WorldWideScience

Sample records for spatially determine soil

  1. Determinants of spatial variability of methane emissions from wet grasslands on peat soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol-Van Dasselaar, van den A.; Beusichem, van M.L.; Oenema, O.

    1999-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions from soils, representing the consequence of CH4 production, CH4 consumption and CH4 transport, are poorly characterised and show a large spatial variability. This study aimed to assess the determinants of field-scale spatial variability of CH4 emissions from wet grasslands on

  2. Is the spatial distribution of mankind's most basic economic traits determined by climate and soil alone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jan; Sieber, Andrea

    2010-05-05

    Several authors, most prominently Jared Diamond (1997, Guns, Germs and Steel), have investigated biogeographic determinants of human history and civilization. The timing of the transition to an agricultural lifestyle, associated with steep population growth and consequent societal change, has been suggested to be affected by the availability of suitable organisms for domestication. These factors were shown to quantitatively explain some of the current global inequalities of economy and political power. Here, we advance this approach one step further by looking at climate and soil as sole determining factors. As a simplistic 'null model', we assume that only climate and soil conditions affect the suitability of four basic landuse types - agriculture, sedentary animal husbandry, nomadic pastoralism and hunting-and-gathering. Using ecological niche modelling (ENM), we derive spatial predictions of the suitability for these four landuse traits and apply these to the Old World and Australia. We explore two aspects of the properties of these predictions, conflict potential and population density. In a calculation of overlap of landuse suitability, we map regions of potential conflict between landuse types. Results are congruent with a number of real, present or historical, regions of conflict between ethnic groups associated with different landuse traditions. Furthermore, we found that our model of agricultural suitability explains a considerable portion of population density variability. We mapped residuals from this correlation, finding geographically highly structured deviations that invite further investigation. We also found that ENM of agricultural suitability correlates with a metric of local wealth generation (Gross Domestic Product, Purchasing Power Parity). From simplified assumptions on the links between climate, soil and landuse we are able to provide good predictions on complex features of human geography. The spatial distribution of deviations from ENM

  3. Using Actively Heated Fibre Optics (AHFO) to determine soil thermal conductivity and soil moisture content at high spatial and temporal resolution

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    Ciocca, Francesco; Abesser, Corinna; Hannah, David; Blaen, Philip; Chalari, Athena; Mondanos, Michael; Krause, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Optical fibre distributed temperature sensing (DTS) is increasingly used in environmental monitoring and for subsurface characterisation, e.g. to obtain precise measurements of soil temperature at high spatio-temporal resolution, over several kilometres of optical fibre cable. When combined with active heating of metal elements embedded in the optical fibre cable (active-DTS), the temperature response of the soil to heating provides valuable information from which other important soil parameters, such as thermal conductivity and soil moisture content, can be inferred. In this presentation, we report the development of an Actively Heated Fibre Optics (AHFO) method for the characterisation of soil thermal conductivity and soil moisture dynamics at high temporal and spatial resolutions at a vegetated hillslope site in central England. The study site is located within a juvenile forest adjacent to the Birmingham Institute of Forest Research (BIFoR) experimental site. It is instrumented with three loops of a 500m hybrid-optical cable installed at 10cm, 25cm and 40cm depths. Active DTS surveys were undertaken in June and October 2016, collecting soil temperature data at 0.25m intervals along the cable, prior to, during and after the 900s heating phase. Soil thermal conductivity and soil moisture were determined according to Ciocca et al. 2012, applied to both the cooling and the heating phase. Independent measurements of soil thermal conductivity and soil moisture content were collected using thermal needle probes, calibrated capacitance-based probes and laboratory methods. Results from both the active DTS survey and independent in-situ and laboratory measurements will be presented, including the observed relationship between thermal conductivity and moisture content at the study site and how it compares against theoretical curves used by the AHFO methods. The spatial variability of soil thermal conductivity and soil moisture content, as observed using the different

  4. Spatial variation in vegetation structure coupled to plant available water determined by two-dimensional soil resistivity profiling in a Brazilian savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joice N; Bustamante, Mercedes; Garcia-Montiel, Diana C; Caylor, Kelly K; Davidson, Eric A

    2007-08-01

    Tropical savannas commonly exhibit large spatial heterogeneity in vegetation structure. Fine-scale patterns of soil moisture, particularly in the deeper soil layers, have not been well investigated as factors possibly influencing vegetation patterns in savannas. Here we investigate the role of soil water availability and heterogeneity related to vegetation structure in an area of the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado). Our objective was to determine whether horizontal spatial variations of soil water are coupled with patterns of vegetation structure across tens of meters. We applied a novel methodological approach to convert soil electrical resistivity measurements along three 275-m transects to volumetric water content and then to estimates of plant available water (PAW). Structural attributes of the woody vegetation, including plant position, height, basal circumference, crown dimensions, and leaf area index, were surveyed within twenty-two 100-m(2) plots along the same transects, where no obvious vegetation gradients had been apparent. Spatial heterogeneity was evaluated through measurements of spatial autocorrelation in both PAW and vegetation structure. Comparisons with null models suggest that plants were randomly distributed over the transect with the greatest mean PAW and lowest PAW heterogeneity, and clustered in the driest and most heterogeneous transect. Plant density was positively related with PAW in the top 4 m of soil. The density-dependent vegetation attributes that are related to plot biomass, such as sum of tree heights per plot, exhibited spatial variation patterns that were remarkably similar to spatial variation of PAW in the top 4 m of soil. For PAW below 4 m depth, mean vegetation attributes, such as mean height, were negatively correlated with PAW, suggesting greater water uptake from the deep soil by plants of larger stature. These results are consistent with PAW heterogeneity being an important structuring factor in the plant distribution at the

  5. The method of determining surface water erosion influence on agricultural valorization of soils with usage of geoprocessing techniques and spatial information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prus Barbara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to propose methodical solutions concerning synthetic agricultural analysis of production space which consists in combined (synthetic – in spatial and statistical contexts – analysis and evaluation of quality and farming utility of soils in connection with soils erosive risk level. The paper is aimed at presentation of methodology useful in such type of analyses as well as demonstration to what extent the areas of farming production space being subject to restrictive protection are exposed to destructive effect of surface water erosion. Own factor (HDSP.E was suggested, which is a high degree synthesis of soil protection in connection with degrees of surface water erosion risk. The proposed methodology was used for detailed spatial analyses performed for Tomice – the Małopolska rural commune (case study. The area model elaborated for the proposed methodology’s purpose faced with soils mechanical composition allowed to make a model of surface water erosion in five-grade scale. Synthetic evaluation (product of spatial objects on numerous thematic layers of quality and farming utility of soils and also zones of surface water erosion risk allowed to assign spatial distribution of HDSP.E factor (abbreviation of high degree of soil protection combined with erosion. The analyses enabled to determine proportional contribution of the most valuable resources of farming production space that are subject to soil erosion negative phenomenon. Geoprocessing techniques used for the analyses of environmental elements of farming production space were applied in the paper. The analysis of spatial distribution of researched phenomena was elaborated in Quantum GIS programme.

  6. Amount, determining factors and spatial distribution of soil organic carbon storage in the Dano catchment (Southwest Burkina-Faso)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounkpatin, O.; Op de Hipt, F.; Bossa, A. Y.; Welp, G.; Amelung, W.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to project and to mitigate the impacts of climate change is closely related to the evaluation of soil organic carbon (SOC) content and stock across different types of land use and soil groups. Therefore, this study aimed at estimating the surface and subsoil organic carbon stocks in different land use systems and across various soil groups. A further aim was to assess the spatial variability of SOC content and stocks and how this is controlled by climate and site properties. The Random Forest (RF) modelling was used and compared to Ordinary Kriging interpolation (OK) for the topsoil SOC and stock. About 70 soil profiles were described along 16 transects with 197 samples collected from different horizons up to 1 m depth where possible. In addition, 1205 samples were collected within an intensive auger grid mapping. Mid-infrared spectroscopy and partial least-squares analysis were used as a fast and low-cost technique to handle the large amount of samples for the SOC estimation. The natural/semi natural vegetation recorded the highest SOC stock in the topsoil (28.6 t C ha-1) as compared to the cropland (25.5 t C ha-1). Over 1 m depth, Gleysols (87.4 t C ha-1) stored the highest amount of SOC stock followed by the Cambisols (76. t C ha-1) and the Plinthosols (73.1 t C ha-1) while the lowest were found in the Lixisols (57.8 t C ha-1). For the topsoil, the RF model revealed soil properties such as cation exchange capacity (CEC) and stone content as main factors affecting SOC content variability while CEC and bulk density were the major drivers for the subsoil. The carbon stock variability was mainly affected by the CEC and the reference soil group in the topsoil while horizon thickness and bulk density constituted the main factors for the subsoil. The geostatistical evaluation proved that the SOC content in the Dano catchment has a moderate spatial autocorrelation while the carbon stock was strongly spatially dependent. The RF gave a better prediction for

  7. Dryland soil microbial communities display spatial biogeographic patterns associated with soil depth and soil parent material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Blaire; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Belnap, Jayne; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are common to drylands worldwide. We employed replicated, spatially nested sampling and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to describe the soil microbial communities in three soils derived from different parent material (sandstone, shale, and gypsum). For each soil type, two depths (biocrusts, 0–1 cm; below-crust soils, 2–5 cm) and two horizontal spatial scales (15 cm and 5 m) were sampled. In all three soils, Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria demonstrated significantly higher relative abundance in the biocrusts, while Chloroflexi and Archaea were significantly enriched in the below-crust soils. Biomass and diversity of the communities in biocrusts or below-crust soils did not differ with soil type. However, biocrusts on gypsum soil harbored significantly larger populations of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria and lower populations of Cyanobacteria. Numerically dominant operational taxonomic units (OTU; 97% sequence identity) in the biocrusts were conserved across the soil types, whereas two dominant OTUs in the below-crust sand and shale soils were not identified in the gypsum soil. The uniformity with which small-scale vertical community differences are maintained across larger horizontal spatial scales and soil types is a feature of dryland ecosystems that should be considered when designing management plans and determining the response of biocrusts to environmental disturbances.

  8. Exploratory and spatial data analysis (EDA-SDA) for determining regional background levels and anomalies of potentially toxic elements in soils from Catorce-Matehuala, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiprés, J.A.; Castro-Larragoitia, J.; Monroy, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    The threshold between geochemical background and anomalies can be influenced by the methodology selected for its estimation. Environmental evaluations, particularly those conducted in mineralized areas, must consider this when trying to determinate the natural geochemical status of a study area, quantifying human impacts, or establishing soil restoration values for contaminated sites. Some methods in environmental geochemistry incorporate the premise that anomalies (natural or anthropogenic) and background data are characterized by their own probabilistic distributions. One of these methods uses exploratory data analysis (EDA) on regional geochemical data sets coupled with a geographic information system (GIS) to spatially understand the processes that influence the geochemical landscape in a technique that can be called a spatial data analysis (SDA). This EDA-SDA methodology was used to establish the regional background range from the area of Catorce-Matehuala in north-central Mexico. Probability plots of the data, particularly for those areas affected by human activities, show that the regional geochemical background population is composed of smaller subpopulations associated with factors such as soil type and parent material. This paper demonstrates that the EDA-SDA method offers more certainty in defining thresholds between geochemical background and anomaly than a numeric technique, making it a useful tool for regional geochemical landscape analysis and environmental geochemistry studies.

  9. Spatial scale drives patterns in soil bacterial diversity: Spatial scale drives soil diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Sarah L. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Gibbons, Sean M. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Graduate Program in Biophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th St. Chicago IL 60637 USA; Owens, Sarah M. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Department of Ecology and Evolution, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, 1101 E. 57th St. Chicago IL 606037 USA; Johnston, Eric R. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Jastrow, Julie D. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Gilbert, Jack A. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Department of Ecology and Evolution, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, 1101 E. 57th St. Chicago IL 606037 USA; Marine Biological Laboratory, 7 MBL Street Woods Hole MA 02543 USA; College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 China; Meyer, Folker [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA

    2016-03-21

    Soil microbial communities are essential for ecosystem function, but linking community composition to biogeochemical processes is challenging because of high microbial diversity and large spatial variability of most soil characteristics. We investigated soil bacterial community structure in a switchgrass stand planted on soil with a history of grassland vegetation at high spatial resolution to determine whether biogeographic trends occurred at the centimeter scale. Moreover, we tested whether such heterogeneity, if present, influenced community structure within or among ecosystems. Pronounced heterogeneity was observed at centimeter scales, with abrupt changes in relative abundance of phyla from sample to sample. At the ecosystem scale (> 10 m), however, bacterial community composition and structure were subtly, but significantly, altered by fertilization, with higher alpha diversity in fertilized plots. Moreover, by comparing these data with data from 1772 soils from the Earth Microbiome Project, it was found that 20% diverse globally sourced soil samples, while grassland soils shared approximately 40% of their operational taxonomic units with the current study. By spanning several orders of magnitude, the analysis suggested that extreme patchiness characterized community structure at smaller scales but that coherent patterns emerged at larger length scales.

  10. Geochemical Background and Baseline Values Determination and Spatial Distribution of Heavy Metal Pollution in Soils of the Andes Mountain Range (Cajamarca-Huancavelica, Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Francés, Fernando; Alonso Rojo, Pilar; García Sánchez, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Concentrations of seven heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and one metalloid (As) as well as various parameters (pH, organic carbon, granulometric analysis and cation exchange capacity) were analyzed in 77 soil samples collected in the mining areas of La Zanja and Colquirrumi (Department of Cajamarca) and Julcani (Department of Huancavelica). Our study proposed geochemical baseline values for heavy metals in a natural region (La Zanja) from samples collected during the period of the environmental impact study (2006), that is, from an earlier period which occurred at the beginning of the exploitation of the current gold mine. The baseline values obtained were as follows: 8.26 mg·kg−1 for Cr; 56.97 mg·kg−1 for Ni; 22, 20 mg·kg−1 for the Cu; 47.42 mg·kg−1 for Zn; 27.50 mg·kg−1 for As; 4.36 mg·kg−1 for Cd; 4.89 mg·kg−1 for Hg, and 44.87 mg·kg−1 for Pb. Through the use of different indices of heavy metal contamination (geo-accumulation index (Igeo), improved Nemerow index (IIN) and potential ecological risk index (RI)), the degree of pollution caused by mining activities in two areas, Colquirrumi and Julcani, which have a high density of mining sites in operation, was determined. The values obtained from these indices indicated that the Colquirrumi region was the most contaminated, followed by Julcani. The area of La Zanja, despite being free of mining operations, presented slight diffuse pollution. Several positive correlations were obtained, with a high level of significance, between pH, organic carbon content, cation exchange capacity, and the Cr, Pb and Ni concentrations of the soils. The spatial distribution of the heavy metals was realized by means of the interpolation method of ordinary kriging. The results obtained and the experience gained in this work were necessary to facilitate the identification of soil contamination processes in high altitude areas of the Andes Western Cordillera (Peru) as a basis for taking appropriate

  11. Geochemical Background and Baseline Values Determination and Spatial Distribution of Heavy Metal Pollution in Soils of the Andes Mountain Range (Cajamarca-Huancavelica, Peru).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Francés, Fernando; Martinez-Graña, Antonio; Alonso Rojo, Pilar; García Sánchez, Antonio

    2017-07-31

    Concentrations of seven heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and one metalloid (As) as well as various parameters (pH, organic carbon, granulometric analysis and cation exchange capacity) were analyzed in 77 soil samples collected in the mining areas of La Zanja and Colquirrumi (Department of Cajamarca) and Julcani (Department of Huancavelica). Our study proposed geochemical baseline values for heavy metals in a natural region (La Zanja) from samples collected during the period of the environmental impact study (2006), that is, from an earlier period which occurred at the beginning of the exploitation of the current gold mine. The baseline values obtained were as follows: 8.26 mg kg-1 for Cr; 56.97 mg kg-1 for Ni; 22, 20 mg kg-1 for the Cu; 47.42 mg kg-1 for Zn; 27.50 mg kg-1 for As; 4.36 mg kg-1 for Cd; 4.89 mg kg-1 for Hg, and 44.87 mg kg-1 for Pb. Through the use of different indices of heavy metal contamination (geo-accumulation index (Igeo), improved Nemerow index (IIN) and potential ecological risk index (RI)), the degree of pollution caused by mining activities in two areas, Colquirrumi and Julcani, which have a high density of mining sites in operation, was determined. The values obtained from these indices indicated that the Colquirrumi region was the most contaminated, followed by Julcani. The area of La Zanja, despite being free of mining operations, presented slight diffuse pollution. Several positive correlations were obtained, with a high level of significance, between pH, organic carbon content, cation exchange capacity, and the Cr, Pb and Ni concentrations of the soils. The spatial distribution of the heavy metals was realized by means of the interpolation method of ordinary kriging. The results obtained and the experience gained in this work were necessary to facilitate the identification of soil contamination processes in high altitude areas of the Andes Western Cordillera (Peru) as a basis for taking appropriate measures when restoring

  12. VIS/NIR Spectroscopy to determine the spatial variation of the weathering degree in Paleogene clay soil - London Clay Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Mohammed; Gibson, Andy, ,, Dr; Koor, Nick, ,, Dr; Gale, Professor Andy; Huggett, Jenny, ,, Dr; Branch, Steve

    2017-04-01

    The London Clay Formation (LCF) which underlies much of South-East England is hugely important as a construction medium. However, its geotechnical performance (shear strength, compressive strength, shrink-swell behaviour, etc. ) is greatly affected by its degree of weathering. Despite this importance, little attention has been focussed on a robust method to define and measure its degree of weathering. This is perhaps a result of a well-known colour change from bluish-grey to brown that accompanies 'weathering' and considered to be the result of oxidisation (Chandler and Apted 1988). Through wide experience, this definition is normally effective, but it is perhaps subjective and reliant on the experience of the investigator and the ability to observe samples or exposures. More objective investigation, typically using SEM is not normally economically feasible or expedient for construction works. We propose a simple, robust method to characterise the degree of weathering in the LCF using reflective or Visible-Near-InfraRed-Spectroscopy (VNIRS). 24 samples were extracted from 2 boreholes drilled in the Hampstead area of London to depths of 12 m within the uppermost Claygate Member of the LCF. VNIRS spectra (350-2500 nm) were measured from all samples and compared with XRD, XRF, SEM and PSD results on the same samples. Results show increased magnitude of absorption features related to clay mineralogy around 1400, 1900 and 2200 nm to a depth of 5 m beneath ground level. Beneath this depth, the absorption features show little variation. SEM analyses show corresponding changes in the degradation of pyrite crystals and individual clay (illite/smectite). These preliminary results show that there is a good potential for VNIRS spectroscopy to determine the variation of weathering in the LCF.

  13. Spatial variation of soil physical properties in adjacent alluvial and colluvial soils under Ustic moisture regime

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    Sağlam, M.; Öztürk, H. S.; Erşahin, S.; Özkan, A. I.

    2011-04-01

    Soils vary spatially due to differences in soil management and soil formation factors. The soil spatial variability is an important determinant of efficiency of farm inputs and yield. This study was carried out to identify and compare spatial variation of some soil physical properties by geostatistics in alluvial and adjacent colluvial soils formed under ustic moisture regime at Gökhöyük State Farm (1750 ha), Amasya, Turkey. Seventy four soil samples were collected on a regular grid (500 × 500-m) and additional 224 samples were collected on 28 500-m fine-transects, randomly superimposed between the nodes of grids. Semivariograms and corresponding kriging maps for soil texture, soil organic matter (SOM), bulk density (BD), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), and available water content (AWC) were prepared. Statistical analyses were conducted separately for colluvial and alluvial sites as well as whole area. The soils in alluvial site is rich in clay with high BD and SOM, and low in Ks and AWC; and the soils in colluvial site was designated as low in Ks, SOM, and AWC and high in BD. All variables, except SOM, showed a strong spatial dependency. In general, nugget, sill and range values of most of the studied soil variables decreased from alluvial site to colluvial site. When local (alluvial and colluvial sites separately) and global (alluvial + colluvial) kriged maps for BD, AWC, and soil textural separates, use of global semivariograms (one semivariogram for entire study area) resulted in lost of some details in colluvial sites, suggesting that local semivariograms for alluvial and colluvial soils should be used in kriging predictions at the farm. The results had significant implications for water management as AWC was spatially associated to clay content in alluvial site and to clay and sand contents in colluvial site.

  14. Landscape Metrics to Predict Soil Spatial Patterns

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    Gillin, C. P.; McGuire, K. J.; Bailey, S.; Prisley, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent literature has advocated the application of hydropedology, or the integration of hydrology and pedology, to better understand hydrologic flowpaths and soil spatial heterogeneity in a landscape. Hydropedology can be used to describe soil units affected by distinct topography, geology, and hydrology. Such a method has not been applied to digital soil mapping in the context of spatial variations in hydrological and biogeochemical processes. The purpose of this study is to use field observations of soil morphology, geospatial information technology, and a multinomial logistic regression model to predict the distribution of five hydropedological units (HPUs) across a 41-hectare forested headwater catchment in New England. Each HPU reflects varying degrees of lateral flow influence on soil development. Ninety-six soil characterization pits were located throughout the watershed, and HPU type was identified at each pit based on the presence and thickness of genetic soil horizons. Digital terrain analysis was conducted using ArcGIS and SAGA software to compute topographic and landscape metrics. Results indicate that each HPU occurs under specific topographic settings that influence subsurface hydrologic conditions. Among the most important landscape metrics are distance from stream, distance from bedrock outcrop, upslope accumulated area, the topographic wetness index, the downslope index, and curvature. Our project is unique in that it delineates high resolution soil units using a process-based morphological approach rather than a traditional taxonomical method taken by conventional soil surveys. Hydropedological predictor models can be a valuable tool for informing forest and land management decisions, water quality planning, soil carbon accounting, and understanding subsurface hydrologic dynamics. They can also be readily calibrated for regions of differing geology, topography, and climate regimes.

  15. Spatial and linear correlations between soil and corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alessandro Chioderoli

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Technologies setting at Agricultural production system have the main characteristics the vertical productivity, reduced costs, soil physical, chemical and biological improvement to promote production sustainable growth. Thus, the study aimed to determine the variability and the linear and special correlations between the plant and soil attributes in order to select and indicate good representation of soil physical quality for forage productivity. In the growing season of 2006, on the Fazenda Bonança in Pereira Barreto (SP, the productivity of autumn corn forage (FDM in an irrigated no-tillage system and the soil physical properties were analyzed. The purpose was to study the variability and the linear and spatial correlations between the plant and soil properties, to select an indicator of soil physical quality related to corn forage yield. A geostatistical grid was installed to collect soil and plant data, with 125 sampling points in an area of 2,500 m². The results show that the studied properties did not vary randomly and that data variability was low to very high, with well-defined spatial patterns, ranging from 7.8 to 38.0 m. On the other hand, the linear correlation between the plant and the soil properties was low and highly significant. The pairs forage dry matter versus microporosity and stem diameter versus bulk density were best correlated in the 0-0.10 m layer, while the other pairs - forage dry matter versus macro - and total porosity - were inversely correlated in the same layer. However, from the spatial point of view, there was a high inverse correlation between forage dry matter with microporosity, so that microporosity in the 0-0.10 m layer can be considered a good indicator of soil physical quality, with a view to corn forage yield.

  16. Spatial distribution of moisture and its relation with soil texture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Largaespada

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available At Esmeralda Farm (Guácimo, Limón Province, C.R., planted to banana cv. Valery, the spatial distribution of soil humidity, and its relationship to some physical properties, were analyzed to determine the variability between the traditional method and use of TDR (Time Domain Reflectrometer in the determination of soil humidity. Sampling was done in a quadricuar pattern, with 36 measurement points georeferenced by GPS at 2 soil depths. At each point the volumetric soil water was measured with 3 different TDR equipments (300, MP and MT, and compared with the traditional method of volumetric humidity (VHM determination. Soil samples were also collected, for texture analysis; with these data, a geostatistical analysis was performed and the corresponding maps were drafted. The soils, of Loam to clayey Loam texture, showed variability between TDR and these determinations regarding the MHV, regardless of depth. On the surface, the highest correlation was found between the values of MHV and TDR-300 (r=0.69, followed by TDRMT (r=0.63 and finally the TDR-MP (r=0.59. At 30 to 60 cm depth, a positive but lower ratio values was found compared MHV with TRD- 300 and TDR-MP (0.47 and 0.38, respectively; no relationship was found with TDR-MT at this depth. In terms of field moisture map, a good representation between methods was found and it can be said that this method was effective in representing the spatial variation of soil moisture.

  17. Factor analysis of soil spatial variability in gully erosion area of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of soil characteristics on gully development and distribution has made it desirable to determine the spatial variability of its physical and chemical properties. This paper examines the spatial variability of soil properties and factors contributing to the general pattern of variability in Agulu- Nanka- Oko gully complex, ...

  18. Spatial Grouping Determines Temporal Integration

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    Hermens, Frouke; Scharnowski, Frank; Herzog, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    To make sense out of a continuously changing visual world, people need to integrate features across space and time. Despite more than a century of research, the mechanisms of features integration are still a matter of debate. To examine how temporal and spatial integration interact, the authors measured the amount of temporal fusion (a measure of…

  19. Spatial determinants of poverty in rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwi, Paul O; Ndeng'e, Godfrey; Kristjanson, Patti; Arunga, Mike; Notenbaert, An; Omolo, Abisalom; Henninger, Norbert; Benson, Todd; Kariuki, Patrick; Owuor, John

    2007-10-23

    This article investigates the link between poverty incidence and geographical conditions within rural locations in Kenya. Evidence from poverty maps for Kenya and other developing countries suggests that poverty and income distribution are not homogenous. We use spatial regression techniques to explore the effects of geographic factors on poverty. Slope, soil type, distance/travel time to public resources, elevation, type of land use, and demographic variables prove to be significant in explaining spatial patterns of poverty. However, differential influence of these and other factors at the location level shows that provinces in Kenya are highly heterogeneous; hence different spatial factors are important in explaining welfare levels in different areas within provinces, suggesting that targeted propoor policies are needed. Policy simulations are conducted to explore the impact of various interventions on location-level poverty levels. Investments in roads and improvements in soil fertility are shown to potentially reduce poverty rates, with differential impacts in different regions.

  20. Soil nutrients influence spatial distributions of tropical tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Robert; Dalling, James W; Harms, Kyle E; Yavitt, Joseph B; Stallard, Robert F; Mirabello, Matthew; Hubbell, Stephen P; Valencia, Renato; Navarrete, Hugo; Vallejo, Martha; Foster, Robin B

    2007-01-16

    The importance of niche vs. neutral assembly mechanisms in structuring tropical tree communities remains an important unsettled question in community ecology [Bell G (2005) Ecology 86:1757-1770]. There is ample evidence that species distributions are determined by soils and habitat factors at landscape (Yasuni), and Panama (Barro Colorado Island). Using spatial distribution maps of >0.5 million individual trees of 1,400 species and 10 essential plant nutrients, we used Monte Carlo simulations of species distributions to test plant-soil associations against null expectations based on dispersal assembly. We found that the spatial distributions of 36-51% of tree species at these sites show strong associations to soil nutrient distributions. Neutral dispersal assembly cannot account for these plant-soil associations or the observed niche breadths of these species. These results indicate that belowground resource availability plays an important role in the assembly of tropical tree communities at local scales and provide the basis for future investigations on the mechanisms of resource competition among tropical tree species.

  1. Strategies for determining soil-loss tolerance

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    Alexander, Earl B.

    1988-11-01

    Excessive soil losses due to erosion or lateral displacement by machinery impair productivity. Some soil loss is tolerable, but not so much that plant productivity diminishes. Thus productivity is the dominant concern in determining soil-loss tolerance. The effects of soil loss on productivity, however, are difficult to determine. Therefore, two alternatives are discussed for determining the limits of soil loss, or soil-loss tolerance. These alternatives are the maintenance of soil organic matter and, for shallow and moderately deep soils, the maintenance of soil depth. They are not new strategies, but our rapidly increasing knowledge of the dynamics of soil organic matter and the rates of soil formation from bedrock or consolidated sediments warrants the reconsideration of these alternatives. Reductions in either soil organic matter or the depth of shallow or moderately deep soils will lead to declining productivity. Soil organic matter, considered to be a surrogate for productivity, is much easier to monitor than is productivity. Also, there are many computer models for predicting the effects of management on soil organic matter. Recently compiled data on rates of soil formation suggest that soil losses of 1 t/a (2.24 Mg/ha yr) are greater than the rate of replenishment by the weathering of lithic or paralithic material in all but very wet climates.

  2. Controls of Soil Spatial Variability in a Dry Tropical Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Pulla

    Full Text Available We examined the roles of lithology, topography, vegetation and fire in generating local-scale (<1 km2 soil spatial variability in a seasonally dry tropical forest (SDTF in southern India. For this, we mapped soil (available nutrients, Al, total C, pH, moisture and texture in the top 10 cm, rock outcrops, topography, all native woody plants ≥1 cm diameter at breast height (DBH, and spatial variation in fire frequency (times burnt during the 17 years preceding soil sampling in a permanent 50-ha plot. Unlike classic catenas, lower elevation soils had lesser moisture, plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn, Mg, Zn, B, clay and total C. The distribution of plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn and Mg appeared to largely be determined by the whole-rock chemical composition differences between amphibolites and hornblende-biotite gneisses. Amphibolites were associated with summit positions, while gneisses dominated lower elevations, an observation that concurs with other studies in the region which suggest that hillslope-scale topography has been shaped by differential weathering of lithologies. Neither NO3(--N nor NH4(+-N was explained by the basal area of trees belonging to Fabaceae, a family associated with N-fixing species, and no long-term effects of fire on soil parameters were detected. Local-scale lithological variation is an important first-order control over soil variability at the hillslope scale in this SDTF, by both direct influence on nutrient stocks and indirect influence via control of local relief.

  3. Spatial Relationships of Urban Land Use, Soils and Heavy Metal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soils are the basic and most important resources of any people. Differences in soil's physical and chemical properties are related to the spatial distribution of land uses. Most of these human activities generate toxic substances that are transported considerable distances away from source and become accumulated in soils, ...

  4. Spatial heterogeneity of soils of the Cerrado-Pantanal ecotone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Codolo de Lucena

    Full Text Available In areas of the Cerrado-Pantanal ecotone in Brazil, the soil displays features which are inherent to the processes of soil formation, both of the Central Plateau and the Pantanal Plain. Given this premise, the area should be noteworthy for its high level of edaphic heterogeneity. The present study aimed to determine the physical, chemical and physico-hydric attributes that best explain the heterogeneity of soils in areas of the Cerrado-Pantanal ecotone, and to assess whether these attributes differ between the studied fragments and between the Cerrado soils of the Central Plateau and of the Pantanal Plain. One hundred and sixty soil samples were collected and 11 profiles described for five areas of the Cerrado-Pantanal ecotone (15º43' S, 56º04' W. The following classes were identified: typic Concretionary Petric Plinthosol; typic Lithoplintic Petric Plinthosol; typic dystrophic Yellow Latosol; dystrophic Yellow Latosol with plinthite, the last three not yet having been described for this region. The chemical attributes CEC, M, OM, K, P, Mg, Ca and Mn explained 40.49% of the variability of the soils in the region under study, whether differing or not between the studied fragments. Spatial distribution of the attributes varied between random and aggregated, with the chemical attributes CEC, K, Ca and Mg being similar to soils of the Pantanal Plain. Whereas Al, P and Mn, as well as the hydric variables, were similar to the Plateau. On the other hand, the average organic matter content, pH, gravel and pebbles, were characteristic of both the Plateau and the Plain.

