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Sample records for special form radioactive

  1. Qualifications of and acceptance criteria for transporting special form radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1991-01-01

    A special form radioactive material is a radioactive material that is in an inert, insoluble, indispersible form such that even in the event of an accident, it will not be dispersed into the environment in a way that could have an adverse impact on public health and safety. Methods of qualifying a special form radioactive material are discussed. Interpretation of acceptance criteria are proposed for the transportation of Type B quantities of a special form radioactive material. 11 refs

  2. Order of 25 March 1981 concerning the approval of special form radioactive materials in sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This order determines the models of sealed sources which constitute special form radioactive materials within the meaning of the Order of 24 November 1977 concerning the characteristics of such materials. (NEA) [fr

  3. 49 CFR 173.476 - Approval of special form Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (radioactive) materials must maintain on file for at least one year after the latest shipment, and provide to... evidence based on calculative methods to show that the material is able to pass the tests; or other... shipping papers as “Radioactive Material, Special Form, n.o.s.” [Amdt. 173-244, 60 FR 50307, Sept. 28, 1995...

  4. Safety regulation for the design approval of special form radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Woon-Kap

    2009-01-01

    Several kinds of special form radioactive sources for industrial, medical applications are being produced in Korea. Special form radioactive sources should meet strict safety requirements specified in the domestic safety regulations and the design of the sources should be certified by the regulatory authority, the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST). Several safety tests such as impact, percussion, heating, and leak tests are performed on the sources according to the domestic regulations and the international safety standards such as ANSI N542-1977 and ISO 2919-1999(E). As a regulatory expert body, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) assesses various types of application documents, such as safety analysis report, quality assurance program, and other documents evidencing fulfillment of requirements for design approval of the special form radioactive sources, submitted by a legal person who intends to produce special form radioactive sources and then reports the assessment result to MEST. A design approval certificate is issued to the applicant by MEST on the basis of a technical evaluation report presented by KINS.

  5. Criteria for cesium capsules to be shipped as special form radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundeen, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to compile all the documentation which defines the criteria for Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) cesium capsules at the IOTECH facility and Applied Radiant Energy Corporation (ARECO) to be shipped as special form radioactive material in the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) Cask. The capsules were originally approved as special form in 1975, but in 1988 the integrity of the capsules came into question. WHC developed the Pre-shipment Acceptance Test Criteria for capsules to meet in order to be shipped as special form material. The Department of Energy approved the criteria and directed WHC to ship the capsules at IOTECH and ARECO meeting this criteria to WHC as special form material

  6. Quality assurance in production and use of special form radioactive material - focal points in BAM approvals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolle, A.; Buhlemann, L.

    2004-01-01

    BAM as the competent authority for approval of special form radioactive material attaches great importance to a detailed audit of the required quality assurance programs for design, manufacture, testing, documentation, use, maintenance and inspection. Applicants have to submit, together with application documentation information on general arrangements for quality assurance, as well as on quality assurance in production and in operation. Fields where BAM has often found deficiencies are leak test methods, weld seam quality and the safety level after use

  7. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for packages, shipments, special arrangements and special form radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The Agency's transport regulations prescribe various requirements for the authorization of packages and shipments in respect of both national and international movement of radioactive material. These authorizations are issued by the relevant competent authority of the country concerned; they take the form of package approval and/or shipment approval certificates. At the request of the Standing Advisory Group of the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM), the Agency has established a programme to maintain a file of those certificates for packages and shipments which are either transported internationally or used outside the country of origin. The purpose of this directory is to facilitate the transfer of information to competent authorities and any other person wishing details on the packaging, authorized contents or special conditions pertinent to any package or shipment. The directory enables competent authorities to be aware of the status of any certificate submitted for validation. It also indicates any change in status of any certificate already validated

  8. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for packages, shipments, special arrangements and special form radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Agency's transport regulations prescribe various requirements for the authorization of packages and shipments in respect of both national and international movement of radioactive materials. These authorizations are issued by the relevant competent authority of the country concerned; they take the form of package approval and/or shipment approval certificates. At the request of the Standing Advisory Group of the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM), the Agency has established a programme to maintain a file of those certificates for packages and shipments which are either transported internationally or used outside the country of origin. The purpose of this directory is to facilitate the transfer of information to competent authorities and any other person wishing details on the packaging, authorized contents or special conditions pertinent to any package or shipment. The directory enables competent authorities to be aware of the status of any certificate submitted for validation. It also indicates any change in status of any certificate already validated. Future updates of the complete data will be distributed annually in a TECDOC form and, in addition, summary listings of the certificates will be issued every six months thereafter

  9. The specification and testing of radioactive sources designated as ''special form'' under the IAEA transport regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aston, D.; Bodimeade, A.H.; Hall, E.G.; Taylor, C.B.G.

    1982-01-01

    The object of this study is to remove some of the uncertainties associated with the application of the IAEA Regulations insofar as they apply to Special Form materials. The first part of this project involved a comparison of the ISO and IAEA Regulations. An analysis of the physical tests has been carried out. The second and most important part of the project involved an assessment of the leakage tests used to evaluate the capsules after each of the physical tests. The work has defined and confirmed by experiment the relationship between the IAEA and ISO impact and percussion tests. The practical application of the tests particularly with regard to specimen orientation will be aided by the data now available. The work has established the sensitivities of the primary volumetric leak test methods and practical procedures are outlined. Volumetric leak test methods, with sentivities approximately 10 - 5 mbar l/s, are considered to be more reliable in detecting leakage paths in capsules than methods using solid leachable or non-leachable radioactive contents. The work reported should assist in the updating and clarification and harmonisation of IAEA Safety Series Nos 6 and 37 and ISO 4919 and ISO TR 4826

  10. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 2003 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    This is the fourteenth annual report being published by the Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency since implementing its database on package approval certificates (PACKTRAM) at the recommendation of the Transport Safety Standards Committee (TRANSSC). It supersedes IAEA-TECDOC-1302 'Directory of National Competent Authorities' Approval Certificates for Package Design, Special Form Material and Shipment of Radioactive Material, 2002 Edition'. Through the database, the Secretariat collects administrative and technical information provided by the issuing competent authority about package approval certificates. Such data are used mainly by national competent authorities and port and customs officials to assist in regulating radioactive material movements in their country, and also by manufacturers and shippers of radioactive material. The database carries information on extant certificates and those that expired within the last complete calendar year. The PACKTRAM database only contains information that has been provided to the IAEA. The data are not complete nor guaranteed to be accurate. If detailed information is required, the original package approval certificates must be consulted. If information is required about package approval certificates that are not contained in the database, the issuing competent authority must be consulted

  11. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 2003 ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-10-01

    This is the fourteenth annual report being published by the Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency since implementing its database on package approval certificates (PACKTRAM) at the recommendation of the Transport Safety Standards Committee (TRANSSC). It supersedes IAEA-TECDOC-1302 'Directory of National Competent Authorities' Approval Certificates for Package Design, Special Form Material and Shipment of Radioactive Material, 2002 Edition'. Through the database, the Secretariat collects administrative and technical information provided by the issuing competent authority about package approval certificates. Such data are used mainly by national competent authorities and port and customs officials to assist in regulating radioactive material movements in their country, and also by manufacturers and shippers of radioactive material. The database carries information on extant certificates and those that expired within the last complete calendar year. The PACKTRAM database only contains information that has been provided to the IAEA. The data are not complete nor guaranteed to be accurate. If detailed information is required, the original package approval certificates must be consulted. If information is required about package approval certificates that are not contained in the database, the issuing competent authority must be consulted.

  12. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 1992 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    Being in a unique position to facilitate information exchange, the Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency was requested by its Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM) to collate package approval data and publish periodical reports thereon. A database was implemented on the mainframe computer in the mid-1980s but this was soon adapted for use on a personal computer. A fully menu-driven system programme was designed that allows both contributing Member States and the Secretariat more flexibility in data processing and reporting. Complete documentation is available in the form of a user guide. The cut-off date used for this report is 31 August 1992. This report supersedes IAEA-TECDOC-617 ''Directory of National Competent Authorities' Approval Certificates for Package Design, Special Form Material and Shipment of Radioactive Material, 1991 Edition''. The information contained in this report is given in six tables. In each of these, information is presented in alphabetical order based on the certificate number. The certificate number is identical with the competent authority identification mark. It is composed of the issuing Member State's international vehicle registration identification (VRI) code, followed by a slash, then a unique number specific to a particular design or shipment that is assigned by the competent authority, another slash and finally a code identifying the type of package involved. ''-85'' is appended to those certificates that were approved on the basis of the 1985 Edition of Safety Series No. 6. Tables 1 to 4 present administrative data including issue and expiry dates, package identification, package serial numbers, modes for which the package/shipment is approved and the edition of Safety Series No. 6 on which the approval has been based. The technical information on package mass, authorized contents, and detailed and general description of the package are contained in Table 5. Table 6

  13. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 2002 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    The current edition of the transport Regulations was published in 1996 and is more commonly referred to as 'ST-1'. Earlier Editions were known as Safety Series No. 6. The latest English reprint (2000) is now identified as TS-R-1 (ST-1, Revised). The transport Regulations elaborate requirements for the design, fabrication and maintenance of packaging as well as those for preparation, consigning, handling, carriage, storage in transit and receipt of the packages at final destination. Approval issued in the form of certificates is required for the design or shipment of packages. This report supersedes IAEA-TECDOC-1237 Directory of National Competent Authorities' Approval Certificates for Package Design, Special Form Material and Shipment of Radioactive Material, 2001 Edition. It is distributed worldwide to the IAEA Member States' competent authorities for transport, and other entities who have requested copies. Electronic copies of the main data file are provided to registered users of the PACKTRAM database. The information contained in this report is given in six tables. In each of these, information is presented in alphabetical order based on the certificate number. Tables 1 to 4 present administrative data including issue and expiry dates, package identification, package serial numbers, modes for which the package/shipment is approved and the edition of the IAEA Transport Safety Regulations on which the approval has been based. The technical information on package mass, authorized contents, and detailed and general description of the package are contained in Table 5. Table 6 shows the certificates reported to the Secretariat by each participating Member State

  14. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 2001 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    The current edition of the transport Regulations was published in 1996 and is more commonly referred to as 'ST-1'. Earlier Editions were known as Safety Series No. 6. The latest English reprint (2000) is now identified as TS-R-1 (ST-1, Revised). The transport Regulations elaborate requirements for the design, fabrication and maintenance of packaging as well as those for preparation, consigning, handling, carriage, storage in transit and receipt of the packages at final destination. Approval issued in the form of certificates is required for the design or shipment of packages. This report supersedes IAEA-TECDOC-1171 D irectory of National Competent Authorities' Approval Certificates for Package Design, Special Form Material and Shipment of Radioactive Material, 2000 Edition . It is distributed worldwide to the IAEA Member States' competent authorities for transport, and other entities who have requested copies. Electronic copies of the main data file are provided to registered users of the PACKTRAM database. The information contained in this report is given in six tables. In each of these, information is presented in alphabetical order based on the certificate number. Tables 1 to 4 present administrative data including issue and expiry dates, package identification, package serial numbers, modes for which the package/shipment is approved and the edition of the IAEA Transport Safety Regulations on which the approval has been based. The technical information on package mass, authorized contents, and detailed and general description of the package are contained in Table 5. Table 6 shows the certificates reported to the Secretariat by each participating Member State

  15. The PACKTRAM database on national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. User's guide for compiled system program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The PACKTRAM system program enables Member States to prepare data diskettes on national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material, for submission to the IAEA, and facilitates data manipulation and report preparation for the IAEA. The system program is provided as a 424 kbyte executable file, for which this document is the User Guide. The system is fully menu-driven and requires an IBM-compatible personal computer with a minimum of 640 kbyte random access memory, a hard drive and one 3-1/2 inch diskette drive. 3 refs, 6 tabs

  16. Development of a data acquisition system in form of an apparatus which is specially designed for the study of the cerebral metabolism employing radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponchon, J.

    1988-03-01

    The subject of this thesis is the development of a data acquisition system in form of an apparatus which is specially designed for the study of cerebral metabolism employing radioactive tracers. Currently, the test is based on the continuous inhalation of gas identified with oxygen 15. After an inhalation period of 6 to 8 minutes the local brain radioactivity attains an equilibrium which corresponds to the parameters of brain metabolism. The constant measurement of the radioactivity facilitates the monitoring of the evolution of these parameters. The apparatus consists of an assemby of lead collimators in which are lodged 26 gamma ray detectors (INa probes), each one of which scans a particular brain region. For ease of use and the provision of numerous possibilities, each detector has been assigned a multichannel pulse height analyser which has been developed by ourselves in order to correspond to and to comply with the demands of our tests. They are equipped with a device which automatically corrects for dead time thereby permitting the analysis of random impulses of a rate greater than 50.000 per second with a loss of less than 1%. The multichannel analysers are connected to a central computer which by means of suitably adapted software allows the calibration of different channel of measurement, controls, the choice of the zone of interest to be integrated and the presentation of integrated results in form of graphs [fr

  17. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 1993 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This is the fourth annual report being published by the Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency since implementing its database on package approval certificates (PACKTRAM) at the recommendation of the Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM). The reporting format was established at consecutive meetings of SAGSTRAM, whose memberships consists of national competent authorities responsible for the transport of radioactive material from those Member States who have a nuclear industry and others who have shown a keen interest in the IAEA's transport safety programme. Through the PACKTRAM database, the Secretariat collects administrative and technical information on package approval certificates to assist national competent authorities in regulating radioactive material movements in their country. The database carries information on extant certificates and those that expired within the last two complete calendar years. The 1985 Edition of IAEA Safety Series No. 6, the 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material'' highlights the role of competent authorities in assuring regulatory compliance in their own countries. Package approval certificates are an important aspect of that function. This document aims to be a useful reference for competent authorities as well as for manufacturers and shippers of radioactive material. 6 tabs

  18. Directory of national competent authorities` approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 1995 edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This is the sixth annual report being published by the Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency since implementing its database on package approval certificates (PACKTRAM) at the recommendation of the Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM). The reporting format was established at consecutive meetings of SAGSTRAM, whose membership consists of national competent authorities responsible for the transport of radioactive material from those Member States who have a nuclear industry and others who have shown a keen interest in the IAEA`s transport safety programme. Through the PACKTRAM database, the Secretariat collects administrative and technical information on package approval certificates to assist national competent authorities in regulating radioactive material movements in their country. The database carries information on extant certificates and those that expired within the last complete calendar year. The 1985 Edition of IAEA Safety Series No. 6, the ``Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material`` highlights the role of competent authorities in assuring regulatory compliance in their own countries. Package approval certificates are an important aspect of that function. This document aims to be a useful reference for competent authorities as well as for manufacturers and shippers of radioactive material. 6 tabs.

  19. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 1999 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    This is the tenth annual report being published by the Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency since implementing its database on package approval certificates (PACKTRAM) at the recommendation of the Transport Safety Standards Advisory Committee (TRANSSAC), formerly known as the Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM). The reporting format was established at consecutive meetings of SAGSTRAM and endorsed by TRANSSAC, whose membership consists of national competent authorities responsible for the transport of radioactive material from those Member States who have a nuclear industry and others who have shown a keen interest in the IAEA's transport safety programme. Through the PACKTRAM database, the Secretariat collects administrative and technical information on package approval certificates to assist national competent authorities in regulating radioactive material movements in their country. The database carries information on extant certificates and those that expired within the last complete calendar year. The 1985 Edition of IAEA Safety Series No. 6, the 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material' highlights the role of competent authorities in assuring regulatory compliance in their own countries. Package approval certificates are an important aspect of that function. This document aims to be a useful reference for competent authorities as well as for manufacturers and shippers of radioactive material

  20. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 1994 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This is the fifth annual report being published by the Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency since implementing its database on package approval certificates (PACKTRAM) at the recommendation of the Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM). The reporting format was established at consecutive meetings of SAGSTRAM, whose membership consists of national competent authorities responsible for the transport of radioactive material from those Member States who have a nuclear industry and others who have shown a keen interest in the IAEA's transport safety programme. Through the PACKTRAM database, the Secretariat collects administrative and technical information on package approval certificates to assist national competent authorities in regulating radioactive material movements in their country. The database carries information on extant certificates and those that expired within the last two complete calendar years. The 1985 Edition of IAEA Safety Series No. 6, the ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material'' highlights the role of competent authorities in assuring regulatory compliance in their own countries. Package approval certificates are an important aspect of that function. This document aims to be a useful reference for competent authorities as well as for manufacturers and shippers of radioactive material

  1. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 1996 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This is the seventh annual report being published by the Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency since implementing its database on package approval certificated (PACKTRAM) at the recommendation of the then Standing Advisory Group on the Sate Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM). The functions of SAGSTRAM were taken over in 1996 by the Transport Safety Standards Advisory Committee (TRANSSAC). The reporting format was established at consecutive meetings of SAGSTRAM, whose membership consists of national competent authorities responsible for the transport of radioactive material from those Member States who have a nuclear industry and others who have shown a keen interest in the IAEA's transport safety programme. Through the PACKTRAM database, the Secretariat collects administrative and technical information on package approval certificates to assist national competent authorities in regulating radioactive material movements in their country. The database carries information on extant certificates and those that expired within the last complete calendar year. The 1985 Edition of IAEA Safety Series No. 6, the ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material'', highlights the role of competent authorities in assuring regulatory compliance in their own countries. Package approval certificates are an important aspect of that function. This document aims to be a useful reference for competent authorities as well as for manufacturers and shippers of radioactive material. 6 tabs

  2. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 1995 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This is the sixth annual report being published by the Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency since implementing its database on package approval certificates (PACKTRAM) at the recommendation of the Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM). The reporting format was established at consecutive meetings of SAGSTRAM, whose membership consists of national competent authorities responsible for the transport of radioactive material from those Member States who have a nuclear industry and others who have shown a keen interest in the IAEA's transport safety programme. Through the PACKTRAM database, the Secretariat collects administrative and technical information on package approval certificates to assist national competent authorities in regulating radioactive material movements in their country. The database carries information on extant certificates and those that expired within the last complete calendar year. The 1985 Edition of IAEA Safety Series No. 6, the ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material'' highlights the role of competent authorities in assuring regulatory compliance in their own countries. Package approval certificates are an important aspect of that function. This document aims to be a useful reference for competent authorities as well as for manufacturers and shippers of radioactive material. 6 tabs

  3. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 1997 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This is the eighth annual report being published by the Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency since implementing its database on package approval certificates (PACKTRAM) at the recommendation of the then Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM). The functions of SAGSTRAM were taken over in 1996 by the Transport Safety Standards Advisory Committee (TRANSSAC). The reporting format was established at consecutive meetings of SAGSTRAM, whose membership consisted of national competent authorities responsible for the transport of radioactive material from those Member States who have a nuclear industry and others who showed a keen interest in the IAEA's transport safety programme. TRANSSAC underscores the importance of data collecting activities and recommends the continued publication of this annual report. The 1985 Edition of Safety Series No. 6, the ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material'', highlights the role of competent authorities in assuring regulatory compliance in their own countries. The issuance of package approval certificates is an important aspects of that function. This document aims to be a useful reference for competent authorities as well as for manufacturers and shippers of radioactive material. 6 tabs

  4. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 2004 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    The PACKTRAM database contains administrative and technical information provided annually by the issuing competent authority about package approval certificates. Such data are used mainly by national competent authorities and port and customs officials to assist in regulating radioactive material movements in their country, and also by manufacturers and shippers of radioactive material. The database carries information on extant certificates and those that expired within the last complete calendar year. This is the fifteenth PACKTRAM annual report to being published by the IAEA. It is distributed worldwide mainly to designated competent authorities, as well as to registered interested parties. The database itself is maintained at www.packtram.org and can be accessed by the general public

  5. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 2000 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    Safety in the transport of radioactive material is dependent on packaging appropriate for the contents being shipped, rather than on operational and/or administrative actions required on the package. The grater the radiological risk posed by the material being moved, the more stringent become the performance for the packaging that can be authorised to contain it. These principles have been expanded since 1061 into a set of regulations that are responsible for safety moving the ever-growing number and complexity of radioactive material shipments throughout the world. The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material are incorporated into UN regulations, as well as the requirements of other international transport organizations. This is the eleventh report published by the IAEA since implementing its database on package approval certificates (PACKTRAM) at the recommendation of the Transport safety Standards Advisory Committee (TRANSSAC). Through the PACKTRAM database, the IAEA collects administrative and technical information provided by the issuing competent authority about package approval certificates

  6. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 1991 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The format of this report is a result of recommendations made by the Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM) at its 6th meeting in November 1987. The database was at that time maintained on the main frame and it was felt that adapting it for use on a personal computer would allow more flexibility in data processing and reporting. This document supersedes TECDOC-552 ''Directory of National Competent Authorities' Approval Certificates for Package Design and Shipment of Radioactive Material 1990 Edition''. Since publication of TECDOC-552, some modifications affecting the structure of the database and reporting formats were undertaken. These are fully described in ''Working Material: The PACKTRAM Database National Competent Authority Package Approval Certificates, User Guide Rev. 1'', which was released in early 1991. The present report is contained in five tables. In each of these, information is presented in alphabetical order based on the certificate number. This is composed of the issuing Member State's VRI code, followed by a slash, then a three- or four-digit number, another slash and finally a code identifying the type of package involved. ''-85'' is appended to those certificates that were approved on the basis of the 1985 Edition of Safety Series No. 6. Tables 1 to 4 present administrative data including issue and expire, dates, package identification, package serial numbers, modes for which the package/shipment is approved and the edition of Safety Series No. 6 on which the approval has been based. The technical information on package mass, authorized contents, and detailed and general description of the package are contained in Table. 5

  7. Special from encapsulation for radioactive material shipments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaich, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Special Form encapsulation has been used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to ship radioactive solids for the past fifteen years. A family of inexpensive stainless steel containers has been developed and tested to meet the USA Department of Transportation (DOT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations concerning radioactive material shipments as Special Form

  8. Special Geometry and Automorphic Forms

    CERN Document Server

    Berglund, P; Wyllard, N; Berglund, Per; Henningson, Mans; Wyllard, Niclas

    1997-01-01

    We consider special geometry of the vector multiplet moduli space in compactifications of the heterotic string on $K3 \\times T^2$ or the type IIA string on $K3$-fibered Calabi-Yau threefolds. In particular, we construct a modified dilaton that is invariant under $SO(2, n; Z)$ T-duality transformations at the non-perturbative level and regular everywhere on the moduli space. The invariant dilaton, together with a set of other coordinates that transform covariantly under $SO(2, n; Z)$, parameterize the moduli space. The construction involves a meromorphic automorphic function of $SO(2, n; Z)$, that also depends on the invariant dilaton. In the weak coupling limit, the divisor of this automorphic form is an integer linear combination of the rational quadratic divisors where the gauge symmetry is enhanced classically. We also show how the non-perturbative prepotential can be expressed in terms of meromorphic automorphic forms, by expanding a T-duality invariant quantity both in terms of the standard special coord...

  9. Special closure for radioactive shipping container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otts, J.V.

    1976-03-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a special lid closure for radioactive material shipping containers, typically steel drums. Three closure techniques were designed, fabricated, and proven to be structurally adequate to protect 1000 lb when dropped 30 ft. The three designs were (1) a 6-in. lid extension (skirt), (2) a 6-in. inner lid, and (3) c-clamps used at the container/lid interface. Based upon structural integrity, economic impact, and minimal design change, the 6-in. lid extension is recommended

  10. Ceramic and glass radioactive waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Readey, D.W.; Cooley, C.R. (comps.)

    1977-01-01

    This report contains 14 individual presentations and 6 group reports on the subject of glass and polycrystalline ceramic radioactive waste forms. It was the general consensus that the information available on glass as a waste form provided a good basis for planning on the use of glass as an initial waste form, that crystalline ceramic forms could also be good waste forms if much more development work were completed, and that prediction of the chemical and physical stability of the waste form far into the future would be much improved if the basic synergistic effects of low temperature, radiation and long times were better understood. Continuing development of the polycrystalline ceramic forms was recommended. It was concluded that the leach rate of radioactive species from the waste form is an important criterion for evaluating its suitability, particularly for the time period before solidified waste is permanently placed in the geologic isolation of a Federal repository. Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the individual papers; the remaining two were previously abstracted.

  11. Characterization of radioactive waste forms. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodersen, K.; Nilsson, K.

    1989-01-01

    This document is the second yearbook for Task 3 of the European Communities 1985-89 programme of research on radioactive waste management and disposal carried out by public organizations and private firms in the Community through costsharing contracts with the Commission of the European Communities. The report, in two volumes, describes progress made in 1987 within the field of Task 3: Testing and evaluation of conditioned waste and engineered barriers. The first volume of the report covers Item 3.1 Characterization of low and medium-level radioactive waste forms and Item 3.5 Development of test methods for quality assurance. The second volume covers Item 3.2: High-level and alpha waste characterization and Item 3.3: Other engineered barriers. Item 3.4 on the round robin study will be treated in a separate report

  12. Characterization of radioactive waste forms. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Green, T.H.

    1989-01-01

    This document is the second yearbook for Task 3 of the European Communities 1985-89 programme of research on radioactive waste management and disposal carried out by public organizations and private firms in the Community through cost-sharing contracts with the Commission of the European Communities. The report, in two volumes, describes progress made in 1987 within the field of Task 3: Testing and evaluation of conditioned waste and engineered barriers. The first volume of the report covers Item 3.1 Characterization of low and medium level radioactive waste forms and Item 3.5. Development of test methods for quality assurance. The second volume covers Item 3.2: High-level and alpha waste characterization and Item 3.3: Other engineered barriers. Item 3.4 on the round robin study will be treated in a separate report

  13. Characterization of radioactive waste forms and packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This publication provides a compendium of waste form, container and waste package properties which are potential importance for waste characterization to support approval for treatment/conditioning, storage and disposal methods and for predicting both short and long term waste behaviour in the repository environment. The properties to be characterized are defined in terms of the technical rationale for their control and characterization. Characterization methods for each property are described in general with reference to detailed discussions existing in the literature. Guidance as to the advantages and disadvantages of individual methods from a technical perspective is also provided where appropriate. This report deals with the characterization of all types of radioactive wastes except spent fuel intended for direct disposal. 115 refs, 17 figs, 12 tabs

  14. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL DOT specification 6M - special form package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaich, R.W.

    1982-07-01

    The ORNL DOT Specification 6M - Special Form Package was fabricated at the Oak Ridge Nation al Laboratory (ORNL) for the transport of Type B solid non-fissile radioactive materials in special form. The package was evaluated on the basis of tests performed by the Dow Chemical Company, Rocky Flats Division, on the DOT-6M container and special form tests performed on a variety of stainless steel capsules at ORNL by Operations Division personnel. The results of these evaluations demonstrate that the package is in compliance with the applicable regulations for the transport of Type B quantities in special form of non-fissile radioactive materials.

  15. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL DOT Specification 20WC-5 - special form packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaich, R.W.

    1982-10-01

    The ORNL DOT Specification 20WC-5 - Special Form Package was fabricated for the transport of large quantities of solid nonfissile radioactive materials in special form. The package was evaluated on the basis of tests performed at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico on an identical fire and impact shield and special form tests performed on a variety of stainless steel capsules at ORNL by Operations Division personnel. The results of these evaluations demonstrate that the package is in compliance with the applicable regulations for the transport of large quantities of nonfissile radioactive materials in special form

  16. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL DOT specification 6M - special form package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaich, R.W.

    1982-07-01

    The ORNL DOT Specification 6M - Special Form Package was fabricated at the Oak Ridge Nation al Laboratory (ORNL) for the transport of Type B solid non-fissile radioactive materials in special form. The package was evaluated on the basis of tests performed by the Dow Chemical Company, Rocky Flats Division, on the DOT-6M container and special form tests performed on a variety of stainless steel capsules at ORNL by Operations Division personnel. The results of these evaluations demonstrate that the package is in compliance with the applicable regulations for the transport of Type B quantities in special form of non-fissile radioactive materials

  17. Specialized equipment needs for the transportation of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condrey, D.; Lambert, M.

    1998-01-01

    To ensure the safe and reliable transportation of radioactive materials and components, from both the front and back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, a transport management company needs three key elements: specialized knowledge, training and specialized equipment. These three elements result, in part, from national and international regulations which require specialized handling of all radioactive shipments. While the reasons behind the first two elements are readily apparent, the role of specialized equipment is often not considered until too late shipment process even though it plays an integral part of any radioactive material transport. This paper will describe the specialized equipment needed to transport three of the major commodities comprising the bulk of international nuclear transports: natural uranium (UF6), low enriched uranium (UF6) and fresh nuclear fuel. (authors)

  18. Type B activity limits for air transport - (an examination of special form and non-special form limits)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyre, P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the application of the ''Q system'' with respect to the maximum limits of activity permitted in Type B (Type B(U) or Type B(M)) packages when transported by air. In particular, estimation is made of the radiological consequences to determine if there is a difference depending on whether the material is in special form or not. An estimate is also made of the radiological consequences of an air accident involving low dispersible radioactive material (LDRM) in the reference Type B package

  19. Preparation and leaching of radioactive INEL waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuman, R.P.; Welch, J.M.; Staples, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to prepare and leach test ceramic and glass waste form specimens produced from actual transuranic waste sludges and high-level waste calcines, respectively. Description of wastes, specimen fabrication, leaching procedure, analysis of leachates and results are discussed. The conclusion is that radioactive waste stored at INEL can be readily incorporated in fused ceramic and glass forms. Initial leach testing results indicate that these forms show great promise for safe long-term containment of radioactive wastes

  20. Radioactivity in the River Danube - special investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, F.J.; Rank, D.; Terlunen, J.

    1989-01-01

    A sediment trap was installed in the River Danube at Vienna (river km 1933.9) in March, 1987. Since April, 1987 sediment samples have been collected monthly. On these samples systematical investigations such as gamma spectrometric measurements, Sr-90 analysis, grain-size-analysis have been carried out. The maximum of Cs-137-activity was about 300 Bq/kg at the beginning of the operation in April, 1987. Since this date the activity has generally decreased with some slight increases. The ratio of the activities of the <20 μm-fraction to the original sample lies between 2 and 4. The results of the monthly collected sediment samples are shown in regard to radioactivity determinations of water samples and sediment cores in power plant-reservoirs of the River Danube. The Chernobyl accident increases the Cs-137-activity of reservoir sediments in the Austrian part of the Danube from about 20 Bq/kg to 3000 Bq/kg in the <20 μm-fraction. The results of gamma spectrometric measurements of bottom sediments, which were taken in March, 1988 at several points of the River Danube (from river km 16/USSR to 1819/CSSR) are shown. (orig.)

  1. Summary: special waste form lysimeters - arid program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, R.L.; Walter, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Special Waste Form Lysimeters - Arid Program is to determine the performance of solidified commercial low-level waste forms using a field-scale lysimeter facility constructed for measuring the release and migration of radionuclides from the waste forms. The performance of these waste forms, as measured by radionuclide concentrations in lysimeter effluent, will be compared to that predicted by laboratory characterization of the waste forms. Waste forms being tested include nuclear power reactor waste streams that have been solidified in cement, Dow polymer, and bitumen. To conduct the field leaching experiments a lysimeter facility was built to measure leachate under actual environmental conditions. Field-scale samples of waste were buried in lysimeters equipped to measure water balance components, effluent radionuclide concentrations, and to a limited extent, radionuclide concentrations in lysimeter soil samples. The waste forms are being characterized by standard laboratory leach tests to obtain estimates of radionuclide release. These estimates will be compared to leach rates observed in the field. Adsorption studies are being conducted to determine the amount of contaminant available for transport after the release. Theoretical solubility calculations will also be performed to investigate whether common solid phases could be controlling radionuclide release. 4 references, 8 figures, 1 table

  2. Initiation to radioactivity in third form of grammar schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, G.; Blanc, J.C.; Juste, G.

    2001-01-01

    The initiation to radioactivity can be aimed at adolescents to sensitive them to radiation field and to allow them to fabricate a pertinent opinion about the use of nuclear energy. The pupils of the third form of grammar school make a research on radioactivity and the different kind of radiations. The pupils participate to the measurement of the radiation emitted by the radon daughter and find the usual experimental protocol. (N.C.)

  3. The Transport of Radioactive Materials under special arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaggio, A.L.; Vietri, J.R.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Agency's Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material rule the international transport of these materials and provide the basis of national and regional regulations. The Regulations establish the technical, operational and administrative requirements which shall be accomplished to carry out the transport of radioactive materials (RAM). They also allow the transport in different conditions of those currently applicable and, in such cases, establish that the transport shall be made under special arrangement. To approve a transport under special arrangement the involved Competent Authority shall be satisfied that the alternative provisions are adequate to ensure that the overall level of safety in transport and in-transit storage is at least equivalent to that which would be provided if all the applicable requirements had been met (para. 2ll of the International Atomic Energy Agency Safety Series No. 6). This paper explains some difficulties the Argentine Competent. Authority has experienced trying by comparing the equivalence between the level of safety resulting from the compliance with current requirements and the overall level of safety which is provided by the application of alternative provisions. As most of the experience gained come from the transport of RAM by road, only this mode of transport is considered. (J.P.N.)

  4. Tomogram forming process and apparatus using radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, H.F.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to nuclear medicine and particularly to a tomogram forming apparatus which permits, with great efficiency, the very sensitive quantitative determination and the accurate spatial localization of the radioactivity of a body section of a patient to whom a substance labelled with radioactive isotopes has been administered. This scanner is characterized in that it includes several highly focused collimators placed one after the other, according to an arrangement which surrounds a scanning field. Each collimator is mobile with respect to the adjacent one and a system enables the arrangement to be rotated about the scanning field from one scanning position to another. Another device enables the collimators to be moved so that, for each scanning position, the focus of each collimator uniformly samples at least half the scanning field [fr

  5. Special waste-form lysimeters: Arid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.L.; Serne, R.J.

    1987-08-01

    The release of contaminant from solidified low-level waste forms is being studied in a field lysimeter facility at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Duplicate samples of five different waste forms have been buried in 10 lysimeters since March 1984. Waste-form samples represent three different waste streams and four solidification agents (masonry cement, Portland III cement, Dow polymer /sup (a)/, and bitumen). Most precipitation at the Hanford Site arrives as winter snow; this contributes to a strong seasonal pattern in water storage and drainage observed in the lysimeters. The result is an annual range in the volumetric soil water content from 11% in late winter to 7% in the late summer and early fall, as well as annual changes in pore water velocities from approximately 1 cm/wk in early spring to less than 0.05 cm/wk in early fall. Measurable quantities of tritium and cobalt-60 are being collected in lysimeter drainage water. Approximately 30% of the original tritium inventory has been leached from two lysimeters originally containing tritium. Cobalt-60 is present in all waste forms; it is being collected in the leachate from five lysimeters. The total amount released varies, but in each case it is less than 0.1% of the original cobalt inventory of the waste sample. Nonradioactive constituents contained in the waste form, such as sodium, boron, and sulfate, are also being leached

  6. Abelian 2-form gauge theory: special features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, R P

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that the four (3 + 1)-dimensional (4D) free Abelian 2-form gauge theory provides an example of (i) a class of field theoretical models for the Hodge theory, and (ii) a possible candidate for the quasi-topological field theory (q-TFT). Despite many striking similarities with some of the key topological features of the two (1 + 1)-dimensional (2D) free Abelian (and self-interacting non-Abelian) gauge theories, it turns out that the 4D free Abelian 2-form gauge theory is not an exact TFT. To corroborate this conclusion, some of the key issues are discussed. In particular, it is shown that the (anti-)BRST and (anti-)co-BRST invariant quantities of the 4D 2-form Abelian gauge theory obey recursion relations that are reminiscent of the exact TFTs but the Lagrangian density of this theory is not found to be able to be expressed as the sum of (anti-)BRST and (anti-)co-BRST exact quantities as is the case with the topological 2D free Abelian (and self-interacting non-Abelian) gauge theories

  7. Low-level radioactive waste form qualification testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohal, M.S.; Akers, D.W.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes activities that have already been completed as well as yet to be performed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to develop a plan to quantify the behavior of radioactive low-level waste forms. It briefly describes the status of various tasks, including DOE approval of the proposed work, several regulatory and environmental related documents, tests to qualify the waste form, preliminary schedule, and approximate cost. It is anticipated that INEEL and Brookhaven National Laboratory will perform the majority of the tests. For some tests, services of other testing organizations may be used. It should take approximately nine months to provide the final report on the results of tests on a waste form prepared for qualification. It is anticipated that the overall cost of the waste quantifying service is approximately $150,000. The following tests are planned: compression, thermal cycling, irradiation, biodegradation, leaching, immersion, free-standing liquid tests, and full-scale testing.

  8. Low-level radioactive waste form qualification testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohal, M.S.; Akers, D.W.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes activities that have already been completed as well as yet to be performed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to develop a plan to quantify the behavior of radioactive low-level waste forms. It briefly describes the status of various tasks, including DOE approval of the proposed work, several regulatory and environmental related documents, tests to qualify the waste form, preliminary schedule, and approximate cost. It is anticipated that INEEL and Brookhaven National Laboratory will perform the majority of the tests. For some tests, services of other testing organizations may be used. It should take approximately nine months to provide the final report on the results of tests on a waste form prepared for qualification. It is anticipated that the overall cost of the waste quantifying service is approximately $150,000. The following tests are planned: compression, thermal cycling, irradiation, biodegradation, leaching, immersion, free-standing liquid tests, and full-scale testing

  9. Results of field testing of radioactive waste forms using lysimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W., Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Jastrow, J.D.; Wickliff, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining informaiton on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station are being tested to develop a low-level waste data base and to obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. In this paper, radionuclide releases from waste forms in the first six years of sampling are presented and discussed. Application of lysimeter data to use in performance assessment models is presented. Initial results from use of data in a performance assessment model are discussed

  10. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included

  11. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included.

  12. Characterization of low and medium level radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sambell, R.A.J.

    1983-01-01

    The work reported was carried out during the first year of the Commission of the European Community's programme on the characterization of low and medium level waste forms. Ten reference waste forms plus others of special national interest have been identified covering PWR, BWR, GCR and reprocessing wastes. The immobilising media include the three main matrices: cement, polymers and bitumen, and a glass. Characterization is viewed as one input to quality assurance of the waste form and covers: waste-matrix compatibility, radiation effects, leaching, microbiological attack, shrinkage and swelling, ageing processes and thermal effects. The aim is a balanced programme of comparative data, predictive modelling and an undserstanding of basic mechanisms

  13. Scientific text as a special form of communication

    OpenAIRE

    CHERNYAKOVA NATALIA STEPANOVNA

    2016-01-01

    It is asserted in the article that scientific text, even being a product of spiritual culture, never ceased to be the main form of an objectivization of scientific thought and the means of special scientific communication.

  14. Nuclear reactor structural material forming less radioactive corrosion product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To provide nuclear reactor structural materials forming less radioactive corrosion products. Constitution: Ni-based alloys such as inconel alloy 718, 600 or inconel alloy 750 and 690 having excellent corrosion resistance and mechanical property even in coolants at high temperature and high pressure have generally been used as nuclear reactor structural materials. However, even such materials yield corrosion products being attacked by coolants circulating in the nuclear reactor, which produce by neutron irradiation radioactive corrosion products, that are deposited in primary circuit pipeways to constitute exposure sources. The present invention dissolves dissolves this problems by providing less activating nuclear reactor structural materials. That is, taking notice on the fact that Ni-58 contained generally by 68 % in Ni changes into Co-58 under irradiation of neutron thereby causing activation, the surface of nuclear reactor structural materials is applied with Ni plating by using Ni with a reduced content of Ni-58 isotopes. Accordingly, increase in the radiation level of the nuclear reactor structural materials can be inhibited. (K.M.)

  15. Low sintering temperature glass waste forms for sequestering radioactive iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Krumhansl, James L.; Garino, Terry J.; Ockwig, Nathan W.

    2012-09-11

    Materials and methods of making low-sintering-temperature glass waste forms that sequester radioactive iodine in a strong and durable structure. First, the iodine is captured by an adsorbant, which forms an iodine-loaded material, e.g., AgI, AgI-zeolite, AgI-mordenite, Ag-silica aerogel, ZnI.sub.2, CuI, or Bi.sub.5O.sub.7I. Next, particles of the iodine-loaded material are mixed with powdered frits of low-sintering-temperature glasses (comprising various oxides of Si, B, Bi, Pb, and Zn), and then sintered at a relatively low temperature, ranging from 425.degree. C. to 550.degree. C. The sintering converts the mixed powders into a solid block of a glassy waste form, having low iodine leaching rates. The vitrified glassy waste form can contain as much as 60 wt % AgI. A preferred glass, having a sintering temperature of 500.degree. C. (below the silver iodide sublimation temperature of 500.degree. C.) was identified that contains oxides of boron, bismuth, and zinc, while containing essentially no lead or silicon.

  16. Mechanisms of leaching and corrosions of vitrified radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, F.; Conradt, R.; Hall, A.R.; Malow, G.; Trocellier, P.; Van Iseghem, P.

    1985-01-01

    The estimation of the risk connected with the storage of radioactive waste in geological formations asks for reliable extrapolation of the data for leaching and corrosion of glasses to very long times. As a consequence the knowledge of the physico-chemical mechanisms which dominate the leaching phenomena can be very useful. In the corrosion due to aqueous solution three main mechanisms can be identified: ion exchange, matrix dissolution and formation of a surface layer. The work performed in the different laboratories has allowed to evaluate the relative importance of the various mechanism. The alkali ion exchange does not seems to be predominant in defining the release of the various elements, the matrix dissolution being the most important. The surface composition is important as the compounds present could dominate the matrix dissolution kinetic. Besides the surface layer could form an impervious layer, which, if stable in time, could protect effectively the glass

  17. Development and characterization of cermet forms for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, W.S.; Quinby, T.C.; Kobisk, E.H.

    1979-01-01

    Cermets designed to isolate high-level wastes in a solid form are a composite consisting of various ceramic phase particles uniformly dispersed in and microencapsulated by an iron-nickel base alloy matrix. The metal matrix provides this waste form with many advantageous features including excellent thermal conductivity and mechanical strength. These cermets are formed by first dissolving the waste in molten urea, precipitating and calcining all the constituents, compacting the calcine, and sintering and reduction to form the final product. The exact formulation of cermets through additions to the waste is designed to fix most of the fission products in stable, leach resistant ceramic phases which are subsequently microencapsulated by an alloy matrix. The alloy matrix, which is derived primarily from the waste itself and includes the reducible fission and activation products from the waste, can be compositionally adjusted through additions to optimize its corrosion resistance under conditions existing in various disposal environments. The processes by which cermets are formed include several new and unique materials preparation options that are being developed to permit engineering scale-up and to be compatible with remote operations. Cermets formed by alternate processing methods are being characterized. Initially, cermet samples were prepared using a laboratory scale, batch process developed for the preparation of special ceramics having high compositional uniformity and excellent sinterability. The modification of this batch process to one suitable for scale-up and remote operation is the subject of this paper. Cermet characterization is also discussed

  18. Modular forms and special cycles on Shimura curves (AM-161)

    CERN Document Server

    Kudla, Stephen S; Yang, Tonghai

    2006-01-01

    Modular Forms and Special Cycles on Shimura Curves is a thorough study of the generating functions constructed from special cycles, both divisors and zero-cycles, on the arithmetic surface ""M"" attached to a Shimura curve ""M"" over the field of rational numbers. These generating functions are shown to be the q-expansions of modular forms and Siegel modular forms of genus two respectively, valued in the Gillet-Soulé arithmetic Chow groups of ""M"". The two types of generating functions are related via an arithmetic inner product formula. In addition, an analogue of the classical Siegel-Weil

  19. Identification and characterization of Department of Energy special-case radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.; Kudera, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper identifies and characterizes Department of Energy (DOE) special-case radioactive wastes. Included in this paper are descriptions of the special-case waste categories and their volumes and curie contents, as well as discussions of potential methods for management of these special-case wastes. Work on extensive inventories of DOE-titled special-case waste are still in progress. 1 tab

  20. Mandatory special or dedicated trains for radioactive materials shipments evidence shows they're not needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, L.S.; Garrison, R.F.; Harmon, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    The rejection of mandatory special or dedicated trains by all responsible Federal agencies for transportation of radioactive materials in shielded casks has a long history. Working with the railroads and the National Academy of Sciences, the ICC adopted standards for transporting radioactive materials in regular freight trains in the mid 1940's. The standards rested primarily on ensuring the integrity of the radioactive materials packaging. AEC, then NRC and DOT, followed the ICC lead, supplementing the licensing rules for casks with a series of performance or stress tests. At no time did these agencies require special trains or special routing for rail casks. Mandatory special trains have too many disadvantages without any proven safety benefit to be worth their high cost to the shipper. The ICC, in a series of litigated cases, found that given the strength of the casks, mandatory special trains were wasteful transportation and an unreasonable railroad practice

  1. Radiation damage in natural materials: implications for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The long-term effect of radiation damage on waste forms, either crystalline or glass, is a factor in the evaluation of the integrity of waste disposal mediums. Natural analogs, such as metamict minerals, provide one approach for the evaluaton of radiation damage effects that might be observed in crystalline waste forms, such as supercalcine or synroc. Metamict minerals are a special class of amorphous materials which were initially crystalline. Although the mechanism for the loss of crystallinity in these minerals (mostly actinide-containing oxides and silicates) is not clearly understood, damage caused by alpha particles and recoil nuclei is critical to the metamictization process. The study of metamict minerals allows the evaluation of long-term radiation damage effects, particularly changes in physical and chemical properties such as microfracturing, hydrothermal alteration, and solubility. In addition, structures susceptible to metamictization share some common properties: (1) complex compositions; (2) some degree of covalent bonding, instead of being ionic close-packed MO/sub x/ structures; and (3) channels or interstitial voids which may accommodate displaced atoms or absorbed water. On the basis of these empirical criteria, minerals such as pollucite, sodalite, nepheline and leucite warrant careful scrutiny as potential waste form phases. Phases with the monazite or fluorite structures are excellent candidates

  2. R and D projects for disposal concepts for special radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Updated requirements for the elaboration of reference methods or back-up methods for the conditioning and ultimate storage of special radioactive wastes are worked out. Subsequently, the present state-of-art and ongoing studies are analyzed. Special radioactive wastes collected in collecting points, or produced in medicine and industry are included in the paper. With special unclear wastes, the emphasis is on wastes from LWR-type reactors and those from the unclear fuel cycle. The PTB data base is to by complemented by the characterization of waste compounds with volatile nuclides. 16 specialist contributions have been included in the data base. (HP) [de

  3. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  4. Leach test of six 192-iridium pellets based on the IAEA 'special form' test procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, G.; Gerdingh, R.

