WorldWideScience

Sample records for spatiotemporal microstructural organization

  1. Spatiotemporal Data Organization and Application Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C.; Yan, S.

    2017-09-01

    Organization and management of spatiotemporal data is a key support technology for intelligence in all fields of the smart city. The construction of a smart city cannot be realized without spatiotemporal data. Oriented to support intelligent applications this paper proposes an organizational model for spatiotemporal data, and details the construction of a spatiotemporal big data calculation, analysis, and service framework for highly efficient management and intelligent application of spatiotemporal data for the entire data life cycle.

  2. Prebiotic organic microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule; Takano, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Kensei

    2012-08-01

    Micro- and sub-micrometer spheres, tubules and fiber-filament soft structures have been synthesized in our experiments conducted with 3 MeV proton irradiations of a mixture of simple inorganic constituents, CO, N(2) and H(2)O. We analysed the irradiation products, with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). These laboratory organic structures produced a wide variety of proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous amino acids after HCl hydrolysis. The enantiomer analysis for D,L-alanine confirmed that the amino acids were abiotically synthesized during the laboratory experiment. We discuss the presence of CO(2) and the production of H(2) during exothermic processes of serpentinization and consequently we discuss the production of hydrothermal CO in a ferromagnesian silicate mineral environment. We also discuss the low intensity of the Earth's magnetic field during the Paleoarchaean Era and consequently we conclude that excitation sources arising from cosmic radiation were much more abundant during this Era. We then show that our laboratory prebiotic microstructures might be synthesized during the Archaean Eon, as a product of the serpentinization process of the rocks and of their mineral contents.

  3. Self-organization of spatio-temporal earthquake clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hainzl

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular automaton versions of the Burridge-Knopoff model have been shown to reproduce the power law distribution of event sizes; that is, the Gutenberg-Richter law. However, they have failed to reproduce the occurrence of foreshock and aftershock sequences correlated with large earthquakes. We show that in the case of partial stress recovery due to transient creep occurring subsequently to earthquakes in the crust, such spring-block systems self-organize into a statistically stationary state characterized by a power law distribution of fracture sizes as well as by foreshocks and aftershocks accompanying large events. In particular, the increase of foreshock and the decrease of aftershock activity can be described by, aside from a prefactor, the same Omori law. The exponent of the Omori law depends on the relaxation time and on the spatial scale of transient creep. Further investigations concerning the number of aftershocks, the temporal variation of aftershock magnitudes, and the waiting time distribution support the conclusion that this model, even "more realistic" physics in missed, captures in some ways the origin of the size distribution as well as spatio-temporal clustering of earthquakes.

  4. Quantitative Determination of Organic Semiconductor Microstructure from the Molecular to Device Scale

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan; Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Miller, Chad E.; Salleo, Alberto; Toney, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to demonstrate quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale. The quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale

  5. AN ADAPTIVE ORGANIZATION METHOD OF GEOVIDEO DATA FOR SPATIO-TEMPORAL ASSOCIATION ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Public security incidents have been increasingly challenging to address with their new features, including large-scale mobility, multi-stage dynamic evolution, spatio-temporal concurrency and uncertainty in the complex urban environment, which require spatio-temporal association analysis among multiple regional video data for global cognition. However, the existing video data organizational methods that view video as a property of the spatial object or position in space dissever the spatio-temporal relationship of scattered video shots captured from multiple video channels, limit the query functions on interactive retrieval between a camera and its video clips and hinder the comprehensive management of event-related scattered video shots. GeoVideo, which maps video frames onto a geographic space, is a new approach to represent the geographic world, promote security monitoring in a spatial perspective and provide a highly feasible solution to this problem. This paper analyzes the large-scale personnel mobility in public safety events and proposes a multi-level, event-related organization method with massive GeoVideo data by spatio-temporal trajectory. This paper designs a unified object identify(ID structure to implicitly store the spatio-temporal relationship of scattered video clips and support the distributed storage management of massive cases. Finally, the validity and feasibility of this method are demonstrated through suspect tracking experiments.

  6. White matter microstructural organization and gait stability in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd M. Bruijn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding age-related decline in gait stability and the role of alterations in brain structure is crucial. Here, we studied the relationship between white matter microstructural organization using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI and advanced gait stability measures in 15 healthy young adults (range 18-30 years and 25 healthy older adults (range 62-82 years.Among the different gait stability measures, only stride time and the maximum Lyapunov exponent (which quantifies how well participants are able to attenuate small perturbations were found to decline with age. White matter microstructural organization (FA was lower throughout the brain in older adults. We found a strong correlation between FA in the left anterior thalamic radiation and left corticospinal tract on the one hand, and step width and safety margin (indicative of how close participants are to falling over on the other. These findings suggest that white matter FA in tracts connecting subcortical and prefrontal areas is associated with the implementation of an effective stabilization strategy during gait.

  7. On the genesis of spatio-temporal self-organized structures in plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talasman, S.J.; Sanduloviciu, M.

    1995-01-01

    The genesis of luminous sharply defined nearly spherical space charges structures formed in an Argon plasma column was experimental investigated. The results reveal spatio-temporal characteristics proper to systems resulting after a self-organization process. Their phenomenology involves electrical charges separation produced by symmetry breaking and spatial separation of the excitation and ionization cross sections functions in a region where electrons are accelerated and, as a result, the appearance of electrostatic forces that, acting as long range correlations, assures, together with dissipative effects, its stability. (Author) 8 Figs., 31 Refs

  8. Fundamental investigations on periodic nano- and microstructured organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, M.

    2005-03-15

    Using organic semiconducting materials in solar cells is a new approach with promising possibilities. The great potential of low cost production combined with mechanical flexibility gives rise to new applications. Due to the relatively simple fabrication process from solution and the mechanical flexibility, the production of organic solar cells by the cost effective roll-to-roll process appears promising. However, the preconditions for commercialization are not fulfilled as yet. The demands on organic solar cells strongly depend on the type of application. The highest demands on solar cell technologies are set by the energy market. Organic solar cells are only expected to be competitive on the energy market when the requirements on efficiency, lifetime and costs are fulfilled at the same time. Regarding this as a long term goal, a less demanding but still challenging medium term goal would be the application of relatively small organic solar cell modules for i.e. portable electronic devices. The integration of Organic Field Effect Transistors (OFET) and Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLED) to all-polymer electronic devices is still under development. Nevertheless, the integration of organic solar cells as one functional component appears promising as the production technologies are expected to be compatible. The innovative contribution of this thesis to the development of organic solar cells is as follows: Motivated by the desire to fabricate efficient and cost effective organic solar cells, the approach of developing novel solar cell architectures based on periodic nano- and microstructures is followed. At present, planar organic solar cells with indium tin oxide (ITO) as a transparent electrode are intensively studied. One decisive cost factor would, however, be the indium price, which is the key component of the ITO electrode. The planar cell architecture can be conceived as a one-dimensional photonic device, however the presented work widens the investigations

  9. Exploring the magnetic and organic microstructures with photoemission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, D.H., E-mail: dhw@nsrrc.org.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu Science Park, 30076 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chan, Yuet-Loy; Hsu, Yao-Jane [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu Science Park, 30076 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEEM with polarized photon enables additional image contrasts and physical insights. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XMCD-based images reveal the shape-dependent domains in Ni80Fe20 microstructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XLD-based images confirm the success of molecular orientation controls. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two interfaces in Co-Pn-Co structures are magnetically and chemically different. -- Abstract: We present photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) studies on geometrically constrained ferromagnetic, organic, and organics-ferromagnet hybrid structures. Powered by an elliptically polarized undulator, the PEEM at Taiwan Light Source (TLS) is capable of recording polarization enhanced X-ray images and has been employed to examine the domain configurations in a lithographically patterned permalloy film as well as the orientations of pentacene molecules adsorbed on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) modified gold surfaces. In addition, magnetic images acquired on cobalt/pentacene and pentacene/cobalt bilayers reveal that in hybrid structures the order of thin film deposition can lead to distinct domain configurations. Spectroscopic evidence further suggests that there is significant orbital hybridization at the interface where metallic cobalt was deposited directly on organic pentacene.

  10. A data science approach for quantifying spatio-temporal effects to graft failures in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Diego; Hamad, Farag; Cadeiras, Martin; Menezes, Ronaldo; Nezamoddini-Kachouie, Nezamoddin

    2016-08-01

    The transplantation of solid organs is one of the most important accomplishments of modern medicine. Yet, organ shortage is a major public health issue; 8,000 people died while waiting for an organ in 2014. Meanwhile, the allocation system currently implemented can lead to organs being discarded and the medical community still investigates factors that affects early graft failure such as distance and ischemic time. In this paper, we investigate early graft failure under a spatio-temporal perspective using a data science unified approach for all six organs that is based on complementary cumulative analysis of both distance and ischemic time. Interestingly, although distance seems to highly affect some organs (e.g. liver), it appears to have no effect on others (e.g. kidney). Similarly, the results on ischemic time confirm it affects early graft failure with higher influence for some organs such as (e.g. heart) and lower influence for others such as (e.g. kidney). This poses the question whether the allocation policies should be individually designed for each organ in order to account for their particularities as shown in this work.

  11. Exploring the magnetic and organic microstructures with photoemission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, D.H.; Chan, Yuet-Loy; Hsu, Yao-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► PEEM with polarized photon enables additional image contrasts and physical insights. ► XMCD-based images reveal the shape-dependent domains in Ni80Fe20 microstructures. ► XLD-based images confirm the success of molecular orientation controls. ► The two interfaces in Co–Pn–Co structures are magnetically and chemically different. -- Abstract: We present photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) studies on geometrically constrained ferromagnetic, organic, and organics–ferromagnet hybrid structures. Powered by an elliptically polarized undulator, the PEEM at Taiwan Light Source (TLS) is capable of recording polarization enhanced X-ray images and has been employed to examine the domain configurations in a lithographically patterned permalloy film as well as the orientations of pentacene molecules adsorbed on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) modified gold surfaces. In addition, magnetic images acquired on cobalt/pentacene and pentacene/cobalt bilayers reveal that in hybrid structures the order of thin film deposition can lead to distinct domain configurations. Spectroscopic evidence further suggests that there is significant orbital hybridization at the interface where metallic cobalt was deposited directly on organic pentacene.

  12. A customized light sheet microscope to measure spatio-temporal protein dynamics in small model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Rieckher

    Full Text Available We describe a customizable and cost-effective light sheet microscopy (LSM platform for rapid three-dimensional imaging of protein dynamics in small model organisms. The system is designed for high acquisition speeds and enables extended time-lapse in vivo experiments when using fluorescently labeled specimens. We demonstrate the capability of the setup to monitor gene expression and protein localization during ageing and upon starvation stress in longitudinal studies in individual or small groups of adult Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. The system is equipped to readily perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, which allows monitoring protein recovery and distribution under low photobleaching conditions. Our imaging platform is designed to easily switch between light sheet microscopy and optical projection tomography (OPT modalities. The setup permits monitoring of spatio-temporal expression and localization of ageing biomarkers of subcellular size and can be conveniently adapted to image a wide range of small model organisms and tissue samples.

  13. Non parametric, self organizing, scalable modeling of spatiotemporal inputs: the sign language paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridakis, G; Karpouzis, K; Drosopoulos, A; Kollias, S

    2012-12-01

    Modeling and recognizing spatiotemporal, as opposed to static input, is a challenging task since it incorporates input dynamics as part of the problem. The vast majority of existing methods tackle the problem as an extension of the static counterpart, using dynamics, such as input derivatives, at feature level and adopting artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques originally designed for solving problems that do not specifically address the temporal aspect. The proposed approach deals with temporal and spatial aspects of the spatiotemporal domain in a discriminative as well as coupling manner. Self Organizing Maps (SOM) model the spatial aspect of the problem and Markov models its temporal counterpart. Incorporation of adjacency, both in training and classification, enhances the overall architecture with robustness and adaptability. The proposed scheme is validated both theoretically, through an error propagation study, and experimentally, on the recognition of individual signs, performed by different, native Greek Sign Language users. Results illustrate the architecture's superiority when compared to Hidden Markov Model techniques and variations both in terms of classification performance and computational cost. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Highly Sensitive Flexible Pressure Sensors Based on Printed Organic Transistors with Centro-Apically Self-Organized Organic Semiconductor Microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, So Young; Park, Sangsik; Yi, Yeon Jin; Kim, Do Hwan; Lim, Jung Ah

    2017-12-13

    A highly sensitive pressure sensor based on printed organic transistors with three-dimensionally self-organized organic semiconductor microstructures (3D OSCs) was demonstrated. A unique organic transistor with semiconductor channels positioned at the highest summit of printed cylindrical microstructures was achieved simply by printing an organic semiconductor and polymer blend on the plastic substrate without the use of additional etching or replication processes. A combination of the printed organic semiconductor microstructure and an elastomeric top-gate dielectric resulted in a highly sensitive organic field-effect transistor (FET) pressure sensor with a high pressure sensitivity of 1.07 kPa -1 and a rapid response time of <20 ms with a high reliability over 1000 cycles. The flexibility and high performance of the 3D OSC FET pressure sensor were exploited in the successful application of our sensors to real-time monitoring of the radial artery pulse, which is useful for healthcare monitoring, and to touch sensing in the e-skin of a realistic prosthetic hand.

  15. Exploring the Spatiotemporal Organization of Membrane Proteins in Living Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Xue, Yiqun; Xing, Jingjing; Song, Kai; Lin, Jinxing

    2018-04-29

    Plasma membrane proteins have important roles in transport and signal transduction. Deciphering the spatiotemporal organization of these proteins provides crucial information for elucidating the links between the behaviors of different molecules. However, monitoring membrane proteins without disrupting their membrane environment remains difficult. Over the past decade, many studies have developed single-molecule techniques, opening avenues for probing the stoichiometry and interactions of membrane proteins in their native environment by providing nanometer-scale spatial information and nanosecond-scale temporal information. In this review, we assess recent progress in the development of labeling and imaging technology for membrane protein analysis. We focus in particular on several single-molecule techniques for quantifying the dynamics and assembly of membrane proteins. Finally, we provide examples of how these new techniques are advancing our understanding of the complex biological functions of membrane proteins.

  16. Spatio-temporal remodeling of functional membrane microdomains organizes the signaling networks of a bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Schneider

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains specialized in the regulation of numerous cellular processes related to membrane organization, as diverse as signal transduction, protein sorting, membrane trafficking or pathogen invasion. It has been proposed that this functional diversity would require a heterogeneous population of raft domains with varying compositions. However, a mechanism for such diversification is not known. We recently discovered that bacterial membranes organize their signal transduction pathways in functional membrane microdomains (FMMs that are structurally and functionally similar to the eukaryotic lipid rafts. In this report, we took advantage of the tractability of the prokaryotic model Bacillus subtilis to provide evidence for the coexistence of two distinct families of FMMs in bacterial membranes, displaying a distinctive distribution of proteins specialized in different biological processes. One family of microdomains harbors the scaffolding flotillin protein FloA that selectively tethers proteins specialized in regulating cell envelope turnover and primary metabolism. A second population of microdomains containing the two scaffolding flotillins, FloA and FloT, arises exclusively at later stages of cell growth and specializes in adaptation of cells to stationary phase. Importantly, the diversification of membrane microdomains does not occur arbitrarily. We discovered that bacterial cells control the spatio-temporal remodeling of microdomains by restricting the activation of FloT expression to stationary phase. This regulation ensures a sequential assembly of functionally specialized membrane microdomains to strategically organize signaling networks at the right time during the lifespan of a bacterium.

  17. The cerebellar Golgi cell and spatiotemporal organization of granular layer activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidio eD‘Angelo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar granular layer has been suggested to perform a complex spatiotemporal reconfiguration of incoming mossy fiber signals. Central to this role is the inhibitory action exerted by Golgi cells over granule cells: Golgi cells inhibit granule cells through double feedforward and feedback inhibitory loops and generate a broad lateral inhibition that extends beyond the afferent synaptic field. This characteristic connectivity has recently been investigated in great detail and been correlated with specific functional properties of the neuron. These include theta-frequency pacemaking, network entrainment into coherent oscillations and phase resetting. Important advances have also been made in terms of determining the membrane and synaptic properties of the neuron, and clarifying the mechanisms of activation by input bursts. Moreover, voltage sensitive dye imaging and multi-electrode array recordings, combined with mathematical simulations based on realistic computational models, have improved our understanding of the impact of Golgi cell activity on granular layer circuit computations. These investigations have highlighted the critical role of Golgi cells in: generating dense clusters of granule cell activity organized in center-surround structures, implementing combinatorial operations on multiple mossy fiber inputs, regulating transmission gain and cut-off frequency, controlling spike timing and burst transmission, and determining the sign, intensity and extension of long-term synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber-granule cell relay. This review considers recent advances in the field, highlighting the functional implications of Golgi cells for granular layer network computation and indicating new challenges for cerebellar research.

  18. Quantitative Determination of Organic Semiconductor Microstructure from the Molecular to Device Scale

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan

    2012-10-10

    A study was conducted to demonstrate quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale. The quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale was key to obtaining precise description of the molecular structure and microstructure of the materials of interest. This information combined with electrical characterization and modeling allowed for the establishment of general design rules to guide future rational design of materials and devices. Investigations revealed that a number and variety of defects were the largest contributors to the existence of disorder within a lattice, as organic semiconductor crystals were dominated by weak van der Waals bonding. Crystallite size, texture, and variations in structure due to spatial confinement and interfaces were also found to be relevant for transport of free charge carriers and bound excitonic species over distances that were important for device operation.

  19. Limiting Data Friction by Reducing Data Download Using Spatiotemporally Aligned Data Organization Through STARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, K. S.; Rilee, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Current data processing practice limits the volume and variety of relevant geoscience data that can practically be applied to important problems. File archives in centralized data centers are the principal means by which Earth Science data are accessed. This approach, however, requires laborious search, retrieval, and eventual customization/adaptation for the data to be used. Such fractionation makes it even more difficult to share outcomes, i.e. research artifacts and data products, hampering reusability and repeatability, since end users generally have their own research agenda and preferences as well as scarce resources. Thus, while finding and downloading data files from central data centers are already costly for end users working in their own field, using data products from other disciplines rapidly becomes prohibitive. This curtails scientific productivity, limits avenues of study, and endangers quality and reproducibility. The Spatio-Temporal Adaptive Resolution Encoding ( STARE ) is a unifying scheme that facilitates the indexing, access, and fusion of diverse Earth Science data. STARE implements an innovative encoding of geo-spatiotemporal information, originally developed for aligning datasets with diverse spatiotemporal characteristics in an array database. The spatial component of STARE recursively quadfurcates a root polyhedron, producing a hierarchical scheme for addressing geographic locations and regions. The temporal component of STARE uses conventional date-time units as an indexing hierarchy. The additional encoding of spatial and temporal resolution information in STARE enables comparisons and conditional selections across diverse datasets. Moreover, spatiotemporal set-operations, e.g. union and intersection, are mapped to efficient integer operations with STARE. Applied to existing data models (point, grid, spacecraft swath) and corresponding granules, STARE indexes provide a streamlined description usable as geo-spatiotemporal metadata. When

  20. Microstructural control over soluble pentacene deposited by capillary pen printing for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wi Hyoung; Min, Honggi; Park, Namwoo; Lee, Junghwi; Seo, Eunsuk; Kang, Boseok; Cho, Kilwon; Lee, Hwa Sung

    2013-08-28

    Research into printing techniques has received special attention for the commercialization of cost-efficient organic electronics. Here, we have developed a capillary pen printing technique to realize a large-area pattern array of organic transistors and systematically investigated self-organization behavior of printed soluble organic semiconductor ink. The capillary pen-printed deposits of organic semiconductor, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS_PEN), was well-optimized in terms of morphological and microstructural properties by using ink with mixed solvents of chlorobenzene (CB) and 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB). Especially, a 1:1 solvent ratio results in the best transistor performances. This result is attributed to the unique evaporation characteristics of the TIPS_PEN deposits where fast evaporation of CB induces a morphological evolution at the initial printed position, and the remaining DCB with slow evaporation rate offers a favorable crystal evolution at the pinned position. Finally, a large-area transistor array was facilely fabricated by drawing organic electrodes and active layers with a versatile capillary pen. Our approach provides an efficient printing technique for fabricating large-area arrays of organic electronics and further suggests a methodology to enhance their performances by microstructural control of the printed organic semiconducting deposits.

  1. Impact of Microstructure on the Photostability of Organic Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Heumueller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand the mechanisms of burn-in degradation in organic solar cells and show pathways to reduce burn-in and increase device lifetime. The initial blend morphology is found to play a critical role during degradation and the main focus of this thesis is on the impact of microstructure on device stability. In order to reveal how morphology influences light induced losses of the characteristic photovoltaic parameters short circuit current and open circuit voltage ...

  2. Spatiotemporal drivers of dissolved organic matter in high alpine lakes: Role of Saharan dust inputs and bacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenov, Natalie; Pulido-Villena, Elvira; Morales-Baquero, Rafael; Ortega-Retuerta, Eva; Sommaruga, Ruben; Reche, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    The effects of many environmental stressors such as UV radiation are mediated by dissolved organic matter (DOM) properties. Therefore, determining the factors shaping spatial and temporal patterns is particularly essential in the most susceptible, low dissolved organic carbon (DOC) lakes. We analyzed spatiotemporal variations in dissolved organic carbon concentration and dissolved organic matter optical properties (absorption and fluorescence) in 11 transparent lakes located above tree line in the Sierra Nevada Mountains (Spain), and we assessed potential external (evaporation and atmospheric deposition) and internal (bacterial abundance, bacterial production, chlorophyll a, and catchment vegetation) drivers of DOM patterns. At spatial and temporal scales, bacteria were related to chromophoric DOM (CDOM). At the temporal scale, water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in dust deposition and evaporation were found to have a significant influence on DOC and CDOM in two Sierra Nevada lakes studied during the ice-free periods of 2000-2002. DOC concentrations and absorption coefficients at 320 nm were strongly correlated over the spatial scale (n = 11, R(2) = 0.86; p DOC concentration and CDOM to these factors. At the continental scale, higher mean DOC concentrations and more CDOM in lakes of the Sierra Nevada than in lakes of the Pyrenees and Alps may be due to a combination of more extreme evaporation, and greater atmospheric dust deposition.

  3. Exploring the spatio-temporal interrelation between groundwater and surface water by using the self-organizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I.-Ting; Chang, Li-Chiu; Chang, Fi-John

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we propose a soft-computing methodology to visibly explore the spatio-temporal groundwater variations of the Kuoping River basin in southern Taiwan. The self-organizing map (SOM) is implemented to investigate the interactive mechanism between surface water and groundwater over the river basin based on large high-dimensional data sets coupled with their occurrence times. We find that extracting the occurrence time from each 30-day moving average data set in the clustered neurons of the SOM is a crucial step to learn the spatio-temporal interaction between surface water and groundwater. We design 2-D Topological Bubble Map to summarize all the groundwater values of four aquifers in a neuron, which can visibly explore the major features of the groundwater in the vertical direction. The constructed SOM topological maps nicely display that: (1) the groundwater movement, in general, extends from the eastern area to the western, where groundwater in the eastern area can be easily recharged from precipitation in wet seasons and discharged into streams during dry seasons due to the high permeability in this area; (2) the water movements in the four aquifers of the study area are quite different, and the seasonal variations of groundwater in the second and third aquifers are larger than those of the others; and (3) the spatial distribution and seasonal variations of groundwater and surface water are comprehensively linked together over the constructed maps to present groundwater characteristics and the interrelation between groundwater and surface water. The proposed modeling methodology not only can classify the large complex high-dimensional data sets into visible topological maps to effectively facilitate the quantitative status of regional groundwater resources but can also provide useful elaboration for future groundwater management.

  4. Spatiotemporal organization of alpha-motoneuron activity in the human spinal cord during different gaits and gait transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenko, Y P; Cappellini, G; Poppele, R E; Lacquaniti, F

    2008-06-01

    Here we studied the spatiotemporal organization of motoneuron (MN) activity during different human gaits. We recorded the electromyographic (EMG) activity patterns in 32 ipsilateral limb and trunk muscles from normal subjects while running and walking on a treadmill (3-12 km/h). In addition, we recorded backward walking and skipping, a distinct human gait that comprises the features of both walking and running. We mapped the recorded EMG activity patterns onto the spinal cord in approximate rostrocaudal locations of the MN pools. The activation of MNs tends to occur in bursts and be segregated by spinal segment in a gait-specific manner. In particular, sacral and cervical activation timings were clearly gait-dependent. Swing-related activity constituted an appreciable fraction (> 30%) of the total MN activity of leg muscles. Locomoting at non-preferred speeds (running and walking at 5 and 9 km/h, respectively) showed clear differences relative to preferred speeds. Running at low speeds was characterized by wider sacral activation. Walking at high non-preferred speeds was accompanied by an 'atypical' locus of activation in the upper lumbar spinal cord during late stance and by a drastically increased activation of lumbosacral segments. The latter findings suggest that the optimal speed of gait transitions may be related to an optimal intensity of the total MN activity, in addition to other factors previously described. The results overall support the idea of flexibility and adaptability of spatiotemporal activity in the spinal circuitry with constraints on the temporal functional connectivity of hypothetical pulsatile burst generators.

  5. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costes, Sylvain V; Chiolo, Irene; Pluth, Janice M.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Jakob, Burkhard

    2009-09-15

    DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DSB within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatio-temporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and nuclear densities. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histone H2AX). Early post-IR, we propose that RIF mark chromatin reorganization, leading to a local nuclear scaffold rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. At later time post-IR, we propose that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear ?scars? marking permanent disruption of the chromatin architecture. When DNA damage is resolved, such chromatin modifications should not necessarily lead to growth arrest and it has been shown that persistent RIF can replicate during mitosis. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may affect the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. This opens the door for a non DNA mutation-based mechanism of radiation-induced phenotypes.

  6. Subwavelength Microstructures Fabrication by Self-Organization Processes in Photopolymerizable Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yu. Denisyuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes our research results on nanometers sizes subwavelength nanostructure fabrication by UV curing of special nanocomposite material with self-organization and light self-focusing effects. For this purpose, special UV curable nanocomposite material with a set of effects was developing: light self-focusing in the photopolymer with positive refractive index change, self-organization based on photo-induced nanoparticles transportation, and oxygen-based polymerization threshold. Both holographic and projection lithography writing methods application for microstructure making shows geometrical optical laws perturbation as result of nanocomposite self-organization effects with formation of nanometers-sized high-aspect-ratio structures. Obtained results will be useful for diffraction limit overcoming in projection lithography as well as for deep lithography technique.

  7. Spatiotemporal dynamics of phosphorus release, oxygen consumption and greenhouse gas emissions after localised soil amendment with organic fertilisers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christel, Wibke [Department for Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Department of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture, Danish Environmental Protection Agency, 1401 Copenhagen C (Denmark); Zhu, Kun [Department for Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Hoefer, Christoph [Rhizosphere Ecology and Biogeochemistry Group, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Kreuzeder, Andreas [Rhizosphere Ecology and Biogeochemistry Group, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Land Salzburg, Natur- und Umweltschutz, Gewerbe (Abteilung 5), Michael-Pacher-Straße 36, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Santner, Jakob [Rhizosphere Ecology and Biogeochemistry Group, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Division of Agronomy, Department of Crop Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Bruun, Sander; Magid, Jakob [Department for Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Jensen, Lars Stoumann, E-mail: lsj@plen.ku.dk [Department for Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark)

    2016-06-01

    Organic fertilisation inevitably leads to heterogeneous distribution of organic matter and nutrients in soil, i.e. due to uneven surface spreading or inhomogeneous incorporation. The resulting localised hotspots of nutrient application will induce various biotic and abiotic nutrient turnover processes and fixation in the residuesphere, giving rise to distinct differences in nutrient availability, soil oxygen content and greenhouse gas (GHG) production. In this study we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of the reaction of manure solids and manure solids char with soil, focusing on their phosphorus (P) availability, as current emphasis on improving societal P efficiency through recycling waste or bio-based fertilisers necessitates a sound understanding of their behaviour. Soil layers amended at a constant P application rate with either pig manure solids or char made from pig manure solids were incubated for three weeks between layers of non-amended, P-depleted soil. Spatial and temporal changes in and around the amendment layers were simultaneously investigated in this study using a sandwich sensor consisting of a planar oxygen optode and multi-element diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) gels, combined with GHG emission measurements. After three weeks of incubation, the soil containing a layer amended with manure solids had a lower overall O{sub 2} content and had emitted significantly more CO{sub 2} than the non-amended control or the char-amended soil. The P availability from manure solids was initially higher than that from the char, but decreased over time, whereas from the char-amended layer P availability increased in the same period. In both treatments, increases in P availability were confined to the amended soil layer and did not greatly affect P availability in the directly adjacent soil layers during the three-week incubation. These results highlight the importance of placing organic P fertilisers close to where the plant roots will grow in

  8. Spatiotemporal dynamics of phosphorus release, oxygen consumption and greenhouse gas emissions after localised soil amendment with organic fertilisers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christel, Wibke; Zhu, Kun; Hoefer, Christoph; Kreuzeder, Andreas; Santner, Jakob; Bruun, Sander; Magid, Jakob; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2016-01-01

    Organic fertilisation inevitably leads to heterogeneous distribution of organic matter and nutrients in soil, i.e. due to uneven surface spreading or inhomogeneous incorporation. The resulting localised hotspots of nutrient application will induce various biotic and abiotic nutrient turnover processes and fixation in the residuesphere, giving rise to distinct differences in nutrient availability, soil oxygen content and greenhouse gas (GHG) production. In this study we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of the reaction of manure solids and manure solids char with soil, focusing on their phosphorus (P) availability, as current emphasis on improving societal P efficiency through recycling waste or bio-based fertilisers necessitates a sound understanding of their behaviour. Soil layers amended at a constant P application rate with either pig manure solids or char made from pig manure solids were incubated for three weeks between layers of non-amended, P-depleted soil. Spatial and temporal changes in and around the amendment layers were simultaneously investigated in this study using a sandwich sensor consisting of a planar oxygen optode and multi-element diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) gels, combined with GHG emission measurements. After three weeks of incubation, the soil containing a layer amended with manure solids had a lower overall O_2 content and had emitted significantly more CO_2 than the non-amended control or the char-amended soil. The P availability from manure solids was initially higher than that from the char, but decreased over time, whereas from the char-amended layer P availability increased in the same period. In both treatments, increases in P availability were confined to the amended soil layer and did not greatly affect P availability in the directly adjacent soil layers during the three-week incubation. These results highlight the importance of placing organic P fertilisers close to where the plant roots will grow in order to

  9. Spatio-temporal variability of inorganic and organic nutrients in five Galician rias (NW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Doval

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variability of inorganic (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, phosphate and silicate and organic (dissolved organic carbon nutrients in five Galician rias (Vigo, Pontevedra, Arousa, Muros and Ares-Betanzos was assessed by considering average values for the upwelling and downwelling periods. Inner stations were significantly different from middle and outer stations, especially during the downwelling period. Spatial differences between the five rías, tested by means of a multivariate analysis, were found in both periods. The behaviour of inorganic and organic nutrient variables was also significantly different between periods with and without shellfish harvesting closures due to the occurrence of toxic phytoplankton species.

  10. Spatio-temporal Remodeling of Functional Membrane Microdomains Organizes the Signaling Networks of a Bacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, Johannes; Klein, Teresa; Mielich-Süss, Benjamin; Koch, Gudrun; Franke, Christian; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kovács, Ákos T; Sauer, Markus; Lopez, Daniel

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains specialized in the regulation of numerous cellular processes related to membrane organization, as diverse as signal transduction, protein sorting, membrane trafficking or pathogen invasion. It has been proposed that this functional diversity would require a

  11. Spatiotemporal Organization of Energy Release Events in the Quiet Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvenic interactions.

  12. Water Soluble Organic Nitrogen (WSON) in Ambient Fine Particles Over a Megacity in South China: Spatiotemporal Variations and Source Apportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xu; Yu, Qingqing; Zhu, Ming; Tang, Mingjin; Li, Sheng; Yang, Weiqiang; Zhang, Yanli; Deng, Wei; Li, Guanghui; Yu, Yuegang; Huang, Zhonghui; Song, Wei; Ding, Xiang; Hu, Qihou; Li, Jun; Bi, Xinhui; Wang, Xinming

    2017-12-01

    Organic nitrogen aerosols are complex mixtures and important compositions in ambient fine particulate matters (PM2.5), yet their sources and spatiotemporal patterns are not well understood particularly in regions influenced by intensive human activities. In this study, filter-based ambient PM2.5 samples at four stations (one urban, two rural, plus one urban roadside) and PM samples from combustion sources (vehicle exhaust, ship emission, and biomass burning) were collected in the coastal megacity Guangzhou, south China, for determining water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) along with other organic and inorganic species. The annual average WSON concentrations, as well as the ratios of WSON to water soluble total nitrogen, were all significantly higher at rural sites than urban sites. Average WSON concentrations at the four sites during the wet season were quite near each other, ranging from 0.41 to 0.49 μg/m3; however, they became 2 times higher at the rural sites than at the urban sites during the dry season. Five major sources for WSON were identified through positive matrix factorization analysis. Vehicle emission (29.3%), biomass burning (22.8%), and secondary formation (20.2%) were three dominant sources of WSON at the urban station, while vehicle emission (45.4%) and dust (28.6%) were two dominant sources at the urban roadside station. At the two rural sites biomass burning (51.1% and 34.1%, respectively) and secondary formation (17.8% and 30.5%, respectively) were dominant sources of WSON. Ship emission contributed 8-12% of WSON at the four sites. Natural vegetation seemed to have very minor contribution to WSON.

  13. The spatio-temporal organization of DNA-repair: a live cell study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Hoogstraten (Deborah)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the work outlined in this thesis is to gain more insight into the organization, dynamic properties and differential reaction kinetics of NER factors within living mammalian cell nuclei. To accomplish this, we made use of the green fluorescent protein technology to study TFIIH

  14. Self-Organization of Spatio-Temporal Hierarchy via Learning of Dynamic Visual Image Patterns on Action Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minju; Hwang, Jungsik; Tani, Jun

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the visual cortex efficiently processes high-dimensional spatial information by using a hierarchical structure. Recently, computational models that were inspired by the spatial hierarchy of the visual cortex have shown remarkable performance in image recognition. Up to now, however, most biological and computational modeling studies have mainly focused on the spatial domain and do not discuss temporal domain processing of the visual cortex. Several studies on the visual cortex and other brain areas associated with motor control support that the brain also uses its hierarchical structure as a processing mechanism for temporal information. Based on the success of previous computational models using spatial hierarchy and temporal hierarchy observed in the brain, the current report introduces a novel neural network model for the recognition of dynamic visual image patterns based solely on the learning of exemplars. This model is characterized by the application of both spatial and temporal constraints on local neural activities, resulting in the self-organization of a spatio-temporal hierarchy necessary for the recognition of complex dynamic visual image patterns. The evaluation with the Weizmann dataset in recognition of a set of prototypical human movement patterns showed that the proposed model is significantly robust in recognizing dynamically occluded visual patterns compared to other baseline models. Furthermore, an evaluation test for the recognition of concatenated sequences of those prototypical movement patterns indicated that the model is endowed with a remarkable capability for the contextual recognition of long-range dynamic visual image patterns.

  15. An integrated overview of spatiotemporal organization and regulation in mitosis in terms of the proteins in the functional supercomplexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyuan eZheng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells may divide via the critical cellular process of cell division/mitosis, resulting in two daughter cells with the same genetic information. A large number of dedicated proteins are involved in this process and spatiotemporally assembled into three distinct super-complex structures/organelles, including the centrosome/spindle pole body, kinetochore/centromere and cleavage furrow/midbody/bud neck, so as to precisely modulate the cell division/mitosis events of chromosome alignment, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis in an orderly fashion. In recent years, many efforts have been made to identify the protein components and architecture of these subcellular organelles, aiming to uncover the organelle assembly pathways, determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the organelle functions, and thereby provide new therapeutic strategies for a variety of diseases. However, the organelles are highly dynamic structures, making it difficult to identify the entire components. Here, we review the current knowledge of the identified protein components governing the organization and functioning of organelles, especially in human and yeast cells, and discuss the multi-localized protein components mediating the communication between organelles during cell division.

  16. Spatio-temporal re-organization of replication foci accompanies replication domain consolidation during human pluripotent stem cell lineage specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Korey A.; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Stanley, Edouard G.; Gilbert, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lineage specification of both mouse and human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is accompanied by spatial consolidation of chromosome domains and temporal consolidation of their replication timing. Replication timing and chromatin organization are both established during G1 phase at the timing decision point (TDP). Here, we have developed live cell imaging tools to track spatio-temporal replication domain consolidation during differentiation. First, we demonstrate that the fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (Fucci) system is incapable of demarcating G1/S or G2/M cell cycle transitions. Instead, we employ a combination of fluorescent PCNA to monitor S phase progression, cytokinesis to demarcate mitosis, and fluorescent nucleotides to label early and late replication foci and track their 3D organization into sub-nuclear chromatin compartments throughout all cell cycle transitions. We find that, as human PSCs differentiate, the length of S phase devoted to replication of spatially clustered replication foci increases, coincident with global compartmentalization of domains into temporally clustered blocks of chromatin. Importantly, re-localization and anchorage of domains was completed prior to the onset of S phase, even in the context of an abbreviated PSC G1 phase. This approach can also be employed to investigate cell fate transitions in single PSCs, which could be seen to differentiate preferentially from G1 phase. Together, our results establish real-time, live-cell imaging methods for tracking cell cycle transitions during human PSC differentiation that can be applied to study chromosome domain consolidation and other aspects of lineage specification. PMID:27433885

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of the vestibular end organs. [morphological indexes of inner ear anatomy and microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, H. H.; Ades, H. W.; West, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vestibular end organs, after chemical fixation, were freeze dried, coated with gold and palladium, and studied in the scanning microscope. Scanning microscopy gives a good three dimensional view of the sensory areas and allows study of both gross anatomy and microstructures. Cross anatomical features of the structure of the ampullae are demonstrated. The form of the statoconia in different species of animals is shown. New aspects of the structure of the sensory hairs are revealed. The hair bundles in the central areas of the cristae and in the striola of the maculae differ structurally from the hair bundles at the periphery of the sensory regions. Furthermore, some hair bundles consisting of very short stereocilia were observed. The relationship between the cupula and the statoconial membrane to the epithelial surface is discussed.

  18. Effect of Organic Material on Mechanical, Hydrological, and Microstructural Properties of Mudstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, M. A.; Reece, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    In this research we analyze the influence of organic material on the mechanical and flow properties of mudstones. We uniformly mix peat, milled and harvested by Bord na Móna from the surface of bogs in Ireland, with natural mudstone from Site C0011 in the Nankai Trough, offshore Japan, obtained during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 322. The mudstone had previously been disaggregated into a homogeneous dry powder of clay- and silt-sized particles. The peat is ground and dry-sieved to achieve a similar particle size distribution as the mudstone (mechanical and hydrological processes affected by peat, we prepare dry peat-mudstone mixtures with three different peat concentrations: 0 wt%, 5 wt%, and 10 wt%. Then, these peat - mudstone mixtures are saturated with deionized water at a water content of 109%, formed into stable slurries, and uniaxially compressed to an axial stress of 100 kPa using resedimentation, a method that simulates the natural behavior of deposition and burial in the laboratory under controlled conditions. How the organic material interacts with the mudstone matrix and pore fluid under compression influences the physical properties of the mudstones such as porosity, compressibility, and permeability; all of which are measured in the resedimentation experiments. We will also analyze the microstructural changes as a function of peat concentration using a petrographic microscope and scanning electron microscope. Due to the fibrous and absorbent nature of peat, we anticipate the peat to force tightly packed clay particles in the mudstone apart resulting in a looser microstructure and increased porosity, and thus, a higher compressibility and permeability. Understanding the controls on the mechanical and flow properties of hydrocarbon-bearing, fine-grained formations is crucial for exploration and successful production from hydrocarbon reservoirs. Additionally, this study has large implications for soil water storage and soil amendment to

  19. Spatio-temporal variation of biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L Y; Chen, Y; Xie, S D

    2013-11-01

    Aiming to reduce the large uncertainties of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emissions estimation, the emission inventory of BVOCs in China at a high spatial and temporal resolution of 36 km × 36 km and 1 h was established using MEGANv2.1 with MM5 providing high-resolution meteorological data, based on the most detailed and latest vegetation investigations. BVOC emissions from 82 plant functional types in China were computed firstly. More local species-specific emission rates were developed combining statistical analysis and category classification, and the leaf biomass was estimated based on vegetation volume and production with biomass-apportion models. The total annual BVOC emissions in 2003 were 42.5 Tg, including isoprene 23.4 Tg, monoterpene 5.6 Tg, sesquiterpene 1.0 Tg, and other VOCs (OVOCs) 12.5 Tg. Subtropical and tropical evergreen and deciduous broadleaf shrubs, Quercus, and bamboo contributed more than 45% to the total BVOC emissions. The highest biogenic emissions were found over northeastern, southeastern, and southwestern China. Strong seasonal pattern was observed with the highest BVOC emissions in July and the lowest in January and December, with daily emission peaked at approximately 13:00 or 14:00 local time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Species Richness, Community Organization, and Spatiotemporal Distribution of Earthworms in the Pineapple Agroecosystems of Tripura, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Dey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact that plant communities may have on underground faunal diversity is unclear. Therefore, understanding the links between plants and organisms is of major interest. Earthworm population dynamics were studied in the pineapple agroecosystems of Tripura to evaluate the impact of monoculture plantation on earthworm communities. A total of thirteen earthworm species belonging to four families and five genera were collected from different sampling sites. Application of sample-based rarefaction curve and nonparametric richness estimators reveal 90–95% completeness of sampling. Earthworm community of pineapple agroecosystems was dominated by endogeic earthworms and Drawida assamensis was the dominant species with respect to its density, biomass, and relative abundance. Vertical distribution of earthworms was greatly influenced by seasonal variations. Population density and biomass of earthworms peaked during monsoon and postmonsoon period, respectively. Overall density and biomass of earthworms were in increasing trend with an increase in plantation age and were highest in the 30–35-year-old plantation. Significant decrease in the Shannon diversity and evenness index and increase in Simpson’s dominance and spatial aggregation index with an increase in the age of pineapple plantation were recorded. Soil temperature and soil moisture were identified as the most potent regulators of earthworm distribution in the pineapple plantation.

  1. Spatio-temporal variation of biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L.Y.; Chen, Y.; Xie, S.D.

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to reduce the large uncertainties of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emissions estimation, the emission inventory of BVOCs in China at a high spatial and temporal resolution of 36 km × 36 km and 1 h was established using MEGANv2.1 with MM5 providing high-resolution meteorological data, based on the most detailed and latest vegetation investigations. BVOC emissions from 82 plant functional types in China were computed firstly. More local species-specific emission rates were developed combining statistical analysis and category classification, and the leaf biomass was estimated based on vegetation volume and production with biomass-apportion models. The total annual BVOC emissions in 2003 were 42.5 Tg, including isoprene 23.4 Tg, monoterpene 5.6 Tg, sesquiterpene 1.0 Tg, and other VOCs (OVOCs) 12.5 Tg. Subtropical and tropical evergreen and deciduous broadleaf shrubs, Quercus, and bamboo contributed more than 45% to the total BVOC emissions. The highest biogenic emissions were found over northeastern, southeastern, and southwestern China. Strong seasonal pattern was observed with the highest BVOC emissions in July and the lowest in January and December, with daily emission peaked at approximately 13:00 or 14:00 local time. -- Highlights: •An emission inventory of BVOCs in China at a high spatial and temporal resolution of 36 km and 1 h is established. •High-resolution meteorological data simulated by MM5 is used. •We update the land cover data used in MEGAN based on the most detailed and latest vegetation investigations. •A new vegetation classification with 82 plant functional types is developed in MEGAN. •The leaf biomass is estimated based on vegetation volume and production with biomass-apportion models. -- An emission inventory of BVOCs in China was established based on the most detailed and latest vegetation investigations, and high-resolution meteorological data

  2. Characterizing spatiotemporal variations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in headwater catchment of a key drinking water source in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yihan; Yu, Kaifeng; Zhou, Yongqiang; Ren, Longfei; Kirumba, George; Zhang, Bo; He, Yiliang

    2017-12-01

    Natural surface drinking water sources with the increasing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) have profound influences on the aquatic environment and drinking water safety. Here, this study investigated the spatiotemporal variations of CDOM in Fengshuba Reservoir and its catchments in China. Twenty-four surface water samples, 45 water samples (including surface water, middle water, and bottom water), and 15 pore water samples were collected from rivers, reservoir, and sediment of the reservoir, respectively. Then, three fluorescent components, namely two humic-like components (C1 and C2) and a tryptophan-like component (C3), were identified from the excitation-emission matrix coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) for all samples. For spatial distributions, the levels of CDOM and two humic-like components in the reservoir were significantly lower than those in the upstream rivers (p CDOM and humic-like matters from the surrounding catchment. For temporal variations, the mean levels of CDOM and three fluorescent components did not significantly change in rivers, suggesting that perennial anthropic activity maybe an important factor impacting the concentration and composition of river CDOM but not the precipitation and runoff. However, these mean values of CDOM for the bulk waters of the reservoir changed markedly along with seasonal variations, indicating that the hydrological processes in the reservoir could control the quality and quantity of CDOM. The different correlations between the fluorescent components and primary water parameters in the river, reservoir, and pore water samples further suggest that the reservoir is an important factor regulating the migration and transformation of FDOM along with the variations of different environmental gradients.

  3. Microstructure of transcallosal motor fibers reflects type of cortical (re-)organization in congenital hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juenger, Hendrik; Koerte, Inga K; Muehlmann, Marc; Mayinger, Michael; Mall, Volker; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Shenton, Martha E; Berweck, Steffen; Staudt, Martin; Heinen, Florian

    2014-11-01

    Early unilateral brain lesions can lead to different types of corticospinal (re-)organization of motor networks. In one group of patients, the contralesional hemisphere exerts motor control not only over the contralateral non-paretic hand but also over the (ipsilateral) paretic hand, as the primary motor cortex is (re-)organized in the contralesional hemisphere. Another group of patients with early unilateral lesions shows "normal" contralateral motor projections starting in the lesioned hemisphere. We investigated how these different patterns of cortical (re-)organization affect interhemispheric transcallosal connectivity in patients with congenital hemiparesis. Eight patients with ipsilateral motor projections (group IPSI) versus 7 patients with contralateral motor projections (group CONTRA) underwent magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The corpus callosum (CC) was subdivided in 5 areas (I-V) in the mid-sagittal slice and volumetric information. The following diffusion parameters were calculated: fractional anisotropy (FA), trace, radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD). DTI revealed significantly lower FA, increased trace and RD for group IPSI compared to group CONTRA in area III of the corpus callosum, where transcallosal motor fibers cross the CC. In the directly neighboring area IV, where transcallosal somatosensory fibers cross the CC, no differences were found for these DTI parameters between IPSI and CONTRA. Volume of callosal subsections showed significant differences for area II (connecting premotor cortices) and III, where group IPSI had lower volume. The results of this study demonstrate that the callosal microstructure in patients with congenital hemiparesis reflects the type of cortical (re-)organization. Early lesions disrupting corticospinal motor projections to the paretic hand consecutively affect the development or maintenance of transcallosal motor fibers. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society

  4. Microstructural Engineering and Architectural Design of Metal-Organic Framework Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Ban, Yujie; Yang, Weishen

    2017-08-01

    In the past decade, a huge development in rational design, synthesis, and application of molecular sieve membranes, which typically included zeolites, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), and graphene oxides, has been witnessed. Owing to high flexibility in both pore apertures and functionality, MOFs in the form of membranes have offered unprecedented opportunities for energy-efficient gas separations. Reports on the fabrication of well-intergrown MOF membranes first appeared in 2009. Since then there has been tremendous growth in this area along with an exponential increase of MOF-membrane-related publications. In order to compete with other separation and purification technologies, like cryogenic distillation, pressure swing adsorption, and chemical absorption, separation performance (including permeability, selectivity, and long-term stability) of molecular sieve membranes must be further improved in an attempt to reach an economically attractive region. Therefore, microstructural engineering and architectural design of MOF membranes at mesoscopic and microscopic levels become indispensable. This review summarizes some intriguing research that may potentially contribute to large-scale applications of MOF membranes in the future. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Effects of fatigue on microstructure and mechanical properties of bone organic matrix under compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trębacz, Hanna; Zdunek, Artur; Cybulska, Justyna; Pieczywek, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether a fatigue induced weakening of cortical bone was revealed in microstructure and mechanical competence of demineralized bone matrix. Two types of cortical bone samples (plexiform and Haversian) were use. Bone slabs from the midshaft of bovine femora were subjected to cyclical bending. Fatigued and adjacent control samples were cut into cubes and demineralized in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Demineralized samples were either subjected to microscopic quantitative image analysis, or compressed to failure (in longitudinal or transverse direction) with a simultaneous analysis of acoustic emission (AE). In fatigued samples porosity of organic matrix and average area of pores have risen, along with a change in the pores shape. The effect of fatigue depended on the type of the bone, being more pronounced in the plexiform than in Haversian tissue. Demineralized bone matrix was anisotropic under compressive loads in both types of cortical structure. The main result of fatigue pretreatment on mechanical parameters was a significant decrease of ultimate strain in the transverse direction in plexiform samples. The decrease of strain in this group was accompanied by a considerable increase of the fraction of large pores and a significant change in AE energy.

  6. Differentiating the Spatiotemporal Distribution of Natural and Anthropogenic Processes on River Water-Quality Variation Using a Self-Organizing Map With Factor Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeuh-Bin; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Lee, Jin-Jing

    2015-08-01

    To elucidate the historical improvement and advanced measure of river water quality in the Taipei metropolitan area, this study applied the self-organizing map (SOM) technique with factor analysis (FA) to differentiate the spatiotemporal distribution of natural and anthropogenic processes on river water-quality variation spanning two decades. The SOM clustered river water quality into five groups: very low pollution, low pollution, moderate pollution, high pollution, and very high pollution. FA was then used to extract four latent factors that dominated water quality from 1991 to 2011 including three anthropogenic process factors (organic, industrial, and copper pollution) and one natural process factor [suspended solids (SS) pollution]. The SOM revealed that the water quality improved substantially over time. However, the downstream river water quality was still classified as high pollution because of an increase in anthropogenic activity. FA showed the spatiotemporal pattern of each factor score decreasing over time, but the organic pollution factor downstream of the Tamsui River, as well as the SS factor scores in the upstream major tributary (the Dahan Stream), remained within the high pollution level. Therefore, we suggest that public sewage-treatment plants should be upgraded from their current secondary biological processing to advanced treatment processing. The conservation of water and soil must also be reinforced to decrease the SS loading of the Dahan Stream from natural erosion processes in the future.

  7. Spatiotemporal models of global soil organic carbon stock to support land degradation assessments at regional and global scales: limitations, challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengl, Tomislav; Heuvelink, Gerard; Sanderman, Jonathan; MacMillan, Robert

    2017-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in fitting and applying spatiotemporal models that can be used to assess and monitor soil organic carbon stocks (SOCS), for example, in support of the '4 pourmille' initiative aiming at soil carbon sequestration towards climate change adaptation and mitigation and UN's Land Degradation Neutrality indicators and similar degradation assessment projects at regional and global scales. The land cover mapping community has already produced several spatiotemporal data sets with global coverage and at relatively fine resolution e.g. USGS MODIS land cover annual maps for period 2000-2014; European Space Agency land cover maps at 300 m resolution for the year 2000, 2005 and 2010; Chinese GlobeLand30 dataset available for years 2000 and 2010; Columbia University's WRI GlobalForestWatch with deforestation maps at 30 m resolution for the period 2000-2016 (Hansen et al. 2013). These data sets can be used for land degradation assessment and scenario testing at global and regional scales (Wei et al 2014). Currently, however, no compatible global spatiotemporal data sets exist on status of soil quality and/or soil health (Powlson et al. 2013). This paper describes an initial effort to devise and evaluate a procedure for mapping spatio-temporal changes in SOC stocks using a complete stack of soil forming factors (climate, relief, land cover, land use, lithology and living organisms) represented mainly through remote sensing based time series of Earth images. For model building we used some 75,000 geo-referenced soil profiles and a stacks space-time covariates (land cover, land use, biomass, climate) at two standard resolutions: (1) 10 km resolution with data available for period 1920-2014 and (2) 1000 m resolution with data available for period 2000-2014. The initial results show that, although it is technically feasible to produce space time estimates of SOCS that demonstrate the procedure, the estimates are relatively uncertain (<45% of variation

  8. Spatiotemporal dynamics of phosphorus release, oxygen consumption and greenhouse gas emissions after localised soil amendment with organic fertilisers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christel, Wibke; Zhu, Kun; Hoefer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    processes and fixation in the residue sphere, giving rise to distinct differences in nutrient availability, soil oxygen content and greenhouse gas (GHG) production. In this study we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of the reaction of manure solids and manure solids char with soil, focusing...... on their phosphorus (P) availability, as current emphasis on improving societal P efficiency through recycling waste or bio-based fertilisers necessitates a sound understanding of their behaviour. Soil layers amended at a constant P application rate with either pig manure solids or char made from pig manure solids...

  9. Quantifying Patterns of Smooth Muscle Motility in the Gut and Other Organs With New Techniques of Video Spatiotemporal Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger G. Lentle

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The uses and limitations of the various techniques of video spatiotemporal mapping based on change in diameter (D-type ST maps, change in longitudinal strain rate (L-type ST maps, change in area strain rate (A-type ST maps, and change in luminous intensity of reflected light (I-maps are described, along with their use in quantifying motility of the wall of hollow structures of smooth muscle such as the gut. Hence ST-methods for determining the size, speed of propagation and frequency of contraction in the wall of gut compartments of differing geometric configurations are discussed. We also discuss the shortcomings and problems that are inherent in the various methods and the use of techniques to avoid or minimize them. This discussion includes, the inability of D-type ST maps to indicate the site of a contraction that does not reduce the diameter of a gut segment, the manipulation of axis [the line of interest (LOI] of L-maps to determine the true axis of propagation of a contraction, problems with anterior curvature of gut segments and the use of adjunct image analysis techniques that enhance particular features of the maps.

  10. Quantifying Patterns of Smooth Muscle Motility in the Gut and Other Organs With New Techniques of Video Spatiotemporal Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentle, Roger G.; Hulls, Corrin M.

    2018-01-01

    The uses and limitations of the various techniques of video spatiotemporal mapping based on change in diameter (D-type ST maps), change in longitudinal strain rate (L-type ST maps), change in area strain rate (A-type ST maps), and change in luminous intensity of reflected light (I-maps) are described, along with their use in quantifying motility of the wall of hollow structures of smooth muscle such as the gut. Hence ST-methods for determining the size, speed of propagation and frequency of contraction in the wall of gut compartments of differing geometric configurations are discussed. We also discuss the shortcomings and problems that are inherent in the various methods and the use of techniques to avoid or minimize them. This discussion includes, the inability of D-type ST maps to indicate the site of a contraction that does not reduce the diameter of a gut segment, the manipulation of axis [the line of interest (LOI)] of L-maps to determine the true axis of propagation of a contraction, problems with anterior curvature of gut segments and the use of adjunct image analysis techniques that enhance particular features of the maps. PMID:29686624

  11. Assembly of live micro-organisms on microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for AFM bio-experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dague, E; Jauvert, E; Laplatine, L; Thibault, C; Viallet, B; Ressier, L

    2011-01-01

    Immobilization of live micro-organisms on solid substrates is an important prerequisite for atomic force microscopy (AFM) bio-experiments. The method employed must immobilize the cells firmly enough to enable them to withstand the lateral friction forces exerted by the tip during scanning but without denaturing the cell interface. In this work, a generic method for the assembly of living cells on specific areas of substrates is proposed. It consists in assembling the living cells within the patterns of microstructured, functionalized poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps using convective/capillary deposition. This versatile approach is validated by applying it to two systems of foremost importance in biotechnology and medicine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and Aspergillus fumigatus fungal spores. We show that this method allows multiplexing AFM nanomechanical measurements by force spectroscopy on S. cerevisiae yeasts and high-resolution AFM imaging of germinated Aspergillus conidia in buffer medium. These two examples clearly demonstrate the immense potential of micro-organism assembly on functionalized, microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for performing rigorous AFM bio-experiments on living cells.

