m (M W=0.7-2.1). While regular earthquakes follow a power-law moment-frequency distribution with a b-value near 1 (the number of events increases by a factor of 10 for each unit increase in MW), we find that while for large LFEs the b-value is ˜6, for small LFEs it is families, or spots on the plate interface where LFEs repeat, can also be fit by exponential distributions. An exponential moment-frequency distribution implies a scale-limited source process. We consider two end-member models where LFE moment is limited by (1) the amount of slip or (2) slip area. We favor the area-limited model. Based on the observed exponential distribution of LFE moment and geodetically observed total slip we estimate that the total area that slips within an LFE family has a diameter of 300 m. Assuming an area-limited model, we estimate the slips, sub-patch diameters, stress drops, and slip rates for LFEs during ETS events. We allow for LFEs to rupture smaller sub-patches within the LFE family patch. Models with 1-10 sub-patches produce slips of 0.1-1 mm, sub-patch diameters of 80-275 m, and stress drops of 30-1000 kPa. While one sub-patch is often assumed, we believe 3-10 sub-patches are more likely. In the second chapter, using high-resolution relative low-frequency earthquake (LFE) locations, we calculate the patch areas (Ap) of LFE families. During Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events, we define AT as the area that slips during LFEs and ST as the total amount of summed LFE slip

  18. Understanding specificity in metabolic pathways-Structural biology of human nucleotide metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welin, Martin; Nordlund, Paer

    2010-01-01

    Interactions are the foundation of life at the molecular level. In the plethora of activities in the cell, the evolution of enzyme specificity requires the balancing of appropriate substrate affinity with a negative selection, in order to minimize interactions with other potential substrates in the cell. To understand the structural basis for enzyme specificity, the comparison of structural and biochemical data between enzymes within pathways using similar substrates and effectors is valuable. Nucleotide metabolism is one of the largest metabolic pathways in the human cell and is of outstanding therapeutic importance since it activates and catabolises nucleoside based anti-proliferative drugs and serves as a direct target for anti-proliferative drugs. In recent years the structural coverage of the enzymes involved in human nucleotide metabolism has been dramatically improved and is approaching completion. An important factor has been the contribution from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at Karolinska Institutet, which recently has solved 33 novel structures of enzymes and enzyme domains in human nucleotide metabolism pathways and homologs thereof. In this review we will discuss some of the principles for substrate specificity of enzymes in human nucleotide metabolism illustrated by a selected set of enzyme families where a detailed understanding of the structural determinants for specificity is now emerging.

  19. Three-dimensional structure of laser-modified Ti6Al4V and bone interface revealed with STEM tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandfield, Kathryn; Palmquist, Anders; Engqvist, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    The early interaction between an implant's surface and bone is a leading factor for implant success, where multiple surface properties contribute to improved bone anchorage. An important parameter is surface topography, both on the micron and nanoscale. Laser-modification has been performed in the thread valleys of Ti6Al4V screws to alter their surface chemistry and topography to form a nanostructured surface titanium-dioxide. Implants were placed in the rabbit tibia, removed with surrounding bone after 8 weeks, fixated, dried and resin embedded. Focused ion beam milling (FIB) was used to prepare specimens from the resin blocks for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Z-contrast electron tomography offered the possibility to explore the interfacial structure with high-resolution in three-dimensions. With this technique, collagen fibers of the surrounding bone appear to have been laid down parallel to the implant surface. Accordingly, visualization of the laser-modified interface with nanoscale three-dimensional resolution, as offered by Z-contrast electron tomography, gives new insights into bone bonding mechanisms between roughened titanium-dioxide surfaces and bone

  20. Evolution of subband structure with gate-tuning at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lucas; Smink, Sander; van Heeringen, Linde; Geessinck, Jaap; Rana, Abimanuya; Rastogi, Ankur; Maan, Jan Kees; Brinkman, Alexander; Zeitler, Uli; Hilgenkamp, Hans; McCollam, Alix

    The outstanding characteristic of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures is the formation of a high mobility 2D electron gas (2DEG) at the interface. The additional presence of superconductivity, magnetism and large spin-orbit coupling in these systems suggests that strong correlations play an important role in the electronic properties, in contrast to conventional semiconductor-based 2DEGs. Knowledge of the electronic bandstructure, and the interdependence of conduction electron density and properties is therefore essential for our understanding of these materials. We present new results of low temperature transport measurements in a high mobility LaAlO3/SrTiO3-based heterostructure, in magnetic fields up to 33 T. Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations are observed, revealing several subbands with different carrier densities. By application of an electric field in the back gate geometry, the Fermi level is tuned and thus we are able to map the smooth evolution of the subbands and their properties with carrier density. These results are in good agreement with recent theoretical work, such that we can disentangle the complex band structure, and quantify aspects such as Rashba spin-splitting and the mixing of orbital character.