    1981-07-01

    The designation 'special form' may be applied to indispersible solid radioactive material if the material meets the requirements of the tests described in the International Atomic Energy Agency Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Type Materials. This report presents the procedures and results of a leach test performed as specified in the regulations on 6 'as received' active 192-iridium pellets. Mechanical tests were not carried out prior to or following the leach test. The activity of each of the first 6 water baths was found to be between 2.3 and 12.6 μCi, (8.5 x 10 4 and 4.7 x 10 5 Bq) and of the second 6, between 1.3 to 6.0 μCi, (4.8 x 10 4 to 2.2 x 10 5 Bq) thus exceeding the allowable limit

  5. Identification and characterization of Department of Energy special-case radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.; Kudera, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper identifies and characterizes Department of Energy (DOE) special-case radioactive wastes. Included in this paper are descriptions of the special-case waste categories and their volumes and curie contents, as well as discussions of potential methods for management of these special-case wastes. Work on extensive inventories of DOE-titled special-case waste are still in progress. All radioactive waste is characterized to determine its waste category. Some wastes may have characteristics of more than one of the major waste types. These characteristics may prevent such wastes from being managed as typical high-level, low-level, or transuranic waste. DOE has termed these wastes special-case wastes. Special-case wastes may require special management and disposal schemes. Because of these special considerations, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) required the identification of all existing and potential DOE-owned special case waste to determine future management planning and funding requirements. The inventory effort includes all commercially held, DOE-owned radioactive materials

  6. High-level radioactive waste incorporation into (special) cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Gouda, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A feasibility study has demonstrated that very strong, durable, relatively impermeable cylinders may be prepared by hot pressing combinations of cements with simulated radioactive waste solids. While the properties have not been studied exhaustively, the results suggest an optional method for immobilization and isolation of radioactive waste. Samples prepared with calcium aluminate cements appeared to have properties superior to those with Portland cements. Four simulated radioactive waste compositions having high rare-earth oxide contents, and some containing a large excess of NaNO 3 , were studied. Modest temperatures [423 to 673 K (150 to 400 0 C)] were used for hot pressing at pressures from 178 to 345 MPa. Dense strong very low porosity specimens resulted when mixtures containing from 10 to 50% waste were hot pressed, incorporating also a small percentage of water. In addition, high-strength cement cylinders were prepared with the waste solid (approximately 20 wt% waste) in a separate core and were very resistant to leaching by water near its boiling point. With this configuration, even the NaNO 3 -containing wastes were resistant to leaching by water

  7. Development of new waste form for treatment and disposal of concentrated liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Kyung Kil; Ji, Young Yong

    2010-12-01

    The radioactive waste form should be meet the waste acceptance criteria of national regulation and disposal site specification. We carried out a characterization of rad waste form, especially the characteristics of radioactivity, mechanical and physical-chemical properties in various rad waste forms. But asphalt products is not acceptable waste form at disposal site. Thus we are change the product materials. We select the development of the new process or new materials. The asphalt process is treatment of concentrated liquid and spent-resin and that we decide the Development of new waste form for treatment and disposal of concentrated liquid radioactive waste

  8. Use of special radioactive molds of gold-198 foils for brachytherapy in skin tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Marco Antonio Rodrigues

    2000-01-01

    This work presents a methodology for manufacturing molds of radioactive gold-198 foils for treatment of skin tumors. The metallic purity of the gold foils produced by the Brazilian market is analyzed and compared to the characteristics of imported materials. Techniques for analyses of the activation homogeneity and dose profile in the plane of the mold are presented. The MicroShield, Version 4 System is used in the theoretical determination of the dose rate along the radioactive molds with different geometries and a comparison with experimental values obtained by optic density readings from special films used in quality control of radiotherapy equipment, dosimetry for thimble ionization chamber and thermoluminescent dosimeters is performed. The dosimeter calibration curve (dose-answer) obtained for the gold-198 energy, is compared with that obtained by a high dose rate iridium-192 small source, commonly used in the brachytherapy procedures. The studies show that the best homogeneity of dose distribution is obtained distributing the radioactive material in the form of concentric rings, with different activities, in number and dimensions dependent on the area to be treated. The method of the radiation dose calculation of the molds presented in this work, is compared with the traditional method used by brachytherapy services for low dose rate. Twenty lesions were treated with the proposed molds. The effectiveness of this methodology is further supported by the cosmetic-therapeutic results of the clinical applications, as well as cost analysis of the procedures. Also, it is analyzed the homogeneity of the dose rate distribution for an irradiated disk with attenuation by two silver coin, objectifying to eliminate loss of mass and consequently uncertainties in the activation when the sections of the disks are made in concentric rings. (author)

  9. Strategy of radioactive waste management of special materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, H.; Merz, E.

    1986-11-01

    Special attention is being paid to the treatment and disposal of the volatile radionuclides tritium, carbon-14, krypton-85, and iodine-129 arising from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. This is shown by a large number of investigations on this subject as well as the 1983 recommendation of the German Radiation Protection Commission. In the present study, recent investigations on these four nuclides have been analysed, and it has been tried to draw conclusions for the realisation of the management concept for these radionuclides. (orig.) [de

  10. Special waste form lysimeters-arid. Annual report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, M.B.; Graham, M.J.

    1985-09-01

    The Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid program was initiated to determine typical source terms generated by commercial solidified low-level nuclear waste in an arid climate. Waste-form leaching tests are being conducted at a field facility at the Hanford site near Richland, Washington. A similar program is being conducted at a humid site. The field facility consists of 10 lysimeters placed around a central instrument caisson. The waste samples from boiling water and pressurized water reactors were emplaced in 1984, and the lysimeters are being monitored for movement of contaminants and water. Solidifying agents being tested include vinyl ester-styrene, bitumen, and cement. Laboratory leaching and geochemical modeling studies are being conducted to predict expected leach rates at the field site and to aid field-data interpretation. Small samples of the solidified waste forms were made for use in the laboratory leaching studies that include standard leach tests and leaching of solidified waste forms in soil columns. Complete chemical and radionuclide analyses are being conducted on the solid and liquid portions of the wastes. 2 refs

  11. Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid: annual report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, M.B.; Graham, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid program was initiated to determine typical source terms generated by commercial solidified low-level nuclear waste in an arid climate. Waste-form leaching tests are being conducted at a field facility at the Hanford site near Richland, Washington. A similar program is being conducted at a humid site. The field facility consists of 10 lysimeters placed around a central instrument caisson. The waste samples from boiling water and pressurized water reactors were emplaced in 1984, and the lysimeters are being monitored for movement of contaminants and water. Solidifying agents being tested include vinyl ester-styrene, bitumen, and cement. Laboratory leaching and geochemical modeling studies are being conducted to predict expected leach rates at the field site and to aid field-data interpretation. Small samples of the solidified waste forms were made for use in the laboratory leaching studies that include standard leach tests and leaching of solidified waste forms in soil columns. Complete chemical and radionuclide analyses are being conducted on the solid and liquid portions of the wastes

  12. Results of technical and economical examinations for substantiation of special plant design for reprocessing and radioactive wastes disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, A.V.; Baldov, A.N.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the results of technical and economical examinations for substantiation of special plant design for reprocessing and radioactive wastes disposal are presented. Ground for the examination conducting was Health of Nation Programme ratified by the President and a number of Governmental decisions. The special plant is planned in the Mangystau Region. In the framework of feasibility study the data base by the worldwide known technologies was implemented, on reprocessing and experience of radioactive waste disposal. The technical requirements for the special plant construction are determined. The alternative options by structure content and site location of the special plant and radioactive waste disposal are cited

  13. Radioactive airborne species formed in the air in high energy accelerator tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.

    2005-01-01

    Many radioactive airborne species have been observed in the air of high energy accelerator tunnels during machine operation. Radiation protection against these induced airborne radioactivities is one of the key issues for radiation safety, especially at high-energy and high-intense proton accelerators such as the J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, Joint project of KEK and JAERI), which is now under construction at the TOKAI site of JAERI. Information on the chemical forms and particle sizes of airborne radioactivities is essential for the estimation of internal doses. For that purpose, the study on radioactive airborne species formed in the air of beam-line tunnels at high-energy accelerators have been extensively conducted by our group. For Be-7, Na-24, S-38, Cl-38,-39, C-11, and N-13, formed by various types of nuclear reactions including nuclear spallation reactions, their aerosol and gaseous fractions are determined by a filter technique. A parallel plate diffusion battery is used for the measurement of aerosol size distributions, and the formation of radioactive aerosols is explained by the attachment of radionuclides to ambient non-radioactive aerosols which are formed through radiation induced reactions. The chemical forms of gaseous species are also determined by using a selective collection method based on a filter technique. A review is given of the physico-chemical properties of these airborne radionuclides produced in the air of accelerator beam-line tunnels.

  14. Leaching studies of low-level radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, R.; Arora, H.; Milian, L.; Clinton, J.

    1985-01-01

    A research program has been underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory to investigate the release of radionuclides from low-level waste forms under laboratory conditions. This paper describes the leaching behavior of Cs-137 from two major low-level waste streams, that is, ion exchange bead resin and boric acid concentrate, solidified in Portland cement. The resultant leach data are employed to evaluate and predict the release behavior of Cs-137 from low-level waste forms under field burial conditions

  15. Solid forms for Savannah River Plant radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, R.M.; Hale, W.H.; Bradley, R.F.; Hull, H.L.; Kelley, J.A.; Stone, J.A.; Thompson, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are being developed to immobilize Savannah River Plant wastes in solid forms such as cement, asphalt, or glass. 137 Cs and 90 Sr are the major biological hazards and heat producers in the alkaline wastes produced at SRP. In the conceptual process being studied, 137 Cs removed from alkaline supernates, together with insoluble sludges that contain 90 Sr, will be incorporated into solid forms of high integrity and low volume suitable for storage in a retrievable surface storage facility for about 100 years, and for eventual shipment to an off-site repository. Mineralization of 137 Cs, or its fixation on zeolite prior to incorporation into solid forms, is also being studied. Economic analyses to reduce costs and fault-tree analyses to minimize risks are being conducted. Methods are being studied for removal of sludge from (and final decontamination of) waste tanks

  16. The new German regulatory system of monitoring workers for intakes of radioactivity with special reference to thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrichs, K.

    1995-01-01

    In Germany, the Association for Radiation Protection (member of IRPA) defined a new standard for the monitoring of workers occupationally exposed to radioactive material. During the last two years this draft has been accepted by the German government in the form of three directives. The purpose of our approach was the installation of a system defining clear criteria for the necessity of regular and special monitoring programs, giving directives for monitoring programs ensuring that dose assessments are as reliable as necessary with the lowest possible expenses, standardizing as far as possible the procedures of dose assessments, and guaranteeing the necessary quality standards. The most important features of these regulations will be discussed in this contribution and their application will be exemplified for the specially difficult monitoring of thorium intakes. (author). 2 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Leach rate characterization of solid radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Barletta, R.E.; Jardine, L.J.; Steindler, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Leach rates were measured using distilled water on four types of waste forms: spray calcined waste mixed with silica and borosilicate glass and sintered, the same pulverized, the same in a lead matrix, and waste glass containing U. Twenty isotopes ranging from 22 Na to 239 Np were measured using activation analysis. Leach rates were also measured for a variety of matrix materials (Zircaloy, Al, Pb, glass, Pb 3 RE 6 (SiO 4 ) 6 ), using one isotope each. 2 tables

  18. Radioactive waste and special waste disposal in salt domes - phoney waste management solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimmel, E.

    1990-01-01

    The paper tries to make aware of the fact that an indefinite safe disposal of anthropogeneous wastes in underground repositories is impossible. Suspicion is raised that the Gorleben-Rambow salt dome has never been studied for its suitability as a repository, but that it was simply taken for granted. Safety analyses are meant only to conceal uncertainty. It is demanded to immediately opt out of the ultimate disposal technique for radioactive and special wastes in salt caverns. (DG) [de

  19. Special barium-lead mortars for radioactive wastes sealing and insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usai, G.

    1995-01-01

    Binding materials with high gamma-absorbance, easy to prepare and use, are of great usefulness in the elimination and disposal of low-level radioactive wastes such as clinical wastes. Use of these materials ranges from construction of containers to sealing of vessels designed for wastes disposal. In this paper the authors describe preparation of special mortars containing barite and/or PbO characterized by good hydraulic properties and high insulating power

  20. A study of the behavior of a cathode film formed in chromium plating with radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Katsuyoshi; Suzuki, Akihira; Doi, Kazuyuki; Arai, Katsutoshi

    1979-01-01

    The behavior and composition of a cathode film formed on a steel cathode during chromium plating were studied with radioactive tracers. A special cell with a rapid washing compartment was used for preventing the cathode film from dissolving in electrolyte after plating. The cathode film was composed of two layers. The outer layer facing to the electrolyte had a loose structure and contained more sulfuric anions than the inner layer, for sulfuric acid probably concentrated in the outer layer. This outer layer is called L-film in this paper. The L-film was easily dissolved in the electrolyte solution. The inner layer (called C-film, compact film) was stable against electrolytes and contained less anions than that of L-film. The C-film had a thickness equivalent to 5 mg/m 2 and the concentration of anions unaffected by the composition of electrolytes. The C-film was not reduced to metallic chromium, but it remained in the cathode film during and after plating. This suggests that chromic acid in the cathode film is not reduced to metallic chromium, that metallic chromium is deposited from chromium complexes reaching the cathode surface through the cathode film, and that the complexes do not play a role on the construction of the cathode film. (author)

  1. Leaching studies of low-level radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, R.; Arora, H.; Clinton, J.C.; Milian, L.

    1985-01-01

    A research program has been under way at the Brookhaven National Laboratory to investigate the radionuclide release behavior of ion exchange bead resin waste solidified in Portland cement. An important aspect of this program is to develop and evaluate testing procedures and methodologies which enable the long-term performance evaluation of waste forms under simulated field conditions. Cesium and strontium release behavior using a range of testing procedures, including intermittent leachant flow conditions, has been investigated. For cyclic wet/dry leaching tests, extended dry periods tend to enhance the release of Cs and suppress the release of Sr. Under extended wet period leaching conditions, however, both Cs and Sr exhibit suppressed releases. In contrast, radionuclide releases observed under continuously saturated leaching conditions, as represented by conventional leaching tests, are significantly different. The relevance and aplicability of these laboratory data obtained under a wide range of leaching conditions to the performance evaluation of waste forms under anticipated field conditions is discussed. 12 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Radioactive effluent sources and special system of channels on the RA Reactor at the Boris Kidric Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojovic, P.; Gacinovic, O.; Milosevic, M.

    1964-10-01

    The paper describes the place of origin, composition and activity of radioactive effluents appearing in some reactor systems and special channels for carrying these effluents to disposal basins located outside the reactor building (author)

  3. The social and special effects of siting a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in rural Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdock, S.H.; Hamm, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    As part of its assessment of the impacts of a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Hudspeth County, the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority (TLLRWDA) sponsored an independent study of the social and special impacts of the facility. These impacts include ''standard'' social impacts (such as impacts on social structures and attitudes, values and perceptions and ''special'' social impacts (such as fear, anxiety, concerns related to equity, the health of future generations, etc.). This paper reports the results of this study. Personal interviews with 71 community leaders and 96 randomly selected county residents were conducted during the summer of 1986. The results suggest that the major concern relates to the contamination of ground water, but that suspicion about the equity of the siting process and about the safe management of wastes is extensive, even among the most knowledgeable respondents. Mitigation concerns center on health and safety issues for residents and on potential forms of mitigation for governmental jurisdictions for leaders. Responses were similar for leaders and residents and for persons in different parts of the county

  4. Experiences from the exercise ''MERLIN'' for the detection of radioactive substances with the participation of special-purpose vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesbach, M.

    2009-01-01

    Experiences of an exercise with hazardous goods, in particular with radioactive substances (measurements and taking environmental samples) are described. Several special-purpose vehicles with equipment and specially trained crews were used together with radiation protection experts according to the concept of Hesse. It has been the greatest exercise in Hesse with regard to hazardous goods and in particular with regard to ''incidents with radioactive substances''. (orig.)

  5. A pneumatic transfer system for special form 252Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, R.J.; Berry, S.M.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Hoggan, J.M.

    1996-09-01

    A pneumatic transfer system has been developed for use with series 100 Special Form 252 Cf. It was developed to reduce the exposure to personnel handling sources of 252 Cf with masses up to 150 microg by permitting remotely activated two-way transfer between the storage container and the irradiation position. The pneumatic transfer system also permits transfers for reproducible repetitive irradiation periods. In addition to the storage container equipped with quick-release fittings, the transfer system consists of an irradiation station, a control box with momentary contact switches to activate the air-pressure control valves and indicators to identify the location of the source, and connecting air hose and electrical wire. A source of 20 psig air and 110 volt electrical power are required for operation of the transfer system which can be easily moved and set up by one individual in 5 to 10 minutes. Tests have shown that rarely does a source become lodged in the transfer tubing, but two methods have been developed to handle incomplete transfers of the 252 Cf source. The first method consists of closing one air vent to allow a pressure impulse to propel the source to the opposite side. The second method applies to those 252 Cf capsules with a threaded or tapped end to which a small ferromagnetic piece can be attached; an incompletely transferred source in the transfer tube can then be guided to a position of safety by surrounding the transfer tubing containing the capsule with a horseshoe magnet attached to the end of a long pole

  6. Radioactive waste immobilization in protective ceramic forms by the HIP method at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayenko, S.Yu.; Kantsedal, V.P.; Tarasov, R.V.; Starchenko, V.A.; Lyubtsev, R.I.

    1993-01-01

    Intense research activities have been carried out in recent years at the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) to develop the method of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) for immobilizing radioactive (primarily, high-level) wastes. With this method, the radioactive material is immobilized in a matrix under the simultaneous action of high pressures (up to 6,000 atm) and appropriate temperatures. The process has 2 variants: (1) radioactive wastes are treated as powders of oxides resulting from calcination during chemical treatment of spent fuel. In this case the radioactive material enters into the crystalline structure of the immobilized matrix or is distributed in the matrix as a homogeneous mixture; (2) protective barrier layers are pressed on spent fuel rods or their pieces as radioactive wastes, by the HIP method (fuel rod encapsulation in a protective form). Based on numerous results from various studies, the authors suggest that various ceramic compositions should be used as protective materials. Here the authors report two trends of their investigations: (1) development of ecologically clean process equipments for radioactive waste treatment by the HIP method; (2) manufacture of promising protective ceramic compositions and investigation of their physico-mechanical properties

  7. A study on characterization and evaluation methodologies of radioactive waste forms for safe disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Y. C.; Lee, G. S.; Kim, G. J.; Nam, H.; Seok, J. H. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-15

    The contents and scope of the study are summarized as follows : elicitation of significant items for characteristic assessment about stability analysis of radioactive waste forms for safe disposal, compressive strength, free water, leaching rate, and weatherability. Suggestion of assessment methods through the characteristic test of waste forms, comparison of assessment methods and suggestion of suitable testing methods about the above stated 4 items. Assessment modeling development for long-term stability of radioactive waste forms, weatherometric test of waste forms, expectation modeling development through VOM(Valance-Oxygen Model). Suggestion of determination standard together assessment testing methods and description about the standard. Explanation to be suitable guideline and regulation of waste handling and acceptance.

  8. State of the art report on bituminized waste forms of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Kook; Shon, Jong Sik; Kim, Kil Jeong; Lee, Kang Moo; Jung, In Ha

    1998-03-01

    In this report, research and development results on the bituminization of radioactive wastes are closely reviewed, especially those regarding waste treatment technologies, waste solidifying procedures and the characteristics of asphalt and solidified forms. A new concept of the bituminization method is suggested in this report which can improve the characteristics of solidified forms. Stable solid forms with high leach resistance, high thermal resistance and good compression strength were produced by the suggested bituminization method, in which spent polyethylene from agricultural farms was added. This report can help further research and development of improved bituminized forms of radioactive wastes that will maintain long term stabilities in disposal sites. (author). 59 refs., 19 tabs., 18 figs

  9. A review of airborne particle sampling with special reference to long-lived radioactive dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.

    1990-03-01

    This report reviews some basic aspects related to the sampling of airborne particles with special reference to Long-Lived Radioactive Dust (LLRD). The report covers a number of areas of practical interest such as the production of aerosols, the dynamics of suspended particles, the physical and chemical characteristics and properties of dust clouds, and the inhalation and measurement of dust. It is followed with a brief review of dust sampling instrumentation, and with a short account of the work done on LLRD in Canada with a few references to work done outside this country. (34 figs., 7 tabs., 117 refs.)

  10. Special training for drivers of vehicles carrying radioactive materials in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridder, K.

    1993-01-01

    In Germany drivers of vehicles carrying radioactive materials have to undergo special training since midyear 1991. Training is organized in a modular system, which means that the driver can customize his dangerous goods training programme by combining several modules. The contents of the training programme, its organization and supervision as well as the means for checking the successful completion of the programme can be seen from the slides. This paper will close with an outlook on the European development, considering the framework set by the regulations of the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) and the European Community (EC). (J.P.N.)

  11. The functionalities of the Darwin radioactivity calculation form and the radiation protection studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsilanizara, A.; Huynh, T.D.; Luneville, L.; Diop, C.M.; Eid, M.

    2003-01-01

    The characterisation of the radioactive sources relative to the evolution of nuclear fuels or to the activation under particles flux (generally neutrons) of structures of a nuclear equipment or a simple isotope decay is a step in the radiation protection studies. This characterisation needs to know a fundamental knowledge: the radionuclides concentration. This one changes with time, and follows the coupled differential equations of first order in time, the generalised Bateman equations. The objective of this paper is to present the functionalities of the Darwin form, developed by the Cea and dedicated to the study of radioactivity. (N.C.)

  12. Local mat-forming cyanobacteria effectively facilitate decontamination of radioactive cesium in rice fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Yoshida, Shigeru; Okumura, Hiroshi; Inagaki, Masayo; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Ito, Tetsuo; Furukawa, Michio

    2015-01-01

    The most effective and widespread method to decontaminate radioactive cesium from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Disaster was peeling topsoil. But the method had problems, such as large amounts of discarded soil and large-scale work. In nature, cyanobacteria formed biomats on the ground surface and facilitated peeling topsoil when the biomats dried. The cyanobacteria-facilitating peeling decontamination method utilized these cyanobacterial properties. Cyanobacteria are located all over Japan and 'local' cyanobacteria could be used for decontamination without introducing new species. Utilizing cyanobacteria could decrease the amount of discarded soil to about 30% and downsize the execution-scale to individual locations. Cyanobacterial biomats were easily cultivated, especially in rice fields, by maintaining wet conditions and exposure to 100 - 83% solar radiation. Shading by a thin net was helpful in maintaining an environment suitable for cyanobacteria. Nowadays, to prevent uptake of radioactive cesium into rice, K + is usually added to fertilizer in rice fields. The K + fertilization in rice fields might also enhance cyanobacterial capture of radioactive cesium, because high concentrations of K + enhanced cyanobacterial uptake of Cs + . Cyanobacteria could also mitigate the risk of radioactive cesium moving away from a decontaminating rice field. Therefore, the cyanobacteria-facilitating peeling decontamination method was proposed as an easy and safe 'D.I.Y.' method for both farmers and the environment. Besides, plowing rice fields with water before peeling improved the efficiency of this method, because plowing increased the radioactive cesium concentration in the topsoil. (author)

  13. Evaluation of low and intermediate level radioactive solidified waste forms and packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    Evaluation of low and intermediate level radioactive waste forms and packages with respect to compliance with quality and safety requirements for transport, interim storage and disposal has become a very important part of the radioactive waste management strategy in many countries. The evaluation of waste forms and packages provides precise basic data for regulatory bodies to establish safety requirements, and implement quality control and quality assurance procedures for radioactive waste management programmes. The requirements depend very much upon the disposal option selected, treatment technology used, waste form characteristics, package quality and other factors. The regulatory requirements can also influence the methodology of waste form/package evaluation together with selection and analysis of data for quality control and safety assurance. A coordinated research programme started at the end of 1985 and brought together 12 participants from 11 countries. The results of the programme and each particular project were discussed at three Research Coordination Meetings held in Cairo, Egypt, in May, 1986; in Beijing, China, in April, 1998; and at Harwell Laboratory, United Kingdom, in November, 1989. This document summarises the salient features and results achieved during the four year investigation and a recommendation for future work in this area. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Evaluation and review of alternative waste forms for immobilization of high level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Objective was to review the relative merits and potential of eleven alternative waste forms being considered for the solidification and disposal of radioactive wastes. A numerical rating of the alternative waste forms was arrived at individually by peer review panel members taking into consideration nine scientific and nine engineering parameters affecting the long-term performance and production of waste forms. A group rating for the alternative forms was achieved by averaging the individiual scores and discussing the available data base. Three final ranking lists comparing: (A) Present Scientific Merits or Least Risk for Use Today; (B) Research Priority; and (3) Present and Potential Engineering Practicality were prepared by the Panel. Each waste form in the lists is assigned a value of either (1) Top Rank, (2) Intermediate Rank, or is assigned a value of either (1) Top Rank, (2) Intermediate Rank, or (3) Bottom Rank. Relative strengths and weaknesses of the alternative waste forms and recommendations for future program directions are discussed

  15. Special feature of the facilities for final disposal of radioactive waste and its potential impact on the licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Gonzales, Horacio M.; Medici, Marcela A.; Alvarez, Daniela E.; Biaggio, Alfredo L.

    2009-01-01

    During the lifetime of a radioactive waste disposal facility it is possible to identify five stages: design, construction, operation, closure and post-closure. While the design, and pre-operation stages are, to some extent, similar to other kind of nuclear or radioactive facilities; construction, operation, closure and post-closure have quite special meanings in the case of radioactive waste disposal systems. For instance, the 'closure' stage of a final disposal facility seems to be equivalent to the commissioning stage of a conventional nuclear or radioactive facility. This paper describes the unique characteristics of these stages of final disposal systems, that lead to concluded that their licensing procedure can not be assimilated to the standard licensing procedures in use for other nuclear or radioactive facilities, making it necessary to develop a tailored license system. (author)

  16. Results after nine years of field testing low-level radioactive waste forms using lysimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Jastrow, J.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining information on the performance of radioactive waste forms. Ion-exchange resins from a nuclear power station were solidified into waste forms using Portland cement and vinyl ester-styrene. These waste forms are being tested to develop a low-level waste data base and to obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. This paper reviews radionuclide releases from those waste forms in the first 9 years of sampling. Included is a discussion of the recently discovered upward migration of radionuclides. Also, lysimeter data are applied to a performance assessment source term model, and initial results are presented

  17. Development of iron phosphate ceramic waste form to immobilize radioactive waste solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jongkwon [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Um, Wooyong, E-mail: wooyong.um@pnnl.gov [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Choung, Sungwook [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    The objective of this research was to develop an iron phosphate ceramic (IPC) waste form using converter slag obtained as a by-product of the steel industry as a source of iron instead of conventional iron oxide. Both synthetic off-gas scrubber solution containing technetium-99 (or Re as a surrogate) and LiCl–KCl eutectic salt, a final waste solution from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, were used as radioactive waste streams. The IPC waste form was characterized for compressive strength, reduction capacity, chemical durability, and contaminant leachability. Compressive strengths of the IPC waste form prepared with different types of waste solutions were 16 MPa and 19 MPa for LiCl–KCl eutectic salt and the off-gas scrubber simulant, respectively, which meet the minimum compressive strength of 3.45 MPa (500 psi) for waste forms to be accepted into the radioactive waste repository. The reduction capacity of converter slag, a main dry ingredient used to prepare the IPC waste form, was 4136 meq/kg by the Ce(IV) method, which is much higher than those of the conventional Fe oxides used for the IPC waste form and the blast furnace slag materials. Average leachability indexes of Tc, Li, and K for the IPC waste form were higher than 6.0, and the IPC waste form demonstrated stable durability even after 63-day leaching. In addition, the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure measurements of converter slag and the IPC waste form with LiCl–KCl eutectic salt met the universal treatment standard of the leachability limit for metals regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This study confirms the possibility of development of the IPC waste form using converter slag, showing its immobilization capability for radionuclides in both LiCl–KCl eutectic salt and off-gas scrubber solutions with significant cost savings.

  18. Technology of forming a positive attitude to physical training students of special medical group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhamediarov N.N.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Defined effective technology stages of forming a positive attitude towards physical education of students in special medical groups, stimulate motivation, epistemologically, informative, content-procedural, analytical and adjustment. For each stage technology offered special tools: lectures, seminars, analysis articles, mini conference on improving technique, racing games, mini-competitions, diagnostic interviews, questionnaires, analysis of log data on attendance. Selected criteria forming positive attitudes towards physical education: theoretical and practical, formed groups for research: experimental and control, analyzed results introduction of technology, efficiency of the proposed technology and means forming a positive attitude towards physical education students in special medical groups.

  19. An experimental survey of the factors that affect leaching from low-level radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1988-09-01

    This report represents the results of an experimental survey of the factors that affect leaching from several types of solidified low-level radioactive waste forms. The goal of these investigations was to determine those factors that accelerate leaching without changing its mechanism(s). Typically, although not in every case,the accelerating factors include: increased temperature, increased waste loading (i.e., increased waste to binder ratio), and decreased size (i.e., decreased waste form volume to surface area ratio). Additional factors that were studied were: increased leachant volume to waste form surface area ratio, pH, leachant composition (groundwaters, natural and synthetic chelating agents), leachant flow rate or replacement frequency and waste form porosity and surface condition. Other potential factors, including the radiation environment and pressure, were omitted based on a survey of the literature. 82 refs., 236 figs., 13 tabs

  20. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  1. Leaching behavior of a simulated bituminized radioactive waste form under deep geological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Shinichi; Iida, Yoshihisa; Nagano, Tetsushi; Akimoto, Toshiyuki

    2003-01-01

    The leaching behavior of a simulated bituminized waste form was studied to acquire data for the performance assessment of the geologic disposal of bituminized radioactive waste. Laboratory-scale leaching tests were performed for radioactive and non-radioactive waste specimens simulating bituminized waste of a French reprocessing company, COGEMA. The simulated waste was contacted with deionized water, an alkaline solution (0.03-mol/l KOH), and a saline solution (0.5-mol/l KCl) under atmospheric and anoxic conditions. The concentrations of Na, Ba, Cs, Sr, Np, Pu, NO 3 , SO 4 and I in the leachates were determined. Swelling of the bituminized waste progressed in deionized water and KOH. The release of the soluble components, Na and Cs, was enhanced by the swelling, and considered to be diffusion-controlled in the swelled layers of the specimens. The release of sparingly soluble components such as Ba and Np was solubility-limited in addition to the progression of leaching. Neptunium, a redox-sensitive element, showed a distinct difference in release between anoxic and atmospheric conditions. The elemental release from the bituminized waste specimens leached in the KCl was very low, which is likely due to the suppression of swelling of the specimens at high ionic strength. (author)

  2. Radiation safety ensuring and environment protection dealing with radioactive waste management in the system of the special plants ''Radon''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenkina, Lidia

    1999-01-01

    This presentation deals with the Russian special plants ''Radon'', a system of 16 regional plants devoted to radioactive waste management. The plants are intended to receive solid radioactive wastes and liquid radioactive wastes of low and medium levels of activity for reprocessing and final disposal. The following topics are discussed: (1) waste characterization, (2) storage construction, (3) preparation of waste for burial, (4) site selection, (5) tasks of the plant, (6) division of plant territory into zones, (7) radiation monitoring, (8) prevention of accidents and elimination of their consequences, (10) training of staff, (11) sanitary treatment of staff and equipment decontamination. Lack of financial means is a major problem. The closure of the Murmansk special plant Radon has caused great problems for the North-European District. The Leningrad special plant Radon has been forced to accept radioactive waste from the Arkhangelsk region. The exhaustion of reserve volumes for solid radioactive waste acceptance at this plant affects the entire North-Western Russia. At present, spent sources of ionising radiation are buried in shallow land-based storage facilities of well type. It was found on inspection that such burial of sources containing nuclides with half-life of more than 30 years must be stopped. Existing storages are inadequate for safe storage of such sources throughout their hazardous period, and are not adjusted for extraction of such sources in the future. The spent sources containing long-lived nuclides must be temporarily stored in transport containers in separate sections of solid waste storage facilities. In 1997, analysis of radiation state parameters for radioactive waste burial at special plants Radon showed that the radiation dose rate at working places and the average annual volumetric activity of radionuclides in the environment were within the admissible limits

  3. Characterization of low and medium-level radioactive waste forms. Joint annual progress report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vejmelka, P.; Sambell, R.A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The work reported was carried out during the second year of the Commission of the European Communities programme on the characterization of low and medium-level waste forms. Ten reference waste forms plus others of special national interest have been identified covering PWR, BWR, GCR and reprocessing wastes. The immobilizing media include the three main matrices: cement, polymers and bitumen, and a glass. Characterization is viewed as one input to quality assurance of the waste form and covers: waste-matrix compatibility, radiation effects, leaching, microbiological attack, shrinkage and swelling, ageing processes and thermal effects. The aim is a balanced programme of comparative data, predictive modelling and an understanding of basic mechanisms

  4. Declaration and authorization forms for the fabrication, distribution or use of radioactive sources or electric generators of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document gathers all the forms to be completed when declaring or when asking for an authorization for the fabrication, retailing or use of radioactive sources or electric equipment generating ionizing radiation. These forms can concern all domains (use of sealed radioactive sources, possession and use of a particle accelerator or of radionuclides, import or export of radionuclides or of products containing radionuclides), or the use of such materials or equipment in the medical sector, or the fabrication and use in industry or research, or in user's guides for radioactive sources

  5. Contribution to the study of external contamination by radioactive products: skin contamination by radioactive cobalt in soluble form and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tymen, H.

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the behavior of the radioactive cobalt isotopes, which are present in reactor coolant systems of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), in the case of occupational skin exposure, and to study different therapies. Our experimental approach stems from standardized methods in skin pharmacology. In a first step, a physico-chemical study of a primary coolant water was carried out to characterize the soluble fraction of radio-cobalt and its skin affinity. The second step consisted in quantifying the diffusion through the skin, in vivo and in vitro in rats, and in vitro in human. Parallel experiments were carried out to study biokinetics of cobalt in rats, after intravenous, intramuscular and subcutaneous injection. Whatever the route of administration, cobalt diffuses easily in the organism. On the contrary, its skin absorption is very limited. In a fourth step, the influence of the skin injuries on absorption was estimated in vivo on rat skin. Several skin models were developed to standardize different injuries: excoriation, heat burns (convection, conduction) and chemical burns (acid or alkaline). Biokinetics study over 24 hours and histological study have shown a relation between skin absorption and stratum corneum alteration. In the latest step of this work, we compared the efficacy of various decontaminating agents administered under different galenic forms. Per (3, 6- anhydro, 2-O-carboxy-methyl)-α-cyclo-dextrin exhibited a significant efficacy for cobalt decontamination of skin. This macromolecule was tested in aqueous solution, in agarose gel and loaded on 'functionalized' fibers intended for development of new decontaminating tissues. (author)

  6. Standard test method for static leaching of monolithic waste forms for disposal of radioactive waste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides a measure of the chemical durability of a simulated or radioactive monolithic waste form, such as a glass, ceramic, cement (grout), or cermet, in a test solution at temperatures <100°C under low specimen surface- area-to-leachant volume (S/V) ratio conditions. 1.2 This test method can be used to characterize the dissolution or leaching behaviors of various simulated or radioactive waste forms in various leachants under the specific conditions of the test based on analysis of the test solution. Data from this test are used to calculate normalized elemental mass loss values from specimens exposed to aqueous solutions at temperatures <100°C. 1.3 The test is conducted under static conditions in a constant solution volume and at a constant temperature. The reactivity of the test specimen is determined from the amounts of components released and accumulated in the solution over the test duration. A wide range of test conditions can be used to study material behavior, includin...

  7. Evaluation and review of alternative waste forms for immobilization of high level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the relative merits and potential of 15 (fifteen) alternative waste forms being considered for the solidification and disposal of radioactive wastes. The relative merits of 4 (four) alternative pre-solidification processing approaches were also assessed in this study. A Peer Review Panel composed of 8 (eight) scientists and engineers representing independent, non-DOE laboratories from industry, government, and universities and the disciplines of materials science, ceramics, glass, metallurgy, and geology conducted the review. A numerical rating of alternative waste forms was arrived at individually by the panel members taking into consideration 9 (nine) scientific and 9 (nine) engineering parameters affecting the long term performance and production of waste forms. At a meeting on May 9, 1980, a group ranking for the alternative forms was achieved by averaging the individual scores and discussing the available data base. Three final ranking lists comparing: (A) Present Scientific Merits or Least Risk for Use Today; and (B) Research Priority; and (C) Present and Potential Engineering Practicality were prepared by the Panel. Each waste form in the lists is assigned a value of either (1) Top Rank, (2) Intermediate Rank, or (3) Bottom Rank. A discussion of the relative strengths and weaknesses of the alternative waste forms and recommendations for future program directions is presented in the body of the accompanying Peer Review Panel report

  8. Studies of high-level radioactive waste form performance at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banba, Tsunetaka; Kamizono, Hiroshi; Mitamura, Hisayoshi

    1992-02-01

    The recent studies of high-level radioactive waste form at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute can be classified into the following three categories; (1) Study on the leaching behavior of the nuclear waste glass placing the focus on the alteration layer and the chemical composition of leachant for the prediction of the long-term corrosion of the waste glass. (2) Study on the radiation (alpha-radiation) effects which have relation to the long-term stability of the nuclear waste glass. (3) Study on the long-term self-irradiation damage of a SYNROC waste form using a curium-doped sample. In the present report, the recent results corresponding to the above categories are described. (author)

  9. Results after ten years of field testing low-level radioactive waste forms using lysimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Jastrow, J.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Larsen, I.L.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining information on the performance of radioactive waste forms. Ion-exchange resins from a commercial nuclear power station were solidified into waste forms using portland cement and vinyl esterstyrene. These waste forms are being tested to: (a) obtain information on performance of waste forms in typical disposal environments, (b) compare field results with bench leach studies, (c) develop a low-level waste data base for use in performance assessment source term calculations, and (d) apply the DUST computer code to compare predicted cumulative release to actual field data. The program, funded by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), includes observed radionuclide releases from waste forms in field lysimeters. The purpose of this paper is to present the experimental results of two lysimeter arrays over 10 years of operation, and to compare those results to bench test results and to DUST code predicted releases. Further analysis of soil cores taken to define the observed upward migration of radionuclides in one lysimeter is also presented

  10. Characterization of radioactive waste forms. Progress report for 1986 Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; McCulloch, C.

    1988-01-01

    The Council of Ministers of the European Communities adopted the third five-year EC programme of research on radioactive waste management and disposal in March 1985. It was recognized that the inevitable production of radioactive waste required perfecting and demonstrating systems for managing the waste produced by the nuclear industry, ensuring at the various stages the best possible protection of man and the environment. Task 3 of the programme 'evaluation of conditioned waste and qualification of engineered barriers' is subdivided into five sections. This book, in two volumes, is a compilation of reports on the progress achieved in four of the sections during 1986, the first year of the third programme. Volume 1 is concerned with Sections 1 and 5, 'Research on low -and medium- active waste' and 'Quality control methods'. Volume 2 covers Section 2 'HLW form characterization' and Section 3 'Other engineered barriers'. Section 4 'Development of standard test methods' is not included in this edition, as results from an interlaboratory round robin test now in progress will only be available for inclusion for the year 1988

  11. Characterization of radioactive waste forms. Progress report for 1986 Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.L.; Mallinson, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    The Council of Ministers of the European Communities adopted the third five-year EC programme of research on radioactive waste management and disposal in March 1985. It was recognized that the inevitable production of radioactive waste required perfecting and demonstrating systems for managing the waste produced by the nuclear industry, ensuring at the various stages the best possible protection of man and the environment. Task 3 of the programme 'evaluation of conditioned waste and qualification of engineered barriers' is subdivided into five sections. This book, in two volumes, is a compilation of reports on the progress achieved in four of the sections during 1986, the first year of the third programme. Volume 1 is concerned with Sections 1 and 5, 'Research on low-and medium- active waste' and 'Quality control methods'. Volume 2 covers Section 2 'HLW form characterization' and Section 3 'Other engineered barriers' Section 4 'Development of standard test methods' is not included in this edition, as results from an interlaboratory round robin test now in progress will only be available for inclusion for the year 1988

  12. Open site tests on corrosion of carbon steel containers for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barinov, A.S.; Ojovan, M.I.; Ojovan, N.V.; Startceva, I.V.; Chujkova, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    Testing of waste containers under open field conditions is a component part of the research program that is being carried out at SIA Radon for more than 20 years to understand the long-term behavior of radioactive waste forms and waste packages. This paper presents the preliminary results of these ongoing studies. The authors used a typical NPP operational waste, containing 137 Cs, 134 Cs, and 60 Co as the dominant radioactive constituents. Bituminized and vitrified waste samples with 30--50 wt.% waste loading were prepared. Combined effects of climatic factors on corrosion behavior of carbon steel containers were estimated using gravimetric and chemical analyses. The observations suggest that uniform corrosion of containers prevails under open field conditions. The upper limits for the lifetime of containers were derived from calculations based on the model of atmospheric steel corrosion. Estimated lifetime values range from 300 to 600 years for carbon steel containers with the wall thickness of 2 mm containing vitrified waste, and from 450 to 500 years for containers with the wall thickness of 2.5 mm that were used for bituminized waste. However, following the most conservative method, pitting corrosion may cause container integrity failure after 60 to 90 years of exposure

  13. Characteristics of high-level radioactive waste forms for their disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2000-12-01

    In order to develop a deep geological repository for a high-level radioactive waste coming from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels discharged from our domestic nuclear power plants, the the required characteristics of waste form are dependent upon a solidifying medium and the amount of waste loading in the medium. And so, by the comparative analysis of the characteristics of various waste forms developed up to the present, a suitable medium is recommended.The overall characteristics of the latter is much better than those of the former, but the change of the properties due to an amorphysation by radiation exposure and its thermal expansion has not been clearly identified yet. And its process has not been commercialized. However, the overall properties of the borosilicate glass waste forms are acceptable for their disposal, their production cost is reasonable and their processes have already been commercialized. And plenty informations of their characteristics and operational experiences have been accumulated. Consequently, it is recommended that a suitable medium solidifying the HLW is a borosilicate glass and its composition for the identification of a reference waste form would be based on the glass frit of R7T7

  14. Design and performance assessment of radioactive waste forms: what can we learn from natural analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this review, we specify the role of natural analogues for the development of solid radioactive waste-forms. Numerous works have been carried out on the major matrices proposed or actually in use for both high-level (glasses, spent fuel, ceramics) and low- or intermediate-level wastes (cement-based materials, bitumens, resins) as well as for metallic containers. We show that some natural, historical or archaeological materials can be considered as good analogues. We suggest that their use has been quite limited in the past for the design of matrices but that both qualitative and quantitative information of great interest (and in some cases unique) have been already inferred for assessing their long-term performance. 14 figs., 1 tab., 72 refs

  15. Radiolysis in cement-based materials ; application to radioactive waste-forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouniol, P.

    2014-01-01

    Cement-based materials appear to be an original environment with respect to radiolysis, due to their intrinsic complexity (porous, multiphasic and evolutional medium) or their very specific physico-chemical conditions (hyper-alkaline medium with pH ≥ 13, high content in calcium) or by the fact of numerous couplings existing between different phenomenologies. At the level of a radioactive cemented wasteform, a high degree of complexity is reached, in particular if the system communicates with the atmosphere (open system allowing regulation of the pressures but also the admission of O 2 , strong reactive with regards to radiolysis). Then, the radiolysis description exceeds widely the only one aspect of the decomposition of alkaline water under irradiation and makes necessary a global phenomenological approach. In this context, some 'outlying' phenomena, highly coupled with radiation chemistry, have to be taken into account because they contribute to deeply modify the net result of the radiolysis: radioactive decay of multiple αβγ emitters with filiation, phase changes (for example H 2 aq → H 2 gas) within the pores, gas transport by convection (Darcy law) and by diffusion (Fick law), precipitation/dissolution of solid phases, effect of the ionic strength and the temperature, disturbances connected to the presence of some solutes with redox potentialities (iron, sulphur). The integration work carried out on the previous points leads to an operational model (DOREMI) allowing the estimate of H 2 amounts produced by radiolysis in different cemented radioactive waste-forms. As the final expression of the model, numerical simulations constitute a relevant tool of expertise and prospecting, contributing to accompany the thought on radiolysis in cement matrices in general and in cemented waste-forms in particular. Starting from different examples, simulations can be so used in order to test some hypotheses or illustrate the greatest influence of gas transport, dose

  16. Microbially influenced degradation of cement-solidified low-level radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Because of its apparent structural integrity, cement has been widely used in the United States as a binder to solidify Class B and C low-level radioactive waste (LLW). However, the resulting cement preparations are susceptible to failure due to the actions of stress and environment. This paper contains information on three groups of microoganisms that are associated with the degradation of cement materials: sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus), nitrifying bacteria (Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter), and heterotrophic bacteria, which produce organic acids. Preliminary work using laboratory- and vendor-manufactured, simulated waste forms exposed to thiobacilli has shown that microbiologically influenced degradation has the potential to severely compromise the structural integrity of ion-exchange resin and evaporator-bottoms waste that is solidified with cement. In addition, it was found that a significant percentage of calcium was leached from the treated waste forms. Also, the surface pH of the treated specimens was decreased to below 2. These conditions apparently contributed to the physical deterioration of simulated waste forms after 30 to 60 days of exposure

  17. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  18. Results of special radiation measurements resulting from the Chernobyl accident and regional analysis of environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    This report of the SCPRI exposes an interpretation of the results concerning the monitoring of the environmental radioactivity in France following Chernobyl accident. Atmospheric dusts, milk and milk products, vegetables, water and various beverages are analyzed. More than 1500 additional food samples are presented. Regional analysis of radioactivity and human gamma-spectrometric investigations are included [fr

  19. Leaching of radioactive waste forms under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petelka, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    To predict the environmental impact of shallow land burial sites for radioactive waste, the mobilization and migration of waste nuclides must be estimated. The theoretical understanding that in potential leaching mechanisms leach-rate variations may arise from changes in both moisture content and volumetric flow rate was tested in column flow leach experiments using labeled vermiculite particles as a simulated waste form. As far as possible, conditions of flow rate and solution ion concentration were chosen to roughly approximate expected field conditions. A modified pressure-plate apparatus was developed, tested, and found suitable for the production of steady-state unsaturated conditions with leachate flow. Water content was determined using the gamma-ray attenuation method. The effects of several parameters on leaching were studied, including moisture content and pore velocity. Pore velocity effects were found to be negligible. It was found that the leach rate depends on the fraction of the exposed waste surface that is wetted and varies with the mobile water content in a non-linear fashion. The experimental results indicate that the release rate of radionuclides placed within a properly sited low-level waste disposal site may be two to three times smaller than that predicted assuming saturated conditions. This study was performed using a homogeneous fine-grained synthetic waste form, at room temperature, with a near neutral pH leachant and oxidizing conditions

  20. Special training for drivers of vehicles carrying radioactive materials in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridder, K.

    1992-01-01

    No rule, not even the best, serves its purpose if it is not complied with just because it is not known. In Europe, and in Germany particularly, this has been accepted wisdom for 12 years. With respect to the greater risk emanating form tank-vehicles, and in the aftermath of a tank-vehicle accident due to the driver's error in Spain 1987 (Los Alfaques) that killed more than 200 persons, tank-vehicle drivers had to undergo special training since midyear 1991. Training is organised in a modular system, which means that the driver can customise his dangerous goods training programme by combining several modules. The contents of the training programme, its organisation and supervision as well as the means for checking the successful completion of the programme are shown. (Author)

  1. Method for making a low density polyethylene waste form for safe disposal of low level radioactive material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, P.; Kalb, P.D.

    1984-06-05

    In the method of the invention low density polyethylene pellets are mixed in a predetermined ratio with radioactive particulate material, then the mixture is fed through a screw-type extruder that melts the low density polyethylene under a predetermined pressure and temperature to form a homogeneous matrix that is extruded and separated into solid monolithic waste forms. The solid waste forms are adapted to be safely handled, stored for a short time, and safely disposed of in approved depositories.