  12. The influence of microstructure on charge separation dynamics in organic bulk heterojunction materials for solar cell applications

    KAUST Repository

    Scarongella, Mariateresa; Paraecattil, Arun Aby; Buchaca-Domingo, Ester; Douglas, Jessica D.; Beaupré , Serge; McCarthy-Ward, Thomas; Heeney, Martin J.; Moser, Jacques Edouard; Leclerc, Mario; Frechet, Jean; Stingelin, Natalie; Banerji, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Light-induced charge formation is essential for the generation of photocurrent in organic solar cells. In order to gain a better understanding of this complex process, we have investigated the femtosecond dynamics of charge separation upon selective excitation of either the fullerene or the polymer in different bulk heterojunction blends with well-characterized microstructure. Blends of the pBTTT and PBDTTPD polymers with PCBM gave us access to three different scenarios: either a single intermixed phase, an intermixed phase with additional pure PCBM clusters, or a three-phase microstructure of pure polymer aggregates, pure fullerene clusters and intermixed regions. We found that ultrafast charge separation (by electron or hole transfer) occurs predominantly in intermixed regions, while charges are generated more slowly from excitons in pure domains that require diffusion to a charge generation site. The pure domains are helpful to prevent geminate charge recombination, but they must be sufficiently small not to become exciton traps. By varying the polymer packing, backbone planarity and chain length, we have shown that exciton diffusion out of small polymer aggregates in the highly efficient PBDTTPD:PCBM blend occurs within the same chain and is helped by delocalization. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  13. Spatio-temporal variations in the composition of organic matter in surface sediments of a mangrove receiving shrimp farm effluents (New Caledonia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschenbroich, Adélaïde; Marchand, Cyril; Molnar, Nathalie; Deborde, Jonathan; Hubas, Cédric; Rybarczyk, Hervé; Meziane, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate spatio-temporal variations in the composition and origin of the benthic organic matter (OM) at the sediment surface in mangrove receiving shrimp farm effluents, fatty acid (FA) biomarkers, natural stable isotopes (δ 13 C and δ 15 N), C:N ratios and chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentrations were determined during the active and the non-active period of the farm. Fatty acid compositions in surface sediments within the mangrove forest indicated that organic matter inputs varied along the year as a result of farm activity. Effluents were the source of fresh particulate organic matter for the mangrove, as evidenced by the unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) distribution. The anthropogenic MUFA 18:1ω9 was not only accumulated at the sediment surface in some parts of the mangrove, but was also exported to the seafront. Direct release of bacteria and enhanced in situ production of fungi, as revealed by specific FAs, stimulated mangrove litter decomposition under effluent runoff condition. Also, microalgae released from ponds contributed to maintain high benthic chl-a concentrations in mangrove sediments in winter and to a shift in microphytobenthic community assemblage. Primary production was high whether the farm released effluent or not which questioned the temporary effect of shrimp farm effluent on benthic microalgae dynamic. This study outlined that mangrove benthic organic matter was qualitatively and quantitatively affected by shrimp farm effluent release and that responses to environmental condition changes likely depended on mangrove stand characteristics. - Highlights: • Fatty acid 18:1ω9 is a relevant marker to monitor effluent pathway in the mangrove. • OM nature and distribution at sediment surface varied in relation to farm activity. • Enhancement of litter-decomposer biomass and activity stimulates litter degradation. • Diatoms dominate the microalgae community under effluent runoff conditions. • Chl-a concentrations suggest

  14. Spatio-temporal variations in the composition of organic matter in surface sediments of a mangrove receiving shrimp farm effluents (New Caledonia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenbroich, Adélaïde, E-mail: adelaide.aschenbroich@univ-brest.fr [UMR BOREA 7208 CNRS/MNHN/UPMC/IRD/UCBN, Muséum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CP 53, 61 rue Buffon, 75231 Paris cedex 5 (France); Marchand, Cyril [Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), UMR 7590, UR 206, BP A5, 98848 Nouméa, New Caledonia (France); Molnar, Nathalie [UMR BOREA 7208 CNRS/MNHN/UPMC/IRD/UCBN, Muséum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CP 53, 61 rue Buffon, 75231 Paris cedex 5 (France); Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), UMR 7590, UR 206, BP A5, 98848 Nouméa, New Caledonia (France); Deborde, Jonathan [Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), UMR 7590, UR 206, BP A5, 98848 Nouméa, New Caledonia (France); Hubas, Cédric; Rybarczyk, Hervé; Meziane, Tarik [UMR BOREA 7208 CNRS/MNHN/UPMC/IRD/UCBN, Muséum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CP 53, 61 rue Buffon, 75231 Paris cedex 5 (France)

    2015-04-15

    In order to investigate spatio-temporal variations in the composition and origin of the benthic organic matter (OM) at the sediment surface in mangrove receiving shrimp farm effluents, fatty acid (FA) biomarkers, natural stable isotopes (δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N), C:N ratios and chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentrations were determined during the active and the non-active period of the farm. Fatty acid compositions in surface sediments within the mangrove forest indicated that organic matter inputs varied along the year as a result of farm activity. Effluents were the source of fresh particulate organic matter for the mangrove, as evidenced by the unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) distribution. The anthropogenic MUFA 18:1ω9 was not only accumulated at the sediment surface in some parts of the mangrove, but was also exported to the seafront. Direct release of bacteria and enhanced in situ production of fungi, as revealed by specific FAs, stimulated mangrove litter decomposition under effluent runoff condition. Also, microalgae released from ponds contributed to maintain high benthic chl-a concentrations in mangrove sediments in winter and to a shift in microphytobenthic community assemblage. Primary production was high whether the farm released effluent or not which questioned the temporary effect of shrimp farm effluent on benthic microalgae dynamic. This study outlined that mangrove benthic organic matter was qualitatively and quantitatively affected by shrimp farm effluent release and that responses to environmental condition changes likely depended on mangrove stand characteristics. - Highlights: • Fatty acid 18:1ω9 is a relevant marker to monitor effluent pathway in the mangrove. • OM nature and distribution at sediment surface varied in relation to farm activity. • Enhancement of litter-decomposer biomass and activity stimulates litter degradation. • Diatoms dominate the microalgae community under effluent runoff conditions. • Chl-a concentrations suggest

  15. Flexible and self-powered temperature-pressure dual-parameter sensors using microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Zang, Yaping; Huang, Dazhen; di, Chong-An; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-09-01

    Skin-like temperature- and pressure-sensing capabilities are essential features for the next generation of artificial intelligent products. Previous studies of e-skin and smart elements have focused on flexible pressure sensors, whereas the simultaneous and sensitive detection of temperature and pressure with a single device remains a challenge. Here we report developing flexible dual-parameter temperature-pressure sensors based on microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric (MFSOTE) materials. The effective transduction of temperature and pressure stimuli into two independent electrical signals permits the instantaneous sensing of temperature and pressure with an accurate temperature resolution of cost and large-area fabrication, make MFSOTE materials possess promising applications in e-skin and health-monitoring elements.

  16. Spatiotemporal Characterization of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) and CDOM-DOC Relationships for Highly Polluted Rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Sijia Li; Jiquan Zhang; Guangyi Mu; Hanyu Ju; Rui Wang; Danjun Li; Ali Hassan Shabbir

    2016-01-01

    Spectral characteristics of CDOM (Chromophoric dissolved organic matter) in water columns are a key parameter for bio-optical modeling. Knowledge of CDOM optical properties and spatial discrepancy based on the relationship between water quality and spectral parameters in the Yinma River watershed with in situ data collected from highly polluted waters are exhibited in this study. Based on the comprehensive index method, the riverine waters showed serious contamination; especially the chemical...

  17. Spatiotemporal Characterization of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM and CDOM-DOC Relationships for Highly Polluted Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijia Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spectral characteristics of CDOM (Chromophoric dissolved organic matter in water columns are a key parameter for bio-optical modeling. Knowledge of CDOM optical properties and spatial discrepancy based on the relationship between water quality and spectral parameters in the Yinma River watershed with in situ data collected from highly polluted waters are exhibited in this study. Based on the comprehensive index method, the riverine waters showed serious contamination; especially the chemical oxygen demand (COD, iron (Fe, manganese (Mn, mercury (Hg and dissolved oxygen (DO were out of range of the contamination warning. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC and total suspended matter (TSM with prominent non-homogenizing were significantly high in the riverine waters, but chlorophyll-a (Chl-a was the opposite. The ternary phase diagram showed that non-algal particle absorption played an important role in total non-water light absorption (>50% in most sampling locations, and mean contributions of CDOM were 13% and 22% in the summer and autumn, respectively. The analysis of the ratio of absorption at 250–365 nm (E250:365 and the spectral slope (S275–295 indicated that CDOM had higher aromaticity and molecular weight in autumn than in summer, which is consistent with the results of water quality and the CDOM relative contribution rate. Redundancy analysis (RDA indicated that the environmental variables OSM (Organic suspended matter had a strong correlation with CDOM absorption, followed by heavy metals, e.g., Mn, Hg and Cr6+. However, for the specific UV absorbance (SUVA254, the seasonal values showed opposite results compared with the reported literature. The potential reasons were that more UDOM (uncolored dissolved organic matter from human sources (wastewater effluent existed in the waters. Terrigenous inputs simultaneously are in relation to the aCDOM(440-DOC relationship with the correlation coefficient of 0.90 in the summer (two-tailed, p < 0

  18. Spatiotemporal variations in the abundance and composition of bulk and chromophoric dissolved organic matter in seasonally hypoxia-influenced Green Bay, Lake Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVilbiss, Stephen E; Zhou, Zhengzhen; Klump, J Val; Guo, Laodong

    2016-09-15

    Green Bay, Lake Michigan, USA, is the largest freshwater estuary in the Laurentian Great Lakes and receives disproportional terrestrial inputs as a result of a high watershed to bay surface area ratio. While seasonal hypoxia and the formation of "dead zones" in Green Bay have received increasing attention, there are no systematic studies on the dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its linkage to the development of hypoxia. During summer 2014, bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis, UV-vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) coupled with PARAFAC analysis were used to quantify the abundance, composition and source of DOM and their spatiotemporal variations in Green Bay, Lake Michigan. Concentrations of DOC ranged from 202 to 571μM-C (average=361±73μM-C) in June and from 279 to 610μM-C (average=349±64μM-C) in August. In both months, absorption coefficient at 254nm (a254) was strongly correlated to bulk DOC and was most abundant in the Fox River, attesting a dominant terrestrial input. Non-chromophoric DOC comprised, on average, ~32% of bulk DOC in June with higher terrestrial DOM and ~47% in August with higher aquagenic DOM, indicating that autochthonous and more degraded DOM is of lower optical activity. PARAFAC modeling on EEM data resulted in four major fluorescent DOM components, including two terrestrial humic-like, one aquagenic humic-like, and one protein-like component. Variations in the abundance of DOM components further supported changes in DOM sources. Mixing behavior of DOM components also indicated that while bulk DOM behaved quasi-conservatively, significant compositional changes occurred during transport from the Fox River to the open bay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Using High Spatio-Temporal Optical Remote Sensing to Monitor Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Arctic River Yenisei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Alexis Herrault

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In Arctic regions, a major concern is the release of carbon from melting permafrost that could greatly exceed current human carbon emissions. Arctic rivers drain these organic-rich watersheds (Ob, Lena, Yenisei, Mackenzie, Yukon but field measurements at the outlets of these great Arctic rivers are constrained by limited accessibility of sampling sites. In particular, the highest dissolved organic carbon (DOC fluxes are observed throughout the ice breakup period that occurs over a short two to three-week period in late May or early June during the snowmelt-generated peak flow. The colored fraction of dissolved organic carbon (DOC which absorbs UV and visible light is designed as chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM. It is highly correlated to DOC in large arctic rivers and streams, allowing for remote sensing to monitor DOC concentrations from satellite imagery. High temporal and spatial resolutions remote sensing tools are highly relevant for the study of DOC fluxes in a large Arctic river. The high temporal resolution allows for correctly assessing this highly dynamic process, especially the spring freshet event (a few weeks in May. The high spatial resolution allows for assessing the spatial variability within the stream and quantifying DOC transfer during the ice break period when the access to the river is almost impossible. In this study, we develop a CDOM retrieval algorithm at a high spatial and a high temporal resolution in the Yenisei River. We used extensive DOC and DOM spectral absorbance datasets from 2014 and 2015. Twelve SPOT5 (Take5 and Landsat 8 (OLI images from 2014 and 2015 were examined for this investigation. Relationships between CDOM and spectral variables were explored using linear models (LM. Results demonstrated the capacity of a CDOM algorithm retrieval to monitor DOC fluxes in the Yenisei River during a whole open water season with a special focus on the peak flow period. Overall, future Sentinel2/Landsat8

  20. The spatiotemporal organization of cilia activity drives multiscale circular flows of mucus in reconstituted human bronchial epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, Etienne; Gras, Delphine; Chanez, Pascal; Viallat, Annie

    2017-11-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases affect hundreds of millions of people worldwide. The bronchial epithelium is the first barrier to protect the respiratory tract via an innate mechanism called mucociliary clearance. It consists in the active transport of a sticky fluid, the mucus, via a myriad of cilia at the epithelial surface of the airways. The mucus traps inhaled pathogens and the protective role of the mucociliary clearance relies on the ability of the cilia to self-organize and coordinate their beating to transport the mucus over the full bronchial tree till its elimination through swallowing or expectoration. Despite a rich corpus of clinical studies, chronic respiratory diseases remain poorly understood and quantitative biophysical studies are still missing. Here we will present the physical mechanisms underlying the mucociliary transport. We will show how the cilia self-organize during the ciliogenesis and how the coordination of their beating direction leads to the formation of fluid flow patterns at the macroscopic scale. Finally, we will discuss the role of long range hydrodynamics interactions in this intricate coupled system. ANR MUCOCIL project, Grant ANR-13-BSV5-0015 and European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA Grant agreement n. PCOFUND-GA-2013-609102.

  1. Biomineralization of unicellular organisms: an unusual membrane biochemistry for the production of inorganic nano- and microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuerlein, Edmund

    2003-02-10

    With evolution, Nature has ingeniously succeeded in giving rise to an impressive variety of inorganic structures. Every organism that synthesizes biogenic minerals does so in a form that is unique to that species. This biomineralization is apparently biologically controlled. It is thus expected that both the synthesis and the form of every specific biogenic mineral is genetically determined and controlled. An investigation of the mechanism of biomineralization has only become possible with the development of modern methods in molecular biology. Unicellular organisms such as magnetic bacteria, calcareous algae, and diatoms, all of which are amongst the simplest forms of life, are particularly suited to be investigated by these methods. Crystals and composites of proteins and amorphous inorganic polymers are formed as complex structures within these organisms; these structures are not known in conventional inorganic chemistry.

  2. Direct deposition of inorganic–organic hybrid semiconductors and their template-assisted microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, V.K.; Baumberg, J.J.; Prakash, G. Vijaya

    2013-01-01

    A straight-forward method is developed to deposit a new class of self-organized inorganic–organic (IO) hybrid, (C 12 H 25 NH 3 ) 2 PbI 4 . These IO hybrid structures are stacked-up as natural multiple quantum well structures and exhibit strong room-temperature exciton emission and other multifunctional features. Here it is successfully demonstrated that these materials can be directly carved into 2D photonic structures from the inexpensive template-assisted electrochemical deposition followed by solution processing. The applicability of this method for many such varieties of IO-hybrids is also explored. By appropriately controlling the deposition conditions and the self-assembly templates, target structures are developed for new-generation low-cost photonic devices. -- Highlights: ► New fabrication methodology for self-organized inorganic–organic hybrids. ► Strongly confined exciton emission and photoconductive properties. ► Simple bottom-up fabrication for device applications.

  3. A compact PTR-ToF-MS instrument for airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds at high spatiotemporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Müller

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report on the development of a compact proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS for airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The new instrument resolves isobaric ions with a mass resolving power (m/Δm of ~1000, provides accurate m/z measurements (Δm < 3 mDa, records full mass spectra at 1 Hz and thus overcomes some of the major analytical deficiencies of quadrupole-MS-based airborne instruments. 1 Hz detection limits for biogenic VOCs (isoprene, α total monoterpenes, aromatic VOCs (benzene, toluene, xylenes and ketones (acetone, methyl ethyl ketone range from 0.05 to 0.12 ppbV, making the instrument well-suited for fast measurements of abundant VOCs in the continental boundary layer. The instrument detects and quantifies VOCs in locally confined plumes (< 1 km, which improves our capability of characterizing emission sources and atmospheric processing within plumes. A deployment during the NASA 2013 DISCOVER-AQ mission generated high vertical- and horizontal-resolution in situ data of VOCs and ammonia for the validation of satellite retrievals and chemistry transport models.

  4. Spatio-temporal variability of the molecular fingerprint of soil dissolved organic matter in a headwater agricultural catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneau, Laurent; Pierson-Wickmann, Anne-Catherine; Jaffrezic, Anne; Lambert, Thibault; Gruau, Gérard

    2013-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is implied in (i) ecosystem services such as the support of biodiversity, (ii) the alteration of the drinkable water quality by formation of trihalomethane and (iii) the transfer of micropollutants from soils to rivers. Moreover, since DOM connects soils and oceans that are interacting with the atmosphere, understanding its biogeochemistry will help in investigating the carbon cycle and in creating strategies to mitigate climate change. DOM in headwater stream ecosystems is mainly inherited from allochtonous inputs with different reservoirs being mobilized during storm and interstorm events at the scale of an hydrological year. Those changes in DOM reservoirs, if accompanied by composition and reactivity changes, may impact DOM ecosystem services and drinking water production processes. Elucidating the compositional changes due to changes in the source of DOM in rivers has thus become a important axis of DOM research. The aim of this study is to test the ability of the molecular tools of the organic geochemistry and more specifically the combination of thermochemiolysis and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (THM-GC-MS) to (i) link the variability of the river DOM composition to different DOM reservoirs in catchment soils and (ii) provide hypothesis on the nature and the mechanisms of formation (microbial growth, litter decomposition) of those reservoirs. This analytical method seems particularly adapted since it allows the differentiation between vegetal and microbial inputs and the determination of the extent of the biodegradation process of biomolecules such as lignin. To test this method, the molecular fingerprint of soil DOM has been investigated in the wetland area of a small (500 ha) agricultural catchment (the so-called Kervidy-Naizin catchment) located in Brittany, western France. The soil DOM was sampled fortnightly at three depths using zero-tension lysimeters during the hydrological year 2010-2011. The samples were

  5. Spatio-temporal variation of the structural organization of demersal communities in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Torruco

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Structural patterns of a sublittoral community were analyzed through a two-year series of samples in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico. The groups involved in the study comprise fishes, molluscs, echinoderms and crustaceans. The time-space progressions of Second 0rder diversity values range between N2=5.3 and N2=9.8 at depths of 40 and 20 m respectively, through the first year of samples. In the second year the highest value (N2=22.2 was found at 30 m. The community ordination data through cluster and principal components analysis show five assemblages: benthic, benthic-demersal, demersal, mid water column, and temporary. There is a striking difference in trophic web structure between the dry season and rainy season. Fish community resource partitioning shows that the components are organized in three guilds: ichthyophagous, carcinophagous and omnivorous. However, a partial overlap of niches was commonly observed, and juvenile stages showed a narrower trophic spectrum than adults. Rev. Biol. Trop. 55 (2: 509-536. Epub 2007 June, 29.Se analizaron los patrones estructurales de la comunidad sublitoral a través de dos años de muestreo. Los grupos involucrados en el estudio fueron: peces, moluscos, equinodermos y crustáceos. Las progresiones espacio-temporales de la diversidad de segundo orden para el primer año se encuentran entre los intervalos de N2=5.3 y N2=9.8 en las profundidades de 40 y 20 m respectivamente. En el segundo periodo el valor más alto (N2=22.2 fue registrado a 30 m. La ordenación de la comunidad a través del análisis de agrupamientos y de Componentes Principales, muestran 5 ensamblajes: béntico, béntico-demersal, demersal, a media columna de agua y temporal. Hay una fuerte diferencia en la estructura de la red trófica entre las estaciones de secas y lluvias. La repartición de recursos en la comunidad de peces, muestran que sus componentes están organizados en tres gremios: Ictiófagos, Carcinófagos y Omnívoros. Sin

  6. Flexible and self-powered temperature-pressure dual-parameter sensors using microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Zang, Yaping; Huang, Dazhen; Di, Chong-an; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-09-21

    Skin-like temperature- and pressure-sensing capabilities are essential features for the next generation of artificial intelligent products. Previous studies of e-skin and smart elements have focused on flexible pressure sensors, whereas the simultaneous and sensitive detection of temperature and pressure with a single device remains a challenge. Here we report developing flexible dual-parameter temperature-pressure sensors based on microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric (MFSOTE) materials. The effective transduction of temperature and pressure stimuli into two independent electrical signals permits the instantaneous sensing of temperature and pressure with an accurate temperature resolution of pressure-sensing sensitivity of up to 28.9 kPa(-1). More importantly, these dual-parameter sensors can be self-powered with outstanding sensing performance. The excellent sensing properties of MFSOTE-based devices, together with their unique advantages of low cost and large-area fabrication, make MFSOTE materials possess promising applications in e-skin and health-monitoring elements.

  7. Large modulation of carrier transport by grain-boundary molecular packing and microstructure in organic thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan

    2009-11-08

    Solution-processable organic semiconductors are central to developing viable printed electronics, and performance comparable to that of amorphous silicon has been reported for films grown from soluble semiconductors. However, the seemingly desirable formation of large crystalline domains introduces grain boundaries, resulting in substantial device-to-device performance variations. Indeed, for films where the grain-boundary structure is random, a few unfavourable grain boundaries may dominate device performance. Here we isolate the effects of molecular-level structure at grain boundaries by engineering the microstructure of the high-performance n-type perylenediimide semiconductor PDI8-CN 2 and analyse their consequences for charge transport. A combination of advanced X-ray scattering, first-principles computation and transistor characterization applied to PDI8-CN 2 films reveals that grain-boundary orientation modulates carrier mobility by approximately two orders of magnitude. For PDI8-CN 2 we show that the molecular packing motif (that is, herringbone versus slip-stacked) plays a decisive part in grain-boundary-induced transport anisotropy. The results of this study provide important guidelines for designing device-optimized molecular semiconductors. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  8. Spatiotemporal Wave Patterns: Information Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhail Rabinovich; Lev Tsimring

    2006-01-20

    Pattern formation has traditionally been studied in non-equilibrium physics from the viewpoint of describing the basic structures and their interactions. While this is still an important area of research, the emphasis in the last few years has shifted towards analysis of specific properties of patterns in various complex media. For example, diverse and unexpected phenomena occur in neuro-like media that are characterized by highly non-trivial local dynamics. We carried out an active research program on analysis of spatio-temporal patterns in various physical systems (convection, oscillating fluid layer, soap film), as well as in neuro-like media, with an emphasis on informational aspects of the dynamics. Nonlinear nonequilibrium media and their discrete analogs have a unique ability to represent, memorize, and process the information contained in spatio-temporal patterns. Recent neurophysiological experiments demonstrated a certain universality of spatio-temporal representation of information by neural ensembles. Information processing is also revealed in the spatio-temporal dynamics of cellular patterns in nonequilibrium media. It is extremely important for many applications to study the informational aspects of these dynamics, including the origins and mechanisms of information generation, propagation and storage. Some of our results are: the discovery of self-organization of periodically oscillatory patterns in chaotic heterogeneous media; the analysis of the propagation of the information along a chaotic media as function of the entropy of the signal; the analysis of wave propagation in discrete non-equilibrium media with autocatalytic properties, which simulates the calcium dynamics in cellular membranes. Based on biological experiments we suggest the mechanism by which the spatial sensory information is transferred into the spatio-temporal code in the neural media. We also found a new mechanism of self-pinning in cellular structures and the related phenomenon

  9. Relationship of electro-physical properties, thermal phase transition and microstructure of organic semiconducting crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, R.M.; Tahir, M.M.; Karomov, Kh.S.; Akhmedov, Kh.M.

    1999-01-01

    Organic crystals of Ph/sub 3/MeP(TCNQ) (Triphenyl-methyl-phosphonium tetracyano quino dimethane) and Et/sub 3/A (TCNQ) (Triethyl ammonium tetracyano quino dimethane) exhibit high tensity resistive effect which make them useful for applications like strain gauges, temperature sensitive resistors, etc. previous investigations of the effect of temperature on the electrical conductivity, thermoelectric power and acoustic emission in the range of 300-360 deg. K show the Ph/sub 3/MeP(TCNQ) crystals dispaly reversible phase transitions at 313 and 317 deg. K during heating the cooling, respectively. Contrary to this the crystals of Et/sub 3/A(TCNQ) and the press tablets of Ph/sub 3/MeP(TCNQ) do not display any such transition. Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) in this study, we have confirmed that a reversible thermal transition also takes place at the similar temperature in Ph/sub 3/MeP(TCNQ); the transition is absent in Et/sub 3/A(TCNQ) and in press tablets of Ph/sub 3/MeP(TCNQ). Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) shows number of structural voids in the single crystals of Ph/sub 3/Mep(TCNQ) which indicates that the phase transition is a volumetric phenomenon; the voids in the crystal may allow the volumetric changes. However, absence of surface defects as observed by SEM in Et/sub 3/A(TCNQ) and in pressed Ph/sub 3/MeP(TCNQ) may hinder the change in the volume of the material due to close packing of molecules. This result in the absence of the phase transitions as ascertained by DSC and other previous electro physical studies. (author)

  10. Investigation into the role of primer, pre-treatments and coating microstructure in preventing cut edge corrosion of organically coated steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khalil

    Investigations were carried out to assess the role of primer, pretreatments and coating microstructure in preventing cutedge corrosion of chrome free organically coated steels. Zinc runoff was monitored from a range of organically coated steels with a large cutedge length exposed over 18 months at Swansea University roof top site. The zinc in the runoff leaches from the zinc-aluminium alloy coating of the substrate. The paint systems' corrosion performance was assessed by monitoring the levels of zinc in the runoff. Consequently the levels of zinc reflected the effectiveness of the applied paint system against corrosion. Runoff was high in initial months with zinc levels reducing with time due to the build up of corrosion products that hindered the progress of corrosion. An accelerated laboratory test using a distilled water electrolyte was developed that predict long-term external weathering runoff from panels of a range of organically coated steels. The corrosion mechanisms of a variety of organically coated Galvalloy steel have been examined using the scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) in 0.1%NaCI. The corrosion behaviour of a coating is related to the zinc-aluminium alloy coating structure and combination of pretreatment and primer. The SVET has been used to assess total zinc loss and the corrosion rate for a comparative measure of organically coating system performance. A correlation has been developed from SVET 24hour experiment data to accelerated weathering data and external weather data that can aid more accurately predicting the in service life of the product. Also considered were the effects of electrolyte conductivity on the morphology of corrosion on pure zinc. A mathematical model has been developed to predict corrosion pit population. Altered microstructure of solidifying zinc aluminium alloy melt via ultrasonication was investigated. Ultrasound irradiation significantly altered the final microstructure. The influence of morphed

  11. Dynamic decomposition of spatiotemporal neural signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Ambrogioni

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neural signals are characterized by rich temporal and spatiotemporal dynamics that reflect the organization of cortical networks. Theoretical research has shown how neural networks can operate at different dynamic ranges that correspond to specific types of information processing. Here we present a data analysis framework that uses a linearized model of these dynamic states in order to decompose the measured neural signal into a series of components that capture both rhythmic and non-rhythmic neural activity. The method is based on stochastic differential equations and Gaussian process regression. Through computer simulations and analysis of magnetoencephalographic data, we demonstrate the efficacy of the method in identifying meaningful modulations of oscillatory signals corrupted by structured temporal and spatiotemporal noise. These results suggest that the method is particularly suitable for the analysis and interpretation of complex temporal and spatiotemporal neural signals.

  12. Single-shot soft x-ray laser-induced ablative microstructuring of organic polymer with demagnifying projection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mocek, Tomáš; Rus, Bedřich; Kozlová, Michaela; Polan, Jiří; Homer, Pavel; Juha, Libor; Hájková, Věra; Chalupský, Jaromír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 10 (2008), s. 1087-1089 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA ČR GA202/05/2316; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : x-ray lasers * laser ablation * microstructuring Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.772, year: 2008

  13. Improved galvanic replacement growth of Ag microstructures on Cu micro-grid for enhanced SERS detection of organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tian-Long; Li, Ji-Guang; Sun, Xudong; Sakka, Yoshio

    2016-04-01

    Galvanic growth of Ag nano/micro-structures on Cu micro-grid was systematically studied for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. Detailed characterizations via FE-SEM and HR-TEM showed that processing parameters, (reaction time, Ag(+) concentration, and PVP addition) all substantially affect thermodynamics/kinetics of the replacement reaction to yield substrates of significantly different microstructures/homogeneities and thus varied SERS performances (sensitivity, enhancement factor, and reproducibility) of the Ag substrates in the detection of R6G analyte. PVP as an additive was shown to notably alter nucleation/growth behaviors of the Ag crystals and promote the deposition of dense and uniform Ag films of nearly monodisperse polyhedrons/nanoplates through suppressing dendrites crystallization. Under optimized synthesis (50mM of Ag(+), 30s of reaction, and 700 wt.% of PVP), Ag substrates exhibiting a high Raman signal enhancement factor of ~1.1 × 10(6) and a low relative standard deviation of ~0.13 in the repeated detection of 10 μM R6G were obtained. The facile deposition and excellent performance reported in this work may allow the Ag microstructures to find wider SERS applications. Moreover, growth mechanisms of the different Ag nano/micro-structures were discussed based on extensive FE-SEM and HR-TEM analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Indeterminacy and Spatiotemporal Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfoser, D.; Tryfona, N.; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2005-01-01

    For some spatiotemporal applications, it can be assumed that the modeled world is precise and bounded, and that our record of it is precise. While these simplifying assumptions are sufficient in applications like a land information system, they are unnecessarily crude for many other applications...

  15. Spatio-Temporal Rule Mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidofalvi, Gyozo; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in communication and information technology, such as the increasing accuracy of GPS technology and the miniaturization of wireless communication devices pave the road for Location-Based Services (LBS). To achieve high quality for such services, spatio-temporal data mining techniques...... are needed. In this paper, we describe experiences with spatio-temporal rule mining in a Danish data mining company. First, a number of real world spatio-temporal data sets are described, leading to a taxonomy of spatio-temporal data. Second, the paper describes a general methodology that transforms...... the spatio-temporal rule mining task to the traditional market basket analysis task and applies it to the described data sets, enabling traditional association rule mining methods to discover spatio-temporal rules for LBS. Finally, unique issues in spatio-temporal rule mining are identified and discussed....

  16. Improved galvanic replacement growth of Ag microstructures on Cu micro-grid for enhanced SERS detection of organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Tian-Long [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Advanced Materials Processing Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1–1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Li, Ji-Guang, E-mail: LI.Jiguang@nims.go.jp [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Advanced Materials Processing Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1–1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Sun, Xudong, E-mail: xdsun@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Sakka, Yoshio [Advanced Materials Processing Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1–1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    Galvanic growth of Ag nano/micro-structures on Cu micro-grid was systematically studied for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. Detailed characterizations via FE-SEM and HR-TEM showed that processing parameters, (reaction time, Ag{sup +} concentration, and PVP addition) all substantially affect thermodynamics/kinetics of the replacement reaction to yield substrates of significantly different microstructures/homogeneities and thus varied SERS performances (sensitivity, enhancement factor, and reproducibility) of the Ag substrates in the detection of R6G analyte. PVP as an additive was shown to notably alter nucleation/growth behaviors of the Ag crystals and promote the deposition of dense and uniform Ag films of nearly monodisperse polyhedrons/nanoplates through suppressing dendrites crystallization. Under optimized synthesis (50 mM of Ag{sup +}, 30 s of reaction, and 700 wt.% of PVP), Ag substrates exhibiting a high Raman signal enhancement factor of ~ 1.1 × 10{sup 6} and a low relative standard deviation of ~ 0.13 in the repeated detection of 10 μM R6G were obtained. The facile deposition and excellent performance reported in this work may allow the Ag microstructures to find wider SERS applications. Moreover, growth mechanisms of the different Ag nano/micro-structures were discussed based on extensive FE-SEM and HR-TEM analysis. - Highlights: • A facile synthetic technique of growing SERS active Ag substrates onto Cu micro-grid has been systematically studied. • Changing processing parameters has yielded Ag crystals of various morphologies and SERS performances. • PVP additive was observed to suppress Ag dendrite crystallization for nearly monodispersed Ag polyhedrons/nanoplates. • PVP modified SERS substrate exhibits excellent EF and RSD values in the repeated detection of 10 μM R6G analyte.

  17. Enhanced performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and OLED-based photoluminescent sensing platforms by novel microstructures and device architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rui [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    After a general introduction to OLEDs and OLED-based PL sensors, the transient emission mechanism of guest-host OLEDs is described both experimentally and theoretically. A monolithic and easy-to-apply process is demonstrated for fabricating multicolor microcavity OLEDs (that improve the sensor platform). The outcoupling issues of OLEDs at the substrate/air interface are addressed by using a microstructured polymer film resulting from a PS and polyethylene glycol (PEG) mixture. Based on the understanding of OLEDs and their improvement, research was done in order to realize integrated all organic-based O2 and pH sensors with improved signal intensity and sensitivity. The sensor design modification and optimization are summarized

  18. Spatiotemporal optical solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malomed, Boris A; Mihalache, Dumitru; Wise, Frank; Torner, Lluis

    2005-01-01

    In the course of the past several years, a new level of understanding has been achieved about conditions for the existence, stability, and generation of spatiotemporal optical solitons, which are nondiffracting and nondispersing wavepackets propagating in nonlinear optical media. Experimentally, effectively two-dimensional (2D) spatiotemporal solitons that overcome diffraction in one transverse spatial dimension have been created in quadratic nonlinear media. With regard to the theory, fundamentally new features of light pulses that self-trap in one or two transverse spatial dimensions and do not spread out in time, when propagating in various optical media, were thoroughly investigated in models with various nonlinearities. Stable vorticity-carrying spatiotemporal solitons have been predicted too, in media with competing nonlinearities (quadratic-cubic or cubic-quintic). This article offers an up-to-date survey of experimental and theoretical results in this field. Both achievements and outstanding difficulties are reviewed, and open problems are highlighted. Also briefly described are recent predictions for stable 2D and 3D solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates supported by full or low-dimensional optical lattices. (review article)

  19. Age-dependent association of thyroid function with brain morphology and microstructural organization: evidence from brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaker, Layal; Cremers, Lotte G M; Korevaar, Tim I M; de Groot, Marius; Dehghan, Abbas; Franco, Oscar H; Niessen, Wiro J; Ikram, M Arfan; Peeters, Robin P; Vernooij, Meike W

    2018-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is crucial during neurodevelopment, but high levels of TH have been linked to neurodegenerative disorders. No data on the association of thyroid function with brain imaging in the general population are available. We therefore investigated the association of thyroid-stimulating hormone and free thyroxine (FT4) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived total intracranial volume, brain tissue volumes, and diffusion tensor imaging measures of white matter microstructure in 4683 dementia- and stroke-free participants (mean age 60.2, range 45.6-89.9 years). Higher FT4 levels were associated with larger total intracranial volumes (β = 6.73 mL, 95% confidence interval = 2.94-9.80). Higher FT4 levels were also associated with larger total brain and white matter volumes in younger individuals, but with smaller total brain and white matter volume in older individuals (p-interaction 0.02). There was a similar interaction by age for the association of FT4 with mean diffusivity on diffusion tensor imaging (p-interaction 0.026). These results are in line with differential effects of TH during neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative processes and can improve the understanding of the role of thyroid function in neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Spatiotemporal Modeling of Community Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Ertugay, and Sebnem Duzgun, “Exploratory and Inferential Methods for Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Residential Fire Clustering in Urban Areas,” Fire ...response in communities.”26 In “Exploratory and Inferential Methods for Spatio-temporal Analysis of Residential Fire Clustering in Urban Areas,” Ceyhan...of fire resources spread across the community. Spatiotemporal modeling shows that actualized risk is dynamic and relatively patterned. Though

  1. Large modulation of carrier transport by grain-boundary molecular packing and microstructure in organic thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan; Jimison, Leslie H.; Northrup, John E.; Toney, Michael F.; Noriega, Rodrigo; Lu, Shaofeng; Marks, Tobin J.; Facchetti, Antonio; Salleo, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Solution-processable organic semiconductors are central to developing viable printed electronics, and performance comparable to that of amorphous silicon has been reported for films grown from soluble semiconductors. However, the seemingly desirable

  2. A Mixed Land Cover Spatio-temporal Data Model Based on Object-oriented and Snapshot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Yinchao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatio-temporal data model (STDM is one of the hot topics in the domains of spatio-temporal database and data analysis. There is a common view that a universal STDM is always of high complexity due to the various situation of spatio-temporal data. In this article, a mixed STDM is proposed based on object-oriented and snapshot models for modelling and analyzing landcover change (LCC. This model uses the object-oriented STDM to describe the spatio-temporal processes of land cover patches and organize their spatial and attributive properties. In the meantime, it uses the snapshot STDM to present the spatio-temporal distribution of LCC on the whole via snapshot images. The two types of models are spatially and temporally combined into a mixed version. In addition to presenting the spatio-temporal events themselves, this model could express the transformation events between different classes of spatio-temporal objects. It can be used to create database for historical data of LCC, do spatio-temporal statistics, simulation and data mining with the data. In this article, the LCC data in Heilongjiang province is used for case study to validate spatio-temporal data management and analysis abilities of mixed STDM, including creating database, spatio-temporal query, global evolution analysis and patches spatio-temporal process expression.

  3. Influence of the Ti microstructure on anodic self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotube layers produced in ethylene glycol electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macak, J.M., E-mail: jan.macak@upce.cz [Center of Materials and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Nam. Cs. Legii 565, 53002 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Jarosova, M. [Laboratory of Nanostructures and Nanomaterials, Institute of Physics of the CAS, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Jäger, A. [Department of Structure analysis, Institute of Physics of the CAS, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 16200 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Sopha, H. [Center of Materials and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Nam. Cs. Legii 565, 53002 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Klementová, M. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry of the CAS, v.v.i., Husinec-Rez 1001, Rez 25068 (Czech Republic)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The microstructure of Ti substrates investigated by EBSD. • Comparison of polished vs. unpolished substrates was carried out. • Grain orientation influences the uniformity of self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. • Tubes with different average diameter grow on grains with different orientation. • Grain size and boundaries influence the number of flaws in the tube layers. - Abstract: The relationship between the microstructure of Ti substrates and the anodic growth of self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotube layers obtained upon their anodization in the ethylene glycol based electrolytes on these substrates is reported for the first time. Polished Ti sheets with mirror-like surface as well as unpolished Ti foils were considered in this work. Grains with a wide range of crystallographic orientations and sizes were revealed by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) and correlated with nanotube growth on both types of substrates. A preferred grain orientation with [0 0 0 1] axis perpendicular to the surface was observed on all substrates. Surfaces of all substrates were anodized for 18 h in ethylene glycol electrolytes containing 88 mM NH{sub 4}F and 1.5% water and thoroughly inspected by SEM. By a precise comparison of Ti substrates before and after anodization, the uniformity of produced self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotube layers was evaluated in regard to the specific orientation of individual grains. Grains with [0 0 0 1] axis perpendicular to the surface turned out to be the most growth-promoting orientation on polished substrates. No orientation was found to be strictly growth-retarding, but sufficient anodization time (24 h) was needed to obtain uniform nanotube layers on all grains without remnant porous initial oxide. In contrast with polished Ti sheets, no specific orientation was found to significantly promote or retard the nanotube growth in the case of unpolished Ti foils. Finally, the difference between the average nanotube diameters of

  4. Deformation microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Hughes, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Microstructural characterization and modeling has shown that a variety of metals deformed by different thermomechanical processes follows a general path of grain subdivision, by dislocation boundaries and high angle boundaries. This subdivision has been observed to very small structural scales...... of the order of 10 nm, produced by deformation under large sliding loads. Limits to the evolution of microstructural parameters during monotonic loading have been investigated based on a characterization by transmission electron microscopy. Such limits have been observed at an equivalent strain of about 10...

  5. The neck region of the C-type lectin DC-SIGN regulates its surface spatiotemporal organization and virus-binding capacity on antigen presenting cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manzo, C.; Torreno-Pina, J.A.; Joosten, B.; Reinieren-Beeren, I.; Gualda, E.J.; Loza-Alvarez, P.; Figdor, Carl; Garcia Parajo, M.F.; Cambi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and

  6. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manzo, C.; Torreno-Pina, J.A.; Joosten, B.; Reinieren-Beeren, I.; Gualda, E.J.; Loza-Alvarez, P.; Figdor, C.G.; Garcia-Parajo, M.F.; Cambi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and

  7. Semiconductors and semimetals epitaxial microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Gossard, Arthur C

    1994-01-01

    Newly developed semiconductor microstructures can now guide light and electrons resulting in important consequences for state-of-the-art electronic and photonic devices. This volume introduces a new generation of epitaxial microstructures. Special emphasis has been given to atomic control during growth and the interrelationship between the atomic arrangements and the properties of the structures.Key Features* Atomic-level control of semiconductor microstructures* Molecular beam epitaxy, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition* Quantum wells and quantum wires* Lasers, photon(IR)detectors, heterostructure transistors

  8. Microstructure Formations in the Two-Phase Region of the Binary Peritectic Organic System TRIS-NPG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogeritsch, Johann; Ludwig, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In order to prepare for an onboard experiment on the International Space Station (ISS), systematic directional solidification experiments with transparent hypoperitectic alloys were carried out at different solidification rates around the critical velocity for morphological stability of both solid phases. The investigations were done in the peritectic region of the binary transparent organic TRIS-NPG system where the formation of layered structures is expected to occur. The transparent appearance of the liquid and solid phase enables real time observations of the dynamic of pattern formation during solidification. The investigations show that frequently occurring nucleation events govern the peritectic solidification morphology which occurs at the limit of morphological stability. As a consequence, banded structures lead to coupled growth even if the lateral growth is much faster compared to the growth in pulling direction.

  9. Microstructural and Electronic Origins of Open-Circuit Voltage Tuning in Organic Solar Cells Based on Ternary Blends

    KAUST Repository

    Mollinger, Sonya A.

    2015-09-22

    © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Organic ternary heterojunction photovoltaic blends are sometimes observed to undergo a gradual evolution in open-circuit voltage (Voc) with increasing amounts of a second donor or an acceptor. The Voc is strongly correlated with the energy of the charge transfer state in the blend, but this value depends on both local and mesoscopic orders. In this work, the behavior of Voc in the presence of a wide range of interfacial electronic states is investigated. The key charge transfer state interfaces responsible for Voc in several model systems with varying morphology are identified. Systems consisting of one donor with two fullerene molecules and of one acceptor with a donor polymer of varying regio-regularity are used. The effects from the changing energetic disorder in the material and from the variation due to a law of simple mixtures are quantified. It has been found that populating the higher-energy charge transfer states is not responsible for the observed change in Voc upon the addition of a third component. Aggregating polymers and miscible fullerenes are compared, and it has been concluded that in both cases charge delocalization, aggregation, and local polarization effects shift the lowest-energy charge transfer state distribution. The open-circuit voltage evolution and charge transfer state interfaces in ternary organic photovoltaic blends are investigated using several model systems. The changes in subgap spectra from energetic disorder and increased population of higher energy states are analyzed and the lowest charge transfer state distribution is observed to shift due to local aggregation and delocalization effects.

  10. Microstructural and Electronic Origins of Open-Circuit Voltage Tuning in Organic Solar Cells Based on Ternary Blends

    KAUST Repository

    Mollinger, Sonya A.; Vandewal, Koen; Salleo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Organic ternary heterojunction photovoltaic blends are sometimes observed to undergo a gradual evolution in open-circuit voltage (Voc) with increasing amounts of a second donor or an acceptor. The Voc is strongly correlated with the energy of the charge transfer state in the blend, but this value depends on both local and mesoscopic orders. In this work, the behavior of Voc in the presence of a wide range of interfacial electronic states is investigated. The key charge transfer state interfaces responsible for Voc in several model systems with varying morphology are identified. Systems consisting of one donor with two fullerene molecules and of one acceptor with a donor polymer of varying regio-regularity are used. The effects from the changing energetic disorder in the material and from the variation due to a law of simple mixtures are quantified. It has been found that populating the higher-energy charge transfer states is not responsible for the observed change in Voc upon the addition of a third component. Aggregating polymers and miscible fullerenes are compared, and it has been concluded that in both cases charge delocalization, aggregation, and local polarization effects shift the lowest-energy charge transfer state distribution. The open-circuit voltage evolution and charge transfer state interfaces in ternary organic photovoltaic blends are investigated using several model systems. The changes in subgap spectra from energetic disorder and increased population of higher energy states are analyzed and the lowest charge transfer state distribution is observed to shift due to local aggregation and delocalization effects.

  11. Spatiotemporal Distribution, Sources, and Photobleaching Imprint of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Yangtze Estuary and Its Adjacent Sea Using Fluorescence and Parallel Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Penghui; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Wen; Huang, Qinghui

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the seasonal and interannual dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the Yangtze Estuary, surface and bottom water samples in the Yangtze Estuary and its adjacent sea were collected and characterized using fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) in both dry and wet seasons in 2012 and 2013. Two protein-like components and three humic-like components were identified. Three humic-like components decreased linearly with increasing salinity (r>0.90, p<0.001), suggesting their distribution could primarily be controlled by physical mixing. By contrast, two protein-like components fell below the theoretical mixing line, largely due to microbial degradation and removal during mixing. Higher concentrations of humic-like components found in 2012 could be attributed to higher freshwater discharge relative to 2013. There was a lack of systematic patterns for three humic-like components between seasons and years, probably due to variations of other factors such as sources and characteristics. Highest concentrations of fluorescent components, observed in estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) region, could be attributed to sediment resuspension and subsequent release of DOM, supported by higher concentrations of fluorescent components in bottom water than in surface water at two stations where sediments probably resuspended. Meanwhile, photobleaching could be reflected from the changes in the ratios between fluorescence intensity (Fmax) of humic-like components and chromophoric DOM (CDOM) absorption coefficient (a355) along the salinity gradient. This study demonstrates the abundance and composition of DOM in estuaries are controlled not only by hydrological conditions, but also by its sources, characteristics and related estuarine biogeochemical processes. PMID:26107640

  12. Spatiotemporal Heterogeneity of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Waters and Soils in a Snow-dominated Headwater Catchment: Investigations at Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory, Owyhee County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, A. G.; Godsey, S.; Lohse, K. A.; Huber, D. P.; Patton, N. R.; Holbrook, S.

    2017-12-01

    The non-uniform distribution of precipitation in snowmelt-driven systems—the result of blowing and drifting snow—is a primary driver of spatial heterogeneity in vegetative communities and soil development. Snowdrifts may increase bedrock weathering below them, creating deeper soils and the potential for greater fracture flow. These snowdrift areas are also commonly more productive than the snow-starved, scoured areas where wind has removed snow. Warming-induced changes in the fraction of precipitation falling as snow, and therefore subject to drifting, may significantly affect carbon dynamics on multiple timescales. The focus of this study is to understand the coupled hydrological and carbon dynamics in a heterogeneous, drift-dominated watershed. We seek to determine the paths of soil water and groundwater in a small headwater catchment (Reynolds Mountain East, Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory, Idaho, USA). Additionally, we anticipate quantifying the flux of dissolved organic carbon through these paths, and relate this to zones of greater vegetative productivity. We deduce likely flowpaths through a combination of soil water, groundwater, and precipitation characterization. Along a transect running from a snowdrift to the stream, we measure hydrometric and hydrochemical signatures of flow throughout the snowmelt period and summer. We then use end-member-mixing analysis to interpret flowpaths in light of inferred subsurface structure derived from drilling and electrical resistance tomography transects. Preliminary results from soil moisture sensors suggest that increased bedrock weathering creates pathways by which snowmelt bypasses portions of the soil, further increasing landscape heterogeneity. Further analysis will identify seasonal changes in carbon sourcing for this watershed, but initial indications are that spring streamwater is sourced primarily from soil water, with close associations between soil carbon and DOC.

  13. Spatiotemporal Distribution, Sources, and Photobleaching Imprint of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Yangtze Estuary and Its Adjacent Sea Using Fluorescence and Parallel Factor Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghui Li

    Full Text Available To investigate the seasonal and interannual dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM in the Yangtze Estuary, surface and bottom water samples in the Yangtze Estuary and its adjacent sea were collected and characterized using fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC in both dry and wet seasons in 2012 and 2013. Two protein-like components and three humic-like components were identified. Three humic-like components decreased linearly with increasing salinity (r>0.90, p<0.001, suggesting their distribution could primarily be controlled by physical mixing. By contrast, two protein-like components fell below the theoretical mixing line, largely due to microbial degradation and removal during mixing. Higher concentrations of humic-like components found in 2012 could be attributed to higher freshwater discharge relative to 2013. There was a lack of systematic patterns for three humic-like components between seasons and years, probably due to variations of other factors such as sources and characteristics. Highest concentrations of fluorescent components, observed in estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM region, could be attributed to sediment resuspension and subsequent release of DOM, supported by higher concentrations of fluorescent components in bottom water than in surface water at two stations where sediments probably resuspended. Meanwhile, photobleaching could be reflected from the changes in the ratios between fluorescence intensity (Fmax of humic-like components and chromophoric DOM (CDOM absorption coefficient (a355 along the salinity gradient. This study demonstrates the abundance and composition of DOM in estuaries are controlled not only by hydrological conditions, but also by its sources, characteristics and related estuarine biogeochemical processes.

  14. Spatiotemporal chaos from bursting dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenstein, Igal; De Decker, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the emergence of spatiotemporal chaos from mixed-mode oscillations, by using an extended Oregonator model. We show that bursting dynamics consisting of fast/slow mixed mode oscillations along a single attractor can lead to spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics, although the spatially homogeneous solution is itself non-chaotic. This behavior is observed far from the Hopf bifurcation and takes the form of a spatiotemporal intermittency where the system locally alternates between the fast and the slow phases of the mixed mode oscillations. We expect this form of spatiotemporal chaos to be generic for models in which one or several slow variables are coupled to activator-inhibitor type of oscillators

  15. Spatio-temporal intermittency on the sandpile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzan, A.; Sinha, S.

    1990-08-01

    The self-organized critical state exhibited by a sandpile model is shown to correspond to motion on an attractor characterized by an invariant distribution of the height variable. The largest Lyapunov exponent is equal to zero. The model nonetheless displays intermittent chaos, with a multifractal distribution of local expansion coefficients in history space. Laminar spatio-temporal regions are interrupted by chaotic bursts caused by avalanches. We introduce the concept of local histories in configuration space and show that their expansion parameters also exhibit a multifractal distribution in time and space. (author). 22 refs, 5 figs

  16. Rainfall spatiotemporal variability relation to wetlands hydroperiods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Hidalgo, Carmen; Guardiola-Albert, Carolina; Fernandez-Naranjo, Nuria

    2017-04-01

    Doñana natural space (Southwestern Spain) is one of the largest protected wetlands in Europe. The wide marshes present in this natural space have such ecological value that this wetland has been declared a Ramsar reserve in 1982. Apart from the extensive marsh, there are also small lagoons and seasonally flooded areas which are likewise essential to maintain a wide variety of valuable habitats. Hydroperiod, the length of time each point remains flooded along an annual cycle, is a critical ecological parameter that shapes aquatic plants and animals distribution and determines available habitat for many of the living organisms in the marshes. Recently, there have been published two different works estimating the hydroperiod of Doñana lagoons with Landsat Time Series images (Cifuentes et al., 2015; Díaz-Delgado et al., 2016). In both works the flooding cycle hydroperiod in Doñana marshes reveals a flooding regime mainly driven by rainfall, evapotranspiration, topography and local hydrological management actions. The correlation found between rainfall and hydroperiod is studied differently in both works. While in one the rainfall is taken from one raingauge (Cifuentes et al., 2015), the one performed by Díaz-Delgado (2016) uses annual rainfall maps interpolated with the inverse of the distance method. The rainfall spatiotemporal variability in this area can be highly significant; however the amount of this importance has not been quantified at the moment. In the present work the geostatistical tool known as spatiotemporal variogram is used to study the rainfall spatiotemporal variability. The spacetime package implemented in R (Pebesma, 2012) facilities its computation from a high rainfall data base of more than 100 raingauges from 1950 to 2016. With the aid of these variograms the rainfall spatiotemporal variability is quantified. The principal aim of the present work is the study of the relation between the rainfall spatiotemporal variability and the

  17. Spatiotemporal Data Mining: A Computational Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Shekhar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Explosive growth in geospatial and temporal data as well as the emergence of new technologies emphasize the need for automated discovery of spatiotemporal knowledge. Spatiotemporal data mining studies the process of discovering interesting and previously unknown, but potentially useful patterns from large spatiotemporal databases. It has broad application domains including ecology and environmental management, public safety, transportation, earth science, epidemiology, and climatology. The complexity of spatiotemporal data and intrinsic relationships limits the usefulness of conventional data science techniques for extracting spatiotemporal patterns. In this survey, we review recent computational techniques and tools in spatiotemporal data mining, focusing on several major pattern families: spatiotemporal outlier, spatiotemporal coupling and tele-coupling, spatiotemporal prediction, spatiotemporal partitioning and summarization, spatiotemporal hotspots, and change detection. Compared with other surveys in the literature, this paper emphasizes the statistical foundations of spatiotemporal data mining and provides comprehensive coverage of computational approaches for various pattern families. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4 2307 We also list popular software tools for spatiotemporal data analysis. The survey concludes with a look at future research needs.

  18. Microstructural and superconducting properties of high current metal-organic chemical vapor deposition YBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductor wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holesinger, T G; Maiorov, B; Ugurlu, O; Civale, L; Chen, Y; Xiong, X; Xie, Y; Selvamanickam, V

    2009-01-01

    Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on flexible, ion beam assisted deposition MgO templates has been used to produce high critical current density (J c ) (Y,Sm) 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O y (REBCO) films suitable for use in producing practical high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductor wires. Thick films on tape were produced with sequential additions of 0.7 μm of REBCO via a reel-to-reel progression through a custom-designed MOCVD reactor. Multi-pass processing for thick film deposition is critically dependent upon minimizing surface secondary phase formation. Critical currents (I c s) of up to 600 A/cm width (t = 2.8 μm, J c = 2.6 MA cm -2 , 77 K, self-field) were obtained in short lengths of HTS wires. These high performance MOCVD films are characterized by closely spaced (Y,Sm) 2 O 3 nanoparticle layers that may be tilted relative to the film normal and REBCO orientation. Small shifts in the angular dependence of J c in low and intermediate applied magnetic fields can be associated with the tilted nanoparticle layers. Also present in these films were YCuO 2 nanoplates aligned with the YBCO matrix (short dimension perpendicular to the film normal), threading dislocations, and oriented composite defects (OCDs). The latter structures consist of single or multiple a-axis oriented grains coated on each side with insulating (Y,Sm) 2 O 3 or CuO. The OCDs formed a connected network of insulating phases by the end of the fourth pass. Subsequent attempts at adding additional layers did not increase I c . There is an inconsistency between the measured J c and the observed microstructural degradation that occurs with each additional layer, suggesting that previously deposited layers are improving with each repeated reactor pass. These dynamic changes suggest a role for post-processing to optimize superconducting properties of as-deposited films, addressing issues associated with reproducibility and manufacturing yield.

  19. Spatio-Temporal Data Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Ha Le

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available On the route to a spatio-temporal geoscience information system, an appropriate data model for geo-objects in space and time has been developed. In this model, geo-objects are represented as sequences of geometries and properties with continuous evolution in each time interval. Because geomodeling software systems usually model objects at specific time instances, we want to interpolate the geometry and properties from two models of an object with only geometrical constraints (no physical or mechanical constraints. This process is called spatio-temporal data construction or morphological interpolation of intermediate geometries. This paper is strictly related to shape morphing, shape deformation, cross-parameterization and compatible remeshing and is only concerned with geological surfaces. In this study, two main sub-solutions construct compatible meshes and find trajectories in which vertices of the mesh evolve. This research aims to find an algorithm to construct spatio-temporal data with some constraints from the geosciences, such as cutting surfaces by faulting or fracturing phenomena and evolving boundaries attached to other surfaces. Another goal of this research is the implementation of the algorithm in a software product, namely a gOcad plug-in. The four main procedures of the algorithm are cutting the surfaces, setting up constraints, partitioning and calculating the parameterizations and trajectories. The software has been tested to construct data for a salt dome and other surfaces in regard to the geological processes of faulting, deposition and erosion. The result of this research is an algorithm and software for the construction of spatio-temporal data.

  20. Dynamic characterizers of spatiotemporal intermittency

    OpenAIRE

    Gupte, Neelima; Jabeen, Zahera

    2006-01-01

    Systems of coupled sine circle maps show regimes of spatiotemporally intermittent behaviour with associated scaling exponents which belong to the DP class, as well as regimes of spatially intermittent behaviour (with associated regular dynamical behaviour) which do not belong to the DP class. Both types of behaviour are seen along the bifurcation boundaries of the synchronized solutions, and contribute distinct signatures to the dynamical characterizers of the system, viz. the distribution of...

  1. Compressing spatio-temporal trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Joachim; Katajainen, Jyrki; Merrick, Damian

    2009-01-01

    such that the most common spatio-temporal queries can still be answered approximately after the compression has taken place. In the process, we develop an implementation of the Douglas–Peucker path-simplification algorithm which works efficiently even in the case where the polygonal path given as input is allowed...... to self-intersect. For a polygonal path of size n, the processing time is O(nlogkn) for k=2 or k=3 depending on the type of simplification....

  2. Visual representation of spatiotemporal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, Kerstin; Zetzsche, Christoph; Brauer, Wilfried; Eisenkolb, A.; Musto, A.

    1998-07-01

    The processing and representation of motion information is addressed from an integrated perspective comprising low- level signal processing properties as well as higher-level cognitive aspects. For the low-level processing of motion information we argue that a fundamental requirement is the existence of a spatio-temporal memory. Its key feature, the provision of an orthogonal relation between external time and its internal representation, is achieved by a mapping of temporal structure into a locally distributed activity distribution accessible in parallel by higher-level processing stages. This leads to a reinterpretation of the classical concept of `iconic memory' and resolves inconsistencies on ultra-short-time processing and visual masking. The spatial-temporal memory is further investigated by experiments on the perception of spatio-temporal patterns. Results on the direction discrimination of motion paths provide evidence that information about direction and location are not processed and represented independent of each other. This suggests a unified representation on an early level, in the sense that motion information is internally available in form of a spatio-temporal compound. For the higher-level representation we have developed a formal framework for the qualitative description of courses of motion that may occur with moving objects.

  3. Spatiotemporal alignment of in utero BOLD-MRI series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Esra Abaci; Luo, Jie; Gagoski, Borjan; Pascau, Javier; Bibbo, Carolina; Robinson, Julian N; Grant, P Ellen; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Golland, Polina; Malpica, Norberto

    2017-08-01

    To present a method for spatiotemporal alignment of in-utero magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) time series acquired during maternal hyperoxia for enabling improved quantitative tracking of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes that characterize oxygen transport through the placenta to fetal organs. The proposed pipeline for spatiotemporal alignment of images acquired with a single-shot gradient echo echo-planar imaging includes 1) signal nonuniformity correction, 2) intravolume motion correction based on nonrigid registration, 3) correction of motion and nonrigid deformations across volumes, and 4) detection of the outlier volumes to be discarded from subsequent analysis. BOLD MRI time series collected from 10 pregnant women during 3T scans were analyzed using this pipeline. To assess pipeline performance, signal fluctuations between consecutive timepoints were examined. In addition, volume overlap and distance between manual region of interest (ROI) delineations in a subset of frames and the delineations obtained through propagation of the ROIs from the reference frame were used to quantify alignment accuracy. A previously demonstrated rigid registration approach was used for comparison. The proposed pipeline improved anatomical alignment of placenta and fetal organs over the state-of-the-art rigid motion correction methods. In particular, unexpected temporal signal fluctuations during the first normoxia period were significantly decreased (P quantitative studies of placental function by improving spatiotemporal alignment across placenta and fetal organs. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:403-412. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Tensor-based spatiotemporal saliency detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Hao; Li, Bin; Deng, Qianqian; Zhang, LiRui; Pan, Zhihong; Tian, Jinwen

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes an effective tensor-based spatiotemporal saliency computation model for saliency detection in videos. First, we construct the tensor representation of video frames. Then, the spatiotemporal saliency can be directly computed by the tensor distance between different tensors, which can preserve the complete temporal and spatial structure information of object in the spatiotemporal domain. Experimental results demonstrate that our method can achieve encouraging performance in comparison with the state-of-the-art methods.