  1. Adhesion-delamination phenomena at the surfaces and interfaces in microelectronics and MEMS structures and packaged devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, V K

    2011-01-01

    Physico-chemical mechanisms of adhesion and debonding at the various surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor devices, integrated circuits and microelectromechanical systems are systematically examined, starting from chip manufacturing and traversing the process stages to the ultimate finished product. Sources of intrinsic and thermal stresses in these devices are pointed out. Thin film ohmic contacts to the devices call for careful attention. The role of an adhesion layer in multilayer metallization schemes is highlighted. In packaged devices, sites facing potential risks of delamination are indicated. As MEMS devices incorporate moving parts, there are additional issues due to adhesion of suspended structures to surfaces in the vicinity, both during chip fabrication and their subsequent operation. Proper surface treatments for preventing adhesion together with design considerations for overcoming stiction pave the way to reliable functioning of these devices. Adhesion-delamination issues in microelectronics and MEMS continue to pose significant challenges to both design and process engineers. This paper is an attempt to survey the adhesion characteristics of materials, their compatibilities and limitations and look at future research trends. In addition, it addresses some of the techniques for improved or reduced adhesion, as demanded by the situation. The paper encompasses fundamental aspects to contemporary applications.

  2. Universal computer interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dheere, RFBM

    1988-01-01

    Presents a survey of the latest developments in the field of the universal computer interface, resulting from a study of the world patent literature. Illustrating the state of the art today, the book ranges from basic interface structure, through parameters and common characteristics, to the most important industrial bus realizations. Recent technical enhancements are also included, with special emphasis devoted to the universal interface adapter circuit. Comprehensively indexed.

  3. Roughness of the SiC/SiO{sub 2} vicinal interface and atomic structure of the transition layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peizhi; Li, Guoliang; Duscher, Gerd, E-mail: gduscher@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Sharma, Yogesh K.; Ahyi, Ayayi C.; Isaacs-Smith, Tamara; Williams, John R.; Dhar, Sarit [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface is generally considered to be the cause for the reduced electron mobility of SiC power devices. Previous studies have shown a correlation between the mobility and the transition layer width at the SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface. The authors investigated this interface with atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and discovered that this transition region was due to the roughness of the vicinal interface. The roughness of a vicinal interface consisted of atomic steps and facets deviating from the ideal off-axis cut plane. The authors conclude that this roughness is limiting the mobility in the channels of SiC MOSFETs.

  4. Functional and structural analysis of yeast trx system reveals structural elements of substrate specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Marcos Antonio; Discola, Karen Fulan; Alves, Simone Vidigal; Netto, Luis Eduardo Soares; Amorim, Gisele Cardoso; Pinheiro, Anderson Sa; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fabio Ceneviva Lacerda; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Guimaraes, Beatriz Gomes

    2006-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductases (Trr) are members of the nucleotide pyridine disulfide oxide reductase family, which includes glutathione reductase (Gr), alkyl hydroperoxide reductase F (AhpF) and lipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd). Constituents of this family are homodimeric flavoproteins containing one redoxactive disulfide and one tightly bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) per subunit. Trr catalyzes the disulfide reduction of oxidized Thioredoxin (Trx) using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) via a FAD molecule and a redox-active cysteine motif. In this context, FAD transfers the reducing equivalents from NADPH molecule to the reactive cysteines and then to the Trx. Trx, Trr and NADPH comprise the Trx system. Trx are low molecular weight proteins (∼12 KDa) which are involved in several thiol-dependent cellular reactions such as synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, sulphur metabolism, regulation of the gene expression and oxidative stress defenses. Remarkably, Trr - Trx interactions presents high species and organelle specificities. (author)