  2. Analysis of alternative transportation methods for radioactive materials shipments including the use of special trains for spent fuel and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.R.; Luna, R.E.; Taylor, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Two studies were completed which evaluate the environmental impact of radioactive material transport. The first was a generic study which evaluated all radioactive materials and all transportation modes; the second addressed spent fuel and fuel-cycle wastes shipped by truck, rail and barge. A portion of each of those studies dealing with the change in impact resulting from alternative shipping methods is presented in this paper. Alternatives evaluated in each study were mode shifts, operational constraints, and, in generic case, changes in material properties and package capabilities. Data for the analyses were obtained from a shipper survey and from projections of shipments that would occur in an equilibrium fuel cycle supporting one hundred 1000-MW(e) reactors. Population exposures were deduced from point source radiation formulae using separation distances derived for scenarios appropriate to each shipping mode and to each exposed population group. Fourteen alternatives were investigated for the generic impact case. All showed relatively minor changes in the overall radiological impact. Since the radioactive material transport is estimated to be fewer than 3 latent cancer fatalities (LCF) for each shipment year (compared to some 300,000 yearly cancer fatalities or 5000 LCF's calculated for background radiation using the same radiological effects model), a 15% decrease caused by shifting from passenger air to cargo air is a relatively small effect. Eleven alternatives were considered for the fuel cycle/special train study, but only one produced a reduction in total special train baseline LCF's (.047) that was larger than 5%

  3. Materials Characterization Center workshop on leaching of radioactive waste forms. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.A.; Strachan, D.M.; Turcotte, R.P.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    At the first Materials Characterization Center (MCC) workshop, on the leaching of radioactive waste forms, there was general agreement that, after certain revisions, the proposed leach test plan set forth by the MCC can be expected to meet most of the nuclear waste community's waste form durability data requirements. The revisions give a clearer definition of the purposes of each test and the end uses of the data. As a result of the workshop, the format of the test program has been recast to clarify the purposes, limitations, and interrelationships of the individual tests. There was also a recognition that the leach test program must be based on an understanding of the mechanistic principles of leaching, and that further study is needed to ensure that the approved data from the MCC leach tests will be compatible with mechanistic research needs. It was agreed that another meeting of the participants in Working Groups 3 and 4, and perhaps some other experts, should be held as soon as possible to focus just on the definition of leach test requirements for mechanistic research. The MCC plans to hold this meeting in April 1980. Many of the tests that will lead to increased understanding of mechanisms will of necessity be long-term tests, sometimes lasting for several years. But the MCC also faces pressing needs to produce approved data that can be used for the comparison of waste forms in the relative near-term, i.e., in the next 1 to 3 yr. Therefore, it was decided to initiate a round-robin test of the MCC short-term static leach procedure as soon as practicable. The MCC has tentative plans for organization of the round robin in May 1980

  4. 13 CFR 108.160 - Special rules for NMVC Companies formed as limited partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special rules for NMVC Companies formed as limited partnerships. 108.160 Section 108.160 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS... of a limited partner pending SBA's written approval of such transfer or succession; and (4) You must...

  5. Convergence criterion for branched contіnued fractions of the special form with positive elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Bodnar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the problem of convergence of the important type of a multidimensional generalization of continued fractions, the branched continued fractions with independent variables, is considered. This fractions are an efficient apparatus for the approximation of multivariable functions, which are represented by multiple power series. When variables are fixed these fractions are called the branched continued fractions of the special form. Their structure is much simpler then the structure of general branched continued fractions. It has given a possibility to establish the necessary and sufficient conditions of convergence of branched continued fractions of the special form with the positive elements. The received result is the multidimensional analog of Seidel's criterion for the continued fractions. The condition of convergence of investigated fractions is the divergence of series, whose elements are continued fractions. Therefore, the sufficient condition of the convergence of this fraction which has been formulated by the divergence of series composed of partial denominators of this fraction, is established. Using the established criterion and Stieltjes-Vitali Theorem the parabolic theorems of branched continued fractions of the special form with complex elements convergence, is investigated. The sufficient conditions gave a possibility to make the condition of convergence of the branched continued fractions of the special form, whose elements lie in parabolic domains.

  6. 15 CFR Appendix I to Part 700 - Form BIS-999-Request for Special Priorities Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Form BIS-999-Request for Special Priorities Assistance I Appendix I to Part 700 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL...

  7. Policy statement--emergency information forms and emergency preparedness for children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Children with chronic medical conditions rely on complex management plans for problems that cause them to be at increased risk for suboptimal outcomes in emergency situations. The emergency information form (EIF) is a medical summary that describes medical condition(s), medications, and special health care needs to inform health care providers of a child's special health conditions and needs so that optimal emergency medical care can be provided. This statement describes updates to EIFs, including computerization of the EIF, expanding the potential benefits of the EIF, quality-improvement programs using the EIF, the EIF as a central repository, and facilitating emergency preparedness in disaster management and drills by using the EIF.

  8. Special RADMIL report. Assessment of the past and present implications of radioactive contamination of Lancashire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The county of Lancashire in the United Kingdom has a unique relationship with the nuclear industry in respect of the number of nuclear facilities within or close to its boundaries. This special Radiation Monitoring in Lancashire (RADMIL) report collates data collected from 1976 to 1994 to provide a dose reconstruction for that period. It is shown that the radiation exposure of the population of Lancashire has decreased over the past twenty years. This has been due largely to a decrease in the authorised discharges from the facilities at Sellafield. Despite the fact that the advisory public dose limits have been reduced fivefold over the period, the dose to the most exposed groups has been consistently below those limits. Present contamination of the Lancashire environment is much reduced by comparison with earlier years. The accumulated effect of past discharges will mean that little further improvement can be expected, however. Similarly, dose levels to the populations are also expected to remain steady unless discharges increase again. This data compilation will form a baseline against which RADMIL can compare the results of future monitoring. (17 figures, 38 tables, 182 references) (UK).

  9. Special RADMIL report. Assessment of the past and present implications of radioactive contamination of Lancashire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The county of Lancashire in the United Kingdom has a unique relationship with the nuclear industry in respect of the number of nuclear facilities within or close to its boundaries. This special Radiation Monitoring in Lancashire (RADMIL) report collates data collected from 1976 to 1994 to provide a dose reconstruction for that period. It is shown that the radiation exposure of the population of Lancashire has decreased over the past twenty years. This has been due largely to a decrease in the authorised discharges from the facilities at Sellafield. Despite the fact that the advisory public dose limits have been reduced fivefold over the period, the dose to the most exposed groups has been consistently below those limits. Present contamination of the Lancashire environment is much reduced by comparison with earlier years. The accumulated effect of past discharges will mean that little further improvement can be expected, however. Similarly, dose levels to the populations are also expected to remain steady unless discharges increase again. This data compilation will form a baseline against which RADMIL can compare the results of future monitoring. (17 figures, 38 tables, 182 references) (UK)

  10. Removal of cesium using coconut fiber in raw and modified forms for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Nella N.M. de; Nobre, Vanessa B.; Potiens Junior, Ademar J.; Sakata, Solange K.; Di Vitta, Patricia B.

    2013-01-01

    Sorption is one of the most studied methods to reduce the volume of radioactive waste streams. Cesium-137 is a radioisotope formed by the fission of uranium and it can cause health problems due to its easy assimilation by cells. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential of coconut fiber in removing cesium from radioactive liquid wastes; this process can help in disposing radioactive waste. The experiments were performed in batch and the particle size of the fiber ranged between 0.30 mm and 0.50 mm. The fiber was treated with hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium. The following parameters were analyzed: contact time, pH and concentration of cesium ions in aqueous solution. After the experiments the samples were filtered and cesium remaining in solution was quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. (author)

  11. Removal of cesium using coconut fiber in raw and modified forms for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Nella N.M. de; Nobre, Vanessa B.; Potiens Junior, Ademar J.; Sakata, Solange K., E-mail: sksakata@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Di Vitta, Patricia B. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2013-07-01

    Sorption is one of the most studied methods to reduce the volume of radioactive waste streams. Cesium-137 is a radioisotope formed by the fission of uranium and it can cause health problems due to its easy assimilation by cells. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential of coconut fiber in removing cesium from radioactive liquid wastes; this process can help in disposing radioactive waste. The experiments were performed in batch and the particle size of the fiber ranged between 0.30 mm and 0.50 mm. The fiber was treated with hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium. The following parameters were analyzed: contact time, pH and concentration of cesium ions in aqueous solution. After the experiments the samples were filtered and cesium remaining in solution was quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. (author)

  12. Methods of generalizing and classifying layer structures of a special form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viktorova, N P

    1981-09-01

    An examination is made of the problem of classifying structures represented by weighted multilayer graphs of special form with connections between the vertices of each layer. The classification of structures of such a form is based on the construction of resolving sets of graphs as a result of generalization of the elements of the training sample of each class and the testing of whether an input object is isomorphic (with allowance for the weights) to the structures of the resolving set or not. 4 references.

  13. Pharmaceutical solvates, hydrates and amorphous forms: A special emphasis on cocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Anne Marie; Worku, Zelalem Ayenew; Kumar, Dinesh; Madi, Atif M

    2017-08-01

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) may exist in various solid forms, which can lead to differences in the intermolecular interactions, affecting the internal energy and enthalpy, and the degree of disorder, affecting the entropy. Differences in solid forms often lead to differences in thermodynamic parameters and physicochemical properties for example solubility, dissolution rate, stability and mechanical properties of APIs and excipients. Hence, solid forms of APIs play a vital role in drug discovery and development in the context of optimization of bioavailability, filing intellectual property rights and developing suitable manufacturing methods. In this review, the fundamental characteristics and trends observed for pharmaceutical hydrates, solvates and amorphous forms are presented, with special emphasis, due to their relative abundance, on pharmaceutical hydrates with single and two-component (i.e. cocrystal) host molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Process for improving the separation efficiency in the isolation of radioactive isotopes in elementary or chemically bonded form from liquids and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidberger, R.; Kirch, R.; Kock, W.

    1986-01-01

    In the process for the improvement of the separation efficiency in the isolation of radioactive isotopes in elementary or chemically bonded form from liquids or gases by ion exchange and adsorption, non-radioactive isotopes of the element to be isolated are added to the fluid before the isolation, whereas at the same time a large surplus of the non-radioactive isotopes to the radioactive isotopes is achieved by addition of only small quantities of compounds of the non-radioactive isotopes. (orig./RB) [de

  15. Special waste-form lysimeters-arid: Three-year monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.L.; Serne, R.J.; Toste, A.P.

    1988-04-01

    Regulations governing the disposal of commercial low-level waste require all liquid waste to be solidified before burial. Most waste must be solidified into a rigid matrix such as cement or plastic to prevent waste consolidation and site slumping after burial. These solidification processes affect the rate at which radionuclides and other solutes are released into the soil. In 1983, a program was initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to study the release of waste from samples of low-level radioactive waste that had been commercially solidified. The primary method used by this program is to bury sample waste forms in field lysimeters and monitor leachate composition from the release and transport of solutes. The lysimeter facility consists of 10 lysimeters, each containing one sample of solidified waste. Five different waste forms are being tested, allowing duplicate samples of each one to be evaluated. The samples were obtained from operating nuclear power plants and are actual waste forms routinely generated at these facilities. All solidification was accomplished by commercial processes. Sample size is a partially filled 210-L drum. All containers were removed prior to burial leaving the bare waste form in contact with the lysimeter soil. 11 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs

  16. The disposal of radioactive wastes in Brazil with special emphasis on rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enokihara, Cyro Teiti

    1983-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes in geological formations seems to be the most appropriate solution for the nuclear waste problem. The disposal sites must provide the maximum safety for the radionuclides during its decay period. The study presents a general analysis of three types rocks: salt, granite and basalt. In our analysis we have dealt with the following aspects: geology, tectonics, seismicity, hydrogeology , mineral resources, geomorphology, population and access. The studied regions were: Sergipe-Alagoas and Reconcavo Basins, Northeastern and Southeastern Folded Regions and Parana Basin. Our study contains the macro-analysis needed for the selection of a safe site for radioactive waste disposal. We believe this work will be useful as a first step for further micro-analysis of selected sites. (author)

  17. The forming of the complexes of soil mezofauna in the zone of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimova, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    We carried out the pedobiological research in the different biogeocenoses in the zone of radioactive contamination. Based on the obtained data we can conclude a direct correlation between the viability of the soil invertebrates and the background gamma-radiation intensity. All the facts indicate that soil animal complexes in biogeocenoses exposed to radiation for a long time impact clearly noticeable suppression

  18. The transport of radioactive materials, paying special attention to nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blechschmidt, M.

    1977-06-01

    The transport of radioactive materials, particularly within the nuclear fuel cycle, is of increasing importance, and is more than ever a matter of public debate. This report provides information concerning the necessary physical, technical and administrative precautions which must be taken to ensure protection of the environment. The international standard of requirements for the packing of the materials is emphasized, as in many cases, transports cross national borders. The relatively comprehensive list of references can be used for the study of details. (orig.) [de

  19. Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multimodal transportation network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, and focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

  20. Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multi-modal transportation network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-28

    Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, all focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

  1. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank Farm Blend) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    Standards (UTS). Two identical Benchscale Steam Reformers (BSR) were designed and constructed at SRNL, one to treat non-radioactive simulants and the other to treat actual radioactive wastes. The results from the non-radioactive BSR were used to determine the parameters needed to operate the radioactive BSR in order to confirm the findings of non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale and engineering scale tests and to qualify an FBSR LAW waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced using SRS LAW from Tank 50 chemically trimmed to look like Hanford's blended LAW known as the Rassat simulant as this simulant composition had been tested in the non-radioactive BSR, the non-radioactive pilot scale FBSR at the Science Applications International Corporation-Science and Technology Applications Research (SAIC-STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID and in the TTT Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) in Denver, CO. This provided a ''tie back'' between radioactive BSR testing and non-radioactive BSR, pilot scale, and engineering scale testing. Approximately six hundred grams of non-radioactive and radioactive BSR product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests performed in 2004 at SAIC-STAR and the engineering scale test performed in 2008 at HRI with the Rassat simulant. The same mineral phases and off-gas species were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for total constituents and durability tested as a granular waste form. A subset of the granular material was stabilized in a clay based geopolymer matrix at 42% and 65% FBSR loadings and durability tested as a monolith waste form. The 65 wt% FBSR loaded monolith made with clay (radioactive) was more durable than the 67-68 wt% FBSR loaded monoliths made from fly ash (non-radioactive) based on short term PCT testing. Long term, 90 to 107

  2. Test Report of Special Form Qualification Testing for the ORNL U ZipCan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Oscar A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This test report describes the special form testing activities performed on the two ZiPCans. One prototype test unit was subjected to the tests stipulated by 10 CFR 71.75 (d)(1)(i), ISO 2919:1999(E) Class 4 impact test, along with the leak rate test specified in 49 CFR 173.469(a)(4)(i). The other test unit was subjected to a leak rate test as specified in 173.469(a)(4)(i) and a heat test as specified in 49 CFR 173.469 (b)(4). Each test unit was leak tested before and after these respective tests. The leak rate tests performed were helium back-pressure tests and bubble tests, as specified in ANSI N14.5-2014.The measured leak rates were converted to standard condition leak rates as specified in ASTM E 493. The determined standardized leak rates from the test and calculation for both test units met the requirements for special form certification.

  3. Characterization of low and medium-level radioactive waste forms. Final report - 2nd Programme 1980-84

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pottier, P.E.; Glasser, F.P.

    1986-01-01

    The European Communities Second R and D Programme 1980-84 'Management and Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Shared cost action)' included a closely coordinated research activity for the 'Characterization of low and medium-level radioactive waste forms'. This report summarizes the main results obtained during the five years of the programme by laboratories in seven European countries participating in the coordinated RandD efforts. Ten reference waste forms have been selected, based on the most important types of low and medium-level waste arisings and the three commonly used immobilization matrices: cement, bitumen and polymers. The investigated properties were mainly: waste-matrix compatibility, radiation effects, leaching behaviour, leached radionuclides speciation, microbiological resistance and thermal as well as mechanical properties. Extensive experimental results relevant for the qualification of waste products and for application in performance analysis are presented in this final report. The main conclusions are drawn for the confinement properties of these different waste forms. These conclusions have also shown the necessity of selecting several other reference waste forms for the continuation of this RandD action now being launched in the Third EC Programme 1985-89

  4. Infrared and Raman investigation of rare-earth phosphate glasses for potential use as radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, S.H.

    1989-01-01

    This project was designed to investigate the properties of the rare-earth phosphate glass systems CeO 2 -P 2 O 5 and Pr 2 O 3 -P 2 O 5 for potential use as radioactive waste glasses. The glass-forming region and optimum processing parameters of these glass systems were investigated. The structure of the host glasses and glassed loaded with simulated waste elements was investigated using Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Because of the radical differences in the spectra of the molybdenum-loaded glasses, the structure of the MoO 3 -P 2 O 5 glass system was also investigated. 29 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Long-term leach testing of solidified radioactive waste forms (International Standard Publication ISO 6961:1982)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanik, J.

    2001-01-01

    Processes are developed for the immobilization of radionuclides by solidification of radioactive wastes. The resulting solidification products are characterized by strong resistance to leaching aimed at low release rates of the radionuclides to the environment. To measure this resistance to leaching of the solidified materials: glass, glass-ceramics, bitumen, cement, concrete, plastics, a long-term leach test is presented. The long-term leach test is aimed at: a) the comparison of different kinds or compositions of solidified waste forms; b) the intercomparison between leach test results from different laboratories on one product; c) the intercomparison between leach test results on products from different processes

  6. Sirenomelia (mermaid syndrome): an infant from parents who used a special form of snuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, M M; Jafari Naveh, H R; Shariati, M; Morteza Zade, F

    2009-05-01

    We report the first case of a fetus with sirenomelia or mermaid syndrome, whose Afghanian parents were heavy user of a special form of snuff. The case was diagnosed as a mermaid syndrome but some of the features were common to both symmelia dipus and symmelia apus, for example, the single lower extremity had the normal femur, tibia and fibula, but the single foot was rotated medially. The digestive tube ended to a massive closed saclike structure and the anus was absence. The external genital organs were rudiment and the normal testes were undescended. Aorta was divided to branches, such that the external iliac arteries were very small in comparison to the internal iliac arteries. Inferior Vena cava was placed on to the left side of the aorta and unlike the majority of reported mermaid syndrome, the bladder was present. So, the researchers believe that the present case is a rare variant of the mermaid syndrome.

  7. Assesment of systemic exposure form a wound contaminated by radioactive products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechowski, Jean; Menoux, Bernadette; Chaptinel, Yves

    1992-03-01

    Wound contamination may occur in case of accidental exposure of workers handling radioactive products. In order to operate radio-toxicological follow-up, a fairly general model must be able to apply to the various injuries and products involved. Some principles and their applications are developed to make it possible for physicians to set up a monitoring program relevant to the assessment of the systemic burden. Only the dosimetry relative to the activity passing through the cutaneous mucous barrier into the blood flow is considered. Local doses at the wound level are not considered. For the interpretation of the measurements, both retention and excretion curves and dosimetric factors are given for the most common radionuclides. (authors) [fr

  8. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Materials and Energy Corporation Sealed Sources at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shott, Gregory [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2017-05-15

    This special analysis (SA) evaluates whether the Materials and Energy Corporation (M&EC) Sealed Source waste stream (PERM000000036, Revision 0) is suitable for shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Disposal of the M&EC Sealed Source waste meets all U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual,” Chapter IV, Section P performance objectives (DOE 1999). The M&EC Sealed Source waste stream is recommended for acceptance without conditions.

  9. Evaluation of a radioactive concrete waste form recovered from an ocean dumpsite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Little dissolution of the concrete waste form in the ocean environment occurred as evidenced by a maximum waste package weight loss of approximately 5%. Water loss through evaporation during curing and dissolution of calcium hydroxide in disposal or inaccuracy of the initial weighing are believed to be responsible for the apparent weight loss. A conservative estimate that assumes a constant 0.33%/yr weight loss due solely to cement-phase dissolution predicts that it would require a minimum of 300 years in this environment before the concrete waste form would lose its integrity. The measured compression strength of the concrete waste form is in the range expected for concrete formulations. This indicates the absence of appreciable attack which is also supported by the observation that negligible deterioration of the waste form surface has occurred. The concrete waste form contained Cs-137, Cs-134, and Co-60. Based on the assumed initial Cs-137 distribution in the waste form, a bulk leach rate for this radionuclide of 2.4x10 -3 g/(cm 2 -day) was calculated. This corresponds to an average fractional activity loss rate of 3.7x10 -2 per year (neglecting decay). 7 figures, 1 table

  10. Application of ion beams in materials science of radioactive waste forms: focus on the performance of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido, Frederico [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, Batiments 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)]. E-mail: garrido@csnsm.in2p3.fr; Nowicki, Lech [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Thome, Lionel [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, Ba-hat timents 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2005-10-15

    Ion beam techniques provide unique tools for the qualification of radioactive waste forms. They address three major issues: (i) the simulation by ion irradiation of the stability of a matrix submitted to radiative environment; (ii) the doping of a material with stable or radioactive elements which simulate the species to be confined; (iii) the characterisation of a material via nuclear microanalysis techniques. Among various classes of nuclear matrices the spent nuclear fuel is widely considered as a potential candidate for the stabilisation of radioactive wastes in scenarios of long term interim storage or final geological disposal. Illustrative examples revealing the potentialities of the use of ion beams either as a pure characterisation tool - to investigate the chemical stability of the UO{sub 2} matrix under an oxygen potential - or in a combined way (e.g. irradiation/characterisation, doping/characterisation) - to explore the radiation stability and the behaviour of foreign species - are presented. Transformations (stoichiometry, depth and structure of growing hyperstoichiometric U{sub 4}O{sub 9}/U{sub 3}O{sub 7} oxides) occurring during low-temperature air oxidation of uranium dioxide single crystals are reported. Swift heavy ion irradiation of UO{sub 2} single crystals leads to a peculiar single crystal-polycrystal transformation (i.e. polygonisation of the fluorite-type structure of the material). Irradiation of UO{sub 2} at low energy shows that the damage production is directly linked to the energy deposited in nuclear elastic collisions. The lattice location of helium atoms (generated in large amount during the storage period) in interstitial octahedral positions is discussed.

  11. Examination plan for the soils and low-level radioactive waste forms of the NRC field testing lysimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Jastrow, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining information on the performance of radioactive waste forms. These experiments were recently shut down and have been examined in accordance with a detailed waste form and soil sampling plan. Ion-exchange resins from a commercial nuclear power station were solidified into waste forms using portland cement and vinyl ester-styrene. These waste forms were tested to (a) obtain information on performance of waste forms in typical disposal environments, (b) compare field results with bench leach studies, (c) develop a low-level waste data base for use in performance assessment source term calculations, and (d) apply the DUST computer code to compare predicted cumulative release to actual field data. The program, funded by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), includes observed radionuclide releases from waste forms at two test sites over 10 years of successful operation. Lysimeters are ideal systems for obtaining actual field test data because, when properly designed and operated, they can be used to isolate soil and waste systems under actual environmental conditions. The purpose of this paper is to present the experimental plan for the examination of the waste forms and soils of the two lysimeter arrays, which have now been shut down. Vertical soil cores have been taken from the soil columns and will be analyzed with radiochemistry to define movement of radionuclides after release from the waste forms. A comparison is made of the DUST-predicted releases to those previously determined and reported from the lysimeter leachate analyses. That comparison uses new partition coefficients (Kd) recently obtained from laboratory analysis of the lysimeter soils and sand. Those DUST code results also will be compared to actual radionuclide movements through the soil columns as determined from soil core analysis

  12. The effects of aging on compressive strength of low-level radioactive waste form samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified ion-exchange resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of liners used to dispose ion-exchange resins. Compressive tests were performed periodically over a 12-year period as part of the Technical Position testing. Results of that compressive testing are presented and discussed. During the study, both portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste form samples were tested. This testing was designed to examine the effects of aging caused by self-irradiation on the compressive strength of the waste forms. Also presented is a brief summary of the results of waste form characterization, which has been conducted in 1986, using tests recommended in the Technical Position on Waste Form. The aging test results are compared to the results of those earlier tests. 14 refs., 52 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Transport of gases through concrete barriers. Task 3: characterization of radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.W.; Atkinson, A.; Claisse, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of the cementitious materials within a radioactive waste repository as a physical barrier to the migration of radionuclides depends on the maintenance of the integrity of the barrier. Potentially, this can be compromised by physical damage to the barrier caused by pressurization as gas is generated within the repository. The maintenance of chemical homogeneity within the material used for backfilling the repository may also be compromised as a consequence of gas pressurization through the formation of additional cracks and the reaction of cementitious materials with gases such as carbon dioxide. Consequently, the migration of gas within repository construction materials may be a significant parameter in both the design of a repository and the provision of a safety-case for disposal. The migration of hydrogen, helium, methane, argon and carbon dioxide has been studied for materials selected to be typical of repository structural concretes and grouts that are being considered for backfilling and waste encapsulation. The apparent permeability of these materials to gas has been shown to be dependent on gas type and average pressure in the structural concrete due to the effects of Knudsen flow at pressures of the order of 100 kPa. This is not observed in the grouts due to the significantly greater pore size. The permeability coefficients of the grouts are several orders of magnitude greater than those of the concrete. Gas migration is strongly influenced by the degree of water saturation of the materials. The presence of interfaces within the materials results in an increase in permeability at higher degrees of water saturation. A simple model has been developed to simulate the effects of gas pressurization. The tangential hoop stress at the surface of a void is calculated and comparison with the expected tensile strength of the materials is used to assess the potential for cracking. The backfill grouts seem to have sufficient permeability to disperse

  14. Peculiarities of forming and dissemination of radioactive contamination in Iput' river after the Chernobyl NPP accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukova, O.M.; Shiryaeva, N.M.; Myshkina, N.K.; Shagalova, Eh.D.; Denisova, V.V.; Skurat, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The process of radiation contamination forming of the river systems by Cs 137 and Sr 90 after the Chernobyl NPP accident was analyzed. It was shown that before 1990-1994 the river system contamination was formed by the initial falling out of radionuclides on the aquatic surface. After 2000 the contamination will form by means of entrance of radionuclides with surface flowing off from columbines. It was determined that the transboundary transport of radionuclides from the Russia territories influences essentially on contamination of Iput' river on the territory of Belarus. On the authors estimations such input was 30% for Cs 137 and 96% for Sr 90 in 1986, 86% for Cs 137 and 65% for Sr 90 at present

  15. Chemical stability of seven years aged cement-PET composite waste form containing radioactive borate waste simulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H.M., E-mail: hosamsaleh70@yahoo.com [Radioisotope Department, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki (Egypt); Tawfik, M.E. [Department of Polymers and Pigments, National Research Center, Dokki (Egypt); Bayoumi, T.A. [Radioisotope Department, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki (Egypt)

    2011-04-15

    Different samples of radioactive borate waste simulate [originating from pressurized water reactors (PWR)] have been prepared and solidified after mixing with cement-water extended polyester composite (CPC). The polymer-cement composite samples were prepared from recycled poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) waste and cement paste (water/cement ratio of 40%). The prepared samples were left to set at room temperature (25 deg. C {+-} 5) under humid conditions. After 28 days curing time the obtained specimens were kept in their molds to age for 7 years under ambient conditions. Cement-polymer composite waste form specimens (CPCW) have been subjected to leach tests for both {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co radionuclides according to the method proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Leaching tests were justified under various factors that may exist within the disposal site (e.g. type of leachant, surrounding temperature, leachant behavior, the leachant volume to CPCW surface area...). The obtained data after 260 days of leaching revealed that after 7 years of aging the candidate cement-polymer composite (CPC) containing radioactive borate waste samples are characterized by adequate chemical stability required for the long-term disposal process.

  16. The variation of organ doses with the particle size and chemical form of an inhaled radioactive aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, B.W.; Adams, N.; Reissland, J.A.

    1979-04-01

    In this report, radiation doses to organs are calculated as a function of the particle size of the inhaled radioactive material. Aerosols with an Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD) from 0.1 μm to 20 μm are considered and doses accumulated by various organs in periods ranging from 1 day to 70 years are given for 65 radionuclides. A computer program is used which calculates the transformations taking place in each organ per curie of inhaled nuclide from the basic radioactivity and metabolic data. The program also calculates the resulting doses both for the organ in which the transformations occur and from penetrating radiation emitted as a result of transformations in other organs. The effects of particle size and chemical form of the nuclides on the doses received by organs are discussed. Tables of doses accumulated by 10 specific organs and other organs together with effective whole body doses are given for particle sizes 0.1 μm, 1 μm and 10 μm (AMAD). (author)

  17. Odontoblasts: Specialized hard-tissue-forming cells in the dentin-pulp complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Okiji, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Odontoblasts are specialized cells that produce dentin and exhibit unique morphological characteristics; i.e., they extend cytoplasmic processes into dentinal tubules. While osteoblasts, which are typical hard-tissue-forming cells, are generated from mesenchymal stem cells during normal and pathological bone metabolism, the induction of odontoblasts only occurs once during tooth development, and odontoblasts survive throughout the lives of healthy teeth. During the differentiation of odontoblasts, signaling molecules from the inner enamel epithelium are considered necessary for the differentiation of odontoblast precursors, i.e., peripheral dental papilla cells. If odontoblasts are destroyed by severe external stimuli, such as deep caries, the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells into odontoblast-like cells is induced. Various bioactive molecules, such as non-collagenous proteins, might be involved in this process, although the precise mechanisms responsible for odontoblast differentiation have not been fully elucidated. Recently, our knowledge about the other functional activities of odontoblasts (apart from dentin formation) has increased. For example, it has been suggested that odontoblasts might act as nociceptive receptors, and surveillance cells that detect the invasion of exogenous pathogens. The regeneration of the dentin-pulp complex has recently gained much attention as a promising future treatment modality that could increase the longevity of pulpless teeth. Finally, congenital dentin anomalies, which are concerned with the disturbance of odontoblast functions, are summarized. © 2016 Japanese Teratology Society.

  18. Development of methodology to evaluate microbially influenced degradation of cement-solidified low-level radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Because of its apparent structural integrity, cement has been widely used in the United States as a binder to solidify Class B and C low-level radioactive waste (LLW). However, the resulting cement preparations are susceptible to failure due to the actions of stress and environment. An environmentally mediated process that could affect cement stability is the action of naturally occurring microorganisms. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), recognizing this eventuality, stated that the effects of microbial action on waste form integrity must be addressed. This paper provides present results from an ongoing program that addresses the effects of microbially influenced degradation (MID) on cement-solidified LLW. Data are provided on the development of an evaluation method using acid-producing bacteria. Results are from work with one type of these bacteria, the sulfur-oxidizing Thiobacillus. This work involved the use of a system in which laboratory- and vendor-manufactured, simulated waste forms were exposed on an intermittent basis to media containing thiobacilli. Testing demonstrated that MID has the potential to severely compromise the structural integrity of ion-exchange resin and evaporator-bottoms waste that is solidified with cement. In addition, it was found that a significant percentage of calcium and other elements were leached from the treated waste forms. Also, the surface pH of the treated specimens decreased to below 2. These conditions apparently contributed to the physical deterioration of simulated waste forms after 60 days of exposure to the thiobacilli

  19. Federal Republic of Germany R and D programme: A special issue of the journal radioactive waste management and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    This book examines the issues of radioactive waste management and the nuclear fuel cycle in the Federal Republic of Germany. Topics considered include the challenges of waste handling and disposal, the borosilicate glass for Pamela, the treatment and conditioning of transuranelement bearing wastes in the Federal Republic of Germany, conditioning of low and intermediate level wastes, volume reduction of low level solid radioactive waste by incineration and compaction in the Federal Republic of Germany, MAW test emplacement in boreholes, treatment and disposal of special radioactive wastes comprising tritium, carbon 14, krypton 85 and iodine 129, and the German Project: ''Safety Studies for Nuclear Waste Management: Development of Safety Assessment Methodology for Final Disposal of Nuclear Waste in a Salt Dome

  20. Radioactive nuclides formed by irradiation of the natural elements with thermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekberg, Kim

    1959-05-15

    For each natural element up to Bi this report gives: the 2200 m/sec neutron absorption cross section; the nuclides formed by thermal neutron activation; the saturation activity per gram natural element for a certain flux; half life and 'tenth life' of the activity; {beta}-energy and/or type of decay; mean {gamma} energy per disintegration; energy and abundance of {gamma} quanta.

  1. Radioactive nuclides formed by irradiation of the natural elements with thermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekberg, Kim

    1959-05-15

    For each natural element up to Bi this report gives: the 2200 m/sec neutron absorption cross section; the nuclides formed by thermal neutron activation; the saturation activity per gram natural element for a certain flux; half life and 'tenth life' of the activity; {beta}-energy and/or type of decay; mean {gamma} energy per disintegration; energy and abundance of {gamma} quanta.

  2. Characteristics of borosilicate waste glass form for high-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Choi, Jong Won; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2001-03-01

    Basic data, required for the design and the performance assessment of a repository of HLW, suchas the chemical composition and the characteristics of the borosilicate waste glass have been identified according to the burn-ups of spent PWR fuels. The diemnsion of waste canister is 430mm in diameter and 1135mm in length, and the canister should hold less than 2kwatts of heat from their decay of radionuclides contained in the HLW. Based on the reprocessing of 5 years-cooled spent fuel, one canister could hold about 11.5wt.% and 10.8wt.% of oxidized HLW corresponding to their burn-ups of 45,000MWD/MTU and 55,000MWD/MTU, respectively. These waste forms have been recommanded as the reference waste forms of HLW. The characteristics of these wastes as a function of decay time been evaluated. However, after a specific waste form and a specific site for the disposal would be selected, the characteristics of the waste should be reevaluated under the consideration of solidification period, loaded waste, storage condition and duration, site circumstances for the repository system and its performance assessment.

  3. Evaluation of sulfur polymer cement as a waste form for the immobilization of low-level radioactive or mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

    1994-03-01

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC), also called modified sulphur cements, is a relatively new material in the waste immobilization field, although it was developed in the late seventies by the Bureau of Mines. The physical and chemical properties of SPC are interesting (e.g., development of high mechanical strength in a short time and high resistance to many corrosive environments). Because of its very low permeability and porosity, SPC is especially impervious to water, which, in turn, has led to its consideration for immobilization of hazardous or radioactive waste. Because it is a thermosetting process, the waste is encapsulated by the sulfur matrix; therefore, very little interaction occurs between the waste species and the sulfur (as there can be when waste prevents the set of portland cement-based waste forms)

  4. Transportation of radioactive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thubert, Francis; Rentien, Guy; Jacquet, Michel

    1981-01-01

    The production and marketing of artificial radioactive elements engaged in by the 'Office des Rayonnements Ionisants' requires the use of specially designed packagings and assorted means of transport. The authors begin by describing the different kinds of products involved and the forms of packagings needed, and go on to discuss the various means of transport used, underlining the fact that, in terms of number and gravity, the incidents that have occurred to date have indeed been few and far between [fr

  5. Chemisorption of organic iodine compounds forming from fission isotopes of radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tot, G.; Galina, F.; Zel'd, E.

    1977-01-01

    Studied is ethyl iodine adsorption, labelled by iodine 131, on palladium black and on aluminium oxide activized by palladium. The desorption of adsorbed iodine in the temperature range of 20-600 deg C by the mass spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric methods was investigated. At the ethyl iodine and palladium interaction the bond between carbon and iodine in the ethyl iodine molecule breaks down and extracting iodine reacts with palladium, forming a stable compound at high temperatures. Desorption of adsorbed iodine is insignificant up to the temperatures of 250-300 deg C. Thus, sorbents, containing palladium, may be successfully applied for iodine absorption from the organic iodine compounds. These compounds spontaneously appear from the iodine fragment ratio isotopes during their interaction with some environmental organic impurities

  6. Integrated Waste Management Strategy and Radioactive Waste Forms for the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirk Gombert; Jay Roach

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) was announced in 2006. As currently envisioned, GNEP will be the basis for growth of nuclear energy worldwide, using a closed proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The Integrated Waste Management Strategy (IWMS) is designed to ensure that all wastes generated by fuel fabrication and recycling will have a routine disposition path making the most of feedback to fuel and recycling operations to eliminate or minimize byproducts and wastes. If waste must be generated, processes will be designed with waste treatment in mind to reduce use of reagents that complicate stabilization and minimize volume. The IWMS will address three distinct levels of technology investigation and systems analyses and will provide a cogent path from (1) research and development (R and D) and engineering scale demonstration, (Level I); to (2) full scale domestic deployment (Level II); and finally to (3) establishing an integrated global nuclear energy infrastructure (Level III). The near-term focus of GNEP is on achieving a basis for large-scale commercial deployment (Level II), including the R and D and engineering scale activities in Level I that are necessary to support such an accomplishment. Throughout these levels is the need for innovative thinking to simplify, including regulations, separations and waste forms to minimize the burden of safe disposition of wastes on the fuel cycle

  7. Integrated Waste Management Strategy and Radioactive Waste Forms for the 21st Century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirk Gombert; Jay Roach

    2007-03-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) was announced in 2006. As currently envisioned, GNEP will be the basis for growth of nuclear energy worldwide, using a closed proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The Integrated Waste Management Strategy (IWMS) is designed to ensure that all wastes generated by fuel fabrication and recycling will have a routine disposition path making the most of feedback to fuel and recycling operations to eliminate or minimize byproducts and wastes. If waste must be generated, processes will be designed with waste treatment in mind to reduce use of reagents that complicate stabilization and minimize volume. The IWMS will address three distinct levels of technology investigation and systems analyses and will provide a cogent path from (1) research and development (R&D) and engineering scale demonstration, (Level I); to (2) full scale domestic deployment (Level II); and finally to (3) establishing an integrated global nuclear energy infrastructure (Level III). The near-term focus of GNEP is on achieving a basis for large-scale commercial deployment (Level II), including the R&D and engineering scale activities in Level I that are necessary to support such an accomplishment. Throughout these levels is the need for innovative thinking to simplify, including regulations, separations and waste forms to minimize the burden of safe disposition of wastes on the fuel cycle.

  8. Comparison among the rice bark in the raw and active forms in the removal of 241Am and 137Cs from liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Rafael V.P.; Lima, Josenilson B. de; Bellini, Maria Helena; Sakata, Solange Kazumi; Marumo, Julio Takehiro

    2011-01-01

    New techniques involving treatment of radioactive wastes which associate simplicity and low cost have been directed the attention for the bio sorption, which is a process were solid vegetable or micro-organism for the retention, removing, or recovering of heavy metals from a liquid environment. This study evaluated the capacity of a bio sorbent to remove Am-241 and Cs-137 from liquid radioactive waste. The chosen material was the rice bark employed in the raw or activated forms. The obtained results suggest that the bio sorption, with the activated rice bark, can be a viable technique for the treatment of liquid radioactive wastes containing Am-241 and Cs-137 present in liquid radioactive wastes

  9. Einstein in matrix form exact derivation of the theory of special and general relativity without tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Ludyk, Günter

    2013-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theories of Special and General Relativity. The target audience are physicists, engineers and applied scientists who are looking for an understandable introduction to the topic - without too much new mathematics. The fundamental equations of Einsteins theory of Special and General Relativity are derived using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. This feature makes the book special and a valuable tool for scientists and engineers with no experience in the field of tensor calculus. In part I the foundations of Special Relativity are developed, part II describes the structure and principle of General Relativity. Part III explains the Schwarzschild solution of spherical body gravity and examines the "Black Hole" phenomenon. Any necessary mathematical tools are user friendly provided, either directly in the text or in the appendices.

  10. Einstein in matrix form. Exact derivation of the theory of special and general relativity without tensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludyk, Guenter [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Physics and Electrical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    Derives the fundamental equations of Einstein's theory of special and general relativity using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. Provides necessary mathematical tools in a user-friendly way, either directly in the text or in the appendices. Appendices contain an introduction to classical dynamics as a refresher of known fundamental physics. Rehearses vector and matrix calculus, differential geometry, and some special solutions of general relativity in the appendices. This book is an introduction to the theories of Special and General Relativity. The target audience are physicists, engineers and applied scientists who are looking for an understandable introduction to the topic - without too much new mathematics. The fundamental equations of Einsteins theory of Special and General Relativity are derived using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. This feature makes the book special and a valuable tool for scientists and engineers with no experience in the field of tensor calculus. In part I the foundations of Special Relativity are developed, part II describes the structure and principle of General Relativity. Part III explains the Schwarzschild solution of spherical body gravity and examines the ''Black Hole'' phenomenon. Any necessary mathematical tools are user friendly provided, either directly in the text or in the appendices.

  11. Einstein in matrix form. Exact derivation of the theory of special and general relativity without tensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludyk, Guenter

    2013-01-01

    Derives the fundamental equations of Einstein's theory of special and general relativity using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. Provides necessary mathematical tools in a user-friendly way, either directly in the text or in the appendices. Appendices contain an introduction to classical dynamics as a refresher of known fundamental physics. Rehearses vector and matrix calculus, differential geometry, and some special solutions of general relativity in the appendices. This book is an introduction to the theories of Special and General Relativity. The target audience are physicists, engineers and applied scientists who are looking for an understandable introduction to the topic - without too much new mathematics. The fundamental equations of Einsteins theory of Special and General Relativity are derived using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. This feature makes the book special and a valuable tool for scientists and engineers with no experience in the field of tensor calculus. In part I the foundations of Special Relativity are developed, part II describes the structure and principle of General Relativity. Part III explains the Schwarzschild solution of spherical body gravity and examines the ''Black Hole'' phenomenon. Any necessary mathematical tools are user friendly provided, either directly in the text or in the appendices.

  12. 41 CFR 102-37.575 - Is there a special form for holding agencies to process donations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for holding agencies to process donations? 102-37.575 Section 102-37.575 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Bodies in Lieu of Abandonment/Destruction § 102-37.575 Is there a special form for holding agencies to process donations? There is no...

  13. Research of radioactive waste storage cask/canister materials, spent nuclear fuels and various radioactive waste forms and development of their assessment methods. Final report for Stage 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrev, D.; Balek, V.; Červinka, R.; Večerník, P.; Člupek, M.; Kouřil, M.; Novák, P.; Stoulil, J.; Silber, R.

    2013-08-01

    The main topics treated are: Research and development of methodologies for canister/cask material degradation assessment; Laboratory research of selected materials of canister/cask with radioactive waste; and Research and assessment of canister/cask materials in natural granite rocks. Two additional documents are appended: Corrosion rate determination for samples in compacted bentonite in anaerobic conditions (methodology), and Roll test for corrosion test in an occluded solution at the interface between a radioactive waste disposal canister and the bentonite cover. (P.A.)

  14. Internal nasal floor configuration in Homo with special reference to the evolution of Neandertal facial form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciscus, Robert G

    2003-06-01

    The presence of a steeply sloping or depressed nasal floor within the nasal cavity of Neandertals is frequently mentioned as a likely specialization or autapomorphy. The depressed nasal floor has also been seen as contributing to a relatively more capacious nasal cavity in Neandertals, which is tied to cold-climate respiratory adaptation and energetics. These observations have been limited largely to a relatively few intact crania, and the character states associated with this trait have not been as precisely codified or analyzed as those published for Plio-Pleistocene hominins (McCollum et al., 1993, J. Hum. Evol. 24, 87; McCollum, 2000, Am. J. Phys. Anthrop. 112, 275). This study examines the internal nasal floor topography in complete crania and isolated maxillae in European, west Asian, and African fossil Homo (n=158) including 25 Neandertals, and a wide range of recent humans from Europe, the Near East, and Africa (n=522). The configuration of the internal nasal floor relative to the nasal cavity entrance is codified as: 1) level, forming a smooth continuous plane; 2) sloped or mildly stepped; or 3) bilevel with a pronounced vertical depression. The frequency of these nasal floor configurations, and their relationship to both nasal margin cresting patterning and a comprehensive set of nasofacial metrics is examined. Neandertals show a high frequency of the bilevel (depressed) configuration in both adults and subadults (80%), but this configuration is also present in lower frequencies in Middle Pleistocene African, Late Pleistocene non-Neandertal (Skhul, Qafzeh), and European Later Upper Paleolithic samples (15%-50%). The bilevel configuration is also present in lower frequencies (ca. 10%) in all recent human samples, but attains nearly 20% in some sub-Saharan African samples. Across extinct and extant Homo (excluding Neandertals), internal nasal floor configuration is not associated with piriform aperture nasal margin patterning, but the two are strongly

  15. Radioactive effluent sources and special system of channels on the RA Reactor at the Boris Kidric Institute; Izvori radioaktivnih efluenata i specijalna kanalizacija u reaktoru RA Instituta Boris Kidric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojovic, P; Gacinovic, O; Milosevic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-10-15

    The paper describes the place of origin, composition and activity of radioactive effluents appearing in some reactor systems and special channels for carrying these effluents to disposal basins located outside the reactor building (author)

  16. Destructive and non-destructive tests for radioactive waste packages Task 3 Characterization of radioactive waste forms. A series of final reports (1985-89) No 43

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odoj, R.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of preliminary waste acceptance requirements quality control of radioactive waste has to be performed prior to interim storage or final disposal. The quality control can either be achieved by random tests on conditioned radioactive waste packages or by process qualification of the conditioning processes. One of the most important criteria is the activity of the radioactive waste product or packages. To get some first information on the waste package γ-spectrometric measurement is performed as non-destructive test. Besides the γ-emitting nuclides the α and β-emitting nuclides can be estimated by calculation if the waste was generated in nuclear power plants and the nuclide relations are known. If the non-destructive determination of nuclides is not sufficient or the non-radioactive content of the waste packages has to be identified sampling from the waste packages has to be performed. This can best be done by core drilling. To avoid the need of water for cooling the drill head, air cooled core drilling is investigated. As mixed wastes is not allowed for final disposal the determination of possible organic toxic materials like PCB, dioxin and furane-compounds in cemented wastes is conducted by GC-MS-investigations. For getting more knowledge in the field of process qualification concerning super compaction, instrumentation of the super compaction process is investigated and tested

  17. Fundamental properties of monolithic bentonite buffer material formed by cold isostatic pressing for high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, S.; Yamanaka, Y.; Kato, K.; Asano, H.; Ueda, H.

    1999-01-01

    The methods of fabrication, handling, and emplacement of engineered barriers used in a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste should be planned as simply as possible from the engineering and economic viewpoints. Therefore, a new concept of a monolithic buffer material around a waste package have been proposed instead of the conventional concept with the use of small blocks, which would decrease the cost for buffer material. The monolithic buffer material is composed of two parts of highly compacted bentonite, a cup type body and a cover. As the forming method of the monolithic buffer material, compaction by the cold isostatic pressing process (CIP) has been employed. In this study, monolithic bentonite bodies with the diameter of about 333 mm and the height of about 455 mm (corresponding to the approx. 1/5 scale for the Japanese reference concept) were made by the CIP of bentonite powder. The dry densities: ρd of the bodies as a whole were measured and the small samples were cut from several locations to investigate the density distribution. The swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity as function of the monolithic body density for CIP-formed specimens were also measured. High density (ρd: 1.4--2.0 Mg/m 3 ) and homogeneous monolithic bodies were formed by the CIP. The measured results of the swelling pressure (3--15 MPa) and hydraulic conductivity (0.5--1.4 x 10 -13 m/s) of the specimens were almost the same as those for the uniaxial compacted bentonite in the literature. It is shown that the vacuum hoist system is an applicable handling method for emplacement of the monolithic bentonite

  18. Saltstone: cement-based waste form for disposal of Savannah River Plant low-level radioactive salt waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Defense waste processing at the Savannah River Plant will include decontamination and disposal of approximately 400 million liters of waste containing NaNO 3 , NaOH, Na 2 SO 4 , and NaNO 2 . After decontamination, the salt solution is classified as low-level waste. A cement-based waste form, saltstone, has been designed for disposal of Savannah River Plant low-level radioactive salt waste. Bulk properties of this material have been tailored with respect to salt leach rate, permeability, and compressive strength. Microstructure and mineralogy of leached and unleached specimens were characterized by SEM and x-ray diffraction analyses. The disposal system for the DWPF salt waste includes reconstitution of the crystallized salt as a solution containing 32 wt % solids. This solution will be decontaminated to remove 137 Cs and 90 Sr and then stabilized in a cement-based waste form. Laboratory and field tests indicate that this stabilization process greatly reduces the mobility of all of the waste constitutents in the surface and near-surface environment. Engineered trenches for subsurface burial of the saltstone have been designed to ensure compatibility between the waste form and the environment. The total disposal sytem, saltstone-trench-surrounding soil, has been designed to contain radionuclides, Cr, and Hg by both physical encapsulation and chemical fixation mechanisms. Physical encapsulation of the salts is the mechanism employed for controlling N and OH releases. In this way, final disposal of the SRP low-level waste can be achieved and the quality of the groundwater at the perimeter of the disposal site meets EPA drinking water standards

  19. An alternative waste form for the final disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) on the basis of a survey of solidification and final disposal of HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, C.