  5. Spatial disaggregation of complex soil map units at regional scale based on soil-landscape relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Sébastien; Lemercier, Blandine; Berthier, Lionel; Walter, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Accurate soil information over large extent is essential to manage agronomical and environmental issues. Where it exists, information on soil is often sparse or available at coarser resolution than required. Typically, the spatial distribution of soil at regional scale is represented as a set of polygons defining soil map units (SMU), each one describing several soil types not spatially delineated, and a semantic database describing these objects. Delineation of soil types within SMU, ie spatial disaggregation of SMU allows improved soil information's accuracy using legacy data. The aim of this study was to predict soil types by spatial disaggregation of SMU through a decision tree approach, considering expert knowledge on soil-landscape relationships embedded in soil databases. The DSMART (Disaggregation and Harmonization of Soil Map Units Through resampled Classification Trees) algorithm developed by Odgers et al. (2014) was used. It requires soil information, environmental covariates, and calibration samples, to build then extrapolate decision trees. To assign a soil type to a particular spatial position, a weighed random allocation approach is applied: each soil type in the SMU is weighted according to its assumed proportion of occurrence in the SMU. Thus soil-landscape relationships are not considered in the current version of DSMART. Expert rules on soil distribution considering the relief, parent material and wetlands location were proposed to drive the procedure of allocation of soil type to sampled positions, in order to integrate the soil-landscape relationships. Semantic information about spatial organization of soil types within SMU and exhaustive landscape descriptors were used. In the eastern part of Brittany (NW France), 171 soil types were described; their relative area in the SMU were estimated, geomorphological and geological contexts were recorded. The model predicted 144 soil types. An external validation was performed by comparing predicted

  6. Spatial filtering of a legacy dataset to characterize relationships between soil organic carbon and soil texture

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, François; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Van Wesemael, Bas

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of soil properties often displays complex and multiscale patterns of variation. It results from multiple soil processes acting simultaneously but at different scales. Hence, characterizing the influence of a given controlling factor on the soil property is made more difficult by the variation due to other controlling factors. In this context, separating the variation of the soil properties by spatial scales could allow disentangling the combined effect of controlling ...

  7. Measuring lateral saturated soil hydraulic conductivity at different spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prima, Simone; Marrosu, Roberto; Pirastru, Mario; Niedda, Marcello

    2017-04-01

    substratum of Permian sandstone that exhibits very low drainage, thus preventing deep water percolation (Castellini et al., 2016). In the laboratory, small-scale lateral and vertical saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks,v, were determined by the constant-head permeameter method (Klute and Dirksen, 1986) on 20 soil cubes of 1331 cm3 of volume (Bagarello and Sgroi, 2008), allowing determination of mean Ks anisotropy for the hillslope. In the field, small-scale Ks,v was determined by infiltration runs of the BEST (Lassabatere et al., 2006) type carried out using a ring with an inner diameter of 0.15 m. The BEST-steady algorithm, proposed by Bagarello et al. (2014), was used to analyze the cumulative infiltration curves in order to decrease the failure rate of the BEST algorithms (Di Prima et al., 2016). The in situ Ks,l at an intermediate spatial scale was estimated by a trench test (Blanco-Canqui et al., 2002) carried out on a monolith 50 cm wide, 68 cm long and 34.5 cm deep (the depth to substratum). Finally, the large spatial scale (hillslope-scale) Ks,lvalue was estimated from the outflow of a 8.5 m large drain and from the perched water table levels monitored in the hillslope, following the methodology of Brooks et al. (2004). Anisotropy was not detected, since the soil cube experiments did not revealed significant differences between Ks,v and Ks,l values. The differences between the Ks datasets measured by the cube and the BEST methods were not statistically significant at p = 0.05. These methods yielded Ks values 6.4 and 5.8 times lower than the hillslope-scale Ks,l, respectively. The Ks,l value obtained by the trench experiment in the soil monolith was 1440 mm h-1, which was only 1.5 times higher than the hillslope-scale Ks,l. Probably, the chosen size of soil monolith was sufficient to properly represent the spatial heterogeneity of the soil in the hillslope. This finding need to be confirmed by further trench tests in soil monoliths to be carried out in the studied

  8. Spatial Variability and Geostatistical Prediction of Some Soil Hydraulic Coefficients of a Calcareous Soil

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    Ali Akbar Moosavi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Saturated hydraulic conductivity and the other hydraulic properties of soils are essential vital soil attributes that play role in the modeling of hydrological phenomena, designing irrigation-drainage systems, transportation of salts and chemical and biological pollutants within the soil. Measurement of these hydraulic properties needs some special instruments, expert technician, and are time consuming and expensive and due to their high temporal and spatial variability, a large number of measurements are needed. Nowadays, prediction of these attributes using the readily available soil data using pedotransfer functions or using the limited measurement with applying the geostatistical approaches has been receiving high attention. The study aimed to determine the spatial variability and prediction of saturated (Ks and near saturated (Kfs hydraulic conductivity, the power of Gardner equation (α, sorptivity (S, hydraulic diffusivity (D and matric flux potential (Фm of a calcareous soil. Material and Methods: The study was carried out on the soil series of Daneshkadeh located in the Bajgah Agricultural Experimental Station of Agricultural College, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran (1852 m above the mean sea level. This soil series with about 745 ha is a deep yellowish brow calcareous soil with textural classes of loam to clay. In the studied soil series 50 sampling locations with the sampling distances of 16, 8 , and 4 m were selected on the relatively regular sampling design. The saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks, near saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs, the power of Gardner equation (α, sorptivity (S, hydraulic diffusivity (D and matric flux potential (Фm of the aforementioned sampling locations was determined using the Single Ring and Droplet methods. After, initial statistical processing, including a normality test of data, trend and stationary analysis of data, the semivariograms of each studied hydraulic attributes were

  9. Spatial pattern of soil and soybean crop: an assessment using digital mapping techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Franco, Mauricio; Cordoba, Mariano; Costa, Jose Luis; Aparicio, Virginia; Domenech, Marisa

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships among spatial patterns of soil properties and soybean crop. The study was carried out in three provinces of Argentina: (i) Buenos Aires (BA), (ii) Entre Rios (ER) and (iii) Cordoba (COR). In each province, 2 agricultural fields were selected. Ancillary information related to soil forming factors in each field was gathered, for example apparent electrical conductivity (ECa), NDVI and yield maps. We used principal component spatial analysis (MULTISPATI-PCA) to delimit zones for soil type by field. To zonal validation, 4 sampling sites were located in which we collected soil samples, grain yield and soybean crop quality. Random Forest (RF) was used to determine the importance of soil properties over soybean crop properties. For comparing soil properties in each zone between fields, a mix lineal model and ANOVA were adjusted. Our results suggest that MULTISPATI-PCA was efficient to delimit zones for soil type. Relationships between soil properties and crop yield were examined and understood. However, it did not occur with crop quality patterns. Topography did not prove to be an accurate indicator of spatial pattern relations of soil properties and crop, whereas ECa, yield maps and NDVI proved to be effective indicators. Grains m-2 and NDVI were affected homogeneously and were showed spatial correspondence according to soil limitations. Percentage of protein did not show spatial correspondence with delimitated zones in saline soils, particularly in ER. In such fields, Om and pH were important for percentage of protein. It was evidenced that a direct relation exists between complex relationship of soil and crop properties and soil degradation.

  10. Spatial analysis of soil salinity and soil structural stability in a semiarid region of New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeh, Inakwu O A; Onus, Alex

    2008-08-01

    Salt-affected soils are a major threat to agriculture especially in the semiarid regions of the world. The effective management of these soils requires adequate understanding of not only how water and, hence, solutes are transported within the soil, but also how soil salinity and sodicity spatially interact to determine soil structural breakdown. For sustainable agricultural production, information on quantitative soil quality, such as salinity, is required for effective land management and environmental planning. In this study, quantitative methods for mapping indicators of soil structural stability, namely salinity and sodicity, were developed to assess the effect of these primary indicators on soil structural breakdown. The current levels of soil salinity, as measured by electrical conductivity (EC) of the soil/water suspension, soil sodicity, represented by exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), and aggregate stability, were assessed. Remote sensing, geographical information system (GIS), and geostatistical techniques--primarily regression-kriging and indicator-kriging--were used to spatially predict the soil sodicity and salinity. The patterns of salinity (EC) and sodicity (ESP>5%) were identified. The effect of land use on these soil quality indicators was found to be minimal. Co-spatial patterns were elucidated between sodic soils (defined by ESP>5%) and highly probable mechanically dispersive soils predicted from indicator-kriging of ASWAT scores. It was established that the incorporation of EC with ESP into an objective index, called electrolyte stability index (ESI=ESP/EC), gave a good indication of soil dispersion, although the threshold ESI value below which effective structural breakdown might occur is 0.025, which is twice as small as the expected 0.05. The discrepancies between ESI and ASWAT scores suggest that other soil factors than salinity and sodicity are affecting soil structural breakdown. This calls for further investigation. The study

  11. Spatial Analysis of Soil Erosion in Swaziland | Manyatsi | UNISWA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper a spatial analysis was undertaken to identify the impact of the factors controlling soil erosion: land management systems, stocking pressure, soil erodibility, average slope of the land, and mean annual rainfall. A binary classification was applied to a broad land cover classes map produced from image ...

  12. Spatial variability of expansive soil properties at different scales ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper applies statistical and geostatistical procedures to analyse the spatial distribution of several soil properties and use the contribution of ge ostatistics to plan optimal soil sampling and management schemes in. Kibaha, Tanzania. Particle-size distribution, Atterberg limits and potential swell were analysed.

  13. Small Scale Spatial Variability of Soil Properties and Nutrients in a Ferralsol under Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M. C.; Vidal Vázquez, E.; Pereira de Almeida, V.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.

    2012-04-01

    Spatial variability of soil attributes, both in natural and agricultural landscapes can be rather large. This heterogeneity results from interactions between pedogenetic processes and soil formation factors. In cultivated soils much variability can also occur as a result of land use and management effect, i.e. agricultural systems and practices. Therefore, the main objectives of this work were to investigate the statistical and geostatistical variability of selected properties in a soil cultivated with corn. The experimental work was carried out in Ilha Solteira, São Paulostate, Brazil and the soil was classified as an Oxisol (SSA), i.e. "Latossolo Vermelho" according to the Brazilian Soil Classification System. Eighty-four soil samples were collected at each of two different depths (0-10 and 10-20 cm) from the one-hectare plot studied. Sampling included a combination of grid and nesting schemes in order to allow description of the spatial variability at different scales. Soil texture fractions (sand, silt clay), organic matter content and pH (CaCl2) were determined using standard methods. Moreover, exchangeable bases (Ca, Mg, K), cation exchange capacity (CEC) and P were determined after exchange resin extraction. In the two depths studied, extractable P, K and Mg contents were found to be highly variable (C.V. > 30%), organic matter content and CEC showed a medium variability (C.V. ≈ 15-30%) and base percent saturation and pH exhibited a low variation (map the spatial variability of the study properties. Semivariograms provided a description of the pattern of spatial variability and some insight into possible process affecting the spatial distribution of the assessed soil properties. Sensitivity of nutrient spatial requirements to between field variability was discussed on the basis of the results obtained. In addition, the usefulness of kriging maps to improve and optimize productivity of this soil under intensive agricultural land use was considered.

  14. Universal spatial correlation functions for describing and reconstructing soil microstructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V Karsanina

    Full Text Available Structural features of porous materials such as soil define the majority of its physical properties, including water infiltration and redistribution, multi-phase flow (e.g. simultaneous water/air flow, or gas exchange between biologically active soil root zone and atmosphere and solute transport. To characterize soil microstructure, conventional soil science uses such metrics as pore size and pore-size distributions and thin section-derived morphological indicators. However, these descriptors provide only limited amount of information about the complex arrangement of soil structure and have limited capability to reconstruct structural features or predict physical properties. We introduce three different spatial correlation functions as a comprehensive tool to characterize soil microstructure: 1 two-point probability functions, 2 linear functions, and 3 two-point cluster functions. This novel approach was tested on thin-sections (2.21×2.21 cm2 representing eight soils with different pore space configurations. The two-point probability and linear correlation functions were subsequently used as a part of simulated annealing optimization procedures to reconstruct soil structure. Comparison of original and reconstructed images was based on morphological characteristics, cluster correlation functions, total number of pores and pore-size distribution. Results showed excellent agreement for soils with isolated pores, but relatively poor correspondence for soils exhibiting dual-porosity features (i.e. superposition of pores and micro-cracks. Insufficient information content in the correlation function sets used for reconstruction may have contributed to the observed discrepancies. Improved reconstructions may be obtained by adding cluster and other correlation functions into reconstruction sets. Correlation functions and the associated stochastic reconstruction algorithms introduced here are universally applicable in soil science, such as for soil

  15. Incorporating models of spatial variation in sampling strategies for soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of soil sampling strategies can be increased by incorporating a spatial variation model. The model can be used in the random selection of sample points i.e. in the sampling design, or in spatial estimation (prediction). In the first approach inference is based on a sampling

  16. Quantifying the heterogeneity of soil compaction, physical soil properties and soil moisture across multiple spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Victoria; Pattison, Ian; Sander, Graham

    2016-04-01

    England's rural landscape is dominated by pastoral agriculture, with 40% of land cover classified as either improved or semi-natural grassland according to the Land Cover Map 2007. Since the Second World War the intensification of agriculture has resulted in greater levels of soil compaction, associated with higher stocking densities in fields. Locally compaction has led to loss of soil storage and an increased in levels of ponding in fields. At the catchment scale soil compaction has been hypothesised to contribute to increased flood risk. Previous research (Pattison, 2011) on a 40km2 catchment (Dacre Beck, Lake District, UK) has shown that when soil characteristics are homogeneously parameterised in a hydrological model, downstream peak discharges can be 65% higher for a heavy compacted soil than for a lightly compacted soil. However, at the catchment scale there is likely to be a significant amount of variability in compaction levels within and between fields, due to multiple controlling factors. This research focusses in on one specific type of land use (permanent pasture with cattle grazing) and areas of activity within the field (feeding area, field gate, tree shelter, open field area). The aim was to determine if the soil characteristics and soil compaction levels are homogeneous in the four areas of the field. Also, to determine if these levels stayed the same over the course of the year, or if there were differences at the end of the dry (October) and wet (April) periods. Field experiments were conducted in the River Skell catchment, in Yorkshire, UK, which has an area of 120km2. The dynamic cone penetrometer was used to determine the structural properties of the soil, soil samples were collected to assess the bulk density, organic matter content and permeability in the laboratory and the Hydrosense II was used to determine the soil moisture content in the topsoil. Penetration results show that the tree shelter is the most compacted and the open field area

  17. Spatial Analysis of Soil Fertility Using Geographical Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research evaluated soil fertility condition of River Otamiri watershed in southeastern Nigeria in relation to topographic heterogeneity using GIS technique. GPS was used to determine the geodetic coordinate of the sampling points and site elevation. Soil samples were collected and analyzed using standard soil analysis ...

  18. Laboratory Tests for Dispersive Soil Viscosity Determining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter-Martirosyan, Z. G.; Ter-Martirosyan, A. Z.; Sobolev, E. S.

    2017-11-01

    There are several widespread methods for soil viscosity determining now. The standard shear test device and torsion test apparatus are the most commonly used installations to do that. However, the application of them has a number of disadvantages. Therefore, the specialists of Moscow State University of Civil Engineering proposed a new device to determine the disperse soil viscosity on the basis of a stabilometer with the B-type camera (viscosimeter). The paper considers the construction of a viscosimeter and the technique for determining soil viscosity inside this tool as well as some experimental verification results of its work.

  19. Spatial downscaling of soil prediction models based on weighted generalized additive models in smallholder farm settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiming; Smith, Scot E; Grunwald, Sabine; Abd-Elrahman, Amr; Wani, Suhas P; Nair, Vimala D

    2017-09-11

    Digital soil mapping (DSM) is gaining momentum as a technique to help smallholder farmers secure soil security and food security in developing regions. However, communications of the digital soil mapping information between diverse audiences become problematic due to the inconsistent scale of DSM information. Spatial downscaling can make use of accessible soil information at relatively coarse spatial resolution to provide valuable soil information at relatively fine spatial resolution. The objective of this research was to disaggregate the coarse spatial resolution soil exchangeable potassium (Kex) and soil total nitrogen (TN) base map into fine spatial resolution soil downscaled map using weighted generalized additive models (GAMs) in two smallholder villages in South India. By incorporating fine spatial resolution spectral indices in the downscaling process, the soil downscaled maps not only conserve the spatial information of coarse spatial resolution soil maps but also depict the spatial details of soil properties at fine spatial resolution. The results of this study demonstrated difference between the fine spatial resolution downscaled maps and fine spatial resolution base maps is smaller than the difference between coarse spatial resolution base maps and fine spatial resolution base maps. The appropriate and economical strategy to promote the DSM technique in smallholder farms is to develop the relatively coarse spatial resolution soil prediction maps or utilize available coarse spatial resolution soil maps at the regional scale and to disaggregate these maps to the fine spatial resolution downscaled soil maps at farm scale.

  20. Using soil apparent electrical conductivity to optimize sampling of soil penetration resistance and to improve the estimations of spatial patterns of soil compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado Siqueira, Glécio; Dafonte Dafonte, Jorge; Bueno Lema, Javier; Valcárcel Armesto, Montserrat; França e Silva, Ênio Farias

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a combined application of an EM38DD for assessing soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and a dual-sensor vertical penetrometer Veris-3000 for measuring soil electrical conductivity (ECveris) and soil resistance to penetration (PR). The measurements were made at a 6 ha field cropped with forage maize under no-tillage after sowing and located in Northwestern Spain. The objective was to use data from ECa for improving the estimation of soil PR. First, data of ECa were used to determine the optimized sampling scheme of the soil PR in 40 points. Then, correlation analysis showed a significant negative relationship between soil PR and ECa, ranging from -0.36 to -0.70 for the studied soil layers. The spatial dependence of soil PR was best described by spherical models in most soil layers. However, below 0.50 m the spatial pattern of soil PR showed pure nugget effect, which could be due to the limited number of PR data used in these layers as the values of this parameter often were above the range measured by our equipment (5.5 MPa). The use of ECa as secondary variable slightly improved the estimation of PR by universal cokriging, when compared with kriging.

  1. Spatial Pattern Analysis of Heavy Metals in Beijing Agricultural Soils Based on Spatial Autocorrelation Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Xiao-Ni; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Sun, Dan-Feng; Li, Hong; Zhou, Lian-Di; Li, Bao-Guo

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the spatial pattern of heavy metals in Beijing agricultural soils using Moran’s I statistic of spatial autocorrelation. The global Moran’s I result showed that the spatial dependence of Cr, Ni, Zn, and Hg changed with different spatial weight matrixes, and they had significant and positive global spatial correlations based on distance weight. The spatial dependence of the four metals was scale-dependent on distance, but these scale effects existed within a threshold distance of 13 km, 32 km, 50 km, and 29 km, respectively for Cr, Ni, Zn, and Hg. The maximal spatial positive correlation range was 57 km, 70 km, 57 km, and 55 km for Cr, Ni, Zn, and Hg, respectively and these were not affected by sampling density. Local spatial autocorrelation analysis detected the locations of spatial clusters and spatial outliers and revealed that the pollution of these four metals occurred in significant High-high spatial clusters, Low-high, or even High-low spatial outliers. Thus, three major areas were identified and should be receiving more attention: the first was the northeast region of Beijing, where Cr, Zn, Ni, and Hg had significant increases. The second was the southeast region of Beijing where wastewater irrigation had strongly changed the content of metals, particularly of Cr and Zn, in soils. The third area was the urban fringe around city, where Hg showed a significant increase. PMID:21776217

  2. Spatial distribution of the chemical properties of the soil and of soybean yield in the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Gazolla-Neto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial dependence between chemical properties of the soil and yield components in the soybean using precision farming techniques. Samples of the soil and plants were taken from georeferenced points to determine the chemical properties of the soil and the yield components. The results were submitted to Pearson correlation analysis, descriptive statistics and geostatistics. The coefficient of variation showed a wide range of distribution for the chemical attributes of the soil, with the highest indices being found for the levels of available phosphorus (102% and potassium (72.65%. Soil pH and organic matter showed a coefficient of variation of 5.96 and 15.93% respectively. Semivariogram analysis of the yield components (productivity, 1,000-seed weight and number of seeds and the chemical properties of the soil (organic matter, pH, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, boron, manganese and zinc fitted the spherical model with moderate spatial dependence, with values ranging from 200 to 700 m. Spatial distribution by means of map interpolation was efficient in evaluating spatial variability, allowing the identification and quantification of regions of low and high productivity in the production area, together with the distribution of soil attributes and their respective levels of availability to the soybean plants.

  3. Spatial Distribution of Fungal Communities in an Arable Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Julia; Hoppe, Björn; König, Stephan; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Fungi are prominent drivers of ecological processes in soils, so that fungal communities across different soil ecosystems have been well investigated. However, for arable soils taxonomically resolved fine-scale studies including vertical itemization of fungal communities are still missing. Here, we combined a cloning/Sanger sequencing approach of the ITS/LSU region as marker for general fungi and of the partial SSU region for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to characterize the microbiome in different maize soil habitats. Four compartments were analyzed over two annual cycles 2009 and 2010: a) ploughed soil in 0-10 cm, b) rooted soil in 40-50 cm, c) root-free soil in 60-70 cm soil depth and d) maize roots. Ascomycota was the most dominant phylum across all compartments. Fungal communities including yeasts and AMF differed strongly between compartments. Inter alia, Tetracladium, the overall largest MOTU (molecular operational taxonomic unit), occurred in all compartments, whereas Trichosporon dominated all soil compartments. Sequences belonging to unclassified Helotiales were forming the most abundant MOTUs exclusively present in roots. This study gives new insights on spatial distribution of fungi and helps to link fungal communities to specific ecological properties such as varying resources, which characterize particular niches of the heterogeneous soil environment.

  4. Spatial Distribution of Fungal Communities in an Arable Soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Moll

    Full Text Available Fungi are prominent drivers of ecological processes in soils, so that fungal communities across different soil ecosystems have been well investigated. However, for arable soils taxonomically resolved fine-scale studies including vertical itemization of fungal communities are still missing. Here, we combined a cloning/Sanger sequencing approach of the ITS/LSU region as marker for general fungi and of the partial SSU region for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF to characterize the microbiome in different maize soil habitats. Four compartments were analyzed over two annual cycles 2009 and 2010: a ploughed soil in 0-10 cm, b rooted soil in 40-50 cm, c root-free soil in 60-70 cm soil depth and d maize roots. Ascomycota was the most dominant phylum across all compartments. Fungal communities including yeasts and AMF differed strongly between compartments. Inter alia, Tetracladium, the overall largest MOTU (molecular operational taxonomic unit, occurred in all compartments, whereas Trichosporon dominated all soil compartments. Sequences belonging to unclassified Helotiales were forming the most abundant MOTUs exclusively present in roots. This study gives new insights on spatial distribution of fungi and helps to link fungal communities to specific ecological properties such as varying resources, which characterize particular niches of the heterogeneous soil environment.

  5. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis in examining scaling properties of the spatial patterns of soil water storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Biswas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the scaling properties of soil water storage is crucial in transferring locally measured fluctuations to larger scales and vice-versa. Studies based on remotely sensed data have shown that the variability in surface soil water has clear scaling properties (i.e., statistically self similar over a wider range of spatial scales. However, the scaling property of soil water storage to a certain depth at a field scale is not well understood. The major challenges in scaling analysis for soil water are the presence of localized trends and nonstationarities in the spatial series. The objective of this study was to characterize scaling properties of soil water storage variability through multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA. A field experiment was conducted in a sub-humid climate at Alvena, Saskatchewan, Canada. A north-south transect of 624-m long was established on a rolling landscape. Soil water storage was monitored weekly between 2002 and 2005 at 104 locations along the transect. The spatial scaling property of the surface 0 to 40 cm depth was characterized using the MFDFA technique for six of the soil water content series (all gravimetrically determined representing soil water storage after snowmelt, rainfall, and evapotranspiration. For the studied transect, scaling properties of soil water storage are different between drier periods and wet periods. It also appears that local controls such as site topography and texture (that dominantly control the pattern during wet states results in multiscaling property. The nonlocal controls such as evapotranspiration results in the reduction of the degree of multiscaling and improvement in the simple scaling. Therefore, the scaling property of soil water storage is a function of both soil moisture status and the spatial extent considered.

  6. Spatial Variability of Soil Properties and its Impact on Simulated Surface Soil Moisture Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korres, W.; Bothe, T.; Reichenau, T. G.; Schneider, K.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial variability of soil properties (particle size distribution, PSD, and bulk density, BD) has large effects on the spatial variability of soil moisture and therefore on plant growth and surface exchange processes. In model studies, soil properties from soil maps are considered homogeneous over mapping units, which neglects the small scale variability of soil properties and leads to underestimated small scale variability of simulated soil moisture. This study focuses on the validation of spatial variability of simulated surface soil moisture (SSM) in a winter wheat field in Western Germany using the eco-hydrological simulation system DANUBIA. SSM measurements were conducted at 20 different sampling points and nine different dates in 2008. Frequency distributions of BD and PSD were derived from an independent dataset (n = 486) of soil physical properties from Germany and the USA. In the simulations, BD and PSD were parameterized according to these frequency distributions. Mean values, coefficients of variation and frequency distributions of simulated SSM were compared to the field measurements. Using the heterogeneous model parameterization, up to 76 % of the frequency distribution of the measured SSM can be explained. Furthermore, the results show that BD has a larger impact on the variability of SSM than PSD. The introduced approach can be used for simulating mean SSM and SSM variability more accurately and can form the basis for a spatially heterogeneous parameterization of soil properties in mesoscale models.

  7. Digital spatial soil and land information for agriculture development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R. K.; Laghathe, Pankaj; Meena, Ranglal; Barman, Alok Kumar; Das, Satyendra Nath

    2006-12-01

    Natural resource management calls for study of natural system prevailing in the country. In India floods and droughts visit regularly, causing extensive damages of natural wealth including agriculture that are crucial for sustenance of economic growth. The Indian Sub-continent drained by many major rivers and their tributaries where watershed, the hydrological unit forms a natural system that allows management and development of land resources following natural harmony. Acquisition of various kinds and levels of soil and land characteristics using both conventional and remote sensing techniques and subsequent development of digital spatial data base are essential to evolve strategy for planning watershed development programmes, their monitoring and impact evaluation. The multi-temporal capability of remote sensing sensors helps to update the existing data base which are of dynamic in nature. The paper outlines the concept of spatial data base development, generation using remote sensing techniques, designing of data structure, standardization and integration with watershed layers and various non spatial attribute data for various applications covering watershed development planning, alternate land use planning, soil and water conservation, diversified agriculture practices, generation of soil health card, soil and land reclamation, etc. The soil and land characteristics are vital to derive various interpretative groupings or master table that helps to generate the desired level of information of various clients using the GIS platform. The digital spatial data base on soils and watersheds generated by All India Soil and Land Use Survey will act as a sub-server of the main GIS based Web Server being hoisted by the planning commission for application of spatial data for planning purposes under G2G domain. It will facilitate e-governance for natural resource management using modern technology.

  8. Spatial variability of chemical properties of soil under pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ferreira da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the spatial variability of soil chemical attributes under pasture, as well as lime and fertilizer recommendations based on the interpretation of soil chemical analysis from two sampling methods: conventional and systematic depths of 0 to 10 and 10 to 20 cm. The study was conducted at IFES-campus Alegre-ES. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and geostatistics. Results indicate that the spatial method enabled the identification of deficit areas and excessive liming and fertilization, which could not be defined by the conventional method.

  9. Spatial variability of vegetation index and soil properties in an integrated crop-livestock system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto C. de C. Bernardi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The knowledge of soil property spatial variability is useful for determining the rational use of inputs, such as the site-specific application of lime and fertilizer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the vegetation index and spatial variability of physical and chemical soil properties in an integrated crop-livestock system (ICLS. Soil samples were taken from a 6.9 ha area in a regular hexagon grid at 0-0.20 m depths. Soil P, K, Ca, Mg, and cation exchange capacity - CEC; base saturation; clay and sand were analyzed. Soil electrical conductivity (ECa was measured with a contact sensor. The site was evaluated at the end of the corn season (April and during forage production (October using Landsat 5 images, remote sensing techniques and a geographic information system (GIS. Results showed that the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI was associated with ECa and soil parameters, indicating crop and pasture variations in the ICLS. Geostatistics and GIS were effective tools for collecting data regarding the spatial variability of soil and crop indicators, identifying variation trends in the data, and assisting data interpretation to determine adequate management strategies.

  10. Mapping spatial variability of soil salinity in a coastal paddy field based on electromagnetic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Huang, Jingyi; Shi, Zhou; Li, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    In coastal China, there is an urgent need to increase land area for agricultural production and urban development, where there is a rapid growing population. One solution is land reclamation from coastal tidelands, but soil salinization is problematic. As such, it is very important to characterize and map the within-field variability of soil salinity in space and time. Conventional methods are often time-consuming, expensive, labor-intensive, and unpractical. Fortunately, proximal sensing has become an important technology in characterizing within-field spatial variability. In this study, we employed the EM38 to study spatial variability of soil salinity in a coastal paddy field. Significant correlation relationship between ECa and EC1:5 (i.e. r >0.9) allowed us to use EM38 data to characterize the spatial variability of soil salinity. Geostatistical methods were used to determine the horizontal spatio-temporal variability of soil salinity over three consecutive years. The study found that the distribution of salinity was heterogeneous and the leaching of salts was more significant in the edges of the study field. By inverting the EM38 data using a Quasi-3D inversion algorithm, the vertical spatio-temporal variability of soil salinity was determined and the leaching of salts over time was easily identified. The methodology of this study can be used as guidance for researchers interested in understanding soil salinity development as well as land managers aiming for effective soil salinity monitoring and management practices. In order to better characterize the variations in soil salinity to a deeper soil profile, the deeper mode of EM38 (i.e., EM38v) as well as other EMI instruments (e.g. DUALEM-421) can be incorporated to conduct Quasi-3D inversions for deeper soil profiles.

  11. Mapping spatial variability of soil salinity in a coastal paddy field based on electromagnetic sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Guo

    Full Text Available In coastal China, there is an urgent need to increase land area for agricultural production and urban development, where there is a rapid growing population. One solution is land reclamation from coastal tidelands, but soil salinization is problematic. As such, it is very important to characterize and map the within-field variability of soil salinity in space and time. Conventional methods are often time-consuming, expensive, labor-intensive, and unpractical. Fortunately, proximal sensing has become an important technology in characterizing within-field spatial variability. In this study, we employed the EM38 to study spatial variability of soil salinity in a coastal paddy field. Significant correlation relationship between ECa and EC1:5 (i.e. r >0.9 allowed us to use EM38 data to characterize the spatial variability of soil salinity. Geostatistical methods were used to determine the horizontal spatio-temporal variability of soil salinity over three consecutive years. The study found that the distribution of salinity was heterogeneous and the leaching of salts was more significant in the edges of the study field. By inverting the EM38 data using a Quasi-3D inversion algorithm, the vertical spatio-temporal variability of soil salinity was determined and the leaching of salts over time was easily identified. The methodology of this study can be used as guidance for researchers interested in understanding soil salinity development as well as land managers aiming for effective soil salinity monitoring and management practices. In order to better characterize the variations in soil salinity to a deeper soil profile, the deeper mode of EM38 (i.e., EM38v as well as other EMI instruments (e.g. DUALEM-421 can be incorporated to conduct Quasi-3D inversions for deeper soil profiles.

  12. Determination Of Slope Instability Using Spatially Integrated Mapping Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharuddin, I. N. Z.; Omar, R. C.; Roslan, R.; Khalid, N. H. N.; Hanifah, M. I. M.

    2016-11-01

    The determination and identification of slope instability are often rely on data obtained from in-situ soil investigation work where it involves the logistic of machineries and manpower, thus these aspects may increase the cost especially for remote locations. Therefore a method, which is able to identify possible slope instability without frequent ground walkabout survey, is needed. This paper presents the method used in prediction of slope instability using spatial integrated mapping framework which applicable for remote areas such as tropical forest and natural hilly terrain. Spatial data such as geology, topography, land use map, slope angle and elevation were used in regional analysis during desktop study. Through this framework, the occurrence of slope instability was able to be identified and was validate using a confirmatory site- specific analysis.

  13. Calibration of a frequency-domain reflectometer for determining soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The soil-water content of a clay-loam soil, determined using factory-supplied parameters for the sensor and soil-estimated parameters, was compared to the soil-water content determined in the laboratory. The range in ... Soil bulk density, clay content and temperature had negligible influence on sensor soil-water contents.

  14. Toward Soil Spatial Information Systems (SSIS) for global modeling and ecosystem management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardner, Marion F.