  5. Structure and catalytic regulatory function of ubiquitin specific protease 11 N-terminal and ubiquitin-like domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Stephen; Gratton, Hayley E; Cornaciu, Irina; Oberer, Monika; Scott, David J; Emsley, Jonas; Dreveny, Ingrid

    2014-05-13

    The ubiquitin specific protease 11 (USP11) is implicated in DNA repair, viral RNA replication, and TGFβ signaling. We report the first characterization of the USP11 domain architecture and its role in regulating the enzymatic activity. USP11 consists of an N-terminal "domain present in USPs" (DUSP) and "ubiquitin-like" (UBL) domain, together referred to as DU domains, and the catalytic domain harboring a second UBL domain. Crystal structures of the DU domains show a tandem arrangement with a shortened β-hairpin at the two-domain interface and altered surface characteristics compared to the homologues USP4 and USP15. A conserved VEVY motif is a signature feature at the two-domain interface that shapes a potential protein interaction site. Small angle X-ray scattering and gel filtration experiments are consistent with the USP11DU domains and full-length USP11 being monomeric. Unexpectedly, we reveal, through kinetic assays of a series of deletion mutants, that the catalytic activity of USP11 is not regulated through intramolecular autoinhibition or activation by the N-terminal DU or UBL domains. Moreover, ubiquitin chain cleavage assays with all eight linkages reveal a preference for Lys(63)-, Lys(6)-, Lys(33)-, and Lys(11)-linked chains over Lys(27)-, Lys(29)-, and Lys(48)-linked and linear chains consistent with USP11's function in DNA repair pathways that is mediated by the protease domain. Our data support a model whereby USP11 domains outside the catalytic core domain serve as protein interaction or trafficking modules rather than a direct regulatory function of the proteolytic activity. This highlights the diversity of USPs in substrate recognition and regulation of ubiquitin deconjugation.

  6. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M.A.; Yu, C.M.; Raley, N.F.

    1999-03-16

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gases in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters. 9 figs.

  7. Effects of Interfaces on the Structure and Novel Physical Properties in Epitaxial Multiferroic BiFeO3 Ultrathin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanwei Huang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In functional oxide films, different electrical/mechanical boundaries near film surfaces induce rich phase diagrams and exotic phenomena. In this paper, we review some key points which underpin structure, phase transition and related properties in BiFeO3 ultrathin films. Compared with the bulk counterparts, we survey the recent results of epitaxial BiFeO3 ultrathin films to illustrate how the atomic structure and phase are markedly influenced by the interface between the film and the substrate, and to emphasize the roles of misfit strain and depolarization field on determining the domain patterns, phase transformation and associated physical properties of BiFeO3 ultrathin films, such as polarization, piezoelectricity, and magnetism. One of the obvious consequences of the misfit strain on BiFeO3 ultrathin films is the emergence of a sequence of phase transition from tetragonal to mixed tetragonal & rhombohedral, the rhombohedral, mixed rhombohedral & orthorhombic, and finally orthorhombic phases. Other striking features of this system are the stable domain patterns and the crossover of 71° and 109° domains with different electrical boundary conditions on the film surface, which can be controlled and manipulated through the depolarization field. The external field-sensitive enhancements of properties for BiFeO3 ultrathin films, including the polarization, magnetism and morphotropic phase boundary-relevant piezoelectric response, offer us deeper insights into the investigations of the emergent properties and phenomena of epitaxial ultrathin films under various mechanical/electrical constraints. Finally, we briefly summarize the recent progress and list open questions for future study on BiFeO3 ultrathin films.