    1982-01-01

    The dissertation comprises two separate parts. The first part presents the basic conditions and concepts of the process leading to the development of a waste form, such as:origin, composition and characteristics of the high-level radioactive waste; evaluation of the methods available for the final disposal of radioactive waste, especially the disposal in a geological formation, including the resulting consequences for the conditions of state in the surroundings of the waste package; essential option for the conception of a waste form and presentation of the waste forms developed and examined on an international level up to now. The second part describes the production of a waste form on TiO 2 basis, in which calcined radioactive waste particles in the submillimeter range are embedded in a rutile matrix. That waste form is produced by uniaxial pressure sintering in the temperature range of 1223 K to 1423 K and pressures between 5 MPa and 20 MPa. Microstructure, mechanical properties and leaching rates of the waste form are presented. Moreover, a method is explained allowing compacting of the rutile matrix and also integration of a wasteless overpack of titanium or TiO 2 into the waste form. (orig.) [de

  20. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the INL Waste Associated with the Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shott, Gregory [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2017-03-21

    This special analysis (SA) evaluates whether the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Waste Associated with the Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) waste stream (INEL167203QR1, Revision 0) is suitable for shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Disposal of the INL Waste Associated with the Unirradiated LWBR waste meets all U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual,” Chapter IV, Section P performance objectives (DOE 1999). The INL Waste Associated with the Unirradiated LWBR waste stream is recommended for acceptance with the condition that the total uranium-233 (233U) inventory be limited to 2.7E13 Bq (7.2E2 Ci).

  1. Main directions of works on radioactive waste management at 30-km zone near the Chernobyl' NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grushinskij, B.Ya.; Komarov, V.I.; Proskuryakov, A.N.; Kham'yanov, L.N.; Khubizov, S.B.; Ignatenko, E.I.; Ryzhkova, V.N.; Luppov, V.A.; Matskevich, G.V.; Frolov, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    Main points and stages of creating an specialized enterprise for centralized reprocessing and radioactive waste disposal are considered. The enterprise is intended for collection conditioning and burial of all types of radioactive wastes, formed during liquidation of accident effect at the Chernobyl' NPP as well as forming in operation of NPP. The enterprise is also used to decontaminate equipment and constructions, for reprocessing of secondary radioactive wastes forming during decontamination process of equipment constructions, transport and work clothes

  2. The functionalities of the Darwin radioactivity calculation form and the radiation protection studies; Les fonctionnalites du formulaire de calcul de la radioactivite Darwin et les etudes de radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsilanizara, A; Huynh, T D; Luneville, L; Diop, C M; Eid, M [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DM2S/SERMA), Service d' Etudes des reacteurs et de Modelisation Avancee, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2003-07-01

    The characterisation of the radioactive sources relative to the evolution of nuclear fuels or to the activation under particles flux (generally neutrons) of structures of a nuclear equipment or a simple isotope decay is a step in the radiation protection studies. This characterisation needs to know a fundamental knowledge: the radionuclides concentration. This one changes with time, and follows the coupled differential equations of first order in time, the generalised Bateman equations. The objective of this paper is to present the functionalities of the Darwin form, developed by the Cea and dedicated to the study of radioactivity. (N.C.)

  3. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank Farm Blend) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hall, H. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Missimer, D. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-08-01

    amorphous, macro-encapsulates the granules, and the monoliths pass ANSI/ANS 16.1 and ASTM C1308 durability testing with Re achieving a Leach Index (LI) of 9 (the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility, IDF, criteria for Tc-99) after a few days and Na achieving an LI of >6 (the Hanford IDF criteria for Na) in the first few hours. The granular and monolithic waste forms also pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) components at the Universal Treatment Standards (UTS). Two identical Benchscale Steam Reformers (BSR) were designed and constructed at SRNL, one to treat non-radioactive simulants and the other to treat actual radioactive wastes. The results from the non-radioactive BSR were used to determine the parameters needed to operate the radioactive BSR in order to confirm the findings of non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale and engineering scale tests and to qualify an FBSR LAW waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced using SRS LAW from Tank 50 chemically trimmed to look like Hanford’s blended LAW known as the Rassat simulant as this simulant composition had been tested in the non-radioactive BSR, the non-radioactive pilot scale FBSR at the Science Applications International Corporation-Science and Technology Applications Research (SAIC-STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID and in the TTT Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) in Denver, CO. This provided a “tie back” between radioactive BSR testing and non-radioactive BSR, pilot scale, and engineering scale testing. Approximately six hundred grams of non-radioactive and radioactive BSR product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests performed in 2004 at SAIC-STAR and the engineering scale test performed in 2008 at HRI with the Rassat simulant. The same mineral phases and off-gas species were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive

  4. On new classes of solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations in the form of convergent special series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonov, M. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    The method of special series with recursively calculated coefficients is used to solve nonlinear partial differential equations. The recurrence of finding the coefficients of the series is achieved due to a special choice of functions, in powers of which the solution is expanded in a series. We obtain a sequence of linear partial differential equations to find the coefficients of the series constructed. In many cases, one can deal with a sequence of linear ordinary differential equations. We construct classes of solutions in the form of convergent series for a certain class of nonlinear evolution equations. A new class of solutions of generalized Boussinesque equation with an arbitrary function in the form of a convergent series is constructed.

  5. Special Analysis of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management

    2012-09-30

    This report describes the methods and results of a special analysis (SA) of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The purpose of the SA is to determine if the approved performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA) (Shott et al., 2001) remain valid. The Area 3 RWMS PA and CA were prepared as a single document and received conditional approval on October 6, 1999. A conditional Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the Area 3 RWMS was issued on October 20, 1999. Since preparation of the approved PA and CA, new information and additional environmental monitoring data have been used to update the PA and CA. At the same time, continual advancements in computer processors and software have allowed improvement to the PA and CA models. Annual reviews of the PA and CA required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 435.1 have documented multiple changes occurring since preparation of the PA and CA. Potentially important changes include: Development of a new and improved baseline PA and CA model implemented in the probabilistic GoldSim simulation platform. A significant increase in the waste inventory disposed at the site. Revision and updating of model parameters based on additional years of site monitoring data and new research and development results. Although changes have occurred, many important PA/CA issues remain unchanged, including the site conceptual model, important features, events, and processes, and the points of compliance. The SA is performed to document the current status of the PA/CA model and to quantitatively assess the impact of cumulative changes on the PA and CA results. The results of the SA are used to assess the validity of the approved PA/CA and make a determination if revision of the PA or CA is necessary. The SA was performed using the Area 3 RWMS, version 2.102, GoldSim model, the current baseline PA/CA model. Comparison of the maximum SA results with the PA

  6. INNOVATIVE FORMS SUPPORTING SAFE METHODS OF WORK IN SAFETY ENGINEERING FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF INTELLIGENT SPECIALIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna GEMBALSKA-KWIECIEŃ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses innovative forms of participation of employees in the work safety system. It also presents the advantages of these forms of employees’ involvement. The aim of empirical studies was the analysis of their behavior and attitude towards health and safety at work. The issues considered in the article have a significant impact on the improvement of methods of prevention related to work safety and aided the creation of a healthy society.

  7. Low-level radioactive waste disposal operations worldwide, with special reference to organic compounds in leachates and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rushbrook, P.E.; McGahan, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes are defined and ground disposal practices worldwide are discussed. The organic content of low-level wastes is tabulated and the organic composition of leachates and gaseous emissions from low-level wastes in the U.K. and U.S.A. are discussed. The radionuclide content of these leachates is tabulated. (U.K.)

  8. Generating acceptability of PNRI environmental radioactivity monitoring studies at the former ammunition dump area in Clark special economic zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Teofilo Y.

    2002-11-01

    The rejection of the 1991 Treaty of Friendship and Cooperation, which sought to extend the military bases agreement (MBA), paved the way for the Americans to abandon Clark Air Base in Angeles, Pampanga, which had served as an American military base since 1947. The total and immediate pullout of the Americans left the base in an ''as is'' condition and without the benefits of restoration efforts. Various studies and reports have been conducted to determine the presence of hazardous wastes in the former Clark Air Base. The issue of hazardous wastes purportedly left there by the Americans is a continuing and a growing concern particularly of citizens living within its area. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) In November of 1997 and in April of 1998, the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute PNRI, upon the request of Clark Development Corporation, conducted a thorough radiological monitoring in CSEZ in order to determine the presence of radioactive contamination. Radioactive materials such as cesium-137 and tritium are considered hazardous wastes. Results of monitoring showed that radiation levels in CSEZ were within allowable standards. This means that the workers and residents at the Clark Air Base ( t he base ) are free from dangers of exposure to radiation. Despite the findings, however, reports by the media and environmental NGOs on the presence of hazardous wastes, including radioactive wastes, in Clark have proliferated. This action plan and project (APP) intends to address the issue of environmental radioactivity contamination (if any) within the CSEZ. The APP results are geared towards dispelling the persistent fear of the public in general, and the base stakeholders especially its residents, in particular, regarding the presence of radioactive contamination which results in untoward health effects to those exposed to such contaminants. Thus, the sectoral concern of this APP is to heighten the level of social acceptability by the base

  9. Generating acceptability of PNRI environmental radioactivity monitoring studies at the former ammunition dump area in Clark special economic zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Teofilo Y

    2002-11-01

    The rejection of the 1991 Treaty of Friendship and Cooperation, which sought to extend the military bases agreement (MBA), paved the way for the Americans to abandon Clark Air Base in Angeles, Pampanga, which had served as an American military base since 1947. The total and immediate pullout of the Americans left the base in an ''as is'' condition and without the benefits of restoration efforts. Various studies and reports have been conducted to determine the presence of hazardous wastes in the former Clark Air Base. The issue of hazardous wastes purportedly left there by the Americans is a continuing and a growing concern particularly of citizens living within its area. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) In November of 1997 and in April of 1998, the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute PNRI, upon the request of Clark Development Corporation, conducted a thorough radiological monitoring in CSEZ in order to determine the presence of radioactive contamination. Radioactive materials such as cesium-137 and tritium are considered hazardous wastes. Results of monitoring showed that radiation levels in CSEZ were within allowable standards. This means that the workers and residents at the Clark Air Base ({sup t}he base{sup )} are free from dangers of exposure to radiation. Despite the findings, however, reports by the media and environmental NGOs on the presence of hazardous wastes, including radioactive wastes, in Clark have proliferated. This action plan and project (APP) intends to address the issue of environmental radioactivity contamination (if any) within the CSEZ. The APP results are geared towards dispelling the persistent fear of the public in general, and the base stakeholders especially its residents, in particular, regarding the presence of radioactive contamination which results in untoward health effects to those exposed to such contaminants. Thus, the sectoral concern of this APP is to heighten the level of social acceptability by the base

  10. Magnetized strange quark matter in f(R, T) gravity with bilinear and special form of time varying deceleration parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, P. K.; Sahoo, Parbati; Bishi, Binaya K.; Aygün, Sezgin

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we have studied homogeneous and anisotropic locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type-I model with magnetized strange quark matter (MSQM) distribution and cosmological constant Λ in f(R, T) gravity where R is the Ricci scalar and T the trace of matter source. The exact solutions of the field equations are obtained under bilinear and special form of time varying deceleration parameter (DP). Firstly, we have considered two specific forms of bilinear DP with a single parameter of the form: q = α(1-t)/1+t and q = -αt/1+t, which leads to the constant or linear nature of the function based on the constant α. Second one is the special form of the DP as q = - 1 + β/1+aβ. From the results obtained here, one can observe that in the early universe magnetic flux has more effects and it reduces gradually in the later stage. For t → ∞, we get p → -Bc and ρ → Bc. The behaviour of strange quark matter along with magnetic epoch gives an idea of accelerated expansion of the universe as per the observations of the type Ia Supernovae.

  11. AN ALTERNATIVE HOST MATRIX BASED ON IRON PHOSPHATE GLASSES FOR THE VITRIFICATION OF SPECIALIZED WASTE FORMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Delbert D.

    2000-01-01

    As mentioned above, the overall goal of this research project was to collect the scientific information essential to develop iron phosphate glass based nuclear wasteforms. The specific objectives of the project were: (1) Investigate the structure of binary iron phosphate glasses and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Understand atomic arrangements and nature of the bonding. Establish structure-property relationships. Determine the compositions and melting conditions which optimize the critical properties of the base glass. (2) Understand the structure of iron phosphate wasteforms and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Investigate how the waste elements are bonded and coordinated within the glass structure. Establish structure-property relationships for the waste glasses. Determine the compositions and melting atmosphere for which the critical properties of the waste forms would be optimum. (3) Determine the role(s) played by the valence states of iron ions and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Understand the different roles of iron(II) and iron(III) ions in determining the critical properties of the base glass and the waste forms. Investigate how the iron valence and its significance depend on the composition and melting atmosphere. (4) Investigate glass forming and crystallization processes of the iron phosphate glasses and their waste forms: Understand the dependence of the glass forming and crystallization characteristics on overall glass composition and valence states of iron ions. Identify the products of devitrification and investigate the critical properties of these crystalline compounds which may adversely affect the chemical and physical properties of the waste forms

  12. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 1998 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    The information contained in this report is given in six tables. Tables 1 to 4 present administrative data including issue and expiration dates, package identification, package serial numbers, modes for which the package/shipments approved and the edition of Safety Series No. 6 on which the approval has been based. The technical information on package mass, authorized contents, and detailed and general description of the package are contained in Table 5. Table 6 shows the certificates reported to the IAEA Secretariat by each participating Member State

  13. Design and realization on function of pre-forming and continuous winding for HT-7U special winding machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jie; Gao Daming; Wen Jun; Zhu Wenhua; Cheng Leping; Tao Yuming

    2000-05-01

    The winding machine is one of the critical facilities for R and D of HT-7U construction. The machine mainly consists of five parts, CICC pay-off spool, a four-rollers straightening assembly, a four-roller forming/bending assembly, continuous winding structure and CNC control system with three-axis CNC control. The facility is needed for CICC magnet fabrication of HT-7U. The main requirements of the winding machine are: continuous winding to reduce number of joints inside the coils; pre-forming CICC conductor to avoid winding with tension; suitable for all TF and PF coils within the scope of various coil shape and dimension limit; improving the configuration tolerance, specially flatness of the CICC conductor. The author emphasizes on the design and realization on function of Pre-forming and Continuous Winding for HT-7U special winding machine. The winding machine with high accuracy has just been developed and applied to the construction of HT-7U model coils

  14. TRU waste form studies with special reference to iron-enriched basalt: 1980. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flinn, J.E.; Henslee, S.P.; Kelsey, P.V. Jr.

    1981-06-01

    Material studies were performed on iron-enriched basalt (IEB) as a waste form containment medium for transuranic wastes. Specimens from laboratory scale, as well as large scale melts, were used in the evaluation. The studies included melting and casting, slag-refractory interaction, slag fruit assessments, volatility of sodium salts from IEB melts, chemical and structure homogeneity, metallic dissolution tests, physical properties, and devitrification associated with the development of mineral phases. In addition, durability tests, which included leaching and mechanical behavior, were performed

  15. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank SX-105 And AN-103) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, Carol; Herman, Connie; Crawford, Charles; Bannochie, Christopher; Burket, Paul; Daniel, Gene; Cozzi, Alex; Nash, Charles; Miller, Donald; Missimer, David

    2014-01-10

    One of the immobilization technologies under consideration as a Supplemental Treatment for Hanford’s Low Activity Waste (LAW) is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). The FBSR technology forms a mineral waste form at moderate processing temperatures thus retaining and atomically bonding the halides, sulfates, and technetium in the mineral phases (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite). Additions of kaolin clay are used instead of glass formers and the minerals formed by the FBSR technology offers (1) atomic bonding of the radionuclides and constituents of concern (COC) comparable to glass, (2) short and long term durability comparable to glass, (3) disposal volumes comparable to glass, and (4) higher Na2O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings than glass. The higher FBSR Na{sub 2}O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings contribute to the low disposal volumes but also provide for more rapid processing of the LAW. Recent FBSR processing and testing of Hanford radioactive LAW (Tank SX-105 and AN-103) waste is reported and compared to previous radioactive and non-radioactive LAW processing and testing.

  16. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-02-02

    ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

  17. Radioactive Demonstration Of Final Mineralized Waste Forms For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste By Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Using The Bench Scale Reformer Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as 137 Cs, 129 I, 99 Tc, Cl, F, and SO 4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form

  18. Lateral spread as a special form of soil movement in Dolina area in municipality Puconci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Čarman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a particular form of soil instability, which is rarely observed in Slovenia. This is a lateral spread of the soil, which appeared some years ago in the central part of Dolina area in the municipality of Puconci. The area is mainly build up from clay and sandy sediments of the Pannonian Sea, predominantly Pliocene age. A significant damage of building has begun several years ago. According to data from research carried out, we suggest that the flat area is disintegrated into individual blocks, moving in different directions. These led to such extensive damage to buildings. Possible cause could be erosion of Dolinski stream at the eastern edge of the area or seismic survey (blasting, vibrations, which were carried out here about 20 years ago. Determination the exact cause of the formation of the soil lateral spread, its extent and dynamics, remain a challenge for the future.

  19. Forms of international movement of capital with special emphasis on the PPP and concessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šovran Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The state has always cooperated with the private sector in order to implement various activities in the best interest of public. The first models of public-private partnerships (PPP appeared at the time of the Roman Empire in the context of public works in construction of public baths, markets and ports. Contemporary international movement of capital is a phenomenon that has existed for over a century. When discussing the PPP in modern day terms, the expansion of private involvement in the public sector starts in the 1970s and the 1980s of the previous century, in public infrastructure projects and in most developed economies. The primary purpose of these arrangements is to reduce expenditures in state budgets, but also to achieve faster and better execution of work, reduce risk and efficiently manage the projects. This paper will briefly present the evolution of PPPs and concessions, with an emphasis on understanding money and capital throughout the evolution of PPP, contemporary forms of movement of capital, as well as equity in terms of globalization. The subject of this paper are also examples of the important PPPs and concessions from the construction of the Suez Canal until today.

  20. Polarized secondary radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaika, N.I.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods of polarized radioactive nuclei beam production: a) a method nuclear interaction of the non-polarized or polarized charged projectiles with target nuclei; b) a method of polarization of stopped reaction radioactive products in a special polarized ion source with than following acceleration; c) a polarization of radioactive nuclei circulating in a storage ring are considered. Possible life times of the radioactive ions for these methods are determined. General schemes of the polarization method realizations and depolarization problems are discussed

  1. Sor/89-426, 24 August 1989, transport packaging of radioactive materials regulations, amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    These Regulations of 24 September 1983 were amended mainly to clarify the original text and further specify certain requirements. In particular, the definitions of A 1 , A 2 , Fissile Class III package and special Form Radioactive Material have been revoked and replaced by new definitions. Also, a new condition has been added regarding Special Form Radioactive Material. Henceforth, no such material may be transported without a certificate attesting that the material meets the requirements set out in Schedule XII of the Regulations [fr

  2. Study on the design and manufacturing requirements of container for low level radioactive solid waste form KRR decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. K.; Kim, H. R.; Park, S. K.; Jung, K. H.; Jung, W. S.; Jung, K. J.

    2000-01-01

    The design requirement and manufacturing criteria have been proposed on the container for the storage and transportation of low level radioactive solid waste from decommissioning of KRR 1 and 2. The structure analysis was carried out based on the design criteria, and the safety of the container was assessed. The ISO container with its capacity of 4m 3 was selected for the radioactive solid waste storage. The proposed container was satisfied the criteria of ISO 1496/1 and the packaging standard of atomic energy act. manufacturing and test standards of IAEA were also applied to the container. Stress distribution and deformation were analyzed under given condition using ANSYS code, and the maximum stress was verified to be within yield stress without any structural deformation. From the results of lifting tests, it was verified that the container was safe

  3. Step-By-Step: Life Cycle Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive waste is an unavoidable by-product when nuclear technologies are used for electricity production and for beneficial practices in medicine, agriculture, research and industry. When the radioactivity of the waste is above a certain threshold, the waste requires special disposal methods. Through extensive research, standards and approaches have been developed for safely and securely preparing for and managing radioactive waste disposal. In the course of its journey from the point of generation to disposal, radioactive waste undergoes a number of predisposal management treatment steps to transform it into a safe, stable and manageable form suitable for transport, storage and disposal

  4. Introduction to Special Edition (of the Journal of Nuclear Materials Management) on Reducing the Threat from Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2007-01-01

    Introductory article for special edition of the JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT outlining the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management Nonproliferation and Arms Control Technical Division. In particular the International Nuclear and Radiological Security Standing Committee and its initial focus covering four topical areas--Radiological Threat Reduction, Nuclear Smuggling and Illicit Trafficking, Countering Nuclear Terrorism, and Radiological Terrorism Consequence Management

  5. The effects of radiation on intermediate-level waste forms. Task 3 characterization of radioactive waste forms a series of final reports (1985-89) no. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilding, C.R.; Phillips, D.C.; Burnay, S.G.; Spindler, W.E.; Lyon, C.E.; Winter, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this programme was to determine the effects of radiation on the properties of intermediate-level waste forms relevant to their storage and disposal. It had two overall aims: to provide immediate data on the effect of radiation on important European ILW waste forms through accelerated laboratory tests; and to develop an understanding of the degradation processes so that long-term, low dose rate effects can be predicted with confidence from short-term, high dose rate experiments. The programme included cement waste forms containing inorganic wastes, organic matrix waste forms, and cement waste forms containing a substantial component of organic waste. Irradiations were carried out by external gamma sources and by the incorporation of alpha emitters, such as 238 Pu. Irradiated materials included matrix materials, simulated waste forms and real waste forms. 2 figs.; 3 tabs.; 8 refs

  6. Radioactive waste management in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzi, F.P.; Bundala, F.M.; Nyanda, A.M.; Msaki, P.

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive waste, like many other hazardous wastes, is of great concern in Tanzania because of its undesirable health effects. The stochastic effects due to prolonged exposure to ionizing radiation produce cancer and hereditary effects. The deterministic effects due to higher doses cause vomiting, skin reddening, leukemia, and death to exposed victims. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the status of radioactive wastes in Tanzania, how they are generated and managed to protect humans and the environment. As Tanzania develops, it is bound to increase the use of ionizing radiation in research and teaching, industry, health and agriculture. Already there are more than 42 Centers which use one form of radioisotopes or another for these purposes: Teletherapy (Co-60), Brach-therapy (Cs-137, Sr-89), Nuclear Medicine (P-32, Tc-99m, 1-131, 1-125, Ga-67, In-111, Tl-206), Nuclear gauge (Am-241, Cs- 137, Sr-90, Kr-85), Industrial radiography (Am-241, C-137, Co-60, lr-92), Research and Teaching (1-125, Am241/Be, Co-60, Cs-137, H-3 etc). According to IAEA definition, these radioactive sources become radioactive waste if they meet the following criteria: if they have outlived their usefulness, if they have been abandoned, if they have been displaced without authorization, and if they contaminate other substances. Besides the origin of radioactive wastes, special emphasis will also be placed on the existing radiation regulations that guide disposal of radioactive waste, and the radioactive infrastructure Tanzania needs for ultimate radioactive waste management. Specific examples of incidences (theft, loss, abandonment and illegal possession) of radioactive waste that could have led to serious deterministic radiation effects to humans will also be presented. (author)

  7. Effects of Different Containers on Radioactivity Measurements using a Dose Calibrator with Special Reference to 111In and 123I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Abe, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Kei; Miyatake, Hiroki; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Low-energy characteristic x-rays emitted by 111 In and 123 I sources are easily absorbed by the containers of the sources, affecting radioactivity measurements using a dose calibrator. We examined the effects of different containers on the estimated activities. The radioactivities of 111 In, 123 I, 201 Tl, and 99m Tc were measured in containers frequently employed in clinical practice in Japan. The 111 In measurements were performed in the vials A and B of the 111 In-pentetreotide preparation kit and in the plastic syringe. The activities of 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine and 201 Tl chloride were measured in the prefilled glass syringes and plastic syringes. The milking vial, vial A, vial B, and plastic syringe were used to assay 99m Tc. For 111 In and 123 I, measurements were performed with and without a copper filter. The filter was inserted into the well of the dose calibrator to absorb low-energy x-rays. The relative estimate was defined as the ratio of the activity estimated with the dose calibrator to the standard activity. The estimated activities varied greatly depending on the container when 111 In and 123 I sources were assayed without the copper filter. The relative estimates of 111 In were 0.908, 1.072, and 1.373 in the vial A, vial B, and plastic syringe, respectively. The relative estimates of 123 I were 1.052 and 1.352 in the glass syringe and plastic syringe, respectively. Use of the copper filter eliminated the container-dependence in 111 In and 123 I measurements. Container-dependence was demonstrated in neither 201 Tl nor 99m Tc measurements. The activities of 111 In and 123 I estimated with a dose calibrator differ greatly among the containers. Accurate estimation may be attained using the container-specific correction factor or using the copper filter.

  8. Objectives for radioactive waste packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, R.H.

    1982-04-01

    The report falls under the headings: introduction; the nature of radioactive wastes; how to manage radioactive wastes; packaging of radioactive wastes (supervised storage; disposal); waste form evaluation and test requirements (supervised storage; disposal); conclusions. (U.K.)

  9. Application of insoluble tannin to recovery of uranium, TRU and heavy metals elements form radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Kazuhiko; Shirato, Wataru; Nakamura, Yasuo; Matsumura, Tatsuro; Takeshita, Kenji; Nakano, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd. (MNF) has developed a new adsorbent, TANNIX (tread mark), for the recovery of uranium, TRU and heavy metal elements in the liquid waste, in which TANNIX derived from a natural tannin polymer. TANNIX has same advantages that handling is easier than that of standard IX-resin, and that the volume of secondary waste is reduced by burning the used TANNIX. We have replaced its radioactive liquid waste treatment system from the conventional co-precipitation process to adsorption process by using TANNIX. TANNIX was founded to be more effective for the recovery of Pu, TRU, and hexavalent chromium Cr-(VI) as well as Uranium. (author)

  10. A special form of SPD covariance matrix for interpretation and visualization of data manipulated with Riemannian geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congedo, Marco; Barachant, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Currently the Riemannian geometry of symmetric positive definite (SPD) matrices is gaining momentum as a powerful tool in a wide range of engineering applications such as image, radar and biomedical data signal processing. If the data is not natively represented in the form of SPD matrices, typically we may summarize them in such form by estimating covariance matrices of the data. However once we manipulate such covariance matrices on the Riemannian manifold we lose the representation in the original data space. For instance, we can evaluate the geometric mean of a set of covariance matrices, but not the geometric mean of the data generating the covariance matrices, the space of interest in which the geometric mean can be interpreted. As a consequence, Riemannian information geometry is often perceived by non-experts as a "black-box" tool and this perception prevents a wider adoption in the scientific community. Hereby we show that we can overcome this limitation by constructing a special form of SPD matrix embedding both the covariance structure of the data and the data itself. Incidentally, whenever the original data can be represented in the form of a generic data matrix (not even square), this special SPD matrix enables an exhaustive and unique description of the data up to second-order statistics. This is achieved embedding the covariance structure of both the rows and columns of the data matrix, allowing naturally a wide range of possible applications and bringing us over and above just an interpretability issue. We demonstrate the method by manipulating satellite images (pansharpening) and event-related potentials (ERPs) of an electroencephalography brain-computer interface (BCI) study. The first example illustrates the effect of moving along geodesics in the original data space and the second provides a novel estimation of ERP average (geometric mean), showing that, in contrast to the usual arithmetic mean, this estimation is robust to outliers. In

  11. Radioactive Bench-scale Steam Reformer Demonstration of a Monolithic Steam Reformed Mineralized Waste Form for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste - 12306

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Brent; Olson, Arlin; Mason, J. Bradley; Ryan, Kevin [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC - 106 Newberry St. SW, Aiken, SC 29801 (United States); Jantzen, Carol; Crawford, Charles [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNL), LLC, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Hanford currently has 212,000 m{sup 3} (56 million gallons) of highly radioactive mixed waste stored in the Hanford tank farm. This waste will be processed to produce both high-level and low-level activity fractions, both of which are to be vitrified. Supplemental treatment options have been under evaluation for treating portions of the low-activity waste, as well as the liquid secondary waste from the low-activity waste vitrification process. One technology under consideration has been the THOR{sup R} fluidized bed steam reforming process offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC (TTT). As a follow-on effort to TTT's 2008 pilot plant FBSR non-radioactive demonstration for treating low-activity waste and waste treatment plant secondary waste, TTT, in conjunction with Savannah River National Laboratory, has completed a bench scale evaluation of this same technology on a chemically adjusted radioactive surrogate of Hanford's waste treatment plant secondary waste stream. This test generated a granular product that was subsequently formed into monoliths, using a geo-polymer as the binding agent, that were subjected to compressibility testing, the Product Consistency Test and other leachability tests, and chemical composition analyses. This testing has demonstrated that the mineralized waste form, produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay using the TTT process, is as durable as low-activity waste glass. Testing has shown the resulting monolith waste form is durable, leach resistant, and chemically stable, and has the added benefit of capturing and retaining the majority of Tc-99, I-129, and other target species at high levels. (authors)

  12. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 16. Repository preconceptual design studies: BPNL waste forms in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Volume 16, ''Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: BPNL Waste Forms in Salt,'' is one of a 23 volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provide a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This document describes a preconceptual design for a nuclear waste storage facility in salt. The waste forms assumed to arrive at the repository were supplied by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BPNL). The facility design consists of several chambers excavated deep within a geologic formation together with access shafts and supportive surface structures. The facility design provides for: receiving and unloading waste containers; lowering them down shafts to the mine level; transporting them to the proper storage area and emplacing them in mined storage rooms. Drawings of the facility design are contained in TM-36/17, ''Drawings for Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: BPNL Waste Forms in Salt.''

  13. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 2. Commercial waste forms, packaging and projections for preconceptual repository design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/2, ''Commercial Waste Forms, Packaging and Projections for Preconceptual Repository Design Studies,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This volume contains the data base for waste forms, packages, and projections from the commercial waste defined by the Office of Waste Isolation in ''Nuclear Waste Projections and Source Term Data for FY 1977,'' Y/OWI/TM-34. Also, as an alternative data base for repository design and analysis, waste forms, packages, and projections for commercial waste defined by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (BPNL) have been included. This data base consists of a reference case for use in the alternative design study and a definition of combustible wastes for use in mine fire and hydrogen generation analyses

  14. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 2. Commercial waste forms, packaging and projections for preconceptual repository design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/2, ''Commercial Waste Forms, Packaging and Projections for Preconceptual Repository Design Studies,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This volume contains the data base for waste forms, packages, and projections from the commercial waste defined by the Office of Waste Isolation in ''Nuclear Waste Projections and Source Term Data for FY 1977,'' Y/OWI/TM-34. Also, as an alternative data base for repository design and analysis, waste forms, packages, and projections for commercial waste defined by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (BPNL) have been included. This data base consists of a reference case for use in the alternative design study and a definition of combustible wastes for use in mine fire and hydrogen generation analyses.

  15. Form coexistence in light krypton nuclei. Isomeric spectroscopy of 72,74Kr nuclei and Coulomb excitation of the 76Kr radioactive beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchez, Emmanuelle

    2003-01-01

    The first part of this research thesis proposes an overview of the different theoretical calculations elaborated in the region of light krypton nuclei, and of published experimental results. The second part reports the electron and gamma isomeric spectroscopy of 72,74 Kr nuclei after fragmentation of the projectile by a magnetic separator (experimental installation, experimental results, discussion). The third part reports the study of the Coulomb excitation of the 76 Kr radioactive beam (method and experimental installation, data analysis and results in terms of germanium and silicon spectra, and form of the 76 Kr)

  16. Ways of decision of problem of forming for the cadets of the special qualities, need the militiaman to successful counteract against the armed attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarenko V.V.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Directions of forming of the special qualities of workers of militia are certain. Information is systematized about the real collisions of workers of militia with criminals. Conformities to law are rotined in the conduct of a be out for scalps criminal. The necessity of development and perfection of the special qualities of workers of militia is exposed. The terms of the hidden attack of criminal are considered. The necessity of mastering of knowledge is rotined about preparatory motions of the armed criminal. Directions of perfection of the special physical and psychical qualities, forming of abilities and skills of implementation of receptions of disarmament, are resulted.

  17. SOR/89-426, Transport Packaging of Radioactive Materials Regulations, amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    These Regulations of 24 August 1989 amend the Transport Packaging of Radioactive Materials Regulations by clarifying the text and specifying certain requirements. In particular certain definitions have been replaced, namely those of ''Fissile Class III package'' and ''Special form radioactive material''. Also, this latter material may not be carried without a certificate attesting that it meets the requirements of the Regulations. (NEA)

  18. Reevaluation of the thyroidal radioactive iodine uptake test, with special reference to reversible primary hypothyroidism with elevated thyroid radioiodine uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, K.; Sato, K.; Ikenoue, H.; Yoshinari, M.; Nakagawa, M.; Kuroda, T.; Fujishima, M.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical significance of the thyroidal radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) test was reevaluated in patients with various thyroid disorders. Compared with 262 normal subjects or 194 patients with euthyroid diffuse goiter with normal serum TSH levels, RAIU values were significantly higher in 100 patients with latent primary hypothyroidism (serum TSH, 5-40 mU/L). In 126 patients with overt primary hypothyroidism (serum TSH, greater than 40 mU/L), RAIU values were either extremely high (49 patients with reversible hypothyroidism and 10 patients with postpartum hypothyroidism) or low (67 patients with irreversible hypothyroidism). The increase in RAIU values in latent, or reversible overt hypothyroidism was TSH dependent, and there was a good correlation between RAIU values and serum TSH levels (r = 0.6203; P less than 0.001). In overt primary hypothyroidism, spontaneous recovery of thyroid function during iodide restriction alone occurred in 52 of 53 patients with RAIU values above 35%, in only 7 of 23 patients with RAIU values between 10-35%, and in none of 50 patients with RAIU below 10%. Thus, recovery was predicted by high RAIU values (P less than 0.001; prediction rate, 91.4%). Goiter was found in about 80% of the patients with reversible hypothyroidism, compared with only 34% of the patients with irreversible hypothyroidism. Recovery of thyroid function during iodide restriction also occurred in 71% of the patients with latent hypothyroidism. However, RAIU measurements did not predict the prognosis of patients with latent hypothyroidism. We conclude that iodine-induced reversible hypothyroidism is common in our patient population, and RAIU measurements may be helpful in determining the prognosis of patients with overt primary hypothyroidism

  19. Treatment of Radioactive Gaseous Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Radioactive waste, with widely varying characteristics, is generated from the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, research laboratories and medical facilities. The waste needs to be treated and conditioned as necessary to provide waste forms acceptable for safe storage and disposal. Although radioactive gaseous radioactive waste does not constitute the main waste flow stream at nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste processing facilities, it represents a major source for potential direct environmental impact. Effective control and management of gaseous waste in both normal and accidental conditions is therefore one of the main issues of nuclear fuel cycle and waste processing facility design and operation. One of the duties of an operator is to take measures to avoid or to optimize the generation and management of radioactive waste to minimize the overall environmental impact. This includes ensuring that gaseous and liquid radioactive releases to the environment are within authorized limits, and that doses to the public and the effects on the environment are reduced to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Responsibilities of the regulatory body include the removal of radioactive materials within authorized practices from any further regulatory control — known as clearance — and the control of discharges — releases of gaseous radioactive material that originate from regulated nuclear facilities during normal operation to the environment within authorized limits. These issues, and others, are addressed in IAEA Safety Standards Series Nos RS-G-1.7, WS-G-2.3 and NS-G-3.2. Special systems should be designed and constructed to ensure proper isolation of areas within nuclear facilities that contain gaseous radioactive substances. Such systems consist of two basic subsystems. The first subsystem is for the supply of clean air to the facility, and the second subsystem is for the collection, cleanup and

  20. Evaluation and review of alternative waste forms for immobilization of high level radioactive wastes. Report number 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A discussion of the relative strengths and weaknesses of the alternative forms and recommendations for future program directions are presented in the body of this report. In addition to the relative ranking, the Peer Review Panel makes the following observations and recommendations: (1) Differences in overall performance of most of the uncoated waste forms are relatively small when compared under approximately equivalent conditions. (2) The increased scientific basis for this class of waste forms has not yet been sufficient to achieve reliably large improvements in waste form performance over the best borosilicate glasses. (3) The increased leach rates at elevated temperatures and the uncertainty regarding mechanisms of leaching under repository conditions continue to indicate that surface temperatures of waste canisters and especially any waste form-water interfaces should be restricted to less than 100 0 C, until more data is available to indicate otherwise. (4) Improvements are noteworthy, but there is still a need for adopting additional standardized tests, standard reference materials, common units and standardized methods of data presentation in the nuclear waste program. (5) Comparative data on leach rates in waters equilibrated with candidate rocks and potential geologic environments are almost non-existent and are essential to establish relevant long term extrapolation of waste form performance.(6) Understanding radiation damage effects on the microstructure and leaching mechanisms of polycrystalline ceramics is still insufficient to judge long term reliability of this class of waste forms. (7) More extensive data on rates and mechanisms of leaching of all waste forms under radiation and repository conditions are needed. (8) Additional studies of fundamental mechanisms controlling long term reliability of glass and alternative waste forms are strongly encouraged

  1. MINERALIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR): COMPARISONS TO VITREOUS WASTE FORMS, AND PERTINENT DURABILITY TESTING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.

    2008-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to generate a document for the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that would cover the following topics: (1) A description of the mineral structures produced by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) of Hanford type Low Activity Waste (LAW including LAWR which is LAW melter recycle waste) waste, especially the cage structured minerals and how they are formed. (2) How the cage structured minerals contain some contaminants, while others become part of the mineral structure (Note that all contaminants become part of the mineral structure and this will be described in the subsequent sections of this report). (3) Possible contaminant release mechanisms from the mineral structures. (4) Appropriate analyses to evaluate these release mechanisms. (5) Why the appropriate analyses are comparable to the existing Hanford glass dataset. In order to discuss the mineral structures and how they bond contaminants a brief description of the structures of both mineral (ceramic) and vitreous waste forms will be given to show their similarities. By demonstrating the similarities of mineral and vitreous waste forms on atomic level, the contaminant release mechanisms of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous (glass) waste forms can be compared. This will then logically lead to the discussion of why many of the analyses used to evaluate vitreous waste forms and glass-ceramics (also known as glass composite materials) are appropriate for determining the release mechanisms of LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms and how the durability data on LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms relate to the durability data for LAW/LAWR glasses. The text will discuss the LAW mineral waste form made by FBSR. The nanoscale mechanism by which the minerals form will be also be described in the text. The appropriate analyses to evaluate contaminant release mechanisms will be discussed, as will the FBSR test results to

  2. Tools for forming strategies for remediation of forests and park areas in northern Europe after radioactive contamination: background and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, L.; Rantavaara, A.; Andersson, K.; Roed, J.

    2002-01-01

    This report compiles background information that can be used in planning appropriate countermeasures for forest and park areas in Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway, in case a nuclear accident results in large-scale contamination of forests. The information is formulated to inform the forestry sector and radiation protection experts about the practicality of both forest management techniques and mechanical cleanup methods, for use in their planning of specific strategies that can lead to an optimal use of contaminated forests. Decisions will depend on the site and the actual situation after radioactive deposition to forested areas, but the report provides background information from investigations performed before an accident occurs that will make the process more effective. The report also discusses the radiological consequences of producing energy from biomass contaminated by a major nuclear accident, both in the context of normal bio-fuel energy production and as a means of reducing potentially severe environmental problems in the forest by firing power plants with highly contaminated forest biomass. (au)

  3. Declaration and authorization forms for the fabrication, distribution or use of radioactive sources or electric generators of ionizing radiation; Formulaires de declaration et d'autorisation de fabrication, de distribution ou d'utilisation de sources radioactives ou de generateurs electriques de rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This document gathers all the forms to be completed when declaring or when asking for an authorization for the fabrication, retailing or use of radioactive sources or electric equipment generating ionizing radiation. These forms can concern all domains (use of sealed radioactive sources, possession and use of a particle accelerator or of radionuclides, import or export of radionuclides or of products containing radionuclides), or the use of such materials or equipment in the medical sector, or the fabrication and use in industry or research, or in user's guides for radioactive sources

  4. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Almost all IAEA Member States use radioactive sources in medicine, industry, agriculture and scientific research, and countries remain responsible for the safe handling and storage of all radioactively contaminated waste that result from such activities. In some cases, waste must be specially treated or conditioned before storage and/or disposal. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme with the support of the Nuclear Energy Department aimed at establishing appropriate technologies and procedures for managing radioactive wastes. (IAEA)

  5. Management of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neerdael, B.; Marivoet, J.; Put, M.; Van Iseghem, P.; Volckaert, G.; Wacquier, W.

    1998-09-01

    The document gives an overview of of different aspects of radioactive waste management in Belgium. The document discusses the radioactive waste inventory in Belgium, the treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste as well as activities related to the characterisation of different waste forms. A separate chapter is dedicated to research and development regarding deep geological disposal of radioactive waste. In the Belgian waste management programme, particular emphasis is on studies for disposal in clay. Main results of these studies are highlighted and discussed

  6. Special Analysis of Transuranic Waste in Trench T04C at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greg Shott; Vefa Yucel; Lloyd Desotell

    2008-01-01

    This Special Analysis (SA) was prepared to assess the potential impact of inadvertent disposal of a limited quantity of transuranic (TRU) waste in classified Trench 4 (T04C) within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under DOE Order 435.1 and DOE Manual (DOE M) 435.1-1. The primary objective of the SA is to evaluate if inadvertent disposal of limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 RWMS is in compliance with the existing, approved Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued under DOE M 435.1-1. In addition, supplemental analyses are performed to determine if there is reasonable assurance that the requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, can be met. The 40 CFR 191 analyses provide supplemental information regarding the risk to human health and the environment of leaving the TRU waste in T04C. In 1989, waste management personnel reviewing classified materials records discovered that classified materials buried in trench T04C at the Area 5 RWMS contained TRU waste. Subsequent investigations determined that a total of 102 55-gallon drums of TRU waste from Rocky Flats were buried in trench T04C in 1986. The disposal was inadvertent because unclassified records accompanying the shipment indicated that the waste was low-level. The exact location of the TRU waste in T04C was not recorded and is currently unknown. Under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.5, low-level waste disposal facilities must obtain a DAS. The DAS specifies conditions that must be met to operate within the radioactive waste management basis, consisting of a

  7. Special Analysis of Transuranic Waste in Trench T04C at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

    2008-05-01

    This Special Analysis (SA) was prepared to assess the potential impact of inadvertent disposal of a limited quantity of transuranic (TRU) waste in classified Trench 4 (T04C) within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under DOE Order 435.1 and DOE Manual (DOE M) 435.1-1. The primary objective of the SA is to evaluate if inadvertent disposal of limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 RWMS is in compliance with the existing, approved Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued under DOE M 435.1-1. In addition, supplemental analyses are performed to determine if there is reasonable assurance that the requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, can be met. The 40 CFR 191 analyses provide supplemental information regarding the risk to human health and the environment of leaving the TRU waste in T04C. In 1989, waste management personnel reviewing classified materials records discovered that classified materials buried in trench T04C at the Area 5 RWMS contained TRU waste. Subsequent investigations determined that a total of 102 55-gallon drums of TRU waste from Rocky Flats were buried in trench T04C in 1986. The disposal was inadvertent because unclassified records accompanying the shipment indicated that the waste was low-level. The exact location of the TRU waste in T04C was not recorded and is currently unknown. Under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.5, low-level waste disposal facilities must obtain a DAS. The DAS specifies conditions that must be met to operate within the radioactive waste management basis, consisting of a

  8. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Managing radioactive wastes used to be a peripheral activity for the French atomic energy commission (Cea). Over the past 40 years, it has become a full-fledged phase in the fuel cycle of producing electricity from the atom. In 2005, the national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) presented to the government a comprehensive overview of the results drawn from 15 years of research. This landmark report has received recognition beyond France's borders. By broadening this agency's powers, an act of 28 June 2006 acknowledges the progress made and the quality of the results. It also sets an objective for the coming years: work out solutions for managing all forms of radioactive wastes. The possibility of recovering wastes packages from the disposal site must be assured as it was asked by the government in 1998. The next step will be the official demand for the creation of a geological disposal site in 2016

  9. Radioactive transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive Transformations describes Ernest Rutherford's Nobel Prize-winning investigations into the mysteries of radioactive matter. In this historic work, Rutherford outlines the scientific investigations that led to and coincided with his own research--including the work of Wilhelm Rӧntgen, J. J. Thomson, and Marie Curie--and explains in detail the experiments that provided a glimpse at special relativity, quantum mechanics, and other concepts that would shape modern physics. This new edition features a comprehensive introduction by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek which engagingly explains how Rutherford's early research led to a better understanding of topics as diverse as the workings of the atom's nucleus, the age of our planet, and the fusion in stars.

  10. Apatite and sodalite based glass-bonded waste forms for immobilization of 129I and mixed halide radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goel, Ashutosh [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); McCloy, John S. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-12-30

    The goal of the project was to utilize the knowledge accumulated by the team, in working with minerals for chloride wastes and biological apatites, toward the development of advanced waste forms for immobilizing 129I and mixed-halide wastes. Based on our knowledge, experience, and thorough literature review, we had selected two minerals with different crystal structures and potential for high chemical durability, sodalite and CaP/PbV-apatite, to form the basis of this project. The focus of the proposed effort was towards: (i) low temperature synthesis of proposed minerals (iodine containing sodalite and apatite) leading to the development of monolithic waste forms, (ii) development of a fundamental understanding of the atomic-scale to meso-scale mechanisms of radionuclide incorporation in them, and (iii) understanding of the mechanism of their chemical corrosion, alteration mechanism, and rates. The proposed work was divided into four broad sections. deliverables. 1. Synthesis of materials 2. Materials structural and thermal characterization 3. Design of glass compositions and synthesis glass-bonded minerals, and 4. Chemical durability testing of materials.

  11. Development of differential quadrature based computational scheme in cylindrical geometry and its application to simulate radionuclide leaching from radioactive waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, T.K.; Bajpai, R.K.; Datta, D.

    2016-01-01

    Differential Quadrature Method (DQM) based computational scheme is developed to solve diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinate. In this scheme, time derivative is approximated using forward difference and the spatial derivatives using polynomial based DQM. This developed scheme is applied to simulate test problem on radionuclide leaching from radioactive waste form. Leach rate is calculated after simulating the leaching process. DQM based results are compared with the analytical solutions and good agreements between the two results are established. The developed tool is used as a numerical tool for computationally intensive calculations, such as regression analysis and correlation analysis etc. Multivariate regression analysis is carried out to establish a linear relationship between leach rate and model parameters e.g., diffusion coefficient, porosity and linear sorption coefficient. Study of correlation analysis carried out in this study shows that diffusion coefficient is positively more correlated with leach rate compared to porosity whereas, K_d is negatively correlated with leach rate. (author)

  12. Engineering product storage under the advanced fuel cycle initiative. Part I: An iterative thermal transport modeling scheme for high-heat-generating radioactive storage forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is developing an integrated nuclear fuel cycle technology under its Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Under the AFCI, waste minimization is stressed. Engineered product storage materials will be required to store concentrated radioactive cesium, strontium, americium, and curium for periods of tens to hundreds of years. The fabrication of such engineered products has some precedence but the concept is largely novel. We thus present a theoretical model used to calculate the maximum radial dimensions of right cylinder storage forms under several scenarios. Maximum dimensions are small, comparable to nuclear fuel pins in some cases, to avoid centerline melting temperatures; this highlights the need for a careful strategy for engineered product storage fabrication and storage

  13. Characteristics of radioactive waste forms conditioned for storage and disposal: Guidance for the development of waste acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    This report attempts to review the characteristics of the individual components of the waste package, i.e. the waste form and the container, in order to formulate, where appropriate, quidelines for the development of practical waste acceptance criteria. Primarily the criteria for disposal are considered, but if more stringent criteria are expected to be necessary for storage or transportation prior to the disposal, these will be discussed. The report will also suggest test areas which will aid the development of the final waste acceptance criteria

  14. Nearfield behaviour of clay barriers and their interaction with concrete Task 3 characterization of radioactive waste forms a series of final reports (1985-89) No 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atabek, R.; Beziat, A.; Coulon, H.; Dardaine, M.; Eglem, A.; Farcy, C.; Fontan, N.; Gatabin, C.; Gegout, P.; Lajudie, A.; Landoas, O.; Lechelle, J.; Plas, F.; Raynal, J.; Revertegat, E.; Debrabant, P.; Proust, D.