    1995-01-01

    The general objective is to conduct research to contribute toward the realization of a world soils and terrain (SOTER) database, which can stand alone or be incorporated into a more complete and comprehensive natural resources digital information system. The following specific objectives are focussed on: (1) to conduct research related to (a) translation and correlation of different soil classification systems to the SOTER database legend and (b) the inferfacing of disparate data sets in support of the SOTER Project; (2) to examine the potential use of AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) data for delineating meaningful soils and terrain boundaries for small scale soil survey (range of scale: 1:250,000 to 1:1,000,000) and terrestrial ecosystem assessment and monitoring; and (3) to determine the potential use of high dimensional spectral data (220 reflectance bands with 10 m spatial resolution) for delineating meaningful soils boundaries and conditions for the purpose of detailed soil survey and land management.

  15. MAPPING SPATIAL MOISTURE CONTENT OF UNSATURATED AGRICULTURAL SOILS WITH GROUND-PENETRATING RADAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Shamir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil subsurface moisture content, especially in the root zone, is important for evaluation the influence of soil moisture to agricultural crops. Conservative monitoring by point-measurement methods is time-consuming and expensive. In this paper we represent an active remote-sensing tool for subsurface spatial imaging and analysis of electromagnetic physical properties, mostly water content, by ground-penetrating radar (GPR reflection. Combined with laboratory methods, this technique enables real-time and highly accurate evaluations of soils' physical qualities in the field. To calculate subsurface moisture content, a model based on the soil texture, porosity, saturation, organic matter and effective electrical conductivity is required. We developed an innovative method that make it possible measures spatial subsurface moisture content up to a depth of 1.5 m in agricultural soils and applied it to two different unsaturated soil types from agricultural fields in Israel: loess soil type (Calcic haploxeralf, common in rural areas of southern Israel with about 30% clay, 30% silt and 40% sand, and hamra soil type (Typic rhodoxeralf, common in rural areas of central Israel with about 10% clay, 5% silt and 85% sand. Combined field and laboratory measurements and model development gave efficient determinations of spatial moisture content in these fields. The environmentally friendly GPR system enabled non-destructive testing. The developed method for measuring moisture content in the laboratory enabled highly accurate interpretation and physical computing. Spatial soil moisture content to 1.5 m depth was determined with 1–5% accuracy, making our method useful for the design of irrigation plans for different interfaces.

  16. Spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties on a steep slope in the loess plateau of China

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Hu; Ming An Shao; Quan Jiu Wang; Jun Fan; Klaus Reichardt

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of the structure of the spatial variability of soil surface hydraulic properties on steep slopes is important for modeling infiltration and runoff processes. The objective of this study was to investigate the spatial variability of these properties on a steep slope of the Loess Plateau in northwest China. A 9600 m² area was systematically sampled in a grid of 106 points spaced 10 m x 10 m. Hydraulic properties were determined with a disc infiltrometer under multiple pressure...

  17. Linking Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Soil Moisture with Upland Soil Iron Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, C. A.; Markewitz, D.; Thompson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Iron minerals play important roles in governing soil nutrient availability and carbon dynamics. Periods of intermittent anoxia (low-oxygen) in upland soils can drive microbial reduction and dissolution of iron minerals. However, quantifying ecosystem-scale iron reduction in upland soils is challenging. The key condition necessary for soil iron reduction is water saturation of soil micropores, even if the entire soil profile is not flooded. We assessed soil moisture and texture across three first-order watersheds at the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory in South Carolina, USA over one year using electromagnetic induction (EMI). From these point measurements, we have created monthly maps of interpolated soil moisture. From the EMI data, we found that locations that remain relatively wet or dry throughout the year are not related to hill-slope position but to differences in soil texture along a catena. Across a gradient of soil moisture and texture (based on soil conductivity from the EMI probe) we installed passive redox sensors and conducted in situ iron reduction experiments. This data will be presented and the relationships between iron reduction, the spatial distribution of soil moisture/clay content, and the significance of these data with respect to soil carbon cycling will be discussed.

  18. [Spatial heterogeneity of soil organic carbon and nutrients in low mountain area of Changbai Mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling; Wang, Hai-Yan; Dai, Wei; Yang, Xiao-Iuan; Li, Xu

    2014-09-01

    Soil samples were collected in Jincang Forest Farm, Wangqing Forestry Bureau to study spatial distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) and nutrients. Geostatistics was used to predict their spatial distribution in the study area, and the prediction results were interpolated using regression-kriging and ordinary kriging. Multiple linear regression was used to study the relationship between SOC and spatial factors. The results showed the SOC density (SOCD) at 0-60 cm was (16.14 ± 4.58) kg · m(-2). Soil organic carbon decreased significantly with the soil depth. With the increasing soil depth, total N, total P, total K, available P and readily available K concentrations decreased. Stepwise regression analysis showed that SOC had good correlation with elevation and cosine of aspect, with the determination coefficient of 0.34 and 0.39, respectively (P model and exponential model. Compared with ordinary kriging, the prediction accuracy was improved by 18%-58% using regression-kriging. Regression-kriging interpolation was also applied to study spatial heterogeneity of soil total N.

  19. Spatial distribution of soil erosion and suspended sediment ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sediment transport rate for Chou-Shui river basin ... 5, Anzhong Road,. Tainan 70970, Taiwan. 4. Department of Hydraulics and Ocean Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1,. University Road, Tainan ... surface runoff discharge, suspended sediment transport rate, quantity of soil erosion, and spatial distribu-.

  20. Field Scale Studies on the Spatial Variability of Soil Quality Indicators in Washington State, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arable lands are needed for sustainable agricultural systems to support an ever-growing human population. Soil quality needs to be defined to assure that new land brought into crop production is sustainable. To evaluate soil quality, a number of soil attributes will need to be measured, evaluated, and integrated into a soil-quality index using the multivariable indicator kriging (MVIK procedure. This study was conducted to determine the spatial variability and correlation of indicator parameters on a field scale with respect to soil quality and suitability for use with MVIK. The variability of the biological parameters decreased in the order of respiration > enzyme assays and qCO2 > microbial biomass C. The distribution frequency of all parameters except respiration were normal although the spatial distribution across the landscape was highly variable. The biological parameters showed little correlation with each other when all data points were considered; however, when grouped in smaller sections, the correlations were more consistent with observed patterns across the field. To accurately assess soil quality, and arable land use, consideration of spatial and temporal variability, soil conditions, and other controlling factors must be taken into account.

  1. Spatial variability of soil potassium in sugarcane areas subjected to the application of vinasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho, Laércio A; Meurer, Ismael; Da Silva Junior, Carlos A; Santos, Cristiane F B; Libardi, Paulo L

    2014-12-01

    When deposited on land the vinasse can promote improvement in fertility, however, often fertilizer application occurs in areas considered homogeneous, without taking into account the variability of the soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of vinasse application on potassium content in two classes of soils cultivated with sugarcane, and characterize the spatial variability of soil using geostatistical techniques. In the 2010 and 2011 crop year, soil samples were collected from an experimental grid at 0-0.2 and 0.2-0.4 m depth in three soils cultivated with sugarcane, totaling 90 samplings in each grid, for the determination of pH, calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), phosphorus (P), aluminum (Al) and potential acidity (H + Al). The data have been submitted to analysis of descriptive statistics and the K attribute was subjected to geostatistical analysis. The coefficient of variation indicated medium and high variability of K for the three soils. The results showed that the spatial dependence of K increased in depth to FRce and decreased to PHlv, indicating that the attribute could have followed the pattern of distribution of clay in depth. The investigation of the spatial variability of K on the surface and subsurface soils provided the definition of management zones with different levels of fertility, which can be organized into sub-areas for a more efficient management of the resources and the environment.

  2. Spatial variability of soil potassium in sugarcane areas subjected to the application of vinasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAÉRCIO A. DE CARVALHO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available When deposited on land the vinasse can promote improvement in fertility, however, often fertilizer application occurs in areas considered homogeneous, without taking into account the variability of the soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of vinasse application on potassium content in two classes of soils cultivated with sugarcane, and characterize the spatial variability of soil using geostatistical techniques. In the 2010 and 2011 crop year, soil samples were collected from an experimental grid at 0-0.2 and 0.2-0.4 m depth in three soils cultivated with sugarcane, totaling 90 samplings in each grid, for the determination of pH, calcium (Ca, magnesium (Mg, potassium (K, phosphorus (P, aluminum (Al and potential acidity (H + Al. The data have been submitted to analysis of descriptive statistics and the K attribute was subjected to geostatistical analysis. The coefficient of variation indicated medium and high variability of K for the three soils. The results showed that the spatial dependence of K increased in depth to FRce and decreased to PHlv, indicating that the attribute could have followed the pattern of distribution of clay in depth. The investigation of the spatial variability of K on the surface and subsurface soils provided the definition of management zones with different levels of fertility, which can be organized into sub-areas for a more efficient management of the resources and the environment.

  3. Spatial distribution of livestock concentration areas and soil nutrients in pastures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanderson, M.A.; Schmidt, J.; Feldmand, C.; Herrmann, A.

    2010-01-01

    Livestock concentration areas can be significant point sources of nutrient pollution. Our objective was to determine the spatial distribution of livestock concentration areas in pastures at the farm scale, along with the distribution of soil nutrients at the individual livestock concentration area

  4. Spatial variability of microbial biomass and organic matter labile pools in a haplic planosol soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Campana Loureiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the spatial variability of soil microbial biomass (SMB and labile soil organic matter pools (labile SOM, under different management systems and plant cover. The experiment was conducted in a Haplic Planosol soil on an Integrated Agroecological Production System (SIPA, in Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro. The evaluated management systems were: alley cropping, pasture, and bush garden, the late one was used as reference area. Three grids of regular spacing of 2.5 x 2.5 meters were used for sampling, consisting of 25 georeferenced points each, where soil samples were taken at 0-10 cm depth. The following labile constituents of soil organic matter were determined: free light fraction (FLF, water soluble C and N, C and N of SMB (SMB-C and SMB-N, and glomalin content. The textural fractions (sand, silt, and clay, pH in water, and chemical attributes (organic C, total N, Ca, Mg, Al, P, K, and CEC-cation exchange capacity were also determined. The areas of alley cropping and pasture showed spatial dependence to the attributes of SOM. The occurrence of high spatial dependence for the attributes associated to microbial biomass in the alley cropping system (C, FLF, SMB-N and respiration, probably was due to external factors related to management, such as: intensive rotational cropping system, diversity of crops and different inputs of organic matter to soil such as pruning material and organic compost.

  5. 511 Spatial Analysis of Soil Fertility Using Geographical Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-07-21

    Jul 21, 2011 ... Abstract. The research evaluated soil fertility condition of River Otamiri watershed in southeastern Nigeria in relation to topographic heterogeneity using GIS technique. GPS was used to determine the geodetic coordinate of the sampling points and site elevation. Soil samples were collected and analyzed.

  6. Contamination and Spatial Variation of Heavy Metals in the Soil-Rice System in Nanxun County, Southeastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing concern about heavy metal contamination in farmland in China and worldwide. In order to reveal the spatial features of heavy metals in the soil-rice system, soil and rice samples were collected from Nanxun, Southeastern China. Compared with the guideline values, elevated concentrations of heavy metals in soils were observed, while heavy metals in rice still remained at a safe level. Heavy metals in soils and rice had moderate to strong spatial dependence (nugget/sill ratios: 13.2% to 49.9%. The spatial distribution of copper (Cu, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb and zinc (Zn in soils illustrated that their high concentrations were located in the southeast part. The high concentrations of cadmium (Cd in soils were observed in the northeast part. The accumulation of all the studied metals is related to the long-term application of agrochemicals and industrial activities. Heavy metals in rice showed different spatial distribution patterns. Cross-correlograms were produced to quantitatively determine the spatial correlation between soil properties and heavy metals composition in rice. The pH and soil organic matter had significant spatial correlations with the concentration of heavy metals in rice. Most of the selected variables had clear spatial correlation ranges for heavy metals in rice, which could be further applied to divide agricultural management zones.

  7. Spatial Structure of Soil Macrofauna Diversity and Tree Canopy in Riparian Forest of Maroon River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Sayad

    2017-02-01

    with a mean temperature of 24.5oc. Plant cover, mainly comprises Populus euphratica Olivie and Tamarix arceuthoides Bge and Lycium shawii Roemer & Schultes. Soil macrofauna were sampled using 175 sampling point along parallel transects (perpendicular to the river. The distance between transects was 100m. We considered distance between samples as 50 m. tree canopy were measured in 5* 5 plots. soil macrofauna were extracted from 50 cm×50 cm×10 cm soil monolith by hand-sorting procedure. All soil macrofauna were identified to family level. Evenness (Sheldon index, richness (Menhinich index and diversity (Shannon H’ index by using PAST version 1.39, were determined in each sample. Classical statistical parameters, i.e. mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, minimum and maximum, were calculated using SPSS17 software. For analysis of the relationship between Soil macrofauna diversity indices and tree canopy (Total canopy, Populous canopy, Tamarix canopy and Serim canopy we calculated the correlation among soil properties and macrofauna using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Next, to determining the spatial structure, we calculated the semivariances. Semivariance quantifies the spatial dependence of spatially ordered variable values. In order to gather information about the spatial connection between any two variables, and to compare the similarity of their spatial structure patterns, cross-variograms were constructed. Cross-variograms are plots of cross-semivariance against the lag distance. Results and Discussion: Soil macrofauna communities were dominated by earthworm, diplopods, coleoptera, gastropoda, araneae, and insect larvae. Correlation analysis of soil macrofauna and tree canopy indicated weak relationships between them. Weak, but significant relationships were found between macrofauna diversity, evenness, richness and total canopy, Populous canopy and Tamarix canopy (positive. Macrofauna indices and tree canopy(excepted Tamarix canopy were

  8. Spatial heterogeneity of physicochemical properties explains differences in microbial composition in arid soils from Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Silvia; Escalante, Ana E; Noguez, Ana M; García-Oliva, Felipe; Martínez-Piedragil, Celeste; Cram, Silke S; Eguiarte, Luis Enrique; Souza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Arid ecosystems are characterized by high spatial heterogeneity, and the variation among vegetation patches is a clear example. Soil biotic and abiotic factors associated with these patches have also been well documented as highly heterogeneous in space. Given the low vegetation cover and little precipitation in arid ecosystems, soil microorganisms are the main drivers of nutrient cycling. Nonetheless, little is known about the spatial distribution of microorganisms and the relationship that their diversity holds with nutrients and other physicochemical gradients in arid soils. In this study, we evaluated the spatial variability of soil microbial diversity and chemical parameters (nutrients and ion content) at local scale (meters) occurring in a gypsum-based desert soil, to gain knowledge on what soil abiotic factors control the distribution of microbes in arid ecosystems. We analyzed 32 soil samples within a 64 m(2) plot and: (a) characterized microbial diversity using T-RFLPs of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, (b) determined soil chemical parameters, and (c) identified relationships between microbial diversity and chemical properties. Overall, we found a strong correlation between microbial composition heterogeneity and spatial variation of cations (Ca(2), K(+)) and anions (HCO[Formula: see text], Cl(-), SO[Formula: see text]) content in this small plot. Our results could be attributable to spatial differences of soil saline content, favoring the patchy emergence of salt and soil microbial communities.

  9. Spatial heterogeneity of physicochemical properties explains differences in microbial composition in arid soils from Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pajares

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Arid ecosystems are characterized by high spatial heterogeneity, and the variation among vegetation patches is a clear example. Soil biotic and abiotic factors associated with these patches have also been well documented as highly heterogeneous in space. Given the low vegetation cover and little precipitation in arid ecosystems, soil microorganisms are the main drivers of nutrient cycling. Nonetheless, little is known about the spatial distribution of microorganisms and the relationship that their diversity holds with nutrients and other physicochemical gradients in arid soils. In this study, we evaluated the spatial variability of soil microbial diversity and chemical parameters (nutrients and ion content at local scale (meters occurring in a gypsum-based desert soil, to gain knowledge on what soil abiotic factors control the distribution of microbes in arid ecosystems. We analyzed 32 soil samples within a 64 m2 plot and: (a characterized microbial diversity using T-RFLPs of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, (b determined soil chemical parameters, and (c identified relationships between microbial diversity and chemical properties. Overall, we found a strong correlation between microbial composition heterogeneity and spatial variation of cations (Ca2, K+ and anions (HCO ${}_{3}^{-}$ 3 − , Cl−, SO ${}_{4}^{2-}$ 4 2 − content in this small plot. Our results could be attributable to spatial differences of soil saline content, favoring the patchy emergence of salt and soil microbial communities.

  10. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stocks in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Martin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon plays a major role in the global carbon budget, and can act as a source or a sink of atmospheric carbon, thereby possibly influencing the course of climate change. Changes in soil organic carbon (SOC stocks are now taken into account in international negotiations regarding climate change. Consequently, developing sampling schemes and models for estimating the spatial distribution of SOC stocks is a priority. The French soil monitoring network has been established on a 16 km × 16 km grid and the first sampling campaign has recently been completed, providing around 2200 measurements of stocks of soil organic carbon, obtained through an in situ composite sampling, uniformly distributed over the French territory.

    We calibrated a boosted regression tree model on the observed stocks, modelling SOC stocks as a function of other variables such as climatic parameters, vegetation net primary productivity, soil properties and land use. The calibrated model was evaluated through cross-validation and eventually used for estimating SOC stocks for mainland France. Two other models were calibrated on forest and agricultural soils separately, in order to assess more precisely the influence of pedo-climatic variables on SOC for such soils.

    The boosted regression tree model showed good predictive ability, and enabled quantification of relationships between SOC stocks and pedo-climatic variables (plus their interactions over the French territory. These relationships strongly depended on the land use, and more specifically, differed between forest soils and cultivated soil. The total estimate of SOC stocks in France was 3.260 ± 0.872 PgC for the first 30 cm. It was compared to another estimate, based on the previously published European soil organic carbon and bulk density maps, of 5.303 PgC. We demonstrate that the present estimate might better represent the actual SOC stock distributions of France, and consequently that the

  11. Influence of environmental factors on the spatial distribution and diversity of forest soil in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonds Kasparinskis

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the spatial relationships between environmental factors (Quaternary deposits, topographical situation, land cover, forest site types, tree species, soil texture and soil groups, and their prefix qualifiers (according to the international Food and Agricultural Organization soil classification system World Reference Base for Soil Resources [FAO WRB]. The results show that it is possible to establish relationships between the distribution of environmental factors and soil groups by applying the generalized linear models in data statistical analysis, using the R 2.11.1 software for processing data from 113 sampling plots throughout the forest territory of Latvia.A very high diversity of soil groups in a relatively similar geological structure was revealed. For various reasons there is not always close relationship between the soil group, their prefix qualifiers and Quaternary deposits, as well as between forest site types, the dominant tree species and specific soil group and its prefix qualifiers. Close correlation was established between Quaternary deposits, forest site types, dominant tree species and soil groups within nutrient-poor sediments and very rich deposits containing free carbonates. No significant relationship was detected between the CORINE Land Cover 2005 classes, topographical situation and soil group.

  12. Assessment of spatial variability of soil thermal properties in cultivated field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2017-04-01

    Most of soil physical properties are spatially variable both in regional and field scale. Spatial heterogeneity of soil properties in the field is related to the nature of the soil itself, but some of the variation is caused by tillage and other management practices. The aim of this work was to determine spatial variability of thermal properties on the cultivated field (40 x 350 m) using geostatistical method. The present work used data obtained from the measurements of topsoil soil texture (sand, silt and clay content), organic carbon, water content, bulk density, particle density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity and thermal diffusivity after harvest of triticale. The measurements were done in 45 points using TDR and KD2Pro for soil water content and thermal properties, respectively. Moreover, measurements of the thermal properties were performed in the laboratory at dry and saturated soil. The coefficient of variations (CV) varied from 1.6% for the particle density to 67% for the clay content. Among the thermal properties the most variable was thermal diffusivity at saturation (24%) and the least variable thermal conductivity in dry state (8.4%). The exponential semivariogram models matched well with empirical semivariogram. The range of the thermal properties measured in the field varied from 10 m for the thermal diffusivity to 23 m for the thermal conductivity. The ranges in dry and saturated soil were greater than at field water content. Among the remaining properties the largest range of the semivariograms was for soil textural fractions (100-250 m) and bulk density (145 m) and the lowest water content (14 m). This indicates that the thermal properties were resultant of both soil water content and bulk density. Most of the soil properties exhibited strong and moderate spatial dependency. Heterogeneity and variation of soil physical and thermal parameters in a field due to soil cultivation should be taken into consideration for a successful agricultural

  13. Intelligent estimation of spatially distributed soil physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, F.; Friedel, M.J.; Ribeiro, G.F.; Fraser, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial analysis of soil samples is often times not possible when measurements are limited in number or clustered. To obviate potential problems, we propose a new approach based on the self-organizing map (SOM) technique. This approach exploits underlying nonlinear relation of the steady-state geomorphic concave-convex nature of hillslopes (from hilltop to bottom of the valley) to spatially limited soil textural data. The topographic features are extracted from Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission elevation data; whereas soil textural (clay, silt, and sand) and hydraulic data were collected in 29 spatially random locations (50 to 75. cm depth). In contrast to traditional principal component analysis, the SOM identifies relations among relief features, such as, slope, horizontal curvature and vertical curvature. Stochastic cross-validation indicates that the SOM is unbiased and provides a way to measure the magnitude of prediction uncertainty for all variables. The SOM cross-component plots of the soil texture reveals higher clay proportions at concave areas with convergent hydrological flux and lower proportions for convex areas with divergent flux. The sand ratio has an opposite pattern with higher values near the ridge and lower values near the valley. Silt has a trend similar to sand, although less pronounced. The relation between soil texture and concave-convex hillslope features reveals that subsurface weathering and transport is an important process that changed from loss-to-gain at the rectilinear hillslope point. These results illustrate that the SOM can be used to capture and predict nonlinear hillslope relations among relief, soil texture, and hydraulic conductivity data. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  14. A Risk Assessment Example for Soil Invertebrates Using Spatially Explicit Agent-Based Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reed, Melissa; Alvarez, Tania; Chelinho, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Current risk assessment methods for measuring the toxicity of plant protection products (PPPs) on soil invertebrates use standardized laboratory conditions to determine acute effects on mortality and sublethal effects on reproduction. If an unacceptable risk is identified at the lower tier...... population models for ubiquitous soil invertebrates (collembolans and earthworms) as refinement options in current risk assessment. Both are spatially explicit agent-based models (ABMs), incorporating individual and landscape variability. The models were used to provide refined risk assessments for different...... application scenarios of a hypothetical pesticide applied to potato crops (full-field spray onto the soil surface [termed “overall”], in-furrow, and soil-incorporated pesticide applications). In the refined risk assessment, the population models suggest that soil invertebrate populations would likely recover...

  15. Compilation of functional soil maps for the support of spatial planning and land management in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, László; Laborczi, Annamária; Takács, Katalin; Szatmári, Gábor; Fodor, Nándor; Illés, Gábor; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Szabó, József

    2015-04-01

    The main objective of the DOSoReMI.hu (Digital, Optimized, Soil Related Maps and Information in Hungary) project is to significantly extend the potential, how demands on spatial soil related information could be satisfied in Hungary. Although a great amount of soil information is available due to former mappings and surveys, there are more and more frequently emerging discrepancies between the available and the expected data. The gaps are planned to be filled with optimized DSM products heavily based on legacy soil data. Delineation of Areas with Excellent Productivity in the framework of the National Regional Development Plan or delimitation of Areas with Natural Constraints in Hungary according to the common European biophysical criteria are primary issues in national level spatial planning. Impact assessment of the forecasted climate change and the analysis of the possibilities of the adaptation in the agriculture and forestry can be supported by scenario based land management modelling, whose results can be also incorporated in spatial planning. All these challenges require adequate, preferably timely and spatially detailed knowledge of the soil cover. For the satisfaction of these demands the soil conditions of Hungary have been digitally mapped based on the most detailed, available recent and legacy soil data, applying proper DSM techniques. Various soil related information were mapped in three distinct approaches: (i) basic soil properties determining agri-environmental conditions (e.g.: soil type according to the Hungarian genetic classification, rootable depth, sand, silt and clay content by soil layers, pH, OM and carbonate content for the plough layer); (ii) biophysical criteria of natural handicaps (e.g.: poor drainage, unfavourable texture and stoniness, shallow rooting depth, poor chemical properties and soil moisture balance) defined by common European system and (iii) agro-meteorologically modelled yield values for different crops, meteorological

  16. The use of spatial empirical models to estimate soil erosion in arid ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Meshal; Feagin, Rusty; Musawi, Layla

    2017-02-01

    The central objective of this project was to utilize geographical information systems and remote sensing to compare soil erosion models, including Modified Pacific South-west Inter Agency Committee (MPSIAC), Erosion Potential Method (EPM), and Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE), and to determine their applicability for arid regions such as Kuwait. The northern portion of Umm Nigga, containing both coastal and desert ecosystems, falls within the boundaries of the de-militarized zone (DMZ) adjacent to Iraq and has been fenced off to restrict public access since 1994. Results showed that the MPSIAC and EPM models were similar in spatial distribution of erosion, though the MPSIAC had a more realistic spatial distribution of erosion and presented finer level details. The RUSLE presented unrealistic results. We then predicted the amount of soil loss between coastal and desert areas and fenced and unfenced sites for each model. In the MPSIAC and EPM models, soil loss was different between fenced and unfenced sites at the desert areas, which was higher at the unfenced due to the low vegetation cover. The overall results implied that vegetation cover played an important role in reducing soil erosion and that fencing is much more important in the desert ecosystems to protect against human activities such as overgrazing. We conclude that the MPSIAC model is best for predicting soil erosion for arid regions such as Kuwait. We also recommend the integration of field-based experiments with lab-based spatial analysis and modeling in future research.

  17. Assessment of some soil properties by spatial variability in saline and sodic soils in Arsanjan plain, Southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadi, Mostafa; Baghernejad, Majid; Emadi, Mehdi; Maftoun, Manouchehr

    2008-01-15

    Spatial patterns for several soil parameters such soil texture, Exchangeable Sodium Percentage (ESP), Electrical Conductivity (ECe), soil pH, Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) were examined in saline and sodic soils in Arsanjan plain, Southern Iran, in order to identify their spatial distribution for implementation of a site-specific management. Soil samples were collected from 0-30, 30-60 and 60-90 cm soil depths at 85 sampling sites. Data were analyzed both statistically and geostatistically on the basis of the semivariogram. The spatial distribution model and spatial dependence level varied between soil parameters. Soil pH and ESP had the minimum and maximum variability at all depths, respectively. Soil properties indicated moderate to strong spatial dependence. ECe exhibited moderate spatial dependence at three depths; pH and ESP had a moderate spatial dependence at 0-30 cm and strong spatial dependence at 30-60 and 60-90 cm depths. Clay and CEC exhibited strong spatial dependence for the 0-30 cm and weak spatial dependence at 30-60 and 60-90 cm depths. Sand and silt had a non-spatial dependence at 0-30 cm and weak spatial dependency at 30-60 and 60-90 cm depths. The spatial variability in small distances of ECe, CEC, pH and ESP generally increased with depth. All geostatistical range values were greater than 1168 m. The results reported herein indicated that the strong spatial dependency of soil properties would lead to the extrinsic factors such as ground water level and drainage. It is important to know the spatial dependence of soil parameters, as management parameters with strong spatial dependence will be more readily managed and an accurate site-specific scheme for precision farming more easily developed.

  18. Spatial Variability of Physical Soil Quality Index of an Agricultural Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh M. Fazle Rabbi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A field investigation was carried out to evaluate the spatial variability of physical indicators of soil quality of an agricultural field and to construct a physical soil quality index (SQIP map. Surface soil samples were collected using 10  m×10 m grid from an Inceptisol on Ganges Tidal Floodplain of Bangladesh. Five physical soil quality indicators, soil texture, bulk density, porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity (KS, and aggregate stability (measured as mean weight diameter, MWD were determined. The spatial structures of sand, clay, and KS were moderate but the structure was strong for silt, bulk density, porosity, and MWD. Each of the physical soil quality indicators was transformed into 0 and 1 using threshold criteria which are required for crop production. The transformed indicators were the combined into SQIP. The kriged SQIP map showed that the agricultural field studied could be divided into two parts having “good physical quality” and “poor physical soil quality.”

  19. Modeling Spatial Soil Water Dynamics in a Tropical Floodplain, East Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geofrey Gabiri

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture is critical for ecohydrological processes and for sustainable water management studies in wetlands. The characterization of soil moisture dynamics and its influencing factors in agriculturally used wetlands pose a challenge in data-scarce regions such as East Africa. High resolution and good-quality time series soil moisture data are rarely available and gaps are frequent due to measurement constraints and device malfunctioning. Soil water models that integrate meteorological conditions and soil water storage may significantly overcome limitations due to data gaps at a point scale. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if the Hydrus-1D model would adequately simulate soil water dynamics at different hydrological zones of a tropical floodplain in Tanzania, to determine controlling factors for wet and dry periods and to assess soil water availability. The zones of the Kilombero floodplain were segmented as riparian, middle, and fringe along a defined transect. The model was satisfactorily calibrated (coefficient of determination; R2 = 0.54–0.92, root mean square error; RMSE = 0.02–0.11 on a plot scale using measured soil moisture content at soil depths of 10, 20, 30, and 40 cm. Satisfying statistical measures (R2 = 0.36–0.89, RMSE = 0.03–0.13 were obtained when calibrations for one plot were validated with measured soil moisture for another plot within the same hydrological zone. Results show the transferability of the calibrated Hydrus-1D model to predict soil moisture for other plots with similar hydrological conditions. Soil water storage increased towards the riparian zone, at 262.8 mm/a while actual evapotranspiration was highest (1043.9 mm/a at the fringe. Overbank flow, precipitation, and groundwater control soil moisture dynamics at the riparian and middle zone, while at the fringe zone, rainfall and lateral flow from mountains control soil moisture during the

  20. Spatial trends and pollution assessment for mercury in the surface soils of the Nansi Lake catchment, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ming-Yi; Yang, Li-Yuan; Wang, Long-Feng; Han, Xue-Mei; Dai, Jie-Rui; Pang, Xu-Gui

    2017-11-09

    Surface soil samples collected from Nansi Lake catchment were analyzed for mercury (Hg) to determine its spatial trends and environmental impacts. Results showed that the average soil Hg contents were 0.043 mg kg-1. A positive correlation was shown between TOC and soil Hg contents. The main type of soil with higher TOC contents and lower pH values showed higher soil Hg contents. Soil TOC contents and CV values were both higher in the eastern catchment. The eastern part of the catchment, where the industry is developed, had relatively high soil Hg contents and a banding distribution of high Hg contents was corresponded with the southwest-northeast economic belt. Urban soils had higher Hg contents than rural soils. The urbanization pattern that soil Hg contents presented a decreasing trend from city center to suburb was shown clearly especially in the three cities. Soil Hg contents in Jining City showed a good consistency with the urban land expansion. The spatial trends of soil Hg contents in the catchment indicated that the type and the intensity of human activities have a strong influence on the distribution of Hg in soils. Calculated risk indices showed that the western part of the catchment presented moderately polluted condition and the eastern part of the catchment showed moderate to strong pollution level. The area with high ecological risk appeared mainly along the economic belt.

  1. Characterization of spatial variability of soil physicochemical properties and its impact on Rhodes grass productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tola, E; Al-Gaadi, K A; Madugundu, R; Zeyada, A M; Kayad, A G; Biradar, C M

    2017-02-01

    Characterization of soil properties is a key step in understanding the source of spatial variability in the productivity across agricultural fields. A study on a 16 ha field located in the eastern region of Saudi Arabia was undertaken to investigate the spatial variability of selected soil properties, such as soil compaction 'SC', electrical conductivity 'EC', pH (acidity or alkalinity of soil) and soil texture and its impact on the productivity of Rhodes grass (Chloris gayana L.). The productivity of Rhodes grass was investigated using the Cumulative Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (CNDVI), which was determined from Landsat-8 (OLI) images. The statistical analysis showed high spatial variability across the experimental field based on SC, clay and silt; indicated by values of the coefficient of variation (CV) of 22.08%, 21.89% and 21.02%, respectively. However, low to very low variability was observed for soil EC, sand and pH; with CV values of 13.94%, 7.20% and 0.53%, respectively. Results of the CNDVI of two successive harvests showed a relatively similar trend of Rhodes grass productivity across the experimental area (r = 0.74, p = 0.0001). Soil physicochemical layers of a considerable spatial variability (SC, clay, silt and EC) were utilized to delineate the experimental field into three management zones (MZ-1, MZ-2 and MZ-3); which covered 30.23%, 33.85% and 35.92% of the total area, respectively. The results of CNDVI indicated that the MZ-1 was the most productive zone, as its major areas of 50.28% and 45.09% were occupied by the highest CNDVI classes of 0.97-1.08 and 4.26-4.72, for the first and second harvests, respectively.