  8. Influence of the solid-gas interface on the effective thermal parameters of a two-layer structure in photoacoustic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, N Munoz; Perez, L MartInez; Garibay-Febles, V; Lozada-Cassou, M

    2004-01-01

    From the theoretical point of view, the influence of the solid-gas interface on the effective thermal parameters in a two-layer structure of the photoacoustic technique is discussed. It is shown that the effective thermal parameters depend strongly upon the thermal resistance value associated with the solid-gas interface. New expressions for the effective thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity in the low frequency limit are obtained. In the high frequency limit, the 'resonant' behaviour of the effective thermal diffusivity is maintained and a new complex dependence on frequency of the effective thermal conductivity is shown

  9. Electrical and photoelectric properties of Si-based metal–insulator–semiconductor structures with Au nanoparticles at the insulator–semiconductor interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koryazhkina, M. N., E-mail: mahavenok@mail.ru; Tikhov, S. V.; Gorshkov, O. N.; Kasatkin, A. P.; Antonov, I. N. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (NNSU) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    It is shown that the formation of Au nanoparticles at the insulator–silicon interface in structures with a high density of surface states results in a shift of the Fermi-level pinning energy at this interface towards the valence-band ceiling in silicon and in increasing the surface-state density at energies close to the Fermi level. In this case, a band with a peak at 0.85 eV arises on the photosensivity curves of the capacitor photovoltage, which is explained by the photoemission of electrons from the formed Au-nanoparticle electron states near the valence-band ceiling in silicon.

  10. Effects of specific adsorption of copper (II) ion on charge transfer reaction at the thin film LiMn2O4 electrode/aqueous electrolyte interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, N.; Yamada, I.; Huang, Y.; Nozawa, T.; Iriyama, Y.; Abe, T.; Ogumi, Z.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a specific adsorption ion, copper (II) ion, on the kinetics of the charge transfer reaction at a LiMn 2 O 4 thin film electrode/aqueous solution (1 mol dm -3 LiNO 3 ) interface. The zeta potential of LiMn 2 O 4 particles showed a negative value in 1 x 10 -2 mol dm -3 LiNO 3 aqueous solution, while it was measured as positive in the presence of 1 x 10 -2 mol dm -3 Cu(NO 3 ) 2 in the solution. The presence of copper (II) ions in the solution increased the charge transfer resistance, and CV measurement revealed that the lithium insertion/extraction reaction was retarded by the presence of small amount of copper (II) ions. The activation energy for the charge transfer reaction in the solution with Cu(NO 3 ) 2 was estimated to be 35 kJ mol -1 , which was ca. 10 kJ mol -1 larger than that observed in the solution without Cu(NO 3 ) 2 . These results suggest that the interaction between the lithium ion and electrode surface is a factor in the kinetics of charge transfer reaction

  11. The euro and the recent European crisis vis-à-vis the gold standard and the great depression: institutionalities, specificities and interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIULIANO CONTENTO DE OLIVEIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The paper aims to establish interfaces between the Great Depression of the 1930s under the Gold Standard and the recent European Crisis under the Euro. It is argued that, despite their specificities, both crises revealed the potentially harmful effects, in economic and social terms, of institutional arrangements that considerably reduce the autonomy of monetary, fiscal and exchange rate policies of participating countries, without being accompanied by increased cooperation between them, which should be led by a global (in the case of the Great Depression or regional (in the case of the European Crisis hegemonic power, which is not only capable of, but is also willing to act as a buyer and lender of last resort, especially in circumstances characterized by increased uncertainty, the deterioration of the general state of expectations and increased liquidity preference. In fact, central European countries in the past and peripheral European countries nowadays were effectively pushed toward deflationary adjustments in which a reduction of prices and wages was accompanied by a reduction of output and employment levels. Thus, in the absence of the possibility of restoring the autonomy of economic policy, the overcome of the crisis necessarily requires, both before - under the Gold Standard - and nowadays - under the Euro -, joint actions aimed to assure that the responsibility for the adjustment will be equally distributed among all the economies, in order to avoid that some of them benefit at the expense of the others in this process.

  12. Structural Basis for Specific Inhibition of tRNA Synthetase by an ATP Competitive Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Pengfei; Han, Hongyan; Wang, Jing; Chen, Kaige; Chen, Xin; Guo, Min

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases demand high species and family specificity. The antimalarial ATP-mimetic cladosporin selectively inhibits P. falciparum LysRS (PfLysRS). How the binding to a universal ATP site achieves the specificity is unknown. Here we report 3 crystal structures of cladosporin with human LysRS, PfLysRS, and a Pf-like human LysRS mutant. In all 3 structures, cladosporin occupies the class defining ATP-binding pocket, replacing the adenosine portion of...