    1991-01-01

    In order to guarantee the safety of waste underground disposal, engineered barriers will be implemented as backfill materials in galleries and access shafts and as buffer materials between the host medium and the waste packages. One of the first requirements for engineered barriers is to minimize water and chemical species transfer. The materials being considered are essentially swelling clays, in particular calcium smectite clays coming from french deposits and hydraulic binders, more specially a ternary cement (named C.L.C.). A vitrified waste disposal in granite is taken as the most constraining scenario as far as engineered barrier is concerned. The clay buffer material is placed between the packages and the host rock. The main properties which are determined are directly related to the engineered barrier requirements: thermal conductivity, hydraulic conductivity, swelling pressure and swelling capacity. Moreover results are obtained on temperature effect on clay microstructure and properties in both cases: without and with water intake. The concrete durability with regard to clay pore water attack is evaluated taking into account previous results obtained to ensure low-level radioactive waste disposal safety. 23 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs

  15. Materials characterization of radioactive waste forms using a multi-element detection method based on the instrumental neutron activation analysis. MEDINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havenith, Andreas Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste has to meet the specifications and acceptance criteria defined by national regulatory and management authorities for its intermediate and final storage. In Germany the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS) has established waste acceptance requirements for the Konrad repository. Konrad is the disposal for radioactive waste with negligible heat generation and is located near the city of Salzgitter and is currently under construction. It will start operation not before the year 2021. The waste-acceptance-requirements are derived from a site-specific safety assessment. They include specific requirements on waste forms, packaging as well as limitations to activities of individual radionuclides and limitations to masses of non-radioactive harmful substances. The amount of chemically toxic elements in the waste is limited in order to avoid pollution of underground water reserves. To comply with these requirements every waste package has to be characterised in its radiological and chemical composition. This characterisation can be performed on the basis of existing documentation or, if the documentation is insufficient, on further analytical analysis. Segmented or integral gamma-scanning as well as active or passive neutron counting are used worldwide as the standard measurement methods for the radiological characterisation and quality checking of radioactive waste. These techniques determine the isotope specific activity of waste packages, but they do not allow the detection of non-radioactive hazardous substances inside the waste packages. Against this background the Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology Transfer (NET) at RWTH Aachen University and the Institute of Safety Research and Reactor Technology at Forschungszentrum Juelich jointly develop an innovative non-destructive analytical technique called MEDINA - ''Multi-Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation'' for

  16. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Neutron Products Incorporated Sealed Source Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-08-31

    The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Neutron Products Incorporated (NPI) Sealed Sources waste stream (DRTK000000056, Revision 0) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The NPI Sealed Sources waste stream consists of 850 60Co sealed sources (Duratek [DRTK] 2013). The NPI Sealed Sources waste stream requires a special analysis (SA) because the waste stream 60Co activity concentration exceeds the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

  17. [Forming radiation load on humans for territory being under influence of radioactive waste release from Nuclear Power Plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, L I

    2010-01-01

    The results of long-term radioecological researches (1980-2005 years), executed on the south of Ukraine on the study of forming of irradiation dose of man as a result of gaz-aerozol extrass and liquid upcasts of radionuclid's from operating AEPS (South Ukraine and Zaporozhia) in the mode of their normal exploitation are presented in the article. Different ways are considered of stantion radionuclids migration in the external environment. The sizes of effective dose of irradiation of man are certain from the receipt of "station" radionuclid's on the considered migratory chainlets. Researches were conducted with the purpose of search of methods of decline of irradiation dose for man in modern terms. Dosimetric descriptions which allow to forecast the size of effective irradiation dose for man from the receipt of radionuclids with AEPS in the mode of its normal exploitation are certain.

  18. Aspects related to the testing of sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olteanu, C. M.; Nistor, V.; Valeca, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources are commonly used in a wide range of applications, such as: medical, industrial, agricultural and scientific research. The radioactive material is contained within the sealed source and the device allows the radiation to be used in a controlled way. Accidents can result if the control over a small fraction of those sources is lost. Sealed nuclear sources fall under the category of special form radioactive material, therefore they must meet safety requirements during transport according to regulations. Testing sealed radioactive sources is an important step in the conformity assessment process in order to obtain the design approval. In ICN Pitesti, the Reliability and Testing Laboratory is notified by CNCAN to perform tests on sealed radioactive sources. This paper wants to present aspects of the verifying tests on sealed capsules for Iridium-192 sources in order to demonstrate the compliance with the regulatory requirements and the program of quality assurance of the tests performed. (authors)

  19. Method of processing nitrate-containing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Norito; Nagase, Kiyoharu; Otsuka, Katsuyuki; Ouchi, Jin.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently concentrate nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes by electrolytically dialyzing radioactive liquid wastes to decompose the nitrate salt by using an electrolytic cell comprising three chambers having ion exchange membranes and anodes made of special materials. Method: Nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes are supplied to and electrolytically dialyzed in a central chamber of an electrolytic cell comprising three chambers having cationic exchange membranes and anionic exchange membranes made of flouro-polymer as partition membranes, whereby the nitrate is decomposed to form nitric acid in the anode chamber and alkali hydroxide compound or ammonium hydroxide in the cathode chamber, as well as concentrate the radioactive substance in the central chamber. Coated metals of at least one type of platinum metal is used as the anode for the electrolytic cell. This enables efficient industrial concentration of nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes. (Yoshihara, H.)

  20. Radioactive contamination of some important fish species in fish ponds and natural waters with special attention to 90Sr radioisotope accumulation Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, D.; Szentjobi, O.

    1977-01-01

    The radioactive contamination accumulated in the organs and bones of fishes, a major protein source for mankind, depends on the radioactive contamination of waters and aquatic vegetation. In addition to the activity per gram of water, K, Ca, and chloride contents of waters and oxygen consumption were studied, since radioactivity and radioactive material enrichment in natural waters are the consequence of complex geological and physico-chemical processes. The origin of the differences in radioactivity of rivers, lakes and fish ponds is tentatively explained from the results of analytical and radiometric measurements of waters. Results of similar investigations on aquatic and coastal vegetation of these waters cannot be explained in a simple way because the answer is uncertain due to the compositional differences of plant specimens and the sampling in changing seasons. Therefore, additional investigations are proposed. (P.J.)

  1. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Materials Interface Interactions Test: Papers presented at the Commission of European Communities workshop on in situ testing of radioactive waste forms and engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1993-08-01

    The three papers in this report were presented at the second international workshop to feature the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT). This Workshop on In Situ Tests on Radioactive Waste Forms and Engineered Barriers was held in Corsendonk, Belgium, on October 13--16, 1992, and was sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). The Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre D'Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN, Belgium), and the US Department of Energy (via Savannah River) also cosponsored this workshop. Workshop participants from Belgium, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United States gathered to discuss the status, results and overviews of the MIIT program. Nine of the twenty-five total workshop papers were presented on the status and results from the WIPP MIIT program after the five-year in situ conclusion of the program. The total number of published MIIT papers is now up to almost forty. Posttest laboratory analyses are still in progress at multiple participating laboratories. The first MIIT paper in this document, by Wicks and Molecke, provides an overview of the entire test program and focuses on the waste form samples. The second paper, by Molecke and Wicks, concentrates on technical details and repository relevant observations on the in situ conduct, sampling, and termination operations of the MIIT. The third paper, by Sorensen and Molecke, presents and summarizes the available laboratory, posttest corrosion data and results for all of the candidate waste container or overpack metal specimens included in the MIIT program

  2. Radioactive waste management solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the more frequent questions that arise when discussing nuclear energy's potential contribution to mitigating climate change concerns that of how to manage radioactive waste. Radioactive waste is produced through nuclear power generation, but also - although to a significantly lesser extent - in a variety of other sectors including medicine, agriculture, research, industry and education. The amount, type and physical form of radioactive waste varies considerably. Some forms of radioactive waste, for example, need only be stored for a relatively short period while their radioactivity naturally decays to safe levels. Others remain radioactive for hundreds or even hundreds of thousands of years. Public concerns surrounding radioactive waste are largely related to long-lived high-level radioactive waste. Countries around the world with existing nuclear programmes are developing longer-term plans for final disposal of such waste, with an international consensus developing that the geological disposal of high-level waste (HLW) is the most technically feasible and safe solution. This article provides a brief overview of the different forms of radioactive waste, examines storage and disposal solutions, and briefly explores fuel recycling and stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management decision making

  3. Radioactively labelled vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.C.; Hamilton, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    The application concerns the manufacture of radioactive forms of vitamin B-12 in which the cobalt atom present in the vitamin B-12 molecule is replaced with a radioactive isotope of cobalt, usually cobalt-57 or cobalt-58. Such radioactive forms of B-12 are used extensively in the diagnosis of B-12 deficiency states

  4. Method for calcining radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorklund, W.J.; McElroy, J.L.; Mendel, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form involves calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix

  5. Experiences from the exercise ''MERLIN'' for the detection of radioactive substances with the participation of special-purpose vehicles; Erfahrungen aus der Uebung ''MERLIN'' zur Detektion radioaktiver Stoffe unter Beteiligung verschiedenen Einsatzfahrzeuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griesbach, M. [Hessisches Ministerium des Innern und fuer Sport, Wiesbaden (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Experiences of an exercise with hazardous goods, in particular with radioactive substances (measurements and taking environmental samples) are described. Several special-purpose vehicles with equipment and specially trained crews were used together with radiation protection experts according to the concept of Hesse. It has been the greatest exercise in Hesse with regard to hazardous goods and in particular with regard to ''incidents with radioactive substances''. (orig.)

  6. Natural occurring radioactive substances. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emara, A E [National Center for radiation Research and Technology Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive substances produced by cosmic rays of those of terrestrial origin are surveyed. The different radioactive decay series are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the element radium as regards its properties and distribution in different environmental samples. The properties of naturally occurring k-40 and its distribution in different natural media are also outlined. Induced radionuclides which are formed as a result of the interaction of cosmic rays with the constituents of the atmosphere are mentioned. In this respect the intensity of natural background radiation and the dose at different locations and levels is surveyed. Some regions of exceptionally high radioactivity which result in high exposure rates are mentioned. Monazite deposits and water springs are mentioned in some detail. The Oklo phenomenon as a natural reactor is also discussed. 8 tabs.

  7. Natural occurring radioactive substances. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emara, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive substances produced by cosmic rays of those of terrestrial origin are surveyed. The different radioactive decay series are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the element radium as regards its properties and distribution in different environmental samples. The properties of naturally occurring k-40 and its distribution in different natural media are also outlined. Induced radionuclides which are formed as a result of the interaction of cosmic rays with the constituents of the atmosphere are mentioned. In this respect the intensity of natural background radiation and the dose at different locations and levels is surveyed. Some regions of exceptionally high radioactivity which result in high exposure rates are mentioned. Monazite deposits and water springs are mentioned in some detail. The Oklo phenomenon as a natural reactor is also discussed. 8 tabs

  8. Handling of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza Mir, Azucena

    1998-01-01

    Based on characteristics and quantities of different types of radioactive waste produced in the country, achievements in infrastructure and the way to solve problems related with radioactive waste handling and management, are presented in this paper. Objectives of maintaining facilities and capacities for controlling, processing and storing radioactive waste in a conditioned form, are attained, within a great range of legal framework, so defined to contribute with safety to people and environment (au)

  9. Radioactive waste disposal package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  10. BN-350 decommissioning problems of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, A.; Tkachenko, V.

    2002-01-01

    Pursuant of modern concept on radioactive waste management applied in IAEA Member States all radioactive wastes produced during the BN-350 operation and decommissioning are subject to processing in order to be transformed to a form suitable for long-term storage and final disposal. The first two priority objectives for BN-350 reactor are as follows: cesium cleaning from sodium followed by sodium drain, and processing; processing of liquid and solid radioactive waste accumulated during BN-350 operation. Cesium cleaning from sodium and sodium processing to NaOH will be implemented under USA engineering and financial support. However the outputted product might be only subject to temporary storage under special conditions. Currently the problem is being solved on selection of technology for sodium hydroxide conversion to final product incorporated into cement-like matrix ready for disposal pursuant to existing regulatory requirements. Industrial installation is being designed for liquid radioactive waste processing followed by incorporation to cement matrix subject to further disposal. The next general objective is management of radioactive waste expected from BN-350 decommissioning procedure. Complex of engineering-radiation investigation that is being conducted at BN-350 site will provide estimation of solid and liquid radioactive waste that will be produced during the course of the BN-350 decommission. Radioactive wastes that will be produced may be shared for primary (metal structures of both reactor and reactor plant main and auxiliary systems equipment as well as construction wastes of dismantled biological protection, buildings and structures) and secondary (deactivation solutions, tools, materials, cloth, special accessory, etc.). Processing of produced radioactive wastes (including high activity waste) requires the use of special industrial facilities and construction of special buildings and structures for arrangement of facilities mentioned as well as for

  11. 77 FR 32711 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-234, Special Immigrant Visa Biodata Form...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ..., Refugees, and Migration, Office of Admissions (PRM/A). Form Number: DS-234. Respondents: Iraqi and Afghan... Population, Refugees and Migration. Dated: May 14, 2012. Kelly A. Gauger, Deputy Director, Office of Admissions, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, Department of State. [FR Doc. 2012-13343 Filed 5...

  12. An alternative host matrix based on iron phosphate glasses for the vitrification of specialized nuclear waste forms. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, D.E.; Marasinghe, K.; Ray, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    'Objectives of this project are to: (1) investigate the glass composition and processing conditions that yield optimum properties for iron phosphate glasses for vitrifying radioactive waste, (2) determine the atomic structure of iron phosphate glasses and the structure-property relationships, (3) determine how the physical and structural properties of iron phosphate glasses are affected by the addition of simulated high level nuclear waste components, and (4) investigate the process and products of devitrification of iron phosphate waste forms. The glass forming ability of about 125 iron phosphate melts has been investigated in different oxidizing to reducing atmospheres using various iron oxide raw materials such as Fe 2 O 3 , FeO, Fe 3 O 4 , and FeC 2 O 4 2H 2 O. The chemical durability, redox equilibria between Fe(II) and Fe(III), crystallization behavior and structural features for these glasses and their crystalline forms have been investigated using a variety of techniques including Mossbauer spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis, differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (DTA/TGA), and X-ray and neutron diffraction.'

  13. Using radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The leaflet discusses the following: radioactivity; radioisotopes; uses of ionising radiations; radioactivity from (a) naturally occurring radioactive elements, and (b) artificially produced radioisotopes; uses of radioactivity in medicine, (a) clinical diagnostic, (b) therapeutic (c) sterilization of medical equipment and materials; environmental uses as tracers; industrial applications, e.g. tracers and radiography; ensuring safety. (U.K.)

  14. Radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radon. Fission product aerosols. Radioiodine. Tritium. Plutonium. Mass transfer of radioactive vapours and aerosols. Studies with radioactive particles and human subjects. Index. This paper explores the environmental and health aspects of radioactive aerosols. Covers radioactive nuclides of potential concern to public health and applications to the study of boundary layer transport. Contains bibliographic references. Suitable for environmental chemistry collections in academic and research libraries

  15. Special aspects of responsibility of the principal offender for commission of the crimes with two forms of guilt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ірина Анатоліївна Зінов'єва

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the author analyzed the views of scientists on the issue of existence of complicity in the crimes with two forms of guilt. The author drew a conclusion that the confines of complicity as joint intentional participation in commission of intentional crime include nothing else than an act or an act and causation of basic consequence. An aggravated consequence caused by the principal offender through negligence is outside complicity because the joint intent to its commission is absent. The author substantiated the necessity for inculpation an aggravated consequence caused by the principal offender through negligence others accomplices if they had a duty and possibility to envisage it. Determining of the confines of knowing nature of an act of the principal offender of others accomplices as the joint result of their interrelated acts is recognized as prerequisite for inculpation them this consequence. Causation an aggravated consequence through negligence of intentional crime jointly by several persons that had a duty and possibility to envisage it is recognized as jointly causation through negligence. The author suggested examine the subjects of causation this consequence that had a duty and possibility to envisage it not as accomplices but as co-causers, each of them individually liable for its causation. The author distinguished the groups of crimes that have an aggravated consequence which is outside complicity. The author suggested the ways of qualification the crime with two forms of guilt subject to existence of the elements of complicity.

  16. Characterization of HLW glass samples Task 3 Characterization of radioactive waste forms a series of final reports (1985-89) No 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malow, G.; Behrend, U.; Schubert, P.

    1991-01-01

    Due to a delay in the melting of the highly radioactive SON68 glass, a short-term post-investigation of the highly radioactive glass from the Pamela plant in Mol (Belgium) has been carried out, the aim being a check-up of the active LEWC glass SM 513 LW11. The results were compared with those obtained for non-radioactive glass samples. The final report of the present CEC programme shortly describes the planned investigations of the glass R7T7 for the whole period of the research contract and the results of the short-term post-investigation of the Pamela glass. 11 refs.; 9 figs.; 4 tabs

  17. [Heel pressure ulcers. Comparative study between heel protective bandage and hydrocellular dressing with special form for the heel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torra i Bou, Joan-Enric; Rueda López, Justo; Camañes, Gemma; Herrero Narváez, Elias; Blanco Blanco, Joan; Martínez-Esparza, Elvira Hernández; Aneas Alcántara, Jesús; Verdú Soriano, José

    2002-05-01

    The heels, together with the sacra area, are one of the most frequent spots where pressure sores appear here in Spain. Any preventive measure against pressure sores on heels needs be oriented towards two main objectives: effective relief of pressure and its compatibility with localized care and skin inspection in order to detect lesions early on at least once a day. The authors planned a comparative, multi-centered, open, labeled and controlled study in which patients were assigned to two groups receiving these treatments: one received traditional preventive pressure sore treatment and a protective bandage on their heels while the other used a special Allevyn Heel hydrocellular dressing to protect their heels. The patients took part in this study over an eight week period. The response variable used to determine the effectiveness of the preventive measure in this study was the appearance of pressure sores. At the beginning, 130 patients were included in this study, 65 in each one of the treatment groups. In the bandage group, 50 patients finished this study while 61 in the dressing group finished this study. The appearance of pressure sores in the protective bandage group occurred in 44% of the patients, 22 out of 50, while in the dressing group, the occurrence rate was 3.3%, 2 out of 61 patients with a value of "ji" squared p pressure sore brought us a value of relative risk of 13.42 (IC 95%: 3.31-54.3) in the group wearing the protective bandage compared to the group wearing the dressing. The results of this study allow us to accept as valid the alternate hypothesis that there exist significant statistical differences between both treatment methods in favor of the Allevyn Heel dressing instead of the protective heel bandage. The use of this dressing, even though it is more expensive a priori than the protective bandage, in terms of unit cost for the product, has proven to be more effective in preventing pressure sores, and cheaper than the protective bandage if

  18. Dynamics of radioactive waste generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogaru, Daniela; Virtopeanu, Cornelia; Ivan, Alexandrina

    2008-01-01

    In Romania there are in operation three facilities licensed for collection, treatment and storage of radioactive waste resulted from industry, research, medicine, and agriculture, named institutional radioactive waste. The repository, which is of near surface type, is designed for disposing institutional radioactive waste. The institutional radioactive wastes generated are allowed to be disposed into repository according to the waste acceptance criteria, defined for the disposal facility. The radioactive wastes which are not allowed for disposal are stored on the site of each facility which is special authorised for this. The paper describes the dynamics of generation of institutional waste in Romania, both for radioactive waste which are allowed to be disposed into repository and for radioactive waste which are not allowed to be disposed of. (authors)

  19. Special aspects for forming the interiors of thai shopping malls through the use of the biological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Iryna O.; Rosliakova, Ljubov V.; Zakharchuk, Viktorija L.; Samosudova, Natalia

    2017-10-01

    This study reviews the biological approach to Thai shopping mall’s interior design planning. The authors defined the principles of the mall’s design optimization in Thailand on the basis of the imitation of biological samples at constructive, art-compositional, organizational and ecological levels. The analysis of forming the shopping malls interiors and space-planning solutions is based on the imitation of eight basic levels of organization of living things: molecules, cells, tissues, organs, organisms, populations, ecosystem and biosphere. The examples of the direct and implicit application of biological analogues were demonstrated in the architecture and design of Thai shopping malls. In the study, the shopping mall is regarded as an open self-sufficient system with a high level of autonomy and a fortified structural organization that includes various functional components. On the basis of the analysis of existing Thai shopping malls, a list of the basic requirements for the design of the malls was compiled. This corresponds to the needs and desires of the modern customer and ensures the competitiveness of the establishment. The phenomenon of multisensory design approach that enhances the psychophysical comfort of the shopping mall visitors is described. Socio-cultural and geographical factors were identified which determine the development of biodesign in Thailand. The article reveals the potential for a combination of biology and design to enhance the aesthetics, ergonomics and efficiency of the shopping malls. The prospects within the development of this field and the possibility of applying the solutions in practice were explored.

  20. Cystography in infants and children: a critical appraisal of the many forms with special regard to voiding cystourethrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccabona, Michael [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Graz, LKH Graz, Auebruggenplatz, 8036 Graz (Austria)

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and discuss the various forms of cystography and their clinical value. Conventional fluoroscopic voiding cystourethrography (VCU), radionuclide cystography and the various sonographic cystographic approaches, including echo-enhanced cystosonography (EECS), are described. Their indications, potential, benefit and setbacks/restrictions are discussed with regard to the literature and the constantly changing clinical demand. With the introduction of EECS a new and reliable tool has been established to be useful for follow-up and screening for vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR); however, with the growing importance of functional disturbances a reliable method to evaluate both function and anatomy/VUR as offered by modified VCU is mandatory, and thus VCU remains to play a major part in evaluating children with urinary tract infection, suspected VUR, hydronephrosis or functional bladder disturbances. While EECS offers a new method for certain indications, such as follow-up examinations in VUR or screening, VCU remains an irreplaceable tool for evaluating anatomy (particularly the male urethra) and bladder function (if performed using the modified technique). (orig.)

  1. Cystography in infants and children: a critical appraisal of the many forms with special regard to voiding cystourethrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and discuss the various forms of cystography and their clinical value. Conventional fluoroscopic voiding cystourethrography (VCU), radionuclide cystography and the various sonographic cystographic approaches, including echo-enhanced cystosonography (EECS), are described. Their indications, potential, benefit and setbacks/restrictions are discussed with regard to the literature and the constantly changing clinical demand. With the introduction of EECS a new and reliable tool has been established to be useful for follow-up and screening for vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR); however, with the growing importance of functional disturbances a reliable method to evaluate both function and anatomy/VUR as offered by modified VCU is mandatory, and thus VCU remains to play a major part in evaluating children with urinary tract infection, suspected VUR, hydronephrosis or functional bladder disturbances. While EECS offers a new method for certain indications, such as follow-up examinations in VUR or screening, VCU remains an irreplaceable tool for evaluating anatomy (particularly the male urethra) and bladder function (if performed using the modified technique). (orig.)

  2. Transporting radioactive rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, G.

    1990-01-01

    The case is made for exempting geological specimens from the IAEA Regulations for Safer Transport of Radioactive Materials. It is pointed out that many mineral collectors in Devon and Cornwall may be unwittingly infringing these regulations by taking naturally radioactive rocks and specimens containing uranium ores. Even if these collectors are aware that these rocks are radioactive, and many are not, few have the necessary equipment to monitor the activity levels. If the transport regulations were to be enforced alarm could be generated and the regulations devalued in case of an accident. The danger from a spill of rock specimens is negligible compared with an accident involving industrial or medical radioactive substances yet would require similar special treatment. (UK)

  3. Investigation into the behaviour of highly compacted dry low-level radioactive waste under repository conditions. Task 3 characterization of radioactive waste forms a series of final reports (1985-89) no 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, S.N.; Wang, J.

    1991-01-01

    Supercompaction is a process in which drums containing low-level radioactive waste are compressed at a high axial pressure of up to 70 MPa, resulting in a significant saving in the volume of a repository built to store such waste. Recent practice of supercompaction is to compact waste which has been placed in a sealed primary container, typically a 200-litre steel drum. During the process of compaction the drum is squashed with its contents into a flat pellet; and the compaction ratio can reach as high as 20:1. Although the compaction of radioactive waste has long been a popular means for reducing its storage volume, there is virtually no available information as to the physical or chemical characteristics of such compacted wastes. The primary objective of this project has been to investigate the physical and some of the chemical characteristics of such supercompacted pellets. All the work was carried out on full-scale 200-litre drums of simulated, but non-radioactive, waste. The compaction ratio reached in this study ranged from 5 to 21, depending on the type of waste. Upon completion of compaction, all drums exhibited a tendency to expand. The magnitude of ultimate expansion for dry storage was of the order of 1 mm only, whereas under wet storage conditions values were up to about 10 mm. As the presence of moisture can significantly increase the expansion of compacted waste drums or stress developed due to restraint, it is recommended that the waste repository be made water/vapour-tight

  4. Radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabkina, L.E.; Mazurek, V.; Myascedov, D.N.; Prokhorov, P.; Kachalov, V.A.; Ziv, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    A radioactive layer in a radioactive source is sealed by the application of a sealing layer on the radioactive layer. The sealing layer can consist of a film of oxide of titanium, tin, zirconium, aluminum, or chromium. Preferably, the sealing layer is pure titanium dioxide. The radioactive layer is embedded in a finish enamel which, in turn, is on a priming enamel which surrounds a substrate

  5. Radioactivity metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, J.

    1979-01-01

    Some aspects of the radioactivity metrology are reviewed. Radioactivity primary references; absolute methods of radioactivity measurements used in the Laboratoire de Metrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants; relative measurement methods; traceability through international comparisons and interlaboratory tests; production and distribution of secondary standards [fr

  6. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teillac, J.

    1988-01-01

    This study of general interest is an evaluation of the safety of radioactive waste management and consequently the preservation of the environment for the protection of man against ionizing radiations. The following topics were developed: radiation effects on man; radioactive waste inventory; radioactive waste processing, disposal and storage; the present state and future prospects [fr

  7. Formulation of special glass frit and its use for decontamination of Joule melter employed for vitrification of high level and radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valsala, T.P.; Mishra, P.K.; Thakur, D.A.; Ghongane, D.E.; Jayan, R.V.; Dani, U.; Sonavane, M.S.; Kulkarni, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced vitrification system at TWMP Tarapur was used for successful vitrification of large volume of HLW stored in waste tank farm. After completion of the operational life of the joule melter, dismantling was planned. Prior to the dismantling, the hold up inventory of active glass product from the melter was flushed out using specially formulated inactive glass frit to reduce the air activity buildup in the cell during dismantling operations. The properties of the special glass frit prepared are comparable with that of the regular product glass. More than 94% of holdup activity was flushed out from the joule melter prior to the dismantling of the melter. (author)

  8. Studies on the optimal disposal of radioactive wastes with special attention to the thermal influence on the surrounding salt bed and to economic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunstman, A.S.; Urbanczyk, K.M.; Wierzchon, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents the method commonly applied in Poland of forecasting the thermal character of an underground high-level radioactive waste repository. It is used for optimizing the mine excavation configuration as well as the order of storage. This method is shown with an example of the research results for the central radioactive waste repository. A short description of the designed repository as well as a comparison of expenditure for underground and surface repositories is given. The method shown in this paper of forecasting the temperature rise in the repository is based on the superposition of the analytical integral solutions of the heat conductivity equation for a single canister - the heat source. The detailed computer tabulation of these solutions enables forecasting the possibility of fast temperature increase at any repository point and at any time, taking into consideration localization and storage time for each of the thousands of stored canisters individually. In the repository design phase this allows the speedy investigation of various variants in the configuration of the placement and transportation corridors as well as the choice of a variant ensuring the best utilization of the repository area and also suitable working conditions for both mining and placement crews. (author)

  9. Management of Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchokosa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Management of Radioactive Wastes is to protect workers and the public from the radiological risk associated with radioactive waste for the present and future. It application of the principles to the management of waste generated in a radioisotope uses in the industry. Any material that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides at concentrations or radioactivity levels greater than ‘exempt quantities’ established by the competent regulatory authorities and for which no further use is foreseen or intended. Origin of the Radioactive Waste includes Uranium and Thorium mining and milling, nuclear fuel cycle operations, Operation of Nuclear power station, Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and Institutional uses of isotopes. There are types of radioactive waste: Low-level Waste (LLW) and High-level Waste. The Management Options for Radioactive Waste Depends on Form, Activity, Concentration and half-lives of the radioactive waste, Storage and disposal methods will vary according to the following; the radionuclides present, and their concentration, and radio toxicity. The contamination results basically from: Contact between radioactive materials and any surface especially during handling. And it may occur in the solid, liquid or gas state. Decontamination is any process that will either reduce or completely remove the amount of radionuclides from a contaminated surface

  10. Radioactive battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaton, R.L.; Silver, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive battery is described that is comprised of a container housing an electrolyte, two electrodes immersed in the electrolyte and insoluble radioactive material disposed adjacent one electrode. Insoluble radioactive material of different intensity of radioactivity may be disposed adjacent the second electrode. If hydrobromic acid is used as the electrolyte, Br 2 will be generated by the radioactivity and is reduced at the cathode: Br 2 + 2e = 2 Br - . At the anode Br - is oxidized: 2Br - = Br 2 + 2e. (U.S.)

  11. Radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejonghe, P.

    1978-01-01

    This article gives an outline of the present situation, from a Belgian standpoint, in the field of the radioactive wastes processing. It estimates the annual quantity of various radioactive waste produced per 1000 MW(e) PWR installed from the ore mining till reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The methods of treatment concentration, fixation, final storable forms for liquid and solid waste of low activity and for high level activity waste. The storage of radioactive waste and the plutonium-bearing waste treatement are also considered. The estimated quantity of wastes produced for 5450 MW(e) in Belgium and their destination are presented. (A.F.)

  12. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Idaho National Laboratory Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor Rods and Pellets Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-08-31

    The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Rods and Pellets waste stream (INEL103597TR2, Revision 2) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream consists of 24 containers with unirradiated fabricated rods and pellets composed of uranium oxide (UO2) and thorium oxide (ThO2) fuel in zirconium cladding. The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream requires an SA because the 229Th, 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U activity concentrations exceed the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

  13. Potential co-disposal of greater-than-class C low-level radioactive waste with Department of Energy special case waste - greater-than-class C low-level waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, W.E.

    1994-09-01

    This document evaluates the feasibility of co-disposing of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) special case waste (SCW). This document: (1) Discusses and evaluates key issues concerning co-disposal of GTCC LLW with SCW. This includes examining these issues in terms of regulatory concerns, technical feasibility, and economics; (2) Examines advantages and disadvantages of such co-disposal; and (3) Makes recommendations. Research and analysis of the issues presented in this report indicate that it would be technically and economically feasible to co-dispose of GTCC LLW with DOE SCW. However, a dilemma will likely arise in the current division of regulatory responsibilities between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and DOE (i.e., current requirement for disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission). DOE SCW is currently not subject to this licensing requirement

  14. International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity. Biennial report 1983-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    The report contains the results of the scientific tasks carried out in 1983-1984 by the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco. The methods development and analytical quality assurance for radionuclide measurements, studies for evaluating environmental impacts of radionuclide releases into the sea, contribution to international marine pollution monitoring and research including special missions are presented. The 47 papers are published in summary form

  15. Radioactive waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Makoto; Kamiya, Kunio; Yusa, Hideo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To form radioactive wastes into a pellet-like solid body having high strength. Structure: Liquid waste containing a radioactive material is heated into a powdery body. Granular solid matter such as sand greater in diameter than grain size of the powdery body are mixed into the powdery body, and thereafter the mixture is formed by a granulator into a pellet-like solid body. The thus formed material is introduced into a drum can, into which a thermoplastic material such as asphalt is poured into the can and cooled so that the asphalt is impregnated inside the pellet to obtain a solid having high strength. (Furukawa, Y.)

  16. Data for radioactive waste management and nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a specialized handbook on the management of radioactive waste, including information applicable to related applications. It consolidates information from many sources to develop techniques for dealing with radioactive waste management and features reports and other specialized data not available in libraries. It covers physical data, chemical data, types of radioactive wastes, and data for different operations

  17. Decontaminating method for radioactive contaminant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    After decontamination of radioactive contaminates with d-limonene, a radioactive material separating agent not compatible with liquid wastes caused by decontamination is added to the liquid wastes. Then after stirring, they are stood still to be separated into two phases, and the radioactive materials in the liquid waste phase caused by decontamination are transferred to the phase of the radioactive material separating agent. With such procedures, they can satisfactorily be separated into two phases of d-limonene and the radioactive material separating agent. Further, d-limonene remaining after the separation can be used again as a decontaminating agent for radioactive contaminates. Therefore, the amount of d-limonene to be used can be reduced, to lower the cost for cleaning, thereby enabling to reduce the amount of radioactive wastes formed. (T.M.)

  18. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomek, D.

    1980-01-01

    The prospects of nuclear power development in the USA up to 2000 and the problems of the fuel cycle high-level radioactive waste processing and storage are considered. The problems of liquid and solidified radioactive waste transportation and their disposal in salt deposits and other geologic formations are discussed. It is pointed out that the main part of the high-level radioactive wastes are produced at spent fuel reprocessing plants in the form of complex aqueous mixtures. These mixtures contain the decay products of about 35 isotopes which are the nuclear fuel fission products, about 18 actinides and their daughter products as well as corrosion products of fuel cans and structural materials and chemical reagents added in the process of fuel reprocessing. The high-level radioactive waste management includes the liquid waste cooling which is necessary for the short and middle living isotope decay, separation of some most dangerous components from the waste mixture, waste solidification, their storage and disposal. The conclusion is drawn that the seccessful solution of the high-level radioactive waste management problem will permit to solve the problem of the fuel cycle radioactive waste management as a whole. The salt deposits, shales and clays are the most suitable for radioactive waste disposal [ru

  19. 220Radon (Thoron) and progeny exposures in the front-end of nuclear fuel cycle activities with special reference to radioactive minerals, thorium and rare earths processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, P.M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Radon is a major Source of radiation exposure both at home and work places due to its universal presence. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has always treated the radioactive noble gas radon ( 222 Rn) and its isotope thoron ( 220 Rn) as a separate subject. ICRP Publication 65 (ICRP, 1993) summarizes the current knowledge of health effects of inhaled radon and its decay products and gives recommendations/guidelines for the control of exposures due to high radon levels encountered in dwellings and work places. A major departure from earlier publications on the subject is the entirely epidemiological considerations for developing the recommendations. In work place monitoring the progeny concentrations are of primary concern than the gases themselves. However radon/thoron gas measurements may also be used provided reliable information on the equilibrium factors are available. Though many developments have taken place and many options are available for individual monitoring for radon (mainly progeny) exposures of occupational workers, a viable personal dosimeter for individual monitoring for thoron daughters is yet to materialize. The doses are mostly estimated by making use of work place monitoring data in combination with occupancy factors

  20. ''Transportare necesse est''. Reflections on attempts to prohibit the transport of radioactive material in Germany with special consideration of the Bremen Port Operation Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmann, U.

    2016-01-01

    Irrespective of the fact that about 95% of all nuclear transports are not related to the nuclear fuel cycle but are needed among others in medicine, research, agriculture, non-destructive testing of material and in the non-nuclear industry the number of protests against transports of all sorts of radioactive material have increased, especially the attempts to prohibit nuclear transports or - e.g. by delay - to hamper them. Such attempts come from citizens' initiatives as well as out of the political area. However, prohibition of nuclear transports can also be prescribed by law. A striking example for such a prohibition is the ban of loading and unloading of nuclear fuel in the ports of Bremen which was inserted in the Bremen Port Operation Act in 2012. Because of the unconstitutionality of this ban (Breach of exclusive federal competence and breach of loyalty to the federal state) but also because of the ban setting a precedent it was indispensable to take action before court against the ban. Several actions were brought to the administration court of Bremen in 2013 by three companies being active in the nuclear fuel cycle. The aim of the actions is to get a decision by the Federal Constitutional Court attesting the unconstitutionality of paragraph 2 subpara 3 of Bremens Port Operation Act.

  1. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: special advisory report on the status of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's plans for repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditmars, J.D.; Walbridge, E.W.; Rote, D.M.; Harrison, W.; Herzenberg, C.L.

    1983-10-01

    Repository performance assessment is analysis that identifies events and processes that might affect a repository system for isolation of radioactive waste, examines their effects on barriers to waste migration, and estimates the probabilities of their occurrence and their consequences. In 1983 Battelle Memorial Institute's Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) prepared two plans - one for performance assessment for a waste repository in salt and one for verification and validation of performance assessment technology. At the request of the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project Office (SRPO), Argonne National Laboratory reviewed those plans and prepared this report to advise SRPO of specific areas where ONWI's plans for performance assessment might be improved. This report presents a framework for repository performance assessment that clearly identifies the relationships among the disposal problems, the processes underlying the problems, the tools for assessment (computer codes), and the data. In particular, the relationships among important processes and 26 model codes available to ONWI are indicated. A common suggestion for computer code verification and validation is the need for specific and unambiguous documentation of the results of performance assessment activities. A major portion of this report consists of status summaries of 27 model codes indicated as potentially useful by ONWI. The code summaries focus on three main areas: (1) the code's purpose, capabilities, and limitations; (2) status of the elements of documentation and review essential for code verification and validation; and (3) proposed application of the code for performance assessment of salt repository systems. 15 references, 6 figures, 4 tables

  2. New radioactivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.; Sandulescu, A.

    1996-01-01

    Some atomic nuclei reorganize their structure by ejection of big protons and neutrons aggregates. The observation of these new radioactivities specifies the theories of the nuclear dynamics. (authors)

  3. Radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Yoshio; Shimizu, Makoto.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of radioactivity in the ocean with marine life are various. Activities in this field, especially the measurements of the radioactivity in sea water and marine life are described. The works first started in Japan concerning nuclear weapon tests. Then the port call to Japan by U.S. nuclear-powered naval ships began. On the other hand, nuclear power generation is advancing with its discharge of warm water. The radioactive pollution of sea water, and hence the contamination of marine life are now major problems. Surveys of the sea areas concerned and study of the radioactivity intake by fishes and others are carried out extensively in Japan. (Mori, K.)

  4. Radioactivity Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firestone, R.B.; Browne, E.

    1985-01-01

    The Radioactivity Handbook will be published in 1985. This handbook is intended primarily for applied users of nuclear data. It will contain recommended radiation data for all radioactive isotopes. Pages from the Radioactivity Handbook for A = 221 are shown as examples. These have been produced from the LBL Isotopes Project extended ENDSF data-base. The skeleton schemes have been manually updated from the Table of Isotopes and the tabular data are prepared using UNIX with a phototypesetter. Some of the features of the Radioactivity Handbook are discussed here

  5. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste

  6. Classification of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. To simplify their management, a number of schemes have evolved for classifying radioactive waste according to the physical, chemical and radiological properties of significance to those facilities managing this waste. These schemes have led to a variety of terminologies, differing from country to country and even between facilities in the same country. This situation makes it difficult for those concerned to communicate with one another regarding waste management practices. This document revises and updates earlier IAEA references on radioactive waste classification systems given in IAEA Technical Reports Series and Safety Series. Guidance regarding exemption of materials from regulatory control is consistent with IAEA Safety Series and the RADWASS documents published under IAEA Safety Series. 11 refs, 2 figs, 2 tab

  7. Radioactive gas solidification apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Eiji; Yabu, Tomohiko; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki.

    1990-01-01

    Handling of a solidification container from the completion for the solidifying processing to the storage of radioactive gases by a remote control equipment such as a manipulator requires a great cost and is difficult to realize. In a radioactive gas solidification device for injection and solidification in accumulated layers of sputtered metals by glow discharge, radiation shieldings are disposed surrounding the entire container, and cooling water is supplied to a cooling vessel formed between the container and the shielding materials. The shielding materials are divided into upper and lower shielding materials, so that solidification container can be taken out from the shielding materials. As a result, the solidification container after the solidification of radioactive gases can be handled with ease. Further, after-heat can be removed effectively from the ion injection electrode upon solidifying treatment upon storage, to attain a radioactive gas solidifying processing apparatus which is safe, economical and highly reliable. (N.H.)

  8. Radioactivity. Centenary of radioactivity discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Tubiana, M.; Bimbot, R.

    1997-01-01

    This small booklet was edited for the occasion of the exhibitions of the celebration of the centenary of radioactivity discovery which took place in various locations in France from 1996 to 1998. It recalls some basic knowledge concerning radioactivity and its applications: history of discovery, atoms and isotopes, radiations, measurement of ionizing radiations, natural and artificial radioactivity, isotope dating and labelling, radiotherapy, nuclear power and reactors, fission and fusion, nuclear wastes, dosimetry, effects and radioprotection. (J.S.)

  9. Sampling airborne radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactive contaminants have historically been considered apart from chemical contaminants because it is their radiological properties that determine their biological and environmental impact. Additionally they have been regulated by special government agencies concerned with radiological protection. Radioactive contaminants are also distinguished by the specialized and very sensitive methods available for the detection of radioactivity. Measurements of a few thousand atoms per liter are not uncommon. Radiation detectors in common use are gas filled chambers, scintillation and semiconductor detectors, and the more recently developed thermoluminescent and etched track detectors. Solid-state nuclear track detectors consist of a large group of inorganic and organic dielectrics which register tracks when traversed by heavy charged particles. They do not respond to light, beta particles or gamma ray photons and thus provide a very low background system for the detection of extremely low levels of radioactivity. In addition, no power source or electronic equipment is required. Cellulose nitrate detectors are currently in use for long term integrated sampling of environmental radon. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TID's) are crystalline materials, in which electrons which have been displaced by an interaction with ionizing radiation become trapped at an elevated energy level and emit visible light when released from that energy level. As which etched-track detectors no power or electronic equipment is needed for the TID's at a measurement site, but they respond to alpha, beta and gamma radiation. Thermoluminescent dosimeters are useful for long term environmental monitoring, and have also been newly incorporated into integrating radon detection systems

  10. Spectroscopic and first-principles calculation studies of the chemical forms of palladium ion in nitric acid solution for development of disposal of high-level radioactive nuclear wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinta; Sato, Toshikazu; Yoshida, Tomoko; Nakaya, Masato; Yoshino, Masahito; Nagasaki, Takanori; Inaba, Yusuke; Takeshita, Kenji; Onoe, Jun

    2018-04-01

    We have investigated the chemical forms of palladium (Pd) ion in nitric acid solution, using XAFS/UV-vis spectroscopic and first-principles methods in order to develop the disposal of high-level radioactive nuclear liquid wastes (HLLW: radioactive metal ions in 2 M nitric acid solution). The results of theoretical calculations and XAFS/UV-vis spectroscopy indicate that Pd is a divalent ion and forms a square-planar complex structure coordinated with four nitrate ions, [Pd(NO3)4]2-, in nitric acid solution. This complex structure is also thermodynamically predicted to be most stable among complexes [Pd(H2O)x(NO3)4-x]x-2 (x = 0-4). Since the overall feature of UV-vis spectra of the Pd complex was independent of nitric acid concentration in the range 1-6 M, the structure of the Pd complex remains unchanged in this range. Furthermore, we examined the influence of γ-ray radiation on the [Pd(NO3)4]2- complex, using UV-vis spectroscopy, and found that UV-vis spectra seemed not to be changed even after 1.0 MGy irradiation. This implies that the Pd complex structure will be still stable in actual HLLW. These findings obtained above are useful information to develop the vitrification processes for disposal of HLLW.

  11. Control of Radioactive Lightning-Conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, E.

    2004-01-01

    The radioactive lightning-conductor production in Brazil was started in 1970 and after a period of 19 years of commercialization of these devices, the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), based in studies done in Brazil and abroad, proved that the radioactive lightning-conductor performance wasn't superior to the conventional one, so the use of radioactive source is not justified. Thence, the authorization for its production was suspended and the installation of this type of lightning-conductor was forbidden. The radioactive material that results from the dismount of these devices must be immediately sent to CNEN, for treatment and temporary storage. After this prohibition and its publication in several specialized magazines, CNEN was searched for several institutions, factories, churches, etc, interested in obtaining information about the handling and shipment procedures of radioactive lightning-conductors that are inoperative and that must be sent to CNEN's Institutes, in a correct and secure form. From this moment CNEN technicians realize that the owners of radioactive lightning-conductors didn't have any knowledge and training in radiation protection, neither in equipment to monitoring the radiation. The radioactive material from these sources is, in almost all cases, the radioisotope 241Am which has a maximum activity of an order of 5 mCi (1,85 x 10-2 TBq); as the radiation emitted by 241Am is of alpha type, whose range in the air, is just few centimeters and the gamma rays are of low energy, an irradiation offer small risk. However, there is a contamination risk on someone hands, by the contact with the source. Aiming to attend, in an objective way, the users' interests in obtaining some pertinent technical information about the shipping of radioactive lightning-conductor that is inoperative or is being replaced and also to optimize its receipt in CNEN's Institutes, because there still has a great number of these lightning-conductors installed and still

  12. Near-field modelling in cement environments. Task 3. Characterization of radioactive waste forms. A series of final reports (1985-89). No 32B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haworth, A.; Sharland, S.M.; Tweed, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    The models used in the assessment of the performance of a radioactive waste repository are necessarily simple and must make assumptions in many areas. The aim of this project is to develop research models to examine various physical and chemical processes in the nearfield of a repository in more detail to justify some of these assumptions. The Cheqmate program has been developed to study coupled chemistry and ionic-transport processes. The numerical method used in the program has recently been improved and models of sorption included in the chemical part of the code. A model of the degradation of cement in a repository has been developed using Cheqmate. In a previous study, the scale of perturbation to the ground-water chemistry surrounding a repository due to the ingress of high pH from the backfill was investigated. The thermodynamic description of clay has been improved and used in a validation exercise for Cheqmate from information provided by the British Geological Survey. A model of diffusion/sorption experiments through cement has also been developed. This model is intended to provide a framework for modelling transport of sorbing species through cement. 11 figs.; 4 tabs.; 20 refs

  13. Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Guidelines regarding the Form and Structure of National Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The 'Guidelines regarding the Form and Structure of National Reports' adopted at the Preparatory Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Joint Convention held from 10 to 12 December 2001 were modified at the Second Review Meeting of the Contracting Parties held from 15 to 24 May 2006. The modified 'Guidelines regarding the Form and Structure of National Reports' are set forth in the Attachment hereto

  14. Origin, quantities produced and ways of conditioning of special wastes in regional collection points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neider, R.

    1983-01-01

    Radioactive substances to be collected at regional collecting points are mostly related to the radionuclides H-3, Ra-226 and Th-232. These special wastes form a particular group of wastes including such solid wastes which do not contain volatile radionuclides yet cannot, for other reasons, be conditioned in accordance with the old Asse qualifications. (orig./DG) [de

  15. Contribution to Radioactive Waste Management in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, M.; Frgic, L.; Sunjerga, S.