  5. Spatiotemporal psychopathology I: No rest for the brain's resting state activity in depression? Spatiotemporal psychopathology of depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northoff, Georg

    2016-01-15

    Despite intense neurobiological investigation in psychiatric disorders like major depressive disorder (MDD), the basic disturbance that underlies the psychopathological symptoms of MDD remains, nevertheless, unclear. Neuroimaging has focused mainly on the brain's extrinsic activity, specifically task-evoked or stimulus-induced activity, as related to the various sensorimotor, affective, cognitive, and social functions. Recently, the focus has shifted to the brain's intrinsic activity, otherwise known as its resting state activity. While various abnormalities have been observed during this activity, their meaning and significance for depression, along with its various psychopathological symptoms, are yet to be defined. Based on findings in healthy brain resting state activity and its particular spatial and temporal structure - defined in a functional and physiological sense rather than anatomical and structural - I claim that the various depressive symptoms are spatiotemporal disturbances of the resting state activity and its spatiotemporal structure. This is supported by recent findings that link ruminations and increased self-focus in depression to abnormal spatial organization of resting state activity. Analogously, affective and cognitive symptoms like anhedonia, suicidal ideation, and thought disorder can be traced to an increased focus on the past, increased past-focus as basic temporal disturbance o the resting state. Based on these findings, I conclude that the various depressive symptoms must be conceived as spatiotemporal disturbances of the brain's resting state's activity and its spatiotemporal structure. Importantly, this entails a new form of psychopathology, "Spatiotemporal Psychopathology" that directly links the brain and psyche, therefore having major diagnostic and therapeutic implications for clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatiotemporal chaos involving wave instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenstein, Igal; Carballido-Landeira, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate pattern formation in a model of a reaction confined in a microemulsion, in a regime where both Turing and wave instability occur. In one-dimensional systems, the pattern corresponds to spatiotemporal intermittency where the behavior of the systems alternates in both time and space between stationary Turing patterns and traveling waves. In two-dimensional systems, the behavior initially may correspond to Turing patterns, which then turn into wave patterns. The resulting pattern also corresponds to a chaotic state, where the system alternates in both space and time between standing wave patterns and traveling waves, and the local dynamics may show vanishing amplitude of the variables.

  7. Noise tolerant spatiotemporal chaos computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Behnam; Kia, Sarvenaz; Lindner, John F; Sinha, Sudeshna; Ditto, William L

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and design a noise tolerant chaos computing system based on a coupled map lattice (CML) and the noise reduction capabilities inherent in coupled dynamical systems. The resulting spatiotemporal chaos computing system is more robust to noise than a single map chaos computing system. In this CML based approach to computing, under the coupled dynamics, the local noise from different nodes of the lattice diffuses across the lattice, and it attenuates each other's effects, resulting in a system with less noise content and a more robust chaos computing architecture.

  8. Nonlinear Spatio-Temporal Dynamics and Chaos in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöll, Eckehard

    2005-08-01

    Nonlinear transport phenomena are an increasingly important aspect of modern semiconductor research. This volume deals with complex nonlinear dynamics, pattern formation, and chaotic behavior in such systems. It bridges the gap between two well-established fields: the theory of dynamic systems and nonlinear charge transport in semiconductors. This unified approach helps reveal important electronic transport instabilities. The initial chapters lay a general framework for the theoretical description of nonlinear self-organized spatio-temporal patterns, such as current filaments, field domains, fronts, and analysis of their stability. Later chapters consider important model systems in detail: impact ionization induced impurity breakdown, Hall instabilities, superlattices, and low-dimensional structures. State-of-the-art results include chaos control, spatio-temporal chaos, multistability, pattern selection, activator-inhibitor kinetics, and global coupling, linking fundamental issues to electronic device applications. This book will be of great value to semiconductor physicists and nonlinear scientists alike.

  9. SPATIOTEMPORAL CONTRAST SENSITIVITY OF EARLY VISION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van

    Based on the spatial and temporal statistics of natural images, a theory is developed that specifies spatiotemporal filters that maximize the flow of information through noisy channels of limited dynamic range. Sensitivities resulting from these spatiotemporal filters are very similar to the human

  10. The Microstructure Organization and Functional Peculiarities of Euphorbia paralias L. and Polygonum maritimum L. – Halophytic Plants from Dunes of Pomorie Lake (Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Kosakivska

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the leaf surface microstructure, pigments spectrum, hormones status and lipids composition of halophytes Polygonum maritimum L. and Euphorbia paralias L. that grow under natural conditions on the dunes of Pomorie Lake, (Bulgaria. It was shown that the existence in saline and dry soils provided among others adaptive mechanisms by specific microstructure of leaf. The adaxial and abaxial surfaces of P. maritimum leaves are covered with a dense layer of cuticle wax, stomata are located on the leaf both sides below the cuticle level. In E. paralias the cuticle is also well developed on the adaxial surface of leaf laminas. The epidermis of the leaf lower side is covered with a less dense cuticle layer formed by large wax crystals. This plant has stoma pores only on the abaxial side of small leaves below the cuticle level and they are surrounded with hump-shaped cuticle constructions. A high amount of carotenoids (as compared with that of chlorophylls in P. maritimum leaves indicates that these pigments have a light-collecting function and could transfer an additional energy to chlorophylls. The high performance liquid chromatography method has been used to provide a qualitative and quantitative analysis of hormones. It was shown that in leaves of E. paralias and P. maritimum free abscisic (ABA and conjugated indole-3-acetic (IAA acids prevailed. A high level of active ABA is correlated with the salt tolerance and ability to survive and grow in stress conditions. A high level of conjugated form of IAA demonstrated that activity of this hormone is limited. The cytokinins qualitative and quantitative analyses demonstrated that in E. paralias leaves zeatin forms dominated, and the level of inactive cytokinins (cis-zeatin and zeatin-O-glucoside was much higher than that of active ones (trans-zeatin and zeatin riboside. P. maritinum leaves contained a significant quantity of isopentenyl forms

  11. Spatiotemporal Thinking in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, T. F.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Tikoff, B.

    2011-12-01

    Reasoning about spatial relations is a critical skill for geoscientists. Within the geosciences different disciplines may reason about different sorts of relationships. These relationships may span vastly different spatial and temporal scales (from the spatial alignment in atoms in crystals to the changes in the shape of plates). As part of work in a research center on spatial thinking in STEM education, we have been working to classify the spatial skills required in geology, develop tests for each spatial skill, and develop the cognitive science tools to promote the critical spatial reasoning skills. Research in psychology, neurology and linguistics supports a broad classification of spatial skills along two dimensions: one versus many objects (which roughly translates to object- focused and navigation focused skills) and static versus dynamic spatial relations. The talk will focus on the interaction of space and time in spatial cognition in the geosciences. We are working to develop measures of skill in visualizing spatiotemporal changes. A new test developed to measure visualization of brittle deformations will be presented. This is a skill that has not been clearly recognized in the cognitive science research domain and thus illustrates the value of interdisciplinary work that combines geosciences with cognitive sciences. Teaching spatiotemporal concepts can be challenging. Recent theoretical work suggests analogical reasoning can be a powerful tool to aid student learning to reason about temporal relations using spatial skills. Recent work in our lab has found that progressive alignment of spatial and temporal scales promotes accurate reasoning about temporal relations at geological time scales.

  12. Spatio-temporal problems of locomotion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolyaninov, Vladimir V

    2000-01-01

    The problem of the spatio-temporal construction of legged movements involves structural freedoms due to the multi-link structure of the extremities, kinematic freedoms of the stepping cycle, and interextremity coordination freedoms, whose purposive organization is established by means of appropriate synergies, i.e. additional functional links the brain's control system forms. The main focus of attention in this work is on the kinematic and coordination synergies of the legged movements of humans and animals. The comparative historical analysis of experimental data and modelling metaphors concentrates on obtaining a unified description, whereas the ultimate mathematical metaphor reduces to space-time geometry, with base step synergies as its invariants. Thus, the concept of a synergetic organization for biomechanical movement freedoms is transformed to the geochronometry concept, actually a modification of Minkowskian geometry. To determine the spectrum of possible geochronometries, the consequences of a generalized 'postulate of a constant speed of light' are studied and different models of wave chronometers compared. (reviews of topical problems)

  13. Diffusion weighted MRI by spatiotemporal encoding: Analytical description and in vivo validations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Eddy; Shemesh, Noam; Frydman, Lucio

    2013-07-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI is a powerful modality for studying microstructure in normal and pathological tissues. The accuracy derived from DW MRI depends on the acquisition of quality images, and on a precise assessment of the b-values involved. Conventional DW MRI tends to be of limited use in regions suffering from large magnetic field or chemical shift heterogeneities, which severely distort the MR images. In this study we propose novel sequences based on SPatio-temporal ENcoding (SPEN), which overcome such shortcomings owing to SPEN's inherent robustness to offsets. SPEN, however, relies on the simultaneous application of gradients and radiofrequency-swept pulses, which may impart different diffusion weightings along the spatial axes. These will be further complicated in DW measurements by the diffusion-sensitizing gradients, and will in general lead to complex, spatially-dependent b-values. This study presents a formalism for analyzing these diffusion-weighted SPEN (dSPEN) data, which takes into account the concomitant effects of adiabatic pulses, of the imaging as well as diffusion gradients, and of the cross-terms between them. These analytical b-values derivations are subject to experimental validations in phantom systems and ex vivo spinal cords. Excellent agreement is found between the theoretical predictions and these dSPEN experiments. The ensuing methodology is then demonstrated by in vivo mapping of diffusion in human breast - organs where conventional k-space DW acquisition methods are challenged by both field and chemical shift heterogeneities. These studies demonstrate the increased robustness of dSPEN vis-à-vis comparable DW echo planar imaging, and demonstrate the value of this new methodology for medium- or high-field diffusion measurements in heterogeneous systems.

  14. The World Spatiotemporal Analytics and Mapping Project (WSTAMP): Discovering, Exploring, and Mapping Spatiotemporal Patterns Across Heterogenous Space-Time Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, A.; Stewart, R.; Held, E.; Piburn, J.; Allen, M. R.; McManamay, R.; Sanyal, J.; Sorokine, A.; Bhaduri, B. L.

    2017-12-01

    Spatiotemporal (ST) analytics applied to major spatio-temporal data sources from major vendors such as USGS, NOAA, World Bank and World Health Organization have tremendous value in shedding light on the evolution of physical, cultural, and geopolitical landscapes on a local and global level. Especially powerful is the integration of these physical and cultural datasets across multiple and disparate formats, facilitating new interdisciplinary analytics and insights. Realizing this potential first requires an ST data model that addresses challenges in properly merging data from multiple authors, with evolving ontological perspectives, semantical differences, changing attributes, and content that is textual, numeric, categorical, and hierarchical. Equally challenging is the development of analytical and visualization approaches that provide a serious exploration of this integrated data while remaining accessible to practitioners with varied backgrounds. The WSTAMP project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has yielded two major results in addressing these challenges: 1) development of the WSTAMP database, a significant advance in ST data modeling that integrates 16000+ attributes covering 200+ countries for over 50 years from over 30 major sources and 2) a novel online ST exploratory and analysis tool providing an array of modern statistical and visualization techniques for analyzing these data temporally, spatially, and spatiotemporally under a standard analytic workflow. We report on these advances, provide an illustrative case study, and inform how others may freely access the tool.

  15. Recapitulation of physiological spatiotemporal signals promotes in vitro formation of phenotypically stable human articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yiyong; Zhou, Bin; Bernhard, Jonathan; Robinson, Samuel; Burapachaisri, Aonnicha; Guo, X. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Standard isotropic culture fails to recapitulate the spatiotemporal gradients present during native development. Cartilage grown from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is poorly organized and unstable in vivo. We report that human cartilage with physiologic organization and in vivo stability can be grown in vitro from self-assembling hMSCs by implementing spatiotemporal regulation during induction. Self-assembling hMSCs formed cartilage discs in Transwell inserts following isotropic chondrogenic induction with transforming growth factor β to set up a dual-compartment culture. Following a switch in the basal compartment to a hypertrophic regimen with thyroxine, the cartilage discs underwent progressive deep-zone hypertrophy and mineralization. Concurrent chondrogenic induction in the apical compartment enabled the maintenance of functional and hyaline cartilage. Cartilage homeostasis, chondrocyte maturation, and terminal differentiation markers were all up-regulated versus isotropic control groups. We assessed the in vivo stability of the cartilage formed under different induction regimens. Cartilage formed under spatiotemporal regulation in vitro resisted endochondral ossification, retained the expression of cartilage markers, and remained organized following s.c. implantation in immunocompromised mice. In contrast, the isotropic control groups underwent endochondral ossification. Cartilage formed from hMSCs remained stable and organized in vivo. Spatiotemporal regulation during induction in vitro recapitulated some aspects of native cartilage development, and potentiated the maturation of self-assembling hMSCs into stable and organized cartilage resembling the native articular cartilage. PMID:28228529

  16. Continuous media with microstructure

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    This book discusses the extension of classical continuum models. To the first class addressed belong various thermodynamic models of multicomponent systems, and to the second class belong primarily microstructures created by phase transformations.

  17. Optics of dielectric microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    From the work carried out within the ph.d. project two topics have been selected for this thesis, namely emission of radiation by sources in dielectric microstructures, and planar photonic crystal waveguides. The work done within the first topic, emission of radiation by sources in dielectric...... microstructures, will be presented in the part I of this thesis consisting of the chapters 2-5. An introductions is given in chapter 2. In part I three methods are presented for calculating spontaneous and classical emission from sources in dielectric microstructures. The first method presented in chapter 3...... is based on the Fermi Golden Rule, and spontaneous emission from emitters in a passive dielectric microstructure is calculated by summing over the emission into each electromagnetic mode of the radiation field. This method is applied to investigate spontaneous emission in a two-dimensional photonic crystal...

  18. Zirconium microstructures: uncharted possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samajdar, I.; Kumar, Gulshan; Singh, Jaiveer; Lodh, Arijit; Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.; Saibaba, N.

    2015-01-01

    The 'conventional' Zirconium microstructures can be significantly extended with information on: (i) microtexture, (ii) residual stresses and (iii) local mechanical properties. Though these involve different tools, but a consolidated microstructure can be crated. This is the theme of this presentation. Examples of this consolidated picture will be made from deformation twinning, recovery-recrystallization, burst ductility and orientation versus solid solution hardening. (author)

  19. Superlattice Microstructured Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Ming-Leung Vincent; Liu, Zhengyong; Cho, Lok-Hin; Lu, Chao; Wai, Ping-Kong Alex; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2014-01-01

    A generic three-stage stack-and-draw method is demonstrated for the fabrication of complex-microstructured optical fibers. We report the fabrication and characterization of a silica superlattice microstructured fiber with more than 800 rhomboidally arranged air-holes. A polarization-maintaining fiber with a birefringence of 8.5 × 10−4 is demonstrated. The birefringent property of the fiber is found to be highly insensitive to external environmental effects, such as pressure. PMID:28788693

  20. Imaging brain tumour microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Markus; Englund, Elisabet; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; van Westen, Danielle; Sundgren, Pia C

    2018-05-08

    Imaging is an indispensable tool for brain tumour diagnosis, surgical planning, and follow-up. Definite diagnosis, however, often demands histopathological analysis of microscopic features of tissue samples, which have to be obtained by invasive means. A non-invasive alternative may be to probe corresponding microscopic tissue characteristics by MRI, or so called 'microstructure imaging'. The promise of microstructure imaging is one of 'virtual biopsy' with the goal to offset the need for invasive procedures in favour of imaging that can guide pre-surgical planning and can be repeated longitudinally to monitor and predict treatment response. The exploration of such methods is motivated by the striking link between parameters from MRI and tumour histology, for example the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient and cellularity. Recent microstructure imaging techniques probe even more subtle and specific features, providing parameters associated to cell shape, size, permeability, and volume distributions. However, the range of scenarios in which these techniques provide reliable imaging biomarkers that can be used to test medical hypotheses or support clinical decisions is yet unknown. Accurate microstructure imaging may moreover require acquisitions that go beyond conventional data acquisition strategies. This review covers a wide range of candidate microstructure imaging methods based on diffusion MRI and relaxometry, and explores advantages, challenges, and potential pitfalls in brain tumour microstructure imaging. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Stochastic Effects in Microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glicksman M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We are currently studying microstructural responses to diffusion-limited coarsening in two-phase materials. A mathematical solution to late-stage multiparticle diffusion in finite systems is formulated with account taken of particle-particle interactions and their microstructural correlations, or "locales". The transition from finite system behavior to that for an infinite microstructure is established analytically. Large-scale simulations of late-stage phase coarsening dynamics show increased fluctuations with increasing volume fraction, Vv, of the mean flux entering or leaving particles of a given size class. Fluctuations about the mean flux were found to depend on the scaled particle size, R/, where R is the radius of a particle and is the radius of the dispersoid averaged over the population within the microstructure. Specifically, small (shrinking particles tend to display weak fluctuations about their mean flux, whereas particles of average, or above average size, exhibit strong fluctuations. Remarkably, even in cases of microstructures with a relatively small volume fraction (Vv ~ 10-4, the particle size distribution is broader than that for the well-known Lifshitz-Slyozov limit predicted at zero volume fraction. The simulation results reported here provide some additional surprising insights into the effect of diffusion interactions and stochastic effects during evolution of a microstructure, as it approaches its thermodynamic end-state.

  2. On the microstructure of organic solutions of mono-carboxylic acids: Combined study by infrared spectroscopy, small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremin, Roman A., E-mail: era@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo T. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); International University “Dubna”, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv 03022 (Ukraine); Rosta, László [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary); Grigoryeva, Natalia A. [Faculty of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, 198504 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-05

    Highlights: • The model of the scattering particle for a reliable SANS analysis is proposed. • The structural parameters of saturated mono-carboxylic acids in solutions are obtained. • The differences in nematic transitions correlate to solvation peculiarities. - Abstract: The data of infrared spectroscopy (IR), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) have been combined to conclude about the nanoscale structural organization of organic non-polar solutions of saturated mono-carboxylic acids with different alkyl chain lengths for diluted solutions of saturated myristic (C14) and stearic (C18) acids in benzene and decalin. In particular, the degree of dimerization was found from the IR spectra. The structural anisotropy of the acids and their dimers was used in the treatment of the data of MD simulations to describe the solute–solvent interface in a cylindrical approximation and show its rather strong influence on SANS. The corresponding scattering length density profiles were used to fit the experimental SANS data comprising the information about the acid molecule isomerization. The SANS data from concentrated solutions showed a partial self-assembling of the acids within the nematic transition is different for two solvents due to lyophobic peculiarities.

  3. Proton beam writing on PMMA and SU-8 films as a tool for development of micro-structures for organic electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Mihir, E-mail: mihirs@iitk.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Shukla, Neeraj; Banerji, Nobin [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Mohapatra, Y.N. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Materials Science Programme, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Samtel Center for Display Technologies, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2012-02-15

    Proton beam writing is a maskless lithographic technique for the fabrication of 3D micro and nano structures in polymers. The fabricated structures find application in micro fluidics, optics, biosensors, etc. We use proton beam writing for micro-patterning in polymers which will facilitate fabrication of test structures for micro-components of micro-fluidic devices, organic thin film transistors (OTFT) and organic light emitting diodes (OLED). In this paper we report fabrication of varying width micro channels in PMMA and SU-8 films used as positive and negative resists respectively. The patterns were written using 2 MeV proton beam focused down to around 1 micron. We have achieved clean periodic micro-channels of width varying from few micrometers to wider ones in both the resists. Being a mask less lithography it provides an efficient way of reducing turnaround time for test structures with several channel widths and patterns being conveniently written at the same development cycle. Possible applications of the patterned structures in OLED/TFT are discussed. Additional structures like checkered board are also fabricated. Optimized fluence for both the resist has been determined.

  4. AxTract: Toward microstructure informed tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Gabriel; Daducci, Alessandro; Petit, Laurent; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Whittingstall, Kevin; Deriche, Rachid; Wassermann, Demian; Descoteaux, Maxime

    2017-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tractography has become the tool of choice to probe the human brain's white matter in vivo. However, tractography algorithms produce a large number of erroneous streamlines (false positives), largely due to complex ambiguous tissue configurations. Moreover, the relationship between the resulting streamlines and the underlying white matter microstructure characteristics remains poorly understood. In this work, we introduce a new approach to simultaneously reconstruct white matter fascicles and characterize the apparent distribution of axon diameters within fascicles. To achieve this, our method, AxTract, takes full advantage of the recent development DW-MRI microstructure acquisition, modeling, and reconstruction techniques. This enables AxTract to separate parallel fascicles with different microstructure characteristics, hence reducing ambiguities in areas of complex tissue configuration. We report a decrease in the incidence of erroneous streamlines compared to the conventional deterministic tractography algorithms on simulated data. We also report an average increase in streamline density over 15 known fascicles of the 34 healthy subjects. Our results suggest that microstructure information improves tractography in crossing areas of the white matter. Moreover, AxTract provides additional microstructure information along the fascicle that can be studied alongside other streamline-based indices. Overall, AxTract provides the means to distinguish and follow white matter fascicles using their microstructure characteristics, bringing new insights into the white matter organization. This is a step forward in microstructure informed tractography, paving the way to a new generation of algorithms able to deal with intricate configurations of white matter fibers and providing quantitative brain connectivity analysis. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5485-5500, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  6. Organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  7. Elimination of spiral waves and spatiotemporal chaos by the pulse with a specific spatiotemporal configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Guoyong; Yang Shiping; Wang Guangrui; Chen Shigang

    2008-01-01

    Spiral waves and spatiotemporal chaos are sometimes harmful and should be controlled. In this paper spiral waves and spatiotemporal chaos are successfully eliminated by the pulse with a very specific spatiotemporal configuration. The excited position D of spiral waves or spatiotemporal chaos is first recorded at an arbitrary time (t 0 ). When the system at the domain D enters a recovering state, the external pulse is injected into the domain. If the intensity and the working time of the pulse are appropriate, spiral waves and spatiotemporal chaos can finally be eliminated because counter-directional waves can be generated by the pulse. There are two advantages in the method. One is that the tip can be quickly eliminated together with the body of spiral wave, and the other is that the injected pulse may be weak and the duration can be very short so that the original system is nearly not affected, which is important for practical applications

  8. Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Palanisamy, Giri; Green, James; Wilson, Bruce; Rhyne, B. Timothy; Lindsley, Chris

    2010-06-01

    Mercury (http://mercury.ornl.gov) is a set of tools for federated harvesting, searching, and retrieving metadata, particularly spatiotemporal metadata. Version 3.0 of the Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. It provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use different metadata formats. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury periodically (typically daily)harvests metadata sources through a collection of interfaces and re-indexes these metadata to provide extremely rapid search capabilities, even over collections with tens of millions of metadata records. A number of both graphical and application interfaces have been constructed within Mercury, to enable both human users and other computer programs to perform queries. Mercury was also designed to support multiple different projects, so that the particular fields that can be queried and used with search filters are easy to configure for each different project.

  9. Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bruce E.; Palanisamy, Giri; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Rhyne, B. Timothy; Lindsley, Chris; Green, James

    2010-01-01

    Mercury (http://mercury.ornl.gov) is a set of tools for federated harvesting, searching, and retrieving metadata, particularly spatiotemporal metadata. Version 3.0 of the Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. It provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use different metadata formats. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury periodically (typically daily) harvests metadata sources through a collection of interfaces and re-indexes these metadata to provide extremely rapid search capabilities, even over collections with tens of millions of metadata records. A number of both graphical and application interfaces have been constructed within Mercury, to enable both human users and other computer programs to perform queries. Mercury was also designed to support multiple different projects, so that the particular fields that can be queried and used with search filters are easy to configure for each different project.

  10. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from......Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  11. Research on Process-oriented Spatio-temporal Data Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XUE Cunjin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the analysis of the present status and existing problems of spatio-temporal data models developed in last 20 years,this paper proposes a process-oriented spatio-temporal data model (POSTDM,aiming at representing,organizing and storing continuity and gradual geographical entities. The dynamic geographical entities are graded and abstracted into process objects series from their intrinsic characteristics,which are process objects,process stage objects,process sequence objects and process state objects. The logical relationships among process entities are further studied and the structure of UML models and storage are also designed. In addition,through the mechanisms of continuity and gradual changes impliedly recorded by process objects,and the modes of their procedure interfaces offered by the customized ObjcetStorageTable,the POSTDM can carry out process representation,storage and dynamic analysis of continuity and gradual geographic entities. Taking a process organization and storage of marine data as an example,a prototype system (consisting of an object-relational database and a functional analysis platform is developed for validating and evaluating the model's practicability.

  12. Fracture mechanics and microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, M.G.; Morrell, R.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of microstructure on defects in ceramics, and the consequences of their presence for the application of fracture mechanics theories are reviewed. The complexities of microstructures, especially the multiphase nature, the crystallographic anisotropy and the resultant anisotropic physical properties, and the variation of microstructure and surface finish from point to point in real components, all lead to considerable uncertainties in the actual performance of any particular component. It is concluded that although the concepts of fracture mechanics have been and will continue to be most useful for the qualitative explanation of fracture phenomena, the usefulness as a predictive tool with respect to most existing types of material is limited by the interrelation between material microstructure and mechanical properties. At present, the only method of eliminating components with unsatisfactory mechanical properties is to proof-test them, despite the fact that proof-testing itself is limited in ability to cope with changes to the component in service. The aim of the manufacturer must be to improve quality and consistency within individual components, from component to component, and from batch to batch. The aim of the fracture specialist must be to study longer-term properties to improve the accuracy of behaviour predictions with a stronger data base. Materials development needs to concentrate on obtaining defect-free materials that can be translated into more-reliable products, using our present understanding of the influence of microstructure on strength and toughness

  13. The Advantages of Human Milk Recognize the Spatiotemporal Locations of Toxins and Intelligently Bypass Them by Forming a Hummingbird-Like Hovering Neural Network Circuitry Based on an Organic Biomimetic Choline Acetyltransferase Memristor/Memcapacitor Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. CHEN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated a unique approach to study human milk’s advantage in promoting and protecting infant early brain cognitive development by recognizing toxins and intelligently bypassing the toxin by forming high frequency oscillation (HFO in the brain circuitry when compared with organic cow milk samples based on an organic memristor/memcapacitor biomimetic Choline Acetyltransferase (CHAT neural network circuitry prosthesis along with a 3D Energy-sensory dynamic mapping method under antibody- free, radiolabeling-free, and reagent-less conditions. We also demonstrated cow milk is unfit for infant cognitive development, and it is actually harmful in terms of mutating infant brain synapse circuitry conformation, current flow direction, and energy output that lead to multiple Pathological High Frequency Oscillation (pHFO formations, and further, it led to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS based on our prediction.

  14. Microstructuring of glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  15. Optimization of Spatiotemporal Apertures in Channel Sounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels; Pedersen, Claus; Yin, Xuefeng

    2008-01-01

    a spatiotemporal model which can describe parallel as well as switched sounding systems. The proposed model is applicable for arbitrary layouts of the spatial arrays. To simplify the derivations we investigate the special case of linear spatial arrays. However, the results obtained for linear arrays can......In this paper we investigate the impact of the spatio-temporal aperture of a channel sounding system equipped with antenna arrays at the transmitter and receiver on the accuracy of joint estimation of Doppler frequency and bi-direction. The contribution of this work is three-fold. Firstly, we state...... be generalized to arbitrary arrays. Secondly, we give the necessary and sufficient conditions for a spatio-temporal array to yield the minimum Cramér-Rao lower bound in the single-path case and Bayesian Cramér-Rao Lower Bound in the multipath case. The obtained conditions amount to an orthogonality condition...

  16. Spatio-Temporal Data Exchange Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Schmidt, Albrecht

    2003-01-01

    We believe that research that concerns aspects of spatio-temporal data management may benefit from taking into account the various standards for spatio-temporal data formats. For example, this may contribute to rendering prototype software “open” and more readily useful. This paper thus identifies...... and briefly surveys standardization in relation to primarily the exchange and integration of spatio-temporal data. An overview of several data exchange languages is offered, along with reviews their potential for facilitating the collection of test data and the leveraging of prototypes. The standards, most...... of which are XML-based, lend themselves to the integration of prototypes into middleware architectures, e.g., as Web services....

  17. Spatiotemporal representation of cardiac vectorcardiogram (VCG signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hui

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vectorcardiogram (VCG signals monitor both spatial and temporal cardiac electrical activities along three orthogonal planes of the body. However, the absence of spatiotemporal resolution in conventional VCG representations is a major impediment for medical interpretation and clinical usage of VCG. This is especially so because time-domain features of 12-lead ECG, instead of both spatial and temporal characteristics of VCG, are widely used for the automatic assessment of cardiac pathological patterns. Materials and methods We present a novel representation approach that captures critical spatiotemporal heart dynamics by displaying the real time motion of VCG cardiac vectors in a 3D space. Such a dynamic display can also be realized with only one lead ECG signal (e.g., ambulatory ECG through an alternative lag-reconstructed ECG representation from nonlinear dynamics principles. Furthermore, the trajectories are color coded with additional dynamical properties of space-time VCG signals, e.g., the curvature, speed, octant and phase angles to enhance the information visibility. Results In this investigation, spatiotemporal VCG signal representation is used to characterize various spatiotemporal pathological patterns for healthy control (HC, myocardial infarction (MI, atrial fibrillation (AF and bundle branch block (BBB. The proposed color coding scheme revealed that the spatial locations of the peak of T waves are in the Octant 6 for the majority (i.e., 74 out of 80 of healthy recordings in the PhysioNet PTB database. In contrast, the peak of T waves from 31.79% (117/368 of MI subjects are found to remain in Octant 6 and the rest (68.21% spread over all other octants. The spatiotemporal VCG signal representation is shown to capture the same important heart characteristics as the 12-lead ECG plots and more. Conclusions Spatiotemporal VCG signal representation is shown to facilitate the characterization of space-time cardiac

  18. Microstructure of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, I.M.

    1995-01-01

    The focus of the symposium was on the changes produced in the microstructure of metals, ceramics, and semiconductors by irradiation with energetic particles. the symposium brought together those working in the different material systems, which revealed that there are a remarkable number of similarities in the irradiation-produced microstructures in the different classes of materials. Experimental, computational and theoretical contributions were intermixed in all of the sessions. This provided an opportunity for these groups, which should interact, to do so. Separate abstracts were prepared for 58 papers in this book

  19. Modificaciones de la microestructura y la materia orgánica en un Argiudol bajo distintas condiciones de cultivo y conservación Microstructure and organic matter modifications in an Agiudoll under different conditions of cultivation and conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz A. Bonel

    2005-07-01

    orgánico" entre las situaciones agrícolas se refleja también en los resultados del análisis de estabilidad de los agregados mediante el método de Henin.The microstructure and the organic matter of the upper part of the A horizon of a silty-loamy Typic Argiudoll in two non cultivated situations (NLp: park in an Experimental Station; NLv: preserved area close to a railroad and under two agricultural management systems (SD: no-till; LR:disk ploughing, are compared. In all cases micromorphological analyses revealed a marked vertical anisotropy constituted by at least three microstructural levels in the first 10 cm of the soil, though the characteristics of those layers differ among the studied situations. Synthetically, NL situations showed a predominance of packing voids and biological features; the SD treatment is characterized by a subsurface layer with laminar aggregates and a predominance of horizontal planar voids; the LR treatment shows a crust development at the surface, low porosity determined by horizontal planar voids and vesicles, together with a lower content of organic residues. There were no significative differences in the quantity and quality of organic matter in the soil comparing SD and LR systems. In this context, it is considered that the long lasting laminar structure developed in the SD system and the temporary surface crust in the LR system are acting in a converging way, both restricting the mixing of organic and mineral phases of the soil. In SD a high accumulation and conservation of the organic compounds occur at the surface, but the biological activity after 10 years of cultivation was not strong enough to incorporate it at more than a few mm of depth. In LR, after ploughing, there is a deeper incorporation of OM, but collaterally a higher degradation occurs. In this way the final balance of the OM in the A horizon appears to be similar in both systems. The similarity in the organic pool between both situations seems to be reflected also

  20. Analyzing Spatiotemporal Anomalies through Interactive Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As we move into the big data era, data grows not just in size, but also in complexity, containing a rich set of attributes, including location and time information, such as data from mobile devices (e.g., smart phones, natural disasters (e.g., earthquake and hurricane, epidemic spread, etc. We are motivated by the rising challenge and build a visualization tool for exploring generic spatiotemporal data, i.e., records containing time location information and numeric attribute values. Since the values often evolve over time and across geographic regions, we are particularly interested in detecting and analyzing the anomalous changes over time/space. Our analytic tool is based on geographic information system and is combined with spatiotemporal data mining algorithms, as well as various data visualization techniques, such as anomaly grids and anomaly bars superimposed on the map. We study how effective the tool may guide users to find potential anomalies through demonstrating and evaluating over publicly available spatiotemporal datasets. The tool for spatiotemporal anomaly analysis and visualization is useful in many domains, such as security investigation and monitoring, situation awareness, etc.

  1. Comparison of Spatiotemporal Fusion Models: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneously capturing spatial and temporal dynamics is always a challenge for the remote sensing community. Spatiotemporal fusion has gained wide interest in various applications for its superiority in integrating both fine spatial resolution and frequent temporal coverage. Though many advances have been made in spatiotemporal fusion model development and applications in the past decade, a unified comparison among existing fusion models is still limited. In this research, we classify the models into three categories: transformation-based, reconstruction-based, and learning-based models. The objective of this study is to (i compare four fusion models (STARFM, ESTARFM, ISTAFM, and SPSTFM under a one Landsat-MODIS (L-M pair prediction mode and two L-M pair prediction mode using time-series datasets from the Coleambally irrigation area and Poyang Lake wetland; (ii quantitatively assess prediction accuracy considering spatiotemporal comparability, landscape heterogeneity, and model parameter selection; and (iii discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the three categories of spatiotemporal fusion models.

  2. Spatio-temporal modeling for residential burglary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfoud, M.; Bhulai, Sandjai; van der Mei, R.D.; Bhulai, Sandjai; Kardaras, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    Spatio-temporal modeling is widely recognized as a promising means for predicting crime patterns. Despite their enormous potential, the available methods are still in their infancy. A lot of research focuses on crime hotspot detection and geographic crime clusters, while a systematic approach to

  3. Spatiotemporal complexity in coupled map lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    1986-01-01

    Some spatiotemporal patterns of couple map lattices are presented. The chaotic kink-like motions are shown for the phase motion of the coupled circle lattices. An extension of the couple map lattice approach to Hamiltonian dynamics is briefly reported. An attempt to characterize the high-dimensional attractor by the extension of the correlation dimension is discussed. (author)

  4. A Flexible Spatio-Temporal Model for Air Pollution with Spatial and Spatio-Temporal Covariates

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Johan; Szpiro, Adam A; Sampson, Paul D; Oron, Assaf P; Richards, Mark; Larson, Tim V; Sheppard, Lianne

    2013-01-01

    The development of models that provide accurate spatio-temporal predictions of ambient air pollution at small spatial scales is of great importance for the assessment of potential health effects of air pollution. Here we present a spatio-temporal framework that predicts ambient air pollution by combining data from several different monitoring networks and deterministic air pollution model(s) with geographic information system (GIS) covariates. The model presented in this paper has been implem...

  5. The Voronoi spatio-temporal data structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioc, Darka

    2002-04-01

    Current GIS models cannot integrate the temporal dimension of spatial data easily. Indeed, current GISs do not support incremental (local) addition and deletion of spatial objects, and they can not support the temporal evolution of spatial data. Spatio-temporal facilities would be very useful in many GIS applications: harvesting and forest planning, cadastre, urban and regional planning, and emergency planning. The spatio-temporal model that can overcome these problems is based on a topological model---the Voronoi data structure. Voronoi diagrams are irregular tessellations of space, that adapt to spatial objects and therefore they are a synthesis of raster and vector spatial data models. The main advantage of the Voronoi data structure is its local and sequential map updates, which allows us to automatically record each event and performed map updates within the system. These map updates are executed through map construction commands that are composed of atomic actions (geometric algorithms for addition, deletion, and motion of spatial objects) on the dynamic Voronoi data structure. The formalization of map commands led to the development of a spatial language comprising a set of atomic operations or constructs on spatial primitives (points and lines), powerful enough to define the complex operations. This resulted in a new formal model for spatio-temporal change representation, where each update is uniquely characterized by the numbers of newly created and inactivated Voronoi regions. This is used for the extension of the model towards the hierarchical Voronoi data structure. In this model, spatio-temporal changes induced by map updates are preserved in a hierarchical data structure that combines events and corresponding changes in topology. This hierarchical Voronoi data structure has an implicit time ordering of events visible through changes in topology, and it is equivalent to an event structure that can support temporal data without precise temporal

  6. Chemically resistant, biocompatible and microstructured surface protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, W.; Pham, M.T.; Hueller, J.

    1984-01-01

    Subject of the invention are chemicallly resistant, biocompatible, and microstructured surface protective coatings of electronic elements and sensors including chemical sensors. Such coatings consist of a radiation-modified organic substance made of a microlithographic material. Modification can be achieved by irradiation with ions, atoms or molecules having an energy between 1 KeV and 1 MeV and a flux between 10 13 and 10 18 particles per cm 2

  7. Research Opportunities for Materials with Ultrafine Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-31

    network with uniformly large pores (see Figure 2). An acidic DCCA, such as oxalic acid , in contrast, results in a somewhat smaller-scale network...bacteriorhodopsin macromolecule 12 FIGURE 2 Control of sol-gel processing with organic acid DCCAs 16 FIGURE 3 Densification microstructures for SiO 2 gels...monodispersed particles and hydrothermal synthesis of composites. Of recent interest in polymeric materials has been the development of rigid-rod

  8. Spatiotemporal drought forecasting using nonlinear models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliades, Lampros; Loukas, Athanasios

    2010-05-01

    Spatiotemporal data mining is the extraction of unknown and implicit knowledge, structures, spatiotemporal relationships, or patterns not explicitly stored in spatiotemporal databases. As one of data mining techniques, forecasting is widely used to predict the unknown future based upon the patterns hidden in the current and past data. In order to achieve spatiotemporal forecasting, some mature analysis tools, e.g., time series and spatial statistics are extended to the spatial dimension and the temporal dimension, respectively. Drought forecasting plays an important role in the planning and management of natural resources and water resource systems in a river basin. Early and timelines forecasting of a drought event can help to take proactive measures and set out drought mitigation strategies to alleviate the impacts of drought. Despite the widespread application of nonlinear mathematical models, comparative studies on spatiotemporal drought forecasting using different models are still a huge task for modellers. This study uses a promising approach, the Gamma Test (GT), to select the input variables and the training data length, so that the trial and error workload could be greatly reduced. The GT enables to quickly evaluate and estimate the best mean squared error that can be achieved by a smooth model on any unseen data for a given selection of inputs, prior to model construction. The GT is applied to forecast droughts using monthly Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) timeseries at multiple timescales in several precipitation stations at Pinios river basin in Thessaly region, Greece. Several nonlinear models have been developed efficiently, with the aid of the GT, for 1-month up to 12-month ahead forecasting. Several temporal and spatial statistical indices were considered for the performance evaluation of the models. The predicted results show reasonably good agreement with the actual data for short lead times, whereas the forecasting accuracy decreases with

  9. Experimental variation of the level and the ratio of angiogenic and osteogenic signaling affects the spatiotemporal expression of bone-specific markers and organization of bone formation in ectopic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Norman; Goldstein, Jan; Kauffmann, Phillip; Epple, Matthias; Schliephake, Henning

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the ratio of angiogenic and osteogenic signaling affects ectopic bone formation when delivered in different amounts. Porous composite PDLLA/CaCO 3 scaffolds were loaded with rhBMP2 and rhVEGF in different dosage combinations and implanted into the gluteal muscles of 120 adult male Wistar rats. Bone formation and expression of alkaline phosphatase and Runx2 were quantified by histomorphometry. Spatial distribution across the scaffolds was assessed by using a grid that discriminated between the periphery and center of the scaffolds. The evaluation showed that the combined delivery of bone morphogenetic protein BMP2 and VEGF in different dosage combinations did not enhance the overall quantity of ectopic bone formation compared to the delivery of BMP2 alone. The addition of VEGF generally upregulated Runx2 after 4 weeks, which may have retarded terminal osteogenic differentiation. However, slow combined delivery of 1.5-2.0 μg BMP2 combined with 50 ng VEGF165 over a period of 5 weeks supported a more even distribution of bone formation across the implanted scaffolds whereas higher amounts of VEGF did not elicit this effect. The findings suggest that structural organization rather than the quantity of ectopic bone formation is affected by the dosage and the ratio of BMP2 and VEGF levels at the observed intervals. The development of carriers for dual growth factor delivery has to take into account the necessity to carefully balance the ratio of growth release.

  10. Microstructural and superconducting properties of high current metal-organic chemical vapor deposition YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} coated conductor wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holesinger, T G; Maiorov, B; Ugurlu, O; Civale, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chen, Y; Xiong, X; Xie, Y; Selvamanickam, V [SuperPower, Inc., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on flexible, ion beam assisted deposition MgO templates has been used to produce high critical current density (J{sub c}) (Y,Sm){sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (REBCO) films suitable for use in producing practical high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductor wires. Thick films on tape were produced with sequential additions of 0.7 {mu}m of REBCO via a reel-to-reel progression through a custom-designed MOCVD reactor. Multi-pass processing for thick film deposition is critically dependent upon minimizing surface secondary phase formation. Critical currents (I{sub c}s) of up to 600 A/cm width (t = 2.8 {mu}m, J{sub c} = 2.6 MA cm{sup -2}, 77 K, self-field) were obtained in short lengths of HTS wires. These high performance MOCVD films are characterized by closely spaced (Y,Sm){sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticle layers that may be tilted relative to the film normal and REBCO orientation. Small shifts in the angular dependence of J{sub c} in low and intermediate applied magnetic fields can be associated with the tilted nanoparticle layers. Also present in these films were YCuO{sub 2} nanoplates aligned with the YBCO matrix (short dimension perpendicular to the film normal), threading dislocations, and oriented composite defects (OCDs). The latter structures consist of single or multiple a-axis oriented grains coated on each side with insulating (Y,Sm){sub 2}O{sub 3} or CuO. The OCDs formed a connected network of insulating phases by the end of the fourth pass. Subsequent attempts at adding additional layers did not increase I{sub c}. There is an inconsistency between the measured J{sub c} and the observed microstructural degradation that occurs with each additional layer, suggesting that previously deposited layers are improving with each repeated reactor pass. These dynamic changes suggest a role for post-processing to optimize superconducting properties of as-deposited films, addressing issues associated with

  11. Identification of microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha, A.F.; Ambrozio Filho, F.

    1984-01-01

    The identification of phases in a material can require the utilization of several techniques. The most used technique and discussed are: optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and 'in-situ' chemical analysis of the phases. The microstructures were classified, in according to the size and phase volumetric fraction, in four types. For each type the most appropriate techniques for identifying the phases are discussed. (E.G.) [pt

  12. ESIPT-Based Photoactivatable Fluorescent Probe for Ratiometric Spatiotemporal Bioimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Photoactivatable fluorophores have become an important technique for the high spatiotemporal resolution of biological imaging. Here, we developed a novel photoactivatable probe (PHBT, which is based on 2-(2-hydroxyphenylbenzothiazole (HBT, a small organic fluorophore known for its classic luminescence mechanism through excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT with the keto form and the enol form. After photocleavage, PHBT released a ratiometric fluorophore HBT, which showed dual emission bands with more than 73-fold fluorescence enhancement at 512 nm in buffer and more than 69-fold enhancement at 452 nm in bovine serum. The probe displayed a high ratiometric imaging resolution and is believed to have a wide application in biological imaging.

  13. Distillation and Visualization of Spatiotemporal Structures in Turbulent Flow Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hege, Hans-Christian; Hotz, Ingrid; Kasten, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Although turbulence suggests randomness and disorder, organized motions that cause spatiotemporal 'coherent structures' are of particular interest. Revealing such structures in numerically given turbulent or semi-turbulent flows is of interest both for practically working engineers and theoretically oriented physicists. However, as long as there is no common agreement about the mathematical definition of coherent structures, extracting such structures is a vaguely defined task. Instead of searching for a general definition, the data visualization community takes a pragmatic approach and provides various tool chains implemented in flexible software frameworks that allow the user to extract distinct flow field structures. Thus physicists or engineers can select those flow structures which might advance their insight best. We present different approaches to distill important features from turbulent flows and discuss the necessary steps to be taken on the example of Lagrangian coherent structures.

  14. Energy prediction using spatiotemporal pattern networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zhanhong; Liu, Chao; Akintayo, Adedotun; Henze, Gregor P.; Sarkar, Soumik

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a novel data-driven technique based on the spatiotemporal pattern network (STPN) for energy/power prediction for complex dynamical systems. Built on symbolic dynamical filtering, the STPN framework is used to capture not only the individual system characteristics but also the pair-wise causal dependencies among different sub-systems. To quantify causal dependencies, a mutual information based metric is presented and an energy prediction approach is subsequently proposed based on the STPN framework. To validate the proposed scheme, two case studies are presented, one involving wind turbine power prediction (supply side energy) using the Western Wind Integration data set generated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for identifying spatiotemporal characteristics, and the other, residential electric energy disaggregation (demand side energy) using the Building America 2010 data set from NREL for exploring temporal features. In the energy disaggregation context, convex programming techniques beyond the STPN framework are developed and applied to achieve improved disaggregation performance.

  15. What Is Spatio-Temporal Data Warehousing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisman, Alejandro; Zimányi, Esteban

    In the last years, extending OLAP (On-Line Analytical Processing) systems with spatial and temporal features has attracted the attention of the GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and database communities. However, there is no a commonly agreed definition of what is a spatio-temporal data warehouse and what functionality such a data warehouse should support. Further, the solutions proposed in the literature vary considerably in the kind of data that can be represented as well as the kind of queries that can be expressed. In this paper we present a conceptual framework for defining spatio-temporal data warehouses using an extensible data type system. We also define a taxonomy of different classes of queries of increasing expressive power, and show how to express such queries using an extension of the tuple relational calculus with aggregated functions.

  16. Statistical methods for spatio-temporal systems

    CERN Document Server

    Finkenstadt, Barbel

    2006-01-01

    Statistical Methods for Spatio-Temporal Systems presents current statistical research issues on spatio-temporal data modeling and will promote advances in research and a greater understanding between the mechanistic and the statistical modeling communities.Contributed by leading researchers in the field, each self-contained chapter starts with an introduction of the topic and progresses to recent research results. Presenting specific examples of epidemic data of bovine tuberculosis, gastroenteric disease, and the U.K. foot-and-mouth outbreak, the first chapter uses stochastic models, such as point process models, to provide the probabilistic backbone that facilitates statistical inference from data. The next chapter discusses the critical issue of modeling random growth objects in diverse biological systems, such as bacteria colonies, tumors, and plant populations. The subsequent chapter examines data transformation tools using examples from ecology and air quality data, followed by a chapter on space-time co...

  17. Spatiotemporal patterns and predictability of cyberattacks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Zhong Chen

    Full Text Available A relatively unexplored issue in cybersecurity science and engineering is whether there exist intrinsic patterns of cyberattacks. Conventional wisdom favors absence of such patterns due to the overwhelming complexity of the modern cyberspace. Surprisingly, through a detailed analysis of an extensive data set that records the time-dependent frequencies of attacks over a relatively wide range of consecutive IP addresses, we successfully uncover intrinsic spatiotemporal patterns underlying cyberattacks, where the term "spatio" refers to the IP address space. In particular, we focus on analyzing macroscopic properties of the attack traffic flows and identify two main patterns with distinct spatiotemporal characteristics: deterministic and stochastic. Strikingly, there are very few sets of major attackers committing almost all the attacks, since their attack "fingerprints" and target selection scheme can be unequivocally identified according to the very limited number of unique spatiotemporal characteristics, each of which only exists on a consecutive IP region and differs significantly from the others. We utilize a number of quantitative measures, including the flux-fluctuation law, the Markov state transition probability matrix, and predictability measures, to characterize the attack patterns in a comprehensive manner. A general finding is that the attack patterns possess high degrees of predictability, potentially paving the way to anticipating and, consequently, mitigating or even preventing large-scale cyberattacks using macroscopic approaches.

  18. Discrete element modeling of microstructure of nacre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Mei Qiang; Cheng, Jing-Ru C.

    2018-04-01

    The microstructure of nacre consists of polygon-shaped aragonite mineral tablets bonded by very thin layers of organic materials and is organized in a brick-mortar morphology. In this research, the discrete element method was utilized to model this structure. The aragonite mineral tablets were modeled with three-dimensional polygon particles generated by the Voronoi tessellation method to represent the Voronoi-like patterns of mineral tablets assembly observed in experiments. The organic matrix was modeled with a group of spring elements. The constitutive relations of the spring elements were inspired from the experimental results of organic molecules from the literature. The mineral bridges were modeled with simple elastic bonds with the parameters based on experimental data from the literature. The bulk stress-strain responses from the models agreed well with experimental results. The model results show that the mineral bridges play important roles in providing the stiffness and yield strength for the nacre, while the organic matrix in providing the ductility for the nacre. This work demonstrated the suitability of particle methods for modeling microstructures of nacre.

  19. Regulation of Spatiotemporal Patterns by Biological Variability: General Principles and Applications to Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Grace

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Spatiotemporal patterns often emerge from local interactions in a self-organizing fashion. In biology, the resulting patterns are also subject to the influence of the systematic differences between the system's constituents (biological variability. This regulation of spatiotemporal patterns by biological variability is the topic of our review. We discuss several examples of correlations between cell properties and the self-organized spatiotemporal patterns, together with their relevance for biology. Our guiding, illustrative example will be spiral waves of cAMP in a colony of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. Analogous processes take place in diverse situations (such as cardiac tissue, where spiral waves occur in potentially fatal ventricular fibrillation so a deeper understanding of this additional layer of self-organized pattern formation would be beneficial to a wide range of applications. One of the most striking differences between pattern-forming systems in physics or chemistry and those in biology is the potential importance of variability. In the former, system components are essentially identical with random fluctuations determining the details of the self-organization process and the resulting patterns. In biology, due to variability, the properties of potentially very few cells can have a driving influence on the resulting asymptotic collective state of the colony. Variability is one means of implementing a few-element control on the collective mode. Regulatory architectures, parameters of signaling cascades, and properties of structure formation processes can be "reverse-engineered" from observed spatiotemporal patterns, as different types of regulation and forms of interactions between the constituents can lead to markedly different correlations. The power of this biology-inspired view of pattern formation lies in building a bridge between two scales: the patterns as a collective state of a very large number of cells on the one hand

  20. Spatiotemporal mapping of diffusion dynamics and organization in plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Nirmalya; Ng, Xue Wen; Sankaran, Jagadish; Wohland, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    Imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and the related FCS diffusion law have been applied in recent years to investigate the diffusion modes of lipids and proteins in membranes. These efforts have provided new insights into the membrane structure below the optical diffraction limit, new information on the existence of lipid domains, and on the influence of the cytoskeleton on membrane dynamics. However, there has been no systematic study to evaluate how domain size, domain density, and the probe partition coefficient affect the resulting imaging FCS diffusion law parameters. Here, we characterize the effects of these factors on the FCS diffusion law through simulations and experiments on lipid bilayers and live cells. By segmenting images into smaller 7  ×  7 pixel areas, we can evaluate the FCS diffusion law on areas smaller than 2 µm and thus provide detailed maps of information on the membrane structure and heterogeneity at this length scale. We support and extend this analysis by deriving a mathematical expression to calculate the mean squared displacement (MSDACF) from the autocorrelation function of imaging FCS, and demonstrate that the MSDACF plots depend on the existence of nanoscopic domains. Based on the results, we derive limits for the detection of domains depending on their size, density, and relative viscosity in comparison to the surroundings. Finally, we apply these measurements to bilayers and live cells using imaging total internal reflection FCS and single plane illumination microscopy FCS.

  1. Spatio-temporal organization of phytoplankton in Peipsi Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharov Andrey

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the results of the study of phytoplankton received at 16 stations of the Lake Peipsi in the spring (May, summer (August and autumn (October within the period of 2012–2015 were analyzed. 186 phytoplankton species were found. The list of mass taxa is given. It was noted that phytoplankton biomass had wide amplitude of annual average values in different lakes: Lake Peipsi/Chudskoe 2.1 ± 0.2 (0.3–23.0 mg / L; Lake Pihkva/Pskovskoe 5.4 ± 1.4 (0.4–34.0 mg / L and Lake Lämmijärv/Teploe 6.1 ± 1.2 (3.4–25.1 mg / l. According to species composition, structure and biomass of phytoplankton the lake belongs to the mesotrophic reservoirs with eutrophic features, as it was in previous years of observation. The water quality in the different parts of Lake Peipsi corresponded to conditionally pure water (1st quality class and slightly polluted one(2nd quality class. Correlation between characteristics of phytoplankton and the environmental factors (temperature, water level, transparency, N and P concentration in water was detected.

  2. Spatiotemporal Regulation of Nuclear Transport Machinery and Microtubule Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Naoyuki; Sato, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Spindle microtubules capture and segregate chromosomes and, therefore, their assembly is an essential event in mitosis. To carry out their mission, many key players for microtubule formation need to be strictly orchestrated. Particularly, proteins that assemble the spindle need to be translocated at appropriate sites during mitosis. A small GTPase (hydrolase enzyme of guanosine triphosphate), Ran, controls this translocation. Ran plays many roles in many cellular events: nucleocytoplasmic shuttling through the nuclear envelope, assembly of the mitotic spindle, and reorganization of the nuclear envelope at the mitotic exit. Although these events are seemingly distinct, recent studies demonstrate that the mechanisms underlying these phenomena are substantially the same as explained by molecular interplay of the master regulator Ran, the transport factor importin, and its cargo proteins. Our review focuses on how the transport machinery regulates mitotic progression of cells. We summarize translocation mechanisms governed by Ran and its regulatory proteins, and particularly focus on Ran-GTP targets in fission yeast that promote spindle formation. We also discuss the coordination of the spatial and temporal regulation of proteins from the viewpoint of transport machinery. We propose that the transport machinery is an essential key that couples the spatial and temporal events in cells. PMID:26308057

  3. Microstructure taxonomy based on spatial correlations: Application to microstructure coarsening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, Tony; Wodo, Olga; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2016-01-01

    To build materials knowledge, rigorous description of the material structure and associated tools to explore and exploit information encoded in the structure are needed. These enable recognition, categorization and identification of different classes of microstructure and ultimately enable to link structure with properties of materials. Particular interest lies in the protocols capable of mining the essential information in large microstructure datasets and building robust knowledge systems that can be easily accessed, searched, and shared by the broader materials community. In this paper, we develop a protocol based on automated tools to classify microstructure taxonomies in the context of coarsening behavior which is important for long term stability of materials. Our new concepts for enhanced description of the local microstructure state provide flexibility of description. The mathematical description of microstructure that capture crucial attributes of the material, although central to building materials knowledge, is still elusive. The new description captures important higher order spatial information, but at the same time, allows down sampling if less information is needed. We showcase the classification protocol by studying coarsening of binary polymer blends and classifying steady state structures. We study several microstructure descriptions by changing the microstructure local state order and discretization and critically evaluate their efficacy. Our analysis revealed the superior properties of microstructure representation is based on the first order-gradient of the atomic fraction.

  4. VLSI electronics microstructure science

    CERN Document Server

    1982-01-01

    VLSI Electronics: Microstructure Science, Volume 4 reviews trends for the future of very large scale integration (VLSI) electronics and the scientific base that supports its development.This book discusses the silicon-on-insulator for VLSI and VHSIC, X-ray lithography, and transient response of electron transport in GaAs using the Monte Carlo method. The technology and manufacturing of high-density magnetic-bubble memories, metallic superlattices, challenge of education for VLSI, and impact of VLSI on medical signal processing are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the impact of VLSI t

  5. VLSI electronics microstructure science

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    VLSI Electronics: Microstructure Science, Volume 3 evaluates trends for the future of very large scale integration (VLSI) electronics and the scientific base that supports its development.This book discusses the impact of VLSI on computer architectures; VLSI design and design aid requirements; and design, fabrication, and performance of CCD imagers. The approaches, potential, and progress of ultra-high-speed GaAs VLSI; computer modeling of MOSFETs; and numerical physics of micron-length and submicron-length semiconductor devices are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the optical linewi

  6. Unsupervised Learning of Spatiotemporal Features by Video Completion

    OpenAIRE

    Nallabolu, Adithya Reddy

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present an unsupervised representation learning approach for learning rich spatiotemporal features from videos without the supervision from semantic labels. We propose to learn the spatiotemporal features by training a 3D convolutional neural network (CNN) using video completion as a surrogate task. Using a large collection of unlabeled videos, we train the CNN to predict the missing pixels of a spatiotemporal hole given the remaining parts of the video through minimizing per...

  7. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands.

  8. UNDERSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER PROCESSES THROUGH SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL RANDOM FORESTS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — UNDERSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER PROCESSES THROUGH SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL RANDOM FORESTS AMY MCGOVERN, TIMOTHY SUPINIE, DAVID JOHN GAGNE II, NATHANIEL TROUTMAN,...

  9. Micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery system embedded in 3D printing for complex tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Solaiman; Koch, Alia; Jun, Yena; Chou, Conrad; Awadallah, Mary R; Lee, Chang H

    2016-04-25

    Three dimensional (3D) printing has emerged as an efficient tool for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, given its advantages for constructing custom-designed scaffolds with tunable microstructure/physical properties. Here we developed a micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery system embedded in 3D printed scaffolds. PLGA microspheres (μS) were encapsulated with growth factors (GFs) and then embedded inside PCL microfibers that constitute custom-designed 3D scaffolds. Given the substantial difference in the melting points between PLGA and PCL and their low heat conductivity, μS were able to maintain its original structure while protecting GF's bioactivities. Micro-precise spatial control of multiple GFs was achieved by interchanging dispensing cartridges during a single printing process. Spatially controlled delivery of GFs, with a prolonged release, guided formation of multi-tissue interfaces from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs). To investigate efficacy of the micro-precise delivery system embedded in 3D printed scaffold, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc scaffolds were fabricated with micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery of CTGF and TGFβ3, mimicking native-like multiphase fibrocartilage. In vitro, TMJ disc scaffolds spatially embedded with CTGF/TGFβ3-μS resulted in formation of multiphase fibrocartilaginous tissues from MSCs. In vivo, TMJ disc perforation was performed in rabbits, followed by implantation of CTGF/TGFβ3-μS-embedded scaffolds. After 4 wks, CTGF/TGFβ3-μS embedded scaffolds significantly improved healing of the perforated TMJ disc as compared to the degenerated TMJ disc in the control group with scaffold embedded with empty μS. In addition, CTGF/TGFβ3-μS embedded scaffolds significantly prevented arthritic changes on TMJ condyles. In conclusion, our micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery system embedded in 3D printing may serve as an efficient tool to regenerate complex and inhomogeneous tissues.