  2. Spatial distribution of soil moisture in precision farming using integrated soil scanning and field telemetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalopesas, Charalampos; Galanis, George; Kalopesa, Eleni; Katsogiannos, Fotis; Kalafatis, Panagiotis; Bilas, George; Patakas, Aggelos; Zalidis, George

    2015-04-01

    Mapping the spatial variation of soil moisture content is a vital parameter for precision agriculture techniques. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation of soil moisture and conductivity (EC) data obtained through scanning techniques with field telemetry data and to spatially separate the field into discrete irrigation management zones. Using the Veris MSP3 model, geo-referenced data for electrical conductivity and organic matter preliminary maps were produced in a pilot kiwifruit field in Chrysoupoli, Kavala. Data from 15 stratified sampling points was used in order to produce the corresponding soil maps. Fusion of the Veris produced maps (OM, pH, ECa) resulted on the delineation of the field into three zones of specific management interest. An appropriate pedotransfer function was used in order to estimate a capacity soil indicator, the saturated volumetric water content (θs) for each zone, while the relationship between ECs and ECa was established for each zone. Validation of the uniformity of the three management zones was achieved by measuring specific electrical conductivity (ECs) along a transect in each zone and corresponding semivariograms for ECs within each zone. Near real-time data produced by a telemetric network consisting of soil moisture and electrical conductivity sensors, were used in order to integrate the temporal component of the specific management zones, enabling the calculation of time specific volumetric water contents on a 10 minute interval, an intensity soil indicator necessary to be incorporated to differentiate spatially the irrigation strategies for each zone. This study emphasizes the benefits yielded by fusing near real time telemetric data with soil scanning data and spatial interpolation techniques, enhancing the precision and validity of the desired results. Furthermore the use of telemetric data in combination with modern database management and geospatial software leads to timely produced operational results

  3. Soil nitrate reducing processes – drivers, mechanisms for spatial variation and significance for nitrous oxide production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline Eleanore Giles

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The microbial processes of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA are two important nitrate reducing mechanisms in soil, which are responsible for the loss of nitrate (NO3-¬ and production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O. A number of factors are known to control these processes, including O2 concentrations and moisture content, N, C, pH and the size and community structure of nitrate reducing organisms responsible for the processes. There is an increasing understanding associated with many of these controls on flux through the nitrogen cycle in soil systems. However, there remains uncertainty about how the nitrate reducing communities are linked to environmental variables and the flux of products from these processes. The high spatial variability of environmental controls and microbial communities across small sub cm areas of soil may prove to be critical in determining why an understanding of the links between biotic and abiotic controls has proved elusive. This spatial effect is often overlooked as a driver of nitrate reducing processes. An increased knowledge of the effects of spatial heterogeneity in soil on nitrate reduction processes will be fundamental in understanding the drivers, location and potential for N2O production from soils.

  4. The Effect of Restoration Treatments on the Spatial Variability of Soil Processes under Longleaf Pine Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K. Hiers

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to (1 characterize tree-based spatial patterning of soil properties and understory vegetation in frequently burned (“reference state” and fire-suppressed longleaf pine forests; and (2 determine how restoration treatments affected patterning. To attain these objectives, we used an experimental manipulation of management types implemented 15 years ago in Florida. We randomly located six mature longleaf pine trees in one reference and four restoration treatments (i.e., burn, control, herbicide, and mechanical, for a total of 36 trees. In addition to the original treatments and as part of a monitoring program, all plots were subjected to several prescribed fires during these 15 years. Under each tree, we sampled mineral soil and understory vegetation at 1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m (vegetation only away from the tree. At these sites, soil carbon and nitrogen were higher near the trunk while graminoids, forbs and saw palmetto covers showed an opposite trend. Our results confirmed that longleaf pine trees affect the spatial patterning of soil and understory vegetation, and this patterning was mostly limited to the restoration sites. We suggest frequent burning as a probable cause for a lack of spatial structure in the “reference state”. We attribute the presence of spatial patterning in the restoration sites to accumulation of organic materials near the base of mature trees.

  5. Determination of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of alfisol soil in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hydrolic conductivity of soil measures the ease at which water moves through the soil by determining the flux density of water passing through the soil. The estimation of hydraulic conductivity indicates how fluids flow throuhg a substance and thus determine the water balance in the soil profile. The trend lines of ...

  6. Spatial variability of soil carbon stock in the Urucu river basin, Central Amazon-Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceddia, Marcos Bacis, E-mail: marcosceddia@gmail.com [Department of Soil, Institute of Agronomy, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropédica, RJ 23890-000 (Brazil); Villela, André Luis Oliveira [Colégio Técnico da UFRRJ, RJ, Seropédica 23890-000 (Brazil); Pinheiro, Érika Flávia Machado [Department of Soil, Institute of Agronomy, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropédica, RJ 23890-000 (Brazil); Wendroth, Ole [Department of Plant & Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Amazon Forest plays a major role in C sequestration and release. However, few regional estimates of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in this ecoregion exist. One of the barriers to improve SOC estimates is the lack of recent soil data at high spatial resolution, which hampers the application of new methods for mapping SOC stock. The aims of this work were: (i) to quantify SOC stock under undisturbed vegetation for the 0–30 and the 0–100 cm under Amazon Forest; (ii) to correlate the SOC stock with soil mapping units and relief attributes and (iii) to evaluate three geostatistical techniques to generate maps of SOC stock (ordinary, isotopic and heterotopic cokriging). The study site is located in the Central region of Amazon State, Brazil. The soil survey covered the study site that has an area of 80 km{sup 2} and resulted in a 1:10,000 soil map. It consisted of 315 field observations (96 complete soil profiles and 219 boreholes). SOC stock was calculated by summing C stocks by horizon, determined as a product of BD, SOC and the horizon thickness. For each one of the 315 soil observations, relief attributes were derived from a topographic map to understand SOC dynamics. The SOC stocks across 30 and 100 cm soil depth were 3.28 and 7.32 kg C m{sup −2}, respectively, which is, 34 and 16%, lower than other studies. The SOC stock is higher in soils developed in relief forms exhibiting well-drained soils, which are covered by Upland Dense Tropical Rainforest. Only SOC stock in the upper 100 cm exhibited spatial dependence allowing the generation of spatial variability maps based on spatial (co)-regionalization. The CTI was inversely correlated with SOC stock and was the only auxiliary variable feasible to be used in cokriging interpolation. The heterotopic cokriging presented the best performance for mapping SOC stock. - Highlights: • The SOC stocks across 30 and 100 cm depth were 3.28 and 7.32 kg C m{sup −2}, respectively. • SOC stocks were 34 and 16

  7. Spatial variability of soil available phosphorous and potassium at three different soils located in Pannonian Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogunović, Igor; Pereira, Paulo; Đurđević, Boris

    2017-04-01

    Information on spatial distribution of soil nutrients in agroecosystems is critical for improving productivity and reducing environmental pressures in intensive farmed soils. In this context, spatial prediction of soil properties should be accurate. In this study we analyse 704 data of soil available phosphorus (AP) and potassium (AK); the data derive from soil samples collected across three arable fields in Baranja region (Croatia) in correspondence of different soil types: Cambisols (169 samples), Chernozems (131 samples) and Gleysoils (404 samples). The samples are collected in a regular sampling grid (distance 225 x 225 m). Several geostatistical techniques (Inverse Distance to a Weight (IDW) with the power of 1, 2 and 3; Radial Basis Functions (RBF) - Inverse Multiquadratic (IMT), Multiquadratic (MTQ), Completely Regularized Spline (CRS), Spline with Tension (SPT) and Thin Plate Spline (TPS); and Local Polynomial (LP) with the power of 1 and 2; two geostatistical techniques -Ordinary Kriging - OK and Simple Kriging - SK) were tested in order to evaluate the most accurate spatial variability maps using criteria of lowest RMSE during cross validation technique. Soil parameters varied considerably throughout the studied fields and their coefficient of variations ranged from 31.4% to 37.7% and from 19.3% to 27.1% for soil AP and AK, respectively. The experimental variograms indicate a moderate spatial dependence for AP and strong spatial dependence for all three locations. The best spatial predictor for AP at Chernozem field was Simple kriging (RMSE=61.711), and for AK inverse multiquadratic (RMSE=44.689). The least accurate technique was Thin plate spline (AP) and Inverse distance to a weight with a power of 1 (AK). Radial basis function models (Spline with Tension for AP at Gleysoil and Cambisol and Completely Regularized Spline for AK at Gleysol) were the best predictors, while Thin Plate Spline models were the least accurate in all three cases. The best

  8. Determining Arsenic Distribution in Urban Soils: A Comparison with Nonurban Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tait Chirenje

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many challenges in the determination of arsenic background concentrations in soils. However, these challenges are magnified when those determinations are carried out on urban soils. Irrespective of this, it is important to correctly identify and understand the extent of pollution in order to provide efficient preventative, remedial actions and cost-effective management of contaminated areas. This review paper discusses the factors that make the determination of arsenic background concentrations in urban areas different from similar determinations in nonurban areas. It also proposes solutions, where applicable, that are based on experience in determining arsenic background concentrations in both urban and nonurban areas in Florida, and from other studies in the literature. Urban soils are considerably different from nonurban areas because they have significant human disturbance, making them more difficult to study. They are characterized by high spatial and temporal variability, compaction, and modified chemical and physical characteristics. These differences have to be addressed during site selection, sample collection, and statistical analyses when determining arsenic distribution.

  9. Spatial distribution of gamma radiation levels in surface soils from Jaduguda uranium mineralization zone, Jharkhand, India, using γ-ray spectrometry, and determination of outdoor dose to the population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maharana Mandakini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of natural radionuclides in surface soil samples around selected villages of Jaduguda were investigated and compared with the radioactivity level in the region. Concentrations of 238 U, 232 Th, and 40 K were determined by a gamma ray spectrometer using the HPGe detector with 50% relative efficiency, and the radiation dose to the local population was estimated. The average estimated activity concentrations of 238 U, 232 Th, and 40 K in the surface soil were 53.8, 44.2 and 464.2 Bq kg -1 respectively. The average absorbed dose rate in the study area was estimated to be 72.5 nGy h-1, where as the annual effective dose to the population was 0.09 mSv y-1. A correlation analysis was made between measured dose rate and individual radionuclides, in order to delineate the contribution of the respective nuclides towards dose rate. The radio-elemental concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium estimated for the soils, in the study area, indicated the enrichment of uranium series nuclide. The results of the present study were subsequently compared with international and national recommended values.

  10. Spatial distribution of gamma radiation levels in surface soils from Jaduguda uranium mineralization zone, Jharkhand, India, using γ-ray spectrometry, and determination of outdoor dose to the population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharana, Mandakini; Krishnan, Narayani; Sengupta, D

    2010-10-01

    The concentrations of natural radionuclides in surface soil samples around selected villages of Jaduguda were investigated and compared with the radioactivity level in the region. Concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, and (40)K were determined by a gamma ray spectrometer using the HPGe detector with 50% relative efficiency, and the radiation dose to the local population was estimated. The average estimated activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, and (40)K in the surface soil were 53.8, 44.2 and 464.2 Bq kg(-1) respectively. The average absorbed dose rate in the study area was estimated to be 72.5 nGy h-1, where as the annual effective dose to the population was 0.09 mSv y-1. A correlation analysis was made between measured dose rate and individual radionuclides, in order to delineate the contribution of the respective nuclides towards dose rate. The radio-elemental concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium estimated for the soils, in the study area, indicated the enrichment of uranium series nuclide. The results of the present study were subsequently compared with international and national recommended values.

  11. Impact of microwave derived soil moisture on hydrologic simulations using a spatially distributed water balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D. S.; Wood, E. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Mancini, M.

    1994-01-01

    Spatial distributions of soil moisture over an agricultural watershed with a drainage area of 60 ha were derived from two NASA microwave remote sensors, and then used as a feedback to determine the initial condition for a distributed water balance model. Simulated hydrologic fluxes over a period of twelve days were compared with field observations and with model predictions based on a streamflow derived initial condition. The results indicated that even the low resolution remotely sensed data can improve the hydrologic model's performance in simulating the dynamics of unsaturated zone soil moisture. For the particular watershed under study, the simulated water budget was not sensitive to the resolutions of the microwave sensors.

  12. An exploratory spatial analysis of soil organic carbon distribution in Canadian eco-regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S.-Y.; Li, J.

    2014-11-01

    As the largest carbon reservoir in ecosystems, soil accounts for more than twice as much carbon storage as that of vegetation biomass or the atmosphere. This paper examines spatial patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) in Canadian forest areas at an eco-region scale of analysis. The goal is to explore the relationship of SOC levels with various climatological variables, including temperature and precipitation. The first Canadian forest soil database published in 1997 by the Canada Forest Service was analyzed along with other long-term eco-climatic data (1961 to 1991) including precipitation, air temperature, slope, aspect, elevation, and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from remote sensing imagery. In addition, the existing eco-region framework established by Environment Canada was evaluated for mapping SOC distribution. Exploratory spatial data analysis techniques, including spatial autocorrelation analysis, were employed to examine how forest SOC is spatially distributed in Canada. Correlation analysis and spatial regression modelling were applied to determine the dominant ecological factors influencing SOC patterns at the eco-region level. At the national scale, a spatial error regression model was developed to account for spatial dependency and to estimate SOC patterns based on ecological and ecosystem factors. Based on the significant variables derived from the spatial error model, a predictive SOC map in Canadian forest areas was generated. Although overall SOC distribution is influenced by climatic and topographic variables, distribution patterns are shown to differ significantly between eco-regions. These findings help to validate the eco-region classification framework for SOC zonation mapping in Canada.

  13. Spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal saline soil at different scales in the Yellow River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuoran; Zhao, Gengxing; Gao, Mingxiu; Chang, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal saline soil at macro, meso and micro scales in the Yellow River delta, China. Soil electrical conductivities (ECs) were measured at 0-15, 15-30, 30-45 and 45-60 cm soil depths at 49 sampling sites during November 9 to 11, 2013. Soil salinity was converted from soil ECs based on laboratory analyses. Our results indicated that at the macro scale, soil salinity was high with strong variability in each soil layer, and the content increased and the variability weakened with increasing soil depth. From east to west in the region, the farther away from the sea, the lower the soil salinity was. The degrees of soil salinization in three deeper soil layers are 1.14, 1.24 and 1.40 times higher than that in the surface soil. At the meso scale, the sequence of soil salinity in different topographies, soil texture and vegetation decreased, respectively, as follows: depression >flatland >hillock >batture; sandy loam >light loam >medium loam >heavy loam >clay; bare land >suaeda salsa >reed >cogongrass >cotton >paddy >winter wheat. At the micro scale, soil salinity changed with elevation in natural micro-topography and with anthropogenic activities in cultivated land. As the study area narrowed down to different scales, the spatial variability of soil salinity weakened gradually in cultivated land and salt wasteland except the bare land.

  14. Spatial and Seasonal Variability of Extreme Soil Temperature in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviličić, Petra; Vučetić, Višnja

    2015-04-01

    In terms of taking the temperature of the Earth in Croatia, first measurements began in 1898 in Križevci, but systematic measurements of soil temperature started in 1951. Today, the measurements are performed at 55 meteorological stations. The process of setting up, calibration, measurement, input, control and data processing is done entirely within the Meteorological and Hydrological Service. Due to the lack of funds, but also as a consequence of the Homeland War, network density in some areas is very rare, leading to aggravating circumstances during analysis. Also, certain temperature series are incomplete or are interrupted and therefore the number of long-term temperature series is very small. This particularly presents problems in coastal area, which is geographically diversified and is very difficult to do a thorough analysis of the area. Using mercury angle geothermometer daily at 7, 14 and 21 h CET, thermal state of soil is measured at 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 cm depth. Thermometers are placed on the bare ground within the meteorological circle and facing north to reduce the direct impact of solar radiation. Lack of term measurements is noticed in the analysis of extreme soil temperatures, which are not real extreme values, but derived from three observational times. On the basis of fifty year series (1961-2010) at 23 stations, the analysis of trends of the surface maximal and minimal soil temperature, as well as the appearance of freezing is presented. Trends were determined by Sen's slope estimator, and statistical significance on 5% level was determined using the Mann-Kendall test. It was observed that the variability of the surface maximal soil temperature on an annual and seasonal level is much higher than those for surface minimal soil temperature. Trends in the recent period show a statistically significant increase in the maximal soil temperature in the eastern and the coastal regions, especially in the spring and summer season. Also, the

  15. Small-scale spatial variability of soil microbial community composition and functional diversity in a mixed forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiufeng; Tian, Jing; Yu, Guirui

    2014-05-01

    Patterns in the spatial distribution of organisms provide important information about mechanisms that regulate the diversity and complexity of soil ecosystems. Therefore, information on spatial distribution of microbial community composition and functional diversity is urgently necessary. The spatial variability on a 26×36 m plot and vertical distribution (0-10 cm and 10-20 cm) of soil microbial community composition and functional diversity were studied in a natural broad-leaved Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) mixed forest soil in Changbai Mountain. The phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) pattern was used to characterize the soil microbial community composition and was compared with the community substrate utilization pattern using Biolog. Bacterial biomass dominated and showed higher variability than fungal biomass at all scales examined. The microbial biomass decreased with soil depths increased and showed less variability in lower 10-20 cm soil layer. The Shannon-Weaver index value for microbial functional diversity showed higher variability in upper 0-10 cm than lower 10-20 cm soil layer. Carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, polymers and amino acids are the main carbon sources possessing higher utilization efficiency or utilization intensity. At the same time, the four carbon source types contributed to the differentiation of soil microbial communities. This study suggests the higher diversity and complexity for this mix forest ecosystem. To determine the driving factors that affect this spatial variability of microorganism is the next step for our study.

  16. Land agroecological quality assessment in conditions of high spatial soil cover variability at the Pereslavskoye Opolye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morev, Dmitriy; Vasenev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The essential spatial variability is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central region of European territory of Russia. The original spatial heterogeneity of forest soils has been further complicated by a specific land-use history and human impacts. For demand-driven land-use planning and decision making the quantitative analysis and agroecological interpretation of representative soil cover spatial variability is an important and challenging task that receives increasing attention from private companies, governmental and environmental bodies. Pereslavskoye Opolye is traditionally actively used in agriculture due to dominated high-quality cultivated soddy-podzoluvisols which are relatively reached in organic matter (especially for conditions of the North part at the European territory of Russia). However, the soil cover patterns are often very complicated even within the field that significantly influences on crop yield variability and have to be considered in farming system development and land agroecological quality evaluation. The detailed investigations of soil regimes and mapping of the winter rye yield have been carried in conditions of two representative fields with slopes sharply contrasted both in aspects and degrees. Rye biological productivity and weed infestation have been measured in elementary plots of 0.25 m2 with the following analysis the quality of the yield. In the same plot soil temperature and moisture have been measured by portable devices. Soil sampling was provided from three upper layers by drilling. The results of ray yield detailed mapping shown high differences both in average values and within-field variability on different slopes. In case of low-gradient slope (field 1) there is variability of ray yield from 39.4 to 44.8 dt/ha. In case of expressed slope (field 2) the same species of winter rye grown with the same technology has essentially lower yield and within-field variability from 20 to 29.6 dt/ha. The

  17. [Factors influencing the spatial variability in soil respiration under different land use regimes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Tao; Liu, Qiao-Hui; Hu, Zheng-Hua; Liu, Yan; Ren, Jing-Quan; Xie, Wei

    2013-03-01

    In order to investigate the factors influencing the spatial variability in soil respiration under different land use regimes, field experiments were performed. Soil respiration and relevant environment, vegetation and soil factors were measured. The spatial variability in soil respiration and the relationship between soil respiration and these measured factors were investigated. Results indicated that land use regimes had significant effects on soil respiration. Soil respiration varied significantly (P Soil respiration rates ranged from 1.82 to 7.46 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1), with a difference of 5.62 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) between the highest and lowest respiration rates. Soil organic carbon was a key factor controlling the spatial variability in soil respiration. In all, ecosystems studied, the relationship between soil respiration and soil organic carbon content can be described by a power function. Soil respiration increased with the increase of soil organic carbon. In forest ecosystem, the relationship between soil respiration and diameter at breast height (DBH) of trees can be explained by a natural logarithmic function. A model composed of soil organic carbon (C, %), available phosphorous (AP, g x kg(-1)) and diameter at breast height (DBH, cm) explained 92.8% spatial variability in soil respiration for forest ecosystems.

  18. Evaluating water erosion prediction project model using Cesium-137-derived spatial soil redistribution data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lack of spatial soil erosion data has been a major constraint on the refinement and application of physically based erosion models. Spatially distributed models can only be thoroughly validated with distributed erosion data. The fallout cesium-137 has been widely used to generate spatial soil re...

  19. High temporal and spatial variability of atmospheric-methane oxidation in Alpine glacier-forefield soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiri, Eleonora; Nauer, Philipp A; Rainer, Edda-Marie; Zeyer, Josef; Schroth, Martin H

    2017-07-07

    Glacier-forefield soils can provide a substantial sink for atmospheric CH4, facilitated by aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). However, MOB activity, abundance, and community structure may be affected by soil age, location in different forefield landforms, and temporal fluctuations in soil-physical parameters. We assessed spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric CH4 oxidation in an Alpine glacier forefield during the snow-free season 2013. We quantified CH4 flux in soils of increasing age and in different landforms (sandhill, terrace, floodplain) using soil-gas-profile and static flux-chamber methods. To determine MOB abundance and community structure, we employed pmoA-gene-based quantitative PCR and targeted-amplicon sequencing. Uptake of CH4 increased in magnitude and decreased in variability with increasing soil age. Sandhill soils exhibited CH4 uptake ranging from -0.03- -3.7 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 Floodplain and terrace soils exhibited smaller uptake and even intermittent CH4 emissions. Linear mixed-effect models indicated that soil age and landform were dominating factors shaping CH4 flux, followed by cumulative rainfall (weighted sum ≤ 4 d prior to sampling). Of 31 MOB operational taxonomic units retrieved, ∼30% were potentially novel, and ∼50% were affiliated with Upland Soil Clusters gamma and alpha. The MOB community structures in floodplain and terrace soils were nearly identical, but differed significantly from highly variable sandhill-soil communities. We conclude that soil age and landform modulate the soil CH4 sink strength in glacier forefields, and recent rainfall affects its short-term variability. This should be taken into account when including this environment in future CH4 inventories.Importance Oxidation of methane (CH4) in well-drained, "upland" soils is an important mechanism for the removal of this potent greenhouse gas from the atmosphere. It is largely mediated by aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). Whereas there is

  20. Spatial variability of detrended soil plow layer penetrometer resistance transect in a sugarcane field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Luis D.; Cumbrera, Ramiro; Mato, Juan; Millán, Humberto; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    Spatial variability of soil properties is relevant for identifying those zones with physical degradation. In this sense, one has to face the problem of identifying the origin and distribution of spatial variability patterns (Brouder et al., 2001; Millán et al., 2012). The objective of the present work was to quantify the spatial structure of soil penetrometer resistance (PR) collected from a transect data consisted of 221 points equidistant. In each sampling, readings were obtained from 0 cm till 70 cm of depth, with an interval of 5 cm (Pérez, 2012). The study was conducted on a Vertisol (Typic Hapludert) dedicated to sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) production during the last sixty years (Pérez et al., 2010). Recently, scaling approach has been applied on the determination of the scaling data properties (Tarquis et al., 2008; Millán et al., 2012; Pérez, 2012). We focus in the Hurst analysis to characterize the data variability for each depth. Previously a detrended analysis was conducted in order to better study de intrinsic variability of the series. The Hurst exponent (H) for each depth was estimated showing a characteristic pattern and differentiating PR evolution in depth. References Brouder, S., Hofmann, B., Reetz, H.F., 2001. Evaluating spatial variability of soil parameters for input management. Better Crops 85, 8-11. Millán, H; AM Tarquís, Luís D. Pérez, Juan Mato, Mario González-Posada, 2012. Spatial variability patterns of some Vertisol properties at a field scale using standardized data. Soil and Tillage Research, 120, 76-84. Pérez, Luís D. 2012. Influencia de la maquinaria agrícola sobre la variabilidad espacial de la compactación del suelo. Aplicación de la metodología geoestadística-fractal. PhD thesis, UPM (In Spanish). Pérez, Luís D., Humberto Millán, Mario González-Posada 2010. Spatial complexity of soil plow layer penetrometer resistance as influenced by sugarcane harvesting: A prefractal approach. Soil and Tillage

  1. Spatial variability of soil aggregate stability at the scale of an agricultural region in Tunisia

    OpenAIRE

    Annabi, M.; Raclot, Damien; Bahri, H.; Bailly, J. S.; Gomez, Cécile; Le Bissonnais, Y.

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Soil aggregate stability is a key factor in soil resistance to water erosion, which is a threat to soils in a large part of northern Tunisia. The analysis of the spatial variability of soil aggregate stability provides both agronomic and environmentally useful information. However, extensive measurements of soil aggregate stability remain tedious and expensive. This study explores two different approaches as alternative to measurements of soil aggregate stability. One ...

  2. DETERMINING SOIL MOISTURE REGIMES FOR VITICULTURAL ZONING PURPOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Poch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyse the suitability of Soil Taxonomy to characterize the soil moisture regime for viticultural zoning studies, comparing the soil moisture parameters used in the Soil Taxonomy classification with soil moisture parameters relevant to the grapevine phenological stages. The results show that Soil Taxonomy does not adequately reflect the variability of soil moisture dynamics during vineyard growing. Then, a proposal for soil moisture regime classification is realised by means of a cluster analysis. This classification is based on determining dry days, as indicated by Soil Taxonomy, in different vine phenological periods, and grouping the cases according to their variability. The soil moisture regime classes, resulting from cluster analysis, show significant differences in soil moisture status in all phenological periods, and therefore present different implications for viticulture, related to potential for vegetative growth, grape production and the grape ripening process.

  3. Drivers for spatial variability in agricultural soil organic carbon stocks in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Cora; Don, Axel; Hobley, Eleanor; Prietz, Roland; Heidkamp, Arne; Freibauer, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Soil organic carbon is one of the largest components of the global carbon cycle. It has recently gained importance in global efforts to mitigate climate change through carbon sequestration. In order to find locations suitable for carbon sequestration, and estimate the sequestration potential, however, it is necessary to understand the factors influencing the high spatial variability of soil organic carbon stocks. Due to numerous interacting factors that influence its dynamics, soil organic carbon stocks are difficult to predict. In the course of the German Agricultural Soil Inventory over 2500 agricultural sites were sampled and their soil organic carbon stocks determined. Data relating to more than 200 potential drivers of SOC stocks were compiled from laboratory measurements, farmer questionnaires and climate stations. The aims of this study were to 1) give an overview of soil organic carbon stocks in Germany's agricultural soils, 2) to quantify and explain the influence of explanatory variables on soil organic carbon stocks. Two different machine learning algorithms were used to identify the most important variables and multiple regression models were used to explore the influence of those variables. Models for predicting carbon stocks in different depth increments between 0-100 cm were developed, explaining up to 62% (validation, 98% calibration) of total variance. Land-use, land-use history, clay content and electrical conductivity were main predictors in the topsoil, while bedrock material, relief and electrical conductivity governed the variability of subsoil carbon stocks. We found 32% of all soils to be deeply anthropogenically transformed. The influence of climate related variables was surprisingly small (≤5% of explained variance), while site variables explained a large share of soil carbon variability (46-100% of explained variance), in particular in the subsoil. Thus, the understanding of SOC dynamics at regional scale requires a thorough description

  4. Analysis of field-scale spatial correlations and variations of soil nutrients using geostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruimin; Xu, Fei; Yu, Wenwen; Shi, Jianhan; Zhang, Peipei; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-02-01

    Spatial correlations and soil nutrient variations are important for soil nutrient management. They help to reduce the negative impacts of agricultural nonpoint source pollution. Based on the sampled available nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP), and available potassium (AK), soil nutrient data from 2010, the spatial correlation, was analyzed, and the probabilities of the nutrient's abundance or deficiency were discussed. This paper presents a statistical approach to spatial analysis, the spatial correlation analysis (SCA), which was originally developed for describing heterogeneity in the presence of correlated variation and based on ordinary kriging (OK) results. Indicator kriging (IK) was used to assess the susceptibility of excess of soil nutrients based on crop needs. The kriged results showed there was a distinct spatial variability in the concentration of all three soil nutrients. High concentrations of these three soil nutrients were found near Anzhou. As the distance from the center of town increased, the concentration of the soil nutrients gradually decreased. Spatially, the relationship between AN and AP was negative, and the relationship between AP and AK was not clear. The IK results showed that there were few areas with a risk of AN and AP overabundance. However, almost the entire study region was at risk of AK overabundance. Based on the soil nutrient distribution results, it is clear that the spatial variability of the soil nutrients differed throughout the study region. This spatial soil nutrient variability might be caused by different fertilizer types and different fertilizing practices.

  5. Soil biodiversity and soil community composition determine ecosystem multifunctionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagg, Cameron; Bender, S Franz; Widmer, Franco; van der Heijden, Marcel G A

    2014-04-08

    Biodiversity loss has become a global concern as evidence accumulates that it will negatively affect ecosystem services on which society depends. So far, most studies have focused on the ecological consequences of above-ground biodiversity loss; yet a large part of Earth's biodiversity is literally hidden below ground. Whether reductions of biodiversity in soil communities below ground have consequences for the overall performance of an ecosystem remains unresolved. It is important to investigate this in view of recent observations that soil biodiversity is declining and that soil communities are changing upon land use intensification. We established soil communities differing in composition and diversity and tested their impact on eight ecosystem functions in model grassland communities. We show that soil biodiversity loss and simplification of soil community composition impair multiple ecosystem functions, including plant diversity, decomposition, nutrient retention, and nutrient cycling. The average response of all measured ecosystem functions (ecosystem multifunctionality) exhibited a strong positive linear relationship to indicators of soil biodiversity, suggesting that soil community composition is a key factor in regulating ecosystem functioning. Our results indicate that changes in soil communities and the loss of soil biodiversity threaten ecosystem multifunctionality and sustainability.

  6. Small-scale spatial variability of atrazine and dinoseb adsorption parameters in an alluvial soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermoud, A; Martins, J M F; Zhang, D; Favre, A C

    2008-01-01

    Soil sorption processes largely control the environmental fate of herbicides. Therefore, accuracy of sorption parameters is crucial for accurate prediction of herbicide mobility in agricultural soils. A combined experimental and statistical study was performed to investigate the small-scale spatial variability of sorption parameters for atrazine and dinoseb in soils and to establish the number of samples needed to provide a value of the distribution coefficient (K(d)) next to the mean, with a given precision. The study explored sorption properties of the two herbicides in subsurface samples collected from four pits distributed along a transect of an alluvial soil; two to four samples were taken at about 30 cm apart at each sampling location. When considering all the data, the distribution coefficients were found to be normally and log-normally distributed for atrazine and dinoseb, respectively; the CVs were relatively high (close to 50% for dinoseb and 40% for atrazine). When analyzed horizon by horizon, the data revealed distribution coefficients normally distributed for both herbicides, whatever the soil layer, with lower CVs. The K(d) values were shown to vary considerably between samples collected at very short distance (a few centimeters), suggesting that taking a single soil sample to determine sorption properties through batch experiments can lead to highly unrepresentative results and to poor sorption/mobility predictions.