  13. Electronic Health Record in Occupational Medicine: Specific Aspects and Requirements of Data Structuring and Standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin TRIFF

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The service of occupational medicine of a specific economic agent, as integrated part of the System of Labor Health and Safety, requires efficient, well-organized information management through standardized and computerized data processing and exploitation. Legal requirements and practical aspects of information management in occupational medicine trigger necessary operational modifications in the Electronic Health File. The goal of the paper is to present basic requirements of structuring the electronic health file and the necessary standards in recording specific data.

  14. Technical Specifications of Structural Health Monitoring for Highway Bridges: New Chinese Structural Health Monitoring Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Moreu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Governments and professional groups related to civil engineering write and publish standards and codes to protect the safety of critical infrastructure. In recent decades, countries have developed codes and standards for structural health monitoring (SHM. During this same period, rapid growth in the Chinese economy has led to massive development of civil engineering infrastructure design and construction projects. In 2016, the Ministry of Transportation of the People’s Republic of China published a new design code for SHM systems for large highway bridges. This document is the first technical SHM code by a national government that enforces sensor installation on highway bridges. This paper summarizes the existing international technical SHM codes for various countries and compares them with the new SHM code required by the Chinese Ministry of Transportation. This paper outlines the contents of the new Chinese SHM code and explains its relevance for the safety and management of large bridges in China, introducing key definitions of the Chinese–United States SHM vocabulary and their technical significance. Finally, this paper discusses the implications for the design and implementation of a future SHM codes, with suggestions for similar efforts in United States and other countries.

  15. Structural Characterization of the Hemagglutinin Receptor Specificity from the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Paulson, James C.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps)

    2012-02-13

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the viral envelope protein that mediates viral attachment to host cells and elicits membrane fusion. The HA receptor-binding specificity is a key determinant for the host range and transmissibility of influenza viruses. In human pandemics of the 20th century, the HA normally has acquired specificity for human-like receptors before widespread infection. Crystal structures of the H1 HA from the 2009 human pandemic (A/California/04/2009 [CA04]) in complex with human and avian receptor analogs reveal conserved recognition of the terminal sialic acid of the glycan ligands. However, favorable interactions beyond the sialic acid are found only for {alpha}2-6-linked glycans and are mediated by Asp190 and Asp225, which hydrogen bond with Gal-2 and GlcNAc-3. For {alpha}2-3-linked glycan receptors, no specific interactions beyond the terminal sialic acid are observed. Our structural and glycan microarray analyses, in the context of other high-resolution HA structures with {alpha}2-6- and {alpha}2-3-linked glycans, now elucidate the structural basis of receptor-binding specificity for H1 HAs in human and avian viruses and provide a structural explanation for the preference for {alpha}2-6 siaylated glycan receptors for the 2009 pandemic swine flu virus.

  16. Chemical and structural analysis of the bone-implant interface by TOF-SIMS, SEM, FIB and TEM: Experimental study in animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmquist, Anders; Emanuelsson, Lena; Sjövall, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Although bone-anchored implants are widely used in reconstructive medicine, the mechanism of osseointegration is still not fully understood. Novel analytical tools are needed to further understand this process, where both the chemical and structural aspects of the bone-implant interface are important. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of combining time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) with optical (LM), scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for studying the bone-implant interface of bone-anchored implants. Laser-modified titanium implants with surrounded bone retrieved after 8 weeks healing in rabbit were dehydrated and resin embedded. Three types of sample preparation were studied to evaluate the information gained by combining TOF-SIMS, SEM, FIB and TEM. The results show that imaging TOF-SIMS can provide detailed chemical information, which in combination with structural information from microscopy methods provide a more complete characterization of anatomical structures at the bone-implant interface. By investigating various sample preparation techniques, it is shown that grinded cross section samples can be used for chemical imaging using TOF-SIMS, if careful consideration of potential preparation artifacts is taken into account. TOF-SIMS analysis of FIB-prepared bone/implant cross section samples show distinct areas corresponding to bone tissue and implant with a sharp interface, although without chemical information about the organic components.

  17. Investigation of the atomic interface structure of mesotaxial Si/CoSi2(100) layers formed by high-dose implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulle-Lieuwma, C.W.T.; Jong, A.F. de; Vandenhoudt, D.E.W.