  10. Microstructured hollow fibers for ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Culfaz, Pmar Zeynep; Culfaz, P.Z.; Rolevink, Hendrikus H.M.; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Hollow fiber ultrafiltration membranes with a corrugated outer microstructure were prepared from a PES/PVP blend. The effect of spinning parameters such as air gap, take-up speed, polymer dope viscosity and coagulation value on the microstructure and membrane characteristics was investigated. Fibers

  11. Accelerated Microstructure Imaging via Convex Optimization (AMICO) from diffusion MRI data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daducci, Alessandro; Canales-Rodríguez, Erick J; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Microstructure imaging from diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) data represents an invaluable tool to study non-invasively the morphology of tissues and to provide a biological insight into their microstructural organization. In recent years, a variety of biophysical models have been proposed to as...

  12. Spatiotemporal Analysis of the 2014 Ebola Epidemic in West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantien A Backer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2014-2016, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia in West Africa experienced the largest and longest Ebola epidemic since the discovery of the virus in 1976. During the epidemic, incidence data were collected and published at increasing resolution. To monitor the epidemic as it spread within and between districts, we develop an analysis method that exploits the full spatiotemporal resolution of the data by combining a local model for time-varying effective reproduction numbers with a gravity-type model for spatial dispersion of the infection. We test this method in simulations and apply it to the weekly incidences of confirmed and probable cases per district up to June 2015, as reported by the World Health Organization. Our results indicate that, of the newly infected cases, only a small percentage, between 4% and 10%, migrates to another district, and a minority of these migrants, between 0% and 23%, leave their country. The epidemics in the three countries are found to be similar in estimated effective reproduction numbers, and in the probability of importing infection into a district. The countries might have played different roles in cross-border transmissions, although a sensitivity analysis suggests that this could also be related to underreporting. The spatiotemporal analysis method can exploit available longitudinal incidence data at different geographical locations to monitor local epidemics, determine the extent of spatial spread, reveal the contribution of local and imported cases, and identify sources of introductions in uninfected areas. With good quality data on incidence, this data-driven method can help to effectively control emerging infections.

  13. Hand, foot and mouth disease: spatiotemporal transmission and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-feng; Guo, Yan-Sha; Christakos, George; Yang, Wei-Zhong; Liao, Yi-Lan; Li, Zhong-Jie; Li, Xiao-Zhou; Lai, Sheng-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yan

    2011-04-05

    The Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease (HFMD) is the most common infectious disease in China, its total incidence being around 500,000~1,000,000 cases per year. The composite space-time disease variation is the result of underlining attribute mechanisms that could provide clues about the physiologic and demographic determinants of disease transmission and also guide the appropriate allocation of medical resources to control the disease. HFMD cases were aggregated into 1456 counties and during a period of 11 months. Suspected climate attributes to HFMD were recorded monthly at 674 stations throughout the country and subsequently interpolated within 1456 × 11 cells across space-time (same as the number of HFMD cases) using the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) method while taking into consideration the relevant uncertainty sources. The dimensionalities of the two datasets together with the integrated dataset combining the two previous ones are very high when the topologies of the space-time relationships between cells are taken into account. Using a self-organizing map (SOM) algorithm the dataset dimensionality was effectively reduced into 2 dimensions, while the spatiotemporal attribute structure was maintained. 16 types of spatiotemporal HFMD transmission were identified, and 3-4 high spatial incidence clusters of the HFMD types were found throughout China, which are basically within the scope of the monthly climate (precipitation) types. HFMD propagates in a composite space-time domain rather than showing a purely spatial and purely temporal variation. There is a clear relationship between HFMD occurrence and climate. HFMD cases are geographically clustered and closely linked to the monthly precipitation types of the region. The occurrence of the former depends on the later.

  14. Hand, foot and mouth disease: spatiotemporal transmission and climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiao-Zhou

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease (HFMD is the most common infectious disease in China, its total incidence being around 500,000 ~1,000,000 cases per year. The composite space-time disease variation is the result of underlining attribute mechanisms that could provide clues about the physiologic and demographic determinants of disease transmission and also guide the appropriate allocation of medical resources to control the disease. Methods and Findings HFMD cases were aggregated into 1456 counties and during a period of 11 months. Suspected climate attributes to HFMD were recorded monthly at 674 stations throughout the country and subsequently interpolated within 1456 × 11 cells across space-time (same as the number of HFMD cases using the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME method while taking into consideration the relevant uncertainty sources. The dimensionalities of the two datasets together with the integrated dataset combining the two previous ones are very high when the topologies of the space-time relationships between cells are taken into account. Using a self-organizing map (SOM algorithm the dataset dimensionality was effectively reduced into 2 dimensions, while the spatiotemporal attribute structure was maintained. 16 types of spatiotemporal HFMD transmission were identified, and 3-4 high spatial incidence clusters of the HFMD types were found throughout China, which are basically within the scope of the monthly climate (precipitation types. Conclusions HFMD propagates in a composite space-time domain rather than showing a purely spatial and purely temporal variation. There is a clear relationship between HFMD occurrence and climate. HFMD cases are geographically clustered and closely linked to the monthly precipitation types of the region. The occurrence of the former depends on the later.

  15. Zirconium diselenite microstructures, formation and mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Chandan C.; Salker, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a series of microstructures of zirconium diselenite (Zr(SeO3)2) has been prepared via a simple precipitation method at room temperature without adding any organic surfactants. Phase purity of the sample has been checked by X-ray Diffraction. From the SEM, FESEM, and TEM images spheroid nanoparticles to the starfish-like structure of zirconium diselenite are detected. The morphological evolution processes were investigated carefully following time-dependent experiments and a growth mechanism has been proposed. Two different crystal growth processes, the oriented attachment process accompanying the Ostwald ripening process were held responsible for the formation of a structure resembling starfish having four arms.

  16. Spatio-temporal scaling of channels in braided streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.G. Hunt; G.E. Grant; V.K. Gupta

    2006-01-01

    The spatio-temporal scaling relationship for individual channels in braided streams is shown to be identical to the spatio-temporal scaling associated with constant Froude number, e.g., Fr = l. A means to derive this relationship is developed from a new theory of sediment transport. The mechanism by which the Fr = l condition apparently governs the scaling seems to...

  17. Spatiotemporal Data Mining, Analysis, and Visualization of Human Activity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xun

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the research challenge of developing efficient new methods for discovering useful patterns and knowledge in large volumes of electronically collected spatiotemporal activity data. I propose to analyze three types of such spatiotemporal activity data in a methodological framework that integrates spatial analysis, data…

  18. Simultaneous spatio-temporal focusing for tissue manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Squier J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous spatiotemporal focusing (SSTF is applied to lens tissue and compared directly with standard femtosecond micromachining of the tissue at the same numerical aperture. Third harmonic generation imaging is used for spatio-temporal characterization of the processing conditions obtained with both a standard and SSTF focus.

  19. Spatiotemporal Interpolation Methods for Solar Event Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filali Boubrahimi, Soukaina; Aydin, Berkay; Schuh, Michael A.; Kempton, Dustin; Angryk, Rafal A.; Ma, Ruizhe

    2018-05-01

    This paper introduces four spatiotemporal interpolation methods that enrich complex, evolving region trajectories that are reported from a variety of ground-based and space-based solar observatories every day. Our interpolation module takes an existing solar event trajectory as its input and generates an enriched trajectory with any number of additional time–geometry pairs created by the most appropriate method. To this end, we designed four different interpolation techniques: MBR-Interpolation (Minimum Bounding Rectangle Interpolation), CP-Interpolation (Complex Polygon Interpolation), FI-Interpolation (Filament Polygon Interpolation), and Areal-Interpolation, which are presented here in detail. These techniques leverage k-means clustering, centroid shape signature representation, dynamic time warping, linear interpolation, and shape buffering to generate the additional polygons of an enriched trajectory. Using ground-truth objects, interpolation effectiveness is evaluated through a variety of measures based on several important characteristics that include spatial distance, area overlap, and shape (boundary) similarity. To our knowledge, this is the first research effort of this kind that attempts to address the broad problem of spatiotemporal interpolation of solar event trajectories. We conclude with a brief outline of future research directions and opportunities for related work in this area.

  20. Spatiotemporal chaos in coupled logistic maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varella Guedes, Andre; Amorim Savi, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of coupled logistic maps. These maps are prototypes of high-dimensional dynamical systems and have been used to describe the evolution and pattern formation in different systems. Here, the logistic map lattice is coupled by a power law and, therefore, each map is influenced by other maps in its neighborhood. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy density is employed to quantify the complexity of system behavior, permitting a general qualitative understanding of different aspects of system dynamics. Three kinds of boundary conditions are treated and the influence of initial conditions is also of concern. Non-homogeneous maps are investigated, showing interesting aspects of spatiotemporal dynamics. The idea is to analyze the spatial interaction between two qualitative different types of behavior from a grid that is split into two parts. Numerical simulations show what types of conditions present a greater tendency to develop chaotic, periodic and synchronized responses. It should be highlighted that non-homogeneous grids have situations where a chaotic pattern can emerge from two periodic responses and also situations where a periodic pattern can emerge from chaos.

  1. Experimental microstructures MOX fuels elaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotta, M.J.; Dubois, S.; Lechelle, J.; Sornay, P.

    2000-01-01

    In order to propose a new MOX fuel, owning higher combustion rate, studies are realized at the CEA in collaboration with Cogema, EDF and Framatome. New microstructures of MOX are looked for around two approaches: the grains size and the plutonium distribution. These approaches are presented and discussed in this paper. The first one develops big grains microstructures obtained, either with anionic (sulfur), or cationic (Cr 2 O 3 ) additives. The second one concerns the CER-CER type composite microstructures. (A.L.B.)

  2. Inkjet Printing of 3D Metallic Silver Complex Microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Sridhar, Ashok; Dimitrov, D.

    2010-01-01

    To broaden the scope of inkjet printing, this paper focuses on printing of an organic silver complex ink on glass substrates towards the fabrication of metallic 3D microstructures. The droplet formation sequence of the inkjet printer is optimised to print continuous layers of metal. A brief

  3. Inhomogeneous microstructural growth by irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishan, K.; Singh, Bachu Narain; Leffers, Torben

    1985-01-01

    In the present paper we discuss the development of heterogeneous microstructure for uniform irradiation conditions. It is shown that microstructural inhomogeneities on a scale of 0.1 μm can develop purely from kinematic considerations because of the basic structure of the rate equations used...... to describe such evolution. Two aspects of the growth of such inhomogeneities are discussed. Firstly, it is shown that a local variation in the sink densities of the various microstructural defects will tend to enhance the inhomogeneity rather than remove it. Secondly, such inhomogeneities will lead to point...... defect fluxes that result in a spatial growth of the inhomogeneous region, which will be stopped only when the microstructural density around this region becomes large. The results have important implications in the formation of denuded zones and void formation in metals....

  4. Modelling microstructural evolution under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikare, V.

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural evolution of materials under irradiation is characterised by some unique features that are not typically present in other application environments. While much understanding has been achieved by experimental studies, the ability to model this microstructural evolution for complex materials states and environmental conditions not only enhances understanding, it also enables prediction of materials behaviour under conditions that are difficult to duplicate experimentally. Furthermore, reliable models enable designing materials for improved engineering performance for their respective applications. Thus, development and application of mesoscale microstructural model are important for advancing nuclear materials technologies. In this chapter, the application of the Potts model to nuclear materials will be reviewed and demonstrated, as an example of microstructural evolution processes. (author)

  5. TEM investigations of microstructures of combustion aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquardt, A.; Hackfort, H.; Borchardt, J.; Schober, T.; Friedrich, J.

    1992-12-01

    In the incineration of organic material, apart from a series of gaseous pollutants, particulate pollutants or combustion aerosols also arise. The latter frequently consist of particles with a solid core of carbon to which a large number of inorganic and organic compounds are attached. These primarily include the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitro-derivatives (NPAH), whose mutagenic or carcinogenic effect is known. The invisible particle sizes in the nanometer range, whose retention in the incineration off-gas is not state of the art, are of increasing significance for man and environment. On the one hand, they are deposited almost completely in the human lung. On the other hand, due to their fine dispersity they have along residence time in the atmosphere where they participate in chemical reactions and climatically significant processes. Important insights about the formation process of combustion aerosols are to be expected from the imaging of their microstructures in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The present contribution describes the development and application of a representative sampling procedure for aerosols from a partial flow of flue gas from a fluidized-bed furnace. The method developed consists of electrically charging aerosol particles in situ and subsequently selectively precipitating them onto a microscope slide in an electric field. TEM studies of aerosol microstructures on the microscope slides revealed that in the combustion of petrol and heating oil under different combustion conditions in principle the same particle structures result, whereas in the incineration of used lubricating oil quite different particle structures were found. Results from the literature on aerosol microstructures in exhaust gases from petrol and diesel engines demonstrate agreement with the results of this study in the basic structure of the particles. (orig.) [de

  6. Micromagnetism and the microstructure of ferromagnetic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Kronmüller, Helmut

    2003-01-01

    Here is a fundamental introduction to microstructure magnetic property relations where microstructures on atomic, nano- and micrometer scales are considered. The authors demonstrate that outstanding magnetic properties require an optimization of microstructural properties where the microstructures in crystalline materials are point defects and dislocations as well as grain and phase boundaries. In amorphous alloys the type of microstructures on atomic scales are defined and used to describe intrinsic and extrinsic properties.

  7. Microstructures (clumps) in turbulent plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balescu, R.; Misguich, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    A general analysis of binary correlations in a turbulent plasma leads to a functional relation relating correlations to the one-particle distribution function. Such a relation allows to understand the mechanism of generation of the microstructures or clumps introduced by Dupree. The expressions introduced by this author appear as a lowest approximation of the general equation. The features and interpretation of these microstructures are briefly discussed [fr

  8. Spatiotemporal Stochastic Resonance:Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Jung

    1996-03-01

    The amplification of weak periodic signals in bistable or excitable systems via stochastic resonance has been studied intensively over the last years. We are going one step further and ask: Can noise enhance spatiotemporal patterns in excitable media and can this effect be observed in nature? To this end, we are looking at large, two dimensional arrays of coupled excitable elements. Due to the coupling, excitation can propagate through the array in form of nonlinear waves. We observe target waves, rotating spiral waves and other wave forms. If the coupling between the elements is below a critical threshold, any excitational pattern will die out in the absence of noise. Below this threshold, large scale rotating spiral waves - as they are observed above threshold - can be maintained by a proper level of the noise[1]. Furthermore, their geometric features, such as the curvature can be controlled by the homogeneous noise level[2]. If the noise level is too large, break up of spiral waves and collisions with spontaneously nucleated waves yields spiral turbulence. Driving our array with a spatiotemporal pattern, e.g. a rotating spiral wave, we show that for weak coupling the excitational response of the array shows stochastic resonance - an effect we have termed spatiotemporal stochastic resonance. In the last part of the talk I'll make contact with calcium waves, observed in astrocyte cultures and hippocampus slices[3]. A. Cornell-Bell and collaborators[3] have pointed out the role of calcium waves for long-range glial signaling. We demonstrate the similarity of calcium waves with nonlinear waves in noisy excitable media. The noise level in the tissue is characterized by spontaneous activity and can be controlled by applying neuro-transmitter substances[3]. Noise effects in our model are compared with the effect of neuro-transmitters on calcium waves. [1]P. Jung and G. Mayer-Kress, CHAOS 5, 458 (1995). [2]P. Jung and G. Mayer-Kress, Phys. Rev. Lett.62, 2682 (1995). [3

  9. Continua with microstructure

    CERN Document Server

    Capriz, Gianfranco

    1989-01-01

    This book proposes a new general setting for theories of bodies with microstructure when they are described within the scheme of the con­ tinuum: besides the usual fields of classical thermomechanics (dis­ placement, stress, temperature, etc.) some new fields enter the picture (order parameters, microstress, etc.). The book can be used in a semester course for students who have already followed lectures on the classical theory of continua and is intended as an introduction to special topics: materials with voids, liquid crystals, meromorphic con­ tinua. In fact, the content is essentially that of a series of lectures given in 1986 at the Scuola Estiva di Fisica Matematica in Ravello (Italy). I would like to thank the Scientific Committee of the Gruppo di Fisica Matematica of the Italian National Council of Research (CNR) for the invitation to teach in the School. I also thank the Committee for Mathematics of CNR and the National Science Foundation: they have supported my research over many years and given ...

  10. Cryptanalysis of a spatiotemporal chaotic cryptosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhouma, Rhouma; Belghith, Safya

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes three different attacks on a recently proposed chaotic cryptosystem in [Li P, Li Z, Halang WA, Chen G. A stream cipher based on a spatiotemporal chaotic system. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2007;32:1867-76]. The cryptosystem under study displays weakness in the generation of the keystream. The encryption is made by generating a keystream mixed with blocks generated from the plaintext. The so obtained keystream remains unchanged for every encryption procedure. Moreover, its generation does neither depend on the plaintext nor on the ciphertext, that's to say, the keystream remains unchangeable for every plaintext with the same length. Guessing the keystream leads to guessing the key. This paper presents three possible attacks able to break the whole cryptosystem based on this drawback in generating the keystream.

  11. The Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Digital News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris

    2016-01-01

    of changing the socially-situated affordances of news use. Having sketched these contours, the chapter then highlights analytical challenges for understanding and conceptualizing the new interrelations between digital news content, production, and consumption, grounding this analysis with theoretical insights...... that emphasize the significance of spatiotemporal dynamics. The emphasis here is on the interrelations and mobilities of digital news audiences, based on a recognition of the productive impacts of media use while being careful to note the limitations of a paradigm shift that points solely to the possibilities...... generated by the ubiquitous presence of media in our everyday lives. Aspects of interaction and personalization beget by new media technologies certainly shape the possibilities, practices and power audiences have to choose news wherever, whenever, and however they want. However, this simultaneously...

  12. Spatiotemporal aspects of flood exposure in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röthlisberger Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While flood hazard mapping in Switzerland is close to completion, only a limited number of studies have been specifically conducted on exposure and vulnerability. We fill this knowledge gap by conducting a nation-wide study of flood exposure of buildings in Switzerland. Therefore, we generate a country-wide comprehensive and homogenous data set of polygons of residential buildings and their period of construction and overlay these building polygons with compiled and harmonized flood hazard maps provided by the Swiss cantons. In this paper we present first results of spatiotemporal analyses, namely the evolution of exposure from 1919 to 2012. Surprising is the increase in the share of exposure of new constructed buildings since the 1980s which contradicts the indented effects of the Swiss flood risk management strategies and calls for further investigations.

  13. Nonreciprocal Thermal Material by Spatiotemporal Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Daniel; Poncelet, Olivier; Batsale, Jean-Chirstophe

    2018-03-01

    The thermal properties of a material with a spatiotemporal modulation, in the form of a traveling wave, in both the thermal conductivity and the specific heat capacity are studied. It is found that these materials behave as materials with an internal convectionlike term that provides them with nonreciprocal properties, in the sense that the heat flux has different properties when it propagates in the same direction or in the opposite one to the modulation of the parameters. An effective medium description is presented which accurately describes the modulated material, and numerical simulations support this description and verify the nonreciprocal properties of the material. It is found that these materials are promising candidates for the design of thermal diodes and other advanced devices for the control of the heat flow at all scales.

  14. Inositol trisphosphate receptor mediated spatiotemporal calcium signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, S

    1995-04-01

    Spatiotemporal Ca2+ signalling in the cytoplasm is currently understood as an excitation phenomenon by analogy with electrical excitation in the plasma membrane. In many cell types, Ca2+ waves and Ca2+ oscillations are mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor/Ca2+ channels in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, with positive feedback between cytosolic Ca2+ and IP3-induced Ca2+ release creating a regenerative process. Remarkable advances have been made in the past year in the analysis of subcellular Ca2+ microdomains using confocal microscopy and of Ca2+ influx pathways that are functionally coupled to IP3-induced Ca2+ release. Ca2+ signals can be conveyed into the nucleus and mitochondria. Ca2+ entry from outside the cell allows repetitive Ca2+ release by providing Ca2+ to refill the endoplasmic reticulum stores, thus giving rise to frequency-encoded Ca2+ signals.

  15. Discrete simulations of spatio-temporal dynamics of small water bodies under varied stream flow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya Sagar, B. S.

    2005-01-01

    Spatio-temporal patterns of small water bodies (SWBs) under the influence of temporally varied stream flow discharge are simulated in discrete space by employing geomorphologically realistic expansion and contraction transformations. Cascades of expansion-contraction are systematically performed by synchronizing them with stream flow discharge simulated via the logistic map. Templates with definite characteristic information are defined from stream flow discharge pattern as the basis to model the spatio-temporal organization of randomly situated surface water bodies of various sizes and shapes. These spatio-temporal patterns under varied parameters (λs) controlling stream flow discharge patterns are characterized by estimating their fractal dimensions. At various λs, nonlinear control parameters, we show the union of boundaries of water bodies that traverse the water body and non-water body spaces as geomorphic attractors. The computed fractal dimensions of these attractors are 1.58, 1.53, 1.78, 1.76, 1.84, and 1.90, respectively, at λs of 1, 2, 3, 3.46, 3.57, and 3.99. These values are in line with general visual observations.

  16. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Baril

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy.

  17. Monitoring the spatiotemporal activities of miRNAs in small animal models using molecular imaging modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Patrick; Ezzine, Safia; Pichon, Chantal

    2015-03-04

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy.

  18. Emergent dynamics of spatio-temporal chaos in a heterogeneous excitable medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittihn, Philip; Berg, Sebastian; Parlitz, Ulrich; Luther, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Self-organized activation patterns in excitable media such as spiral waves and spatio-temporal chaos underlie dangerous cardiac arrhythmias. While the interaction of single spiral waves with different types of heterogeneity has been studied extensively, the effect of heterogeneity on fully developed spatio-temporal chaos remains poorly understood. We investigate how the complexity and stability properties of spatio-temporal chaos in the Bär-Eiswirth model of excitable media depend on the heterogeneity of the underlying medium. We employ different measures characterizing the chaoticity of the system and find that the spatial arrangement of multiple discrete lower excitability regions has a strong impact on the complexity of the dynamics. Varying the number, shape, and spatial arrangement of the heterogeneities, we observe strong emergent effects ranging from increases in chaoticity to the complete cessation of chaos, contrasting the expectation from the homogeneous behavior. The implications of our findings for the development and treatment of arrhythmias in the heterogeneous cardiac muscle are discussed.

  19. Discrete simulations of spatio-temporal dynamics of small water bodies under varied stream flow discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Daya Sagar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatio-temporal patterns of small water bodies (SWBs under the influence of temporally varied stream flow discharge are simulated in discrete space by employing geomorphologically realistic expansion and contraction transformations. Cascades of expansion-contraction are systematically performed by synchronizing them with stream flow discharge simulated via the logistic map. Templates with definite characteristic information are defined from stream flow discharge pattern as the basis to model the spatio-temporal organization of randomly situated surface water bodies of various sizes and shapes. These spatio-temporal patterns under varied parameters (λs controlling stream flow discharge patterns are characterized by estimating their fractal dimensions. At various λs, nonlinear control parameters, we show the union of boundaries of water bodies that traverse the water body and non-water body spaces as geomorphic attractors. The computed fractal dimensions of these attractors are 1.58, 1.53, 1.78, 1.76, 1.84, and 1.90, respectively, at λs of 1, 2, 3, 3.46, 3.57, and 3.99. These values are in line with general visual observations.

  20. A stream cipher based on a spatiotemporal chaotic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ping; Li Zhong; Halang, Wolfgang A.; Chen Guanrong

    2007-01-01

    A stream cipher based on a spatiotemporal chaotic system is proposed. A one-way coupled map lattice consisting of logistic maps is served as the spatiotemporal chaotic system. Multiple keystreams are generated from the coupled map lattice by using simple algebraic computations, and then are used to encrypt plaintext via bitwise XOR. These make the cipher rather simple and efficient. Numerical investigation shows that the cryptographic properties of the generated keystream are satisfactory. The cipher seems to have higher security, higher efficiency and lower computation expense than the stream cipher based on a spatiotemporal chaotic system proposed recently

  1. The CONNECT project: Combining macro- and micro-structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Yaniv; Alexander, Daniel C; Jones, Derek K; Bizzi, Albero; Behrens, Tim E J; Clark, Chris A; Cohen, Yoram; Dyrby, Tim B; Huppi, Petra S; Knoesche, Thomas R; Lebihan, Denis; Parker, Geoff J M; Poupon, Cyril; Anaby, Debbie; Anwander, Alfred; Bar, Leah; Barazany, Daniel; Blumenfeld-Katzir, Tamar; De-Santis, Silvia; Duclap, Delphine; Figini, Matteo; Fischi, Elda; Guevara, Pamela; Hubbard, Penny; Hofstetter, Shir; Jbabdi, Saad; Kunz, Nicolas; Lazeyras, Francois; Lebois, Alice; Liptrot, Matthew G; Lundell, Henrik; Mangin, Jean-François; Dominguez, David Moreno; Morozov, Darya; Schreiber, Jan; Seunarine, Kiran; Nava, Simone; Poupon, Cyril; Riffert, Till; Sasson, Efrat; Schmitt, Benoit; Shemesh, Noam; Sotiropoulos, Stam N; Tavor, Ido; Zhang, Hui Gary; Zhou, Feng-Lei

    2013-10-15

    In recent years, diffusion MRI has become an extremely important tool for studying the morphology of living brain tissue, as it provides unique insights into both its macrostructure and microstructure. Recent applications of diffusion MRI aimed to characterize the structural connectome using tractography to infer connectivity between brain regions. In parallel to the development of tractography, additional diffusion MRI based frameworks (CHARMED, AxCaliber, ActiveAx) were developed enabling the extraction of a multitude of micro-structural parameters (axon diameter distribution, mean axonal diameter and axonal density). This unique insight into both tissue microstructure and connectivity has enormous potential value in understanding the structure and organization of the brain as well as providing unique insights to abnormalities that underpin disease states. The CONNECT (Consortium Of Neuroimagers for the Non-invasive Exploration of brain Connectivity and Tracts) project aimed to combine tractography and micro-structural measures of the living human brain in order to obtain a better estimate of the connectome, while also striving to extend validation of these measurements. This paper summarizes the project and describes the perspective of using micro-structural measures to study the connectome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Controlling spatiotemporal chaos in one- and two-dimensional coupled logistic map lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astakhov, V.V.; Anishchenko, V.S.; Strelkova, G.I.; Shabunin, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    A method of control of spatiotemporal chaos in lattices of coupled maps is proposed in this work. Forms of spatiotemporal perturbations of a system parameter are analytically determined for one- and two-dimensional logistic map lattices with different kinds of coupling to stabilize chosen spatiotemporal states previously unstable. The results are illustrated by numerical simulation. Controlled transition from the regime of spatiotemporal chaos to the previously chosen regular spatiotemporal patterns is demonstrated. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  3. Spatio-temporal patterns of coral recruitment at Vamizi Island ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatio-temporal patterns of coral recruitment at Vamizi Island, Quirimbas Archipelago, Mozambique. ... Spatial and temporal patterns of recruitment of reef corals were assessed for the first time in Mozambique ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  4. Transition to turbulence via spatiotemporal intermittency in stimulated Raman backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoric, M.M.; Jovanovic, M.S.; Rajkovic, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    The spatiotemporal evolution of stimulated Raman backscattering in a bounded, uniform, weakly dissipative plasma is studied. The nonlinear model of a three-wave interaction involves a quadratic coupling of slowly varying complex amplitudes of the laser pump, the backscattered and the electron plasma wave. The corresponding set of coupled partial differential equations with nonlinear phase detuning that is taken into account is solved numerically in space time with fixed nonzero source boundary conditions. The study of the above open, convective, weakly confined system reveals a quasiperiodic transition to spatiotemporal chaos via spatiotemporal intermittency. In the analysis of transitions a dual scheme borrowed from fields of nonlinear dynamics and statistical physics is applied. An introduction of a nonlinear three-wave interaction to a growing family of paradigmatic equations which exhibit a route to turbulence via spatiotemporal intermittency is outlined in this work. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. The application of a hierarchical Bayesian spatiotemporal model for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Process (GP) model by using the Gibbs sampling method. The result for ... good indicator of the HBST method. The statistical ... summary and discussion of future works are given .... spatiotemporal package in R language (R core team. 2013).

  6. Annual spatiotemporal migration schedules in three larger insectivorous birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lars Bo; Jensen, Niels Odder; Willemoes, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of spatiotemporal migration patterns is important for our understanding of migration ecology and ultimately conservation of migratory species. We studied the annual migration schedules of European nightjar, a large nocturnal insectivore and compared it with two other larger ...

  7. Spatiotemporal patterns formed by deformed adhesive in peeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Toda, Akihiko

    2007-01-01

    Dynamical properties of peeling an adhesive tape are investigated experimentally as an analogy of sliding friction. An adhesive tape is peeled by pulling an elastic spring connected to the tape. Controlling its spring constant k and pulling speed V, peel force is measured and spatiotemporal patterns formed on the peeled tape by deformed adhesive are observed. It is found that there exist two kinds of adhesive state in peeling front. The emergence of multiple states is caused by the stability of a characteristic structure (tunnel structure) formed by deformed adhesive. Tunnel structures are distributed spatiotemporally on adhesive tape after peeling. Based on the spatiotemporal distribution, a morphology-dynamical phase diagram is constructed on k-V space and is divided into the four regions: (A) uniform pattern with tunnel structure, (B) uniform pattern without tunnel structure, (C) striped pattern with oscillatory peeling, and (D) spatiotemporally coexistent pattern

  8. Spatiotemporal modeling of WNV in mosquitoes in Suffolk County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — R code and dataset to produce spatial models. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Meyer, M., S. Campbell, and J. Johnston. Spatiotemporal...

  9. Modeling how shark and dolphin skin patterns control transitional wall-turbulence vorticity patterns using spatiotemporal phase reset mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R; Hellum, Aren M

    2014-10-23

    Many slow-moving biological systems like seashells and zebrafish that do not contend with wall turbulence have somewhat organized pigmentation patterns flush with their outer surfaces that are formed by underlying autonomous reaction-diffusion (RD) mechanisms. In contrast, sharks and dolphins contend with wall turbulence, are fast swimmers, and have more organized skin patterns that are proud and sometimes vibrate. A nonlinear spatiotemporal analytical model is not available that explains the mechanism underlying control of flow with such proud patterns, despite the fact that shark and dolphin skins are major targets of reverse engineering mechanisms of drag and noise reduction. Comparable to RD, a minimal self-regulation model is given for wall turbulence regeneration in the transitional regime--laterally coupled, diffusively--which, although restricted to pre-breakdown durations and to a plane close and parallel to the wall, correctly reproduces many experimentally observed spatiotemporal organizations of vorticity in both laminar-to-turbulence transitioning and very low Reynolds number but turbulent regions. We further show that the onset of vorticity disorganization is delayed if the skin organization is treated as a spatiotemporal template of olivo-cerebellar phase reset mechanism. The model shows that the adaptation mechanisms of sharks and dolphins to their fluid environment have much in common.

  10. A feasibility study: Selection of a personalized radiotherapy fractionation schedule using spatiotemporal optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Minsun; Stewart, Robert D.; Phillips, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of using spatiotemporal optimization, i.e., intensity-modulated spatial optimization followed by fractionation schedule optimization, to select the patient-specific fractionation schedule that maximizes the tumor biologically equivalent dose (BED) under dose constraints for multiple organs-at-risk (OARs). Methods: Spatiotemporal optimization was applied to a variety of lung tumors in a phantom geometry using a range of tumor sizes and locations. The optimal fractionation schedule for a patient using the linear-quadratic cell survival model depends on the tumor and OAR sensitivity to fraction size (α/β), the effective tumor doubling time (T d ), and the size and location of tumor target relative to one or more OARs (dose distribution). The authors used a spatiotemporal optimization method to identify the optimal number of fractions N that maximizes the 3D tumor BED distribution for 16 lung phantom cases. The selection of the optimal fractionation schedule used equivalent (30-fraction) OAR constraints for the heart (D mean ≤ 45 Gy), lungs (D mean ≤ 20 Gy), cord (D max ≤ 45 Gy), esophagus (D max ≤ 63 Gy), and unspecified tissues (D 05 ≤ 60 Gy). To assess plan quality, the authors compared the minimum, mean, maximum, and D 95 of tumor BED, as well as the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for optimized plans to conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans prescribing 60 Gy in 30 fractions. A sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the effects of T d (3–100 days), tumor lag-time (T k = 0–10 days), and the size of tumors on optimal fractionation schedule. Results: Using an α/β ratio of 10 Gy, the average values of tumor max, min, mean BED, and D 95 were up to 19%, 21%, 20%, and 19% larger than those from conventional prescription, depending on T d and T k used. Tumor EUD was up to 17% larger than the conventional prescription. For fast proliferating tumors with T d less than 10 days, there was no

  11. A feasibility study: Selection of a personalized radiotherapy fractionation schedule using spatiotemporal optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minsun, E-mail: mk688@uw.edu; Stewart, Robert D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Phillips, Mark H. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of using spatiotemporal optimization, i.e., intensity-modulated spatial optimization followed by fractionation schedule optimization, to select the patient-specific fractionation schedule that maximizes the tumor biologically equivalent dose (BED) under dose constraints for multiple organs-at-risk (OARs). Methods: Spatiotemporal optimization was applied to a variety of lung tumors in a phantom geometry using a range of tumor sizes and locations. The optimal fractionation schedule for a patient using the linear-quadratic cell survival model depends on the tumor and OAR sensitivity to fraction size (α/β), the effective tumor doubling time (T{sub d}), and the size and location of tumor target relative to one or more OARs (dose distribution). The authors used a spatiotemporal optimization method to identify the optimal number of fractions N that maximizes the 3D tumor BED distribution for 16 lung phantom cases. The selection of the optimal fractionation schedule used equivalent (30-fraction) OAR constraints for the heart (D{sub mean} ≤ 45 Gy), lungs (D{sub mean} ≤ 20 Gy), cord (D{sub max} ≤ 45 Gy), esophagus (D{sub max} ≤ 63 Gy), and unspecified tissues (D{sub 05} ≤ 60 Gy). To assess plan quality, the authors compared the minimum, mean, maximum, and D{sub 95} of tumor BED, as well as the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for optimized plans to conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans prescribing 60 Gy in 30 fractions. A sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the effects of T{sub d} (3–100 days), tumor lag-time (T{sub k} = 0–10 days), and the size of tumors on optimal fractionation schedule. Results: Using an α/β ratio of 10 Gy, the average values of tumor max, min, mean BED, and D{sub 95} were up to 19%, 21%, 20%, and 19% larger than those from conventional prescription, depending on T{sub d} and T{sub k} used. Tumor EUD was up to 17% larger than the conventional prescription. For fast proliferating

  12. Markovian Limit of a Spatio-Temporal Correlated Open Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnai, T.

    Large fluctuation of Brownian particles is affected by the finiteness of the correlation length of the background noise field. Indeed a Fokker—Planck equation is derived in a Markovian limit of a spatio-temporal short correlated noise. Corresponding kinetic quantities are renormalized due to the spatio-temporal memory. We also investigate the case of open system by connecting a thermostat to the system.

  13. Microstructure of rapidly solidified materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, H.

    1984-07-01

    The basic features of rapidly solidified microstructures are described and differences arising from alternative processing strategies are discussed. The possibility of achieving substantial undercooling prior to solidification in processes such as quench atomization and chill block melt spinning can give rise to striking microstructural transitions even when external heat extraction is nominally Newtonian. The increased opportunity in laser and electron beam surface melting for epitaxial growth on the parent solid at an accelerating rate, however, does not exclude the formation of nonequilibrium phases since the required undercooling can be locally attained at the solidification front which is itself advancing at a sufficiently high velocity. The effects of fluid flow indicated particularly in melt spinning and surface melting are additional to the transformational and heat flow considerations that form the present basis for interpretation of such microstructural effects.

  14. Sex & vision I: Spatio-temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramov Israel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral cortex has a very large number of testosterone receptors, which could be a basis for sex differences in sensory functions. For example, audition has clear sex differences, which are related to serum testosterone levels. Of all major sensory systems only vision has not been examined for sex differences, which is surprising because occipital lobe (primary visual projection area may have the highest density of testosterone receptors in the cortex. We have examined a basic visual function: spatial and temporal pattern resolution and acuity. Methods We tested large groups of young adults with normal vision. They were screened with a battery of standard tests that examined acuity, color vision, and stereopsis. We sampled the visual system’s contrast-sensitivity function (CSF across the entire spatio-temporal space: 6 spatial frequencies at each of 5 temporal rates. Stimuli were gratings with sinusoidal luminance profiles generated on a special-purpose computer screen; their contrast was also sinusoidally modulated in time. We measured threshold contrasts using a criterion-free (forced-choice, adaptive psychophysical method (QUEST algorithm. Also, each individual’s acuity limit was estimated by fitting his or her data with a model and extrapolating to find the spatial frequency corresponding to 100% contrast. Results At a very low temporal rate, the spatial CSF was the canonical inverted-U; but for higher temporal rates, the maxima of the spatial CSFs shifted: Observers lost sensitivity at high spatial frequencies and gained sensitivity at low frequencies; also, all the maxima of the CSFs shifted by about the same amount in spatial frequency. Main effect: there was a significant (ANOVA sex difference. Across the entire spatio-temporal domain, males were more sensitive, especially at higher spatial frequencies; similarly males had significantly better acuity at all temporal rates. Conclusion As with other sensory systems

  15. Visualization and assessment of spatio-temporal covariance properties

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Huang

    2017-11-23

    Spatio-temporal covariances are important for describing the spatio-temporal variability of underlying random fields in geostatistical data. For second-order stationary random fields, there exist subclasses of covariance functions that assume a simpler spatio-temporal dependence structure with separability and full symmetry. However, it is challenging to visualize and assess separability and full symmetry from spatio-temporal observations. In this work, we propose a functional data analysis approach that constructs test functions using the cross-covariances from time series observed at each pair of spatial locations. These test functions of temporal lags summarize the properties of separability or symmetry for the given spatial pairs. We use functional boxplots to visualize the functional median and the variability of the test functions, where the extent of departure from zero at all temporal lags indicates the degree of non-separability or asymmetry. We also develop a rank-based nonparametric testing procedure for assessing the significance of the non-separability or asymmetry. Essentially, the proposed methods only require the analysis of temporal covariance functions. Thus, a major advantage over existing approaches is that there is no need to estimate any covariance matrix for selected spatio-temporal lags. The performances of the proposed methods are examined by simulations with various commonly used spatio-temporal covariance models. To illustrate our methods in practical applications, we apply it to real datasets, including weather station data and climate model outputs.

  16. Spatiotemporal dynamics of large-scale brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Jeremy

    Understanding the dynamics of large-scale brain activity is a tough challenge. One reason for this is the presence of an incredible amount of complexity arising from having roughly 100 billion neurons connected via 100 trillion synapses. Because of the extremely high number of degrees of freedom in the nervous system, the question of how the brain manages to properly function and remain stable, yet also be adaptable, must be posed. Neuroscientists have identified many ways the nervous system makes this possible, of which synaptic plasticity is possibly the most notable one. On the other hand, it is vital to understand how the nervous system also loses stability, resulting in neuropathological diseases such as epilepsy, a disease which affects 1% of the population. In the following work, we seek to answer some of these questions from two different perspectives. The first uses mean-field theory applied to neuronal populations, where the variables of interest are the percentages of active excitatory and inhibitory neurons in a network, to consider how the nervous system responds to external stimuli, self-organizes and generates epileptiform activity. The second method uses statistical field theory, in the framework of single neurons on a lattice, to study the concept of criticality, an idea borrowed from physics which posits that in some regime the brain operates in a collectively stable or marginally stable manner. This will be examined in two different neuronal networks with self-organized criticality serving as the overarching theme for the union of both perspectives. One of the biggest problems in neuroscience is the question of to what extent certain details are significant to the functioning of the brain. These details give rise to various spatiotemporal properties that at the smallest of scales explain the interaction of single neurons and synapses and at the largest of scales describe, for example, behaviors and sensations. In what follows, we will shed some

  17. Modelling within-host spatiotemporal dynamics of invasive bacterial disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Grant

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanistic determinants of bacterial growth, death, and spread within mammalian hosts cannot be fully resolved studying a single bacterial population. They are also currently poorly understood. Here, we report on the application of sophisticated experimental approaches to map spatiotemporal population dynamics of bacteria during an infection. We analyzed heterogeneous traits of simultaneous infections with tagged Salmonella enterica populations (wild-type isogenic tagged strains [WITS] in wild-type and gene-targeted mice. WITS are phenotypically identical but can be distinguished and enumerated by quantitative PCR, making it possible, using probabilistic models, to estimate bacterial death rate based on the disappearance of strains through time. This multidisciplinary approach allowed us to establish the timing, relative occurrence, and immune control of key infection parameters in a true host-pathogen combination. Our analyses support a model in which shortly after infection, concomitant death and rapid bacterial replication lead to the establishment of independent bacterial subpopulations in different organs, a process controlled by host antimicrobial mechanisms. Later, decreased microbial mortality leads to an exponential increase in the number of bacteria that spread locally, with subsequent mixing of bacteria between organs via bacteraemia and further stochastic selection. This approach provides us with an unprecedented outlook on the pathogenesis of S. enterica infections, illustrating the complex spatial and stochastic effects that drive an infectious disease. The application of the novel method that we present in appropriate and diverse host-pathogen combinations, together with modelling of the data that result, will facilitate a comprehensive view of the spatial and stochastic nature of within-host dynamics.

  18. Simple models for studying complex spatiotemporal patterns of animal behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyutyunov, Yuri V.; Titova, Lyudmila I.

    2017-06-01

    Minimal mathematical models able to explain complex patterns of animal behavior are essential parts of simulation systems describing large-scale spatiotemporal dynamics of trophic communities, particularly those with wide-ranging species, such as occur in pelagic environments. We present results obtained with three different modelling approaches: (i) an individual-based model of animal spatial behavior; (ii) a continuous taxis-diffusion-reaction system of partial-difference equations; (iii) a 'hybrid' approach combining the individual-based algorithm of organism movements with explicit description of decay and diffusion of the movement stimuli. Though the models are based on extremely simple rules, they all allow description of spatial movements of animals in a predator-prey system within a closed habitat, reproducing some typical patterns of the pursuit-evasion behavior observed in natural populations. In all three models, at each spatial position the animal movements are determined by local conditions only, so the pattern of collective behavior emerges due to self-organization. The movement velocities of animals are proportional to the density gradients of specific cues emitted by individuals of the antagonistic species (pheromones, exometabolites or mechanical waves of the media, e.g., sound). These cues play a role of taxis stimuli: prey attract predators, while predators repel prey. Depending on the nature and the properties of the movement stimulus we propose using either a simplified individual-based model, a continuous taxis pursuit-evasion system, or a little more detailed 'hybrid' approach that combines simulation of the individual movements with the continuous model describing diffusion and decay of the stimuli in an explicit way. These can be used to improve movement models for many species, including large marine predators.

  19. Microstructure of Matrix in UHTC Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Stackpoole, Margaret; Gusman, Michael I.; Chavez-Garia Jose; Doxtad, Evan

    2011-01-01

    Approaches to controlling the microstructure of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) are described.. One matrix material has been infiltrated into carbon weaves to make composite materials. The microstructure of these composites is described.

  20. Microstructure study of AUC and UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ying; Gao Dihua; Lu Huaichang

    1992-01-01

    The microstructures of AUC, UO 2 powder and pellets were investigated with metallo-scope, SEM, TEM, XRD, and image analyzer. The influence of the reduction conditions of AUC on the microstructures of UO 2 powder and pellet were studied

  1. Spatiotemporal distribution of the benthic macrofauna in an urbanized subtropical estuary: environmental variations and anthropogenic impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Rocha Mattos

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was conducted in the Itajaí-Açu river lower estuary in Southern Brazil, in which we aimed to: (1 analyze spatiotemporal variations on the macrofauna; (2 search for relationships between environmental variables and the assembly and (3 evaluate the influence of capital dredging upon the assembly. Two hundred twenty eight samples were performed in four stations, two of which affected by dredging. Sediment (sand, silt and clay, organic matter and carbonate and water column´s variables (temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity were also assessed. We applied Principal Component Analysis for environmental variables and Hierarchical Clustering for biotic data. Correlations between environmental and biotic matrices were tested by Canonical Analysis of Principal Coordinates. Spatiotemporal variations in the assembly were tested by Permutational Multivariate Analysis of Variance. From the 21.839 organisms sampled, 97% was represented by the gastropod Heleobia australis. Despite the influence of the river discharge on the ecosystem, dredging was deleterious to the assembly, favoring opportunistic organisms such as H. australis.

  2. A Statistical Physics Characterization of the Complex Systems Dynamics: Quantifying Complexity from Spatio-Temporal Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorehdavoudi, Hana; Bogdan, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Biological systems are frequently categorized as complex systems due to their capabilities of generating spatio-temporal structures from apparent random decisions. In spite of research on analyzing biological systems, we lack a quantifiable framework for measuring their complexity. To fill this gap, in this paper, we develop a new paradigm to study a collective group of N agents moving and interacting in a three-dimensional space. Our paradigm helps to identify the spatio-temporal states of the motion of the group and their associated transition probabilities. This framework enables the estimation of the free energy landscape corresponding to the identified states. Based on the energy landscape, we quantify missing information, emergence, self-organization and complexity for a collective motion. We show that the collective motion of the group of agents evolves to reach the most probable state with relatively lowest energy level and lowest missing information compared to other possible states. Our analysis demonstrates that the natural group of animals exhibit a higher degree of emergence, self-organization and complexity over time. Consequently, this algorithm can be integrated into new frameworks to engineer collective motions to achieve certain degrees of emergence, self-organization and complexity.

  3. Spatiotemporal video deinterlacing using control grid interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Ragav; Zwart, Christine M.; Frakes, David H.; Li, Baoxin

    2015-03-01

    With the advent of progressive format display and broadcast technologies, video deinterlacing has become an important video-processing technique. Numerous approaches exist in the literature to accomplish deinterlacing. While most earlier methods were simple linear filtering-based approaches, the emergence of faster computing technologies and even dedicated video-processing hardware in display units has allowed higher quality but also more computationally intense deinterlacing algorithms to become practical. Most modern approaches analyze motion and content in video to select different deinterlacing methods for various spatiotemporal regions. We introduce a family of deinterlacers that employs spectral residue to choose between and weight control grid interpolation based spatial and temporal deinterlacing methods. The proposed approaches perform better than the prior state-of-the-art based on peak signal-to-noise ratio, other visual quality metrics, and simple perception-based subjective evaluations conducted by human viewers. We further study the advantages of using soft and hard decision thresholds on the visual performance.

  4. Microstructure of enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, A

    1997-01-01

    Enamel is a composite material consisting of mineral and organic phases. The properties of the mineral phase are modulated dramatically by its division into microscopic crystals, cemented together by the organic matrix protein polymer. A good concept of the 3D orientations of the crystals derives from visualizing their growth perpendicular to the surface in which they develop, which is pitted by the secretory poles of the ameloblasts. The arrangement of the crystals is the cause of the discontinuities, known as the prism boundaries or junctions, in the otherwise continuous structure. These locations acquire a more concentrated organic matrix during maturation, and they are both crack stoppers and crack propagation tracks in the adult tissue. Any tendency of prisms to cleave may be reduced by their varicosities, which reflect daily variations in the rate of production; their cross-sectional shape; the non-parallelism of adjacent groups, which develops through translocation of groups of cells across the surface during development; and the support of any one microscopic tissue element by other tissue, including dentine, placed to resist an applied load. Incremental growth lines are preferential cleavage planes within the enamel. Failure patterns of enamel in normal and abnormal use can be explained by these parameters, with additional consideration of functional variation and fatigue.

  5. Aspects of second-order analysis of structured inhomogeneous spatio-temporal processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Ghorbani, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Statistical methodology for spatio-temporal point processes is in its infancy. We consider second-order analysis based on pair correlation functions and K-functions for general inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes and for inhomogeneous spatio-temporal Cox processes. Assuming spatio......-temporal separability of the intensity function, we clarify different meanings of second-order spatio-temporal separability. One is second-order spatio-temporal independence and relates to log-Gaussian Cox processes with an additive covariance structure of the underlying spatio-temporal Gaussian process. Another...... concerns shot-noise Cox processes with a separable spatio-temporal covariance density. We propose diagnostic procedures for checking hypotheses of second-order spatio-temporal separability, which we apply on simulated and real data....

  6. Second-order analysis of structured inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Ghorbani, Mohammad

    Statistical methodology for spatio-temporal point processes is in its infancy. We consider second-order analysis based on pair correlation functions and K-functions for first general inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes and second inhomogeneous spatio-temporal Cox processes. Assuming...... spatio-temporal separability of the intensity function, we clarify different meanings of second-order spatio-temporal separability. One is second-order spatio-temporal independence and relates e.g. to log-Gaussian Cox processes with an additive covariance structure of the underlying spatio......-temporal Gaussian process. Another concerns shot-noise Cox processes with a separable spatio-temporal covariance density. We propose diagnostic procedures for checking hypotheses of second-order spatio-temporal separability, which we apply on simulated and real data (the UK 2001 epidemic foot and mouth disease data)....

  7. The World Spatiotemporal Analytics and Mapping Project (WSTAMP): Further Progress in Discovering, Exploring, and Mapping Spatiotemporal Patterns Across the World's Largest Open Source Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piburn, J.; Stewart, R.; Myers, A.; Sorokine, A.; Axley, E.; Anderson, D.; Burdette, J.; Biddle, C.; Hohl, A.; Eberle, R.; Kaufman, J.; Morton, A.

    2017-10-01

    Spatiotemporal (ST) analytics applied to major data sources such as the World Bank and World Health Organization has shown tremendous value in shedding light on the evolution of cultural, health, economic, and geopolitical landscapes on a global level. WSTAMP engages this opportunity by situating analysts, data, and analytics together within a visually rich and computationally rigorous online analysis environment. Since introducing WSTAMP at the First International Workshop on Spatiotemporal Computing, several transformative advances have occurred. Collaboration with human computer interaction experts led to a complete interface redesign that deeply immerses the analyst within a ST context, significantly increases visual and textual content, provides navigational crosswalks for attribute discovery, substantially reduce mouse and keyboard actions, and supports user data uploads. Secondly, the database has been expanded to include over 16,000 attributes, 50 years of time, and 200+ nation states and redesigned to support non-annual, non-national, city, and interaction data. Finally, two new analytics are implemented for analyzing large portfolios of multi-attribute data and measuring the behavioral stability of regions along different dimensions. These advances required substantial new approaches in design, algorithmic innovations, and increased computational efficiency. We report on these advances and inform how others may freely access the tool.

  8. The World Spatiotemporal Analytics and Mapping Project (WSTAMP: Further Progress in Discovering, Exploring, and Mapping Spatiotemporal Patterns Across the World’s Largest Open Source Data Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piburn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Spatiotemporal (ST analytics applied to major data sources such as the World Bank and World Health Organization has shown tremendous value in shedding light on the evolution of cultural, health, economic, and geopolitical landscapes on a global level. WSTAMP engages this opportunity by situating analysts, data, and analytics together within a visually rich and computationally rigorous online analysis environment. Since introducing WSTAMP at the First International Workshop on Spatiotemporal Computing, several transformative advances have occurred. Collaboration with human computer interaction experts led to a complete interface redesign that deeply immerses the analyst within a ST context, significantly increases visual and textual content, provides navigational crosswalks for attribute discovery, substantially reduce mouse and keyboard actions, and supports user data uploads. Secondly, the database has been expanded to include over 16,000 attributes, 50 years of time, and 200+ nation states and redesigned to support non-annual, non-national, city, and interaction data. Finally, two new analytics are implemented for analyzing large portfolios of multi-attribute data and measuring the behavioral stability of regions along different dimensions. These advances required substantial new approaches in design, algorithmic innovations, and increased computational efficiency. We report on these advances and inform how others may freely access the tool.

  9. Spatial organization of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro--results from a new individual cell-based model with podia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC requires their extensive in vitro expansion. MSC in culture typically grow to confluence within a few weeks. They show spindle-shaped fibroblastoid morphology and align to each other in characteristic spatial patterns at high cell density. We present an individual cell-based model (IBM that is able to quantitatively describe the spatio-temporal organization of MSC in culture. Our model substantially improves on previous models by explicitly representing cell podia and their dynamics. It employs podia-generated forces for cell movement and adjusts cell behavior in response to cell density. At the same time, it is simple enough to simulate thousands of cells with reasonable computational effort. Experimental sheep MSC cultures were monitored under standard conditions. Automated image analysis was used to determine the location and orientation of individual cells. Our simulations quantitatively reproduced the observed growth dynamics and cell-cell alignment assuming cell density-dependent proliferation, migration, and morphology. In addition to cell growth on plain substrates our model captured cell alignment on micro-structured surfaces. We propose a specific surface micro-structure that according to our simulations can substantially enlarge cell culture harvest. The 'tool box' of cell migratory behavior newly introduced in this study significantly enhances the bandwidth of IBM. Our approach is capable of accommodating individual cell behavior and collective cell dynamics of a variety of cell types and tissues in computational systems biology.

  10. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  11. Modeling of emulsion copolymer microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doremaele, G.H.J.; Herk, van A.M.; German, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    A model is developed to describe stages II and III of batch emulsion copolymn., and its predictive capabilities are investigated by application to the system styrene-Me acrylate. The main reaction site is the monomer-swollen polymer particle. Copolymn. rate and copolymer microstructure (molar

  12. Nonlinear microstructured polymer optical fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frosz, Michael Henoch

    is potentially the case for microstructured polymer optical fibres (mPOFs). Another advantage is that polymer materials have a higher biocompatibility than silica, meaning that it is easier to bond certain types of biosensor materials to a polymer surface than to silica. As with silica PCFs, it is difficult...

  13. Spatiotemporal exploratory models for broad-scale survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Daniel; Hochachka, Wesley M; Zuckerberg, Benjamin; Winkler, David W; Shaby, Ben; Munson, M Arthur; Hooker, Giles; Riedewald, Mirek; Sheldon, Daniel; Kelling, Steve

    2010-12-01

    The distributions of animal populations change and evolve through time. Migratory species exploit different habitats at different times of the year. Biotic and abiotic features that determine where a species lives vary due to natural and anthropogenic factors. This spatiotemporal variation needs to be accounted for in any modeling of species' distributions. In this paper we introduce a semiparametric model that provides a flexible framework for analyzing dynamic patterns of species occurrence and abundance from broad-scale survey data. The spatiotemporal exploratory model (STEM) adds essential spatiotemporal structure to existing techniques for developing species distribution models through a simple parametric structure without requiring a detailed understanding of the underlying dynamic processes. STEMs use a multi-scale strategy to differentiate between local and global-scale spatiotemporal structure. A user-specified species distribution model accounts for spatial and temporal patterning at the local level. These local patterns are then allowed to "scale up" via ensemble averaging to larger scales. This makes STEMs especially well suited for exploring distributional dynamics arising from a variety of processes. Using data from eBird, an online citizen science bird-monitoring project, we demonstrate that monthly changes in distribution of a migratory species, the Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), can be more accurately described with a STEM than a conventional bagged decision tree model in which spatiotemporal structure has not been imposed. We also demonstrate that there is no loss of model predictive power when a STEM is used to describe a spatiotemporal distribution with very little spatiotemporal variation; the distribution of a nonmigratory species, the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis).

  14. A hybrid spatiotemporal drought forecasting model for operational use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliades, L.; Loukas, A.

    2010-09-01

    Drought forecasting plays an important role in the planning and management of natural resources and water resource systems in a river basin. Early and timelines forecasting of a drought event can help to take proactive measures and set out drought mitigation strategies to alleviate the impacts of drought. Spatiotemporal data mining is the extraction of unknown and implicit knowledge, structures, spatiotemporal relationships, or patterns not explicitly stored in spatiotemporal databases. As one of data mining techniques, forecasting is widely used to predict the unknown future based upon the patterns hidden in the current and past data. This study develops a hybrid spatiotemporal scheme for integrated spatial and temporal forecasting. Temporal forecasting is achieved using feed-forward neural networks and the temporal forecasts are extended to the spatial dimension using a spatial recurrent neural network model. The methodology is demonstrated for an operational meteorological drought index the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) calculated at multiple timescales. 48 precipitation stations and 18 independent precipitation stations, located at Pinios river basin in Thessaly region, Greece, were used for the development and spatiotemporal validation of the hybrid spatiotemporal scheme. Several quantitative temporal and spatial statistical indices were considered for the performance evaluation of the models. Furthermore, qualitative statistical criteria based on contingency tables between observed and forecasted drought episodes were calculated. The results show that the lead time of forecasting for operational use depends on the SPI timescale. The hybrid spatiotemporal drought forecasting model could be operationally used for forecasting up to three months ahead for SPI short timescales (e.g. 3-6 months) up to six months ahead for large SPI timescales (e.g. 24 months). The above findings could be useful in developing a drought preparedness plan in the region.

  15. Microstructured metal molds fabricated via investment casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, Andrew H; King, William P

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an investment casting process to produce aluminum molds having integrated microstructures. Unlike conventional micromolding tools, the aluminum mold was large and had complex curved surfaces. The aluminum was cast from curved microstructured ceramic molds which were themselves cast from curved microstructured rubber. The aluminum microstructures had an aspect ratio of 1:1 and sizes ranging from 25 to 50 µm. Many structures were successfully cast into the aluminum with excellent replication fidelity, including circular, square and triangular holes. We demonstrate molding of large, curved surfaces having surface microstructures using the aluminum mold.

  16. An evaluation of space time cube representation of spatiotemporal patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensson, Per Ola; Dahlbäck, Nils; Anundi, Daniel; Björnstad, Marius; Gillberg, Hanna; Haraldsson, Jonas; Mårtensson, Ingrid; Nordvall, Mathias; Ståhl, Josefine

    2009-01-01

    Space time cube representation is an information visualization technique where spatiotemporal data points are mapped into a cube. Information visualization researchers have previously argued that space time cube representation is beneficial in revealing complex spatiotemporal patterns in a data set to users. The argument is based on the fact that both time and spatial information are displayed simultaneously to users, an effect difficult to achieve in other representations. However, to our knowledge the actual usefulness of space time cube representation in conveying complex spatiotemporal patterns to users has not been empirically validated. To fill this gap, we report on a between-subjects experiment comparing novice users' error rates and response times when answering a set of questions using either space time cube or a baseline 2D representation. For some simple questions, the error rates were lower when using the baseline representation. For complex questions where the participants needed an overall understanding of the spatiotemporal structure of the data set, the space time cube representation resulted in on average twice as fast response times with no difference in error rates compared to the baseline. These results provide an empirical foundation for the hypothesis that space time cube representation benefits users analyzing complex spatiotemporal patterns.

  17. Spatio-temporal networks: reachability, centrality and robustness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Matthew J; Musolesi, Mirco

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in spatial and temporal networks have enabled researchers to more-accurately describe many real-world systems such as urban transport networks. In this paper, we study the response of real-world spatio-temporal networks to random error and systematic attack, taking a unified view of their spatial and temporal performance. We propose a model of spatio-temporal paths in time-varying spatially embedded networks which captures the property that, as in many real-world systems, interaction between nodes is non-instantaneous and governed by the space in which they are embedded. Through numerical experiments on three real-world urban transport systems, we study the effect of node failure on a network's topological, temporal and spatial structure. We also demonstrate the broader applicability of this framework to three other classes of network. To identify weaknesses specific to the behaviour of a spatio-temporal system, we introduce centrality measures that evaluate the importance of a node as a structural bridge and its role in supporting spatio-temporally efficient flows through the network. This exposes the complex nature of fragility in a spatio-temporal system, showing that there is a variety of failure modes when a network is subject to systematic attacks.

  18. Spatio-temporal models of mental processes from fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoos, Firdaus; Machiraju, Raghu; Singh, Shantanu; Morocz, Istvan Ákos

    2011-07-15

    Understanding the highly complex, spatially distributed and temporally organized phenomena entailed by mental processes using functional MRI is an important research problem in cognitive and clinical neuroscience. Conventional analysis methods focus on the spatial dimension of the data discarding the information about brain function contained in the temporal dimension. This paper presents a fully spatio-temporal multivariate analysis method using a state-space model (SSM) for brain function that yields not only spatial maps of activity but also its temporal structure along with spatially varying estimates of the hemodynamic response. Efficient algorithms for estimating the parameters along with quantitative validations are given. A novel low-dimensional feature-space for representing the data, based on a formal definition of functional similarity, is derived. Quantitative validation of the model and the estimation algorithms is provided with a simulation study. Using a real fMRI study for mental arithmetic, the ability of this neurophysiologically inspired model to represent the spatio-temporal information corresponding to mental processes is demonstrated. Moreover, by comparing the models across multiple subjects, natural patterns in mental processes organized according to different mental abilities are revealed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatiotemporal dynamics of spring and stream water chemistry in a high-mountain area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelazny, Miroslaw; Astel, Aleksander; Wolanin, Anna; Malek, Stanislaw

    2011-01-01

    The present study deals with the application of the self-organizing map (SOM) technique in the exploration of spatiotemporal dynamics of spring and stream water samples collected in the Chocholowski Stream Basin located in the Tatra Mountains (Poland). The SOM-based classification helped to uncover relationships between physical and chemical parameters of water samples and factors determining the quality of water in the studied high-mountain area. In the upper part of the Chocholowski Stream Basin, located on the top of the crystalline core of the Tatras, concentrations of the majority of ionic substances were the lowest due to limited leaching. Significantly higher concentration of ionic substances was detected in spring and stream samples draining sedimentary rocks. The influence of karst-type springs on the quality of stream water was also demonstrated. - Highlights: → We use SOM approach to explore physiochemical data for mountain waters. → Geologic structure and hydrological events impact water chemistry. → Limited leaching, typical of crystalline core, reflects in low water mineralization. → Sedimentary rocks are susceptible for leaching. → Eutrophication has not been shown to be a threat in the Chocholowska Valley. - Spatiotemporal dynamics of spring and stream water chemistry in unique high-mountain area was evaluated by the self-organizing map technique.

  20. Spatio-temporal Eigenvector Filtering: Application on Bioenergy Crop Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Kamarianakis, Y.; Georgescu, M.

    2017-12-01

    A suite of 10-year ensemble-based simulations was conducted to investigate the hydroclimatic impacts due to large-scale deployment of perennial bioenergy crops across the continental United States. Given the large size of the simulated dataset (about 60Tb), traditional hierarchical spatio-temporal statistical modelling cannot be implemented for the evaluation of physics parameterizations and biofuel impacts. In this work, we propose a filtering algorithm that takes into account the spatio-temporal autocorrelation structure of the data while avoiding spatial confounding. This method is used to quantify the robustness of simulated hydroclimatic impacts associated with bioenergy crops to alternative physics parameterizations and observational datasets. Results are evaluated against those obtained from three alternative Bayesian spatio-temporal specifications.

  1. Spiking neural network for recognizing spatiotemporal sequences of spikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Dezhe Z.

    2004-01-01

    Sensory neurons in many brain areas spike with precise timing to stimuli with temporal structures, and encode temporally complex stimuli into spatiotemporal spikes. How the downstream neurons read out such neural code is an important unsolved problem. In this paper, we describe a decoding scheme using a spiking recurrent neural network. The network consists of excitatory neurons that form a synfire chain, and two globally inhibitory interneurons of different types that provide delayed feedforward and fast feedback inhibition, respectively. The network signals recognition of a specific spatiotemporal sequence when the last excitatory neuron down the synfire chain spikes, which happens if and only if that sequence was present in the input spike stream. The recognition scheme is invariant to variations in the intervals between input spikes within some range. The computation of the network can be mapped into that of a finite state machine. Our network provides a simple way to decode spatiotemporal spikes with diverse types of neurons

  2. Dynamical topology and statistical properties of spatiotemporal chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Quntao; Gao, Xun; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Hongli

    2012-12-01

    For spatiotemporal chaos described by partial differential equations, there are generally locations where the dynamical variable achieves its local extremum or where the time partial derivative of the variable vanishes instantaneously. To a large extent, the location and movement of these topologically special points determine the qualitative structure of the disordered states. We analyze numerically statistical properties of the topologically special points in one-dimensional spatiotemporal chaos. The probability distribution functions for the number of point, the lifespan, and the distance covered during their lifetime are obtained from numerical simulations. Mathematically, we establish a probabilistic model to describe the dynamics of these topologically special points. In spite of the different definitions in different spatiotemporal chaos, the dynamics of these special points can be described in a uniform approach.

  3. Frequency Modulation and Spatiotemporal Stability of the sCPG in Preterm Infants with RDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Barlow

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonnutritive suck (NNS is an observable and accessible motor behavior which is often used to make inference about brain development and pre-feeding skill in preterm and term infants. The purpose of this study was to model NNS burst compression pressure dynamics in the frequency and time domain among two groups of preterm infants, including those with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, N=15 and 17 healthy controls. Digitized samples of NNS compression pressure waveforms recorded at a 1-week interval were collected 15 minutes prior to a scheduled feed. Regression analysis and ANOVA revealed that healthy preterm infants produced longer NNS bursts and the mean burst initiation cycle frequencies were higher when compared to the RDS group. Moreover, the initial 5 cycles of the NNS burst manifest a frequency modulated (FM segment which is a significant feature of the suck central pattern generator (sCPG, and differentially expressed in healthy and RDS infants. The NNS burst structure revealed significantly lower spatiotemporal index values for control versus RDS preterm infants during FM, and provides additional information on the microstructure of the sCPG which may be used to gauge the developmental status and progression of oromotor control systems among these fragile infants.

  4. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    This is an editorial article (preface) for the publication of symposium papers in the Journal of Nuclear materials: These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15–19, 2015.

  5. Money: A Market Microstructure Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Krueger, Malte

    2008-01-01

    The current discussion about the future of the financial system draws heavily on a set of theories known as the ‘New Monetary Economics’. The New Monetary Economics predicts that deregulation and financial innovation will lead to a moneyless world. This paper uses a market microstructure approach to show that a common medium of exchange that serves as unit of account will remain a necessary instrument to reduce transaction costs. This finding is supported by empirical evidence from foreign...

  6. Microstructural characterization of EXCEL alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oroza Z E, Celiz; Saumell M, Lani; Versaci, R A; Bozzano, P B

    2012-01-01

    The microstructure of Excel alloy was studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the present phases. Characteristic peaks of α-Zr (HCP), β-Zr (BCC) and δhydride (FCC) were identified. The high relatives intensities of certain peaks suggest that samples are textured. Basal poles were dominant in radial-longitudinal planes and prismatic poles have the highest concentration in radial-tangential planes (author)

  7. Microstructure fibers for gas detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějec, Vlastimil; Mrázek, Jan; Hayer, Miloš; Peterka, Pavel; Kaňka, Jiří; Honzátko, Pavel; Berková, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 26, 2/3 (2006), s. 317-321 ISSN 0928-4931. [MADICA 2004. Tunis, 29.11.2004-01.12.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/02/0779 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : photonic crystals * crystal microstructure * optical fibres * fibre optic sensors * gas Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.325, year: 2006

  8. Innovative microstructures in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutty, T.R.G.; Kumar, Arun; Kamath, H.S.

    2009-01-01

    For cleaner and safe nuclear power, new processes are required to design better nuclear fuels and make more efficient reactors to generate nuclear power. Therefore, one must understand how the microstructure changes during reactor operation. Accordingly, the materials scientists and engineers can then design and fabricate fuels with higher reliability and performance. Microstructure and its evolution are big unknowns in nuclear fuel. The basic requirements for the high performance of a fuel are: a) Soft pellets - To reduce Pellet clad mechanical interaction (PCMI) b) Large grain size - To reduce fission gas release (FGR). The strength of the pellet at room temperature is related to grain size by the Hall-Petch relation. Accordingly, the lower grain sized pellets will have high strength. But at high temperature (above equicohesive temperature) the grain boundaries becomes weaker than grain matrix. Since the small grain sized pellets have more grain boundary areas, these pellet become softer than pellet that have large grain sizes. Also as grain size decreases, creep rate of the fuel increases. Therefore, pellets with small grain size have higher creep rate and better plasticity. Therefore, these pellets will be useful to reduce the PCMI. On the other hand, pellet with large grain size is beneficial to reduce the fission gas release. In developing thermal reactor fuels for high burn-up, this factor should be taken into consideration. The question being asked is whether the microstructure can be tailored for irradiation hardening, fracture resistance, fission-gas release. This paper deals with the role played by microstructure for better irradiation performance. (author)

  9. Thin film diamond microstructure applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roppel, T.; Ellis, C.; Ramesham, R.; Jaworske, D.; Baginski, M. E.; Lee, S. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Selective deposition and abrasion, as well as etching in atomic oxygen or reduced-pressure air, have been used to prepare patterned polycrystalline diamond films which, on further processing by anisotropic Si etching, yield the microstructures of such devices as flow sensors and accelerometers. Both types of sensor have been experimentally tested in the respective functions of hot-wire anemometer and both single- and double-hinged accelerometer.

  10. Microstructured reactor for electroorganic synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzek, Karel, E-mail: bouzekk@vscht.c [Department of Inorganic Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Jiricny, Vladimir [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, v.v.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Rozvojova 2, 165 02 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kodym, Roman [Department of Inorganic Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kristal, Jiri [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, v.v.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Rozvojova 2, 165 02 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Bystron, Tomas [Department of Inorganic Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2010-11-30

    In the present work a brief overview of microstructured devices, the advantages and disadvantages as well as the principles of a multiscale design approach are presented. The advantages mainly comprise uniform current density distribution, local control of the process parameters, high single-pass conversion of the reactant and reduced concentration of the supporting electrolyte needed to perform the reaction. The main challenge with this type of cell is gas evolution, a typical reaction taking place at the counter-electrode. The phenomena discussed are documented using the example of anodic methoxylation of 4-methylanisole. An analysis was made of the two-phase flow hydrodynamics inside the microstructured cell. The range of operational conditions suitable for the desired reaction was identified. The results were used together with the information on the electrode reaction kinetics in the form of the Butler-Volmer-type equation for the design of a suitable bipolar microstructured cell. A bipolar cell optimized to perform the desired reaction is reported. The results are compared with the published data. An analysis was performed that proved that the performance of the existing technology is more demanding in terms of energy consumption for the separation of the final product from the reaction mixture. The process intensification was evaluated on the basis of the available data.

  11. Overview of microstructural evolution in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are important structural materials common to several different reactor systems, including light water and fast breeder fission, and magnetic fusion reactors (LWR, FBR, and MFR, respectively). The microstructures that develop in 300 series austenitic stainless steels during neutron irradiation at 60-700 C include combinations of dislocation loops and networks, bubbles and voids, and various kinds of precipitate phases (radiation-induced, or -enhanced or -modified thermal phases). Many property changes in these steels during neutron irradiation are directly or indirectly related to radiation-induced microstructural evolution. Even more important is the fact that radiation-resistance of such steels during either FBR or MFR irradiation is directly related to control of the evolving microstructure during such irradiation. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the large and complex body of data accumulated from various fission reactor irradiation experiments conducted over the many years of research on microstructural evolution in this family of steels. The data can be organized into several different temperature regimes which then define the nature of the dominant microstructural components and their sensitivities to irradiation parameters (dose, helium/dpa ratio, dose rate) or metallurgical variables (alloy composition, pretreatment). The emphasis in this paper will be on the underlying mechanisms driving the microstructure to evolve during irradiation or those enabling microstructural stability related to radiation resistance. (orig.)

  12. Stochastic resonance based on modulation instability in spatiotemporal chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Liu, Hongjun; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu

    2017-04-03

    A novel dynamic of stochastic resonance in spatiotemporal chaos is presented, which is based on modulation instability of perturbed partially coherent wave. The noise immunity of chaos can be reinforced through this effect and used to restore the coherent signal information buried in chaotic perturbation. A theoretical model with fluctuations term is derived from the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation via Wigner transform. It shows that through weakening the nonlinear threshold and triggering energy redistribution, the coherent component dominates the instability damped by incoherent component. The spatiotemporal output showing the properties of stochastic resonance may provide a potential application of signal encryption and restoration.

  13. Spatio-temporal data analytics for wind energy integration

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Lei; Zhang, Junshan

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief presents spatio-temporal data analytics for wind energy integration using stochastic modeling and optimization methods. It explores techniques for efficiently integrating renewable energy generation into bulk power grids. The operational challenges of wind, and its variability are carefully examined. A spatio-temporal analysis approach enables the authors to develop Markov-chain-based short-term forecasts of wind farm power generation. To deal with the wind ramp dynamics, a support vector machine enhanced Markov model is introduced. The stochastic optimization of economic di

  14. Coexistence of collapse and stable spatiotemporal solitons in multimode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtyrina, Olga V.; Fedoruk, Mikhail P.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2018-01-01

    We analyze spatiotemporal solitons in multimode optical fibers and demonstrate the existence of stable solitons, in a sharp contrast to earlier predictions of collapse of multidimensional solitons in three-dimensional media. We discuss the coexistence of blow-up solutions and collapse stabilization by a low-dimensional external potential in graded-index media, and also predict the existence of stable higher-order nonlinear waves such as dipole-mode spatiotemporal solitons. To support the main conclusions of our numerical studies we employ a variational approach and derive analytically the stability criterion for input powers for the collapse stabilization.

  15. Replication Strategy for Spatiotemporal Data Based on Distributed Caching System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Lian; Yang, Liu; Tao, Yang; Xu, Juan; Zhao, Lun

    2018-01-14

    The replica strategy in distributed cache can effectively reduce user access delay and improve system performance. However, developing a replica strategy suitable for varied application scenarios is still quite challenging, owing to differences in user access behavior and preferences. In this paper, a replication strategy for spatiotemporal data (RSSD) based on a distributed caching system is proposed. By taking advantage of the spatiotemporal locality and correlation of user access, RSSD mines high popularity and associated files from historical user access information, and then generates replicas and selects appropriate cache node for placement. Experimental results show that the RSSD algorithm is simple and efficient, and succeeds in significantly reducing user access delay.

  16. Artificial neural network does better spatiotemporal compressive sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Young; Hsu, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2012-06-01

    Spatiotemporal sparseness is generated naturally by human visual system based on artificial neural network modeling of associative memory. Sparseness means nothing more and nothing less than the compressive sensing achieves merely the information concentration. To concentrate the information, one uses the spatial correlation or spatial FFT or DWT or the best of all adaptive wavelet transform (cf. NUS, Shen Shawei). However, higher dimensional spatiotemporal information concentration, the mathematics can not do as flexible as a living human sensory system. The reason is obviously for survival reasons. The rest of the story is given in the paper.

  17. Tensor analysis methods for activity characterization in spatiotemporal data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haass, Michael Joseph; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Ochoa, Edward M

    2014-03-01

    Tensor (multiway array) factorization and decomposition offers unique advantages for activity characterization in spatio-temporal datasets because these methods are compatible with sparse matrices and maintain multiway structure that is otherwise lost in collapsing for regular matrix factorization. This report describes our research as part of the PANTHER LDRD Grand Challenge to develop a foundational basis of mathematical techniques and visualizations that enable unsophisticated users (e.g. users who are not steeped in the mathematical details of matrix algebra and mulitway computations) to discover hidden patterns in large spatiotemporal data sets.

  18. Secondary Instabilities and Spatiotemporal Chaos in Parametric Surface Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Vinals, J.

    1995-01-01

    A 2D model is introduced to study the onset of parametric surface waves, their secondary instabilities, and the transition to spatiotemporal chaos. We obtain the stability boundary of a periodic standing wave above onset against Eckhaus, zigzag, and transverse amplitude modulations (TAM), as a function of the control parameter var-epsilon and the wavelength of the pattern. The Eckhaus and TAM boundaries cross at a finite value of var-epsilon, thus explaining the finite threshold for the TAM observed experimentally. At larger values of var-epsilon, a numerical solution reveals a transition to spatiotemporal chaotic states mediated by the TAM instability

  19. Pattern control and suppression of spatiotemporal chaos using geometrical resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.A.; Bellorin, A.; Reyes, L.I.; Vasquez, C.; Guerrero, L.E.

    2004-01-01

    We generalize the concept of geometrical resonance to perturbed sine-Gordon, Nonlinear Schroedinger, phi (cursive,open) Greek 4 , and Complex Ginzburg-Landau equations. Using this theory we can control different dynamical patterns. For instance, we can stabilize breathers and oscillatory patterns of large amplitudes successfully avoiding chaos. On the other hand, this method can be used to suppress spatiotemporal chaos and turbulence in systems where these phenomena are already present. This method can be generalized to even more general spatiotemporal systems. A short report of some of our results has been published in [Europhys. Lett. 64 (2003) 743

  20. Replication Strategy for Spatiotemporal Data Based on Distributed Caching System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Lian; Tao, Yang; Xu, Juan; Zhao, Lun

    2018-01-01

    The replica strategy in distributed cache can effectively reduce user access delay and improve system performance. However, developing a replica strategy suitable for varied application scenarios is still quite challenging, owing to differences in user access behavior and preferences. In this paper, a replication strategy for spatiotemporal data (RSSD) based on a distributed caching system is proposed. By taking advantage of the spatiotemporal locality and correlation of user access, RSSD mines high popularity and associated files from historical user access information, and then generates replicas and selects appropriate cache node for placement. Experimental results show that the RSSD algorithm is simple and efficient, and succeeds in significantly reducing user access delay. PMID:29342897

  1. Spatio-Temporal Data Mining for Location-Based Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidofalvi, Gyozo

    . The objectives of the presented thesis are three-fold. First, to extend popular data mining methods to the spatio-temporal domain. Second, to demonstrate the usefulness of the extended methods and the derived knowledge in promising LBS examples. Finally, to eliminate privacy concerns in connection with spatio......-temporal data mining by devising systems for privacy-preserving location data collection and mining.......Location-Based Services (LBS) are continuously gaining popularity. Innovative LBSes integrate knowledge about the users into the service. Such knowledge can be derived by analyzing the location data of users. Such data contain two unique dimensions, space and time, which need to be analyzed...

  2. Spatio-temporal databases complex motion pattern queries

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, Marcos R

    2013-01-01

    This brief presents several new query processing techniques, called complex motion pattern queries, specifically designed for very large spatio-temporal databases of moving objects. The brief begins with the definition of flexible pattern queries, which are powerful because of the integration of variables and motion patterns. This is followed by a summary of the expressive power of patterns and flexibility of pattern queries. The brief then present the Spatio-Temporal Pattern System (STPS) and density-based pattern queries. STPS databases contain millions of records with information about mobi

  3. Routes to spatiotemporal chaos in Kerr optical frequency combs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coillet, Aurélien; Chembo, Yanne K

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the various routes to spatiotemporal chaos in Kerr optical frequency combs, obtained through pumping an ultra-high Q-factor whispering-gallery mode resonator with a continuous-wave laser. The Lugiato-Lefever model is used to build bifurcation diagrams with regards to the parameters that are externally controllable, namely, the frequency and the power of the pumping laser. We show that the spatiotemporal chaos emerging from Turing patterns and solitons display distinctive dynamical features. Experimental spectra of chaotic Kerr combs are also presented for both cases, in excellent agreement with theoretical spectra.

  4. Size-dependent diffusion promotes the emergence of spatiotemporal patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lai; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Banerjee, Malay

    2014-01-01

    intraspecific physiological variations at the individual level. Here we explore the impacts of size variation within species resulting from individual ontogeny, on the emergence of spatiotemporal patterns in a fully size-structured population model. We found that size dependency of animal's diffusivity greatly......, we found that the single-generation cycle is more likely to drive spatiotemporal patterns compared to predator-prey cycles, meaning that the mechanism of Hopf bifurcation might be more common than hitherto appreciated since the former cycle is more widespread than the latter in case of interacting...

  5. Spatiotemporal variability in carbon exchange fluxes across the Sahel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tagesson, Håkan Torbern; Fensholt, Rasmus; Cappelaere, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    for semi-arid ecosystems. We have synthesized data on the land-atmosphere exchange of CO2 measured with the eddy covariance technique from the six existing sites across the Sahel, one of the largest semi-arid regions in the world. The overall aim of the study is to analyse and quantify the spatiotemporal...... variability in these fluxes and to analyse to which degree spatiotemporal variation can be explained by hydrological, climatic, edaphic and vegetation variables. All ecosystems were C sinks (average ± total error -162 ± 48 g C m-2 y-1), but were smaller when strongly impacted by anthropogenic influences...

  6. Spatio-temporal modeling of nonlinear distributed parameter systems

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Han-Xiong

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this volume is to provide a brief review of the previous work on model reduction and identifi cation of distributed parameter systems (DPS), and develop new spatio-temporal models and their relevant identifi cation approaches. In this book, a systematic overview and classifi cation on the modeling of DPS is presented fi rst, which includes model reduction, parameter estimation and system identifi cation. Next, a class of block-oriented nonlinear systems in traditional lumped parameter systems (LPS) is extended to DPS, which results in the spatio-temporal Wiener and Hammerstein s

  7. Mobile technologies and the spatiotemporal configurations of institutional practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shklovski, Irina; Troshynski, Emily; Dourish, Paul

    2015-01-01

    are specifically concerned with what happens to institutional roles, power relationships, and decision-making processes when a particular type of information—that of spatiotemporal location of people—is made into a technologically tradable object through the use of location-based systems. We examine...... in which broad adoption of location-based and mobile technologies has the capacity to radically reconfigure the spatiotemporal arrangement of institutional processes. The presence of digital location traces creates new forms of institutional accountability, facilitates a shift in the understood relation...... between location and action, and necessitates new models of interpretation and sense making in practice....

  8. Estimating the state of large spatio-temporally chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, E.; Hunt, B.R.; Szunyogh, I.; Zimin, A.V.; Kostelich, E.J.; Corazza, M.; Kalnay, E.; Patil, D.J.; Yorke, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the estimation of the state of a large spatio-temporally chaotic system from noisy observations and knowledge of a system model. Standard state estimation techniques using the Kalman filter approach are not computationally feasible for systems with very many effective degrees of freedom. We present and test a new technique (called a Local Ensemble Kalman Filter), generally applicable to large spatio-temporally chaotic systems for which correlations between system variables evaluated at different points become small at large separation between the points

  9. Normal white matter microstructure in women long-term recovered from anorexia nervosa: A diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Lasse; Rø, Øyvind; Endestad, Tor

    2018-01-01

    Studies point to white matter (WM) microstructure alterations in both adolescent and adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). These include reduced fractional anisotropy in several WM fiber tracts, suggesting reduced WM integrity. The extent to which these alterations are reversible with recovery from AN is unclear. There is a paucity of research investigating the presence of WM microstructure alterations in recovered AN patients, and results are inconsistent. This study aimed to investigate the presence of WM microstructure alterations in women long-term recovered from AN. Twenty-one adult women who were recovered from AN for at least 1 year were compared to 21 adult comparison women. Participants were recruited via user-organizations for eating disorders, local advertisements, and online forums. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to compare WM microstructure between groups. Correlations between WM microstructure and clinical characteristics were also explored. There were no statistically significant between-group differences in WM microstructure. These null findings remained when employing liberal alpha level thresholds. Furthermore, there were no statistically significant correlations between WM microstructure and clinical characteristics. Our findings showed normal WM microstructure in long-term recovered patients, indicating the alterations observed during the acute phase are reversible. Given the paucity of research and inconsistent findings, future studies are warranted to determine the presence of WM microstructure alterations following recovery from AN. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Spatio-temporal correlations in the Manna model in one, three and five dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Gary; Pruessner, Gunnar

    2018-02-01

    Although the paradigm of criticality is centered around spatial correlations and their anomalous scaling, not many studies of self-organized criticality (SOC) focus on spatial correlations. Often, integrated observables, such as avalanche size and duration, are used, not least as to avoid complications due to the unavoidable lack of translational invariance. The present work is a survey of spatio-temporal correlation functions in the Manna Model of SOC, measured numerically in detail in d = 1,3 and 5 dimensions and compared to theoretical results, in particular relating them to “integrated” observables such as avalanche size and duration scaling, that measure them indirectly. Contrary to the notion held by some of SOC models organizing into a critical state by re-arranging their spatial structure avalanche by avalanche, which may be expected to result in large, nontrivial, system-spanning spatial correlations in the quiescent state (between avalanches), correlations of inactive particles in the quiescent state have a small amplitude that does not and cannot increase with the system size, although they display (noisy) power law scaling over a range linear in the system size. Self-organization, however, does take place as the (one-point) density of inactive particles organizes into a particular profile that is asymptotically independent of the driving location, also demonstrated analytically in one dimension. Activity and its correlations, on the other hand, display nontrivial long-ranged spatio-temporal scaling with exponents that can be related to established results, in particular avalanche size and duration exponents. The correlation length and amplitude are set by the system size (confirmed analytically for some observables), as expected in systems displaying finite size scaling. In one dimension, we find some surprising inconsistencies of the dynamical exponent. A (spatially extended) mean field theory (MFT) is recovered, with some corrections, in five

  11. Compost addition reduces porosity and chlordecone transfer in soil microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woignier, Thierry; Clostre, Florence; Fernandes, Paula; Rangon, Luc; Soler, Alain; Lesueur-Jannoyer, Magalie

    2016-01-01

    Chlordecone, an organochlorine insecticide, pollutes soils and contaminates crops and water resources and is biomagnified by food chains. As chlordecone is partly trapped in the soil, one possible alternative to decontamination may be to increase its containment in the soil, thereby reducing its diffusion into the environment. Containing the pesticide in the soil could be achieved by adding compost because the pollutant has an affinity for organic matter. We hypothesized that adding compost would also change soil porosity, as well as transport and containment of the pesticide. We measured the pore features and studied the nanoscale structure to assess the effect of adding compost on soil microstructure. We simulated changes in the transport properties (hydraulic conductivity and diffusion) associated with changes in porosity. During compost incubation, the clay microstructure collapsed due to capillary stresses. Simulated data showed that the hydraulic conductivity and diffusion coefficient were reduced by 95 and 70% in the clay microstructure, respectively. Reduced transport properties affected pesticide mobility and thus helped reduce its transfer from the soil to water and to the crop. We propose that the containment effect is due not only to the high affinity of chlordecone for soil organic matter but also to a trapping mechanism in the soil porosity.

  12. Fabrication of metallic microstructures by micromolding nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Winter, Michael R.; Domeier, Linda A.; Allan, Shawn M.; Skala, Dawn M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for fabricating metallic microstructures, i.e., microcomponents of micron or submicron dimensions. A molding composition is prepared containing an optional binder and nanometer size (1 to 1000 nm in diameter) metallic particles. A mold, such as a lithographically patterned mold, preferably a LIGA or a negative photoresist mold, is filled with the molding composition and compressed. The resulting microstructures are then removed from the mold and the resulting metallic microstructures so provided are then sintered.

  13. State estimation of spatio-temporal phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan

    This dissertation addresses the state estimation problem of spatio-temporal phenomena which can be modeled by partial differential equations (PDEs), such as pollutant dispersion in the atmosphere. After discretizing the PDE, the dynamical system has a large number of degrees of freedom (DOF). State estimation using Kalman Filter (KF) is computationally intractable, and hence, a reduced order model (ROM) needs to be constructed first. Moreover, the nonlinear terms, external disturbances or unknown boundary conditions can be modeled as unknown inputs, which leads to an unknown input filtering problem. Furthermore, the performance of KF could be improved by placing sensors at feasible locations. Therefore, the sensor scheduling problem to place multiple mobile sensors is of interest. The first part of the dissertation focuses on model reduction for large scale systems with a large number of inputs/outputs. A commonly used model reduction algorithm, the balanced proper orthogonal decomposition (BPOD) algorithm, is not computationally tractable for large systems with a large number of inputs/outputs. Inspired by the BPOD and randomized algorithms, we propose a randomized proper orthogonal decomposition (RPOD) algorithm and a computationally optimal RPOD (RPOD*) algorithm, which construct an ROM to capture the input-output behaviour of the full order model, while reducing the computational cost of BPOD by orders of magnitude. It is demonstrated that the proposed RPOD* algorithm could construct the ROM in real-time, and the performance of the proposed algorithms on different advection-diffusion equations. Next, we consider the state estimation problem of linear discrete-time systems with unknown inputs which can be treated as a wide-sense stationary process with rational power spectral density, while no other prior information needs to be known. We propose an autoregressive (AR) model based unknown input realization technique which allows us to recover the input

  14. 3D Bioprinting of Artificial Tissues: Construction of Biomimetic Microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongxiang; Lin, Xin; Huang, Peng

    2018-04-24

    It is promising that artificial tissues/organs for clinical application can be produced via 3D bioprinting of living cells and biomaterials. The construction of microstructures biomimicking native tissues is crucially important to create artificial tissues with biological functions. For instance, the fabrication of vessel-like networks to supply cells with initial nutrient and oxygen, and the arrangement of multiple types of cells for creating lamellar/complex tissues through 3D bioprinting are widely reported. The current advances in 3D bioprinting of artificial tissues from the view of construction of biomimetic microstructures, especially the fabrication of lamellar, vascular, and complex structures are summarized. In the end, the conclusion and perspective of 3D bioprinting for clinical applications are elaborated. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Spatiotemporal variability of marine renewable energy resources in Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varlas, George; Christakos, Konstantinos; Cheliotis, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, A.; Steeneveld, G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Marine Renewable Energy (MRE) resources such as wind and wave energy depend on the complex behaviour of weather and climatic conditions which determine the development of MRE technologies, energy grid, supply and prices. This study investigates the spatiotemporal variability of MRE resources along

  16. Spatiotemporal distribution patterns of forest fires in northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavo Pérez-Verdin; M. A. Márquez-Linares; A. Cortes-Ortiz; M. Salmerón-Macias

    2013-01-01

    Using the 2000-2011 CONAFOR databases, a spatiotemporal analysis of the occurrence of forest fires in Durango, one of the most affected States in Mexico, was conducted. The Moran's index was used to determine a spatial distribution pattern; also, an analysis of seasonal and temporal autocorrelation of the data collected was completed. The geographically weighted...

  17. Large scale stochastic spatio-temporal modelling with PCRaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, D.J.; Drost, N.; Schmitz, O.; Jong, K. de; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2013-01-01

    PCRaster is a software framework for building spatio-temporal models of land surface processes (http://www.pcraster.eu). Building blocks of models are spatial operations on raster maps, including a large suite of operations for water and sediment routing. These operations are available to model

  18. Spatiotemporal dynamics of cortical representations during and after stimulus presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, M.E. van de; Borne, E.W.P. van den; Jensen, O.; Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2016-01-01

    Visual perception is a spatiotemporally complex process. In this study, we investigated cortical dynamics during and after stimulus presentation. We observed that visual category information related to the difference between faces and objects became apparent in the occipital lobe after 63 ms. Within

  19. ELASTIC CLOUD COMPUTING ARCHITECTURE AND SYSTEM FOR HETEROGENEOUS SPATIOTEMPORAL COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Shi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Spatiotemporal computation implements a variety of different algorithms. When big data are involved, desktop computer or standalone application may not be able to complete the computation task due to limited memory and computing power. Now that a variety of hardware accelerators and computing platforms are available to improve the performance of geocomputation, different algorithms may have different behavior on different computing infrastructure and platforms. Some are perfect for implementation on a cluster of graphics processing units (GPUs, while GPUs may not be useful on certain kind of spatiotemporal computation. This is the same situation in utilizing a cluster of Intel's many-integrated-core (MIC or Xeon Phi, as well as Hadoop or Spark platforms, to handle big spatiotemporal data. Furthermore, considering the energy efficiency requirement in general computation, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA may be a better solution for better energy efficiency when the performance of computation could be similar or better than GPUs and MICs. It is expected that an elastic cloud computing architecture and system that integrates all of GPUs, MICs, and FPGAs could be developed and deployed to support spatiotemporal computing over heterogeneous data types and computational problems.

  20. Elastic Cloud Computing Architecture and System for Heterogeneous Spatiotemporal Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, X.

    2017-10-01

    Spatiotemporal computation implements a variety of different algorithms. When big data are involved, desktop computer or standalone application may not be able to complete the computation task due to limited memory and computing power. Now that a variety of hardware accelerators and computing platforms are available to improve the performance of geocomputation, different algorithms may have different behavior on different computing infrastructure and platforms. Some are perfect for implementation on a cluster of graphics processing units (GPUs), while GPUs may not be useful on certain kind of spatiotemporal computation. This is the same situation in utilizing a cluster of Intel's many-integrated-core (MIC) or Xeon Phi, as well as Hadoop or Spark platforms, to handle big spatiotemporal data. Furthermore, considering the energy efficiency requirement in general computation, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) may be a better solution for better energy efficiency when the performance of computation could be similar or better than GPUs and MICs. It is expected that an elastic cloud computing architecture and system that integrates all of GPUs, MICs, and FPGAs could be developed and deployed to support spatiotemporal computing over heterogeneous data types and computational problems.

  1. Spatiotemporal radiotherapy planning using a global optimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Ali; Salari, Ehsan

    2018-02-01

    This paper aims at quantifying the extent of potential therapeutic gain, measured using biologically effective dose (BED), that can be achieved by altering the radiation dose distribution over treatment sessions in fractionated radiotherapy. To that end, a spatiotemporally integrated planning approach is developed, where the spatial and temporal dose modulations are optimized simultaneously. The concept of equivalent uniform BED (EUBED) is used to quantify and compare the clinical quality of spatiotemporally heterogeneous dose distributions in target and critical structures. This gives rise to a large-scale non-convex treatment-plan optimization problem, which is solved using global optimization techniques. The proposed spatiotemporal planning approach is tested on two stylized cancer cases resembling two different tumor sites and sensitivity analysis is performed for radio-biological and EUBED parameters. Numerical results validate that spatiotemporal plans are capable of delivering a larger BED to the target volume without increasing the BED in critical structures compared to conventional time-invariant plans. In particular, this additional gain is attributed to the irradiation of different regions of the target volume at different treatment sessions. Additionally, the trade-off between the potential therapeutic gain and the number of distinct dose distributions is quantified, which suggests a diminishing marginal gain as the number of dose distributions increases.

  2. Gaze control during interceptive actions with different spatiotemporal demands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navia, J.A.; Dicks, M.S.; van der Kamp, J; Ruiz, L.

    It is widely accepted that the sources of information used to guide interceptive actions depend on conflicting spatiotemporal task demands. However, there is a paucity of evidence that shows how information pick-up during interceptive actions is adapted to such conflicting constraints. The present

  3. Pain Recognition using Spatiotemporal Oriented Energy of Facial Muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Ramin; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a critical sign in many medical situations and its automatic detection and recognition using computer vision techniques is of great importance. Utilizes this fact that pain is a spatiotemporal process, the proposed system in this paper employs steerable and separable filters to measures e...

  4. Spatio-temporal point process filtering methods with an application

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frcalová, B.; Beneš, V.; Klement, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, 3-4 (2010), s. 240-252 ISSN 1180-4009 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA101120604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cox point process * filtering * spatio-temporal modelling * spike Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.750, year: 2010

  5. Spatio-temporal analysis of Salmonella surveillance data in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho Calado Domingues, Ana Rita; Vieira, Antonio; Hendriksen, Rene S.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the usefulness of spatio-temporal statistical tools to detect outbreaks using routine surveillance data where limited epidemiological information is available. A dataset from 2002 to 2007 containing information regarding date, origin, source and serotype of 29 586 Salmonella ...

  6. On spatio-temporal Lévy based Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokesova, Michaela; Hellmund, Gunnar; Jensen, Eva Bjørn Vedel

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses a new class of models for spatio-temporal Cox point processes. In these models, the driving field is defined by means of an integral of a weight function with respect to a Lévy basis. The relations to other Cox process models studied previously are discussed and formulas for t...

  7. Spatiotemporal Coupling of the Tongue in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Mili S.; Green, Jordan R.; Yunusova, Yana; Hanford, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The primary aim of the investigation was to identify deficits in spatiotemporal coupling between tongue regions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The relations between disease-related changes in tongue movement patterns and speech intelligibility were also determined. Methods: The authors recorded word productions from 11…

  8. Spatio-Temporal Saliency Perception via Hypercomplex Frequency Spectral Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Tian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Salient object perception is the process of sensing the salient information from the spatio-temporal visual scenes, which is a rapid pre-attention mechanism for the target location in a visual smart sensor. In recent decades, many successful models of visual saliency perception have been proposed to simulate the pre-attention behavior. Since most of the methods usually need some ad hoc parameters or high-cost preprocessing, they are difficult to rapidly detect salient object or be implemented by computing parallelism in a smart sensor. In this paper, we propose a novel spatio-temporal saliency perception method based on spatio-temporal hypercomplex spectral contrast (HSC. Firstly, the proposed HSC algorithm represent the features in the HSV (hue, saturation and value color space and features of motion by a hypercomplex number. Secondly, the spatio-temporal salient objects are efficiently detected by hypercomplex Fourier spectral contrast in parallel. Finally, our saliency perception model also incorporates with the non-uniform sampling, which is a common phenomenon of human vision that directs visual attention to the logarithmic center of the image/video in natural scenes. The experimental results on the public saliency perception datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach compared to eleven state-of-the-art approaches. In addition, we extend the proposed model to moving object extraction in dynamic scenes, and the proposed algorithm is superior to the traditional algorithms.

  9. Spatio-temporal joins on symbolic indoor tracking data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Hua; Yang, Bin; Jensen, Christian S.

    2011-01-01

    and studies probabilistic, spatio-temporal joins on historical indoor tracking data. Two meaningful types of join are defined. They return object pairs that satisfy spatial join predicates either at a time point or during a time interval. The predicates considered include “same X,” where X is a semantic...

  10. Mode locking and spatiotemporal chaos in periodically driven Gunn diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Feldberg, Rasmus; Knudsen, Carsten

    1990-01-01

    oscillation entrains with the external signal. This produces a devil’s staircase of frequency-locked solutions. At higher microwave amplitudes, period doubling and other forms of mode-converting bifurcations can be seen. In this interval the diode also exhibits spatiotemporal chaos. At still higher microwave...

  11. Spatiotemporal Diffusive Evolution and Fractal Structure of Ground Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwada, Tsuyoshi

    2018-02-01

    The spatiotemporal diffusive evolution and fractal structure of ground motion have been investigated at the in-ground tunnel of the KEK B-Factory (KEKB) injector linear accelerator (linac). The slow dynamic fluctuating displacements of the tunnel floor are measured in real time with a new remote-controllable sensing system based on a laser-based alignment system. Based on spatiotemporal analyses with linear-regression models, which were applied in both the time and frequency domains to time-series data recorded over a period of approximately 8 months, both coherent and stochastic components in the displacements of the tunnel floor were clearly observed along the entire length of the linac. In particular, it was clearly observed that the stochastic components exhibited characteristic spatiotemporal diffusive evolution with the fractal structure and fractional dimension. This report describes in detail the experimental techniques and analyses of the spatiotemporal diffusive evolution of ground motion observed at the in-ground tunnel of the injector linac using a real-time remote-controllable sensing system.

  12. Spatiotemporal resonances in mixing of open viscous fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Tabeling, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    In this Letter, we reveal a new dynamical phenomenon, called "spatiotemporal resonance," which is expected to take place in a broad range of viscous, periodically forced, open systems. The observation originates from a numerical and theoretical analysis of a micromixer, and is supported...

  13. Synchronization of spatiotemporal chaotic systems by feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.; Grebogi, C.

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrate that two identical spatiotemporal chaotic systems can be synchronized by (1) linking one or a few of their dynamical variables, and (2) applying a small feedback control to one of the systems. Numerical examples using the diffusively coupled logistic map lattice are given. The effect of noise and the limitation of the technique are discussed

  14. Control and characterization of spatio-temporal disorder in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    characterizing the type of spatio-temporal disorder that is embodied in this disordered ... The results from this experiment will shed light on the more general questions ... sponds to only odd or even multiples of the common frequency, ω0. Thus ...

  15. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Adámek, Jiří; Antoni, V.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 10 (2014), s. 102309-102309 ISSN 1070-664X Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Drift waves * Magnetron sputtering plasma * Spatiotemporal synchronization Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.142, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4898693

  16. Relationships between acoustic emissions and microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, G.V.; Gopal, R.

    1979-01-01

    Results of a systematic study of 'microstructure-deformation-acoustic emission' relationships on two widely used pressure retaining component materials, namely A533-B nuclear pressure vessel steel and a 7075 aluminum alloy, are presented. The study consists of conducting acoustic monitored tensile tests on a variety of quenched and aged microstructures in the two alloy systems and extensive microstructural characterization of test specimens by light optic and electron microscopy techniques. The results suggest a consistent relationship between acoustic emissions and microdeformation mechanisms. The role of specific microstructural constituents in generating acoustic emissions in the two alloys is discussed. (author)

  17. Microstructure characterization of ceramic nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmert, J.; Gaessner, W.

    1984-08-01

    A system of characterizing methods is described based on quantitative ceramographic methods. This system is applicable in quality assurance of UO 2 nuclear fuel in small-scale production and for determining microstructural parameters in scientific investigations. The system is based essentially on the measuring of microstructural parameters by the methods of linear analysis by the VEB Carl Zeiss Jena EPIQUANT mechanical optical microstructural analyzer. It is completed by measuring the pore size using automatic the television analyzer QTM. Before the quantitative microstructural characterization, in each case the morphology of the structure is estimated qualitatively. (author)

  18. Monocytic and granulocytic myeloid derived suppressor cells differentially regulate spatiotemporal tumour plasticity during metastatic cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounova, Maria; Lee, Eunmi; Piranlioglu, Raziye; El Andaloussi, Abdeljabar; Kolhe, Ravindra; Demirci, Mehmet F; Marasco, Daniela; Asm, Iskander; Chadli, Ahmed; Hassan, Khaled A; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Zhou, Gang; Arbab, Ali S; Cowell, John K; Korkaya, Hasan

    2017-04-06

    It is widely accepted that dynamic and reversible tumour cell plasticity is required for metastasis, however, in vivo steps and molecular mechanisms are poorly elucidated. We demonstrate here that monocytic (mMDSC) and granulocytic (gMDSC) subsets of myeloid-derived suppressor cells infiltrate in the primary tumour and distant organs with different time kinetics and regulate spatiotemporal tumour plasticity. Using co-culture experiments and mouse transcriptome analyses in syngeneic mouse models, we provide evidence that tumour-infiltrated mMDSCs facilitate tumour cell dissemination from the primary site by inducing EMT/CSC phenotype. In contrast, pulmonary gMDSC infiltrates support the metastatic growth by reverting EMT/CSC phenotype and promoting tumour cell proliferation. Furthermore, lung-derived gMDSCs isolated from tumour-bearing animals enhance metastatic growth of already disseminated tumour cells. MDSC-induced 'metastatic gene signature' derived from murine syngeneic model predicts poor patient survival in the majority of human solid tumours. Thus spatiotemporal MDSC infiltration may have clinical implications in tumour progression.

  19. Distinct spatiotemporal expression of ISM1 during mouse and chick development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osório, Liliana; Wu, Xuewei; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2014-01-01

    Isthmin 1 (ISM1) constitutes the founder of a new family of secreted proteins characterized by the presence of 2 functional domains: thrombospondin type 1 repeat (TSR1) and adhesion-associated domain in MUC4 and other proteins (AMOP). ISM1 was identified in the frog embryo as a member of the FGF8 synexpression group due to its expression in the brain midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) or isthmus. In zebrafish, ISM1 was described as a WNT- and NODAL-regulated gene. The function of ISM1 remains largely elusive. So far, ISM1 has been described as an angiogenesis inhibitor that has a dual function in endothelial cell survival and cell death. For a better understanding of ISM1 function, we examined its spatiotemporal distribution in mouse and chick using RT-PCR, ISH, and IHC analyses. In the mouse, ISM1 transcripts are found in tissues such as the anterior mesendoderm, paraxial and lateral plate mesoderm, MHB and trunk neural tube, as well as in the somites and dermomyotome. In the newborn and adult, ISM1 is prominently expressed in the lung and brain. In addition to its putative role during embryonic and postnatal development, ISM1 may also be important for organ homeostasis in the adult. In the chick embryo, ISM1 transcripts are strongly detected in the ear, eye, and spinal cord primordia. Remarkable differences in ISM1 spatiotemporal expression were found during mouse and chick development, despite the high homology of ISM1 orthologs in these species.

  20. An Efficient Method of Sharing Mass Spatio-Temporal Trajectory Data Based on Cloudera Impala for Traffic Distribution Mapping in an Urban City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianjie Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The efficient sharing of spatio-temporal trajectory data is important to understand traffic congestion in mass data. However, the data volumes of bus networks in urban cities are growing rapidly, reaching daily volumes of one hundred million datapoints. Accessing and retrieving mass spatio-temporal trajectory data in any field is hard and inefficient due to limited computational capabilities and incomplete data organization mechanisms. Therefore, we propose an optimized and efficient spatio-temporal trajectory data retrieval method based on the Cloudera Impala query engine, called ESTRI, to enhance the efficiency of mass data sharing. As an excellent query tool for mass data, Impala can be applied for mass spatio-temporal trajectory data sharing. In ESTRI we extend the spatio-temporal trajectory data retrieval function of Impala and design a suitable data partitioning method. In our experiments, the Taiyuan BeiDou (BD bus network is selected, containing 2300 buses with BD positioning sensors, producing 20 million records every day, resulting in two difficulties as described in the Introduction section. In addition, ESTRI and MongoDB are applied in experiments. The experiments show that ESTRI achieves the most efficient data retrieval compared to retrieval using MongoDB for data volumes of fifty million, one hundred million, one hundred and fifty million, and two hundred million. The performance of ESTRI is approximately seven times higher than that of MongoDB. The experiments show that ESTRI is an effective method for retrieving mass spatio-temporal trajectory data. Finally, bus distribution mapping in Taiyuan city is achieved, describing the buses density in different regions at different times throughout the day, which can be applied in future studies of transport, such as traffic scheduling, traffic planning and traffic behavior management in intelligent public transportation systems.

  1. GISpark: A Geospatial Distributed Computing Platform for Spatiotemporal Big Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Zhong, E.; Wang, E.; Zhong, Y.; Cai, W.; Li, S.; Gao, S.

    2016-12-01

    Geospatial data are growing exponentially because of the proliferation of cost effective and ubiquitous positioning technologies such as global remote-sensing satellites and location-based devices. Analyzing large amounts of geospatial data can provide great value for both industrial and scientific applications. Data- and compute- intensive characteristics inherent in geospatial big data increasingly pose great challenges to technologies of data storing, computing and analyzing. Such challenges require a scalable and efficient architecture that can store, query, analyze, and visualize large-scale spatiotemporal data. Therefore, we developed GISpark - a geospatial distributed computing platform for processing large-scale vector, raster and stream data. GISpark is constructed based on the latest virtualized computing infrastructures and distributed computing architecture. OpenStack and Docker are used to build multi-user hosting cloud computing infrastructure for GISpark. The virtual storage systems such as HDFS, Ceph, MongoDB are combined and adopted for spatiotemporal data storage management. Spark-based algorithm framework is developed for efficient parallel computing. Within this framework, SuperMap GIScript and various open-source GIS libraries can be integrated into GISpark. GISpark can also integrated with scientific computing environment (e.g., Anaconda), interactive computing web applications (e.g., Jupyter notebook), and machine learning tools (e.g., TensorFlow/Orange). The associated geospatial facilities of GISpark in conjunction with the scientific computing environment, exploratory spatial data analysis tools, temporal data management and analysis systems make up a powerful geospatial computing tool. GISpark not only provides spatiotemporal big data processing capacity in the geospatial field, but also provides spatiotemporal computational model and advanced geospatial visualization tools that deals with other domains related with spatial property. We

  2. MICROSTRUCTURE OF SUPERCONDUCTING MGB(2).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZHU,Y.; LI,Q.; WU,L.; VOLKOV,V.; GU,G.; MOODENBAUGH,A.R.

    2001-07-12

    Recently, Akimitsu and co-workers [1] discovered superconductivity at 39 K in the intermetallic compound MgB{sub 2}. This discovery provides a new perspective on the mechanism for superconductivity. More specifically, it opens up possibilities for investigation of structure/properties in a new class of materials. With the exceptions of the cuprate and C{sub 60} families of compounds, MgB{sub 2} possesses the highest superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}. Its superconductivity appears to follow the BCS theory, apparently being mediated by electron-phonon coupling. The coherence length of MgB{sub 2} is reported to be longer than that of the cuprates [2]. In contrast to the cuprates, grain boundaries are strongly coupled and current density is determined by flux pinning [2,3]. Presently, samples of MgB{sub 2} commonly display inhomogeneity and porosity on the nanoscale, and are untextured. In spite of these obstacles, magnetization and transport measurements show that polycrystalline samples may carry large current densities circulating across many grains [3,4]. Very high values of critical current densities and critical fields have been recently observed in thin films [5,6]. These attributes suggest possible large scale and electronic applications. The underlying microstructure can be intriguing, both in terms of basic science and in applied areas. Subsequent to the discovery, many papers were published [1-13], most dealing with synthesis, physical properties, and theory. There have yet been few studies of microstructure and structural defects [11, 14]. A thorough understanding of practical superconducting properties can only be developed after an understanding of microstructure is gained. In this work we review transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of sintered MgB{sub 2} pellets [14]. Structural defects, including second phase particles, dislocations, stacking faults, and grain boundaries, are analyzed using electron diffraction, electron

  3. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kaoumi, Djamel; Bai, Xian-Ming

    2017-12-01

    The 8th symposium on Microstructural Progresses in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) was held at San Diego Convention Center and Marriott Marquis & Marina, San Diego, California, USA, February 26-March 2, 2017, as part of the TMS 2017 146th Annual Meeting and Exhibition. Since 2003, when the first MPIM symposium was held in the same place, the symposium has been held in odd years and has grown to one of the biggest symposia in the TMS Annual Meeting which invites more than sixty symposia. In the 8th MPIM symposium, a total of 106 oral and poster presentations, including 16 invited talks, were delivered for 4 days.

  4. JBK-75 microstructure specification recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    Since the ASTM-E-45 standard for microcleanliness is not applicable to superalloys like JBK-75 stainless steel (Modified A-286), Rocky Flats should adopt the Ladish microcleanliness standard (APML Cleanliness Classification of High Temperature Alloys Chart, 1971), as a guide for setting material acceptance specifications for JBK-75. Inclusion ratings of S-2, N-2, C-2, and M-2 should be acceptable. The microstructure should have a grain size of 5 or finer, but not smaller than 9, and microsegregation (banding) should be kept to a minimum

  5. User requirements for geo-collaborative work with spatio-temporal data in a web-based virtual globe environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovcheva, Zornitza; van Elzakker, Corné P J M; Köbben, Barend

    2013-11-01

    Web-based tools developed in the last couple of years offer unique opportunities to effectively support scientists in their effort to collaborate. Communication among environmental researchers often involves not only work with geographical (spatial), but also with temporal data and information. Literature still provides limited documentation when it comes to user requirements for effective geo-collaborative work with spatio-temporal data. To start filling this gap, our study adopted a User-Centered Design approach and first explored the user requirements of environmental researchers working on distributed research projects for collaborative dissemination, exchange and work with spatio-temporal data. Our results show that system design will be mainly influenced by the nature and type of data users work with. From the end-users' perspective, optimal conversion of huge files of spatio-temporal data for further dissemination, accuracy of conversion, organization of content and security have a key role for effective geo-collaboration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  6. The leak microstructure, preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, M.

    1997-01-01

    The leak microstructure, a new type of element for position-sensitive proportional gas counter, is introduced. For every single detected ionizing radiation it gives a pair of ''induced'' charges of the same quantity (pulses of the same amplitude), of opposite sign, with the same collection time and essentially in time coincidence, that are proportional to the collected primary ionization. A gas multiplication up to 1.5 x 10 5 was achieved. The complete absence of insulating materials in the active volume of this microstructure enables to avoid problems of charging-up and makes its behaviour stable and repeatable. By using the charge-pair generated, it allows the development of a position-sensitive detecting board with a two-dimensional read-out. Between the two external surfaces of this board it is possible to insert an intermediate third conducting layer which reduces (or practically suppresses) the capacitive cross-talk between the X and Y read-out strip systems. Furthermore, this intermediate layer can give a very fast trigger to coordinate the charge-pair and to govern the data acquisition system. By reading every strip separately it is possible to resolve the multi hit problem in two-dimensions. Using isobutane as the gas, an energy resolution of about 8% FWHM was recorded with α-particles from an 241 Am source. In isobutane gas, X-rays from a 55 Fe source and β-particles from a 14 C source were also detected. (orig.)

  7. Inventory of alloy composition, microstructures and mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inventory of alloy composition, microstructures and mechanical properties of automobile engine parts. ... Journal of Applied Science, Engineering and Technology ... This research work investigated the chemical compositions, microstructures and mechanical properties of the ferrous and non-ferrous auto engine parts such ...

  8. A microstructured Polymer Optical Fiber Biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiliyanov, Grigoriy Andreev; Jensen, Jesper Bo; Hoiby, Poul E.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of the complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers.......We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of the complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers....

  9. Imaging brain microstructure with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B; Nilsson, Markus

    2018-01-01

    This article gives an overview of microstructure imaging of the brain with diffusion MRI and reviews the state of the art. The microstructure-imaging paradigm aims to estimate and map microscopic properties of tissue using a model that links these properties to the voxel scale MR signal. Imaging ...

  10. Investigations on the microstructure and mechanical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper addresses the weldability, microstructure and mechanical properties of the multi-pass welding of super-duplex stainless steel (SDSS). Pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) was carried out employing ER2553 and ERNiCrMo-4 fillers. Microstructure examination showed the presence of austenite in ...

  11. Workshop Report: Linking Processing to Performance through Microstructure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    ..., and time-dependent property models. Other topics of interest included probabilistic aspects of property prediction, microstructurally informed constitutive modeling, microstructural evolution during processing, crystal plasticity...

  12. Microstructures and mechanical properties of aging materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, P.K.; Viswanathan, R.; Murty, K.L.; Simonen, E.P.; Frear, D.

    1993-01-01

    This book contains a collection of papers presented at the symposium on ''Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Aging Materials,'' that was held in Chicago, IL. November 2-5, 1992 in conjunction with the Fall Meeting of The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS). The subjects of interest in the symposium included: (1) mechanisms of microstructural degradation, (2) effects of microstructural degradation on mechanical behavior, (3) development of life prediction methodology for in-service structural and electronic components, (4) experimental techniques to monitor degradation of microstructures and mechanical properties, and (5) effects of environment on microstructural degradation and mechanical properties. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  13. Discriminating Yogurt Microstructure Using Diffuse Reflectance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Møller, Flemming; Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann

    2015-01-01

    The protein microstructure of many dairy products is of great importance for the consumers’ experience when eating the product. However, studies concerning discrimination between protein microstructures are limited. This paper presents preliminary results for discriminating different yogurt...... microstructures using hyperspectral (500-900nm) diffuse reflectance images (DRIs) – a technique potentially well suited for inline process control. Comparisons are made to quantified measures of the yogurt microstructure observed through confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The output signal from both...... modalities is evaluated on a 24 factorial design covering four common production parameters, which significantly change the chemistry and the microstructure of the yogurt. It is found that the DRIs can be as discriminative as the CSLM images in certain cases, however the performance is highly governed...

  14. Effective and efficient analysis of spatio-temporal data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongnan

    Spatio-temporal data mining, i.e., mining knowledge from large amount of spatio-temporal data, is a highly demanding field because huge amounts of spatio-temporal data have been collected in various applications, ranging from remote sensing, to geographical information systems (GIS), computer cartography, environmental assessment and planning, etc. The collection data far exceeded human's ability to analyze which make it crucial to develop analysis tools. Recent studies on data mining have extended to the scope of data mining from relational and transactional datasets to spatial and temporal datasets. Among the various forms of spatio-temporal data, remote sensing images play an important role, due to the growing wide-spreading of outer space satellites. In this dissertation, we proposed two approaches to analyze the remote sensing data. The first one is about applying association rules mining onto images processing. Each image was divided into a number of image blocks. We built a spatial relationship for these blocks during the dividing process. This made a large number of images into a spatio-temporal dataset since each image was shot in time-series. The second one implemented co-occurrence patterns discovery from these images. The generated patterns represent subsets of spatial features that are located together in space and time. A weather analysis is composed of individual analysis of several meteorological variables. These variables include temperature, pressure, dew point, wind, clouds, visibility and so on. Local-scale models provide detailed analysis and forecasts of meteorological phenomena ranging from a few kilometers to about 100 kilometers in size. When some of above meteorological variables have some special change tendency, some kind of severe weather will happen in most cases. Using the discovery of association rules, we found that some special meteorological variables' changing has tight relation with some severe weather situation that will happen

  15. Age-Related Changes in Trabecular and Cortical Bone Microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huayue Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The elderly population has substantially increased worldwide. Aging is a complex process, and the effects of aging are myriad and insidious, leading to progressive deterioration of various organs, including the skeleton. Age-related bone loss and resultant osteoporosis in the elderly population increase the risk for fractures and morbidity. Osteoporosis is one of the most common conditions associated with aging, and age is an independent risk factor for osteoporotic fractures. With the development of noninvasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT, micro-CT, and high resolution peripheral quantitative CT (HR-pQCT, imaging of the bone architecture provides important information about age-related changes in bone microstructure and estimates of bone strength. In the past two decades, studies of human specimens using imaging techniques have revealed decreased bone strength in older adults compared with younger adults. The present paper addresses recently studied age-related changes in trabecular and cortical bone microstructure based primarily on HR-pQCT and micro-CT. We specifically focus on the three-dimensional microstructure of the vertebrae, femoral neck, and distal radius, which are common osteoporotic fracture sites.

  16. Age-related changes in trabecular and cortical bone microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huayue; Zhou, Xiangrong; Fujita, Hiroshi; Onozuka, Minoru; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2013-01-01

    The elderly population has substantially increased worldwide. Aging is a complex process, and the effects of aging are myriad and insidious, leading to progressive deterioration of various organs, including the skeleton. Age-related bone loss and resultant osteoporosis in the elderly population increase the risk for fractures and morbidity. Osteoporosis is one of the most common conditions associated with aging, and age is an independent risk factor for osteoporotic fractures. With the development of noninvasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), micro-CT, and high resolution peripheral quantitative CT (HR-pQCT), imaging of the bone architecture provides important information about age-related changes in bone microstructure and estimates of bone strength. In the past two decades, studies of human specimens using imaging techniques have revealed decreased bone strength in older adults compared with younger adults. The present paper addresses recently studied age-related changes in trabecular and cortical bone microstructure based primarily on HR-pQCT and micro-CT. We specifically focus on the three-dimensional microstructure of the vertebrae, femoral neck, and distal radius, which are common osteoporotic fracture sites.

  17. Spatiotemporal dynamics of surface water networks across a global biodiversity hotspot—implications for conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulbure, Mirela G; Broich, Mark; Kininmonth, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The concept of habitat networks represents an important tool for landscape conservation and management at regional scales. Previous studies simulated degradation of temporally fixed networks but few quantified the change in network connectivity from disintegration of key features that undergo naturally occurring spatiotemporal dynamics. This is particularly of concern for aquatic systems, which typically show high natural spatiotemporal variability. Here we focused on the Swan Coastal Plain, a bioregion that encompasses a global biodiversity hotspot in Australia with over 1500 water bodies of high biodiversity. Using graph theory, we conducted a temporal analysis of water body connectivity over 13 years of variable climate. We derived large networks of surface water bodies using Landsat data (1999–2011). We generated an ensemble of 278 potential networks at three dispersal distances approximating the maximum dispersal distance of different water dependent organisms. We assessed network connectivity through several network topology metrics and quantified the resilience of the network topology during wet and dry phases. We identified ‘stepping stone’ water bodies across time and compared our networks with theoretical network models with known properties. Results showed a highly dynamic seasonal pattern of variability in network topology metrics. A decline in connectivity over the 13 years was noted with potential negative consequences for species with limited dispersal capacity. The networks described here resemble theoretical scale-free models, also known as ‘rich get richer’ algorithm. The ‘stepping stone’ water bodies are located in the area around the Peel-Harvey Estuary, a Ramsar listed site, and some are located in a national park. Our results describe a powerful approach that can be implemented when assessing the connectivity for a particular organism with known dispersal distance. The approach of identifying the surface water bodies that act as

  18. Spatiotemporal dynamics of surface water networks across a global biodiversity hotspot—implications for conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulbure, Mirela G.; Kininmonth, Stuart; Broich, Mark

    2014-11-01

    The concept of habitat networks represents an important tool for landscape conservation and management at regional scales. Previous studies simulated degradation of temporally fixed networks but few quantified the change in network connectivity from disintegration of key features that undergo naturally occurring spatiotemporal dynamics. This is particularly of concern for aquatic systems, which typically show high natural spatiotemporal variability. Here we focused on the Swan Coastal Plain, a bioregion that encompasses a global biodiversity hotspot in Australia with over 1500 water bodies of high biodiversity. Using graph theory, we conducted a temporal analysis of water body connectivity over 13 years of variable climate. We derived large networks of surface water bodies using Landsat data (1999-2011). We generated an ensemble of 278 potential networks at three dispersal distances approximating the maximum dispersal distance of different water dependent organisms. We assessed network connectivity through several network topology metrics and quantified the resilience of the network topology during wet and dry phases. We identified ‘stepping stone’ water bodies across time and compared our networks with theoretical network models with known properties. Results showed a highly dynamic seasonal pattern of variability in network topology metrics. A decline in connectivity over the 13 years was noted with potential negative consequences for species with limited dispersal capacity. The networks described here resemble theoretical scale-free models, also known as ‘rich get richer’ algorithm. The ‘stepping stone’ water bodies are located in the area around the Peel-Harvey Estuary, a Ramsar listed site, and some are located in a national park. Our results describe a powerful approach that can be implemented when assessing the connectivity for a particular organism with known dispersal distance. The approach of identifying the surface water bodies that act as

  19. Night sleep influences white matter microstructure in bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Francesco; Melloni, Elisa M T; Dallaspezia, Sara; Bollettini, Irene; Locatelli, Clara; Poletti, Sara; Colombo, Cristina

    2017-08-15

    Alteration of circadian rhythms and sleep disruption are prominent trait-like features of bipolar disorder (BD). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures suggest a widespread alteration of white matter (WM) microstructure in patients with BD. Sleep promotes myelination and oligodendrocyte precursor cells proliferation. We hypothesized a possible association between DTI measures of WM microstructure and sleep quantity measures in BD. We studied 69 inpatients affected by a depressive episode in course of type I BD. We used whole brain tract-based spatial statistics on DTI measures of WM microstructure: axial, radial, and mean diffusivity (AD, RD, MD), and fractional anisotropy (FA). Self-assessed measures of time asleep (TA) and total sleep time (TST) were extracted from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Actigraphic recordings were performed on a subsample of 23 patients. We observed a positive correlation of DTI measures of FA with actigraphic measures of TA and TST, and with PSQI measure of TA. DTI measures of RD inversely associated with actigraphic measure of TA, and with PSQI measures of TA and TST. Several WM tracts were involved, including corpus callosum, cyngulate gyrus, uncinate fasciculus, left superior and inferior longitudinal and fronto-occipital fasciculi, thalamic radiation, corona radiata, retrolenticular part of internal capsule and corticospinal tract. The study is correlational in nature, and no conclusion about a causal connection can be drawn. Reduced FA with increased RD and MD indicate higher water diffusivity associated with less organized myelin and/or axonal structures. Our findings suggest an association between sleep disruption and these measures of brain microstructure in specific tracts contributing to the functional connectivity in BD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Approximate spatio-temporal top-k publish/subscribe

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Lisi; Shang, Shuo

    2018-01-01

    Location-based publish/subscribe plays a significant role in mobile information disseminations. In this light, we propose and study a novel problem of processing location-based top-k subscriptions over spatio-temporal data streams. We define a new type of approximate location-based top-k subscription, Approximate Temporal Spatial-Keyword Top-k (ATSK) Subscription, that continuously feeds users with relevant spatio-temporal messages by considering textual similarity, spatial proximity, and information freshness. Different from existing location-based top-k subscriptions, Approximate Temporal Spatial-Keyword Top-k (ATSK) Subscription can automatically adjust the triggering condition by taking the triggering score of other subscriptions into account. The group filtering efficacy can be substantially improved by sacrificing the publishing result quality with a bounded guarantee. We conduct extensive experiments on two real datasets to demonstrate the performance of the developed solutions.

  1. Spatiotemporal Characteristics for the Depth from Luminance Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Matsubara

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Images with higher luminance contrast tend to be perceived closer in depth. To investigate a spatiotemporal characteristic of this effect, we evaluated subjective depth of a test stimulus with various spatial and temporal frequencies. For the purpose, the depth of a reference stimulus was matched to that of the test stimulus by changing the binocular disparity. The results showed that the test stimulus was perceived closer with higher luminance contrast for all conditions. Contrast efficiency was obtained from the contrast that provided the subjective depth for each spatiotemporal frequency. The shape of the contrast efficiency function was spatially low-pass and temporally band-pass. This characteristic is different from the one measure for a detection task. This suggests that only subset of contrast signals are used for depth from contrast.

  2. Against Laplacian Reduction of Newtonian Mass to Spatiotemporal Quantities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Niels C. M.

    2018-03-01

    Laplace wondered about the minimal choice of initial variables and parameters corresponding to a well-posed initial value problem. Discussions of Laplace's problem in the literature have focused on choosing between spatiotemporal variables relative to absolute space (i.e. substantivalism) or merely relative to other material bodies (i.e. relationalism) and between absolute masses (i.e. absolutism) or merely mass ratios (i.e. comparativism). This paper extends these discussions of Laplace's problem, in the context of Newtonian Gravity, by asking whether mass needs to be included in the initial state at all, or whether a purely spatiotemporal initial state suffices. It is argued that mass indeed needs to be included; removing mass from the initial state drastically reduces the predictive and explanatory power of Newtonian Gravity.

  3. Spatial and spatio-temporal bayesian models with R - INLA

    CERN Document Server

    Blangiardo, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Dedication iiiPreface ix1 Introduction 11.1 Why spatial and spatio-temporal statistics? 11.2 Why do we use Bayesian methods for modelling spatial and spatio-temporal structures? 21.3 Why INLA? 31.4 Datasets 32 Introduction to 212.1 The language 212.2 objects 222.3 Data and session management 342.4 Packages 352.5 Programming in 362.6 Basic statistical analysis with 393 Introduction to Bayesian Methods 533.1 Bayesian Philosophy 533.2 Basic Probability Elements 573.3 Bayes Theorem 623.4 Prior and Posterior Distributions 643.5 Working with the Posterior Distribution 663.6 Choosing the Prior Distr

  4. Approximate spatio-temporal top-k publish/subscribe

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Lisi

    2018-04-26

    Location-based publish/subscribe plays a significant role in mobile information disseminations. In this light, we propose and study a novel problem of processing location-based top-k subscriptions over spatio-temporal data streams. We define a new type of approximate location-based top-k subscription, Approximate Temporal Spatial-Keyword Top-k (ATSK) Subscription, that continuously feeds users with relevant spatio-temporal messages by considering textual similarity, spatial proximity, and information freshness. Different from existing location-based top-k subscriptions, Approximate Temporal Spatial-Keyword Top-k (ATSK) Subscription can automatically adjust the triggering condition by taking the triggering score of other subscriptions into account. The group filtering efficacy can be substantially improved by sacrificing the publishing result quality with a bounded guarantee. We conduct extensive experiments on two real datasets to demonstrate the performance of the developed solutions.

  5. Using Covariant Lyapunov Vectors to Understand Spatiotemporal Chaos in Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mark; Xu, Mu; Barbish, Johnathon; Mukherjee, Saikat

    2017-11-01

    The spatiotemporal chaos of fluids present many difficult and fascinating challenges. Recent progress in computing covariant Lyapunov vectors for a variety of model systems has made it possible to probe fundamental ideas from dynamical systems theory including the degree of hyperbolicity, the fractal dimension, the dimension of the inertial manifold, and the decomposition of the dynamics into a finite number of physical modes and spurious modes. We are interested in building upon insights such as these for fluid systems. We first demonstrate the power of covariant Lyapunov vectors using a system of maps on a lattice with a nonlinear coupling. We then compute the covariant Lyapunov vectors for chaotic Rayleigh-Bénard convection for experimentally accessible conditions. We show that chaotic convection is non-hyperbolic and we quantify the spatiotemporal features of the spectrum of covariant Lyapunov vectors. NSF DMS-1622299 and DARPA/DSO Models, Dynamics, and Learning (MoDyL).

  6. Precursor of transition to turbulence: spatiotemporal wave front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, S; Sengupta, T K

    2014-04-01

    To understand transition to turbulence via 3D disturbance growth, we report here results obtained from the solution of Navier-Stokes equation (NSE) to reproduce experimental results obtained by minimizing background disturbances and imposing deterministic excitation inside the shear layer. A similar approach was adopted in Sengupta and Bhaumik [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 154501 (2011)], where a route of transition from receptivity to fully developed turbulent stage was explained for 2D flow in terms of the spatio-temporal wave-front (STWF). The STWF was identified as the unit process of 2D turbulence creation for low amplitude wall excitation. Theoretical prediction of STWF for boundary layer was established earlier in Sengupta, Rao, and Venkatasubbaiah [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 224504 (2006)] from the Orr-Sommerfeld equation as due to spatiotemporal instability. Here, the same unit process of the STWF during transition is shown to be present for 3D disturbance field from the solution of governing NSE.

  7. Spatiotemporal Scaling Effect on Rainfall Network Design Using Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Wei

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Because of high variation in mountainous areas, rainfall data at different spatiotemporal scales may yield potential uncertainty for network design. However, few studies focus on the scaling effect on both the spatial and the temporal scale. By calculating the maximum joint entropy of hourly typhoon events, monthly, six dry and wet months and annual rainfall between 1992 and 2012 for 1-, 3-, and 5-km grids, the relocated candidate rain gauges in the National Taiwan University Experimental Forest of Central Taiwan are prioritized. The results show: (1 the network exhibits different locations for first prioritized candidate rain gauges for different spatiotemporal scales; (2 the effect of spatial scales is insignificant compared to temporal scales; and (3 a smaller number and a lower percentage of required stations (PRS reach stable joint entropy for a long duration at finer spatial scale. Prioritized candidate rain gauges provide key reference points for adjusting the network to capture more accurate information and minimize redundancy.

  8. Deformation and microstructure of rutile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchin, M.G.; Bursill, L.A.; Lafage, C.

    1989-01-01

    Studies of the mechanical properties of rutiles are described, in particular the behaviour of the elastic limit under compression with respect to variations in temperature (pure rutile), intrinsic non-stoichiometry (pure rutile reduced under low oxygen pressure) and extrinsic non-stoichiometry (rutile doped with chromia and alumina). A wide range of values is obtained, which may be understood in terms of the interaction of dislocations belonging to the slip systems {101} and {110} with impurities, non-stoichiometric small and extended defects and precipitates. Transmission electron microscopy at medium resolution as well as high resolution electron microscopy have been used to relate mechanical behaviour with microstructure. 43 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs

  9. A Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revesz Peter Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent recovery of ancient DNA from a growing number of human samples shows that mitochondrial DNA haplogroup I was introduced to Europe after the end of the Last Glacial Maximum. This paper provides a spatio-temporal analysis of the various subhaplogroups of mitochondrial DNA I. The study suggests that haplogroup I diversified into haplogroups I1, I2’3, I4 and I5 at specific regions in Eurasia and then spread southward to Crete and Egypt.

  10. Spatio-temporal reasoning and decision support tools

    OpenAIRE

    Renso, Chiara; Wachowicz, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Currently, mobility data is revolutionizing the traditional fields of spatio-temporal reasoning and decision making analysis, not only to scale-up to the large and growing data volumes, but also to address complex questions related to change, trends, duration, and evolution. In mobility data, space and time are inextricably linked, since humans, robots and systems that dynamically act, and interact within social networks, are embedded in space, and any change is often the result of actions an...

  11. Characteristics and Applications of Spatiotemporally Focused Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenrui Jing

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing (SSTF of femtosecond laser pulses gives rise to strong suppression of nonlinear self-focusing during the propagation of the femtosecond laser beam. In this paper, we begin with an introduction of the principle of SSTF, followed by a review of our recent experimental results on the characterization and application of the spatiotemporally focused pulses for femtosecond laser micromachining. Finally, we summarize all of the results and give a future perspective of this technique.

  12. Spatiotemporal Dynamics and Reliable Computations in Recurrent Spiking Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Ryan; Rosenbaum, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Randomly connected networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons provide a parsimonious model of neural variability, but are notoriously unreliable for performing computations. We show that this difficulty is overcome by incorporating the well-documented dependence of connection probability on distance. Spatially extended spiking networks exhibit symmetry-breaking bifurcations and generate spatiotemporal patterns that can be trained to perform dynamical computations under a reservoir computing framework.

  13. Spatiotemporal Dynamics and Reliable Computations in Recurrent Spiking Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Ryan; Rosenbaum, Robert

    2017-01-06

    Randomly connected networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons provide a parsimonious model of neural variability, but are notoriously unreliable for performing computations. We show that this difficulty is overcome by incorporating the well-documented dependence of connection probability on distance. Spatially extended spiking networks exhibit symmetry-breaking bifurcations and generate spatiotemporal patterns that can be trained to perform dynamical computations under a reservoir computing framework.

  14. A simple spatiotemporal chaotic Lotka-Volterra model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprott, J.C.; Wildenberg, J.C.; Azizi, Yousef

    2005-01-01

    A mathematically simple example of a high-dimensional (many-species) Lotka-Volterra model that exhibits spatiotemporal chaos in one spatial dimension is described. The model consists of a closed ring of identical agents, each competing for fixed finite resources with two of its four nearest neighbors. The model is prototypical of more complicated models in its quasiperiodic route to chaos (including attracting 3-tori), bifurcations, spontaneous symmetry breaking, and spatial pattern formation

  15. Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-ray Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaven, Stanton L.

    2009-01-01

    A novel scintillating optical fiber is presented using a composite micro-structured quartz optical fiber. Scintillating materials are introduced into the multiple inclusions of the fiber. This creates a composite optical fiber having quartz as a cladding with an organic scintillating material core. X-ray detection using these fibers is compared to a collimated cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. Results show a good correlation between the fiber count rate trend and that of the CdTe detector.

  16. Spatiotemporal behavior and nonlinear dynamics in a phase conjugate resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siuying Raymond

    1993-01-01

    The work described can be divided into two parts. The first part is an investigation of the transient behavior and stability property of a phase conjugate resonator (PCR) below threshold. The second part is an experimental and theoretical study of the PCR's spatiotemporal dynamics above threshold. The time-dependent coupled wave equations for four-wave mixing (FWM) in a photorefractive crystal, with two distinct interaction regions caused by feedback from an ordinary mirror, was used to model the transient dynamics of a PCR below threshold. The conditions for self-oscillation were determined and the solutions were used to define the PCR's transfer function and analyze its stability. Experimental results for the buildup and decay times confirmed qualitatively the predicted behavior. Experiments were carried out above threshold to study the spatiotemporal dynamics of the PCR as a function of Pragg detuning and the resonator's Fresnel number. The existence of optical vortices in the wavefront were identified by optical interferometry. It was possible to describe the transverse dynamics and the spatiotemporal instabilities by modeling the three-dimensional-coupled wave equations in photorefractive FWM using a truncated modal expansion approach.

  17. Artificial spatiotemporal touch inputs reveal complementary decoding in neocortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Calogero M; Mazzoni, Alberto; Spanne, Anton; Enander, Jonas M D; Mogensen, Hannes; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Camboni, Domenico; Micera, Silvestro; Jörntell, Henrik

    2017-04-04

    Investigations of the mechanisms of touch perception and decoding has been hampered by difficulties in achieving invariant patterns of skin sensor activation. To obtain reproducible spatiotemporal patterns of activation of sensory afferents, we used an artificial fingertip equipped with an array of neuromorphic sensors. The artificial fingertip was used to transduce real-world haptic stimuli into spatiotemporal patterns of spikes. These spike patterns were delivered to the skin afferents of the second digit of rats via an array of stimulation electrodes. Combined with low-noise intra- and extracellular recordings from neocortical neurons in vivo, this approach provided a previously inaccessible high resolution analysis of the representation of tactile information in the neocortical neuronal circuitry. The results indicate high information content in individual neurons and reveal multiple novel neuronal tactile coding features such as heterogeneous and complementary spatiotemporal input selectivity also between neighboring neurons. Such neuronal heterogeneity and complementariness can potentially support a very high decoding capacity in a limited population of neurons. Our results also indicate a potential neuroprosthetic approach to communicate with the brain at a very high resolution and provide a potential novel solution for evaluating the degree or state of neurological disease in animal models.

  18. Reliable Collaborative Filtering on Spatio-Temporal Privacy Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lots of multilayer information, such as the spatio-temporal privacy check-in data, is accumulated in the location-based social network (LBSN. When using the collaborative filtering algorithm for LBSN location recommendation, one of the core issues is how to improve recommendation performance by combining the traditional algorithm with the multilayer information. The existing approaches of collaborative filtering use only the sparse user-item rating matrix. It entails high computational complexity and inaccurate results. A novel collaborative filtering-based location recommendation algorithm called LGP-CF, which takes spatio-temporal privacy information into account, is proposed in this paper. By mining the users check-in behavior pattern, the dataset is segmented semantically to reduce the data size that needs to be computed. Then the clustering algorithm is used to obtain and narrow the set of similar users. User-location bipartite graph is modeled using the filtered similar user set. Then LGP-CF can quickly locate the location and trajectory of users through message propagation and aggregation over the graph. Through calculating users similarity by spatio-temporal privacy data on the graph, we can finally calculate the rating of recommendable locations. Experiments results on the physical clusters indicate that compared with the existing algorithms, the proposed LGP-CF algorithm can make recommendations more accurately.

  19. Visual memory performance for color depends on spatiotemporal context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivers, Christian N L; Schreij, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Performance on visual short-term memory for features has been known to depend on stimulus complexity, spatial layout, and feature context. However, with few exceptions, memory capacity has been measured for abruptly appearing, single-instance displays. In everyday life, objects often have a spatiotemporal history as they or the observer move around. In three experiments, we investigated the effect of spatiotemporal history on explicit memory for color. Observers saw a memory display emerge from behind a wall, after which it disappeared again. The test display then emerged from either the same side as the memory display or the opposite side. In the first two experiments, memory improved for intermediate set sizes when the test display emerged in the same way as the memory display. A third experiment then showed that the benefit was tied to the original motion trajectory and not to the display object per se. The results indicate that memory for color is embedded in a richer episodic context that includes the spatiotemporal history of the display.

  20. Spatio-temporal patterns in simple models of marine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudel, U.; Baurmann, M.; Gross, T.

    2009-04-01

    Spatio-temporal patterns in marine systems are a result of the interaction of population dynamics with physical transport processes. These physical transport processes can be either diffusion processes in marine sediments or in the water column. We study the dynamics of one population of bacteria and its nutrient in in a simplified model of a marine sediments, taking into account that the considered bacteria possess an active as well as an inactive state, where activation is processed by signal molecules. Furthermore the nutrients are transported actively by bioirrigation and passively by diffusion. It is shown that under certain conditions Turing patterns can occur which yield heterogeneous spatial patterns of the species. The influence of bioirrigation on Turing patterns leads to the emergence of ''hot spots``, i.e. localized regions of enhanced bacterial activity. All obtained patterns fit quite well to observed patterns in laboratory experiments. Spatio-temporal patterns appear in a predator-prey model, used to describe plankton dynamics. These patterns appear due to the simultaneous emergence of Turing patterns and oscillations in the species abundance in the neighborhood of a Turing-Hopf bifurcation. We observe a large variety of different patterns where i) stationary heterogeneous patterns (e.g. hot and cold spots) compete with spatio-temporal patterns ii) slowly moving patterns are embedded in an oscillatory background iii) moving fronts and spiral waves appear.

  1. Improved kinect-based spatiotemporal and kinematic treadmill gait assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltoukhy, Moataz; Oh, Jeonghoon; Kuenze, Christopher; Signorile, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    A cost-effective, clinician friendly gait assessment tool that can automatically track patients' anatomical landmarks can provide practitioners with important information that is useful in prescribing rehabilitative and preventive therapies. This study investigated the validity and reliability of the Microsoft Kinect v2 as a potential inexpensive gait analysis tool. Ten healthy subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.3 and 1.6m·s -1 , as spatiotemporal parameters and kinematics were extracted concurrently using the Kinect and three-dimensional motion analysis. Spatiotemporal measures included step length and width, step and stride times, vertical and mediolateral pelvis motion, and foot swing velocity. Kinematic outcomes included hip, knee, and ankle joint angles in the sagittal plane. The absolute agreement and relative consistency between the two systems were assessed using interclass correlations coefficients (ICC2,1), while reproducibility between systems was established using Lin's Concordance Correlation Coefficient (rc). Comparison of ensemble curves and associated 90% confidence intervals (CI90) of the hip, knee, and ankle joint angles were performed to investigate if the Kinect sensor could consistently and accurately assess lower extremity joint motion throughout the gait cycle. Results showed that the Kinect v2 sensor has the potential to be an effective clinical assessment tool for sagittal plane knee and hip joint kinematics, as well as some spatiotemporal temporal variables including pelvis displacement and step characteristics during the gait cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Selecting salient frames for spatiotemporal video modeling and segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaomu; Fan, Guoliang

    2007-12-01

    We propose a new statistical generative model for spatiotemporal video segmentation. The objective is to partition a video sequence into homogeneous segments that can be used as "building blocks" for semantic video segmentation. The baseline framework is a Gaussian mixture model (GMM)-based video modeling approach that involves a six-dimensional spatiotemporal feature space. Specifically, we introduce the concept of frame saliency to quantify the relevancy of a video frame to the GMM-based spatiotemporal video modeling. This helps us use a small set of salient frames to facilitate the model training by reducing data redundancy and irrelevance. A modified expectation maximization algorithm is developed for simultaneous GMM training and frame saliency estimation, and the frames with the highest saliency values are extracted to refine the GMM estimation for video segmentation. Moreover, it is interesting to find that frame saliency can imply some object behaviors. This makes the proposed method also applicable to other frame-related video analysis tasks, such as key-frame extraction, video skimming, etc. Experiments on real videos demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  3. Computational discovery of extremal microstructure families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Desai; Skouras, Mélina; Zhu, Bo; Matusik, Wojciech

    2018-01-01

    Modern fabrication techniques, such as additive manufacturing, can be used to create materials with complex custom internal structures. These engineered materials exhibit a much broader range of bulk properties than their base materials and are typically referred to as metamaterials or microstructures. Although metamaterials with extraordinary properties have many applications, designing them is very difficult and is generally done by hand. We propose a computational approach to discover families of microstructures with extremal macroscale properties automatically. Using efficient simulation and sampling techniques, we compute the space of mechanical properties covered by physically realizable microstructures. Our system then clusters microstructures with common topologies into families. Parameterized templates are eventually extracted from families to generate new microstructure designs. We demonstrate these capabilities on the computational design of mechanical metamaterials and present five auxetic microstructure families with extremal elastic material properties. Our study opens the way for the completely automated discovery of extremal microstructures across multiple domains of physics, including applications reliant on thermal, electrical, and magnetic properties. PMID:29376124

  4. Microstructure Modeling of Third Generation Disk Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this program was to model, validate, and predict the precipitation microstructure evolution, using PrecipiCalc (QuesTek Innovations LLC) software, for 3rd generation Ni-based gas turbine disc superalloys during processing and service, with a set of logical and consistent experiments and characterizations. Furthermore, within this program, the originally research-oriented microstructure simulation tool was to be further improved and implemented to be a useful and user-friendly engineering tool. In this report, the key accomplishments achieved during the third year (2009) of the program are summarized. The activities of this year included: Further development of multistep precipitation simulation framework for gamma prime microstructure evolution during heat treatment; Calibration and validation of gamma prime microstructure modeling with supersolvus heat treated LSHR; Modeling of the microstructure evolution of the minor phases, particularly carbides, during isothermal aging, representing the long term microstructure stability during thermal exposure; and the implementation of software tools. During the research and development efforts to extend the precipitation microstructure modeling and prediction capability in this 3-year program, we identified a hurdle, related to slow gamma prime coarsening rate, with no satisfactory scientific explanation currently available. It is desirable to raise this issue to the Ni-based superalloys research community, with hope that in future there will be a mechanistic understanding and physics-based treatment to overcome the hurdle. In the mean time, an empirical correction factor was developed in this modeling effort to capture the experimental observations.

  5. Observation of asphalt binder microstructure with ESEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, P; Kadhim, H; Baaj, H; Tighe, S

    2017-09-01

    The observation of asphalt binder with the environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) has shown the potential to observe asphalt binder microstructure and its evolution with binder aging. A procedure for the induction and identification of the microstructure in asphalt binder was established in this study and included sample preparation and observation parameters. A suitable heat-sampling asphalt binder sample preparation method was determined for the test and several stainless steel and Teflon sample moulds developed, finding that stainless steel was the preferable material. The magnification and ESEM settings conducive to observing the 3D microstructure were determined through a number of observations to be 1000×, although other magnifications could be considered. Both straight run binder (PG 58-28) and an air blown oxidised binder were analysed; their structures being compared for their relative size, abundance and other characteristics, showing a clear evolution in the fibril microstructure. The microstructure took longer to appear for the oxidised binder. It was confirmed that the fibril microstructure corresponded to actual characteristics in the asphalt binder. Additionally, a 'bee' micelle structure was found as a transitional structure in ESEM observation. The test methods in this study will be used for more comprehensive analysis of asphalt binder microstructure. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Evolution of phase microstructure during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1985-11-01

    The phase microstructure of alloys is frequently severely altered during irradiation. Sluggish precipitation reactions including precipitation coarsening are accelerated by irradiation-enhanced diffusion. Radiation-induced segregation redistributes existing precipitate phases within the microstructure, induces precipitation of nonequilibrium phases and affects the composition of phases in multicomponent alloys. The displacement process causes disordering of ordered alloys and frequently amorphization, especially in intermetallic compounds, at low temperature. Although a good qualitative understanding of the basic process involved, i.e., displacement mixing, radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation exists, methods for detailed quantitative modeling of the evolution of the microstructure of alloys remain to be developed

  7. Modeling the microstructural evolution during constrained sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Tikare, V.

    A numerical model able to simulate solid state constrained sintering of a powder compact is presented. The model couples an existing kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model for free sintering with a finite element (FE) method for calculating stresses on a microstructural level. The microstructural response...... to the stress field as well as the FE calculation of the stress field from the microstructural evolution is discussed. The sintering behavior of two powder compacts constrained by a rigid substrate is simulated and compared to free sintering of the same samples. Constrained sintering result in a larger number...

  8. Morphology and microstructure of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Srinivansan, K.

    1991-01-01

    Lightweight continuous carbon fiber based polymeric composites are currently enjoying increasing acceptance as structural materials capable of replacing metals and alloys in load bearing applications. As with most new materials, these composites are undergoing trials with several competing processing techniques aimed at cost effectively producing void free consolidations with good mechanical properties. As metallic materials have been in use for several centuries, a considerable database exists on their morphology - microstructure; and the interrelationships between structure and properties have been well documented. Numerous studies on composites have established the crucial relationship between microstructure - morphology and properties. The various microstructural and morphological features of composite materials, particularly those accompanying different processing routes, are documented.

  9. Effects of organic additives on microstructure and mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, P.R. China ... porosity are of interest for engineering applications, as gas filters ... Flow diagram for fabricating porous silicon nitride samples.

  10. Internal friction, microstructure, and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Sommer, W.F.; Davidson, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    A brief review is given of internal friction relaxation peaks and background internal friction. The microstructural origin of the internal friction is discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on radiation effects

  11. Surface microstructure replication in injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Uffe Arlø; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2006-01-01

    topography is transcribed onto the plastic part through complex mechanisms. This replication, however, is not perfect, and the replication quality depends on the plastic material properties, the topography itself, and the process conditions. This paper describes and discusses an investigation of injection...... molding of surface microstructures. The fundamental problem of surface microstructure replication has been studied. The research is based on specific microstructures as found in lab-on-a-chip products and on rough surfaces generated from EDM (electro discharge machining) mold cavities. Emphasis is put...... on the ability to replicate surface microstructures under normal injection-molding conditions, i.e., with commodity materials within typical process windows. It was found that within typical process windows the replication quality depends significantly on several process parameters, and especially the mold...

  12. Microstructural aspects of SYNROC from sandia precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.T.; Watson, K.G.; Bellrose, A.

    1987-04-01

    Typical microstructures formed in Synroc C have been observed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The principal effects of segregation, variation of calciner atmosphere and change in hot-pressing conditions, are summarised

  13. Microstructure and properties of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen Tungsheng

    1984-01-01

    Ceramics materials study is an important field in modern materials science. Each side presented 19 papers most of which were recent investigations giving rather extensive coverage of microstructure and properties of new materials. (Auth.)

  14. Modeling of microstructural evolution under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Microstructural evolution under irradiation is an extremely complex phenomenon involving numerous interacting mechanisms which alter both the microstructure and microchemistry of structural alloys. Predictive procedures which correlate primary irradiation and material variables to microstructural response are needed to extrapolate from the imperfect data base, which will be available, to fusion reactor conditions. Clearly, a marriage between models and experiments is needed. Specific steps to achieving such a marriage in the form of composite correlation model analysis are outlined and some preliminary results presented. The strongly correlated nature of microstructural evolution is emphasized and it is suggested that rate theory models, resting on the principle of material balances and focusing on coupled point defect-microchemical segregation processes, may be a practical approach to correlation model development. (orig.)

  15. Chalcogenide glass hollow core microstructured optical fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir S. eShiryaev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent developments on chalcogenide glass hollow core microstructured optical fibers (HC-MOFs are presented. The comparative analysis of simulated optical properties for chalcogenide HC-MOFs of negative-curvature with different size and number of capillaries is given. The technique for the manufacture of microstructured chalcogenide preforms, which includes the assembly of the substrate glass tube and 8-10 capillaries, is described. Further trends to improve the optical transmission in chalcogenide NCHCFs are considered.

  16. Tunable Beam Diffraction in Infiltrated Microstructured Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosberg, Christian Romer; Bennet, Francis H.; Neshev, Dragomir N.

    We experimentally study beam propagation in two dimensional photonic lattices in microstructured optical fibers infiltrated with high index liquids. We demonstrate strongly tunable beam diffraction by dynamically varying the coupling between individual lattice sites.......We experimentally study beam propagation in two dimensional photonic lattices in microstructured optical fibers infiltrated with high index liquids. We demonstrate strongly tunable beam diffraction by dynamically varying the coupling between individual lattice sites....

  17. Effects of Synchronous Rolling on Microstructure, Hardness, and Wear Resistance of Laser Multilayer Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W.; Zha, G. C.; Xi, M. Z.; Gao, S. Y.

    2018-03-01

    A synchronous rolling method was proposed to assist laser multilayer cladding, and the effects of this method on microstructure, microhardness, and wear resistance were studied. Results show that the microstructure and mechanical properties of the traditional cladding layer exhibit periodic inhomogeneity. Synchronous rolling breaks the columnar dendrite crystals to improve the uniformity of the organization, and the residual plastic energy promotes the precipitation of strengthening phases, as CrB, M7C3, etc. The hardness and wear resistance of the extruded cladding layer increase significantly because of the grain refinement, formation of dislocations, and dispersion strengthening. These positive significances of synchronous rolling provide a new direction for laser cladding technology.

  18. Dynamic spatiotemporal trends of dengue transmission in the Asia-Pacific region, 1955-2004.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahera Banu

    Full Text Available Dengue fever (DF is one of the most important emerging arboviral human diseases. Globally, DF incidence has increased by 30-fold over the last fifty years, and the geographic range of the virus and its vectors has expanded. The disease is now endemic in more than 120 countries in tropical and subtropical parts of the world. This study examines the spatiotemporal trends of DF transmission in the Asia-Pacific region over a 50-year period, and identified the disease's cluster areas.The World Health Organization's DengueNet provided the annual number of DF cases in 16 countries in the Asia-Pacific region for the period 1955 to 2004. This fifty-year dataset was divided into five ten-year periods as the basis for the investigation of DF transmission trends. Space-time cluster analyses were conducted using scan statistics to detect the disease clusters. This study shows an increasing trend in the spatiotemporal distribution of DF in the Asia-Pacific region over the study period. Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, Singapore and Malaysia are identified as the most likely clusters (relative risk = 13.02 of DF transmission in this region in the period studied (1995 to 2004. The study also indicates that, for the most part, DF transmission has expanded southwards in the region.This information will lead to the improvement of DF prevention and control strategies in the Asia-Pacific region by prioritizing control efforts and directing them where they are most needed.

  19. Integrating movement ecology with biodiversity research - exploring new avenues to address spatiotemporal biodiversity dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeltsch, Florian; Bonte, Dries; Pe'er, Guy; Reineking, Björn; Leimgruber, Peter; Balkenhol, Niko; Schröder, Boris; Buchmann, Carsten M; Mueller, Thomas; Blaum, Niels; Zurell, Damaris; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Wiegand, Thorsten; Eccard, Jana A; Hofer, Heribert; Reeg, Jette; Eggers, Ute; Bauer, Silke

    2013-01-01

    Movement of organisms is one of the key mechanisms shaping biodiversity, e.g. the distribution of genes, individuals and species in space and time. Recent technological and conceptual advances have improved our ability to assess the causes and consequences of individual movement, and led to the emergence of the new field of 'movement ecology'. Here, we outline how movement ecology can contribute to the broad field of biodiversity research, i.e. the study of processes and patterns of life among and across different scales, from genes to ecosystems, and we propose a conceptual framework linking these hitherto largely separated fields of research. Our framework builds on the concept of movement ecology for individuals, and demonstrates its importance for linking individual organismal movement with biodiversity. First, organismal movements can provide 'mobile links' between habitats or ecosystems, thereby connecting resources, genes, and processes among otherwise separate locations. Understanding these mobile links and their impact on biodiversity will be facilitated by movement ecology, because mobile links can be created by different modes of movement (i.e., foraging, dispersal, migration) that relate to different spatiotemporal scales and have differential effects on biodiversity. Second, organismal movements can also mediate coexistence in communities, through 'equalizing' and 'stabilizing' mechanisms. This novel integrated framework provides a conceptual starting point for a better understanding of biodiversity dynamics in light of individual movement and space-use behavior across spatiotemporal scales. By illustrating this framework with examples, we argue that the integration of movement ecology and biodiversity research will also enhance our ability to conserve diversity at the genetic, species, and ecosystem levels.

  20. Microstructural study of multiaxial low cycle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Sakane

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the relationship between the stress response and the microstructure under tension-torsion multiaxial proportional and nonproportional loadings. Firstly, this paper discusses the material dependency of additional hardening of FCC materials in relation with the stacking fault energy of the materials. The FCC materials studied were Type 304 stainless steel, pure copper, pure nickel, pure aluminum and 6061 aluminum alloy. The material with lower stacking fault energy showed stronger additional hardening, which was discussed in relation with slip morphology and dislocation structures. This paper, next, discusses dislocation structures of Type 304 stainless steel under proportional and nonproportional loadings at high temperature. The relationship between the microstructure and the hardening behavior whether isotropic or anisotropic was discussed. The re-arrangeability of dislocation structure was discussed in loading mode change tests. Microstructures of the steel was discussed in more extensively programmed multiaxial low cycle fatigue tests at room temperature, where three microstructures, dislocation bundle, stacking fault and cells, which were discussed in relation with the stress response. Finally, temperature dependence of the microstructure was discussed under proportional and nonproportional loadings, by comparing the microstructures observed at room and high temperatures.

  1. Self-Organization in Coupled Map Scale-Free Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Ming, Liang; Zong-Hua, Liu; Hua-Ping, Lü

    2008-01-01

    We study the self-organization of phase synchronization in coupled map scale-free networks with chaotic logistic map at each node and find that a variety of ordered spatiotemporal patterns emerge spontaneously in a regime of coupling strength. These ordered behaviours will change with the increase of the average links and are robust to both the system size and parameter mismatch. A heuristic theory is given to explain the mechanism of self-organization and to figure out the regime of coupling for the ordered spatiotemporal patterns

  2. Accelerated Microstructure Imaging via Convex Optimization (AMICO) from diffusion MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daducci, Alessandro; Canales-Rodríguez, Erick J; Zhang, Hui; Dyrby, Tim B; Alexander, Daniel C; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-15

    Microstructure imaging from diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) data represents an invaluable tool to study non-invasively the morphology of tissues and to provide a biological insight into their microstructural organization. In recent years, a variety of biophysical models have been proposed to associate particular patterns observed in the measured signal with specific microstructural properties of the neuronal tissue, such as axon diameter and fiber density. Despite very appealing results showing that the estimated microstructure indices agree very well with histological examinations, existing techniques require computationally very expensive non-linear procedures to fit the models to the data which, in practice, demand the use of powerful computer clusters for large-scale applications. In this work, we present a general framework for Accelerated Microstructure Imaging via Convex Optimization (AMICO) and show how to re-formulate this class of techniques as convenient linear systems which, then, can be efficiently solved using very fast algorithms. We demonstrate this linearization of the fitting problem for two specific models, i.e. ActiveAx and NODDI, providing a very attractive alternative for parameter estimation in those techniques; however, the AMICO framework is general and flexible enough to work also for the wider space of microstructure imaging methods. Results demonstrate that AMICO represents an effective means to accelerate the fit of existing techniques drastically (up to four orders of magnitude faster) while preserving accuracy and precision in the estimated model parameters (correlation above 0.9). We believe that the availability of such ultrafast algorithms will help to accelerate the spread of microstructure imaging to larger cohorts of patients and to study a wider spectrum of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sex differences in spatiotemporal expression of AR, ERα, and ERβ mRNA in the perinatal mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogi, Kazutaka; Takanashi, Haruka; Nagasawa, Miho; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that every masculinized function might be organized by a particular contribution of androgens vs. estrogens in a critical time window. Here, we aimed to investigate the sex differences in brain testosterone levels and in the spatiotemporal dynamics of steroid receptor mRNA expression in perinatal mice, by using enzyme immunoassay and real-time PCR, respectively. We found that testosterone levels in the forebrain transiently increased around birth in male mice. During the perinatal period, levels of androgen receptor mRNA in the hypothalamus (hypo) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) were higher in male mice than in female mice. Estrogen receptor α (ERα) mRNA levels in the hypo and hippocampus were higher in male mice than in female mice before birth. In contrast, ERβ mRNA expression in the PFC was higher in female mice immediately after birth. These spatiotemporal sex differences in steroid receptor expression might contribute to organizing sex differences of not only reproductive function, but also anxiety, stress responses, and cognition in mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding to Hierarchical Microstructures of Crab (Chinese hairy) Shell as a Natural Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuanqiang, Zhou [Testing Center, Yangzhou University, No. 48 Wenhui East Road, Yangzhou (China); Xiangxiang, Gong [Testing Center, Yangzhou University, No. 48 Wenhui East Road, Yangzhou (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Jie, Han [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China)

    2016-03-07

    This work was done to better understand the microstructures, composition and mechanical properties of Chinese hairy crab shell. For fully revealing its hierarchical microstructure, the crab shell was observed with electron microscope under different magnifications from different facets. XRD, EDS, FTIR and TGA techniques have been used to characterize the untreated and chemically-treated crab shells, which provided enough information to determine the species and relative content of components in this biomaterial. Combined the microstructures with constituents analysis, the structural principles of crab shell was detailedly realized from different structural levels beyond former reports. To explore the relationship between structure and function, the mechanical properties of shell have been measured through performing tensile tests. The contributions of organics and minerals in shell to the mechanical properties were also discussed by measuring the tensile strength of de-calcification samples treated with HCl solution.

  5. Understanding to Hierarchical Microstructures of Crab (Chinese hairy) Shell as a Natural Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuanqiang, Zhou; Xiangxiang, Gong; Jie, Han

    2016-01-01

    This work was done to better understand the microstructures, composition and mechanical properties of Chinese hairy crab shell. For fully revealing its hierarchical microstructure, the crab shell was observed with electron microscope under different magnifications from different facets. XRD, EDS, FTIR and TGA techniques have been used to characterize the untreated and chemically-treated crab shells, which provided enough information to determine the species and relative content of components in this biomaterial. Combined the microstructures with constituents analysis, the structural principles of crab shell was detailedly realized from different structural levels beyond former reports. To explore the relationship between structure and function, the mechanical properties of shell have been measured through performing tensile tests. The contributions of organics and minerals in shell to the mechanical properties were also discussed by measuring the tensile strength of de-calcification samples treated with HCl solution

  6. 4D cone beam CT via spatiotemporal tensor framelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Hao; Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei; Lin, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: On-board 4D cone beam CT (4DCBCT) offers respiratory phase-resolved volumetric imaging, and improves the accuracy of target localization in image guided radiation therapy. However, the clinical utility of this technique has been greatly impeded by its degraded image quality, prolonged imaging time, and increased imaging dose. The purpose of this letter is to develop a novel iterative 4DCBCT reconstruction method for improved image quality, increased imaging speed, and reduced imaging dose. Methods: The essence of this work is to introduce the spatiotemporal tensor framelet (STF), a high-dimensional tensor generalization of the 1D framelet for 4DCBCT, to effectively take into account of highly correlated and redundant features of the patient anatomy during respiration, in a multilevel fashion with multibasis sparsifying transform. The STF-based algorithm is implemented on a GPU platform for improved computational efficiency. To evaluate the method, 4DCBCT full-fan scans were acquired within 30 s, with a gantry rotation of 200°; STF is also compared with a state-of-art reconstruction method via spatiotemporal total variation regularization. Results: Both the simulation and experimental results demonstrate that STF-based reconstruction achieved superior image quality. The reconstruction of 20 respiratory phases took less than 10 min on an NVIDIA Tesla C2070 GPU card. The STF codes are available at https://sites.google.com/site/spatiotemporaltensorframelet . Conclusions: By effectively utilizing the spatiotemporal coherence of the patient anatomy among different respiratory phases in a multilevel fashion with multibasis sparsifying transform, the proposed STF method potentially enables fast and low-dose 4DCBCT with improved image quality.

  7. 4D cone beam CT via spatiotemporal tensor framelet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Hao, E-mail: hao.gao@emory.edu [Departments of Mathematics and Computer Science, and Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Lin, Yuting [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: On-board 4D cone beam CT (4DCBCT) offers respiratory phase-resolved volumetric imaging, and improves the accuracy of target localization in image guided radiation therapy. However, the clinical utility of this technique has been greatly impeded by its degraded image quality, prolonged imaging time, and increased imaging dose. The purpose of this letter is to develop a novel iterative 4DCBCT reconstruction method for improved image quality, increased imaging speed, and reduced imaging dose. Methods: The essence of this work is to introduce the spatiotemporal tensor framelet (STF), a high-dimensional tensor generalization of the 1D framelet for 4DCBCT, to effectively take into account of highly correlated and redundant features of the patient anatomy during respiration, in a multilevel fashion with multibasis sparsifying transform. The STF-based algorithm is implemented on a GPU platform for improved computational efficiency. To evaluate the method, 4DCBCT full-fan scans were acquired within 30 s, with a gantry rotation of 200°; STF is also compared with a state-of-art reconstruction method via spatiotemporal total variation regularization. Results: Both the simulation and experimental results demonstrate that STF-based reconstruction achieved superior image quality. The reconstruction of 20 respiratory phases took less than 10 min on an NVIDIA Tesla C2070 GPU card. The STF codes are available at https://sites.google.com/site/spatiotemporaltensorframelet . Conclusions: By effectively utilizing the spatiotemporal coherence of the patient anatomy among different respiratory phases in a multilevel fashion with multibasis sparsifying transform, the proposed STF method potentially enables fast and low-dose 4DCBCT with improved image quality.

  8. Measurement Error Correction for Predicted Spatiotemporal Air Pollution Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Joshua P; Chang, Howard H; Strickland, Matthew J; Szpiro, Adam A

    2017-05-01

    Air pollution cohort studies are frequently analyzed in two stages, first modeling exposure then using predicted exposures to estimate health effects in a second regression model. The difference between predicted and unobserved true exposures introduces a form of measurement error in the second stage health model. Recent methods for spatial data correct for measurement error with a bootstrap and by requiring the study design ensure spatial compatibility, that is, monitor and subject locations are drawn from the same spatial distribution. These methods have not previously been applied to spatiotemporal exposure data. We analyzed the association between fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and birth weight in the US state of Georgia using records with estimated date of conception during 2002-2005 (n = 403,881). We predicted trimester-specific PM2.5 exposure using a complex spatiotemporal exposure model. To improve spatial compatibility, we restricted to mothers residing in counties with a PM2.5 monitor (n = 180,440). We accounted for additional measurement error via a nonparametric bootstrap. Third trimester PM2.5 exposure was associated with lower birth weight in the uncorrected (-2.4 g per 1 μg/m difference in exposure; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -3.9, -0.8) and bootstrap-corrected (-2.5 g, 95% CI: -4.2, -0.8) analyses. Results for the unrestricted analysis were attenuated (-0.66 g, 95% CI: -1.7, 0.35). This study presents a novel application of measurement error correction for spatiotemporal air pollution exposures. Our results demonstrate the importance of spatial compatibility between monitor and subject locations and provide evidence of the association between air pollution exposure and birth weight.

  9. Visual search of cyclic spatio-temporal events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Jacques; Davoine, Paule-Annick; Cunty, Claire

    2018-05-01

    The analysis of spatio-temporal events, and especially of relationships between their different dimensions (space-time-thematic attributes), can be done with geovisualization interfaces. But few geovisualization tools integrate the cyclic dimension of spatio-temporal event series (natural events or social events). Time Coil and Time Wave diagrams represent both the linear time and the cyclic time. By introducing a cyclic temporal scale, these diagrams may highlight the cyclic characteristics of spatio-temporal events. However, the settable cyclic temporal scales are limited to usual durations like days or months. Because of that, these diagrams cannot be used to visualize cyclic events, which reappear with an unusual period, and don't allow to make a visual search of cyclic events. Also, they don't give the possibility to identify the relationships between the cyclic behavior of the events and their spatial features, and more especially to identify localised cyclic events. The lack of possibilities to represent the cyclic time, outside of the temporal diagram of multi-view geovisualization interfaces, limits the analysis of relationships between the cyclic reappearance of events and their other dimensions. In this paper, we propose a method and a geovisualization tool, based on the extension of Time Coil and Time Wave, to provide a visual search of cyclic events, by allowing to set any possible duration to the diagram's cyclic temporal scale. We also propose a symbology approach to push the representation of the cyclic time into the map, in order to improve the analysis of relationships between space and the cyclic behavior of events.

  10. Spatiotemporal Signal Analysis via the Phase Velocity Transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattor, Nathan

    2000-01-01

    The phase velocity transform (PVT) is an integral transform that divides a function of space and time into components that propagate at uniform phase velocities without distortion. This paper examines the PVT as a method to analyze spatiotemporal fluctuation data. The transform is extended to systems with discretely sampled data on a periodic domain, and applied to data from eight azimuthally distributed probes on the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX). This reveals features not shown by Fourier analysis, particularly regarding nonsinusoidal mode structure. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  11. Spatio-Temporal Encoding in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation two methods for spatio-temporal encoding in medical ultrasound imaging are investigated. The first technique is based on a frequency division approach. Here, the available spectrum of the transducer is divided into a set of narrow bands. A waveform is designed for each band...... the signal to noise ratio and simultaneously the penetration depth so that the medical doctor can image deeper lying structures. The method is tested both experimentally and in simulation and has also evaluated for the purpose of blood flow estimation. The work presented is based on four papers which...

  12. PARALLEL SPATIOTEMPORAL SPECTRAL CLUSTERING WITH MASSIVE TRAJECTORY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Z. Gu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Massive trajectory data contains wealth useful information and knowledge. Spectral clustering, which has been shown to be effective in finding clusters, becomes an important clustering approaches in the trajectory data mining. However, the traditional spectral clustering lacks the temporal expansion on the algorithm and limited in its applicability to large-scale problems due to its high computational complexity. This paper presents a parallel spatiotemporal spectral clustering based on multiple acceleration solutions to make the algorithm more effective and efficient, the performance is proved due to the experiment carried out on the massive taxi trajectory dataset in Wuhan city, China.

  13. Scalable Top-k Spatio-Temporal Term Querying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Anders; Sidlauskas, Darius; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2014-01-01

    With the rapidly increasing deployment of Internet-connected, location-aware mobile devices, very large and increasing amounts of geo-tagged and timestamped user-generated content, such as microblog posts, are being generated. We present indexing, update, and query processing techniques...... that are capable of providing the top-k terms seen in posts in a user-specified spatio-temporal range. The techniques enable interactive response times in the millisecond range in a realistic setting where the arrival rate of posts exceeds today's average tweet arrival rate by a factor of 4-10. The techniques...

  14. Image sequence analysis using spatio-temporal texture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, S.K.; Clark, G.A.; Barnes, F.L.; Schaich, P.C.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have developed and coded an algorithm for motion pattern classification based on spatio-temporal texture. The algorithm has been implemented and tested for the detection of wakes in simulated data with a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio (0.7 dB). Using a open-quote hold one out close-quote method, a detection probability of 100% with a 0% false alarm rate has been achieved on the limited number of samples (47 in each category) tested. The actual detection can be displayed in the form of a movie that can effectively show the submarine tracks based on the detected wake locations

  15. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Dendritic Spines in the Living Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chien eChen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are ubiquitous postsynaptic sites of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain, and thus may serve as structural indicators of functional synapses. Recent works have suggested that neuronal coding of memories may be associated with rapid alterations in spine formation and elimination. Technological advances have enabled researchers to study spine dynamics in vivo during development as well as under various physiological and pathological conditions. We believe that better understanding of the spatiotemporal patterns of spine dynamics will help elucidate the principles of experience-dependent circuit modification and information processing in the living brain.

  16. Assessing global vegetation activity using spatio-temporal Bayesian modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Vera L.; van Eck, Christel M.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Regnier, Pierre A. G.

    2016-04-01

    This work demonstrates the potential of modelling vegetation activity using a hierarchical Bayesian spatio-temporal model. This approach allows modelling changes in vegetation and climate simultaneous in space and time. Changes of vegetation activity such as phenology are modelled as a dynamic process depending on climate variability in both space and time. Additionally, differences in observed vegetation status can be contributed to other abiotic ecosystem properties, e.g. soil and terrain properties. Although these properties do not change in time, they do change in space and may provide valuable information in addition to the climate dynamics. The spatio-temporal Bayesian models were calibrated at a regional scale because the local trends in space and time can be better captured by the model. The regional subsets were defined according to the SREX segmentation, as defined by the IPCC. Each region is considered being relatively homogeneous in terms of large-scale climate and biomes, still capturing small-scale (grid-cell level) variability. Modelling within these regions is hence expected to be less uncertain due to the absence of these large-scale patterns, compared to a global approach. This overall modelling approach allows the comparison of model behavior for the different regions and may provide insights on the main dynamic processes driving the interaction between vegetation and climate within different regions. The data employed in this study encompasses the global datasets for soil properties (SoilGrids), terrain properties (Global Relief Model based on SRTM DEM and ETOPO), monthly time series of satellite-derived vegetation indices (GIMMS NDVI3g) and climate variables (Princeton Meteorological Forcing Dataset). The findings proved the potential of a spatio-temporal Bayesian modelling approach for assessing vegetation dynamics, at a regional scale. The observed interrelationships of the employed data and the different spatial and temporal trends support

  17. Estimating spatio-temporal dynamics of size-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2014-01-01

    with simple stock dynamics, to estimate simultaneously how size distributions and spatial distributions develop in time. We demonstrate the method for a cod population sampled by trawl surveys. Particular attention is paid to correlation between size classes within each trawl haul due to clustering...... of individuals with similar size. The model estimates growth, mortality and reproduction, after which any aspect of size-structure, spatio-temporal population dynamics, as well as the sampling process can be probed. This is illustrated by two applications: 1) tracking the spatial movements of a single cohort...

  18. A million-plus neuron model of the hippocampal dentate gyrus: Dependency of spatio-temporal network dynamics on topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Phillip J; Yu, Gene J; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a million-plus granule cell compartmental model of the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus, including excitatory, perforant path input from the entorhinal cortex, and feedforward and feedback inhibitory input from dentate interneurons. The model includes experimentally determined morphological and biophysical properties of granule cells, together with glutamatergic AMPA-like EPSP and GABAergic GABAA-like IPSP synaptic excitatory and inhibitory inputs, respectively. Each granule cell was composed of approximately 200 compartments having passive and active conductances distributed throughout the somatic and dendritic regions. Modeling excitatory input from the entorhinal cortex was guided by axonal transport studies documenting the topographical organization of projections from subregions of the medial and lateral entorhinal cortex, plus other important details of the distribution of glutamatergic inputs to the dentate gyrus. Results showed that when medial and lateral entorhinal cortical neurons maintained Poisson random firing, dentate granule cells expressed, throughout the million-cell network, a robust, non-random pattern of spiking best described as spatiotemporal "clustering". To identify the network property or properties responsible for generating such firing "clusters", we progressively eliminated from the model key mechanisms such as feedforward and feedback inhibition, intrinsic membrane properties underlying rhythmic burst firing, and/or topographical organization of entorhinal afferents. Findings conclusively identified topographical organization of inputs as the key element responsible for generating a spatio-temporal distribution of clustered firing. These results uncover a functional organization of perforant path afferents to the dentate gyrus not previously recognized: topography-dependent clusters of granule cell activity as "functional units" that organize the processing of entorhinal signals.

  19. White matter microstructure mediates the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness and spatial working memory in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Lauren E; Verstynen, Timothy D; Burzynska, Agnieszka Z; Voss, Michelle W; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Wong, Chelsea; Fanning, Jason; Awick, Elizabeth; Gothe, Neha; Phillips, Siobhan M; Mailey, Emily; Ehlers, Diane; Olson, Erin; Wojcicki, Thomas; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F; Erickson, Kirk I

    2016-05-01

    White matter structure declines with advancing age and has been associated with a decline in memory and executive processes in older adulthood. Yet, recent research suggests that higher physical activity and fitness levels may be associated with less white matter degeneration in late life, although the tract-specificity of this relationship is not well understood. In addition, these prior studies infrequently associate measures of white matter microstructure to cognitive outcomes, so the behavioral importance of higher levels of white matter microstructural organization with greater fitness levels remains a matter of speculation. Here we tested whether cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) levels were associated with white matter microstructure and whether this relationship constituted an indirect pathway between cardiorespiratory fitness and spatial working memory in two large, cognitively and neurologically healthy older adult samples. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to determine white matter microstructure in two separate groups: Experiment 1, N=113 (mean age=66.61) and Experiment 2, N=154 (mean age=65.66). Using a voxel-based regression approach, we found that higher VO2max was associated with higher fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure of white matter microstructure, in a diverse network of white matter tracts, including the anterior corona radiata, anterior internal capsule, fornix, cingulum, and corpus callosum (PFDR-correctedmicrostructure within these regions, among others, constituted a significant indirect path between VO2max and spatial working memory performance. These results suggest that greater aerobic fitness levels are associated with higher levels of white matter microstructural organization, which may, in turn, preserve spatial memory performance in older adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding particulate coating microstructure development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christine Cardinal

    How a dispersion of particulates suspended in a solvent dries into a solid coating often is more important to the final coating quality than even its composition. Essential properties like porosity, strength, gloss, particulate order, and concentration gradients are all determined by the way the particles come together as the coating dries. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryoSEM) is one of the most effective methods to directly visualize a drying coating during film formation. Using this method, the coating is frozen, arresting particulate motion and solidifying the sample so that it be imaged in an SEM. In this thesis, the microstructure development of particulate coatings was explored with several case studies. First, the effect of drying conditions was determined on the collapse of hollow latex particles, which are inexpensive whiteners for paint. Using cryoSEM, it was found that collapse occurs during the last stages of drying and is most likely to occur at high drying temperatures, humidity, and with low binder concentration. From these results, a theoretical model was proposed for the collapse of a hollow latex particle. CryoSEM was also used to verify a theoretical model for the particulate concentration gradients that may develop in a coating during drying for various evaporation, sedimentation and particulate diffusion rates. This work created a simple drying map that will allow others to predict the character of a drying coating based on easily calculable parameters. Finally, the effect of temperature on the coalescence and cracking of latex coatings was explored. A new drying regime for latex coatings was identified, where partial coalescence of particles does not prevent cracking. Silica was shown to be an environmentally friendly additive for preventing crack formation in this regime.

  1. Assessment of spatio-temporal gait parameters from trunk accelerations during human walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Hof, AL

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of an analysis of spatio-temporal gait parameters based upon accelerometry. To this purpose, acceleration patterns of the trunk and their relationships with spatio-temporal gait parameters were analysed in healthy subjects. Based on model predictions of the body's

  2. Enhancement of peak intensity in a filament core with spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Bin; Chu Wei; Li Guihua; Zhang Haisu; Ni Jielei [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Gao Hui; Liu Weiwei [Institute of Modern Optics, Nankai University, Tianjin, 300071 (China); Yao Jinping; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chin, See Leang [Center for Optics, Photonics and Laser (COPL) and Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    We demonstrate that the peak intensity in the filament core, which is inherently limited by the intensity clamping effect during femtosecond laser filamentation, can be significantly enhanced using spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses. In addition, the filament length obtained by spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses is {approx}25 times shorter than that obtained by a conventional focusing scheme, resulting in improved high spatial resolution.

  3. Building spatio-temporal database model based on ontological approach using relational database environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, N.; Burney, S.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Everything in this world is encapsulated by space and time fence. Our daily life activities are utterly linked and related with other objects in vicinity. Therefore, a strong relationship exist with our current location, time (including past, present and future) and event through with we are moving as an object also affect our activities in life. Ontology development and its integration with database are vital for the true understanding of the complex systems involving both spatial and temporal dimensions. In this paper we propose a conceptual framework for building spatio-temporal database model based on ontological approach. We have used relational data model for modelling spatio-temporal data content and present our methodology with spatio-temporal ontological accepts and its transformation into spatio-temporal database model. We illustrate the implementation of our conceptual model through a case study related to cultivated land parcel used for agriculture to exhibit the spatio-temporal behaviour of agricultural land and related entities. Moreover, it provides a generic approach for designing spatiotemporal databases based on ontology. The proposed model is capable to understand the ontological and somehow epistemological commitments and to build spatio-temporal ontology and transform it into a spatio-temporal data model. Finally, we highlight the existing and future research challenges. (author)

  4. Spatio-temporal resolved diagnostics of the single filament barrier discharge in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.E.; Brandenburg, R.; Michel, P.; Kozlov, K.V.

    2001-01-01

    First experimental results on the spatio-temporal development of single filaments of DBDs in dry air at atmospheric pressure are presented. The measurements allow a detailed visualisation and interpretation of the streamer development. In combination with the kinetic model they are used to get information on the spatiotemporal development of the reduced field-strength E/n, too

  5. An implicit spatiotemporal shape model for human activity localization and recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oikonomopoulos, A.; Patras, I.; Pantic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of localisation and recognition of human activities in unsegmented image sequences. The main contribution of the proposed method is the use of an implicit representation of the spatiotemporal shape of the activity which relies on the spatiotemporal localization

  6. A flexible spatiotemporal method for fusing satellite images with different resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaolin Zhu; Eileen H. Helmer; Feng Gao; Desheng Liu; Jin Chen; Michael A. Lefsky

    2016-01-01

    Studies of land surface dynamics in heterogeneous landscapes often require remote sensing datawith high acquisition frequency and high spatial resolution. However, no single sensor meets this requirement. This study presents a new spatiotemporal data fusion method, the Flexible Spatiotemporal DAta Fusion (FSDAF) method, to generate synthesized frequent high spatial...

  7. Brain microstructure mapping using quantitative and diffusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebois, Alice

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the human brain microstructure mapping using quantitative and diffusion MRI. The T1/T2 quantitative imaging relies on sequences dedicated to the mapping of T1 and T2 relaxation times. Their variations within the tissue are linked to the presence of different water compartments defined by a specific organization of the tissue at the cell scale. Measuring these parameters can help, therefore, to better characterize the brain microstructure. The dMRI, on the other hand, explores the brownian motion of water molecules in the brain tissue, where the water molecules' movement is constrained by natural barriers, such as cell membranes. Thus, the information on their displacement carried by the dMRI signal gives access to the underlying cyto-architecture. Combination of these two modalities is, therefore, a promising way to probe the brain tissue microstructure. The main goal of the present thesis is to set up the methodology to study the microstructure of the white matter of the human brain in vivo. The first part includes the acquisition of a unique MRI database of 79 healthy subjects (the Archi/CONNECT), which includes anatomical high resolution data, relaxometry data, diffusion-weighted data at high spatio-angular resolution and functional data. This database has allowed us to build the first atlas of the anatomical connectivity of the healthy brain through the automatic segmentation of the major white matter bundles, providing an appropriate anatomical reference for the white matter to study individually the quantitative parameters along each fascicle, characterizing its microstructure organization. Emphasis was placed on the construction of the first atlas of the T1/T2 profiles along the major white matter pathways. The profiles of the T1 and T2 relaxation times were then correlated to the quantitative profiles computed from the diffusion MRI data (fractional anisotropy, radial and longitudinal diffusivities, apparent diffusion coefficient

  8. SOLAP technology: Merging business intelligence with geospatial technology for interactive spatio-temporal exploration and analysis of data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivest, Sonia; Bédard, Yvan; Proulx, Marie-Josée; Nadeau, Martin; Hubert, Frederic; Pastor, Julien

    To support their analytical processes, today's organizations deploy data warehouses and client tools such as OLAP (On-Line Analytical Processing) to access, visualize, and analyze their integrated, aggregated and summarized data. Since a large part of these data have a spatial component, better client tools are required to take full advantage of the geometry of the spatial phenomena or objects being analyzed. With this regard, Spatial OLAP (SOLAP) technology offers promising possibilities. A SOLAP tool can be defined as "a type of software that allows rapid and easy navigation within spatial databases and that offers many levels of information granularity, many themes, many epochs and many display modes synchronized or not: maps, tables and diagrams" [Bédard, Y., Proulx, M.J., Rivest, S., 2005. Enrichissement du OLAP pour l'analyse géographique: exemples de réalisation et différentes possibilités technologiques. In: Bentayeb, F., Boussaid, O., Darmont, J., Rabaseda, S. (Eds.), Entrepôts de Données et Analyse en ligne, RNTI B_1. Paris: Cépaduès, pp. 1-20]. SOLAP tools offer a new user interface and are meant to be client applications sitting on top of multi-scale spatial data warehouses or datacubes. As they are based on the multidimensional paradigm, they facilitate the interactive spatio-temporal exploration of data. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how SOLAP concepts support spatio-temporal exploration of data and then to present the geovisualization, interactivity, and animation features of the SOLAP software developed by our research group. This paper first reviews the general concepts behind OLAP and SOLAP systems. This is followed by a discussion of how these SOLAP concepts support spatio-temporal exploration of data. In the subsequent section, SOLAP software is introduced along with features that enable geovisualization, interactivity and animation.

  9. Active sensing via movement shapes spatiotemporal patterns of sensory feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamper, Sarah A; Roth, Eatai; Cowan, Noah J; Fortune, Eric S

    2012-05-01

    Previous work has shown that animals alter their locomotor behavior to increase sensing volumes. However, an animal's own movement also determines the spatial and temporal dynamics of sensory feedback. Because each sensory modality has unique spatiotemporal properties, movement has differential and potentially independent effects on each sensory system. Here we show that weakly electric fish dramatically adjust their locomotor behavior in relation to changes of modality-specific information in a task in which increasing sensory volume is irrelevant. We varied sensory information during a refuge-tracking task by changing illumination (vision) and conductivity (electroreception). The gain between refuge movement stimuli and fish tracking responses was functionally identical across all sensory conditions. However, there was a significant increase in the tracking error in the dark (no visual cues). This was a result of spontaneous whole-body oscillations (0.1 to 1 Hz) produced by the fish. These movements were costly: in the dark, fish swam over three times further when tracking and produced more net positive mechanical work. The magnitudes of these oscillations increased as electrosensory salience was degraded via increases in conductivity. In addition, tail bending (1.5 to 2.35 Hz), which has been reported to enhance electrosensory perception, occurred only during trials in the dark. These data show that both categories of movements - whole-body oscillations and tail bends - actively shape the spatiotemporal dynamics of electrosensory feedback.

  10. Electrophysiological evidence for spatiotemporal flexibility in the ventrolateral attention network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Ristic

    Full Text Available Successful completion of many everyday tasks depends on interactions between voluntary attention, which acts to maintain current goals, and reflexive attention, which enables responding to unexpected events by interrupting the current focus of attention. Past studies, which have mostly examined each attentional mechanism in isolation, indicate that volitional and reflexive orienting depend on two functionally specialized cortical networks in the human brain. Here we investigated how the interplay between these two cortical networks affects sensory processing and the resulting overt behavior. By combining measurements of human performance and electrocortical recordings with a novel analytical technique for estimating spatiotemporal activity in the human cortex, we found that the subregions that comprise the reflexive ventrolateral attention network dissociate both spatially and temporally as a function of the nature of the sensory information and current task demands. Moreover, we found that together with the magnitude of the early sensory gain, the spatiotemporal neural dynamics accounted for the high amount of the variance in the behavioral data. Collectively these data support the conclusion that the ventrolateral attention network is recruited flexibly to support complex behaviors.

  11. Spatiotemporal Visualization of Tsunami Waves Using Kml on Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, H.; Delavar, M. R.; Sharifi, M. A.; Pirooz, M. D.

    2017-09-01

    Disaster risk is a function of hazard and vulnerability. Risk is defined as the expected losses, including lives, personal injuries, property damages, and economic disruptions, due to a particular hazard for a given area and time period. Risk assessment is one of the key elements of a natural disaster management strategy as it allows for better disaster mitigation and preparation. It provides input for informed decision making, and increases risk awareness among decision makers and other stakeholders. Virtual globes such as Google Earth can be used as a visualization tool. Proper spatiotemporal graphical representations of the concerned risk significantly reduces the amount of effort to visualize the impact of the risk and improves the efficiency of the decision-making process to mitigate the impact of the risk. The spatiotemporal visualization of tsunami waves for disaster management process is an attractive topic in geosciences to assist investigation of areas at tsunami risk. In this paper, a method for coupling virtual globes with tsunami wave arrival time models is presented. In this process we have shown 2D+Time of tsunami waves for propagation and inundation of tsunami waves, both coastal line deformation, and the flooded areas. In addition, the worst case scenario of tsunami on Chabahar port derived from tsunami modelling is also presented using KML on google earth.

  12. Validating spatiotemporal predictions of an important pest of small grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Scott C; Holtzer, Thomas O; Peairs, Frank B; Lester, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod pests are typically managed using tactics applied uniformly to the whole field. Precision pest management applies tactics under the assumption that within-field pest pressure differences exist. This approach allows for more precise and judicious use of scouting resources and management tactics. For example, a portion of a field delineated as attractive to pests may be selected to receive extra monitoring attention. Likely because of the high variability in pest dynamics, little attention has been given to developing precision pest prediction models. Here, multimodel synthesis was used to develop a spatiotemporal model predicting the density of a key pest of wheat, the Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov). Spatially implicit and spatially explicit models were synthesized to generate spatiotemporal pest pressure predictions. Cross-validation and field validation were used to confirm model efficacy. A strong within-field signal depicting aphid density was confirmed with low prediction errors. Results show that the within-field model predictions will provide higher-quality information than would be provided by traditional field scouting. With improvements to the broad-scale model component, the model synthesis approach and resulting tool could improve pest management strategy and provide a template for the development of spatially explicit pest pressure models. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Interpolation of daily rainfall using spatiotemporal models and clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Militino, A. F.

    2014-06-11

    Accumulated daily rainfall in non-observed locations on a particular day is frequently required as input to decision-making tools in precision agriculture or for hydrological or meteorological studies. Various solutions and estimation procedures have been proposed in the literature depending on the auxiliary information and the availability of data, but most such solutions are oriented to interpolating spatial data without incorporating temporal dependence. When data are available in space and time, spatiotemporal models usually provide better solutions. Here, we analyse the performance of three spatiotemporal models fitted to the whole sampled set and to clusters within the sampled set. The data consists of daily observations collected from 87 manual rainfall gauges from 1990 to 2010 in Navarre, Spain. The accuracy and precision of the interpolated data are compared with real data from 33 automated rainfall gauges in the same region, but placed in different locations than the manual rainfall gauges. Root mean squared error by months and by year are also provided. To illustrate these models, we also map interpolated daily precipitations and standard errors on a 1km2 grid in the whole region. © 2014 Royal Meteorological Society.

  14. Multiscale recurrence analysis of spatio-temporal data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, M.; Marwan, N.; Kurths, J.

    2015-12-01

    The description and analysis of spatio-temporal dynamics is a crucial task in many scientific disciplines. In this work, we propose a method which uses the mapogram as a similarity measure between spatially distributed data instances at different time points. The resulting similarity values of the pairwise comparison are used to construct a recurrence plot in order to benefit from established tools of recurrence quantification analysis and recurrence network analysis. In contrast to other recurrence tools for this purpose, the mapogram approach allows the specific focus on different spatial scales that can be used in a multi-scale analysis of spatio-temporal dynamics. We illustrate this approach by application on mixed dynamics, such as traveling parallel wave fronts with additive noise, as well as more complicate examples, pseudo-random numbers and coupled map lattices with a semi-logistic mapping rule. Especially the complicate examples show the usefulness of the multi-scale consideration in order to take spatial pattern of different scales and with different rhythms into account. So, this mapogram approach promises new insights in problems of climatology, ecology, or medicine.

  15. Synthesizing spatiotemporally sparse smartphone sensor data for bridge modal identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Ekin; Feng, Maria Q.

    2016-08-01

    Smartphones as vibration measurement instruments form a large-scale, citizen-induced, and mobile wireless sensor network (WSN) for system identification and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Crowdsourcing-based SHM is possible with a decentralized system granting citizens with operational responsibility and control. Yet, citizen initiatives introduce device mobility, drastically changing SHM results due to uncertainties in the time and the space domains. This paper proposes a modal identification strategy that fuses spatiotemporally sparse SHM data collected by smartphone-based WSNs. Multichannel data sampled with the time and the space independence is used to compose the modal identification parameters such as frequencies and mode shapes. Structural response time history can be gathered by smartphone accelerometers and converted into Fourier spectra by the processor units. Timestamp, data length, energy to power conversion address temporal variation, whereas spatial uncertainties are reduced by geolocation services or determining node identity via QR code labels. Then, parameters collected from each distributed network component can be extended to global behavior to deduce modal parameters without the need of a centralized and synchronous data acquisition system. The proposed method is tested on a pedestrian bridge and compared with a conventional reference monitoring system. The results show that the spatiotemporally sparse mobile WSN data can be used to infer modal parameters despite non-overlapping sensor operation schedule.

  16. Interpolation of daily rainfall using spatiotemporal models and clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Militino, A. F.; Ugarte, M. D.; Goicoa, T.; Genton, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulated daily rainfall in non-observed locations on a particular day is frequently required as input to decision-making tools in precision agriculture or for hydrological or meteorological studies. Various solutions and estimation procedures have been proposed in the literature depending on the auxiliary information and the availability of data, but most such solutions are oriented to interpolating spatial data without incorporating temporal dependence. When data are available in space and time, spatiotemporal models usually provide better solutions. Here, we analyse the performance of three spatiotemporal models fitted to the whole sampled set and to clusters within the sampled set. The data consists of daily observations collected from 87 manual rainfall gauges from 1990 to 2010 in Navarre, Spain. The accuracy and precision of the interpolated data are compared with real data from 33 automated rainfall gauges in the same region, but placed in different locations than the manual rainfall gauges. Root mean squared error by months and by year are also provided. To illustrate these models, we also map interpolated daily precipitations and standard errors on a 1km2 grid in the whole region. © 2014 Royal Meteorological Society.

  17. Spatiotemporal throughfall patterns beneath an urban tree row

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogeholz, P.; Van Stan, J. T., II; Hildebrandt, A.; Friesen, J.; Dibble, M.; Norman, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Much recent research has focused on throughfall patterns in natural forests as they can influence the heterogeneity of surface ecohydrological and biogeochemical processes. However, to the knowledge of the authors, no work has assessed how urban forest structures affect the spatiotemporal variability of throughfall water flux. Urbanization greatly alters not only a significant portion of the land surface, but canopy structure, with the most typical urban forest configuration being landscaped tree rows along streets, swales, parking lot medians, etc. This study examines throughfall spatiotemporal patterns for a landscaped tree row of Pinus elliottii (Engelm., slash pine) on Georgia Southern University's campus (southeastern, USA) using 150 individual observations per storm. Throughfall correlation lengths beneath this tree row were similar to, but appeared to be more stable across storm size than, observations in past studies on natural forests. Individual tree overlap and the planting interval also may more strongly drive throughfall patterns in tree rows. Meteorological influences beyond storm magnitude (intensity, intermittency, wind conditions, and atmospheric moisture demand) are also examined.

  18. Spatiotemporal optical pulse transformation by a resonant diffraction grating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovastikov, N. V.; Bykov, D. A., E-mail: bykovd@gmail.com; Doskolovich, L. L., E-mail: leonid@smr.ru; Soifer, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Image Processing Systems Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The diffraction of a spatiotemporal optical pulse by a resonant diffraction grating is considered. The pulse diffraction is described in terms of the signal (the spatiotemporal incident pulse envelope) passage through a linear system. An analytic approximation in the form of a rational function of two variables corresponding to the angular and spatial frequencies has been obtained for the transfer function of the system. A hyperbolic partial differential equation describing the general form of the incident pulse envelope transformation upon diffraction by a resonant diffraction grating has been derived from the transfer function. A solution of this equation has been obtained for the case of normal incidence of a pulse with a central frequency lying near the guided-mode resonance of a diffraction structure. The presented results of numerical simulations of pulse diffraction by a resonant grating show profound changes in the pulse envelope shape that closely correspond to the proposed theoretical description. The results of the paper can be applied in creating new devices for optical pulse shape transformation, in optical information processing problems, and analog optical computations.

  19. Spatiotemporal electromagnetic soliton and spatial ring formation in nonlinear metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinggui; Wen Shuangchun; Xiang Yuanjiang; Wang Youwen; Luo Hailu

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic investigation of ultrashort electromagnetic pulse propagation in metamaterials (MMs) with simultaneous cubic electric and magnetic nonlinearity. We predict that spatiotemporal electromagnetic solitons may exist in the positive-index region of a MM with focusing nonlinearity and anomalous group velocity dispersion (GVD), as well as in the negative-index region of the MM with defocusing nonlinearity and normal GVD. The experimental circumstances for generating and manipulating spatiotemporal electromagnetic solitons can be created by elaborating appropriate MMs. In addition, we find that, in the negative-index region of a MM, a spatial ring may be formed as the electromagnetic pulse propagates for focusing nonlinearity and anomalous GVD; while the phenomenon of temporal splitting of the electromagnetic pulse may appear for the same case except for the defocusing nonlinearity. Finally, we demonstrate that the nonlinear magnetization makes the sign of effective electric nonlinear effect switchable due to the combined action of electric and magnetic nonlinearity, exerting a significant influence on the propagation of electromagnetic pulses.

  20. Adaptive changes in spatiotemporal gait characteristics in women during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyk, Janusz W; Opala-Berdzik, Agnieszka; Plewa, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal gait cycle characteristics were assessed at early (P1), and late (P2) pregnancy, as well as at 2 months (PP1) and 6 months (PP2) postpartum. A substantial decrease in walking speed was observed throughout the pregnancy, with the slowest speed (1±0.2m/s) being during the third trimester. Walking at slower velocity resulted in complex adaptive adjustments to their spatiotemporal gait pattern, including a shorter step length and an increased duration of both their stance and double-support phases. Duration of the swing phase remained the least susceptible to changes. Habitual walking velocity (1.13±0.2m/s) and the optimal gait pattern were fully recovered 6 months after childbirth. Documented here adaptive changes in the preferred gait pattern seem to result mainly from the altered body anthropometry leading to temporary balance impairments. All the observed changes within stride cycle aimed to improve gait safety by focusing on its dynamic stability. The pregnant women preferred to walk at a slower velocity which allowed them to spend more time in double-support compared with their habitual pattern. Such changes provided pregnant women with a safer and more tentative ambulation that reduced the single-support period and, hence, the possibility of instability. As pregnancy progressed a significant increase in stance width and a decrease in step length was observed. Both factors allow also for gait stability improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Spatiotemporal Features for Asynchronous Event-based Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eLagorce

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bio-inspired asynchronous event-based vision sensors are currently introducing a paradigm shift in visual information processing. These new sensors rely on a stimulus-driven principle of light acquisition similar to biological retinas. They are event-driven and fully asynchronous, thereby reducing redundancy and encoding exact times of input signal changes, leading to a very precise temporal resolution. Approaches for higher-level computer vision often rely on the realiable detection of features in visual frames, but similar definitions of features for the novel dynamic and event-based visual input representation of silicon retinas have so far been lacking. This article addresses the problem of learning and recognizing features for event-based vision sensors, which capture properties of truly spatiotemporal volumes of sparse visual event information. A novel computational architecture for learning and encoding spatiotemporal features is introduced based on a set of predictive recurrent reservoir networks, competing via winner-take-all selection. Features are learned in an unsupervised manner from real-world input recorded with event-based vision sensors. It is shown that the networks in the architecture learn distinct and task-specific dynamic visual features, and can predict their trajectories over time.

  2. Spatiotemporal matrix image formation for programmable ultrasound scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Beatrice; Morichau-Beauchant, Pierre; Porée, Jonathan; Garofalakis, Anikitos; Tavitian, Bertrand; Tanter, Mickael; Provost, Jean

    2018-02-01

    As programmable ultrasound scanners become more common in research laboratories, it is increasingly important to develop robust software-based image formation algorithms that can be obtained in a straightforward fashion for different types of probes and sequences with a small risk of error during implementation. In this work, we argue that as the computational power keeps increasing, it is becoming practical to directly implement an approximation to the matrix operator linking reflector point targets to the corresponding radiofrequency signals via thoroughly validated and widely available simulations software. Once such a spatiotemporal forward-problem matrix is constructed, standard and thus highly optimized inversion procedures can be leveraged to achieve very high quality images in real time. Specifically, we show that spatiotemporal matrix image formation produces images of similar or enhanced quality when compared against standard delay-and-sum approaches in phantoms and in vivo, and show that this approach can be used to form images even when using non-conventional probe designs for which adapted image formation algorithms are not readily available.

  3. Spatio-temporal analysis of blood perfusion by imaging photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaunseder, Sebastian; Trumpp, Alexander; Ernst, Hannes; Förster, Michael; Malberg, Hagen

    2018-02-01

    Imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) has attracted much attention over the last years. The vast majority of works focuses on methods to reliably extract the heart rate from videos. Only a few works addressed iPPGs ability to exploit spatio-temporal perfusion pattern to derive further diagnostic statements. This work directs at the spatio-temporal analysis of blood perfusion from videos. We present a novel algorithm that bases on the two-dimensional representation of the blood pulsation (perfusion map). The basic idea behind the proposed algorithm consists of a pairwise estimation of time delays between photoplethysmographic signals of spatially separated regions. The probabilistic approach yields a parameter denoted as perfusion speed. We compare the perfusion speed versus two parameters, which assess the strength of blood pulsation (perfusion strength and signal to noise ratio). Preliminary results using video data with different physiological stimuli (cold pressure test, cold face test) show that all measures are influenced by those stimuli (some of them with statistical certainty). The perfusion speed turned out to be more sensitive than the other measures in some cases. However, our results also show that the intraindividual stability and interindividual comparability of all used measures remain critical points. This work proves the general feasibility of employing the perfusion speed as novel iPPG quantity. Future studies will address open points like the handling of ballistocardiographic effects and will try to deepen the understanding of the predominant physiological mechanisms and their relation to the algorithmic performance.

  4. Integrating GIS and ABM to Explore Spatiotemporal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M.; Jiang, Y.; Yang, C.

    2013-12-01

    Agent-based modeling as a methodology for the bottom-up exploration with the account of adaptive behavior and heterogeneity of system components can help discover the development and pattern of the complex social and environmental system. However, ABM is a computationally intensive process especially when the number of system components becomes large and the agent-agent/agent-environmental interaction is modeled very complex. Most of traditional ABM frameworks developed based on CPU do not have a satisfying computing capacity. To address the problem and as the emergence of advanced techniques, GPU computing with CUDA can provide powerful parallel structure to enable the complex simulation of spatiotemporal dynamics. In this study, we first develop a GPU-based ABM system. Secondly, in order to visualize the dynamics generated from the movement of agent and the change of agent/environmental attributes during the simulation, we integrate GIS into the ABM system. Advanced geovisualization technologies can be utilized for representing the spatiotemporal change events, such as proper 2D/3D maps with state-of-the-art symbols, space-time cube and multiple layers each of which presents pattern in one time-stamp, etc. Thirdly, visual analytics which include interactive tools (e.g. grouping, filtering, linking, etc.) is included in our ABM-GIS system to help users conduct real-time data exploration during the progress of simulation. Analysis like flow analysis and spatial cluster analysis can be integrated according to the geographical problem we want to explore.

  5. Mining Spatiotemporal Patterns of the Elder's Daily Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. R.; Chen, C. F.; Liu, M. E.; Tsai, S. J.; Son, N. T.; Kinh, L. V.

    2016-06-01

    With rapid developments in wearable device technology, a vast amount of spatiotemporal data, such as people's movement and physical activities, are generated. Information derived from the data reveals important knowledge that can contribute a long-term care and psychological assessment of the elders' living condition especially in long-term care institutions. This study aims to develop a method to investigate the spatial-temporal movement patterns of the elders with their outdoor trajectory information. To achieve the goal, GPS based location data of the elderly subjects from long-term care institutions are collected and analysed with geographic information system (GIS). A GIS statistical model is developed to mine the elderly subjects' spatiotemporal patterns with the location data and represent their daily movement pattern at particular time. The proposed method first finds the meaningful trajectory and extracts the frequent patterns from the time-stamp location data. Then, a density-based clustering method is used to identify the major moving range and the gather/stay hotspot in both spatial and temporal dimensions. The preliminary results indicate that the major moving area of the elderly people encompasses their dorm and has a short moving distance who often stay in the same site. Subjects' outdoor appearance are corresponded to their life routine. The results can be useful for understanding elders' social network construction, risky area identification and medical care monitoring.

  6. Spatiotemporal Variations of Reference Crop Evapotranspiration in Northern Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To set up a reasonable crop irrigation system in the context of global climate change in Northern Xinjiang, China, reference crop evapotranspiration (ET0 was analyzed by means of spatiotemporal variations. The ET0 values from 1962 to 2010 were calculated by Penman-Monteith formula, based on meteorological data of 22 meteorological observation stations in the study area. The spatiotemporal variations of ET0 were analyzed by Mann-Kendall test, Morlet wavelet analysis, and ArcGIS spatial analysis. The results showed that regional average ET0 had a decreasing trend and there was an abrupt change around 1983. The trend of regional average ET0 had a primary period about 28 years, in which there were five alternating stages (high-low-high-low-high. From the standpoint of spatial scale, ET0 gradually increased from the northeast and southwest toward the middle; the southeast and west had slightly greater variation, with significant regional differences. From April to October, the ET0 distribution significantly influenced the distribution characteristic of annual ET0. Among them sunshine hours and wind speed were two of principal climate factors affecting ET0.

  7. Placing invasive species management in a spatiotemporal context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Christopher M; Bode, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Invasive species are a worldwide issue, both ecologically and economically. A large body of work focuses on various aspects of invasive species control, including how to allocate control efforts to eradicate an invasive population as cost effectively as possible: There are a diverse range of invasive species management problems, and past mathematical analyses generally focus on isolated examples, making it hard to identify and understand parallels between the different contexts. In this study, we use a single spatiotemporal model to tackle the problem of allocating control effort for invasive species when suppressing an island invasive species, and for long-term spatial suppression projects. Using feral cat suppression as an illustrative example, we identify the optimal resource allocation for island and mainland suppression projects. Our results demonstrate how using a single model to solve different problems reveals similar characteristics of the solutions in different scenarios. As well as illustrating the insights offered by linking problems through a spatiotemporal model, we also derive novel and practically applicable results for our case studies. For temporal suppression projects on islands, we find that lengthy projects are more cost effective and that rapid control projects are only economically cost effective when population growth rates are high or diminishing returns on control effort are low. When suppressing invasive species around conservation assets (e.g., national parks or exclusion fences), we find that the size of buffer zones should depend on the ratio of the species growth and spread rate.

  8. A modified consumer inkjet for spatiotemporal control of gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cohen

    Full Text Available This paper presents a low-cost inkjet dosing system capable of continuous, two-dimensional spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression via delivery of diffusible regulators to a custom-mounted gel culture of E. coli. A consumer-grade, inkjet printer was adapted for chemical printing; E. coli cultures were grown on 750 microm thick agar embedded in micro-wells machined into commercial compact discs. Spatio-temporal regulation of the lac operon was demonstrated via the printing of patterns of lactose and glucose directly into the cultures; X-Gal blue patterns were used for visual feedback. We demonstrate how the bistable nature of the lac operon's feedback, when perturbed by patterning lactose (inducer and glucose (inhibitor, can lead to coordination of cell expression patterns across a field in ways that mimic motifs seen in developmental biology. Examples of this include sharp boundaries and the generation of traveling waves of mRNA expression. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of reaction-diffusion effects in the well-studied lac operon. A finite element reaction-diffusion model of the lac operon is also presented which predicts pattern formation with good fidelity.

  9. Spatio-temporal statistical models with applications to atmospheric processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikle, C.K.

    1996-01-01

    This doctoral dissertation is presented as three self-contained papers. An introductory chapter considers traditional spatio-temporal statistical methods used in the atmospheric sciences from a statistical perspective. Although this section is primarily a review, many of the statistical issues considered have not been considered in the context of these methods and several open questions are posed. The first paper attempts to determine a means of characterizing the semiannual oscillation (SAO) spatial variation in the northern hemisphere extratropical height field. It was discovered that the midlatitude SAO in 500hPa geopotential height could be explained almost entirely as a result of spatial and temporal asymmetries in the annual variation of stationary eddies. It was concluded that the mechanism for the SAO in the northern hemisphere is a result of land-sea contrasts. The second paper examines the seasonal variability of mixed Rossby-gravity waves (MRGW) in lower stratospheric over the equatorial Pacific. Advanced cyclostationary time series techniques were used for analysis. It was found that there are significant twice-yearly peaks in MRGW activity. Analyses also suggested a convergence of horizontal momentum flux associated with these waves. In the third paper, a new spatio-temporal statistical model is proposed that attempts to consider the influence of both temporal and spatial variability. This method is mainly concerned with prediction in space and time, and provides a spatially descriptive and temporally dynamic model

  10. Collaborative simulation method with spatiotemporal synchronization process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yisheng; Ding, Guofu; Zhang, Weihua; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Shengfeng; Tan, John Kian

    2016-10-01

    When designing a complex mechatronics system, such as high speed trains, it is relatively difficult to effectively simulate the entire system's dynamic behaviors because it involves multi-disciplinary subsystems. Currently,a most practical approach for multi-disciplinary simulation is interface based coupling simulation method, but it faces a twofold challenge: spatial and time unsynchronizations among multi-directional coupling simulation of subsystems. A new collaborative simulation method with spatiotemporal synchronization process control is proposed for coupling simulating a given complex mechatronics system across multiple subsystems on different platforms. The method consists of 1) a coupler-based coupling mechanisms to define the interfacing and interaction mechanisms among subsystems, and 2) a simulation process control algorithm to realize the coupling simulation in a spatiotemporal synchronized manner. The test results from a case study show that the proposed method 1) can certainly be used to simulate the sub-systems interactions under different simulation conditions in an engineering system, and 2) effectively supports multi-directional coupling simulation among multi-disciplinary subsystems. This method has been successfully applied in China high speed train design and development processes, demonstrating that it can be applied in a wide range of engineering systems design and simulation with improved efficiency and effectiveness.

  11. Hardmetals - microstructural design, testing and property maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roebuck, B; Gee, M G; Morrell, R [NPL Materials Centre, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    The production of WC/Co hardmetals and their analogues is considered a mature technology, however lately there has been new research results where the concept of microstructural design was used to produce alternatives to the conventional two-phase structure. This Industry is currently well served by a range of baseline established standards, which, if properly followed with good attention to correct quality procedures, will ensure consistent products. However, there are certain key properties such as corrosion, fatigue, impact wear or high temperature strength and toughness that are often measured but not always by standard tests methods. Microstructural design potential is reviewed, particularly the possibilities of performance improvement via changes in size, shape and distribution of the phases as well as recent developments in testing, specifically S-N fatigue and abrasive wear. Finally, the concept of property mapping is introduced as a tool for providing a framework for optimizing properties. Its utility in correlating performance properties and their relationships with microstructural parameters is evaluated. Two property maps are discussed: one where the property is plotted against a microstructural feature (microstructure property maps) such as WC grain size or Co binder phase content against coercivity or hardness and one where different properties, such as hardness and toughness are mapped against each other (comparative property maps). (nevyjel)

  12. Hardmetals - microstructural design, testing and property maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roebuck, B.; Gee, M.G.; Morrell, R.

    2001-01-01

    The production of WC/Co hardmetals and their analogues is considered a mature technology, however lately there has been new research results where the concept of microstructural design was used to produce alternatives to the conventional two-phase structure. This Industry is currently well served by a range of baseline established standards, which, if properly followed with good attention to correct quality procedures, will ensure consistent products. However, there are certain key properties such as corrosion, fatigue, impact wear or high temperature strength and toughness that are often measured but not always by standard tests methods. Microstructural design potential is reviewed, particularly the possibilities of performance improvement via changes in size, shape and distribution of the phases as well as recent developments in testing, specifically S-N fatigue and abrasive wear. Finally, the concept of property mapping is introduced as a tool for providing a framework for optimizing properties. Its utility in correlating performance properties and their relationships with microstructural parameters is evaluated. Two property maps are discussed: one where the property is plotted against a microstructural feature (microstructure property maps) such as WC grain size or Co binder phase content against coercivity or hardness and one where different properties, such as hardness and toughness are mapped against each other (comparative property maps). (nevyjel)

  13. Oscillations, complex spatiotemporal behavior, and information transport in networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destexhe, A.

    1994-01-01

    Various types of spatiotemporal behavior are described for two-dimensional networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons with time delayed interactions. It is described how the network behaves as several structural parameters are varied, such as the number of neurons, the connectivity, and the values of synaptic weights. A transition from spatially uniform oscillations to spatiotemporal chaos via intermittentlike behavior is observed. The properties of spatiotemporally chaotic solutions are investigated by evaluating the largest positive Lyapunov exponent and the loss of correlation with distance. Finally, properties of information transport are evaluated during uniform oscillations and spatiotemporal chaos. It is shown that the diffusion coefficient increases significantly in the spatiotemporal phase similar to the increase of transport coefficients at the onset of fluid turbulence. It is proposed that such a property should be seen in other media, such as chemical turbulence or networks of oscillators. The possibility of measuring information transport from appropriate experiments is also discussed

  14. Full-Scale Approximations of Spatio-Temporal Covariance Models for Large Datasets

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Bohai

    2014-01-01

    Various continuously-indexed spatio-temporal process models have been constructed to characterize spatio-temporal dependence structures, but the computational complexity for model fitting and predictions grows in a cubic order with the size of dataset and application of such models is not feasible for large datasets. This article extends the full-scale approximation (FSA) approach by Sang and Huang (2012) to the spatio-temporal context to reduce computational complexity. A reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm is proposed to select knots automatically from a discrete set of spatio-temporal points. Our approach is applicable to nonseparable and nonstationary spatio-temporal covariance models. We illustrate the effectiveness of our method through simulation experiments and application to an ozone measurement dataset.

  15. Spatiotemporal characterization of dissolved carbon for inland waters in semi-humid/semiarid region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, K. S.; Zang, S. Y.; Zhao, Y.; Du, J.; Li, L.; Zhang, N. N.; Wang, X. D.; Shao, T. T.; Guan, Y.; Liu, L.

    2013-05-01

    Spatiotemporal variations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), inorganic carbon (DIC) in 26 waters across the semi-humid/semi-arid Songnen Plain, China were examined with data collected during 2008-2011. Fresh (n = 14) and brackish (n = 12) waters were grouped according to electrical conductivity (threshold = 1000 μS cm-1). Significant differences in the mean DOC/DIC concentrations were observed between fresh (5.63 mg L-1, 37.39 mg L-1) and brackish waters (15.33 mg L-1, 142.93 mg L-1). Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and DOC concentrations were mainly controlled by climatic-hydrologic conditions. The observation indicated that the outflow conditions in the semi-endorheic region had condensed effects on the dissolved carbon, resulting in close relationships between salinity vs. DOC (R2 = 0.66), and vs. DIC (R2 = 0.94). Independent data set collected in May 2012 also confirmed this finding (DOC: R2 = 0.79), (DIC: R2 = 0.91), highlighting the potential of quantifying DOC/DIC via salinity measurements for waters dispersed in the plain. Indices based on CDOM absorption spectra, e.g. DOC specific CDOM absorption (SUVA254), absorption ratio a250 : a365 (E250:365) and spectral slope ratio (Sr, S275-295/S350-400), were applied to characterize DOM composition and quality. Our results indicate high molecular weight CDOM fractions are more abundant in fresh waters than brackish waters.

  16. Microstructural strength of tidal soils – a rheometric approach to develop pedotransfer functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoppe Nina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Differences in soil stability, especially in visually comparable soils can occur due to microstructural processes and interactions. By investigating these microstructural processes with rheological investigations, it is possible to achieve a better understanding of soil behaviour from the mesoscale (soil aggregates to macroscale (bulk soil. In this paper, a rheological investigation of the factors influencing microstructural stability of riparian soils was conducted. Homogenized samples of Marshland soils from the riparian zone of the Elbe River (North Germany were analyzed with amplitude sweeps (AS under controlled shear deformation in a modular compact rheometer MCR 300 (Anton Paar, Germany at different matric potentials. A range physicochemical parameters were determined (texture, pH, organic matter, CaCO3 etc. and these factors were used to parameterize pedotransfer functions. The results indicate a clear dependence of microstructural elasticity on texture and water content. Although the influence of individual physicochemical factors varies depending on texture, the relevant features were identified taking combined effects into account. Thus, stabilizing factors are: organic matter, calcium ions, CaCO3 and pedogenic iron oxides; whereas sodium ions and water content represent structurally unfavorable factors. Based on the determined statistical relationships between rheological and physicochemical parameters, pedotransfer functions (PTF have been developed.

  17. Microstructural evolution of castable during firing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, E.M.B.; Ribeiro, S.

    2011-01-01

    Castable are materials used for high temperature industrial applications, containing one or more binding agents, aggregates and additives. Calcium aluminate cement (CAC) is one of the most used binding agents, mainly due to his abundance, low cost, refractoriness and high mechanical and chemical resistance. During high temperature processes, these materials exhibit microstructural evolution that changes their properties and affect the performance. The purpose of this work was to study the microstructural changes presented by a castable, containing CAC and alumina aggregates, during heat treatment. For that, was used X-ray diffraction, thermal analyses, electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy to characterize concretes after heat treatment up to 1000 deg C. The results allowed to understand the microstructural changes at high temperature and its influence in mechanical properties of the castable. (author)

  18. Microstructure evolution of titanium after tensile test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronski, S.; Wierzbanowski, K.; Jędrychowski, M.; Tarasiuk, J; Wronski, M.; Baczmanski, A.; Bacroix, B.

    2016-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative behavior of titanium T40 during tensile loading with a special emphasis on the presence of deformation twins in the observed microstructures is described. The samples for tensile tests were cut out from the rolled titanium sheet along the rolling and transverse directions. Several microstructure maps were determined using Electron Backscatter Diffraction technique (EBSD). These data were used to obtain crystallographic textures, misorientation distributions, grain size, twin boundary length, grain orientation spread, low and high angle boundary fractions and Schmid and Taylor factors. The deformation mechanisms and microstructure characteristics are different in the samples stretched along rolling and transverse directions. A strong appearance of tensile twins was observed in the samples deformed along transverse direction. On the other hand, more frequent subgrain formation and higher orientation spread was observed in the sample deformed along rolling direction, which caused’‘orientation blurring’ leading to an increase of grain size with deformation, as determined from OIM analysis.

  19. Microstructured optical fibers for gas sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challener, William Albert; Choudhury, Niloy; Palit, Sabarni

    2017-10-17

    Microstructured optical fiber (MOF) includes a cladding extending a length between first and second ends. The cladding includes an inner porous microstructure that at least partially surrounds a hollow core. A perimeter contour of the hollow core has a non-uniform radial distance from a center axis of the cladding such that first segments of the cladding along the perimeter contour have a shorter radial distance from the center axis relative to second segments of the cladding along the perimeter contour. The cladding receives and propagates light energy through the hollow core, and the inner porous microstructure substantially confines the light energy within the hollow core. The cladding defines at least one port hole that extends radially from an exterior surface of the cladding to the hollow core. Each port hole penetrates the perimeter contour of the hollow core through one of the second segments of the cladding.

  20. Surface Microstructure Replication in Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Arlø, Uffe Rolf

    2005-01-01

    topography is transcribed onto the plastic part through complex mechanisms. This replication however, is not perfect, and the replication quality depends on the plastic material properties, the topography itself, and the process conditions. This paper describes and discusses an investigation of injection...... moulding of surface microstructures. Emphasis is put on the ability to replicate surface microstructures under normal injection moulding conditions, notably with low cost materials at low mould temperatures. The replication of surface microstructures in injection moulding has been explored...... for Polypropylene at low mould temperatures. The process conditions were varied over the recommended process window for the material. The geometry of the obtained structures was analyzed. Evidence suggests that step height replication quality depends linearly on structure width in a certain range. Further...

  1. Realized Variance and Market Microstructure Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter R.; Lunde, Asger

    2006-01-01

    We study market microstructure noise in high-frequency data and analyze its implications for the realized variance (RV) under a general specification for the noise. We show that kernel-based estimators can unearth important characteristics of market microstructure noise and that a simple kernel......-based estimator dominates the RV for the estimation of integrated variance (IV). An empirical analysis of the Dow Jones Industrial Average stocks reveals that market microstructure noise its time-dependent and correlated with increments in the efficient price. This has important implications for volatility...... estimation based on high-frequency data. Finally, we apply cointegration techniques to decompose transaction prices and bid-ask quotes into an estimate of the efficient price and noise. This framework enables us to study the dynamic effects on transaction prices and quotes caused by changes in the efficient...

  2. Diffraction analysis of the microstructure of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Scardi, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Diffraction Analysis of the Microstructure of Materials provides an overview of diffraction methods applied to the analysis of the microstructure of materials. Since crystallite size and the presence of lattice defects have a decisive influence on the properties of many engineering materials, information about this microstructure is of vital importance in developing and assessing materials for practical applications. The most powerful and usually non-destructive evaluation techniques available are X-ray and neutron diffraction. The book details, among other things, diffraction-line broadening methods for determining crystallite size and atomic-scale strain due, e.g. to dislocations, and methods for the analysis of residual (macroscale) stress. The book assumes only a basic knowledge of solid-state physics and supplies readers sufficient information to apply the methods themselves.

  3. Voronoi diagram and microstructure of weldment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jung Ho [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Voronoi diagram, one of the well-known space decomposition algorithms has been applied to express the microstructure of a weldment for the first time due to the superficial analogy between a Voronoi cell and a metal's grain. The area of the Voronoi cells can be controlled by location and the number of the seed points. This can be correlated to the grain size in the microstructure and the number of nuclei formed. The feasibility of representing coarse and fine grain structures were tested through Voronoi diagrams and it is applied to expression of cross-sectional bead shape of a typical laser welding. As result, it successfully described coarsened grain size of heat affected zone and columnar crystals in fusion zone. Although Voronoi diagram showed potential as a microstructure prediction tool through this feasible trial but direct correlation control variable of Voronoi diagram to solidification process parameter is still remained as further works.

  4. Microstructure history effect during sequential thermomechanical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassar, Reza S.; Murphy, John; Burton, Christina; Horstemeyer, Mark F.; El kadiri, Haitham; Shokuhfar, Tolou

    2008-01-01

    The key to modeling the material processing behavior is the linking of the microstructure evolution to its processing history. This paper quantifies various microstructural features of an aluminum automotive alloy that undergoes sequential thermomechanical processing which is comprised hot rolling of a 150-mm billet to a 75-mm billet, rolling to 3 mm, annealing, and then cold rolling to a 0.8-mm thickness sheet. The microstructural content was characterized by means of electron backscatter diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results clearly demonstrate the evolution of precipitate morphologies, dislocation structures, and grain orientation distributions. These data can be used to improve material models that claim to capture the history effects of the processing materials

  5. Identification of two evolutionarily conserved 5' cis-elements involved in regulating spatiotemporal expression of Nolz-1 during mouse embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny Li-Yun Chang

    Full Text Available Proper development of vertebrate embryos depends not only on the crucial funtions of key evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulators, but also on the precisely spatiotemporal expression of these transcriptional regulators. The mouse Nolz-1/Znf503/Zfp503 gene is a mammalian member of the conserved zinc-finger containing NET family. The expression pattern of Nolz-1 in mouse embryos is highly correlated with that of its homologues in different species. To study the spatiotemporal regulation of Nolz-1, we first identified two evolutionarily conserved cis-elements, UREA and UREB, in 5' upstream regions of mouse Nolz-1 locus. We then generated UREA-LacZ and UREB-LacZ transgenic reporter mice to characterize the putative enhancer activity of UREA and UREB. The results indicated that both UREA and UREB contained tissue-specific enhancer activity for directing LacZ expression in selective tissue organs during mouse embryogensis. UREA directed LacZ expression preferentially in selective regions of developing central nervous system, including the forebrain, hindbrain and spinal cord, whereas UREB directed LacZ expression mainly in other developing tissue organs such as the Nolz-1 expressing branchial arches and its derivatives, the apical ectodermal ridge of limb buds and the urogenital tissues. Both UREA and UREB directed strong LacZ expression in the lateral plate mesoderm where endogenous Nolz-1 was also expressed. Despite that the LacZ expression pattern did not full recapitulated the endogenous Nolz-1 expression and some mismatched expression patterns were observed, co-expression of LacZ and Nolz-1 did occur in many cells of selective tissue organs, such as in the ventrolateral cortex and ventral spinal cord of UREA-LacZ embryos, and the urogenital tubes of UREB-LacZ embryos. Taken together, our study suggests that UREA and UREB may function as evolutionarily conserved cis-regulatory elements that coordinate with other cis-elements to regulate

  6. Hot deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of TA15 titanium alloy with nonuniform microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pengfei; Zhan, Mei, E-mail: zhanmei@nwpu.edu.cn; Fan, Xiaoguang; Lei, Zhenni; Cai, Yang

    2017-03-24

    The flow behavior and microstructure evolution of a near α titanium alloy with nonuniform microstructure during hot deformation were studied by isothermal compression test and electron backscatter diffraction technique. It is found that the nonuniform microstructure prior to deformation consists of equiaxed α, lamellar α in the colony form and β phase, and the α colony keeps the Burgers orientation relationship with β phase. The flow stress of nonuniform microstructure exhibits significant flow softening after reaching the peak stress at a low strain, which is similar to the lamellar microstructure. Nevertheless, the existence of equiaxed α in nonuniform microstructure makes its flow stress and softening rate be lower than the lamellar microstructure. During deformation, the lamellar α undertakes most of the deformation and turns to be rotated, bended and globularized. Moreover, these phenomena exhibit significant heterogeneity due to the orientation dependence of the deformation of lamellar α. The continuous dynamic recrystallization and bending of lamellar α lead to the “fragmentation” during globularization of lamellar α. The bending of lamellar α is speculated as a form of plastic buckling, because the bending of lamellar α almost proceed in the manner of “rigid rotation” and presents opposite bending directions for the adjacent colonies.

  7. Microstructural imaging of human neocortex in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Luke J; Kirilina, Evgeniya; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2018-03-24

    The neocortex of the human brain is the seat of higher brain function. Modern imaging techniques, chief among them magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), allow non-invasive imaging of this important structure. Knowledge of the microstructure of the neocortex has classically come from post-mortem histological studies of human tissue, and extrapolations from invasive animal studies. From these studies, we know that the scale of important neocortical structure spans six orders of magnitude, ranging from the size of axonal diameters (microns), to the size of cortical areas responsible for integrating sensory information (centimetres). MRI presents an opportunity to move beyond classical methods, because MRI is non-invasive and MRI contrast is sensitive to neocortical microstructure over all these length scales. MRI thus allows inferences to be made about neocortical microstructure in vivo, i.e. MRI-based in vivo histology. We review recent literature that has applied and developed MRI-based in vivo histology to probe the microstructure of the human neocortex, focusing specifically on myelin, iron, and neuronal fibre mapping. We find that applications such as cortical parcellation (using R 1 maps as proxies for myelin content) and investigation of cortical iron deposition with age (using R 2 * maps) are already contributing to the frontiers of knowledge in neuroscience. Neuronal fibre mapping in the cortex remains challenging in vivo, but recent improvements in diffusion MRI hold promise for exciting applications in the near future. The literature also suggests that utilising multiple complementary quantitative MRI maps could increase the specificity of inferences about neocortical microstructure relative to contemporary techniques, but that further investment in modelling is required to appropriately combine the maps. In vivo histology of human neocortical microstructure is undergoing rapid development. Future developments will improve its specificity, sensitivity, and

  8. Connectivity Measures in EEG Microstructural Sleep Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Dimitris; Koupparis, Andreas M; Kokkinos, Vasileios; Koutroumanidis, Michalis; Kostopoulos, George K

    2016-01-01

    During Non-Rapid Eye Movement sleep (NREM) the brain is relatively disconnected from the environment, while connectedness between brain areas is also decreased. Evidence indicates, that these dynamic connectivity changes are delivered by microstructural elements of sleep: short periods of environmental stimuli evaluation followed by sleep promoting procedures. The connectivity patterns of the latter, among other aspects of sleep microstructure, are still to be fully elucidated. We suggest here a methodology for the assessment and investigation of the connectivity patterns of EEG microstructural elements, such as sleep spindles. The methodology combines techniques in the preprocessing, estimation, error assessing and visualization of results levels in order to allow the detailed examination of the connectivity aspects (levels and directionality of information flow) over frequency and time with notable resolution, while dealing with the volume conduction and EEG reference assessment. The high temporal and frequency resolution of the methodology will allow the association between the microelements and the dynamically forming networks that characterize them, and consequently possibly reveal aspects of the EEG microstructure. The proposed methodology is initially tested on artificially generated signals for proof of concept and subsequently applied to real EEG recordings via a custom built MATLAB-based tool developed for such studies. Preliminary results from 843 fast sleep spindles recorded in whole night sleep of 5 healthy volunteers indicate a prevailing pattern of interactions between centroparietal and frontal regions. We demonstrate hereby, an opening to our knowledge attempt to estimate the scalp EEG connectivity that characterizes fast sleep spindles via an "EEG-element connectivity" methodology we propose. The application of the latter, via a computational tool we developed suggests it is able to investigate the connectivity patterns related to the occurrence

  9. Spatiotemporal characteristics of retinal response to network-mediated photovoltaic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Elton; Smith, Richard; Goetz, Georges; Lei, Xin; Galambos, Ludwig; Kamins, Theodore I; Harris, James; Mathieson, Keith; Palanker, Daniel; Sher, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    Subretinal prostheses aim at restoring sight to patients blinded by photoreceptor degeneration using electrical activation of the surviving inner retinal neurons. Today, such implants deliver visual information with low-frequency stimulation, resulting in discontinuous visual percepts. We measured retinal responses to complex visual stimuli delivered at video rate via a photovoltaic subretinal implant and by visible light. Using a multielectrode array to record from retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the healthy and degenerated rat retina ex vivo, we estimated their spatiotemporal properties from the spike-triggered average responses to photovoltaic binary white noise stimulus with 70-μm pixel size at 20-Hz frame rate. The average photovoltaic receptive field size was 194 ± 3 μm (mean ± SE), similar to that of visual responses (221 ± 4 μm), but response latency was significantly shorter with photovoltaic stimulation. Both visual and photovoltaic receptive fields had an opposing center-surround structure. In the healthy retina, ON RGCs had photovoltaic OFF responses, and vice versa. This reversal is consistent with depolarization of photoreceptors by electrical pulses, as opposed to their hyperpolarization under increasing light, although alternative mechanisms cannot be excluded. In degenerate retina, both ON and OFF photovoltaic responses were observed, but in the absence of visual responses, it is not clear what functional RGC types they correspond to. Degenerate retina maintained the antagonistic center-surround organization of receptive fields. These fast and spatially localized network-mediated ON and OFF responses to subretinal stimulation via photovoltaic pixels with local return electrodes raise confidence in the possibility of providing more functional prosthetic vision. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Retinal prostheses currently in clinical use have struggled to deliver visual information at naturalistic frequencies, resulting in discontinuous percepts. We

  10. Microstructural and rheological analysis of fillers and asphalt mastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geber, R; Simon, A; Kocserha, I; Buzimov, A

    2017-01-01

    Pavements are made of different grades of mineral aggregates and organic binder. The aggregates are sorted in different sizes and different amount which are mixed together with bitumen. The finest mineral fraction (d<0.063 mm) is called filler. This component has an important role in asphalt mixture - it fills the gaps between the aggregates and if mixed with bitumen (which is called asphalt mastics) it sticks the larger particles together. Particle size, microstructure and surface properties of fillers highly affect the cohesion with bitumen, therefore the aim of our research was to investigate the microstructure of mineral fillers (limestone, dolomite) which are used in Hungarian road constructions with the use of different techniques (particle size distribution, scanning electronmicroscopy tests, mercury intrusion porosimetry, BET specific surface tests, determination of hydrophobicity). After the tests of fillers, asphalt mastics were prepared and rheological examinations were obtained. These examinations served to observe the interaction and the effect of fillers. The stiffening effect of fillers and the causes of rutting were also investigated. Based on our results, it can be stated that particle size, hydrophobic properties and the amount of fillers highly affect the rheological properties of mastics. (paper)

  11. Microstructure mechanical properties relationship in bainitic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altuna, M. A.; Gutierrez, I.

    2005-01-01

    In the present work, the microstructures and their mechanical properties have been studies in different bainitic structures. therefore, different bainitic morphologies have been produced by isothermal treatments carried out at different temperatures. For these steels, 400-450 degree centigree is the optimum range of temperatures in order to obtain bainitic structures. If the Temperature is higher, perlite is also formed and if it is lower, martensite is obtained during quenching. SEM and EBSD/OIM techniques were applied in order to study the microstructure. Tensile tests were carried out for mechanical characterization. (Author) 20 refs

  12. Microstructural characterization of primary coolant pipe steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.; Bentley, J.

    1986-01-01

    Atom probe field-ion microscopy, analytical electron microscopy, and optical microscopy have been used to investigate the changes that occur in the microstructure of cast CF 8 primary coolant pipe stainless steel after long term thermal aging. The cast duplex microstructure consisted of austenite with 15% delta-ferrite. Investigation of the aged material revealed that the ferrite spinodally decomposed into a fine scaled network of α and α'. A fine G-phase precipitate was also observed in the ferrite. The observed degradation in mechanical properties is probably a consequence of the spinodal decomposition in the ferrite

  13. Quantitative interface models for simulating microstructure evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.Z.; Wang, T.; Zhou, S.H.; Liu, Z.K.; Chen, L.Q.

    2004-01-01

    To quantitatively simulate microstructural evolution in real systems, we investigated three different interface models: a sharp-interface model implemented by the software DICTRA and two diffuse-interface models which use either physical order parameters or artificial order parameters. A particular example is considered, the diffusion-controlled growth of a γ ' precipitate in a supersaturated γ matrix in Ni-Al binary alloys. All three models use the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters from the same databases. The temporal evolution profiles of composition from different models are shown to agree with each other. The focus is on examining the advantages and disadvantages of each model as applied to microstructure evolution in alloys

  14. Microstructured extremely thin absorber solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biancardo, Matteo; Krebs, Frederik C

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present the realization of extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells employing conductive glass substrates functionalized with TiO2 microstructures produced by embossing. Nanocrystalline or compact TiO2 films on Indium doped tin oxide (ITO) glass substrates were embossed by press......In this paper we present the realization of extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells employing conductive glass substrates functionalized with TiO2 microstructures produced by embossing. Nanocrystalline or compact TiO2 films on Indium doped tin oxide (ITO) glass substrates were embossed...

  15. Microstructured optical fibers - Fundamentals and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2006-01-01

    In recent years optical fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane have attracted much attention from both researchers and industry. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect. Among the many unique applications offered...... by these fibers are mode guidance in air, highly flexible dispersion engineering, and the use of very heterogeneous material combinations. In this paper, we review the different types and applications of microstructured optical fibers, with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  16. Biomimetic microstructures for photonic and fluidic synergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, Maria; Mpatzaka, Theodora; Alexandropoulos, Dimitris; Vainos, Nikolaos A.

    2017-08-01

    Nature-inspired micro- and nano-structures offer a unique platform for the development of novel synergetic systems combining photonic and microfluidic functionalities. In this context, we examine the paradigm of butterfly Vanessa cardui and develop artificial diffractive microstructures inspired by its natural designs. Softlithographic and nanoimprint protocols are developed to replicate surfaces of natural specimens. Further to their optical behavior, interphases tailored by such microstructures exhibit enhanced hydrophobic properties, as compared to their planar counterparts made of the same materials. Such synergies exploited by new design approaches pave the way to prospective optofluidic, lab-on-chip and sensing applications.

  17. Spatio-temporal dynamics of relativistic electron bunches during the micro bunching instability: study of the Synchrotron Soleil and UVSOR storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, Eleonore

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic electron bunches circulating in storage rings are used to produce intense radiation from far-infrared to X-rays. However, above a density threshold value, the interaction between the electron bunch and its own radiation can lead to a spatio-temporal instability called micro bunching instability. This instability is characterized by a strong emission of coherent THz radiation (typically 105 times stronger than the classical synchrotron radiation) which is a signature of the presence of microstructures (at mm scale) in the electron bunch. This instability is known to be a fundamental limitation of the operation of synchrotron light sources at high beam current. In this thesis, we have focused on this instability from a nonlinear dynamics point of view by combining experimental studies carried out at the Synchrotron Soleil and UVSOR storage rings with numerical studies mainly based on the Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equation. In a first step, due to the very indirect nature of the experimental observations, we have sought to deduce information on the microstructure wavenumber either by looking at the temporal evolution of the THz signal emitted during the instability or by studying the response of the electron bunch to a laser perturbation. In a second step, we have achieved direct, real time observations of the microstructures dynamics through two new, very different, detection techniques: a thin-film superconductor-based detector at UVSOR, and a spectrally-encoded electro-optic detection technique at Soleil. These new available experimental observations have allowed severe comparisons with the theoretical models. (author)

  18. Microstructure evolution and microstructure/mechanical properties relationships in alpha+beta titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunha

    In this study, the microstructural evolution of Timetal 550 was investigated. Timetal 550 showed two types of phase transformations (martensitic and nucleation and growth) depending on the cooling rate from the beta region. The alpha phase initially precipitated at the prior beta grain boundaries, and it had a Burgers OR with one of the adjacent grains. It was found that colonies could grow, even in the fast-cooled Timetal 550 sample, from the grain boundary alpha into the prior beta grain with which it exhibited the Burgers OR. Three orientation relationships were also found between alpha laths in the basketweave microstructure. Microhardness testing demonstrated that fast-cooled Timetal 550 samples with basketweave microstructure were harder than slowly-cooled samples with colony microstructure. Orientation-dependent deformation was found in the colony microstructure. Specifically, when the surface normal is perpendicular to the [0001] of alpha, the material deforms easily in the direction perpendicular to the [0001] of alpha. Fuzzy logic and Bayesian neural network models were developed to predict the room temperature tensile properties of Timetal 550. This involved the development of a database relating microstructural features to mechanical properties. A Gleeble 3800 thermal-mechanical simulator was used to develop various microstructures. Microstructural features of tensile-tested samples were quantified using stereological procedures. The quantified microstructural features and the tensile properties were used as inputs and outputs, respectively, for modeling the relationships between them. The individual influence of five microstructural features on tensile properties was determined using the established models. The microstructural features having the greatest impact on UTS and YS were the thickness of alpha laths and the width of grain boundary alpha layer, and the microstructural features having the greatest impact on elongation were the thickness of

  19. Effet des additions sur la microstructure et le comportement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the microstructure, thermal fatigue and tribological tests of the NiAl coating, obtained by atmospheric plasma ...... Mechanisms of oxidation and its role in microstructural evolution of ... protective coatings, Surface and Coatings Technology, Vol.

  20. Quantitative approach on SEM images of microstructure of clay soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施斌; 李生林; M.Tolkachev

    1995-01-01

    The working principles of Videolab Image Processing System (VIPS), the examining methods of orientation of microstructural units of clay soils and analysing results on SEM images of some typical microstructures of clay soils using the VIPS are introduced.

  1. Tracking and mapping of spatiotemporal quantities using unicellular swarm intelligence visualisation of invisible hazardous substances using unicellular swarm intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Oyekan, John Oluwagbemiga

    2016-01-01

    The book discusses new algorithms capable of searching for, tracking, mapping and providing a visualization of invisible substances. It reports on the realization of a bacterium-inspired robotic controller that can be used by an agent to search for any environmental spatial function such as temperature or pollution. Using the parameters of a mathematical model, the book shows that it is possible to control the exploration, exploitation and sensitivity of the agent. This feature sets the work apart from the usual method of applying the bacterium behavior to robotic agents. The book also discusses how a computationally tractable multi-agent robotic controller was developed and used to track as well as provide a visual map of a spatio-temporal distribution of a substance. On the one hand, this book provides biologists and ecologists with a basis to perform simulations related to how individual organisms respond to spatio-temporal factors in their environment as well as predict and analyze the behavior of organis...

  2. A spatio-temporal analysis of suicide in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcach, Carlos

    2017-04-20

    In 2012, international statistics showed El Salvador's suicide rate as 40th in the world and the highest in Latin America. Over the last 15 years, national statistics show the suicide death rate declining as opposed to an increasing rate of homicide. Though completed suicide is an important social and health issue, little is known about its prevalence, incidence, etiology and spatio-temporal behavior. The primary objective of this study was to examine completed suicide and homicide using the stream analogy to lethal violence within a spatio-temporal framework. A Bayesian model was applied to examine the spatio-temporal evolution of the tendency of completed suicide over homicide in El Salvador. Data on numbers of suicides and homicides at the municipal level were obtained from the Instituto de Medicina Legal (IML) and population counts, from the Dirección General de Estadística y Censos (DIGESTYC), for the period of 2002 to 2012. Data on migration were derived from the 2007 Population Census, and inequality data were obtained from a study by Damianović, Valenzuela and Vera. The data reveal a stable standardized rate of total lethal violence (completed suicide plus homicide) across municipalities over time; a decline in suicide; and a standardized suicide rate decreasing with income inequality but increasing with social isolation. Municipalities clustered in terms of both total lethal violence and suicide standardized rates. Spatial effects for suicide were stronger among municipalities located in the north-east and center-south sides of the country. New clusters of municipalities with large suicide standardized rates were detected in the north-west, south-west and center-south regions, all of which are part of time-stable clusters of homicide. Prevention efforts to reduce income inequality and mitigate the negative effects of weak relational systems should focus upon municipalities forming time-persistent clusters with a large rate of death by suicide. In

  3. Cartography in the Age of Spatio-temporal Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Jiayao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cartography is an ancient science with almost the same long history as the world's oldest culture.Since ancient times,the movement and change of anything and any phenomena,including human activities,have been carried out in a certain time and space.The development of science and technology and the progress of social civilization have made social management and governance more and more dependent on time and space.The information source,theme,content,carrier,form,production methods and application methods of map are different in different historical periods,so that its all-round value is different. With the arrival of the big data age,the scientific paradigm has now entered the era of "data-intensive" paradigm,so is the cartography,with obvious characteristics of big data science.All big data are caused by movement and change of all things and phenomena in the geographic world,so they have space and time characteristics and thus cannot be separated from the spatial reference and time reference.Therefore,big data is big spatio-temporal data essentially.Since the late 1950s and early 1960s,modern cartography,that is,the cartography in the information age,takes spatio-temporal data as the object,and focuses on the processing and expression of spatio-temporal data,but not in the face of the large scale multi-source heterogeneous and multi-dimensional dynamic data flow(or flow datafrom sky to the sea.The real-time dynamic nature,the theme pertinence,the content complexity,the carrier diversification,the expression form personalization,the production method modernization,the application ubiquity of the map,is incomparable in the past period,which leads to the great changes of the theory,technology and application system of cartography.And all these changes happen to occur in the 60 years since the late 1950s and early 1960s,so this article was written to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the "Acta Geodaetica et Cartographica Sinica".

  4. Spatiotemporal noise covariance estimation from limited empirical magnetoencephalographic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Sung C; Plis, Sergey M; Ranken, Doug M; Schmidt, David M

    2006-01-01

    The performance of parametric magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) source localization approaches can be degraded by the use of poor background noise covariance estimates. In general, estimation of the noise covariance for spatiotemporal analysis is difficult mainly due to the limited noise information available. Furthermore, its estimation requires a large amount of storage and a one-time but very large (and sometimes intractable) calculation or its inverse. To overcome these difficulties, noise covariance models consisting of one pair or a sum of multi-pairs of Kronecker products of spatial covariance and temporal covariance have been proposed. However, these approaches cannot be applied when the noise information is very limited, i.e., the amount of noise information is less than the degrees of freedom of the noise covariance models. A common example of this is when only averaged noise data are available for a limited prestimulus region (typically at most a few hundred milliseconds duration). For such cases, a diagonal spatiotemporal noise covariance model consisting of sensor variances with no spatial or temporal correlation has been the common choice for spatiotemporal analysis. In this work, we propose a different noise covariance model which consists of diagonal spatial noise covariance and Toeplitz temporal noise covariance. It can easily be estimated from limited noise information, and no time-consuming optimization and data-processing are required. Thus, it can be used as an alternative choice when one-pair or multi-pair noise covariance models cannot be estimated due to lack of noise information. To verify its capability we used Bayesian inference dipole analysis and a number of simulated and empirical datasets. We compared this covariance model with other existing covariance models such as conventional diagonal covariance, one-pair and multi-pair noise covariance models, when noise information is sufficient to estimate them. We

  5. Spatiotemporal Propagation of the Cortical Atrophy: Population and Individual Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Koval

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Repeated failures in clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD have raised a strong interest for the prodromal phase of the disease. A better understanding of the brain alterations during this early phase is crucial to diagnose patients sooner, to estimate an accurate disease stage, and to give a reliable prognosis. According to recent evidence, structural alterations in the brain are likely to be sensitive markers of the disease progression. Neuronal loss translates in specific spatiotemporal patterns of cortical atrophy, starting in the enthorinal cortex and spreading over other cortical regions according to specific propagation pathways. We developed a digital model of the cortical atrophy in the left hemisphere from prodromal to diseased phases, which is built on the temporal alignment and combination of several short-term observation data to reconstruct the long-term history of the disease. The model not only provides a description of the spatiotemporal patterns of cortical atrophy at the group level but also shows the variability of these patterns at the individual level in terms of difference in propagation pathways, speed of propagation, and age at propagation onset. Longitudinal MRI datasets of patients with mild cognitive impairments who converted to AD are used to reconstruct the cortical atrophy propagation across all disease stages. Each observation is considered as a signal spatially distributed on a network, such as the cortical mesh, each cortex location being associated to a node. We consider how the temporal profile of the signal varies across the network nodes. We introduce a statistical mixed-effect model to describe the evolution of the cortex alterations. To ensure a spatiotemporal smooth propagation of the alterations, we introduce a constrain on the propagation signal in the model such that neighboring nodes have similar profiles of the signal changes. Our generative model enables the reconstruction of personalized

  6. A spatio-temporal analysis of suicide in El Salvador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Carcach

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2012, international statistics showed El Salvador’s suicide rate as 40th in the world and the highest in Latin America. Over the last 15 years, national statistics show the suicide death rate declining as opposed to an increasing rate of homicide. Though completed suicide is an important social and health issue, little is known about its prevalence, incidence, etiology and spatio-temporal behavior. The primary objective of this study was to examine completed suicide and homicide using the stream analogy to lethal violence within a spatio-temporal framework. Methods A Bayesian model was applied to examine the spatio-temporal evolution of the tendency of completed suicide over homicide in El Salvador. Data on numbers of suicides and homicides at the municipal level were obtained from the Instituto de Medicina Legal (IML and population counts, from the Dirección General de Estadística y Censos (DIGESTYC, for the period of 2002 to 2012. Data on migration were derived from the 2007 Population Census, and inequality data were obtained from a study by Damianović, Valenzuela and Vera. Results The data reveal a stable standardized rate of total lethal violence (completed suicide plus homicide across municipalities over time; a decline in suicide; and a standardized suicide rate decreasing with income inequality but increasing with social isolation. Municipalities clustered in terms of both total lethal violence and suicide standardized rates. Conclusions Spatial effects for suicide were stronger among municipalities located in the north-east and center-south sides of the country. New clusters of municipalities with large suicide standardized rates were detected in the north-west, south-west and center-south regions, all of which are part of time-stable clusters of homicide. Prevention efforts to reduce income inequality and mitigate the negative effects of weak relational systems should focus upon municipalities forming time

  7. Microstructural evolution at high strain rates in solution-hardened interstitial free steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenishi, A.; Teodosiu, C.; Nesterova, E.V.

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive transmission electron microscopical studies have been conducted for solution-hardened steels deformed at high (1000 s -1 ) and low (0.001 s -1 ) strain rates, in order to clarify the effects of strain rate and a jump in strain rate on the evolution of the microstructure and its connection with the mechanical response. It was revealed that the various types of microstructure, observed even within the same specimen, depend on the corresponding grain orientations and their evolution with progressive deformation depends on these microstructure types. At high strain rates, the dislocation density increases especially at low strains and the onset of dislocation organization is delayed. A jump in strain rate causes an increase of the dislocation density inside an organized structure. These results corroborated the mechanical behaviour at high strain rates after compensation for the cross-sectional reduction and temperature increase. The higher work-hardening rate at high strain rates could be connected to a delay in the dislocation organization. The high work-hardening rate just after a jump could be due to an increase of the density of dislocations distributed uniformly inside an organized structure

  8. A hybrid spatio-temporal data indexing method for trajectory databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Shengnan; Gong, Jun; Li, Songnian; Zhu, Qing; Liu, Xintao; Zhang, Yeting

    2014-07-21

    In recent years, there has been tremendous growth in the field of indoor and outdoor positioning sensors continuously producing huge volumes of trajectory data that has been used in many fields such as location-based services or location intelligence. Trajectory data is massively increased and semantically complicated, which poses a great challenge on spatio-temporal data indexing. This paper proposes a spatio-temporal data indexing method, named HBSTR-tree, which is a hybrid index structure comprising spatio-temporal R-tree, B*-tree and Hash table. To improve the index generation efficiency, rather than directly inserting trajectory points, we group consecutive trajectory points as nodes according to their spatio-temporal semantics and then insert them into spatio-temporal R-tree as leaf nodes. Hash table is used to manage the latest leaf nodes to reduce the frequency of insertion. A new spatio-temporal interval criterion and a new node-choosing sub-algorithm are also proposed to optimize spatio-temporal R-tree structures. In addition, a B*-tree sub-index of leaf nodes is built to query the trajectories of targeted objects efficiently. Furthermore, a database storage scheme based on a NoSQL-type DBMS is also proposed for the purpose of cloud storage. Experimental results prove that HBSTR-tree outperforms TB*-tree in some aspects such as generation efficiency, query performance and query type.

  9. A Hybrid Spatio-Temporal Data Indexing Method for Trajectory Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengnan Ke

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been tremendous growth in the field of indoor and outdoor positioning sensors continuously producing huge volumes of trajectory data that has been used in many fields such as location-based services or location intelligence. Trajectory data is massively increased and semantically complicated, which poses a great challenge on spatio-temporal data indexing. This paper proposes a spatio-temporal data indexing method, named HBSTR-tree, which is a hybrid index structure comprising spatio-temporal R-tree, B*-tree and Hash table. To improve the index generation efficiency, rather than directly inserting trajectory points, we group consecutive trajectory points as nodes according to their spatio-temporal semantics and then insert them into spatio-temporal R-tree as leaf nodes. Hash table is used to manage the latest leaf nodes to reduce the frequency of insertion. A new spatio-temporal interval criterion and a new node-choosing sub-algorithm are also proposed to optimize spatio-temporal R-tree structures. In addition, a B*-tree sub-index of leaf nodes is built to query the trajectories of targeted objects efficiently. Furthermore, a database storage scheme based on a NoSQL-type DBMS is also proposed for the purpose of cloud storage. Experimental results prove that HBSTR-tree outperforms TB*-tree in some aspects such as generation efficiency, query performance and query type.

  10. A Hybrid Spatio-Temporal Data Indexing Method for Trajectory Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Shengnan; Gong, Jun; Li, Songnian; Zhu, Qing; Liu, Xintao; Zhang, Yeting

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been tremendous growth in the field of indoor and outdoor positioning sensors continuously producing huge volumes of trajectory data that has been used in many fields such as location-based services or location intelligence. Trajectory data is massively increased and semantically complicated, which poses a great challenge on spatio-temporal data indexing. This paper proposes a spatio-temporal data indexing method, named HBSTR-tree, which is a hybrid index structure comprising spatio-temporal R-tree, B*-tree and Hash table. To improve the index generation efficiency, rather than directly inserting trajectory points, we group consecutive trajectory points as nodes according to their spatio-temporal semantics and then insert them into spatio-temporal R-tree as leaf nodes. Hash table is used to manage the latest leaf nodes to reduce the frequency of insertion. A new spatio-temporal interval criterion and a new node-choosing sub-algorithm are also proposed to optimize spatio-temporal R-tree structures. In addition, a B*-tree sub-index of leaf nodes is built to query the trajectories of targeted objects efficiently. Furthermore, a database storage scheme based on a NoSQL-type DBMS is also proposed for the purpose of cloud storage. Experimental results prove that HBSTR-tree outperforms TB*-tree in some aspects such as generation efficiency, query performance and query type. PMID:25051028

  11. Spatiotemporal dynamics of a digital phase-locked loop based coupled map lattice system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Tanmoy, E-mail: tbanerjee@phys.buruniv.ac.in; Paul, Bishwajit; Sarkar, B. C. [Department of Physics, University of Burdwan, Burdwan, West Bengal 713 104 (India)

    2014-03-15

    We explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of a coupled map lattice (CML) system, which is realized with a one dimensional array of locally coupled digital phase-locked loops (DPLLs). DPLL is a nonlinear feedback-controlled system widely used as an important building block of electronic communication systems. We derive the phase-error equation of the spatially extended system of coupled DPLLs, which resembles a form of the equation of a CML system. We carry out stability analysis for the synchronized homogeneous solutions using the circulant matrix formalism. It is shown through extensive numerical simulations that with the variation of nonlinearity parameter and coupling strength the system shows transitions among several generic features of spatiotemporal dynamics, viz., synchronized fixed point solution, frozen random pattern, pattern selection, spatiotemporal intermittency, and fully developed spatiotemporal chaos. We quantify the spatiotemporal dynamics using quantitative measures like average quadratic deviation and spatial correlation function. We emphasize that instead of using an idealized model of CML, which is usually employed to observe the spatiotemporal behaviors, we consider a real world physical system and establish the existence of spatiotemporal chaos and other patterns in this system. We also discuss the importance of the present study in engineering application like removal of clock-skew in parallel processors.

  12. Autonomous patterning of cells on microstructured fine particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Iwori; Kawanabe, Masato; Kaneko, Arata

    2015-01-01

    Regularly patterned cells can clarify cellular function and are required in some biochip applications. This study examines cell patterning along microstructures and the effect of microstructural geometry on selective cellular adhesion. Particles can be autonomously assembled on a soda-lime glass substrate that is chemically patterned by immersion in a suspension of fine particles. By adopting various sizes of fine particles, we can control the geometry of the microstructure. Cells adhere more readily to microstructured fine particles than to flat glass substrate. Silica particles hexagonally packed in 5–40 μm line and space microstructures provide an effective cell scaffold on the glass substrate. Cultured cells tend to attach and proliferate along the microstructured region while avoiding the flat region. The difference in cell adhesion is attributed to their geometries, as both of the silica particles and soda-lime glass are hydrophilic related with cell adhesiveness. After cell seeding, cells adhered to the flat region migrated toward the microstructured region. For most of the cells to assemble on the scaffold, the scaffolding microstructures must be spaced by at most 65 μm. - Highlights: • PS and SiO 2 particles provide effective scaffolds for cells. • Cells that adhere to microstructured particles successfully proliferate and differentiate. • Selective adhesion and growth along the scaffold can be achieved by patterning the fine particle microstructure. • Cells adhered to flat regions migrate toward microstructured regions. • Selective adhesion by cells depends on the microstructural geometry; specifically, on the inter-line spacing

  13. Role of Microstructure on the Performance of UHTCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.; Gasch, Matthew J.; Lawson, John W.; Gusman, Michael I.; Stackpoole, Mairead

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated a number of methods to control microstructure. We have routes to form: a) in situ "composites" b) Very fine microstructures. Arcjet testing and other characterization of monolithic materials. Control oxidation through microstructure and composition. Beginning to incorporate these materials as matrices for composites. Modeling effort to facilitate material design and characterization.

  14. Hollow fiber ultrafiltration membranes with microstructured inner skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Culfaz, P.Z.; Wessling, Matthias; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2011-01-01

    Hollow fiber membranes with microstructured inner surfaces were fabricated from a PES/PVP blend using a spinneret with a microstructured needle. The effect of spinning parameters such as polymer dope flow rate, bore liquid flowrate, air gap and take-up speed on the microstructure and shape of the

  15. Patterning biomaterials for the spatiotemporal delivery of bioactive molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eMinardi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of tissue engineering is to promote the repair of functional tissues. For decades, the combined use of biomaterials, growth factors, and stem cells has been at the base of several regeneration strategies. Among these, biomimicry emerged as a robust strategy to efficiently address this clinical challenge. Biomimetic materials, able to recapitulate the composition and architecture of the extracellular matrix, are the materials of choice, for their biocompatibility and higher rate of efficacy. In addition, it has become increasingly clear that restoring the complex biochemical environment of the target tissue is crucial for its regeneration. Towards this aim, the combination of scaffolds and growth factors is required. The advent of nanotechnology significantly impacted the field of tissue engineering by providing new ways to reproduce the complex spatial and temporal biochemical patterns of tissues. This review will present the most recent approaches to finely control the spatiotemporal release of bioactive molecules for various tissue engineering applications.

  16. Spatiotemporal reconstruction of list-mode PET data

    CERN Document Server

    Nichols, T E; Asma, E; Leahy, R M

    2002-01-01

    We describe a method for computing a continuous time estimate of tracer density using list-mode positron emission tomography data. The rate function in each voxel is modeled as an inhomogeneous Poisson process whose rate function can be represented using a cubic B-spline basis. The rate functions are estimated by maximizing the likelihood of the arrival times of detected photon pairs over the control vertices of the spline, modified by quadratic spatial and temporal smoothness penalties and a penalty term to enforce non-negativity. Randoms rate functions are estimated by assuming independence between the spatial and temporal randoms distributions. Similarly, scatter rate functions are estimated by assuming spatiotemporal independence and that the temporal distribution of the scatter is proportional to the temporal distribution of the trues. A quantitative evaluation was performed using simulated data and the method is also demonstrated in a human study using 11C-raclopride.

  17. Databases spatiotemporal taxonomy with moving objects. Theme review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Alejandro Rojas Barbosa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In the last decade, databases have evolved so much that we no longer speak only of spatial databases, but also of spatial and temporal databases. This means that the event or record has a spatial or localization variable and a temporality variable, which allows updating the previously stored record. Method: This paper presents a bibliographic review about concepts, spatio-temporal data models, specifically the models of data in movement. Results: Taxonomic considerations of the queries are presented in the models of data in movement, according to the persistence of the query (time, location, movement, object and patterns, as well as the different proposals of indexes and structures. Conclusions: The implementation of model proposals, such as indexes and structures, can lead to standardization problems. This is why it should be standardized under the standards and standards of the OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium.

  18. Factor copula models for data with spatio-temporal dependence

    KAUST Repository

    Krupskii, Pavel

    2017-10-13

    We propose a new copula model for spatial data that are observed repeatedly in time. The model is based on the assumption that there exists a common factor that affects the measurements of a process in space and in time. Unlike models based on multivariate normality, our model can handle data with tail dependence and asymmetry. The likelihood for the proposed model can be obtained in a simple form and therefore parameter estimation is quite fast. Simulation from this model is straightforward and data can be predicted at any spatial location and time point. We use simulation studies to show different types of dependencies, both in space and in time, that can be generated by this model. We apply the proposed copula model to hourly wind data and compare its performance with some classical models for spatio-temporal data.

  19. Spread-spectrum communication using binary spatiotemporal chaotic codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xingang; Zhan Meng; Gong Xiaofeng; Lai, C.H.; Lai, Y.-C.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a scheme to generate binary code for baseband spread-spectrum communication by using a chain of coupled chaotic maps. We compare the performances of this type of spatiotemporal chaotic code with those of a conventional code used frequently in digital communication, the Gold code, and demonstrate that our code is comparable or even superior to the Gold code in several key aspects: security, bit error rate, code generation speed, and the number of possible code sequences. As the field of communicating with chaos faces doubts in terms of performance comparison with conventional digital communication schemes, our work gives a clear message that communicating with chaos can be advantageous and it deserves further attention from the nonlinear science community

  20. Spatiotemporal reconstruction of list-mode PET data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Thomas E.; Qi, Jinyi; Asma, Evren; Leahy, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a method for computing a continuous time estimate of tracer density using list-mode positron emission tomography data. The rate function in each voxel is modeled as an inhomogeneous Poisson process whose rate function can be represented using a cubic B-spline basis. The rate functions are estimated by maximizing the likelihood of the arrival times of detected photon pairs over the control vertices of the spline, modified by quadratic spatial and temporal smoothness penalties and a penalty term to enforce non-negativity. Randoms rate functions are estimated by assuming independence between the spatial and temporal randoms distributions. Similarly, scatter rate functions are estimated by assuming spatiotemporal independence and that the temporal distribution of the scatter is proportional to the temporal distribution of the trues. A quantitative evaluation was performed using simulated data and the method is also demonstrated in a human study using 11C-raclopride

  1. Task-relevant information is prioritized in spatiotemporal contextual cueing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yoko; Ueda, Yoshiyuki; Ogawa, Hirokazu; Saiki, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Implicit learning of visual contexts facilitates search performance-a phenomenon known as contextual cueing; however, little is known about contextual cueing under situations in which multidimensional regularities exist simultaneously. In everyday vision, different information, such as object identity and location, appears simultaneously and interacts with each other. We tested the hypothesis that, in contextual cueing, when multiple regularities are present, the regularities that are most relevant to our behavioral goals would be prioritized. Previous studies of contextual cueing have commonly used the visual search paradigm. However, this paradigm is not suitable for directing participants' attention to a particular regularity. Therefore, we developed a new paradigm, the "spatiotemporal contextual cueing paradigm," and manipulated task-relevant and task-irrelevant regularities. In four experiments, we demonstrated that task-relevant regularities were more responsible for search facilitation than task-irrelevant regularities. This finding suggests our visual behavior is focused on regularities that are relevant to our current goal.

  2. Spatiotemporal Recurrent Convolutional Networks for Traffic Prediction in Transportation Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiyang; Wu, Zhihai; Wang, Shuqin; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Xiaolei

    2017-06-26

    Predicting large-scale transportation network traffic has become an important and challenging topic in recent decades. Inspired by the domain knowledge of motion prediction, in which the future motion of an object can be predicted based on previous scenes, we propose a network grid representation method that can retain the fine-scale structure of a transportation network. Network-wide traffic speeds are converted into a series of static images and input into a novel deep architecture, namely, spatiotemporal recurrent convolutional networks (SRCNs), for traffic forecasting. The proposed SRCNs inherit the advantages of deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) and long short-term memory (LSTM) neural networks. The spatial dependencies of network-wide traffic can be captured by DCNNs, and the temporal dynamics can be learned by LSTMs. An experiment on a Beijing transportation network with 278 links demonstrates that SRCNs outperform other deep learning-based algorithms in both short-term and long-term traffic prediction.

  3. Spatiotemporal Fluctuations and Triggers of Ebola Virus Spillover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, John Paul; Park, Andrew W; Kramer, Andrew M; Han, Barbara A; Alexander, Laura W; Drake, John M

    2017-03-01

    Because the natural reservoir of Ebola virus remains unclear and disease outbreaks in humans have occurred only sporadically over a large region, forecasting when and where Ebola spillovers are most likely to occur constitutes a continuing and urgent public health challenge. We developed a statistical modeling approach that associates 37 human or great ape Ebola spillovers since 1982 with spatiotemporally dynamic covariates including vegetative cover, human population size, and absolute and relative rainfall over 3 decades across sub-Saharan Africa. Our model (area under the curve 0.80 on test data) shows that spillover intensity is highest during transitions between wet and dry seasons; overall, high seasonal intensity occurs over much of tropical Africa; and spillover intensity is greatest at high (>1,000/km 2 ) and very low (Ebola spillover from wild reservoirs and indicate particular times and regions for targeted surveillance.

  4. Multivariate spatiotemporal visualizations for mobile devices in Flyover Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, S.; Thorn, R.; Myrbo, A.; Roth, R.; Goring, S. J.; Williams, J.

    2017-12-01

    Visualizing and interacting with complex multivariate and spatiotemporal datasets on mobile devices is challenging due to their smaller screens, reduced processing power, and limited data connectivity. Pollen data require visualizing pollen assemblages spatially, temporally, and across multiple taxa to understand plant community dynamics through time. Drawing from cartography, information visualization, and paleoecology, we have created new mobile-first visualization techniques that represent multiple taxa across many sites and enable user interaction. Using pollen datasets from the Neotoma Paleoecology Database as a case study, the visualization techniques allow ecological patterns and trends to be quickly understood on a mobile device compared to traditional pollen diagrams and maps. This flexible visualization system can be used for datasets beyond pollen, with the only requirements being point-based localities and multiple variables changing through time or depth.

  5. Parametric spatiotemporal oscillation in reaction-diffusion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2016-03-01

    We consider a reaction-diffusion system in a homogeneous stable steady state. On perturbation by a time-dependent sinusoidal forcing of a suitable scaling parameter the system exhibits parametric spatiotemporal instability beyond a critical threshold frequency. We have formulated a general scheme to calculate the threshold condition for oscillation and the range of unstable spatial modes lying within a V-shaped region reminiscent of Arnold's tongue. Full numerical simulations show that depending on the specificity of nonlinearity of the models, the instability may result in time-periodic stationary patterns in the form of standing clusters or spatially localized breathing patterns with characteristic wavelengths. Our theoretical analysis of the parametric oscillation in reaction-diffusion system is corroborated by full numerical simulation of two well-known chemical dynamical models: chlorite-iodine-malonic acid and Briggs-Rauscher reactions.

  6. More than a Tad: spatiotemporal control of Caulobacter pili.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignolet, Johann; Panis, Gaël; Viollier, Patrick H

    2018-04-01

    The Type IV pilus (T4P) is a powerful and sophisticated bacterial nanomachine involved in numerous cellular processes, including adhesion, DNA uptake and motility. Aside from the well-described subtype T4aP of the Gram-negative genera, including Myxococcus, Pseudomonas and Neisseria, the Tad (tight adherence) pilus secretion system re-shuffles homologous parts from other secretion systems along with uncharacterized components into a new type of protein translocation apparatus. A representative of the Tad apparatus, the Caulobacter crescentus pilus assembly (Cpa) machine is built exclusively at the newborn cell pole once per cell cycle. Recent comprehensive genetic analyses unearthed a myriad of spatiotemporal determinants acting on the Tad/Cpa system, many of which are conserved in other α-proteobacteria, including obligate intracellular pathogens and symbionts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spatio-temporal light shaping for parallel nano-biophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    followed separate tracks. Width-shaping, or spatial techniques, have mostly ignored light’s thickness (using continuous-wave lasers), while thickness-shaping, or temporal techniques, typically ignored the beam width. This disconnected spatial and temporal track also shows in our own research where we....... Another step is to vary light’s pulsewidth (thickness) as it propagates to get maximum compression (and highest energy density) at a chosen target plane. This temporal focusing can selectively look at a defined crosssection within a sample with only minimal disturbance from other regions. It can also do...... plane-byplane micromachining for faster laser processing compared to scanning a focused laser spot. Our previous work on spatial light shaping, together with the interplay between spatial and temporal modulation, invariably provides a strong position to pursue application-oriented spatiotemporal...

  8. Efficient image or video encryption based on spatiotemporal chaos system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Shiguo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, an efficient image/video encryption scheme is constructed based on spatiotemporal chaos system. The chaotic lattices are used to generate pseudorandom sequences and then encrypt image blocks one by one. By iterating chaotic maps for certain times, the generated pseudorandom sequences obtain high initial-value sensitivity and good randomness. The pseudorandom-bits in each lattice are used to encrypt the Direct Current coefficient (DC) and the signs of the Alternating Current coefficients (ACs). Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the scheme has good cryptographic security and perceptual security, and it does not affect the compression efficiency apparently. These properties make the scheme a suitable choice for practical applications.

  9. A spatio-temporal extension to the map cube operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzate, Juan C.; Moreno, Francisco J.; Echeverri, Jaime

    2012-09-01

    OLAP (On Line Analytical Processing) is a set of techniques and operators to facilitate the data analysis usually stored in a data warehouse. In this paper, we extend the functionality of an OLAP operator known as Map Cube with the definition and incorporation of a function that allows the formulation of spatio-temporal queries. For example, consider a data warehouse about crimes that includes data about the places where the crimes were committed. Suppose we want to find and visualize the trajectory (a trajectory is just the path that an object follows through space as a function of time) of the crimes of a suspect beginning with his oldest crime and ending with his most recent one. In order to meet this requirement, we extend the Map Cube operator.

  10. Spatio-temporal behaviour of medium-range ensemble forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipling, Zak; Primo, Cristina; Charlton-Perez, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Using the recently-developed mean-variance of logarithms (MVL) diagram, together with the TIGGE archive of medium-range ensemble forecasts from nine different centres, we present an analysis of the spatio-temporal dynamics of their perturbations, and show how the differences between models and perturbation techniques can explain the shape of their characteristic MVL curves. We also consider the use of the MVL diagram to compare the growth of perturbations within the ensemble with the growth of the forecast error, showing that there is a much closer correspondence for some models than others. We conclude by looking at how the MVL technique might assist in selecting models for inclusion in a multi-model ensemble, and suggest an experiment to test its potential in this context.

  11. Factor copula models for data with spatio-temporal dependence

    KAUST Repository

    Krupskii, Pavel; Genton, Marc G.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new copula model for spatial data that are observed repeatedly in time. The model is based on the assumption that there exists a common factor that affects the measurements of a process in space and in time. Unlike models based on multivariate normality, our model can handle data with tail dependence and asymmetry. The likelihood for the proposed model can be obtained in a simple form and therefore parameter estimation is quite fast. Simulation from this model is straightforward and data can be predicted at any spatial location and time point. We use simulation studies to show different types of dependencies, both in space and in time, that can be generated by this model. We apply the proposed copula model to hourly wind data and compare its performance with some classical models for spatio-temporal data.

  12. An Innovative Infrastructure with a Universal Geo-Spatiotemporal Data Representation Supporting Cost-Effective Integration of Diverse Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilee, Michael Lee; Kuo, Kwo-Sen

    2017-01-01

    The SpatioTemporal Adaptive Resolution Encoding (STARE) is a unifying scheme encoding geospatial and temporal information for organizing data on scalable computing/storage resources, minimizing expensive data transfers. STARE provides a compact representation that turns set-logic functions into integer operations, e.g. conditional sub-setting, taking into account representative spatiotemporal resolutions of the data in the datasets. STARE geo-spatiotemporally aligns data placements of diverse data on massive parallel resources to maximize performance. Automating important scientific functions (e.g. regridding) and computational functions (e.g. data placement) allows scientists to focus on domain-specific questions instead of expending their efforts and expertise on data processing. With STARE-enabled automation, SciDB (Scientific Database) plus STARE provides a database interface, reducing costly data preparation, increasing the volume and variety of interoperable data, and easing result sharing. Using SciDB plus STARE as part of an integrated analysis infrastructure dramatically eases combining diametrically different datasets.

  13. A Novel Method to Verify Multilevel Computational Models of Biological Systems Using Multiscale Spatio-Temporal Meta Model Checking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pârvu, Ovidiu; Gilbert, David

    2016-01-01

    Insights gained from multilevel computational models of biological systems can be translated into real-life applications only if the model correctness has been verified first. One of the most frequently employed in silico techniques for computational model verification is model checking. Traditional model checking approaches only consider the evolution of numeric values, such as concentrations, over time and are appropriate for computational models of small scale systems (e.g. intracellular networks). However for gaining a systems level understanding of how biological organisms function it is essential to consider more complex large scale biological systems (e.g. organs). Verifying computational models of such systems requires capturing both how numeric values and properties of (emergent) spatial structures (e.g. area of multicellular population) change over time and across multiple levels of organization, which are not considered by existing model checking approaches. To address this limitation we have developed a novel approximate probabilistic multiscale spatio-temporal meta model checking methodology for verifying multilevel computational models relative to specifications describing the desired/expected system behaviour. The methodology is generic and supports computational models encoded using various high-level modelling formalisms because it is defined relative to time series data and not the models used to generate it. In addition, the methodology can be automatically adapted to case study specific types of spatial structures and properties using the spatio-temporal meta model checking concept. To automate the computational model verification process we have implemented the model checking approach in the software tool Mule (http://mule.modelchecking.org). Its applicability is illustrated against four systems biology computational models previously published in the literature encoding the rat cardiovascular system dynamics, the uterine contractions of labour

  14. Imaging collagen type I fibrillogenesis with high spatiotemporal resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamov, Dimitar R; Stock, Erik; Franz, Clemens M; Jähnke, Torsten; Haschke, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen type I, belong to the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins and they have received much attention over the last five decades due to their large interactome, complex hierarchical structure and high mechanical stability. Nevertheless, the collagen self-assembly process is still incompletely understood. Determining the real-time kinetics of collagen type I formation is therefore pivotal for better understanding of collagen type I structure and function, but visualising the dynamic self-assembly process of collagen I on the molecular scale requires imaging techniques offering high spatiotemporal resolution. Fast and high-speed scanning atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide the means to study such processes on the timescale of seconds under near-physiological conditions. In this study we have applied fast AFM tip scanning to study the assembly kinetics of fibrillar collagen type I nanomatrices with a temporal resolution reaching eight seconds for a frame size of 500 nm. By modifying the buffer composition and pH value, the kinetics of collagen fibrillogenesis can be adjusted for optimal analysis by fast AFM scanning. We furthermore show that amplitude-modulation imaging can be successfully applied to extract additional structural information from collagen samples even at high scan rates. Fast AFM scanning with controlled amplitude modulation therefore provides a versatile platform for studying dynamic collagen self-assembly processes at high resolution. - Highlights: • Continuous non-invasive time-lapse investigation of collagen I fibrillogenesis in situ. • Imaging of collagen I self-assembly with high spatiotemporal resolution. • Application of setpoint modulation to study the hierarchical structure of collagen I. • Observing real-time formation of the D-banding pattern in collagen I

  15. Spatio-temporal observations of the tertiary ozone maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Sofieva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We present spatio-temporal distributions of the tertiary ozone maximum (TOM, based on GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars ozone measurements in 2002–2006. The tertiary ozone maximum is typically observed in the high-latitude winter mesosphere at an altitude of ~72 km. Although the explanation for this phenomenon has been found recently – low concentrations of odd-hydrogen cause the subsequent decrease in odd-oxygen losses – models have had significant deviations from existing observations until recently. Good coverage of polar night regions by GOMOS data has allowed for the first time to obtain spatial and temporal observational distributions of night-time ozone mixing ratio in the mesosphere.

    The distributions obtained from GOMOS data have specific features, which are variable from year to year. In particular, due to a long lifetime of ozone in polar night conditions, the downward transport of polar air by the meridional circulation is clearly observed in the tertiary ozone maximum time series. Although the maximum tertiary ozone mixing ratio is achieved close to the polar night terminator (as predicted by the theory, TOM can be observed also at very high latitudes, not only in the beginning and at the end, but also in the middle of winter. We have compared the observational spatio-temporal distributions of the tertiary ozone maximum with that obtained using WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model and found that the specific features are reproduced satisfactorily by the model.

    Since ozone in the mesosphere is very sensitive to HOx concentrations, energetic particle precipitation can significantly modify the shape of the ozone profiles. In particular, GOMOS observations have shown that the tertiary ozone maximum was temporarily destroyed during the January 2005 and December 2006 solar proton events as a result of the HOx enhancement from the increased ionization.

  16. Heterogeneity induces spatiotemporal oscillations in reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andrew L.; Klika, Václav; Woolley, Thomas E.; Gaffney, Eamonn A.

    2018-05-01

    We report on an instability arising in activator-inhibitor reaction-diffusion (RD) systems with a simple spatial heterogeneity. This instability gives rise to periodic creation, translation, and destruction of spike solutions that are commonly formed due to Turing instabilities. While this behavior is oscillatory in nature, it occurs purely within the Turing space such that no region of the domain would give rise to a Hopf bifurcation for the homogeneous equilibrium. We use the shadow limit of the Gierer-Meinhardt system to show that the speed of spike movement can be predicted from well-known asymptotic theory, but that this theory is unable to explain the emergence of these spatiotemporal oscillations. Instead, we numerically explore this system and show that the oscillatory behavior is caused by the destabilization of a steady spike pattern due to the creation of a new spike arising from endogeneous activator production. We demonstrate that on the edge of this instability, the period of the oscillations goes to infinity, although it does not fit the profile of any well-known bifurcation of a limit cycle. We show that nearby stationary states are either Turing unstable or undergo saddle-node bifurcations near the onset of the oscillatory instability, suggesting that the periodic motion does not emerge from a local equilibrium. We demonstrate the robustness of this spatiotemporal oscillation by exploring small localized heterogeneity and showing that this behavior also occurs in the Schnakenberg RD model. Our results suggest that this phenomenon is ubiquitous in spatially heterogeneous RD systems, but that current tools, such as stability of spike solutions and shadow-limit asymptotics, do not elucidate understanding. This opens several avenues for further mathematical analysis and highlights difficulties in explaining how robust patterning emerges from Turing's mechanism in the presence of even small spatial heterogeneity.

  17. Patterns of urban violent injury: a spatio-temporal analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cusimano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury related to violent acts is a problem in every society. Although some authors have examined the geography of violent crime, few have focused on the spatio-temporal patterns of violent injury and none have used an ambulance dataset to explore the spatial characteristics of injury. The purpose of this study was to describe the combined spatial and temporal characteristics of violent injury in a large urban centre.Using a geomatics framework and geographic information systems software, we studied 4,587 ambulance dispatches and 10,693 emergency room admissions for violent injury occurrences among adults (aged 18-64 in Toronto, Canada, during 2002 and 2004, using population-based datasets. We created kernel density and choropleth maps for 24-hour periods and four-hour daily time periods and compared location of ambulance dispatches and patient residences with local land use and socioeconomic characteristics. We used multivariate regressions to control for confounding factors. We found the locations of violent injury and the residence locations of those injured were both closely related to each other and clearly clustered in certain parts of the city characterised by high numbers of bars, social housing units, and homeless shelters, as well as lower household incomes. The night and early morning showed a distinctive peak in injuries and a shift in the location of injuries to a "nightlife" district. The locational pattern of patient residences remained unchanged during those times.Our results demonstrate that there is a distinctive spatio-temporal pattern in violent injury reflected in the ambulance data. People injured in this urban centre more commonly live in areas of social deprivation. During the day, locations of injury and locations of residences are similar. However, later at night, the injury location of highest density shifts to a "nightlife" district, whereas the residence locations of those most at risk of injury do not change.

  18. Imaging collagen type I fibrillogenesis with high spatiotemporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamov, Dimitar R, E-mail: stamov@jpk.com [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Stock, Erik [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Franz, Clemens M [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jähnke, Torsten; Haschke, Heiko [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen type I, belong to the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins and they have received much attention over the last five decades due to their large interactome, complex hierarchical structure and high mechanical stability. Nevertheless, the collagen self-assembly process is still incompletely understood. Determining the real-time kinetics of collagen type I formation is therefore pivotal for better understanding of collagen type I structure and function, but visualising the dynamic self-assembly process of collagen I on the molecular scale requires imaging techniques offering high spatiotemporal resolution. Fast and high-speed scanning atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide the means to study such processes on the timescale of seconds under near-physiological conditions. In this study we have applied fast AFM tip scanning to study the assembly kinetics of fibrillar collagen type I nanomatrices with a temporal resolution reaching eight seconds for a frame size of 500 nm. By modifying the buffer composition and pH value, the kinetics of collagen fibrillogenesis can be adjusted for optimal analysis by fast AFM scanning. We furthermore show that amplitude-modulation imaging can be successfully applied to extract additional structural information from collagen samples even at high scan rates. Fast AFM scanning with controlled amplitude modulation therefore provides a versatile platform for studying dynamic collagen self-assembly processes at high resolution. - Highlights: • Continuous non-invasive time-lapse investigation of collagen I fibrillogenesis in situ. • Imaging of collagen I self-assembly with high spatiotemporal resolution. • Application of setpoint modulation to study the hierarchical structure of collagen I. • Observing real-time formation of the D-banding pattern in collagen I.

  19. Spatio-temporal clustering of wildfires in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, R.; Pereira, M. G.; Caramelo, L.; Vega Orozco, C.; Kanevski, M.

    2012-04-01

    Several studies have shown that wildfires in Portugal presenthigh temporal as well as high spatial variability (Pereira et al., 2005, 2011). The identification and characterization of spatio-temporal clusters contributes to a comprehensivecharacterization of the fire regime and to improve the efficiency of fire prevention and combat activities. The main goalsin this studyare: (i) to detect the spatio-temporal clusters of burned area; and, (ii) to characterize these clusters along with the role of human and environmental factors. The data were supplied by the National Forest Authority(AFN, 2011) and comprises: (a)the Portuguese Rural Fire Database, PRFD, (Pereira et al., 2011) for the 1980-2007period; and, (b) the national mapping burned areas between 1990 and 2009. In this work, in order to complement the more common cluster analysis algorithms, an alternative approach based onscan statistics and on the permutation modelwas used. This statistical methodallows the detection of local excess events and to test if such an excess can reasonably have occurred by chance.Results obtained for different simulations performed for different spatial and temporal windows are presented, compared and interpreted.The influence of several fire factors such as (climate, vegetation type, etc.) is also assessed. Pereira, M.G., Trigo, R.M., DaCamara, C.C., Pereira, J.M.C., Leite, S.M., 2005:"Synoptic patterns associated with large summer forest fires in Portugal".Agricultural and Forest Meteorology. 129, 11-25. Pereira, M. G., Malamud, B. D., Trigo, R. M., and Alves, P. I.: The history and characteristics of the 1980-2005 Portuguese rural fire database, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 3343-3358, doi:10.5194/nhess-11-3343-2011, 2011 AFN, 2011: AutoridadeFlorestalNacional (National Forest Authority). Available at http://www.afn.min-agricultura.pt/portal.

  20. BioenergyKDF: Enabling Spatiotemporal Data Synthesis and Research Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Aaron T [ORNL; Movva, Sunil [ORNL; Karthik, Rajasekar [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; White, Devin A [ORNL; Thomas, Neil [ORNL; Chase, Adrian S Z [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (BioenergyKDF) is a scalable, web-based collaborative environment for scientists working on bioenergy related research in which the connections between data, literature, and models can be explored and more clearly understood. The fully-operational and deployed system, built on multiple open source libraries and architectures, stores contributions from the community of practice and makes them easy to find, but that is just its base functionality. The BioenergyKDF provides a national spatiotemporal decision support capability that enables data sharing, analysis, modeling, and visualization as well as fosters the development and management of the U.S. bioenergy infrastructure, which is an essential component of the national energy infrastructure. The BioenergyKDF is built on a flexible, customizable platform that can be extended to support the requirements of any user community especially those that work with spatiotemporal data. While there are several community data-sharing software platforms available, some developed and distributed by national governments, none of them have the full suite of capabilities available in BioenergyKDF. For example, this component-based platform and database independent architecture allows it to be quickly deployed to existing infrastructure and to connect to existing data repositories (spatial or otherwise). As new data, analysis, and features are added; the BioenergyKDF will help lead research and support decisions concerning bioenergy into the future, but will also enable the development and growth of additional communities of practice both inside and outside of the Department of Energy. These communities will be able to leverage the substantial investment the agency has made in the KDF platform to quickly stand up systems that are customized to their data and research needs.

  1. Spatiotemporal conceptual platform for querying archaeological information systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Sartzetaki, Mary; Sarris, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    Spatial and temporal distribution of archaeological sites has been shown to associate with several attributes including marine, water, mineral and food resources, climate conditions, geomorphological features, etc. In this study, archeological settlement attributes are evaluated under various associations in order to provide a specialized query platform in a geographic information system (GIS). Towards this end, a spatial database is designed to include a series of archaeological findings for a secluded geographic area of Crete in Greece. The key categories of the geodatabase include the archaeological type (palace, burial site, village, etc.), temporal information of the habitation/usage period (pre Minoan, Minoan, Byzantine, etc.), and the extracted geographical attributes of the sites (distance to sea, altitude, resources, etc.). Most of the related spatial attributes are extracted with readily available GIS tools. Additionally, a series of conceptual data attributes are estimated, including: Temporal relation of an era to a future one in terms of alteration of the archaeological type, topologic relations of various types and attributes, spatial proximity relations between various types. These complex spatiotemporal relational measures reveal new attributes towards better understanding of site selection for prehistoric and/or historic cultures, yet their potential combinations can become numerous. Therefore, after the quantification of the above mentioned attributes, they are classified as of their importance for archaeological site location modeling. Under this new classification scheme, the user may select a geographic area of interest and extract only the important attributes for a specific archaeological type. These extracted attributes may then be queried against the entire spatial database and provide a location map of possible new archaeological sites. This novel type of querying is robust since the user does not have to type a standard SQL query but

  2. High Spatio-Temporal Resolution Bathymetry Estimation and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsma, E. W. J.; Conley, D. C.; Davidson, M. A.; O'Hare, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, bathymetry estimates using video images have become increasingly accurate. With the cBathy code (Holman et al., 2013) fully operational, bathymetry results with 0.5 metres accuracy have been regularly obtained at Duck, USA. cBathy is based on observations of the dominant frequencies and wavelengths of surface wave motions and estimates the depth (and hence allows inference of bathymetry profiles) based on linear wave theory. Despite the good performance at Duck, large discrepancies were found related to tidal elevation and camera height (Bergsma et al., 2014) and on the camera boundaries. A tide dependent floating pixel and camera boundary solution have been proposed to overcome these issues (Bergsma et al., under review). The video-data collection is set estimate depths hourly on a grid with resolution in the order of 10x25 meters. Here, the application of the cBathy at Porthtowan in the South-West of England is presented. Hourly depth estimates are combined and analysed over a period of 1.5 years (2013-2014). In this work the focus is on the sub-tidal region, where the best cBathy results are achieved. The morphology of the sub-tidal bar is tracked with high spatio-temporal resolution on short and longer time scales. Furthermore, the impact of the storm and reset (sudden and large changes in bathymetry) of the sub-tidal area is clearly captured with the depth estimations. This application shows that the high spatio-temporal resolution of cBathy makes it a powerful tool for coastal research and coastal zone management.

  3. Spatiotemporal Analysis of AIDS Incidence Among Adults in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Lizzi, Elisangela Aparecida; Nunes, Altacilio Aparecido; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi

    2016-01-01

    AIDS is the fourth leading cause of death worldwide and, currently, the overall prevalence rate of HIV infection in Brazil is 0.5% among men and 0.3% among women. To evaluate the spatiotemporal trend of AIDS in Brazil from 2006 to 2012 and its relationship with human development index (HDI) and their components income, education and life expectancy. This ecological study evaluate the spatiotemporal trend of standardized incidence ratio of AIDS among adults in Brazil from 2006 to 2012 and its relationship with HDI by using a Bayesian analysis, considering the Brazilian Federal Units as units of analysis. The proposed statistical model allows obtaining a standardized incidence ratio (SIR, adjusted by gender and age). Among the men, our results show higher incidence rates in the States of the Southern regions as well as in the state of Amazonas (Northern Brazil). In females, we found other patterns for SIR, with higher incidence rates in the states of Rio de Janeiro (Southeast region), Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina (both in Southern region). Among men it was observed as an expressive association between the SIR values and the overall HDI and income and education components, but it was observed to have an inverse association with the life expectancy component. Among women, it is noted that the SIR values are associated with the overall HDI and the education components only at the beginning of the studied period. AIDS remains a major public health problem in Brazil, mainly in the southern and southeastern regions of the country. Considering its association with HDI, it is noted that the disease still remains related to the pattern observed in the early years of the studied period, at least in the more developed regions of Brazil. This certainly happened because of the chronicity of the disease, thus affecting people with good socioeconomic status.

  4. Effect of initial microstructure on the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of Ti during cold rolling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolyarov, V.V.; Zhu, Y.T.; Raab, G.I.; Zharikov, A.I.; Valiev, R.Z.

    2004-01-01

    Ultrafine-grained (UFG) Ti rods were produced via cold rolling UFG and coarse-grained (CG) Ti stocks. The initial UFG stock was produced via equal channel angular pressing. It was found that the initial UFG structure had beneficial influence on the mechanical properties of the cold-rolled Ti rods. Compared with Ti rods with initial CG microstructure, the Ti rods with the initial UFG microstructure have both higher strength and higher ductility after being cold rolled to varying strains. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Ti rods with the initial UFG microstructure had finer, more homogeneous microstructures after cold rolling. This study demonstrates the merit of UFG Ti processed by ECAP for further shaping and forming into structural components with superior mechanical properties

  5. Studying Microstructure in Molecular Crystals With Nanoindentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Manish Kumar; Desiraju, Gautam R; Ramamurty, Upadrasta

    2014-01-01

    Intergrowth polymorphism refers to the existence of distinct structural domains within a single crystal of a compound. The phenomenon is exhibited by form II of the active pharmaceutical ingredient felodipine, and the associated microstructure is a significant feature of the compound's structural...

  6. Microstructure and transformation kinetics in bainitic steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luzginova, N.V.

    2008-01-01

    With the aim of reaching a better understanding of the microstructure evolution and the overall phase transformation kinetics in hyper-eutectoid steels a commercial SAE 52100 bearing steel and 7 model alloys with different concentrations of chromium, cobalt and aluminum have been studied in this

  7. Cellular automaton simulation of microstructure evolution during ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    different composition and austenite grain size. Using the ..... Figure 1. Microstructures of 0⋅28% C steel heat treated samples: a. cooling rate 1⋅75°C/S and equivalent grain diameter .... qualitative predictions point to the essential soundness.

  8. Microstructured optical fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Town, Graham E.; McCosker, Ravi; Yuan, Scott Wu

    2010-01-01

    We describe a dual-core microstructured optical fiber designed for refractive index sensing of fluids. We show that by using the exponential dependence of intercore coupling on analyte refractive index, both large range and high sensitivity can be achieved in the one device. We also show...

  9. Spontaneous emission from active dielectric microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2001-01-01

    and engineered due to the dependence of the emission rate on the location and polarisation of the emitters in the structure. This paper addresses the methods of quantum electrodynamics of dielectric media which enable calculation of the local rate of spontaneous emission in active microstructures....

  10. Microstructural characterization of pipe bomb fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Otto; Oxley, Jimmie; Smith, James; Platek, Michael; Ghonem, Hamouda; Bernier, Evan; Downey, Markus; Cumminskey, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Recovered pipe bomb fragments, exploded under controlled conditions, have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and microhardness. Specifically, this paper examines the microstructural changes in plain carbon-steel fragments collected after the controlled explosion of galvanized, schedule 40, continuously welded, steel pipes filled with various smokeless powders. A number of microstructural changes were observed in the recovered pipe fragments: deformation of the soft alpha-ferrite grains, deformation of pearlite colonies, twin formation, bands of distorted pearlite colonies, slip bands, and cross-slip bands. These microstructural changes were correlated with the relative energy of the smokeless powder fillers. The energy of the smokeless powder was reflected in a reduction in thickness of the pipe fragments (due to plastic strain prior to fracture) and an increase in microhardness. Moreover, within fragments from a single pipe, there was a radial variation in microhardness, with the microhardness at the outer wall being greater than that at the inner wall. These findings were consistent with the premise that, with the high energy fillers, extensive plastic deformation and wall thinning occurred prior to pipe fracture. Ultimately, the information collected from this investigation will be used to develop a database, where the fragment microstructure and microhardness will be correlated with type of explosive filler and bomb design. Some analyses, specifically wall thinning and microhardness, may aid in field characterization of explosive devices.

  11. Elastocapillary fabrication of three-dimensional microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Honschoten, J.W.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Ondarcuhu, T.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Sundaram, J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2010-01-01

    We describe the fabrication of three-dimensional microstructures by means of capillary forces. Using an origami-like technique, planar silicon nitride structures of various geometries are folded to produce three-dimensional objects of 50–100 m. Capillarity is a particularly effective mechanism since

  12. Biomechanical aspects of bone microstructure in vertebrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-10-29

    Oct 29, 2009 ... Biomechanical or biophysical principles can be applied to study biological structures in their modern or fossil form. Bone is an important tissue in paleontological studies as it is a commonly preserved element in most fossil vertebrates, and can often allow its microstructures such as lacuna and canaliculi to ...

  13. Microstructural characterization of stone wool fibre network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapelle, Lucie; Brøndsted, Povl; Kusano, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of fibrous network as complex as stone wool materials requires a relevant description of their microstructure and architecture. In this study, different methods have been proposed to characterize the fibre orientation, diameter and length of fibres as well...

  14. On the microstructure of bituminous binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.; Dillingh, E.C.; Hermse, C.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the common features and the evolution of microstructures of bituminous binders regardless of their grade (PEN 10/20 to 160/220) and source/origin using the atomic force microscope operated in phase contrast mode. All bituminous binders show the same

  15. Automatic detection of microaneurysms using microstructure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with DIARETDB0 and DIARETDB1 datasets using a classifier based on multi- ... developed, the accurate detection of microaneurysm in colour retinal images .... Two dictionary elements of vessel and non-vessel were used in the sparse rep- ..... Images are analyzed from the point of view of its specific microstructures: ridges,.

  16. Bilaterally Microstructured Thin Polydimethylsiloxane Film Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Yu, Liyun; Hassouneh, Suzan Sager

    2015-01-01

    Thin PDMS films with complex microstructures are used in the manufacturing of dielectric electro active polymer (DEAP) actuators, sensors and generators, to protect the metal electrode from large strains and to assure controlled actuation. The current manufacturing process at Danfoss Polypower A/...

  17. 3D microstructuring of biodegradable polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagstrup, Johan; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    Biopolymer films with a thickness of 100μm are prepared using spin coating technique with solutions consisting of 25wt.% polycaprolactone or poly-l-lactide in dichloromethane. SU-8 stamps are fabricated using three photolithography steps. The stamps are used to emboss 3D microstructures in the bi...

  18. Microstructural evolution in inhomogeneous elastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jou, H.J.; Leo, P.H.; Lowengrub, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    We simulate the diffusional evolution of microstructures produced by solid state diffusional transformations in elastically stressed binary alloys in two dimensions. The microstructure consists of arbitrarily shaped precipitates embedded coherently in an infinite matrix. The precipitate and matrix are taken to be elastically isotropic, although they may have different elastic constants (elastically inhomogeneous). Both far-field applied strains and mismatch strains between the phases are considered. The diffusion and elastic fields are calculated using the boundary integral method, together with a small scale preconditioner to remove ill-conditioning. The precipitate-matrix interfaces are tracked using a nonstiff time updating method. The numerical method is spectrally accurate and efficient. Simulations of a single precipitate indicate that precipitate shapes depend strongly on the mass flux into the system as well as on the elastic fields. Growing shapes (positive mass flux) are dendritic while equilibrium shapes (zero mass flux) are squarish. Simulations of multiparticle systems show complicated interactions between precipitate morphology and the overall development of microstructure (i.e., precipitate alignment, translation, merging, and coarsening). In both single and multiple particle simulations, the details of the microstructural evolution depend strongly o the elastic inhomogeneity, misfit strain, and applied fields. 57 refs., 24 figs

  19. Microstructure characterizaton of advanced oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Gerber, E.W.; McCord, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    Preirradiation porosity, grain size, and microcomposition characteristics are presented for selected advanced oxide (PuO 2 -UO 2 ) LMFBR developmental fuels fabricated for irradiation testing in EBR-II. Quantitative microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and a recently developed quantitative autoradiographic technique are utilized to relate microstructure characteristics to fabrication parameters

  20. Zirconium influence on microstructure of aluminide coatings ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Influence of Zr on the microstructure and phase characteristics of aluminide diffusion coatings deposited on the nickel .... of hydrogen gas into CVD reactor, where nickel samples .... presence of three phases: β-NiAl, γ -Ni3Al and γ-Ni(Al).