  7. General relationships between abiotic soil properties and soil biota across spatial scales and different land-use types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhofer, Klaus; Schöning, Ingo; Alt, Fabian; Herold, Nadine; Klarner, Bernhard; Maraun, Mark; Marhan, Sven; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wubet, Tesfaye; Yurkov, Andrey; Begerow, Dominik; Berner, Doreen; Buscot, François; Daniel, Rolf; Diekötter, Tim; Ehnes, Roswitha B; Erdmann, Georgia; Fischer, Christiane; Foesel, Bärbel; Groh, Janine; Gutknecht, Jessica; Kandeler, Ellen; Lang, Christa; Lohaus, Gertrud; Meyer, Annabel; Nacke, Heiko; Näther, Astrid; Overmann, Jörg; Polle, Andrea; Pollierer, Melanie M; Scheu, Stefan; Schloter, Michael; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Schulze, Waltraud; Weinert, Jan; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Wolters, Volkmar; Schrumpf, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Very few principles have been unraveled that explain the relationship between soil properties and soil biota across large spatial scales and different land-use types. Here, we seek these general relationships using data from 52 differently managed grassland and forest soils in three study regions spanning a latitudinal gradient in Germany. We hypothesize that, after extraction of variation that is explained by location and land-use type, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in the abundance and diversity of soil biota. If the relationships between predictors and soil organisms were analyzed individually for each predictor group, soil properties explained the highest amount of variation in soil biota abundance and diversity, followed by land-use type and sampling location. After extraction of variation that originated from location or land-use, abiotic soil properties explained significant amounts of variation in fungal, meso- and macrofauna, but not in yeast or bacterial biomass or diversity. Nitrate or nitrogen concentration and fungal biomass were positively related, but nitrate concentration was negatively related to the abundances of Collembola and mites and to the myriapod species richness across a range of forest and grassland soils. The species richness of earthworms was positively correlated with clay content of soils independent of sample location and land-use type. Our study indicates that after accounting for heterogeneity resulting from large scale differences among sampling locations and land-use types, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in fungal and soil fauna abundance or diversity. However, soil biota was also related to processes that act at larger spatial scales and bacteria or soil yeasts only showed weak relationships to soil properties. We therefore argue that more general relationships between soil properties and soil biota can only be derived from future studies that consider

  8. General relationships between abiotic soil properties and soil biota across spatial scales and different land-use types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Birkhofer

    Full Text Available Very few principles have been unraveled that explain the relationship between soil properties and soil biota across large spatial scales and different land-use types. Here, we seek these general relationships using data from 52 differently managed grassland and forest soils in three study regions spanning a latitudinal gradient in Germany. We hypothesize that, after extraction of variation that is explained by location and land-use type, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in the abundance and diversity of soil biota. If the relationships between predictors and soil organisms were analyzed individually for each predictor group, soil properties explained the highest amount of variation in soil biota abundance and diversity, followed by land-use type and sampling location. After extraction of variation that originated from location or land-use, abiotic soil properties explained significant amounts of variation in fungal, meso- and macrofauna, but not in yeast or bacterial biomass or diversity. Nitrate or nitrogen concentration and fungal biomass were positively related, but nitrate concentration was negatively related to the abundances of Collembola and mites and to the myriapod species richness across a range of forest and grassland soils. The species richness of earthworms was positively correlated with clay content of soils independent of sample location and land-use type. Our study indicates that after accounting for heterogeneity resulting from large scale differences among sampling locations and land-use types, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in fungal and soil fauna abundance or diversity. However, soil biota was also related to processes that act at larger spatial scales and bacteria or soil yeasts only showed weak relationships to soil properties. We therefore argue that more general relationships between soil properties and soil biota can only be derived from future

  9. Gravimetric determination of soil organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miyazawa

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out to evaluate a gravimetric method for the determination of soil organic matter by the mass loss at 300ºC. The gravimetric method was compared with Walkley-Black, using several brazilian soils with variable chemical and physical properties. Gravimetric method was positively correlated with Walkley-Black method with the following linear regression equation: y = 3.72x + 0.29, r = 0.94. The angular coefficient 3.72 for tropical soils was greater than those reported in the literature for temperate soils (from 1.68 to 2.13. The difference was due to greater oxidation degree of the organic matter. When compared with Walkley-Black method, gravimetric technique showed certain distinct advantages such as no environmental contamination with Cr6+ and improved laboratory safety eliminating the use of concentrated sulfuric acid.Avaliou-se o método de determinação gravimétrica da matéria orgânica do solo pela perda de massa por incineração a 300ºC e comparou-se com o carbono determinado pelo método Walkley-Black. Os dois métodos foram correlacionados positivamente com a seguinte equação de regressão linear: y = 3,720x + 0,2914. r = 0,937. O coeficiente. 3,720 foi maior do que os encontrados na literatura. que variaram de 1,68 a 2,13. Esta diferença foi atribuída ao maior grau de oxidação da matéria orgânica dos solos das regiões tropicais. O método de incineração é aplicável para determinação do C do solo em rotina. O método não contamina o meio ambiente com metal tóxico (Cr6+ e não oferece riscos aos analistas com o uso de ácido sulfúrico concentrado.

  10. Sample sizes to control error estimates in determining soil bulk density in California forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youzhi Han; Jianwei Zhang; Kim G. Mattson; Weidong Zhang; Thomas A. Weber

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing forest soil properties with high variability is challenging, sometimes requiring large numbers of soil samples. Soil bulk density is a standard variable needed along with element concentrations to calculate nutrient pools. This study aimed to determine the optimal sample size, the number of observation (n), for predicting the soil bulk density with a...

  11. Linking the field-scale spatial pattern of bare soil respiration with organic carbon fractions and other covariates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Michael; Bornemann, Ludger; Graf, Alexander; Welp, Gerd; Vereecken, Harry; Amelung, Wulf

    2010-05-01

    Soil heterotrophic respiration fluxes at field scale exhibit substantial spatial variability. Chamber-based measurements of respiration fluxes were carried out within a 40x180 m bare soil plot. Soil temperatures were measured simultaneouslyto the flux measuremnts. Further, we used measurements of total soil organic carbon content, apparent electrical conductivity as well as mid-infrared spectroscopy- based carbon fractions as co-variates. Futher, basic soil properties like e.gtexture were determined as co-variates. After computing correlation coefficients, a stepwise multiple linear regression procedure was used to spatially predict bare soil respiration from the co-variates. In particular the soil carbon fractions and the apparent electrical conductivity show a certain, even though limited, predictive potential. In a fist step we applied external drift kriging to determine the improvement of using co-variates in an estimation procedure in comparison to ordinary kriging. The relative improvement using the co-variates in terms of the root mean square error was moderate with about 12%. In a second step we applied simulated annealing to perform stochastic simulations conditioned with external drift kriging to generate more realistic spatial patterns of heterotrophic respiration at plot scale. The conditional stochastic simulations revealed a significantly improved reproduction of the probability density function and the semivariogram of the original point data.

  12. Determining the spatial variability of crop yields of two different climatic regions in Southwest Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshonkulov, Ravshan; Poyda, Arne; Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the spatial variability of soil physical properties is crucial for agricultural land management. We determined the spatial variability within two agricultural fields in the regions of Kraichgau and Swabian Jura in Southwest Germany. We determined soil physical properties and recorded the temporal development of soil mineral nitrogen (N) and water content as well as that of plant variables (phenology, biomass, leaf area index (LAI), N content, green vegetation fraction (GVF). The work was conducted during the vegetation periods of 2015 and 2016 in winter wheat, and winter rapeseed in Kraichgau and winter barley and silage maize on Swabian Jura. Measurements were taken in three-weekly intervals. On each field, we identified three plots with reduced plant development using high-resolution (RapidEye) satellite images ("cold spots"). Measurements taken on these cold spots were compared to those from five established (long-term) reference plots representing the average field variability. The software EXPERT-N was used to simulate the soil crop system at both cold spots and reference plots. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to identify the most important parameters for the determination of spatial variability in crop growth dynamics.

  13. Spatial and temporal variations of soil moisture under Rosmarinus officinalis and Quercus coccifera in a burned soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno-García, E.; Pascual-Aguilar, J. A.; Llovet, J.

    2009-04-01

    of 172 mm; and (3) ten months after fire (Jun-08), when 50 mm were registered in the previous ten days. The spatial pattern of SMC was determined trough geostatistical analysis using GS+ software, calculating the semivariograms, to analyse the spatial correlation scale, interpolating data to estimate values of SMC at unsampled locations by means of kriging and finally, the results of kriging were displayed as different contour maps. Results showed that spatial pattern of SMC was highly variable, with important differences recorded within short distances. In fact, the range of spatial correlation (a0), which is the distance at that spatial correlation exists, varied between 0.5 to 1.4 m. A0 also varied according to the time from fire, with values of 0.5 m in the first rainfall after fire, 0.9 m four months later and 1.4 m ten months after fire occurs. This result suggests that the extent of the wettest areas increase as the vegetation recover. After the first rainfall, the SMC spatial pattern seems to be related to the soil microsite characteristics, mainly organic matter content, presence of hydrophobicity and soil clay content. Generally, the highest SMC (26-31%) appears at the burned bare soil areas. Four months later, as the same time as Q. coccifera resprouts, and in the R. officinalis microsites an important regrowth of Brachypodium resutum is observed, the spatial pattern of SMC changed according this plant cover distribution. This pattern is more clearly observed ten months after fire, when the highest SMC values were located at Q. coccifera and B. resutum areas (28-33%). At this time, no evidence of germination of R. officinalis (obligate seeder specie) was found. The lowest SMC (19-22%) appeared at the half lower part of the plot, where there was a central strip dominated by bare soil, with scarce presence of resprouter species. These results showed that at detailed working scale, the soil moisture pattern in this burned area was highly heterogeneous and the

  14. Spatially Distributed Characterization of Soil Dynamics Using Travel-Time Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Falk; Zink, Matthias; Attinger, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    The description of storage and transport of both water and solved contaminants in catchments is very difficult due to the high heterogeneity of the subsurface properties that govern their fate. This heterogeneity, combined with a generally limited knowledge about the subsurface, results in high degrees of uncertainty. As a result, stochastic methods are increasingly applied, where the relevant processes are modeled as being random. Within these methods, quantities like the catchment travel or residence time of a water parcel are described using probability density functions (PDF). The derivation of these PDF's is typically done by using the water fluxes and states of the catchment. A successful application of such frameworks is therefore contingent on a good quantification of these fluxes and states across the different spatial scales. The objective of this study is to use travel times for the characterization of an ca. 1000 square kilometer, humid catchment in Central Germany. To determine the states and fluxes, we apply the mesoscale Hydrological Model mHM, a spatially distributed hydrological model to the catchment. Using detailed data of precipitation, land cover, morphology and soil type as inputs, mHM is able to determine fluxes like recharge and evapotranspiration and states like soil moisture as outputs. Using these data, we apply the above theoretical framework to our catchment. By virtue of the aforementioned properties of mHM, we are able to describe the storage and release of water with a high spatial resolution. This allows for a comprehensive description of the flow and transport dynamics taking place in the catchment. The spatial distribution of such dynamics is then compared with land cover and soil moisture maps as well as driving forces like precipitation and potential evapotranspiration to determine the most predictive factors. In addition, we investigate how non-local data like the age distribution of discharge flows are impacted by, and

  15. Geochemistry and spatial variability of metal(loid) concentrations in soils of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, José João Lelis Leal; Abrahão, Walter Antônio Pereira; de Mello, Jaime Wilson Vargas; da Silva, Juscimar; da Costa, Liovando Marciano; de Oliveira, Teógenes Senna

    2015-02-01

    Since 2009 a policy has been implemented in Brazil to establish the natural concentrations of potentially toxic substances in soil for each state. Historically a 'mining state', Minas Gerais established a Quality Reference Value for metal(loid)s for all of the soils in the state. To successfully establish these values it is important to study the spatial geochemical diversity for the state. In this context, the objectives of this work are: (1) to evaluate the natural concentrations of metal(loid)s in pristine Minas Gerais soils and (2) to interpret the spatial variability in concentration of these elements. The 0-20 cm layer of soils was sampled for 697 georeferenced sites including the main geological materials and soil groups. Soil properties were analyzed according to methodologies suitable for Brazilian soils. The concentration of metal(loid)s was determined by acid extraction according to EPA 3051A. Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation and spatial variability analyses were performed. The dominance of acidic pH and low CEC values reflects the pervasive deep acid weathering. The variability of metal(loid) concentrations for soils of the state may be attributed to geological diversity and different pedogenesis. Correlation and spatial analysis indicated that the Fe concentration is strongly associated with metal(loid) concentrations in topsoil. According to the spatial geochemical diversity of the state, a k-means cluster analysis was performed which identified four clusters. A significant difference in the mean values of metal(loid) concentrations between the clusters confirmed that the single Quality Reference Value established does not represent the geochemical diversity of soils in Minas Gerais. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors affecting the spatial patterns of soil infiltration capacity at the hillslope scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Winnie; Coles, Anna; Appels, Willemijn; Hopp, Luisa; McDonnell, Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of soil infiltration capacity (Ic) and its relation to soil properties have been the subject of many studies in the past decades. However, the controls on the spatial organization of infiltration capacity in the landscape are still poorly understood. A better understanding of the patterns of Ic is important since these patterns govern runoff generation and possible threshold runoff responses in low-angled terrain prone to overland flow. In this study we present spatial patterns of Ic on a 5 ha low-angled agricultural field in Southern Saskatchewan and explore above- and below-ground controls. The study site is located in the semi-arid region of western Canada with a mean annual precipitation of 350 mm. Runoff on these loess soils (Brown Chernozems) is mainly generated during spring snowmelt and occurs as infiltration-excess overland flow over frozen ground. Hillslopes in that region typically have a slope of 1-4%. Infiltration capacity was measured on the 5 ha field in late summer 2013 at 63 randomly distributed locations, using a single ring infiltrometer (Cornell Sprinkle Infiltrometer). Geostatistical analyses were carried out to explore the spatial organization of Ic. Soil depth was measured at 17 locations across the field, the roughness of the soil surface was described for each Ic measuring location and the microtopography on a 456 cm2 area was determined at 60 locations. Hillslope-scale topographic controls will be examined by correlating terrain indices with the Ic pattern. Furthermore, three dye tracer experiments with Brilliant Blue were carried out at a low, medium and high Ic spot to investigate the question if local scale macroporosity can explain the spatial distribution of Ic. Infiltration capacities range from 0 to 79.4 mm h-1 with a median of 11.7 mm h-1 and show no significant correlation with surface roughness, microtopography or soil depth. However, first geostatistical analyses suggest that there is a spatial organization of

  17. Extraction and determination of glucosinolates from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimsing, Anne Louise; Kirkegaard, John A; Bruun Hansen, Hans Christian

    2005-12-14

    The use of glucosinolate-containing plants as soil-incorporated biofumigants for pest and disease control has raised questions regarding the fate of glucosinolates in soil; however, no method for routine analysis of glucosinolates in soil has been reported. A simple method to extract glucosinolates from soil with quantification as desulfoglucosinolates by HPLC is presented. The method involves two extractions with 70% methanol at room temperature, centrifugation, and filtration prior to the desulfation step. The desulfoglucosinolates are then quantified by HPLC using established protocols for plant tissue analysis. There were no significant interfering peaks from the soil extracts, and the method provided high extraction efficiencies (around 100%) for both aromatic (benzyl) and aliphatic (2-propenyl) glucosinolates when amended at a wide range of realistic field soil concentrations (1.6-120 nmol/g of soil). The method was equally effective in three diverse Australian soils that varied in organic matter, clay content, and pH. The method was effective in air-dried or field-moist soil, although evidence for rapid glucosinolate degradation in field-moist soil indicates that extraction of moist soils should be performed as soon as possible after sampling. The method is compatible with field soil sampling at remote sites and utilizes the same equipment and protocols already established for plant tissue analysis. Extraction of glucosinolates in the field following incorporation of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and rape (Brassica napus) green manure crops was also tested. Eight different glucosinolates contained in the plant tissues were identified and quantified in soil extracts at concentrations ranging from 0.11 to 21.7 nmol/g of soil.

  18. Temporal and spatial variations of soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes at three differently managed grasslands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Imer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A profound understanding of temporal and spatial variabilities of soil carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere is needed to reliably quantify these fluxes and to develop future mitigation strategies. For managed grassland ecosystems, temporal and spatial variabilities of these three soil greenhouse gas (GHG fluxes occur due to changes in environmental drivers as well as fertilizer applications, harvests and grazing. To assess how such changes affect soil GHG fluxes at Swiss grassland sites, we studied three sites along an altitudinal gradient that corresponds to a management gradient: from 400 m a.s.l. (intensively managed to 1000 m a.s.l. (moderately intensive managed to 2000 m a.s.l. (extensively managed. The alpine grassland was included to study both effects of extensive management on CH4 and N2O fluxes and the different climate regime occurring at this altitude. Temporal and spatial variabilities of soil GHG fluxes and environmental drivers on various timescales were determined along transects of 16 static soil chambers at each site. All three grasslands were N2O sources, with mean annual soil fluxes ranging from 0.15 to 1.28 nmol m−2 s−1. Contrastingly, all sites were weak CH4 sinks, with soil uptake rates ranging from −0.56 to −0.15 nmol m−2 s−1. Mean annual soil and plant respiration losses of CO2, measured with opaque chambers, ranged from 5.2 to 6.5 μmol m−2 s−1. While the environmental drivers and their respective explanatory power for soil N2O emissions differed considerably among the three grasslands (adjusted r2 ranging from 0.19 to 0.42, CH4 and CO2 soil fluxes were much better constrained (adjusted r2 ranging from 0.46 to 0.80 by soil water content and air temperature, respectively. Throughout the year, spatial heterogeneity was particularly high for soil N2O and CH4 fluxes. We found permanent hot spots for soil N2O emissions as well as

  19. Estimating Soil Organic Carbon Stocks and Spatial Patterns with Statistical and GIS-Based Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Junjun; Jing, Changwei; Lin, Shengpan; Zhang, Cao; Liu, Qiankun; DeGloria, Stephen D.; Wu, Jiaping

    2014-01-01

    Accurately quantifying soil organic carbon (SOC) is considered fundamental to studying soil quality, modeling the global carbon cycle, and assessing global climate change. This study evaluated the uncertainties caused by up-scaling of soil properties from the county scale to the provincial scale and from lower-level classification of Soil Species to Soil Group, using four methods: the mean, median, Soil Profile Statistics (SPS), and pedological professional knowledge based (PKB) methods. For the SPS method, SOC stock is calculated at the county scale by multiplying the mean SOC density value of each soil type in a county by its corresponding area. For the mean or median method, SOC density value of each soil type is calculated using provincial arithmetic mean or median. For the PKB method, SOC density value of each soil type is calculated at the county scale considering soil parent materials and spatial locations of all soil profiles. A newly constructed 1∶50,000 soil survey geographic database of Zhejiang Province, China, was used for evaluation. Results indicated that with soil classification levels up-scaling from Soil Species to Soil Group, the variation of estimated SOC stocks among different soil classification levels was obviously lower than that among different methods. The difference in the estimated SOC stocks among the four methods was lowest at the Soil Species level. The differences in SOC stocks among the mean, median, and PKB methods for different Soil Groups resulted from the differences in the procedure of aggregating soil profile properties to represent the attributes of one soil type. Compared with the other three estimation methods (i.e., the SPS, mean and median methods), the PKB method holds significant promise for characterizing spatial differences in SOC distribution because spatial locations of all soil profiles are considered during the aggregation procedure. PMID:24840890

  20. A Molecular Investigation of Soil Organic Carbon Composition, Variability, and Spatial Distribution Across an Alpine Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H. T.; Lawrence, C. R.; Winnick, M.; Druhan, J. L.; Williams, K. H.; Maher, K.; Rainaldi, G. R.; McCormick, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    The cycling of carbon through soils is one of the least understood aspects of the global carbon cycle and represents a key uncertainty in the prediction of land-surface response to global warming. Thus, there is an urgent need for advanced characterization of soil organic carbon (SOC) to develop and evaluate a new generation of soil carbon models. We hypothesize that shifts in SOC composition and spatial distribution as a function of soil depth can be used to constrain rates of transformation between the litter layer and the deeper subsoil (extending to a depth of approximately 1 m). To evaluate the composition and distribution of SOC, we collected soil samples from East River, a shale-dominated watershed near Crested Butte, CO, and characterized relative changes in SOC species as a function of depth using elemental analysis (EA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and bulk C X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our results show that total organic carbon (TOC) decreases with depth, and high total inorganic carbon (TIC) content was found in deeper soils (after 75 cm), a characteristic of the bedrock (shale). The distribution of aliphatic C relative to the parent material generally decreases with depth and that polysaccharide can be a substantial component of SOC at various depths. On the other hand, the relative distribution of aromatic C, traditionally viewed as recalcitrant, only makes up a very small part of SOC regardless of depth. These observations confirm that molecular structure is not the only determinant of SOC turnover rate. To study other contributors to SOC decomposition, we studied changes in the spatial correlation of SOC and minerals using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). We found that aromatics mostly locate on the surface of small soil aggregates (1-10 μm). Polysaccharides and proteins, both viewed as labile traditionally, are more evenly distributed over the interior of the

  1. Variation in soil carbon dioxide efflux at two spatial scales in a topographically complex boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Katharine C.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Striegl, Rob; Neff, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dynamics of high-latitude regions are an important and highly uncertain component of global carbon budgets, and efforts to constrain estimates of soil-atmosphere carbon exchange in these regions are contingent on accurate representations of spatial and temporal variability in carbon fluxes. This study explores spatial and temporal variability in soilatmosphere carbon dynamics at both fine and coarse spatial scales in a high-elevation, permafrost-dominated boreal black spruce forest. We evaluate the importance of landscape-level investigations of soil-atmosphere carbon dynamics by characterizing seasonal trends in soil-atmosphere carbon exchange, describing soil temperature-moisture-respiration relations, and quantifying temporal and spatial variability at two spatial scales: the plot scale (0–5 m) and the landscape scale (500–1000 m). Plot-scale spatial variability (average variation on a given measurement day) in soil CO2 efflux ranged from a coefficient of variation (CV) of 0.25 to 0.69, and plot-scale temporal variability (average variation of plots across measurement days) in efflux ranged from a CV of 0.19 to 0.36. Landscape-scale spatial and temporal variability in efflux was represented by a CV of 0.40 and 0.31, respectively, indicating that plot-scale spatial variability in soil respiration is as great as landscape-scale spatial variability at this site. While soil respiration was related to soil temperature at both the plot- and landscape scale, landscape-level descriptions of soil moisture were necessary to define soil respiration-moisture relations. Soil moisture variability was also integral to explaining temporal variability in soil respiration. Our results have important implications for research efforts in high-latitude regions where remote study sites make landscape-scale field campaigns challenging.

  2. Spatial Variation of some Soil Physico-Chemical Properties of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spatial dependence of the properties studied was weak to moderate. Sampling spacing of 30 – 60 m is appropriate for soil fertility assessment in the test area. A sample size of 37 core samples per hectare is required to adequately predict the mean of soil properties with 5 % allowable error. Keywords: Spatial variability ...

  3. Soil Tillage Management Affects Maize Grain Yield by Regulating Spatial Distribution Coordination of Roots, Soil Moisture and Nitrogen Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinbing; Zhou, Baoyuan; Sun, Xuefang; Yue, Yang; Ma, Wei; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the root system through the soil profile has an impact on moisture and nutrient uptake by plants, affecting growth and productivity. The spatial distribution of the roots, soil moisture, and fertility are affected by tillage practices. The combination of high soil density and the presence of a soil plow pan typically impede the growth of maize (Zea mays L.).We investigated the spatial distribution coordination of the root system, soil moisture, and N status in response to different soil tillage treatments (NT: no-tillage, RT: rotary-tillage, SS: subsoiling) and the subsequent impact on maize yield, and identify yield-increasing mechanisms and optimal soil tillage management practices. Field experiments were conducted on the Huang-Huai-Hai plain in China during 2011 and 2012. The SS and RT treatments significantly reduced soil bulk density in the top 0-20 cm layer of the soil profile, while SS significantly decreased soil bulk density in the 20-30 cm layer. Soil moisture in the 20-50 cm profile layer was significantly higher for the SS treatment compared to the RT and NT treatment. In the 0-20 cm topsoil layer, the NT treatment had higher soil moisture than the SS and RT treatments. Root length density of the SS treatment was significantly greater than density of the RT and NT treatments, as soil depth increased. Soil moisture was reduced in the soil profile where root concentration was high. SS had greater soil moisture depletion and a more concentration root system than RT and NT in deep soil. Our results suggest that the SS treatment improved the spatial distribution of root density, soil moisture and N states, thereby promoting the absorption of soil moisture and reducing N leaching via the root system in the 20-50 cm layer of the profile. Within the context of the SS treatment, a root architecture densely distributed deep into the soil profile, played a pivotal role in plants' ability to access nutrients and water. An optimal

  4. Calibration of a frequency-domain reflectometer for determining soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-01-01

    Jan 1, 2006 ... content (θv) of the core was calculated from the gravimetric soil- water content and soil bulk density. This procedure was repeated for all 78 soil samples. Particle size distribution was determined using the pipette method reported by Gee and Bauder (1986). Sensors were connected to a CR7X data-logger ( ...

  5. Spatial distributions and eco-partitioning of soil biogeochemical properties in the Everglades National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Todd Z; Bruland, Gregory L; Newman, Susan; Reddy, K Ramesh; Grunwald, Sabine

    2011-12-01

    Large-scale ecosystem restoration efforts, such as those in the Florida Everglades, can be long-term and resource intensive. To gauge success, restoration efforts must have a means to evaluate positive or negative results of instituted activities. Edaphic properties across the Everglades landscape have been determined to be a valuable metric for such evaluation, and as such, a baseline condition from which to make future comparisons and track ecosystem response is necessary. The objectives of this work were to document this baseline condition in the southern most hydrologic unit of the Everglades, Everglades National Park (ENP), and to determine if significant eco-partitioning of soil attributes exists that would suggest the need to focus monitoring efforts in particular eco-types within the ENP landscape. A total of 342 sites were sampled via soil coring and parameters such as total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), total carbon (TC), total calcium, total magnesium, and bulk density were measured at three depth increments in the soil profile (floc, 0-10 cm, and 10-20 cm). Geostatistical analysis and GIS applications were employed to interpolate site-specific biogeochemical properties of soils across the entire extent of the ENP. Spatial patterns and eco-type comparisons suggest TC and TN to be highest in Shark River Slough (SRS) and the mangrove interface (MI), following trends of greatest organic soil accumulation. However, TP patterns suggest greatest storages in MI, SRS, and western marl and wet prairies. Eco-partitioning of soil constituents suggest local drivers of geology and hydrology are significant in determining potential areas to focus monitoring for future change detection.

  6. Comparison of spatial interpolation methods for soil moisture and its application for monitoring drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Fan, Li; Wu, Wei; Liu, Hong-Bin

    2017-09-26

    Soil moisture data can reflect valuable information on soil properties, terrain features, and drought condition. The current study compared and assessed the performance of different interpolation methods for estimating soil moisture in an area with complex topography in southwest China. The approaches were inverse distance weighting, multifarious forms of kriging, regularized spline with tension, and thin plate spline. The 5-day soil moisture observed at 167 stations and daily temperature recorded at 33 stations during the period of 2010-2014 were used in the current work. Model performance was tested with accuracy indicators of determination coefficient (R (2)), mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), root mean square error (RMSE), relative root mean square error (RRMSE), and modeling efficiency (ME). The results indicated that inverse distance weighting had the best performance with R (2), MAPE, RMSE, RRMSE, and ME of 0.32, 14.37, 13.02%, 0.16, and 0.30, respectively. Based on the best method, a spatial database of soil moisture was developed and used to investigate drought condition over the study area. The results showed that the distribution of drought was characterized by evidently regional difference. Besides, drought mainly occurred in August and September in the 5 years and was prone to happening in the western and central parts rather than in the northeastern and southeastern areas.

  7. Assessment of spatial distribution of soil heavy metals using ANN-GA, MSLR and satellite imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Arman; Delavar, Mohammad Amir; Kaboudin, Babak; Askari, Mohammad Sadegh

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to assess and compare heavy metal distribution models developed using stepwise multiple linear regression (MSLR) and neural network-genetic algorithm model (ANN-GA) based on satellite imagery. The source identification of heavy metals was also explored using local Moran index. Soil samples (n = 300) were collected based on a grid and pH, organic matter, clay, iron oxide contents cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) concentrations were determined for each sample. Visible/near-infrared reflectance (VNIR) within the electromagnetic ranges of satellite imagery was applied to estimate heavy metal concentrations in the soil using MSLR and ANN-GA models. The models were evaluated and ANN-GA model demonstrated higher accuracy, and the autocorrelation results showed higher significant clusters of heavy metals around the industrial zone. The higher concentration of Cd, Pb and Zn was noted under industrial lands and irrigation farming in comparison to barren and dryland farming. Accumulation of industrial wastes in roads and streams was identified as main sources of pollution, and the concentration of soil heavy metals was reduced by increasing the distance from these sources. In comparison to MLSR, ANN-GA provided a more accurate indirect assessment of heavy metal concentrations in highly polluted soils. The clustering analysis provided reliable information about the spatial distribution of soil heavy metals and their sources.

  8. Contamination levels and spatial distribution of organochlorine pesticides in soils from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, K; Sharma, Ramesh C; Kumar, Sudhir

    2012-02-01

    Organochlorine pesticides, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), are potential chemical pollutants extensively used for agriculture and vector control purposes due to low cost and high effectiveness. Concentrations of HCH and DDT were determined in 175 surface soil samples from different agricultural fields, fallow and urban lands of districts Nagaon and Dibrugarh, Assam, India. The mean concentrations of total HCH and total DDT were 825 ng/g (range: 98-1945 ng/g) and 903 ng/g (range: 166-2288 ng/g) in district Nagaon while 705 ng/g (range: 178-1701 ng/g) and 757 ng/g (range: 75-2296 ng/g) in district Dibrugarh, respectively. The soils from paddy fields contained highest amounts of HCH and DDT residues. Total organic carbon was found to be positively associated with soil HCH and DDT residues. Ratios of DDT/(DDD+DDE) were 1.25 and 1.82 while of α/γ HCH were 2.78 and 2.51 for districts Dibrugarh and Nagaon, respectively. Source identification revealed that soil residue levels have originated from long past and recent mixed source of technical HCH and Lindane for HCHs and mainly technical DDT for DDTs. Spatial distribution was also investigated to identify the areas with higher pesticide loadings in soil. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of Hillslope-Scale Soil Moisture Spatial and Temporal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, E.; Kögler, S.; Wollschlaeger, U.; Zacharias, S.; Werban, U.; Dietrich, P.

    2013-12-01

    Soil moisture is a key state variable that controls hydrological and energy fluxes at various spatial and temporal scales. Understanding and characterizing this variability is one of the major challenges within hydrological sciences. Understanding soil moisture dynamics at the hillslope scale is important to link point- and catchment-scale studies, and for up- and down-scaling of hydrological processes. Nevertheless, deriving generalizable process understanding is not trivial, because of the non-linearity of hillslope response to rainfall. The overall aim of this work was to describe the soil moisture variability at different spatial and temporal scales within a hillslope area with varying topography and soil type but homogeneous land use. Recent developments of wireless sensor technology allow for the long-term monitoring of soil water content with high spatial and temporal resolution, hence facilitate a better understanding of soil moisture spatial variability and the related hydrological processes. Geophysical techniques such as electromagnetic induction (EMI) methods have been widely used during the last decades to map soil properties at the field scale, because of their suitability for fast and precise mapping of soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) over large areas. In the Harz Mountains (Central Germany), a 2.5 ha hillslope area was permanently instrumented with a wireless soil moisture and soil temperature monitoring network (SoilNet). It comprises 40 measurement nodes, and 30 of them were located according to a geostatitstical sampling strategy based on ancillary information. At each of the network nodes, 6 sensors measure hourly the soil water content and soil temperature at three depths within the vadose zone. Time-lapse EMI measurements were carried out to map spatial patterns of ECa over several depths. The one-year high-resolution SoilNet time-series is described, and the soil moisture spatial variability is discussed.

  10. Spatial variability of soil salinity at different scales in the mangrove rice agro-ecosystem in West Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sylla, M.; Stein, A.; Breemen, van N.; Fresco, L.O.

    1995-01-01

    Spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal low lands results from a complex interaction of climate, river hydrology, topography and tidal flooding. The aim of this study was to determine the significant effects of these causal factors at different scales in the West African mangrove

  11. Influence of Elevation Data Resolution on Spatial Prediction of Colluvial Soils in a Luvisol Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vít Penížek

    Full Text Available The development of a soil cover is a dynamic process. Soil cover can be altered within a few decades, which requires updating of the legacy soil maps. Soil erosion is one of the most important processes quickly altering soil cover on agriculture land. Colluvial soils develop in concave parts of the landscape as a consequence of sedimentation of eroded material. Colluvial soils are recognised as important soil units because they are a vast sink of soil organic carbon. Terrain derivatives became an important tool in digital soil mapping and are among the most popular auxiliary data used for quantitative spatial prediction. Prediction success rates are often directly dependent on raster resolution. In our study, we tested how raster resolution (1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 20 and 30 meters influences spatial prediction of colluvial soils. Terrain derivatives (altitude, slope, plane curvature, topographic position index, LS factor and convergence index were calculated for the given raster resolutions. Four models were applied (boosted tree, neural network, random forest and Classification/Regression Tree to spatially predict the soil cover over a 77 ha large study plot. Models training and validation was based on 111 soil profiles surveyed on a regular sampling grid. Moreover, the predicted real extent and shape of the colluvial soil area was examined. In general, no clear trend in the accuracy prediction was found without the given raster resolution range. Higher maximum prediction accuracy for colluvial soil, compared to prediction accuracy of total soil cover of the study plot, can be explained by the choice of terrain derivatives that were best for Colluvial soils differentiation from other soil units. Regarding the character of the predicted Colluvial soils area, maps of 2 to 10 m resolution provided reasonable delineation of the colluvial soil as part of the cover over the study area.

  12. Influence of Elevation Data Resolution on Spatial Prediction of Colluvial Soils in a Luvisol Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penížek, Vít; Zádorová, Tereza; Kodešová, Radka; Vaněk, Aleš

    2016-01-01

    The development of a soil cover is a dynamic process. Soil cover can be altered within a few decades, which requires updating of the legacy soil maps. Soil erosion is one of the most important processes quickly altering soil cover on agriculture land. Colluvial soils develop in concave parts of the landscape as a consequence of sedimentation of eroded material. Colluvial soils are recognised as important soil units because they are a vast sink of soil organic carbon. Terrain derivatives became an important tool in digital soil mapping and are among the most popular auxiliary data used for quantitative spatial prediction. Prediction success rates are often directly dependent on raster resolution. In our study, we tested how raster resolution (1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 20 and 30 meters) influences spatial prediction of colluvial soils. Terrain derivatives (altitude, slope, plane curvature, topographic position index, LS factor and convergence index) were calculated for the given raster resolutions. Four models were applied (boosted tree, neural network, random forest and Classification/Regression Tree) to spatially predict the soil cover over a 77 ha large study plot. Models training and validation was based on 111 soil profiles surveyed on a regular sampling grid. Moreover, the predicted real extent and shape of the colluvial soil area was examined. In general, no clear trend in the accuracy prediction was found without the given raster resolution range. Higher maximum prediction accuracy for colluvial soil, compared to prediction accuracy of total soil cover of the study plot, can be explained by the choice of terrain derivatives that were best for Colluvial soils differentiation from other soil units. Regarding the character of the predicted Colluvial soils area, maps of 2 to 10 m resolution provided reasonable delineation of the colluvial soil as part of the cover over the study area. PMID:27846230

  13. CONSIDERATIONS CONCERNING THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF SOILS IN THE CENTRAL MOLDAVIAN TABLELAND

    OpenAIRE

    V. Budui

    2006-01-01

    The spatial distribution of soils in central Moldavian Tableland is influenced by climate, vegetation and geomorphological characteristics (slope, altitude). Representative soils of this region are cernisol (cernoziom and faeoziom) and luvisol (preluvosol and luvosol). Another pedological characteristic of this region is soil erosion that affects sloped versants.

  14. CONSIDERATIONS CONCERNING THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF SOILS IN THE CENTRAL MOLDAVIAN TABLELAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Budui

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of soils in central Moldavian Tableland is influenced by climate, vegetation and geomorphological characteristics (slope, altitude. Representative soils of this region are cernisol (cernoziom and faeoziom and luvisol (preluvosol and luvosol. Another pedological characteristic of this region is soil erosion that affects sloped versants.

  15. Spatial Variability of Particle Sizes of Coastal Plain Sands Soils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... assess the extent of variability, spatial dependence and structure of soil particle sizes, pedological and management implications in the coastal plain sands soils of southeastern Nigeria. Surface (0 – 15cm) and subsurface (15 – 30cm) soil samples were collected at 10m2 intervals (rigid grid nodes) in a 100m by 100m plot ...

  16. Soil erosion evolution and spatial correlation analysis in a typical karst geomorphology using RUSLE with GIS

    OpenAIRE

    C. Zeng; C. Zeng; C. Zeng; S. Wang; S. Wang; X. Bai; X. Bai; Y. Li; Y. Tian; Y. Tian; Y. Li; L. Wu; L. Wu; G. Luo; G. Luo

    2017-01-01

    Although some scholars have studied soil erosion in karst landforms, analyses of the spatial and temporal evolution of soil erosion and correlation analyses with spatial elements have been insufficient. The lack of research has led to an inaccurate assessment of environmental effects, especially in the mountainous area of Wuling in China. Soil erosion and rocky desertification in this area influence the survival and sustainability of a population of 0.22 billion people. This...

  17. Spatial distribution of gamma radiation levels in surface soils from Jaduguda uranium mineralization zone, Jharkhand, India, using γ-ray spectrometry, and determination of outdoor dose to the population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maharana, Mandakini; Krishnan, Narayani; Sengupta, D

    2010-01-01

    The concentrations of natural radionuclides in surface soil samples around selected villages of Jaduguda were investigated and compared with the radioactivity level in the region. Concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, and (40...

  18. Soil respiration across a permafrost transition zone: spatial structure and environmental correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegen, James C.; Anderson, Carolyn G.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Crump, Alex R.; Chen, Xingyuan; Hess, Nancy

    2017-09-01

    Soil respiration is a key ecosystem function whereby shifts in respiration rates can shift systems from carbon sinks to sources. Soil respiration in permafrost-associated systems is particularly important given climate change driven permafrost thaw that leads to significant uncertainty in resulting ecosystem carbon dynamics. Here we characterize the spatial structure and environmental drivers of soil respiration across a permafrost transition zone. We find that soil respiration is characterized by a non-linear threshold that occurs at active-layer depths greater than 140 cm. We also find that within each season, tree basal area is a dominant driver of soil respiration regardless of spatial scale, but only in spatial domains with significant spatial variability in basal area. Our analyses further show that spatial variation (the coefficient of variation) and mean-variance power-law scaling of soil respiration in our boreal system are consistent with previous work in other ecosystems (e.g., tropical forests) and in population ecology, respectively. Comparing our results to those in other ecosystems suggests that temporally stable features such as tree-stand structure are often primary drivers of spatial variation in soil respiration. If so, this provides an opportunity to better estimate the magnitude and spatial variation in soil respiration through remote sensing. Combining such an approach with broader knowledge of thresholding behavior - here related to active layer depth - would provide empirical constraints on models aimed at predicting ecosystem responses to ongoing permafrost thaw.

  19. Spatial P heterogeneity in forest soil: Influence on microbial P uptake and community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilla, Thomas; Angulo-Schipper, Bridith; Méndez, Juan Carlos; Dippold, Michaela A.; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Spielvogel, Sandra

    2017-04-01

    Other than nitrogen, phosphorus (P) is the most important growth limiting nutrient in soils. Yet, little information is available concerning the spatial heterogeneity of P content in forest soils. More so, the effects of a homogeneous vs. heterogeneous soil P distribution on microbial P acquisition and community structure have yet to be determined. Thus, a rhizotron experiment based on a P-deficient forest soil was conducted to investigate competitive P uptake strategies of microbes. F. sylvatica-bearing rhizotrons were labeled with Fe33PO4, a relatively immobile P source native to the study soil. Homogeneous and heterogeneous P patterns were created to study the effects of spatial P heterogeneity on plant and microbial P acquisition. P mobilization by microorganisms was tracked by an improved 33P-PLFA method, linking 33P incorporation in microbes with changes in microbial community structure in soils in situ. The microbial P uptake was enhanced in rhizotrons with high P availability and in those with a patchy P distribution. Characteristic PLFAs indicate a congregation of beech-associated ectomycorrhizal fungi in P-rich patches. These ectomycorrhizal fungi are likely to strongly increase P mobilization from the used Fe33PO4 in high P habitats. In contrast, habitats with low P availability require a more complex microbial community structure without a dominant group to mobilize this inaccessible P source. Therefore, hotspots of P are likely to promote the efforts of fungal hyphae for P mobilization - an effect which decreases with lower P content. Additionally, gram positive and negative bacteria exhibit a vastly higher P uptake under increasingly patchy P distributions. However, they form a smaller portion of the microbial community than in homogeneously P enriched rhizotrons, suggesting that filamentous organisms benefit from the patchy P distribution. Thus, only a heterogeneous P distribution promotes P acquisition of forest microbial communities from mineral P

  20. Proposal for a Spatial Organization Model in Soil Science (The Example of the European Communities Soil Map).

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the computational problems of automating paper-based spatial information. A new relational structure for soil science information based on the main conceptual concepts used during conventional cartographic work is proposed. This model is a computerized framework for coherent description of the geographical variability of soils, combined…

  1. SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF SOIL IN COIMBATORE FOR GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING PURPOSES

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhimathi. A.; Arumairaj. P. D; Lakshmi Priya. L; Meenambal. T.

    2010-01-01

    An adequate knowledge of the soil at a site proposed for a new structure is essential. The selection of type of foundation and its performance depend on the characteristics of underlying soil. The depth at which the foundation can be laid, the allowable bearing pressure of soil and swell potential of the soil are the three important parameters carried out to asses the general suitability of the site for construction. A Soil Characteristics Prediction Model(SCPM) is developed to estimate the a...

  2. Spatial and vertical distribution of soil organic carbon at the catchment scale in Mediterranean ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Haithem; Mekki, Insaf; Annabi, Mohamed; Jacob, Frédéric

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in enhancing crop production and mitigating additional greenhouse gas emissions. In fact, the assessment of the amount of SOC at the regional scale is important to better understand the role of the SOC reservoir in global climate and environmental issues. Besides, the vertical SOC profile may be of great importance for SOC cycling, both on short time scale, due to interactions with the soil temperature and moisture profile, as well as on long time scale because of depth-specific stabilization mechanisms of organic matter. The objective of this study is: i) to characterize the spatial variability of SOC in a catchment at different soil depths and ii) to assess the contributions of factors controlling this variability. The studied catchment, named Lebna, is located in the Cap Bon north-eastern Tunisia and it covers about 218 km². We used a dataset from a survey provided by the IAO (Instituto Agronomico per l'Oltremare) 20th course professional master "remote sensing and natural resources evaluation" field survey staff from 2 to 28 April 2000 (IAO, 2002). Ninety-one profiles with 345 soil horizons were described according to the IAO framework and the total carbon was determined using the combustion method with the Carlo Erba Analyser 1500. The results showed the high spatial variation of SOC content depending on soil types and land use. In fact, agricultural practices mainly crop residues management and tillage influence SOC dynamic. Concerning vertical distribution, SOC content is higher in topsoil compared to subsoil. The results suggest that further work is required to better characterize the quality of the SOC at different depths.

  3. An exploration of spatial risk assessment for soil protection: estimating risk and establishing priority areas for soil protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibblewhite, M G; Bellamy, P H; Brewer, T R; Graves, A R; Dawson, C A; Rickson, R J; Truckell, I; Stuart, J

    2014-03-01

    Methods for the spatial estimation of risk of harm to soil by erosion by water and wind and by soil organic matter decline are explored. Rates of harm are estimated for combinations of soil type and land cover (as a proxy for hazard frequency) and used to estimate risk of soil erosion and loss of soil organic carbon (SOC) for 1 km(2)pixels. Scenarios are proposed for defining the acceptability of risk of harm to soil: the most precautionary one corresponds to no net harm after natural regeneration of soil (i.e. a 1 in 20 chance of exceeding an erosion rate of soils and a carbon stock decline of 0 tha(-1)y(-1) for organic soils). Areas at higher and lower than possible acceptable risk are mapped. The veracity of boundaries is compromised if areas of unacceptable risk are mapped to administrative boundaries. Errors in monitoring change in risk of harm to soil and inadequate information on risk reduction measures' efficacy, at landscape scales, make it impossible to use or monitor quantitative targets for risk reduction adequately. The consequences for priority area definition of expressing varying acceptable risk of harm to soil as a varying probability of exceeding a fixed level of harm, or, a varying level of harm being exceeded with a fixed probability, are discussed. Soil data and predictive models for rates of harm to soil would need considerable development and validation to implement a priority area approach robustly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Soil Respiration Fluxes from Alpine and Subalpine Soils in the East River Watershed, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, M. E.; Winnick, M.; Rainaldi, G. R.; Lawrence, C. R.; Druhan, J. L.; Hsu, H. T.; Maher, K.

    2016-12-01

    Soil respiration of carbon to the atmosphere represents one of the largest fluxes of the terrestrial carbon cycle and is sensitive to changes in temperature, soil moisture, and processes affecting carbon stability. Despite the importance of these sensitivities, few studies have examined the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of soil CO2 fluxes and their controls on intermediate- to large-scale integrated soil fluxes. In this study, we examine spatial variability at scales of 10-5 -101 km2 and temporal variability at scales of hours to months of soil CO2 fluxes through the 2016 growing season in the East River Watershed, CO. We present analyses of (1) temporal variability of CO2 fluxes from four locations with depth-resolved temperature, moisture content, soil gas pCO2, and soil carbon content measurements; (2) spatial variability of CO2 fluxes and surface soil water content across a gridded hillslope with 74 points over an area of 2.5 x 10-3 km2 measured at multiple times throughout the growing season; and (3) variability of CO2 fluxes and surface soil water content from >20 point locations across the 85 km2 catchment targeting a range of vegetation, slope, and aspect characteristics. Comparing soil CO2 fluxes with depth-resolved temperature, moisture, pCO2 and carbon content, we calculate depth-resolved CO2 production rates and their correlations with soil conditions. Gridded hillslope flux measurements reveal strong and consistent variability across separation distances of 1 - 30 m with a slight dependence on slope position, likely representing the controls of lateral flow on soil moisture content. Finally, we analyze correlations of soil CO2 fluxes from point measurements representing broad-scale landscape units with vegetation and geomorphological characteristics. Combining these observations, we examine the implications of our results for interpolating point flux measurements to the catchment scale and for calculating integrated fluxes through the growing

  5. Spatial Prediction of Hydraulic Zones from Soil Properties and Secondary Data Using Factorial Kriging Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, James; Morari, Francesco; Scudiero, Elia; Teatini, Pietro; Vellidis, George

    2015-04-01

    The development of pedotransfer functions (PTF) is an important topic in soil science research because there is a critical need for incorporation of vadose zone phenomena into large scale climate models. Soil measurements are inherently spatially dependent and therefore application of geospatial statistics provides an avenue for estimating soil properties. The aim of this study is to define management zones based on soil hydraulic properties. Samples were collected from 50 locations at 4 depths in a 20.8ha field located in the Po River delta in Italy. Water retention curves (WRC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves (UHC) and were determined via inversion of measurements taken using the Wind (Dane and Topp, 1994) method. This region is in known to have paleo-channel structures and highly heterogeneous soils. Factorial kriging analysis (FKA) was applied to hydraulic parameters in one data set and soil physical properties in another data set at 4 depths. The mapped principal components (PCs) were used in a fuzzy-c means algorithm to define zones of like properties. To examine the physical significance of these zones, curve parameters and hydraulic curves were investigated. Zones were able to distinguish between θ_s(saturated water content), n (shape parameter) and α (inverse of air entry) while θr (residual water content) and Ks (saturated conductivity) were not statistically different between the groups. For curve comparisons, WRC were found to be significantly different between zones at all tensions while effective saturation curves (Se) differ for the majority of tensions (except at 28cm), but UHC did not differ. The spatial relevance of the zones was examined by overlaying hydraulic zones with zones defined using the FKA and fuzzy-c means approach from soil physical properties such as texture and bulk density. The hydraulic zones overlaid with areal accuracy ranging from 46.66% to 92.41%. As there is much similarity between these sets of zones, there

  6. Soil moisture determinations using capacitance probe methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atkins, Ronald T

    1998-01-01

    ...) systems is a relatively new approach to soil moisture measurements. A unique probe assembly and a readout device that measures voltage drop and phase shift were developed and used for direct capacitance measurements...

  7. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Soil CO2 Flux in Sugarcane Green Harvest Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Luiza Moraes Tavares

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The sugarcane green harvest system, characterized by mechanized harvesting and the absence of crop burning, affects soil quality by increasing crop residue on the soil surface after harvest; thus, it contributes to improving the physical, chemical, and microbiological properties and influences the soil carbon content and CO2 flux (FCO2. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial and temporal variability of soil FCO2 in sugarcane green harvest systems. The experiment was conducted in two areas of sugarcane in São Paulo, Brazil: the first had a 5-year history of sugarcane green harvest (SG-5 and the second had a longer history of 10 years (SG-10. The temporal FCO2 were evaluated in the dry and rainy periods, and spatial variability in the dry period, and related to soil chemical and physical properties, including organic C porosity, bulk density, soil penetration resistance, mean weight diameter of soil aggregates, clay, P, S, Ca, Mg and Fe. The temporal variability indicated no differences between the dry and rainy periods in SG-10, while in SG-5 soil moisture was increased by 33 % in the rainy period. The spatial variability indicated a different pattern from the temporal one, where FCO2 in SG-10 was correlated with soil temperature, air-filled pore space, total porosity, soil moisture, and the Ca and Mg contents; in the SG-5 area, FCO2 was correlated with soil mean weight diameter of soil aggregates and the sulfur content.

  8. Spatial filtering of electrical resistivity and slope intensity: Enhancement of spatial estimates of a soil property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourennane, Hocine; Hinschberger, Florent; Chartin, Caroline; Salvador-Blanes, Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    To best utilize the electrical resistivity data and slope intensity derived from a Digital Elevation Model, the kriging spatial components technique was applied to separate the nuggets and small- and large-scale structures for both resistivity and slope intensity data. The spatial structures in the resistivity and slope intensity data, which are poorly correlated with soil thickness (ST), are then filtered out prior to integrating the resistivity data and slope intensity into soil thickness estimation over a 12 ha area located in the south-western Parisian Basin (France). ST was measured at 650 locations over the study area by manual augering. Twenty percent of the observations (131 points) were randomly selected to constitute the validation dataset. The remaining 80% of the dataset (519 points) was used as the prediction dataset. The resistivity data represent a set of 7394 measurement points for each of the three investigated depths over the study area. The methodology involves successively (1) a principal component analysis (PCA) on the electrical measurements and (2) a geostatistical filtering of the small-scale component and noise in the first component (PC1) of the PCA. The results show that the correlation between ST and PC1 is greatly improved when the small-scale component and noise are filtered out, and similarly, the correlation between ST and slope intensity is greatly improved once the geostatistical filtering is carried out on the slope data. Thus, the large scales of both slope intensity and the electrical resistivity's PC1 were used as external drifts to predict ST over the entire study area. This prediction was compared with ordinary kriging and kriging either with a large scale of slope intensity or with a large scale of the electrical resistivity's PC1 taken as an external drift. The first prediction of ST by ordinary kriging, which was considered as our reference, was also compared to those achieved by kriging using the raw secondary variables

  9. The Relationship between an Invasive Shrub and Soil Moisture: Seasonal Interactions and Spatially Covarying Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong He

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that positive relationships between invasive plants and soil can contribute to further plant invasions. However, it remains unclear whether these relations remain unchanged throughout the growing season. In this study, spatial sequences of field observations along a transect were used to reveal seasonal interactions and spatially covarying relations between one common invasive shrub (Tartarian Honeysuckle, Lonicera tatarica and soil moisture in a tall grassland habitat. Statistical analysis over the transect shows that the contrast between soil moisture in shrub and herbaceous patches vary with season and precipitation. Overall, a negatively covarying relationship between shrub and soil moisture (i.e., drier surface soils at shrub microsites exists during the very early growing period (e.g., May, while in summer a positively covarying phenomenon (i.e., wetter soils under shrubs is usually evident, but could be weakened or vanish during long precipitation-free periods. If there is sufficient rainfall, surface soil moisture and leaf area index (LAI often spatially covary with significant spatial oscillations at an invariant scale (which is governed by the shrub spatial pattern and is about 8 m, but their phase relation in space varies with season, consistent with the seasonal variability of the co-varying phenomena between shrub invasion and soil water content. The findings are important for establishing a more complete picture of how shrub invasion affects soil moisture.

  10. Spatial variation and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoro Duke

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available An investigative study on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in soils of different sampling stations in Effurun metropolis and its environs of the Niger Delta Area of Nigeria was carried out with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Among the 16 US EPA priority PAHs determined, pyrene was observed to be the most abundant compound at all sites (20 %, followed by fluoranthene (14 %, phenanthrene (12 %, chrysene (10 % and benzo(ghiperylene (6 %. High concentrations of pyrene could be attributed to anthropogenic source such as industrial and vehicular emissions. On the other hand, naphthalene, acenathalene and anthracene accounted for 3.2 %, 1.6 %, and 1.1 %, respectively. The observed trend: Refinery > Ekpan > Enerhen > Water Resources > Alegbo > Ugborikoko > Ugboroke could be attributed to the density of industrial and commercial activities in each area. Clear differences in the total PAH between urban/industrial and rural areas were observed. The results showed that PAH levels in soils from heavily industrial sites were higher in concentrations to the effect that Refinery locations were comparatively higher than all other locations. The higher levels of PAHs observed in the Refinery location are clear indications of combustion emissions and gas flaring from fractionating towers.

  11. Phosphorus accumulation and spatial distribution in agricultural soils in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Gitte Holton; Kristensen, Kristian; Olesen, S E

    2013-01-01

    Over the past century, phosphorus (P) has accumulated in Danish agricultural soils. We examined the soil P content and the degree of P saturation in acid oxalate (DPS) in 337 agricultural soil profiles and 32 soil profiles from deciduous forests sampled at 0–0.25, 0.25–0.50, 0.50–0.75 and 0.75–1....

  12. Spatial Relationships of Urban Land Use, Soils and Heavy Metal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    geo-accumulation index (Igeo) to examine the differences in the urban soils of Lagos Mainland Area due to human activities. ... urban soils. This is usually associated with the impact of urbanization on land use pattern (Widinarko et al,. 2005). Urban soil pollution due to environmental ..... Ecology and Biochemistry, Eldor.

  13. Effects of Spatial Heterogeneity in Rainfall and Vegetation Type on Soil Moisture and Evapotranspiration

    CERN Document Server

    Puma, Michael J; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Nordbotten, Jan M; Guswa, Andrew J; Kavetski, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear plant-scale interactions controlling the soil-water balance are generally not valid at larger spatial scales due to spatial heterogeneity in rainfall and vegetation type. The relationships between spatially averaged variables are hysteretic even when unique relationships are imposed at the plant scale. The characteristics of these hysteretic relationships depend on the size of the averaging area and the spatial properties of the soil, vegetation, and rainfall. We upscale the plant-scale relationships to the scale of a regional land-surface model based on simulation data obtained through explicit representation of spatial heterogeneity in rainfall and vegetation type. The proposed upscaled function improves predictions of spatially averaged soil moisture and evapotranspiration relative to the effective-parameter approach for a water-limited Texas shrubland. The degree of improvement is a function of the scales of heterogeneity and the size of the averaging area. We also find that single-valued functi...

  14. Spatially and Temporally Complete Satellite Soil Moisture Data Based on a Data Assimilation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple soil moisture products have been generated from data acquired by satellite. However, these satellite soil moisture products are not spatially or temporally complete, primarily due to track changes, radio-frequency interference, dense vegetation, and frozen soil. These deficiencies limit the application of soil moisture in land surface process simulation, climatic modeling, and global change research. To fill the gaps and generate spatially and temporally complete soil moisture data, a data assimilation algorithm is proposed in this study. A soil moisture model is used to simulate soil moisture over time, and the shuffled complex evolution optimization method, developed at the University of Arizona, is used to estimate the control variables of the soil moisture model from good-quality satellite soil moisture data covering one year, so that the temporal behavior of the modeled soil moisture reaches the best agreement with the good-quality satellite soil moisture data. Soil moisture time series were then reconstructed by the soil moisture model according to the optimal values of the control variables. To analyze its performance, the data assimilation algorithm was applied to a daily soil moisture product derived from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E, the Microwave Radiometer Imager (MWRI, and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2. Preliminary analysis using soil moisture data simulated by the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS Noah model and soil moisture measurements at a multi-scale Soil Moisture and Temperature Monitoring Network on the central Tibetan Plateau (CTP-SMTMN was performed to validate this method. The results show that the data assimilation algorithm can efficiently reconstruct spatially and temporally complete soil moisture time series. The reconstructed soil moisture data are consistent with the spatial precipitation distribution and have strong

  15. Research Note:Determination of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions in a semi-arid basin, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tombul

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variations in soil hydraulic properties such as soil moisture q(h and hydraulic conductivity K(q or K(h, may affect the performance of hydrological models. Moreover, the cost of determining soil hydraulic properties by field or laboratory methods makes alternative indirect methods desirable. In this paper, various pedotransfer functions (PTFs are used to estimate soil hydraulic properties for a small semi-arid basin (Kurukavak in the north-west of Turkey. The field measurements were a good fit with the retention curve derived using Rosetta SSC-BD for a loamy soil. To predict parameters to describe soil hydraulic characteristics, continuous PTFs such as Rosetta SSC-BD (Model H3 and SSC-BD-q33q1500 (Model H5 have been applied. Using soil hydraulic properties that vary in time and space, the characteristic curves for three soil types, loam, sandy clay loam and sandy loam have been developed. Spatial and temporal variations in soil moisture have been demonstrated on a plot and catchment scale for loamy soil. It is concluded that accurate site-specific measurements of the soil hydraulic characteristics are the only and probably the most promising method to progress in the future. Keywords: soil hydraulic properties, soil characteristic curves, PTFs

  16. Factors Influencing Spatial Variability in Nitrogen Processing in Nitrogen-Saturated Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S. Gilliam

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N saturation is an environmental concern for forests in the eastern U.S. Although several watersheds of the Fernow Experimental Forest (FEF, West Virginia exhibit symptoms of N saturation, many watersheds display a high degree of spatial variability in soil N processing. This study examined the effects of temperature on net N mineralization and nitrification in N-saturated soils from FEF, and how these effects varied between high N-processing vs. low N-processing soils collected from two watersheds, WS3 (fertilized with [NH4]2SO4 and WS4 (untreated control. Samples of forest floor material (O1 horizon and mineral soil (to a 5-cm depth were taken from three subplots within each of four plots that represented the extremes of highest and lowest rates of net N mineralization and nitrification (hereafter, high N and low N, respectively of untreated WS4 and N-treated WS3: control/low N, control/high N, N-treated/low N, N-treated/high N. Forest floor material was analyzed for carbon (C, lignin, and N. Subsamples of mineral soil were extracted immediately with 1 N KCl and analyzed for NH4+ and NO3- to determine preincubation levels. Extracts were also analyzed for Mg, Ca, Al, and pH. To test the hypothesis that the lack of net nitrification observed in field incubations on the untreated/low N plot was the result of absence of nitrifier populations, we characterized the bacterial community involved in N cycling by amplification of amoA genes. Remaining soil was incubated for 28 d at three temperatures (10, 20, and 30°C, followed by 1 NKCl extraction and analysis for NH4+ and NO3-. Net nitrification was essentially 100% of net N mineralization for all samples combined. Nitrification rates from lab incubations at all temperatures supported earlier observations based on field incubations. At 30°C, rates from N-treated/high N were three times those of N-treated/low N. Highest rates were found for untreated/high N (two times greater than those of

  17. Small scale spatial heterogeneity of soil respiration in an old growth temperate deciduous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, A.; Jurasinski, G.; Glatzel, S.

    2009-10-01

    The large scale spatial heterogeneity of soil respiration caused by differences in site conditions is quite well understood. However, comparably little is known about the micro scale heterogeneity within forest ecosystems on homogeneous soils. Forest age, soil texture, topographic position, micro topography and stand structure may influence soil respiration considerably within short distance. In the present study within site spatial heterogeneity of soil respiration has been evaluated. To do so, an improvement of available techniques for interpolating soil respiration data via kriging was undertaken. Soil respiration was measured with closed chambers biweekly from April 2005 to April 2006 using a nested design (a set of stratified random plots, supplemented by 2 small and 2 large nested groupings) in an unmanaged, beech dominated old growth forest in Central Germany (Hainich, Thuringia). A second exclusive randomized design was established in August 2005 and continually sampled biweekly until July 2007. The average soil respiration values from the random plots were standardized by modeling soil respiration data at defined soil temperature and soil moisture values. By comparing sampling points as well as by comparing kriging results based on various sampling point densities, we found that the exclusion of local outliers was of great importance for the reliability of the estimated fluxes. Most of this information would have been missed without the nested groupings. The extrapolation results slightly improved when additional parameters like soil temperature and soil moisture were included in the extrapolation procedure. Semivariograms solely calculated from soil respiration data show a broad variety of autocorrelation distances (ranges) from a few centimeters up to a few tens of meters. The combination of randomly distributed plots with nested groupings plus the inclusion of additional relevant parameters like soil temperature and soil moisture data permits an

  18. [Spatial relevance between natural regeneration of Picea and heterogeneity of soil available nitrogen in Guandi Mountain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hai-Bing; Han, You-Zhi; Yang, Xiu-Qing; Le, Li

    2010-03-01

    By using geostatistic and pattern analysis methods, this paper studied the spatial pattern of Picea seedlings in naturally regenerated conifer (Picea) and mixed (Picea-Populus-Betula) forests in Guandi Mountain of Shanxi Province, China. The spatial distribution of soil nitrogen was also quantified by semivariogram analysis. To understand the effects of spatial heterogeneity of soil nitrogen on the regeneration of Picea seedlings, the relationships between the regeneration pattern of the seedlings and the spatial distribution of soil nitrogen were investigated by using GIS superposition and statistical analysis. In conifer stands, the distribution of Picea seedlings appeared as a patch pattern and was auto-correlated; while in mixed stands, the distribution was of gathering distribution pattern controlled by random factors. In the Picea stands with relatively low soil nitrogen content, the spatial distribution of soil available nitrogen was significantly heterogeneous and auto-correlated; whereas in the mixed stands with high nitrogen content, the distribution of soil available nitrogen showed random heterogeneity. In the conifer stands, the spatial correlation between Picea seedlings regeneration pattern and soil available nitrogen distribution was significant, regenerating more seedlings in the patches with higher NH4(+) -N concentration; while in the mixed stands, the correlation was not significant.

  19. Spatial variability of soil and vegetation characteristics in an urban park in Tel-Aviv

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah, Pariente; Zhevelev, Helena M.; Oz, Atar

    2010-05-01

    Mosaic-like spatial patterns, consisting of divers soil microenvironments, characterize the landscapes of many urban parks. These microenvironments may differ in their pedological, hydrological and floral characteristics, and they play important roles in urban ecogeomorphic system functioning. In and around a park covering 50 ha in Tel Aviv, Israel, soil properties and herbaceous vegetation were measured in eight types of microenvironments. Six microenvironments were within the park: area under Ceratonia siliqua (Cs-U), area under Ficus sycomorus (Fi-U), a rest area under F. sycomorus (Re-U), an open area with bare soil (Oa-S), an open area with biological crusts (Oa-C), and an open area with herbaceous vegetation (Oa-V). Outside the park were two control microenvironments, located, respectively, on a flat area (Co-P) and an inclined open area (Co-S). The soil was sampled from two depths (0-2 and 5-10 cm), during the peak of the growing season (March). For each soil sample, moisture content, organic matter content, CaCO3 content, texture, pH, electrical conductivity, and soluble ions contents were determined in 1:1 water extraction. In addition, prior to the soil sampling, vegetation cover, number of species, and species diversity of herbaceous vegetation were measured. The barbecue fires and visitors in each of the microenvironments were counted. Whereas the soil organic matter and vegetation in Fi-U differed from those in the control(Co-P, Co-S), those in Oa-V were similar to those in the control. Fi-U was characterized by higher values of soil moisture, organic matter, penetration depth, and vegetation cover than Cs-U. Open microenvironments within the park (Oa-S, Oa-C, Oa-V) showed lower values of soil penetration than the control microenvironments. In Oa-V unique types of plants such as Capsella bursa-pastoris and Anagallis arvensis, which did not appear in the control microenvironments, were found. This was true also for Fi-U, in which species like Oxalis pes

  20. SPATIAL CORRELATION BETWEEN PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SOIL AND WEEDS IN TWO MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Roberto Schaffrath

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial correlation between soil properties and weeds is relevant in agronomic and environmental terms. The analysis of this correlation is crucial for the interpretation of its meaning, for influencing factors such as dispersal mechanisms, seed production and survival, and the range of influence of soil management techniques. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial correlation between the physical properties of soil and weeds in no-tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT systems. The following physical properties of soil and weeds were analyzed: soil bulk density, macroporosity, microporosity, total porosity, aeration capacity of soil matrix, soil water content at field capacity, weed shoot biomass, weed density, Commelina benghalensis density, and Bidens pilosa density. Generally, the ranges of the spatial correlations were higher in NT than in CT. The cross-variograms showed that many variables have a structure of combined spatial variation and can therefore be mapped from one another by co-kriging. This combined variation also allows inferences about the physical and biological meanings of the study variables. Results also showed that soil management systems influence the spatial dependence structure significantly.

  1. Exploring the spatial variability of soil properties in an Alfisol Catena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosemary, F.; Vitharana, U. W. A.; Indraratne, S. P.; Weerasooriya, R.; Mishra, U.

    2016-11-10

    Detailed digital soil maps showing the spatial heterogeneity of soil properties consistent with the landscape are required for site-specific management of plant nutrients, land use planning and process-based environmental modeling. We characterized the short-scale spatial heterogeneity of soil properties in an Alfisol catena in a tropical landscape of Sri Lanka. The impact of different land-uses (paddy, vegetable and un-cultivated) was examined to assess the impact of anthropogenic activities on the variability of soil properties at the catenary level. Conditioned Latin hypercube sampling was used to collect 58 geo-referenced topsoil samples (0–30 cm) from the study area. Soil samples were analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), organic carbon (OC), cation exchange capacity (CEC) and texture. The spatial correlation between soil properties was analyzed by computing crossvariograms and subsequent fitting of theoretical model. Spatial distribution maps were developed using ordinary kriging. The range of soil properties, pH: 4.3–7.9; EC: 0.01–0.18 dS m–1 ; OC: 0.1–1.37%; CEC: 0.44– 11.51 cmol (+) kg–1 ; clay: 1.5–25% and sand: 59.1–84.4% and their coefficient of variations indicated a large variability in the study area. Electrical conductivity and pH showed a strong spatial correlation which was reflected by the cross-variogram close to the hull of the perfect correlation. Moreover, cross-variograms calculated for EC and Clay, CEC and OC, CEC and clay and CEC and pH indicated weak positive spatial correlation between these properties. Relative nugget effect (RNE) calculated from variograms showed strongly structured spatial variability for pH, EC and sand content (RNE < 25%) while CEC, organic carbon and clay content showed moderately structured spatial variability (25% < RNE < 75%). Spatial dependencies for examined soil properties ranged from 48 to 984 m. The mixed effects model fitting followed by Tukey's post

  2. Spatial effects of aboveground biomass on soil ecological parameters and trace gas fluxes in a savannah ecosystem of Mount Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Joscha; Gütlein, Adrian; Sierra Cornejo, Natalia; Kiese, Ralf; Hertel, Dietrich; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    The savannah biome is a hotspot for biodiversity and wildlife conservation in Africa and recently got in the focus of research on carbon sequestration. Savannah ecosystems are under strong pressure from climate and land-use change, especially around populous areas like the Mt. Kilimanjaro region. Savannah vegetation in this area consists of grassland with isolated trees and is therefore characterized by high spatial variation of canopy cover, aboveground biomass and root structure. Canopy structure is known to affect microclimate, throughfall and evapotranspiration and thereby controls soil moisture conditions. Consequently, the canopy structure is a major regulator for soil ecological parameters and soil-atmospheric trace gas exchange (CO2, N2O, CH4) in water limited environments. The spatial distribution of these parameters and the connection between above and belowground processes are important to understand and predict ecosystem changes and estimate its vulnerability. Our objective was to determine trends and changes of soil parameters and relate their spatial variability to the vegetation structure. We chose three trees from each of the two most dominant species (Acacia nilotica and Balanites aegyptiaca) in our research area. For each tree, we selected transects with nine sampling points of the same relative distances to the stem. Distances were calculated in relation to the crown radius. At these each sampling point a soil core was taken and separated in 0-10 cm and 10-30 cm depth. We measured soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage, microbial biomass carbon C and N, soil respiration as well as root biomass and -density, soil temperature and soil water content. Each tree was characterized by crown spread, leaf area index and basal area. Preliminary results show that C and N stocks decreased about 50% with depth independently of distance to the tree. Soil water content under the tree crown increased with depth while it decreased under grass cover. Microbial

  3. Determination of potential management zones from soil electrical conductivity, yield and crop data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Shi, Zhou; Wu, Ci-fang; Li, Hong-yi; Li, Feng

    2008-01-01

    One approach to apply precision agriculture to optimize crop production and environmental quality is identifying management zones. In this paper, the variables of soil electrical conductivity (EC) data, cotton yield data and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data in an about 15 ha field in a coastal saline land were selected as data resources, and their spatial variabilities were firstly analyzed and spatial distribution maps constructed with geostatistics technique. Then fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm was used to define management zones, fuzzy performance index (FPI) and normalized classification entropy (NCE) were used to determine the optimal cluster numbers. Finally one-way variance analysis was performed on 224 georeferenced soil and yield sampling points to assess how well the defined management zones reflected the soil properties and productivity level. The results reveal that the optimal number of management zones for the present study area was 3 and the defined management zones provided a better description of soil properties and yield variation. Statistical analyses indicate significant differences between the chemical properties of soil samples and crop yield in each management zone, and management zone 3 presented the highest nutrient level and potential crop productivity, whereas management zone 1 the lowest. Based on these findings, we conclude that fuzzy c-means clustering approach can be used to delineate management zones by using the given three variables in the coastal saline soils, and the defined management zones form an objective basis for targeting soil samples for nutrient analysis and development of site-specific application strategies.

  4. An Improved Technique for dry Soil Moisture Release Curves to Determine Soil Mineralogical and Physical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, G. S.; Campbell, C. S.; Cobos, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Soil moisture release curves (MRC) or moisture sorption isotherms, which relate the amount of water in soil to its water potential or water activity, have many applications in soil physics and geotechnical engineering including determining soil water flow, specific surface area, swelling potential, and clay mineralogy and activity. Although research showing MRC for various soils dates back more than 50 years, limitations with the measurement technique have made developing MRC time consuming and inaccurate, especially in dry soils. Recently, an instrument was developed to create moisture sorption isotherms for various food and pharmaceutical products. The objective of this research was to investigate its use in soils for obtaining MRC in dry soils simply and accurately. Several different soil types were tested in the instrument from pure sand to bentonite and smectite clays. From the MRC of these soils, we were able to develop good correlations between actual and derived clay activity, surface area, and swelling potential. In addition, we were able to see hysteresis in dry soil water uptake for all soils, including sand. According to our tests, this new instrument will provide a powerful tool to investigate several soil physical properties simply and accurately.

  5. Using high-resolution radar images to determine vegetation cover for soil erosion assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiel, D; Herrmann, S; Jadczyszyn, J

    2013-07-30

    Healthy soils are crucial for human well-being. Because soils are threatened worldwide, politicians recognize the need for soil protection. For example, the European Commission has launched the Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection, which requests the European member states to identify high risk areas for soil degradation. Most states use the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) to assess soil erosion risk at the national scale. The USLE includes different factors, one of them is the vegetation cover and management factor (C factor). Modern satellite-based radar sensors now provide highly accurate vegetation cover data, enabling opportunities to improve the accuracy of the C factor. The presented study proves the suitability for C factor determination based on a multi-temporal classification of high-resolution radar images. Further USLE factors were derived from existing data sources (meteorological data, soil maps, digital elevation model) to conduct an USLE-based soil erosion assessment. The resulting map illustrates a qualitative assessment for soil erosion risk within a plot of about 7*12 km in an agricultural region in Poland that is very susceptible to soil erosion processes. A high erosion risk of more than 10 tonnes per ha and year was assessed to occur on 13.6% (646 ha) of the agricultural areas within the investigated plot. Further 7.8% (372 ha) of agricultural land is threaten by a medium risk of 5-10 tonnes per ha and year. Such a spatial information about areas of high or medium soil erosion risk are crucial for the development of strategies for the protection of soils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interpolation Approaches for Characterizing Spatial Variability of Soil Properties in Tuz Lake Basin of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji, Taha; Sertel, Elif; Tanik, Aysegul

    2017-12-01

    Soil management is an essential concern in protecting soil properties, in enhancing appropriate soil quality for plant growth and agricultural productivity, and in preventing soil erosion. Soil scientists and decision makers require accurate and well-distributed spatially continuous soil data across a region for risk assessment and for effectively monitoring and managing soils. Recently, spatial interpolation approaches have been utilized in various disciplines including soil sciences for analysing, predicting and mapping distribution and surface modelling of environmental factors such as soil properties. The study area selected in this research is Tuz Lake Basin in Turkey bearing ecological and economic importance. Fertile soil plays a significant role in agricultural activities, which is one of the main industries having great impact on economy of the region. Loss of trees and bushes due to intense agricultural activities in some parts of the basin lead to soil erosion. Besides, soil salinization due to both human-induced activities and natural factors has exacerbated its condition regarding agricultural land development. This study aims to compare capability of Local Polynomial Interpolation (LPI) and Radial Basis Functions (RBF) as two interpolation methods for mapping spatial pattern of soil properties including organic matter, phosphorus, lime and boron. Both LPI and RBF methods demonstrated promising results for predicting lime, organic matter, phosphorous and boron. Soil samples collected in the field were used for interpolation analysis in which approximately 80% of data was used for interpolation modelling whereas the remaining for validation of the predicted results. Relationship between validation points and their corresponding estimated values in the same location is examined by conducting linear regression analysis. Eight prediction maps generated from two different interpolation methods for soil organic matter, phosphorus, lime and boron parameters

  7. Spatial changes in the prokaryotic community structure across a soil catena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Zhuravleva, Anna; Tkhakakhova, Azida

    2017-04-01

    Mesorelief is a complex biogeochemical factor regulating hydrothermal regimes of the surface soil layer, the type of plant cover, etc., and, therefore, influences on soil microbial community structure. A natural model of soil sequence across the slope is a soil catena. Soils forming on various mesorelief positions significantly differ in physicochemical and biological properties, leading to the changes in spatial distribution of various bacterial and archaeal taxa across the soil catena. The aim of this study was to determine soil microbial community structure of different ecosystems corresponding to three mesorelief positions within the soil catena. The catena was located at the right bank of the Oka River (Moscow region, Russian Federation). Soil samples were taken at depths of 0-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and 40-60 cm from three sites within the transect of 960 m with elevation of 80 m, corresponding to the autonomous (AU), transitional (TR) (both Luvisols), and accumulative (AC) (Fluvisol Umbric) positions of the landscape. The dominant vegetation of studied sites were rootstock- and loose bunchgrasses of the fallow ecosystem (AU), a secondary small-leaved forest of the forest ecosystem (TR), and a meadow-bog association of the meadow-bog ecosystem (AC). The distances between the sites were 680 m (AU and TR), and 280 m (TR and AC). The soil samples were homogenized, and the total community DNA of three replicates was extracted using the FastDNA® SPIN kit for Soil. All DNA replicates were combined in a pooled sample and the DNA was used for PCR with specific primers for the 16S V3 and V4 regions. The products were purified and submitted to Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Obtained sequence data were evaluated using the MiSeq Reporter Metagenomics Workflow and QIIME. Quantification of the bacterial and archaeal metabolically active cells was quantified by the FISH-method. Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria, Firmictutes and Actinobacteria were the major phyla in autonomous site

  8. Soil erosion evolution and spatial correlation analysis in a typical karst geomorphology using RUSLE with GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cheng; Wang, Shijie; Bai, Xiaoyong; Li, Yangbing; Tian, Yichao; Li, Yue; Wu, Luhua; Luo, Guangjie

    2017-07-01

    Although some scholars have studied soil erosion in karst landforms, analyses of the spatial and temporal evolution of soil erosion and correlation analyses with spatial elements have been insufficient. The lack of research has led to an inaccurate assessment of environmental effects, especially in the mountainous area of Wuling in China. Soil erosion and rocky desertification in this area influence the survival and sustainability of a population of 0.22 billion people. This paper analyzes the spatiotemporal evolution of soil erosion and explores its relationship with rocky desertification using GIS technology and the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE). Furthermore, this paper analyzes the relationship between soil erosion and major natural elements in southern China. The results are as follows: (1) from 2000 to 2013, the proportion of the area experiencing micro-erosion and mild erosion was at increasing risk in contrast to areas where moderate and high erosion are decreasing. The area changes in this time sequence reflect moderate to high levels of erosion tending to convert into micro-erosion and mild erosion. (2) The soil erosion area on the slope, at 15-35°, accounted for 60.59 % of the total erosion area, and the corresponding soil erosion accounted for 40.44 %. (3) The annual erosion rate in the karst region decreased much faster than in the non-karst region. Soil erosion in all of the rock outcrop areas indicates an improving trend, and dynamic changes in soil erosion significantly differ among the various lithological distribution belts. (4) The soil erosion rate decreased in the rocky desertification regions, to below moderate levels, but increased in the severe rocky desertification areas. The temporal and spatial variations in soil erosion gradually decreased in the study area. Differences in the spatial distribution between lithology and rocky desertification induced extensive soil loss. As rocky desertification became worse, the erosion

  9. Spatial relationship between the productivity of cane sugar and soil electrical conductivity measured by electromagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Glecio; Silva, Jucicléia; Bezerra, Joel; Silva, Enio; Montenegro, Abelardo

    2013-04-01

    The cultivation of sugar cane in Brazil occupies a prominent place in national production chain, because the country is the main world producer of sugar and ethanol. Accordingly, studies are needed that allow an integrated production and technified, and especially that estimates of crops are consistent with the actual production of each region. The objective of this study was to determine the spatial relationship between the productivity of cane sugar and soil electrical conductivity measured by electromagnetic induction. The field experiment was conducted at an agricultural research site located in Goiana municipality, Pernambuco State, north-east of Brazil (Latitude 07 ° 34 '25 "S, Longitude 34 ° 55' 39" W). The surface of the studied field is 6.5 ha, and its mean height 8.5 m a.s.l. This site has been under sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum sp.) monoculture during the last 24 years and it was managed burning the straw each year after harvesting, renewal of plantation was performed every 7 years. Studied the field is located 10 km east from Atlantic Ocean and it is representative of the regional landscape lowlands, whose soils are affected by salinity seawater, sugarcane plantations with the main economical activity. Soil was classified an orthic the Podsol. The productivity of cane sugar and electrical conductivity were measured in 90 sampling points. The productivity of cane sugar was determined in each of the sampling points in plots of 9 m2. The Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa, mS m-1) was measured with an electromagnetic induction device EM38-DD (Geonics Limited). The equipment consists of two units of measurement, one in a horizontal dipole (ECa-H) to provide effective measurement distance of 1.5 m approximately and other one in vertical dipole (ECa-V) with an effective measurement depth of approximately 0.75 m. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and geostatistical tools. The results showed that productivity in the study area

  10. Effectiveness of using pedo-transfer functions to quantify the spatial variability of soil water retention characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Nunzio; Santini, Alessandro

    1997-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of soil hydraulic properties is of crucial importance for reliable applications of recently developed distributed models to environmental studies and land-use planning. To provide such information in a cost-effective way, indirect estimation of water transport parameters from easily measurable or already available soil data using pedo-transfer functions (PTFs) is becoming increasingly popular. However, distributed hydrological modeling requires that soil hydraulic characterization also takes account of the description of spatial variability. The objective of this study was to evaluate some published PTFs in the light of their ability to quantify the spatial structure and variability of soil water retention adequately. Four PTFs were tested: two provided only values of water content at specific pressure potentials (PTF Group A), whereas the remaining two estimated the parameters of closed-form relations describing the water retention function (PTF Group B). Measured data for testing were obtained from undisturbed soil samples taken from the top layer of different soils along a 5 km transect with constant spacing of 50 m. Overall, summary statistics and sample distributions of the PTF-estimated retention characteristics at selected pressure potentials are close to those of the retention variables used as reference for comparisons. The largest discrepancies are related to the use of PTFs pertaining to Group A. Although the quality of kriged interpolations based on soil property data obtained by simplified methodologies still gives cause for concern, results show that the structure of spatial variability exhibited by the variables considered along the study transect is described well enough when using PTFs for determining soil water retention characteristics.

  11. Determining soil erosion from roads in coastal plain of Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFero Grace; W.J. Elliot

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports soil losses and observed sediment deposition for 16 randomly selected forest road sections in the National Forests of Alabama. Visible sediment deposition zones were tracked along the stormwater flow path to the most remote location as a means of quantifying soil loss from road sections. Volumes of sediment in deposition zones were determined by...

  12. Post-fire spatial patterns of soil nitrogen mineralization and microbial abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica A H Smithwick

    Full Text Available Stand-replacing fires influence soil nitrogen availability and microbial community composition, which may in turn mediate post-fire successional dynamics and nutrient cycling. However, fires create patchiness at both local and landscape scales and do not result in consistent patterns of ecological dynamics. The objectives of this study were to (1 quantify the spatial structure of microbial communities in forest stands recently affected by stand-replacing fire and (2 determine whether microbial variables aid predictions of in situ net nitrogen mineralization rates in recently burned stands. The study was conducted in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia and Engelmann spruce/subalpine fir (Picea engelmannii/Abies lasiocarpa forest stands that burned during summer 2000 in Greater Yellowstone (Wyoming, USA. Using a fully probabilistic spatial process model and Bayesian kriging, the spatial structure of microbial lipid abundance and fungi-to-bacteria ratios were found to be spatially structured within plots two years following fire (for most plots, autocorrelation range varied from 1.5 to 10.5 m. Congruence of spatial patterns among microbial variables, in situ net N mineralization, and cover variables was evident. Stepwise regression resulted in significant models of in situ net N mineralization and included variables describing fungal and bacterial abundance, although explained variance was low (R²<0.29. Unraveling complex spatial patterns of nutrient cycling and the biotic factors that regulate it remains challenging but is critical for explaining post-fire ecosystem function, especially in Greater Yellowstone, which is projected to experience increased fire frequencies by mid 21(st Century.

  13. Post-Fire Spatial Patterns of Soil Nitrogen Mineralization and Microbial Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithwick, Erica A. H.; Naithani, Kusum J.; Balser, Teri C.; Romme, William H.; Turner, Monica G.

    2012-01-01

    Stand-replacing fires influence soil nitrogen availability and microbial community composition, which may in turn mediate post-fire successional dynamics and nutrient cycling. However, fires create patchiness at both local and landscape scales and do not result in consistent patterns of ecological dynamics. The objectives of this study were to (1) quantify the spatial structure of microbial communities in forest stands recently affected by stand-replacing fire and (2) determine whether microbial variables aid predictions of in situ net nitrogen mineralization rates in recently burned stands. The study was conducted in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) and Engelmann spruce/subalpine fir (Picea engelmannii/Abies lasiocarpa) forest stands that burned during summer 2000 in Greater Yellowstone (Wyoming, USA). Using a fully probabilistic spatial process model and Bayesian kriging, the spatial structure of microbial lipid abundance and fungi-to-bacteria ratios were found to be spatially structured within plots two years following fire (for most plots, autocorrelation range varied from 1.5 to 10.5 m). Congruence of spatial patterns among microbial variables, in situ net N mineralization, and cover variables was evident. Stepwise regression resulted in significant models of in situ net N mineralization and included variables describing fungal and bacterial abundance, although explained variance was low (R2<0.29). Unraveling complex spatial patterns of nutrient cycling and the biotic factors that regulate it remains challenging but is critical for explaining post-fire ecosystem function, especially in Greater Yellowstone, which is projected to experience increased fire frequencies by mid 21st Century. PMID:23226324

  14. Determination of steroids in manure and soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin; Björklund, Bengt Erland; Halling-Sørensen, Bent

    . In summary, the sample preparation was systematically evaluated with testing different solvents and a suite of solid phase extraction materials. The optimized method utilizes the pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) technology with automated (integrated) clean-up combined with an additional off-line multi......-step clean-up. The sample extracts were derivatized and analyzed utilizing a gas chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry technology. This method is applicable on all types of environmental solid samples (e.g., biosolids, soils and sediments)....

  15. Spatial variation in soil active-layer geochemistry across hydrologic margins in polar desert ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Barrett

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar deserts are characterized by severe spatial-temporal limitations of liquid water. In soil active layers of the Antarctic Dry Valleys, liquid water is infrequently available over most of the arid terrestrial landscape. However, soils on the margins of glacial melt-water streams and lakes are visibly wet during the brief Austral summer when temperatures permit the existence of liquid water. We examined the role of these hydrologic margins as preferential zones for the transformation and transport of nutrient elements and solutes in an environment where geochemical weathering and biological activity is strictly limited by the dearth of liquid water. We report on hydropedological investigations of aquatic-terrestrial transition zones adjacent to 11 stream and lake systems in the Antarctic Dry Valleys. Our results show that wetted zones extended 1–11 m from the edges of lotic and lentic systems. While capillary demand and surface evaporation drive a one-way flux of water through these zones, the scale of these transition zones is determined by the topography and physical characteristics of the surrounding soils. Nutrient concentrations and fluxes appear to be influenced by both the hydrology and microbial-mediated biogeochemical processes. Salt concentrations are enriched near the distal boundary of the wetted fronts due to evapo-concentration of pore water in lake margin soils, while organic matter, ammonium and phosphate concentrations are highest in stream channel sediments where potential for biological activity is greatest. Thus, in the Antarctic Dry Valleys, intermittently wet soils on the margins of streams and lakes are important zones of both geochemical cycling and biological activity.

  16. Spatial variability of soil nutrient in paddy plantation: Sites FELCRA Seberang Perak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, H.; Adnan, N. A.; Mispan, M. R.; Athirah. A, A.

    2016-06-01

    The conventional methods currently used for rice cultivation in Malaysia are unable to give maximum yield although the yield production of paddy is increasing. This is due to the conversional method being unable to include soil properties as one of their parameters in agriculture management. Soil properties vary spatially in farm scale due to differences in topography, parent material, vegetation or land management and soil characteristics; also plantation productivity varies significantly over small spatial scales. Knowledge of spatial variability in soil fertility is important for site specific nutrient management. Analysis of spatial variability of soil nutrient of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) were conducted in this study with the aid of GIS (i.e ArcGIS) and statistical softwares. In this study different temporal and depths of soil nutrient were extracted on the field and further analysis of N,P,K content were analysed in the chemical laboratory and using spatially technique in GIS sofware. The result indicated that for the Seberang Perak site of 58 hactares area, N and K are met minimum requirements nutrient content as outlines by the MARDI for paddy cultivation. However, P indicated poor condition in the study area; therefore the soil needs further attention and treatment.

  17. Determining Critical Soil pH for Grain Sorghum Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Butchee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. has become a popular rotation crop in the Great Plains. The transition from conventional tillage to no-tillage production systems has led to an increase in the need for crop rotations. Some of the soils of the Great Plains are acidic, and there is concern that grain sorghum production may be limited when grown on acidic soils. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of soil pH for grain sorghum production. Potassium chloride-exchangeable aluminum was also analyzed to determine grain sorghum’s sensitivity to soil aluminum (Al concentration. The relationship between relative yield and soil pH was investigated at Lahoma, Perkins, and Haskell, Oklahoma, USA with soil pH treatments ranging from 4.0–7.0. Soil pH was altered using aluminum sulfate or hydrated lime. Soil acidity reduced grain sorghum yield, resulting in a 10% reduction in yield at soil pH 5.42. Potassium chloride-exchangeable aluminum levels above 18 mg kg−1 resulted in yield reductions of 10% or greater. Liming should be considered to increase soil pH if it is below these critical levels where grain sorghum will be produced.

  18. Outcomes of fungal interactions are determined by soil invertebrate grazers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Thomas W; Boddy, Lynne; Jones, T Hefin

    2011-11-01

    Saprotrophic fungal community composition, determined by the outcome of competitive mycelial interactions, is one of the many key factors affecting soil nutrient mineralisation and decomposition rates. Fungal communities are not generally predicted to be regulated by top-down factors, such as predation, but rather by bottom-up factors, including resource availability. We show that invertebrate grazers can exert selective pressures on fungal decomposer communities in soil, reversing the outcomes of competitive interactions. By feeding selectively on the cord-forming fungus Resinicium bicolor, isopods prevented the competitive exclusion of Hypholoma fasciculare and Phanerochaete velutina in soil and wood. Nematode populations also reversed the outcomes of competitive interactions by stimulating growth of less competitive fungi. These represent two opposing mechanisms by which soil fauna may influence fungal community composition and diversity. Factors affecting soil invertebrate communities will have direct consequences for fungal-mediated nutrient cycling in woodland soils. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  19. Hyperspectral Imaging Analysis for the Classification of Soil Types and the Determination of Soil Total Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyao Jia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil is an important environment for crop growth. Quick and accurately access to soil nutrient content information is a prerequisite for scientific fertilization. In this work, hyperspectral imaging (HSI technology was applied for the classification of soil types and the measurement of soil total nitrogen (TN content. A total of 183 soil samples collected from Shangyu City (People’s Republic of China, were scanned by a near-infrared hyperspectral imaging system with a wavelength range of 874–1734 nm. The soil samples belonged to three major soil types typical of this area, including paddy soil, red soil and seashore saline soil. The successive projections algorithm (SPA method was utilized to select effective wavelengths from the full spectrum. Pattern texture features (energy, contrast, homogeneity and entropy were extracted from the gray-scale images at the effective wavelengths. The support vector machines (SVM and partial least squares regression (PLSR methods were used to establish classification and prediction models, respectively. The results showed that by using the combined data sets of effective wavelengths and texture features for modelling an optimal correct classification rate of 91.8%. could be achieved. The soil samples were first classified, then the local models were established for soil TN according to soil types, which achieved better prediction results than the general models. The overall results indicated that hyperspectral imaging technology could be used for soil type classification and soil TN determination, and data fusion combining spectral and image texture information showed advantages for the classification of soil types.

  20. Temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen transformations in a coniferous forest soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, A.M.; Zoomer, H.R.; van Verseveld, H.W.; Verhoef, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Forest soils show a great degree of temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen mineralization. The aim of the present study was to explain temporal variation in nitrate leaching from a nitrogen-saturated coniferous forest soil by potential nitrification, mineralization rates and nitrate uptake by

  1. Temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen transformations in a coniferous soil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, A.M.; Zoomer, H.R.; van Verseveld, H.W.; Verhoef, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Forest soils show a great degree of temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen mineralization. The aim of the present study was to explain temporal variation in nitrate leaching from a nitrogen-saturated coniferous forest soil by potential nitrification, mineralization rates and nitrate uptake by

  2. Spatial oxygen distribution and nitrous oxide emissions from soil after manure application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Kun; Bruun, Sander; Larsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The availability and spatial distribution of oxygen (O2) in agricultural soil are controlling factors in the production and emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere, but most experiments investigating the effects of various factors on N2O emissions in soil have been conducted without det...

  3. Spatial variability of arsenic in relation with some soil forming factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil and water samples collected from Bijar area were analyzed in order to investigate arsenic contamination sources and their human risk potentiality assessment. Routine physical and chemical characteristics, iron oxides and arsenic contents were measured in 227 soil samples. Spatial variability of arsenic was ...

  4. Application of spatial Markov chains to the analysis of the temporal-spatial evolution of soil erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruimin; Men, Cong; Wang, Xiujuan; Xu, Fei; Yu, Wenwen

    Soil and water conservation in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area of China is important, and soil erosion is a significant issue. In the present study, spatial Markov chains were applied to explore the impacts of the regional context on soil erosion in the Xiangxi River watershed, and Thematic Mapper remote sensing data from 1999 and 2007 were employed. The results indicated that the observed changes in soil erosion were closely related to the soil erosion levels of the surrounding areas. When neighboring regions were not considered, the probability that moderate erosion transformed into slight and severe erosion was 0.8330 and 0.0049, respectively. However, when neighboring regions that displayed intensive erosion were considered, the probabilities were 0.2454 and 0.7513, respectively. Moreover, the different levels of soil erosion in neighboring regions played different roles in soil erosion. If the erosion levels in the neighboring region were lower, the probability of a high erosion class transferring to a lower level was relatively high. In contrast, if erosion levels in the neighboring region were higher, the probability was lower. The results of the present study provide important information for the planning and implementation of soil conservation measures in the study area.

  5. Do stones modify the spatial distribution of fire-induced soil water repellency? Preliminary data

    OpenAIRE

    J. García-Moreno; A.J. Gordillo-Rivero; Gil, J.; N.T. Jiménez-Morillo; J. Matix-Solera; F.A. González-Peñaloza; Granged, A.J.P.; G. Bárcenas-Moreno; P. Jiménez-Pinilla; Lozano, E; Jordán, A.; Zavala, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Water repellency is a property of many fire-affected soils that contributes to delayed wetting rates and shows many hydrological and geomorphological consequences. Fire-induced soil water repellency (SWR) may be modulated by pre-fire soil and vegetation properties. Many studies have been carried out to investigate the relationship between SWR and these properties. But, to our knowledge, no studies have considered the effect of surface stones in the spatial distribution of fire-ind...

  6. Soil fertility assessment and mapping of spatial variability at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information on soil fertility assessment and mapping of arable land helps to design appropriate soil fertility management practices. Experiment was conducted at ... Exchangeable Ca and Mg ranged from 9.25 (LU 4) to 23.35 cmol (+) kg-1 (LU 2) and 2.76 (LU 5) to 8.50 cmol (+) kg-1 (LU 3), respectively. The highest (76.86%) ...

  7. Spatial Variability of Soil Morphorlogical and Physico- Chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    for optimum and sustainable agriculture. (Wilding, 1985). Variation in soil properties imposed limitation on the potentiality of the soil and productivity status. ... The samples were air dried ground and sieved to separate the fine earth particle fraction (less than 2 mm) from coarse fragments using ceramic mortar and pestle.

  8. WIND EROSION INTENSITY DETERMINATION USING SOIL PARTICLE CATCHER DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Lackóová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To analyze wind erosion events in the real terrain conditions, we proposed to construct a prototype of soil particle catcher devices to trap soil particles. With these devices we are able to measure the intensity of wind erosion at six different heights above the soil surface in one location or at three different heights in two places. It is possible to use them for six different places at the same time as well. We performed field measurements to determine the amount of soil particles transported by the wind between 26th – 31st March 2012. Each measuring took 60 minutes. After this time the soil particle catchers were emptied and further measurements carried out. At the beginning we selected two places for measurement (soil HPJ 16 and 37 at two heights, one above the other. Then we used two measuring systems 40 m apart at two sites (D2 and D4 and the soil captured at two heights (0, 1. The maximum weight of soil particles trapped in measuring system D2 at height (0 was 1242.7 g at a wind speed of 9.6 ms-1. At measurement height (1 the maximum weight was 72.7 g trapped at the same average hourly rate, but during different measurement events. The measuring system at D4 trapped the highest amount of soil at a wind speed of 8.9 ms-1 (1141.7 g at height (0 and at a speed of 9.3 ms-1 (22.3 g at height (1. During the measurements with the two basic measuring systems D4 and D2, we measured the wind erosion intensity together with soil particle catchers D1 and D3. D3 was placed between devices D4 and D2, D1 was 20 m ahead D2. Soil particle catchers were placed on the soil surface at height position (0. We measured increasing soil erosion downwind on four locations spaced at 20 m. The results show that with there is an increasing quantity of particles collected as the erosive surface length increases, due to the so-called snowball effect. We analyzed selected trapped soil samples in order to determine the size of the soil particles and their proportion

  9. Spatial distribution of nematodes in soil cultivated with sugarcane under different uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, M. O.; Pedrosa, E. M. R.; Vicente, T. F. S.; Siqueira, G. M.; Montenegro, A. A. A.