    2002-01-01

    The problem of dangerous waste disposal in Croatia is not more only technical problem; it grew over to political one of the first degree. Nobody likes to have the repository in own courtyard. Some five hundred institutions and factories produce in Croatia low, intermediate or high level radioactive waste. Till now all the dangerous waste is keeping in basements of the institute Rudjer Boskovic in Zagreb, just one kilometre form the city centre. This temporary solution is working fore some fifty years, but cannot be conserved forever. In the paper are presented some of the solutions for radioactive waste deposition, known from the references. The deep, impermeable layers in Panonian area have conserved petroleum and gas under pressure of more hundred bars for few dozens millions of years. Therefore, we propose the underground deposition of radioactive waste in deep boreholes. The liquid waste can be injected in deep isolated layers. In USA and Russia, for many years such solutions are realised. In USA exist special regulations for this kind of waste management. In the paper is described the procedure of designing, execution and verification of deposition in Russia. In northern part of Croatia exist thousand boreholes with known geological data. The boreholes were executed for investigation and exploitation of oil and gas fields. This data can make good use to define safe deep layers capable to be used for repositories of liquid waste. For the high level radioactive waste we propose the deep boreholes of greater diameter, filled with containers. One borehole with 50 cm diameter and 1000 m deep can be safe deposition for c/a 50 m3 of solid high level radioactive waste. Croatia has not big quantity of waste and some boreholes can satisfy all the quantities of waste in Croatia. This is not the cheapest solution, but it can satisfy the strongest conditions of safety. (author)

  16. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This book highlights the main issues of public concern related to radioactive waste management and puts them into perspective. It provides an overview of radioactive waste management covering, among other themes, policies, implementation and public communication based on national experiences. Its purpose is to assists in increasing the understanding of radioactive waste management issues by public and national authorities, organizations involved in radioactive waste management and the nuclear industry; it may also serve as a source book for those who communicate with the public. Even in the unlikely event that nuclear power does not further develop around the world, the necessity for dealing with nuclear waste from past usages, from uranium mining and milling, decontamination and decommissioning of existing nuclear facilities and from the uses of radioactive materials in medicine, industry and research would still exist. In many countries, radioactive waste management planning involves making effective institutional arrangements in which responsibilities and liabilities are well established for the technical operation and long term surveillance of disposal systems. Financing mechanisms are part of the arrangements. Continuous quality assurance and quality control, at all levels of radioactive waste management, are essential to ensure the required integrity of the system. As with any other human activity, improvements in technology and economics may be possible and secondary problems avoided. Improvements and confirmation of the efficiency of processes and reduction of uncertainties can only be achieved by continued active research, development and demonstration, which are the goals of many national programmes. International co-operation, also in the form of reviews, can contribute to increasing confidence in the ongoing work. The problem of radioactive wastes is not a unique one; it may be compared with other problems of toxic wastes resulting from many other

  17. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  18. Encapsulation of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pordes, O.; Plows, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for encapsulating a particular radioactive waste which consists of suspending the waste in a viscous liquid encapsulating material, of synthetic resin monomers or prepolymers, and setting the encapsulating material by addition or condensation polymerization to form a solid material in which the waste is dispersed. (author)

  19. Recent advances on glass-forming systems driven far from equilibrium. Special issue marking the completion of the Research Unit FOR 1394 `Nonlinear response to probe vitrification'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    The nature of the glass transition is one of the frontier questions in Statistical Physics and Materials Science. Highly cooperative structural processes develop in glass-forming melts exhibiting relaxational dynamics which is spread out over many decades in time. While considerable progress has been made in recent decades towards understanding dynamical slowing-down in quiescent systems, the interplay of glassy dynamics with external fields reveals a wealth of novel phenomena yet to be explored. This special issue focuses on recent results obtained by the Research Unit FOR 1394 `Nonlinear response to probe vitrification' which was funded by the German Science Foundation (DFG). In the projects of the research unit, strong external fields were used in order to gain insights into the complex structural and transport phenomena at the glass transition under far-from-equilibrium conditions. This aimed inter alia to test theories of the glass transition developed for quiescent systems by pushing them beyond their original regime. Combining experimental, simulational, and theoretical efforts, the eight projects within the FOR 1394 measured and determined aspects of the nonlinear response of supercooled metallic, polymeric, and silica melts, of colloidal dispersions, and of ionic liquids. Applied fields included electric and mechanic fields, and forced active probing (`micro-rheology'), where a single probe is forced through the glass-forming host. Nonlinear stress-strain and force-velocity relations as well as nonlinear dielectric susceptibilities and conductivities were observed. While the physical manipulation of melts and glasses is interesting in its own right, especially technologically, the investigations performed by the FOR 1394 suggest to use the response to strong homogeneous and inhomogeneous fields as technique to explore on the microscopic level the cooperative mechanisms in dense melts of strongly interacting constituents. Questions considered concern the

  20. Simulated Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  1. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  2. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, F.

    1982-01-01

    Following a definition of the term 'radioactive waste', including a discussion of possible criteria allowing a delimitation of low-level radioactive against inactive wastes, present techniques of handling high-level, intermediate-level and low-level wastes are described. The factors relevant for the establishment of definitive disposals for high-level wastes are discussed in some detail. Finally, the waste management organization currently operative in Austria is described. (G.G.)

  3. Radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl reactor accident on April 26, 1986, many individual values for radioactivity in the air, in foodstuffs and in the soil were measured and published. Prof. Dr. Rolf Steiner, Wiesbaden, the author of this paper, evaluated the host of data - mostly official pollution data -, drew conclusions regarding the radioactivity actually released at Chernobyl, and used the data to test the calculation model adotped by the Radiation Protection Ordinance. (orig./RB) [de

  4. The influence of the physico-chemical form of the aerosol on the radiological consequences of notional accidental releases of radioactivity from a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, G.N.; Jones, J.A.; Simmonds, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The radiological consequences of a wide range of notional accidental releases from a 1300 MW(e) LMFBR (Liquid Metal-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor) were assessed in a study published by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) in 1977. In that study representative values were in general adopted for each of the important parameters while recognising that in reality they could vary considerably. The present study is concerned with the sensitivity of the predicted consequences to the physico-chemical form of the released aerosol. Of particular interest is the importance of a mixed sodium-transuranium element aerosol which may be formed in accidental releases of activity from sodium cooled FBRs. Two significant findings emerge from the study. First the predicted consequences in general are relatively insensitive to the range of physico-chemical forms analysed. For generic assessments therefore it is sufficient to assume the properties of the aerosol adopted in the initial study (1 μm AMAD and each element in the oxide form); the exception concerns the estimation of the incidence of early morbidity, and to a lesser extent early mortality, but only for a limited range of release composition. The second finding is that the radiological consequences are not, contrary to what might have been expected, significantly increased for the release of a mixed sodium-element aerosol

  5. Methods and Production of Cementation Materials for Immobilisation into Waste Form. Research of Cementation Processes for Specific Liquid Radioactive Waste Streams of Radiochemical Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhanov, L.P.

    2013-01-01

    In the near future Russian Federation is planning to use industrial cementation facilities at two radiochemical combines - PA 'Mayak' and Mountain Chemical Combine. Scope of the research within the IAEA CRP contact No. 14176 included the development of cementation processes for specfic liquid radioactive waste streams that are present in these enterprisers. The research on cementation of liquid waste from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing at PA 'Mayak' allowed obtaining experimental data characterizing the technological process and basic characteristics of the produced cement compounds (e.g. mechanical strength, water resistance, frost resistance, flowability, etc.) immobilizing different streams of waste (e.g. hydrated-salt sludges, filter material pulps, mixture of hydrated salt slurries and filter material pulps, tritium liquid waste). Determined optimum technological parameters will allow industrial scale production of cement compound with required quality and higher flowability that is necessary for providing uniform filling of compartments of storage facilities at these sites. The research has been also carried out for the development of cementation technology for immobilization of pulps from storage tanks of Mountain Chemical Combine radiochemical plant. Cementation of such pulps is a difficult technological task because pulps are of complex chemical composition (e.g. hydroxides of manganese, iron, nickel, etc., as well as silicon oxide) and a relatively high activity. The research of cementation process selection for these pulps included studies of the impact of sorbing additive type and content on cement compounds leachability, flowability, impact of cement compound age to its mechanical strength, heat generation of cement compounds and others. The research results obtained allowed testing of cementation facility with a pulse type mixer on the full-scale. Use of such mixer for pulp cementation makes possible to prepare a homogeneous cement compound with the

  6. Public information on radioactive waste: a study of an emerging issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronfman, L.M.; Bronfman, B.H.; Regens, J.L.

    1979-10-01

    Through an analysis of information provided in the printed media on the topic of radioactive waste, the study analyzes the emergence of radioactive waste as a public issue in the press. Over eight hundred articles printed in both specialized and non-specialized sources from 1973 to 1978 have been content-analyzed in order to describe how the problem of radioactive waste is defined and what dimensions of the problems are receiving attention. Between 1973 and 1978, there was a substantial increase in the amount of information on the topic of radioactive waste available to the public through a variety of popular and specialized media sources. This increase coincides with documented public concern with the problem of radioactive waste. Discussions of radioactive waste have focused for all sources more frequently on themes not directly related to the technical problems of radioactive waste storage or isolation. A substantial amount of the information available to a variety of segments of the public is composed of discussions of real or perceived risk related to the existence of waste or to methods of disposing of it. In addition to risk, a substantial proportion of the discussions deal with institutional themes. Over time, the total amount of information on most dimensions of the radioactive waste problem has increased substantially. Institutional themes have gained relative to other issues over the three time periods. National and local press sources infrequently specify the form of waste being discussed thus providing evidence that the quality of technical information available to some members of the public is very low

  7. PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

    1961-11-14

    A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

  8. Radioactive waste processing container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Kanjiro; Koyanagi, Naoaki; Sakamoto, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Ikuo.

    1992-01-01

    A radioactive waste processing container used for processing radioactive wastes into solidification products suitable to disposal such as underground burying or ocean discarding is constituted by using cements. As the cements, calcium sulfoaluminate clinker mainly comprising calcium sulfoaluminate compound; 3CaO 3Al 2 O 3 CaSO 4 , Portland cement and aqueous blast furnace slug is used for instance. Calciumhydroxide formed from the Portland cement is consumed for hydration of the calcium sulfoaluminate clinker. According, calcium hydroxide is substantially eliminated in the cement constituent layer of the container. With such a constitution, damages such as crackings and peelings are less caused, to improve durability and safety. (I.N.)

  9. Alternatives for conversion to solid interim waste forms of the radioactive liquid high-level wastes stored at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogler, S.; Trevorrow, L.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Steindler, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    Techniques for isolating and solidifying the nuclear wastes in the storage tanks at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center plant have been examined. One technique involves evaporating the water and forming a molten salt containing the precipitated sludge. The salt is allowed to solidify and is stored in canisters until processing into a final waste form is to be done. Other techniques involve calcining the waste material, then agglomerating the calcine with sodium silicate to reduce its dispersibility. This option can also involve a prior separation and decontamination of the supernatant salt. The sludge and all resins containing fission-product activity are then calcined together. The technique of removing the water and solidifying the salt may be the simplest method for removing the waste from the West Valley Plant

  10. The influence of moisture content of sand on leach rates from cement and bitumen radioactive waste forms in a shallow ground repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovasic, Z.; Torok, J.; Buckley, L.P.

    1992-11-01

    Leaching rates from cement and bitumen-conditioned waste in contact with sand were determined with different water content of the sand up to and including saturation. A cylindrical waste form occupied one end of a column, with sand packed in the remainder. Axial radionuclide concentration profiles in the columns were determined several times during the experiment using an automated system consisting of a gamma spectrometer and an optical bench. The migration of 85 Sr, 137 Cs and 60 Co was determined from concentration profiles with time. The diffusion coefficient for 137 Cs in cement varied more than expected with the change of moisture content of sand. The leaching of bitumen waste forms is complex, and has poor reproducibility. When the water content of the sand was below 0.067 mL/mL, no leaching was determined from bitumen waste forms in all of the specimens except one. No clear relationship could be established between leach rate and the water content of sand above 0.18 mL/mL water content

  11. Development of test methods for quality control of LLW and MLW in cement or polymers (Parts 1 and 2). Task 3. Characterization of radioactive waste forms. A series of final reports (1985-1989) no. 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelis, G. de; Marchetti, A.; Balzamo, S.

    1992-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. In the first part, the qualification of samples arising from the cementation of low (LLW) and intermediate level ( MLW) radioactive wastes is studied. In particular, bead ion exchange resins, filter sludges, BWR evaporator concentrates and decontamination solutions have been taken into account. The properties of the final waste forms have been compared with the ones of laboratory scale samples. The qualification of the solidified wastes was performed according to the requirements of the Italian Regulatory Body. Particular attention is devoted to mechanical and thermal properties, biodegradability and behaviour versus water. In the second part, the influence of different parameters on the leaching of Cesium from cemented BWR evaporator concentrates (sulfates) is tested. In particular the influence of the variation of temperature, initial concentration of the tracer, renewal and chemical composition of the leachant, size of the sample, has been tested. 20 refs., 68 figs., 21 tabs

  12. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohl, P.

    1985-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) attaches considerable importance to its cooperation with Japan. It was said in the annual conference in 1977 that the presentation of the acceptable policy regarding radioactive waste management is the largest single factor for gaining public confidence when nuclear power is adopted with assurance. The risk connected with radioactive wastes was often presented as the major obstacle to the development of nuclear energy, however, an overall impression of optimism and confidence prevailed by the technical appraisal of the situation in this field by the committee of the NEA. This evolution can be easily explained by the significant progress achieved in radioactive waste management both at the technical level and with respect to the implementation of special legislation and the establishment of specialized institutions and financing schemes. More research will focus on the optimization of the technical, safety and economic aspects of specific engineering designs at specific sites on the long term isolation of wastes, and the NEA contributes to this general effort. The implementation of disposal programs is also in progress. (Kako, I.)

  13. Radioactive substance removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Jun; Tayama, Ryuichi; Teruyama, Hidehiko; Hikichi, Takayoshi.

    1992-01-01

    If inert gases are jetted from a jetting device to liquid metals in a capturing vessel, the inert gases are impinged on the inner wall surface of the capturing vessel, to reduce the thickness of a boundary layer as a diffusion region of radioactive materials formed between the inner wall surface of the capturing vessel and the liquid metals. Further, a portion of the boundary layer is peeled off to increase the adsorption amount of radioactive materials by the capturing vessel. When the inert gases are jetted on the inner or outer circumference of the capturing vessel to rotate the capturing vessel, the flow of the liquid metals is formed along with the rotation, and the thickness of the boundary layer is reduced or the boundary layer is peeled off to increase the absorption amount of the radioactive materials. If gas bubbles are formed in the liquid metals by the inert gases, the liquid metals are stirred by the gas bubbles to reduce the thickness of the boundary layer or peel it off, thereby enabling to increase the adsorption amount of the radioactive materials. Since it is not necessary to pass through the rotational member to the wall surface of the vessel, safety and reliability can be improved. (N.H.)

  14. Radioactivity in foodstuffs 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The average radioactivity dose level to which the Norwegian population was exposed through the ingestion of food in 1988 was between 0.10 and 0.15 mSv. This was about the same as in 1987. The radioactivity dose to which individuals with certain special dietary habits (large proportions of freshwater fish and reindeer meat in the diet) were exposed, was, however, up to three times higher in 1988 than in 1987. This was due firstly to the fact that reindeer meat which had been produced prior to the Chernobyl accident was no longer available, and secondly, to dietary advice not being followed as closely as before. The cost-benefit ratio of the measures introduced to reduce radioactivity levels in food, i.e. resources employed compared with the actual reduction in radioactivity levels achieved, has proved to be reasonably satisfactory, both in 1987 and 1988. Action levels and dietary advice remained unchanged in 1988. The present report summarizes results of analyses performed in 1988, and describes the measures introduced concerning various categorites of foods. Measures introduced were, as in 1987, primarily focused on the production of sheep meat (mutton/lamb) and on reindeer farming. 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. A densimeter with radioactive isotope of teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Guopu; Zhao Xiuliang; Cheng Pinjing

    2002-01-01

    A densimeter with radioactive isotope beseemed experiment teaching for speciality of nuclear engineering and nuclear technology in higher education is presented. Principle of work and composing of instrument system are introduced briefly

  16. Annual report 1984. Radioactive isotope department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.

    1985-11-01

    New technologies for production and application of radionuclides and synthesis of radioactive compounds are reported. Special importance is attributed to the characterization of radioactive compounds and the quality check of /sup 99m/Tc- and 14 C-labelled complexes within animal tests. An extensive list of publications and lectures illustrates the international cooperation of research in the field of radiochemistry

  17. Radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtiss, D.H.; Heacock, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of a process for treating radioactive waste whereby a mud of radioactive waste and cementing material is formed in a mixer. This mud is then transferred from the mixer to a storage and transport container where it is allowed to harden. To improve transport efficiency an alkali silicate or an alkaline-earth metal silicate is added to the mud. For one hundred parts by weight of radioactive waste in the mud, twenty to one hundred parts by weight of cementing material are added and five to fifty parts by weight of silicate, the amount of waste in the mud exceeding the combined amount of cementing and silicate material [fr

  18. Radioactive waste processing field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Minoru.

    1993-01-01

    Storing space for radioactive wastes (storage tunnels) are formed underground of the sea bottom along coast. A plurality of boreholes through which sea water flows are pored vertically in a direction intersecting underground streams of brine in the ground between the tunnels and seaside. Sea water introduction pipes are joined to the upper side walls of the boreholes. The sea water introduction pipes have introduction ports protruded under the sea level of the coastal sea area region. Since sea water flows from the introduction ports to the boreholes passing through the sea water introduction pipes, sea water is always filled in the boreholes. Therefore, brine is sufficiently supplied toward the land by sea water from the boreholes, the underground stream of brine is negligibly small. This can prevent radioactive contamination due to flow of the underground water when radioactive wastes are buried in the underground near coast. (I.N.)

  19. Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Guidelines regarding the form and structure of national reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    At the Preparatory Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Joint Convention held from 10 to 12 December 2001, three documents were adopted concerning the rules and arrangements for conducting meetings of Contracting Parties to the Convention. As announced in the Report on the Preparatory Meeting (GOV/INF/2002/3), these three documents are being made available as INFCIRCs. Accordingly, herewith attached are the Guidelines regarding the Form and Structure of National Reports. Also being made available are the Rules of Procedure and Financial Rules (INFCIRC/602) and Guidelines regarding the Review Process (INFCIRC/603)

  20. Synthesis and Properties of Metallic Technetium and Technetium-Zirconium Alloys as Transmutation Target and Radioactive waste storage form in the UREX+1 Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Thomas [Idaho State University/Idaho National Laboratory, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)]|[Harry Reid Center, University Nevada - Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R. [Harry Reid Center, University Nevada - Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2008-07-01

    In the application of UREX+1 process, technetium will be separated together with uranium and iodine within the first process step. After the separation of uranium, technetium and iodine must be immobilized by their incorporation in a suitable waste storage-form. Based on recent activities within the AFCI community, a potential candidate as waste storage form to immobilize technetium is to alloy the metal with excess zirconium. Alloys in the binary Tc-Zr system may act as potential transmutation targets in order to transmute Tc-99 into Ru-100. We are presenting first results in the synthesis of metallic technetium, and the synthesis of equilibrium phases in the binary Tc-Zr system at 1400 deg. C after arc-melting and isothermal annealing under inert conditions. Samples were analyzed using X-ray powder diffraction, Rietveld analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and electron probe micro-analysis, which allows us to construct the binary Tc-Zr phase diagram for the isothermal section at 1400 deg. C. (authors)

  1. Radioactive Waste Repositories Administration - SURAO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucerka, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Atomic Act specifies, among other things, responsibilities of the government in the field of safe disposal of radioactive wastes. To satisfy this responsibility, the Ministry of Industry and Trade has established the Radioactive Waste Repositories Administration (SURAO). SURAO's major responsibilities include: (a) the preparation, construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of radioactive waste repositories and the monitoring of their environmental impacts; (b) radioactive waste management; (c) spent or irradiated nuclear fuel processing into a form suitable for storage/disposal or reuse; (d) record-keeping of received radioactive wastes and their producers; (e) administration of fund transfers as stipulated by the Atomic Act, Article 27; (f) development of proposals for specification of fees to be paid to the Nuclear Account; (g) responsibility for and coordination of research and development in the field of radioactive waste handling and management; (h) supervision of licensees' margin earmarked for the decommissioning of their facilities; (i) providing services in radioactive waste handling and management; (j) handling and management of radioactive wastes that have been transferred to the Czech Republic from abroad and cannot be sent back; (k) interim administration of radioactive wastes that have become state property. The Statute of the Administration is reproduced in full. (P.A.)

  2. Handling and disposal of radioactive scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, K.

    1975-01-01

    The 9th special course for journalists was in this year on the highly topical subject 'handling and disposal of radioactive scrap'. It was held on the 26th and 27th May 1975 at the Nuclear Research Centre at Karlsruhe. These courses have been held for several years by the Nuclear Research Association (GfK) in the School for Nuclear Engineering and are intended mainly to contribute to journalists of the daily papers, radio and television who are 'not previously technically trained' an introduction into the difficult subject matter of nuclear engineering with its ancillary areas. In view of the many discussions carried on in public the course is further intended to achieve that the problems discussed are treated by means of publicity which is free from emotion. In the journalists' course this year specially selected experts gave technical information prepared for general information as to how radioactive waste can be safely worked up and then finally stored without adverse effects on the environment. Since the interesting collection of questions was put forward in a compressed form and at the same time clearly presented, the author reports on the different separate subjects on which lectures were given. (orig.) [de

  3. Materials characterization of radioactive waste forms using a multi-element detection method based on the instrumental neutron activation analysis. MEDINA; Stoffliche Charakterisierung radioaktiver Abfallprodukte durch ein Multi-Element-Analyseverfahren basierend auf der instrumentellen Neutronen-Aktivierungs-Analyse. MEDINA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havenith, Andreas Wilhelm

    2015-07-01

    Radioactive waste has to meet the specifications and acceptance criteria defined by national regulatory and management authorities for its intermediate and final storage. In Germany the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS) has established waste acceptance requirements for the Konrad repository. Konrad is the disposal for radioactive waste with negligible heat generation and is located near the city of Salzgitter and is currently under construction. It will start operation not before the year 2021. The waste-acceptance-requirements are derived from a site-specific safety assessment. They include specific requirements on waste forms, packaging as well as limitations to activities of individual radionuclides and limitations to masses of non-radioactive harmful substances. The amount of chemically toxic elements in the waste is limited in order to avoid pollution of underground water reserves. To comply with these requirements every waste package has to be characterised in its radiological and chemical composition. This characterisation can be performed on the basis of existing documentation or, if the documentation is insufficient, on further analytical analysis. Segmented or integral gamma-scanning as well as active or passive neutron counting are used worldwide as the standard measurement methods for the radiological characterisation and quality checking of radioactive waste. These techniques determine the isotope specific activity of waste packages, but they do not allow the detection of non-radioactive hazardous substances inside the waste packages. Against this background the Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology Transfer (NET) at RWTH Aachen University and the Institute of Safety Research and Reactor Technology at Forschungszentrum Juelich jointly develop an innovative non-destructive analytical technique called MEDINA - ''Multi-Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation'' for

  4. Ethical aspects in connection with the disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boetsch, W.

    2003-01-01

    The progress of modern natural and technological science and their far-reaching consequences affecting the distant future require increasingly practice-oriented ethical concepts. In the discussions about responseable acting, the question of the ethical tenability of nuclear energy nowadays takes a special position. Above all the problem of the disposal of radioactive wastes - the effects of which on the distant future have to be prognosticated - is controversially discussed in society. The Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) commissioned Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS) in the context of the project ''Disposal of radioactive wastes in the context of ethical objectives'' to summarise the current national and international status of ethical aspects in connection with the disposal of radioactive wastes. One aim of this report is to derive criteria to form the basis of a comprehensive discussion of the ethical aspects of the disposal of radioactive wastes. These criteria are to describe, as far as possible, all content-related aspects that result from radioactive waste disposal. The issues in this report resulting from the opinions, comments and publications presented are to serve as a basis for an experts' meeting at which the important ethical criteria concerning the responsible management of radioactive waste disposal are to be discussed at an interdisciplinary level with all those involved. The results of this report are based on an investigation which gathered the available national and international statements, principles, and criteria relating to the ethical aspects of the disposal of radioactive wastes and to sustainable development in the context of the technological impact assessment up to beginning of 2000. In the meantime, the debate in Germany has become somewhat more pragmatic, i. a. due to the work of the research group ''Arbeitskreis Auswahlverfahren Endlagerstandorte (AkEnd)'' and

  5. Statistical aspects in radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoetzl, H.

    1979-10-01

    This report contains a summary of basic concepts and formulae important for the treatment of errors and for calculating lower limits of detection in radioactivity measurements. Special attention has been paid to practical application and examples which are of interest for scientists working in this field. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Radioactive waste management in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilleux, E.

    1984-01-01

    The first part of this paper briefly describes the nuclear industry in Belgium and the problem of radioactive wastes with regard to their quality and quantity. The second part emphasizes the recent guidelines regarding the management of the nuclear industry in general and the radioactive wastes in particular. In this respect, important tasks are the reinforcement of administrative structures with regard to the supervision and the control of nuclear activities, the establishment of a mixed company entrusted with the covering of the needs of nuclear plants in the field of nuclear fuels and particularly the setting up of a public autonomous and specialized organization, the 'Public Organization for the Management of Radioactive Waste and Fissile Materials', in short 'O.N.D.R.A.F.'. This organization is in charge of the management of the transport, the conditioning, the storage and the disposal of radioactive wastes. (Auth.)

  7. Radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, R.F.; Lazerson, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    A problem with ore sorting arrangements is that radiation is difficult to measure accurately while particles are moving at speed past the detector. This is particulary so when dealing with ores such as gold ores which have weak emissions. A method of measuring radioactive emissions from moving radioactive material includes the steps of shielding the radiation detector(s) so that the angle of acceptance of the receptor surface is restricted, and further shielding the shielded portion of the detector with a second material which is less radiation emissive than the material of the first shield. This second shield is between the first shield and the detector

  8. The role of sensorimotor learning in the perception of letter-like forms: tracking the causes of neural specialization for letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Karin H; Atwood, Thea P

    2009-02-01

    Functional specialization in the brain is considered a hallmark of efficient processing. It is therefore not surprising that there are brain areas specialized for processing letters. To better understand the causes of functional specialization for letters, we explore the emergence of this pattern of response in the ventral processing stream through a training paradigm. Previously, we hypothesized that the specialized response pattern seen during letter perception may be due in part to our experience in writing letters. The work presented here investigates whether or not this aspect of letter processing-the integration of sensorimotor systems through writing-leads to functional specialization in the visual system. To test this idea, we investigated whether or not different types of experiences with letter-like stimuli ("pseudoletters") led to functional specialization similar to that which exists for letters. Neural activation patterns were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after three different types of training sessions. Participants were trained to recognize pseudoletters by writing, typing, or purely visual practice. Results suggested that only after writing practice did neural activation patterns to pseudoletters resemble patterns seen for letters. That is, neural activation in the left fusiform and dorsal precentral gyrus was greater when participants viewed pseudoletters than other, similar stimuli but only after writing experience. Neural activation also increased after typing practice in the right fusiform and left precentral gyrus, suggesting that in some areas, any motor experience may change visual processing. The results of this experiment suggest an intimate interaction among perceptual and motor systems during pseudoletter perception that may be extended to everyday letter perception.

  9. Chapter 2. Peculiarities of radioactive particle formation and isotope fractionation resulted from underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Radioactive particles, forming terrain fallouts from underground nuclear explosion differ sufficiently from radioactive particles, produced by atmospheric nuclear explosions. Patterns of underground nuclear explosion development, release of radioactivity to the atmosphere, formation of a cloud and base surge, peculiarities of formed radioactive particles, data on isotope fractionation in radioactive particles are presented. Scheme of particle activation, resulted from underground explosions is given

  10. Main approaches to solving the problems of radioactive waste processing and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, V.M.; Syrkus, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    papers devoted to the problems of processing and disposal of radioactive wastes, formed during nuclear facility operation and after decommissioning are reviewed. Techniques for gaseous and liquid waste solidification, as well as solid waste processing by mechanical fragmentation and combustion are considered. Possibilities of radioactive waste disposal in cosmic space, their burial at the bed of seas ansd oceans, in geological storages are discussed. Special attention disposal. The conclusion is made that today there are no any uniform way for radiactive waste disposal and standard technical means for its realization. Solution of the problems considered should be of a complex character and it is carried out within international research programs

  11. Technical and logistic provisions for the delivery of radioactive wastes in the final repository Konrad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeppinghaus, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The beginning of radioactive waste delivery to the final repository Konrad is planned for 2019. The main issue for the technical and logistic provisions is the development of a concept for the transport of the licensed radioactive waste containers to the site, including a turning concept for cylindrical waste forms and planning, construction and manufacture of transport equipment. Further issues include a logistic concept considering specific boundary conditions as administrative processes, priorities, special features of the delivering institutions and technical requirements of the repository.

  12. Comparison among the rice bark in the raw and active forms in the removal of {sup 241}Am and {sup 137}Cs from liquid radioactive wastes; Comparacao entre a casca de arroz nas formas brutas e ativada na remocao de {sup 241}Am e {sup 137}Cs de rejeitos radioativos liquidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Rafael V.P.; Lima, Josenilson B. de; Bellini, Maria Helena; Sakata, Solange Kazumi; Marumo, Julio Takehiro, E-mail: rpadua@ipen.b, E-mail: sksakata@ipen.b, E-mail: jblima@ipen.b, E-mail: mbmarumo@ipen.b, E-mail: jtmarumo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    New techniques involving treatment of radioactive wastes which associate simplicity and low cost have been directed the attention for the bio sorption, which is a process were solid vegetable or micro-organism for the retention, removing, or recovering of heavy metals from a liquid environment. This study evaluated the capacity of a bio sorbent to remove Am-241 and Cs-137 from liquid radioactive waste. The chosen material was the rice bark employed in the raw or activated forms. The obtained results suggest that the bio sorption, with the activated rice bark, can be a viable technique for the treatment of liquid radioactive wastes containing Am-241 and Cs-137 present in liquid radioactive wastes

  13. Radioactive wastes in Oklo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcazar, M.; Flores R, J.H.; Pena, P.; Lopez, A.

    2006-01-01

    The acceptance of the Nuclear Energy as electric power supply implies to give answer to the population on the two main challenges to conquer in the public opinion: the nuclear accidents and the radioactive wastes. Several of the questions that are made on the radioactive wastes, its are the mobility migration of them, the geologic stability of the place where its are deposited and the possible migration toward the aquifer mantels. Since the half lives of the radioactive waste of a Nuclear Reactor are of several hundred of thousands of years, the technical explanations to the previous questions little convince to the public in general. In this work summary the results of the radioactive waste generated in a natural reactor, denominated Oklo effect that took place in Gabon, Africa, it makes several thousands of millions of years, a lot before the man appeared in the Earth. The identification of at least 17 reactors in Oklo it was carried out thanks to the difference in the concentrations of Uranium 235 and 238 prospective, and to the analysis of the non-mobility of the radioactive waste in the site. It was able by this way to determine that the reactors with sizes of hardly some decimeter and powers of around 100 kilowatts were operating in intermittent and spontaneous form for space of 150,000 years, with operation cycles of around 30 minutes. Recent studies have contributed information valuable on the natural confinement of the radioactive waste of the Oklo reactors in matrixes of minerals of aluminum phosphate that caught and immobilized them for thousands of millions of years. This extracted information from the nature contributes guides and it allows 'to verify' the validity of the current proposals on the immobilization of radioactive wastes of a nuclear reactor. This work presents in clear and accessible form to the public in general on the secure 'design', operation, 'decommissioning' and 'storage' of the radioactive waste of the reactors that the nature put

  14. The Control of Pollution (Special Waste) Regulations 1980 SI 1980 No. 1709

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    These Regulations give effect to certain provisions of Community Legislation in Council Directive No. 78/319/EEC concerned with toxic and dangerous waste which will be special waste. Regulation 3 deals with radioactive waste which will be special waste if it has dangerous properties other than radioactivity. Precautions against radioactivity are dealt with under the Radioactive Substances Act 1960. (NEA) [fr

  15. Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  16. Radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwach, G.

    1986-01-01

    This is an overview of radioactivity monitoring work done in the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf in the wake of the Chernobyl accident. It consists of air, rainwater, food and personnel monitoring. Additional services to the public are: information and development of a database and a computer code for predicting future radionuclide concentration in air, soil, water and food. (G.Q.)

  17. Transport of radioactive materials. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, H.W.; Falkhof, W.; Heibach, K.; Ungermann, N.; Hungenberg, H.

    1991-01-01

    With the last changes in the Ordinance Concerning the Transport of Hazardous Goods two regulations which are important for the carrying trade were introduced: 1. The conveyer must train the driver. He must only employ reliable drivers. 2. The driver must participate in a training course (as of July 1, 1991). These obligations, which already existed in the past in regard to the transport of nuclear fuel, have been extended to include the transport of other radioactive materials. In part I the book deals with basic training courses for parcelled goods, and part II goes into the special knowledge which is required of drivers of radioactive materials. The parts consist of the following sections: 1. General regulations, 2, Responsibility when transporting hazardous goods, 3. General danger features, 4. Information on dangers and their designation, 5. The vehicle's equipment and carrying out the transport, 6. Measures for avoiding accidents. At the end of each section the participant in the course finds a series of questions which pertain to the subject matter just treated so that he can test his own learning performance. So as to make things easier for the trainee, the corect answers are listed in the appendix. As a supplementary section on radioactive materials, part II offers additional detailed explanations by experts in the field on the features of radioactive materials and the dangers they pose. In the margin - next to the instructory text - the key words are given so that the right place in the text of the instruction manual can be readily found. These key words are compiled in the appendix to form an index. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Safety against radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The ALWIT anticontamination suit is briefly described, consisting of lasting antistatic ''NDMEX III''. It was specially developed for the fire brigade who are exposed to a particular kind of contamination while carrying out radiation measurements during fire fighting, rescue and clearing up work. The ALWIT suit reliably prevents radioactive contamination of the surface of the body while wearing a breathing apparatus, independent of the ambient air. Tightly fitting cuffs on the neck, arms and legs together with zippers placed behind prevent contamination even with extreme movement. (P.F.K.)

  19. Radioactive waste management glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Waste Management Glossary defines over 300 terms in the English language that have special meanings when they are used in the context of radioactive waste management. The Glossary is intended to provide a consistent reference for these terms for specialists in this field. It also will assist non-specialists who read IAEA reports dealing with waste management. This is the second edition of the Glossary. It is intended to update and replace its predecessor, TECDOC-264, that was issued in 1982. (author)

  20. Mixed radioactive and chemotoxic wastes (RMW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejonghe, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    During the first decades of development of nuclear energy, organizations involved in the management of nuclear wastes had their attention focused essentially on radioactive components. The impression may have prevailed that, considering the severe restrictions on radioactive materials, the protection measured applied for radioactive components of wastes would be more than adequate to cope with potential hazards from non radioactive components associated with radioactive wastes. More recently it was acknowledged that such interpretation is not necessarily justified in all cases since certain radioactive wastes also contain non-negligible amounts of heavy metals or hazardous organic components which, either, do not decay, or are subject to completely different decay (decomposition) mechanisms. The main purposes of the present study are to analyze whether mixed radioactive wastes are likely to occur in Europe and in what form, whether one needs a basis for integration for evaluating various forms of toxicity and by which practical interventions possible problems can be avoided or at least reduced. (au)

  1. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1982-01-01

    This book provides information on the origin, characteristics and methods of processing of radioactive wastes, as well as the philosophy and practice of their storage and disposal. Chapters are devoted to the following topics: radioactive wastes, characteristics of radioactive wastes, processing liquid and solid radioactive wastes, processing wastes from spent fuel reprocessing, processing gaseous radioactive wastes, fixation of radioactive concentrates, solidification of high-level radioactive wastes, use of radioactive wastes as raw material, radioactive waste disposal, transport of radioactive wastes and economic problems of radioactive wastes disposal. (C.F.)

  2. Disposal of radioactive waste: the forming of a new approach in Germany. Summary and international perspective. FSC Community Visit and National Workshop, Hitzacker, Hamburg, 5-8 October 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The fifth workshop of the OECD/NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was hosted by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) and the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), the authorities responsible for implementing and regulating radioactive waste management in Germany, respectively. The central theme of the event was 'the forming of a new approach to radioactive waste management in Germany'. The three-day event started with a community visit in Hitzacker, which included a one-day meeting with community representatives and other stakeholders. This was followed by a tour to radioactive waste management facilities in Gorleben, and then the national workshop, which took place in Hamburg. Sixty-five registered participants, from 13 countries, attended the event. About 60% were German stakeholders, the remainder came from FSC member countries and international organisations. The German stakeholders included local actors, academics, and representatives of state and federal governments, NGOs, waste producers and other companies. The international audience consisted of FSC, typically affiliated with national regulatory bodies, government, or implementing organisations, plus other delegates and academics. The event was structured as follows: The introductory session (Day 1 morning and early afternoon) took place in Hitzaker and explored the historical context and the current situation of radioactive waste management in Germany. It entailed plenary presentations by key actors of policy making processes and discussions focusing on stakeholder concerns about trust and confidence. Three sessions took place in Hamburg and addressed the topics 'The new proposed approach to site selection, with emphasis on basic premises' (Day 1 late afternoon), 'The new proposed approach to site selection, with emphasis on stakeholder involvement' (Day 2 afternoon), and 'The new approach to

  3. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This eighth chapter presents the radioactive wastes and waste disposal; classification of radioactive wastes; basis requests of the radioactive waste management; conditions for a radioactive waste disposal; registers and inventories; transport of radioactive wastes from a facility to another and the radioactive waste management plan

  4. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, D.F.; Ross, W.A.

    1990-04-24

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another. 8 figs.

  5. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.F.; Ross, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another. 8 figs

  6. Generation of point isotropic source dose buildup factor data for the PFBR special concretes in a form compatible for usage in point kernel computer code QAD-CGGP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Around the PFBR (Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor) reactor assembly, in the peripheral shields special concretes of density 2.4 g/cm 3 and 3.6 g/cm 3 are to be used in complex geometrical shapes. Point-kernel computer code like QAD-CGGP, written for complex shield geometry comes in handy for the shield design optimization of peripheral shields. QAD-CGGP requires data base for the buildup factor data and it contains only ordinary concrete of density 2.3 g/cm 3 . In order to extend the data base for the PFBR special concretes, point isotropic source dose buildup factors have been generated by Monte Carlo method using the computer code MCNP-4A. For the above mentioned special concretes, buildup factor data have been generated in the energy range 0.5 MeV to 10.0 MeV with the thickness ranging from 1 mean free paths (mfp) to 40 mfp. Capo's formula fit of the buildup factor data compatible with QAD-CGGP has been attempted

  7. Radioactivity of the Cooling Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E. P.

    1943-03-01

    The most important source of radioactivity at the exit manifold of the pile will be due to O{sup 19}, formed by neutron absorption of O{sup 18}. A recent measurement of Fermi and Weil permits to estimate that it will be safe to stay about 80 minutes daily close to the exit manifolds without any shield. Estimates are given for the radioactivities from other sources both in the neighborhood and farther away from the pile.

  8. The administration of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdillon, P.J.; Godfrey, B.E.; O'Brien, R.

    1983-01-01

    A brief history is given of the evolution of a system to approve the licensing of doctors and dentists to use radioactive medicinal products in man. Currently, the Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee (ARSAC) is appointed by UK Health Ministers to advise them on the granting, renewal, suspension, revocation and variation of certificates. The type of information requested on the application form for a certificate is outlined. (UK)

  9. Radioactivity: ''small users, big problems''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, C.

    1993-01-01

    In the United Kingdom there are at least one thousand small users of radioactivity in industry, in medicine, in higher education establishments and even schools. These users of small amounts of radioactivity, covering a wide variety of forms and applications, have difficulty in disposing of their wastes. Disposal provisions for users outside the nuclear industry, the practical problems they encounter and the future developments likely are discussed. (UK)

  10. Radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkhout, F.

    1991-01-01

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author)

  11. Radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkhout, F

    1991-01-01

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author).

  12. Radioactive hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of radioactive substances in hospital laboratories is discussed and the attendant hazards and necessary precautions examined. The new legislation under the Health and Safety at Work Act which, it is proposed, will replace existing legal requirements in the field of health and safety at work by a system of regulations and approved codes of practice designed to maintain or improve the standards of health, safety and welfare already established, is considered with particular reference to protection against ionising radiations. (UK)

  13. Radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.C.; Hyslop, C.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to show how to assess the detriment resulting from the release of radioactive materials to the environment. The minimum information required for the assessments is given for seven radionuclides of interest from the point of view of environmental contamination. The seven radionuclides are tritium, krypton-85, strontium-90, iodine-131, cesium-137, radium-226 and plutonium-239. Information is given on the radiation doses and the radiation effects on man due to these radioisotopes. (AN)

  14. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Melvin, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is part of the Annual Literature Review issue of Water Environment Research. The review attempts to provide a concise summary of important water-related environmental science and engineering literature of the past year, of which 40 separate topics are discussed. On the topic of radioactive wastes, the present paper deals with the following aspects: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; waste processing and decommissioning; environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides; and remedial actions and treatment. 178 refs

  15. Use plan for demonstration radioactive-waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, L.R.; McCampbell, M.R.; Thompson, J.D.

    1982-04-01

    The University of Maryland at Baltimore was awarded a grant from the Department of Energy to test a specially modified incinerator to burn biomedical radioactive waste. In preparation for the incinerator, the Radiation Safety Office devised a comprehensive plan for its safe and effective use. The incinerator plan includes a discussion of regulations regarding on-site incineration of radioactive waste, plans for optimum use in burning four principal waste forms, controlled air incineration technology, and standard health physics safety practices; a use plan, including waste categorization and segregation, processing, and ash disposition; safety procedures, including personnel and area monitoring; and methods to evaluate the incinerator's effectiveness by estimating its volume reduction factors, mass and activity balances, and by determining the cost effectiveness of incineration versus commercial shallow land burial

  16. Radon concentration and natural radioactivity evaluation in the Vysehrad casemates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berka, Z.; Thinova, L.; Stepan, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Vysehrad casemates formed a part of Prague's defense system in the middle ages. The casemates consist of a large system of underground corridors (which are in direct contact with subsoils) that run around the whole Vysehrad hill. The corridors are covered by an artificially made-up ground. Although there are many vents and embrasures in the casemates, investigation of radon accumulation in the casemates is of interest. A comprehensive radon and natural radioactivity survey has been carried out on the Vysehrad hill as part of special scientific programme for secondary school students. No extreme radon concentration or extremely high natural radioactivity has been observed. The highest radon concentration were measured in the blind parts of corridors that are normally unused. The radon concentrations found can be described as health-safe

  17. Preparation of radioactive tracer for studying sediment movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.D.; Ghauri, G.A.; Qureshi, M.H.; Khan, N.A.

    1983-06-01

    In order to study the movement of sediment in harbours, estuaries and streams, artificial sediment in the form of glass is prepared. A preselected nuclide is added to the glass during its manufacture. The density and size distribution of the glass particles is method with that of the natural sediment. The activation of the artificial sediment in a reactor changes the nuclide into a radioactive isotope thereby tagging it and making it possible to trace its movement with suitable radiation detector. The method of tracer preparation is described with special reference to sadiment movement studies at Karachi harbour. (authors)

  18. Processing and Pre-Treatment of Solid Radioactive Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerre, P. [Service de Controle des Radiations et de Genie Radioactif, Commissariat a L' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France)

    1960-07-01

    As solid radioactive waste varies in form, dimensions and volume, the Atomic Energy Commission first of all reduces the volume by breaking up and compressing the waste. Since the temporary storage of such waste is always attended by the risk of contamination, an efficient packing system has been devised and adopted. This consists of embedding the waste in the heart of a specially-designed block of concrete possessing the following characteristics: Great strength Maximum insolubility Resistance to corrosion Maximum imperviousness Protection against radiation. It is thus quite safe to store these blocks with a view to final dumping. (author)

  19. Environmental radioactivity in Canada - 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracey, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    The radiological surveillance program of the Department of National Health and Welfare is conducted for the purpose of determining levels of environmental radioactivity in Canada and assessing the resulting population exposures. Special investigations were carried out during 1982 on metabolism of natural radionuclides and on the accumulation of radon in energy-efficient homes. The pre-operational phase of the monitoring program at the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station was completed. Dose commitments have been estimated for the ongoing natural radioactivity, fallout and reactor studies. All measurements made during the year are below the limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection

  20. Environmental radioactivity in Canada, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, R.G.; Quinn, J.M.; Tracy, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    The radiological surveillance program of the Department of National Health and Welfare is conducted for the purpose of determining levels of environmental radioactivity in Canada and assessing the resulting population exposures. Special investigations were carried out during 1981 on bottled mineral waters and in conjunction with unusual occurences at nuclear reactor sites and a uranium refinery. Dose commitments have been estimated for the ongoing natural radioactivity, fallout and reactor studies. All measurements made during the year are below the limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection

  1. Low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbay, H.; Chapuis, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    During dismantling operations of nuclear facilities radioctive and non radioactive wastes are produced. The distinction between both kinds of wastes is not easy. In each dismantling operation special care and rules are defined for the separation of wastes. Each case must be separately studied. The volume and the surface activites are analyzed. Part of the wastes had been disposed in a public environment. The regulations, the international recommendations, thetheoretical and experimental investigations in this field are presented. A regulation principle and examples of radioactivity limits, on the basis of international recommendations, are provided. Those limits are calculated from individual radiation dose that may reach human beings [fr

  2. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank SX-105, Tank AN-103, And AZ-101/102) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

    2013-09-18

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is a robust technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of radioactive wastes. Applications have been tested at the pilot scale for the high sodium, sulfate, halide, organic and nitrate wastes at the Hanford site, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). Due to the moderate processing temperatures, halides, sulfates, and technetium are retained in mineral phases of the feldspathoid family (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite, etc). The feldspathoid minerals bind the contaminants such as Tc-99 in cage (sodalite, nosean) or ring (nepheline) structures to surrounding aluminosilicate tetrahedra in the feldspathoid structures. The granular FBSR mineral waste form that is produced has a comparable durability to LAW glass based on the short term PCT testing in this study, the INL studies, SPFT and PUF testing from previous studies as given in the columns in Table 1-3 that represent the various durability tests. Monolithing of the granular product was shown to be feasible in a separate study. Macro-encapsulating the granular product provides a decrease in leaching compared to the FBSR granular product when the geopolymer is correctly formulated.