    1991-01-01

    Aligned mesotaxial films of CoSi 2 in monocrystalline (100) oriented Si substrates have been formed by high-dose ion implantation of Co, followed by a high temperature treatment. The atomic structures of both the lower and upper Si/CoSi 2 (100) interfaces of the buried CoSi 2 layer have been investigated by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) combined with image simulations. A domain-like structure is observed consisting of areas with different interfaces. In order to derive the atomic configuration, image simulations of different proposed models are presented. By comparing simulated images and HREM images, two different atomic structure models for the Si/CoSi 2 (100) interface have been found. In the first model the interfacial Co atoms are six-fold coordinated and the tetrahedral coordination and bond lengths of silicon atoms are everywhere maintained. In the second model we found evidence for a 2 x 1 interface reconstruction, involving a difference in composition. The interfacial Co atoms are seven-fold coordinated. It is shown that the boundaries between the domains are associated with interfacial dislocations of edge-type with Burgers vectors b a/4 inclined and b = a/2 parallel to the interfacial plane. (author)

  18. Pinning-free GaAs MIS structures with Si interface control layers formed on (4 x 6) reconstructed (0 0 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anantathanasarn, Sanguan; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2003-06-30

    (0 0 1)-Oriented GaAs metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures having a silicon interface control layer (Si ICL) were fabricated on surfaces having Ga-rich (4x6) reconstructions. Si ICL was grown by molecular beam epitaxy. MIS structures were fabricated by partially converting Si ICL to SiN{sub x} by direct nitridation, and further depositing a thick SiO{sub 2} layer on top as the main passivation dielectric by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and MIS capacitance-voltage (C-V) techniques were used for characterization. The initial surface reconstruction was found to have a surprisingly strong effect on the degree of Fermi level pinning at the MIS interface. In contrast to the standard As-rich (2x4) surface, which results in strongly pinned MIS interfaces, the novel SiO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}/Si ICL/GaAs MIS structures formed on ''genuine'' (4x6) surface realized complete unpinning of Fermi level over the entire band gap with a minimum interface state density of 4x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1} range.

  19. Interface, a dispersed architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    Past and current specification techniques use timing diagrams and written text to describe the phenomenology of an interface. This paper treats an interface as the architecture of a number of processes, which are dispersed over the related system parts and the message path. This approach yields a

  20. Study of metal specific interaction, F-LUMO and VL shift to understand interface of CuPc thin films and noble metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Sumona; Mukherjee, M., E-mail: manabendra.mukherjee@saha.ac.in

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • F-LUMO, a hybridized state near E{sub F} confirms partial charge transfer. • Non-significant role of partial charge transfer in VL shift over push back effect. • Pyrrole sites affected for partial charge transfer from Cu and Ag substrates. • Negligible effect on pyrrole cites for Pt and Au substrates. - Abstract: The performances of organic electronic devices are significantly associated with their energy level alignment at organic semiconductor/metal–electrode interfaces. The electronic character of an organic semiconducting molecular over-layer on a metal surface can vary from semiconducting to metallic, depending on the nature of the molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi level of the electrode. The general tendency of extrapolating established models for single crystal substrates to ‘real’ device substrates is highly misleading. Hence, the importance of metal specific interaction, former lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (F-LUMO) and vacuum level (VL) shift have been investigated as a function of thickness of the deposited films by means of photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) to understand the interface between CuPc and Cu, Ag, Pt and Au foils sequentially. The XPS data provides the signature of affectability of pyrrole sites of CuPc molecules for partial charge transfer from Cu and Ag substrates while a negligible effect on pyrrole cites resulted for Pt and Au substrates. Furthermore, the appearance of F-LUMO, a hybridized state close to the Fermi level gives confirmatory information about partial charge transfer. Contrary to the general belief that vacuum level shift caused by charge transfer can partially or totally cancel that for push back effect, our observation indicates that the partial charge transfer does not play significant role in the shift of vacuum level. The entire thickness dependent electronic energy level alignment of CuPc films on all noble metal substrates is explained in terms