    2012-04-01

    Sugarcane is a crop of major importance within the Brazilian economy, being an activity that generates energy and with high capacity to develop various economic sectors. Currently the greatest challenge is to maximize productivity and minimize environmental impacts. The plant-parasites nematodes have great expression, because influence directly the productive potential of sugarcane crops. Accordingly, little research has been devoted to the study of spatial variability of nematodes. Thus, the purpose of this work is to analyze the spatial distribution of nematodes in a soil cultivated with sugarcane in areas with and without irrigation, with distinct spacing of sampling to determine the differences between the sampling scales. The study area is located in the municipality of Goiana (Pernambuco State, Brazil). The experiment was conducted in two areas with 40 hectares each, being collected 90 samples at different spacing: 18 samples with spacing of 200.00 x 200.00 m, 36 samples with spacing of 20.00 m x 20.00 m and 36 samples with spacing of 2.00 m x 2.00 m. Soil samples were collected at deep of 0.00-0.20 m and nematodes were extracted per 300 cm3 of soil through centrifugal flotation in sucrose being quantified, classified according trophic habit (plant-parasites, fungivores, bacterivores, omnivores and predators) and identified in level of genus or family. In irrigated area the amount of water applied was determined considering the evapotranspiration of culture. The data were analyzed using classical statistics and geostatistics. The results demonstrated that the data showed high values of coefficient of variation in both study areas. All attributes studied showed log normal frequency distribution. The area B (irrigated) has a population of nematodes more stable than the area A (non-irrigated), a fact confirmed by its mean value of the total population of nematodes (282.45 individuals). The use of geostatistics not allowed to assess the spatial distribution of

  10. Farmer data sourcing. The case study of the spatial soil information maps in South Tyrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Chiesa, Stefano; Niedrist, Georg; Thalheimer, Martin; Hafner, Hansjörg; La Cecilia, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    Nord-Italian region South Tyrol is Europe's largest apple growing area exporting ca. 15% in Europe and 2% worldwide. Vineyards represent ca. 1% of Italian production. In order to deliver high quality food, most of the farmers in South Tyrol follow sustainable farming practices. One of the key practice is the sustainable soil management, where farmers collect regularly (each 5 years) soil samples and send for analyses to improve cultivation management, yield and finally profitability. However, such data generally remain inaccessible. On this regard, in South Tyrol, private interests and the public administration have established a long tradition of collaboration with the local farming industry. This has granted to the collection of large spatial and temporal database of soil analyses along all the cultivated areas. Thanks to this best practice, information on soil properties are centralized and geocoded. The large dataset consist mainly in soil information of texture, humus content, pH and microelements availability such as, K, Mg, Bor, Mn, Cu Zn. This data was finally spatialized by mean of geostatistical methods and several high-resolution digital maps were created. In this contribution, we present the best practice where farmers data source soil information in South Tyrol. Show the capability of a large spatial-temporal geocoded soil dataset to reproduce detailed digital soil property maps and to assess long-term changes in soil properties. Finally, implication and potential application are discussed.

  11. Spatial analysis of water infiltration in urban soils. Case study of Iasi municipality (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristian Vasilica, Secu; Ionut, Minea

    2013-04-01

    The post-communist period (after 1989) caused important changes in the functional structure of Iasi municipality. The partly dismantling of the industrial area, the urban sprawl against the periurban and agricultural space, the new infrastructure works, all these determined important changes of soils' physical and morphological properties (e.g. porosity, density, compaction, infiltration rate etc., in the first case, and changes in soil horizons, in the second case etc.). This study aims to prove the variability of physical properties through the combination of statistical and geostatistical methods intended for a correct spatial representation. Water infiltration in urban soils was analyzed in relation to land use and the age of parental materials. Field investigations consisted in measurements of the water infiltration (by the means of Turf Tech infiltrometer), resistance to penetration (penetrologger), moisture deficit (Theta Probe) and resistivity (EC) for 70 equally distanced points (750 m x 750 m) placed in a grid covering more than 33 km2. In the laboratory, there were determined several parameters as density, porosity (air pycnometer), gravimetric moisture and other hydrophysical indicators. Filed investigations results are very heterogeneous, because of the human intervention on soils. The curves of variation for the rate water infiltration in soils indicate a downward trend, from high values in first time interval (one minute), between 5000 and 60 mm/h-1, gradually decreasing to the interval of 5-10 minutes (between 30 and 1000 mm/ h-1 to a general trend of flattening after a large time interval (in the timeframe of 50-60 minutes, the infiltration rate ranges between 4 and 142 mm•h-1). The highest frequency (≥65%) caracterizes the infiltration rates between 20 and 65 mm•h-1. For each analyzed sector (residential areas, industrial areas, degraded lands, recreational areas - parks and botanical gardens, forests heterogeneous agricultural lands), the

  12. Determination of soil properties from earthquake data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta Lopez, Carlos Isidro

    2002-08-01

    Soil damping and site (system) dominant vibration frequency estimations were obtained by means of the Random Decrement Method (RDM) using numerically simulated time series of soil model responses upon random excitations and real earthquake records. Highly reliable estimations were obtained when the system response was dominated by a distinctive or preferential vibration mode. Different damping mechanisms did not play a significant role in the variability of damping estimations; however, the excitation type did. The damping estimations were highly dependent on how well the Randomdec signature was defined. The alternate methods to measure the decay of the Randomdec signature may produce large variability in the damping estimations. The most consistent and reliable estimations were obtained using the average of the decay every half-cycle of the Randomdec signature. Hurley's method consistently underestimated the damping values by an average of 50%. The frequency estimations were highly consistent when the Randomdec signature is well defined. Horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) spectral ratios were used to characterize local sediment response, and 1-D wave propagation modeling was used to estimate soil properties and theoretical amplification factors of shallow marine sediment layers in an experimental site in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Relative to the vertical spectral amplitude, the horizontal spectral amplitudes increased by an order of magnitude at 0.35 Hz, and by at least two orders of magnitude at 1.9 Hz. A 50-m-thick soil system parameterized as three solid layers resting over a half-space with a water layer at the top produced theoretical H/V spectral ratios largely consistent with the observed H/V spectral ratios. The modeling results were consistent with both earthquake and background noise records. The use of background noise offers the advantage of better defining the spectral characteristics of the signal when, during the averaging process, a large ensemble is

  13. Spatial Distribution of Iron in Soils and Vegetation Cover Close to an Abandoned Manganese Oxide Ore Mine, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekosse, Georges Ivo E.

    This study aimed at establishing the spatial distribution of iron (Fe) in soils and vegetation cover within the periphery of the Kgwakgwe Manganese (Mn) oxides ore abandoned mine in Botswana. Four hundred soil samples and two hundred vegetation samples were obtained from a 4 km2 area close to the mine. Determination of Fe concentrations after acid digestion of samples was performed using an atomic absorption spectrometer equipped with a deuterium background correction. Tests for soil pH and soil colour were complementary to soil chemical analysis. Results were processed using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) techniques with integrated Land and Water Information System (ILWIS), Geosoft Oasis Montaj, ArcGIS and Microsoft Excel software packages. Concentrations of Fe in soils was from 1116.59 to 870766.00 μg g-1 with a mean of 17593.52 μg g-1 and for leaves, levels were from 101.2 to 3758.09 μg g-1 with a mean of 637.07 μg g-1. Soil pH values ranged from 2.92 to 7.26 and soil colour shades ranged from yellowish red to very dark grey. Gridded soils and vegetation maps show Fe anomalies in different parts of the study area. Values were low in areas located at the mine workings and in the Northwestern part of the study area and high in the north and southern part. Where concentrations of Fe were high in soils, correspondingly high figures were obtained for vegetation cover. Similar trends were obtained for soil pH distribution in the study area. Bedrock geology, topography, Mn mineralization, soil acidity and prevailing oxidizing conditions were governing factors that influenced the concentration and spatial distribution of Fe in the soils and vegetation. The findings further confirm that Fe distribution and its chemistry in the soils and environment around the Kgwakgwe abandoned Mn oxides ore mine have affected the vegetation cover.

  14. Relevance of anisotropy and spatial variability of gas diffusivity for soil-gas transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Kühne, Anke; Lang, Friederike

    2017-04-01

    Models of soil gas transport generally do not consider neither direction dependence of gas diffusivity, nor its small-scale variability. However, in a recent study, we could provide evidence for anisotropy favouring vertical gas diffusion in natural soils. We hypothesize that gas transport models based on gas diffusion data measured with soil rings are strongly influenced by both, anisotropy and spatial variability and the use of averaged diffusivities could be misleading. To test this we used a 2-dimensional model of soil gas transport to under compacted wheel tracks to model the soil-air oxygen distribution in the soil. The model was parametrized with data obtained from soil-ring measurements with its central tendency and variability. The model includes vertical parameter variability as well as variation perpendicular to the elongated wheel track. Different parametrization types have been tested: [i)]Averaged values for wheel track and undisturbed. em [ii)]Random distribution of soil cells with normally distributed variability within the strata. em [iii)]Random distributed soil cells with uniformly distributed variability within the strata. All three types of small-scale variability has been tested for [j)] isotropic gas diffusivity and em [jj)]reduced horizontal gas diffusivity (constant factor), yielding in total six models. As expected the different parametrizations had an important influence to the aeration state under wheel tracks with the strongest oxygen depletion in case of uniformly distributed variability and anisotropy towards higher vertical diffusivity. The simple simulation approach clearly showed the relevance of anisotropy and spatial variability in case of identical central tendency measures of gas diffusivity. However, until now it did not consider spatial dependency of variability, that could even aggravate effects. To consider anisotropy and spatial variability in gas transport models we recommend a) to measure soil-gas transport parameters

  15. Spatial analysis of soil organic carbon in Zhifanggou catchment of the Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingming; Zhang, Xingchang; Zhen, Qing; Han, Fengpeng

    2013-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) reflects soil quality and plays a critical role in soil protection, food safety, and global climate changes. This study involved grid sampling at different depths (6 layers) between 0 and 100 cm in a catchment. A total of 1282 soil samples were collected from 215 plots over 8.27 km(2). A combination of conventional analytical methods and geostatistical methods were used to analyze the data for spatial variability and soil carbon content patterns. The mean SOC content in the 1282 samples from the study field was 3.08 g · kg(-1). The SOC content of each layer decreased with increasing soil depth by a power function relationship. The SOC content of each layer was moderately variable and followed a lognormal distribution. The semi-variograms of the SOC contents of the six different layers were fit with the following models: exponential, spherical, exponential, Gaussian, exponential, and exponential, respectively. A moderate spatial dependence was observed in the 0-10 and 10-20 cm layers, which resulted from stochastic and structural factors. The spatial distribution of SOC content in the four layers between 20 and 100 cm exhibit were mainly restricted by structural factors. Correlations within each layer were observed between 234 and 562 m. A classical Kriging interpolation was used to directly visualize the spatial distribution of SOC in the catchment. The variability in spatial distribution was related to topography, land use type, and human activity. Finally, the vertical distribution of SOC decreased. Our results suggest that the ordinary Kriging interpolation can directly reveal the spatial distribution of SOC and the sample distance about this study is sufficient for interpolation or plotting. More research is needed, however, to clarify the spatial variability on the bigger scale and better understand the factors controlling spatial variability of soil carbon in the Loess Plateau region.

  16. Spatial analysis of soil organic carbon in Zhifanggou catchment of the Loess Plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Li

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon (SOC reflects soil quality and plays a critical role in soil protection, food safety, and global climate changes. This study involved grid sampling at different depths (6 layers between 0 and 100 cm in a catchment. A total of 1282 soil samples were collected from 215 plots over 8.27 km(2. A combination of conventional analytical methods and geostatistical methods were used to analyze the data for spatial variability and soil carbon content patterns. The mean SOC content in the 1282 samples from the study field was 3.08 g · kg(-1. The SOC content of each layer decreased with increasing soil depth by a power function relationship. The SOC content of each layer was moderately variable and followed a lognormal distribution. The semi-variograms of the SOC contents of the six different layers were fit with the following models: exponential, spherical, exponential, Gaussian, exponential, and exponential, respectively. A moderate spatial dependence was observed in the 0-10 and 10-20 cm layers, which resulted from stochastic and structural factors. The spatial distribution of SOC content in the four layers between 20 and 100 cm exhibit were mainly restricted by structural factors. Correlations within each layer were observed between 234 and 562 m. A classical Kriging interpolation was used to directly visualize the spatial distribution of SOC in the catchment. The variability in spatial distribution was related to topography, land use type, and human activity. Finally, the vertical distribution of SOC decreased. Our results suggest that the ordinary Kriging interpolation can directly reveal the spatial distribution of SOC and the sample distance about this study is sufficient for interpolation or plotting. More research is needed, however, to clarify the spatial variability on the bigger scale and better understand the factors controlling spatial variability of soil carbon in the Loess Plateau region.

  17. The relative importance of hydrophobicity in determining runoff-infiltration processes in burned forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Lea; Malkinson, Dan; Voogt, Annelies; Leska, Danny; Argaman, Eli; Keesstra, Saskia

    2010-05-01

    Wildfires induce fundamental changes to vegetation and soil structure/texture which conseqeuntly have major impacts on infiltration capacity, overland flow generation, runoff and sediment yields. The relative importance, however, of fire-induced soil water repellency (WR) on hydrological and erosional processes is somewhat controversial, partially, as the direct effects of soil WR in-situ field conditions have been difficult to isolate. It is generally accepted that hydrophobicity is caused by the formation of organic substances in forest soils, while burning is considered to enhance this process. Given the complex response of the soil-vegetation system to burning, soil WR is only one of several affecting soil hydrology. Other factors include the physical sealing of soils triggered by rain drops energy, the increase in soil erodibility due to changes in soil aggregates, and the role of the ash in sealing the burned surface. The degree and spatial distribution of WR burned varies considerably with fire severity, soil and vegetation type, soil moisture content and time since burning. Nevertheless, given the inverse relationship between soil moisture and hydrophobicity, the role of the latter in determining overland flow during wet winters when the soil is mostly inundated, is marginal. Following a 60 ha wildfire, which took place at the Pe'eram catchment during July 2009, we assessed the spatio-temporal distribution of WR in a burned Pinus halepensis forest. The site, located in the Upper Galille, Israel, was severely burned; the combustion removed all understory vegetation and burned down some of the trunks, leaving a thick layer of ash. The soils composed of reddish-brown clay loam forest soil and terra rossa on limestone bedrock, greyish light rendzina characterises the marl and chalk exposures. To consider the effect of distance from trees, in-situ hydrophobicity was assessed within a week, month and five months after the fire, using the WDPT test. Measurements

  18. Spatial patterns of soil moisture from two regional monitoring networks in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Qin; Franz, Trenton E.; Li, Ruopu; Lang, Yunchao; Fiebrich, Christopher A.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding soil moisture spatial variability (SMSV) at regional scales is of great value for various purposes; however, relevant studies are still limited and have yielded inconsistent findings about the primary controls on regional SMSV. To further address this issue, long-term soil moisture data were retrieved from two large scale monitoring networks located in the continental United States, including the Michigan Automated Weather Network and the Oklahoma Mesonet. To evaluate different controls on SMSV, supporting datasets, which contained data on climate, soil, topography, and vegetation, were also compiled from various sources. Based on temporal stability analysis, the results showed that the mean relative difference (MRD) of soil moisture was more correlated with soil texture (e.g., negative correlations between MRD and sand fraction, and positive ones between MRD and silt and clay fractions) than with meteorological forcings in both regions, which differed from the traditional notion that meteorological forcings were the dominant controls on regional SMSV. Moreover, the results revealed that contrary to the previous conjecture, the use of soil moisture temporal anomaly did not reduce the impacts of static properties (e.g., soil properties) on soil moisture temporal dynamics. Instead, it was found that the magnitude of soil moisture temporal anomaly was mainly negatively correlated with sand fraction and positively with silt and clay fractions in both regions. Finally, the relationship between the spatial average and standard deviation of soil moisture as well as soil moisture temporal anomaly was investigated using the data from both networks. The field data showed that the relationship for both soil moisture and soil moisture temporal anomaly was more affected by soil texture than by climatic conditions (e.g., precipitation). The results of this study provided strong field evidence that local factors (e.g., soil properties) might outweigh regional

  19. A comparison of interpolation methods for predicting spatial variability of soil organic matter content in Eastern Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đurđević, Boris; Jug, Irena; Jug, Danijel; Vukadinović, Vesna; Bogunović, Igor; Brozović, Bojana; Stipešević, Bojan

    2017-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) plays crucial role in soil health and productivity and represents one of the key functions for determining soil degradation and soil suitability for crop production. Nowadays, continuing decline of organic matter in soils in agroecosystems, due to inappropriate agricultural practice (burning and removal of crop residue, overgrazing, inappropriate tillage, etc.) and environmental conditions (climate change, extreme weather conditions, erosion) leads to devastating soil degradation processes and decreases soil productivity. The main objectives of this research is to compare three different interpolation methods (Inverse Distance Weighting IDW, Ordinary kriging OK and Empirical Bayesian Kriging EBK) and provide best spatial predictor in order to ensure detailed analysis of the agricultural land in Osijek-Baranja County, Croatia. A number of 9,099 soil samples have been compiled from layer 0-30 cm and analyzed in laboratory. The average value of SOM in the study area was 2.66%, while 70.7 % of samples had SOM value below 3% in Osijek-Baranja County. Among the applied methods, the lowest root mean square error was recorded under Empirical Bayesian Kriging method which had most accurately assessed soil organic matter. The main advantage of EBK is that the process of creating a valid kriging model is automated so the manual parameter adjusting is eliminated, and this resulted with reduced uncertainty of EBK model. Conducted interpolation and visualization of data showed that 85.7% of agricultural land in Osijek-Baranja County has SOM content lower than 3%, which may indicate some sort of soil degradation process. By using interpolation methods combined with visualization of data, we can detect problematic areas much easier and with additional analysis, suggest measures to repair degraded soils. This kind of approach to problem solving in agriculture can be applied on various agroecological conditions and can significantly facilitate and

  20. LIME REQUIREMENT DETERMINATION AND LIMING IMPACT ON SOIL NUTRIENT STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunoslav Karalić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of conducted research was to determine the influence of liming, mineral and organic fertilization on soil chemical properties and nutrient availability in the soil, yield height and mineral composition of alfalfa. Results were used to create regression models for prediction of liming impact on soil chemical properties. Liming and fertilization experiment was sat up in 20 L volume plastic pots with two types of acid soils with different texture from two sites. Ten liming and fertilization treatments were applied in four repetitions. Lime treatments increased soil pH values and decreased hydrolytic acidity. Mineral and organic fertilization affected additional soil acidification. Application of lime intensified mineralization and humus decomposition, while organic fertilization raised humus content. The results showed significant increase of AL-P2O5 and K2O availability. The treatments increased soil Ca concentrations, but at the same time decreased exchangeable Mg concentrations. Soil pH increase resulted in lower Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu availability. Soil CEC was increased by applied treatments. Lime rates increased number and height of alfalfa plants, as well as yield of leaf, stalk increased concentrations of N, P, K and Ca in alfalfa leaf and stalk, but decreased leaf Mg and Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu concentrations. Regression computer models predicted with adequate accuracy P, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu availability and final pH value as a result of liming and fertilization impact.

  1. Anthropogenic transformation of city parks soils: spatial and time peculiarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poputnikov, Vadim; Prokofieva, Tatiana

    2010-05-01

    Despite of quasi-natural status of urban parks, these territories often have a complicated history of local landuse. Urban park territories can accumulate maximum volume of information about the ways and peculiarities of soil anthropogenic transformation due to the absence of large-scale ground works and sealing of territories. As an objects of research 2 Moscow historical forest parks - "Pokrovskoe-Streshnevo" and "Tushinskiy" were chosen. From the one hand, these parks are characterizing by sufficiently square, which are representative by abundance of areas with different land use type. On the other hand, these areas have distinction both in soil forming factors and anthropogenic activities history. For the description of anthropogenic soil cover transformation the set of landuse types schemes were created. By these schemes were characterized a more than 250 years period. A range of soil pits were described on the different land use types territories. Different physical-chemical (pH, cation exchange capacity, amount of total organic carbon and nutrient element (P2O5 & K2O), amount of carbonates, and total amount of Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, Mn & Ni), physical (particle size composition, bulk density and penetration resistance) properties were measured. The micromorphological (in thin sections) properties were described. Using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the main morphological and chemical properties of black carbon particles were disclosed in every surface horizons type. Using above-mentioned methods, we described following types of anthropogenic-transformed horizons - "postagricultural" horizons of abandoned tillage field soils, "urbic" horizons of settlements area soils, "technogenic" horizons of soils of constructed or reclaimed territories and different intergrade horizons. The presence of different type horizons with various properties marks existence of fixed land use for different periods. The whole way of anthropogenic

  2. Soil Moisture Controls for Spatial Variability for a Humid Forest Hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Gwak, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important variable in explaining hydrological processes at hillslope scale. The distribution of soil moisture along a hillslope is related to the spatial distribution of the soil properties, the topography, the soil depth, and the vegetation. In order to investigate the factors affecting soil moisture, various environmental data were collected from a humid forest hillslope in this study. Several factors (the wetness index; the contributing area; the local slope; the soil depth; the composition of sand, silt, and clay; the scaling parameter; the hydraulic conductivity; the tree diameter at breast height; and the total weighted basal area) were evaluated for their effect on soil moisture and its distribution over the hillslope at depths of 10, 30, and 60 cm. The relationships of the various factors with the spatial variability of soil moisture indicated the existence of a threshold soil moisture which is related to the composition of the soil and the factors related to the distribution of water in the study area.

  3. Geostatistical modeling of the spatial variability and risk areas of southern root-knot nematodes in relation to soil properties

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, B.V.; Perry, C; Goovaerts, P.; Vellidis, G.; Sullivan, D.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying the spatial variability and risk areas for southern root-knot nematode [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood] (RKN) is key for site-specific management (SSM) of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fields. The objectives of this study were to: (i) determine the soil properties that influence RKN occurrence at different scales; and (ii) delineate risk areas of RKN by indicator kriging. The study site was a cotton field located in the southeastern coastal plain region of the US...

  4. Layer specific geostatistical coregionalisation of soil organic carbon utilising terrain attributes and spatial patterns of soil redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugoß, V.; Fiener, P.; Schneider, K.

    2009-04-01

    sampling density without substantial precision loss, especially when using more complex process-oriented covariables such as spatial patterns of soil redistribution. Especially, patterns of tillage erosion show a significant influence upon the spatial distribution of SOC and hence show some potential to improve SOC maps of agriculturally used land also on larger scales. However, it has to be recognised that the optimal covariables vary between different soil layers indicating different processes responsible for the soil layer specific SOC distribution. Hence, no general covariable is successfully applicable for bulk samples.

  5. Predictive spatial modelling for mapping soil salinity at continental scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Elisabeth; Wilford, John; de Caritat, Patrice

    2017-04-01

    Soil salinity is a serious limitation to agriculture and one of the main causes of land degradation. Soil is considered saline if its electrical conductivity (EC) is > 4 dS/m. Maps of saline soil distribution are essential for appropriate land development. Previous attempts to map soil salinity over extensive areas have relied on satellite imagery, aerial electromagnetic (EM) and/or proximally sensed EM data; other environmental (climate, topographic, geologic or soil) datasets are generally not used. Having successfully modelled and mapped calcium carbonate distribution over the 0-80 cm depth in Australian soils using machine learning with point samples from the National Geochemical Survey of Australia (NGSA), we took a similar approach to map soil salinity at 90-m resolution over the continent. The input data were the EC1:5 measurements on the learning software 'Cubist' (www.rulequest.com) was used as the inference engine for the modelling, a 90:10 training:test set data split was used to validate results, and 100 randomly sampled trees were built using the training data. The results were good with an average internal correlation (r) of 0.88 between predicted and measured logEC1:5 (training data), an average external correlation of 0.48 (test subset), and a Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (which evaluates the 1:1 fit) of 0.61. Therefore, the rules derived were mapped and the mean prediction for each 90-m pixel was used for the final logEC1:5 map. This is the most detailed picture of soil salinity over Australia since the 2001 National Land and Water Resources Audit and is generally consistent with it. Our map will be useful as a baseline salinity map circa 2008, when the NGSA samples were collected, for future State of the Environment reports.

  6. Upscaling spatially heterogeneous parameterisations of soil compaction to investigate catchment scale flood risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Victoria; Pattison, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Upscaling land management signals observed at the point scale to the regional scale is challenging for three reasons. Individual catchments are unique and at the point scale land management signals are spatially and temporally variable, depending on topography, soil characteristics and on the individual characteristics of a rainfall event. However at larger scales land management effects diffuse and climatic or human induced signals have a larger impact. This does not mean that there is no influence on river flows, just that the effect is not discernible. Land management practices in different areas of the catchment vary spatially and temporally and their influence on the flood hydrograph will be different at different points within the catchment. Once the water enters the river, the land management effects are disturbed further by hydrodynamic and geomorphological dispersion. Pastoral agriculture is the dominant rural land cover in the UK (40% is classified as improved/ semi-natural grassland - Land Cover Map 2007). The intensification of agriculture has resulted in greater levels of soil compaction associated with higher stocking densities in fields. Natural flood management is the alteration, restoration or use of landscape features to reduce flood risk. Soil compaction has been shown to change the partitioning of rainfall into runoff. However the link between locally observed hydrological changes and catchment scale flood risk has not yet been proven. This paper presents the results of a hydrological modelling study on the impact of soil compaction on downstream flood risk. Field experiments have been conducted in multiple fields in the River Skell catchment, in Yorkshire, UK (area of 120km2) to determine soil characteristics and compaction levels under different types of land-use. We use this data to parameterise and validate the Distributed Physically-based Connectivity of Runoff model. A number of compaction scenarios have been tested that represent

  7. Ensemble learning for spatial interpolation of soil potassium content based on environmental information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available One important method to obtain the continuous surfaces of soil properties from point samples is spatial interpolation. In this paper, we propose a method that combines ensemble learning with ancillary environmental information for improved interpolation of soil properties (hereafter, EL-SP. First, we calculated the trend value for soil potassium contents at the Qinghai Lake region in China based on measured values. Then, based on soil types, geology types, land use types, and slope data, the remaining residual was simulated with the ensemble learning model. Next, the EL-SP method was applied to interpolate soil potassium contents at the study site. To evaluate the utility of the EL-SP method, we compared its performance with other interpolation methods including universal kriging, inverse distance weighting, ordinary kriging, and ordinary kriging combined geographic information. Results show that EL-SP had a lower mean absolute error and root mean square error than the data produced by the other models tested in this paper. Notably, the EL-SP maps can describe more locally detailed information and more accurate spatial patterns for soil potassium content than the other methods because of the combined use of different types of environmental information; these maps are capable of showing abrupt boundary information for soil potassium content. Furthermore, the EL-SP method not only reduces prediction errors, but it also compliments other environmental information, which makes the spatial interpolation of soil potassium content more reasonable and useful.

  8. [Spatial pattern of soil fertility in Bashan tea garden: a prediction based on environmental auxiliary variables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Le-feng; Yang, Chao; Lin, Fen-fang; Yang, Ning; Zheng, Xin-yu; Xu, Hong-wei; Wang, Ke

    2010-12-01

    Taking topographic factors and NDVI as auxiliary variables, and by using regression-kriging method, the spatial variation pattern of soil fertility in Bashan tea garden in the hilly area of Fuyang City was explored. The spatial variability of the soil fertility was mainly attributed to the structural factors such as relative elevation and flat/vertical curvature. The lower the relative elevation, the worse the soil fertility was. The overall soil fertility level was relatively high, and the area with lower soil fertility only accounted for 5% of the total. By using regression-kriging method with relative elevation as auxiliary variable, the prediction accuracy of soil fertility was obviously higher than that by using ordinary kriging method, with the mean error and root mean square error being 0. 028 and 0. 108, respectively. It was suggested that the prediction method used in this paper could fully reflect the effects of environmental variables on soil fertility , improve the prediction accuracy about the spatial pattern of soil fertility, and provide scientific basis for the precise management of tea garden.

  9. Ensemble learning for spatial interpolation of soil potassium content based on environmental information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Du, Peijun; Wang, Dongchen

    2015-01-01

    One important method to obtain the continuous surfaces of soil properties from point samples is spatial interpolation. In this paper, we propose a method that combines ensemble learning with ancillary environmental information for improved interpolation of soil properties (hereafter, EL-SP). First, we calculated the trend value for soil potassium contents at the Qinghai Lake region in China based on measured values. Then, based on soil types, geology types, land use types, and slope data, the remaining residual was simulated with the ensemble learning model. Next, the EL-SP method was applied to interpolate soil potassium contents at the study site. To evaluate the utility of the EL-SP method, we compared its performance with other interpolation methods including universal kriging, inverse distance weighting, ordinary kriging, and ordinary kriging combined geographic information. Results show that EL-SP had a lower mean absolute error and root mean square error than the data produced by the other models tested in this paper. Notably, the EL-SP maps can describe more locally detailed information and more accurate spatial patterns for soil potassium content than the other methods because of the combined use of different types of environmental information; these maps are capable of showing abrupt boundary information for soil potassium content. Furthermore, the EL-SP method not only reduces prediction errors, but it also compliments other environmental information, which makes the spatial interpolation of soil potassium content more reasonable and useful.

  10. China’s Energy Intensity, Determinants and Spatial Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the shadow of the energy crisis and environmental degradation, energy intensity is a hot topic in academic circles in China. The energy intensity distribution map of China indicates the fairly large geographic disparities globally and clustering locally in some areas, ascending from the southeast regions to the northwest provinces. Although energy intensity and its determinants vary from place to place, few studies have been made from the spatial perspective. Determinates of energy intensity and spatial spillover effects should be taken into consideration. Controlling for seven exogenous variables (per capita GDP; the share of the secondary sector; foreign direct investment; international trade, energy price, the share of coal, and transport sector and their spatial lags, we apply a spatial Durbin model to test for spatial spillover effects among energy intensity and exogenous variables from a panel of 29 Chinese provinces over 1998 to 2014. We find that per capita GDP has an insignificant and negative direct and indirect effect, but has a significant and negative total effect on energy intensity. The share of the secondary sector and the share of coal are found to have significant and positive direct and indirect effects on energy intensity. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI and Trade have significant and negative direct and indirect effects on energy intensity. The direct effect of energy price is found to be significantly positive while the indirect effect is negative. Only the direct effect of the Transport variable is significant and positive. The results of this study offer some theoretical evidence for differential localized policy making related to reduction in energy intensity.

  11. Vegetation-induced spatial variability of soil redox properties in wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalai, Zoltán; Jakab, Gergely; Kiss, Klaudia; Ringer, Marianna; Balázs, Réka; Zacháry, Dóra; Horváth Szabó, Kata; Perényi, Katalin

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation induced land patches may result spatial pattern of on soil Eh and pH. These spatial pattern are mainly emerged by differences of aeration and exudation of assimilates. Present paper focuses on vertical extent and temporal dynamics of these patterns in wetlands. Two study sites were selected: 1. a plain wetland on calcareous sandy parent material (Ceglédbercel, Danube-Tisza Interfluve, Hungary); 2. headwater wetland with calcareous loamy parent material (Bátaapáti, Hungary). Two vegetation patches were studied in site 1: sedgy (dominated by Carex riparia) and reedy (dominated by Phragmites australis). Three patches were studied in site2: sedgy1 (dominated by C vulpina), sedgy 2 (C. riparia); nettle-horsetail (Urtica dioica and Equisetum arvense). Boundaries between patches were studied separately. Soil redox, pH and temperature studied by automated remote controlled instruments. Three digital sensors (Ponsell) were installed in each locations: 20cm and 40cm sensors represent the solum and 100 cm sensor monitors the subsoil). Groundwater wells were installed near to triplets for soil water sampling. Soil Eh, pH and temperature values were recorded in each 10 minutes. Soil water sampling for iron and DOC were carried out during saturated periods. Spatial pattern of soil Eh is clearly caused by vegetation. We measured significant differences between Eh values of the studied patches in the solum. We did not find this kinds horizontal differences in the subsoil. Boundaries of the patches usually had more reductive soil environment than the core areas. We have found temporal dynamics of the spatial redox pattern. Differences were not so well expressed during wintertime. These spatial patterns had influence on the DOC and iron content of porewater, as well. Highest temporal dynamics of soil redox properties and porewater iron could be found in the boundaries. These observations refer to importance patchiness of vegetation on soil chemical properties in

  12. Guidance for Determining the Acceptability of Environmental Fate Studies Conducted with Foreign Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    International and U.S. soil taxonomical classification systems, distribution of soil orders in the United States, specific criteria to help scientists determine when foreign soils are representative of U.S. soils at intended pesticide use sites.

  13. Heavy metals in soils from a typical industrial area in Sichuan, China: spatial distribution, source identification, and ecological risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiyin; Zhang, Shirong; Xiao, Luoyi; Zhong, Qinmei; Li, Linxian; Xu, Guangrong; Deng, Ouping; Pu, Yulin

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic activities could result in increasing concentrations of heavy metals in soil and deteriorating in soil environmental quality. Topsoil samples from a typical industrial area, Shiting River Valley, Sichuan, