WorldWideScience

Sample records for species coleoptera chrysomelidae

  1. Two new fossil species of Cryptocephalus Geoffroy (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Baltic and Dominican Amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two new species of Cryptocephalus Geoffroy (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are described and illustrated from fossil resin: Cryptocephalus groehni sp. nov (Baltic amber) and Cryptocephalus kheelorum sp. nov. (Dominican amber). These are the first described species of Cryptocephalinae from fossil resin. ...

  2. Three cryptic species in Asecodes (Förster) (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae) parasitizing larvae of Galerucella spp. (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae), including a new species

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    Hansson,Christer; Hambäck,Peter

    2013-01-01

    Three morphologically very similar species of Asecodes Förster (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) are reviewed. Asecodes parviclava (Thomson) is removed from synonymy under A. lucens stat. rev., and differentiated from A. lucens (Nees) and A. lineophagum sp. n. All three species develop as gregarious endoparasitoids in larvae of Galerucella spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), but each species has its own unique host range. Asecodes lineophagum attacks only Galerucella lineola (Fabr.) and A. lucens ...

  3. A remarkable new species group of green seed beetles from genus Amblycerus Thunberg (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae), with description of a new Brazilian species

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    Ribeiro-Costa, Cibele Stramare; Vieira, Marcelli Krul; Manfio, Daiara; Kergoat, Gael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Representatives of the subfamily Bruchinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are usually small and inconspicuous, with only a few species drawing the attention. Here we deal with several unusually colored species of Amblycerus Thunberg, 1815, one of the two most diverse bruchine genera in the Western hemisphere. We define the virens group that consists of five species whose bodies are covered with a green vestiture, including one new for science, Amblycerus medialis Ribeiro-Costa, Vieira & Manfio, sp. n. (Type locality: Brazil: Pará, Rondônia). This study also provides redescriptions, diagnoses, comparative notes, illustrations, geographic distribution records and a key to the species in this group. PMID:24843259

  4. First fossil Lamprosomatinae leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) with descriptions of new genera and species from Baltic amber.

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    Bukejs, Andris; Nadein, Konstantin

    2015-03-11

    In the current paper the first fossil representatives of leaf-beetles from the subfamily Lamprosomatinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are described and illustrated from Upper Eocene Baltic amber: Succinoomorphus warchalowskii gen. et sp. nov., Archelamprosomius balticus gen. et sp. nov., and Archelamprosomius kirejtshuki sp. nov. A key to fossil Lamprosomatinae is provided.

  5. A new species of bromeliad-feeding Cephaloleia Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae from Costa Rica: evidence from DNA barcodes, larval and adult morphology and insect diets

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    Carlos Garcia-Robledo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Neotropical genus Cephaloleia Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae includes 214 species distributed from the south of Mexico to Argentina. Cephaloleia beetles feed mostly on plants from the order Zingiberales. The interactions between Cephaloleia beetles and their Zingiberales host plants is proposed as one of the oldest and most conservative associations. Here we describe a new species of Cephaloleia (C. kuprewiczae sp. n. that feeds on two species of bromeliads (Pitcairnia arcuata and P. brittoniana, Bromeliaceae: Pitcairnioideae. Cephaloleia kuprewiczae was previously described as Cephaloleia histrionica. This study includes evidence from DNA barcodes (COI, larval and adult morphology and insect diets that separates C. kuprewiczae from C. histrionica as a new species.

  6. A new species of bromeliad-feeding Cephaloleia Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae) from Costa Rica: evidence from DNA barcodes, larval and adult morphology and insect diets

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    García-Robledo, Carlos; Staines, Charles L.; Kress, W. John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Neotropical genus Cephaloleia Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae) includes 214 species distributed from the south of Mexico to Argentina. Cephaloleia beetles feed mostly on plants from the order Zingiberales. The interactions between Cephaloleia beetles and their Zingiberales host plants is proposed as one of the oldest and most conservative associations. Here we describe a new species of Cephaloleia (Cephaloleia kuprewiczae sp. n.) that feeds on two species of bromeliads (Pitcairnia arcuata and Pitcairnia brittoniana, Bromeliaceae: Pitcairnioideae). Cephaloleia kuprewiczae was previously described as Cephaloleia histrionica. This study includes evidence from DNA barcodes (COI), larval and adult morphology and insect diets that separates Cephaloleia kuprewiczae from Cephaloleia histrionica as a new species. PMID:25685006

  7. Naamlijst van de Nederlandse Bladkevers (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenen, R.; Winkelman, J.

    1993-01-01

    Checklist of the Dutch leaf-beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). A new checklist of the leaf-beetles of The Netherlands is presented. It is to be used in the European Invertebrate Survey project 'The Leaf-beetles of The Netherlands'. The list is annotated to explain changes in faunistic status and

  8. Chrysomelinae species (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) and new biological data from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Flinte, Vivian; Abejanella, André; Daccordi, Mauro; Monteiro, Ricardo F.; Macedo, Margarete Valverde

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Chrysomelinae is one of the largest subfamilies in Chrysomelidae, yet much basic information remains unknown for Neotropical species. The present study aims to compile the first regional list of Chrysomelinae for the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and assemble natural history traits obtained from our fieldwork from 2005 to 2010 in Serra dos Órgãos National Park, a mountainous area of Atlantic forest. The species list was compiled from data from field work, collections, and literature, and recorded a total of 100 species, belonging to 21 genera in one tribe (Chrysomelini) and three subtribes: Chrysolinina (91 species), Chrysomelina (eight species) and Entomoscelina (one species). Of these, 91 species are new records for the state. Serra dos Órgaõs National Park holds records of 43 species, with Platyphora being the most species-rich genus, and Solanaceae the most common host plant family. Some new records of reproductive mode (larviparous vs. oviparous) and larval behavior are also given. These Brazil Chrysomelinae species exhibited a clear seasonal pattern, with more species recorded in the hot and rainy season from October to January, and considerably fewer species from June to August, during the drier and colder months. The fraction of new records in comparison with published species and natural history information illustrates how little we know of Chrysomelinae in the state and in the country. PMID:29391849

  9. Chrysomelinae species (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) and new biological data from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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    Flinte, Vivian; Abejanella, André; Daccordi, Mauro; Monteiro, Ricardo F; Macedo, Margarete Valverde

    2017-01-01

    Chrysomelinae is one of the largest subfamilies in Chrysomelidae, yet much basic information remains unknown for Neotropical species. The present study aims to compile the first regional list of Chrysomelinae for the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and assemble natural history traits obtained from our fieldwork from 2005 to 2010 in Serra dos Órgãos National Park, a mountainous area of Atlantic forest. The species list was compiled from data from field work, collections, and literature, and recorded a total of 100 species, belonging to 21 genera in one tribe (Chrysomelini) and three subtribes: Chrysolinina (91 species), Chrysomelina (eight species) and Entomoscelina (one species). Of these, 91 species are new records for the state. Serra dos Órgaõs National Park holds records of 43 species, with Platyphora being the most species-rich genus, and Solanaceae the most common host plant family. Some new records of reproductive mode (larviparous vs. oviparous) and larval behavior are also given. These Brazil Chrysomelinae species exhibited a clear seasonal pattern, with more species recorded in the hot and rainy season from October to January, and considerably fewer species from June to August, during the drier and colder months. The fraction of new records in comparison with published species and natural history information illustrates how little we know of Chrysomelinae in the state and in the country.

  10. Molecular phylogenetics, systematics and host-plant associations of the Bruchidius albosparsus (Fåhraeus) species group (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae) with the description of four new species.

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    Delobel, Alex; Le Ru, Bruno; Genson, Gwenaëlle; Musyoka, Boaz K; Kergoat, Gael J

    2015-03-16

    Bruchidius Schilsky is a large paraphyletic genus of seed beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) which consists of multiple lineages that are usually associated with narrow sets of host-plants. In this study we focus on a group that mostly develops on wattle trees (acacias) belonging to the genus Vachellia Wight & Arn. This group originally included nine species and was designated as the Bruchidius centromaculatus (Allard) species group, but recent phylogenetic analyses revealed that these species belong to a much wider group of species with similar morphologies. For reasons of anteriority we call this enlarged group Bruchidius albosparsus (Fåhraeus). Here we review the morphology of species in this group and provide new diagnoses and ecological data for 10 species. The following combinations and synonymies are proposed: Bruchidius tanaensis (Pic, 1921) (= Bruchus tanaensis Pic, 1921) comb. nov. and Bruchidius albosparsus (Fåhraeus, 1839) (= Bruchus spadiceus Fåhraeus, 1839) syn. nov. Four new species are also described: B. eminingensis sp. nov., B. gerrardiicola sp. nov., B. glomeratus sp. nov. and B. haladai sp. nov. Finally we carried out molecular phylogenetic analyses on a multi-marker dataset of 59 specimens and 35 species, including 14 species from the group. The resulting trees allow us to confirm the monophyly of the group of interest and provide a more detailed picture of their evolutionary relationships.

  11. Three cryptic species in Asecodes (Förster (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae parasitizing larvae of Galerucella spp. (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, including a new species

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    Christer Hansson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three morphologically very similar species of Asecodes Förster (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae are reviewed. Asecodes parviclava (Thomson is removed from synonymy under A. lucens stat. rev., and differentiated from A. lucens (Nees and A. lineophagum sp. n. All three species develop as gregarious endoparasitoids in larvae of Galerucella spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, but each species has its own unique host range. Asecodes lineophagum attacks only Galerucella lineola (Fabr. and A. lucens only G. sagittariae (Gyllenhal, whereas A. parviclava parasitizes G. tenella (L., G. calmariensis (L. and G. pusilla (Duftschmid. The Asecodes species are similar but display small though distinct morphological differences, and are distinguished also through molecular differences. The genetic distance in mitochondrial CO1 ranged from 2.3% to 7.3% between the species. Five names, one valid and four synonyms, were available for this group of species, but none of them was linked to a primary type. To promote stability of nomenclature, primary types are designated for all five names, neotypes for Eulophus lucens Nees, Entedon mento Walker and Derostenus parviclava Thomson, and lectotypes for Entedon chthonia Walker and Entedon metagenes Walker. Entedon mento, E. chthonia and E. metagenes remain synonymized under A. lucens.

  12. A checklist of seed-beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) from Iran.

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    Ghahari, Hassan; Borowiec, Lech

    2017-05-16

    The fauna of Iranian Bruchinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is summarized in this paper. In total 117 species from 14 genera (Spermophagus Schoenherr, Zabrotes Horn, Acanthobruchidius Borowiec, Acanthoscelides Schilsky, Bruchidius Schilsky, Callosobruchus Pic, Mimosestes Bridwell, Paleoacanthoscelides Borowiec, Palaeobruchidius Egorov, Specularius Bridwell, Stator Bridwell, Bruchus Linnaeus, Caryedon Schoenherr, Rhaebus Fischer von Waldheim) are listed as the fauna of Iran.

  13. World checklist of flea-beetles of the genus Epitrix (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieńkowski, Andrzej O; Orlova-Bienkowskaja, Marina J

    2017-05-18

    The world checklist of the genus Epitrix (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) is necessary, since many species of this genus are serious pests of potato and other Solanaceae, and since some species have been inadvertedly introduced from one continent to another and established. We have compiled the catalogue of all species described to date. There are 162 species and 11 subspecies in the world. The geographic distribution is indicated for each species.

  14. New genera and species of leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from China and South Korea

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    Two new genera from China (Taumaceroides Lopatin and Yunnaniata Lopatin) and 11 new species (Smaragdina quadrimaculata Lopatin, Smaragdina oblongum Lopatin, Hyphaenia volkovitshi Lopatin, Arthrotus daliensis Lopatin, Taumaceroides sinicus Lopatin, Yunnaniata konstantinovi Lopatin, Calomicrus yunnanu...

  15. Two new species of the genus Gonioctena Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Chrysomelinae) from Sichuan, China.

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    Cho, Hee-Wook; Borowiec, Lech

    2014-02-18

    Two new species of Gonioctena Chevrolat, G. sichuana sp. n. and G. metallica sp. n., are described from Sichuan Province, China. Diagnostic characters and illustrations are provided. Ovoviviparity is recorded in G. metallica sp. n.

  16. A chromosomal analysis of four species of Chilean Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae

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    Eduard Petitpierre

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Four species of Chilean leaf beetles in the subfamily Chrysomelinae have been cytogenetically analyzed, Blaptea elguetai Petitpierre, 2011, Henicotherus porteri Bréthes, 1929 and Jolivetia obscura (Philippi, 1864 show 2n = 28 chromosomes and a 13 + Xyp male meioformula, and Pataya nitida (Philippi, 1864 has the highest number of 2n = 38 chromosomes. The karyotype of H. porteri is made of mostly small meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and that of Jolivetia obscura displays striking procentric blocks of heterochromatin at pachytene autosomic bivalents using conventional staining. These findings are discussed in relation to previous cytogenetic data and current taxonomy of the subfamily.

  17. Analysis of some elements in three Chrysolina (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) species by EDXRF spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budak, G. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Science, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)]. E-mail: gbudak@atauni.edu.tr; Aslan, I. [Plant Protection Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Karabulut, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Science, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Tirasoglu, E. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    In this investigation, the concentration levels of potassium, calcium, iron, nickel and cadmium for three Chrysolina species were measured in the region of Erzurum (Turkey) located at latitude 40 deg. 17' north and longitude 41 deg. 17' east. The concentrations measured by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry were analysed. Photons of 59.5 keV and 5.9 keV emitted, respectively, by an annular {sup 241}Am and {sup 55}Fe radioactive source were used to excite the characteristic X-rays of various elements present in the insect samples. These results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  18. Patch colonization by Trirhabda canadensis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae): effects of plant species composition and wind.

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    Morrow, P A; Tonkyn, D W; Goldburg, R J

    1989-10-01

    The goldenrod leaf beetle, Trirhabda canadensis, is known to respond to odors of host and non-host species in the laboratory. Here we report movements of T. canadensis in the field in response to volatile odors from monocultures and polycultures of host plants. Overall, beetles preferentially colonized plots with a higher density of host plants and lower diversity of allelochemicals, but under some wind conditions there were marked exceptions. At high windspeeds, they colonized whichever plot(s) was upwind. At low windspeeds, beetles colonized preferred plots even when they were not upwind. The data suggest that odor dispersion varies in a complex way with windspeed: at low windspeeds beetles received information from a wide are of vegetation and made choices while at high windspeeds information was available only from upwind plot(s).

  19. A Comparative Assessment of the Response of Two Species of Cucumber Beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to Visual and Olfactory Cues and Prospects for Mass Trapping.

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    Piñero, Jaime C

    2018-04-09

    Spotted (Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardii) and striped (Acalymma vittatum) cucumber beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are serious pests of field-grown cucurbits in most areas of the United States where these crops are grown. This study aimed at quantifying, using a comparative approach, the behavioral response of A. vittatum and D. u. howardii to visual and olfactory cues associated with different trap types. In a first field study, Pherocon corn rootworm (CRW) traps baited with a 5-component floral-based lure (= AgBio lure) captured significantly more A. vittatum than traps baited with any other commercial lure. When used in combination with yellow sticky cards, the AgBio lure outperformed the other lures except for the Trécé lure TRE8274. Subsequent tests revealed that the response of both cucumber beetle species to the AgBio lure was positively associated with increases in the amount of lure used. In the last series of tests that involved color discrimination by the beetles, traps constructed using 3.8-liter jugs painted yellow outperformed the CRW trap. Results from on-farm research, conducted at a commercial vegetable farm, confirmed the beetles' visual preference for yellow, and also revealed an excellent performance of the mass trapping system, which kept cucumber beetle densities in the cash crop below economic thresholds. Combined findings indicate that the mass trapping system developed can be implemented as part of a broader IPM program aimed at managing cucumber beetles.

  20. Susceptibility of 32 elm species and hybrids (Ulmus spp.) to the elm leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) under field conditions in Arizona.

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    Bosu, Paul P; Miller, Fredric; Wagner, Michael R

    2007-12-01

    We evaluated elm leaf beetle, Pyrhalta luteola (Müller) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), defoliation of 32 elm species or hybrids (taxa) established under field conditions in Holbrook, AZ. Percentage of defoliation, number of eggs, and number of larvae were estimated on randomly selected 15-cm shoot lengths annually in July, from 1996 to 2001. The following nine taxa consistently sustained 15-46% mean overall defoliation: 1) Siberian elm, U. pumila L.; 2) 'Dropmore' elm, U. pumila; 3) 'Camperdownii' elm, U. glabra Huds.; 4) 'Regal' elm, U. glabra x U. carpinifolia Gledisch x U. pumila); 5) 'Sapporo Autumn Gold' elm (U. pumila x U. japonica Sang.); 6) 'New Horizon' elm (U. pumila x U. japonica); 7) 'Charisma' elm [(U. japonica x U. wilsoniana Schneid.) x (U. japonica x U. pumila)]; 8) 'W2115-1' elm (U. parvifolia Jacq. x U. procera Salisb.); and 9) 'Homestead' elm [(U. hollandica Mill. x U. carpinifolia) x (U. pumila-racemosa Dieck x U. carpinifolia)]. Percentage of defoliation was significantly low on four Chinese elm (U. parvifolia) cultivars ('Allee', 'Athena', 'Glory'/lace bark, and 'Kings Choice'). Percentage of defoliation was also low on seven Asian elms (including U. chemnoui Cheng, U. bergmaniana Sneid., U. szechuanica Fang, and species of the U. davidiana Planch. complex [U. davidiana, U. japonica, U. wilsoniana, and U. propinqua Koidz.]) and the American elm (U. americana L.) 'Valley Forge'. Percentage of defoliation and the number of eggs or larvae per plant were highly correlated. The results of this study are generally consistent with results of past laboratory screening trials.

  1. A model species for agricultural pest genomics: the genome of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

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    Schoville, Sean D; Chen, Yolanda H; Andersson, Martin N; Benoit, Joshua B; Bhandari, Anita; Bowsher, Julia H; Brevik, Kristian; Cappelle, Kaat; Chen, Mei-Ju M; Childers, Anna K; Childers, Christopher; Christiaens, Olivier; Clements, Justin; Didion, Elise M; Elpidina, Elena N; Engsontia, Patamarerk; Friedrich, Markus; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Gibbs, Richard A; Goswami, Chandan; Grapputo, Alessandro; Gruden, Kristina; Grynberg, Marcin; Henrissat, Bernard; Jennings, Emily C; Jones, Jeffery W; Kalsi, Megha; Khan, Sher A; Kumar, Abhishek; Li, Fei; Lombard, Vincent; Ma, Xingzhou; Martynov, Alexander; Miller, Nicholas J; Mitchell, Robert F; Munoz-Torres, Monica; Muszewska, Anna; Oppert, Brenda; Palli, Subba Reddy; Panfilio, Kristen A; Pauchet, Yannick; Perkin, Lindsey C; Petek, Marko; Poelchau, Monica F; Record, Éric; Rinehart, Joseph P; Robertson, Hugh M; Rosendale, Andrew J; Ruiz-Arroyo, Victor M; Smagghe, Guy; Szendrei, Zsofia; Thomas, Gregg W C; Torson, Alex S; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M; Weirauch, Matthew T; Yates, Ashley D; Yocum, George D; Yoon, June-Sun; Richards, Stephen

    2018-01-31

    The Colorado potato beetle is one of the most challenging agricultural pests to manage. It has shown a spectacular ability to adapt to a variety of solanaceaeous plants and variable climates during its global invasion, and, notably, to rapidly evolve insecticide resistance. To examine evidence of rapid evolutionary change, and to understand the genetic basis of herbivory and insecticide resistance, we tested for structural and functional genomic changes relative to other arthropod species using genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and community annotation. Two factors that might facilitate rapid evolutionary change include transposable elements, which comprise at least 17% of the genome and are rapidly evolving compared to other Coleoptera, and high levels of nucleotide diversity in rapidly growing pest populations. Adaptations to plant feeding are evident in gene expansions and differential expression of digestive enzymes in gut tissues, as well as expansions of gustatory receptors for bitter tasting. Surprisingly, the suite of genes involved in insecticide resistance is similar to other beetles. Finally, duplications in the RNAi pathway might explain why Leptinotarsa decemlineata has high sensitivity to dsRNA. The L. decemlineata genome provides opportunities to investigate a broad range of phenotypes and to develop sustainable methods to control this widely successful pest.

  2. Toxomerus duplicatus Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Syrphidae preying on Microtheca spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae larvae

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    VS Sturza

    Full Text Available Microtheca spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae are insect pests primarily related to Brassicaceae crops. In the State of Rio Grande do Sul (RS, southern Brazil, they are found on forage turnip, Raphanus sativus L. var. oleiferus Metzg., which is commonly grown during fall/winter seasons. This work reports the predation of Microtheca spp. larvae by Toxomerus duplicatus Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Syrphidae larvae, on forage turnip crop, in Santa Maria, RS. This register provides new information about Microtheca spp. natural enemies in Brazil, which might be a new option for integrate pest management of these species.

  3. Faunistic and Systematic Studies on the Subfamily Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) in Artvin, Erzincan and Erzurum Provinces of Turkey

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    ASLAN, İrfan; ÖZBEK, Hikmet

    2014-01-01

    This faunal and systematic study on the subfamily Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) is based on material collected from Artvin, Erzincan and Erzurum provinces during 1992-1996 and previous years. 34 species belonging to twelve genera were recorded. Among them, Chrysolina cuprina (Duftchimit), C. geminata (Paykul), C. hyrcana Weise, C. trapezicollis Bechyné and Timarcha hummeli Falderman are new records for Turkish fauna. Chrysomela collaris L., C. populi L., C. salceti (Weise) and Pl...

  4. Review of the West Indian genus Monotalla Bechyné (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae, Alticini) with description of five new species

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    Konstantinov, Alexander S.; Linzmeier, Adelita M.; Clark, Shawn M.; Ivie, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The West Indian genus Monotalla Bechyné is reviewed, redescribed and illustrated. Five new species are added: Monotalla dominica sp. n. (Dominica); Monotalla lecticofolia sp. n. (St. Lucia); Monotalla maierae sp. n. (St. Lucia); Monotalla obrienorum sp. n. (Grenada); and Monotalla viridis sp. n. (St. Lucia). A key to Monotalla species is provided. PMID:26052242

  5. A new species of the genus Ambrostoma Motschulsky (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Chrysomelinae) from South Korea, with larval descriptions and biological notes

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    Hee-Wook Cho; Lech Borowiec

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Ambrostoma koreana sp. n. is described from South Korea. Detailed descriptions and illustrations of adult and all larval instars are provided and differences to closely related species are discussed. Ovoviviparity is reported for the first time in the genus Ambrostoma . Notes on distribution, host plant and biology are also provided.

  6. A new species of the genus Ambrostoma Motschulsky (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Chrysomelinae from South Korea, with larval descriptions and biological notes

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    Hee-Wook Cho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Ambrostoma koreana sp. n. is described from South Korea. Detailed descriptions and illustrations of adult and all larval instars are provided and differences to closely related species are discussed. Ovoviviparity is reported for the first time in the genus Ambrostoma. Notes on distribution, host plant and biology are also provided.

  7. High-throughput biodiversity analysis: Rapid assessment of species richness and ecological interactions of Chrysomelidae (Coleoptera) in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Zurita, Jesús; Cardoso, Anabela; Coronado, Indiana; De la Cadena, Gissela; Jurado-Rivera, José A; Maes, Jean-Michel; Montelongo, Tinguaro; Nguyen, Dinh Thi; Papadopoulou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity assessment has been the focus of intense debate and conceptual and methodological advances in recent years. The cultural, academic and aesthetic impulses to recognise and catalogue the diversity in our surroundings, in this case of living objects, is furthermore propelled by the urgency of understanding that we may be responsible for a dramatic reduction of biodiversity, comparable in magnitude to geological mass extinctions. One of the most important advances in this attempt to characterise biodiversity has been incorporating DNA-based characters and molecular taxonomy tools to achieve faster and more efficient species delimitation and identification, even in hyperdiverse tropical biomes. In this assay we advocate for a broad understanding of Biodiversity as the inventory of species in a given environment, but also the diversity of their interactions, with both aspects being attainable using molecular markers and phylogenetic approaches. We exemplify the suitability and utility of this framework for large-scale biodiversity assessment with the results of our ongoing projects trying to characterise the communities of leaf beetles and their host plants in several tropical setups. Moreover, we propose that approaches similar to ours, establishing the inventories of two ecologically inter-related and species-rich groups of organisms, such as insect herbivores and their angiosperm host-plants, can serve as the foundational stone to anchor a comprehensive assessment of diversity, also in tropical environments, by subsequent addition of trophic levels.

  8. High-throughput biodiversity analysis: Rapid assessment of species richness and ecological interactions of Chrysomelidae (Coleoptera) in the tropics

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    Gómez-Zurita, Jesús; Cardoso, Anabela; Coronado, Indiana; De la Cadena, Gissela; Jurado-Rivera, José A.; Maes, Jean-Michel; Montelongo, Tinguaro; Nguyen, Dinh Thi; Papadopoulou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Biodiversity assessment has been the focus of intense debate and conceptual and methodological advances in recent years. The cultural, academic and aesthetic impulses to recognise and catalogue the diversity in our surroundings, in this case of living objects, is furthermore propelled by the urgency of understanding that we may be responsible for a dramatic reduction of biodiversity, comparable in magnitude to geological mass extinctions. One of the most important advances in this attempt to characterise biodiversity has been incorporating DNA-based characters and molecular taxonomy tools to achieve faster and more efficient species delimitation and identification, even in hyperdiverse tropical biomes. In this assay we advocate for a broad understanding of Biodiversity as the inventory of species in a given environment, but also the diversity of their interactions, with both aspects being attainable using molecular markers and phylogenetic approaches. We exemplify the suitability and utility of this framework for large-scale biodiversity assessment with the results of our ongoing projects trying to characterise the communities of leaf beetles and their host plants in several tropical setups. Moreover, we propose that approaches similar to ours, establishing the inventories of two ecologically inter-related and species-rich groups of organisms, such as insect herbivores and their angiosperm host-plants, can serve as the foundational stone to anchor a comprehensive assessment of diversity, also in tropical environments, by subsequent addition of trophic levels. PMID:27408583

  9. Host specialization and species richness of root-feeding chrysomelid larvae (Chrysomelidae, Coleoptera) in a New Guinea rain forest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokon, R.; Novotný, Vojtěch; Samuelson, G. A.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6, (2005), s. 595-604 ISSN 0266-4674 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6007106; GA MŠk 1P05ME744 Grant - others: Darwin Initiative for the Survival of Species(GB) 162/10/030; U.S. National Science Foundation(US) DEB-97-07928; U.S. National Science Foundation(US) DEB-02-11591 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : herbivore communities * insect-plant interactions * leaf beetles Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.013, year: 2005

  10. New records and species of Crepidodera Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Eocene European amber, with a brief review of described fossil beetles from Bitterfeld amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukejs, Andris; Biondi, Maurizio; Alekseev, Vitalii I

    2016-11-15

    Based on six relatively well-preserved specimens from Eocene Baltic amber, Crepidodera tertiotertiaria sp. nov. is described. The new species is illustrated and compared with morphologically similar extant and fossil relatives. It is the third described fossil species of Crepidodera Chevrolat. In addition to the new taxon, new fossil records of C. decolorata Nadein & Perkovsky from Baltic and Bitterfeld amber are presented. A key to species of Crepidodera described from fossil resins is provided, and a checklist of Coleoptera described from Bitterfeld amber is compiled.

  11. Bioacoustics of Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) on Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is an economically important pest of common bean Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabaceae) in the tropics and subtropics. It is difficult to detect the presence of A. obtectus because the larvae are cryptic and spend most of their developmental time...

  12. Selectivity of a biological control agent, Diorhabda carinulata Desbrochers, 1870 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) for host species within the genus Tamarix Linneaus, 1753

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.L. Dudley; D.W. Bean; R.R. Pattison; A. Caires

    2012-01-01

    Initial field releases of the saltcedar leaf beetle, Diorhabda carinulata Desbrochers, 1870 (Chrysomelidae), against saltcedars, Tamarix Linneaus, 1753 (Tamaricaceae) in North America were unsuccessful at sites where the target taxon was T. parviflora de Condolle, 1828 as opposed to the more widespread T....

  13. Exploring the Leaf Beetle Fauna (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of an Ecuadorian Mountain Forest Using DNA Barcoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Birthe; Ahrens, Dirk; Marín Armijos, Diego; Peters, Marcell K.; Wagner, Thomas; Wägele, Johann W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tropical mountain forests are hotspots of biodiversity hosting a huge but little known diversity of insects that is endangered by habitat destruction and climate change. Therefore, rapid assessment approaches of insect diversity are urgently needed to complement slower traditional taxonomic approaches. We empirically compare different DNA-based species delimitation approaches for a rapid biodiversity assessment of hyperdiverse leaf beetle assemblages along an elevational gradient in southern Ecuador and explore their effect on species richness estimates. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on a COI barcode data set of 674 leaf beetle specimens (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of 266 morphospecies from three sample sites in the Podocarpus National Park, we employed statistical parsimony analysis, distance-based clustering, GMYC- and PTP-modelling to delimit species-like units and compared them to morphology-based (parataxonomic) species identifications. The four different approaches for DNA-based species delimitation revealed highly similar numbers of molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) (n = 284–289). Estimated total species richness was considerably higher than the sampled amount, 414 for morphospecies (Chao2) and 469–481 for the different MOTU types. Assemblages at different elevational levels (1000 vs. 2000 m) had similar species numbers but a very distinct species composition for all delimitation methods. Most species were found only at one elevation while this turnover pattern was even more pronounced for DNA-based delimitation. Conclusions/Significance Given the high congruence of DNA-based delimitation results, probably due to the sampling structure, our study suggests that when applied to species communities on a regionally limited level with high amount of rare species (i.e. ~50% singletons), the choice of species delimitation method can be of minor relevance for assessing species numbers and turnover in tropical insect communities

  14. New species of Diabrotica Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae and a key to Diabrotica and related genera: results of a synopsis of North and Central American Diabrotica species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Derunkov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The following 18 new species of Diabrotica are described and illustrated as a result of the synopsis of North and Central American species: D. barclayi sp. nov., Guatemala; D. caveyi sp. nov., Costa Rica; D. costaricensis sp. nov., Costa Rica; D. dmitryogloblini sp. nov., Mexico; D. duckworthorum sp. nov., Honduras; D. hartjei sp. nov., Panama; D. josephbalyi sp. nov., Costa Rica; D. lawrencei sp. nov., Mexico; D. mantillerii sp. nov., Panama; D. martinjacobyi sp. nov., Honduras; D. mitteri sp. nov., Panama; D. perkinsi sp. nov., Guatemala; D. redfordae sp. nov., Costa Rica; D. reysmithi sp. nov., Costa Rica; D. salvadorensis sp. nov., El Salvador; D. sel sp. nov., Panama; D. spangleri sp. nov., Costa Rica; D. waltersi sp. nov., Panama. In addition, a key to separate Diabrotica from related genera is presented.

  15. Revision of the Gonioctena nivosa species-group (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Chrysomelinae) in the Holarctic region, with descriptions of two new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hee-Wook; Kippenberg, Horst; Borowiec, Lech

    2016-01-01

    The Gonioctena nivosa species-group of the genus Gonioctena Chevrolat, 1836 is defined and reviewed. It contains six species including two new to science: Gonioctena gracilicornis (Kraatz, 1879), Gonioctena nivosa (Suffrian, 1851), Gonioctena norvegica (Strand, 1936), Gonioctena springlovae (Bechyně, 1948), Gonioctena amurensis Cho & Borowiec, sp. n. and Gonioctena jani Cho & Borowiec, sp. n. Six new synonyms are proposed: Gonioctena nivosa (= Gonioctena arctica alberta Brown, 1952, syn. n., Phytodecta linnaeana bergrothi Jacobson, 1901, syn. n., Phytodecta linnaeanus var. mutatus Achard, 1924, syn. n., Phytodecta linnaeanus var. simplex Achard, 1924, syn. n. and Phytodecta nivosa var. cedehensis Ronchetti, 1922, syn. n.) and Gonioctena norvegica (= Gonioctena janovskii Medvedev, 1976, syn. n.). Phytodecta flavicornis var. limbatipennis Achard, 1924 and Phytodecta nivosa var. bicolor Heyden, 1883 are removed from synonymy with Gonioctena nivosa (Suffrian, 1851) and are synonymized with Gonioctena flavicornis (Suffrian, 1851). Distribution maps, a key to species, color variation, geographic variation of male genitalia and host plants are provided. Ovoviviparity is newly recorded in Gonioctena gracilicornis and Gonioctena nivosa. Lectotypes are designated for Gonioctena affinis, Gonioctena arctica, Gonioctena linnaeana bergrothi and Gonioctena nivosa.

  16. Population Development of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Landrace Bean Varieties Occurring in Southwestern Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, L M; Araújo, A E F; Santos, A C V; Santos, V B; Sousa, A H

    2016-02-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris (L.), is one of the most important sources of protein worldwide, and Latin America is one of the recognized centers of diversity of this species. However, storage of this product after harvest is not feasible because of bruchid attacks. This study determined the accumulated normalized rate of emergence and the daily emergence rate of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae:Bruchinae) in five landrace varieties of common bean (BRL 01, SNA 01, RDR 01, RBC 01, and RBC 13) that occurin southwestern Amazonia. These varieties were selected for this study because they are well-distributed throughout the Amazonian communities. Beans of each variety were infested with 50 unsexed adults, and the insects were removed 13 d after beginning the bioassays. The adult progeny obtained from the feeding substrate were counted and removed every other day after the first emergence, until the end of the emergence period. Differences were observed in the calculated rates of development; however, the time required for development and emergence of the insects was independent. Of the five varieties of bean investigated, we observed that the RDR 01, BRL 01, and SNA 01 cultivars are resistant to Z. subfasciatus; the results indicate that the use of these three varieties can reduce problems associated with bruchid attacks and enable storage of the product after harvesting.

  17. Biology and life history of Argopistes tsekooni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in China, a promising biological control agent of Chinese privet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y-Z Zhang; J. Sun; J.L. Hanula

    2009-01-01

    The biology and life history of Argopistes tsekooni Chen (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a potential biological control agent of Chinese privet, Ligustrum sinense Lour., was studied under laboratory and outdoor conditions in Huangshan City of Anhui Province, China, in 2006. A. tsekooni larvae are leafminers that...

  18. Book review: Leaf and Seed Beetles of South Carolina (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae and Orsodacnidae), by J. C. Ciegler

    Science.gov (United States)

    The book entitled Leaf and Seed Beetles of South Carolina (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae and Orsodacnidae), by J. C. Ciegler. (246 pages, 324 black and white illustrations, 8.5 “ x 11"; ISBN 0-9753471-8-7. Forty dollars, paperback. Biota of South Carolina. Volume 5. Clemson University, Clemson, S. ...

  19. Effects of starvation and mating status on the activity of the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oku, K.; Vermeer, K.M.C.A.; Verbaarschot, P.; Jong, de P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Flea beetles are characterized by their tendency to jump. They can also fly. First, the effects of starvation on flight activity in the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were determined. After starving P. nemorum for five days a greater number of individuals of both

  20. Release and distribution of Lilioceris cheni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of air potato (Dioscorea bulbilfera: Dioscoreaceae), in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    From 2012 to 2015, 429,668 Lilioceris cheni Gressit and Kimoto (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were released in Florida for biological control of air potato [Dioscorea bulbilfera L. (Dioscoreaceae)]. The spatial distribution of releases was highly aggregated, with several areas of high density releases ...

  1. Seasonality of Colaspis crinicornis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and its Injury Potential to Corn in Southeastern Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Kentaro; Meinke, Lance J

    2018-02-09

    Colaspis crinicornis Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) primarily occurs in the Great Plains, United States. Although C. crinicornis has historically been considered a non-pest and is rarely found in agricultural systems, population densities of this species have been increasing in corn, Zea mays L., and soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, over the last decade in southeastern Nebraska. As part of a comprehensive project to understand the life history and pest potential of C. crinicornis, a field study was conducted to: understand adult seasonality of C. crinicornis using emergence cages and whole-plant-count sampling in cornfields and sweep-net sampling in soybean fields; confirm voltinism and the overwintering stage; and evaluate the potential of larvae to cause economic injury to corn roots. Data indicate that C. crinicornis is univoltine in southeastern Nebraska and overwinters as medium-large larvae at least 20 cm deep in the soil. Adults were present from June through August with peak emergence in July. The C. crinicornis lifecycle is similar to related Colaspis species. Root injury to corn was minor at population densities encountered in the field, and therefore, C. crinicornis is unlikely to cause economic loss. C. crinicornis may be an example of an insect species that has exploited open niches in crops that have been created by changes in agricultural and pest management practices. The lifecycle and polyphagous nature of the insect, annual crop rotation, the shift to minimum tillage, and replacement of insecticides with Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) traits may have collectively facilitated establishment and increased survival in agroecosystems. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Jumping mechanisms and performance in beetles. I. Flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Alticini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadein, Konstantin; Betz, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    The present study analyses the anatomy, mechanics and functional morphology of the jumping apparatus, the performance and the kinematics of the natural jump of flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini). The kinematic parameters of the initial phase of the jump were calculated for five species from five genera (average values from minimum to maximum): acceleration 0.91-2.25 (×10(3)) m s(-2), velocity 1.48-2.80 m s(-1), time to take-off 1.35-2.25 ms, kinetic energy 2.43-16.5 µJ, G: -force 93-230. The jumping apparatus is localized in the hind legs and formed by the femur, tibia, femoro-tibial joint, modified metafemoral extensor tendon, extensor ligament, tibial flexor sclerite, and extensor and flexor muscles. The primary role of the metafemoral extensor tendon is seen in the formation of an increased attachment site for the extensor muscles. The rubber-like protein resilin was detected in the extensor ligament, i.e. a short, elastic element connecting the extensor tendon with the tibial base. The calculated specific joint power (max. 0.714 W g(-1)) of the femoro-tibial joint during the jumping movement and the fast full extension of the hind tibia (1-3 ms) suggest that jumping is performed via a catapult mechanism releasing energy that has beforehand been stored in the extensor ligament during its stretching by the extensor muscles. In addition, the morphology of the femoro-tibial joint suggests that the co-contraction of the flexor and the extensor muscles in the femur of the jumping leg is involved in this process. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. New contributions to the knowledge of Chinese flea beetle fauna (III): Revision of Meishania Chen & Wang with description of five new species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The flea beetle genus Meishania Chen & Wang is revised and five new species - M. cangshanensis sp. nov., M. flavipennis sp. nov., M. fulvotigera sp. nov., and M. sichuanica sp. nov. from China and M. bhutanensis sp. nov. from Bhutan - are described. All species of Meishania are illustrated and a key...

  4. Forgotten Aulacothorax Boheman, 1858, a senior synonym of Orthaltica Crotch, 1873 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A discovery of the holotype of Aulacothorax exilis Boheman, 1858 originally described in Scydmaeninae (Staphylinidae) in the collections of Naturhistoriska Riksmuseet Stockholm in Sweden revealed that this species is actually a leaf beetle (Chrysomelidae) belonging to a genus until now known as Orth...

  5. Host plant quality of Tamarix ramosissima and T. parviflora for three sibling species of the biocontrol insect Diorhabda elongata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalin, Peter; O'Neal, Melissa J; Dudley, Tom; Bean, Daniel W

    2009-10-01

    Several sibling species of the leaf beetle Diorhabda elongata (Brullé) have been introduced into North America for the biocontrol of saltcedars (Tamarix spp.), but only one, D. carinulata (Desbrochers), has been extensively used in the field. The first open releases took place in 2001, and widespread defoliation occurred at sites infested by Tamarix ramosissima, T. chinensis, and their hybrid forms. The beetles failed, however, to establish at sites where other Tamarix species are targeted for control. In this study, we compared the preference and performance of three Diorhabda sibling species using adult choice and larval performance experiments on the two formally targeted Tamarix species: T. ramosissima and T. parviflora. In the adult choice experiment, a greater proportion of D. carinulata was found on T. ramosissima than on T. parviflora. For the other two sibling species, D. elongata (Brullé) and D. carinata (Faldermann), adults were found in similar proportions on the two host plants. In the larval performance experiment, larval growth and survival did not differ between Tamarix species for any Diorhabda type; however, D. carinata larval biomass was 35-50% greater than the other beetles regardless of host species. Based on the few adults of D. carinulata found on T. parviflora in the adult choice experiment, we do not recommend introducing this beetle at sites where T. parviflora is targeted for biological control. The species D. carinata seems especially promising for future release because its larvae gained substantially more biomass than the other beetles during the same time period on both Tamarix species.

  6. A key to American genus Merobruchus Bridwell (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) with descriptions of species and two new host plant records for the subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfio, Daiara; Ribeiro-Costa, Cibele Stramare

    2016-02-09

    Merobruchus Bridwell is placed in the group Merobruchus of Acanthoscelidina (Bruchini) being distinguished from all bruchines mainly by the apical projections in the last abdominal ventrite of females and some males. All 25 species of Merobruchus are distributed in the New World, mainly in the Neotropical Region, feeding on seeds of Mimosoideae (Acacieae, Ingeae and Mimoseae). As well as some other bruchine genera, Merobruchus shows considerable morphological variation both in external and in internal (male genitalia) characters. Moreover, some species are very similar to each other in their colour and distribution pattern of pubescence on the dorsal surface, sometimes making species recognition difficult. Thus, the main objective of this paper is to provide a key including coloured illustrations for Merobruchus species to facilitate the process of identification and to avoid misunderstandings. Images of dorsal habitus, male and female pygidium and male genitalia are provided for all species. In addition, M. machadoi sp. nov. (Holotype male deposited in DZUP: Brazil, Rio Grande do Sul State) is described; M. bicoloripes (Pic) and M. pickeli (Pic) are redescribed; and a new synonymy is proposed: Pseudopachymerus pickeli Pic, 1927 = Pseudopachymerus pickeli var. subnotatus Pic, 1927 syn. nov. Two new host plants are recorded for Bruchinae: Parapiptadenia rigida (Benth.) Brenan (Mimosoideae) and Pterogyne nitens Tul. (Caesalpinioideae).

  7. A new species of the genus Ambrostoma Motschulsky (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Chrysomelinae) from South Korea, with larval descriptions and biological notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hee-Wook; Borowiec, Lech

    2013-01-01

    Ambrostoma koreana sp. n. is described from South Korea. Detailed descriptions and illustrations of adult and all larval instars are provided and differences to closely related species are discussed. Ovoviviparity is reported for the first time in the genus Ambrostoma. Notes on distribution, host plant and biology are also provided.

  8. The New World Gibbobruchus Pic (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae): description of a new species and phylogenetic insights into the evolution of host associations and biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfio, Daiara; Jorge, Isaac R; Morse, Geoffrey E; Ribeiro-Costa, Cibele S

    2016-04-18

    The seed beetle Gibbobruchus tridentatus Manfio, Jorge & Ribeiro-Costa sp. nov. is described from the Amazon basin in Brazil (Acre) and Ecuador (Napo), and is included in an updated key to the species of Gibbobruchus Pic. This new species and the recently described G. bergamini Manfio & Ribeiro-Costa are incorporated into a phylogenetic reanalysis of the genus and into a comparative analysis of host plant use and biogeography. Species groups previously proposed were supported and the evolutionary history in host plant-use shows Gibbobruchus conserved at tribe level, Cercideae (Caesalpinioideae), with coordination between biogeographic expansion and host genus shifts. Both species, Gibbobruchus tridentatus Manfio, Jorge & Ribeiro-Costa sp. nov. and G. bergamini, were placed within the group scurra (G. tridentatus (G. scurra (G. cavillator+G. bolivianus+G. bergamini))) and supported by one synapomorphy. Additionally, we update geographic distributions and host plant records. Two hosts, Bauhinia argentinensis Burkart and B. tarapotensis Benth. are recorded for the first time as hosts for the genus and for the subfamily.

  9. Hylax bahiensis Bechyné (Chrysomelidae: Eumolpinae): a New Potential Pest of Eucalyptus and Species Used for Atlantic Rainforest Restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafia, R G; da Silva, J B; Ramos, J F; Mafia, G V; Rosado-Neto, G H; Ferronatto, E M O

    2015-02-01

    Hylax bahiensis Bechyné (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a new pest of forest species, including eucalyptus (hybrid Eucalyptus urophylla x Eucalyptus grandis), Joannesia princeps, Mimosa artemisiana, Croton urucurana, Croton floribundus, and Senna multijuga is recorded. The insect attack in clonal eucalyptus plantations and in forest restoration areas between 2010 and 2013 in the states of Espírito Santo, Bahia and Minas Gerais, Brasil, was observed for the first time. The outbreaks generally occurred from September to March. This new potential pest can affect the growth, productivity, and quality of the trees. We recommended monitoring this leaf-eating beetle especially during the critical period of its occurrence.

  10. Effects of starvation and mating status on the activity of the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Oku, K.; Vermeer, K.M.C.A.; Verbaarschot, P.; Jong, de, P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Flea beetles are characterized by their tendency to jump. They can also fly. First, the effects of starvation on flight activity in the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were determined. After starving P. nemorum for five days a greater number of individuals of both sexes flew than when fed continuously for the same period. In addition, the effect of the mating status of females of P. nemorum on their movement was determined. Mated females were more active than v...

  11. Importance of Secondary Metabolites for Leaf Beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. EKİZ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae are one of the most diverse families of herbivorous insects. Many of them are important agricultural pests and cause remarkable loss of crop and money as well. Plant leaves and roots are primary food source of both larva and adults of leaf beetles. Plants produce many secondary metabolites in reaction to herbivore insects. It is a well-known phenomenon that quantity and variety of secondary metabolites in plant leaves may change in response to insect attacks. Herbivore insects have to deal with such defensive secondary chemicals and overcome either by detoxifying or storing them. Accordingly, many specialist herbivores coevolved with their host plant. Certain phenolic glycosides may reduce leaf beetle feeding. Condensed tannins are anti-herbivore defenses against leaf chewing beetles, including leaf beetles. Flavonoid compounds are feeding deterrents for many flea leaf beetles. Cinnamic acid derivatives are other known feeding deterrents for leaf beetles. Secondary metabolites quantity and nutritional quality of host plants are not only important for feeding but also for providing enemy-free space and suitable oviposition sites.

  12. Anatomical and nutritional factors associated with susceptibility of elms (Ulmus spp.) to the elm leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosu, Paul P; Wagner, Michael R

    2008-06-01

    A wide range of susceptibility exists across elm (Ulmus) species and hybrids to the elm leaf beetle, Pyrrhalta luteola (Müller) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). We evaluated various elm species, hybrids, or cultivars (taxa) growing in an experimental plantation in the city of Holbrook, AZ, for leaf anatomical (toughness and trichome density) and nutritional (minerals and sugars) traits that may be associated with host resistance. Leaf toughness and percentage of defoliation (susceptibility) were not correlated. However, we found weak negative correlations between percentage of defoliation and density of trichomes on the leaf abaxial surface. Of the 11 leaf nutrients examined, concentrations of iron and phosphorus correlated inversely with percentage of defoliation. The remaining nine traits did not show any correlation with percentage of defoliation. We concluded that individual anatomical and nutritional traits of elm species/hybrids do not seem to create a strong barrier to elm leaf beetle defoliation. However, the results from a stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that collectively, these traits may play an important role in determining susceptibility.

  13. Flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Alticinae collected by malaise trap method in Gölcük Natural Park (Isparta, Turkey, with a new record for Turkish fauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslan Gül E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on Alticinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae material collected by Malaise trapping which is different from other standardized collecting methods. A total of 19 flea beetle species belonging to 6 genera were collected from Gölcük Natural Park, Isparta (Turkey during 2009. The species are listed in a table together with distributional data in Turkey. Among them, Longitarsus curtus (Allard, 1860 is recorded for the first time in Turkey. L. monticola Kutschera, 1863 and L. curtus are recently separated synonyms and thus all data referring to the distribution of both species are currently important. Hence, the zoogeographical distribution of the new record is reviewed with some remarks; habitus and genitalia are illustrated.

  14. Leaf beetles are ant-nest beetles: the curious life of the juvenile stages of case-bearers (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cryptocephalinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrain, Federico A.; Buffington, Matthew L.; Chaboo, Caroline S.; Chamorro, Maria L.; Schöller, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although some species of Cryptocephalinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) have been documented with ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) for almost 200 years, information on this association is fragmentary. This contribution synthesizes extant literature and analysizes the data for biological patterns. Myrmecophily is more common in the tribe Clytrini than in Cryptocephalini, but not documented for Fulcidacini or the closely-related Lamprosomatinae. Myrmecophilous cryptocephalines (34 species in 14 genera) primarily live among formicine and myrmecines ants as hosts. These two ant lineages are putative sister-groups, with their root-node dated to between 77–90 mya. In the New World tropics, the relatively recent radiation of ants from moist forests to more xeric ecosystems might have propelled the association of cryptocephalines and ant nests. Literature records suggest that the defensive behavioral profile or chemical profile (or both) of these ants has been exploited by cryptocephalines. Another pattern appears to be that specialized natural enemies, especially parasitoid Hymenoptera, exploit cryptocephaline beetles inside the ant nests. With the extant data at hand, based on the minimum age of a fossil larva dated to 45 mya, we can infer that the origin of cryptocephaline myrmecophily could have arisen within the Upper Cretaceous or later. It remains unknown how many times myrmecophily has appeared, or how old is the behavior. This uncertainty is compounded by incongruent hypotheses about the origins of Chrysomelidae and angiosperm-associated lineages of cryptocephalines. Living with ants offers multiple advantages that might have aided the colonization of xeric environments by some cryptocephaline species. PMID:26798319

  15. Localized search cues in corn roots for western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernklau, E J; Bjostad, L B; Meihls, L N; Coudron, T A; Lim, E; Hibbard, B E

    2009-04-01

    Cues that elicit a characteristic localized search behavior by neonate larvae of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), were extracted from living corn, Zea mays L., roots with acetone. Larvae were exposed to corn roots or to an acetone extract of corn roots and then transferred into a bioassay arena where their movements were tracked and recorded. After a 5-min exposure to live corn roots, larvae produced highly convoluted tracks that were indicative of a localized search behavior, and these distinctive tracks were also produced by larvae exposed to an acetone extract of corn roots. Larvae exposed to a filter paper control moved in relatively straight paths that were indicative of ranging behavior. Larval tracks were recorded by means of a videocamera and tracking software, and four parameters of movement were used to quantify the tracks: mean turn angle, mean meander, total distance, and maximum distance from origin. For every parameter measured, tracks resulting from exposure to the control were significantly different from tracks resulting from exposure to live corn roots and to all doses of the corn root extract. In a separate experiment, larvae exposed to corn root pieces or corn root juice exhibited the localized search behavior, but larvae exposed to oat root pieces and oat root juice (nonhost) exhibited ranging behavior.

  16. Antixenosis in maize reduces feeding by western corn rootworm larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernklau, E J; Hibbard, B E; Bjostad, L B

    2010-12-01

    SUM2162 is the first known example of a naturally occurring maize, Zea mays L., genotype with antixenosis (nonpreference) resistance to western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), larval feeding. Behavioral responses of neonate western corn rootworm larvae were evaluated in laboratory bioassays with seven maize genotypes selected for native resistance to rootworm feeding damage. Two susceptible maize genotypes and one transgenic (Bacillus thuringiensis) maize genotype were included as controls. In soil bioassays with cut roots, no larvae entered the roots of the resistant variety SUM2162, but at least 75% of the larvae entered the roots of every other maize type. Larvae made significantly fewer feeding holes in the roots of SUM2162 than in all the other maize genotypes, except the isoline control. In feeding bioassays, larval feeding varied significantly among maize genotypes, but there was no significant difference between the resistant varieties and the susceptible controls. There were no significant differences among any of the genotypes in host recognition (search) behavior of larvae after exposure to the roots. Little variation in feeding stimulant blends was observed among maize genotypes, indicating minimal contribution to the observed antixenosis.

  17. Insecticide resistance status of Colorado potato beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) adults in northern Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Tian; Xiong, Man-Hui; Lu, Wei-Ping; Liu, Ping; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2010-08-01

    Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), has become the economically most important insect defoliator of potatoes, Solanum tuberosum L., in northern Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region in China. Currently, control of Colorado potato beetle relies mainly on chemical insecticides. And this may result in insecticide resistance. In this study, LD50 values were measured by a topical bioassay for 14 conventional insecticides in seven local populations from Urumqi, Changji, Tacheng, Nilka, Gongliu, Qapqal, and Tekes counties (cities). The Tekes field population was the most susceptible population and was selected as a reference strain. Compared with the Tekes strain, the Changji, Qapqal, Nilka, Tacheng, and Gongliu populations exhibited moderate to very high levels of resistance to cyhalothrin. The Qapqal and Changji populations showed a moderate and a very high resistance to deltamethrin, respectively. And the Changji population developed a high resistance against alpha-cypermethrin. Moreover, the Qapqal population had a moderate resistance to carbofuran, and the Urumqi population reached high level of resistance to endosulfan. Possible resistance mechanisms of the Changji and Qapqal populations were determined using three enzyme inhibitors. Triphenyl phosphate (TPP), diethylmeleate, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO) had little synergism to cyhalothrin in the two populations. In contrast, PBO and TPP exhibited some synergistic effects to carbofuran in the Qapqal population, indicating the involvement of monooxygenases and esterases in conferring carbofuran resistance. It seems that additional mechanisms, such as target site insensitivity, should play an important role in Colorado potato beetle resistances to cyhalothrin and carbofuran in northern Xinjiang local populations.

  18. Effects of Pyramided Bt Corn and Blended Refuges on Western Corn Rootworm and Northern Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keweshan, Ryan S; Head, Graham P; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2015-04-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, and the northern corn rootworm, Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), are major pests of corn (Zea mays L). Several transgenic corn events producing insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) kill corn rootworm larvae and reduce injury to corn roots. However, planting of Bt corn imposes selection on rootworm populations to evolve Bt resistance. The refuge strategy and pyramiding of multiple Bt toxins can delay resistance to Bt crops. In this study, we assessed the impact of four treatments--1) non-Bt corn, 2) Cry3Bb1 corn, 3) corn pyramided with Cry3Bb1 and Cry34/35Ab1, and 4) pyramided corn with a blended refuge--on survival, time of adult emergence, and size of western and northern corn rootworm. All treatments with Bt corn led to significant reductions in the number of adults that emerged per plot. However, at one location, we identified Cry3Bb1-resistant western corn rootworm. In some cases Bt treatments reduced size of adults and delayed time of adult emergence, with effects most pronounced for pyramided corn. For both species, the number of adults that emerged from pyramided corn with a blended refuge was significantly lower than expected, based solely on emergence from pure stands of pyramided corn and non-Bt corn. The results of this study indicate that pyramided corn with a blended refuge substantially reduces survival of both western and northern corn rootworm, and as such, should be a useful tool within the context of a broader integrated pest management strategy. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Identification of feeding stimulants in corn roots for western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernklau, E J; Bjostad, L B

    2008-04-01

    Using a bioassay-driven approach, we have isolated and identified a blend of compounds from the roots of germinating corn, Zea mays L., that serve as feeding stimulants for neonate western corn rootworm larvae, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). The active blend is a combination of simple sugars (30:4:4 mg/ml glucose:fructose:sucrose in the corn root) plus at least one of the free fatty acids in germinating corn roots (2:5 mg/ml oleic acid:linoleic acid in the corn root). When an extract of germinating corn was partitioned into an ethyl acetate fraction and an aqueous fraction, full feeding occurred only when the two fractions were recombined, indicating that the phagostimulant was comprised of both polar and nonpolar components. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of root extracts from germinating corn seedlings revealed a blend of 20 compounds from a variety of chemical classes, including small sugars, diacids, amino acids, inorganic compounds, and free fatty acids. When the major components were tested in feeding bioassays, the sugars and lipids were shown to be essential for feeding by larvae, but the two classes of compounds were only effective when combined. The sugars alone elicited feeding by only 40% of larvae, but the percentage of larvae feeding was increased significantly with the addition of linoleic acid (91.7% larvae feeding) or oleic acid (85.8% larvae feeding). The amino acids alone were not essential elements for feeding by western corn rootworm larvae.

  20. Effectiveness of corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) areawide pest management in South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, B Wade; Chandler, Laurence D; Riedell, Walter E

    2007-10-01

    Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence and Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are serious pests of maize, Zea mays L. To reduce the amount of toxicants released into the environment, the Agricultural Research Service implemented a 5-yr (1997-2001) areawide pest management program in five geographic locations, including one in South Dakota. The objective was to use integrated pest management tactics to suppress adult Diabrotica populations over a broad geographic area by using aerially applied semiochemical-baited insecticides. Suppressed populations theoretically should reduce oviposition, limit larval feeding damage to maize roots, and result in fewer beetles emerging in subsequent years. We used emergence cages, sticky traps, and CRW lure traps to monitor adult D. barberi and D. v. virgifera populations. We sampled for Diabrotica eggs, and we determined damage to maize roots. We sampled in several maize fields (control) located near the areawide site. The baited insecticides were effective in reducing adult populations 1 and 2 wk after application, and most remained low for the duration of the maize growing season. Fewer beetles were captured in both sticky and lure traps in the areawide site than in the control site. With a few exceptions, egg counts, adult emergence, and maize root damage were similar between the areawide and control sites; however, maize roots had greater fresh weight in the control site. Although not all goals were accomplished, when considering the amount of toxicant released into the environment, using semiochemical-baited insecticides to suppress adult pest Diabrotica populations seems to be an effective areawide management tool.

  1. Bioactivity of Six Plant Extracts on Adults of Demotispa neivai (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Luis C.; Plata-Rueda, Angelica; Zanuncio, José C.; Serrão, José E.

    2015-01-01

    Demotispa neivai Bondar (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) damage oil palm fruits, which makes it necessary to develop products to control this insect. The mortality, repellency, and antifeeding effects on adults of D. neivai of six plant extracts of Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (Sapindales: Meliaceae), Ricinus communis (L.) (Malpighiaes: Euphorbiaceae), Citrus sinensis Oesbek (Sapindales: Rutaceae), Nicotiana tabacum (L.) (Slanales: Solanaceae), Capsicum annuum (L.) (Solanales: Solanaceae), and Artemisia absinthium (L.) (Asterales: Asteraceae) were determined: 1) the lethal concentration LC50-90, lethal time of D. neivai was evaluated after spraying the fruits of oil palm; 2) repellent effects of each ingredient were evaluated by calculating the index of repellency; 3) antifeeding effects with the rate of inhibition calculated between doses of 20 and 24 g/liter. The mortality of D. neivai was higher with the extracts Ci. sinensis, R. communis, N. tabacum, and Ca. annuum. The mortality of D. neivai increased in the first 72 hr in all treatments. The extracts of N. tabacum, Ca. annuum, and A. indica were more repellent to D. neivai that those of Ci. sinensis, Ar. Absinthium, and R. communis. Antifeeding effect was higher with Ci. sinensis and R. communis. The increased mortality of D. neivai by Ci. sinensis can be explained by the effect of this compound on the respiratory system of insects. Extracts of Ci. sinensis, R. communis, N. tabacum, and Ca. annuum repelled and caused mortality of D. neivai and, thus, can be used in integrate pest management programs of this pest in oil palm plantations. PMID:25843587

  2. Characterization of Antibiosis to Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Brazilian Maize Landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Eduardo Neves; Nogueira, Luciano; de Souza, Bruno Henrique Sardinha; Ribeiro, Zulene Antônio; Louvandini, Helder; Zukoff, Sarah Natalie; Júnior, Arlindo Leal Boiça

    2018-02-09

    Resistance to insect pests can be found in several native, landrace plants and can be an important alternative to conventional control methods. Diabrotica speciosa (Germar) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) larvae are important maize (Zea mays L.) (Cyperales: Poaceae) root pests and finding native resistance in landraces would greatly contribute to maize-breeding programs aimed at controlling this pest. This study investigated whether the growth, survival, oviposition rhythm, fecundity, and fertility of D. speciosa are negatively influenced by specific maize landraces, and the existence of any morphological barriers in the roots that may correlate with plant resistance to the larval attack. Nineteen genotypes (17 landraces and 2 cultivars) were screened for antibiosis in assays that were conducted in the laboratory using seedling maize plants where the development time, longevity, weight, total survival, and sex ratio of adults were evaluated. Out of nineteen genotypes, eight were selected according to their resistance levels for an additional rearing study evaluating oviposition and fecundity. Landrace Pérola and cultivar SCS 154-Fortuna were classified as resistant because they increased the maturation period from larva to adult and decreased survivorship; and the landrace Palha Roxa was also classified as resistant for showing a lower fertility rate than other landraces. Resistant landraces that were infested by D. speciosa larvae showed greater amounts of some morphological barriers comparing with uninfested plants. The landraces classified as resistant may be considered in future plant-breeding programs, aiming to develop resistant maize cultivars to D. speciosa larval attack. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Origin of Pest Lineages of the Colorado Potato Beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Victor M; Chen, Yolanda H; Schoville, Sean D; Wang, Cong; Hawthorne, David J

    2018-04-02

    Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say [Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae]) is a pest of potato throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but little is known about the beetle's origins as a pest. We sampled the beetle from uncultivated Solanum host plants in Mexico, and from pest and non-pest populations in the United States and used mitochondrial DNA and nuclear loci to examine three hypotheses on the origin of the pest lineages: 1) the pest beetles originated from Mexican populations, 2) they descended from hybridization between previously divergent populations, or 3) they descended from populations that are native to the Plains states in the United States. Mitochondrial haplotypes of non-pest populations from Mexico and Arizona differed substantially from beetles collected from the southern plains and potato fields in the United States, indicating that beetles from Mexico and Arizona did not contribute to founding the pest lineages. Similar results were observed for AFLP and microsatellite data . In contrast, non-pest populations from the states of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Texas were genetically similar to U.S. pest populations, indicating that they contributed to the founding of the pest lineages. Most of the pest populations do not show a significant reduction in genetic diversity compared to the plains populations in the United States. We conclude that genetically heterogeneous beetle populations expanded onto potato from native Solanum hosts. This mode of host range expansion may have contributed to the abundant genetic diversity of contemporary populations, perhaps contributing to the rapid evolution of climate tolerance, host range, and insecticide resistance.

  4. Rhyparida foaensis (Jolivet, Verma & Mille, 2007, comb. n. (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae and implications for the colonization of New Caledonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Gomez-Zurita

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of external morphology of the New Caledonian leaf beetle Dematochroma foaensis Jolivet, Verma & Mille (Chrysomelidae, Eumolpinae, Colaspoidini substantiates its new combination into the genus Rhyparida Baly (Chrysomelidae, Eumolpinae, Nodinini. The species is redescribed here to highlight characters important for suprageneric diagnosis. This is the second species of Nodinini found in New Caledonia, otherwise rich in species of Colaspoidini, raising questions about the paucity of Rhyparida and this tribe in New Caledonian fauna, when they are dominant in surrounding archipelagoes, and very rich in potential source areas such as Australia and New Guinea. Some alternative explanations for this pattern are advanced, serving as alternative hypotheses until our knowledge on the ecology of these species improves or supported phylogenetic scenarios become available for this group.

  5. Transgenic Bt Corn, Soil Insecticide, and Insecticidal Seed Treatment Effects on Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Beetle Emergence, Larval Feeding Injury, and Corn Yield in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calles-Torrez, Veronica; Knodel, Janet J; Boetel, Mark A; Doetkott, Curt D; Podliska, Kellie K; Ransom, Joel K; Beauzay, Patrick; French, B Wade; Fuller, Billy W

    2018-02-09

    Northern, Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), and western, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), corn rootworms are economic pests of corn, Zea mays L. in North America. We measured the impacts of corn hybrids incorporated with Cry3Bb1, Cry34/35Ab1, and pyramided (Cry3Bb1 + Cry34/35Ab1) Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) proteins, tefluthrin soil insecticide, and clothianidin insecticidal seed treatment on beetle emergence, larval feeding injury, and corn yield at five locations from 2013 to 2015 in eastern North Dakota. In most cases, emergence was significantly lower in Bt-protected corn than in non-Bt corn hybrids. Exceptions included Wyndmere, ND (2013), where D. barberi emergence from Cry34/35Ab1 plots was not different from that in the non-Bt hybrid, and Arthur, ND (2013), where D. v. virgifera emergence from Cry3Bb1 plots did not differ from that in the non-Bt hybrid. Bt hybrids generally produced increased grain yield compared with non-Bt corn where rootworm densities were high, and larval root-feeding injury was consistently lower in Bt-protected plots than in non-Bt corn. The lowest overall feeding injury and emergence levels occurred in plots planted with the Cry3Bb1 + Cry34/35Ab1 hybrid. Time to 50% cumulative emergence of both species was 5-7 d later in Bt-protected than in non-Bt hybrids. Tefluthrin and clothianidin were mostly inconsequential in relation to beetle emergence and larval root injury. Our findings could suggest that some North Dakota populations could be in early stages of increased tolerance to some Bt toxins; however, Bt corn hybrids currently provide effective protection against rootworm injury in eastern North Dakota. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Lethal effect of blue light on strawberry leaf beetle, Galerucella grisescens (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Ayako

    2017-06-02

    In a previous study, we found that blue-light irradiation kills insects such as fruit flies, mosquitos, and flour beetles. However, the lethal effects of blue light on coleopteran field crop pests have not been investigated. Chrysomelidae, a major family in phytophagous beetles, includes many species of crop pests. We investigated the lethal effect of blue light on chrysomelid beetles by examining the mortality of the strawberry leaf beetle Galerucella grisescens irradiated with different wavelengths of blue light during the non-mobile egg or pupal stage by using light-emitting diodes. Fifty to seventy percent of beetles irradiated with 407, 417, 438, or 465-nm lights at 15 × 10 18 photons·m -2 ·s -1 during the egg stage died before hatching; ca. 90% of hatchlings irradiated with 438-nm light during the egg stage died before eclosion; and 35-55% of beetles irradiated with 407, 417, 454, and 465-nm lights at the same intensity during the pupal stage died before eclosion. Field crop pests are considered to have high tolerance to blue light because they are usually exposed to sunlight in their natural habitats. However, this study suggests that blue light can kill some field crop as well as household insect pests.

  7. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) with phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Yang, Hong; Dai, Renhuai

    2017-10-01

    Acanthoscelides obtectus is a common species of the subfamily Bruchinae and a worldwide-distributed seed-feeding beetle. The complete mitochondrial genome of A. obtectus is 16,130 bp in length with an A + T content of 76.4%. It contains a positive AT skew and a negative GC skew. The mitogenome of A. obtectus contains 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes and a non-coding region (D-loop). All PCGs start with an ATN codon, and seven (ND3, ATP6, COIII, ND3, ND4L, ND6, and Cytb) of them terminate with TAA, while the remaining five (COI, COII, ND1, ND4, and ND5) terminate with a single T, ATP8 terminates with TGA. Except tRNA Ser , the secondary structures of 21 tRNAs that can be folded into a typical clover-leaf structure were identified. The secondary structures of lrRNA and srRNA were also predicted in this study. There are six domains with 48 helices in lrRNA and three domains with 32 helices in srRNA. The control region of A. obtectus is 1354 bp in size with the highest A + T content (83.5%) in a mitochondrial gene. Thirteen PCGs in 19 species have been used to infer their phylogenetic relationships. Our results show that A. obtectus belongs to the family Chrysomelidae (subfamily-Bruchinae). This is the first study on phylogenetic analyses involving the mitochondrial genes of A. obtectus and could provide basic data for future studies of mitochondrial genome diversities and the evolution of related insect lineages.

  8. Catalog of known immature stages of Camptosomate leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cryptocephalinae and Lamprosomatinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack of syntheses of knowledge on immature stages of insects impedes accurate understanding of their diversity, biology and evolution. In Chrysomelidae, this information gap undermines basic explanations of this lineage’s radiation. Literature describing and discussing known immature stages of cas...

  9. Host range validation, molecular identification, and release and establishment of a Chinese biotype of the Asian leaf beetle Lilioceris cheni (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae:Criocerinae) for control of Dioscorea bulbifera L. in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioscorea bulbifera, an Asian vine, is invasive in the southeastern USA. It rarely flowers but propagates from potato-like bulbils formed in leaf axils, which persist into the subsequent growing season. Lilioceris cheni Gressitt and Kimoto, a foliage-feeding beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Crio...

  10. Comparative evaluation of development and reproductive capacity of two biotypes of Lilioceris cheni Gressitt and Kimoto (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of air potato (Dioscorea bulbifera L.) in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Chinese biotype of Lilioceris cheni Gressitt and Kimoto (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is being mass reared and released in Florida for control of the invasive vine, Dioscorea bulbifera L. (Dioscoreales). Another biotype from Nepal is under investigation to determine if its release would benefit the ...

  11. Modeling a western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), maturation delay and resistance evolution in Bt corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung Koo; Krupke, Christian H; Murphy, Alexzandra F; Spencer, Joseph L; Gray, Michael E; Onstad, David W

    2014-06-01

    Emergence delay and female-skewed sex ratios among adults of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Bt corn have been reported in field studies. The authors used a simulation model to study the effect of a maturation delay and a female-skewed sex ratio for D. v. virgifera emerging from Bt corn on the evolution of Bt resistance. The effect of skewed toxin mortality in one sex on evolution of Bt resistance was insignificant. An emergence delay among resistant beetles from Bt corn slowed resistance evolution. A shift in the time of emergence for homozygous susceptible beetles from Bt corn did not have a significant effect on the evolution of Bt resistance in D. v. virgifera. This simulation study suggested that skewed toxin mortality in one sex and an emergence delay for beetles in Bt corn are not major concerns for managing resistance by D. v. virgifera to single-toxin or pyramided Bt corn. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Effects of glyphosate on the non-target leaf beetle Cerotoma arcuata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in field and laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jardel L; Galdino, Tarcísio V S; Silva, Geverson A R; Picanço, Marcelo C; Silva, Antônio A; Corrêa, Alberto S; Martins, Júlio C

    2018-04-06

    This study aimed to assess the glyphosate application effects on the Cerotoma arcuata Oliver (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) population in glyphosate-resistant soybean crops. Field studies were conducted with glyphosate and the insecticide endosulfan to observe the effects of these pesticides on C. arcuata, on its damages in the crop and on the populations of natural enemies in glyphosate-resistant soybean crops. Moreover, the lethal and behavioral sublethal response of C. arcuata to glyphosate and endosulfan was conducted in the laboratory. The results of the field and laboratory experiments showed that glyphosate caused moderate toxicity and high irritability in C. arcuata and that endosulfan caused high toxicity and irritability. Therefore, the direct effect of glyphosate on C. arcuata was negative and does not explain the population increases of this pest in glyphosate-resistant soybean. However, the glyphosate also decreased the density of predators. Thus, the negative effect of glyphosate on the predators may be related to population increases of C. arcuata in glyphosate-resistant soybean crops, however, more studies are needed to better evidence this relationship. This study suggests that glyphosate can impact other non-target organisms, such as herbivorous insects and natural enemies and that the use of this herbicide will need to be carefully stewarded to prevent potential disturbances in beneficial insect communities in agricultural systems.

  13. Phenology and population dynamics of willow beetles (Coleoptera: chrysomelidae) in short-rotation coppiced willows at Long Ashton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The life cycles and phylogeny of three willow beetle pests, Phyllodecta vulgatissima, P. vitellinae and Galerucella lineola (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae), were investigated during 1994-95 in an experimental plantation of short-rotation coppiced willows (Salix viminalis Bowles Hybrid) at Pearces Farm, Long Ashton (Bristol), UK, Willow rods were sampled at regular intervals throughout the year and carefully search for eggs, larvae and adult beetles. An extensive survey was done in hedgerows around the site during February 1995 in order to identify the overwintering sites of adult beetles. In autumn 1995, hibernation trap-bands were used to study the onset of hibernation and the distribution of hibernating in the vicinity of the willow plantation. Adult flight activity was monitored each week throughout the year using window traps. Pot-grown willows were established in the field to augment observations on beetle behaviour in spring and autumn. Exclusion cages were used during the summer in an attempt to estimate the natural mortality of eggs larvae and pupae, but this technique had to be abandoned because all the cages were attacked and damaged by wasps. The fecundity of adult beetles and the development of eggs, larvae and pupae were measured in the laboratory under controlled environment conditions. (Author)

  14. Comparison of leaf beetle assemblages of deciduous trees canopies in Hungary (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, K; Markó, V

    2005-01-01

    The species richness and species composition of Coleoptera assemblages were investigated in deciduous tree canopies in Hungary. Apple and pear orchards were investigated in Nagykovácsi, Kecskemét and Sárospatak in 1990-94, and limes and maples in Keszthely in 1999-2002. Faunistic results and conclusions of these investigations were published elsewhere. Examination of the fauna of parks, avenues and other planted urban plant stocks has only begun to occupy researchers in the last decade in Hungary. The proportion of leaf-beetle species in the material gathered on maples and limes ranged between 17.0 and 21.3 per cent. The commonest leaf-beetle specimens collected in the lime canopy were Aphthona euphorbiae, Chaetocnema tibialis, Longitarsus lycopi, L. pellucidus, L. pratensis and L. succineus. The commonest on maple were Aphthona euphorbiae, Chaetocnema concinna, C. tibialis, Longitarsus lycopi, L. pellucidus, L. succineus, Phyllotreta cruciferae and P. vittula. This study presents the details on the composition of the chrysomelid communities that was compared by metric ordination using the Syntax 5.1 program.

  15. Impact of the nutrients N and K and soluble sugars on Diabrotica speciosa (Germar) (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) and Agrotis ipsilon (Hufnagel) (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) populations in potato crops, Solanum tuberosum L. (Solanaceae); Impacto dos nutrientes N e K e de acucares soluveis sobre populacoes de Diabrotica speciosa (Germar) (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) e Agrotis ipsilon (Hufnagel) (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) na cultura da batata, Solanum tuberosum L. (Solanaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeredo, Edson Henrique de [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Pinheiral, RJ (Brazil). Pro-Reitoria de Extensao], e-mail: edsonhenrique.azeredo@bol.com.br; Lima, Eduardo [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Agronomia. Dept. de Solos; Cassino, Paulo Cesar Rodrigues [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Centro Integrado de Manejo de Pragas C.R.G.

    2004-03-15

    Impact of the nutrients N and K and soluble sugars on Diabrotica speciosa (Germar) (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) and Agrotis ipsilon (Huefnagel) (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) populations in potato crops, Solanum tuberosum L. (Solanaceae). The occurrence of Diabrotica speciosa (Germar, 1824) and Agrotis ipsilon (Huefnagel, 1767) on the potato cultivars Achat and Monalisa, influenced by nitrogen and potassium dosage, and minimum quantity of soluble sugars, was studied. The following parameters were evaluated: concentration of mineral nutrient and sugar in green leaf, senescent leaf, leaf in abscission, stem, tubercle and total plant using extracts of infusion in ethanol 80%. The largest infestation of D. speciosa larvae was on Monalisa cultivar at 150 kg.ha{sup -1} of N + K with 27.03% at P< 0,05. It was observed that the effect of the dosage of N + K in the increment of the concentration of soluble sugars increased the damages in the tubercles and stems by A. ipsilon. The infestation by these species increased to 58.82% on the Monalisa cultivar, when the nitrogen dosage increased from zero to 150 kg.ha{sup -1}, in the absence of potassium. On the other hand, high dosage of K reduced the damages by A. ipsilon on Monalisa cultivar. However, it did not influence the storage of soluble sugar. The results indicated that in Achat cultivar the accumulated soluble sugar was reduced, probably sensitized by elevation of potassic fertilization dosing, differing from Monalisa cultivar, in which the influence was by nitrogen dosing. (author)

  16. A new species of Chaeridiona Baly (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae: Oncocephalini) infesting ginger Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) in India and redescription of Chaeridiona pseudometallica Basu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameem, K M; Prathapan, K D

    2014-06-17

    Chaeridiona mayuri n. sp. infesting ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) in southern India is described and illustrated. Cheilocostus speciosus ( J. Koenig) C. D. Specht, Globba sessiliflora Sims and Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith are reported as additional host plants. Chaeridiona pseudometallica Basu is redescribed and illustrated. A key to the species of Indian Chaeridiona is provided.

  17. Feeding by flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae; Phyllotreta spp.) is decreased on canola (Brassica napus) seedlings with increased trichome density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Juliana J; Holowachuk, Jennifer M; Gruber, Margaret Y; Grenkow, Larry F

    2011-02-01

    Laboratory and field studies were undertaken to determine the effects of increased numbers of trichomes on seedling stems, petioles, and first true leaves of Brassica napus L., canola, on the feeding and behavior of the crucifer flea beetle Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Seedlings of 'Westar' canola with genes inserted from Arabidopsis thaliana L. for increased trichome production, called Hairyl, were tested against Westar seedlings in no-choice and choice laboratory tests, and against parental plants and other cultivars grown from seed with and without insecticide in field trials at Saskatoon and Lethbridge, Canada. Analyses ofprefeeding and feeding behavior in no-choice tests of first true leaves found that flea beetles interacted with their host while off Hairyl leaves more so than beetles presented with leaves of Westar. Beetles required twice as much time to reach satiation when feeding on leaves with increased pubescence than on Westar leaves. In laboratory choice tests, flea beetles fed more on cotyledons and second true leaves of Westar than on comparable tissues of the transgenic line. In field trials, variations in feeding patterns were seen over time on cotyledons of the line with elevated trichomes. However, all four young true leaves of Hairyl seedlings were fed upon less than were the parental lines. Feeding on Hairyl plants frequently occurred at levels equal to or less than on cultivars grown from insecticide-treated seed. This study highlights the first host plant resistance trait developed in canola, dense pubescence, with a strong potential to deter feeding by crucifer flea beetles.

  18. Applying an integrated refuge to manage western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae): effects on survival, fitness, and selection pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L; Alves, Analiza P; Estes, Ronald E; Gray, Michael E; Meinke, Lance J; Shields, Elson J; Thompson, Stephen D; Tinsley, Nicholas A; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2013-10-01

    The refuge strategy can delay resistance of insect pests to transgenic maize producing toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). This is important for the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), because of its history of adaptation to several management practices. A 2-yr study across four locations was conducted to measure the effects of integrated refuge (i.e., blended refuge) on western corn rootworm survival to adulthood, fitness characteristics, and susceptibility to Bt maize in the subsequent generation. The treatments tested in this study were as follows: a pure stand of Bt maize (event DAS-59122-7, which produces Bt toxins Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1), a pure stand of refuge (non-Bt maize), and two variations on an integrated refuge consisting of 94.4% Bt maize and 5.6% non-Bt maize. Within the two integrated refuge treatments, refuge seeds received a neonicotinoid insecticidal seed treatment of either 1.25 mg clothianidin per kernel or 0.25 mg thiamethoxam per kernel. Insects in the pure stand refuge treatment had greater survival to adulthood and earlier emergence than in all other treatments. Although fecundity, longevity, and head capsule width were reduced in treatments containing Bt maize for some site by year combinations, Bt maize did not have a significant effect on these factors when testing data across all sites and years. We found no differences in susceptibility of larval progeny to Bt maize in bioassays using progeny of adults collected from the four treatments.

  19. Evaluation of management strategies for bean leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and Bean pod mottle virus (Comoviridae) in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Jeffrey D; Rice, Marlin E; Hill, John H

    2008-08-01

    Cerotoma trifurcata Förster (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and Bean pod mottle virus (Comoviridae) (BPMV) both can reduce yield and seed quality of soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr. Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of systemic, seed-applied, and foliar-applied insecticides for the management of this pest complex at three locations in central, northeastern, and northwestern Iowa during 2002-2004. Seed-applied insecticide was evaluated according to a currently recommended management program for Iowa (i.e., insecticide applications that target emerging overwintered beetles, F0, and the first seasonal generation, F1 ). The experimental treatments included seed-applied (thiamethoxam, 0.3-0.5 g [AI] kg(-1)] or clothianidin, 47.32 ml [AI] kg(-1)) and foliar-applied (A-cyhalothrin, 16.83-28.05 g [AI] ha(-1)) or esfenvalerate (43.74-54.69 g [AI] ha(-1)) insecticides. Applications of the foliar insecticides were timed to target F0, F1 or both F0 and F1 populations of C. trifurcata. Our results confirm that insecticides timed at F0 and F1 populations of C. trifurcata can reduce vector populations throughout the growing season, provide limited reduction in virus incidence, and improve both yield and seed coat color. Furthermore, seed-applied insecticides may be the more reliable option for an F0-targeted insecticide if used within this management strategy. An F0-targeted insecticide by itself only gave a yield improvement in one out of eight location-years. However, by adding an F1-targeted insecticide, there was a yield gain of 1.42-1.67 quintal ha(-1), based on contrast comparisons at three location-years.

  20. Impact of planting dates and insecticide strategies for managing crucifer flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in spring-planted canola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knodel, Janet J; Olson, Denise L; Hanson, Bryan K; Henson, Robert A

    2008-06-01

    Integration of cultural practices, such as planting date with insecticide-based strategies, was investigated to determine best management strategy for flea beetles (Phyllotreta spp.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in canola (Brassica napus L.). We studied the effect of two spring planting dates of B. napus and different insecticide-based management strategies on the feeding injury caused by fleabeetles in North Dakota during 2002-2003. Adult beetle peak emergence usually coincided with the emergence of the early planted canola, and this resulted in greater feeding injury in the early planted canola than later planted canola. Use of late-planted canola may have limited potential for cultural control of flea beetle, because late-planted canola is at risk for yield loss due to heat stress during flowering. Flea beetle injury ratings declined when 1) the high rate of insecticide seed treatment plus a foliar insecticide applied 21 d after planting was used, 2) the high rate of insecticide seed treatment only was used, or 3) two foliar insecticide sprays were applied. These insecticide strategies provided better protection than the low rates of insecticide seed treatments or a single foliar spray, especially in areas with moderate-to-high flea beetle populations. The foliar spray on top of the seed treatment controlled later-emerging flea beetles as the seed treatment residual was diminishing and the crop became vulnerable to feeding injury. The best insecticide strategy for management of flea beetle was the high rate of insecticide seed treatment plus a foliar insecticide applied at 21 d after planting, regardless of planting date.

  1. Bioactivity of Novel Botanical Insecticide From Gnidia kaussiana (Thymeleaceae) Against Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Stored Vigna subterranea (Fabaceae) Grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosini, D; Nukenine, E N

    2017-01-01

    Hexane, acetone, and methanol extracts from Gnidia kaussiana Meisn (Thymeleaceae), each at two dosages (0.2 and 1 ml/50 g grains corresponding, respectively to 1 and 5g/kg), and neem seed oil (NSO), used as standard insecticide were evaluated for repellence, toxicity to Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) adults, F1 progeny inhibition, persistence and as grain protectant during storage. Experiments were laid out at complete randomized design with five replications for repellence test and four for others. All the extracts were effective in protecting stored Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdcourt) from insect attack; however, their bioactivities were inversely correlated with solvent polarity. No adult survival was recorded in treated grains with hexane extract at 5 g/kg dosage within 2 d exposure. Also at 5 g/kg, all extracts hindered adults emergence, grain damage and weight loss after 4 months storage. Moreover, hexane extract was more repellent and exhibited averagely repellency. The insecticidal effectiveness of hexane extract did not decreased provided that the exposure time of insects to the product was high (7 d). The potency of acetone and methanol extracts decreased with storage time, although not linearly and remained significantly toxic to C. maculatus up to 60 d of storage. Therefore, hexane and acetone extracts are good candidates for incorporation in integrated pest management programs for control of cowpea weevils in stored grains by poor-resourced farmers and store keepers in Cameroon and other developing countries. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  2. Inheritance and Fitness Costs of Resistance to Cry3Bb1 Corn by Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, David A; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic crops that produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely planted to manage pest insects. One of the primary pests targeted by Bt corn in the United States is western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Cry3Bb1 corn for management of western corn rootworm was commercialized in 2003, and beginning in 2009, populations of western corn rootworm with field-evolved resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn were found in Iowa. Here we quantify the magnitude, inheritance, and fitness costs of resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn in two strains (Hopkinton and Cresco) derived from field populations that evolved resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn. For Hopkinton, we found evidence for complete resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn and nonrecessive inheritance. Additionally, no fitness costs of Cry3Bb1 resistance were detected for Hopkinton. For Cresco, resistance was incomplete and recessive, and we detected fitness costs affecting developmental rate, survival to adulthood, and fecundity. These results suggest that variation may exist among field populations in both the inheritance and accompanying fitness costs of resistance. To the extent that field populations exhibit nonrecessive inheritance and a lack of fitness cost, this will favor more rapid evolution of resistance than would be expected when resistance is functionally recessive and is accompanied by fitness costs. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The Role of Leaf Volatiles of Ludwigia octovalvis (Jacq.) Raven in the Attraction of Altica cyanea (Weber) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Saubhik; Karmakar, Amarnath; Mukherjee, Abhishek; Barik, Anandamay

    2017-07-01

    Larvae and adults of Altica cyanea (Weber) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) feed on the rice-field weed Ludwigia octovalvis (Jacq.) Raven (Onagraceae), commonly known as willow primrose, which is considered a biocontrol agent of the weed. Volatile organic compounds from undamaged plants, plants after 4, 12, and 36 h of continuous feeding by A. cyanea larvae or adult females and after mechanical damaging were identified by GC-MS and GC-FID analyses. Twenty nine compounds were identified from undamaged plants. 2Z-Penten-1-ol, geraniol, and 1-tridecanol were present in all plants damaged by larvae. In contrast, feeding by adults caused the release of 2Z-penten-1-ol only after 12 and 36 h; whereas geraniol and 1-tridecanol appeared only after 36 h. Farnesyl acetone was detected after 12 and 36 h of feeding by larvae and after 36 h of feeding by adults. Farnesene was detected after 36 h of feeding by larvae and adults. Linalool was unique after 36 h of feeding by larvae. In Y-shaped glass tube olfactometer bioassays, A. cyanea females were attracted to volatiles after 36 h of feeding by larvae or adults compared to volatiles released by undamaged plants. The insects were attracted to five synthetic compounds: 3-hexanol, α-pinene, linalool oxide, geraniol, and phytol. Synthetic blends were more attractive than individual compounds. Compared to undamaged plants, volatiles released by plants, damaged by conspecific individuals, were more attractive to A. cyanea females, due to elevated emissions of 3-hexanol, α-pinene, linalool oxide, geraniol, and phytol.

  4. A novel bacterial symbiont association in the hispid beetle, Octodonta nipae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), their dynamics and phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Habib; Muhammad, Abrar; Islam, Saif Ul; Islam, Waqar; Hou, Youming

    2018-03-27

    The hispid leaf beetle, Octodonta nipae (Maulik), (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a devastating pest of palm cultivation worldwide. Endosymbiotic bacteria in the genus Wolbachia are arguably one of the most abundant bacterial group associated with arthropods. Owing to its critical effects on host reproduction, Wolbachia has garnered much attention as a prospective future tool for insect pest management. However, their association, infection dynamics, and functionality remain unknown in this insect pest. Here, we diagnosis for the first time, the infection prevalence, and occurrence of Wolbachia in O. nipae. Experimental evidence by the exploration of wsp gene vindicate that O. nipae is naturally infected with bacterial symbiont of genus Wolbachia, showing a complete maternal inheritance with shared a common Wolbachia strain (wNip). Moreover, MLST (gatB, fbpA, coxA, ftsZ, and hcpA) analysis enabled the detections of new sequence type (ST-484), suggesting a particular genotypic association of O. nipae and Wolbachia. Subsequently, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay demonstrated variable infection density across different life stages (eggs, larvae, pupae and adult male and female), body parts (head, thorax, abdomen), and tissues (ovaries, testes, and guts). Infection density was higher in egg and female adult stage, as well as abdomen and reproductive tissues as compared to other samples. Interestingly, Wolbachia harbored dominantly in a female than the male adult, while, no significant differences were observed between male and female body parts and tissues. Phylogeny of Wolbachia infection associated with O. nipae rectified from all tested life stages were unique and fall within the same monophyletic supergroup-A of Wolbachia clades. The infection density of symbiont is among the valuable tool to understand their biological influence on hosts, and this latest discovery would facilitate the future investigations to understand the host-symbiont complications and

  5. Faunistic patterns of leaf beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) within elevational and temporal gradients in Sierra de San Carlos, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Reyes, Uriel Jeshua; Niño-Maldonado, Santiago; Barrientos-Lozano, Ludivina; Clark, Shawn M; Jones, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    The study of biodiversity of Chrysomelidae in Mexico and its variation within ecological gradients has increased recently, although important areas in the country remain to be explored. We conducted a faunistic inventory and analyzed the elevational and temporal variation of leaf beetle communities in the Sierra de San Carlos, in the state of Tamaulipas, in northeastern Mexico. This is an area with high to extreme priority for conservation, and due to its insular geographical position and to the vegetational communities present, it must be considered as a sky island. We selected seven sample sites distributed in different elevations within three localities, and comprising different vegetational communities. At each site, we randomly delimited 12 sample plots of 400 m(2) where sampling was conducted by entomological sweep netting and collecting directly by hand. Sampling was conducted monthly at each plot, for a total of 1,008 samples between February 2013 and January 2014. By the end of the study, we had obtained a total of 3,081 specimens belonging to six subfamilies, 65 genera, and 113 species, with Trichaltica scabricula (Crotch, 1873) being recorded for first time in Mexico. Species richness was less than the values observed at other studies conducted in the same region, which is attributed to differences in the number of plant species and to the insular location of Sierra de San Carlos; however, the higher diversity values suggest a higher quality of natural resources and vegetational communities. No consistent pattern of leaf beetle communities was correlated with elevation, although higher values of species richness and diversity were obtained at the highest elevation site. The seasonal gradient showed that the rainy season is most favorable for leaf beetle communities. We found that species composition was different between sites and months, and also that there exists a significant association between the abundance obtained at each site and particular

  6. Faunistic patterns of leaf beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) within elevational and temporal gradients in Sierra de San Carlos, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Reyes, Uriel Jeshua; Niño-Maldonado, Santiago; Barrientos-Lozano, Ludivina; Clark, Shawn M.; Jones, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study of biodiversity of Chrysomelidae in Mexico and its variation within ecological gradients has increased recently, although important areas in the country remain to be explored. We conducted a faunistic inventory and analyzed the elevational and temporal variation of leaf beetle communities in the Sierra de San Carlos, in the state of Tamaulipas, in northeastern Mexico. This is an area with high to extreme priority for conservation, and due to its insular geographical position and to the vegetational communities present, it must be considered as a sky island. We selected seven sample sites distributed in different elevations within three localities, and comprising different vegetational communities. At each site, we randomly delimited 12 sample plots of 400 m2 where sampling was conducted by entomological sweep netting and collecting directly by hand. Sampling was conducted monthly at each plot, for a total of 1,008 samples between February 2013 and January 2014. By the end of the study, we had obtained a total of 3,081 specimens belonging to six subfamilies, 65 genera, and 113 species, with Trichaltica scabricula (Crotch, 1873) being recorded for first time in Mexico. Species richness was less than the values observed at other studies conducted in the same region, which is attributed to differences in the number of plant species and to the insular location of Sierra de San Carlos; however, the higher diversity values suggest a higher quality of natural resources and vegetational communities. No consistent pattern of leaf beetle communities was correlated with elevation, although higher values of species richness and diversity were obtained at the highest elevation site. The seasonal gradient showed that the rainy season is most favorable for leaf beetle communities. We found that species composition was different between sites and months, and also that there exists a significant association between the abundance obtained at each site and

  7. DANOS CAUSADOS POR LARVAS E ADULTOS DE DIABROTICA SPECIOSA (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE EM MILHO DAMAGES CAUSED BY LARVAE AND ADULTS OF DIABROTICA SPECIOSA (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE IN CORN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GILBERTO BATISTA CASTOR MARQUES

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available A espécie Diabrotica speciosa (Germar, 1824 é, tradicionalmente, na fase adulta, uma praga polífaga, embora apresente certa preferência por folhas do feijoeiro e soja. Entretanto, nos últimos anos, a fase de larva deste crisomelídeo adquiriu o status de praga, à semelhança de outras espécies do mesmo gênero nos EUA, causando consideráveis danos ao sistema radicular do milho. O objetivo da pesquisa foi avaliar os danos causados por diferentes níveis populacionais de larvas de D. speciosa às raízes de milho, e, pelos adultos às folhas de milho, soja, feijoeiro e arroz. Desde as menores densidades populacionais de larvas, houve redução significativa no peso seco das raízes do milho, peso seco da parte aérea e na altura das plantas em relação à testemunha. Constatou-se que o nível de controle está aquém de 40 larvas por planta. Os adultos tiveram significativa preferência por folhas do feijoeiro e soja, sendo o milho e o arroz menos consumidos.Diabrotica speciosa (Germar, 1824 is traditionally a polyphagous pest during the adult phase although with some preference for bean and soybean leaves. In the past years, however, the larval phase of this chrysomelid achieved the pest status likewise other species of the genus in the USA causing severe damages to the root system of corn. The aim of this research was to evaluate the damages caused by different population levels of D. speciosa to corn roots and by adults to corn, soybean, bean and rice leaves. A significant decrease in the dry weight of corn roots, in the dry weight of the upper part, and in plant height in comparison with the control plant was observed even in small larvae population densities. The economic threshold level was less than 40 larvae per plant. The adults had significant preference for bean and soybean leaves while corn and rice were less consumed.

  8. Ação inseticida do extrato de Derris amazonica Killip para Cerotoma arcuatus Olivier (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae Insecticide action of the extract of Derris amazonica Killip for Cerotoma arcuatus Olivier (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Rodrigo Alecio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A abundância e o potencial inseticida de Derris amazonica e a necessidade de controle de Cerotoma arcuatus Olivier (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae na cultura do feijão-caupi (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp estimularam a realização desta pesquisa, que objetivou avaliar a ação inseticida do extrato de D. amazonica a adultos de C. arcuatus em condições de laboratório. Os bioensaios testaram as vias de intoxicação por ingestão de folhas contaminadas, contato com superfície contaminada e aplicação tópica, com delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado, com quatro repetições. Os valores de mortalidade e consumo foliar dos insetos foram submetidos à análise de regressão, sendo utilizada a análise de Probit para determinação das CL50, da DL50 e dos TL50. O extrato de D. amazonica, contendo 3,7% de rotenona, foi tóxico para adultos de C. arcuatus via ingestão de folhas contaminadas (CL50=15,14 µL do extrato.mL-1 de água, superfície contaminada (CL50=0,45 µL do extrato.cm-2 e aplicação tópica (DL50=1,44 µL do extrato.g-1 do inseto. Mortalidades de adultos de C. arcuatus superiores a 80% e os menores tempos letais médios foram obtidos na concentração de 5% (v v-1 do extrato em todos os bioensaios. O consumo foliar de adultos de C. arcuatus foi inversamente proporcional a concentração do extrato quando expostos por via de ingestão foliar ou aplicação tópica, sendo inclusive observada inibição da alimentação dos indivíduos. O extrato de D. amazonica é tóxico para C. arcuatus e inibe a alimentação dos insetos a partir da concentração de 1% (v v-1.The abundance and insecticidal potential of Derris amazonica in addition to need of controlling Cerotoma arcuatus for bean crop stimulated this research. The objective of this work was to evaluate insecticide action of the extract of D. amazonica to adults of C. arcuatus in laboratory conditions. The bioassays were carried out using three distend methodologies: leaf

  9. Diversity of Alticinae in Oaxaca, Mexico: A preliminary study (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, David G

    2013-01-01

    This is a preliminary study of the diversity of the Flea Beetles (Alticinae) of the Mexican state of Oaxaca based on fieldwork by the author in 1991, 1997, and 2010, the literature, and specimens in several institutional collections. The number of genera and species for Mexico as well as for Oaxaca increased significantly from previous studies. There are now 625 species in 90 genera recorded from Mexico with 275 species in 68 genera recorded from Oaxaca. There are 113 species known only from the state of Oaxaca and another 38 species known only from Oaxaca and the surrounding states. Oaxaca has a relatively high diversity as well as a high percentage of endemism. This study also demonstrates the effects of how even a small amount of fieldwork together with extracting specimen data from institutional collections can significantly increase the total faunistic and diversity knowledge of an area. A complete list of the genera and species known from Oaxaca is included.

  10. Diversity of Alticinae in Oaxaca, Mexico: A preliminary study (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This is a preliminary study of the diversity of the Flea Beetles (Alticinae) of the Mexican state of Oaxaca based on fieldwork by the author in 1991, 1997, and 2010, the literature, and specimens in several institutional collections. The number of genera and species for Mexico as well as for Oaxaca increased significantly from previous studies. There are now 625 species in 90 genera recorded from Mexico with 275 species in 68 genera recorded from Oaxaca. There are 113 species known only from the state of Oaxaca and another 38 species known only from Oaxaca and the surrounding states. Oaxaca has a relatively high diversity as well as a high percentage of endemism. This study also demonstrates the effects of how even a small amount of fieldwork together with extracting specimen data from institutional collections can significantly increase the total faunistic and diversity knowledge of an area. A complete list of the genera and species known from Oaxaca is included. PMID:24163579

  11. Two new species of South American Glaresidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, M J

    2016-08-24

    Two new species of South American Glaresidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) are described: Glaresis smithi Paulsen, new species from Argentina, and Glaresis mondacai Paulsen, new species from Chile and Peru. The species are compared to their closest congener, Glaresis fritzi Martínez et al., and a key is provided for the known South American species of the genus Glaresis Erichson.

  12. Allenaltica, a new genus of flea beetles from the Oriental Region (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini

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    Kaniyarikkal D. Prathapan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A new genus of flea beetles (Allenaltica gen. nov. with a new species, Allenaltica flavicornis, sp. nov. from the Philippine Islands (Mindanao is described, illustrated and compared with related genera.

  13. Consequências da alimentação em espécies de Solanum (SOLANACEAE) para o tamanho, a forma e a performance de dois cassidíneos (COLEOPTERA, CHRYSOMELIDAE)

    OpenAIRE

    Danessa Schardong Boligon

    2012-01-01

    A variedade de plantas hospedeiras e suas características, bem como a digestão e assimilação dos seus nutrientes por parte dos insetos herbívoros compreendem mecanismos pré- e pós-ingestivos centrais para a interpretação de fenômenos da história de vida dos insetos. Metriona elatior (Klug, 1829) e Gratiana spadicea (Klug, 1829) (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae) têm diferente comportamento alimentar; a primeira é considerada oligófaga e ocorre sobre algumas espécies de Solanum e, a segun...

  14. The genus Ivalia Jacoby 1887 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) of the mount Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following new species of Ivalia Jacoby 1887 are described from the mount Kinabalu (Sabah, Malaysia): I. besar, I. biasa, I. fulvomaculata, I. haruka, I. marginata, I. minutissima, I. nigrofasciata, I. pseudostriolata, I. rubrorbiculata, I. striolata. Chabria kinabalensis Bryant 1938 is transferr...

  15. The genus Ivalia Jacoby 1887 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini of the mount Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia

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    Haruo Takizawa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The following new species of Ivalia Jacoby 1887 are described from the mount Kinabalu (Sabah, Malaysia: Ivalia besar sp. nov., I. biasa sp. nov., I. fulvomaculata sp. nov., I. haruka sp. nov., I. marginata sp. nov., I. minutissima sp. nov., I. nigrofasciata sp. nov., I. pseudostriolata sp. nov., I. rubrorbiculata sp. nov., I. striolata sp. nov..

  16. Andersonoplatus, a new, remarkable, leaf litter inhabiting genus of Monoplatina (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersonoplatus, new genus with 16 new species from Venezuela and Panama is described and illustrated. All the specimens are collected in leaf litter by R. Anderson and S. and J. Peck. Andersonoplatus is compared to Andersonaltica Linzmeier and Konstantinov, Apleuraltica Bechyne, Distigmoptera Blake...

  17. Cryptocephaline Egg Case Provides Incomplete Protection from Generalist Predators (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae

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    Matthias Schöller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The egg case of Cryptocephalus rufipes (Goeze is described and illustrated. In laboratory trials, eggs of field-collected C. rufipes were observed for larval emergence (untreated control or exposed to two species of generalist predators, Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens or Xylocoris flavipes (Reuter in no-choice experiments. The behaviour of the predators upon contact with the C. rufipes eggs was observed. The number of hatching larvae was counted and compared. In the presence of each of the two species of predators, larval emergence was significantly reduced. Eggs that were not protected by an egg case were completely consumed by the predators. C. rufipes eggs were therefore incompletely protected from the studied generalist predators. This is the first study showing experimentally the protective function of cryptocephaline egg case.

  18. A comprehensive guide to the Argentinian case-bearer beetle fauna (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Camptosomata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrain, Federico A.; Chamorro, Maria Lourdes; Cabrera, Nora; Sassi, Davide; Roig-Juñent, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge of Argentinian Camptosomata has largely remained static for the last 60 years since the last publication by Francisco de Asis Monrós in the 1950’s. One hundred and ninety Camptosomata species (182 Cryptocephalinae and 8 Lamprosomatinae) in 31 genera are recorded herein from Argentina. Illustrated diagnostic keys to the subfamilies, tribes, subtribes and genera of Argentinian Camptosomata, plus species checklists and illustrations for all genera of camptosomatan beetles cited for each political region of Argentina are provided. General notes on the taxonomy and distribution, as well as basic statistics, are also included. This study provides basic information about the Camptosomata fauna in Argentina that will facilitate in the accurate generic-level identification of this group and aid subsequent taxonomic revisions, and phylogenetic, ecological, and biogeographic studies. This information will also facilitate faunistic comparisons between neighboring countries. Two nomenclatural acts are proposed: Temnodachrys (Temnodachrys) argentina (Guérin, 1952), comb. n., and Metallactus bivitticollis (Jacoby, 1907), comb. n. The following are new records for Argentina: Stegnocephala xanthopyga (Suffrian, 1863) and Lamprosoma azureum Germar, 1824. Currently, the most diverse camptosomate tribe in Argentina is Clytrini, with almost twice the number of species of Cryptocephalini. New records for Argentina are predicted. PMID:28769688

  19. Paracrossidius radekcervenkai (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae), a new species from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červenka, Radek; Nakládal, Oto

    2017-05-18

    A new species of Paracrossidius Balthasar, 1932 (Coleoptera Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae) from China is described and compared with similar species. Paracrossidius was originally described as a monotypic subgenus based on the type species Aphodius (Paracrossidius) instigator Balthasar, 1932 from Sichuan Province, China. Paracrossidius is currently considered a genus with 10 previously described species, most of which inhabit various parts of China (Dellacasa et al. 2016).

  20. Trials on the Timing of Chemical Control of Lentil weevil, Bruchus lentis Frӧlich (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae in Lentil Field in Gachsaran Region (Iran

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    K. Saeidi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The lentil weevil, Bruchus lentis Frӧlich, (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae is the most serious pest of lentil in Iran. Economic losses due to this pest reach up to 40% of the lentil crop. Over a two-year study (2012 and 2013 in Agricultural Research Station of Gachsaran Region, best timing of chemical control of B. lentis was determined. A field experiment with cultivation of lentil Sina variety Lens culinaris Medik was conducted in a randomized complete block design with five treatments and three replications. The treatments consisted of spraying four times (respectively, during the early flowering, 10 days after the first spraying, 10 days after the second spraying; 10 days after the third spraying and control (without spraying. For the spraying from Endosulfan insecticide EC50% at ratio one liter per hectare was used. Three samples were taken from the pods and totally 150 pods from each replicate for contaminations of seeds were investigated. After the determination of the percent of seeds contamination, results were statistically analysed. Based on the results obtained, first spray treatment, with the mean contamination of 15.45% and second spray treatment with the mean contamination of 12.25% had the highest impact on reducing contamination lentil seeds to B. lentis and between them there was no statistically significant difference and were in one group. Therefore, spraying one time during the early flowering until 15 days after it was the best time to control of B. lentis.

  1. Multiple endo-beta-1,4-glucanases present in the gut fluid of a defoliating beetle, Podontia quatuordecimpunctata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammad Mosleh; Chowdhury, Md Mahmudul Hasan; Mojumder, Suman; Dwaipayan, Sikdar

    2012-04-01

    Endo-beta-1, 4-glucanase (EC 3.2.1.4) activity was measured in the gut fluid of phytophagous insect Podontia quatuordecimpunctata Linnaeus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in different days of development. The eight day-old larva showed maximum activity with 1.73 U mg(-1) of protein, which was confirmed by gel zymography. In zymogram, using Carboxymethyl Cellulose (CMC) as substrate, four distinct cellulolytic protein bands were detected in leaf borer gut fluids through out of its development. The optimum temperature and pH were 60 degrees C and 5.0, respectively. This endo-beta-1,4-glucanase showed maximum stability at 20-45 degrees C with approximately 20% remaining activity. Zymography also showed complete loss of endo-beta-1,4 glucanase activity at 55 degrees C. This is the first report that the cellulolytic enzyme is produced in the gut of P. quatuordecimpunctata through the whole developmental stages, from the 1st instar to the adult, except for pupae.

  2. Evolution of host utilization patterns in the seed beetle genus Mimosestes Bridwell (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Toshihide; Bonet, Arturo; Yoshitake, Hiraku; Romero-Nápoles, Jesús; Jinbo, Utsugi; Ito, Motomi; Shimada, Masakazu

    2010-06-01

    The evolutionary history of diet breadth expansion and intergeneric host shifts in the seed beetle genus Mimosestes were reconstructed to investigate the process of host range expansion in phytophagous insects. The evolutionary correlation between diet breadth and variation in oviposition behavior of Mimosestes was also examined to estimate the process of generalist evolution within the genus. Ancestral state reconstruction based on a molecular phylogeny inferred from three mitochondrial markers (16S rRNA, 12S rRNA, and COI) and one nuclear marker (EF-1alpha) revealed that host utilization patterns were shaped by repeated colonizations to novel or pre-adapted host plants. Neither plant genus and species group level host conservatism nor an evolutionary tendency toward specialization was found in the genus, contrary to the expectations of plant-insect co-evolutionary theory. In addition, statistical analyses revealed that diet breadth was significantly correlated with oviposition behavior, suggesting that behavioral factors such as the oviposition preferences of female seed beetles affect the expansion of diet breadth in generalists. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Karyotype, heterochromatin distribution and meiosis of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Bohemann) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Ronan X.; Santos, Igor S.; Silva, Janisete G.; Costa, Marco A.; Pompolo, Silvia G.

    2008-01-01

    Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boh.) has been extensively studied in its agronomic and biochemical aspects due to its importance as a damaging insect to leguminous grains during storage. The few cytogenetic studies published on this species yielded conflicting results. In this study, the karyotype was analyzed in order to accurately describe the chromosome C-banding patterns and meiosis. The brain ganglion at the pre pupa and the adult and pupal testes were analyzed. All individuals had 26 chromosomes in both brain ganglion and spermatogonic mitotic metaphases. These chromosomes were classified as follows: the 12 th pair and the Y chromosome were telocentric; the X chromosome was acrocentric; the 4 th and 5 th pairs were sub metacentric; and the remaining pairs were all metacentric. One of the members of the 5 th pair presented a secondary constriction. All chromosomes presented pericentromeric heterochromatin. The large arms of the pairs 5, 9 and X presented heterochromatin. The X chromosome showed to be heteropyknotic throughout the prophase of the fi rst meiotic division. The sub phases of prophase I were atypical and meiosis II was rarely identified. Testes of all males showed a few cells; the bivalents were rod-like shaped in metaphase I. Karyological formulae were 2n = 24 + XX in females and 2n = 24 + XYp and either n = 12 + X or n = 12 + Y in males. (author)

  4. Karyotype, heterochromatin distribution and meiosis of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Bohemann) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Ronan X.; Santos, Igor S.; Silva, Janisete G.; Costa, Marco A. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas; Pompolo, Silvia G. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Geral

    2008-09-15

    Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boh.) has been extensively studied in its agronomic and biochemical aspects due to its importance as a damaging insect to leguminous grains during storage. The few cytogenetic studies published on this species yielded conflicting results. In this study, the karyotype was analyzed in order to accurately describe the chromosome C-banding patterns and meiosis. The brain ganglion at the pre pupa and the adult and pupal testes were analyzed. All individuals had 26 chromosomes in both brain ganglion and spermatogonic mitotic metaphases. These chromosomes were classified as follows: the 12{sup th} pair and the Y chromosome were telocentric; the X chromosome was acrocentric; the 4{sup th} and 5{sup th} pairs were sub metacentric; and the remaining pairs were all metacentric. One of the members of the 5{sup th} pair presented a secondary constriction. All chromosomes presented pericentromeric heterochromatin. The large arms of the pairs 5, 9 and X presented heterochromatin. The X chromosome showed to be heteropyknotic throughout the prophase of the fi rst meiotic division. The sub phases of prophase I were atypical and meiosis II was rarely identified. Testes of all males showed a few cells; the bivalents were rod-like shaped in metaphase I. Karyological formulae were 2n = 24 + XX in females and 2n = 24 + XYp and either n = 12 + X or n = 12 + Y in males. (author)

  5. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerols as Host Recognition Cues for Western Corn Rootworm Larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernklau, E J; Hibbard, B E; Dick, D L; Rithner, C D; Bjostad, L B

    2015-04-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) was identified as a host recognition cue for larvae of the western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. An active glycolipid fraction obtained from an extract of germinating maize roots was isolated with thin layer chromatography using a bioassay-driven approach. When analyzed with LC-MS (positive ion scanning), the assay-active spot was found to contain four different MGDG species: 18:3-18:3 (1,2-dilinolenoyl), 18:2-18:3 (1-linoleoyl, 2-linolenoyl), 18:2-18:2 (1,2-dilinoleoyl), and 18:2-16:0 (1-linoleoyl, 2-palmitoyl). A polar fraction was also needed for activity. When combined with a polar fraction containing a blend of sugars (glucose:fructose:sucrose:myoinositol), the isolated MGDG elicited a unique tight-turning behavior by neonate western corn rootworm larvae that is indicative of host recognition. In behavioral bioassays where disks treated with the active blend were exposed to successive sets of rootworm larvae, the activity of MGDG increased over four exposures, suggesting that larvae may be responding to compounds produced after enzymatic breakdown of MGDG. In subsequent tests with synthetic blends composed of theoretical MGDG-breakdown products, larval responses to four synthetic blends were not significantly different (P<0.5) than the response to isolated MGDG. GC-MS analysis showed modest increases in the amounts of the 16:0, 18:0, and 18:3 free fatty acids released from MGDG after a 30-min exposure to rootworm larvae, which is consistent with the enzymatic breakdown hypothesis. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. A REVISION OF THE PACHNEPHORUS FROM THE AFROTROPICAL REGION (COLEOPTERA, CHRYSOMELIDAE

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    Stefano Zoia

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A revision of the genus Pachnephorus Chevrolat, 1837 from the Afrotropical Region is given and a key to the species is provided. Types of all the previously known taxa have been studied and redescribed; 40 new taxa are described and illustrated: P. achardi n. sp. (Mali, P. aequatorianus n. sp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. aethiopicus n. sp. (Etiopia, P. baehri n. sp. (Namibia, P. balyi n. sp. (Angola, P. beharui n. sp. (Etiopia, P. bertiae n. sp. (Madagascar, P. bezdeki n. sp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. bracarumvestitus n. sp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. bryanti n. sp. (Mali, P. burgeoni n. sp. (Natal, P. camerun­ensis n. sp. (Camerun, P. cristiani n. sp. (Namibia, P. crocodilinus n. sp. (Zambia, P. daccordii n. sp. (Yemen, P. danielssoni n. sp. (Sierra Leone, P. danielssoni congoanus n. ssp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. demeyeri n. sp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. episternalis n. sp. (Madagascar, P. fabianae n. sp. (Congo, P. fasciatus occidentalis n. ssp. (Nigeria, P. gardinii n. sp. (Etiopia, P. gerstaeckeri n. sp. (Namibia, P. grobbelaarae n. sp. (South Africa, P. hajeki n. sp. (Madagascar, P. lopatini n. sp. (Senegal, P. malicus n. sp. (Mali, P. maroantsetranus n. sp. (Madagascar, P. medvedevi n. sp. (Zambia, P. mo­seykoi n. sp. (Chad, P. pacificus n. sp. (Central Afr. Rep., P. parentorum n. sp. (Ghana, P. poggii n. sp. (Somalia, P. regalini n. sp. (Zambia, P. rigatoi n. sp. (Kenya, P. sas­sii n. sp. (Guinea Bissau, P. shuteae n. sp. (Rep. South Africa, P. sprecherae n. sp. (Madagascar, P. uhligi n. sp. (Namibia, P. willersi n. sp. (Namibia. The lectoypes of P. conspersus Gerstaecker, 1871, P. senegalensis Achard, 1914, P. latior Pic, 1921 and P. testaceipes Fairmaire, 1880 are designated. A new synonymy (P. costatus Achard, 1914 n. syn. of P. torridus Baly, 1878 and a nomenclatural change (Mecistes lineatus (Pic, 1921 n. comb. for Pachnephorus lineatus Pic, 1921 are proposed; the Lectotypes of M. lineatus and of M. flavipes (Gerstaecker, 1855 are designated.

  7. Adult Diapause in Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Hodek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies dealing with adult (reproductive diapause in the Coleoptera are reviewed, as a kind of supplement to the classic compendia. In the first two sections, the general characteristics of adult diapause are described and principal terms explained. Original articles dealing with 19 species from nine coleopteran families (Coccinellidae, Chrysomelidae, Bruchidae, Curculionidae, Carabidae, Silphidae, Scolytidae, Scarabaeidae, and Endomychidae are reviewed. Finally attempts are made at generalisations from the papers reviewed, and hypotheses on diapause evolution are inferred. A polyphenic character of diapause is a prominent feature in C. septempunctata and L. decemlineata, but has been found also in other Coleoptera and in insects generally and often generates voltinism heterogeneity within populations.

  8. A new species of Larinus Dejean (Coleoptera: Curculionidae from China

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    Levent Gültekin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on specimens in the Natural History Museum (London, a new species of the genus Larinus Dejan, 1821 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Lixinae, Larinus barclayi sp. nov., is described from China. The new species is assigned to the subgenus Phyllonomeus Gistel, 1856, compared with closely related species, and colour digital photographs of morphological characters are presented.

  9. Biology and phenology of three leaf beetle species (Chrysomelidae) in a montane forest in southeast Brazil*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinte, Vivian; Hentz, Ethel; Morgado, Barbara Mascarenhas; Lima, Anne Caruliny do Monte; Khattar, Gabriel; Monteiro, Ricardo Ferreira; de Macedo, Margarete Valverde

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The population phenology of the cassidines, Coptocycla arcuata and Omaspides trichroa, and the chrysomeline, Platyphora axillaris, was studied at Serra dos Órgãos National Park, State of Rio de Janeiro, southeast Brazil. Monthly surveys of larvae and adults were conducted between 2008 and 2011 at approximately 1000 m altitude on their respective host plants, Cordia polycephala (Boraginaceae), Ipomoea philomega (Convolvulaceae) and Solanum scuticum (Solanaceae). This is the first observation of larviparity and host record for Platyphora axillaris. Although having different life history traits, all species showed similar phenologies. They were abundant from October to March, months of high temperatures and intense rainfall, with two distinct reproductive peaks in the same season. Abundance dropped abruptly during the coldest and driest months, from May to August. Frequently none of these species were recorded during June and July. This phenological pattern is similar to other Chrysomelidae living in subtropical areas of Brazil. Temperature and rainfall appear to be the major factors influencing the fluctuation of these three species. PMID:26798318

  10. Two new species of Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorani, J

    2015-01-01

    The Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of the Indian region is rich and highly speciose, with nearly 90 described species and scores of undescribed species (Poorani 2002). There is a dire need to systematically revise the genera and species of this tribe from the Indian region. Due to paucity of representative collections covering the entire region and lack of access to types, it is difficult to identify most of the Scymnini of the Indian region to species. As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed. Two economically important and unique species of Scymnini (Coccinellidae) belonging to Horniolus Weise (1900) and Scymnus (Pullus) Mulsant (1846) from the Southern Indian state of Karnataka that have remained unnamed for long are treated in this paper. These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified. Horniolussororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species.

  11. Incidence, Spread and Mechanisms of Pyrethroid Resistance in European Populations of the Cabbage Stem Flea Beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae.

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    Dorte H Højland

    Full Text Available Cabbage stem flea beetle (CSFB, Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae is a major early season pest of oilseed rape throughout Europe. Pyrethroids have been used for controlling this pest by foliar application, but in recent years control failures have occurred, particularly in Germany due to the evolution of knock-down resistance (kdr. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence and spread of pyrethroid resistance in CSFB collected in Germany, Denmark and the United Kingdom during 2014. The level of pyrethroid resistance was measured in adult vial tests and linked to the presence of kdr genotypes.Although kdr (L1014F genotypes are present in all three countries, marked differences in pyrethroid efficacy were found in adult vial tests. Whereas Danish CSFB samples were in general susceptible to recommended label rates, those collected in the UK mostly resist such rates to some extent. Moderately resistant and susceptible samples were found in Germany. Interestingly, some of the resistant samples from the UK did not carry the kdr allele, which is in contrast to German CSFB. Pre-treatment with PBO, prior to exposure to λ-cyhalothrin suggested involvement of metabolic resistance in UK samples.Danish samples were mostly susceptible with very low resistance ratios, while most other samples showed reduced sensitivity in varying degrees. Likewise, there was a clear difference in the presence of the kdr mutation between the three countries. In the UK, the presence of kdr genotypes did not always correlate well with resistant phenotypes. This appears to be primarily conferred by a yet undisclosed, metabolic-based mechanism. Nevertheless our survey disclosed an alarming trend concerning the incidence and spread of CSFB resistance to pyrethroids, which is likely to have negative impacts on oilseed production in affected regions due to the lack of alternative modes of action for resistance management purposes.

  12. Evaluation of damage caused by Bruchus pisorum L (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae on some parameters related to seed quality of pea forage cultivars (Pisum sativum L.

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    Ivelina Nikolova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It was evaluated the damage caused by Bruchus pisorum L (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae on the germination ability of pea farage varieties (Pisum sativum L.. Result of damage by Bruchus pisorum in seeds with parasitized larva was significant decrease of the germination by 16.4% percentage points, the length and weight of primary radicle by 16.8 and 24.5%, the length and weight of plumule by 12.3 and 14.1%, the vigor index of primary radicle and plumule by 32.5 and 32.8% as well as the germination index by 17.4%. The inhibitory effect was on average 17.8%. Essential significant changes in regard to the studied parameters were found for damaged seeds with bruchid emergence hole. In these seeds the gewrmination decrease by 58.3% percentage points, the length and weight of primary radicle by 34.1 and 36.2%, the length and weight of plumule by 31.8 and 34.3%, the vigor index of primary radicle and plumule by 81.1 and 82.1% as well as the germination index by 83.1%. The inhibitory effect was on average 58.3%. It was found that the damaged seeds with parasitoid emergence hole provided better possibility for growth and development of plants whereas the damaged seeds with bruchid emergence hole had significantly low germination, vigor and sowing characteristics. These seeds could not provide the establishment of well-garnished stand and stable yields. As tolerant to damage by Bruchus pisorum was distinguished Glyans variety for which the values of parameters related to germination and vigor of seeds were influenced in the lowest degree from the damage unlike the sensitive Pleven 4 variety. Dominant factor influencing germination ability of seeds for all analyzed parameters was the type of seeds compared to varietal appurtenance.

  13. Long-chain alkanes and fatty acids from Ludwigia octovalvis weed leaf surface waxes as short-range attractant and ovipositional stimulant to Altica cyanea (Weber) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, S; Sarkar, N; Barik, A

    2017-06-01

    The importance of leaf surface wax compounds from the rice-field weed Ludwigia octovalvis (Jacq.) Raven (Onagraceae) was determined in the flea beetle Altica cyanea (Weber) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Extraction, thin layer chromatography and GC-MS and GC-FID analyses of surface waxes of young, mature and senescent leaves revealed 20, 19 and 19 n-alkanes between n-C15 and n-C35, respectively; whereas 14, 14 and 12 free fatty acids between C12:0 and C22:0 fatty acids were identified in young, mature and senescent leaves, respectively. Tricosane was predominant n-alkane in young and mature leaves, whilst eicosane predominated in senescent leaves. Heneicosanoic acid, palmitic acid and docosanoic acid were the most abundant free fatty acids in young, mature and senescent leaves, respectively. A. cyanea females showed attraction to 0.25 mature leaf equivalent surface waxes compared with young or senescent leaves in a short glass Y-tube olfactometer bioassay. The insects were attracted to a synthetic blend of 0.90, 1.86, 1.83, 1.95, 0.50 and 0.18 µg ml-1 petroleum ether of hexadecane, octadecane, eicosane, tricosane, palmitic acid and alpha-linolenic acid, respectively, comparable with the proportions as present in 0.25 mature leaf equivalent surface waxes. A. cyanea also laid eggs on a filter paper moistened with 0.25 mature leaf equivalent surface waxes or a synthetic blend of 0.90, 1.86, 1.83, 1.95, 0.50 and 0.18 µg ml-1 petroleum ether of hexadecane, octadecane, eicosane, tricosane, palmitic acid and alpha-linolenic acid, respectively. This finding could provide a basis for monitoring of the potential biocontrol agent in the field.

  14. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping of Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Host Plant Resistance in Two Populations of Doubled Haploid Lines in Maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Martin O; Marroquin, Juan J; Flint-Garcia, Sherry; Dashiell, Kenton; Willmot, David B; Hibbard, Bruce E

    2018-02-09

    Over the last 70 yr, more than 12,000 maize accessions have been screened for their level of resistance to western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (LeConte; Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), larval feeding. Less than 1% of this germplasm was selected for initiating recurrent selection or other breeding programs. Selected genotypes were mostly characterized by large root systems and superior root regrowth after root damage caused by western corn rootworm larvae. However, no hybrids claiming native (i.e., host plant) resistance to western corn rootworm larval feeding are currently commercially available. We investigated the genetic basis of western corn rootworm resistance in maize materials with improved levels of resistance using linkage disequilibrium mapping approaches. Two populations of topcrossed doubled haploid maize lines (DHLs) derived from crosses between resistant and susceptible maize lines were evaluated for their level of resistance in three to four different environments. For each DHL topcross an average root damage score was estimated and used for quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. We found genomic regions contributing to western corn rootworm resistance on all maize chromosomes, except for chromosome 4. Models fitting all QTL simultaneously explained about 30 to 50% of the genotypic variance for root damage scores in both mapping populations. Our findings confirm the complex genetic structure of host plant resistance against western corn rootworm larval feeding in maize. Interestingly, three of these QTL regions also carry genes involved in ascorbate biosynthesis, a key compound we hypothesize is involved in the expression of western corn rootworm resistance. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A NOVEL CADHERIN-LIKE GENE FROM WESTERN CORN ROOTWORM, DIABROTICA VIRGIFERA VIRGIFERA (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE), LARVAL MIDGUT TISSUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cadherin-like gene and its mRNA were cloned from western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera: Coleoptera), an economically important agricultural pest in North America and Europe. The full length cDNA (5371 bp in length) encodes an open reading frame for a 1688 amino ...

  16. A new species of Xylotrechus Chevrolat from China (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shulin; Yang, Weicheng

    2017-01-01

    Xylotrechus tristisfacies sp. n. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae, Clytini) from China is described and illustrated. Characters distinguishing the new species from its close relatives, which possess an entirely black or dark brown pronotum with a black median stripe on the disc and dense yellowish to gray pubescent elytra with black or brown spots or bands, are presented.

  17. Two new Larainae species from Guayana region, Venezuela (Coleoptera: Elmidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laššová, Kristína; Ciampor, Fedor; Ciamporová-Zaťovičová, Zuzana

    2014-01-06

    Two new species of the subfamily Larainae (Insecta: Coleoptera: Elmidae), Hexanchorus angeli n. sp. and Hypsilara autanai n. sp., are described from Guyana region in Venezuela. We provide habitus photographs, detail drawings of both male and female genitalia, and description of morphological features important for discrimination of the new species. Molecular differences within genera were measured using 816bp fragment of mtDNA gene for cytochrome oxidase c subunit I. Sequence divergences among species are discussed.

  18. Observaciones sobre el gualapán (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Hispinae y otras limitantes entomológicas en cultivos de chontaduro en el Bajo Anchicayá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alarcón Andrés

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizaron observaciones y colectas sistemáticas desde enero a diciembre de 1996, en compañía de agricultores del Bajo Anchicayá, Valle (60-140 msnm, Bosque pluvial tropical, 24º C, precipitación mayor a 4000 mm. Alurnus sp, localmente llamado “gualapánâ€? o “llagaâ€?, puede afectar del 50 al 100% del follaje joven de la palma y en asocio circunstancial con curculionidos barrenadores del estipe conformar complejos letales (Rhynchophorus palmarum L., Dynamis borassi Fabr, Rhinostomus barbirostris Fabr., Metamasius hemipterus Fabr., y M. dasyurus Champion. Se aportan observaciones sobre la etiología, aspectos autoecológicos de la plaga y de los complejos entomológicos. Las limitaciones edáficas, desbalances nutricionales, sumados a prácticas agrícolas inadecuadas (escalamiento de palmas y uso descuidado de plaguicidas contribuyen significativamente con la problemática entomológica, se propone un manejo con enfoque ecológico integral. ABSTRACT Observations on “Gualapanâ€? (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Hispinae and others entomological limitations chontaduro’s crops located in Bajo Anchicaya, Valle, Colombia.We did several observations and collect from January to December of 1996, with the help of local farmers of Bajo Anchicaya, Valle (altitude of 60 to 140 m.a.s.l., it’s a tropical rainforest, temperature 24 C, and rainfall is 4000 millimeters. Alurnus sp, named “Gualapanâ€? or “Soreâ€? by the local people, may affect from 50 to 100% of the palm’s foliage, and in rare cases with the help of curculionids could be a lethal partnership (Rhynchophorus palmarum L., Dynamis borassi Fabr, Rhinostomus barbirostris Fabr., Metamasius hemipterus Fabr., y M. dasyurus Champion. The edafologics limitants, nutritional imbalances, in conjunction with inappropriate agricultural practices (e.g.: escalade of palms trees and inappropriate use of pesticides contribute enormously

  19. Identification and Comparison of Candidate Olfactory Genes in the Olfactory and Non-Olfactory Organs of Elm Pest Ambrostoma quadriimpressum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Based on Transcriptome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinliang; Chen, Qi; Zhao, Hanbo; Ren, Bingzhong

    2016-01-01

    The leaf beetle Ambrostoma quadriimpressum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is a predominant forest pest that causes substantial damage to the lumber industry and city management. However, no effective and environmentally friendly chemical method has been discovered to control this pest. Until recently, the molecular basis of the olfactory system in A. quadriimpressum was completely unknown. In this study, antennae and leg transcriptomes were analyzed and compared using deep sequencing data to identify the olfactory genes in A. quadriimpressum. Moreover, the expression profiles of both male and female candidate olfactory genes were analyzed and validated by bioinformatics, motif analysis, homology analysis, semi-quantitative RT-PCR and RT-qPCR experiments in antennal and non-olfactory organs to explore the candidate olfactory genes that might play key roles in the life cycle of A. quadriimpressum. As a result, approximately 102.9 million and 97.3 million clean reads were obtained from the libraries created from the antennas and legs, respectively. Annotation led to 34344 Unigenes, which were matched to known proteins. Annotation data revealed that the number of genes in antenna with binding functions and receptor activity was greater than that of legs. Furthermore, many pathway genes were differentially expressed in the two organs. Sixteen candidate odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 10 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 34 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 inotropic receptors [1] and 2 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and their isoforms were identified. Additionally, 15 OBPs, 9 CSPs, 18 ORs, 6 IRs and 2 SNMPs were predicted to be complete ORFs. Using RT-PCR, RT-qPCR and homology analysis, AquaOBP1/2/4/7/C1/C6, AquaCSP3/9, AquaOR8/9/10/14/15/18/20/26/29/33, AquaIR8a/13/25a showed olfactory-specific expression, indicating that these genes might play a key role in olfaction-related behaviors in A. quadriimpressum such as foraging and seeking. AquaOBP4/C5, AquaOBP4/C5, AquaCSP7

  20. Identification and Comparison of Candidate Olfactory Genes in the Olfactory and Non-Olfactory Organs of Elm Pest Ambrostoma quadriimpressum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae Based on Transcriptome Analysis.

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    Yinliang Wang

    Full Text Available The leaf beetle Ambrostoma quadriimpressum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae is a predominant forest pest that causes substantial damage to the lumber industry and city management. However, no effective and environmentally friendly chemical method has been discovered to control this pest. Until recently, the molecular basis of the olfactory system in A. quadriimpressum was completely unknown. In this study, antennae and leg transcriptomes were analyzed and compared using deep sequencing data to identify the olfactory genes in A. quadriimpressum. Moreover, the expression profiles of both male and female candidate olfactory genes were analyzed and validated by bioinformatics, motif analysis, homology analysis, semi-quantitative RT-PCR and RT-qPCR experiments in antennal and non-olfactory organs to explore the candidate olfactory genes that might play key roles in the life cycle of A. quadriimpressum. As a result, approximately 102.9 million and 97.3 million clean reads were obtained from the libraries created from the antennas and legs, respectively. Annotation led to 34344 Unigenes, which were matched to known proteins. Annotation data revealed that the number of genes in antenna with binding functions and receptor activity was greater than that of legs. Furthermore, many pathway genes were differentially expressed in the two organs. Sixteen candidate odorant binding proteins (OBPs, 10 chemosensory proteins (CSPs, 34 odorant receptors (ORs, 20 inotropic receptors [1] and 2 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs and their isoforms were identified. Additionally, 15 OBPs, 9 CSPs, 18 ORs, 6 IRs and 2 SNMPs were predicted to be complete ORFs. Using RT-PCR, RT-qPCR and homology analysis, AquaOBP1/2/4/7/C1/C6, AquaCSP3/9, AquaOR8/9/10/14/15/18/20/26/29/33, AquaIR8a/13/25a showed olfactory-specific expression, indicating that these genes might play a key role in olfaction-related behaviors in A. quadriimpressum such as foraging and seeking. AquaOBP4/C5, Aqua

  1. Impacto dos nutrientes N e K e de açúcares solúveis sobre populações de Diabrotica speciosa (Germar (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae e Agrotis ipsilon (Hüfnagel (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae na cultura da batata, Solanum tuberosum L. (Solanaceae Impact of the nutrients N and K and soluble sugars on Diabrotica speciosa (Germar (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae and Agrotis ipsilon (Hüfnagel (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae populations in potato crops, Solanum tuberosum L. (Solanaceae

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    Edson Henrique de Azeredo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudada a ocorrência de Diabrotica speciosa (Germar, 1824 (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae e de Agrotis ipsilon (Hüfnagel, 1767 (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae em plantas de batata, cultivares Achat e Monalisa, influenciadas por dosagens de nitrogênio e potássio, e teor mínimo de açúcares solúveis. Os seguintes parâmetros foram avaliados: concentração de nutrientes minerais e açúcar em folha verde, folha senescente, folha em abcisão, haste, tubérculo e planta total usando extratos de infusão em etanol 80%. A maior infestação por larvas de D. speciosa foi na cultivar Monalisa a 150 kg.ha-1 de N + K com 27,03% a PThe occurrence of Diabrotica speciosa (Germar, 1824 and Agrotis ipsilon (Hüfnagel, 1767 on the potato cultivars Achat and Monalisa, influenced by nitrogen and potassium dosage, and minimum theor of soluble sugars, was studied. The following parameters were evaluated: concentration of mineral nutrient and sugar in green leaf, senescent leaf, leaf in abscission, stem, tubercle and total plant using extracts of infusion in ethanol 80%. The largest infestation of D. speciosa larvae was on Monalisa cultivar at 150 kg.ha-1 of N + K with 27.03% at P< 0,05. It was observed that the effect of the dosage of N + K in the increment of the concentration of soluble sugars increased the damages in the tubercles and stems by A. ipsilon. The infestation by these species increased to 58.82% on the Monalisa cultivar, when the nitrogen dosage increased from zero to 150 kg.ha-1, in the absence of potassium. On the other hand, high dosage of K reduced the damages by A. ipsilon on Monalisa cultivar. However, it did not influence the storage of soluble sugar. The results indicated that in Achat cultivar the accumulated soluble sugar was reduced, probably sensibilized by elevation of potassic fertilization dosing, differing from Monalisa cultivar, in which the influence was by nitrogen dosing.

  2. Isolation and identification of floral attractants from a nectar plant for the dried bean beetle, Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuts, József; Woodcock, Christine M; Caulfield, John C; Powers, Stephen J; Pickett, John A; Birkett, Michael A

    2018-03-08

    The response of virgin females of the legume pest Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) to headspace extracts of volatiles collected from flowers of a nectar plant, Daucus carota, was investigated using behaviour (four-arm olfactometry) and coupled gas chromatography-electroantennography (GC-EAG). Odours from inflorescences were significantly more attractive to virgin female beetles than clean air. Similarly, a sample of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) collected by air entrainment (dynamic headspace collection) was more attractive to beetles than a solvent control. In coupled GC-EAG experiments with beetle antennae and the VOC extract, six components showed EAG activity. Using coupled GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC peak enhancement with authentic standards, the components were identified as α-pinene (S:R 16:1), sabinene, myrcene, limonene (S:R 1:3), terpinolene and (S)-bornyl acetate. Females preferred the synthetic blend of D. carota EAG-active volatiles to the solvent control in bioassays. When compared directly, odours of D. carota inflorescences elicited stronger positive behaviour than the synthetic blend. This is the first report of behaviourally active volatiles linked to pollen location for A. obtectus, and development of the six-component blend is being pursued, which could underpin the design of semiochemical-based field management approaches against this major pest of stored products. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Long-horned Beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae and Tortoise Beetles (Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae of Tripura, northeastern India with some new additions

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    B.K. Agarwala

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the occurrence of nineteen species of Long-horned Beetles (Cerambycidae and eleven species of Tortoise Beetles (Cassidinae from Tripura state, northeastern India. These include 11 species of Cerambycidae and seven species of Cassidinae, respectively, as new records from the state. Distribution of these beetles in different parts of the state are provided.

  4. A new species of Scymnobius Casey (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Scymnini from Pernambuco, Brazil

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    José Adriano Giorgi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Scymnobius Casey (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Scymnini from Pernambuco, Brazil. Scymnobius pernambucensis sp. nov. from Pernambuco, Brazil, is described and illustrated. This is the third species of this genus recorded from Brazil.

  5. Variable Effects of Grass-Neotyphodium Associations on Cereal Leaf Beetle (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae) Feeding, Development and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although cereal grains are the preferred food plants of the cereal leaf beetle, Oulema melanopus (L.), several other graminoid species are acceptable feeding hosts of larvae and adults of this chrysomelid beetle. In view of the potential for expanding the use of diverse endophytic fungi (Neotyphodi...

  6. Stevesaltica, a new genus of moss and leaf-litter inhabiting flea beetles from Bolivia (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new genus (Stevesaltica) with two new species (S. normi and S. perdita) from Bolivia is described and illustrated. It is similar to Exoceras Jacoby. An identification key for all flea beetle genera known to occur in mosses in the Western Hemisphere is provided....

  7. An unusual new species of Micraspis Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from northeastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorani, J

    2014-01-01

    Micraspispusillus sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is described and illustrated from the northeastern region of India. It is unusual in possessing very large eye canthus and is the smallest species of the genus known from India so far.

  8. Illustrated guide to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire and related species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 33 species of Agrilus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) hypothesized to be most closely related to Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (the emerald ash borer), are described and illustrated. Morphology (adults and immatures), biology, distribution, detailed taxonomic history and systematics are presented fo...

  9. Dinâmica populacional de bruquíneos (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae em Senna multijuga (Rich. H. S. Irwin & Barneby (Caesalpinaceae Population dynamics of bruchines (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae in Senna multijuga (Rich. H. S. Irwin & Barneby (Caesalpinaceae

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    Lisiane Taiatella Sari

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Senna multijuga (Rich. H. S. Irwin & Barneby (Caesalpinaceae é uma planta ornamental comum no sudeste do Brasil, suscetível ao dano por bruquíneos predadores de sementes. Com o objetivo de identificar os predadores de suas sementes e determinar seus ciclos populacionais, frutos de cinco árvores foram coletados em 2000 e 2001 e acondicionados em casa de vegetação até a emergência de adultos. Os bruquíneos foram identificados como Sennius crudelis Ribeiro-Costa & Reynaud, 1998, S. puncticollis (Fåhraeus, 1839 e S. nappi Ribeiro-Costa & Reynaud, 1998. Sennius crudelis foi a espécie mais abundante em 2000, seguida por S. puncticollis e S. nappi. Em 2001, Sennius crudelis foi seguida por S. nappi e S. puncticollis. Diferenças foram observadas entre as árvores com relação ao período de frutificação, refletindo na oviposição. O período de emergência dos adultos se inicia em julho tanto em casa de vegetação quan-to no campo. Os resultados demonstraram que as dinâmicas populacionais dos bruquíneos são complexas e a compreensão desses processos contribui para responder a muitas outras questões ecológicas do grupo.Senna multijuga (Rich. H. S. Irwin & Barneby (Caesalpinaceae is a native ornamental tree common in southeastern Brazil and susceptible to seed damage due to bruchines. To identify seed predators and determine their population cycles, fruits from five trees were collected in 2000 and 2001 and stored in a green house until adult emerged. Seed beetles were then identified as Sennius crudelis Ribeiro-Costa & Reynaud, 1998, S. puncticollis (Fåhraeus, 1839 and S. nappi Ribeiro-Costa & Reynaud, 1998. Sennius crudelis was the most abundant species in 2000 followed by S. puncticollis and S. nappi. In 2001, Sennius crudelis was followed by S. nappi and S. puncticollis. Differences were observed among trees relating to fruiting period which reflected in the oviposition. Adult emergence begins in July in the green house and in

  10. Impact of the nutrients N and K and soluble sugars on Diabrotica speciosa (Germar) (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) and Agrotis ipsilon (Hufnagel) (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) populations in potato crops, Solanum tuberosum L. (Solanaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azeredo, Edson Henrique de; Lima, Eduardo; Cassino, Paulo Cesar Rodrigues

    2004-01-01

    Impact of the nutrients N and K and soluble sugars on Diabrotica speciosa (Germar) (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) and Agrotis ipsilon (Huefnagel) (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) populations in potato crops, Solanum tuberosum L. (Solanaceae). The occurrence of Diabrotica speciosa (Germar, 1824) and Agrotis ipsilon (Huefnagel, 1767) on the potato cultivars Achat and Monalisa, influenced by nitrogen and potassium dosage, and minimum quantity of soluble sugars, was studied. The following parameters were evaluated: concentration of mineral nutrient and sugar in green leaf, senescent leaf, leaf in abscission, stem, tubercle and total plant using extracts of infusion in ethanol 80%. The largest infestation of D. speciosa larvae was on Monalisa cultivar at 150 kg.ha -1 of N + K with 27.03% at P -1 , in the absence of potassium. On the other hand, high dosage of K reduced the damages by A. ipsilon on Monalisa cultivar. However, it did not influence the storage of soluble sugar. The results indicated that in Achat cultivar the accumulated soluble sugar was reduced, probably sensitized by elevation of potassic fertilization dosing, differing from Monalisa cultivar, in which the influence was by nitrogen dosing. (author)

  11. Predação de sementes de Allagoptera arenaria (Gomes O'Kuntze (Arecaceae por Pachymerus nucleorum Fabricius (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae Seed predation on Allagoptera arenaria (Gomes O'Kuntze (Arecaceae by Pachymerus nucleorum Fabricius (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae

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    Viviane Grenha

    2008-01-01

    , the emergence of these insects in the laboratory and from fruits dissected. It was verified that Pachymerus nucleorum oviposit on young developing infrutescences, different from literature records for other palm species, for which oviposition takes place on the fruit already on the ground. Fruit predation by P. nucleorum was 29.3% at ridge forest and 20.6% at Clusia open shrubland formation. The life cycle of P. nucleorum was long and with wide range of variation within samples, what suggests a possible diapause in some stage of life cycle.

  12. Efeitos da terra diatomácea sobre Diabrotica speciosa (Germar, 1824 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae em batata inglesa Effects of diatomaceous earth on Diabrotica speciosa (Germar, 1824 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae in potato

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    Franscinely Aparecida Assis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A espécie Diabrotica speciosa é um crisomelídeo responsável por causar danos consideráveis à batateira, o que torna indispensável seu controle com inseticidas para minimizar os prejuízos causados à cultura. Assim, objetivou-se, com este trabalho, avaliar os efeitos da terra diatomácea sobre o comportamento alimentar e a mortalidade de D. speciosa em batata inglesa em condições de laboratório. Adotou-se o DIC com três tratamentos e oito repetições, sendo: 1 - testemunha; 2 - TD polvilhada (0,5 g/vaso e 3 - TD pulverizada a 1%. As batateiras, cv. Emeraude, foram polvilhadas ou pulverizadas com TD, 30 dias após o plantio e, 24 horas após a aplicação, as plantas foram fornecidas aos insetos, sem e com chance de escolha. Houve diferença significativa entre os tratamentos, sendo a menor porcentagem de folíolos com injúrias observada em plantas que receberam a aplicação de TD pulverizada (teste sem chance de escolha e TD polvilhada ou pulverizada (teste com chance de escolha. Também houve redução do número de injúrias foliares às 24 e às 48 horas (TD polvilhada ou pulverizada e, às 72 horas, a redução foi observada somente com a aplicação da TD polvilhada. Com relação à ação inseticida da TD, foi verificado seu efeito após 48 horas, tanto via polvilhamento, quanto via pulverização. Assim, a aplicação de TD pode auxiliar no manejo de D. speciosa, contribuindo para conferir proteção às plantas de batata inglesa e aumentar a mortalidade desse inseto-praga.The species D. speciosa is a chrysomelid responsible for causing considerable damage on potato plant, making its control with insecticides essential to minimize the damage caused to this culture. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of diatomaceous earth (DE on feeding behavior and mortality of D. speciosa in potato under laboratory conditions. A completely randomized design was used with three treatments and eight replicates being: 1

  13. Functional morphology and evolution of the hyper-elongated intromittent organ in Cassida leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yoko; Michels, Jan; Appel, Esther; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2017-02-01

    The peculiar phenomenon of hyper-elongation of intromittent organs is well known in a number of insect groups. However, the unresolved questions of how and why such a phenomenon originated independently many times continue to attract biologists' attention. To be able to detect the evolutionary driving mechanisms that enabled insects to repeatedly acquire such a peculiarity, first of all the structural key features and the mechanics of these organs have to be determined. In the present study, the morphology of the reproductive organs of two species of the beetle genus Cassida, with a special focus on the male structures, was scrutinised in detail during copulation and at rest using different microscopy techniques. We found that the hyper-elongated structure of the intromittent organ, called flagellum, is part of the male ejaculatory duct. When the flagellum is inserted into the female spermathecal duct, longitudinal muscles of the ejaculatory duct, but not the flagellum, are shortened. These results strongly suggest that the contraction of the longitudinal muscles of the ejaculatory duct causes propulsion of the flagellum into the highly spiralled spermathecal duct of the female. The tip of the cuticular flagellum is curled up, which can suggest that its physical properties differ from those of the rest of the flagellum. Considering the preceding modelling studies, this property aids the flagellum in penetrating within the highly spiralled and very variable female duct. Based on our morphological results and in comparison with the morphology of intromittent organs of other beetles, we discuss the evolutionary origin of the hyper-elongation in the Cassida species and propose a hypothesis that explains the independent origin of the hyper-elongation of intromittent organs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Morphology and DNA barcoding reveal a new species of Eudicella from East Africa (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Matthias

    2016-07-13

    A new species of Eudicella White, 1839 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae), is described from Uganda and Kenya: E. nana new species. Morphological and genetic analyses of the new taxon and phenotypically allied species are given. Eudicella nana is compared with its hypothesized sister species, E. darwiniana Kraatz, 1880, and diagnostic characters that distinguish it from other species occurring in the same region are provided.

  15. Significance of colour polymorphism in mountain populations of abundant leaf beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae

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    Mikhailov, Y. E.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaf beetles, especially common and abundant species, play significant role in the flow of biomass and energy in alpine ecosystems. They feed openly in the leafage of shrubs and herbs and their various metallic colourations or highly melanistic forms absorb solar radiation, promoting warming and decreasing penetration of UV. Therefore colour polymorphism is important for monitoring of status of exact populations. Polymorphism as ecologically selected variability serves for the most complete and effective use of environmental heterogeneity. That is why composition of morphs and its changes in space and time are especially sensitive. Eco-geographical reguliarities of colour polymorphism is shown for various mountain populations of Chrysomela lapponica, Gonioctena árctica and Oreina sulcata throughout their distribution area. These species together with related ones enable to make a sensitive network of biosensors for climate change monitoring in Holarctic region. [fr]
    Les Scarabées des feuilles deviennent spécialement communs, présentent de nombreuses espèces et sans doute peuvent jouer un rôle important sur le cycle de biomasse et le flux d'énergie des écosystèmes alpiens. Ces insectes mangent les feuilles des arbrisseaux ou des herbes et leurs colorations métalliques très variées ou leurs formes fortement mélaniques absorbent les radiations solaires; c'est comme cela qu'ils provoquent un réchauffement et arrivent à filtrer les rayons UV. En conséquence, le polymorphisme de couleurs se montre très important pour le monitoring de plusieurs populations concernées. Si nous considérons ce polymorphisme comme un type de variabilité sélectionnée écologiquement, il peut bien contribuer à une utilisation plus effective et complète de l'hétérogénéité environnementale. C'est pourquoi la composition des morphotypes et ses changements aussi bien dans l'espace que dans le temps deviennent très sensibles

  16. Coleoptera species inhabiting prairie wetlands of the Cottonwood Lake Area, Stutsman County, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, B.A.; Swanson, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    The aquatic Coleoptera of a prairie wetland complex in Stutsman County, North Dakota, were collected from April 1979 to November 1980. Identification of 2594 individuals confirmed 57 species, including seven new records for North Dakota. Two seasonally flooded and two semipermanent wetlands, totaling 7.43 ha, contained 53% of the Dytiscidae, 43% of the Haliplidae, 38% of the Hydrophilidae, and 22% of the Gyrinidae species previously identified from North Dakota. Although 49.1% of the Coleoptera species occurred in both types of wetlands, the occurrence of 29 species varied by wetland class.

  17. A new fossil species of the genus Coptodera Dejean, 1825 (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Lebiinae) from Baltic amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Sara; Ortuño, Vicente M

    2015-07-07

    In this paper a new species of fossil ground-beetle, Coptodera elektra n. sp. (Coleoptera: Carabidae) preserved in a piece of Baltic amber (Eocene) is described and the paleobiology of the species is studied. This new species represents the first known fossil record for the genus, as well as the first record of its presence in Europe.

  18. Two new species of Parandrinae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in genera Parandra and Acutandra from South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two new species of high-elevation Parandrinae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) are described from Bolivia and Ecuador, South America. Both species are unusual in having piceous coloration over most of the dorsal surface. Acutandra caterinoi Lingafelter & Tishechkin, new species, is described from Pichin...

  19. Análise comparativa dos surtos e danos causados pelos besouros desfolhadores Costalimaita ferruginea (Fabricius, 1801 e Costalimaita lurida (Lefévre, 1891 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae em plantios de eucalipto

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    Reginaldo Gonçalves Mafia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Os besouros desfolhadores Costalimaita ferruginea (Fabricius, 1801 e Costalimaita lurida (Lefévre, 1891 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae são pragas importantes da cultura do eucalipto. A biologia e comportamento daninho de C. ferruginea já foram caracterizados. Todavia, não existem estudos sobre o potencial de C. lurida como praga da cultura. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar, de forma comparativa, os surtos e as injúrias causadas por C. ferruginea e C. lurida em plantios de eucalipto. Para isso, 202,8 mil ha de plantios clonais de eucalipto, nos Estados do Espírito Santo, da Bahia e de Minas Gerais, foram monitorados no período crítico de ocorrência (quente e chuvoso. Os surtos detectados foram caracterizados, determinando-se, por meio de amostragens, a incidência, a severidade e as populações absoluta e relativa do inseto por planta atacada. De forma geral, o comportamento daninho de C. lurida foi similar ao de C. ferruginea, em termos de época de ocorrência e tipo de injúrias causadas. Todavia, C. lurida apresentou maiores picos populacionais, em termos absolutos (insetos por planta e relativos (razão entre o número de insetos e altura das plantas atacadas, e atingiu maior proporção de área, podendo ser considerado mais daninho que C. ferruginea. O besouro C. lurida deve ser monitorado considerando os mesmos critérios. Além disso, os surtos desta nova praga poderão ser avaliados quanto ao nível crítico para controle, empregando-se as mesmas premissas adotadas para C. ferruginea. Adicionalmente aos resultados, registrou-se, pela primeira vez, a ocorrência de C. lurida no Estado da Bahia, em plantas de araçá (Psidium guineense, Swartz (Myrtaceae.

  20. New species and records of Macrodactylus Dejean (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae: Macrodactylini) from Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Pérez, Roberto; Morón, Miguel Ángel

    2014-08-28

    Two new species of Macrodactylus Dejean (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) from Bolivia are described and illustrated: M. megaphyllus new species (from Comarapa, Santa Cruz and Sehuenca, Cochabamba) and M. yunganus new species (from Mairana and Comarapa, Santa Cruz). In addition, the species Macrodactylus bolivianus Moser, M. gracilis Moser, and M. nobilis Frey are redescribed and illustrated to help facilitate identification of these species. A key to the 10 species of Macrodactylus presently known from Bolivia is provided. 

  1. A new species of Golinca Thomson (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae): first record of the genus for Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valois, M; Silva, F

    2015-02-16

    Golinca trevisani Valois & Silva, new species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Trichiini: Incina) from Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondônia, and Amazonas, Brazil is described, representing the first record of the genus Golinca for Brazil. Diagnosis, illustrations of key morphological characters, the first male genitalia description in the genus, and a key for identification of four species of Golinca are provided.

  2. The genus Platytenerus Miyatake, 1985 (Coleoptera: Cleridae: Neorthopleurinae), with description of a new species from Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-23

    The genus Platytenerus Miyatake, 1985 (Coleoptera: Cleridae) is redescribed and classified into the subfamily Neorthopleurinae Opitz, 2009. A phylogenetic tree is supplementally provided for Platytenerus based on twenty morphological and two geographical characters. A new species of the genus, Platytenerus iriomotensis sp. n. is described from Iriomote Island, Okinawa, Japan.

  3. Beetle and plant arrow poisons of the Ju|’hoan and Hai||om San peoples of Namibia (Insecta, Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae; Plantae, Anacardiaceae, Apocynaceae, Burseraceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboo, Caroline S.; Biesele, Megan; Hitchcock, Robert K.; Weeks, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of archery to hunt appears relatively late in human history. It is poorly understood but the application of poisons to arrows to increase lethality must have occurred shortly after developing bow hunting methods; these early multi-stage transitions represent cognitive shifts in human evolution. This paper is a synthesis of widely-scattered literature in anthropology, entomology, and chemistry, dealing with San (“Bushmen”) arrow poisons. The term San (or Khoisan) covers many indigenous groups using so-called ‘click languages’ in southern Africa. Beetles are used for arrow poison by at least eight San groups and one non-San group. Fieldwork and interviews with Ju|’hoan and Hai||om hunters in Namibia revealed major differences in the nature and preparation of arrow poisons, bow and arrow construction, and poison antidote. Ju|’hoan hunters use leaf-beetle larvae of Diamphidia Gerstaecker and Polyclada Chevrolat (Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) collected from soil around the host plants Commiphora africana (A. Rich.) Engl. and Commiphora angolensis Engl. (Burseracaeae). In the Nyae Nyae area of Namibia, Ju|’hoan hunters use larvae of Diamphidia nigroornata Ståhl. Larvae and adults live above-ground on the plants and eat leaves, but the San collect the underground cocoons to extract the mature larvae. Larval hemolymph is mixed with saliva and applied to arrows. Hai||om hunters boil the milky plant sap of Adenium bohemianum Schinz (Apocynaceae) to reduce it to a thick paste that is applied to their arrows. The socio-cultural, historical, and ecological contexts of the various San groups may determine differences in the sources and preparation of poisons, bow and arrow technology, hunting behaviors, poison potency, and perhaps antidotes. PMID:27006594

  4. Beetle and plant arrow poisons of the Ju|'hoan and Hai||om San peoples of Namibia (Insecta, Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae; Plantae, Anacardiaceae, Apocynaceae, Burseraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboo, Caroline S; Biesele, Megan; Hitchcock, Robert K; Weeks, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The use of archery to hunt appears relatively late in human history. It is poorly understood but the application of poisons to arrows to increase lethality must have occurred shortly after developing bow hunting methods; these early multi-stage transitions represent cognitive shifts in human evolution. This paper is a synthesis of widely-scattered literature in anthropology, entomology, and chemistry, dealing with San ("Bushmen") arrow poisons. The term San (or Khoisan) covers many indigenous groups using so-called 'click languages' in southern Africa. Beetles are used for arrow poison by at least eight San groups and one non-San group. Fieldwork and interviews with Ju|'hoan and Hai||om hunters in Namibia revealed major differences in the nature and preparation of arrow poisons, bow and arrow construction, and poison antidote. Ju|'hoan hunters use leaf-beetle larvae of Diamphidia Gerstaecker and Polyclada Chevrolat (Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) collected from soil around the host plants Commiphora africana (A. Rich.) Engl. and Commiphora angolensis Engl. (Burseracaeae). In the Nyae Nyae area of Namibia, Ju|'hoan hunters use larvae of Diamphidia nigroornata Ståhl. Larvae and adults live above-ground on the plants and eat leaves, but the San collect the underground cocoons to extract the mature larvae. Larval hemolymph is mixed with saliva and applied to arrows. Hai||om hunters boil the milky plant sap of Adenium bohemianum Schinz (Apocynaceae) to reduce it to a thick paste that is applied to their arrows. The socio-cultural, historical, and ecological contexts of the various San groups may determine differences in the sources and preparation of poisons, bow and arrow technology, hunting behaviors, poison potency, and perhaps antidotes.

  5. Ancyronyx reticulatus and A. pulcherrimus, two new riffle beetle species from Borneo, and discussion about elmid plastron structures (Coleoptera: Elmidae).

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    Kodada, Ján; Jäch, Manfred A; Ciampor, Fedor

    2014-02-03

    Two new species of Ancyronyx Erichson, 1847 (Coleoptera: Elmidae) are described from Borneo: A. pulcherrimus (Brunei) and A. reticulatus (Sabah). Habitus views, illustrations of important characters as well as plastron structures of Ancyronyx reticulatus are presented and discussed.

  6. Fifteen into Three Does Go: Morphology, Genetics and Genitalia Confirm Taxonomic Inflation of New Zealand Beetles (Chrysomelidae: Eucolaspis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doddala, Prasad R C; Minor, Maria A; Rogers, David J; Trewick, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Eucolaspis Sharp 1886 is a New Zealand native leaf beetle genus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Eumolpinae) with poorly described species and a complex taxonomy. Many economically important fruit crops are severely damaged by these beetles. Uncertain species taxonomy of Eucolaspis is leaving any biological research, as well as pest management, tenuous. We used morphometrics, mitochondrial DNA and male genitalia to study phylogenetic and geographic diversity of Eucolaspis in New Zealand. Freshly collected beetles from several locations across their distribution range, as well as identified voucher specimens from major museum collections were examined to test the current classification. We also considered phylogenetic relationships among New Zealand and global Eumolpinae (Coleoptera: Chyrosomelidae). We demonstrate that most of the morphological information used previously to define New Zealand Eucolaspis species is insufficient. At the same time, we show that a combination of morphological and genetic evidence supports the existence of just 3 mainland Eucolaspis lineages (putative species), and not 5 or 15, as previously reported. In addition, there may be another closely related lineage (putative species) on an offshore location (Three Kings Islands, NZ). The cladistic structure among the lineages, conferred through mitochondrial DNA data, was well supported by differences in male genitalia. We found that only a single species (lineage) infests fruit orchards in Hawke's Bay region of New Zealand. Species-host plant associations vary among different regions.

  7. Species of beetles (Coleoptera; Scarabaeidae associated to banana (Musa spp. in Ceballos, Ciego de Avila, Cuba

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    Maria Luisa Sisne Luis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A white light trap was placed in bananas plantations, according to Sisne, 2009 and MINAG, 1985, in the Citric enterprise of Ciego de Ávila during the period between May and July of 2010 with the objective of determining the composition of genus and species of the order Coleoptera family Scarabaeidae associated to the agroecosystem. The species Cyclocephala cubana Chapin, Phyllophaga puberula Duval, and Phyllophaga patruelis Chev. are associated to bananas crops in these areas.

  8. Bioindication Potential of the Coleoptera

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    Belitskaya Mariya Nikolaevna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Different families of Coleoptera ambiguously respond to the pollution of SPZs with industrial emissions. For example, the SPZ of Volgograd aluminum plant has the changing biodiversity of insect communities at different distances from the pollution source. The increasing level of pollution is accompanied by the reduction in species abundance. At a distance of 200 m a special ecological zone with the specific composition of the entomofauna was formed. It is significantly different from other habitats. No Cerambycidae species may survive in the zone of maximum pollution, and the number of Curculionidae species is reduced significantly. The number of Cerambycidae decreases by more than 40 % in the presence of even minimal contamination. The most sensitive bioindicators are represented by such insects as Cerambycidae, Curculionidae and Chrysomelidae. Changes in the indices can be described by the function y = arctan (x, where x is the distance from the pollution source (in meters. The specificity of this function is to identify levels of possible changes of species richness and numerical abundance of communities. On the basis of trigonometric functions describing the changes in the species composition and abundance, the authors offered the method for assessing the quality of the environment in SPZs. The use of three families of insects opens up prospects of differentiation zones of technogenic pressure.

  9. Stevewoodia minutum, a new genus and species of Scolytidae (Coleoptera) from the West Indies. Studies on West Indian Scolytidae (Coleoptera) 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Bright, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A new genus of Scolytidae (Coleoptera), Stevewoodia, from St. Lucia in the Lesser Antilles, is herein named and described. The type species, Stevewoodia minutum sp. n. is also named. The genus is named in honor of the late Steven L. Wood for his many contributions to the systematics of the Scolytidae. PMID:21594171

  10. A new species of Oxelytrum Gistel (Coleoptera, Silphidae) from southern Argentina, with a key to the species of the genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the forensically interesting genus Oxelytrum Gistel (Coleoptera, Silphidae), Oxelytrum selknan, is described from Santa Cruz and Tierra del Fuego provinces, Argentina. The new species resembles Oxelytrum biguttatum (Philippi) in outer aspect, but has different male genitalia, in particular a median lobe longer than the paramera. All the described species of Oxelytrum have the median lobe shorter than the paramera. The internal sac, as far as it could be reconstructed from dry-pinned specimens, also shows differences between the two species. A key to the species of Oxelytrum is given and illustrated. PMID:22773910

  11. Agrilus rubensteini, a new species from the Philippines related to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new species from the Philippines closely related to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, 1888 (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is described: Agrilus rubensteini Chamorro & Jendek, new species. This is the first species in the A. cyaneoniger species-group recorded for the Philippines. Agr...

  12. Two new species of Parandrinae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the genera Parandra and Acutandra from South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingafelter, Steven W; Tishechkin, Alexey K

    2017-05-30

    Two new species of high-elevation Parandrinae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) are described from Bolivia and Ecuador, South America. Both species are unusual in having piceous coloration over most of the dorsal surface. Parandra (Tavandra) santossilvai Lingafelter & Tishechkin, new species, is described from Achira, Santa Cruz Province, Bolivia, a site at 2,000 meters elevation. Acutandra caterinoi Lingafelter & Tishechkin, new species, is described from Pichincha Province, Ecuador, from sites between 1,900-2,500 meters. Illustrations, descriptions, diagnoses, and discussion of their generic and subgeneric placements are included.

  13. A catalog of the types of Chrysomelidae sensu lato (Insecta, Coleoptera, Polyphaga deposited in the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales, Buenos Aires Catálogo de los tipos de Chrysomelidae sensu lato (Insecta, Coleoptera, Polyphaga depositados en el Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales, Buenos Aires

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    Axel O. Bachmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The type specimens (all current categories of Chrysomelidae s.l. deposited in this Museum are listed; 125 names are recorded, 85 of them (68 percent are represented here by name-bearing types ('primary' types, five of them dubious. The family is taken in its broadest sense, including the Bruchinae, Hispinae (along with the former Cassidinae, and other groups sometimes considered as separate families. The specific and subspecific names were alphabetically filed, followed by the generic ones as they were spelled in the original publication, or the generic and specific names in the case of subspecies and varieties. Later combinations and/or current binomina are mentioned insofar as these are known to the authors. Two lists are added: 1. of specimens labelled as types of unavailable names, chiefly those not found in the literature, and supposedly not published, and 2. of specimens labelled as types, but not originally included as such, and published or not after the original description.Se catalogan los ejemplares típicos, de todas las categorías aceptadas, de Chrysomelidae s.l. conservados en este museo; se registran 125 nombres, 85 de ellos (68 por ciento representados aquí por tipos portadores de nombres (tipos 'primarios', cinco de ellos dudosos. La familia se toma en su concepto más amplio, incluyendo a las Bruchinae, las Hispinae (con las anteriores Cassidinae y otros grupos a veces considerados como familias separadas. Los nombres específicos y subespecíficos fueron ordenados alfabéticamente; a estos siguen los de los géneros, así como se publicaron originalmente, o de los géneros y especies en el caso de las subespecies y variedades. Se mencionan las combinaciones ulteriores y/o los binomios en uso, hasta donde son conocidos por los autores. Se agregan dos listas: 1. de los ejemplares rotulados como tipos, de nombres no disponibles, principalmente aquellos no hallados en la bibliografía, y supuestamente no publicados, y 2. de los

  14. Description of the third instar larvae of five species of Cyclocephala (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Dynastinae from Mexico

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    Miguel A. Morón

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Description of the third instar larvae of five species of Cyclocephala (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Dynastinae from Mexico. Larvae of four species of Cyclocephala are described for the first time based on specimens collected in Mexican localities: C. barrerai Martínez, 1969 from Puebla, C. sinaloae Howden & Endrödi, 1966 from Sinaloa, C. fasciolata Bates, 1888 from Veracruz, and C. jalapensis Casey, 1915 from Hidalgo. Larva of C. lunulata Burmeister, 1847, is redescribed based on specimens from the Mexican states of Morelos, Puebla, and Veracruz. Diagnostic structures are illustrated and the differences and similarities of each species with other previously described larvae of the genus are commented.

  15. Sulawesi Onthophagus: seven new species in select groups (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikken, J; Huijbregts, J

    2017-03-05

    Eleven species in five small operational groups of the scarab genus Onthophagus Latreille, 1802 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) are treated, all from the Indonesian island of Sulawesi and nearby smaller islands. These groups are defined, and their species are keyed, described, and illustrated, including the following seven new species: Onthophagus bisscrutator (O. scrutator group); O. bongkudai (O. holosericus group); O. sopu (O. manguliensis group); O. hollowayi, O. seseba, and O. annulopunctatus (O. seseba group); and O. begoniophilus (O. deflexicollis group). Lectotypes are designated for Onthophagus scrutator Harold, 1877 and O. holosericus Harold, 1877.

  16. AN UPDATE OF THE ROMANIAN FAUNA OF COLEOPTERA: NEW RECORDS AND NOTES ON RARE AND LITTLE KNOWN SPECIES

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    Eugen Nitzu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available First records of four species of Coleoptera (Fam. Leiodidae: Hydnobius latifrons (Curtis, 1840; Scarabaeidae: Limarus zenkeri (Germar, 1813; Zopheridae: Pycnomerus sulcicollis (Germar, 1824; Tenebrionidae: Helops caeruleus (Linnaeus, 1758 for the Romanian fauna are presented. The data on faunal distribution of the new recorded species and other rare and interesting species is provided.

  17. Field Trial Performance of Herculex XTRA (Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1) and SmartStax (Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 + Cry3Bb1) Hybrids and Soil Insecticides Against Western and Northern Corn Rootworms (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K D; Campbell, L A; Lepping, M D; Rule, D M

    2017-06-01

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), and northern corn rootworm, Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), are important insect pests in corn, Zea mays L. For more than a decade, growers have been using transgenic plants expressing proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to protect corn roots from feeding. In 2011, western corn rootworm populations were reported to have developed resistance to Bt hybrids expressing Cry3Bb1 and later found to be cross-resistant to hybrids expressing mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab. The identification of resistance to Cry3 (Cry3Bb1, mCry3A, and eCry3.1Ab) hybrids led to concerns about durability and efficacy of products with single traits and of products containing a pyramid of a Cry3 protein and the binary Bt proteins Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1. From 2012 to 2014, 43 field trials were conducted across the central United States to estimate root protection provided by plants expressing Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 alone (Herculex RW) or pyramided with Cry3Bb1 (SmartStax). These technologies were evaluated with and without soil-applied insecticides to determine if additional management measures provided benefit where Cry3 performance was reduced. Trials were categorized for analysis based on rootworm damage levels on Cry3-expressing hybrids and rootworm feeding pressure within each trial. Across scenarios, Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 hybrids provided excellent root protection. Pyramided traits provided greater root and yield protection than non-Bt plus a soil-applied insecticide, and only in trials where larval feeding pressure exceeded two nodes of damage did Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 single-trait hybrids and pyramided hybrids show greater root protection from the addition of soil-applied insecticides. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A new species of Callispa Baly (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae, Callispini) infesting coconut palm ( Cocos nucifera L.) in India

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    Shameem, K. M.; Prathapan, K. D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Callispa keram sp. n. infesting coconut palm (Cocos nucifera L.) in Kerala, India is described and illustrated. Livistona chinensis R.Br. and Syagrus romanzoffiana (Cham.) Glassman are reported as additional host plants. PMID:23653522

  19. High-throughput biodiversity analysis: Rapid assessment of species richness and ecological interactions of Chrysomelidae (Coleoptera) in the tropics

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez-Zurita,Jesus; Cardoso,Anabela; Coronado,Indiana; De la Cadena,Gissela; Jurado-Rivera,José A.; Maes,Jean-Michel; Montelongo,Tinguaro; Nguyen,Dinh; Papadopoulou,Anna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Biodiversity assessment has been the focus of intense debate and conceptual and methodological advances in recent years. The cultural, academic and aesthetic impulses to recognise and catalogue the diversity in our surroundings, in this case of living objects, is furthermore propelled by the urgency of understanding that we may be responsible for a dramatic reduction of biodiversity, comparable in magnitude to geological mass extinctions. One of the most important advances in this at...

  20. A model species for agricultural pest genomics: the genome of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, is one of the most challenging agricultural pests to manage and has shown a spectacular ability to rapidly adapt to a broad range of solanaceaeous (nightshade/potato) plants, variable climate during its global invasion, and, most notably, an...

  1. New species and records of pollen and sap beetles for Iran (Coleoptera: Kateretidae, Nitidulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audisio, Paolo; Cline, Andrew R; Lasoń, Andrzej; Jelínek, Josef; Sabatelli, Simone; Serri, Sayeh

    2017-01-09

    During recent expeditions in North and Southwest Iran, 10 species of Kateretidae and Nitidulidae (Coleoptera) were found. One species of Kateretidae, Brachyleptus bicoloratus Reitter, 1896, and three nitidulid species, Afrogethes schilskyi (Reitter, 1897), Stachygethes khnzoriani (Kirejtshuk, 1979), and S. nigerrimus (Rosenhauer, 1856) are recorded for the first time for the Iranian fauna (the latter is also a new record for Asia). Thymogethes ahriman (Jelínek, 1981) is herein resurrected to species rank, and two species, Thymogethes kassites sp. nov. and T. khorasanicus sp. nov., are described as new. An updated key to the known Near East and Afghan species of the genus Thymogethes Audisio & Cline, 2009 is also provided. Available and recently collected biological and distributional data, as well as short taxonomic comments, are given for the discussed species.

  2. Possible living flea beetle fossil in Bolivia: A new genus of flea beetles with modified hind legs (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new genus (Chanealtica) with three new species (C. cuevas, C. ellimon, and C. maxi) from Bolivia is described and illustrated. It is compared with Aphthonoides Jacoby 1885, Argopistes Motschulsky 1860, Metroserrapha Bechyne 1958, Psylliodes Berthold 1827 and Psyllototus Nadein 2010. Remarkably, ba...

  3. Influence of sun and shade conditions on Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) abundance and feeding activity on tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) under field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum Dunal) is a perennial invasive weed species which has become a serious problem in both agricultural and natural areas of the southeastern United States. A field survey was conducted at a ranch in Madison County, Florida, to assess the effect of sun and shade condi...

  4. Revisiting Coleoptera a + T-rich region: structural conservation, phylogenetic and phylogeographic approaches in mitochondrial control region of bioluminescent Elateridae species (Coleoptera).

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    Amaral, Danilo T; Mitani, Yasuo; Oliveira, Gabriela; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Viviani, Vadim R

    2017-09-01

    The control region (CR) or A + T-rich region in Coleoptera mt genome is poorly characterized, including the Elateroidea bioluminescent species. Here, we provided the first attempt to characterize and compare the structure and organization of the CR of different species within Elateridae. We also revisited some sequenced Coleoptera CR and observed consensus T-stretches, non-conserved sequences near the stem-loop and unusual inner tRNAs-like sequences. All these features are probably involved in the replication start of the mt genome. The phylogenetic relationships in Elateridae bioluminescent groups using partial sequence of CR showed the monophyly of Pyrearinus pumilus group and Pyrearinus as a polyphyletic genus, corroborating our previous results. The wider genetic variation obtained by CR analysis could separate two different lineages that occur within P. termitilluminans populations. In Elateridae, the CR exhibited high polymorphism within and between populations, which was also observed in other Coleoptera species, suggesting that the CR could be described as a suitable molecular marker to be applied in phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies.

  5. Habitat preferences of ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) species in the northern Black Hills of South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, David J; Brandenburg, Dylan; Petit, Samantha; Gabel, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) are a major component of terrestrial invertebrate communities and have been used as bioindicators of habitat change and disturbance. The Black Hills of South Dakota is a small area with a high biodiversity, but the ground beetles of this region are little studied. The habitat preferences of ground beetles in the Black Hills are unknown, and baseline data must be collected if these beetles are to be used in the future as bioindicators. Ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) were collected from pitfall traps at two sites in each of five kinds of habitats (grassland, bur oak-ironwood forests, ponderosa pine-common juniper forests, aspen-pine forests, and a spruce forest) from which habitat structure characteristics and plant abundance data also were collected. In total, 27 species of ground beetles were identified. Although some species, such as Dicaelus sculptilis Say were found in most habitats, other species showed distinct habitat preferences: Poecilus lucublandus (Say) preferred oak forests, Pasimachus elongatus LeConte preferred grasslands, and Calathus ingratus Dejean preferred high-elevation aspen-pine forests. Pterostichus adstrictus Escholtz was found only in woodlands, and Carabus taedatus Say strictly in higher elevation (over 1,500 m) aspen or coniferous woods, and may represent relict populations of boreal species. Elevation, exposure to sunlight, and cover of woody plants strongly influence the structure of carabid communities in the Black Hills.

  6. Description of a new species of Cylloepus Erichson from southeastern Brazil (Coleoptera, Elmidae

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    Maria Inês Silva Passos

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Cylloepus dorvillei sp. nov. is described and illustrated from a first order stream at the Atlantic Forest in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Taxonomic and habitat notes on the new species are presented.Descrição de uma nova espécie de Cylloepus Erichson do sudeste do Brasil (Coleoptera, Elmidae. Cylloepus dorvillei sp. nov. é descrita e ilustrada com base em espécimes coletados em um rio de primeira ordem na Mata Atlântica do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. Notas sobre a taxonomia e o hábitat da nova espécie são apresentadas.

  7. Descrição da larva de 3º ínstar e redescrição do adulto de Phaedon confinis Klug (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae

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    2015-08-01

    Abstract. In view of the potential of Phaedon confinis Klug as an biological control agent of the Senecio brasiliensis Less and the lack of taxonomic knowledge of the species Phaedon recorded for Brazil, this paper aimed to describe the 3rd larval instar, redescribe the adult, as well as add new characters and illustrations to acknowledgment of the specie. The P. confinis larvae are eruciform, subcylindrical, elongated and slightly convex; dorsal surface dark brown and ventral surface with yellowish lighter regions; four setae in the front; six stemmata arranged in three groups; brown labrum, with four pairs of setae, pronotal plate with ten setae; pleural region of prothorax with tubercle T; meso- and metathorax with tubercles Dai and Dae close, but not fused, and tubercles Es-Ss fused between themselves by midline; simple tarsal claws; abdomen with tubercle Dae absent and Dai present, little pronounced; abdominal tubercles with two setae in Dpi and Dpe. Adult has oval body and dorsally convex; pronotum and elytral glabrous; predominant colour blue metallic violet; lateral margins of pronotum rounded, yellowish brown with central macula metallic blue, elytral striae with deep punctuation and arranged in eight longitudinal rows; yellowish brown regions on the head, prothorax and legs; head with two small oval black maculae, posterior to the eyes in vertex region.

  8. Evolutionary history of Coleoptera revealed by extensive sampling of genes and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Qian; Che, Li-Heng; Li, Yun; Dan Liang; Pang, Hong; Ślipiński, Adam; Zhang, Peng

    2018-01-15

    Beetles (Coleoptera) are the most diverse and species-rich group of insects, and a robust, time-calibrated phylogeny is fundamental to understanding macroevolutionary processes that underlie their diversity. Here we infer the phylogeny and divergence times of all major lineages of Coleoptera by analyzing 95 protein-coding genes in 373 beetle species, including ~67% of the currently recognized families. The subordinal relationships are strongly supported as Polyphaga (Adephaga (Archostemata, Myxophaga)). The series and superfamilies of Polyphaga are mostly monophyletic. The species-poor Nosodendridae is robustly recovered in a novel position sister to Staphyliniformia, Bostrichiformia, and Cucujiformia. Our divergence time analyses suggest that the crown group of extant beetles occurred ~297 million years ago (Mya) and that ~64% of families originated in the Cretaceous. Most of the herbivorous families experienced a significant increase in diversification rate during the Cretaceous, thus suggesting that the rise of angiosperms in the Cretaceous may have been an 'evolutionary impetus' driving the hyperdiversity of herbivorous beetles.

  9. Carpophilus zeaphilus, a new sap beetle species acclimatized in Italy (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae

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    Paolo Audisio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Carpophilus zeaphilus Dobson, 1969 (Coleoptera, Nitidulidae, Carpophilinae is an Afrotropical species that has become widespread in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and southern Mediterranean areas in recent years. The species was first recorded from Europe in Portugal and Spain nearly thirty years ago, and it was later intercepted in Sicily near Trapani in 1991. A few specimens of this species were collected in April, 2015 in a sparsely forested area near Rome, which suggests a recent acclimatization into peninsular Italy. Specimens were taken on flowering trees of Prunus spinosa L. (Rosaceae, an unusual occurrence for most introduced species of Carpophilinae that are normally associated with rotten fruit and other decomposing vegetal matter.

  10. Soil and saproxylic species (Coleoptera, Collembola, Araneae in primeval forests from the Northern part of South-Easthern Carpathians

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    Eugen Nițu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2006-2007 we carried out faunal investigations in the vernal, estival and autumnal seasons in the scientific reserve "Codrul Secular Giumalău" using quantitative sampling methods. We identified 189 species of Coleoptera, 70 of Collembola and 20 of Araneae. Of these, 11 phytophagous, 18 myceto/xylo-mycetophagous, 9 mixophagous, 18 xylo- and cambio-xylemophagous, 38 saproxylophagous, 125 (55 Coleoptera, 70 Collembola detritivorous (sapro-, copro- and necrophagous, 60 (40 Coleoptera, 20 Aranea predators/parasitoids. Hymenaphorura polonica Pomorski, 1990 (Collembola, and Leiodes rhaeticus Erichson, 1845 (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, are recorded for the first time in the Romanian fauna. The rare species and characteristic species for the old primeval spruce forests are analysed for each studied taxonomic group. The species richness and faunal diversity from the Giumalău primeval spruce forest are compared with those of other very well preserved forests from the Carpathians scientific reserves (Codrul Secular Slătioara, Pietrosul Rodnei. The species abundances were used to compute the similarity indexes between the sampled sectors of forest and to perform Cluster Analysis. We observed that the dead wood in the 2nd-6th phases of decomposition has a great influence not only on the saproxylic species but also on the soil fauna like ground beetles (Carabidae that use the logs as ecologic microrefuges (winter refugees or diurnal refugees. The structure of the soil fauna is influenced by wood extraction from the forest ecosystem or by natural perturbations, this consisting in the appearance of opportunistic species as Orchesella pontica (Collembola and in decreasing of species richness of Carabidae (Coleoptera.

  11. Open-field host specificity test of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandolfo, D.; McKay, F.; Medal, J.C.; Cuda, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    An open-field experiment was conducted to assess the suitability of the South American leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth for biological control of Solanum viarum Dunal in the USA. An open-field test with eggplant, Solanum melongena L., was conducted on the campus of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and a S. viarum control plot was established 40 km from the campus. One hundred adult beetles were released in each plot at the beginning of the experiment during the vegetative stage of the plants, and forty additional beetles were released in the S. melongena plot at the flowering stage. All the plants in each plot were checked twice a week and the number of adults, immatures, and eggs recorded. Results showed almost a complete rejection of eggplant by G. boliviana. No noticeable feeding damage was ever recorded on eggplant. The experiment was ended when the eggplants started to senesce or were severely damaged by whiteflies and spider mites. The results of this open-field experiment corroborate previous quarantine/laboratory host-specificity tests indicating that a host range expansion of G. boliviana to include eggplant is highly unlikely. Gratiana boliviana was approved for field release in May 2003 in the USA. To date, no non-target effects have been observed either on eggplant or native species of Solanum. (author) [es

  12. Soil and saproxylic species (Coleoptera, Collembola, Araneae in primeval forests from the northern part of South-Easthern Carpathians

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    Eugen Nitu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2006-2007 we carried out faunal investigations in the vernal, estival and autumnal seasons in the scientific reserve "Codrul Secular Giumalãu" using quantitative sampling methods. We identified 189 species of Coleoptera, 70 of Collembola and 20 of Araneae. Of these, 11 phytophagous, 18 myceto/xylo-mycetophagous,9 mixophagous, 18 xylo- and cambio-xylemophagous, 38 saproxylophagous,125 (55 Coleoptera, 70 Collembola detritivorous (sapro-, copro- andnecrophagous, 60 (40 Coleoptera, 20 Aranea predators/parasitoids. Hymenaphorura polonica Pomorski, 1990 (Collembola, and Leiodes rhaeticus Erichson, 1845 (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, are recorded for the first time in the Romanian fauna. The rare species and characteristic species for the old primeval spruce forests are analysed for each studied taxonomic group. The species richness and faunal diversity from the Giumalãu primeval spruce forest are compared with those of other very well preserved forests from the Carpathians scientific reserves (Codrul Secular Slãtioara,Pietrosul Rodnei. The species abundances were used to compute the similarity indexes between the sampled sectors of forest and to perform Cluster Analysis. We observed that the dead wood in the 2nd-6th phases of decomposition has a great influence not only on the saproxylic species but also on the soil fauna like ground beetles(Carabidae that use the logs as ecologic microrefuges (winter refugees or diurnal refugees. The structure of the soil fauna is influenced by wood extraction from the forest ecosystem or by natural perturbations, this consisting in the appearance of opportunistic species as Orchesella pontica (Collembola and in decreasing ofspecies richness of Carabidae (Coleoptera.

  13. Seasonal timing of diapause induction limits the effective range of Diorhabda elongata deserticola (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) as a biological control agent for tamarisk (Tamarix spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Daniel W; Dudley, Tom L; Keller, Julie C

    2007-02-01

    The leaf beetle Diorhabda elongata Brullé subspecies deserticola Chen, collected in northwestern China, has been released in the western United States to control tamarisk (Tamarix spp.). While beetle establishment and saltcedar defoliation have been noted at northern study sites, this species has not established at latitudes south of the 38th parallel. Critical daylength for diapause induction was measured in the laboratory and ranged between 14 h 50 min to 15 h 08 min, depending on temperature, and adults were shown to cease reproduction and enter diapause at daylengths of 14 h 30 min or less. Critical daylength in the field was measured at approximately 14 h 39 min and occurred 13 d before 50% of the population reached diapause. South of 36 degrees 20' N, the longest days of the year are shorter than 14 h 39 min, making the beetles univoltine in the southern United States. North of 36 degrees 20' N, a window of reproductive activity opens 13 d after the critical daylength is reached in the spring and closes 13 d after it is passed in the summer, allowing at least a partial second summer generation. It is predicted that south of the 38th parallel, premature diapause will increase mortality and disrupt synchrony between the life cycle of the beetle and host plant availability. This could hinder establishment and help explain the failure of this population south of the 38th parallel, providing a rationale for testing other populations of D. elongata in the southern range of Tamarix in North America.

  14. Buttercup squash provides a marketable alternative to blue hubbard as a trap crop for control of striped cucumber beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Andrew F; Adler, Lynn S; Hazzard, Ruth V

    2010-12-01

    Winter squash is a vital agricultural commodity worldwide. In the Northeastern United States, the primary insect pest is the striped cucumber beetle, Acalymma vittatum F. Using a Blue Hubbard squash (Cucurbita maxima Duchesne) perimeter trap crop system can reduce insecticide use by >90% in butternut squash (C. moschata Poir), the primary winter squash grown in this region. Despite the savings in insecticide costs, growers may be reluctant to give up field space for a perimeter crop of Blue Hubbard squash, which comprises only 5% of the winter squash market in New England as compared with 19% for buttercup squash. Finding a more marketable trap crop would lower the barrier for adoption of this system. We tested eight varieties of three species of cucurbits for attractiveness to beetles relative to Blue Hubbard and butternut squash, and chose buttercup squash as the most promising replacement. We compared the effect of a buttercup border, Blue Hubbard border, or control (no border) on beetle numbers, herbivory, insecticide use, pollination, and pollen limitation in the main crop. We found that buttercup squash performed equally well as Blue Hubbard as a trap crop, with 97% reduction in total insecticide use compared with control fields. Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) and squash bees (Peponapis pruinosa Say) were the predominant pollinators, and border treatments did not affect visitation. Hand pollination did not increase reproduction or yield, indicating that natural pollination was sufficient for full yield. This study confirms the effectiveness of perimeter trap crop systems and offers growers a more marketable trap crop for managing cucumber beetle damage. © 2010 Entomological Society of America

  15. Carbon isotope ratios document that the elytra of western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) reflects adult versus larval feeding and later instar larvae prefer Bt corn to alternate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltpold, Ivan; Adamczyk, John J; Higdon, Matthew L; Clark, Thomas L; Ellersieck, Mark R; Hibbard, Bruce E

    2014-06-01

    In much of the Corn Belt and parts of Europe, the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is the most important insect pest of maize. The need for additional basic knowledge of this pest has been highlighted while developing resistance management plans for insecticidal genetically modified crops. This study evaluated the possibility of tracking feeding habits of western corn rootworm larvae using stable carbon isotope signatures. Plants accumulate different ratios of (13)C:(12)C isotopes, usually expressed as δ(13)C, according to whether they use the C3 or C4 photosynthetic pathway. Herbivore biomass is expected to reflect the δ(13)C of the food they eat. For the current experiment, western corn rootworm larvae were grown on different species of plants exhibiting different δ(13)C values. The δ(13)C values were then measured in elytra of emerged beetles. When beetles were unfed, biomass reflected larval feeding. When beetles were fed for 31 d postemergence, δ(13)C values of elytra almost exclusively reflected adult feeding. These results suggest the use of caution in the interpretation of δ(13)C data aiming to document larval diet history when adult feeding history is unknown. The technique was also used to evaluate western corn rootworm larval choice between alternate hosts and maize with and without genetically modified (Bt) traits aimed at their control. Propensity for feeding on alternate hosts versus maize was biased toward feeding on maize regardless whether the maize had Bt or not, suggesting western corn rootworm larvae were not repelled by Bt. These data will be helpful for regulators in interpreting western corn rootworm feeding data on Bt maize.

  16. Pseudaspidimerus palatus, a new species of the genus Pseudaspidimerus Kapur, 1948 from the Malay Peninsula (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

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    Lizhi Huo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A new species of the genus Pseudaspidimerus Kapur, 1948 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae, Pseudaspidimerus palatus Huo & Wang, sp. n. from the Malay Peninsula is described with illustrations and a distribution map. The genus Pseudaspidimerus is recorded for the first time from Malaysia and Singapore.

  17. Austrelmis Brown (Coleoptera: Byrrhoidea: Elmidae) from Argentina: five new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Veronica; Archangelsky, Miguel

    2015-12-17

    Material belonging to the genus Austrelmis Brown, from different localities from northwestern Argentina, is studied and described. Five new species are described and illustrated from adults of both sexes: Austrelmis argentinensis sp. nov., A. catamarcensis sp. nov., A. talampayensis sp. nov., A. tafi sp. nov. and A. robustus sp.nov. The new species are compared to other known species of the genus. A comparative table summarizing the most important characters used to identify the argentine species of Austrelmis and a distributional map for Argentina are included.

  18. Studies on West Indian Scolytidae (Coleoptera) 4: A review of the Scolytidae of Puerto Rico, U.S.A with descriptions of one new genus, fourteen new species and notes on new synonymy (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.E. Bright; J.A. Torres

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive biodiversity study of the Scolytidae (Coleoptera) of Puerto Rico, USA has been underway for several years. Seventy-one species are now recorded from the island. One new genus, Allothenemus, is described with Allothenemus minutus new species, as the type species. An additional 13 new species are described: Chramesus atlanticus, Scolytodes puertoricensis...

  19. CINQUE NUOVE SPECIE DI TRECHUS DELL’ETIOPIA (Coleoptera, Carabidae

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    P. Magrini

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Nella presente nota vengono descritte cinque nuove specie di Trechus, tutte raccolte in alta quota in Etiopia, e inquadrate nei gruppi di specie indicati da Jeannel. Tre provengono dal Massiccio del Simien (Provincia di Gondar: Trechus peynei n. sp. e Trechus loeffleri n. sp. (gruppo simienensis e Trechus martelluccii n. sp. (gruppo sublaevis; due provengono dal Monte Batu (Mendebo, Provincia di Bale: Trechus batuensis n. sp. (gruppo bipartitus e Trechus bastianinii n. sp., non inquadrabile al momentoin nessuno dei gruppi di specie indicati da Jeannel. Non descriviamo una sesta specie, sintopica con T. bastianinii n. sp., anche se sicuramente nuova, poichè abbiamo a disposizione solo due esemplari femmina. Tutte le nuove specie si differenziano chiaramente da tutte quelle finora descritte, per la diversità netta sia dell’edeago che della morfologia esterna, i cui caratteri e immagini descrittive sono riportati nel testo.

  20. Four new species of Nyctonympha Thomson, 1868 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

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    Antonio Santos-Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Four new species of Nyctonympha Thomson, 1868 are described: N. antonkozlovi sp. nov. and N. sinjaevi sp. nov. from Colombia, N. birai sp. nov. from Venezuela and N. mariahelenae sp. nov. from Brazil (Rondônia, Bolivia and Peru. Nyctonympha flavipes Aurivillius, 1990 is formally excluded from the Peruvian and Brazilian fauna. A provisional key to species of Nyctonympha is provided.

  1. Natural enemies of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in northeast China, with notes on two species of parasitic Coleoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-Yi Wang; Liang-Ming Cao; Zhong-Qi Yang; Jian J. Duan; Juli R. Gould; Leah S. Bauer

    2016-01-01

    To investigate natural enemies of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in northeastern China, we conducted field surveys of ash (Fraxinus Linnaeus (Oleaceae)) trees in semi-natural forests and plantations at variable EAB densities from 2008 to 2013. Our surveys revealed a complex of...

  2. Drivers of species richness in European Tenebrionidae (Coleoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorini, Simone; Ulrich, Werner

    2012-08-01

    The species-area relationship (SAR) and the latitudinal gradient in species richness are the most widespread and best-documented patterns in ecology, yet few studies have explored how the two patterns are interrelated. We used tenebrionid beetles as a species rich invertebrate group to investigate how area, habitat heterogeneity, climate, and ecological history act together in shaping species richness across Europe. We tested the effects of various climatic gradients on tenebrionid richness, with separate analyses for endemics and non-endemics. To take into account differences in area size among geographical units, we included species-area relationships using simultaneous autoregressive models. Although area had a significant effect on richness, the signal associated with temperature is so strong that it is still evident as a major driver. Also, the effect of area was only apparent when the effect of spatial coordinates had been accounted for, which has important implications for the use of SARs to locate diversity hotspots. The influence of latitude was mainly explained by a temperature gradient. Our findings support a postglacial European colonisation mainly from glacial southern refuges. Large Mediterranean islands were also important refugial areas.

  3. Review of the genus Fontidessus Miller & Spangler, 2008 (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Hydroporinae, Bidessini with description of four new species

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    Kelly Miller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The genus Fontidessus Miller & Spangler, 2008 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporinae: Bidessini is reviewed. The genus now includes seven species with three previously described, and four new species described here: F. microphthalmus Miller & Montano, sp. n.; F. bettae Miller & Montano, sp. n.; F. christineae Miller & Montano, sp. n., and F. aquarupe Miller & Montano, sp. n. Each species is diagnosed and described, including the previously known species, based on new specimens and new information. Habitus, male genitalia and other diagnostic features are illustrated for each species. A key to the seven species is provided. Fontidessus species are unique to hygropetric habitats in the Guiana Shield craton of northern South American.

  4. Especies mexicanas de Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae Mexican species of Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera associated to agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae

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    Alberto Romo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron las especies de picudos o gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae en México. Se registraron 5 especies asociadas con especies de Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes y Yucca; de éstas, 4 pertenecen a la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis y Cactophagus spinolae y 1 a la Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus. Se presentan diagnosis, ilustraciones y una clave para la identificación de las 5 especies de curculiónidos asociados con agaves. Se establecen las siguientes sinonimias: Sphenophorus validus LeConte, 1858 = Cactophagus spinolae (Gyllenhal, 1838; y Zygops polymitus seminiveus LeConte, 1884, Z. p. leopardinus Desbrochers, 1891 y Z. p. suffusus Casey, 1892 = Peltophorus polymitus Boheman, 1845.Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae associated with agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae from Mexico are analyzed. Five species were recorded associated with species of Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes, and Yucca. Four of these species belong to the subfamily Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis, and Cactophagus spinolae and 1 belongs to the subfamily Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus. Diagnoses, illustrations and a key are presented for identifying the 5 species of weevils found on agaves. The following synonymies are established: Sphenophorus validus LeConte, 1858 = Cactophagus spinolae (Gyllenhal, 1838; and Zygops polymitus seminiveus LeConte, 1884, Z. p. leopardinus Desbrochers, 1891, and Z. p. suffusus Casey, 1892 = Peltophorus polymitus Boheman, 1845.

  5. A NEW SPECIES OF CHRYSODEMA FROM MINDORO, PHILIPPINES (COLEOPTERA, BUPRESTIDAE

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    Maurizio Gigli

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Chrysodema danterina n. sp. from Mindoro, Philippines, is described and illustrated. Comparative remarks are made with the widely distributed Chrysodema smaragdu­la (Olivier, 1790 that, despite a very different general look, shows several similar characters. The new species, whose female is unknown, is immediately recognizable from any other in the genus for the proportions of the body, the completely black colour and the shape and the exceptional size of male genitalia.

  6. Cerambycidae (Insecta: Coleoptera) of Quixadá, Ceará State, Brazil: new records and new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Francisco E De L; Bravo, Freddy; Monnè, Miguel A

    2016-09-06

    A checklist of longhorn beetles (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) of Quixadá County, Ceará State, Brazil is presented. Fifty-six specimens were examined and 32 species were identified, distributed in 29 genera, 19 tribes and two subfamilies. Fifteen species are new distributional records for Ceará State. Nealcidion latipenne (Bates, 1863) is recorded by the first time in Caatinga Biome. Lathroeus immaculatus sp. nov. (Acanthocinini, Lamiinae) is described and figured.

  7. Review of the continental Oriental species of Lilioceris Reitter (Chrysomelidae: Criocerinae) closely related to Lilioceris impressa (F.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criocerine leaf beetles found in Nepal feeding on Dioscorea bulbifera (L.), an exotic, invasive weed of Asian origin, were identified as Lilioceris cheni Gressitt & Kimoto based on a synopsis of the Oriental Lilioceris species and review of the Lilioceris impressa species group. All the species incl...

  8. Comparative cytogenetics of three species of Dichotomius (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae

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    Guilherme Messias da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic and mitotic chromosomes of Dichotomius nisus, D. semisquamosus and D. sericeus were analyzed after conventional staining, C-banding and silver nitrate staining. In addition, Dichotomius nisus and D. semisquamosus chromosomes were also analyzed after fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with an rDNA probe. The species analyzed had an asymmetrical karyotype with 2n = 18 and meta-submetacentric chromosomes. The sex determination mechanism was of the Xy p type in D. nisus and D. semisquamosus and of the Xyr type in D. sericeus. C-banding revealed the presence of pericentromeric blocks of constitutive heterochromatin (CH in all the chromosomes of the three species. After silver staining, the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs were located in autosomes of D. semisquamosus and D. sericeus and in the sexual bivalent of D. nisus. FISH with an rDNA probe confirmed NORs location in D. semisquamosus and in D. nisus. Our results suggest that chromosome inversions and fusions occurred during the evolution of the group.

  9. Bayesian species delimitation reveals generalist and specialist parasitic wasps on Galerucella beetles (Chrysomelidae): sorting by herbivore or plant host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambäck, Peter A; Weingartner, Elisabet; Ericson, Lars; Fors, Lisa; Cassel-Lundhagen, Anna; Stenberg, Johan A; Bergsten, Johannes

    2013-04-27

    To understand the ecological and evolutionary consequences of species interactions in food webs necessitates that interactions are properly identified. Genetic analyses suggest that many supposedly generalist parasitoid species should rather be defined as multiple species with a more narrow diet, reducing the probability that such species may mediate indirect interactions such as apparent competition among hosts. Recent studies showed that the parasitoid Asecodes lucens mediate apparent competition between two hosts, Galerucella tenella and G. calmariensis, affecting both interaction strengths and evolutionary feedbacks. The same parasitoid was also recorded from other species in the genus Galerucella, suggesting that similar indirect effects may also occur for other species pairs. To explore the possibility of such interactions, we sequenced mitochondrial and nuclear genetic markers to resolve the phylogeny of both host and parasitoid and to test the number of parasitoid species involved. We thus collected 139 Galerucella larvae from 8 host plant species and sequenced 31 adult beetle and 108 parasitoid individuals. The analysis of the Galerucella data, that also included sequences from previous studies, verified the five species previously documented as reciprocally monophyletic, but the Bayesian species delimitation for A. lucens suggested 3-4 cryptic taxa with a more specialised host use than previously suggested. The gene data analyzed under the multispecies coalescent model allowed us to reconstruct the species tree phylogeny for both host and parasitoid and we found a fully congruent coevolutionary pattern suggesting that parasitoid speciation followed upon host speciation. Using multilocus sequence data in a Bayesian species delimitation analysis we propose that hymenopteran parasitoids of the genus Asecodes that infest Galerucella larvae constitute at least three species with narrow diet breath. The evolution of parasitoid Asecodes and host Galerucella show

  10. Current state of knowledge on Wolbachia infection among Coleoptera: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajtoch, Łukasz; Kotásková, Nela

    2018-01-01

    Despite great progress in studies on Wolbachia infection in insects, the knowledge about its relations with beetle species, populations and individuals, and the effects of bacteria on these hosts, is still unsatisfactory. In this review we summarize the current state of knowledge about Wolbachia occurrence and interactions with Coleopteran hosts. An intensive search of the available literature resulted in the selection of 86 publications that describe the relevant details about Wolbachia presence among beetles. These publications were then examined with respect to the distribution and taxonomy of infected hosts and diversity of Wolbachia found in beetles. Sequences of Wolbachia genes ( 16S rDNA, ftsZ ) were used for the phylogenetic analyses. The collected publications revealed that Wolbachia has been confirmed in 204 beetle species and that the estimated average prevalence of this bacteria across beetle species is 38.3% and varies greatly across families and genera (0-88% infected members) and is much lower (c. 13%) in geographic studies. The majority of the examined and infected beetles were from Europe and East Asia. The most intensively studied have been two groups of herbivorous beetles: Curculionidae and Chrysomelidae. Coleoptera harbor Wolbachia belonging to three supergroups: F found in only three species, and A and B found in similar numbers of beetles (including some doubly infected); however the latter two were most prevalent in different families. A total of 59% of species with precise data were found to be totally infected. Single infections were found in 69% of species and others were doubly- or multiply-infected. Wolbachia caused numerous effects on its beetle hosts, including selective sweep with host mtDNA (found in 3% of species), cytoplasmic incompatibility (detected in c. 6% of beetles) and other effects related to reproduction or development (like male-killing, possible parthenogenesis or haplodiploidy induction, and egg development

  11. Aphid Species Affect Foraging Behavior of Coccinella septempunctata (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad Umar; Qadri, Hafiz Faqir Hussain; Khan, Muhammad Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Flowers are admirable in scenic good looks and artistic beautification. These are also playing necessary roles in therapeutic preparations. Aphid is an important sucking pest of various flowers in ornamental territories and it is generally controlled by predators, so it was necessary to evaluate which aphid species affect the predator more or less. Biocontrol agent Coccinella septempunctata was used against cosmos aphid (Aphis spiraecola, rose aphid (Macrosiphum rosea), gul e ashrafi aphid (Aphis fabae), kaner aphid (Aphis nerii), chandni aphid (Sitobion avenae), dahlia aphid (Myzus persicae) and annual chrysanthemum aphid (Macrosiphoniella sanborni). The grub of C. septempunctata consumed 283.8±9.04 M. rosea, 487.7±12.6 M. sanborni, 432.75±16.02 A. spiraecola, 478.2±8.07 A. fabae, 552.3±9.04 M. persicae, 142±1.32 A. nerii and 498.5±13.09 S. avenae in its whole larval life. The M. persicae and M. rosea consuming grubs showed 100% adult emergence while, M. sanborni, A. spiraecola, A. fabae and S. avenae showed 96.58, 89.02, 94.78 and 75.45% adult emergence, respectively. The C. septempunctata has significant predatory potential against A. spiraecola, M. rosea, A. fabae, S. avenae, M. persicae and M. sanborni except A. nerii. Thus, further studies are needed to find out alternate predator to control A. nerii on ornamentals.

  12. Species delimitation in northern European water scavenger beetles of the genus Hydrobius (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossen, Erlend I.; Ekrem, Torbjørn; Nilsson, Anders N.; Bergsten, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The chiefly Holarctic Hydrobius species complex (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae) currently consists of Hydrobius arcticus Kuwert, 1890, and three morphological variants of Hydrobius fuscipes (Linnaeus, 1758): var. fuscipes, var. rottenbergii and var. subrotundus in northern Europe. Here molecular and morphological data are used to test the species boundaries in this species complex. Three gene segments (COI, H3 and ITS2) were sequenced and analyzed with Bayesian methods to infer phylogenetic relationships. The Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent (GMYC) model and two versions of the Bayesian species delimitation method BPP, with or without an a priori defined guide tree (v2.2 & v3.0), were used to evaluate species limits. External and male genital characters of primarily Fennoscandian specimens were measured and statistically analyzed to test for significant differences in quantitative morphological characters. The four morphotypes formed separate genetic clusters on gene trees and were delimited as separate species by GMYC and by both versions of BPP, despite specimens of Hydrobius fuscipes var. fuscipes and Hydrobius fuscipes var. subrotundus being sympatric. Hydrobius arcticus and Hydrobius fuscipes var. rottenbergii could only be separated genetically with ITS2, and were delimited statistically with GMYC on ITS2 and with BPP on the combined data. In addition, six or seven potentially cryptic species of the Hydrobius fuscipes complex from regions outside northern Europe were delimited genetically. Although some overlap was found, the mean values of six male genital characters were significantly different between the morphotypes (p Morphological characters previously presumed to be diagnostic were less reliable to separate Hydrobius fuscipes var. fuscipes from Hydrobius fuscipes var. subrotundus, but characters in the literature for Hydrobius arcticus and Hydrobius fuscipes var. rottenbergii were diagnostic. Overall, morphological and molecular evidence strongly

  13. Bionomics data and descriptions of the immatures of Calyptocephala gerstaeckeri Boheman (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), pest of the oil palm (Elaeis guineensis J.) and camedor palm (Chamaedorea elegans Mart.) (Arecaceae) in Tabasco, Mexico; Datos bionomicos y descripcion de los inmaduros de Calyptocephala gerstaeckeri Boheman (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), plaga de la Palma Aceitera (Elaeis guineensis J.) y de la Palma Camedor (Chamaedorea elegans Mart.) (Arecaceae) en Tabasco, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordova-Ballona, Leonides [Universidad Popular de la Chontalpa, Tabasco (Mexico); Sanchez-Soto, Saul [Colegio de Postgraduados, Tabasco (Mexico). Campus Tabasco

    2008-11-15

    Characters of the external morphology of egg, larval instars and pupae of Calyptocephala gerstaeckeri Boheman, insect pest of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis J.) and camedor palm (Chamaedorea elegans Mart.) in the State of Tabasco, Mexico, are described and illustrated. Some bionomics data are also presented. The specie was reared in the laboratory on young oil palm plants. (author)

  14. Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) Species, Flight, and Attack on Living Eastern Cottonwood Trees.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, D R; D.C. Booth: M.S. Wallace

    2005-12-01

    ABSTRACT In spring 2002, ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) infested an intensively managed 22-ha tree plantation on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Nearly 3,500 scolytids representing 28 species were captured in ethanol-baited traps from 18 June 2002 to 18 April 2004. More than 88% of total captures were exotic species. Five species [Dryoxylon onoharaensum (Murayama), Euwallacea validus (Eichhoff), Pseudopityophthorus minutissimus (Zimmermann), Xyleborus atratus Eichhoff, and Xyleborus impressus Eichhoff]) were collected in South Carolina for the first time. Of four tree species in the plantation, eastern cottonwood, Populus deltoides Bartram, was the only one attacked, with nearly 40% of the trees sustaining ambrosia beetle damage. Clone ST66 sustained more damage than clone S7C15. ST66 trees receiving fertilization were attacked more frequently than trees receiving irrigation, irrigation_fertilization, or controls, although the number of S7C15 trees attacked did not differ among treatments. The study location is near major shipping ports; our results demonstrate the necessity for intensive monitoring programs to determine the arrival, spread, ecology, and impact of exotic scolytids.

  15. Revision of the Australian species of Figulus MacLeay, 1819 (Coleoptera: Lucanidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, Cinzia; Zilioli, Michele; Bartolozzi, Luca; Bartolozzi, Luca

    2016-11-10

    The Australian species of the genus Figulus MacLeay, 1819 (Coleoptera: Lucanidae: Lucaninae: Figulini) are reviewed. Four new synonymies are established: F. howei De Lisle, 1967 and F. tambourinensis Mjöberg, 1916 are junior synonyms of F. nitens Waterhouse, 1874 (new synonymy); F. laevithorax Bomans is a junior synonym of F. regularis Westwood, 1834 (new synonymy); F. mento Albers, 1883 and F. mento foveatus Kriesche, 1922 are junior synonyms of F. sulcicollis Hope in Westwood, 1845 (new synonymy). The number of Figulus species known from Australia thus decreases to seven, four of which are endemic to Australia and one to Christmas Island. Lectotypes are designated for F. australicus Thomson, 1862, F. clivinoides Thomson, 1862, F. nitens Waterhouse, 1874, F. rossi Gahan, 1900, and F. tambourinensis Mjöberg, 1916. All the seven valid species are redescribed and a key is given for their identification. Photographs of the habitus, the mentum and illustrations of the aedeagus for all the taxa are also included. New unpublished data on the host plants and habitats for some of the Australian species are included.

  16. Coleoptera in the Altai Mountains (Mongolia: species richness and community patterns along an ecological gradient

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    Oyundelger Khurelpurev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Altai Mountains located in western Mongolia comprise diverse habitats including forest, mountain steppe, dry steppe, semidesert, and desert. This study used advanced statistics to examine how diversity and species composition of beetle communities depend on vegetation pattern and environmental factors along an ecological gradient from steppe to desert. Our study included the beetle families Tenebrionidae, Carabidae, Curculionidae, and Coccinellidae, which account for the majority of the known beetle fauna in the area. The most abundant Coleoptera in all plots were Harpalus limbaris, Corsyra fusula, and Anatolica cellicola; otherwise, we caught a large number of rare species. The beta diversity of communities was correlated with distance between plots. Species richness of beetles was positively impacted by plant cover and correlated negatively with rising temperatures, whereas Shannon diversity of beetle communities was significantly higher in areas with higher precipitation. Distribution and community composition of Coleopterans were governed by environmental factors, especially plant diversity, mean annual temperature, and summer precipitation, as revealed by redundancy analysis.

  17. Two new species of the megadiverse lentic diving-beetle genus Hydrovatus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae described from NE Thailand

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    Olof Bistrom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe two new Hydrovatus species (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporinae: Hydrovatini from the province of Khon Kaen, Isan region in NE Thailand. Hydrovatus is the third most species rich genus of diving beetles (Dytiscidae. It occurs on all continents except Antarctica and now numbers 210 currently recognized species. Both new species, H. diversipunctatus sp. n. and H. globosus sp. n., were collected at lights and are only known from the type locality “Khon Kaen” (a city and province. Diagnoses based on morphology for the separation from closely related species are given together with illustrations of male genitalia and habitus photos. We provide a determination key to Old World species of the pustulatus species group and to Oriental species of the oblongipennis species group.

  18. Preferência alimentar de adultos de Metriona elatior Klug (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae por diferentes híbridos de Solanum melogena Linnaeus (Solanaceae = Feeding preference of adults of Metriona elatior Klug (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae for different hybrids of Solanum melogena Linnaeus (Solanaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gandolfo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Metriona elatior Klug é potencial candidato para o controle biológico de Solanum viarum Dunal (joá-bravo, pois as larvas e adultos se alimentam de suas folhas e têm baixa taxa de dispersão. A especificidade é um forte requisito para a adequabilidade de umorganismo como agente de controle biológico, especialmente pela estratégia inundativa. Desse modo, a preferência alimentar do adulto desse inseto em laboratório foi avaliada em 14 híbridos de Solanum melogena Linnaeus (berinjela. A criação estoque foi mantida emlaboratório, com os indivíduos se alimentando de folhas do joá-bravo. O estudo foi realizado utilizando-se testes de dupla e múltipla escolha, em períodos de alimentação de 24 e 48h, oferecendo-se discos de tecido foliar, em condições de placas de Petri. As avaliaçõesda sobrevivência e consumo foliar dos insetos adultos recém-emergidos foram realizadas em folhas de joá-bravo e dos híbridos de berinjela, mantidas túrgidas pela imersão do pecíolo em água. A área foliar foi medida antes e após quatro dias de exposição ao inseto. M. elatiorapresentou preferência para alimentação, sobrevivência e consumo na planta daninha. A preferência do crisomelídeo foi maior para o híbrido ‘Minikuro Kowishiki’ de berinjela.Metriona elatior Klug is a potential biocontrol agent for Solanum viarum Dunal (tropical soda apple, because larvae and adults feed on its leaves and this species shows a low dispersion rate. Specificity plays a major role in the feasibility of an organism as abiological control agent, especially in the inundative strategy. The feeding preference of M. elatior adults was evaluated to 14 eggplant (Solanum melogena Linnaeus hybrids. Mass rearing was carried out under lab conditions, with the insect feeding directly on S. viarum leaves. The study started with dual and multiple choice tests in 24 and 48 hour feeding times, by offering leaf disks in Petri dish conditions. Survival and leaf

  19. Dimorfismo sexual em Metaxyonycha angusta (Perty, 1832 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v27i2.1321 Sex determination in Metaxyonycha angusta (Perty, 1832 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v27i2.1321

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norivaldo dos Anjos

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available O besouro Metaxyonycha angusta é um dos principais desfolhadores de eucalipto, resultando seu ataque em consideráveis perdas na produção de madeira. O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar caracteres morfológicos que permitam realizar a sexagem em M. angusta. Insetos adultos foram coletados no município de Andrêlandia, Estado de Minas Gerais. A avaliação das características morfológicas externas foi realizada em 50 insetos de cada sexo. Procuraram-se características morfológicas externas para diferir os sexos dos indivíduos dessa espécie, tais como a forma dos uroesternitos e as dimensões corporais. A sexagem de em>M. angusta deve ser realizada examinando-se o formato do 5º uroesternito. Nos machos, a margem posterior apresenta um leve recorte e, nas fêmeas, a margem posterior desse mesmo segmento apresenta um entalhe mais profundoAmong eucalypt leaf beetles, Metaxyonycha angusta is a very important pest because it causes losses to the wood production in the Brazilian eucalypt plantations. This work deals to the morphologic character which allow sex determination in that insect specie. External morphologic characteristics, such as urosternite shapes and body measurements, were examined from 50 insects of each sex. Sex determination may be found out through examining the fifth urosternite. In males, there is a small clipping at the posterior edge of the fifth urosternite. Females have the posterior edge of that segment presenting a deeper notch

  20. A new brachypterous species of Phoberus MacLeay (Coleoptera: Trogidae) and status changes of species in the East African P. nigrociliatus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strümpher, Werner P; Scholtz, Clarke H

    2017-01-06

    A new brachypterous species, Phoberus nyikanus Strümpher (Coleoptera: Trogidae), is described from Malawi. In addition, three status changes are proposed: Phoberus nigrociliatus (Kolbe) from the Ethiopian highlands, P. nyansanus (Haaf) from central East Africa, and P. nyassicus (Haaf) from southern Tanzanian mountains are elevated to species level. A key is provided to aid in the identification of members of the P. nigrociliatus group, and the species in the group are illustrated by photographs. This brings the total number of species in the genus to 44.

  1. Ogyges Kaup, a flightless genus of Passalidae (Coleoptera) from Mesoamerica: nine new species, a key to identify species, and a novel character to support its monophyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Enio B

    2014-12-02

    Nine new species of Ogyges Kaup (Coleoptera: Passalidae) from the mountainous cloud forests of Mesoamerica are described: O. handali new species and O. menchuae new species from Guatemala; O. cavei new species, O. laurae new species, O. llama new species, O. mutenroshii new species, O. ratcliffei new species, and O. toriyamai new species from Honduras; and O. sandinoi new species from Nicaragua, the first objective record of the genus for this country. A key to the adult Ogyges is included. The work also shows that Ogyges possesses an exclusive autapomorphy: a trituberculate suprainternal tooth of each mandible (one long and wide apical tubercle and two connected, small, almost conical, basal tubercles). This character state is found in all known Ogyges species and is proposed as a synapomorphy that supports the monophyly of the genus.

  2. Naturally-Occurring Entomopathogenic Fungi on Three Bark Beetle Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Bulgaria

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    Slavimira A. Draganova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae belong to one of the most damaging groups of forest insects and the activity of their natural enemies –pathogens, parasitoids,parasites or predators suppressing their population density,is of great importance. Biodiversity of entomopathogenic fungi on bark beetles in Bulgaria has been investigated sporadically. The aim of this preliminary study was to find, identify and study morphological characteristics of fungal entomopathogens naturally-occurring in populations of three curculionid species – Ips sexdentatus Boern, Ips typographus (L. and Dryocoetes autographus (Ratz.. Dead pest adults were found under the bark of Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies trees collectedfrom forests in the Maleshevska and Vitosha Mountains. Fungal pathogens were isolated into pure cultures on SDAY (Sabouraud dextrose agar with yeast extract and were identified based on morphological characteristics both on the host and in a culture.Morphological characteristics of the isolates were studied by phenotypic methods. The fungal isolates obtained from dead adults of Ips sexdentatus, Ips typographus and D. autographus were found to belong to the species Beauveria bassiana (Bals. – Criv. Vuillemin,Beauveria brongniartii (Saccardo Petch and Isaria farinosa (Holmsk. Fries (anamorph Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes: Hypocreales, Cordycipitaceae. Morphological traits of the isolates are described.

  3. Distribution of the Related Weevil Species Sitophilus oryzae and S. zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Farmer Stored Grains of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F; Yan, X P

    2018-03-28

    Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are major insect pests of farm-stored grains in China. Moreover, their respective distribution and prevalence are not yet assessed for grain storage facilities in China. The two species are often difficult to identify by morphology because they are immature or their presence is only evident from fragments. Species-specific primers were, therefore, designed based on the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) of 34 populations found throughout China and three foreign populations. Following the validation of this molecular-based approach for species identification, the distribution of the two species in China was determined from 68 different grain storage facilities. The results indicate that S. zeamais is prevalent throughout the country whereas S. oryzae is mainly present in the south and the center of China. It is believed that this distribution pattern is in function of ecological adaptation, mostly determined by temperature and the grain species. This is the first report of its kind, demonstrating the distribution of S. zeamais and S. oryzae in grain storage facilities throughout China and analyzed by species-specific primers of COI.

  4. New records of Paracrias Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae as parasitoids on weevil larvae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae in Brazil, with the description of a new species

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    Luciano Palmieri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Paracrias strii Schauff, 1985 and P. ceratophaga Palmieri & Hansson sp. nov. are first record in Brazil and both are associated with Ceratopus Schoenherr larvae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae reared from syconia of two species of fig-trees. Both Paracrias species are diagnosed and illustrated. Males of P. ceratophaga sp. nov. are described. The association of Paracrias with weevil larvae is briefly discussed.

  5. Further contributions to the Coleoptera fauna of New Brunswick with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Reginald P; Webster, Vincent L; Alderson, Chantelle A; Hughes, Cory C; Sweeney, Jon D

    2016-01-01

    This paper treats 134 new records of Coleoptera for the province of New Brunswick, Canada from the following 41 families: Gyrinidae, Carabidae, Dytiscidae, Histeridae, Leiodidae, Scarabaeidae, Scirtidae, Buprestidae, Elmidae, Limnichidae, Heteroceridae, Ptilodactylidae, Eucnemidae, Throscidae, Elateridae, Lampyridae, Cantharidae, Dermestidae, Bostrichidae, Ptinidae, Cleridae, Melyridae, Monotomidae, Cryptophagidae, Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae, Nitidulidae, Endomychidae, Coccinellidae, Corylophidae, Latridiidae, Tetratomidae, Melandryidae, Mordellidae, Tenebrionidae, Mycteridae, Pyrochroidae, Aderidae, Scraptiidae, Megalopodidae, and Chrysomelidae. Among these, the following four species are newly recorded from Canada: Dirrhagofarsus ernae Otto, Muona & McClarin (Eucnemidae), Athous equestris (LeConte) (Elateridae), Ernobius opicus Fall (Ptinidae), and Stelidota coenosa Erichson (Nitidulidae). The Family Limnichidae is newly reported for New Brunswick, and one species is added to the fauna of Nova Scotia. Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer (Latridiidae), Tetratoma (Abstrulia) variegata Casey (Tetratomidae), and Chauliognathus marginatus (Fabricius) (Cantharidae) are removed from the faunal list of New Brunswick, and additional records of Lacconotus punctatus LeConte (Mycteridae) are presented and discussed. Lindgren funnel traps provided specimens for 104 (78%) of the species and were the sole source of specimens for 89 (66%) of the species reported here, suggesting they are a very useful tool for sampling Coleoptera fauna in the forests of New Brunswick.

  6. Integrative taxonomy of New Caledonian beetles: species delimitation and definition of the Uloma isoceroides species group (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, Ulomini, with the description of four new species

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    Laurent Soldati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available New Caledonia is an important biodiversity hotspot with much undocumented biodiversity, especially in many insect groups. Here we used an integrative approach to explore species diversity in the tenebrionid genus Uloma (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, Ulomini, which encompasses about 150 species, of which 22 are known from New Caledonia. To do so, we focused on a morphologically homogeneous group by comparing museum specimens with material collected during several recent field trips. We also conducted molecular phylogenetic analyses based on a concatenated matrix of four mitochondrial and three nuclear genes for 46 specimens. The morphological study allowed us to discover and describe four new species that belong to the group of interest, the Uloma isoceroides group. Molecular analyses confirmed the species boundaries of several of the previously described species and established the validity of the four new species. The phylogenetic analyses also provided additional information on the evolutionary history of the group, highlighting that a species that was thought to be unrelated to the group was in fact a member of the same evolutionary lineage. Molecular species delimitation confirmed the status of the sampled species of the group and also suggested some hidden (cryptic biodiversity for at least two species of the group. Altogether this integrative taxonomic approach has allowed us to better define the boundaries of the Uloma isoceroides species group, which comprises at least 10 species: Uloma isoceroides (Fauvel, 1904, Uloma opacipennis (Fauvel, 1904, Uloma caledonica Kaszab, 1982, Uloma paniei Kaszab, 1982, Uloma monteithi Kaszab, 1986, Uloma robusta Kaszab, 1986, Uloma clamensae sp. n., Uloma condaminei sp. n., Uloma jourdani sp. n., and Uloma kergoati sp. n. We advocate more studies on other New Caledonian groups, as we expect that much undocumented biodiversity can be unveiled through the use of similar approaches.

  7. A new species of oobius trjapitzin (hymenoptera:encyrtidae) from the russian far east that parasitizes eggs of emerald ash borer (coleoptera:buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new egg parasitoid of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) from the Russian Far East, Oobius primorskyensis Yao et Duan is described. Both morphological characters and analysis of DNA sequence divergence suggest that this species is different from the previ...

  8. An interactive multi-entry key to the species of Megalostomis Chevrolat, with description of a new species from Paraguay (Chrysomelidae, Cryptocephalinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Agrain

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this contribution is to release an interactive multi-entry key to all known species of the genus IChevrolat. This key constitutes a new tool created to aid the identification of the species of this diverse genus, which occasionally may be difficult to identify to the species-level, due to the lack of reference collections for most countries within its distribution range, and to the presence of intra-specific variation and secondary sexual characters. It is expected that this on-line key will facilitate future periodic updates, and will benefit all those persons interested in identifying these taxa. The present paper also includes the description of Megalostomis juanenrique sp. n., a new species from Paraguay. In addition, Megalostomis gigas Lacordaire, and Megalostomis robustipes Monrós are newly cited for the fauna of Paraguay. The online interactive Lucid key is available at http://keys.lucidcentral.org/keys/v3/megalostomis. Offline Lucid data files in LIF and SDD formats are also available at doi: 10.3897/zookeys.425.7631.app1 and doi: 10.3897/zookeys.425.7631.app2.

  9. Faunistic notes on Cryptophagidae and Latridiidae of Talassemtane National Park, Western Rif, Morocco, with the description of a new species (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, José Carlos; Benyahia, Yousra; Brustel, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    In order to contribute to the knowledge of beetles (Coleoptera) of the mountainous region of Morocco, Talassemtane National Park (Western Rif, Chefchaouen district, Morocco) was surveyed. This is an exceptional protected area of the Mediterranean Intercontinental Biosphere Reserve (RIBM). The checklist was made using different traps combined with active periodical searches during 2013-2015. A total of 153 beetles belonging to 19 species from four subfamilies (Cryptophagidae: Cryptophaginae and Atomariinae; Latridiidae: Latridiinae and Corticariinae) was collected. Dienerella (Cartoderema) talassemata, a new species (Coleoptera: Latridiidae) was compared to other morphologically related species. One species is recorded for the first time for North Africa; three species are new records for Morocco. In addition, amongst the species listed, three are endemic to Morocco: Dienerella talassemtana sp. n ., Caenoscelis humifera and Dienerella besucheti .

  10. Faunistic notes on Cryptophagidae and Latridiidae of Talassemtane National Park, Western Rif, Morocco, with the description of a new species (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Otero

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to contribute to the knowledge of beetles (Coleoptera of the mountainous region of Morocco, Talassemtane National Park (Western Rif, Chefchaouen district, Morocco was surveyed. This is an exceptional protected area of the Mediterranean Intercontinental Biosphere Reserve (RIBM. The checklist was made using different traps combined with active periodical searches during 2013–2015. A total of 153 beetles belonging to 19 species from four subfamilies (Cryptophagidae: Cryptophaginae and Atomariinae; Latridiidae: Latridiinae and Corticariinae was collected. Dienerella (Cartoderema talassemata, a new species (Coleoptera: Latridiidae was compared to other morphologically related species. One species is recorded for the first time for North Africa; three species are new records for Morocco. In addition, amongst the species listed, three are endemic to Morocco: Dienerella talassemtana sp. n., Caenoscelis humifera and Dienerella besucheti.

  11. Tanyproctus (Tanyproctus) arher (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae: Tanyproctini), a new species from the Socotra Island, Yemen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bezděk, Aleš; Sehnal, R.; Král, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3737, č. 2 (2013), s. 191-196 ISSN 1175-5326 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Coleoptera * Scarabaeoidea * Scarabaeidae Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.060, year: 2013 http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2013/f/zt03737p196.pdf

  12. Canuschiza of Socotra Island (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae). Part 2. Canuschiza minuta species group

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sehnal, R.; Král, D.; Bezděk, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2017), s. 77-86 ISSN 0374-1036 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Coleoptera * Scarabaeoidea * Scarabaeidae Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 0.632, year: 2016 https://www.biotaxa.org/AEMNP/article/view/35052

  13. Patterns of tree species usage by long-horned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Fiji

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Waqa-Sakiti, H.; Stewart, A.; Čížek, Lukáš; Hodge, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 1 (2014), s. 57-64 ISSN 0030-8870 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/12/1952 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Coleoptera Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.924, year: 2014 http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.2984/68.1.5

  14. Digitonthophagus Balthasar, 1959: taxonomy, systematics, and morphological phylogeny of the genus revealing an African species complex (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génier, François; Moretto, Philippe

    2017-03-31

    The taxonomy and systematics of the genus Digitonthophagus Balthasar (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae: Onthophagini) is revised. A detailed study of the male genitalia combined with external morphology suggests that the variability, previously recognized, for D. gazella is hiding a species complex within the Afrotropical region and the Arabian Peninsula. The current study recognizes 16 species; 13 from the Afrotropical region and Arabian Peninsula and three from the eastern portion of the Saharo-Arabian region and the continental Indomalayan region. Species are organized into six species groups based on the results of the morphology-based phylogenetic analysis. The following 12 species are described as new: D. aksumensis Génier new species; D. biflagellatus Génier new species; D. dilatatus Génier new species; D. eucatta Génier new species; D. falciger Génier new species; D. fimator Génier new species; D. namaquensis Génier new species; D. petilus Génier new species; D. sahelicus Moretto new species; D. uks Génier new species; D. ulcerosus Génier new species; and D. viridicollis Génier new species. In order to stabilize nomenclature, lectotypes are designated for Scarabaeus bonasus Fabricius, 1775; Scarabaeus catta Fabricius, 1787, and Onthophagus gazella lusinganus d'Orbigny. A neotype is designated for Scarabaeus dorcas Olivier, 1789 whose status and synonymy need to be altered in order to clarify the status of Scarabaeus gazella auctorum, the widely introduced species with economic importance. A naming scheme is presented for the sclerites of the internal sac. External and male genitalia are illustrated and distribution maps are provided for each species.

  15. Navigator, a new endemic genus of Cetoniinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from Australia, with descriptions of two new species and behavioural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeseneder, Christian H; Hutchinson, Paul M

    2016-10-10

    The endemic flower beetle genus Navigator new genus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Schizorhinini) is described from Australia. Navigator contains species that are morphologically and behaviourally unusual when compared to the majority of other Australian flower beetles in several easily visible characters. A differential diagnosis with similar Australian schizorhinine genera and species is performed, and a key to its species is provided. Pseudoclithria fossor Lea, 1914 and Pseudoclithria ruficornis (Westwood, 1874) are moved to the genus Navigator, resulting in Navigator fossor new combination, which is designated as the type species, and Navigator ruficornis new combination. A lectotype is designated for Navigator fossor (Lea, 1914). We describe Navigator interior new species, from Central Australia and Navigator pixii new species, which occurs in Queensland and is the smallest Australian Schizorhinini known. Distribution information for all Navigator species is provided. Our observations of Navigator fossor and Navigator pixii show their larvae are free living in soil and feed on decaying leaves, which is the first time such behaviour is described in Australian cetoniines. We observe that three Navigator species are more tolerant of arid climate than most other Australian cetoniines, adults almost never visit flowers, and males are often in flight searching for sedentary females.

  16. Host specificity of Asian Chrysochus Chevr. in Dej. (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Eumolpinae) and their potential use for biological control of invasive Vincetoxicum species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The European herbaceous perennials Vincetoxicum rossicum (pale swallow-wort) and V. nigrum (black swallow-wort; Apocynaceae, subfamily Asclepiadoideae) have invaded various natural areas and managed habitats in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada, and a classical biological contro...

  17. Plagiometriona emarcida (Boheman, 1855) and Plagiometriona forcipata (Boheman, 1855) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae), a single species differing in larval performace and adult phenotype

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flinte, V.; Windsor, D.; Sekerka, Lukáš; de Macedo, M. V.; Monteiro, R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 44, 15-16 (2010), s. 891-904 ISSN 0022-2933 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Cassidinae * Plagiometriona * synonymy Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.782, year: 2010

  18. Bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae infesting mango trees (Mangifera indica L. in Southern Thailand, with two new species recorded for Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisut Sittichaya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen species of ambrosia beetles and two bark beetle belonging to the curculionid subfamilies Scolytinae andPlatypodinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae were collected from three infested mango trees (Mangifera indica L. in theresearch orchards of the Faculty of Natural Resources, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla Province. Two species,Arixyleborus grandis (Schedl and Xyleborinus sculptilis (Schedl, are recorded for the first time in Thailand.

  19. Necrophagous species of Diptera and Coleoptera in northeastern Brazil: state of the art and challenges for the Forensic Entomologist

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    Simão D. Vasconcelos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Inventories on necrophagous insects carried out in Brazil encompass mostly species from the southeastern and central-western regions of the country. This review aims to produce the first checklist of necrophagous Diptera and Coleoptera species of forensic relevance in northeastern Brazil, an area that concentrates high rates of homicides. We performed a literature survey on scientific articles, theses and dissertations regarding necrophagous insect species in the region, and contacted scientists who develop research on forensic entomology. Fifty-two species of Diptera belonging to eight families with previous record of necrophagy were reported in the region: Sarcophagidae, Calliphoridae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, Piophilidae, Phoridae, Anthomyiidae and Stratiomyidae. Coleopteran species from six families of forensic relevance were registered, although taxonomical identification remained superficial. Bait traps were the most frequent methodology used, followed by collection on animal carcasses. Seven Dipteran species from two families were registered on human cadavers. All species had been previously reported in other Brazilian states and/or other countries, although none has been effectively used in legal procedures in the region. The status of research on forensic entomology in northeastern Brazil is incipient, and the checklist produced here contributes to the knowledge on the local diversity of necrophagous insects.

  20. Descriptions of the Larvae of Two Species of Paranomala and One Species of Strigoderma (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Rutelinae) from Puebla, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Víctor Alfonso Cuate Mozo; Agustin Aragon Garcia; Betzabeth Cecilia Pérez Torres; Miguel Ángel Morón; Jesús Francisco López Olguín; Vicente Santiago Marco Mancebón

    2014-01-01

    The third instar larvae of Paranomala flavilla  (Bates), P. hoepfneri  (Bates) and Strigoderma costulipennis  Bates, collected in Puebla, Mexico, in soils cultivated with amaranth are described. Illustrations of the diagnostic structures and comments on the differences with other larvae of the genera studied in Mexico are included. CARACTERIZACIÓN DE LAS LARVAS DE DOS ESPECIES DE Paranomala Y UNA ESPECIE DE Strigoderma (COLEOPTERA: MELOLONTHIDAE: RUTELINAE) DE PUEBLA, MÉXICO. Se prese...

  1. Descriptions of the larvae of two species of paranomala and one species of strigoderma (coleoptera: melolonthidae: rutelinae) from puebla, mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Cuate Mozo, Víctor Alfonso; Aragon Garcia, Agustin; Pérez Torres, Betzabeth Cecilia; Morón, Miguel Ángel; López Olguín, Jesús Francisco; Marco Mancebón, Vicente Santiago

    2014-01-01

     The third instar larvae of Paranomala flavilla  (Bates), P. hoepfneri  (Bates) and Strigoderma costulipennis  Bates, collected in Puebla, Mexico, in soils cultivated with amaranth are described. Illustrations of the diagnostic structures and comments on the differences with other larvae of the genera studied in Mexico are included.CARACTERIZACIÓN DE LAS LARVAS DE DOS ESPECIES DE Paranomala Y UNA ESPECIE DE Strigoderma (COLEOPTERA: MELOLONTHIDAE: RUTELINAE) DE PUEBLA, MÉXICO.Se presentan las ...

  2. Novas espécies de Adetus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae, Apomecynini New species of Adetus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae, Apomecynini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se da descrição de novas espécies de Adetus LeConte, 1852, provenientes da Bolívia (Santa Cruz: Adetus cacapira sp. nov. e A. cecamirim sp. nov.; do Peru (Cuzco e da Bolívia (Santa Cruz: A. inca sp. nov. e do México (Veracruz: A. catemaco sp. nov.The following species of Adetus LeConte, 1852 are described: from Bolivia (Santa Cruz, A. cacapira sp. nov. and A. cecamirim sp. nov.; from Peru (Cuzco, and Bolívia (Santa Cruz, A. inca sp. nov.; from Mexico (Veracruz, A. catemaco sp. nov.

  3. Parasitism of Ground Beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) by a New Species of Hairworm (Nematomorpha: Gordiida) in Arctic Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Crystal M; Hanelt, Ben; Buddle, Christopher M

    2016-06-01

    The host-parasite associations between ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) and hairworms (Nematomorpha: Gordiida) collected from the Arctic (an understudied and ecologically important region) is described. Carabids and their parasites were collected from 12 sites spanning the 3 northernmost ecoclimatic zones of Canada (north boreal, subarctic, and high Arctic) using standardized methods. The beetles and hairworms were identified using traditional morphological approaches. Seven beetle species are recorded as hosts: Amara alpina, Pterostichus caribou, Pterostichus brevicornis, Pterostichus tareumiut, Pterostichus haematopus, Patrobus septentrionis, and Notiophilus borealis. All represent new host records (increasing the known North American host list from 14 to 21), and this is the first record of hairworm infection in the genus Notiophilus. Beetles from Banks Island, Northwest Territory, were infected in high numbers (11-19% per sampling period) and were used as an ecological case study. There was no significant relationship between infection status and host species, body size, or sex. Beetles collected in yellow pan traps and in wet habitats were more likely to be infected, likely due to water-seeking behavior induced by the parasites. Morphological examinations indicate that the hairworms collected from all locations represent a single, new species of Gordionus, making it only the sixth hairworm species and the third species of that genus found in Canada. Hosts are unknown for all other Canadian (and 1 Alaskan) Gordionus species.

  4. A review of the primary types of the Hawaiian stag beetle genus Apterocyclus Waterhouse (Coleoptera, Lucanidae, Lucaninae, with the description of a new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Paulsen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The species of the Hawaiian stag beetle genus Apterocyclus Waterhouse (Coleoptera: Lucanidae are reviewed following an examination of all primary types. Although the continued existence of the species is unknown and some possibly are extinct there are five recently extant species, including one species that is described here as new. The holotypes for all available names are pictured, and synonymies discussed and updated. Lectotypes are designated for Apterocyclus honoluluensis Waterhouse and A. munroi Sharp. A key to species and a revised catalog for the genus are provided.

  5. A review of the primary types of the Hawaiian stag beetle genus Apterocyclus Waterhouse (Coleoptera, Lucanidae, Lucaninae), with the description of a new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, M J; Hawks, David C

    2014-01-01

    The species of the Hawaiian stag beetle genus Apterocyclus Waterhouse (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) are reviewed following an examination of all primary types. Although the continued existence of the species is unknown and some possibly are extinct there are five recently extant species, including one species that is described here as new. The holotypes for all available names are pictured, and synonymies discussed and updated. Lectotypes are designated for Apterocyclus honoluluensis Waterhouse and A. munroi Sharp. A key to species and a revised catalog for the genus are provided.

  6. Correction of existing generic and species concepts in Platyceroidini (Coleoptera: Lucanidae: Lucaninae) and the description of four new species of Platyceroides Benesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, M J

    2017-05-23

    The endemic North American stag beetle tribe Platyceroidini Paulsen & Hawks (Coleoptera: Lucanidae: Lucaninae) is reviewed. All primary types were studied and the existing generic and species concepts are subsequently corrected. Based on study of the male genitalia and external morphology, the previously monotypic genus Platyceropsis Benesh is reduced to subgeneric status under Platyceroides Benesh, new status, and the species Platyceroides laticollis (Casey) and Platyceroides keeni (Casey) new combination are transferred to this subgenus. Praocerus, new subgenus, is created to contain the species Platyceroides latus (Fall), and P. viriditinctus (Benesh). In the nominal subgenus, confusion has resulted from the historic misapplication of the oldest available name, Platyceroides agassii (LeConte), resulting in significant underestimation of the number of extant taxa. Lectotypes are designated for four species-group names (listed in their original combinations): Platycerus latus Fall, Platycerus opacus Fall, Platycerus pacificus Casey, and Platycerus parvicollis Casey. Four new species (Platyceroides barrae, P. infernus, P. pampinatus, and P. umpquus) are described from California and Oregon, United States of America. The following species are valid and are removed from synonymy with P. agassii: P. pacificus (Casey), revised status, and P. californicus (Casey), revised status. The synonym Platycerus parvicollis Casey is transferred from Platyceroides agassii to P. californicus, new synonymy. With the addition of four new species and the correction of the mistaken synonymies the total number of species in the tribe Platyceroidini is now 16.

  7. Macrodactylini (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Melolonthinae: primary types of type species and taxonomic changes to the generic classification

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    Juares Fuhrmann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Type series for 35 type species of Macrodactylini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae are studied and taxonomic changes are proposed. The following 35 lectotypes are designated: Agaocnemis pruina Moser, 1918; Amphicrania ursina Burmeister, 1855; Anomalochilus singularis Blanchard, 1850; Anomalonyx uruguayensis Moser, 1921; Aulanota sulcipennis Moser, 1924; Barybas nanus Blanchard, 1850; Barybas volvulus Burmeister, 1855; Calodactylus tibialis Blanchard, 1850; Ceraspis pruinosa LePeletier de Saint-Fargeau & Audinet-Serville, 1828; Ceratolontha venezuelae Arrow, 1948; Chariodactylus chacoensis Moser, 1919; Clavipalpus dejeani Laporte, 1832; Corminus canescens Burmeister, 1855; Ctenotis obesa Burmeister, 1855; Ctilocephala pellucens Burmeister, 1855; Demodema fallax Blanchard, 1850; Euryaspis gaudichaudii Blanchard, 1851; Faula cornuta Blanchard, 1850; Gama grandicornis Blanchard, 1850; Gastrohoplus mirabilis Moser, 1921; Mallotarsus spadiceus Blanchard, 1850; Manodactylus gaujoni Moser, 1919; Manopus biguttatus Conte de Castelnau, 1840; Melolontha rufipennis Fabricius, 1801; Oedichira pachydactyla Burmeister, 1855; Pachycerus castaneipennis Guérin-Méneville, 1831; Pachylotoma viridis Blanchard, 1850; Pectinosoma elongata Arrow, 1913; Philochlaenia virescens Blanchard, 1842; Plectris tomentosa LePeletier de Saint-Fargeau & Audinet-Serville, 1828; Pseudohercitis viridiaenea Moser, 1921; Rhinaspoides aeneofusca Moser, 1919; Schizochelus flavescens Blanchard, 1850; Serica marmorea Guérin-Méneville, 1831; and Ulomenes hypocrita Blanchard, 1850. The following six genera are revalidated: Byrasba Harold, 1869 (formerly a synonym of Rhinaspis Perty, 1833; Euryaspis Blanchard, 1851 (formerly a synonym of Plectris LePeletier de Saint-Fargeau & Audinet-Serville, 1828; Junkia Dalla Torre, 1913 (formerly a synonym of Plectris; Faula Blanchard, 1850 (formerly a synonym of Ceraspis LePeletier de Saint-Fargeau & Audinet-Serville, 1828; Paulosawaya

  8. A taxonomic revision of the Cymindis (Pinacodera limbata species group (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Lebiini, including description of a new species from Florida, U.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Hunting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cymindis (Pinacodera limbata species group (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Lebiini is a precinctive New World taxon with ranges extended from portions of temperate southeastern Canada and the U.S.A. through the montane regions of Mexico, south to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. The group is distinguishable from all other members of the subgenus Pinacodera by males possessing a distinctive sclerite (endophallic plate at the apex of the endophallus. In the past, a lack of material and misunderstandings of range of variation within species have contributed to confusion about how many species there really are.This revision of the limbata species group includes a classification, a key to groups within the subgenus Pinacodera and species within the limbata group, descriptions of species, re-rankings and new synonymies. In total 10 taxa are treated, with 6 new synonyms proposed, 1 new combination introduced and 1 new species described: Cymindis (Pinacodera rufostigma (type locality: Archbold Biological Station, Highlands County, Florida, U.S.A.. Each taxon is characterized in terms of structural features of adults, habitat, geographical distribution, and chorological affinities. Available ecological information and treatments of variation are included.

  9. Phenological changes of the most commonly sampled ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) species in the UK environmental change network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozsgai, Gabor; Baird, John; Littlewood, Nick A.; Pakeman, Robin J.; Young, Mark R.

    2018-03-01

    Despite the important roles ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) play in ecosystems, the highly valued ecosystem services they provide, and ample descriptive documentation of their phenology, the relative impact of various environmental factors on carabid phenology is not well studied. Using the long-term pitfall trap capture data from 12 terrestrial Environmental Change Network (ECN) sites from the UK, we examined how changing climate influenced the phenology of common carabids, and the role particular climate components had on phenological parameters. Of the 28 species included in the analyses, 19 showed earlier start of their activity. This advance was particularly pronounced in the spring, supporting the view that early phenophases have a greater tendency to change and these changes are more directly controlled by temperature than later ones. Autumn activity extended only a few cases, suggesting a photoperiod-driven start of hibernation. No association was found between life-history traits and the ability of species to change their phenology. Air temperatures between April and June were the most important factors determining the start of activity of each species, whilst late season precipitation hastened the cessation of activity. The balance between the advantages and disadvantages of changing phenology on various levels is likely to depend on the species and even on local environmental criteria. The substantially changing phenology of Carabidae may influence their function in ecosystems and the ecosystem services they provide.

  10. Outbreaks of three leaf beetles species in Salix plantations; Insektsskadegoerelse i Salixodlingar - bladbaggar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeglund, Solveig; Eklund, Karin; Bjoerkman, Christer [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Entomology

    1999-07-01

    Several species of leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) have caused economic damage in coppiced willow plantations in Britain. In Sweden we have observed outbreaks of three species; Phratora vulgatissima, Galerucella lineola and Lochmaea caprea. One feature of leaf beetles is that both adults and larvae feed on plants. The adults make holes in willow leaves when feeding whereas larvae skeletonize the leaves by eating on the leaf underside. Willows attacked by high densities of P. vulgatissima may show a yield loss of up to 40%. Leaf beetles have a large reproduction capacity. Each female can lay 10-20 eggs per day for several weeks. Without natural control the beetles would be very common in plantations. The egg and the first larval stages seem to be the most vulnerable to predation. With more knowledge about the biology of leaf beetle enemies it will perhaps be possible to use natural biological control programs as a method for managing these beetles.

  11. Phylogeny of the genus Yumtaax Boucher (Coleoptera, Passalidae, Proculini: Taxonomic and evolutionary implications with descriptions of three new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Fernando Beza-Beza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yumtaax Boucher (Coleoptera: Passalidae is an endemic genus from the temperate sierras of Mexico and includes six narrowly distributed species. Yumtaax species have been assigned to several genera of Passalidae throughout history, and a phylogenetic approach is necessary to understand species delimitation and interspecific relationships. This study reconstructed the molecular phylogeny of six Yumtaax morphotypes using parsimony and Bayesian analysis of DNA sequence data from the ribosomal nuclear gene region 28S and the mitochondrial gene regions 12S and cytochrome oxidase I (COI in addition to morphological characters. Analyses recovered two well-supported Yumtaax clades (the Yumtaax laticornis and Yumtaax imbellis clades that are possible sister lineages. One synapomorphic morphological character state and the geographic isolation of the group provide corroborative evidence for monophyly. Molecular phylogenetic analyses and traditional morphological examinations also resulted in the discovery of two undescribed Yumtaax species and the discovery of two separate evolutionary lineages (cryptic species within Yumtaax recticornis. As a result we describe three new species (Yumtaax veracrucensis Beza-Beza, Reyes-Castillo & Jameson, sp. n., Yumtaax cameliae Beza-Beza, Reyes-Castillo & Jameson, sp. n., and Yumtaax jimenezi Beza-Beza, Reyes-Castillo & Jameson, sp. n., redescribe two species (Yumtaax recticornis [Burmeister 1847] and Yumtaax laticornis [Truqui 1857], and provide a key to all nine Yumtaax species. This study is one of two studies to use molecular data to evaluate the evolutionary relationships of a genus of Bess Beetles (Passalidae, an ecologically important insect group exhibiting low morphological variability and heretofore lacking molecular phylogenetic study.

  12. Larval performance of the mustard leaf beetle (Phaedon cochleariae, Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) on white mustard (Sinapis alba) and watercress (Nasturtium officinale) leaves in dependence of plant exposure to ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifenrath, Kerstin, E-mail: reifenrath@biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.d [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Julius-von-Sachs Institut fuer Biowissenschaften, Julius-von-Sachs Platz 3, D-97082 Wuerzburg (Germany); Mueller, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.mueller@uni-bielefeld.d [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Julius-von-Sachs Institut fuer Biowissenschaften, Julius-von-Sachs Platz 3, D-97082 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Short-term exposure to ambient or attenuated ultraviolet (UV) radiation resulted in shifts in plant metabolite concentrations of the Brassicaceae Sinapis alba and Nasturtium officinale. Leaf quality also varied between plant species and within species due to age. Larvae of the oligophagous leaf beetle Phaedon cochleariae were raised on these different host leaves, in order to investigate the effects of variable plant chemistry on this herbivore. The performance of P. cochleariae was influenced by chemical differences between and within plant species but it responded with high plasticity to plants stressed by ultraviolet radiation. Body mass increase and developmental times of larvae were exclusively affected by plant species and leaf-age. However, developmental differences were fully compensated in the pupal stage. We suggest that the plasticity of herbivores may depend on the degree of specialisation, and insect performance may not necessarily be altered by stress-induced host plants. - The larval performance of an oligophagous leaf beetle is influenced by chemical differences between and within plant species but responds with high plasticity to plants stressed by ultraviolet radiation.

  13. Bionomics data and descriptions of the immatures of Calyptocephala gerstaeckeri Boheman (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), pest of the oil palm (Elaeis guineensis J.) and camedor palm (Chamaedorea elegans Mart.) (Arecaceae) in Tabasco, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordova-Ballona, Leonides; Sanchez-Soto, Saul

    2008-01-01

    Characters of the external morphology of egg, larval instars and pupae of Calyptocephala gerstaeckeri Boheman, insect pest of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis J.) and camedor palm (Chamaedorea elegans Mart.) in the State of Tabasco, Mexico, are described and illustrated. Some bionomics data are also presented. The specie was reared in the laboratory on young oil palm plants. (author)

  14. A revised checklist species of the Curculionoidea (Coleoptera, excluding Scolytinae of Rostov Oblast and Kalmykia, the southern part of European Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri G. Arzanov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This work provides a list of 703 species of weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea, excluding Scolytinae recorded in two adjacent administrative regions in the southern part of European Russia: Rostov Oblast and the Republic of Kalmykia. The species diversity of the ten recorded families is as follows: Nemonychidae (1, Anthribidae (10, Rhynchitidae (12, Attelabidae (2, Apionidae (70, Nanophyidae (12, Brachyceridae (2, Dryophthoridae (4, Erirhinidae (13, Curculionidae (577, excluding Scolytinae. In total, 151 species are added to the faunal list of the southern European Russia.

  15. Current state of knowledge on Wolbachia infection among Coleoptera: a systematic review

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    Łukasz Kajtoch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Despite great progress in studies on Wolbachia infection in insects, the knowledge about its relations with beetle species, populations and individuals, and the effects of bacteria on these hosts, is still unsatisfactory. In this review we summarize the current state of knowledge about Wolbachia occurrence and interactions with Coleopteran hosts. Methods An intensive search of the available literature resulted in the selection of 86 publications that describe the relevant details about Wolbachia presence among beetles. These publications were then examined with respect to the distribution and taxonomy of infected hosts and diversity of Wolbachia found in beetles. Sequences of Wolbachia genes (16S rDNA, ftsZ were used for the phylogenetic analyses. Results The collected publications revealed that Wolbachia has been confirmed in 204 beetle species and that the estimated average prevalence of this bacteria across beetle species is 38.3% and varies greatly across families and genera (0–88% infected members and is much lower (c. 13% in geographic studies. The majority of the examined and infected beetles were from Europe and East Asia. The most intensively studied have been two groups of herbivorous beetles: Curculionidae and Chrysomelidae. Coleoptera harbor Wolbachia belonging to three supergroups: F found in only three species, and A and B found in similar numbers of beetles (including some doubly infected; however the latter two were most prevalent in different families. A total of 59% of species with precise data were found to be totally infected. Single infections were found in 69% of species and others were doubly- or multiply-infected. Wolbachia caused numerous effects on its beetle hosts, including selective sweep with host mtDNA (found in 3% of species, cytoplasmic incompatibility (detected in c. 6% of beetles and other effects related to reproduction or development (like male-killing, possible parthenogenesis or haplodiploidy

  16. Current state of knowledge on Wolbachia infection among Coleoptera: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotásková, Nela

    2018-01-01

    Background Despite great progress in studies on Wolbachia infection in insects, the knowledge about its relations with beetle species, populations and individuals, and the effects of bacteria on these hosts, is still unsatisfactory. In this review we summarize the current state of knowledge about Wolbachia occurrence and interactions with Coleopteran hosts. Methods An intensive search of the available literature resulted in the selection of 86 publications that describe the relevant details about Wolbachia presence among beetles. These publications were then examined with respect to the distribution and taxonomy of infected hosts and diversity of Wolbachia found in beetles. Sequences of Wolbachia genes (16S rDNA, ftsZ) were used for the phylogenetic analyses. Results The collected publications revealed that Wolbachia has been confirmed in 204 beetle species and that the estimated average prevalence of this bacteria across beetle species is 38.3% and varies greatly across families and genera (0–88% infected members) and is much lower (c. 13%) in geographic studies. The majority of the examined and infected beetles were from Europe and East Asia. The most intensively studied have been two groups of herbivorous beetles: Curculionidae and Chrysomelidae. Coleoptera harbor Wolbachia belonging to three supergroups: F found in only three species, and A and B found in similar numbers of beetles (including some doubly infected); however the latter two were most prevalent in different families. A total of 59% of species with precise data were found to be totally infected. Single infections were found in 69% of species and others were doubly- or multiply-infected. Wolbachia caused numerous effects on its beetle hosts, including selective sweep with host mtDNA (found in 3% of species), cytoplasmic incompatibility (detected in c. 6% of beetles) and other effects related to reproduction or development (like male-killing, possible parthenogenesis or haplodiploidy induction, and

  17. Especies mexicanas de Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera) asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae) Mexican species of Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera) associated to agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae)

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Romo; Juan J. Morrone

    2012-01-01

    Se estudiaron las especies de picudos o gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae) en México. Se registraron 5 especies asociadas con especies de Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes y Yucca; de éstas, 4 pertenecen a la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis y Cactophagus spinolae) y 1 a la Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus). Se presentan diagnosis, ilustraciones y una clave para la identificación de...

  18. Simple and Efficient Trap for Bark and Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to Facilitate Invasive Species Monitoring and Citizen Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, M S; Hulcr, J; Šigut, M; Lucky, A

    2015-06-01

    Bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae & Platypodinae) are among the most damaging forest pests worldwide, and monitoring is essential to damage prevention. Unfortunately, traps and attractants that are currently used are costly, and agencies rely on limited field personnel for deployment. The situation can be greatly aided by 1) the development of cost-effective trapping techniques, and 2) distribution of the effort through the Citizen Science approach. The goal of this study was to test a simple, effective trap that can be made and deployed by anyone interested in collecting bark and ambrosia beetles. Three trap types made from 2-liter soda bottles and, separately, four attractants were compared. Simple, one-window traps performed comparably at capturing species in traps painted or with multiple windows. A comparison of attractants in two-window traps found that 95% ethanol attracted the highest number of species but that Purell hand sanitizer (70% ethanol) and then Germ-X hand sanitizer (63% ethanol) were also effective. A perforated zip-top plastic bag containing Purell hanging over a trap filled with automobile antifreeze attracted the fewest species and individual specimens. Overall, >4,500 bark and ambrosia beetles, including 30 species were captured, representing a third of the regional species diversity. More than three quarters of the specimens were nonnative, representing nearly half of the known regional exotic species. These results suggest that simple one-window soda bottle traps baited with ethanol-based hand sanitizer will be effective and inexpensive tools for large-scale monitoring of bark and ambrosia beetles. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Lamprosoma W. Kirby (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae: descrição de nova espécie, redescrições e chave para algumas espécies sul americanas

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    Caxambú Marcelo Galeazzi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Lamprosoma alacre sp. nov. from Mato Grosso is described and illustrated. The genus Lamprosoma is redescribed and illustrations of characters are provided. The following south american species are redescribed: L. amethystinum Perty, 1832, L. azureum Germar, 1824, L. bicolor W. Kirby, 1818, L. chrysopygium Germar, 1824, L. corruscum Guérin-Méneville, 1844, L. podtiaguini Monrós, 1947 and L. triste Guérin-Méneville, 1844.

  20. White grubs (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae in the "Planalto Region", Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil: Key for identification, species richness and distribution

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    Mariana A. Cherman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available White grubs (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae in the "Planalto Region", Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil: Key for identification, species richness and distribution. The objective of this study was to survey the occurrence and geographic distribution of white grub species (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae in cultivated and non-cultivated fields of the "Planalto Region", Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil and develop a key at genus-level. Twenty-eight species from 15 genera and three subfamilies were recorded: Dynastinae, Melolonthinae and Rutelinae. The species or genera recorded for the first time in the state are: Cyclocephala metrica, C. tucumana, Isonychus albicinctus, Liogenys bidenticeps, L. fusca, L. obesa and L. sinuaticeps, Paranomala violacea, as well as unidentified species of Amononyx, Dicrania, Leucothyreus, Macrodactylus, Plectris and Rhizogeniates. Among the species recorded, 23 were associated with winter crops. Only Cyclocephala metrica, Dyscinetus rugifrons, two species of Leucothyreus and one species of the tribe Sericini were not present in cultivated crop fields. Cyclocephala flavipennis and Diloboderus abderus occurred in most of the municipalities sampled, often associated with Plectris sp., C. modesta and C. putrida. The highest richness of melolonthids was concentrated in the northeast of the Planalto region.

  1. Descriptions of the Larvae of Two Species of Paranomala and One Species of Strigoderma (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Rutelinae from Puebla, Mexico

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    Víctor Alfonso Cuate Mozo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The third instar larvae of Paranomala flavilla  (Bates, P. hoepfneri  (Bates and Strigoderma costulipennis  Bates, collected in Puebla, Mexico, in soils cultivated with amaranth are described. Illustrations of the diagnostic structures and comments on the differences with other larvae of the genera studied in Mexico are included. CARACTERIZACIÓN DE LAS LARVAS DE DOS ESPECIES DE Paranomala Y UNA ESPECIE DE Strigoderma (COLEOPTERA: MELOLONTHIDAE: RUTELINAE DE PUEBLA, MÉXICO. Se presentan las descripciones de la larva de tercer estadio de Paranomala flavilla (Bates, P. hoepfneri (Bates y Strigoderma costulipennis Bates, recolectadas en el estado de Puebla, México, en suelos con cultivo de amaranto (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.. Se incluyen ilustraciones distintivas y comentarios sobre las diferencias con las larvas de otras especies de los géneros estudiados en México.

  2. A diversidade inventarial de Coleoptera (Insecta em uma paisagem antropizada do Bioma Araucária The inventory diversity of Coleoptera (Insecta of an anthropized landscape in the Biome Araucaria

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    Norma G. Ganho

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Como parte do Projeto PROVIVE, foram analisadas a riqueza de espécies, a composição taxonômica, a proporção de espécies raras e a constância taxonômica ao nível de família relacionada à riqueza de espécies, em comunidades de Coleoptera, em Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná. Os dados foram obtidos a partir de coletas através de armadilha malaise no estrato do sub-bosque de cinco áreas com diferentes graus de intervenção antrópica, de setembro de 1999 a agosto de 2000. As 52 semanas de amostragem nas cinco áreas resultaram na coleta de 10.822 indivíduos de 1659 espécies. Todas as áreas apresentaram alta riqueza de espécies e diversidade, como indicado por vários índices. A área em estágio mais avançado de sucessão vegetal foi menos rica do que aquelas em estágio inicial/intermediária. De acordo com diferentes estimadores de riqueza de espécies, o número de espécies coletadas poderia aumentar de 22-123% com o aumento do esforço de coleta. As áreas menos conservadas foram mais ricas em espécies raras ("singletons", "doubletons" e únicas do que as mais conservadas. Nas cinco áreas houve uma constância taxonômica entre as famílias mais ricas (Curculionidae, Chrysomelidae, Cerambycidae, Staphylinidae, Mordelidae, Elateridae, Scarabaeidae, Coccinellidae e Tenebrionidae envolvendo 60% do total de espécies, como observado para a abundância de indivíduos. A existência de um padrão de constância taxonômica de famílias, quando considerados 60% da riqueza de espécies e/ou de abundância de indivíduos por local, poderá tornar mais fácil e rápido o estudo de comunidades de Coleoptera, habilitando a ordem a ser um táxon indicador de condições ambientais de áreas florestadas.The species richness, taxonomic composition, rare species, and taxonomic constancy at family level were studied in communities of Coleoptera in Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, as part of PROVIVE project. The data were gathered

  3. Mating Success, Longevity, and Fertility of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Chrysomelidae: Coleoptera in Relation to Body Size and Cry3Bb1-Resistant and Cry3Bb1-Susceptible Genotypes

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    Bryan Wade French

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Insect resistance to population control methodologies is a widespread problem. The development of effective resistance management programs is often dependent on detailed knowledge regarding the biology of individual species and changes in that biology associated with resistance evolution. This study examined the reproductive behavior and biology of western corn rootworm beetles of known body size from lines resistant and susceptible to the Cry3Bb1 protein toxin expressed in transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis maize. In crosses between, and within, the resistant and susceptible genotypes, no differences occurred in mating frequency, copulation duration, courtship duration, or fertility; however, females mated with resistant males showed reduced longevity. Body size did not vary with genotype. Larger males and females were not more likely to mate than smaller males and females, but larger females laid more eggs. Moderately strong, positive correlation occurred between the body sizes of successfully mated males and females; however, weak correlation also existed for pairs that did not mate. Our study provided only limited evidence for fitness costs associated with the Cry3Bb1-resistant genotype that might reduce the persistence in populations of the resistant genotype but provided additional evidence for size-based, assortative mating, which could favor the persistence of resistant genotypes affecting body size.

  4. Morphological characterization of pollens from three Apiaceae species and their ingestion by twelve-spotted lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ávila, V A; Aguiar-Menezes, E L; Gonçalves-Esteves, V; Mendonça, C B F; Pereira, R N; Santos, T M

    2016-04-19

    Larvae and adults of certain species of predator lady beetles feed on pollen, guaranteeing their survival, and at times, reproduction in the absence of preferred prey. Palynology, therefore, may contribute in the investigation of botanical families visited by these predators in order to obtain this floral resource. There are records of the visitation of Apiaceae flowers by Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer, 1775 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae), but not the ingestion of their pollen grains by this lady beetle. The external morphology of pollen grains of three Apiaceae aromatic species (Anethum graveolens L., Coriandrum sativum L., Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) was characterized, and it was evaluated the ingestion of these pollens by fourth instar larvae and adults of C. maculata upon confinement along with flowers of these Apiaceae for 24 and 48 hours. The pollen grains of those species presented similar external morphology. In the two times of exposure, the larvae ingested the same amount of pollen from the three Apiaceae species, and the amount of C. sativum pollen ingested was the same between larvae and adults. The amount of A. graveolens pollen grains ingested by the adults was significantly greater than the pollens of C. sativum and F. vulgare, in 24 hours, with the opposite occurring in 48 hours. In the first 24 hours, the adults ingested more A. graveolens pollen than the larvae, with the opposite occurring with F. vulgare. There was no significant difference in the amount of Apiaceae pollen ingested between larvae and adults in 48 hours. The results suggest that the pollen-eating habits of certain aphidophagous lady beetles may be crucial in their preservation within agro-ecosystems.

  5. Occurrence and biology of Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802 (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae parasitising different species of Coccinellidae (Coleoptera in Neotropical region

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    RB Silva

    Full Text Available Surveys on Coccinellidae (Coleoptera in Sete Lagoas city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, indicated the parasitism of adults of the species Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, 1775, Eriopis connexa (Germar, 1824 and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866, by Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802 (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae. Since then, the parasitoid have been maintained in its original hosts at the Insect Rearing Laboratory - LACRI of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Institution - Embrapa Milho e Sorgo. Besides the citation of occurrence in Brazil, this work also indicates the parasitoid preference for C. maculata (70% of parasitism, followed by O. v-nigrum (43.3% of parasitism and E. connexa (36.7% of parasitism. Total life cycle of D. coccinellae was longer on C. maculata (32.4 ± 0.48 days, compared to O. v-nigrum (29.5 ± 0.49 days and E. connexa (27.8 ± 0.4 days. Due to the relatively high percentage of field parasitism, D. coccinellae can reduce the efficiency of biological pest control by Coccinellidae predators especially in the case of C. maculata.

  6. Occurrence and biology of Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802) (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae) parasitising different species of Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) in Neotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R B; Cruz, I; Figueiredo, M L C; Pereira, A G; Penteado-Dias, A M

    2012-02-01

    Surveys on Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) in Sete Lagoas city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, indicated the parasitism of adults of the species Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, 1775, Eriopis connexa (Germar, 1824) and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866), by Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802) (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae). Since then, the parasitoid have been maintained in its original hosts at the Insect Rearing Laboratory - LACRI of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Institution - Embrapa Milho e Sorgo. Besides the citation of occurrence in Brazil, this work also indicates the parasitoid preference for C. maculata (70% of parasitism), followed by O. v-nigrum (43.3% of parasitism) and E. connexa (36.7% of parasitism). Total life cycle of D. coccinellae was longer on C. maculata (32.4 ± 0.48 days), compared to O. v-nigrum (29.5 ± 0.49 days) and E. connexa (27.8 ± 0.4 days). Due to the relatively high percentage of field parasitism, D. coccinellae can reduce the efficiency of biological pest control by Coccinellidae predators especially in the case of C. maculata.

  7. Age-Stage, Two-Sex Life Tables of the Lady Beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Feeding on Different Aphid Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Shakeel, Muhammad; Iftikhar, Ayesha; Shahid, Muhammad Rafiq; Zhu, Xun

    2018-04-02

    Life table and predation data were collected for Coccinella septempunctata (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) feeding on three different host aphid species, Aphis craccivora (Koch) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), Lipaphis erysimi (Kaltenbach) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), and Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), under laboratory conditions, using age-stage, two-sex life table. The preadult developmental period of C. septempunctata was the shortest on M. persicae (21.12 d) and the longest on A. craccivora (28.81 d). Net reproductive rate (R0) ranged from 77.31 offspring per individual on A. craccivora to 165.97 offspring per individual on M. persicae. Mean generation time (T) ranged from 39.10 d on M. persicae to 51.96 d on L. erysimi. Values of the intrinsic rate of increase (r) decreased in the order M. persicae, A. craccivora, and L. erysimi (0.1302, 0.0864 and 0.0848 d-1, respectively). The highest finite rate of increase (λ) was observed on M. persicae (1.1391 d-1) and the lowest was observed on A. craccivora and L. erysimi (1.0903 and 1.0885 d-1, respectively). This information will be useful in relation to the mass rearing of C. septempunctata in biological control systems.

  8. Review of Cycadophila Xu, Tang & Skelley (Coleoptera: Erotylidae: Pharaxonothinae) inhabiting Cycas (Cycadaceae) in Asia, with descriptions of a new subgenus and thirteen new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Paul; Xu, Guang; Tang, William; Lindström, Anders J; Marler, Thomas; Khuraijam, Jibankumar Singh; Singh, Rita; Radha, P; Rich, Stephen

    2017-05-12

    The genus Cycadophila Xu, Tang & Skelley (Coleoptera: Erotylidae: Pharaxonothinae) associated with Cycas L. (Cycadacaeae) in Asia is reviewed. Strobilophila, new subgenus, with five species is described: Cycadophila (Strobilophila) assamensis new species, C. (S.) hiepi new species, C. (S.) kwaiensis new species, C. (S.) tansachai new species and C. (S.) yangi new species, all associated with Cycas. For the nominate subgenus Cycadophila eight new species are described, Cycadophila (Cycadophila) abyssa new species, C. (C.) collina new species,C. (C.) samara new species, C. (C.) convexa new species, C. (C.) cyclochasma new species, C. (C.) eurynota new species, C. (C.) papua new species, and C. (C.) torquata new species and four new generic combinations are proposed: C. (C.) vittata (Arrow) new combination, C. (C.) discimaculata (Mader) new combination, C. (C.) intermedia (Chûjô) new combination, and C. (C.) lata (Grouvelle) new combination. Only the first three listed species of the nominate subgenus have known associations with Cycas. Species are distinguished on the basis of morphology and/or by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. The larva of subgenus Strobilophila is described based on individuals collected together with adults and matched with analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Keys to subgenera and species of known adults and larvae are provided.

  9. Preferência alimentar de adultos de Metriona elatior Klug (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae por diferentes híbridos de Solanum melogena Linnaeus (Solanaceae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i4.5874 Feeding preference of adults of Metriona elatior Klug (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae for different hybrids of Solanum melogena Linnaeus (Solanaceae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i4.5874

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    Robinson Antonio Pitelli

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Metriona elatior Klug é potencial candidato para o controle biológico de Solanum viarum Dunal (joá-bravo, pois as larvas e adultos se alimentam de suas folhas e têm baixa taxa de dispersão. A especificidade é um forte requisito para a adequabilidade de um organismo como agente de controle biológico, especialmente pela estratégia inundativa. Desse modo, a preferência alimentar do adulto desse inseto em laboratório foi avaliada em 14 híbridos de Solanum melogena Linnaeus (berinjela. A criação estoque foi mantida em laboratório, com os indivíduos se alimentando de folhas do joá-bravo. O estudo foi realizado utilizando-se testes de dupla e múltipla escolha, em períodos de alimentação de 24 e 48h, oferecendo-se discos de tecido foliar, em condições de placas de Petri. As avaliações da sobrevivência e consumo foliar dos insetos adultos recém-emergidos foram realizadas em folhas de joá-bravo e dos híbridos de berinjela, mantidas túrgidas pela imersão do pecíolo em água. A área foliar foi medida antes e após quatro dias de exposição ao inseto. M. elatior apresentou preferência para alimentação, sobrevivência e consumo na planta daninha. A preferência do crisomelídeo foi maior para o híbrido Minikuro Kowishiki de berinjela.Metriona elatior Klug is a potential biocontrol agent for Solanum viarum Dunal (tropical soda apple, because larvae and adults feed on its leaves and this species shows a low dispersion rate. Specificity plays a major role in the feasibility of an organism as a biological control agent, especially in the inundative strategy. The feeding preference of M. elatior adults was evaluated to 14 eggplant (Solanum melogena Linnaeus hybrids. Mass rearing was carried out under lab conditions, with the insect feeding directly on S. viarum leaves. The study started with dual and multiple choice tests in 24 and 48 hour feeding times, by offering leaf disks in Petri dish conditions. Survival and leaf

  10. Two new species of Batrisodes Reitter (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Pselaphinae) from China.

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    Jiang, Ri-Xin; Yin, Zi-Wei

    2016-12-05

    Two new species, Batrisodes linyejiei Jiang and Yin, new species and Batrisodes petalosus Jiang and Yin, new species, are described from China. The former species is associated with Formica ants and the latter with Myrmica ants. A key to all 11 Batrisodes species known to occur in China is provided.

  11. Diet improvement for western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is the most serious insect pest of corn (Zea mays L.) in the United States and parts of Europe, and arguably the world’s most expensive pest to control. Several diet formulations are currently used by industry and researchers t...

  12. Corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Lak

    Spatial dispersion is a main characteristic of insect populations. Dispersion pattern provides useful information for developing effective sampling and scouting programs because it affects sampling accuracy, efficiency, and precision. Insect dispersion, however, is dynamic in space and time and largely dependent upon interactions among insect, plant and environmental factors. This study investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of corn rootworm dispersion at different spatial scales by using the global positioning system, the geographic information system, and geostatistics. Egg dispersion pattern was random or uniform in 8-ha cornfields, but could be aggregated at a smaller scale. Larval dispersion pattern was aggregated regardless of spatial scales used in this study. Soil moisture positively affected corn rootworm egg and larval dispersions. Adult dispersion tended to be aggregated during peak population period and random or uniform early and late in the season and corn plant phenology was a major factor to determine dispersion patterns. The dispersion pattern of root injury by corn rootworm larval feeding was aggregated and the degree of aggregation increased as the root injury increased within the range of root injury observed in microscale study. Between-year relationships in dispersion among eggs, larvae, adult, and environment provided a strategy that could predict potential root damage the subsequent year. The best prediction map for the subsequent year's potential root damage was the dispersion maps of adults during population peaked in the cornfield. The prediction map was used to develop site-specific pest management that can reduce chemical input and increase control efficiency by controlling pests only where management is needed. This study demonstrated the spatio-temporal dynamics of insect population and spatial interactions among insects, plants, and environment.

  13. Effect of temperature and tree species on damage progression caused by whitespotted sawyer (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) larvae in recently burned logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Sébastien; Bauce, Eric; Berthiaume, Richard; Long, Bernard; Labrie, Jacques; Daigle, Louis-Frédéric; Hébert, Christian

    2013-06-01

    The whitespotted sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus scutellatus (Say) (Coleoptera: Ce-rambycidae), is one of the most damaging wood-boring insects in recently burned boreal forests of North America. In Canada, salvage logging after wildfire contributes to maintaining the timber volume required by the forest industry, but larvae of this insect cause significant damage that reduces the economic value of lumber products. This study aimed to estimate damage progression as a function of temperature in recently burned black spruce (Picea mariana (Miller) Britton, Sterns, and Poggenburg) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lambert) trees. Using axial tomographic technology, we modeled subcortical development and gallery depth progression rates as functions of temperature for both tree species. Generally, these rates were slightly faster in black spruce than in jack pine logs. Eggs laid on logs kept at 12 degrees C did not hatch or larvae were unable to establish themselves under the bark because no larval development was observed. At 16 degrees C, larvae stayed under the bark for > 200 d before penetrating into the sapwood. At 20 degrees C, half of the larvae entered the sapwood after 30-50 d, but gallery depth progression stopped for approximately 70 d, suggesting that larvae went into diapause. The other half of the larvae entered the sapwood only after 100-200 d. At 24 and 28 degrees C, larvae entered the sapwood after 26-27 and 21 d, respectively. At 28 degrees C, gallery depth progressed at a rate of 1.44 mm/d. Temperature threshold for subcortical development was slightly lower in black spruce (12.9 degrees C) than in jack pine (14.6 degrees C) and it was 1 degrees C warmer for gallery depth progression for both tree species. These results indicate that significant damage may occur within a few months after fire during warm summers, particularly in black spruce, which highlights the importance of beginning postfire salvage logging as soon as possible to reduce economic

  14. Glesirhanis bercioi, a new genus and species from Baltic amber (Coleoptera: Endomychidae: Leiestinae) with a checklist and nomenclatural notes regarding fossil Endomychidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Floyd W; Alekseev, Vitaly I

    2014-01-24

    A new genus and species of handsome fungus beetle, Glesirhanis bercioi gen. nov., sp. nov. (Coleoptera: Endomychidae: Leiestinae) is described from Baltic amber. The newly described genus is compared with all known extant and extinct genera of the subfamily. A key to the genera of Leiestinae including fossils and a checklist of fossil Endomychidae are provided. The status of two taxa previously placed in Endomychidae, Palaeoendomychus gymnus Zhang and Tetrameropsis mesozoica Kirejtshuk & Azar, is discussed, and a new status for the latter, elevating it to the family-level as Tetrameropseidae status nov., is proposed.

  15. Phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography reveals the internal morphology of a new fossil species of the Corticaria-sylvicola-group (Coleoptera: Latridiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reike, Hans-Peter; Bukejs, Andris; Arlt, Tobias; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Manke, Ingo

    2017-03-13

    Corticaria amberica sp. nov. (Coleoptera: Latridiidae) from Baltic amber is described and illustrated using the features of the male genitalia. To study these features, phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography was used for the first time with a member of this family. A literature-based checklist of fossil and subfossil Latridiidae is provided. The following new synonymy is established: Latridius alexeevi Bukejs, Kirejtshuk & Rücker, 2011 = Latridius usovae Sergi & Perkovsky, 2014 syn. nov. New fossil records for the species Latridius alexeevi Bukejs, Kirejtshuk & Rücker, Latridius jantaricus Borowiec, Revelieria groehni Sergi, Perkovsky & Reike, and Corticarina palaeominuta Reike are also presented.

  16. New species of Brachiacantha Dejean, 1837 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Mexico and Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor-Arriola, Jorge Ismael; Toledo-Hernández, Víctor Hugo

    2017-12-15

    Five new species of the genus Brachiacantha Dejean (Coccinellidae) from Mexico and Central America are described and illustrated. The species B. angulata sp. nov., B. truncata sp. nov., B. brevicuspidata sp. nov. and B. robustihamata sp. nov. are consistent with the dentipes group. The species B. brevihamata sp. nov. is consistent with the fifth group of Leng (1911); the species shares some characteristics with South American species.

  17. Preliminary list of Coleoptera heritage species of the Talassemtane National Park, Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Yousra Benyahia; Hervé Brustel; Salwa El Antry; Olivier Courtin; Noureddin Maatouf; Lionel Valladares; Latifa Rohi

    2016-01-01

    A faunistic survey on beetles was conducted within the Talassemtane National Park (Western Rif, District of Chefchaouen), in order to improve knowledge of their local diversity, to assess species and provide the first list of heritage species. This is an inventory that took place for 3 consecutive years (2013-2015). Out of 550 species identified so far, 137 are processed in this document, which lists heritage species: 67 endemic to Morocco, 20 rare saproxylic and 48 species new to Morocco, in...

  18. Species delimitation of the Hyphydrus ovatus complex in western Palaearctic with an update of species distributions (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae

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    Johannes Bergsten

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The species status of Hyphydrus anatolicus Guignot, 1957 and H. sanctus Sharp, 1882, previously often confused with the widespread H. ovatus (Linnaeus, 1760, are tested with molecular and morphological characters. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1 was sequenced for 32 specimens of all three species. Gene-trees were inferred with parsimony, time-free bayesian and strict clock bayesian analyses. The GMYC model was used to estimate species limits. All three species were reciprocally monophyletic with CO1 and highly supported. The GMYC species delimitation analysis unequivocally delimited the three species with no other than the three species solution included in the confidence interval. A likelihood ratio test rejected the one-species null model. Important morphological characters distinguishing the species are provided and illustrated. New distributional data are given for the following species: Hyphydrus anatolicus from Slovakia and Ukraine, and H. aubei Ganglbauer, 1891, and H. sanctus from Turkey.

  19. A new species of the subgenus Scymnus from Pakistan (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Azad; Chen, Xiaosheng; Qiu, Baoli; Wang, Xingmin

    2017-01-01

    A new species, Scymnus (Scymnus) contortubus Rashid, Chen & Wang, sp. n. , is described and illustrated from Pakistan. A diagnosis, remarks, illustrations, and a distribution map are provided of the new species and its most similar congener, S. (S..) nubilus Mulsant.

  20. A new species of the genusPhaenochilusWeise from China (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Chilocorini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Huo, Lizhi; Chen, Xiaosheng; Ren, Shunxiang; Wang, Xingmin

    2017-01-01

    A new species Phaenochilus albomarginalis Li & Wang, sp. n. is described. The only other species recorded from China is Phaenochilus metasternalis Miyatake, 1970 and it is described here for comparison. Diagnoses, detailed descriptions, illustrations, and distributions are provided.

  1. Mordellidae (Coleoptera: Heteromera) from Papua New Guinea, with descriptions of new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batten, R.

    1990-01-01

    New records from Papua New Guinea are given for the following species: Ophthalmoglipa australis Franciscolo, Tolidopalpus castaneicolor Ermisch, Mordellapygium elongatum Ray; the following new species are described: Paratomoxia agathae, Mordellistenoda ismayi, M. trapezoides, Glipostenoda

  2. A new species of Trechisibus from Peruvian Andes (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Trechinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Delgado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the new species Trechisibus (s. str. delestali sp. n., is described from the southern Peruvian Andes. The morphological differences with the geographically closest species of the subgenus are also presented and discussed.

  3. Inventory of the Lamiinae species (Insecta, Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) of the Parque Nacional do Itatiaia, RJ, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Monné, Marcela Laura; Monné, Miguel Angel; Quintino, Hingrid Yara; Botero, Juan Pablo; Machado, Vanessa Souza; Aragão, Allan Carelli; Simões, Marianna Vieira dos Passos; Cupello, Mario

    2012-01-01

    A survey of the Lamiinae species recorded in the Parque Nacional do Itatiaia, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, is presented. The data were based on literature, field work and in the collection of the Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Three hundred and twenty two species of Lamiinae are registered, and this represents about 30% of the species that occur in the Atlantic Rainforest. Forty two new distribution records are registered. One hundred and thirty five species are illu...

  4. A new species of Luchoelmis Spangler & Staines (Coleoptera: Elmidae) from Argentina and its probable larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archangelsky, Miguel; Brand, Cecilia

    2014-03-19

    A new species of riffle beetle from southwestern Argentina, Luchoelmis kapenkemkensis, is described. Its diagnostic characters are illustrated and the key for the identification the species of the genus is updated. A larva, very likely belonging to this species, is also described and compared to other related larvae.

  5. A second species of Cheleion from Johor, Malaysia (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Aphodiinae, Stereomerini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Král, David; Hájek, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    A new species of the genus Cheleion Vårdal & Forshage, 2010, Cheleion jendeki sp. n., from Johor, Malaysia is described, illustrated and compared with the type species of the genus, Cheleion malayanum Vårdal & Forshage, 2010. Photographs of the two species are presented. The adaptation to inquilinous lifestyle of Cheleion is compared with those in other beetle groups and briefly discussed.

  6. A new extant species of Electribius Crowson from Honduras (Coleoptera: Elateroidea: Artematopodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmel, Matthew L; Bocakova, Milada

    2015-03-05

    A new extant species of Electribius Crowson, E. llamae sp.n., is described from Cusuco National Park, Cortés Province, Honduras. This new species lacks one of the supposed autapomorphies of the genus; therefore the definition of the genus requires modification. A revised key to the known extant species is presented, and their known distributions are mapped.

  7. A new species of nearctic Ernobius Thomson (Coleoptera: Ptinidae: Ernobiinae) from Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel A. Arango

    2009-01-01

    A new species of Ernobius is described from material collected at the Griffith State Nursery in Wood County, Wisconsin, U.S.A. Ernobius youngi new species is described from a single adult female bringing the number of Ernobius species known from North America north of Mexico to 31.

  8. Reassessment of Species Diversity of the Subfamily Denticollinae (Coleoptera: Elateridae through DNA Barcoding.

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    Taeman Han

    Full Text Available The subfamily Denticollinae is a taxonomically diverse group in the family Elateridae. Denticollinae includes many morphologically similar species and crop pests, as well as many undescribed species at each local fauna. To construct a rapid and reliable identification system for this subfamily, the effectiveness of molecular species identification was assessed based on 421 cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI sequences of 84 morphologically identified species. Among the 84 morphospecies, molecular species identification of 60 species (71.4% was consistent with their morphological identifications. Six cryptic and/or pseudocryptic species with large genetic divergence (>5% were confirmed by their sympatric or allopatric distributions. However, 18 species, including a subspecies, had ambiguous genetic distances and shared overlapping intra- and interspecific genetic distances (range: 2.12%-3.67% suggesting incomplete lineage sorting, introgression of mitochondrial genome, or affection by endosymbionts, such as Wolbachia infection, between species and simple genetic variation within species. In this study, we propose a conservative threshold of 3.6% for convenient molecular operational taxonomic unit (MOTU identification in the subfamily Denticollinae based on the results of pairwise genetic distances analyses using neighbor-joining, mothur, Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery analysis, and tree-based species delimitation by Poisson Tree Processes analysis. Using the 3.6% threshold, we identified 87 MOTUs and found 8 MOTUs in the interval between 2.5% to 3.5%. Evaluation of MOTUs identified in this range requires integrative species delimitation, including review of morphological and ecological differences as well as sensitive genetic markers. From this study, we confirmed that COI sequence is useful for reassessing species diversity for polymorphic and polytypic species occurring in sympatric and allopatric distributions, and for a single species having

  9. The Hydraenidae of Cuba (Insecta: Coleoptera) III. Description of two new hygropetric species of Hydraena Kugelann.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deler-Hernández, Albert; Fikáček, Martin; Delgado, Juan A

    2017-04-07

    Two new species of the genus Hydraena Kugelann, 1794 collected from hygropetric habitats in eastern Cuba are described: Hydraena (Hydraenopsis) blancae sp. nov. from the Nipe-Sagua-Baracoa mountain range, and Hydraena (Hydraenopsis) matthiasi sp. nov. from the Sierra Maestra mountain range. Both species, especially the latter, are closely related to Hydraena (Hydraenopsis) franklyni Deler-Hernández & Delgado, 2012. Diagnostic characters for both new species are provided and illustrated; habitat information and distributional data are also included. An updated key to Cuban species of Hydraena is provided. With this study, the number of species of Hydraena known from Cuba raises to six.

  10. Preliminary list of Coleoptera heritage species of the Talassemtane National Park, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousra Benyahia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A faunistic survey on beetles was conducted within the Talassemtane National Park (Western Rif, District of Chefchaouen, in order to improve knowledge of their local diversity, to assess species and provide the first list of heritage species. This is an inventory that took place for 3 consecutive years (2013-2015. Out of 550 species identified so far, 137 are processed in this document, which lists heritage species: 67 endemic to Morocco, 20 rare saproxylic and 48 species new to Morocco, including two new to science.

  11. A new subgenus Wraseellus of the genus Pterostichus Bonelli (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Pterostichini) and new species descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongliang; Sciaky, Riccardo; Liang, Hongbin; Zhou, Hongzhang

    2013-01-01

    A new subgenus Wraseiellus new subgenus (type species: Pterostichus andrewesi Jedlička 1931) of the genus Pterostichus from China is described. Eight species and one subspecies are recognized in the new subgenus including three new species and one new subspecies: Pt. (Wraseiellus) comatus new species (Guangxi: Maoershan, N25.87°, E110.42°), Pt. (Wraseiellus) crassiapex new species (Hubei: Tiechanghuang, N30.75°, E110.30°), Pt. (Wraseiellus) pseduodiversus new species (Yunnan: Luguhu, N27.63°, E100.82°), Pt. (Wraseiellus) stictopleurus cangshanensis new subspecies (Yunnan: Cangshan, N25.63°, E100.14°). Feronia crebrepunctata Straneo, 1937 is newly proposed as junior synonym of Pterostichus meyeri Jedlička, 1934. A key to all known species and subspecies, images of habitus and genitalia, and distribution maps are provided.

  12. Two new species of the Pterostichus macrogenys species group (Coleoptera, Carabidae discovered in shallow subterranean habitats in northern Honshu, Japan

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    Kôji Sasakawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shallow subterranean environments have recently received attention as a habitat for Carabidae beetles, and many new species have been discovered using collection techniques devised for this habitat. We report the discovery of two new species of the macrogenys species group of the Pterostichus subgenus Nialoe Tanaka, 1958, collected by subterranean baited traps in northern Honshu, Japan. Pterostichus shinbodakensis Sasakawa & Itô, sp. n. is described from Mt. Shinbodake, Niigata Prefecture, and P. tateishiyamanus Sasakawa & Itô, sp. n. is described from the southeastern foot of Mt. Tateishiyama, Fukushima Prefecture. Comparative male genital morphology shows that among the known species, the two new species are most closely related to P. falcispinus Sasakawa, 2005 and P. chokaisanus Sasakawa, 2009, respectively. In addition, sympatric occurrence of P. shinbodakensis with a smaller, unidentified species of the species group was also confirmed. The implications of these results for future studies of the macrogenys species group, as well as those of Nialoe, are discussed.

  13. Three new species of tiger beetles and new data on Cicindelina species from Angola (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Cicindelinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Artur R M; Capela, Rúben A; Oesterle, Andreas

    2015-10-15

    Three new species of tiger beetles, two of the genus Trichotaenia Rivalier, 1957 and one of the genus Cylindera Westwood, 1831, subgenus Ifasina Jeannel, 1946 are described from Angola. An annotated list of species of Cicindelina sampled in this country is provided also. Records for three species previously unknow from Angola are given: Ophryodera smrzi Werner, 2005, Lophyra clatharta (Dejean, 1825) and Lophyra sumlini Cassola, 1976. Some considerations on the distribution and general ecology of these beetles in Angola are also presented. Further, two dichotomic keys are made available for the identification of Trichotaenia species with marked shoulders and Cylindera (Ifasina) species of western and southwestern Africa, respectively.

  14. A revision of the Larainae (Coleoptera, Elmidae) of Venezuela, with description of nine new species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Crystal A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The species of the riffle beetle subfamily Larainae occurring in Venezuela are revised. Examination of 756 specimens yielded 22 species in nine genera occurring throughout the country. Seven species are newly recorded from the country: Phanoceroides sp. 1, Phanocerus clavicornis Sharp, 1882, Phanocerus congener Grouvelle, 1898, Pharceonus volcanus Spangler & Santiago-Fragoso, 1992, Disersus dasycolus Spangler & Santiago-Fragoso, 1992, Disersus chibcha Spangler & Santiago-Fragoso, 1987, and Disersus inca Spangler & Santiago-Fragoso, 1992. Nine species are found to be new to science, which are here described: Hexanchorus dentitibialis sp. n., H. falconensis sp. n., H. flintorum sp. n., H. homaeotarsoides sp. n., H. inflatus sp. n., Phanocerus rufus sp. n., Pharceonus grandis sp. n., Pharceonus ariasi sp. n., Potamophilops bostrychophallus sp. n. Additionally, a key to species, distribution maps, and photographs and genitalia illustrations are provided for all species. PMID:24146552

  15. A revision of the Larainae (Coleoptera, Elmidae of Venezuela, with description of nine new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal Maier

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The species of the riffle beetle subfamily Larainae occurring in Venezuela are revised. Examination of 756 specimens yielded 22 species in nine genera occurring throughout the country. Seven species are newly recorded from the country: Phanoceroides sp. 1, Phanocerus clavicornis Sharp, 1882, Phanocerus congener Grouvelle, 1898, Pharceonus volcanus Spangler and Santiago-Fragoso, 1992, Disersus dasycolus, Spangler and Santiago-Fragoso, 1992, Disersus chibcha Spangler and Santiago, 1987, and Disersus inca Spangler and Santiago-Fragoso, 1992. Nine species are found to be new to science, which are here described: Hexanchorus dentitibialis sp. n., H. falconensis sp. n., H. flintorum sp. n., H. homaeotarsoides sp. n., H. inflatus sp. n., Phanocerus rufus sp. n., Pharceonus grandis sp. n., Pharceonus ariasi sp. n., Potamophilops bostrychophallus sp. n. Additionally, a key to species, distribution maps, and photographs and genitalia illustrations are provided for all species.

  16. A revision of the Larainae (Coleoptera, Elmidae) of Venezuela, with description of nine new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Crystal A

    2013-01-01

    The species of the riffle beetle subfamily Larainae occurring in Venezuela are revised. Examination of 756 specimens yielded 22 species in nine genera occurring throughout the country. Seven species are newly recorded from the country: Phanoceroides sp. 1, Phanocerus clavicornis Sharp, 1882, Phanocerus congener Grouvelle, 1898, Pharceonus volcanus Spangler & Santiago-Fragoso, 1992, Disersus dasycolus Spangler & Santiago-Fragoso, 1992, Disersus chibcha Spangler & Santiago-Fragoso, 1987, and Disersus inca Spangler & Santiago-Fragoso, 1992. Nine species are found to be new to science, which are here described: Hexanchorus dentitibialis sp. n., H. falconensis sp. n., H. flintorum sp. n., H. homaeotarsoides sp. n., H. inflatus sp. n., Phanocerus rufus sp. n., Pharceonus grandis sp. n., Pharceonus ariasi sp. n., Potamophilops bostrychophallus sp. n. Additionally, a key to species, distribution maps, and photographs and genitalia illustrations are provided for all species.

  17. A taxonomic review of Korean Liogluta Thomson (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Aleocharinae) with descriptions of three new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Gyu; Ahn, Kee-Jeong

    2016-11-15

    A taxonomic review of the Liogluta Thomson in Korea is presented. The genus is represented in Korea by eight species including three new species, L. changwhani Lee & Ahn, sp. nov., L. jinilli Lee & Ahn, sp. nov. and L. rufescens Lee & Ahn, sp. nov. Two species [L. distans (Sharp) and L. ursi (Sawada)] are new to the Korean peninsula and L. pyonganica is recorded for the first time in South Korea. A key, descriptions, habitus photographs and illustrations of the diagnostic characters are provided.

  18. Three new species of Claudiella Reichardt & Vanin, 1976 (Coleoptera, Torridincolidae) from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Cesar João; Hamada, Neusa

    2016-12-05

    The monotypic Neotropical genus Claudiella Reichardt & Vanin, 1976 is currently known only from Brazil (C. ingens Reichardt & Vanin, 1976). We describe here three new species from Brazil, C. jefersoni sp. n., C. jeaneae sp. n. and C. anamariae sp. n., from Roraima, Minas Gerais and Bahia states, respectively, bringing to four the number of species included in Claudiella. These species can be distinguished by different characteristics observed in the legs, mouth parts, metathoracic wings and male genitalia.

  19. Redescription of Stenolophus thoracicus Casey (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Harpalini), a valid species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Yves; Messer, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Stenolophus thoracicus Casey is revalidated. The species is redescribed based on a study of the syntypes and of several conspecific specimens from eastern North America. The species differs from the other eastern species of the subgenus Agonoleptus in having the metasternum shorter and the wings reduced to tiny stubs. The dorsal habitus and median lobe of the aedeagus, along with the structures of the internal sac, are illustrated. PMID:21594130

  20. Two new species of Euconnus (Rhomboconnus) in Peru and Bolivia (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Scydmaeninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    JaŁoszyŃski, PaweŁ

    2018-01-25

    To date, the subgenus Rhomboconnus Franz of Euconnus Thomson was represented by ten species known to occur in Venezuela, Panama and Ecuador. For the first time Rhomboconnus is reported to occur in Peru and Bolivia, and two new species are described: Euconnus wari sp. n. (Peru) and E. inkachakanus sp. n. (Bolivia). The latter species is the largest representative of Rhomboconnus, with body length exceeding 3 mm.

  1. Epiverta Dieke (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Epilachnini): A Complex of Species, Not a Monotypic Genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Huo, Lizhi; Szawaryn, Karol; Wang, Xingmin

    2017-01-01

    Rich sampling and modern research techniques, including SEM, revealed that rarely collected epilachnine species Epiverta chelonia is a complex of four closely related species: E. chelonia (Mader, 1933), E. albopilosa, E. angusta, and E. supinata spp. nov. All Epiverta species are described and illustrated, a key to the species and a distribution map are provided. Lectotype of Solanophila cheloniaMader, 1933 is designated and its type locality delimited to Yunnan Province, Deqin County (China). © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  2. Two new species of Paraneseuthia Franz (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Scydmaeninae) from West Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałoszyński, Paweł

    2014-12-17

    Two new species of Paraneseuthia are described from peninsular Malaysia: P. joeparkeri sp. n. from Bukit Larut (Maxwell Hill) and P. titiwangsana sp. n. from the Genting Highlands. The new species are morphologically allied to species known so far only from Sumatra; they all share emarginate apex of the aedeagus bordered at each side by a subtriangular projection and a pair of setae. This is the first record of this eutheiine genus from the Malay Peninsula and extends the known diversity of Paraneseuthia species within the historical Sundaland area.

  3. Winklerites serbicus, a new endogean species of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Bembidiini from southeastern Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćurčić S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new endogean bembidiine ground beetle species, Winklerites serbicus sp. n., from a cave in the southeastern part of Serbia is both described and diagnosed. Male and female genital structures and other taxonomically important characters are illustrated. The new species is clearly distinct from its closest congeners. Fifteen species of the genus so far known are arranged in six groups. The new species is both endemic and relict, inhabiting southeastern Serbia only. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173038 i br. 47007

  4. Species diversity and qualitative assessment of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in three riparian habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, G J; Carney, V A; Jones, E N; Pollock, D A

    2010-06-01

    In a 3-yr study involving saltcedar-free, saltcedar-infested, and burned habitats in a riparian area at Lake Meredith, TX, the number of carabid species collected, diversity indices, and indicator species varied significantly among habitats. A 3-yr average of 15, 14, and 24 carabid species were collected from the saltcedar-free, saltcedar-infested, and burned habitats, respectively. Values for species richness, Shannon's and Simpson's diversity indices, and evenness index for pooled data collected from 2005 to 2007 were higher in the burned habitat followed by the saltcedar-free habitat and the saltcedar-infested habitat. Within-year parameters across the three habitats generally followed the pooled data results with some variation. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analyses clearly indicated groups of carabid species preferred specific habitats. Five species in the burned area had indicator species percentage values >50% (Agonum punctiforme, Agonum texanum, Brachinus alternans, Harpalus pensylvanicus, and Poecilus chalcites). In the saltcedar-infested and saltcedar-free habitats, only one species in each habitat had indicator species percentage values that exceeded 50%: Calathus opaculus and Cicindela punctulata punctulata, respectively.

  5. A new species of Agaporomorphus Zimmermann, 1921 from Peru (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Hendrich

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Agaporomorphus julianeae sp. n. is described from the Biological Field Station Panguana, in Huànuco province of central Peru. The new species belongs to the A. knischi-group sensu Miller 2005. Together with A. knischi Zimmermann, 1921 and A. colberti Miller & Wheeler, 2008 this is the third species of the genus with broadly enlarged male antennomeres. The new species can be separated from A. colberti and A. knischi by the smaller please expanded male antennomere VIII, and the form of the median lobe. Important species characters (median lobe, male antennae, metafemur, colour pattern of the new species and A. knischi are figured, and the habitat, a temporary blackwater forest pond, and its species rich water beetle coenosis are illustrated and described in detail. The Brazilian A. mecolobus Miller, 2001, only known from the type material from Sao Paulo, is here recorded for Minas Gerais. Habitus photos of four additional Agaporomorphus species and Hydrodytes opalinus (Zimmermann, 1921 are provided. Altogether ten species of Agaporomorphus are now known.

  6. A new species and first record of the genus Cynegetis Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachnini from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmin Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The first species of the genus Cynegetis Chevrolat is recorded from China. Cynegetis chinensis Wang & Ren, sp. n. is described from the Ningxia Province in North China. A key to the known species of Cynegetis is given. Diagnostic similarities and differences between Cynegetis and Subcoccinella Agassiz & Erichson are discussed and illustrated.

  7. First record of Arthromelodes Jeannel in China, with description of a new species (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Pselaphinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zi-Wei

    2018-01-01

    A new species of Arthromelodes Jeannel, A. choui sp. n. , is described from northern Taitung, Taiwan, representing the first record of the genus in China. The species is distinctive, and may be readily separated from its congeners by the unique structures of male tergite 1(IV), and the aedeagus.

  8. The effect of anoxic treatment on the larvae of six species of dermestids (Coleoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergh, J.E.; Hansen, L.S.; Jensen, K.M.V.

    2003-01-01

    Based on surveys of species of museum pest insects commonly found in Finland, Norway, Denmark and Sweden, six species were selected for a study of the effect of exposure to anoxic treatment on the larval stage. An oxygen level of 0.3% (the rest, nitrogen) was applied and lethal exposure times were...

  9. New species and new records of Xenelmis Hinton (Coleoptera: Elmidae) from Southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Brunno Henrique Lanzellotti; Dos Passos, Maria Inês Da Silva; Ferreira, Nelson

    2015-03-18

    The genus Xenelmis is found in the Nearctic and Neotropical regions. Currently, seven out of thirteen species are registered from Brazil. Here, two new species of Xenelmis from Brazil are described and illustraded-Xenelmis sinecarina sp. nov. and Xenelmis granatoides sp. nov. Additionaly, X. granata and X. micros are characterized and illustrated.

  10. Description of a new species of the genus Glenea from Tibet, China (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae, Saperdini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiying Lin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A new species, Glenea jini sp. n. is described from Tibet, China. It can be separated from other species of the genus Glenea Newman by the complicated black and ochre markings as well as characters of the genitalia.

  11. The effect of anoxic treatment on the larvae of six species of dermestids (Coleoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergh, J.E.; Hansen, L.S.; Jensen, K.M.V.

    2003-01-01

    Based on surveys of species of museum pest insects commonly found in Finland, Norway, Denmark and Sweden, six species were selected for a study of the effect of exposure to anoxic treatment on the larval stage. An oxygen level of 0.3% (the rest, nitrogen) was applied and lethal exposure times wer...

  12. Four new species of the genus Philanthaxia Deyrolle, 1864 (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: Thomassetiini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílý, Svatopluk

    2016-12-04

    Descriptions of four new species of the genus Philanthaxia Deyrolle, 1864: P. depressifrons sp. nov. (Vietnam), P.granum sp. nov., P. hanloni sp. nov. and P. purpureifrons sp. nov (all from The Philippines). All described species are illustrated and compared with the similar or sympatric congeners.

  13. New species of Zenoria Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Brazil and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Paula B; González F, Guillermo

    2016-12-07

    Four new species of Zenoria Mulsant, 1850 are described: Zenoria limitrophi sp. nov. from Brazil; and Z. westerduijni sp. nov., Z. carbo sp. nov., and Z. miroi sp. nov. from Peru. Diagnostic characters are illustrated and relationships with previously described species are discussed.

  14. Review of the Berosus Leach of Venezuela (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae, Berosini with description of fourteen new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Oliva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The species of the water scavenger beetle genus Berosus Leach occurring in Venezuela are reviewed. Thirty-six species are recorded, including fifteen new species, fourteen of which are described here as new: B. aragua sp. n., B. asymmetricus sp. n., B. capanaparo sp. n., B. castaneus sp. n., B. corozo sp. n., B. ebeninus sp. n., B. garciai sp. n., B. humeralis sp. n., B. jolyi sp. n., B. llanensis sp. n., B. megaphallus sp. n., B. ornaticollis sp. n., B. repertus sp. n., and B. tramidrum sp. n. The fifteenth new species, known from a single female, is left undescribed pending the collection of males. Twelve species are recorded from Venezuela for the first time: B. ambogynus Mouchamps, B. consobrinus Knisch, B. elegans Knisch, B. geayi d’Orchymont, B. ghanicus d’Orchymont, B. guyanensis Queney, B. holdhausi Knisch, B. marquardti Knisch, B. olivae Queney, B. reticulatus Knisch, B. wintersteineri Knisch, and B. zimmermanni Knisch.

  15. Morphometric analysis, mimicry, and color polymorphism in five species of Chauliognathus Hentz (Coleoptera, Cantharidae

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    Vilmar Machado

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents data on morphometric variation for length and width of elytra in tive sympatric species of the genus Chauliognathus Hentz, 1830: C. flavipes Fabricius, 1781, C. octomaculatus Pie, 1915, C. expansus Waterhouse, 1878, C. fallax Germar, 1824 and C. lineatus Zwetsch & Machado, 2000. The meaning of this variation is discussed in the light of the theory of mimicry and visual communication between prey and predator. Females are larger than males in all species, except C. expansus. The analysis of variance for length of elytron as well as for width showed that the differences between species are significant for males and females; significant interaction (sex x species was also found. The similarity in color pattern of these species, as well as similarities in the morphometric analysis, suggests that they could form a mimetic ring of the Müllerian type, which the authors suggest be called, a "yellow-black" complex.

  16. Phosphine resistance in Australian Cryptolestes species (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae): perspectives from mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Wee Tek; Beckett, Stephen J; De Barro, Paul J

    2016-06-01

    The flat grain beetle (FGB) species Cryptolestes ferrugineus, C. pusillus, C. pusilloides and C. turcicus are major stored-product pests worldwide, of which the first three are present in Australia. C. ferrugineus is also a species with high phosphine resistance status in various countries. Morphological identification of Cryptolestes species is difficult and represents an additional barrier to effective management of phosphine resistance in FGBs. Mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I (mtDNA COI) gene characterisation enabled differentiation of the four major FGB pest species through direct sequence comparison, and enabled the development of a PCR-RFLP method for rapid species differentiation. We detected two mtDNA haplotypes (Cunk-01, 02) present at low frequencies with an average nucleotide divergence rate of 0.079 ± 0.011 (SE) from C. pusillus. This nucleotide divergence rate is similar to that between C. ferrugineus and C. pusilloides (0.088 ± 0.012). Male and female genitalia morphologies of the Cunk-02 individuals indicated they were consistent with C. pusillus, yet DNA sequence analyses suggested species-level divergence. The mtDNA COI gene of phosphine-bioassayed, lab-reared F1 generation survivors supported the presence of strong phosphine resistance in C. ferrugineus, but unexpectedly also in C. pusilloides and C. pusillus F1 survivors. We demonstrated the utility of molecular DNA techniques for differentiating closely related insect species, and its usefulness in assisting the management of pest insect species. The likely presence of a cryptic C. pusillus species in Australia and the possible development of strong phosphine resistance in Australian FGB pest species require further investigation. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. A New Mexican Species of Orizabus Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae: Pentodontini), with a Key to the Species of the Genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, M M; Gasca-Álvarez, H J; Deloya, C

    2018-02-01

    A new Orizabus species is described from Chilapa de Álvarez in the state of Guerrero (Mexico). The new species is similar to Orizabus rawlinsi Dechambre Bull Soc Entomol Fr 98:342, 1993, which is known from the state of Oaxaca but differs in the pygidial punctation, and the shape of the marginal pronotal bead and the parameres. A revised identification key to Orizabus species is provided.

  18. An integrative taxonomy on the locally endangered species of the Korean Scarabaeus (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Taeman; Kim, Jin Ill; Yi, Dae-Am; Jeong, Jongchel; An, Seung Lak; Park, In Gyun; Park, Haechul

    2016-07-22

    The ball-rolling dung beetles of the genus Scarabaeus are very ecologically important for the recycling of feces of large herbivores and the related nature management. There has been a significant decline, however, in the numbers of many species at the population and individual levels. S. typhon is currently thought to be the sole member of Scarabaeus distributed in Korea; however, that species underwent serious local extinctions in the 1970s. Before planning a full-scale species recovery, it is important to have an understanding of the exact species diversity and genetic structures of the focal species. We therefore attempted an integrative taxonomy focused on the Korean population of S. typhon and also on S. pius and S. sacer, which were once thought to be distributed in Korea, using both morphological and molecular approaches. The results of both approaches reveal the Korean species of Scarabaeus to be S. typhon and S. pius. In particular, our molecular results inferred from cytochrome c oxidase subunit I genetic analysis show that S. typhon should be considered a single species despite having various haplotypes throughout its wide geographical range from Europe to Korea. We identified two distinct lineages of S. pius (groups A and B) across a wide distributional range. We conclude that the Korean specimens of S. pius belong to group A and that S. pius is new to Korea under the current taxonomic treatment.

  19. USING TAXONOMIC REVISION DATA TO ESTIMATE THE GLOBAL SPECIES RICHNESS AND CHARACTERISTICS OF UNDESCRIBED SPECIES OF DIVING BEETLES (COLEOPTERA: DYTISCIDAE

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    Viktor Nilsson-Örtman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Many methods used for estimating species richness are either difficult to use on poorly known taxa or require input data that are laborious and expensive to collect. In this paper we apply a method which takes advantage of the carefully conducted tests of how the described diversity compares to real species richness that are inherent in taxonomic revisions. We analyze the quantitative outcome from such revisions with respect to body size, zoogeographical region and phylogenetic relationship. The best fitting model is used to predict the diversity of unrevised groups if these would have been subject to as rigorous species level hypothesis-testing as the revised groups. The sensitivity of the predictive model to single observations is estimated by bootstrapping over resampled subsets of the original data. The Dytiscidae is with its 4080 described species (end of May 2009 the most diverse group of aquatic beetles and have a world-wide distribution. Extensive taxonomic work has been carried out on the family but still the number of described species increases exponentially in most zoogeographical regions making many commonly used methods of estimation difficult to apply. We provide independent species richness estimates of subsamples for which species richness estimates can be reached through extrapolation and compare these to the species richness estimates obtained through the method using revision data. We estimate there to be 5405 species of dytiscids, a 1.32-fold increase over the present number of described species. The undescribed diversity is likely to be biased towards species with small body size from tropical regions outside of Africa.

  20. Color variability and body size of larvae of two Epomis species (Coleoptera: Carabidae in Israel

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    Gil Wizen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Species identification using the characteristics of developmental stages is challenging. However, for insect taxonomy the coloration of larval stages can be an informative feature. The use of live specimens is recommended for this because the color fades in preserved specimens. In this study we examine the possibility of using variation in coloration and color pattern of larvae in order to distinguish between two ground beetles species Epomis dejeani Dejean, 1831 and E. circumscriptus Duftschmid, 1812. We present an atlas and describe the coloration and body size of the three larval stages of the above species based on live specimens. The first instar larvae of the two Epomis species can be easily distinguished based on their color. From the second instar on, the variability in coloration and color patterns increases, creating an overlap in these attributes between larvae of the two species. Except for minor differences in color of the antennae and the base of the mandibles, larvae of the two species are indistinguishable at the second and third larval stages. To the best of our knowledge this is the first attempt to use variation in coloration and color pattern in live larvae in order to identify coleopterans. The color atlas of the larvae enables simple separation of the two Epomis species without requiring sophisticated magnifying devices, although it is less straightforward at the second and third larval stages. We found similar body lengths between the two species for all developmental stages, except for third instar larvae prior to pupation. In the two species the difference in larval body length before pupation positively correlated with that of the adult beetles. More than 70% of the adults' length can be explained by the length of the late third-instar larva; i.e. the large larvae develop into large adults. The larger specimens are the females.

  1. Review of the species of Paratenetus Spinola inhabiting America, north of Mexico (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae

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    Yves Bousquet

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The North American (north of Mexico species of the tenebrionid genus Paratenetus Spinola are reviewed and a key is presented for their identification. Five species are recognized, P. gibbipennis Motschulsky, P. fuscus LeConte, P. punctatus Spinola and two sp. n., P. exutus [type locality: Tabusintac, Nova Scotia] and P. texanus [type locality: Port Isabel, Cameron County, Texas]. Two syn. n. are proposed: P. cribratus Motschulsky, 1868 with P. gibbipennis Motschulsky, 1868 and P. crinitus Fall, 1907 with P. fuscus LeConte, 1850. A lectotype is selected for Paratenetus punctatus Spinola. A type species is designated for Storthephora Mäklin, 1875 (Storthephora denticollis Mäklin, 1875.

  2. Neoelmis guarani Shepard & Barr, a sexually dimorphic new species from Paraguay (Insecta: Coleoptera: Elmidae: Elminae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, William D; Barr, Cheryl B

    2016-02-22

    Neoelmis guarani new species is described and illustrated from specimens collected in streams of the Cordillera de los Altos, southeast of Asunción and near the towns of Piribebuy and Chololó, Paraguay. Males and females of this species exhibit strong secondary sexual dimorphism not found in other known species of Neoelmis. Males have striking modifications of the pro- and mesothoracic legs and bear a pair of ventrally projecting processes on both the mesoventrite and the second abdominal ventrite. Females have the elytra modified with a pair of dorsal projections.

  3. Taxonomy and natural history of the myrmecophilous genus Clinterocera Motschulsky, 1858 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) from China and adjacent regions: definition of species group and revision of the C. discipennis species group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian-Yue; Xu, Hao

    2016-06-22

    The Asian genus Clinterocera Motschulsky, 1858 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Cremastocheilini) is redescribed and divided into four species groups based on adult external characters. The definition of species groups and an identification key to these species groups are provided. The C. discipennis species group is revised, and two species are recognized: C. discipennis Fairmaire, 1889 and C. trimaculata Ma, 1993. Callynomes rufiventris Fairmaire, 1904, Callynomes rufithorax Moser, 1901, Callynomes cruciatus Moser, 1901, Callynomes vitalisi (Bourgoin, 1924), and Clinterocera rubra Ma, 1992 are placed as junior synonyms of Clinterocera discipennis. The male of Clinterocera trimaculata is described for the first time and newly recorded from Vietnam. Diagnoses and illustrations of Clinterocera discipennis and Clinterocera trimaculata are provided, with comments on the intraspecific variations. New distribution records of the two species are presented on a map. Brief natural history notes and host ant Liometopum sinense Wheeler, 1921 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) record of Clinterocera trimaculata are also given.

  4. Scolytinae in hazelnut orchards of Turkey: clarification of species and identification key (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

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    Celal Tuncer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hazelnut, a very important cash crop in Turkey, is frequently colonized by bark and ambrosia beetle species (Scolytinae. Some scolytine species may cause economic damage while other species do not; therefore, proper identification is important in orchard management. Extensive sampling demonstrated that the most common pest species in Turkey’s hazelnut orchards are Anisandrus dispar, Xylosandrus germanus, and Xyleborinus saxesenii. Hypothenemus eruditus can also be common, but only colonizes branches that are already dead. Lymantor coryli, Hypoborus ficus, Taphrorychus ramicola, and Taphrorychus hirtellus are rare and do not causes damage to live plants. Xyleborinus saxesenii appears to have been frequently misidentified and misreported as either L. coryli or Xyleborus xylographus. The former is rare, and the latter probably does not occur in Turkey. To avoid future misidentifications, a dichotomous identification key is provided for bark and ambrosia beetles of hazelnut orchards in Turkey.

  5. A new species of the genus Anthaxia Eschscholtz, 1829 from Mauritania (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: Anthaxiini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílý, Svatopluk

    2016-02-02

    Although the Buprestid fauna of the Sahel is relatively well-known many new species have been discovered in this region in the course of the last decades. Also many new species of the tribe Anthaxiini, whose life cycle is connected with the plant genus Acacia (Fabaceae), have been described since the last (and first) comprehensive study by Mateu (1972). This exhaustive paper deals with all insects developing in (or living on) Acacia spp. During the project dealing with the pests of the genus Acacia in Mauritania and Benin run by J. F. Vayssieres (IITA), a new species of Anthaxia Eschscholtz, 1829 was discovered; the description of this new species is given in this paper.

  6. Description of two new species of Clivina Latreille (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Clivinini from southeastern United States

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    Yves Bousquet

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of the genus Clivina Latreille are described. One, C. choatei Bousquet & Skelley, belongs to the nominotypical subgenus and is known from six specimens collected in northern Florida. The species is structurally similar to C. myops Bousquet, known only from the holotype found in North Carolina, but differs among others by its smaller size and wider elytral striae. The second species, C. alabama Bousquet, belongs to the subgenus Antroforceps Barr and is known from two specimens collected in north-central Alabama. The species is structurally most similar to C. sasajii Ball, known only from Latimer County in Oklahoma, but differs among others in the absence of eyes and inthe pronotum and elytra proportionally wider.

  7. A new species of Myrmedonota Cameron from eastern Kansas (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Aleocharinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, K. Taro

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Myrmedonota heliantha sp. n. is described from eastern Kansas (USA). All specimens were collected from dung. A modified new key to the species of Myrmedonota of America north of Mexico is provided. PMID:21594129

  8. A second species of Oculogryphus (Coleoptera, Lampyridae, with notes on the phylogenetic affinities of the genus

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    Ming-Luen Jeng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A second species of the enigmatic lampyrid genus Oculogryphus is described and figured as Oculogryphus bicolor sp. n. from Vietnam. The definition of the genus is slightly modified with consideration of newly detected morphological variation from this species. According to a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis including nearly 80% of documented lampyrid genera, Oculogryphus is the putative sister group to Stenocladius s. str. within the paraphyletic group of Ototretinae-Ototretadrilinae. The classification of Stenocladius is briefly discussed in this context.  

  9. Javorella suvodolensis, a new endogean species of ground beetles (Trechini, Carabidae, Coleoptera from southwest Serbia

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    Ćurčić Srećko B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A new species of endogean carabid beetles (Javorella suvodolensis n. sp has been described from under stones, village Debelja, near Nova Varoš, Mt. Javor, southwestern Serbia. This new species is easily distinguished from all other phenetically close congeners in many important respects such as the body size, body shape, shape of head, form and size of eyes, number of ommatidia, length of antennae, shape of pronotum, shape of elytra, relative position of humeral setae, structure and form of female genitalia and the shape of the gonosternite. Javorella suvodolensis n. sp. is the first known endogean species of the genus Javorella S. B. Ćurčić, M. M. Brajković & B. P. M. Ćurčić [apart from the cavernicolous species Javorella suvoborensis (Pavićević & Popović and Javorella javorensis Ćurčić, Brajković & Ćurčić]. This new species and its congeners belong to an old separate phyletic lineage, distinct from all other related species groups. Additionally, J. suvodolensis n. sp. is relic and endemic to the mountains of southwest Serbia.

  10. Morphometry of eyes, antennae and wings in three species of Siagona (Coleoptera, Carabidae

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    Federica Talarico

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In carabid beetles, physiological and behavioural characteristics reflect specific habitat demands and there is a strong correlation between body form and habit in species with different life style. In this study, we compared the morphometry and compound eye characteristics of three species of the genus Siagona: S. jenissoni, S. dejeani and S. europaea. These carabids have a stenotopic lifestyle in Mediterranean clayey soils, inhabiting the ground fissure system formed during the dry season. All species have a Mediterranean distribution and are nocturnal olfactory hunters, and are strict ant predators. For morphometric measurements, we considered body length (mm, wing length (mm, antenna length (mm, head width (mm, trochanter length (mm, number of ommatidia, eye surface area (mm2, ommatidia density (number of ommatidia/mm2 of eye surface area, head height (mm, thorax height (mm and abdomen height (mm. The data revealed intersexual and interspecific differences. The three species differ in relative length of the antennae, density and number of ommatidia and relative trochanter length. Significant differences occurred in wing sizes, which are well developed in S. europaea, the only species capable of flight. When eye size is compared with other ground beetles of various lifestyles, Siagona shows pronounced “microphthalmy” an adaptation to subterranean life in clayey crevices of tropical and subtropical climates with a marked dry season.

  11. Influence of life history and sex on metal accumulation in two beetle species (insecta: Coleoptera)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindqvist, L.; Block, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    Insects are important components of most terrestrial environments owing to their great abundance, biomass and diversity. They also make up an important food resource for other animals. Consequently, in many food webs insects constitute important links in metal-transport chains between trophic levels. Therefore trace-metal concentrations in insects have an important influence on the trace-metal distribution in the biosphere. In various insects, Cd, Cu and Zn are usually accumulated to the extent that they reach levels above those of the food, whereas Fe is not. In response to metal pollution, accumulation of nonessential metals was found to increase markedly, whereas essential metals accumulated less owing to regulating mechanisms in the insects. In polluted environments, metal concentrations were found to be higher in predatory invertebrates than in phytophagous ones in studies where insects were analysed in broad categories such as families. However, no such trend was observed when species were treated separately. The pattern of metal accumulation can differ between species. This is true even for species utilizing the same food resource. For instance, concentrations of Cd, Cu and Fe differed between four species of sawflies feeding on pine needles from the same locality. It is therefore likely that insects with different food sources accumulate metals differently depending on the concentration and chemical form of the metals in the food. There have been few studies aimed at determining whether patterns of metal accumulation differ between males and females of the same species. In one such study on the sawfly Neodiprion sertifer concentrations of Cd, Cu and Fe tended to be higher in males than in females. However, this pattern was not found in two other sawfly species. Target organs for Cd were found to differ between males and females in the grasshopper Aiolopus thalassinus. The testis accumulated Cd to a higher degree than the ovaries.

  12. Orthogonius species and diversity in Thailand (Coleoptera, Caraboidea, Orthogoniini, a result from the TIGER project

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    Mingyi Tian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The carabid genus Orthogonius MacLeay is treated, based mainly on materials collected in Thailand through the TIGER project (the Thailand Inventory Group for Entomological Research. Among 290 specimens, 20 species are identified in total, 10 of them are new species: O. taghavianae sp. n. (Nakhon Nayok: Khao Yai National Park, O. coomanioides sp. n. (Phetchabun: Thung Salaeng Luang National Park, O. similaris sp. n. (Phetchabun: Thung Salaeng Luang National Park; Loei: Phu Kradueng National Park, O. setosopalpiger sp. n. (Phetchabun: Thung Salaeng Luang National Park, O. gracililamella sp. n. (Loei: Phu Kradueng National Park; Chaiyaphum: Tat Tone National Park, O. pseudochaudoiri sp. n. (Phetchabum: Thung Salaeng Luang National Park; Nakhon Nayok: Khao Yai National Park, O. constrictus sp. n. (Phetchabum: Thung Salaeng Luang National Park, O. pinophilus sp. n. (Phetchabum: Thung Salaeng Luang National Park, O. vari sp. n. (Cambodia: Siem Reap; Thailand: Ubon Ratchathani: Pha Taem National Park; Phetchabun: Thung Salaeng Luang National Park and O. variabilis sp. n. (Thailand: Phetchabun: Thung Salaeng Luang National Park; Nakhon Nayok: Khao Yai National Park; Phetchabun: Nam Nao National Park; China: Yunnan. In addition, O. mouhoti Chaudoir, 1871 and O. kirirom Tian & Deuve, 2008 are recorded in Thailand for the first time. In total, 30 species of Orthogonius have been recorded from Thailand, indicating that Thailand holds one of the richest Orthogonius faunas in the world. A provisional key to all Thai species is provided. A majority of Thai Orthogonius species are endemic. Among the ten national parks in which orthogonine beetles were collected, Thung Salaeng Luang holds the richest fauna, including 16 species.

  13. Four new species and first nominal record of Chasmogenus Sharp, 1882 (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae) from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Bruno; Ferreira, Nelson

    2014-02-20

    The genus Chasmogenus Sharp, 1882 (Hydrophilidae: Acidocerinae) is recorded from Brazil for the first time. Four new species are described and illustrated from the Southeastern Region of the country: C. fluminensis sp. nov. (Rio de Janeiro State), C. lilianae sp. nov. (Rio de Janeiro State), C. itatiaia sp. nov. (Minas Gerais and Rio de Janeiro States), and C. ubatuba sp. nov. (São Paulo State). Chasmogenus sapucay Fernández, 1986 is recorded for the first time from Northern and Southeastern Brazil. Notes on morphology and an updated key for the South American species are provided.

  14. Four New Ladybug Species Belonging to Decadiomus Chapin (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra-Carmona, A E; Otero, M

    2014-12-01

    While searching for native natural enemies attacking invasive insect pests in Puerto Rico, we found four undescribed ladybug species belonging to the Caribbean ladybug genus Decadiomus Chapin. In this article, we describe the following species from Puerto Rico: Decadiomus seini n. sp., Decadiomus ramosi n. sp., Decadiomus hayuyai n. sp., and Decadiomus martorelli n. sp. Illustrations of the dorsal habitus, shape of prosternal carinae, and drawings of male and female genitalia are presented. We also present a key for Diomini of Puerto Rico and discuss their importance as potential biocontrol agents.

  15. Depositories of the type material of the species Coccidophilus lozadaiGonzalez, 2012 (Insecta: Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

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    Pedro W. Lozada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available 6 paratypes of the species Coccidophilus lozadai Gonzalez, 2012, are deposited in the collection of Servicio Nacional de Sanidad Agraria (SENASA, Lima, Peru. The holotype and remaining paratypes are deposited in the Museo de Historia Natural (MUSM, Lima, Peru, and National Museum of Natural History (USNM, Washington, D.C., USA.

  16. Two new species of Corticeus from Mexico and honduras (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles A. Triphlehorn; John C. Moser

    1970-01-01

    The genus Cortiecus Piller and Mitterpacher is represented on every continent except Antartica. Blackwelder (1945, p. 533) lists 10 species from Central and South America and Arnett (1963, p. 685) lists 13 from the United States. Most occur with bark beetles (Family Scolytidae), but their roles are poorly understood. Some authors have called them...

  17. Two new species and new record of Batricavus Yin & Li (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Pselaphinae) from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zi-Wei; Li, Li-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Two new species, Batricavus abdominalis Yin & Li, sp. n. and Batricavus hainanensis Yin & Li, sp. n. are described from Hainan, South China, with male habitus and major diagnostic features illustrated. Batricavus tibialis Yin & Li is newly recorded from Zhejiang, East China. Keys to both sexes of the genus are included.

  18. Two new species of Nomuraius Hlaváč (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Pselaphinae) from southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meng-Chi; Yin, Zi-Wei

    2018-03-22

    Two new Chinese species of the tyrine genus Nomuraius Hlaváč, N. excavatus Huang Yin, sp. n. (Guangxi), and N. nanlingensis Huang Yin, sp. n. (Guangdong), are described and illustrated. The identification key and distributional map of the genus are updated to include the new data.

  19. Four new species of Cephennomicrus Reitter (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Scydmaeninae) from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałoszyński, Paweł

    2015-01-19

    Four new species of Cephennomicrus are described from Malaysia: C. curvidens sp. n., C. gentingensis sp. n. (both from the Genting Highlands, West Malaysia), C. santubongensis sp. n. and C. muluensis sp. n. (both from Sarawak, East Malaysia). Male genitalia of all new taxa are illustrated and diagnostic characters are discussed. 

  20. Nine new Trechisibus species from Peru and Argentina (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Trechinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegro, Gianni; Giachino, Pier Mauro

    2016-11-15

    Nine new Trechisibus species are described, four from Central Peru (T. huascarani n. sp. and T. recuayi n. sp. from Dept. Ancash, T. curtii n. sp. and T. lemairei n. sp. from Dept. Huanuco) and five from Patagonian Argentina, Province of Rio Negro (T. brevis n. sp., T. longipenis n. sp., T. parvulus n. sp., T. sciakyi n. sp., T. striatus n. sp.).

  1. [Mites associated with two species of the genus Odontotaenius (Coleoptera: Passalidae) in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios-Torres, Pilar Liliana; Villegas-Guzmán, Gabriel A

    2015-09-01

    Mites can establish association with different arthropods as coleopterans tamites scaraoaeicae ana Passalidae. Passalids are distributed in tropical and templates zones, and until now, more than 200 species of mites have been associated to them. One of the relationships between passalids and mites is the phoresy where one small animal (the phoretic) seeks out and attaches to another animal (the host) for transportation. Herein, we studied the mites associated to O. zodiacus and O. striatopunctatus; for this, 80 Odontotaenius with mites were reviewed; passalids were collected in and under decaying logs from six states of Mexico, and were individually kept in vials with 80% ethanol. The specimens were carried to the laboratory and mites removed with fine-pointed forceps under stereo microscope. The mites were stored with 80 % alcohol until some were cleared with lacto-phenol and mounted in Hoyer's solution. We found 1,945 mites belonging to 13 families (Acaridae, Ascidae, Diarthrophallidae, Digamasellidae, Diplogyniidae, Euzerconidae, Heterocheylidae, Histiostomatidae, Klinckowstroemiidae, Laelapidae, Megisthanidae, Trematuridae, and Uropodidae) and 42 species, being the most abundant species Anoelus sp. For O. striatopunctatus (16 specimens) we found 562 mites (95 female female, 34 male male, 197 hypopus, 234 deutonymph, 2 tritonymph) of 11 families and 22 species; the most abundant were Uropodidae (42 %) and Histiostomatidae (26 %). While for 0. zodiacus (64 specimens) were found 1,383 mites (300 female female, 204 male male, 608 hypopus, 139 deutonymphs, 133 tritonymphs) of 10 families and 30 species; the most abundant were: Diartrophallidae, Acaridae, and Histiostomatidae (23 % for the two first and 21 % for third). The high abundance and richness was in O. zodiacus, likewise Margalef (S') and Shanon-Winner (H') indexes were higher in this species (O. zodiacus S' = 4.05, H' = 2.2; O. striatopunctatus S' = 3.34, H' = 1.94), while Equity (EH) was similar to both

  2. Bryanites graeffii sp. n. (Coleoptera, Carabidae: museum rediscovery of a relict species from Samoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Liebherr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bryanites graeffii sp. n. is described from Samoa based on a single male specimen collected between 1862–1870 that was recently discovered in the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris. Cladistic analysis based on 127 morphological characters from 49 exemplars of the carabid beetle tribe Platynini in the Austral-Pacific region, places the new species as adelphotaxon to Bryanites samoaensis Valentine, type species of the genus Bryanites Valentine, 1987. Bryanites comprises, along with Vitagonum Moore, 1998 of Fiji and Ctenognathus Fairmaire, 1843 of New Zealand, a clade that diverged early in the evolutionary history of Pacific platynine Carabidae. Bryanites graeffii exhibits very large body size among taxa of Platynini—16.2 mm standardized body length—with the genus characterized by vestigial flight wings and metathoracic apomorphies that are associated with flight-wing loss. Along with Blackburnia Sharp, 1878 of Hawaii, the origins of Bryanites, Vitagonum, and Ctenognathus are hypothesized to date to the Miocene, with their radiations beginning long before the origins of the geographically widespread, flight-capable species of Metacolpodes Jeannel, 1948 that colonized numerous island systems across the western Pacific. Given the numerous platynine taxa collected by extensive biotic surveys of Samoa during the first quarter of the 20th Century, the absence of any specimens of B. graeffii since the initial collection of the unique holotype prior to 1871 suggests that this species may be extinct. Such extirpation of large platynine carabid beetles has also been documented for Hawaii, where the time of extinction of seven Blackburnia species represented only by subfossil fragments coincides with the time of human colonization and attendant introduction of the Pacific rat, Rattus exulans (Peale.

  3. Identification of Sex Pheromones and Sex Pheromone Mimics for Two North American Click Beetle Species (Coleoptera: Elateridae) in the Genus Cardiophorus Esch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Jacqueline M; Collignon, R Maxwell; Zou, Yunfan; Millar, Jocelyn G

    2018-04-01

    To date, all known or suspected pheromones of click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae) have been identified solely from species native to Europe and Asia; reports of identifications from North American species dating from the 1970s have since proven to be incorrect. While conducting bioassays of pheromones of a longhorned beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), we serendipitously discovered that males of Cardiophorus tenebrosus L. and Cardiophorus edwardsi Horn were specifically attracted to the cerambycid pheromone fuscumol acetate, (E)-6,10-dimethylundeca-5,9-dien-2-yl acetate, suggesting that this compound might also be a sex pheromone for the two Cardiophorus species. Further field bioassays and electrophysiological assays with the enantiomers of fuscumol acetate determined that males were specifically attracted by the (R)-enantiomer. However, subsequent analyses of extracts of volatiles from female C. tenebrosus and C. edwardsi showed that the females actually produced a different compound, which was identified as (3R,6E)-3,7,11-trimethyl-6,10-dodecadienoic acid methyl ester (methyl (3R,6E)-2,3-dihydrofarnesoate). In field trials, both the racemate and the (R)-enantiomer of the pheromone attracted similar numbers of male beetles, suggesting that the (S)-enantiomer was not interfering with responses to the insect-produced (R)-enantiomer. This report constitutes the first conclusive identification of sex pheromones for any North American click beetle species. Possible reasons for the strong and specific attraction of males to fuscumol acetate, which is markedly different in structure to the actual pheromone, are discussed.

  4. Elemental distribution in reproductive and neural organs of the Epilachna nylanderi (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a phytophage of nickel hyperaccumulator Berkheya coddii (Asterales: Asteraceae) by micro-PIXE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta; Orłowska, Elżbieta; Augustyniak, Maria; Nakonieczny, Mirosław; Tarnawska, Monika; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech; Migula, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of metal hyperaccumulation by plants is often explained by a pathogen or herbivore defense hypothesis. However, some insects feeding on metal hyperaccumulating plants are adapted to the high level of metals in plant tissues. Former studies on species that feed on the leaves of Berkheya coddii Roessler 1958 (Asteraceae), a nickel-hyperaccumulating plant, demonstrated several protective mechanisms involved in internal distribution, immobilization, and elimination of Ni from the midgut and Malpighian tubules. These species are mainly coleopterans, including the lady beetle, Epilachna nylanderi (Mulsant 1850) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), collected from the ultramafic ecosystem near Barberton in South Africa. By performing particle-induced X-ray emission microanalysis elemental microanalysis (PIXE), this study examined whether Ni may be harmful to internal body systems that decide on insect reactivity (central nervous system [CNS]), their reproduction, and the relationships between Ni and other micronutrients. Data on elemental distribution of nine selected elements in target organs of E. nylanderi were compared with the existing data for other insect species adapted to the excess of metals. Micro-PIXE maps of seven regions of the CNS showed Ni mainly in the neural connectives, while cerebral ganglia were better protected. Concentrations of other bivalent metals were lower than those of Ni. Testis, compared with other reproductive organs, showed low amounts of Ni. Zn was effectively regulated at physiological dietary levels. In insects exposed to excess dietary Zn, it was also accumulated in the reproductive organs. Comparison of E. nylanderii with other insects that ingest hyperaccumulating plants, especially chrysomelid Chrysolina clathrata (Clark) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), showed lower protection of the CNS and reproductive organs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  5. Revision of the Agrilus adonis species-group (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: Agrilini with description of sixteen new species from southeastern Asia

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    Eduard Jendek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The newly defined Agrilus adonis species-group comprising thirty taxa from Southeast Asia is revised based on the examination of type specimens. The taxonomic concept and distribution of all known taxa is reexamined for the first time since they were described. The complete commented bibliographic data are given for each name. The key to species is provided and complemented with illustration of habitus and genitalia. Images of all primary types are also included. The distribution of selected species is shown on maps. The following sixteen new species are described: Agrilus acrobeles sp. nov.; A. bunsu sp. nov.; A. cechovskyi sp. nov.; A. curiosus sp. nov.; A. garo sp. nov.; A. iban sp. nov.; A. jakli sp. nov.; A. kuchingi sp. nov.; A. lembik sp. nov.; A. meratus sp. nov.; A. orangulu sp. nov.; A. serratus sp. nov.; A. strbai sp. nov.; A. upsilon sp. nov.; A. vir sp. nov. and A. xiphos sp. nov.. The name emeritus Descarpentries & Villiers, 1963 is removed from the synonymy of Agrilus perlisensis Fisher 1936 and revalidated as the name for species A. emeritus Descarpentries & Villiers, 1963. Nine new synonyms are proposed: Agrilus adonis Deyrolle, 1864 (= A. perlisensis Fisher, 1936 syn. nov. = A. testor Kerremnas, 1900 syn. nov.; A. emeritus Descarpentries & Villiers, 1963 (= A. deuvei Baudon, 1965 syn. nov. = A. souvannavongsi Baudon, 1968 syn. nov.; A. famulus Kerremans, 1900 (= A. convergens Fisher, 1930 syn. nov. = A. japanensis Obenberger, 1935 syn. nov.; A. insularis Deyrolle, 1864 (= A. nigrocyaneus Deyrolle, 1864 syn. nov. = A. falsulus Obenberger, 1924 syn. nov.; A. malasicus Fisher, 1930 (=A. bettotanus Fisher, 1930 syn. nov.. Some of those names were already treated as invalid ones but in the synonymy of different species. Their taxonomic history is recognizable from commented references cited at each name.

  6. Bolivian Rhinotragini IV: Paraeclipta gen. nov. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, new species and new combinations

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    Robin O. S. Clarke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraeclipta gen. nov. is described to allocate five new species, and ten transferred from Eclipta Bates, 1873: P. cabrujai sp. nov.; P. clementecruzi sp. nov.; P. melgarae sp. nov.; P. tomhacketti sp. nov.; P. moscosoi sp. nov.; P. bicoloripes (Zajciw, 1965, comb. nov.; P. croceicornis (Gounelle, 1911, comb. nov.; P. flavipes (Melzer, 1922, comb. nov.; P. jejuna (Gounelle, 1911, comb. nov.; P. kawensis (Peñaherrera-Leiva & Tavakilian, 2004, comb. nov.; P. longipennis (Fisher, 1947, comb. nov.; P. rectipennis (Zajciw, 1965, comb. nov.; P. soumourouensis (Tavakilian & Peñaherrera-Leiva, 2003, comb. nov.; P. tenuis (Burmeister, 1865, comb. nov.; and P. unicoloripes (Zajciw, 1965, comb. nov. The Bolivian species are illustrated. A key to their identification and host flower records are provided.

  7. New species of Scolytodes (Coleoptera: Scolytidae from Costa Rica and Panamá

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    Bjarte H. Jordal

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Seven species of Scolytodes (tribe Ctenophorini are described as new to science: S. concavus and S. circumsetosus (from Ficus branches, La Selva, S. montanus (Monteverde, S. nudifrons (Las Cruces near San Vito, and S. triangulus (fogging sample, La Selva, all from Costa Rica, and S. ungulatus (Cerro Punta and S. punctifrons (from Astronium graveolens, Canal Zone, both from Panama. New distributional and host plant data are given for the following species: S. amoenus (Ficus branch, La Selva, and the first record south of Mexico, S. immanis (Cerro de La Muerte, S. impressus (Xylopia branch, Peninsula de Osa, S. ochromae (Ochroma branch, La Selva, S. piceus (fogging sample, La Selva, the first low altitude record, and S. swieteniae (fogging sample, La Selva and Braulio Carrillo, the first exact locality data, all from Costa Rica, and S. nanellus (Barro Colorado Island from Panama.

  8. A new species of Lelegeis (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae: Diaperini from the Atlantic Forest of Brazil

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    Sergio Aloquio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lelegeis Champion, 1886 occurs only in the Neotropical region and comprises four species: L. aeneipennis Champion, 1886 from Mexico; L. apicalis Laporte & Brullé, 1831 from Cuba; L. hispaniolae Triplehorn, 1962 from Haiti and the Dominican Republic; and L. nigrifrons (Chevrolat, 1878 occurring in Brazil, Mexico, Panama, Peru and Venezuela. Here, Lelegeis pytanga sp. nov. is described based on specimens collected in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, and the first detailed description of the sclerites of the male and female terminalia of Lelegeis is produced. The new species can be easily distinguished from the other Lelegeis by its dull reddish brown to reddish orange elytral coloration, while the remaining body surface is dull black. The morphology of Lelegeis and its generic boundaries within Diaperinae are discussed.

  9. Description of a new species of the stag beetle genus Auxicerus Waterhouse, 1883 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Lucanidae

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    Robert Perger

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species of the Andean stag beetle genus Auxicerus Waterhouse, 1883 is described from the humid Tucuman-Bolivian forest in the southern Bolivian Andes. Auxicerus magnipunctatus sp. nov. is distinguished from all congeners by the distinctly larger punctures of the mesosternum; antennomeres 2–6 subquadrate, last two joints of club wider than long; lamellae not widely separated; posterior end of ocular canthus rounded and anterior edge of canthus moderately developed into an obtuse triangle. Auxicerus magnipunctatus sp. nov. is possibly endemic to the Tucuman-Bolivian forest. Along with the presence of other endemic beetle species with tropical congeners, the discovery of A. magnipunctatus sp. nov. supports the idea that the persistence of rather tropical taxa in the subtropical realm is fostered by increased humidity at orographic rain barriers and climatic stability in the Tucuman-Bolivian forest.

  10. Italian Dermestidae: notes on some species and an updated checklist (Coleoptera

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    Gian Luca Nardi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An up-to-date checklist of the Italian Dermestidae is provided. The presence of 95 species in Italy is confirmed, while further 5 species (Dermestes (Dermestes vorax Motschulsky, 1860, Thorictus pilosus Peyron, 1857, T. wasmanni Reitter, 1895, Attagenus (Attagenus simonis Reitter, 1881 and Globicornis (G. breviclavis (Reitter, 1878 and 1 subspecies (A. (A. tigrinus pulcher Faldermann, 1835 are excluded from the Italian fauna.Attagenus (Attagenus calabricus Reitter, 1881 and A. (A. lobatus Rosenhauer, 1856 are for the first time recorded from Abruzzi and Tuscany respectively; A. (A. silvaticus Zhantiev, 1976 is recorded for the first time from mainland Italy (Apulia; Anthrenus (Anthrenus angustefasciatus Ganglbauer, 1904 is new to northern Italy (Friuli-Venezia Giulia, central Italy (Tuscany, Apulia and Basilicata; A. (A. munroi Hinton, 1943 is new to central Italy (Elba Island; A. (A. delicatus Kiesenwetter, 1851 is for the first time recorded from Apulia; Globicornis (Globicornis fasciata (Fairmaire & Brisout de Barneville, 1859 is new to southern Italy (Basilicata; G. (Hadrotoma sulcata (C.N.F. Brisout de Barneville, 1866 is for the first time recorded from central Italy (Abruzzi, Campania and Sicily, while Trogoderma inclusum LeConte, 1854 is new to Apulia.Seven species (Dermestes (Dermestes peruvianus Laporte de Castelnau, 1840, D. (Dermestinus carnivorus Fabricius, 1775, D. (Dermestinus hankae Háva, 1999, D. (Dermestinus intermedius intermedius Kalík, 1951, D. (Dermestinus szekessyi Kalík, 1950, Anthrenus (Anthrenops coloratus Reitter, 1881 and Trogoderma angustum (Solier, 1849 recently recorded from Italy (without further details are discussed.The lectotype and a paralectotype are designated for Attagenus (A. calabricus Reitter, 1881 from Calabria.Attagenus pellio (Linnaeus, 1758 var. pilosissimus Roubal, 1932 is removed from synonymy with A. (A. pellio and recognized as a valid species (stat. prom.; it is known from Lombardy, Apulia

  11. A new species of Mada Gordon from the Andes (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Epilachnini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szawaryn, Karol; González, Guillermo

    2017-01-26

    Although Gordon (1975) revised the herbivorous ladybirds of the New World, the taxonomy of this group in the Americas is still poorly studied. Some recent efforts have been made at the generic (Szawaryn 2015b) as well as species level (Szawaryn 2015a; González & Gómez 2013; González 2015) to describe and improve our knowledge of the systematics of Neotropical Epilachnini, but they still need more investigation.

  12. OCCURRENCE OF SPECIES FAMILY CARABIDAE (COLEOPTERA INDEPENCE ON THE INPUT OF ORGANIC MATTER INTO SOIL

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    Jana Porhajašová

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of different rates of organic fertilizers (farmyard manure and bio sludge on occurrence of soil organisms with focus to species of family Carabidae. During 2001-2003, samples of biological material were collected using the earth trap method. Samples were taken from five treatments (i unfertilized, (ii 25 t ha-1 farmyard manure, (iii 50 t ha-1 bio sludge, (iv 50 t ha-1 farmyard manure, (v 100 t ha-1 bio sludge which cover area of 9 000 m2 at experimental farm of Slovak Agricultural University Kolíňany. Totally 59 054 individuals of soil edaphon belong to 23 epigeic groups was collected from which 25 species totally 21 189 individuals belong to the target group Carabidae. The attributes of specific identity according Jaccard (IA ranged from 45.45 to 71.43 % and those of dominant identity (ID from 94.20 to 97.72 %. The attributes of diversity (d achieved a level from 0.5406 to 0.8986. Harpalus rufipes (De Geer, 1774 occurring on arid to damp soil, mostly in light places, was determined as the dominant species. The attributes of individual treatments are influenced by the quantity of organic mater inputs into soil that affects the formation of well-defined communities with the characteristic species composition. A comparison of individual treatments in terms of the occurrence of zooedaphon showed that application of 100 t ha-1 bio sludge create the most suitable soil condition for zooedaphon development.

  13. A key to species of subgenus Lithochlaenius (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Chlaeniini, Chlaenius, with descriptions of three new species

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    Ye Liu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of genus Chlaenius Bonelli subgenus Lithochlaenius Kryzhanovskij are described from China: Chlaenius chuanqianensis Liu & Liang, sp. n. (type locality: Xishui, Guizhou Province, C. linwensini Liu & Liang, sp. n. (type locality: Fujian Province, and Chlaenius propeagilis Liu & Kavanaugh, sp. n. (type locality: Gaoligongshan, Yunnan Province. Seven species of the subgenus are redescribed: C. agiloides Jedlička, C. formosensis Lorenz, C. agilis Chaudoir, C. leishanensis Kirschenhofer, C. noguchii Bates, C. rambouseki Lutshnik, and C. wrasei Kirschenhofer. Additional taxonomic changes include the following: Chlaenius formosanus Jedlička is treated as a junior synonym of C. rambouseki Lutshnik and C. anchomenoides Bates, syn. n. and C. nuristanus Jedlička as junior synonyms of C. agilis Chaudoir, syn. n. Chlaenius latro LaFerté-Sénectère is considered a nomen nudum stat. n. and unavailable, leaving C. agilis Chaudoir as the next available name. Chlaenius nuristanus aberration rubridipes Jedlička is also an unavailable name. Chlaenius formosensis Lorenz (=C. formosanus Habu is returned to species status stat. n. A key to adults of the 10 known species of subgenus Lithochlaenius is provided.

  14. Karyotype and sex chromosome differentiation in two Nalassus species (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae

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    Dirim Şendoğan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic features of Nalassus bozdagus Nabozhenko & Keskin, 2010 and Nalassus plebejus Küster, 1850 were analysed using conventional and differential staining. Mitotic and meiotic chromosomal analysis revealed the diploid number as 2n = 20 (9+Xyp in both species. Besides the general resemblance of two Nalassus Mulsant, 1854 karyotypes, important differences related to variations in the number of metacentric/submetacentric chromosomes, localization of highly impregnated regions which are considered as NOR and heterochromatin distribution are clearly observed. The most prominent difference between two species is found related to the X chromosome which is clearly larger in N. bozdagus and has a conspicuous secondary constriction on the long arm. As a result of silver staining, the existence of highly impregnated areas associated with Xyp of N. bozdagus in both prophase I and metaphase I, suggests that NORs are seemingly located on sex chromosomes. On the other hand, the potential NORs of N. plebejus were observed only in prophase I nuclei. With the application of fluorescence dye DAPI, the AT rich chromosome regions and Xyp which forms the parachute configuration were shown in both species.

  15. A NEW SUBGENUS AND TWO NEW SPECIES OF TRECHUS FROM ETHIOPIA (Coleoptera, Carabidae

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    Paolo Magrini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of Trechus from the Oromia Province (Ethiopia are described in the present note. In the first part we describe Archeotrechus, a new microphtalmic Trechus, characterized by the dilation of only the first tarsal segment in males and by the aedeagus with the dorsal part amost completely divided into two lobes: a sclerified connection exists only in the region of the basal ostium. To this subgenus we ascribe the new species Trechus (Archeotrechus relictus, from the area of Mt. Sgona (Batu, of yellow-brown colour, rather flattened, with non sinuate pronotum and blunt fore and hind angles; two discal setae in the third stria. The aedeagus is much elongated, with a spherical apical button, copulatory piece triangular, lanceolate, with a sharp apex, little sclerified and very simple, typical of ancestral forms, like for instance Minitrechus Vigna Taglianti & Magrini, 2009. The female gonostyli, short and curved, bear at the apex two big setae on the inner edge. In the second part of the note we describe Trechus (s. str. oromiensis, a new species of bipartitus Group (sensu novo, characterized by the presence of only one discal seta on elytra and by peculiar features of the aedeagus.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of the pygidial gland secretion of three ground beetle species (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadić, Marija; Soković, Marina; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Ćirić, Ana; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna; Ilijin, Larisa; Tešević, Vele; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Todosijević, Marina; Vesović, Nikola; Ćurčić, Srećko

    2016-04-01

    The antimicrobial properties of the pygidial gland secretions released by the adults of the three ground beetle species, Carabus ullrichii, C. coriaceus, and Abax parallelepipedus, have been tested. Microdilution method was applied for detection of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFCs). Additionally, morpho-histology of the pygidial glands is investigated. We have tested 16 laboratory and clinical strains of human pathogens—eight bacterial both gram-positive and gram-negative species and eight fungal species. The pygidial secretion samples of C. ullrichii have showed the strongest antimicrobial effect against all strains of treated bacteria and fungi. Staphylococcus aureus, Lysteria monocytogenes, and Salmonella typhimurium proved to be the most sensitive bacterial strains. Penicillium funiculosum proved to be the most sensitive micromycete, while P. ochrochloron and P. verrucosum var . cyclopium the most resistant micromycetes. The pygidial secretion of C. coriaceus has showed antibacterial potential solely against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and antifungal activity against Aspergillus fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus, and P. ochrochloron. Antibacterial properties of pygidial gland secretion of A. parallelepipedus were achieved against P. aeruginosa, while antifungal activity was detected against five of the eight tested micromycetes (A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus, Trichoderma viride, and P. verrucosum var . cyclopium). Commercial antibiotics Streptomycin and Ampicillin and mycotics Ketoconazole and Bifonazole, applied as the positive controls, showed higher antibacterial/antifungal properties for all bacterial and fungal strains. The results of this observation might have a significant impact on the environmental aspects and possible medical purpose in the future.

  17. Recovery of surface-dwelling assemblages (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Staphylinidae) during clear-cut originated reforestation with native tree species

    OpenAIRE

    D Nagy, Dávid; Magura, Tibor; Mizser, Szabolcs; Debnár, Zsuzsanna; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Timber-oriented forest management has an important impact on biodiversity in forest ecosystems. Recovery dynamics of two groups of beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Staphylinidae) were studied after reforestation with native English oak (Quercus robur). We expected that reforestation with heavy site preparation causes a shift in the diversity of surface-dwelling beetles in early phases of reforestation. Moreover, we tested the habitat specialist hypothesis, assuming that...

  18. DUE NUOVE SPECIE SINTOPICHE DI TYPHLOREICHEIA DELLA SARDEGNA SUD-ORIENTALE (Coleoptera, Carabidae

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    Paolo Magrini

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Vengono descritte e illustrate due nuove specie sintopiche di Typhloreicheia della Sardegna sud-orientale: la prima, T. carlonnisi n. sp., campionata alla base del pozzo d’ingresso della Grotta Su Pittiolu de Gospuru (Armungia, Cagliari, la seconda, T. paladinii n. sp., campionata sotto i massi che circondano l’ingresso della medesima cavità e sul Monte Lora presso San Vito (Muravera. La prima risulta affine per molti caratteri alle specie del “gruppo angelae” (sensu Magrini 2003a, e si distingue dalle altre Typhloreicheia note di Sardegna per la combinazione dei seguenti caratteri: piccole dimensioni, tempie appiattite e poco sporgenti, elitre con setole discali presenti nelle interstrie 2-3-5-7 e margini laterali con denticoli presenti fino all’apice; edeago breve, con apice del lobo mediano sottile e incurvato ventralmente in visione laterale, asimmetrico in visione ventrale. Lamella copulatrice costituita da una lamina allungata con apice arrotondato, con la porzione dorsale nettamente sclerificata in forma di artiglio. La seconda, appartenente al “gruppo occulta” (sensu Magrini & Bulirsch 2002, si differenzia dall’affine Typhloreicheia viti Magrini & Bulirsch, 2002 per le elitre più allungate e meno convesse, per l’edeago più robusto, con lobo mediano meno appuntito e appena incurvato a sinistra in visione ventrale e apice più corto e largo in visione laterale, e per la lamella copulatrice con apice più arrotondato; le differenze nettamente maggiori nei confronti delle altre specie del gruppo sono evidenziate nella chiave dicotomica allegata. La spettacolare radiazione adattativa del genere Typhloreicheia in Sardegna, recentemente proposta e discussa da uno degli autori del presente contributo (A.C., e le ipotesi concernenti l’origine di questa linea di Reicheiina nell’isola, sono richiamate ed evidenziate alla luce dei nuovi dati.

  19. Eight new species of Batrisodes Reitter from China (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Pselaphinae

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    Ri-Xin Jiang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Eight new species of the genus Batrisodes Reitter are described from continental China, seven of which were found in association with ants: B. abdominalis sp. n. and B. tianmuensis sp. n. with an Ectomomyrmex ant from Zhejiang; B. grossus sp. n. with an Odontomachus ant from Guangxi; B. simianshanus sp. n. with an Aphaenogaster ant from Chongqing; B. qiului sp. n. with a Pheidole ant, B. xuhaoi sp. n. with a Lasius ant, and B. zhouchaoi sp. n. with Lasius and Nylanderia ants from Sichuan. Batrisodes zethus sp. n. was collected from a leaf litter sample.

  20. A remarkable new genus and species of Lixini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Lixinae from Madagascar

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    Levent Gültekin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Klassius gen. nov. with type species Klassius klassi sp. nov. is described from Madagascar in tribe Lixini, and illustrated. The new genus is close to Larinus and related genera from which differs by its elytra triangularly shaped, humeri so strongly inflated as to appear as an hemisphaerical disc ventrally, prosternum with a faint trace of shallow rostral canal, base of elytra arcuate towards prothorax, metepimeron completely and metanepisternum partly concealed by elytra, lateral intervals angularly curved on abdominal ventrites and flattened. Relationships between close genera are briefly discussed.

  1. Motuotrichius yangi, a new genus and species from southeastern Tibet, China (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Trichiini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Chen, Chang-Chin

    2016-12-07

    Motuotrichius yangi, new genus, new species is described from Motuo, southeastern Tibet. Motuotrichius seems to have a mixture of characters observed in the genera Epitrichius Tagawa, 1941, Indotrichius Krikken, 2009, Lasiotrichius Reitter, 1899, and Trichius Fabricius, 1775, but is separable from all the known Eurasian genera of Trichiina by the presence of a tooth on the inner side of the mesotibia in both sexes. The habitus, external characters, and male genitalia of Motuotrichius yangi are illustrated. The following new combinations are given: Gnorimotrichius albomaculatus (Moser, 1902), Gnorimotrichius signatus (Chûjô, 1940), Gnorimotrichius trilineatus (Ma, 1992), and Gnorimotrichius tronqueti (Antoine, 2002).

  2. Coleoptera Associated with Decaying Wood in a Tropical Deciduous Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-López, N Z; Andrés-Hernández, A R; Carrillo-Ruiz, H; Rivas-Arancibia, S P

    2016-08-01

    Coleoptera is the largest and diverse group of organisms, but few studies are dedicated to determine the diversity and feeding guilds of saproxylic Coleoptera. We demonstrate the diversity, abundance, feeding guilds, and succession process of Coleoptera associated with decaying wood in a tropical deciduous forest in the Mixteca Poblana, Mexico. Decaying wood was sampled and classified into four stages of decay, and the associated Coleoptera. The wood was identified according to their anatomy. Diversity was estimated using the Simpson index, while abundance was estimated using a Kruskal-Wallis test; the association of Coleoptera with wood species and decay was assessed using canonical correspondence analysis. Decay wood stage I is the most abundant (51%), followed by stage III (21%). We collected 93 Coleoptera belonging to 14 families, 41 genera, and 44 species. The family Cerambycidae was the most abundant, with 29% of individuals, followed by Tenebrionidae with 27% and Carabidae with 13%. We recognized six feeding guilds. The greatest diversity of Coleoptera was recorded in decaying Acacia farnesiana and Bursera linanoe. Kruskal-Wallis analysis indicated that the abundance of Coleoptera varied according to the species and stage of decay of the wood. The canonical analysis showed that the species and stage of decay of wood determined the composition and community structure of Coleoptera.

  3. Cryptic diversity in the Azorean beetle genus Tarphius Erichson, 1845 (Coleoptera: Zopheridae): An integrative taxonomic approach with description of four new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Paulo A V; Amorim, Isabel R; Terzopoulou, Sofia; Rigal, François; Emerson, Brent C; Serrano, Artur R M

    2017-02-23

    Recent findings based on molecular data support the occurrence in the Azores of several independently evolving lineages of the beetle genus Tarphius Erichson, 1845 (Coleoptera: Zopheridae Solier, 1834) and higher species richness masked by cryptic diversity, needing formal taxonomic description. All Tarphius from the Azores are revised using an integrative taxonomic approach, using evidence from morphology, morphometrics and molecular data to delimit species. Our results reveal that Azorean Tarphius comprise at least five phyletic lineages, two of which share a similar morphology, despite being divergent at the molecular level. A total of four new species are described grouped into two complexes: i) two new species in the "complex tornvalli" with the new taxa Tarphius relictus sp. nov. (Terceira) and Tarphius furtadoi sp. nov. (São Jorge, Faial and Pico) and; ii) two new species in the "complex azoricus-wollastoni-depressus" with the new taxa Tarphius gabrielae sp. nov. (Pico) and Tarphius floresensis sp. nov. (Flores). Descriptions, photographs of holotypes and morphological details, and remarks on diagnostic features comparing similar species are presented. Additional information on the distribution and conservation status of the 12 described species in the archipelago is also provided.

  4. Landscape patterns of species-level association between ground-beetles and overstory trees in boreal forests of western Canada (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

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    Bergeron, J. A. Colin; Spence, John R.; Volney, W. Jan A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Spatial associations between species of trees and ground-beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) involve many indirect ecological processes, likely reflecting the function of numerous forest ecosystem components. Describing and quantifying these associations at the landscape scale is basic to the development of a surrogate-based framework for biodiversity monitoring and conservation. In this study, we used a systematic sampling grid covering 84 km2 of boreal mixedwood forest to characterize the ground-beetle assemblage associated with each tree species occurring on this landscape. Projecting the distribution of relative basal area of each tree species on the beetle ordination diagram suggests that the carabid community is structured by the same environmental factors that affects the distribution of trees, or perhaps even by trees per se. Interestingly beetle species are associated with tree species of the same rank order of abundance on this landscape, suggesting that conservation of less abundant trees will concomitantly foster conservation of less abundant beetle species. Landscape patterns of association described here are based on characteristics that can be directly linked to provincial forest inventories, providing a basis that is already available for use of tree species as biodiversity surrogates in boreal forest land management. PMID:22371676

  5. Landscape patterns of species-level association between ground-beetles and overstory trees in boreal forests of western Canada (Coleoptera, Carabidae

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    Colin Bergeron

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Spatial associations between species of trees and ground-beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae involve many indirect ecological processes, likely reflecting the function of numerous forest ecosystem components. Describing and quantifying these associations at the landscape scale is basic to the development of a surrogate-based framework for biodiversity monitoring and conservation. In this study, we used a systematic sampling grid covering 84 km2 of boreal mixedwood forest to characterize the ground-beetle assemblage associated with each tree species occurring on this landscape. Projecting the distribution of relative basal area of each tree species on the beetle ordination diagram suggests that the carabid community is structured by the same environmental factors that affects the distribution of trees, or perhaps even by trees per se. Interestingly beetle species are associated with tree species of the same rank order of abundance on this landscape, suggesting that conservation of less abundant trees will concomitantly foster conservation of less abundant beetle species. Landscape patterns of association described here are based on characteristics that can be directly linked to provincial forest inventories, providing a basis that is already available for use of tree species as biodiversity surrogates in boreal forest land management.

  6. Systematics of the Ceracis furcifer Species-Group (Coleoptera: Ciidae): The Specialized Consumers of the Blood-Red Bracket Fungus Pycnoporus sanguineus

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    Pecci-Maddalena, Italo S. C.; Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano

    2017-01-01

    The Ceracis furcifer species-group (Coleoptera: Ciidae) originally comprised nine species names: Ceracis cornifer (Mellié, 1849); C. cylindricus (Brèthes, 1922); C. furcifer Mellié, 1849; C. hastifer (Mellié, 1849); C. monocerus Lawrence, 1967; C. ruficornis Pic, 1916; C. simplicicornis (Pic, 1916); C. semipallidus Pic, 1922 and C. unicornis Gorham, 1898. Ceracis semipallidus was synonymised with C. furcifer and then no further changes were made to the composition of the group. Here, we provide a taxonomic revision of the Ceracis furcifer species-group and new data on the geographic distribution and host fungi of the included species. Lectotypes are designated for C. cornifer, C. furcifer, C. hastifer, C. ruficornis, C. semipallidus and C. unicornis. As results we: (i) synonymise C. cylindricus, C. monocerus, C. simplicicornis, C. unicornis with C. cornifer; (ii) confirm the synonymy of C. semipallidus with C. furcifer; (iii) redescribe C. cornifer, C. hastifer, C. furcifer and C. ruficornis; and (iv) provide an identification key for species in the furcifer group. The frontoclypeal horn and body coloration showed great intraspecific variation. We show that species in the furcifer group have distributions wider than previously known and use mainly Pycnoporus sanguineus as host fungus. Species of the furcifer group are the only animals specialized in feeding on basidiomes of P. sanguineus. PMID:28714939

  7. A third karyosystematic investigation of the Stictotarsus griseostriatus (De Geer group of sibling species (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae

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    Robert Angus

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Karyological analysis has been carried out on Stictotarsus griseostriatus (De Geer, 1774 from Tjøme in southern Norway, one of the type localities of Deronectes maritimus Helliesen, 1890, as well as from the Canton of Valais in the Swiss Alps and Bavaria in the German Alps. True S. griseostriatus is shown to occur over much of the central Alps, and the synonymy of S. griseostriatus var. nigrescens Favre, 1890 is confirmed.  Analysis of Corsican material shows that the species inhabiting the island is S. ibericus Dutton et Angus, 2007. The known distributions of the S. griseostriatus group species occurring in the Alps and on Corsica are given, and Pleistocene fossil material from Starunia in the Ukrainian Carpathians is figured and discussed. A syntype of Potamodytes multilineatus Falkenström, 1922, in Helliesen’s collection in Oslo, is noted and a neotype designated for Deronectes maritimus Helliesen, 1890 as the original material on which the description was based cannot be found.

  8. Susceptibility of Two Sitophilus species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae to Essential Oils from Foeniculum vulgare and Satureja hortensis

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    Asgar Ebadollahi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the insecticidal activity of essential oils from Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare (Apiaceae, and Summer savory, Satureja hortensis (Lamiaceae, against two stored-product insects. Essential oils from two species of plants were obtained by Clevenger-type water distillation and their fumigant toxicities were tested against adults of the wheat weevil, Sitophilus granarius and rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (Curculionidae. The mortality was determined after 24 and 48 hrs from beginning of exposure. LC50 values of each essential oil were estimated for each insect species. Fumigation bioassays revealed that essential oils from two plants had strong insecticidal activity on experimental insects. LC50 values indicated that S. granarius was more susceptible than S. oryzae to essential oils at the exposure time 24 and 48 hrs. The mortality effect of S. hortensis oil was lower than F. vulgare oil. The LC50 values decreased with the duration of exposure to the essential oil concentrations. In all case, responses varied according to plant material, concentration, and exposure time. These results indicated that essential oils from S. hortensis and F. vulgare could be applicable to the management of stored product insects to decrease ecologically detrimental effects of utilization synthetic insecticides.

  9. Impact of agrochemicals on non-target species: Calathus fuscipes Goeze 1777 (Coleoptera: Carabidae) as model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Anita; Cavaliere, Francesco; Giulianini, Piero Giulio; Mazzei, Antonio; Talarico, Federica; Vommaro, Maria Luigia; Brandmayr, Pietro

    2017-08-01

    Carabid beetles are important in the biological control of arable crop pests. Agricultural practices can produce over time a delayed toxic effect at the organismal and population levels and can compromise the survival on these species. In this research, we quantified the cumulative sublethal effect on body size, Malpighian tubules and immune responses in Calathus fuscipes adults living in the potato field and exposed to lambda-cyhalothrin and cymoxanil-based commercial formulates. Reductions of morphological parameters such as body, pronotum and elytron in both males and females from the potato field indicated that the pre-imaginal stages (larvae and pupae) suffer the sublethal effects of exposure to the larvicide control action of lambda-cyhalothrin. Ultrastructural alterations recorded in Malpighian tubules at the level of plasma membrane, mitochondria and nucleus indicated the reduction of the detoxification capability. The basal phenoloxidase and lysozyme-like enzyme activities have measured as markers of immune competence. Spectrophometric analyses showed that the chronic exposure in field causes an increase of basal phenoloxidase enzyme activity, while the lytic activity of haemolymph was not affected. As a result, the use of larvicides and fungicides have a harmful effect on beneficial species such C. fuscipes living in the soil of potato fields. These morphological and physiological results recorded at the organismal level can provide useful information of effects at the population and community levels to preserve the biodiversity of agroecosystem. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Skimming behaviour and spreading potential of Stenus species and Dianous coerulescens (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae)

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    Lang, Carolin; Seifert, Karlheinz; Dettner, Konrad

    2012-11-01

    Rove beetles of the genus Stenus Latreille and the genus Dianous Leach possess pygidial glands containing a multifunctional secretion of piperidine and pyridine-derived alkaloids as well as several terpenes. One important character of this secretion is the spreading potential of its different compounds, stenusine, norstenusine, 3-(2-methyl-1-butenyl)pyridine, cicindeloine, α-pinene, 1,8-cineole and 6-methyl-5-heptene-2-one. The individual secretion composition enables the beetles to skim rapidly and far over the water surface, even when just a small amount of secretion is emitted. Ethological investigations of several Stenus species revealed that the skimming ability, skimming velocity and the skimming behaviour differ between the Stenus species. These differences can be linked to varied habitat claims and secretion saving mechanisms. By means of tensiometer measurements using the pendant drop method, the spreading pressure of all secretion constituents as well as some naturally identical beetle secretions on the water surface could be established. The compound 3-(2-methyl-1-butenyl)pyridine excelled stenusine believed to date to be mainly responsible for skimming relating to its surface activity. The naturally identical secretions are not subject to synergistic effects of the single compounds concerning the spreading potential. Furthermore, evolutionary aspects of the Steninae's pygidial gland secretion are discussed.

  11. New species and records of Scolytodes (Coleoptera, Curculionidae: Scolytinae) from South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordal, Bjarte H

    2013-01-01

    Seventeen new species of Scolytodes Ferrari are described from Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Argentina: Scolytodes cenchros, S. concavifrons, S. conpunctus, S. fraterniatratus, S. frontocarinatus, S. solarius and S. trigonus from Cecropia leafstalks; S. pascopomus from a fruit husk; S. obovatus, S. clusiaphilus, S. clusiapraelatus and S. uniseriatus from Clusia litter sifting; S. grossepunctatus and S. fulvus from general litter sifting; and S. inusitatus, S. sagittarius and S. sus collected by flight intercept traps. The synonymy of S. imitans and S. nitidissimus is confirmed. Additional South American records are given for S. chapuisi (Ecuador), S. interpunctatus (Peru), S. maurus (Ecuador), and S. suspectus (Ecuador), all taken from Cecropia leafstalks, and S. similis (Peru) and S. unipunctatus (Bolivia).

  12. A NEW SPECIES OF TRECHUS FROM THE ETHIOPIAN PLATEAU (Coleoptera, Carabidae

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    Paolo Magrini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Trechus from the Oromia Province (Ethiopia is described in the present note. This new taxon shows some peculiar characters, such as a much swollen abdomen of pseudophysiogastric aspect, a feature shared by other high altitude Trechinae, as for instance Queinnectrechus Deuve, 1992 from Asia. The integuments are glabrous; the antennae are short; the pronotum is larger than long, with regularly rounded sides and hind angles; the elytrae are short and rounded (pseudophysiogastric with the first six striae well engraved, on the third of them two discal foveolate setae are well visible. The aedeagus is big and stout, abruptly narrowing at the tip (in lateral view, with a small botton slanting upwards; the copulatory piece is big and well sclerified, triangular, with a more or less sharpened tip. Well recognizable for the “pseudophysiogastric” aspect, Trechus (Trechus ericalis n.sp. belongs to the bipartitus group.

  13. A simultaneous journal / wiki publication and dissemination of a new species description: Neobidessodes darwiniensis sp. n. from northern Australia (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Bidessini

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    Lars Hendrich

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe a new Australian species in journal format and simultaneously open the description in a wiki format on the www.species-id.net. The wiki format will always link to the fixed original journal description of the taxon, however it permits future edits and additions to species'  taxonomy and biology. The diving beetle Neobidessodes darwiniensis sp. n. (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Bidessini is described based on a single female, collected in a rest pool of the Harriet Creek in the Darwin Area, Northern Territory. Within Neobidessodes the new species is well characterized by its elongate oval body with rounded sides, short and stout segments of antennae, length of body and dorsal surface coloration. In addition to external morphology, we used mitochondrial cox1 sequence data to support generic assignment and to delineate the new species from other Australian Bidessini including all other known Neobidessodes. Illustrations based on digital images are provided here and as online resources. A modified key is provided. Altogether ten species of the genus are now known worldwide, nine from Australia and one from New Guinea.

  14. Notes on the Reproductive Ecology and Description of the Preimaginal Morphology of Elaphrus sugai Nakane, the Most Endangered Species of Elaphrus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Carabidae Ground Beetle Worldwide.

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    Kôji Sasakawa

    Full Text Available Elucidating the basic life-history of endangered species is the first important step in the conservation of such species. This study examined the reproductive ecology and the preimaginal morphology of the endangered ground beetle Elaphrus sugai Nakane (Coleoptera: Carabidae; currently, the Watarase wetland of the central Kanto Plain, Japan is the only confirmed locality of this beetle species. Laboratory rearing of reproductive adults collected in early April revealed that females can lay more than 131 eggs. Eggs were laid in mud, without an egg chamber. Larvae reached adulthood when fed a diet of mealworms, indicating that E. sugai larvae are insect larvae feeders. An earthworm diet, the optimal diet for larvae of a congeneric species (E. punctatus Motschulsky, was lethal to E. sugai larvae. The egg stage was 3-4 days in duration under a 16L8D cycle (22°C. The duration from hatching to adult eclosion was 23-42 days at various temperatures simulating those of the reproductive period. Larval morphology was similar to that of consubgeneric species described previously. The pupa is unusual, in that the setae on the abdominal tergites are long (twice as long as those of the abdominal segment and have somewhat "coiled" apices. Finally, the current endangered status of E. sugai was compared to that of E. viridis Horn, which has been regarded as the most endangered species of the genus worldwide.

  15. Notes on the Reproductive Ecology and Description of the Preimaginal Morphology of Elaphrus sugai Nakane, the Most Endangered Species of Elaphrus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Ground Beetle Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasakawa, Kôji

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the basic life-history of endangered species is the first important step in the conservation of such species. This study examined the reproductive ecology and the preimaginal morphology of the endangered ground beetle Elaphrus sugai Nakane (Coleoptera: Carabidae); currently, the Watarase wetland of the central Kanto Plain, Japan is the only confirmed locality of this beetle species. Laboratory rearing of reproductive adults collected in early April revealed that females can lay more than 131 eggs. Eggs were laid in mud, without an egg chamber. Larvae reached adulthood when fed a diet of mealworms, indicating that E. sugai larvae are insect larvae feeders. An earthworm diet, the optimal diet for larvae of a congeneric species (E. punctatus Motschulsky), was lethal to E. sugai larvae. The egg stage was 3-4 days in duration under a 16L8D cycle (22°C). The duration from hatching to adult eclosion was 23-42 days at various temperatures simulating those of the reproductive period. Larval morphology was similar to that of consubgeneric species described previously. The pupa is unusual, in that the setae on the abdominal tergites are long (twice as long as those of the abdominal segment) and have somewhat "coiled" apices. Finally, the current endangered status of E. sugai was compared to that of E. viridis Horn, which has been regarded as the most endangered species of the genus worldwide.

  16. The potential of different fruit species as food for Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

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    Camila Fediuk de Castro Guedes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Harmonia axyridis was detected for the first time in Brazil in 2002. Since then, it has been recorded from the South to the Midwest of the country. Until now, almost all the registered cases were associated with the presence of aphids, its preferred source of food. Due to the occurrence of this species in areas of fruit growing in the South and Southeast of Brazil, the aim of this study was to analyze the preference and use of three different cultivars of fruit. The tests were set at 25ºC ± 1ºC, RH 70% ± 10%, and in a photophase of 12 h and with apples (Gala and Fuji, grapes (Niágara and Rubi, and pears (Williams and Asian. In the undamaged fruit experiment, the insects did not cause any noticeable damage. In the damaged and undamaged fruit experiment, a higher and statistically significant percentage of H. axyridis adults were found in the three damaged fruits. In the different cultivar experiment the Niágara grape, the Gala apple, and the Williams pear were significantly preferred by H. axyridis adults. These results may help in the management of this insect, preventing damage, which have been observed in other places where H. axyridis was introduced.

  17. Five new species, one new genus, two synonymies, and new distributional records in Cerambycidae (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ubirajara R; Galileo, Maria Helena M; Santos-Silva, Antonio

    2016-02-09

    Five new species, and one new genus of Cerambycidae are described: Drycothaea vulcanica sp. nov. (Calliini), from Ecuador (Holotype male deposited in AMNH: Napo, 29.X.1988, J.S. Miller leg.); Perissomerus machadoi sp. nov. (Neoibidionini), from Paraguay (Holotype male deposited in MZSP: Alto Paraguay, 30.XI.2002, Di Iorio leg.); Cacostola carinata sp. nov. (Onciderini), from Brazil (Holotype female deposited in MZSP: Rio Grande do Norte, IX.2008, D.R.R. Fernandes et al. leg.); Ypomacena gen. nov. (Apomecynini) from Brazil to include Y. monnei sp. nov. (Holotype male deposited in MNRJ: Bahia, XI.1970, Roppa leg.), and Y. gibbosa sp. nov. (Holotype female deposited in MNRJ: Rio de Janeiro, 31.X.1969, Alvarenga & Seabra leg.). Dorcasta prolongata Fisher, 1947 is proposed as a new synonym of Bebelis lignea (Bates, 1866). Bisaltes (Bisaltes) fuchsi Breuning, 1971 is proposed as a new synonym of Bisaltes (Bisaltes) buquetii Thomson, 1868. Additionally, sixteen new states records for Brazil, and three country records for Bolivia are provided.

  18. Apoderus coryli (L. – a Biologically Little Known Species of the Attelabidae (Coleoptera

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    Jaroslav Urban

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hazel-leaf roller weevil (Apoderus coryli /L./ is a noteworthy species from the perspective of biology and forestry; it belongs to the family Attelabidae. Its occurrence, development and harmfulness were studied in surroundings of Brno city in 2011 and 2012. Imagoes of the first generation and those of not very numerous second generation are observed to winter in the area under study. From the beginning of May to the end of July they occur on the host woody plants (mainly on Carpinus betulus and Corylus avellana. The males and females consume on average 21 and 33 cm2 of leaves, respectively. The fertilized females cut into the leaf blade in an original manner, and bite into the main and side leaf veins. They fold the withering part of the blade lengthwise to the adaxial face first, and then forming the folded blade into a short cylindrical roll. In the initial phase of rolling, the females lay up on average 1.0 egg into the leaf rolls on C. betulus (1.2 on C. avellana. In total, they make around 30 rolls. The larvae emerge on average within 10 days. In the course of 3 to 4 weeks, they pass through two instars only and damage on average 4 cm2 of leaves. This work describes the occurrence and development of the beetles of the first and second generation. It provides an assessment of the mortality of the individual development stages of A. coryli within the rolls. It was demonstrated that rolling of the leaves causes on average 9 times more damage to the trees than maturation feeding of the beetles.

  19. The response of Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and Temnochila chlorodia (Coleoptera: Trogossitidae) to Ips paraconfusus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) pheromone components and verbenone

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    Christopher J. Fettig; Stepehen R. McKelvey; Christopher P. Dabney; Robert R. Borys

    2007-01-01

    The red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte, 1860 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is a common bark beetle species found throughout much of North America and China. In 2004, we observed that California fivespined ips, Ips paraconfusus Lanier, 1970 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), attack densities in logging debris were inversely related to D...

  20. NOTE TASSONOMICHE E NOMENCLATORIALI SU ALCUNE SPECIE PALEARTICHE DI SIBINIA E TYCHIUS (COLEOPTERA, CURCULIONIDAE

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    Roberto Caldara

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In accordo con le disposizioni del codice internazionale di Nomenclatura Zoologica, vengono proposte otto azioni allo scopo di salvaguardare la stabilità della nomenclatura attuale di alcune specie della tribù Tychiini. seguendo le indicazioni dell’Articolo 23.9.1, Sibinia subelliptica Desbrochers, 1873 è considerato nomen protectum e Gymnetron schaumi Becker, 1864 è considerato nomen oblitum; Sibinia phalerata Gyllenhal, 1836 è considerato nomen protectum e Sibinia centromaculata Villa & Villa, 1835 è considerato nomen oblitum. Essendo presenti le condizioni richieste dall’articolo 75.3, vengono designati i neotipi dei seguenti taxa: Sibinia centromaculata Villa & Villa, 1835; Sybines pulchellus Desbrochers, 1875. Sono inoltre stabiliti i lectotypi di: Gymne­ tron schaumi Becker, 1864; Sibinia attalica Gyllenhal var. lateralis Desbrochers, 1895; Sibinia cinctella Desbrochers, 1898; Sibinia pozuelica Fuente, 1910; Tychius barceloni­cus Desbrochers, 1908; Tychius edentatus Desbrochers, 1895; Tychius pallidicornis Desbrochers, 1875; Tychius parvulus Stephens, 1831; Tychius seductor Desbrochers, 1908. Vengono proposte le seguenti nuove sinonimie: Sibinia bipunctata Kirsch, 1870 = Sibi­nia postsignata Voss, 1971 n. syn.; Sibinia exigua Faust = Sibinia cinctella Desbrochers, 1898 n. syn.; Sibinia femoralis Germar, 1824 = Sibinia attalica var. lateralis Desbrochers, 1895 n. syn. = Sibinia consanguinea Desbrochers, 1895 n. syn. = Sibinia attalica var. curtula Desbrochers, 1907 n. syn. = Sibinia dilataticollis Desbrochers, 1907 n. syn.= Sibinia seducta Desbrochers, 1907 n. syn. = Sibinia pozuelica Fuente, 1910 n. syn.; Si­binia pici Desbrochers = Sibinia otiosa Hustache, 1944 n. syn. = Sibinia praeventa Hustache, 1944 n. syn.; Sibinia subelliptica Desbrochers, 1873 = Sibinia schaumei Desbrochers, 1895 n. syn.; Sibinia unicolor Fåhraeus, 1843 = Sybines pulchellus Desbrochers, 1875 n. syn. = Sibinia ochreata Schilsky, 1912 n. syn

  1. The comparative osmoregulatory ability of two water beetle genera whose species span the fresh-hypersaline gradient in inland waters (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Hydrophilidae.

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    Susana Pallarés

    Full Text Available A better knowledge of the physiological basis of salinity tolerance is essential to understanding the ecology and evolutionary history of organisms that have colonized inland saline waters. Coleoptera are amongst the most diverse macroinvertebrates in inland waters, including saline habitats; however, the osmoregulatory strategies they employ to deal with osmotic stress remain unexplored. Survival and haemolymph osmotic concentration at different salinities were examined in adults of eight aquatic beetle species which inhabit different parts of the fresh-hypersaline gradient. Studied species belong to two unrelated genera which have invaded saline waters independently from freshwater ancestors; Nebrioporus (Dytiscidae and Enochrus (Hydrophilidae. Their osmoregulatory strategy (osmoconformity or osmoregulation was identified and osmotic capacity (the osmotic gradient between the animal's haemolymph and the external medium was compared between species pairs co-habiting similar salinities in nature. We show that osmoregulatory capacity, rather than osmoconformity, has evolved independently in these different lineages. All species hyperegulated their haemolymph osmotic concentration in diluted waters; those living in fresh or low-salinity waters were unable to hyporegulate and survive in hyperosmotic media (> 340 mosmol kg(-1. In contrast, the species which inhabit the hypo-hypersaline habitats were effective hyporegulators, maintaining their haemolymph osmolality within narrow limits (ca. 300 mosmol kg(-1 across a wide range of external concentrations. The hypersaline species N. ceresyi and E. jesusarribasi tolerated conductivities up to 140 and 180 mS cm(-1, respectively, and maintained osmotic gradients over 3500 mosmol kg(-1, comparable to those of the most effective insect osmoregulators known to date. Syntopic species of both genera showed similar osmotic capacities and in general, osmotic responses correlated well with upper salinity levels

  2. Endogean and cavernicolous Coleoptera of the Balkans. XVII. A new species of the genus Speluncarius Reitter, 1886 (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Harpalinae, Pterostichini) from Croatia.

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    Hlaváč, Peter; Lakota, Ján; Čeplík, Dávid

    2016-09-02

    The genus Speluncarius Reitter, 1886 (Harpalinae, Pterostichini) is made up by anophthalmous or almost blind species. The genus is related to Tapinopterus Schaum, 1858, which contains numerous species from the Balkan-Anatolian region and have more or less developed eyes. Speluncarius is distributed in the Western Palaearctic region; 26 species and one subspecies are known from Italy, the Balkan Peninsula and Turkey. The genus is classified in five subgenera, Elasmopterus Kraatz, 1886 (6 spp.); Hypogearius Jeannel, 1953 (3 spp.); Hypogium Tschitscherine, 1900 (1 sp.); Pontotapinus Guéorguiev & Lohaj, 2008 (1 sp.) and Speluncarius (s.str.) Reitter, 1886 (15 spp.) (Sciaky, 1982; Bousquet, 2003; Guéorguiev & Lohaj, 2008; Casale et al., 2013).

  3. Do cardinal directions in different Acacia tree species affect biological activities of bruchid beetle, Bruchidius buettikeri Decelle (Bruchidae: Coleoptera), in Riyadh Region, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldawood, A S

    2009-12-15

    Biological activities of bruchid beetle: Bruchidius buettikeri Decelle (Bruchidae: Coleoptera) were studied in four cardinal directions of Acacia tree species in Huraimila and Salbouk. In Huraimila, two species of Acacia; A. grrrardii, subspecies A. g. negevensis (Iraqi) and A. g. nagednsis (Najdi); and A. ehrenbergiana (Salam) were sampled. In Salbouk, A. tortilis radiana (Samar) was sampled. No significant differences were observed for entrance and exit holes per pod and beetles emergence until 45 days on four cardinal directions of different Acacia tree species, except for entrance holes at Dam and Farm locations on Najdi in Huraimila. However, greater activities were observed in south and east direction in farm locations whereas, in the valley (Abu Gatada, Alyata and Dam locations) more bruchid activities were observed in north and south on Najdi and samar while east and west on Iraqi. Moreover, activities were greater on Acacia trees with greater number of seed per pod. Greater bruchid infestation per pod was found on East direction in the farm locations but in the valley locations no distinct trend was observed. Results showed a significant, positive correlation between bruchid activities and temperature but similar strength negative correlation was observed for rest of various abiotic factors. Moreover, a strong positive correlation was recorded between neonate entrance and number of beetle emergence.

  4. Anomiopus Westwood (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae: novas espécies do grupo virescens Anomiopus Westwood (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae: new species of the virescens group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia Luzia Canhedo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Três novas espécies de Anomiopus Westwood, 1842 são acrescentadas ao grupo virescens: A. lunatipes sp. nov. (Brasil: Amazonas, A. paraguaiensis sp. nov. (Paraguai e A. tuberifrons sp. nov. (Brasil: Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso do Sul e São Paulo. Chave para as espécies do grupo virescens é fornecida.Three new species of Anomiopus Westwood, 1842 are added to the virescensgroup: A. lunatipes sp. nov. (Brazil: Amazonas, A. paraguaiensis sp. nov. (Paraguai and A. tuberifrons sp. nov. (Brazil: Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso do Sul and São Paulo. A key to the species of the group virescens is provided.

  5. Is Prey Specificity Constrained by Geography? Semiochemically Mediated Oviposition in Rhizophagus grandis (Coleoptera: Monotomidae) with Its Specific Prey, Dendroctonus micans (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), and with Exotic Dendroctonus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohet, Loïc; Grégoire, Jean-Claude

    2017-08-01

    Examples of totally specific predators are rare, and the mechanisms underlying this specificity are often poorly understood. In Eurasia, the Monotomid beetle Rhizophagus grandis is found only in the galleries of its prey, the bark beetle Dendroctonus micans. The specificity of R. grandis relies on kairomones which female predators use to adjust their oviposition to the number of prey larvae available in a gallery. Yet these chemical signals are still largely unknown. The North American D. punctatus and D. valens, which are not sympatric with R. grandis but have a similar ecology as D. micans, could also elicit predator oviposition, which would suggest that specificity in this predator-prey system is constrained by geography. In order to further identify these determinants of specificity, we used artificial oviposition boxes to compare the oviposition level of R. grandis in the presence of larvae of each of the three prey species. We jointly used sequential dynamic headspace extractions and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry to investigate oviposition stimuli associated with each prey species and potential oviposition inhibitors emitted by the predator. We further assessed potential stimuli with the analysis of emissions from D. micans larvae reared alone. Overall, we identified and quantified 67 compounds, mostly terpenes. Several robust candidate stimulants or inhibitors of R. grandis' oviposition were identified. The three prey species elicited similar oviposition levels in R. grandis, which suggests that this predator could form new associations outside of its native range.

  6. Duas novas espécies de Ptychoderes Schoenherr (Coleoptera, Anthribidae, Anthribinae, Ptychoderini Two new species of Ptychoderes Schoenherr (Coleoptera, Anthribidae, Anthribinae, Ptychoderini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo M. Mermudes

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Duas novas espécies de Ptychoderes Schoenherr, 1823 são descritas e ilustradas: Ptychoderes magnus sp. nov., da Bolívia e Brasil (localidade-tipo: Ouro Preto d'Oeste, Rondônia e P. jekeli sp. nov. do Brasil e Guiana Francesa (localidade-tipo: Roches de Kourou.The following new species of Ptychoderes Schoenherr, 1823 are described and illustrated (type-localities parenthetic: Ptychoderes magnus sp. nov., from Bolivia and Brazil (Rondônia: Ouro Preto d'Oeste and P. jekeli sp. nov., from Brazil and French Guiana (Roches de Kourou.

  7. Development times and age-specific life table parameters of the native lady beetle species Coccinella novemnotata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and its invasive congener Coccinella septempunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugine, Todd A; Losey, John E

    2014-08-01

    To determine if differences in life history parameters contribute to native species exclusion, immature development times, larval survivorship, reproductive life history parameters, and age-specific life tables were determined for two populations (eastern United States and western United States) of ninespotted lady beetles (Coccinella novemnotata Herbst) and one population of sevenspotted lady beetles (Coccinella septempunctata L.). Developing larvae were provided an ad libitum diet of pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris) at a constant temperature of 25°C. The first and fourth larval stadia of C. novemnotata were significantly longer than that of C. septempunctata, as was their total development time from egg to newly eclosed adult. Stage-specific developmental mortality was low for both species and did not exceed 7% for the entire development period. The preoviposition period of the two C. novemnotata populations was significantly shorter (15-20%) than that of C. septempunctata. C. novemnotata from both locations laid significantly fewer total eggs than C. septempunctata (34-40% fewer) over the 31-d test period, and also fewer eggs per day (37-43% fewer). The net reproductive rate of the C. novemnotata populations was 42-50% lower than that of C. septempunctata as was C. novemnotata's intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm: 0.1716 and 0.1840 vs. 0.1959 for western and eastern C. novemnotata and C. septempunctata, respectively).

  8. Multiple incursions and putative species revealed using a mitochondrial and nuclear phylogenetic approach to the Trogoderma variabile (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) trapping program in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castalanelli, M A; Mikac, K M; Baker, A M; Munyard, K; Grimm, M; Groth, D M

    2011-06-01

    The Warehouse beetle, Trogoderma variabile (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), is an internationally significant invasive pest of packed goods and stored grain. When it was first documented in Australia at Griffith, New South Wales, in 1977, an eradication campaign was initiated. After several years and considerable effort, the eradication campaign was abandoned. To monitor the presence and spread of T. variabile, surveys were carried out by government agencies in 1992 and 2002. When survey data was compared, it was concluded that the distribution of morphologically identified T. variabile had doubled in most Australian states. Here, we used samples from the 2002 survey to conduct a phylogenetic study using partial sequences of mitochondrial genes Cytochrome oxidase I and Cytochrome B, and the nuclear gene 18S, to examine the distribution and dispersal of T. variabile and detect the presence of misidentified species. Based on our molecular results, we show that only 47% of the samples analysed were T. variabile, and the remaining were a mixture of six putative species. In addition, T. variabile was found in only 78% of the trapping sites. We discuss the importance of correct diagnosis in relation to the eradication campaign.

  9. ABUNDÂNCIA RELATIVA DAS ESPÉCIES DE CERAMBYCIDAE (INSECTA-COLEOPTERA EM POMAR DE FRUTÍFERAS MISTO RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OF SPECIES OF THE CERAMBYCIDAE FAMILY (INSECTA-COLEOPTERA IN MIXED ORCHARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Rose Pereira da Silva

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Estudou-se a abundância relativa das espécies da família Cerambycidae (Insecta-Coleoptera em um pomar de frutíferas misto composto por 28 diferentes espécies, no período de dezembro de 1997 a maio de 1999 em Ceres, Estado de Goiás, Brasil. Foram utilizadas armadilhas luminosas modelo “Luiz de Queiroz” com lâmpadas Bl-15 wats. Essas armadilhas foram ligadas por 12 horas em dois dias consectivos num total de 24 horas de coletas semanais. Coletaram-se 1.474 cerambicídeos, agrupados em 39 gêneros e 49 espécies. Acanthoderes jaspidea, Achryson surinamum, Chlorida festiva, Eurodacrys sexgutatta, Gnomibidion fulvipes, Lophopoeum timbouve, Megacyllene acuta, Rhopalophora collaris e Trichophorus distinctus foram as espécies classificadas como muito abundantes. Das espécies coletadas, 48,98 % foram classificadas como raras, 12,24 % como dispersas, 20,41 % como comuns e 18,37 % como muito abundantes. Dentre os 39 gêneros, Oreodera foi representado por três espécies (6,13 %, os gêneros Acanthoderes, Aerenica, Chrysoprasis, Colobothea, Eutrypanus, Megacylene, Myoxomorpha e Nyssodrysternum por duas espécies (4,08 %, e os demais gêneros por apenas uma espécie.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Levantamento; riqueza de espécies; ecologia; comportamento.

    It was studied the relative abundance to the species of the family Cerambycidae (Insecta-Coleoptera in a mixed orchard composed by 28 diferent species in the period from decembre 1997 to may 1999 in Ceres, state of Goi

  10. Dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dung beetle fauna of the subfamily Scarabaeinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) occurring in the Laikipia District of Kenya was surveyed. A total of 79 species were found which are diagnosed, keyed, and known dung preferences discussed. Seven species are new records for Kenya, namely Allogymnopleurus ...

  11. A review and phylogeny of Scarabaeine dung beetle fossils (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae), with the description of two Canthochilum species from Dominican amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Frank-Thorsten; Dimitrov, Dimitar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing rate of systematic research on scarabaeine dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae), their fossil record has remained largely unrevised. In this paper, we review all 33 named scarabaeine fossils and describe two new species from Dominican amber (Canthochilum alleni sp.n., Canthochilum philipsivieorum sp.n.). We provide a catalogue of all fossil Scarabaeinae and evaluate their assignment to this subfamily, based primarily on the original descriptions but also, where possible, by examining the type specimens. We suggest that only 21 fossil taxa can be reliably assigned to the Scarabaeinae, while the remaining 14 should be treated as doubtful Scarabaeinae. The doubtful scarabaeines include the two oldest dung beetle fossils known from the Cretaceous and we suggest excluding them from any assessments of the minimum age of scarabaeine dung beetles. The earliest reliably described scarabaeine fossil appears to be Lobateuchus parisii, known from Oise amber (France), which shifts the minimum age of the Scarabaeinae to the Eocene (53 Ma). We scored the best-preserved fossils, namely Lobateuchus and the two Canthochilum species described herein, into the character matrix used in a recent morphology-based study of dung beetles, and then inferred their phylogenetic relationships with Bayesian and parsimony methods. All analyses yielded consistent phylogenies where the two fossil Canthochilum are placed in a clade with the extant species of Canthochilum, and Lobateuchus is recovered in a clade with the extant genera Ateuchus and Aphengium. Additionally, we evaluated the distribution of dung beetle fossils in the light of current global dung beetle phylogenetic hypotheses, geological time and biogeography. The presence of only extant genera in the late Oligocene and all later records suggests that the main present-day dung beetle lineages had already been established by the late Oligocene–mid Miocene. PMID:27547512

  12. A review and phylogeny of Scarabaeine dung beetle fossils (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae), with the description of two Canthochilum species from Dominican amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Sergei; Vaz-de-Mello, Fernando Z; Krell, Frank-Thorsten; Dimitrov, Dimitar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing rate of systematic research on scarabaeine dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae), their fossil record has remained largely unrevised. In this paper, we review all 33 named scarabaeine fossils and describe two new species from Dominican amber (Canthochilum alleni sp.n., Canthochilum philipsivieorum sp.n.). We provide a catalogue of all fossil Scarabaeinae and evaluate their assignment to this subfamily, based primarily on the original descriptions but also, where possible, by examining the type specimens. We suggest that only 21 fossil taxa can be reliably assigned to the Scarabaeinae, while the remaining 14 should be treated as doubtful Scarabaeinae. The doubtful scarabaeines include the two oldest dung beetle fossils known from the Cretaceous and we suggest excluding them from any assessments of the minimum age of scarabaeine dung beetles. The earliest reliably described scarabaeine fossil appears to be Lobateuchus parisii, known from Oise amber (France), which shifts the minimum age of the Scarabaeinae to the Eocene (53 Ma). We scored the best-preserved fossils, namely Lobateuchus and the two Canthochilum species described herein, into the character matrix used in a recent morphology-based study of dung beetles, and then inferred their phylogenetic relationships with Bayesian and parsimony methods. All analyses yielded consistent phylogenies where the two fossil Canthochilum are placed in a clade with the extant species of Canthochilum, and Lobateuchus is recovered in a clade with the extant genera Ateuchus and Aphengium. Additionally, we evaluated the distribution of dung beetle fossils in the light of current global dung beetle phylogenetic hypotheses, geological time and biogeography. The presence of only extant genera in the late Oligocene and all later records suggests that the main present-day dung beetle lineages had already been established by the late Oligocene-mid Miocene.

  13. A review and phylogeny of Scarabaeine dung beetle fossils (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae, with the description of two Canthochilum species from Dominican amber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Tarasov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing rate of systematic research on scarabaeine dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae, their fossil record has remained largely unrevised. In this paper, we review all 33 named scarabaeine fossils and describe two new species from Dominican amber (Canthochilum alleni sp.n., Canthochilum philipsivieorum sp.n.. We provide a catalogue of all fossil Scarabaeinae and evaluate their assignment to this subfamily, based primarily on the original descriptions but also, where possible, by examining the type specimens. We suggest that only 21 fossil taxa can be reliably assigned to the Scarabaeinae, while the remaining 14 should be treated as doubtful Scarabaeinae. The doubtful scarabaeines include the two oldest dung beetle fossils known from the Cretaceous and we suggest excluding them from any assessments of the minimum age of scarabaeine dung beetles. The earliest reliably described scarabaeine fossil appears to be Lobateuchus parisii, known from Oise amber (France, which shifts the minimum age of the Scarabaeinae to the Eocene (53 Ma. We scored the best-preserved fossils, namely Lobateuchus and the two Canthochilum species described herein, into the character matrix used in a recent morphology-based study of dung beetles, and then inferred their phylogenetic relationships with Bayesian and parsimony methods. All analyses yielded consistent phylogenies where the two fossil Canthochilum are placed in a clade with the extant species of Canthochilum, and Lobateuchus is recovered in a clade with the extant genera Ateuchus and Aphengium. Additionally, we evaluated the distribution of dung beetle fossils in the light of current global dung beetle phylogenetic hypotheses, geological time and biogeography. The presence of only extant genera in the late Oligocene and all later records suggests that the main present-day dung beetle lineages had already been established by the late Oligocene–mid Miocene.

  14. The beetle Costalimaita ferruginea (Coleoptera: Chysomelidae) in Eucalyptus plantations in transition area of Amazon and Cerrado Biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, T K R; Pires, E M; Souza, A P; Tanaka, A A; Monteiro, E B; Wilcken, C F

    2018-02-01

    Costalimaita ferruginea (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) attacks Eucalyptus plants causing severe damage through netting of the leaves. Recently, this Coleoptera has been reported attacking Myrtaceae in Mato Grosso State and, studies about the occurrence of this beetle in commercial plantations of eucalypts has been the subject of researchers through monitoring programmes in the forest protection area. With the beginning of the rainy season, adults were observed causing damage in eucalypt plantations in four cities that are part of the transition region of Amazon and Cerrado Biomes. The spots where these insects were observed are located in Feliz Natal, Lucas do Rio Verde, Sorriso and Vera. The purpose of this study was to report the new occurrences and to characterize the attack period of the beetle C. ferruginea in Eucalyptus plantations in Middle-North region of Mato Grosso State, region of Biomes Transition.

  15. Definition of the jianfengling species group of the ground beetle genus Orthogonius MacLeay (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Orthogoniini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Tian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The jianfengling species group of the termitophilous carabid genus Orthogonius MacLeay, 1825 is defined and reviewed. This species group ranges from southern China, crossing Indochina and Myanmar to eastern India. To date, the jianfengling species group is composed of ten species, including six new species which are hereinafter described and illustrated: O. wrasei sp. n. (Myanmar, O. bellus sp. n. and O. limbourgi sp. n. (Vietnam, O. politior sp. n., O. aberlenci sp. n. (Laos and O. meghalayaensis sp. n. (India. Habitus, elytral apices and male genitalia of all species are illustrated. A key to species and a distribution map of jianfengling species group are provided.

  16. A new species of Homalocerus Schoenherr from the Atlantic coast of the State of São Paulo, Brazil (Coleoptera, Belidae, Belinae, with notes on color pattern and on the sclerites of the internal sac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio A. Vanin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Homalocerus Schoenherr from the Atlantic coast of the State of São Paulo, Brazil (Coleoptera, Belidae, Belinae, with notes on color pattern and on the sclerites of the internal sac. Homalocerus bimaculatus sp. nov. (type locality: Brazil, São Paulo is described and illustrated, and comments on the sclerites of the internal sac of aedeagus and on color pattern are provided. The new species is compared to other similar species of the genus, being distinguished by having three clusters of carmine pubescence on pronotum and two lateral whitish oval spots located slightly before the middle of each elytron. Six species of Homalocerus, including the new one, are known from the State of São Paulo. The previously published identification key for species of Homalocerus is updated to include H. bimaculatus.

  17. A key toGrouvellinusChampion, 1923 from mainland China with descriptions of two new species (Coleoptera, Elmidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Dongju; Sun, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    A key to Grouvellinus Champion from mainland China is provided. Two new species of Grouvellinus are described from Jiangxi, China, Grouvellinus orbiculatus sp. n. and Grouvellinus sagittatus sp. n. Descriptions, diagnoses, and illustrations of the new species are given. Habitus photos of the nine known species are provided including the four species from Taiwan.

  18. A key to Grouvellinus Champion, 1923 from mainland China with descriptions of two new species (Coleoptera, Elmidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bian Dongju

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A key to Grouvellinus Champion from mainland China is provided. Two new species of Grouvellinus are described from Jiangxi, China, Grouvellinus orbiculatus sp. n. and Grouvellinus sagittatus sp. n. Descriptions, diagnoses, and illustrations of the new species are given. Habitus photos of the nine known species are provided including the four species from Taiwan.

  19. A taxonomic review of the genusHorniolusWeise from China, with description of a new species (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaosheng; Xie, Xiufeng; Ren, Shunxiang; Wang, Xingmin

    2016-01-01

    Five species of the genus Horniolus Weise, 1901 from China are revised, including the description of a new species, Horniolus hainanensis Chen & Ren, sp. n. Horniolus sonduongensis Hoàng, 1979 is reported from China for the first time. A key to the species from China is provided. Nomenclatural history, diagnoses, detailed descriptions, illustrations, and distribution for each species have been provided. A checklist of all known species of this genus is also presented.

  20. A taxonomic review of the genus Horniolus Weise from China, with description of a new species (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosheng Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Five species of the genus Horniolus Weise, 1901 from China are revised, including the description of a new species, Horniolus hainanensis Chen & Ren, sp. n. Horniolus sonduongensis Hoàng, 1979 is reported from China for the first time. A key to the species from China is provided. Nomenclatural history, diagnoses, detailed descriptions, illustrations, and distribution for each species have been provided. A checklist of all known species of this genus is also presented.

  1. Effects of Habitat and Human Activities on Species Richness and Assemblages of Staphylinidae (Coleoptera in the Baltic Sea Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Irmler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, the staphylind fauna was studied in six habitats of the Baltic Sea coast of Schleswig-Holstein (northern Germany. The following habitats lagoon, sandy beach, shingle beach, primary dune, wooded cliff, and woodless cliff were significantly separated by their species composition. Vegetation and soil moisture were the most important factors separating the assemblages. Lagoons exhibited the most species-rich habitat. Sandy beaches provided the highest number of endangered species. Both sandy beaches and woodless cliffs showed the highest number of exclusive species. A loss of species was determined in the gradient from sandy to shingle beaches. Few species preferred shingle beaches; abundance of Cafius xantholoma increased with the increasing amount of shingle. More species preferred the sandy conditions, for example, Polystomota grisea, P. punctatella, and Phytosus spinifer. Anotylus insecatus and Bledius defensus require distinct mixtures of sand and silt on woodless cliffs. Tourist impact on sandy beaches accounts for approximately 50% loss of species.

  2. Description of a new species of Coelosis Hope from Guajira Peninsula, northern Colombia (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae: Oryctini

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    Jhon César Neita Moreno

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Coelosis is described from the Macuira Mountains range, in the Guajira Peninsula in the extreme north of Colombia. An illustrated character comparison between this new species and the previously reported Colombian species in the genus is presented. A key for the identification and a distribution map for the Colombian species of Coelosis are presented, as well as a key for the genera of the tribe Oryctini in Colombia.

  3. New Species of Tenuisvalvae (Duverger) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Feeding on Parthenolecanium perlatum (Cockerell) (Hemiptera: Coccidae) in Citrus Crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, P B; Castro-Guedes, C F; Peronti, A L B G; Almeida, L M

    2017-10-01

    A new species of Hyperaspidini, Tenuisvalvae quadripunctata sp. nov. is described and illustrated. The genus is now represented by 11 species, all native of South America, and the new taxon is integrated into the existing key to species of the genus. Ecological data for T. quadripunctata sp. nov. and a list with prey and host plants to the species of the genus Tenuisvalvae are provided.

  4. The nearly complete mitochondrial genome of a snout weevil, Eucryptorrhynchus brandti (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Teng; Yu, Bo; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-07-01

    We report the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of a snout weevil, Eucryptorrhynchus brandti (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The 16,919 bp long genome consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and a partial control region. A phylogenetic tree has been built using the 13 protein-coding genes of 11 related species from Coleoptera. Our results would contribute to further study of phylogeny in Coleoptera.

  5. Diagnosis and key of the main families and species of South American Coleoptera of forensic importance Diagnose e chave de identificação para as principais famílias e espécies de Coleoptera de importância forense da América do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia M. Almeida

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to provide diagnosis and keys of the families and species, with illustrations of the main groups. A table of all related species recorded from South America is presented, including the substrate in which they were collected and their geographical distribution. The list comprises 221 species included in 15 families, of which 70% of the species are from Brazil. Scarabaeidae is the most diverse family with 121 species, followed by Staphylinidae with 68. Also we provide one database of Coleoptera species associated with carcasses in South America.O objetivo deste trabalho é apresentar diagnoses e chaves de identificação das principais famílias e espécies de importância forense, com ilustrações dos principais grupos. É apresentada uma tabela de todas as espécies de ocorrência na América do Sul, incluindo o substrato nas quais foram coletadas e sua distribuição geográfica. A lista compreende 221 espécies incluídas em 15 famílias, das quais pelo menos 70% das espécies são distribuídas no Brasil. Scarabaeidae é a família com maior diversidade com 121 espécies, seguida por Staphylinidae com 68. Também é fornecida uma base de dados para as espécies de Coleoptera associadas a carcaças na América do Sul.

  6. Description of Phloeosinus laricionis sp. n. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), a new bark beetle species from southern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccoli, Massimo; Sidoti, Agatino

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new species of pine bark beetle, Phloeosinus laricionis, associated with a pine decline recently affecting young plantations of Pinus nigra ssp. laricio Poiret growing on the Etna volcano, Sicily (South Italy). The new species is morphologically close to the group species of P. cedri Brisout, P. acatayi Schedl, and P. pfefferi Knížek, having all odd interstriae on the declivity of elytra bearing small, individual, sparse, more or less sharply pointed tubercles in males, or with smaller sparse blunt, nippled tubercles in females. While the other species of the same group live on cedars, the new species is the only Palaearctic Phloeosinus known from pine.

  7. Cytogenetic characterization of Eurysternus caribaeus (Coleoptera ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 88; Issue 2. Cytogenetic characterization of Eurysternus caribaeus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae): evidence of sex-autosome fusion and diploid number reduction prior to species dispersion. Amanda Paulino De Arcanjo Diogo Cavalcanti Cabral-De-Mello Ana Emília Barros E ...

  8. Western Hemisphere Zuphiini: descriptions of Coarazuphium whiteheadi, new species, and Zuphioides, new genus, and classification of the genera (Coleoptera, Carabidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Ball

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on small samples (exemplars analyzed with morphological methods, including detailed descriptions and illustrations, this study treats primarily the Zuphium genus-group in the Western Hemisphere, which comprises two precinctive genera: Coarazuphium Gnaspini, Vanin & Godoy, 1998 (type species Parazuphium tessai Godoy & Vanin, 1990 and Zuphioides gen. n. (type species Zuphium mexicanum Chaudoir, 1863. The genus Coarazuphium includes six troglobitic species from Brazilian caves, and one probably hypogaeic (troglophilic species from the mountains of Oaxaca, in Mexico (C. whiteheadi, sp. n., type locality, ridge top, in western Oaxaca, Mexico, at 2164 m, 35 km north of San Pedro Juchatengo, 16.462N, 97.010W. The epigaeic genus Zuphioides includes 23 species, with its geographical range extended from Neotropical temperate Argentina in southern South America, northward through the tropics to north temperate southeastern Canada, in the Nearctic Region. Keys are provided to the species of Coarazuphium and to the genera of Western Hemisphere Zuphiini.

  9. On the taxonomy of the genus Sidonis Mulsant, stat. nov. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chnoodini) with descriptions of new species from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churata-Salcedo, Julissa M; Almeida, Lucia M; González, Guillermo; Gordon, Robert D

    2017-11-20

    The subgenus Sidonis Mulsant, 1850 is elevated to generic status and two new species from Brazil are described and illustrated: Sidonis bira sp. nov. and Sidonis biguttata sp. nov. New geographic distribution records are provided. In addition, lectotypes of Sidonis consanguinea (Mulsant, 1850) and S. guttata (Sicard, 1912) are designated. Illustrations of diagnostic characters from five of six species of the genus, comments on the differences from similar species and a key to all recognized taxa are included.

  10. Two new species and new records of Cerambycidae (Insecta, Coleoptera) from Itatiaia National Park, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monné, Marcela L; Monné, Miguel A; Botero, Juan P; Carelli, Allan

    2016-07-12

    The descriptions of two species of Lamiinae, Lepturges (Lepturges) batesi sp. nov. (Acanthocinini) and Onocephala chicomendes sp. nov. (Onocephalini) and an addendum of Cerambycinae and Lamiinae to the list of species of Cerambycidae in the Itatiaia National Park are presented. The data are based on fieldwork conducted over the last six years. Eighteen species of Cerambycinae and 21 of Lamiinae are recorded, with a total of 39 new distribution records.

  11. potential for biological control of rice yellow mottle virus vectors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), Locris rubra Fabricius (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), Oxya hyla Stål (Orthoptera: Acrididae), andConocephalus longipennis. (de Haan) (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) were the most encountered insect species during the rice ...

  12. The genus Aspidimerus Mulsant, 1850 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) from China, with descriptions of two new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Lizhi; Wang, Xingmin; Chen, Xiaosheng; Ren, Shunxiang

    2013-01-01

    Chinese members of the genus Aspidimerus Mulsant, 1850 are reviewed. Ten species are recognized, including two new species: A. zhenkangicus Huo & Ren, sp. n. and A. menglensis Huo & Ren, sp. n. A. kabakovi Hoàng is recorded from China for the first time. A. blandus (Mader, 1954) is recognized as synonymous with A. ruficrus Gorham, 1895 (syn. n.). Aspidimerus rectangulatus Kuznetsov & Pang, 1991 and A. serratus Kuznetsov & Pang, 1991 are transferred to the genus Pseudaspidimerus Kapur, 1948 (comb. n.). All species from China are described and illustrated. Distribution maps of the Chinese species, a key and a catalogue of all known Aspidimerus are provided.

  13. Contribution to the knowledge of the subgenus Scymnus (Parapullus Yang, 1978 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, with description of eight new species

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    Xiaosheng Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eight new species of the subgenus Scymnus (Parapullus Yang, 1978 from China are described and illustrated: S. (P. hastatus sp. n., S. (P. baxianshanensis sp. n., S. (P. laojielingensis sp. n., S. (P. annuliformis sp. n., S. (P. papillatus sp. n., S. (P. dichotomus sp. n., S. (P. shenmuensis sp. n. and S. (P. yanzigouensis sp. n. Diagnoses and distributions are provided for each species. An updated key to the Chinese species of the subgenus Parapullus is given. A catalogue to all known species of this subgenus is also presented.

  14. Two new species of the genus Laemostenus (Pristonychus Bonelli from Bulgaria and notes on L. (P. euxinicus Nitzu (Coleoptera, Carabidae

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    Guéorguiev, B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of subgenus Pristonychus Dejean, 1828, of the genus Laemostenus Bonelli, 1810, are described and illustrated: L. stoevi n. sp. from northern Bulgaria and L. derventicus n. sp. from southeastern Bulgaria. Both new species are distinguished from the closely related L. euxinicus Nitzu, 1998, L. tichyi (Kult, 1946 and L. punctatus (Dejean, 1828. This work contributes to both the faunistics and taxonomy of L. euxinicus from Romania. The assumed adaptive trend and origin of the most modified characters of the two new species are discussed, and the systematic place, taxonomic status and formation of more divergent species of the 'terricola' group are presented.

  15. Temperature alters the relative abundance and population growth rates of species within the Dendroctonus frontalis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. Evans; Richard Hoffstetter; Matthew Ayres; Kier Klepzig

    2011-01-01

    Temperature has strong effects on metabolic processes ofindividuals and demographics of populations, but effects on ecological communities are not well known. Many economically and ecologically important pest species have obligate associations with other organisms; therefore, effects of temperature on these species might be mediated by strong interactions. The southern...

  16. DNA barcodes and molecular diagnostics to distinguish an introduced and native Laricobius (Coleoptera: Derodontidae) species in eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.A. Davis; N.P. Havill; Z.N. Adelman; A. Caccone; L.T. Kok; S.M. Salom

    2011-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics based on DNA barcodes can be powerful identification tools in the absence of distinctive morphological characters for distinguishing between closely related species. A specific example is distinguishing the endemic species Laricobius rubidus from Laricobius nigrinus, a biological control agent of hemlock...

  17. Oviposition Preference and Larval Performance of Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Four Eastern North American Hardwood Tree Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. D. Morewood; P. R. Neiner; J. R. McNeil; J. C. Sellmer; K. Hoover

    2003-01-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky ) is an invasive wood-boring cerambycid beetle that kills hardwood trees. The host range of this species is unusually broad but is not well defined in the available literature and may include tree species that have not been reported as hosts because they have not previously been exposed to the beetle. We...

  18. Impacts of non-native Norway spruce plantation on abundance and species richness of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae

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    Z. Elek

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of non-native Norway spruce plantation on the abundance and species richness of carabids were studied in the Bükk National Park in Hungary, central Europe. Pitfall catches from recently established (5 yr old, young (15 yr after planting, middle-aged (30 yr after planting, old Norway spruce Picea abies plantation (50 yr after planting, and a native submontane beech forest (Fagetum sylvaticae as a control stand were compared.

    Our results showed that deciduous forest species decreased significantly in abundance in the plantations, and appeared in high abundance only in the native beech forest. Furthermore, open habitat species increased remarkably in abundance in the recently established plantation. Carabids were significantly more abundant and species rich in the native forest than in the plantations, while differences were not significant among the plantations. Multiple regression between the abundance and species richness of carabids and twelve environmental measurements showed that pH of the soil, herb cover and density of the carabids’ prey had a significant effect in determining abundance and species richness.

    Our results showed that plantation of non-native Norway spruce species had a detrimental effect on the composition of carabid communities and no regeneration could be observed during the growth of plantations even 50 yr after the establishment. This emphasises the importance of an active nature management practice to facilitate the recolonization of the native species.

  19. Overview and new records of the species of the tribes Dyschiriini and Clivinini from Iraq (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Scaritinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulirsch, Petr; Stachowiak, Mieczysław

    2017-01-01

    The genera Clivinopsis Bedel 1895 and Torretassoa Schatzmayr & Koch 1933 have been recorded in Iraq for the first time. New records of several species of Dyschirius Bonelli 1810 Dyschiriodes Jeannel 1941 (Dyschiriini W. Kolbe 1880) and Clivina Latreille 1802 (Clivinini Rafinesque 1815) are given. The identification key to the species of Dyschiriini from Iraq is provided.

  20. Overview and new records of the species of the tribes Dyschiriini and Clivinini from Iraq (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Scaritinae

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    Petr Bulirsch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The genera Clivinopsis Bedel 1895 and Torretassoa Schatzmayr & Koch 1933 have been recorded in Iraq for the first time. New records of several species of Dyschirius Bonelli 1810 Dyschiriodes Jeannel 1941 (Dyschiriini W. Kolbe 1880 and Clivina Latreille 1802 (Clivinini Rafinesque 1815 are given. The identification key to the species of Dyschiriini from Iraq is provided.

  1. First record of Microscapha LeConte from Baltic amber with description of a new species and list of fossil Melandryidae (Coleoptera: Tenebrionoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukejs, Andris; Alekseev, Vitalii I

    2015-09-03

    Microscapha andrzeji sp. nov., the first fossil representative of the genus is described from Eocene Baltic amber. An updated list of fossil Melandryidae (Coleoptera: Tenebrionoidea) is provided. The presence of Microscapha within Baltic amber suggests some potential for palaeoenvironmental inferences based on the melandryid assemblage within the deposit.

  2. A new species of Speonemadus from Portugal, with the revision of the escalerai-group (Coleoptera, Leiodidae

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    Ana Sofia P.S. Reboleira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, intense field work in caves of Portugal has provided new data on the distribution of subterranean Iberian leiodid beetles. Speonemadus algarvensis sp. nov. is described from caves of southern Portugal. The new species is included in the Speonemadus Jeannel, 1922 escalerai-group (Cholevinae; Anemadini. All species of the S. escalerai-group are revised and S. breuili (Jeannel, 1922 is resurrected as a valid species. A key to identify the species of the S. escalerai-group is provided and the distinctive characters are illustrated. The distribution of all species of the group is mapped with new data together with biogeographic considerations.

  3. Definition and review of the lancangjiang species group of the termitophilous genus Orthogonius Macleay, 1825 (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Orthogoniini

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    Mingyi Tian

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The lancanjiang species group of the termitophilous ground beetle genus Orthogonius Macleay, 1825, is defined and reviewed. This group is characterized by the black and rather elongate body, dense punctation on head and elytra, long and slender appendages, thin fore tibiae, and elytral interval 3 without a subapical setiferous pore. To date, the lancanjiang species group is composed of four species and one subspecies, including three new species and one new subspecies which are described in the present paper: O. macrophthalmus sp. n. (northern Vietnam, O. euthyphallus sp. n. (southern Vietnam, O. euthyphallus bolavenensis ssp. n. (southern Laos and O. carinatus sp. n. (northern Laos. A distribution map and a key to all species of this group are also provided.

  4. Description of a new species of Platynus Bonelli from the Appalachian Mountains of eastern North America (Coleoptera, Carabidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Yves

    2012-01-01

    A new species of the genus Platynus Bonelli, Platynus daviesi, is described from specimens collected in the Appalachian Mountains. The species is structurally most similar to Platynus parmarginatus Hamilton but differs in having the coloration of the body dorsally darker on average, the elytra proportionally longer and wider, the vertex and disc of pronotum with well impressed microsculpture, the elytral interval 3 with four or five discal setae in most specimens, and the median lobe of aedeagus less curved overall. DNA barcoding was performed on several species of eastern North American Platynus species and Platynus daviesi was found to be genetically distinct from Platynus parmarginatus. A key to the 12 species of Platynus found east of the Mississippi River is provided.

  5. Species Richness and Abundance of Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) in Huatulco, Oaxaca, Mexico; Relationships with Phenological Changes in the Tropical Dry Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, F A; Ortega-Huerta, M A; Zaragoza-Caballero, S; González-Soriano, E; Ramírez-García, E

    2017-07-26

    Cerambycidae have an important ecological role in initiating the degradation process of dead wood, but few studies have evaluated Cerambycidae community attributes in relation to ecosystem phenology. We surveyed the cerambicid fauna of the tropical dry forest in Huatulco, Oaxaca, Mexico, and explored the relationship of Cerambycidae species richness and abundance with phenological changes in vegetation. We applied three collecting methods of light traps, direct collection, and Malaise traps to survey Cerambycidae throughout 2005. To determine seasonal variations, we collected samples in the dry season month of February in the rainy season of May-July and August-September, and in the transition months of October and November through. We collected and identified 145 species, 88 genera, 37 tribes, and four subfamilies. The subfamily with the highest number of species was Cerambycinae (100 species), and the tribe with the highest number of genera and species was Elaphidiini with 13 genera and 33 species. The ICE non-parametric estimator determined an overall expected richness of 373 species, while the overall Shannon Diversity Index was 4.1. Both species richness and abundance varied seasonally, with the highest values recorded in the rainy season and the lowest in the dry season. Overall species abundance was not significantly correlated to monthly rainfall or EVI neither, only for "direct collecting" the EVI vs Richness and EVI vs Shannon Diversity Index were significantly correlated. We propose that the seemingly contradictory relationships between seasonal richness patterns of Cerambycidae and the greening/senescence of vegetation (EVI) may be explained by the seasonal availability of dead organic matter, flowers, or leafy vegetation that may be synchronized with the behavior of different cerambycid species.

  6. Trophic relations of Opatrum sabulosum (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae with leaves of cultivated and uncultivated species of herbaceous plants under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Brygadyrenko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We carried out a quantitative assessment of the consumption of herbaceous plants by Opatrum sabulosum (Linnaeus, 1761 – a highly significant agricultural pest species. We researched the feeding preferences of this pest species with respect to 33 uncultivated and 22 cultivated plant species. This species of darkling beetle feeds on many uncultivated plant species, including those with hairy leaves and bitter milky sap, such as Scabiosa ucrainca (5.21 mg/specimen/24 hours, Euphorbia virgata (3.45, Solanum nigrum (3.32, Centauria scabiosa (2.47, Lamium album (2.41, Aristolochia clematitis (1.76, Chenopodium album (1.73, Arctium lappa (1.51, Asperula odorata (1.20. A high rate of leaf consumption is also characteristic for cultivated species, for example, Perilla nankinensis (5.05 mg/specimen/24 hours, Lycopersicon esculentum (3.75, Tropaeolum majus (3.29, Nicotiana tabacum (2.66, Rumex acetosa (1.96, Beta vulgaris (1.27. O. sabulosum is capable of feeding on plants which are poisonous to cattle. This species of darkling beetle consumes 95.5% of the cultivated and 48.5% of the uncultivated herbaceous plants researched.

  7. Taxonomy of the poorly known Quedius mutilatus group of wingless montane species from Middle Asia (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Staphylinini

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    Maria Salnitska

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Quedius mutilatus group, a very poorly known presumably monophyletic complex of wingless, possibly hypogean species confined to the Tien-Shan Mountains, is characterized as such for the first time. Newly available material clarified the identity of Q. mutilatus Eppelsheim, 1888 and Q. kalabi Smetana, 1995, each hitherto known from a handful of non-conspecific and vaguely georeferenced specimens only. Additional material is reported for Q. equus Smetana, 2014 and one species, Quedius kungeicus sp. nov., is described. All available data on the taxonomy, distribution and bionomics for all these four species of the group are summarized.

  8. A revision of the genus Stictobura Crotch (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Sticholotidinae) and description of a new species of Sticholotis Crotch

    Science.gov (United States)

    The species of Stictobura Crotch (1874) (Coccinellidae: Sticholotidinae) are revised. Stictobura gibbula (Weise, 1908) indeed belongs to Sticholotis Crotch (1874) under which it was originally described (stat. rev.) and is removed from Stictobura. Stictobura buruensis Korschefsky (1944) is transferr...

  9. New species, new records and new morphological characters of the genus Tillicera Spinola from China (Coleoptera, Cleridae, Clerinae

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    Gan-Yan Yang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of the genus Tillicera Spinola, 1844 from China are described and illustrated: Tillicera sensibila sp. n. form Yunnan and Tillicera wenii sp. n. from Taiwan. Tillicera bibalteata Gorham, 1892, T. hirsuta (Pic, 1926 and T. michaeli Gerstmeier & Bernhard, 2010 are newly recorded from China. Tillicera auratofasciata (Pic, 1927 is newly recorded in some provinces of China. A key to species of the genus from China is provided. Relationships between species are discussed with emphasis on characters of male phallus, female internal reproductive organs and pit-like sensilla in male terminal antennomere, which is discovered in Tillicera for the first time. The present generic definition of Tillicera is discussed as well. Photos of terminalia of the previously known species are also provided for comparison.

  10. Pterostichus neilgaimani sp. nov., a new species of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) from relict sacred grove in Eastern Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaladze, Giorgi; Kalatozishvili, Levan; Janiashvili, Zurab; Bakuradze, Giorgi

    2017-10-03

    A new species of ground beetles (Coleoptea: Carabidae) belonging to the subgenus Aphaonus Reitter, 1887 (genus Pterostichus Bonelli, 1810) is described, based on two specimens collected from the sacred grove of Khevsha (Eastern Georgia).

  11. Effects of gallery density and species ratio on the fitness and fecundity of two sympatric bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T S; Hofstetter, R W

    2009-06-01

    Interspecific interactions among tree-killing bark beetle species may have ecologically important consequences on beetle population dynamics. Using two tree-killing beetle species (Dendroctonus brevicomis and D. frontalis), we performed observational and experimental studies to verify cross-attraction and co-colonization under field conditions in northern Arizona and test the effects of gallery density and species ratio on response variables of average gallery length, offspring size (progeny fitness), and offspring production per centimeter gallery (fecundity). Our results show that both D. frontalis and D. brevicomis aggregate to pheromones synthesized de novo by D. brevicomis under field conditions and that galleries of both D. brevicomis and D. frontalis occurred together in the same region of a single host tree with significant frequency. In experimental manipulations of species ratios, the presence of conspecific beetles in the gallery environment strongly mediated fecundity, but D. frontalis was the only species that suffered negative impacts from the presence of heterospecific beetles in the gallery environment. Interactions did not result in any apparent fitness effects for progeny of either species, which suggests that multispecies aggregations and co-colonization may be a dominant ecological strategy in the region and result in niche sharing.

  12. A new species of Meligethes Stephens from China and additional data on members of the M. chinensis species-complex (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae, Meligethinae

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    Meike Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Meligethes (Odontogethes inexpectatus sp. n. is described from China, Sichuan Province. The new species is based on a female specimen previously incorrectly referred to as Meligethes scrobescens Chen, Lin, Huang & Yang, 2015, which was recently described from a series of male specimens collected in the same area. Both species belong to the taxonomically difficult species-group related to M. chinensis Kirejtshuk, 1979, including a dozen closely related species distributed throughout Nepal and SW and Central China. The true female of Meligethes scrobescens is also described, based on recently collected material from China (Hubei and Chongqing, including a series of male and female specimens. Diagnostic characters distinguishing the new species from all other known members of the M. chinensis species-group and species-complex are discussed, and their overall range distribution are depicted. Additional data on geographic distribution and larval ecology of some of the closely related species are also reported.

  13. New species of Bidessonotus Régimbart, 1895 with a review of the South American species (Coleoptera, Adephaga, Dytiscidae, Hydroporinae, Bidessini

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    Kelly Miller

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The South American species of the New World genus Bidessonotus Régimbart, 1895 are reviewed with descriptions of seven new species. This brings the total number of valid Bidessonotus species to 37, making it the largest Bidessini genus in the New World. The new species are B. annae sp. n. (Venezuela, B. josiahi sp. n. (Venezuela, B. palecephalus sp. n. (Venezuela, B. reductus sp. n. (Venezuela, B. septimus sp. n. (Venezuela, B. spinosus sp. n. (Venezuela, and B. valdezi sp. n. (Guyana, Suriname. New distribution records are provided for many other South American Bidessonotus species. The main diagnostic features of Bidessonotus species are in the male genitalia, and these are illustrated for all South American species. Diagnostic features, distributions (including distribution maps, and additional comments are provided for all South American species.

  14. Scolytus stepheni sp. n. - a new species of bark-beetle (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae) from Northern India with a key to Indian Scolytus Geoffroy, 1762 species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelshtam, Michail Yu.; V. Petrov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A new species of bark-beetle from Kashmir, Scolytus stepheni sp. n., dedicated to the late Professor Emeritus Stephen Lane Wood, is described and figured. Key to Indian Scolytus Geoffroy, 1762 species is provided. PMID:21594178

  15. Changing Names with Changed Address: Integrated Taxonomy and Species Delimitation in the Holarctic Colymbetes paykulli Group (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae.

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    Marcus K Drotz

    Full Text Available Species delimitation of geographically isolated forms is a long-standing problem in less studied insect groups. Often taxonomic decisions are based directly on morphologic variation, and lack a discussion regarding sample size and the efficiency of migration barriers or dispersal/migration capacity of the studied species. These problems are here exemplified in a water beetle complex from the Bering Sea region that separates North America from Eurasia. Only a few sampled specimens occur from this particular area and they are mostly found in museum and private collections. Here we utilize the theory of integrated taxonomy to discuss the speciation of the Holarctic Colymbetes paykulli water beetle complex, which historically has included up to five species of which today only two are recognized. Three delimitation methods are used; landmark based morphometry of body shape, variation in reticulation patterns of the pronotum exo-skeleton and sequence variation of the partial mitochondrial gene Cyt b. Our conclusion is that the Palearctic and Nearctic populations of C. paykulli are given the status of separate species, based on the fact that all methods showed significant separation between populations. As a consequence the name of the Palearctic species is C. paykulli Erichson and the Nearctic species should be known as C. longulus LeConte. There is no clear support for delineation between Palearctic and Nearctic populations of C. dahuricus based on mtDNA. However, significant difference in size and reticulation patterns from the two regions is shown. The combined conclusion is that the C. dahuricus complex needs a more thorough investigation to fully disentangle its taxonomic status. Therefore it is here still regarded as a Holarctic species. This study highlights the importance to study several diagnosable characters that has the potential to discriminate evolutionary lineage during speciation.

  16. Revision of the Indo-Australian species of the genus Phaeochrous castelnau, 1840 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae, Hybosorinae), with notes on the African species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijten, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    A revision of the Indo-Australian species and notes on the African species of Phaeochrous are given. Nine new species and three new subspecies are described, viz., Phaeochrous australicus (Australia), compactus (Sri Lanka), elevatus (South India, Sri Lanka), enigmaticus (Java, Bangla Desh, China),

  17. Rhinusa Stephens: a taxonomic revision of the species belonging to the R. tetra and R. bipustulata groups (Coleoptera Curculionidae

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    Roberto Caldara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The species of Rhinusa Stephens, 1829 (Curculionidae, Curculioninae, Mecinini belonging to the R. tetra and R. bipustulata groups are revised. Four of them from Middle East are new to science. The R. bipustulata group includes five species: R. bipustulata (Rossi, 1792; R. pelletieri sp. nov.; R. scrophulariae Caldara, 2009; R. algirica (Brisout de Barneville, 1862; R. emmrichi (Bajtenov, 1979, whereas the R. tetra group includes nine species: R. tetra (Fabricius, 1792; R. verbasci (Rosenschoeld, 1838; R. ensifer sp. nov.; R. moroderi (Reitter, 1906; R. weilli sp. nov.; R. comosa (Rosenschoeld, 1838; R. acifer sp. nov.; R asellus (Gravenhorst, 1807; R. tenuirostris (Stierlin, 1888. The following new synonym is proposed: Rhinusa bipustulata (Rossi, 1792 (= Gymnetron municipale Voss, 1960 syn. nov.. The neotype of Rhynchaenus asellus Gravenhorst, 1807 was designated. Moreover, the following lectotypes are designated: Cionus spilotus Germar, 1821; Gymnetron bipustulatum var. germari Faust, 1889; Gymnetron bodenheimeri Wagner, 1926; Gymnetron cylindrirostre Gyllenhal, 1838; Gymnetron nasutum Rosenschoeld, 1838; Gymnetron plagiatum Gyllenhal, 1838; Gymnetron polonicum Rosenschoeld, 1838; Gymnetron tenuirostre Stierlin, 1888. A key to the species, diagnoses of species groups, descriptions or redescriptions, notes on type specimens, synonymies, comparative notes, distribution, bionomics when available, photographs of habitus and drawings of rostra, terminalia and other useful characters for taxonomy are provided.

  18. Studies on Adriaphaenops Noesske with the description of five new species from the Dinarides (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Trechini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohaj, Roman; Lakota, Ján; Quéinnec, Eric; Pavićević, Dragan; Čeplík, Dávid

    2016-12-12

    The species belonging to the trechine genus Adriaphaenops Noesske, 1928 are studied. As a result, seven currently known and five newly described species are recognized. Morphological characters of the habitus (especially the shape of head and pronotum) as well as male genitalia are widely used to delimit the species. The following new species are described: A. albanicus sp. nov. (Albania, Shkodër, Boga, Thatë Mts.), A. jasminkoi sp. nov. (Bosnia & Hercegovina, Nevesinje, Novakova pećina cave), A. mlejneki sp. nov. (Montenegro, Gornje Stravče, Kučke planine Mts.), A. njegosiensis sp. nov. (Montenegro, Cetinje, Cetinjska pećina cave) and A.rumijaensis sp. nov. (Montenegro, Virpazar, Rumija Mts.). Lectotype for A. stirni (Pretner, 1959) is designated. Data on the distribution and ecology of new taxa, complemented with descriptions of the type localities are provided. Key to the identification of all twelve Adriaphaenops species, as well as a key of all hitherto known aphaenopsoid Trechini genera from Dinarides are also given.

  19. Exocelina baliem sp. n., the only known pond species of New Guinea Exocelina Broun, 1886 (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae

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    Helena Shaverdo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Exocelina baliem sp. n. is described from the Baliem Valley in the Central Mountain Range of New Guinea (Papua Province, Indonesia.striolate elytra, different structure and setation of the male and female genitalia and tarsomeres, and inhabiting swampy ponds, the new species differs from all known New Guinea species, which have smooth elytra and are stream associated. It forms a monophyletic group with the Australian E. ferruginea (Sharp, 1882 and New Caledonian E. inexspectata Wewalka, Balke & Hendrich, 2010, based on shape of the paramere and structure of the male tarsi. Habitus, protarsomeres, and male and female genitalia are illustrated, comparing some structures with E. ferruginea and two New Guinea stream species. We briefly discuss the biogeographic relevance of this discovery.

  20. New species of Eriopeltastes Burmeister & Schaum, 1840 (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Cetoniinae, Trichiini from South Africa

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    Enrico Ricchiardi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Both male and female of a new species of Eriopeltasttes Burmeister & Schaum, 1840, E. (E. ornatus Ricchiardi, sp. n., are described from the mistbelt grassland of KwaZulu-Natal. Sexual dimorphism is extreme in this genus, with females being brachypterous, fossorial and entirely black to dark brown in general body colour. This is only the fifth out of 12 known species in this genus for which the female is known. The species appears to be restricted to areas within or in the immediate vicinities of two marginal nature reserves, Karkloof and Blinkwater, in a grassland habitat that is regarded as one of the most threatened in the Province of KwaZulu-Natal. Despite its acknowledged importance as centre of endemism the area is currently in a precarious state of large-scale degradation.

  1. Trap attributes influencing capture of Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae on common bean fields Atributos da armadilha influenciam captura de Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae em feijoeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Ursi Ventura

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Refinements in trap characteristics may improve ability to monitor and mass-trap beetles. Field assays were conducted in common bean fields to assess responses of Diabrotica speciosa (Germar to some trap characteristics. Golden yellow plastic cups (750 mL traps caught more D. speciosa females and males than did clear traps. Carrot slices in Petri dishes baited with Lagenaria vulagaris L. powder (cucurbitacin source - 0.28% caught more beetles than did dishes with carrot alone. Dispensers for the floral volatile attractant 1,4-dimethoxybenze were also compared. Rubber septa dispenser attracted more beetles than did control (dental wicks saturated with acetone. Captures on dental wick, starch matrix and feminine pad dispensers were intermediate and did not differ from those on rubber septa and unbaited controls. Perforated bottle traps (2000 mL, when baited with the floral attractant, caught more beetles than did window bottle traps (both traps contained L. vulgaris powder in most assessments done from two to ten days after trap placement in the field. Traps with the insecticide carbaryl captured more beetles than did traps without it, 2-4 and 8-10 days after trap placement in the field, but not in the remaining periods (0-2, 4-6 and 6-8 days. Traps baited with 1,4-dimethoxybenzene captured more beetles than did the unbaited ones in all assessments (each other day from two to ten days after trap placement in the field. Finally, similar amounts of beetles were captured using plastic bottle traps (2000 mL: perforated, window (both with cucurbitacin and sticky (without cucurbitacin traps, when were baited with the floral attractant.Refinamentos em caraterísticas de armadilhas podem incrementar sua habilidade para monitorar e capturar em massa os insetos. Experimentos foram conduzidos em lavoura de feijoeiro para verificar as respostas de Diabrotica speciosa (Germar a algumas características de armadilhas. Armadilhas de copos plástico (750 mL amarelo ouro capturaram mais fêmeas e machos de D. speciosa do que transparentes. Placas de Petri com pedaços de cenoura, com pó seco de purungo, Lagenaria vulgaris L. (fonte de cucurbitacina - 0,28% capturaram mais insetos do que placas com somente cenoura. Liberadores para o atraente floral 1,4-dimetoxibenzeno foram também comparados. Liberador de septo de borracha atraiu mais insetos do que o controle (flocos dentais saturados com acetona. Capturas nos tratamentos com liberadores de floco dental, matriz borato e absorvente higiênico foram intermediárias mas não diferiram da testemunha e septo. Modelo de armadilha de garrafa (2000 mL furada capturou mais insetos do que armadilha vazada ("janelas" (ambas contendo pó seco de purungo na maioria das avaliações, dos dois até os dez dias após a instalação das armadilhas no campo. Armadilhas com inseticida carbaryl capturaram mais insetos do que armadilhas sem, nos intervalos de 2-4 e 9-10 dias após a instalação das armadilhas no campo. Nos períodos restantes (0-2, 4-6- e 6-8 dias, diferenças não foram detectadas. Armadilhas com 1,4-dimetoxibenzeno capturaram mais insetos do que armadilhas sem o volátil (avaliações a cada dois dias dos dois aos dez dias após a instalação no campo. Finalmente, quantidades similares de insetos foram capturadas usando armadilhas de garrafa pet (2000 mL: vazadas ("janelas", furadas (ambas com cucurbitacina e adesivas quando estas foram iscadas com o atraente floral.

  2. Medicinal plant extracts on the control of Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae Extratos de plantas medicinais no controle de Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae

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    F.S. Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the insecticidal effect of aqueous, alcoholic, and oil extracts from leaves of eight medicinal plants against Diabrotica speciosa prepared at five concentrations. The extracts that used commercial soybean oil as solvent showed the highest D. speciosa mortality due to the solvent itself, regardless of the used plants and their concentrations. Thus, commercial soybean oil was discarded as solvent since at these volumes it would cause serious phytotoxicity problems. After 24 hours of exposure of the pest to the extracts, the highest D. speciosa mortality values were observed for Copaifera langsdorfii and Chenopodium ambrosioides extracts, both in 5% alcohol, and Artemisia verlotorum, in 10% water. However, in the last mortality assessment (48 h, C. langsdorfii extract in 5% alcohol showed higher mortality of this pest, followed by C. ambrosioides extract in 5% alcohol, compared to the remaining plants.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito inseticida de extratos aquosos, alcoólicos e oleosos de folhas de oito plantas medicinais contra Diabrotica speciosa preparadas em cinco concentrações. Os extratos que utilizaram óleo de soja comercial como solvente apresentaram as maiores mortalidades de D. speciosa em função do próprio óleo, independentemente das plantas utilizadas em suas concentrações. Sendo assim, o óleo de soja comercial foi descartado como solvente, pois nestes volumes acarretaria sérios problemas de fitotoxidade. Após 24 horas de exposição da praga aos extratos, os maiores valores de mortalidade de D. speciosa foram observados nos extratos de Copaifera Langsdorfii e de Chenopodium ambrosioides, ambos em álcool 5%, e de Artemisia verlotorum, em água 10%. Entretanto, na última avaliação de mortalidade (48 h, o extrato de C. langsdorfii em álcool a 5% apresentou maior mortalidade dessa praga, seguida pelo extrato alcoólico a 5% de C. ambrosioides comparada às demais plantas.

  3. Seasonal dynamics, age structure and reproduction of four Carabus species (Coleoptera: Carabidae) living in forested landscapes in Hungary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kádár, Ferenc; Fazekas, Judit P.; Sárospataki, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    Budapest (Central Hungary), in 1988–1991. The sex ratio was male-dominated, but this was significant only for C. coriaceus. The catch of C. germarii adults showed relatively short activity period with unimodal curve, but activity was longer and bimodal for the other three species. Adults of C. germarii....... germarii. Reproduction lasted much longer, for about four months, in C. convexus. The mean number of ripe eggs per female were 4.2 in C. convexus, 5.4 in C. coriaceus, 6.6 in C. germarii, and 7.4 in C. hortensis. The maximum number found was about three times the average in all studied species...

  4. Het voorkomen van de glanskevers van het genus Caprophilus in Nederland (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude, de J.

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of nitidulid beetles of the genus Carpophilus in the Netherlands (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) Some species of the genus Carpophilus (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) may act as pests of stored products like cocoabeans, peanuts, dried fruits like figs and dates, imported from tropical or

  5. Islands in the desert: Species delimitation and evolutionary history of Pseudotetracha tiger beetles (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae: Megacephalini) from Australian salt lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Alejandro; Hudson, Peter; Galián, José

    2016-08-01

    The Australian salt lakes are a natural archipelago-like laboratory for investigating evolutionary and population processes. Their environmental conditions have not undergone relevant changes since the aridification of Australia 10-5 million years ago. The genus Pseudotetracha, a group of nocturnal tiger beetles found on these remote salt lakes, includes 20 described species. Recent studies based on molecular markers and cytogenetics hinted at the existence of cryptic species within this group. Here we use various species delimitation algorithms to detect a high number of cryptic and undescribed taxa, and challenge the validity of the taxonomic characters traditionally used for discerning species in this group. Our analyses show that the divergence dates of the clades, between 10 and 5 million years ago, correspond to the period in which Australia was undergoing an aridification process that probably isolated the ancestral Pseudotetracha populations to individual lakes or palaeodrainage basins. This implies an important role of the isolation, produced by the aridification of Australia, in the speciation and divergence of Pseudotetracha, which underwent a remarkable radiation as the populations became geographically restricted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Taxonomy of the Oriental genus Bolbochromus: a generic overview and descriptions of four new species (Coleoptera: Geotrupidae: Bolboceratinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikken, Jan; Li, Chun-Lin

    2013-11-01

    A taxonomic overview of the essentially Oriental genus Bolbochromus Boucomont, 1909 is given. Two new southeast Asian subgenera are proposed: Metabolbochromus (type species Scarabaeus sulcicollis Wiedemann, 1819), characterised by unique male genitalia (lacking separated parameres), and Bolbochromops (type species Bolboceras ludekingi Lansberge, 1886), with a distinctly two-horned head (but with separated parameres). The remaining known Bolbochromus, apparently all with a distinct pair of parameres and a distinct frontovertexal protrusion only, are left in the nominotypical subgenus, awaiting a reappraisal of the poorly sampled continental fauna. Four new species are described and compared with close relatives, all in the nominotypical subgenus: Bolbochromus (Bolbochromus) dumogensis (Sulawesi), B. (Bolbochromus) mindanaicus (Philippines), B. (Bolbochromus) pumilus (south India), and B. (Bolbochromus) sinensis (south China). Identity of type species of Bolbochromus to be established (type of Bolboceras laetus Westwood, 1852 not found, and type locality Ceylon doubtful). All named Bolbochromus taxa are listed and characterised (some of them tentatively) in a synoptic table. The southeast Asian island taxa are all keyed and diagnosed, along with notes on variation, range extensions, taxon ranking, and illustrations.

  7. Molecular species identification of Central European ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) using nuclear rDNA expansion segments and DNA barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Michael J; Astrin, Jonas J; Hannig, Karsten; Peters, Marcell K; Stoeckle, Mark Y; Wägele, Johann-Wolfgang

    2010-09-13

    The identification of vast numbers of unknown organisms using DNA sequences becomes more and more important in ecological and biodiversity studies. In this context, a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene has been proposed as standard DNA barcoding marker for the identification of organisms. Limitations of the COI barcoding approach can arise from its single-locus identification system, the effect of introgression events, incomplete lineage sorting, numts, heteroplasmy and maternal inheritance of intracellular endosymbionts. Consequently, the analysis of a supplementary nuclear marker system could be advantageous. We tested the effectiveness of the COI barcoding region and of three nuclear ribosomal expansion segments in discriminating ground beetles of Central Europe, a diverse and well-studied invertebrate taxon. As nuclear markers we determined the 18S rDNA: V4, 18S rDNA: V7 and 28S rDNA: D3 expansion segments for 344 specimens of 75 species. Seventy-three species (97%) of the analysed species could be accurately identified using COI, while the combined approach of all three nuclear markers provided resolution among 71 (95%) of the studied Carabidae. Our results confirm that the analysed nuclear ribosomal expansion segments in combination constitute a valuable and efficient supplement for classical DNA barcoding to avoid potential pitfalls when only mitochondrial data are being used. We also demonstrate the high potential of COI barcodes for the identification of even closely related carabid species.

  8. Is the invasive species Listronotus bonariensis (Kuschel (Coleoptera: Curculionidae (Argentine stem weevil a threat to New Zealand natural grassland ecosystems?

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    Barbara Ingeborg Patricia Barratt

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listronotus bonariensis (Argentine stem weevil is a stem-boring weevil that has become a major pasture pest in New Zealand, and cool climate turf grass in Australia. This species is also frequently found in native tussock grassland in New Zealand. Laboratory and field trials were established to determine the risk posed to both seedlings and established plants of three native grass species compared to what happens with the most common host of this species, Lolium perenne (ryegrass. Adult weevil feeding damage scores were higher on Poa colensoi and Festuca novae-zelandiae than Chionochloa rigida. Oviposition was lower on P. colensoi than L. perenne, and no eggs were laid on F. novae-zealandiae. In field trials using the same four species established as spaced plants L. bonariensis laid more eggs per tiller in L. perenne in a low altitude pasture site than in ryegrass in a higher altitude site. No were eggs found on the three native grass species at the tussock sites, and only low numbers were found on other grasses at the low altitude pasture site. Despite this, numbers of adult weevils were extracted from the plants in the field trials. These may have comprised survivors of the original weevils added to the plants, together with naturally occurring individuals arising from the next field generation. Irrespective, higher numbers were recovered from the tussock site plants than from those from the pasture site. It was concluded that L. bonariensis is likely to have a greater impact on native grass seedling survival than on established plants.

  9. The morphology of the immature stages of two rare Lixus species (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Lixinae) and notes on their biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, Filip; Stejskal, Robert; Skuhrovec, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mature larvae and pupae of Lixus (Ortholixus) bituberculatus Smreczyński, 1968 and Lixus (Dilixellus) neglectus Fremuth, 1983 (Curculionidae: Lixinae: Lixini) are described and compared with known larvae of 21 other Lixus and 2 Hypolixus taxa. The mature larva and pupa of Lixus bituberculatus are the first immature stages described representing the subgenus Ortholixus. The larva of Lixus neglectus, in the subgenus Dilixellus, is distinguished from the known larvae of four species in this subgenus by having more pigmented sclerites on the larval body. All descriptions of mature larvae from the tribe Lixini, as do all known species from the tribe Cleonini, fit the diagnosis of the mature larva of the Lixinae subfamily. Furthermore, new biological information of these species in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Romania is provided. For Lixus bituberculatus, a chicory, Cichorium intybus L. (Asteraceae), is identified as a host plant, and Lixus neglectus is found on dock Rumex thyrsiflorus Fingerh. (Polygonaceae). Both species are probably monophagous or oligophagous. Adults of Lixus bituberculatus often inhabit host plants growing in active, dry and sunny pastures with sparse patches without vegetation, being mostly active during the night in April/May and then again in September, when the highest activity levels are observed. Adults of Lixus neglectus inhabit dry grasslands on sandy soils with host plants, being active during the day from May to September, with the highest level of activity in May/June and September. The larvae of both species are borers in the stem and root of the host plant, and they pupate in root or root neck. Adults leave the pupation cells at the end of summer and do not hibernate in the host plants. Finally, Romania is a new geographic record for Lixus bituberculatus. PMID:27551208

  10. Notes on species of the genus Chlaenius Bonelli, 1810 (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Chlaeniini) from four agro-climatic zones of Rajasthan, with description of two new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanu, N Yaiphabi; Swaminathan, R

    2017-03-01

    Fourteen species of the genus Chlaenius from the semi-arid and sub-humid plain zones of Rajasthan (India) have been revised in this paper, including the description of two new species: Chlaenius (Lissauchenius) udaipurensis sp. nov. and Chlaenius (Chlaeniellus) pseudotristis sp. nov. A key to these species has been given with suitable line diagrams and photographs to illustrate key taxonomic characters including labrum, mentum, maxillary and labial palpi, pronotum, elytra and aedeagus.

  11. Description of the male of Antodice quadrimaculata Martins Galileo, 2003 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae), with new country record for the species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Rafael C de; Silva, Bianca Piraccini; Julio, Carlos E de Alvarenga

    2018-02-05

    The genus Antodice Thomson, 1864 was revised by Martins Galileo (1998) and currently includes 27 species (Tavakilian Chevillotte 2017), distributed from Mexico to southern South America. Based on a single female specimen collected in Arroyo Cristal, Ka'azapá, Paraguay, the species Antodice quadrimaculata was first described by Martins Galileo in 2003. The holotype specimen was collected on 20 November 1999 by J. Jensen and is deposited in the Museum of Zoology of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. With the help of Carlos Aguilar, from Paraguay's National Museum of Natural History, we were able to determine the exact location where the holotype was collected. With the collection and the description of the male, presented herein, we describe the male of this species record its occurrence in Brazil, a new country record.We identified this species as belonging to the group of Antodice species with yellowish flagellomeres and a black apex, resembling Antodice venustula Lane, 1973 in its elytral color pattern. In A. venustula, the elytra are covered with whitish pubescence and exhibit only two patches of compact white pubescence. In A. quadrimaculata, according to Martins Galileo (2003), the elytra are of a reddish color with whitish pubescence on the dorsal anterior area and close to the apexes, and they also have three patches of compact white pubescence. The specimens of A. quadrimaculata cited herein were collected in the Iguaçu National Park (Parque Nacional do Iguaçu-PNI), the largest fragment of Atlantic forest in southern Brazil, located in the western region of the state of Paraná. The insects were collected using light traps, set up on nights with a new moon. The artificial light source was a 500-Watt incandescent lamp powered by a Honda EP 2500 generator. Sampling began at 6 p.m., ending between midnight and 3 a.m. the next day. The studied material was deposited in the entomological collection of the Museum of Zoology at the State University of

  12. A review of the genus Potemnemus Thomson, 1864 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) with description of a new species from Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Henrik; Kvamme, Torstein

    2015-11-13

    All preserved type specimens and type series of the genus Potemnemus Thomson, 1864 from museum collections have been examined. The presented taxonomic study is based on examination of morphological characters as well as studies of the genitalia. The genitalia are described for the first time. The type of P. scabrosus Olivier, 1790 is lost, and the original drawing has been designated as a lectotype. The monospecific genus Parapotemnemus Breuning, 1971 nov. syn. is considered to be a junior synonym of Potemnemus Thomson, 1864 based on similarities in both external and male genitalia characters. Potemnemus wheatcrofti (Breuning, 1971) nov. comb. thus becomes a new combination. The holotype of P. wheatcrofti nov. comb. is lost, and a paratype ♂ has been designated as a neotype. Potemnemus nylanderi nov. sp. is described from the eastern parts of Papua New Guinea. The following new synonyms within the genus Potemnemus have been introduced: P. hispidus Gressitt, 1952 nov. syn. is a junior synonym of P. sepicanus Kriesche, 1923, P. detzneri Kriesche, 1923 nov. syn. is a junior synonym of P. trimaculatus Lea, 1918, and P. loriai Breuning, 1956 nov. syn. and P. triturberculatus Breuning, 1942 nov. syn. are both junior synonyms of P. scabrosus (Olivier, 1790). As a result of the present study the following species have been resurrected to species level: Potemnemus trimaculatus Lea, 1918 sp. res., P. wolfi Berchmans, 1925 sp. res., and P. thomsoni Lansberge, 1880 sp. res. The genus Periaptodes Pascoe, 1866 gen. res. has been resurrected as a valid genus based on differences in both external and male genitalia characters, and re-descriptions of the genera Potemnemus and Periaptodes are presented. Consequently, the following species have been transferred back to Periaptodes from Potemnemus: Periaptodes frater (Van de Poll, 1887), P. lictor Pascoe, 1866, P. olivieri (Thomson, 1864), P. potemnemoides Kriesche, 1936. P. testator Pascoe, 1866, P. paratestator Breuning, 1980. P

  13. Six new species of the genus Exocelina Broun, 1886 from Wano Land, New Guinea (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae

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    Helena Shaverdo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Six new species of New Guinea Exocelina Broun, 1886 are described in this paper: E. iratoi sp. n., E. likui sp. n., E. pui sp. n., E. pulukensis sp. n., E. tomhansi sp. n., and E. wigodukensis sp. n. Although different morphologically, together with Exocelina ascendens (Balke, 1998, E. bagus (Balke & Hendrich, 2001, and E. ransikiensis Shaverdo, Panjaitan & Balke, 2016, they are found to form a monophyletic clade and be closely related to representatives of the E. ekari-group, based on preliminary analysis of sequence data. An identification key to the species is provided, and important diagnostic characters are illustrated. The present data on the species’ distribution show that most of them are local endemics.

  14. Hunting billbug (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) life cycle and damaging life stage in North Carolina, with notes on other billbug species abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doskocil, J P; Brandenburg, R L

    2012-12-01

    In the southeastern United States, hunting billbug, Sphenophorus venatus vestitus Chittenden, adults are often observed in turfgrass, but our knowledge of their biology and ecology is limited. Field surveys and experiments were conducted to determine the species composition, life cycle, damaging life stage, and distribution of billbugs within the soil profile in turfgrass in North Carolina. Linear pitfall trapping revealed six species of billbug, with the hunting billbug making up 99.7% of all beetles collected. Data collected from turf plus soil sampling suggest that hunting billbugs have two overlapping generations per year in North Carolina and that they overwinter as both adults and larvae. Field experiments provided evidence that adult hunting billbugs are capable of damaging warm season turfgrasses.

  15. Fungi associated with Ips acuminatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Ukraine with a special emphasis on pathogenicity of ophiostomatoid species

    OpenAIRE

    Davydenko, Kateryna; Vasaitis, Rimvydas; Menkis, Audrius

    2017-01-01

    Conifer bark beetles are well known to be associated with fungal complexes, which consist of pathogenic ophiostomatoid fungi as well as obligate saprotroph species. However, there is little information on fungi associated with Ips acuminatus in central and eastern Europe. The aim of the study was to investigate the composition of the fungal communities associated with the pine engraver beetle, I. acuminatus, in the forest-steppe zone in Ukraine and to evaluate the pathogenicity of six associa...

  16. A new species of Laemostenus Bonelli, 1810 (Coleoptera, Carabidae from Els Ports Natural Park (Catalonia, northeastern Iberian peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prieto, M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Laemostenus (Antisphodrus portsensis n. sp. is described from five caves at Els Ports Natural Park. The new taxon can be distinguished from its geographical neighbours, L. (A. levantinus (Bolívar, 1919 and L. (A. lassallei Mateu, 1989, by the shape of its head and pronotum, and particularly by the morphology of the male genitalia. The study includes some remarks about the habitat and ecology of the new species.

  17. Introduction of the Exocelina ekari-group with descriptions of 22 new species from New Guinea (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Shaverdo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Exocelina ekari-group is here introduced and defined mainly on the basis of a discontinuous outline of the median lobe of the aedeagus. The group is known only from New Guinea (Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. It contained four species to date: E. astrophallus (Balke, 1998, E. atowaso (Shaverdo, Sagata & Balke, 2005, E. munaso (Shaverdo, Sagata & Balke, 2005, and E. polita (Sharp, 1882. Twenty two new species are described herein: E. alexanderi sp. n., E. anggiensis sp. n., E. arfakensis sp. n., E. bifida sp. n., E. brahminensis sp. n., E. bundiensis sp. n., E. edeltraudae sp. n., E. ekari sp. n., E. eme sp. n., E. evelyncheesmanae sp. n., E. hansferyi sp. n., E. irianensis sp. n., E. kakapupu sp. n., E. knoepfchen sp. n., E. oceai sp. n., E. pseudosoppi sp. n., E. soppi sp. n., E. unipo sp. n., E. utowaensis sp. n., E. waigeoensis sp. n., E. weylandensis sp. n., and E. wondiwoiensis sp. n. The lectotype of Copelatus politus Sharp, 1882 is designated. A checklist and identification key to all species of the group are provided and important diagnostic characters (habitus, color, male antennae and protarsomeres 4–5, median lobes and parameres are illustrated. Data on the distribution and habitat requirements are given. Representatives of the E. ekari-group are so far mostly known from lowland to lower montane habitats of the northern and central parts of New Guinea, the group is less diverse in higher altitudes.

  18. New fossil species of ommatids (Coleoptera: Archostemata) from the Middle Mesozoic of China illuminating the phylogeny of Ommatidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jingjing; Wang, Yongjie; Ren, Dong; Yang, Xingke

    2012-07-09

    Ommatidae is arguably the "most ancestral" extant beetle family. Recent species of this group are only found in South America and Australia, but the fossil record reveals a much broader geographical distribution in the Mesozoic. Up to now, thirteen fossil genera with more than 100 species of ommatids have been described. However, the systematic relationships of the extant and extinct Ommatidae have remained obscure. Three constraint topologies were designed based on Kirejtshuk's hypothesis, enforced the monophyly of Tetraphalerus + Odontomma, Pareuryomma + Notocupes and both respectively. In this study, four new species, Pareuryomma ancistrodonta sp. nov., Pareuryomma cardiobasis sp. nov., Omma delicata sp. nov., and Tetraphalerus decorosus sp. nov., are described. Based on well-preserved fossil specimens and previously published data the phylogenetic relationships of extant and extinct lineages of Ommatidae were analyzed for the first time cladistically. Based on the results we propose a new classification with six tribes of Ommatidae: Pronotocupedini, Notocupedini, Lithocupedini, Brochocoleini, Ommatini and Tetraphalerini. These taxa replace the traditional four subfamilies. There is good support for the monophyly of the ingroup. Notocupedini, as defined by Ponomarenko, are paraphyletic. Notocupoides + Eurydictyon are the sister group of the remaining fossil and extant ommatids. Together they form the clade Pronotocupedini. Notocupedini and Lithocupedini are the next two branches. The tribe Brochocoleini is the sister group of a clade comprising Tetraphalerini and Ommatini.

  19. The Hydraenidae of Cuba (Insecta: Coleoptera) II: Morphology of preimaginal stages of six species and notes on their biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deler-Hernández, Albert; Delgado, Juan A

    2017-03-06

    Preimaginal stages of the six species of Hydraenidae presently known from Cuba were obtained by rearing adults in the laboratory. Eggs of Hydraena perkinsi Spangler, 1980, H. decui Spangler, 1980 and H. franklyni Deler-Hernández & Delgado, 2012 are described and illustrated for the first time. The first instar larva of Gymnochthebius fossatus (LeConte, 1855) is redescribed, adding some new remarkable morphological characters including what could be the first abdominal egg-burster reported for this family. All larval instars of H. perkinsi, H. guadelupensis Orchymont, 1923 and Ochthebius attritus LeConte, 1878 are described and illustrated for the first time, with a special emphasis on their chaetotaxy. The second instar larva of G. fossatus along with first and third instar larvae of H. decui and H. franklyni are also studied for the first time. The pupal morphology and vestiture of a species belonging to the genus Hydraena are described for the first time, based on the pupa of H. perkinsi. Biological notes for several preimaginal stages of the studied species are also given.

  20. Effects of Different Temperatures on the Development of Dermestes Frischii and Dermestes Undulatus (Coleoptera, Dermestidae): Comparison Between Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambiase, Simonetta; Murgia, Giulia; Sacchi, Roberto; Ghitti, Michele; di Lucia, Valeria

    2018-03-01

    Dermestidae could be useful in forensic investigations to assess the PMI as adults and larvae colonize dried remains. We reared two species of Dermestidae (Dermestes frischii and Dermestes undulatus) to understand the effects of different temperatures on the length of their whole life cycle and on their immature stages. Both species were reared at 23°C ± 0.5, RH 75% and at 26°C ± 0.5, 75% RH. Our result shows that the temperature is the main factor that influences the development of those species; in fact, increasing temperature leads to a shorter development cycle (59.8 ± 0.5 and 38.1 ± 0.2 for D. frischii; 50.6 ± 0.6 and 36.2 ± 0.2 for D. undulatus). Furthermore, we found that the number of the molts before the pupa decreases from 5-7 to 5-6 for D. frischii and from 4-6 to 4-5 for D. undulatus, respectively, at 23°C and 26°C. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Synopsis of the pelidnotine scarabs (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Rutelinae, Rutelini and annotated catalog of the species and subspecies

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    Matthew R. Moore

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The pelidnotine scarabs (Scarabaeidae: Rutelinae: Rutelini are a speciose, paraphyletic assemblage of beetles that includes spectacular metallic species (“jewel scarabs” as well as species that are ecologically important as herbivores, pollinators, and bioindicators. These beetles suffer from a complicated nomenclatural history, due primarily to 20th century taxonomic and nomenclatural errors. We review the taxonomic history of the pelidnotine scarabs, present a provisional key to genera with overviews of all genera, and synthesize a catalog of all taxa with synonyms, distributional data, type specimen information, and 107 images of exemplar species. As a result of our research, the pelidnotine leaf chafers (a paraphyletic group include 27 (26 extant and 1 extinct genera and 420 valid species and subspecies (419 extant and 1 extinct. Our research makes biodiversity research on this group tractable and accessible, thus setting the stage for future studies that address evolutionary and ecological trends. Based on our research, 1 new species is described, 1 new generic synonym and 12 new species synonyms are proposed, 11 new lectotypes and 1 new neotype are designated, many new or revised nomenclatural combinations, and many unavailable names are presented. The following taxonomic changes are made: New generic synonym: The genus Heteropelidnota Ohaus, 1912 is a new junior synonym of Pelidnota MacLeay, 1819. New species synonyms: Plusiotis adelaida pavonacea Casey, 1915 is a syn. n. of Chrysina adelaida (Hope, 1841; Odontognathus gounellei Ohaus, 1908 is a revised synonym of Pelidnota ebenina (Blanchard, 1842; Pelidnota francoisgenieri Moore & Jameson, 2013 is a syn. n. of Pelidnota punctata (Linnaeus, 1758; Pelidnota genieri Soula, 2009 is a syn. n. of Pelidnota punctata (Linnaeus, 1758; Pelidnota lutea (Olivier, 1758 is a revised synonym of Pelidnota punctata (Linnaeus, 1758; Pelidnota (Pelidnota texensis Casey, 1915 is a revised synonym of

  2. Synopsis of the pelidnotine scarabs (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Rutelinae, Rutelini) and annotated catalog of the species and subspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Matthew R.; Jameson, Mary L.; Garner, Beulah H.; Audibert, Cédric; Smith, Andrew B. T.; Seidel, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The pelidnotine scarabs (Scarabaeidae: Rutelinae: Rutelini) are a speciose, paraphyletic assemblage of beetles that includes spectacular metallic species (“jewel scarabs”) as well as species that are ecologically important as herbivores, pollinators, and bioindicators. These beetles suffer from a complicated nomenclatural history, due primarily to 20th century taxonomic and nomenclatural errors. We review the taxonomic history of the pelidnotine scarabs, present a provisional key to genera with overviews of all genera, and synthesize a catalog of all taxa with synonyms, distributional data, type specimen information, and 107 images of exemplar species. As a result of our research, the pelidnotine leaf chafers (a paraphyletic group) include 27 (26 extant and 1 extinct) genera and 420 valid species and subspecies (419 extant and 1 extinct). Our research makes biodiversity research on this group tractable and accessible, thus setting the stage for future studies that address evolutionary and ecological trends. Based on our research, 1 new species is described, 1 new generic synonym and 12 new species synonyms are proposed, 11 new lectotypes and 1 new neotype are designated, many new or revised nomenclatural combinations, and many unavailable names are presented. The following taxonomic changes are made: New generic synonym: The genus Heteropelidnota Ohaus, 1912 is a new junior synonym of Pelidnota MacLeay, 1819. New species synonyms: Plusiotis adelaida pavonacea Casey, 1915 is a syn. n. of Chrysina adelaida (Hope, 1841); Odontognathus gounellei Ohaus, 1908 is a revised synonym of Pelidnota ebenina (Blanchard, 1842); Pelidnota francoisgenieri Moore & Jameson, 2013 is a syn. n. of Pelidnota punctata (Linnaeus, 1758); Pelidnota genieri Soula, 2009 is a syn. n. of Pelidnota punctata (Linnaeus, 1758); Pelidnota lutea (Olivier, 1758) is a revised synonym of Pelidnota punctata (Linnaeus, 1758); Pelidnota (Pelidnota) texensis Casey, 1915 is a revised synonym of

  3. Taxonomic review of Chinese species of ground beetles of the subgenus Pseudoophonus (genus Harpalus) (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataev, Boris M; Liang, Hongbin

    2015-02-19

    A taxonomic review of 23 species of the subgenus Pseudoophonus Motschulsky, 1844, the genus Harpalus Latreille, 1802, occurring in China is given, and a key to these species is provided. The species are divided in three species groups and five subgroups, the distinctive characters of which are listed. The following new synonyms are established: Harpalus calceatus Duftschmid, 1812 = Anisodactylus propinquus Ballion, 1870, syn. n.; H. davidi (Tschitschérine, 1897) = H. kailiensis Huang, 1992, syn. n.; = H. adenticulatus Huang, 1992, syn. n.; = H. cilihumerus Huang, Hu & Sun, 1994, syn. n.; H. fokienensis Schauberger, 1930 = H. muciulus Huang, 1992, syn. n.; H. griseus (Panzer, 1796) = H. xinjiangensis Huang, Hu & Sun, 1994, syn. n.; H. hauserianus Schauberger, 1929 = H. disaogashimensis Huang, 1995, syn. n.; H. pastor pastor Motschulsky, 1844 = H. penglainus Huang, Hu & Sun, 1994, syn. n.; = H. chiloschizontus Huang, 1995, syn. n.; H. rufipes (DeGeer, 1774) = H. scabripectus Huang, Hu & Sun, 1994, syn. n.; H. singularis Tschitschérine, 1906 = H. chengjiangensis Huang, 1993, syn. n.; H. sinicus Hope, 1845 = H. periglabellus Huang, 1992, syn. n.; = H. longihornus Lei & Huang, 1997, syn. n.; and H. tridens Morawitz, 1862 = H. hypogeomysis Huang, 1993, syn. n.; = H. pilosus Huang, 1995, syn. n. Statuses of H. yinchuanensis Huang, 1993 and H. disimuciulus Huang, Lei, Yan & Hu, 1996 are discussed. Lectotypes are designated for H. capito Morawitz, 1862, H. japonicus Morawitz, 1862 and H. eous Tschitschérine, 1901. New data on distribution of Pseudoophonus species in China are provided. Harpalus babai Habu, 1973 is reported from China (Jiangxi) for the first time. The following taxa are recorded from the following Chinese provinces for the first time: H. ussuriensis Chaudoir, 1863 from Hunan; H. aenigma (Tschitschérine, 1897) from Hubei, Jiangxi, and Guangxi; H. pastor Motschulsky, 1844 from Beijing and Xizang; H. fokienensis Schauberger, 1930 from Anhui and Jiangxi; H

  4. Review of Canadian species of the genus Mocyta Mulsant & Rey (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Aleocharinae, with the description of a new species and a new synonymy

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    Jan Klimaszewski

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Six species of the genus Mocyta Mulsant & Rey are reported from Canada: Mocyta amblystegii (Brundin, M. breviuscula (Mäklin, M. discreta (Casey, M. fungi (Gravenhorst, M. luteola (Erichson, and M. sphagnorum Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n. New provincial and state records include: M. breviuscula – Saskatchewan and Oregon; M. discreta – Quebec, Ontario and Saskatchewan; M. luteola – New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Massachusetts and Minnesota; and M. fungi – Saskatchewan. Mocyta sphagnorum is described from eastern Canada from specimens captured in Newfoundland, New Brunswick, Quebec and Ontario. Mocyta negligens Mulsant and Rey, a native European species suspected of occurring in Canada, is excluded from the Nearctic fauna based on comparison of European types with similarly coloured Canadian specimens, which are now identified as M. luteola. The European species, Mocyta gilvicollis (Scheerpeltz, is synonymized with another European nominal species, M. negligens, based on examination of type material of the two species. Lectotypes are designated for Eurypronota discreta Casey, Atheta gilvicollis Scheerpeltz, Homalota luteola Erichson, Colpodota negligens Mulsant and Rey, Acrotona prudens Casey and Dolosota redundans Casey. The latter species is here synonymized with M. luteola. A review of the six Nearctic species is provided, including keys to species and closely related genera, colour habitus images, images of genitalia, biological information and maps of their distributions in Canada.

  5. A new species of Desmopachria Babington (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) from Cuba with a prediction of its geographic distribution and notes on other Cuban species of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megna, Yoandri S; Sánchez-Fernández, David

    2014-01-10

    A new species, Desmopachria andreae sp. n. is described from Cuba. Diagnostic characters including illustrations of male genitalia are provided and illustrated for the five species of the genus occurring on the island. For these five species both a simple key to adults and maps of their known distribution in Cuba are also provided. Using a Maximun Entropy method (MaxEnt), a distribution model was developed for D. andreae sp.n. Based on the model's predictions, this species has a higher probability of occurring in high altitude forests (above 1000 m a.s.l.), characterised by relatively low temperatures especially during the hottest and wettest seasons, specifically, the mountainous areas of the Macizo de Guamuhaya (Central Cuba), Sierra Maestra (S Cuba) and Nipe-Sagua-Baracoa (NE Cuba). In some of these areas the species has not yet been recorded, and should be searched for in future field surveys.

  6. Carnivorous diving beetles of the genus Desmopachria (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) from Brazil: New species, new records, and a checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Rafael Benzi; Ferreira, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Eight new species of DesmopachriaBabington, 1841 are described and illustrated from Brazil: D. dicrophallica sp. nov. , D. disticta sp. nov. , D. grammosticta sp. nov. , D . grandinigra sp. nov. , D. itamontensis sp. nov. , D. leptophallica sp. nov. , D. stethothrix sp. nov. , and D. ukuki sp. nov. The species D. amyaeMiller, 2001 , D. cheiMiller, 1999 , D. margarita Young, 1990, and D. volatidiscaMiller, 2001 are recorded for the first time from Brazil. From species of the Desmopachria reported in Brazil, D. aldessaYoung, 1980 has a new record from Pará state and D. fossulataZimmermann, 1928, D. granoidesYoung, 1986 , and D. laevis Sharp, 1882 have new records from Rio de Janeiro State. A checklist of all Desmopachria recorded from Brazil is presented with notes about some of the localities. Resumo Oito espécies novas de DesmopachriaBabington, 1841 são descritas e ilustradas para o Brasil, D. dicrophallica sp. nov. , D. disticta sp. nov. , D. grammosticta sp. nov. , D . grandinigra sp. nov., D. itamontensis sp. nov., D. leptophallica sp. nov., D. stethothrix sp. nov. e D. ukuki sp. nov. As espécies D. amyaeMiller, 2001, D. cheiMiller, 1999 , D. margarita Young, 1990 e D. volatidiscaMiller, 2001 são registradas pela primeira vez para o Brasil. Das espécies de Desmopachria registradas para o Brasil D. aldessaYoung, 1980 tem um novo registro para o estado do Pará e D. fossulataZimmermann, 1928 , D. granoidesYoung, 1986 e D. laevis Sharp, 1882 têm novos registros para o estado do Rio de Janeiro. Uma listagem de todos os Desmopachria registrados para o Brasil é apresentada, com notas acerca de algumas localidades. PMID:25373202

  7. Diel flight behaviour and dispersal patterns of aquatic Coleoptera and Heteroptera species with special emphasis on the importance of seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csabai, Zoltán; Kálmán, Zoltán; Szivák, Ildikó; Boda, Pál

    2012-09-01

    Dispersal flight is the most important and almost the only way for primary aquatic insects to find new water habitats. During a 30-week-long project, we monitored the flight dispersal behaviour of aquatic beetles and bugs with using highly and horizontally polarizing agricultural black plastic sheets laid onto the ground. Based on the flight data of more than 45,000 individuals and 92 species, we explored and described eight different diel flight activity patterns. We found that seven of eight dispersal patterns are consistent with the previous knowledge, while three conspicuous mass dispersal periods can be identified as in the mid morning and/or around noon and/or at nightfall. As an exception, we found a `daytime' pattern occurred exclusively in spring, in which mass dispersal can be seen from mid morning to late afternoon. In contrast to previous studies, we emphasize here that the seasonality has to be considered in evaluation of the diurnal flight activity. According to the seasons, a `three code sign' was proposed to indicate the diel dispersal flight behaviour of a species for a year. Most of the species utilize different diel activity patterns in different seasons. In spring, the daytime pattern was the preferred type, but in summer and autumn, the evening types were the most popular patterns. We stated that the seasonal change of air temperature has a crucial role in that a pattern could be manifested in a given season or not and brings a need to change the diel dispersal pattern among seasons.

  8. A review of the Palaearctic species of Larinus Dejean (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in C. J. Schoenherr collection: nomenclature and lectotype designations

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    Levent Gültekin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The syntypes of 41 species of Larinus Dejean described by L. Gyllenhal and C. H. Boheman, housed at the C. J. Schoenherr collection in the Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm and the Museum of Evolution, Uppsala University, are examined. Lectotypes are designated, a nomenclatural review performed, many previous synonyms confirmed and three new synonyms proposed: Larinus planus (Fabricius, 1792 (= Larinus rusticanus Gyllenhal, 1835 syn. nov.; Larinus carlinae (Olivier, 1807 (= Larinus sulphurifer Boheman, 1843 syn. nov.; Larinus minutus Gyllenhal, 1835 (= Larinus puncticollis Capiomont, 1874 syn. nov.. Colour images for 15 lectotypes are presented.

  9. Aroid scarabs in the genus Peltonotus Burmeister (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Dynastinae: key to species and new distributional data

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    Mary Jameson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The southeast Asian scarab beetle genus Peltonotus Burmeister (Scarabaeidae, Dynastinae, Cyclocephalini is reviewed. New country records for Peltonotus morio Burmeister (Myanmar and Vietnam, P. nasutus Arrow (southern China and Cambodia, and P. favonius Jameson and Wada (Myanmar are reported, including a new record in the Palearctic/Sino-Japanese biogeographic region. The first female specimen of P. favonius is described. Biological associations with aroid inflorescences are reviewed, and human consumption of Peltonotus beetles is reported. A key to all species, paralectotype designations for P. nasutus, diagnoses, and distributions using dynamic mapping tools are included.

  10. Two new species of Conognatha Eschscholtz, 1829 (Coleoptera, Buprestidae, Stigmoderini) from Southeast and South Brazilian regions with distributional notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, Clayton; Mermudes, José Ricardo M

    2014-08-28

    Conognatha (Pithiscus) coffeatus sp. nov. and Conognatha (Pithiscus) puris sp. nov., both from the Atlantic Rainforest (type locality: Itatiaia, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil), are described and illustrated. They differ from each other mainly by the elytral colour pattern, presence of a short longitudinal groove between the vertex and the frons in C. (P.) puris sp. nov., and differences in frons shape, antennae sensory fields, pronotum and aedeagus. The distribution of C. (P.) gounellei is extended to the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. A modified key to include the new species, as well as illustrations, are presented.

  11. New species and records of Stenus (Nestus of the canaliculatus group, with the erection of a new species group (Insecta: Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Steninae

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    Alexandr B. Ryvkin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The canaliculatus species group of Stenus (Nestus is redefined. Four new Palaearctic species of the group are described and illustrated: S. (N. alopex sp. nov. from the Putorana Highland and Taymyr Peninsula, Russia; S. (N. canalis sp. nov. from SE Siberia and the Russian Far East; S. (N. canosus sp. nov. from the Narat Mt Ridge, Chinese Tien Shan; S. (N. delitor sp. nov. from C & SE Siberia. New distributional data as well as brief analyses of old records for fourteen species described earlier are provided from both Palaearctic and Nearctic material. S. (N. milleporus Casey, 1884 ​(= sectilifer Casey, 1884 is revalidated as a species propria. S. (N. sphaerops Casey, 1884 is redescribed; its aedeagus is figured for the first time; the aedeagus of S. (N. caseyi Puthz, 1972 as well as aedeagi of eight previously described Palaearctic species are illustrated anew. A key for the identification of all the known Palaearctic species of the group is given. A morphology and ecology based analysis of the main evolutionary trends within the group is provided. A lectotype is designated for S. (N. melanopus Marsham, 1802; its Siberian and NE European records are supposed to be erroneous; the monotypic melanopus species group is erected.

  12. First record of the beetle family Throscidae (Insecta: Coleoptera, a new species of Aulonothroscus Horn, and new species records to the fauna of Peru

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    Paul J. Johnson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The beetle family Throscidae is documented from Peru for the first time, based on specimens collected in the regions of Cajamarca, Junín, Loreto and Madre de Dios. Aulonothroscus tambopata new species is described from Madre de Dios. Also, three additional species of Aulonothroscus are reported from Peru for the first time – A. alvarengai Cobos new country record, A. freudi Cobos new country record, and A. oculatissimus Cobos new country record. A key separating these four species is given. This report is part of the “Beetles of Peru” project.

  13. Three new species of Macrelmis Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Elmidae: Elminae) from Southeastern Brazil with new definition of species groups to the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Passos, Maria Inês Silva; De Miranda, Gustavo Silva; Nessimian, Jorge Luiz

    2015-12-16

    Three new species of Macrelmis Motschulsky, 1859 are described and illustrated based on adult males from Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais and São Paulo states (southeastern Brazil). A new species groups definition is proposed for the genus, with a redefinition of the former six (aristeae sp. group, celsa sp. group, isus sp. group, granigera sp. group, milleri sp. group and striata sp. group) and designation of four new groups (alea new sp. group, amazonica new sp. group, grandis new sp. group and jureceki new sp. group). The male genitalia of M. clypeata is illustrated for the first time and distributional maps for all species of the genus are provided.

  14. The first record of Litargus tetraspilotus (Coleoptera, Mycetophagidae in Brazil, with biological notes and complementary description of the species

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    Julianne Milléo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Litargus tetraspilotus LeConte, 1856 was collected feeding on Oidium sp. (Fungi, Ascomycota, Erysiphaceae associated with fruit trees. This is the first time L. tetraspilotus is recorded in Brazil, totaling three species of Mycetophagidae for this country. This study aims to provide a complementary description of this species based on new characters and to present information on its life cycle under laboratory conditions and fluctuation in population in the field. During the period of inventories between July 2004 and August 2006, about every fifteen days, a total of 565 specimens of L. tetraspilotus were collected, with the highest abundance found on citrus plants, with values differing significantly between the two years. The population levels differed between the seasons; spring had the greatest abundance and autumn the least. There was a significant positive correlation of L. tetraspilotus abundance with rainfall and relative humidity. Mycetophagidae, as well as other mycophagous families of Brazilian coleopterans, are barely studied, warranting further future studies of their bioecology and systematics.

  15. A new genus and two new species of Pterostichini from China, with “sphodrine-like” parameres (Coleoptera, Carabidae

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    Borislav Gueorguiev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A new genus of Pterostichini, Apophylon Guéorguiev & Sciaky, gen. n. (type species: Apophylon schillhammeri Guéorguiev & Sciaky, sp. n. is proposed for Apophylon schillhammeri Guéorguiev & Sciaky, sp. n. (type locality: China, SE Guizhou Province, Leishan County, SE Kaili and Apophylon pangu Guéorguiev & Sciaky, sp. n. (type locality: China, NW Hunan Province, Wulingyuan District, near the town of Wulingyuan. These two species share a unique combination of characters, not known in any other Pterostichini. The new genus can be distinguished by having (1 a left paramere without transverse apophysis; (2 a falcate right paramere, with styloid apex, broadened medial part and subbasal hasp; (3 a median lobe with dorsal ostium; (4 metatarsomeres 1-2 setose on the medioventral surface, in addition to the lateroventral setae; (5 meso- and metatarsomeres 1–4 with two dorsolateral grooves diverging distally; and (6 elytral striae with shining isodiametric microreticulation, which is in contrast to less shining transverse-mesh microreticulation on the elytral intervals.

  16. First assessment on the molecular phylogeny and phylogeography of the species Gnaptor boryi distributed in Greece (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkontas, Ioannis; Papadaki, Stavrini; Trichas, Apostolos; Poulakakis, Nikos

    2017-11-01

    The genus Gnaptor Brullé, 1983 (Blaptini, Gnaptorina) occurs in southeast Europe as well as in Asiatic regions. As regards its taxonomy, four morphological species have been attributed: Gnaptor boryi, G. prolixus, G. spinimanus and G. medvedevi. Here, we use two different mitochondrial genetic markers (16S and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI)) in order to investigate the relationships between the populations of the species G. boryi in Greece, compare them with the current taxonomy and conjecture about its biogeographic history. In total, 29 specimens (28 G. boryi and one G. prolixus) were analyzed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods. Our results clarified the presence of three well-supported lineages: two belongs to G. boryi and one to G. prolixus. The first diversification of these lineages started in the Late Miocene at 9 Mya with the split of G. prolixus from Turkey and the second major split occurred in the Early Pliocene at 3.7 Mya between the two lineages of G. boryi distributed separately in northern Greece and Peloponnesos. According to Statistical Dispersal - Vicariance Analysis and dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis analysis analyses, vicariance seems to be the biogeographic event responsible for the divergence of the two major lineages of G. boryi.

  17. Effects of diet type, developmental stage, and gut compartment in the gut bacterial communities of two Cerambycidae species (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Myeong; Choi, Min-Young; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Shin Ae; Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Song, Jaekyeong; Kim, Seong-Hyun; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    The gut bacterial community of wood-feeding beetles has been examined for its role on plant digestion and biocontrol method development. Monochamus alternatus and Psacothea hilaris, both belonging to the subfamily Lamiinae, are woodfeeding beetles found in eastern Asia and Europe and generally considered as destructive pests for pine and mulberry trees, respectively. However, limited reports exist on the gut bacterial communities in these species. Here, we characterized gut bacterial community compositions in larva and imago of each insect species reared with host tree logs and artificial diets as food sources. High-throughput 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene revealed 225 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on a 97% sequences similarity cutoff from 138,279 sequence reads, the majority of which were derived from Proteobacteria (48.2%), Firmicutes (45.5%), and Actinobacteria (5.2%). The OTU network analysis revealed 7 modules with densely connected OTUs in specific gut samples, in which the distributions of Lactococcus-, Kluyvera-, Serratia-, and Enterococcus-related OTUs were distinct between diet types or developmental stages of the host insects. The gut bacterial communities were separated on a detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) plot and by c-means fuzzy clustering analysis, according to diet type. The results from this study suggest that diet was the main determinant for gut bacterial community composition in the two beetles.

  18. A revision of the genus Ora Clark, 1865 (Coleoptera: Scirtidae) in Argentina (part I)--descriptions of new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libonatti, María Laura

    2014-11-12

    Three new species of the genus Ora Clark are described from Argentina: O. brevieminentia sp. n., O. megadepressa sp. n. and O. sigmoidea sp. n. All the species are characterized by a pair of frontoclypeal foveae, dorsal surface of mandible covered with setae, third labial palpomere arising from the inner margin of second palpomere, anterior pronotal angles distinctly projected anteriorly, a pair of glabrous areas on abdominal ventrites 2-5, ventrite 5 emarginate, with a pair of foveae in females, and tegmen with an apical digitiform lobe. Ora brevieminentia is similar externally to O. gamma Champion and O. platensis Brèthes, but it differs in having a more convex body, a smaller total length/elytral width ratio, coarser elytral punctation and a shorter lateral protuberance on the penis. Ora megadepressa is similar externally to O. depressa Fabricius, but differs in that the body is wider, the tegmen is laterally spiny with the lobe less narrowed basally, and the penis is straight with the base and the longer subapical process directed to the right-hand. Ora sigmoidea is similar in body color and shape to O. brevenotata Pic, and the aedeagus resembles that of O. texana Champion. However, the lobe of the tegmen is less protruding, the laminar dorsal piece of the penis is broadened, the apex is truncate, and the S-shaped ventral piece is distinctly curved.

  19. Contribution to the knowledge of the Carabus (Archiplectes) satyrus Kurnakov, 1962, species complex in Abkhazia (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Carabini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodovnikov, Igor A; Zamotajlov, Alexandr S; Fominykh, Dmitriy D; Titarenko, Andrey Y

    2014-01-01

    This study is based on a comparative analysis of extensive material of Carabus (Archiplectes) satyrus Kurnakov, 1962, its various forms and related taxa recently collected by the authors and some other collectors in Abkhazia. The status or specific affiliations of several subspecies are changed and a subspecies is described. Carabus (Archiplectes) besleticus Kurnakov, 1972, stat. n. is treated as a separate species housing six hitherto established subspecies in addition to the nominal type: Carabus (Archiplectes) besleticusmtsaranus Kurnakov, 1972, Carabus (Archiplectes) besleticusduripshensis Kurnakov, 1972, Carabus (Archiplectes) besleticusnapraensis Belousov & Zamotajlov, 1993, Carabus (Archiplectes) besleticusdsychvensis Kurnakov, 1972, Carabus (Archiplectes) besleticusadzinbai Retezár, 2013, and Carabus (Archiplectes) besleticusresheviensissubsp. n.Carabus (Archiplectes) satyrus is treated as monotypical while the specific status of Carabus (Archiplectes) pseudopshuensis Zamotajlov, 1991, earlier proposed by Fominykh and Zamotajlov (2012), is confirmed based on the morphological and morphometric data.

  20. Frequent discordance between morphology and mitochondrial DNA in a species group of European water beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Bilton

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Hydroporus memnonius species group includes both widespread and range restricted diving beetle taxa in the western Palaearctic, some of which have been divided into a number of geographical subspecies. Of these, Hydroporus necopinatus is distributed in the far west of Europe, from central Spain to southern Britain, and has been split into three subspecies, occurring in Iberia (necopinatus sst., France (robertorum and England (roni respectively—the last of these being a rare example of an insect taxon apparently endemic to northern Europe. Here we explore inter-relationships between populations and subspecies of H. necopinatus and related members of the Hydroporus melanarius subgroup, using mitochondrial COI sequence data. We reveal widespread discordance between mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and morphology in areas where H. necopinatus and H. melanarius come into contact, consistent with historical introgressive hybridization between these taxa. In light of this discordance, the lack of clear genetic divergence between H. necopinatus subspecies, and the fact that both robertorum and roni are morphologically intermediate between H. necopinatus sstr. and H. melanarius, we suggest that these taxa may be of hybridogenic origin, rather than representing discrete evolutionary lineages.

  1. STUDY UPON THE SPECIES IPS TYPOGRAPHUS L. (COLEOPTERA, CURCULIONIDAE IN THE RAŞINARI FORESTRY ECOSYSTEM, SIBIU COUNTY

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    Iuliana ANTONIE

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The disturbance of the equilibrium between the endogenous and exogenous command factors of human origin leads to massive perturbations in the forestry ecosystems affecting all the living beings within the biocenosis and especially the forestry entomologic fauna. Under some circumstances the pest insects from the forestry ecosystem can produce big damages to the trees in the case of maintaining high effectives of these and for many years, too. Our study aimed the monitoring the species Ips typographus L., a forestry pest, which by its action produces important damages to the spruce fir. The research work ran for two years, during 2012-2013, in the area of Raşinari Forestry District, Sibiu County. The work method was to install at the skirt of the forest the traps with pheromones bait in the researched area. There were collected a number of 4,146 samples of which in 2012 were captured 1,973 individuals and in 2013 were captured 2,173 individuals. There was established a growth of the pest population in the studied biotope, this being the same as at the national level. As a consequence there are imposed further studies in order to find the most proper solutions regarding stopping the dissemination of the insect into new territories and maintaining the density of the population of the pest beyond the economic level of damage.

  2. Necrophagous species of Diptera and Coleoptera in northeastern Brazil: state of the art and challenges for the Forensic Entomologist Espécies necrófagas de Diptera e Coleoptera na Região Nordeste do Brasil: estado da arte e desafios para o Entomologista Forense

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    Simão D. Vasconcelos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Inventories on necrophagous insects carried out in Brazil encompass mostly species from the southeastern and central-western regions of the country. This review aims to produce the first checklist of necrophagous Diptera and Coleoptera species of forensic relevance in northeastern Brazil, an area that concentrates high rates of homicides. We performed a literature survey on scientific articles, theses and dissertations regarding necrophagous insect species in the region, and contacted scientists who develop research on forensic entomology. Fifty-two species of Diptera belonging to eight families with previous record of necrophagy were reported in the region: Sarcophagidae, Calliphoridae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, Piophilidae, Phoridae, Anthomyiidae and Stratiomyidae. Coleopteran species from six families of forensic relevance were registered, although taxonomical identification remained superficial. Bait traps were the most frequent methodology used, followed by collection on animal carcasses. Seven Dipteran species from two families were registered on human cadavers. All species had been previously reported in other Brazilian states and/or other countries, although none has been effectively used in legal procedures in the region. The status of research on forensic entomology in northeastern Brazil is incipient, and the checklist produced here contributes to the knowledge on the local diversity of necrophagous insects.Inventários de insetos necrófagos no Brasil abordam em sua maioria espécies das regiões Sudeste e Centro-Oeste do país. Esta revisão visa apresentar um checklist de espécies necrófagas de Diptera e Coleoptera de importância forense no Nordeste brasileiro, uma área que concentra elevadas taxas de homicídio. Nós conduzimos uma revisão bibliográfica consultando artigos, teses e dissertações sobre espécies necrófagas na região, e contatamos cientistas que desenvolvem pesquisa em entomologia forense. Cinquenta e duas esp

  3. DUE NUOVE SPECIE DI OTIORHYNCHUS (LIXORRHYNCHUS REITTER, 1914 E UNA NUOVA SPECIE DI RAYMONDIONYMUS WOLLASTON, 1873 DEI MONTI AURUNCI (LAZIO (COLEOPTERA, CURCULIONOIDEA

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    Paolo Magrini

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nella presente nota vengono descritti tre nuovi Curculionoidea ipogei dei Monti Aurunci (Lazio: Otiorhynchus (Lixorrhynchus avoni n. sp.; Otiorhynchus (Lixorrhyn­chus paulae n. sp. e Raymondionymus pulcherrimus n. sp. Nel testo vengono riportate immagini fotografiche dei principali caratteri esoscheletrici (sia interni che esterni che contraddistinguono le nuove specie, nell’ambito dei gruppi di appartenenza. Una cartina geografica riassume lo stato dell’attuale distribuzione dei Lixorrhynchus anoftalmi o microftalmi in Italia penisulare e nell’area Sardo-Corsa. Le prime due specie presentano indubbie affinità con Otiorhynchus (Lixorrhynchus bastianinii Magrini, Meoli & Abbazzi, 2005, recentemente descritto dei Monti Aurunci centrali [Grava dei Serini (= Grotta dei Serini 587 La/FR], mentre la terza specie costituisce, insieme a R. meggiolaroi (Osella, 1977 (Liguria, R. eximius Meregalli & Osella, 2006 (Lazio, Monti Simbruini e R. zoiai (Osella & Giusto, 1985 (Piemonte, Massiccio del Monviso, un gruppo immediatamente riconoscibile rispetto ai taxa congeneri, per la particolare conformazione del pronoto.

  4. Effects of induced water stress on leaf trichome density and foliar nutrients of three elm (Ulmus) species: implications for resistance to the elm leaf beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosu, Paul P; Wagner, Michael R

    2007-06-01

    Seedlings of three elm species with variable susceptibility to the elm leaf beetle (Pyrrhalta luteola Müller) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were subjected to three water stress treatments (no stress, low stress, and high stress) in a greenhouse experiment. The species tested were Ulmus pumila L. (Siberian elm = highly susceptible), U. parvifolia Jacq. (Chinese elm = resistant), and U. americana L. (American elm = intermediate). The seedlings were analyzed for changes in the levels of selected host traits (trichome density, foliar concentration of nitrogen [N], phosphorus [P], potassium [K], calcium [Ca], magnesium [Mg], iron [Fe], and manganese [Mn]), some of which had previously been implicated in resistance to the elm leaf beetle. Density of leaf abaxial surface trichomes (simple, bulbous, and total trichomes) and foliar Fe and Mg concentrations increased significantly in the highly susceptible Siberian elms under water stress. In contrast, stress reduced trichome density in the moderately susceptible American elms, but it had no effect on levels of foliar mineral nutrients. The stress treatments had no influence on host traits in the resistant Chinese elms. The results suggest that environmental stress can alter plant traits that are likely involved in determining resistance of elms to the elm leaf beetle.

  5. Description of 23 new species of the Exocelina ekari-group from New Guinea, with a key to all representatives of the species group (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae

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    Helena Shaverdo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty three new species of Exocelina Broun, 1886 from New Guinea are described herein: E. bewaniensis sp. n., E. bismarckensis sp. n., E. craterensis sp. n., E. gorokaensis sp. n., E. herowana sp. n., E. jimiensis sp. n., E. kisli sp. n., E. ksionseki sp. n., E. lembena sp. n., E. mantembu sp. n., E. michaelensis sp. n., E. pinocchio sp. n., E. pseudoastrophallus sp. n., E. pseudobifida sp. n., E. pseudoedeltraudae sp. n., E. pseudoeme sp. n., E. sandaunensis sp. n., E. simbaiarea sp. n., E. skalei sp. n., E. tabubilensis sp. n., E. tariensis sp. n., E. vovai sp. n., and E. wannangensis sp. n. All of them have been found to belong to the E. ekari-group. An identification key to all known species of the group is provided, and important diagnostic characters (habitus, color, male antennae, protarsomeres 4–5, median lobes, and parameres are illustrated. Data on the distribution of the new species and some already described species are given.

  6. A new species of the genus Orchesia Latreille (Coleoptera: Melandryidae) from Baltic amber with a key to species described from fossil resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, Vitalii I; Bukejs, Andris

    2015-04-17

    Orchesia (Orchestera) canaliculata sp. nov. is described and illustrated from Eocene Baltic amber (Kaliningrad Region, Russia). New fossil records on O. turkini Alekseev & Bukejs and O. rasnitzyni Nikitsky are presented. A key to species of Orchesia Latreille, described from fossil resins, is provided.

  7. 1825 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae

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    Márcia d´Avila

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The erva-mate (Ilex paraguariensis A.St.-Hil. has a social, cultural and economic importance in the southern states of Brazil. The pure stands of this culture was responsible for the increase of many species of insects. Hedypathes betulinus (Klug, 1825 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae is considered the main pest from an economic viewpoint because of its difficult control and potential for damage. The larval phase occurs inside the twings and trunks, what makes more difficult to deal with its detention and management. Cultural and mechanical management are the most indicated, such as collection of adults, prunning and burning of plant parts damaged by the insect, balanced nutrition, adequate plant density and maintenance of areas with native vegetation or also the introduction of policulture. These strategies may increase the agroecossystem balance and thus a reduction of the insect-pest to an aceptable level. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assemble and the discuss the information on the bioecology and management of erva-mate borer.

  8. Diet based fitness variability of Coccinella novemnotata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

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    Coccinella novemnotata (Herbst) is a species of North American native lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) that has come under great ecological duress over the past 30 years and is experiencing a significant decline throughout its native range. This species once was widely distributed across mos...

  9. Review of the tribe Chilocorini Mulsant from Iran (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biranvand, Amir; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Li, Wenjing; Nicolas, Vincent; Shakarami, Jahanshir; Fekrat, Lida; Hesami, Shahram

    2017-01-01

    The Iranian checklist of the tribe Chilocorini Mulsant, 1846 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is updated. In total, 13 species belonging to four genera ( Brumoides Chapin, 1965, Chilocorus Leach, 1815, Exochomus Redtenbacher, 1843, and Parexochomus Barovsky, 1922) are listed from Iran. An identification key to all genera and species currently known from Iran is presented along with illustrations of adult specimens and male genitalia.

  10. Changing distributions of Cantharidae and Buprestidae within Great Britain (Coleoptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, K.

    2003-01-01

    Changing distributions of Cantharidae and Buprestidae within Great Britain (Coleoptera) Data are presented on the distribution of selected species from two coleopteran families chosen to represent a random slice of the British fauna. The species have been chosen as exhibiting extremes of range

  11. Elmidae Curtis, 1830 (Coleoptera, Polyphaga, Byrrhoidea) of the Neotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Melissa Ottoboni; Dos Passos, Maria Ines Da Silva; Fonseca-Gessner, Alaíde Aparecida; Froehlich, Claudio Gilberto

    2013-10-29

    A bibliography of significant taxonomic papers on Elmidae (Coleoptera, Polyphaga, Byrrhoidea), and a checklist of valid species and subspecies and their geographic distributions are provided. Forty-seven genera and 430 valid species are included. Maps show the geographic distribution of the genera by country.

  12. An annotated checklist of Malachiidae (Coleoptera: Cleroidea) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirutenko, Vladyslav; Ghahari, Hassan

    2016-09-09

    A checklist of Iranian Malachiidae (Coleoptera) is given in this paper. Eighty two species from 22 genera (subfamily Malachiinae) are listed in the fauna of Iran. Of these species, 31 are endemic to Iran, and one Anthocomus pupillatus Abeille de Perrin, 1890 is a new record for this country.

  13. Coleoptera of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: an annotated checklist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, M.P.; Barr, W.F.; Johnson, J.B.

    1986-04-30

    An insect survey was conducted on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during the summers of 1981-1983. This site is on the Snake River Plains in southeastern Idaho. Presented here is an annotated checklist of the Coleoptera collected. Successful collecting methods, dates of adult occurrence, and relative abundance are given for each species. Relevant biological information is also presented for some species.

  14. Significantly higher Carabid beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) catch in conventionally than in organically managed Christmas tree plantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Søren; Lund, Malthe; Rønn, Regin

    2012-01-01

    trapped carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) varied between conventionally and organically managed Caucasian Fir (Abies nordmanniana (Stev.)) plantations, in northern Zealand, Denmark. We recorded significantly higher numbers of carabid beetle specimens and species at conventionally than at organically...

  15. First report of Chalepus dorni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae in maize crops of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

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    Rosangela Cristina Marucci

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chalepus dorni larvae were observed in commercial maize crops in the central region of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, during 2006-2007, 2008-2009 and 2010-2011 harvests. Early symptom of attack was characterized first by mines in the lower leaves of maize plants and later by the formation of necrotic areas. Although, there are reports of genus Chalepus in maize, this is the first record on the presence of C. dorni in maize in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

  16. Disruption of host location of western corn rootworm larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) with carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernklau, E J; Fromm, E A; Bjostad, L B

    2004-04-01

    Elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) prevented neonate larvae of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, from locating the roots of growing corn in behavioral bioassays conducted in soil tubs. When CO2 was pumped into one end of a soil tub, significantly more larvae were recovered from soil at the treated end than from soil around a growing corn plant at the opposite end of the tub. In controls with ambient air pumped into one end of a soil tub, significantly more larvae were recovered from the soil around the corn plant than from soil on the treated side. Larvae were unable to locate the roots of corn seedlings when CO2-generating materials were mixed into the soil. CO2-concentrations in soil were measured by mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring at m/z 44. Granules composed of baker's yeast, yeast nutrients, and an organic substrate were prepared as a CO2 source and were tested in larger soil tub bioassays. Significantly fewer larvae were recovered from corn roots in the soil tubs with yeast granules than from corn roots in control soil tubs. The CO2-generating granules produced soil CO2 concentrations between 15.8 and 18.5 mmol/mol (compared with 1.7-2.6 mmol/mol in control tubs), and this was sufficient to prevent larvae from locating corn roots. In field trials, organic and inorganic CO2- generating treatments resulted in root ratings that were significantly lower than for the control plants.

  17. Insecticide enhancement with feeding stimulants in corn for western corn rootworm larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernklau, E J; Bjostad, L B

    2005-08-01

    Amounts of the insecticide thiamethoxam required for 50% mortality of western corn rootworm larvae, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, were reduced 100-fold when extracts of germinating corn, Zea mays L., were used to entice neonate larvae to feed on it. In behavioral bioassays, neonate rootworm larvae fed vigorously on filter paper disks treated with liquid pressed from corn roots. Moreover, disks treated with an acetone extract of corn (dried and rewetted with water) also elicited strong feeding from larvae. Larvae wandered away from filter paper disks treated with distilled water without feeding. Dilutions of thiamethoxam were tested in the bioassay alone or with corn extract and the efficacy of this insecticide was improved by the addition of the corn extract. For solutions containing 10 ppm thiamethoxam, 95% larval mortality occurred after 30 min of exposure when corn extract was present, but only 38% mortality occurred when the same concentration of insecticide alone (no feeding stimulants) was tested. Larval mortality after 24 h was significantly higher for corn extract-treated disks with 0.01, 0.1, 1, or 10 ppm insecticide than for the same concentrations without corn extract. Thiamethoxam did not deter larval feeding on corn extract, even at the highest concentration of thiamethoxam tested.

  18. Methyl Anthranilate as a Repellent for Western Corn Rootworm Larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernklau, E J; Hibbard, B E; Norton, A P; Bjostad, L B

    2016-08-01

    Methyl anthranilate was identified as the active compound in extracts of maize (Zea mays L.) roots that were shown to be repellent to neonate western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae. A bioassay-driven approach was used to isolate the active material from diethyl ether extracts of roots from germinating maize seeds. Separation of the extract on a Florisil column yielded an active fraction of 90:10 hexane:diethyl ether. Analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified two compounds in the active fraction: indole (2,3-benzopyrrole) and methyl anthranilate (methyl 2-aminobenzoate). When tested in behavioral bioassays, methyl anthranilate elicited a significant (P < 0.05) repellent response at doses of 1, 10, and 100 µg. In subsequent single-choice bioassays, 1, 10, and 100 µg of methyl anthranilate prevented larvae from approaching 10 mmol/mol concentrations of carbon dioxide, which is normally highly attractive to the larvae. Indole, the other compound identified from the active fraction, did not elicit a behavioral response by the larvae. Methyl anthranilate has potential for development as a management tool for western corn rootworm larvae and may be best suited for use in a push-pull control strategy. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Description of immature stages of the genus Plagiosterna (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae from Korea

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    Jinyoung Park

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Immature stages of the genus Plagiosterna Motschulsky are described in detail for the first time in Korea. A key for identifying larvae and pupae of Korean Plagiosterna is provided, along with illustrations of their habitus and larval tubercle patterns. Some remarks on their systematics are also given.

  20. Population Study of Diabrotica speciosa (Ger. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae in Fall / Winter Season

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    Ventura Maurício Ursi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Population studies of D. speciosa on fall / winter crops were conducted. Larvae were monitored on maize (Zea mays L., wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and black oats (Avena strigosa Schreb. and beetles on soybeans (Glycine max (L. Mill., maize, common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., wheat and black oats from March 23, 2001 to August 24, 2001. Soybean, maize, common beans, wheat and oats were sown on December 28, 2000; February 9, 2001; March 2, 2001; April 26, 2001 and May 11, 2001, respectively. Maize and common beans were grown on latter growing season. Adult beetles of D. speciosa were collected throughout the sampling period. Greatest beetles population peak occurred on wheat in August 3, 2001 which coincided with flowering period. Population dynamics of males and females was similar on common beans and soybeans. Females on maize predominate mostly after the first 30 days after the plant emergence (dae (before were not detected until about 45 dae. Males appeared to predominate during the flowering period. Similar population dynamics of males and females were found on wheat and black oats. Greatest peak of larvae occurred on maize roots. The growing season corn farm system was recently introduced, what probably explains the reports of increasing populations of adults during almost the whole year. Probable applications of the results are discussed.

  1. Oxygen Consumption and Acoustic Activity of Adult Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) during Hermetic Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Anastasia W; Mankin, Richard W; Smith, Bradley W; Baributsa, Dieudonne

    2018-04-20

    Acoustic monitoring was applied to consider hermetic exposure durations and oxygen levels required to stop adult Callosobruchus maculatus activity and economic damage on cowpea. A 15-d study was conducted with six treatments of 25, 50, and 100 C. maculatus adults in 500 and 1000 mL jars using acoustic probes inserted through stoppers sealing the jars. Acoustic activity as a result of locomotion, mating, and egg-laying was measured by identifying sound impulses with frequency spectra representative of known insect sounds, and counting trains (bursts) of impulses separated by intervals of <200 ms, that typically are produced only by insects. By the end of the first week of storage in all treatments, oxygen levels declined to levels below 4%, which has been demonstrated to cause mortality in previous studies. Concomitantly, insect sound burst rates dropped below an acoustic detection threshold of 0.02 bursts s −1 , indicating that the insects had ceased feeding. Statistically significant relationships were obtained between two different measures of the acoustic activity and the residual oxygen level. Based on the experimental results, a simple equation can be used to estimate the time needed for oxygen to decline to levels that limit insect feeding damage and thus grain losses in hermetic storage containers of different insect population levels and various volumes.

  2. Host Specificity of Argopistes tsekooni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a Potential Biological Control Agent of Chinese Privet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan Zhuo Zhang; James Hanula; Jiang Hua Sun

    2008-01-01

    Chinese privet, Ligustrum sinense Lour., is a perennial semi-evergreen shrub that is aserious invasive weed in the United States. Classical biological control offers the best hope forcontrolling it in an economic, effective, and persistent way. Host...

  3. Using trap crops for control of Acalymma vittatum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) reduces insecticide use in butternut squash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, A; Hazzard, R; Adler, L S; Boucher, J

    2009-06-01

    Striped cucumber beetle, Acalymma vittatum F., is the primary insect pest of cucurbit crops in the northeastern United States. Adult beetles colonize squash crops from field borders, causing feeding damage at the seedling stage and transmitting bacterial wilt Erwinia tracheiphila Hauben et al. 1999. Conventional control methods rely on insecticide applications to the entire field, but surrounding main crops with a more attractive perimeter could reduce reliance on insecticides. A. cittatum shows a marked preference for Blue Hubbard squash (Cucurbita maxima Duchesne) over butternut squash (C. moschata Poir). Given this preference, Blue Hubbard squash has the potential to be an effective perimeter trap crop. We evaluated this system in commercial butternut fields in 2003 and 2004, comparing fields using perimeter trap cropping with Blue Hubbard to conventionally managed fields. In 2003, we used a foliar insecticide to control beetles in the trap crop borders, and in 2004, we compared systemic and foliar insecticide treatments for the trap crop borders. We found that using a trap crop system reduced or eliminated the need to spray the main crop area, reducing insecticide use by up to 94% compared with conventional control methods, with no increase in herbivory or beetle numbers. We surveyed the growers who participated in these experiments and found a high level of satisfaction with the effectiveness and simplicity of the system. These results suggest that this method of pest control is both effective and simple enough in its implementation to have high potential for adoption among growers.

  4. Evaluating western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) emergence and root damage in a seed mix refuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, A F; Ginzel, M D; Krupke, C H

    2010-02-01

    Resistance management is essential for maintaining the efficacy and long-term durability of transgenic corn engineered to control western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte). Theoretically, a refuge can be provided by growing susceptible (refuge) plants in either a separate section of the field adjacent to resistant (transgenic) plants, or as a seed mixture. We examined the effects of varying the structure of a 10 and 20% refuge between currently approved structured refuges (block or strip plantings), as well as deploying the refuge within a seed mix, on adult emergence timing and magnitude, root damage and yield. Our 2-yr field study used naturally occurring western corn rootworm populations and included seven treatments: 10 and 20% block refuge, 10 and 20% strip refuge, 10 and 20% seed mix refuge, and 100% refuge. Beetles emerging from refuge corn emerged more synchronously with those emerging from transgenic (Bacillus thuringiensis [Berliner] Bt-RW) corn in seed mix refuges when compared with block refuges. The proportion of beetles emerging from refuge plants was significantly greater in a block and strip refuge structure than in a seed mix refuge. More beetles emerged from Bt-RW corn plants when they were grown as part of a seed mix. We discuss the potential benefits and drawbacks of a seed mix refuge structure in light of these findings.

  5. Impact of planting date on sunflower beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) infestation, damage, and parasitism in cultivated sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Laurence D; Knodel, Janet J

    2003-06-01

    The sunflower beetle, Zygogramma exclamationis (F.), is the major defoliating pest of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Planting date was evaluated as a potential management tool in a variety of production regions throughout North Dakota from 1997 to 1999, for its impact on sunflower beetle population density of both adults and larvae, defoliation caused by both feeding stages, seed yield, oil content, and larval parasitism in cultivated sunflower. Results from this 3-yr study revealed that sunflower beetle adult and larval populations decreased as planting date was delayed. Delayed planting also reduced defoliation from adult and larval feeding, which is consistent with the lower numbers of the beetles present in the later seeded plots. Even a planting delay of only 1 wk was sufficient to significantly reduce feeding damage to the sunflower plant. Yield reduction caused by leaf destruction of the sunflower beetle adults and larvae was clearly evident in the first year of the study. The other component of sunflower yield, oil content, did not appear to be influenced by beetle feeding. The tachinid parasitoid, Myiopharus macellus (Rheinhard), appeared to be a significant mortality factor of sunflower beetle larvae at most locations regardless of the dates of planting, and was able to attack and parasitize the beetle at various larval densities. The results of this investigation showed the potential of delayed planting date as an effective integrated pest management tactic to reduce sunflower beetle adults, larvae, and their resulting defoliation. In addition, altering planting dates was compatible with biological control of the beetle, because delaying the planting date did not reduce the effectiveness of the parasitic fly, M. macellus, which attacks the sunflower beetle larvae.

  6. The Temporal and Spatial Invasion Genetics of the Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae in Southern Europe.

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    Darija Lemic

    Full Text Available This study describes the genetics of the western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte in southern Europe during the introduction (1996-2001 and establishment/spread (2002-2011 phases of its invasion. The Diabrotica microsatellite core-set was used to perform traditional population genetics analyses. Our results indicated that during the introduction phase genetic diversity and population genetic structure were lower overall as compared to the establishment/spread phase. Unusually high genetic differentiation was found between the Italy and southern Europe comparisons, including high differentiation between Italian populations separated by a short distance during the establishment/spread phase. STRUCTURE analysis revealed two genetic clusters during the introduction phase and two genetic clusters during the establishment/spread phase. However, bottlenecked populations were only detected during the invasion phase. A small but significant isolation by distance effect was noted in both phases. Serbia was the geographic source of WCR to Croatia and Hungary in the introduction phase, while the United States of America was the possible source of WCR to Italy in 2001. These introductory populations were the subsequent source of individuals sampled during the establishment/spread phase. Repeated introductions and admixture events in southern Europe may have resulted in genetically diverse WCR populations that have attained 83% of all known alleles worldwide.

  7. Banded cucumber beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) resistance in romaine lettuce: understanding latex chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many plants subjected to herbivore damage exude latex, a rich source of biochemicals, which play important roles in host plant resistance. Our previous studies showed that fresh latex from Valmaine, a resistant cultivar of romaine lettuce Lactuca sativa L., applied to artificial diet is highly deter...

  8. Response of the Cottonwood Leaf Beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to Bacillus thuringiensis var. san diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer

    1990-01-01

    A standardized laboratory bioassay was used to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal responses of larval and adult cottonwood leaf beetles, Chrysomela scripta F., to Bacillus thuringiensis var. san diego, formulated as M-One standard powder (Mycogen Corporation, San Diego). The median lethal concentration (LC

  9. Cytogenetic effect of Alternanthera philoxeroides (alligator weed) on Agasicles hygrophila (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in its native range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant polyploidy potentially affects plant-insect interactions; however, its effect on insect fitness remains largely unexplored. Alternanthera philoxeroides is a South American amphibious Amaranthaceae, which invades aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Different morphotypes and cytotypes were identif...

  10. Early Detection and Mitigation of Resistance to Bt Maize by Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andow, David A; Pueppke, Steven G; Schaafsma, Arthur W; Gassmann, Aaron J; Sappington, Thomas W; Meinke, Lance J; Mitchell, Paul D; Hurley, Terrance M; Hellmich, Richard L; Porter, R Pat

    2016-02-01

    Transgenic Bt maize that produces less than a high-dose has been widely adopted and presents considerable insect resistance management (IRM) challenges. Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, has rapidly evolved resistance to Bt maize in the field, leading to local loss of efficacy for some corn rootworm Bt maize events. Documenting and responding to this resistance has been complicated by a lack of rapid diagnostic bioassays and by regulatory triggers that hinder timely and effective management responses. These failures are of great concern to the scientific and agricultural community. Specific challenges posed by western corn rootworm resistance to Bt maize, and more general concerns around Bt crops that produce less than a high-dose of Bt toxin, have caused uncertainty around current IRM protocols. More than 15 years of experience with IRM has shown that high-dose and refuge-based IRM is not applicable to Bt crops that produce less than a high-dose. Adaptive IRM approaches and pro-active, integrated IRM-pest management strategies are needed and should be in place before release of new technologies that produce less than a high-dose. We suggest changes in IRM strategies to preserve the utility of corn rootworm Bt maize by 1) targeting local resistance management earlier in the sequence of responses to resistance and 2) developing area-wide criteria to address widespread economic losses. We also favor consideration of policies and programs to counteract economic forces that are contributing to rapid resistance evolution. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Screening for corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) resistance to transgenic Bt corn in North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, and northern corn rootworms (NCR), D. barberi Smith & Lawrence, are major economic pests of corn in much of the U.S. Corn Belt. Western corn rootworm resistance to transgenic corn expressing Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) endotoxins has been confi...

  12. Field-based assessment of resistance to Bt Corn by Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a serious pest of corn and is managed with Bt corn that produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Beginning in 2009, severe injury to Bt corn producing Cry3Bb1 was observed in some cornfields ...

  13. Susceptibility of Nebraska Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Populations to Bt Corn Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangila, David S; Gassmann, Aaron J; Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L; French, B Wade; Meinke, Lance J

    2015-04-01

    Transgenic plants have been widely adopted by growers to manage the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, in field corn. Because of reduced efficacy in some Nebraska fields after repeated use of Cry3Bb1-expressing hybrids, single plant bioassays were conducted in 2012 and 2013 to characterize the susceptibility of western corn rootworm populations to the rootworm-active proteins Cry3Bb1, mCry3A, and Cry34/35Ab1. Results demonstrate that there are heritable differences in susceptibility of Nebraska western corn rootworm populations to rootworm-active Bt traits. Proportional survival and corrected survival data coupled with field histories collectively support the conclusion that a level of field resistance to Cry3Bb1 has evolved in some Nebraska populations in response to selection pressure and that cross-resistance exists between Cry3Bb1 and mCry3A. There was no apparent cross-resistance between Cry34/35Ab1 and either Cry3Bb1 or mCry3A. The potential implications of these results on current and future corn rootworm management strategies are discussed. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A core set of microsatellite markers for Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) population genetics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interest in the ecological and population genetics of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, has grown rapidly in the last few years in North America and Europe. This interest is a result of a number of converging issues related to increasing difficult...

  15. First-instar western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: chrysomelidae) response to carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strnad, S.P.; Bergman, M.K.; Fulton, W.C.

    1986-08-01

    Responses of first-instar western corn rootworm to CO/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ gas gradients were studied in a laboratory test arena. Number of larvae reaching the gas source, number of turns toward and away from the gas source, larval velocity, and number of turns per cm traveled were recorded. Larvae exhibited a positive chemotactic response to CO/sub 2/ but not N/sub 2/ or air. There was no indication that a kinesis of any type was involved because velocities and turning rates were not significantly different among treatments. Results indicate that newly hatched larve may use CO/sub 2/ to locate corn roots.

  16. Revisão das espécies brasileiras do gênero Exoplectra Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Exoplectrinae, Exoplectrini A revision of Brazilian species of the genus Exoplectra Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Exoplectrinae, Exoplectrini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V. Costa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available As espécies brasileiras de Exoplectra Chevrolat, 1844 são revisadas com base no estudo de caracteres morfológicos do exoesqueleto e genitália. Dentre as 37 espécies do gênero foram estudadas 14 brasileiras, incluindo as três propostas como novas. Foi examinado o material-tipo de nove espécies. São designados os lectótipos de E. angustifrons Weise, 1895, E. calcarata (Germar, 1824, E. coccinea (Fabricius, 1801 e E. miniata (Germar, 1824. Exoplectra companyoi Mulsant, 1850 é revalidada; E. aenea (Fabricius, 1801, E. bernardinensis Brèthes, 1925, E. impotens Mulsant, 1850, E. luteicornis Mulsant, 1850 e E. irregularis (Crotch, 1874 são provisoriamente removidas do gênero. São propostas duas novas espécies do Brasil: E. columba sp. nov., do Paraná e E. bimaculata sp. nov., do Amamzonas. É apresentada chave dicotômica para as espécies, fotos e desenhos das principais estruturas utilizadas para identificação.The Brazilian species of Exoplectra Chevrolat, 1844, based on the morphological analysis of external characters and genitalia, are revised. Among the 37 species in the genera, 14 Brazilian species were analysed, including three new species. It was studied the type material of nine of them. The lectotypes of E. angustifrons Weise, 1895, E. calcarata (Germar, 1824, E. coccinea (Fabricius, 1801 and E. miniata (Germar, 1824 are designated. Exoplectra companyoi Mulsant, 1850 is revalidated; E. aenea (Fabricius, 1801, E. bernardinensis Brèthes, 1925, E. impotens Mulsant, 1850, E. luteicornis Mulsant, 1850 and E. irregularis (Crotch, 1874 are provisionally removed from the genus. Two new species from Brazil are proposed: E. columba sp. nov., from Paraná and E. bimaculata sp. nov., from Amazonas. Dicotomic key for species is presented as well as pictures and illustrations for the main structures used in the identification.

  17. Detection of reproducing populations of Coccinella novemnotata within coccinellid assemblages (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in western South Dakota and western Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adults of three native species of lady beetles [Coccinella novemnotata Herbst, Coccinella transversoguttata richardsoni Brown, and Adalia bipunctata (L.); Coleoptera: Coccinellidae] of conservation interest were detected during recent surveys at several locations in western South Dakota and western ...

  18. Role of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larval vibrations in host-quality assessments by Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Richard W. Mankin; Yigen Chen; Jian J. Duan; Therese M. Poland; Leah S. Bauer

    2011-01-01

    The biological control agent Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive cambium-feeding species responsible for recent, widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in...

  19. New distributional records and comments for the species of the genus Queda (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae Nuevos registros distribucionales y comentarios para las especies del género Queda (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo R. Trémouilles

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available New distributional records for the species of the genus Queda Sharp are presented based on the examination of the Dytiscid collection at the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales. The presence of the genus in Paraguay is herein reported for the first time. Some additional data on the identified species are also provided.Se aportan nuevos registros sobre distribución geográfica de las especies del género Queda Sharp, basados sobre el examen de la colección de Dytiscidae del Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales. La presencia del género en el Paraguay es reportada aquí por primera vez. Se proporciona información adicional sobre las especies identificadas.

  20. Novas espécies de Neocorini e Pteropliini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae da América do Sul New species of Neocorini and Pteropliini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae from South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena M. Galileo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Novas espécies descritas em Neocorini: Marauna bucki sp. nov. (Brasil: Rio Grande do Sul e M. abati sp. nov. (Paraguai. Em Pteropliini:; Rhaphiptera boliviana sp. nov. e Ataxia cineracea sp. nov. (Bolívia: Santa Cruz.New species described in Neocorini: Marauna bucki sp. nov. (Brazil: Rio Grande do Sul and M. abati sp. nov. (Paraguai. In Pteropliini: Rhaphiptera boliviana sp. nov. and Ataxia cineracea sp. nov. (Bolivia: Santa Cruz.