  1. Study of metal specific interaction, F-LUMO and VL shift to understand interface of CuPc thin films and noble metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Sumona; Mukherjee, M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • F-LUMO, a hybridized state near E_F confirms partial charge transfer. • Non-significant role of partial charge transfer in VL shift over push back effect. • Pyrrole sites affected for partial charge transfer from Cu and Ag substrates. • Negligible effect on pyrrole cites for Pt and Au substrates. - Abstract: The performances of organic electronic devices are significantly associated with their energy level alignment at organic semiconductor/metal–electrode interfaces. The electronic character of an organic semiconducting molecular over-layer on a metal surface can vary from semiconducting to metallic, depending on the nature of the molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi level of the electrode. The general tendency of extrapolating established models for single crystal substrates to ‘real’ device substrates is highly misleading. Hence, the importance of metal specific interaction, former lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (F-LUMO) and vacuum level (VL) shift have been investigated as a function of thickness of the deposited films by means of photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) to understand the interface between CuPc and Cu, Ag, Pt and Au foils sequentially. The XPS data provides the signature of affectability of pyrrole sites of CuPc molecules for partial charge transfer from Cu and Ag substrates while a negligible effect on pyrrole cites resulted for Pt and Au substrates. Furthermore, the appearance of F-LUMO, a hybridized state close to the Fermi level gives confirmatory information about partial charge transfer. Contrary to the general belief that vacuum level shift caused by charge transfer can partially or totally cancel that for push back effect, our observation indicates that the partial charge transfer does not play significant role in the shift of vacuum level. The entire thickness dependent electronic energy level alignment of CuPc films on all noble metal substrates is explained in terms of a

  2. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  3. Effects of weathering on performance of intumescent coatings for structure fire protection in the wildland-urban interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Babak

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of weathering on the performance of intumescent fire-retardant coatings on wooden products. The weathering effects included primary (solar irradiation, moisture, and temperature) and secondary (environmental contaminants) parameters at various time intervals. Wildland urban interface (WUI) fires have been an increasing threat to lives and properties. Existing solutions to mitigate the damages caused by WUI fires include protecting the structures from ignition and minimizing the fire spread from one structure to another. These solutions can be divided into two general categories: active fire protection systems and passive fire protection systems. Passive systems are either using pre-applied wetting agents (water, gel, or foam) or adding an extra layer (composite wraps or coatings). Fire-retardant coating treatment methods can be divided into impregnated (penetrant) and intumescent categories. Intumescent coatings are easy to apply, economical, and have a better appearance in comparison to other passive fire protection methods, and are the main focus of this study. There have been limited studies conducted on the application of intumescent coatings on wooden structures and their performance after long-term weathering exposure. The main concerns of weathering effects are: 1) the reduction of ignition resistance of the coating layer after weathering; and 2) the fire properties of coatings after weathering since coatings might contribute as a combustible fuel and assist the fire growth after ignition. Three intumescent coatings were selected and exposed to natural weathering conditions in three different time intervals. Two types of tests were performed on the specimens: a combustibility test consisted of a bench-scale performance evaluation using a Cone Calorimeter, and a thermal decomposition test using Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) method (also known

  4. DAFS study of site-specific local structure of Mn in manganese ferrite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsov, E.; Haskel, D.; Cady, A.; Yang, A.; Vittoria, C.; Zuo, X.; Harris, V.G.

    2006-01-01

    Manganese ferrite (MnFe 2 O 4 ) is a well-known magnetic material widely used in electronics for many years. It is well established that its magnetic behavior is strongly influenced by local structural properties of Mn ions, which are distributed between crystallographically inequivalent tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the unit cell. In order to understand and be able to tune properties of these structures, it is necessary to have detailed site-specific structural information on the system. Here we report on the application of diffraction-anomalous fine structure (DAFS) spectroscopy to resolve site-specific Mn local structures in manganese ferrite films. The DAFS measurements were done at undulator beamline 4-ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The DAFS spectra (Fig. 1) were measured at several Bragg reflections in the vicinity of the Mn absorption K-edge, having probed separately contributions from tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordinated Mn sites. The DAFS data analysis done with an iterative Kramers-Kroenig algorithm made it possible to solve separately the local structure around different inequivalent Mn sites in the unit cell. The reliability of the data treatment was checked carefully, and it was showed that the site-specific structural parameters obtained with DAFS allow us to describe fluorescence EXAFS spectrum measured independently. Fig. 2 shows individual site contributions to the imaginary part of the resonant scattering amplitude obtained from the treatment of the data of Fig. 1. The analysis of the refined site-specific absorption spectra was done using EXAFS methods based on theoretical standards. We provided direct evidence for the tetrahedral Mn-O bond distance being increased relative to the corresponding Fe-O distance in bulk manganese ferrites. The first coordination shell number was found to be reduced significantly for Mn atoms at these sites. This finding is consistent with the well-known tendency of Mn

  5. Molecular-structure control of ultrafast electron injection at cationic porphyrin-CdTe quantum dot interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; Ahmed, Ghada H.; Shaheen, Basamat; Sun, Jingya; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    Charge transfer (CT) at donor (D)/acceptor (A) interfaces is central to the functioning of photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. Understanding and controlling this process on the molecular level has been proven to be crucial for optimizing

  6. First applications of structural pattern recognition methods to the investigation of specific physical phenomena at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratta, G.A.; Vega, J.; Pereira, A.; Portas, A.; Luna, E. de la; Dormido-Canto, S.; Farias, G.; Dormido, R.; Sanchez, J.; Duro, N.; Vargas, H.; Santos, M.; Pajares, G.; Murari, A.

    2008-01-01

    Structural pattern recognition techniques allow the identification of plasma behaviours. Physical properties are encoded in the morphological structure of signals. Intelligent access methods have been applied to JET databases to retrieve data according to physical criteria. On the one hand, the structural form of signals has been used to develop general purpose data retrieval systems to search for both similar entire waveforms and similar structural shapes inside waveforms. On the other hand, domain dependent knowledge was added to the structural information of signals to create particular data retrieval methods for specific physical phenomena. The inclusion of explicit knowledge assists in data analysis. The latter has been applied in JET to look for first, cut-offs in ECE heterodyne radiometer signals and, second, L-H transitions

  7. First applications of structural pattern recognition methods to the investigation of specific physical phenomena at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratta, G.A. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion (Spain)], E-mail: giuseppe.ratta@ciemat.es; Vega, J.; Pereira, A.; Portas, A.; Luna, E. de la [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion (Spain); Dormido-Canto, S.; Farias, G.; Dormido, R.; Sanchez, J.; Duro, N.; Vargas, H. [Dpto. Informatica y Automatica-UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Santos, M.; Pajares, G. [Dpto. Arquitectura de Computadores y Automatica-UCM, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, Padua (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    Structural pattern recognition techniques allow the identification of plasma behaviours. Physical properties are encoded in the morphological structure of signals. Intelligent access methods have been applied to JET databases to retrieve data according to physical criteria. On the one hand, the structural form of signals has been used to develop general purpose data retrieval systems to search for both similar entire waveforms and similar structural shapes inside waveforms. On the other hand, domain dependent knowledge was added to the structural information of signals to create particular data retrieval methods for specific physical phenomena. The inclusion of explicit knowledge assists in data analysis. The latter has been applied in JET to look for first, cut-offs in ECE heterodyne radiometer signals and, second, L-H transitions.

  8. Universal and Language-Specific Patterns in the Acquisition of Verb Argument Structures in German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischner, Franziska N.; Weissenborn, Jürgen; Naigles, Letitia R.

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the influence of universal and language-specific morpho-syntactic properties (i.e., flexible word order, case) on the acquisition of verb argument structures in German compared with English. To this end, 65 three- to nine-year-old German learning children and adults were asked to act out grammatical ("The sheep…

  9. Co-Localisation of Abnormal Brain Structure and Function in Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badcock, Nicholas A.; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.; Hardiman, Mervyn J.; Barry, Johanna G.; Watkins, Kate E.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between brain structure and function in 10 individuals with specific language impairment (SLI), compared to six unaffected siblings, and 16 unrelated control participants with typical language. Voxel-based morphometry indicated that grey matter in the SLI group, relative to controls, was increased in the left inferior…

  10. Production of specific structured lipids by enzymatic interesterification: optimization of the reaction by response surface design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Skands, Anja Rebecca Havegaard; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Rapeseed oil and capric acid were interesterified in solvent-free media catalyzed by Lipozyme IM (Rhizomucor miehei) to produce specific-structured