  3. Immobilization of radioactive wastes in glasses and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotto, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    A large amount of radioactive liquid wastes arises from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels to recover uranium and plutonium. Immobilization of such wastes in solid form and disposal of the solidified wastes in safe places, to prevent contamination of the human environment, are topics of considerable interest for both the scientific community and the public in general. The great majority of materials candidate for the encapsulation of radioactive wastes are inorganic non-metalic, such as glasses, glass-ceramics, special cements, calcined ceramics and few more. Among these materials, certain glasses have received special attention, and are being studied for over twenty years. It is estimated that about US$2 billion have already been spent in these studies. The disposal (long term storage) of these solid wastes may be possible in deep geological formations, salt mines, the ocean bed, by evacuation to the outer space, etc. A brief review on the several options avaiable for encapsulation and disposal of high level radioactive liquid wastes is presented, along with the relative merits and disadvantages of the candidate materials for encapsulation. A few suggestions for the solution of the Brazilian problem are advanced. (Author) [pt

  4. Optimization of concrete composition in radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Peric, A.

    1995-01-01

    Low and intermediate level waste represents 95% of the total wastes that is conditioned into special concrete containers. Since these containers are to protect radioactive waste safely for about 300 years, the selection and precise control of physical and mechanical characteristics of materials is very important. After volume reduction and valuable components recovery, waste materials have to be conditioned for transport, storage and disposal. Conditioning is the waste management step in which radioactive wastes are immobilized and packed. The immobilization processes involve conversation of the wastes to solid forms that reduce the potential for migration or dispersion of radionuclides from the wastes by natural processes during storage, transport and disposal. The immobilization processes involve the use of various matrices of nonradioactive materials, such as concrete, to fix the wastes as monoliths, usually directly in the waste containers used for subsequent handling. In this paper an optimization of concrete container composition, used for storing radioactive waste from nuclear power plants, is presented. Optimization was performed on the composition of the concrete that is used in the container production. In experiments, the authors tried to obtain the best mechanical characteristics of the concrete, varying the weight percentage of the granulate due to its diameter, water-to-cement ratios and type of the cements that were used in preparing the concrete container formulation. Concrete containers, that were optimized in the manner described in this paper, will be in used for the radioactive waste materials final disposal, using the concept of the engineer trench system facilities

  5. Radioactive source manipulator and stowage device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, C.

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of a radioactive source manipulator and stowage device comprising: a cylindrical body; a transversely disposed socket formed near one end of said cylindrical body for receiving a radioactive source; a cylindrical sleeve rotatably mounted on said cylindrical body; and an aperture formed in the wall of said sleeve whereby rotation of said sleeve to axially align said aperture with said socket will permit a radioactive source to be inserted into and removed from said socket and rotation of said sleeve to move said aperture out of alignment with said socket when the socket contains a radioactive source readies the device for manipulation and stowage

  6. Radioactive substance separation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takuhiko.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable separation of fission products, radioactive corrosion products and the likes in primary coolants with no requirement for the replacement of separation system during plant service life, by providing protruded magnetic pole plates in a liquid metal flow channel to thereby form slopes magnetic fields. Constitution: A plurality of magnetic pole plates are disposed vertically in a comb-like arrangement so as not to contact with each other along the direction of flow in a rectangular primary coolant pipeway at the exit of the reactor core in an LMFBR type reactor. Large magnetic poles are provided to the upper and lower sides of the pipeway and coils are wound on the side opposed to the pipeway. When electrical current is supplied to the coils, the magnetic pole is magnetized intensely and thus the magnetic pole plates are also magnetized intensely and thus the magnetic pole plates are also magnetized intensely to form large gradient in the magnetic fields between the upper and lower magnetic plates, whereby ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic fission products and radioactive corrosion products in the coolants are intensely adsorbed and not detached by the flow of the coolants. Accordingly, the fission products and the radioactive corrosion products can surely be removed with no requirement for the exchange of separation system during plant service life. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. Safety disposal studies of radioactive and hazardous wastes using cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, M.M.E.

    2000-01-01

    radioactive waste is generated from the production of nuclear energy and from the use of radioactive materials applications, agriculture and medicine. the important of safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized. conditioning of radioactive waste is the transform of radioactive waste into a suitable form for storage and disposal. common immobilization methods include solidification of low radioactive waste in cement or bitumen.in order to improve cement properties to decrease the release of liquid radioactive waste into the environment and its dispersion to a level where the risks to individuals, population and the environment

  8. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2013-01-31

    The purpose of this Special Analysis (SA) is to determine if the Oak Ridge (OR) Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) uranium-233 (233U) waste stream (DRTK000000050, Revision 0) is acceptable for shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The CEUSP 233U waste stream requires a special analysis because the concentrations of thorium-229 (229Th), 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U exceeded their NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria action levels. The acceptability of the waste stream is evaluated by determining if performance assessment (PA) modeling provides a reasonable expectation that SLB disposal is protective of human health and the environment. The CEUSP 233U waste stream is a long-lived waste with unique radiological hazards. The SA evaluates the long-term acceptability of the CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal as a two tier process. The first tier, which is the usual SA process, uses the approved probabilistic PA model to determine if there is a reasonable expectation that disposal of the CEUSP 233U waste stream can meet the performance objectives of U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management,” for a period of 1,000 years (y) after closure. The second tier addresses the acceptability of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal by evaluating long-term site stability and security, by performing extended (i.e., 10,000 and 60,000 y) modeling analyses, and by evaluating the effect of containers and the depth of burial on performance. Tier I results indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of compliance with all performance objectives if the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is disposed in the Area 5 RWMS SLB disposal units. The maximum mean and 95th percentile PA results are all less than the performance objective for 1,000 y. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis indicates that there is a high likelihood of

  9. Radioactivity telemetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouras, Florent; Legrand, Bernard; Montigaud, Jean-Marie; Grandin, Marc

    1969-05-01

    The authors present an assembly which aims at radio-transmitting from mobile stations information on radioactivity. It comprises 20 mobile stations which can be located within the Cadarache Centre or outside of it within a 10 km radius, and a central station which centralises information. The report proposes a general presentation of these stations, their characteristics and principles of operation. It describes operation sequences, central station functions (call programmer, address and memory management, recording, peripherals) and its energy supply, and mobile station functions. The last part presents the installation, its start-up and exploitation, its threshold devices and its safety device

  10. Radioactive thickness gauge (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guizerix, J.

    1962-01-01

    The author describes a thickness gauge in which the scintillating crystal detector alternately 'sees' a radioactive source through the material which is to be measured and then a control source of the same material; the radiations are separated in time by an absorbing valve whose sections are alternately full and hollow. The currents corresponding to the two sources are separated beyond the photomultiplier tube by a detector synchronized with the rotation of the valve. The quotient of these two currents is then obtained with a standard recording potentiometer. It is found that the average value of the response which is in the form G = f(I 1 /I 2 ) is not affected by decay of the radioactive sources, and that it is little influenced by variations of high tension, temperature, or properties of the air in the source detector interval. The performance of the gauge is given. (author) [fr

  11. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizawa, Hideo

    1982-01-01

    A system of combining a calciner for concentrated radioactive liquid waste and an incinerator for miscellaneous radioactive solid waste is being developed. Both the calciner and the incinerator are operated by fluidized bed method. The system features the following points: (1) Inflammable miscellaneous solids and concentrated liquid can be treated in combination to reduce the volume. (2) Used ion-exchange resin can be incinerated. (3) The system is applicable even if any final waste disposal method is adopted; calcinated and incinerated solids obtained as intermediate products are easy to handle and store. (4) The system is readily compatible with other waste treatment systems to form optimal total system. The following matters are described: the principle of fluidized-bed furnaces, the objects of treatment, system constitution, the features of the calciner and incinerator, and the current status of development. (J.P.N.)

  12. Some applications of natural radioactivity in industry and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yonghe; Xu Qiujing

    1992-01-01

    There are natural radioactivity isotopes of uranium, thorium and potassium everywhere in nature. The characteristics of these isotopes form the basis of various applications. Some applications of natural radioactivity in industry and agriculture are introduced

  13. Methodology for estimating accidental radioactive releases in nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, H.B.

    1979-01-01

    Estimation of the risks of accidental radioactive releases is necessary in assessing the safety of any nuclear waste management system. The case of a radioactive waste form enclosed in a barrier system is considered. Two test calculations were carried out

  14. Radioactivity Distribution in Malaysian Marine Environment. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zal U'yun Wan Mahmood; Abdul Kadir Ishak; Norfaizal Mohamad; Wo, Y.M.; Kamarudin Samuding

    2015-01-01

    The marine radioactivity distribution mapping in malaysia was developed with the aim to illustrate the pattern of the distribution of both anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in seawater and sediments. The data collected will form the basis for an anthropogenic radioactivity.

  15. Communication from the Radioactive Shipping Service

    CERN Multimedia

    DDGS Unit

    2011-01-01

    The radioactive materials Import/Export service reminds you that all movements of potentially radioactive material must be declared in advance. For exports, shipping requests must be made via the EDH request form, ticking the box “radioactive material”. For imports, an electronic form must be completed before the arrival of the material. Requests which do not comply with the above procedure and any unauthorized imports of radioactive material will be refused.The same applies to imports/exports of radioactive sources. All necessary information is given in the web site: http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Yann Donjoux / Radioactive Shipping Service Phone: +41 22 767.31.71 Fax: +41 22 766.92.00 Email: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch

  16. Radioactive tracer system to indicate drill bit wear or failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, B.A.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive tracer system for indicating drill bit wear or failure utilizing radioactive krypton 85 in clathrate form, in the form of water-soluble kryptonates, or dissolved grease, is described. Preferably the radioactive krypton is placed so that when drill bit wear or failure occurs, the radioactive krypton 85 is relased and effectively becomes diffused in the circulating drilling fluid. At the surface, the radioactive krypton 85 gas is separated from the circulating drilling fluid by gas-mud separating means and is transported as a gas to a counting chamber where an accurate radioactivity count of beta rays released from the krypton is obtained. (Patent Office Record)

  17. Environmental Radioactivity. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Ismail Sulaiman; Zalina Laili

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explains several things which consist radioactivity measurements, regular and high background radioactivity, radioactive contaminated soil and radioactivity in fertilizers, rocks, building materials, food, water, environments, sediments, flora and fauna. Besides, the natural radioactive gas concentration of radon and toron in the environment also been discussed specifically in this chapter.

  18. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Ootsuka, Masaharu; Uetake, Naoto; Ozawa, Yoshihiro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prepare radioactive solidified wastes excellent in strength, heat resistance, weather-proof, water resistance, dampproof and low-leaching property. Method: A hardening material reactive with alkali silicates to form less soluble salts is used as a hardener for alkali silicates which are solidification filler for the radioactive wastes, and mixed with cement as a water absorbent and water to solidify the radioactive wastes. The hardening agent includes, for example, CaCO 3 , Ca(ClO 4 ) 2 , CaSiF 6 and CaSiO 3 . Further, in order to reduce the water content in the wastes and reduce the gap ratio in the solidification products, the hardener adding rate, cement adding rate and water content are selected adequately. As the result, solidification products can be prepared with no deposition of easily soluble salts to the surface thereof, with extremely low leaching of radioactive nucleides. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, C.P.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented on the environmental behavior of radioactive wastes. The management of high-level wastes and waste disposal methods were discussed. Some topics included were ore processing, coagulation, absorption and ion exchange, fixation, ground disposal, flotation, evaporation, transmutation and extraterrestrial disposal. Reports were given of the 226 Ra, 224 Ra and tritium activity in hot springs, 90 Sr concentrations in the groundwater and in White Oak Creek, radionuclide content of algae, grasses and plankton, radionuclides in the Danube River, Hudson River, Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Lake Michigan, Columbia River and other surface waters. Analysis showed that 239 Pu was scavenged from Lake Michigan water by phytoplankton and algae by a concentration factor of up to 10,000. Benthic invertebrates and fish showed higher 239 Pu concentrations than did their pelagic counterparts. Concentration factors are also given for 234 Th, 60 Co, Fe and Mr in marine organisms. Two models for predicting the impact of radioactivity in the food chain on man were mentioned. In an accidental release from a light-water power reactor to the ocean, the most important radionuclides discharged were found to be 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 239 Pu and activation products 65 Zr, 59 Fe, and 95 Zr

  20. Development of radioactivity estimation system considering radioactive nuclide movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumura, Nobuo; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    A radioactivity estimation system considering radioactive nuclide movement is developed to integrate the established codes and the code system for decommissioning of sodium cooled fast reactor (FBR). The former are the codes for estimation of radioactivity movement in sodium coolant of fast reactor which are named SAFFIRE, PSYCHE and TTT. The latter code system is to estimate neutron irradiation activity (COSMARD-RRADO). It is paid special attention to keep the consistency of input data used among these codes and also the simplification of their interface. A new function is added to the estimation system, to estimate minor FP inventory caused by the fission of impurities contained in the coolant and slight fuel material attached on the fuel cladding. To check the evaluation system, the system is applied with radioactivity data of the preceding FBR such as BN-350, JOYO and Monju. Agreement between the analysis results and the measurement is well satisfactory. The uncertainty of the code system is within several tens per cent for the activation of primary coolant (Na-22) and factor of 2-4 for the estimation of radioactivity inventory in sodium coolant. (author)

  1. Radioactive waste interim storage in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    The short summary on the radioactive waste interim storage in Germany covers the following issues: importance of interim storage in the frame of radioactive waste management, responsibilities and regulations, waste forms, storage containers, transport of vitrified high-level radioactive wastes from the reprocessing plants, central interim storage facilities (Gorleben, Ahaus, Nord/Lubmin), local interim storage facilities at nuclear power plant sites, federal state collecting facilities, safety, radiation exposure in Germany.

  2. Well logging radioactive detector assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osburn, T.D.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a well logging instrument of the type having a radioactive logging sub having a sealed chamber and have a radioactive source for emitting radioactive energy into the well formation, the instrument having a radioactive energy detector for detecting gamma rays resulting from the emission of the radioactive energy into the well formation, and means for pressing the sub against the well of the well, an improved Dewar flask for the detector. It comprises: an inner housing formed of titanium and containing the detector; an outer housing formed of titanium, having a cylindrical side wall surrounding the inner housing and separated by a clearance which is evacuated, the outer housing being located within the sealed chamber in the sub of the instrument; a window section formed in the side wall of the outer housing adjacent the detector and on a side of the side wall closest to the wall of the well when the sub is pressed against the wall of the well; and wherein the inner housing has a cylindrical side wall that is of lesser wall thickness than the wall thickness of the side wall of the outer housing other than in the window section

  3. Environmental Assessment Radioactive Source Recovery Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In a response to potential risks to public health and safety, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the recovery of sealed neutron sources under the Radioactive Source Recovery Program (RSRP). This proposed program would enhance the DOE's and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) joint capabilities in the safe management of commercially held radioactive source materials. Currently there are no federal or commercial options for the recovery, storage, or disposal of sealed neutron sources. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts that would be expected to occur if the DOE were to implement a program for the receipt and recovery at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico, of unwanted and excess plutonium-beryllium ( 238 Pu-Be) and americium-beryllium ( 241 Am-Be) sealed neutron sources. About 1 kg (2.2 lb) plutonium and 3 kg (6.6 lb) americium would be recovered over a 15-year project. Personnel at LANL would receive neutron sources from companies, universities, source brokers, and government agencies across the country. These neutron sources would be temporarily stored in floor holes at the CMR Hot Cell Facility. Recovery reduces the neutron emissions from the source material and refers to a process by which: (1) the stainless steel cladding is removed from the neutron source material, (2) the mixture of the radioactive material (Pu-238 or Am-241) and beryllium that constitutes the neutron source material is chemically separated (recovered), and (3) the recovered Pu-238 or Am-241 is converted to an oxide form ( 238 PuO 2 or 241 AmO 2 ). The proposed action would include placing the 238 PuO 2 or 241 AmO 2 in interim storage in a special nuclear material vault at the LANL Plutonium Facility

  4. The real performance of radioactive lightning arrester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The study of the performance of radioactive lightning arrester comparing to the performance of conventional one are presented. Measurements of currents between lightning arrester and an energyzed plate with wind simulation were done for radioactive and conventional lightning arresters, separately. The attraction range of radioactive and conventional lightning arresters using atmospheric pulses produced by a generator of 3MV were verified, separately and simultaneously. The influence of ionization produced by radioactive lightning arrester on critical disruptive tension of a spark plate, testing two lightning arresters for differents nominal attraction distances with applications of atmospheric pulses (positive and negative polarity) and tensions of 60 Hz was verified. The radiation emitted by a radioactive lightning had used in a building was retired and handled without special carefullness by a personnel without worthy of credence to evaluate the hazard in handling radioactive lightning arrester was measured. Critical disruptive tensions of radioactive and conventional lightning arrester using a suspensed electrode and external pulse generator of 6MV was measured. The effect of attraction of a radioactive and conventional lightning arresters disposed symmetrically regarding the same suspensed electrode was verified simultaneously. Seven cases on faults of radioactive lightning arrester in external areas are present. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Radioactive fallout and neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejat Akar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Possible link between radioactivity and the occurrence of neural tube defects is a long lasting debate since the Chernobyl nuclear fallout in 1986. A recent report on the incidence of neural defects in the west coast of USA, following Fukushima disaster, brought another evidence for effect of radioactive fallout on the occurrence of NTD’s. Here a literature review was performed focusing on this special subject.

  6. Management of radioactive waste nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.; Marek, J.

    1976-01-01

    The authors give a survey of the sources, types and amounts of radioactive waste in LWR nuclear power stations (1,300 MWe). The amount of solid waste produced by a Novovorenezh-type PWR reactor (2 x 400 resp. 1 x 1,000 MWe) is given in a table. Treatment, solidification and final storage of radioactive waste are shortly discussed with special reference to the problems of final storage in the CSR. (HR) [de

  7. Radioactive colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, L.

    1987-01-01

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  8. Radioactivity and the French uranium bearing minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiollard, P.Ch.; Boisson, J.M.; Leydet, J.C.; Meisser, N.

    1998-01-01

    This special issue of Regne Mineral journal is entirely devoted to the French uranium mining industry. It comprises 4 parts dealing with: the uranium mining industry in France (history, uranium rush, deposits, geologic setting, prosperity and recession, situation in 1998, ore processing); radioactivity and the uranium and its descendants (discovery, first French uranium bearing ores, discovery of radioactivity, radium and other uranium descendants, radium mines, uranium mines, atoms, elements and isotopes, uranium genesis, uranium decay, isotopes in an uranium ore, spontaneous fission, selective migration of radionuclides, radon in mines and houses, radioactivity units, radioprotection standards, new standards and controversies, natural and artificial radioactivity, hazards linked with the handling and collecting of uranium ores, conformability with radioprotection standards, radioactivity of natural uranium minerals); the French uranium bearing minerals (composition, crystal structure, reference, etymology, fluorescence). (J.S.)

  9. Storage of solid and liquid radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijasic, A.; Gacinovic, O.

    1961-01-01

    Solid radioactive waste collected during 1961 from the laboratories of the Institute amounted to 22.5 m 3 . This report contains data about activity of the waste collected from january to November 1961. About 70% of the waste are short lived radioactive material. Material was packed in metal barrels and stored in the radioactive storage in the Institute. There was no contamination of the personnel involved in these actions. Liquid radioactive wastes come from the Isotope production laboratory, laboratories using tracer techniques, reactor cooling; decontamination of the equipment. Liquid wastes from isotope production were collected in plastic bottles and stored. Waste water from the RA reactor were collected in special containers. After activity measurements this water was released into the sewage system since no activity was found. Table containing data on quantities and activity of radioactive effluents is included in this report

  10. Program specialization

    CERN Document Server

    Marlet, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the principles and techniques of program specialization - a general method to make programs faster (and possibly smaller) when some inputs can be known in advance. As an illustration, it describes the architecture of Tempo, an offline program specializer for C that can also specialize code at runtime, and provides figures for concrete applications in various domains. Technical details address issues related to program analysis precision, value reification, incomplete program specialization, strategies to exploit specialized program, incremental specialization, and data speci

  11. The Spanish general radioactive waste plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondo, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The author summarized the current status of Spain's general radioactive waste management plan. This plan forms the basis for a national radioactive waste management policy and decommissioning strategy. It is updated periodically, the current 5. plan was approved in 1999. The most important element of the current strategy is the development of a centralized interim HLW storage facility by 2010. (A.L.B.)

  12. Special theory of relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Kilmister, Clive William

    1970-01-01

    Special Theory of Relativity provides a discussion of the special theory of relativity. Special relativity is not, like other scientific theories, a statement about the matter that forms the physical world, but has the form of a condition that the explicit physical theories must satisfy. It is thus a form of description, playing to some extent the role of the grammar of physics, prescribing which combinations of theoretical statements are admissible as descriptions of the physical world. Thus, to describe it, one needs also to describe those specific theories and to say how much they are limit

  13. History of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minder, W.

    1981-01-01

    The author describes the historical development of the physics of atoms and nuclei. After a consideration of the ancient Greek philosophy concerning atoms the behaviour of gases is discussed with regards to statistical mechanics. Then the developement of chemistry from alchemy is described. Thereafter the early studies of gas discharges are described with regards to the electronic structure of atoms. In this connection the periodic system of elements is considered. Then the detection of the α-radiation of Uranium by Becquerel and the detections of M. and P. Curie are described. Thereafter the radiactive decay of nuclei is discussed. Then a popular introduction into nuclear structure is given with special regards to artificial radioactivity and nuclear fission. Finally nuclear reactors, the atomic bombs, applications of radionuclides, and problems of radiation protection are described. (HSI) [de

  14. Radioactive waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Takashi; Funabashi, Kiyomi; Chino, Koichi.

    1992-01-01

    In a waste processing device for solidifying, pellets formed by condensing radioactive liquid wastes generated from a nuclear power plant, by using a solidification agent, sodium chloride, sodium hydroxide or sodium nitrate is mixed upon solidification. In particular, since sodium sulfate in a resin regenerating liquid wastes absorbs water in the cement upon cement solidification, and increases the volume by expansion, there is a worry of breaking the cement solidification products. This reaction can be prevented by the addition of sodium chloride and the like. Accordingly, integrity of the solidification products can be maintained for a long period of time. (T.M.)

  15. Radioactive labelled orgotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The preparation and use of radioactively labelled orgotein, i.e. water-soluble protein congeners in pure, injectable form, is described. This radiopharmaceutical is useful in scintigraphy, especially for visualization of the kidneys where the orgotein is rapidly concentrated. Details of the processes for labelling bovine orgotein with sup(99m)Tc, 60 Co, 125 I or 131 I are specified. The pharmaceutical preparation of the labelled orgotein for intravenous and parenteral administration is also described. Examples using either sup(99m)TC or 125 I-orgotein in scintiscanning dogs' kidneys are given. (UK)

  16. Aqueous radioactive waste bituminization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, A.S.

    1980-08-01

    The bituminzation of decontamination and ion exchange resin stripping wastes with four grades of asphalt was investigated to determine the effects of asphalt type on the properties of the final products. All waste forms deformed readily under light loads indicating they would flow if not restrained. It was observed in all cases that product leaching rates increased as the hardness of the asphalt used to treat the waste increased. If bituminization is adopted for any Ontario Hydro aqueous radioactive wastes they should be treated with soft asphalt to obtain optimum leaching resistance and mechanical stability during interim storage should be provided by a corrosion resistant container

  17. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slansky, C.M.

    1975-01-01

    High-level radioactive waste is produced at Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) during the recovery of spent highly enriched nuclear fuels. Liquid waste is stored safely in doubly contained tanks made of steel. The liquid waste is calcined to a solid and stored safely in a retrievable form in doubly contained underground bins. The calcine can be treated further or left untreated in anticipation of ultimate storage. Fluidized bed calcination has been applied to many kinds of high-level waste. The environmental impact of high-level waste management at the ICcP has been negligible and should continue to be negligible. 13 refs

  18. Survey on non-nuclear radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    On request from the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, the Swedish government has in May 2002 set up a non-standing committee for non-nuclear radioactive waste. The objective was to elaborate proposals for a national system for the management of all types of non-nuclear radioactive wastes with special consideration of inter alia the polluter pays principle and the responsibility of the producers. The committee will deliver its proposals to the government 1 December 2003. SSI has assisted the committee to the necessary extent to fulfill the investigation. This report is a summery of SSI's background material concerning non-nuclear radioactive waste in Sweden

  19. Determination of radioactivity in meat samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, G.M.; Atta, M.A.; Shafiq, M.; Zafar, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of radionuclides in edibles can create harmful effects in the human body. It is, therefore, essential that the radioactivity must be searched in the food stuff specially in those items which are available near the nuclear installations. The radioactivity in the meat samples obtained from the surroundings of PINSTECH (Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology), PINSTECH Complex has been determined using high resolution Ge(Li) gamma ray spectrometer and a low level beta counting system. The results show that the measured values of the radioactivity are below the maximum permissible levels. (author)

  20. Contribution of RPB2 to multilocus phylogenetic studies of the euascomycetes (Pezizomycotina, Fungi) with special emphasis on the lichen-forming Acarosporaceae and evolution of polyspory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeb, Valérie; Lutzoni, François; Roux, Claude

    2004-09-01

    Despite the recent progress in molecular phylogenetics, many of the deepest relationships among the main lineages of the largest fungal phylum, Ascomycota, remain unresolved. To increase both resolution and support on a large-scale phylogeny of lichenized and non-lichenized ascomycetes, we combined the protein coding-gene RPB2 with the traditionally used nuclear ribosomal genes SSU and LSU. Our analyses resulted in the naming of the new subclasses Acarosporomycetidae and Ostropomycetidae, and the new class Lichinomycetes, as well as the establishment of the phylogenetic placement and novel circumscription of the lichen-forming fungi family Acarosporaceae. The delimitation of this family has been problematic over the past century, because its main diagnostic feature, true polyspory (numerous spores issued from multiple post-meiosis mitoses) with over 100 spores per ascus, is probably not restricted to the Acarosporaceae. This observation was confirmed by our reconstruction of the origin and evolution of this form of true polyspory using maximum likelihood as the optimality criterion. The various phylogenetic analyses carried out on our data sets allowed us to conclude that: (1) the inclusion of phylogenetic signal from ambiguously aligned regions into the maximum parsimony analyses proved advantageous in reconstructing phylogeny; however, when more data become available, Bayesian analysis using different models of evolution is likely to be more efficient; (2) neighbor-joining bootstrap proportions seem to be more appropriate in detecting topological conflict between data partitions of large-scale phylogenies than posterior probabilities; and (3) Bayesian bootstrap proportion provides a compromise between posterior probability outcomes (i.e., higher accuracy, but with a higher number of significantly supported wrong internodes) vs. maximum likelihood bootstrap proportion outcomes (i.e., lower accuracy, with a lower number of significantly supported wrong internodes).

  1. Stigma and radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Stigma is a special impact of radioactive waste disposal resulting from the perceptions of risk people have of nuclear waste. In this case, stigma is the devaluing or discrediting of a person, group, or geographical area because of proximity to a nuclear waste disposal site, resulting in negative consequences for the individual and collective (e.g., local economy, community relations, perceived quality of life). As part of a social and economic impact assessment of the proposed HLWR at Hanford Site, WA for Washington State, focus groups were conducted in the Tri-Cities near Hanford to identify stigma effects. Results from the groups showed strong evidence of individual impacts of stigmatization: local residents described prejudice towards them because they live near Hanford which appeared to affect their self-respect, the use of the phrase glowing in the dark by outsiders to symbolize the stigma, and showed concern about the possibility that local products might suffer from reduced demand because of products becoming associated with radioactivity in the public's mind. These results indicate that stigma effects are real and should be studied in research and assessments

  2. Radioactive sources in chemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2007-01-01

    Radioactive sources including all radioactive materials exceeding exemption levels have to be registered in national databases according to international standards based on the recommendations ICRP 60 and a proper licensing should take place as described for example in the 96/29/EURATOM. In spite of that, unregistered sources could be found, usually due to the fact that the owner is not aware of radiation characteristics of sources. The material inventories of chemical laboratories are typical and most frequent example where radioactive sources could be found. Five different types of sources could be identified. The most frequent type are chemicals, namely thorium and uranium compounds. They are used not due to their radioactivity but due to their chemical properties. As for all other sources a stringent control is necessary in order to assure their safe use. Around hundred of stored radioactive chemical items were found during inspections of such laboratories performed by the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration or qualified experts in a period December 2006 - July 2007. Users of such chemicals are usually not aware that thorium and uranium chemicals are radioactive and, as unsealed sources, they could be easily spilled out and produce contamination of persons, surfaces, equipment etc. The external exposure as well as the internal exposure including exposure due to inhalation could be present. No knowledge about special precautions is usually present in laboratories and leads to underestimating of a potential risk and unintentional exposure of the laboratory personnel, students etc. Due to the long decay times in decay series of Th -232, U-238 and U- 235 the materials are also radioactive today. Even more, in case of thorium chemicals the radioactivity increased substantially from the time of their production. The implementation of safety measures has been under way and includes a survey of the qualified experts, establishment of organizational structure in a

  3. Treating agent for urea containing radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Hiroshi; Maki, Kentaro.

    1973-01-01

    Object: To add a coagulant into urea containing radioactive material to precipitate and remove the radioactive material in the urea. Structure: Iodosalt is added into urea and next, a mixed reagent in which silver ion or silver acetic ion and iron hydroxide precipitation or ferrite ion coexist is added therein. The urea is treated to have a sufficient alkaline, after which it is introduced into a basket type centrifuge formed with a filter layer in combination of an upper glass fiber layer and a lower active carbon layer. The treating agent can uniformly remove radioactive ion and radioactive chelate within urea containing inorganic salt and various metabolites. (Nakamura, S.)

  4. Environmental radioactivity. Measurement and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The contribution on environmental radioactivity covers the following issues: natural and artificial radioactivity; continuous monitoring of radioactivity; monitoring authorities and measurement; radioactivity in the living environment; radioactivity in food and feeding stuff; radioactivity of game meat and wild-growing mushrooms; radioactivity in mines; radioactivity in the research center Rossendorf.

  5. Structural study of phosphomannan of yeast-form cells of Candida albicans J-1012 strain with special reference to application of mild acetolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, H; Shibata, N; Mitobe, H; Ohkubo, Y; Suzuki, S

    1989-08-01

    Structural analysis of the phosphomannan isolated from yeast-form cells of a pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans J-1012 strain, was conducted. Treatment of this phosphomannan (Fr. J) with 10 mM HCl at 100 degrees C for 60 min gave a mixture of beta-1,2-linked manno-oligosaccharides, from tetraose to biose plus mannose, and an acid-stable mannan moiety (Fr. J-a), which was then acetolyzed by means of an acetolysis medium, 100:100:1 (v/v) mixture of (CH3CO)2O, CH3COOH, and H2SO4, at 40 degrees C for 36 h in order to avoid cleavage of the beta-1,2 linkage. The resultant manno-oligosaccharide mixture was fractionated on a column of Bio-Gel P-2 to yield insufficiently resolved manno-oligosaccharide fractions higher than pentaose and lower manno-oligosaccharides ranging from tetraose to biose plus mannose. The higher manno-oligosaccharide fraction was then digested with the Arthrobacter GJM-1 alpha-mannosidase in order to cleave the enzyme-susceptible alpha-1,2 and alpha-1,3 linkages, leaving manno-oligosaccharides containing the beta-1,2 linkage at their nonreducing terminal sites, Manp beta 1----2Manp alpha 1----2Manp alpha 1----2Manp alpha 1----2Man, Manp beta 1----2Manp beta 1----2Manp alpha 1----2Manp alpha 1---- 2Manp alpha 1----2Man, and Manp beta 1----2Manp beta 1----2Manp beta 1----2Manp alpha 1---- 2Manp alpha 1----2Manp alpha 1----2Man. However, the result of acetolysis of Fr. J-a by means of a 10:10:1 (v/v) mixture of (CH3CO)2O, CH3COOH, and H2SO4 at 40 degrees C for 13 h was significantly different from that obtained by the mild acetolysis method; i.e., the amount of mannose was apparently larger than that formed by the mild acetolysis method. In summary, a chemical structure for Fr. J as a highly branched mannan containing 14 different branching moieties was proposed.

  6. The treatment of radioactive waste in Institute of Nuclear Physics of Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radyuk, R.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The main purpose of radioactive waste treatment is security of humanity and environment for future. The formation of radioactive waste in Institute of Nuclear Physics connects with scientific and research works on reactor and cyclotron. There are works in the field of radiochemistry, activation analysis, research of material. It is connected with some different materials used in practical work: mountain rock, food-stuffs, biological materials and other. The Institute of Nuclear Physics has enterprise, making radioactive isotopes. In consequence of this work radioactive wastes form. Average annual volume of liquid radioactive waste is 2000 m 3 in year. During normal work of nuclear reactor and enterprise of radioactive isotope small part of radionuclides with gaseous waste gets in environment. The content of inert gas does not exceed 2% of permissible level . Value of radionuclides fall out in area from 0.5 Km to 10 Km does not differ global fall out and changes from 1.1.10 6 Bq/km 2 to 1.6.10 7 Bq/km 2 month (permissible doze - 5.6.10 8 Bq/km 2 .month). The solid radioactive waste of medium and low activity are burying on Republic point of radioactive waste storage. Annual volume of solid radioactive waste is 60 m 3 in year and total radioactivity is 10 11 Bk. The solid radioactive waste of high activity are going to of Chelyabinsk. The liquid radioactive waste belong to second and third group of radioactive waste (classification of IAEA). The decontamination of liquid radioactive waste are made on the station of liquid radioactive waste treatment by method of sedimentation and distillation. The productivity of this plant is 15m 3 in day. Before treatment liquid radioactive waste is analyzed to determine chemical and radiochemical composition. It is solution with content of salt from 0.8 g/l to 15 g/l, salt Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ - 20 mg-eqv/l, oxygen - 100 mg O 2 /l , activity from 10 2 Bq/l to 10 4 Bq/l. The radionuclides composition of liquid radioactive

  7. Method for treating radioactive liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komrow, R.R.; Pritchard, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    A process for treating and handling radioactive liquids and rendering such liquids safe for handling is disclosed. Transportation and disposal, the process comprises adding thereto a small amount of a water-insoluble alkali salt of an aqueous alkali saponified gelatinized-starch-polyacrylonitrile graft polymer, to form a solid, semi-solid or gel product

  8. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    understanding of form per se, or, to use an expression from this text, of form as form. This challenge can be reduced to one question: how can design teaching support students in achieving not only the ability to recognize and describe different form-related concepts in existing design (i.e. analytical...

  9. Some historical background to the IAEA Definition and Recommendations concerning high-level radioactive wastes or other high-level radioactive matter unsuitable for dumping at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The need for internationally acceptable standards and regulations for preventing pollution of the sea by radioactive materials was recognized by the United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea, which adopted the Convention on the High Seas in April 1958. Article 25 of the Convention provides that ''every State shall take measures to prevent pollution of the seas from the dumping of radioactive wastes, taking into account any standards and regulations which may be formulated by the competent international organizations.'' The Conference also adopted a resolution recommending that the IAEA pursue studies and take action to assist States in controlling the discharge of radioactive materials into the sea. When the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter was adopted at the Intergovernmental Conference in London, 1972, the IAEA was given specific responsibilities to define criteria and standards for dealing with the questions of sea disposal of radioactive wastes. The IAEA Definition and Recommendations concerning ''high-level radioactive wastes or other high-level radioactive matter unsuitable for dumping at sea'' identify material, the radioactive content of which is at such a level that the Parties to the Convention would wish to prevent any participating State from issuing a special permit even after a detailed appraisal of the safety of the proposed operation, and even for the sector of the marine environment furthest removed from man, i.e. the deep sea with depth greater than 4000 m. Some historical background to these problems is discussed and some of the Japanese findings of the deep sea survey in the Pacific are introduced for comparison with the North Atlantic data which formed a basis of the IAEA Definition and Recommendations for the London Dumping Convention

  10. Environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Outline summary of a report prepared under contract to the DOE: Research Priorities and UK Estuaries: An Overview identifying Research Requirements. Topics considered include the study of radionuclides released into the NE Irish Sea from BNFL, Sellafields, differences in the isotopic composition of stable lead in various sediments, the concentration and distribution of 'hot particles' derived from BNFL in the Irish Sea and adjacent areas, together with attempts to separate hot particles from sediments, and the composition and properties of marine surfaces in relation to uptake and loss of radionuclides, particularly in relation to the common mussel, Mytilus edulis. The problem of the presence of transuranic radionuclides in the bottom sediments of the NE Irish Sea is considered. Profiles of radioactivity are being developed at the shelf-break in order to determine the transfer of radionuclides from the sea surface to the deep sea and to coastal waters; organisms examined include phytoplankton, zooplankton and crustacea (shrimps). Organisms such as Acantharia have been examined to determine transfer of elements and radionuclides to skeletal structures eg Sr, Ba and Si. (U.K.)

  11. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomeke, J.O.

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive waste management and disposal requirements options available are discussed. The possibility of beneficial utilization of radioactive wastes is covered. Methods of interim storage of transuranium wastes are listed. Methods of shipment of low-level and high-level radioactive wastes are presented. Various methods of radioactive waste disposal are discussed

  12. Transport of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-12-01

    The report on the transport of radioactive substances covers the following topics: facts on radioactive materials transport, safety of the transport of radioactive substances, legal regulations and guidelines: a multiform but consistent system, transport of nuclear fuels, safety during the transport of nuclear fuel, future transport of spent fuel elements and high-level radioactive wastes in Germany.

  13. Method of reprocessing radioactive asphalt solidification products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaya, Iwao; Murakami, Tadashi; Miyake, Takafumi; Inagaki, Yuzo.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain heat-stable solidification products and decrease the total volume thereof by modifying the solidified form by the reprocessing of existent radioactive asphalt solidification products. Method: Radioactive asphalt solidification products are heated into a fluidized state. Then, incombustible solvents such as perchloroethylene or trichloroethylene are added to a dissolving tank to gradually dissolve the radioactive asphalt solidification products. Thus, organic materials such as asphalts are transferred into the solvent layer, while inorganic materials containing radioactive materials remain as they are in the separation tank. Then, the inorganic materials containing the radioactive materials are taken out and then solidified, for example, by converting them into a rock or glass form. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Radioactive waste generated from utilization of radioisotopes and each step of the nuclear fuel cycle and decommissioning of nuclear facilities are presented. On the safe management of radioactive waste management, international safety standards are established such as ''The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management (IAEA)'' and T he Joint Convention on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management . Basic steps of radioactive waste management consist of treatment, conditioning and disposal. Disposal is the final step of radioactive waste management and its safety is confirmed by safety assessment in the licensing process. Safety assessment means evaluation of radiation dose rate caused by radioactive materials contained in disposed radioactive waste. The results of the safety assessment are compared with dose limits. The key issues of radioactive waste disposal are establishment of long term national strategies and regulations for safe management of radioactive waste, siting of repository, continuity of management activities and financial bases for long term, and security of human resources. (Author)

  15. Radioactively labelled vitamin B12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlton, J C; Lewis, A

    1976-12-01

    A method is described for preparing radioactively labelled vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) by reacting ..cap alpha..-(5,6-dimethylbenzimidazolyl) hydrogenobamide with active (sup(57,58)Co) cobaltous ion. The latter may be in the form of cobaltous chloride or sulphate in aqueous or aqueous alcoholic medium. The reaction is effected by heating the reactants in darkness at pH 4 to 8. An excess of cyanide is added to convert the hydroxocobalamin formed to cyanocobalamin.

  16. Radioactively labelled vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.C.; Lewis, A.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for preparing radioactively labelled vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) by reacting α-(5,6-dimethylbenzimidazolyl) hydrogenobamide with active (sup(57,58)Co) cobaltous ion. The latter may be in the form of cobaltous chloride or sulphate in aqueous or aqueous alcoholic medium. The reaction is effected by heating the reactants in darkness at pH 4 to 8. An excess of cyanide is added to convert the hydroxocobalamin formed to cyanocobalamin. (U.K.)

  17. Ecological Role of Soils upon Radioactive Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetnov, Evgeny; Shcheglov, Alexei; Tsvenova, Olga

    2016-04-01

    The ecological role of soils upon radioactive contamination is clearly manifested in the system of notions about ecosystems services, i.e., benefits gained by humans from ecosystems and their components, including soils (Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, 2005). For the soils, these services are considered on the basis of soil functions in the biosphere that belong to the protective ecosystem functions within the group of soil functions known under the names of "Buffer and protective biogeocenotic shield" (at the level of particular biogeocenoses) and "Protective shield of the biosphere" (at the global biospheric level) (according to Dobrovol'skii & Nikitin, 2005). With respect to radionuclides, this group includes (1) the depositing function, i.e., the accumulation and long-term sequestration of radioactive substances by the soil after atmospheric fallout; (2) the geochemical function, i.e., the regulation of horizontal and vertical fluxes of radionuclides in the system of geochemically conjugated landscapes and in the soil-groundwater and soil-plant systems; and (3) the dose-forming function that is manifested by the shielding capacity of the soil with respect to the external ionizing radiation (lowering of the dose from external radiation) and by the regulation of the migration of radionuclides in the trophic chain (lowering of the dose from internal radiation). The depositing and geochemical functions of the soils are interrelated, which is seen from quantitative estimates of the dynamics of the fluxes of radionuclides in the considered systems (soil-plant, soil-groundwater, etc.). The downward migration of radionuclides into the lower soil layers proceeds very slowly: for decades, more than 90% of the pool of radionuclides is stored in the topmost 10 cm of the soil profile. In the first 3-5 years after the fallout, the downward migration of radionuclides with infiltrating water flows decreases from several percent to decimals and hundredths of percent from the

  18. Statutory Instruments - 1984 No. 863 and 1985 No. 708. Public Health, England and Wales - Public Health Scotland. The Control of Pollution (Radioactive Waste) Regulations 1984, The Control of Pollution (Radioactive Waste) Regulations 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Regulations provide that radioactive waste is to be treated as any other waste for pollution control purposes as opposed to special radioactive control purposes. In the former respect, radioactive waste is subject to Part II of the Control of Pollution Act 1974, but in the latter, it remains subject to the Radioactive Substances Act 1960. (NEA) [fr

  19. Radioactive liquid waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Takashi; Baba, Tsutomu; Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Matsuda, Masami; Chino, Koichi; Ikeda, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    As an adsorbent used for removing radioactive nuclides such as cesium and strontium from radioactive liquid wastes generated from a reprocessing plant, a silicon compound having siloxane bonds constituted by silicon and oxygen and having silanol groups constituted by silicon, oxygen and hydrogen, or an inorganic material mainly comprising aluminosilicate constituted with silicon, oxygen and aluminum is used. In the adsorbent of the present invention, since silica main skeletons are partially decomposed in an aqueous alkaline solution to newly form silanol groups having a cation adsorbing property, pretreatment such as pH adjustment is not necessary. (T.M.)

  20. Apparatus for measuring radioactive emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, R.C.; Lazerson, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring radioactive emissions from moving radioactive material comprises at least one radiation detector in a housing serving as a first radiation shield and in which at least one groove is formed to expose at least a portion of a receptor surface of the detector. The groove extends transverse to the direction of movement of the material over the detector. A second radiation shield may be located between at least a portion of the first shield and the detector. The material of the second shield is inherently less contaminated and emits secondary excitation radiation of lower energy than the first material. (author)

  1. Radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    The widely published claims that the public health effects resulting from routine emissions are between 0.01 and 0.1 serious health effects per gigawattyear, and hence are at least a thousand times smaller than those resulting from air pollution by the burning of coal, cannot be true, for two reasons. The authors of these claims have ignored at least two of the more important isotopes, radon-222 and carbon-14, which are presently released to the environment, and thus contribute greatly to the health impact of nuclear energy. The health effects calculated in the earlier work cover only those which occur during the year in which the energy is generated. This means, figuratively speaking, that the authors have confused an annual installment payment with the full cost. This is unacceptable. The contribution to the health impact of nuclear energy arising from the single isotopic species radon-222 emanating from the mill tailings is estimated to 400 lung cancer deaths/GW(e)y, larger even than the most pessimistic estimates of the health impact of energy from coal through atmospheric pollution. We have no assurance that other long-lived isotopes do not contribute comparable amounts to the health impact of nuclear energy. The discussion of the health impact of radon-222 raises the fundamental moral question--how far into the future our responsibility extends. If such a long-termresponsibility is rejected, then we must at least try to predict the environmental buildup of radioactive pollutants, in order to avoid unacceptable and irreversible levels of radiation dose rate. The potential health consequences from long-lived radioisotopes seem to have been largely ignored so far, and should be explored in detail

  2. Proceedings of national seminar on physics with radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintalapudi, S.N.; Shyam, R.

    1991-01-01

    This volume containing the proceedings of the national seminar on physics with radioactive ion beams gives a broad overview of the developments taking place in the area of nuclear physics and accelerator physics with special emphasis on the utilization of radioactive ion beams for various studies. Topics covered include studies on nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics and the wide ranging applications of radioactive ion beams in these and other areas of nuclear sciences. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. Specialization Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Ulrik Pagh; Lawall, Julia Laetitia; Consel, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Design patterns offer many advantages for software development, but can introduce inefficiency into the final program. Program specialization can eliminate such overheads, but is most effective when targeted by the user to specific bottlenecks. Consequently, we propose that these concepts...... are complementary. Program specialization can optimize programs written using design patterns, and design patterns provide information about the program structure that can guide specialization. Concretely, we propose specialization patterns, which describe how to apply program specialization to optimize uses...... of design patterns. In this paper, we analyze the specialization opportunities provided by specific uses of design patterns. Based on the analysis of each design pattern, we define the associated specialization pattern. These specialization opportunities can be declared using the specialization classes...

  4. A comparison and cross-reference of commercial low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, T.A.

    1997-04-01

    This document, prepared by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, is a comparison and cross-reference of commercial low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria. Many of these are draft or preliminary criteria as well as implemented criteria at operating low-level radioactive waste management facilities. Waste acceptance criteria from the following entities are included: US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, South Carolina, Washington, Utah, Nevada, California, illinois, Texas, North Carolina, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, New York, and the Midwest Compact Region. Criteria in the matrix include the following: physical form, chemical form, liquid limits, void space in packages, concentration averaging, types of packaging, chelating agents, solidification media, stability requirements, sorptive media, gas, oil, biological waste, pyrophorics, source material, special nuclear material, package dimensions, incinerator ash, dewatered resin, transuranics, and mixed waste. Each criterion in the matrix is cross-referenced to its source document so that exact requirements can be determined

  5. Current practice of incineration of low-level institutional radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, L.R.; McCampbell, M.R.; Thompson, J.D.

    1981-02-01

    During 1972, 142 medical and academic institutions were surveyed to assess the current practice of incineration of low-level radioactive waste. This was one activity carried out by the University of Maryland as part of a contract with EG and G Idaho, Inc., to site a radioactive waste incineration system. Of those surveyed, 46 (approximately 32%) were presently incinerating some type of radioactive waste. All were using controlled-air, multistage incinerators. Incinerators were most often used to burn animal carcasses and other biological wastes (96%). The average size unit had a capacity of 113 kg/h. Disposal of liquid scintillation vials posed special problems; eight institutions incinerated full scintillation vials and five incinerated scintillation fluids in bulk form. Most institutions (87%) used the incinerator to dispose of other wastes in addition to radioactive wastes. About half (20) of the institutions incinerating radioactive wastes reported shortcomings in their incineration process; those most often mentioned were: problems with liquid scintillation wastes, ash removal, melting glass, and visible smoke. Frequently cited reasons for incinerating wastes were: less expensive than shipping for commercial shallow land burial, volume reduction, convenience, and closure of existing disposal sites

  6. Current status of high level radioactive waste disposal in Japan and foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoru; Tanabe, Hiromi; Inagaki, Yusuke; Ishida, Hisahiro; Kato, Osamu; Kurata, Mitsuyuki; Yamachika, Hidehiko

    2002-01-01

    At a time point of 2002, there is no country actually disposing high level radioactive wastes into grounds, but in most of countries legislative preparation and practicing agents are carried out and site selection is promoted together with energetic advancement of its R and Ds. As disposal methods of the high level radioactive wastes, various methods such as space disposal, oceanic bottom disposal, ice bed disposal, ground disposal, and so on have been examined. And, a processing technology called partitioning and transmutation technology separating long-lived radionuclides from liquid high level radioactive waste and transmutation into short-lived or harmless radionuclides has also been studied. Here was introduced their wrestling conditions in Japan and main foreign countries, as a special issue of the Current status of high level radioactive waste disposal in Japan and foreign countries'. The high level radioactive wastes (glassification solids or spent nuclear fuels) are wastes always formed by nuclear power generation and establishment of technologies is an important subject for nuclear fuel cycle. (G.K.)

  7. Working safely with radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Wynne

    1993-01-01

    In common with exposure to many other laboratory chemicals, exposure to ionising radiations and to radioactive materials carries a small risk of causing harm. Because of this, there are legal limits to the amount of exposure to ionising radiations at work and special rules for working with radioactive materials. Although radiation protection is a complex subject it is possible to simplify to 10 basic things you should do -the Golden Rules. They are: 1) understand the nature of the hazard and get practical training; 2) plan ahead to minimise time spent handling radioactivity; 3) distance yourself appropriately from sources of radiation; 4) use appropriate shielding for the radiation; 5) contain radioactive materials in defined work areas; 6) wear appropriate protective clothing and dosimeters; 7) monitor the work area frequently for contamination control; 8) follow the local rules and safe ways of working; 9) minimise accumulation of waste and dispose of it by appropriate routes, and 10) after completion of work, monitor, wash, and monitor yourself again. These rules are expanded in this article. (author)

  8. Radioactivity in Dutch consumer products

    CERN Document Server

    Janssen, M P M

    2002-01-01

    This study took place within the framework of a general update of the average radiation dose for the Dutch population. It focuses on consumer products in which radionuclides have been intentionally incorporated and on radiation-emitting devices that can be supplied to members of the public without special surveillance. Eleven consumer products were studied in more detail. The radiation from these products determined 90% of the total collective dose due to consumer products in the Netherlands in 1988. Individual and collective doses are presented here for each product. The total collective dose has decreased from 130 personSv in 1988 to 4.6 personSv at present. This reduction was attributed to: a decrease in the number of radioactive products (gas mantles), lower estimates of the number of radioactive products present in the Netherlands thanks to new information (camera lenses, smoke detectors containing Ra-226), replacement of radioactive by non-radioactive products (gas mantles, dental protheses), and a lowe...

  9. Report on radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The safe management of radioactive wastes constitutes an essential part of the IAEA programme. A large number of reports and conference proceedings covering various aspects of the subject have been issued. The Technical Review Committee on Underground Disposal (February 1988) recommended that the Secretariat issue a report on the state of the art of underground disposal of radioactive wastes. The Committee recommended the need for a report that provided an overview of the present knowledge in the field. This report covers the basic principles associated with the state of the art of near surface and deep geological radioactive waste disposal, including examples of prudent practice, and basic information on performance assessment methods. It does not include a comprehensive description of the waste management programmes in different countries nor provide a textbook on waste disposal. Such books are available elsewhere. Reviewing all the concepts and practices of safe radioactive waste disposal in a document of reasonable size is not possible; therefore, the scope of this report has been limited to cover essential parts of the subject. Exotic disposal techniques and techniques for disposing of uranium mill tailings are not covered, and only brief coverage is provided for disposal at sea and in the sea-bed. The present report provides a list of references to more specialized reports on disposal published by the IAEA as well as by other bodies, which may be consulted if additional information is sought. 108 refs, 22 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Treatment of radioactive effluents at the Boris Kidric Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojovic, P.; Drobnik, S.; Popara, D.

    1964-10-01

    The paper describes the origin, composition and activity of radioactive effluents at the Boris Kidric Institute, their collection at the places or origin, transport to the place of disposal and treatment of some smaller quantities. Special attention has been paid to effluents with short-lived isotopes produced in the Laboratory for radioactive isotope production (author)

  11. 10 CFR 20.1005 - Units of radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Units of radioactivity. 20.1005 Section 20.1005 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION General Provisions § 20.1005 Units of radioactivity. For the purposes of this part, activity is expressed in the special unit of...

  12. Combustible radioactive waste treatment by incineration and chemical digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stretz, L.A.; Crippen, M.D.; Allen, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    A review is given of present and planned combustible radioactive waste treatment systems in the US. Advantages and disadvantages of various systems are considered. Design waste streams are discussed in relation to waste composition, radioactive contaminants by amount and type, and special operating problems caused by the waste

  13. High Level Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings of the second annual international conference on High Level Radioactive Waste Management, held on April 28--May 3, 1991, Las Vegas, Nevada, provides information on the current technical issue related to international high level radioactive waste management activities and how they relate to society as a whole. Besides discussing such technical topics as the best form of the waste, the integrity of storage containers, design and construction of a repository, the broader social aspects of these issues are explored in papers on such subjects as conformance to regulations, transportation safety, and public education. By providing this wider perspective of high level radioactive waste management, it becomes apparent that the various disciplines involved in this field are interrelated and that they should work to integrate their waste management activities. Individual records are processed separately for the data bases

  14. New type of natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubchenya, V.A.; Chechev, V.P.; Yavshits, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration is being given in popular form to investigations of a new type of natural radioactivity - spontaneous emission of fragments, more massive than α-particles, by heavy element nuclei, called f-decay by analogy with known α and γ decays. Some data on radioactivity, origin of the decay are presented. Possibilities of f-decay, predictions and hypotheses are discussed. The reason of late discovery of f-decay lies in low f-decay probability 10 -9 with respect to α-decay and in a certain sluggishness of settled knowledge about possible types of radioactive decay. The idea of f-decay is presented. It differs from the idea about a new type of decay as modification of asymmetric fission and contains an attempt to explain the intermediate position of f-decay between α-decay and

  15. Overview of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    The question of what to do with radioactive wastes is discussed. The need to resolve this issue promptly is pointed out. Two significant events which have occurred during the Carter administration are discussed. An Interagency Review Group (IRG) on waste management was formed to formulate recommendations leading to the establishment of a National policy for managing radioactive wastes. The technical findings in the IRG report are listed. The author points out some issues not addressed by the report. President Carter issued a national policy statement on Radioactive Waste Management in February 1980. The most significant elements of this statement are summarized. The cancellation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is currently meeting opposition in Congress. This and other items in the National Policy Statement are discussed

  16. Documentary form no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    This first documentary form, edited by the national association of local commissions of information about nuclear activities (ANCLI), briefly presents the radioactivity phenomenon, the ionising radiations, the characteristics of radiation sources (activity, half life, energy), and the dosimetry (absorbed, equivalent, efficient doses). (J.S.)

  17. Radioactive mineral occurences of Colorado and bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson-Moore, J.L.; Collins, D.B.; Hornbaker, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    This two-part report provides an essentially complete listing of radioactive occurrences in Colorado, with a comprehensive bibliography and bibliographic cross-indexes. Part 1 lists approximately 3000 known radioactive occurrences with their locations and brief accounts of the geology, mineralogy, radioactivity, host rock, production data, and source of data for each. The occurrences are classified by host rock and plotted on U.S. Geological Survey 1 0 x 2 0 topographic quadrangle maps with a special 1 : 100,000-scale base map for the Uravan mineral belt. Part 2 contains the bibliography of approximately 2500 citations on radioactive mineral occurrences in the state, with cross-indexes by county, host rock, and the special categories of ''Front Range,'' ''Colorado Plateau,'' and ''thorium.'' The term ''occurrence'' as used in this report is defined as any site where the concentration of uranium or thorium is at least 0.01% or where the range of radioactivity is greater than twice the background radioactivity. All citations and occurrence data are stored on computer diskettes for easy retrieval, correction, and updating

  18. Solidification method of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Tsutomu; Chino, Koichi; Sasahira, Akira; Ikeda, Takashi

    1992-07-24

    Metal solidification material can completely seal radioactive wastes and it has high sealing effect even if a trace amount of evaporation should be caused. In addition, the solidification operation can be conducted safely by using a metal having a melting point of lower than that of the decomposition temperature of the radioactive wastes. Further, the radioactive wastes having a possibility of evaporation and scattering along with oxidation can be solidified in a stable form by putting the solidification system under an inert gas atmosphere. Then in the present invention, a metal is selected as a solidification material for radioactive wastes, and a metal, for example, lead or tin having a melting point of lower than that of the decomposition temperature of the wastes is used in order to prevent the release of the wastes during the solidification operation. Radioactive wastes which are unstable in air and scatter easily, for example, Ru or the like can be converted into a stable solidification product by conducting the solidification processing under an inert gas atmosphere. (T.M.).

  19. The disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormai, P.

    2006-01-01

    The first part shows different ways of 'producing' radioactive wastes, defines the wastes of small, medium and high activity and gives estimation on the quantity of the necessary capacities of waste disposal facilities. The modern radioactive waste disposal that is the integrated processing of the form of waste, the package, the technical facility and the embedding geological environment that guarantee the isolation together. Another factor is the lifetime of radioactive waste which means that any waste containing long lifetime waste in higher concentration than 400-4000 kBq/kg should be disposed geologically. Today the centre of debate disposal of radioactive waste is more social than technical. For this reason not only geological conditions and technical preparations, but social discussions and accepting communities are needed in selecting place of facilities. Now, the focus is on long term temporary disposal of high activity wastes, like burnt out heating elements. The final part of the paper summarizes the current Hungarian situation of disposal of radioactive wastes. (T-R.A.)

  20. Chapter 7. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The inspection and assessment activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) focused on minimization of activity and the quantity of produced radioactive waste (RAW), and on increasing safety of waste management. The general scheme of rad-waste management in the Slovak Republic is presented. The radioactive wastes produced during the operation of NPP V-1, NPP V-2 and NPP Mochovce in 1999 are listed.Liquid RAW was treated and conditioned into a solid form at the nuclear facility Technology for treatment and conditioning of RAW. In 1999 combustible solid waste was treated at the nuclear facility Incinerator of VUJE Trnava. Produced liquid and solid RAW are stored at designed equipment at individual nuclear installations (in case of NPP V-1, NPP V-2 Bohunice and NPP Mochovce in compliance with the Regulation No. 67/1987 Coll. law).The status of free capacity of these storages as of 31.121999 is presented. Storage solidified product built the SE-VYZ was fully filled at the end of 1999. In 1999 there was a significant improvement in the process of radioactive waste management by: (A) issuing approval for commissioning the National Repository for RAW, (B) issuing approval for commissioning the Treatment and Conditioning Center for RAW, (C) having the application for approval to transport conditioned RAW to the National repository Mochovce in the final stage of evaluation. At the beginning of 2000 it is realistic to expect that RAW conditioned in the Conditioning center of RAW will start to be disposed at the National repository of RAW in Mochovce

  1. The system for centralized inventory keeping and ultimate disposal of radioactive waste in the former German Democratic Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beise, E.; Mielke, H.G.; Mueller, W.; Oppermann, U.

    1991-01-01

    The report explains the concept adopted by the former GDR. The system based at Morsleben, for centralized inventory keeping and management of radioactive waste is explained, refewing to the amounts of waste accrued, storage and transport of waste drums, classification and preparation of waste forms, and ultimate disposal of radioactive waste in the Morsleben repository. The report includes information on the management of special waste and spent fuel elements which cannot be stored at the Morsleben site. Most of the radioactive waste produced in the former GDR has been stored since 1979 at the Morsleben site. The waste came from the nuclear power plants (Greifswald, Rheinsberg), and from installations and institutes applying or producing radionuclides - so-called APR waste - (e.g. from the institutes at Rossendorf and Berlin-Buch, and from about 1300 other waste producers). The waste was accepted as or processed to solid waste forms, liquid waste, sealed radiation sources, and special waste; the ultimate storage techniques applied are packing of drums, backfilling, solidification of liquid waste and disposal in boreholes. Up to the end of the year 1989, the Morsleben repository received about 14000 m 3 of radioactive waste (about 40% solid waste, and about 60% liquid waste). (orig.) [de

  2. A special form of noise reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, R.M.; Greten, H.P.; Swarte, P.

    2008-01-01

    Popmusic reproduction or reinforcement in disco's or poppodia on a very high sound pressure level is highly appreciated by the so called target group. For the neighbours, this can be very annoying, especially when these music sessions take place during the night. A poor sound insulation creates an

  3. On a relative form of Verdier Specialization

    OpenAIRE

    Fullwood, James; Wang, Dongxu

    2016-01-01

    Comment: Written for the proceedings of "International Conference on Singularity Theory, in Honor of Henry Laufer's 70th Birthday", which took place in December 2015 at the Tsinghua Sanya International Mathematics Forum in Sanya China

  4. Natural atmospheric radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, A.

    1986-01-01

    After having summed up the different old or new units, used in radioactivity and radioprotection, the origins of atmospheric radioactivity are reported. Next the authors deal with the air content in radon, thoron and their radioactive descendants, insisting on the variations of the radon air content and on the radioactive balance between radon and its descendants. Then a few notions concerning the natural radioactive aerosol are developed: electric charge state, granulometric distribution. The possible effects of natural atmospheric radioactivity on man are studied with a distinction between inner irradiation and outer irradiation, an average assessment is shown. Finally the important problem of radon in inhabitations is approached [fr

  5. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

    1985-08-30

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

  6. Evaluation of low-level solid radioactive waste generated by a large hospital and disposed of with ordinary refuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, L.; Pedroli, G.; Monciardini, M.; Bianchi, L.; Novario, R.; Beretta, A.

    1996-01-01

    In the Lombardy region some hospitals have recently been reported to the local authorities because of the presence of radioactivity in hospital refuse sent to the municipal tips for incineration. On various occasions the refuse collectors coming from the hospitals had to return with their refuse as traces of radioactivity were detected at the entrance to the tips equipped with monitoring systems. Hospitals administering radioactive substances for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes produce radioactive waste mainly in solid and liquid form. This waste is principally present in patient excreta and in contaminated materials. Radioactive waste present in patient excreta is normally disposed of through the sewage system provided that the concentration limits and annual activity stipulated by law are respected. The contaminated materials coming from the departments that carry out radioisotopic investigations and therapy with unsealed sources can be collected separately and sent to a tip after a period of storage to permit radioactive decay. However, part of the radioactive waste escapes all checks and inevitably mixes with normal refuse or with special hospital refuse that is not considered radioactive. This occurs in the case of: 1. excreta from patients who are not hospitalised after a radioisotopic investigation and materials contaminated by the excreta; 2. excreta from hospitalised patients which are eliminated outside the nuclear medicine and radiotherapy departments; 3. contaminated materials produced with unsealed sources in hospital departments other than those of nuclear medicine and radiotherapy; The waste indicated in point 1 is probably the main problem in ecological terms as the patients who are not hospitalised eliminate radioactive excreta into domestic sewage systems and can also contaminate materials that are disposed of with normal household refuse. In this case any solution to the problem would seriously affect diagnostic activities carried out in the

  7. Acceptance criteria for radioactive waste deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzyski, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    The disposal of low-and intermediate level radioactive waste in either shallow ground or rock cavities must be subjected to special guidelines which are used by national authorities and implementing bodies when establishing and regulating respositories. These informations are given by the acceptance criteria and will depend on specific site conditions and optmized procedures. (author) [pt

  8. Radioactive solid waste management at Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraman, A.P.; Balu, K.

    1977-01-01

    The Radioactive solid waste management programme at BARC, India during 1965-1975 is described in detail. The operational experience, which includes the handling treatment and disposal of these solid wastes is reported alongwith the special problems faced in the case of large volume low hazard potential wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle. (K.B.)

  9. FFTF radioactive solid waste handling and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The equipment necessary for the disposal of radioactive solid waste from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is scheduled to be available for operation in late 1982. The plan for disposal of radioactive waste from FFTF will utilize special waste containers, a reusable Solid Waste Cask (SWC) and a Disposable Solid Waste Cask (DSWC). The SWC will be used to transport the waste from the Reactor Containment Building to a concrete and steel DSWC. The DSWC will then be transported to a burial site on the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. Radioactive solid waste generated during the operation of the FFTF consists of activated test assembly hardware, reflectors, in-core shim assemblies and control rods. This radioactive waste must be cleaned (sodium removed) prior to disposal. This paper provides a description of the solid waste disposal process, and the casks and equipment used for handling and transport

  10. Radioactive waste management in West Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, H [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.)

    1978-01-01

    The technologies developed in West Germany for radioactive waste management are widely reviewed. The first topic in this review paper is the disposal of low- and middle-level radioactive liquid wastes. Almost all these liquid wastes are evaporated, and the typical decontamination factor attained is 10/sup 4/ -- 10/sup 6/. The second topic is the solidification of residuals. Short explanation is given to bituminization and some new processes. The third topic is high-level liquid wastes. Degradation of glass quality due to various radiation is discussed. Embedding of small glass particles containing radioactive wastes into metal is also explained. Disposals of low-level solid wastes and the special wastes produced from reprocessing and mixed oxide fuel fabrication are explained. Final disposal of radioactive wastes in halite is discussed as the last topic. Many photographs are used to illustrate the industrial or experimental use of those management methods.

  11. Measurements of natural radioactivity in historical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kierzek, J.; Kunicki-Goldfinger, J.J.; Kasprzak, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Natural radioactive components of historical glasses and two methods of the respective measurement of the radioactivity are discussed. The evaluation of radioactivity of glass objects using a Geiger-Mueller counter and high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry is presented. A survey of the Warsaw National Museum glass collection with a Geiger-Mueller counter allowed distinguishing the vessels made of potassium and sodium glass by their level of natural radioactivity. Gamma spectrometry, on the other hand, enables estimating a specific radionuclide content. Special attention is given to uranium glasses. One 19th century Bohemian vessel, coloured with a uranium compound, was carefully examined using gamma spectrometry. K 2 O and U content were estimated to be 16.2 and 0.33%, respectively. (orig.)

  12. Biosorption of Am-241 and Cs-137 by radioactive liquid waste by coffee husk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Rafael Vicente de Padua; Sakata, Solange Kazumi; Bellini, Maria Helena; Marumo, Julio Takehiro, E-mail: jtmarumo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP, has stored many types of radioactive liquid wastes, including liquid scintillators, mixed wastes from chemical analysis and spent decontamination solutions. These wastes need special attention, because the available treatment processes are often expensive and difficult to manage. Biosorption using biomass of vegetable using agricultural waste has become a very attractive technique because it involves the removal of heavy metals ions by low cost biossorbents. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential of the coffee husk to remove Am-241 and Cs-137 from radioactive liquid waste. The coffee husk was tested in two forms, treated and untreated. The chemical treatment of the coffee husk was performed with HNO{sub 3} and NaOH diluted solutions. The results showed that the coffee husk did not showed significant differences in behavior and capacity for biosorption for Am-241 and Cs-137 over time. Coffee husk showed low biosorption capacity for Cs-137, removing only 7.2 {+-} 1.0% in 4 hours of contact time. For Am-241, the maximum biosorption was 57,5 {+-} 0.6% in 1 hours. These results suggest that coffee husk in untreated form can be used in the treatment of radioactive waste liquid containing Am-241. (author)

  13. Biosorption of Am-241 and Cs-137 by radioactive liquid waste by coffee husk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Rafael Vicente de Padua; Sakata, Solange Kazumi; Bellini, Maria Helena; Marumo, Julio Takehiro

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP, has stored many types of radioactive liquid wastes, including liquid scintillators, mixed wastes from chemical analysis and spent decontamination solutions. These wastes need special attention, because the available treatment processes are often expensive and difficult to manage. Biosorption using biomass of vegetable using agricultural waste has become a very attractive technique because it involves the removal of heavy metals ions by low cost biossorbents. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential of the coffee husk to remove Am-241 and Cs-137 from radioactive liquid waste. The coffee husk was tested in two forms, treated and untreated. The chemical treatment of the coffee husk was performed with HNO 3 and NaOH diluted solutions. The results showed that the coffee husk did not showed significant differences in behavior and capacity for biosorption for Am-241 and Cs-137 over time. Coffee husk showed low biosorption capacity for Cs-137, removing only 7.2 ± 1.0% in 4 hours of contact time. For Am-241, the maximum biosorption was 57,5 ± 0.6% in 1 hours. These results suggest that coffee husk in untreated form can be used in the treatment of radioactive waste liquid containing Am-241. (author)

  14. Peculiarities of Environment Pollution as a Special Type of Radioactive Waste: Field Means for Comprehensive Characterization of Soil and Bottom Sediments and their Application in the Survey at the Flood plain of Techa River - 13172

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Oleg; Danilovich, Alexey; Potapov, Victor; Stepanov, Vyacheslav; Smirnov, Sergey; Volkovich, Anatoly [National Research Centre - Kurchatov Institute, 1 Kurchatov Sq. (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Contamination of natural objects - zone alarm fallout, zones and flood plains near production sites (the result of technological accidents and resource extraction) occupy large areas. Large area and volume of contaminated matter, moderate specific activity (as low - medium-level wastes) make such objects specific types of radioactive waste. These objects exist for a long time, now they are characterized by a bound state of nuclides with the matrix. There is no cost-effective ways to remove these waste, the only solution for the rehabilitation of such areas is their isolation and regular monitoring through direct and indirect measurements. The complex of instruments was developed to field mapping of contamination. It consists of a portable spectrometric collimated detector, collimated spectrometric borehole detector, underwater spectrometer detector, spectrometer for field measurements of the specific activity of Sr-90, connected to a portable MCA 'Colibry (Hummingbird)'. The complex was used in settlements of Bryansk region, rivers Techa and Yenisei. The effectiveness of the developed complex considered by the example of characterization of the reservoir 10 (artificial lake) in Techinsky cascade containing a huge amount of radioactive waste. The developed field means for comprehensive characterization of soil and bottom sediments contamination are very effective for mapping and monitoring of environment contamination after accidents. Especially in case of high non-uniformity of fallout and may be very actual in Fukushima area. (authors)

  15. Peculiarities of Environment Pollution as a Special Type of Radioactive Waste: Field Means for Comprehensive Characterization of Soil and Bottom Sediments and their Application in the Survey at the Flood plain of Techa River - 13172

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Oleg; Danilovich, Alexey; Potapov, Victor; Stepanov, Vyacheslav; Smirnov, Sergey; Volkovich, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    Contamination of natural objects - zone alarm fallout, zones and flood plains near production sites (the result of technological accidents and resource extraction) occupy large areas. Large area and volume of contaminated matter, moderate specific activity (as low - medium-level wastes) make such objects specific types of radioactive waste. These objects exist for a long time, now they are characterized by a bound state of nuclides with the matrix. There is no cost-effective ways to remove these waste, the only solution for the rehabilitation of such areas is their isolation and regular monitoring through direct and indirect measurements. The complex of instruments was developed to field mapping of contamination. It consists of a portable spectrometric collimated detector, collimated spectrometric borehole detector, underwater spectrometer detector, spectrometer for field measurements of the specific activity of Sr-90, connected to a portable MCA 'Colibry (Hummingbird)'. The complex was used in settlements of Bryansk region, rivers Techa and Yenisei. The effectiveness of the developed complex considered by the example of characterization of the reservoir 10 (artificial lake) in Techinsky cascade containing a huge amount of radioactive waste. The developed field means for comprehensive characterization of soil and bottom sediments contamination are very effective for mapping and monitoring of environment contamination after accidents. Especially in case of high non-uniformity of fallout and may be very actual in Fukushima area. (authors)

  16. Thermal treatment of organic radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrubasik, A.; Stich, W.

    1993-01-01

    The organic radioactive waste which is generated in nuclear and isotope facilities (power plants, research centers and other) must be treated in order to achieve a waste form suitable for long term storage and disposal. Therefore the resulting waste treatment products should be stable under influence of temperature, time, radioactivity, chemical and biological activity. Another reason for the treatment of organic waste is the volume reduction with respect to the storage costs. For different kinds of waste, different treatment technologies have been developed and some are now used in industrial scale. The paper gives process descriptions for the treatment of solid organic radioactive waste of low beta/gamma activity and alpha-contaminated solid organic radioactive waste, and the pyrolysis of organic radioactive waste

  17. Electrodeless light source provided with radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive materials are used to assist in starting a discharge in an electrodeless light source. The radioactive emissions predispose on the inner surface of the lamp envelope loosely bound charges which thereafter assist in initiating discharge. The radioactive material can be enclosed within the lamp envelope in gaseous or non-gaseous form. Preferred materials are krypton 85 and americium 241. In addition, the radioactive material can be dispersed in the lamp envelope material or can be a pellet imbedded in the envelope material. Finally, the radioactive material can be located in the termination fixture. Sources of alpha particles, beta particles, or gamma rays are suitable. Because charges accumulate with time on the inner surface of the lamp envelope, activity levels as low as 10 -8 curie are effective as starting aids. (Auth.)

  18. Method of processing radioactive solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootaka, Hisashi; Aizu, Tadashi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the volume-reducing effect for the radioactive solids wastes by freezing and then pulverizing them. Method: Miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes produced from a nuclear power plant and packed in vinyl resin bags are filled in a drum can and nitrogen gas at low temperature (lower than 0 0 C) from a cylinder previously prepared by filling liquid nitrogen (at 15kg/cm 2 , -196 0 C) to freeze the radioactive solid wastes. Thereafter, a hydraulic press is inserted into the drum can to compress and pulverize the thus freezed miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes into powder. The powder thus formed does not expand even after removing the hydraulic press from the drum can, whereby the volume reduction of the radioactive solid wastes can be carried out effectively. (Horiuchi, T.)

  19. Method for immobilizing radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babad, H.; Strachan, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive iodine, present as alkali metal iodides or iodates in an aqueous solution, is incorporated into an inert solid material for long-term storage by adding to the solution a stoichiometric amount with respect to the formation of a sodalite (3M2O.3Al2O3. 6SiO2.2MX, where M alkali metal; X I - or IO 3- ) of an alkali metal, alumina and silica, stirring the solution to form a homogeneous mixture, drying the mixture to form a powder, compacting and sintering the compacted powder at 1073 to 1373 K (800 0 to 1100 0 C.) for a time sufficient to form sodalite

  20. Radioactivity and geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper recalls a few steps of the introduction of radioactivity in geophysics and astrophysics: contribution of radioelements to energy balance of the Earth, age of the Earth based on radioactive disintegration and the discovery of cosmic radiations

  1. Radioactive Waste Management Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This strategy defines methods and means how collect, transport and bury radioactive waste safely. It includes low level radiation waste and high level radiation waste. In the strategy are foreseen main principles and ways of storage radioactive waste

  2. Radioactivity in consumer products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

    1978-08-01

    Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

  3. Radioactivity of bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, M.A.; Winkler, R.; Ascherl, R.; Lenz, E.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between [de

  4. Immersed radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-03-01

    This document presents a brief overview of immersed radioactive wastes worldwide: historical aspects, geographical localization, type of wastes (liquid, solid), radiological activity of immersed radioactive wastes in the NE Atlantic Ocean, immersion sites and monitoring

  5. The IAEA's high level radioactive waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saire, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the different activities that are performed under the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) high level radioactive waste management programme. The Agency's programme is composed of five main activities (information exchange, international safety standards, R ampersand D activities, advisory services and special projects) which are described in the paper. Special emphasis is placed on the RADioactive WAste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme which was implemented in 1991 to document international consensus that exists on the safe management of radioactive waste. The paper also raises the question about the need for regional repositories to serve certain countries that do not have the resources or infrastructure to construct a national repository

  6. The Barents Sea, distribution and fate of radioactive contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foeyn, L.; Heldal, H.E.; Svaeren, I.

    1999-01-01

    Possible contamination in the marine food webs of the Barents Sea may be a problem for a rational harvest of the area. Radioactive contamination has in this context a special public impact as even traces of radioactivity seems to be considered by the public to be a real danger. It is therefor of special importance, from a regulatory and fisheries point of view, to accumulate knowledge of the behaviour of radioactive elements in the marine ecosystems of the Barents Sea in order to place this contamination in proper and realistic proportions

  7. Transport of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuller, C.

    2003-01-01

    In this article author describes the system of transport and processing of radioactive wastes from nuclear power of Slovenske elektrarne, plc. It is realized the assurance of transport of liquid and solid radioactive wastes to processing links from places of their formation, or of preliminary storage and consistent transports of treated radioactive wastes fixed in cement matrix of fibre-concrete container into Rebublic storage of radioactive wastes in Mochovce

  8. Focus on radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, M

    1989-01-01

    Written for children, this book looks at the nature of radioactive materials, how they were discovered, what they are used for and how they affect the environment around us. The emphasis is on the benefits of radioactive materials, particularly in nuclear power stations, in medical diagnostics and radiotherapy, in industry and in agriculture. Nuclear fission and fusion are explained, how radioactive materials are handled and naturally occurring radioactivity are included. (UK).

  9. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.

    1994-01-01

    This booklet is a publication by International Atomic Energy Agency for general awareness of citizens and policy-makers to clarify their concept of nuclear wastes. In a very simple way it tells what is radioactivity, radiations and radioactive wastes. It further hints on various medial and industrial uses of radiations. It discusses about different types of radioactive wastes and radioactive waste management. Status of nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern European countries are also discussed

  10. Radioactive consumer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Otomaru

    1981-01-01

    Present situation of utilizing the radioactive consumer products and exposure dose were reviewed with published data. Practically, consumer products are divided into three categories, (1) radioactive nuclides intentionally incorporated into radioluminous dye, ionization chambers for smoke detector, eliminator of static electricity, and glow lamp (2) natural radioactive nuclides contained in false teeth, porcelain, glass, and gas mantle (3) natural radioactive nuclides accumulated as industrial waste at the consumption of coal, petroleum, and natural gas or in fertilizer and materials for construction. (Nakanishi, T.)

  11. Aspects of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutoiu, Dan

    2003-01-01

    The origin and types of radioactive waste, the objective and the fundamental principles of radioactive waste management and the classification of radioactive waste are presented. Problems of the radioactive waste management are analyzed. (authors)

  12. Radioactive Substances Regulations, 1959 under the Radioactive Substances Act 1957

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    These Regulations as amended lay down maximum permissible concentrations and doses and prescribe radiation protection measures for personnel. They provide for the licensing procedures for radioactive materials and irradiating apparatus and the conditions to be complied with for their handling, packaging, transport and disposal. The Schedules to the Regulations contain tables of maximum permissible radionuclide concentrations, models of licence application forms and labels. (NEA) [fr

  13. Optimization of Concrete Composition in Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IIija, P.

    1999-01-01

    Low and Intermediate level radioactive waste re presents 95% of the total wastes that is conditioned into special concrete containers. Since these containers are to protect radioactive waste safely for about 300 years, the selection and precise control of physical and mechanical characteristics of materials is very important. After volume reduction and valuable components recovery, waste materials have to be conditioned for transport, storage and disposal. Conditioning is the waste management step in which radioactive wastes are immobilized and packed . In this paper methods and optimization of concrete container composition, used for storing radioactive waste, is presented

  14. Understanding radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the sources and health effects of radioactive wastes. It reveals the techniques to concentrate and immobilize radioactivity and examines the merits of various disposal ideas. The book, which is designed for the lay reader, explains the basic science of atoms,nuclear particles,radioactivity, radiation and health effects

  15. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This ninth chapter presents de CNEN-NE--5.01 norm 'Transport of radioactive material'; the specifications of the radioactive materials for transport; the tests of the packages; the requests for controlling the transport and the responsibilities during the transport of radioactive material

  16. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Illustrated by drawings, this publication briefly describes radioactive exposure modalities (external or internal irradiation), the ways they are measured and assessed (doses, units), the different natural radioactivity origins, the different radioactivity origins related to human activity, the share of each origin in population exposures

  17. Development of Data Base on Radioactive Discharges and Environmental Activity Levels in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vokal, B.; Krizman, M.

    2003-01-01

    Radioactivity monitoring in the environment in Slovenia has been currently performed on a regular basis as a monitoring of global radioactive contamination and as operational monitoring in the surroundings of facilities with radioactive discharges. Environmental radioactivity monitoring due to atmospheric nuclear bomb tests in Slovenia started in 1961, while monitoring of radioactive discharges from nuclear facilities in Slovenia started in early 1980s with the extent programmes: in the Krsko nuclear power plant in 1981, in the uranium mining and milling facility at Zirovski vrh (1985) and in the research reactor at Brinje near Ljubljana (1986). Both categories of the results are documented in written reports and sent to the competent authorities, mostly on annual basis. According to the requirements of the European Commission (Commission Recommendation of 8. June 2000 on the application of Article 36 of the Euratom Treaty concerning the monitoring of the levels of the radioactivity in the environment for the purpose of assessing the exposure of the population as a whole (2000/473/Euratom) and Commission Recommendation of 6. December 1999 on the application of Article 37 of the Euratom Treaty (1999/829/Euratom)) and on initiative of the IAEA (IAEA Document International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Project International Data base on Discharges of Radioactive Material to the Environment, 2000) the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) started in 2002 with development of the computerised data base on environmental data and radioactive discharges data for the most facilities, specially for the nuclear fuel cycle. At present the environmental database contains the data on global contamination of air, surface waters, tap water sources and food chain (1 37C s, 9 0S r) and also on levels of major natural radionuclides (7 B e, 2 10P b, 2 26R a, 4 0K ). Data base on radioactive discharges for the recent years comprises the activities of fission and activation

  18. Status of the ENDF/B special applications files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, L.

    1977-01-01

    The newly formed SAFE Subcommittee of the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group is charged with the responsibility for providing, reviewing, and testing several ENDF/B special purpose evaluated files. This responsibility currently encompasses dosimetry, activation, hydrogen and helium production, and radioactive decay data required by a variety of users. New formats have been approved by CSEWG for the inclusion of the activation and hydrogen and helium production cross-section libraries. The decay data will be in the same format as that already employed by the Fission Product and Actinide Subcommittee of CSEWG. While an extensive dosimetry file was available on the ENDF/B-IV library for fast reactor applications, other data are needed to extend the range of applications, especially to higher incident neutron energies. This Subcommittee has long-range plans to provide evaluated neutron interaction data that can be recommended for use in many specialized applications. 1 figure, 3 tables

  19. Processing of combustible radioactive waste using incineration techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maestas, E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Member countries numerous incineration concepts are being studied as potential methods for conditioning alpha-bearing and other types of combustible radioactive waste. The common objective of these different processes is volume reduction and the transformation of the waste to a more acceptable waste form. Because the combustion processes reduce the mass and volume of waste to a form which is generally more inert than the feed material, the resulting waste can be more uniformly compatible with safe handling, packaging, storage and/or disposal techniques. The number of different types of combustion process designed and operating specifically for alpha-bearing wastes is somewhat small compared with those for non-alpha radioactive wastes; however, research and development is under way in a number of countries to develop and improve alpha incinerators. This paper provides an overview of most alpha-incineration concepts in operation or under development in OECD/NEA Member countries. The special features of each concept are briefly discussed. A table containing characteristic data of incinerators is presented so that a comparison of the major programmes can be made. The table includes the incinerator name and location, process type, capacity throughput, operational status and application. (author)

  20. Specialization Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz , Ulrik Pagh; Lawall , Julia ,; Consel , Charles

    1999-01-01

    Design patterns offer numerous advantages for software development, but can introduce inefficiency into the finished program. Program specialization can eliminate such overheads, but is most effective when targeted by the user to specific bottlenecks. Consequently, we propose to consider program specialization and design patterns as complementary concepts. On the one hand, program specialization can optimize object-oriented programs written using design patterns. On the other hand, design pat...

  1. Krsko NPP radioactive waste characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skanata, D.; Kroselj, V.; Jankovic, M.

    2007-01-01

    In May 2005 Krsko NPP initiated the Radioactive Waste Characterization Project and commissioned its realization to the consulting company Enconet International, Zagreb. The Agency for Radwaste Management was invited to participate on the Project. The Project was successfully closed out in August 2006. The main Project goal consisted of systematization the existing and gathering the missing radiological, chemical, physical, mechanical, thermal and biological information and data on radioactive waste. In a general perspective, the Project may also be considered as a part of broader scope of activities to support state efforts to find a disposal solution for radioactive waste in Slovenia. The operational low and intermediate level radioactive waste has been structured into 6 waste streams that contain evaporator concentrates and tank sludges, spent ion resins, spent filters, compressible and non-compressible waste as well as specific waste. For each of mentioned waste streams, process schemes have been developed including raw waste, treatment and conditioning technologies, waste forms, containers and waste packages. In the paper the main results of the Characterization Project will be briefly described. The results will indicate that there are 17 different types of raw waste that have been processed by applying 9 treatment/conditioning technologies. By this way 18 different waste forms have been produced and stored into 3 types of containers. Within each type of container several combinations should be distinguished. Considering all of this, there are 34 different types of waste packages altogether that are currently stored in the Solid Radwaste Storage Facility at the Krsko NPP site. Because of these findings a new identification system has been recommended and consequently the improvement of the existing database on radioactive waste has been proposed. The potential areas of further in depth characterization are indicated. In the paper a brief description on the

  2. Radioactive liquid water processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Noda, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Fumio.

    1993-01-01

    Alkaline earth metals and heavy metals are added to radioactive liquid wastes containing a surface active agent comprising alkali metal salts of higher fatty acids. These metals form metal soaps with the surface active agent dissolved in the liquid wastes and crystallized. The crystallized metal soaps are introduced to a filtering column filled with a burnable polymeric fibrous filtering material. The filtering material is burnt. This can remove the surface active agent to remove COD without using an active carbon. (T.M.)

  3. Radioactive discharges from Sellafield (UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentreath, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    This study of low-level liquid radioactive discharges from the British Nuclear Fuels Ltd Sellafield site into the eastern basin of the Irish Sea, prepared on the basis of existing publications and documents, reviews chemical forms and rate of discharges, physical oceanography, sediment distribution and fisheries of the Irish Sea, behaviour of radionuclides in seawater, association with sedimentary materials, accumulation of radionuclides by biological materials, environmental monitoring, surveillance and assessment of radiation exposure of the public and impact on the environment

  4. Special Weapons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Supporting Navy special weapons, the division provides an array of engineering services, technical publication support services, logistics support services, safety...

  5. Radioactive waste management for a radiologically contaminated hospitalized patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina Jomir, G.; Michel, X.; Lecompte, Y.; Chianea, N.; Cazoulat, A.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste management in the post-accidental phase following caring for a radiologically contaminated patient in a hospital decontamination facility must be anticipated at a local level to be truly efficient, as the volume of waste could be substantial. This management must comply with the principles set out for radioactive as well as medical waste. The first step involves identification of radiologically contaminated waste based on radioactivity measurement for volume reduction. Then, the management depends on the longest radioactive half-life of contaminative radionuclides. For a half-life inferior to 100 days, wastes are stored for their radioactivity to decay for at least 10 periods before disposal like conventional medical waste. Long-lived radioactive waste management implies treatment of liquid waste and special handling for sorting and packaging before final elimination at the French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA). Following this, highly specialized waste management skills, financial responsibility issues and detention of non-medical radioactive sources are questions raised by hospital radioactive waste management in the post-accidental phase. (authors)

  6. Treating radioactive effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkham, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    In the treatment of radioactive effluent it is known to produce a floc being a suspension of precipitates carrying radioactive species in a mother liquor containing dissolved non-radioactive salts. It is also known and accepted practice to encapsulate the floc in a solid matrix by treatment with bitumen, cement and the like. In the present invention the floc is washed with water prior to encapsulation in the solid matrix whereby to displace the mother liquor containing the dissolved non-radioactive salts. This serves to reduce the final amount of solidified radioactive waste with consequent advantages in the storage and disposal thereof. (author)

  7. Radioactivity in foodstuffs 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The average per capita radiation dose received by the Norwegian population due to intake of foodstuffs in 1990 was between 0.03 and 0.06 mSv. This was about the same level as in previous years since the Chernobyl accident. Certain individuals with special dietary habits (consumption of large amounts of freshwater fish and reindeer), and who live in heavily contaminated areas, received higher doses (appr. 1 mSv). In 1990 dietary advice was maintained with regard to people consuming large amounts of reindeer meat and/or game and freshwater fish. The aim is still that no person shall be exposed to an annual dose of more than 1 mSv through food. The present report reviews the data concerning radioactivity levels in dairy products, meat and fish for 1990. Levels were similar to those recorded in the previous year, but considerably lower than those in 1988. The report also presents some data from a 5-year radio-ecological research programme carried out by the Norwegian Institute of Nature Research (NINA). In general, levels in wild fish and game were below the intervention limit of 6000 Bq/kg, apart from a few reindeer herds and fish from a few localities. 8 figs. 6 tabs

  8. Radioactivity in foodstuffs 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The dose of radioactivity to which the average Norwegian consumer was exposed through the consumption of food during the year immediately following the Chernobyl accident was 0.15 mSv. Certain individuals with special dietary habits (large proportions of freswater fish and reindeer meat), and who live in regions particularly affected by radionuclide contamination, have been exposed to higher doses (0.4 to 1.8 mSv). These doses would have been considerably higher had not dietary advise been followed. Even though health risk assessments suggested in the spring of 1987 that it was reasonable to revoke the action levels then in force, they were nevertheless maintained after political consideration of the situation. Measures implemented in 1987 have resulted in a certain reduction of the dose to which the population has been exposed, and the associated costs have also fallen considerably in relation to the situation in 1986. The present report summarizes analytical results of monitoring and surveillance activities in 1987 and describes the measures introduced with regard to the various categories of food. Measures have been introduced primarily in connection with sheep meat production and reindeer farming, even if certain measures have been necessary also with regard to goat milk and cheese manufacture

  9. Communication from the Radioactive Waste Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste service of the Radiation protection Group informs you that as of 15 April 2011 radioactive waste can be delivered to the waste treatment centre (Bldg. 573) only during the following hours: Mon- Thu: 08:00 – 11:30 / 13:30 – 16:00 Fri : 08:00 – 11:30 An electronic form must be filled in before the arrival of the waste at the treatment centre: https://edh.cern.ch/Document/General/RadioactiveWaste for further information, please call 73171.

  10. Response to Illicit Trafficking of Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Two response paths are discussed in the presentation. Reactive response follows when an alarm of a border monitor goes off or a notification is received about an incident involving or suspected to involve radioactive materials. The response can also be the result of the finding of a discrepancy between a customs declaration form and the corresponding actual shipment. Proactive response is undertaken upon receipt of intelligence information suggesting the illicit trafficking of radioactive materials, notification about the discovery of non-compliance with transport regulations or if discrepancies are found in an inventory of radioactive materials.

  11. First days of R and D in radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The first meeting of R and D in radioactive waste management was organized by ENRESA on 21,22,23 April 1993. The main objective was to disseminate the most relevant works within the 2nd R and D plan, and to establish and adequate form involved for discussion R and D radioactive waste management. (Author) The meeting was articulated in 50 sessions: I.- Low and medium radioactive wastes II.- High level radioactive wastes: activities of ENRESA III.- High level radioactive wastes: near field. IV.- Biosphere, radiological protection, behaviour evaluation V.- Dismantling and decommissioning nuclear facilities VI.- Geosphere

  12. Vitrification of hazardous and radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Schumacher, R.

    1995-01-01

    Vitrification offers many attractive waste stabilization options. Versatility of waste compositions, as well as the inherent durability of a glass waste form, have made vitrification the treatment of choice for high-level radioactive wastes. Adapting the technology to other hazardous and radioactive waste streams will provide an environmentally acceptable solution to many of the waste challenges that face the public today. This document reviews various types and technologies involved in vitrification

  13. Radiological testing of products containing radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.W.; Knight, A.

    1980-01-01

    Consumer products containing radioactive substances are tested by NRPB to determine how much radioactive material is likely to be released from a product if it is misused or accidentally damaged. Such testing is briefly described with particular reference to ionisation chamber smoke detectors, liquid crystal display watches illuminated with gaseous tritium light sources and anti-static brushes containing polonium-210 in the form of ceramic microspheres. (U.K.)

  14. Radioactive wastes handling problems in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, R.; Venegas, R.

    1984-07-01

    A brief description of the radioactive wastes problem in Venezuela is presented. The origins of the problem are shown in a squematic form. The requirements for its solution are divided into three parts: information system, control system, radioactive wastes hadling system. A questionnaire summarizing factors to be considered when looking for a solution to the problem in Venezuela is included, as well as conclusions and recomendations for further discussion

  15. Radioactive material packaging performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, T.

    1992-06-01

    In an effort to provide uniform packaging of hazardous material on an international level, recommendations for the transport of dangerous goods have been developed by the United Nations. These recommendations are performance oriented and contrast with a large number of packaging specifications in the US Department of Transportation's hazard materials regulations. This dual system presents problems when international shipments enter the US Department of Transportation's system. Faced with the question of continuing a dual system or aligning with the international system, the Research and Special Programs Administration of the US Department of Transportation responded with Docket HM-181. This began the transition toward the international transportation system. Following close behind is Docket HM-169A, which addressed low specific activity radioactive material packaging. This paper will discuss the differences between performance-oriented and specification packaging, the transition toward performance-oriented packaging by the US Department of Transportation, and performance-oriented testing of radioactive material packaging by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Dockets HM-181 and HM-169A will be discussed along with Type A (low activity) and Type B (high activity) radioactive material packaging evaluations

  16. Chemical decontamination of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.I.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. There is also a variety of alternatives for treatment and conditioning of the wastes prior disposal. The importance of treatment of radioactive waste for protection of human and environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has gained in this field. Generally, the methods used for treatment of radioactive wastes can be classified into three type's biological, physical and chemical treatment this physical treatment it gives good result than biological treatment. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. In chemical treatment there are different procedures, solvent extraction, ion exchange, electro dialysis but solvent extraction is best one because high purity can be optioned on the other hand the disadvantage that it is expensive. Beside the solvent extraction technique one can be used is ion exchange which gives reasonable result, but requires pretreatment that to avoid in closing of column by colloidal and large species. Electro dialysis technique gives quite result but less than solvent extraction and ion exchange technique the advantage is a cheep.(Author)

  17. The ATB-8K packaging for transport of radioactive waste in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michels, L.; Dybeck, P.

    1998-01-01

    The ATB-8K container has been developed on behalf of SKB, the Swedish nuclear fuel and waste management organization, to transport large volumes of radioactive waste conditioned in moulds and drums, or large size scrap components, from nuclear facilities to the Swedish Final Repository for radioactive waste (SFR). In most cases the waste is under LSA form, but when the dose rate at 3 meters from the unshielded object exceeds 10 mSv/h, the transport packaging must been the regulatory requirements applicable to type B(U) packages, with no fissile content. Considering the dose rate around the package, it will be transported under exclusive use. The ATB-8k packaging is therefore a type B(U) packaging, specially designed for the transportation of high activity conditioned waste. (authors)

  18. Specialized science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2014-04-01

    As the body of scientific knowledge in a discipline increases, there is pressure for specialization. Fields spawn subfields that then become entities in themselves that promote further specialization. The process by which scientists join specialized groups has remarkable similarities to the guild system of the middle ages. The advantages of specialization of science include efficiency, the establishment of normative standards, and the potential for greater rigor in experimental research. However, specialization also carries risks of monopoly, monotony, and isolation. The current tendency to judge scientific work by the impact factor of the journal in which it is published may have roots in overspecialization, as scientists are less able to critically evaluate work outside their field than before. Scientists in particular define themselves through group identity and adopt practices that conform to the expectations and dynamics of such groups. As part of our continuing analysis of issues confronting contemporary science, we analyze the emergence and consequences of specialization in science, with a particular emphasis on microbiology, a field highly vulnerable to balkanization along microbial phylogenetic boundaries, and suggest that specialization carries significant costs. We propose measures to mitigate the detrimental effects of scientific specialism.

  19. Legal and regulator framework of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez Cassanello, Griselda; Mels Siningen, Celeste; Reina, Mariana; Vega, Hernan

    2009-01-01

    The present work intends to develop the legislative and regulatory framework in the matter of radioactive waste. The legal frame of the radioactive waste conformed by the National Constitution, the treaties and conventions, laws and decrees and regulatory norm in Argentine . The subject is approached from the international point of view considering the slogan of 36 The Annual Meeting of the Association Argentine de Nuclear Technology: 'The Nuclear Energy in the Present World'. This work also contains a special paragraph dedicated to the analysis of practical cases related to the subject and the activity of the National Commission of Atomic Energy. (author)

  20. Natural radiation and radioactivity in education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanoue, Masanobu

    1999-01-01

    To understand radiation and radioactivity, it is important to recall the history of their investigation. At first, the works made by Elster and Geitel with a leaf electroscope about 100 years age are introduced. Then the variations of environmental radiation level are shown by the results obtained with a large volume NaI(Tl) detector on my car travelling all over Japan and the data with a pocket dosimeter during my tours in Europe. Among environmental radioactivity, radon and tritium are specially remarked from the historical and educational points of view, with various methods for their measurements. (author)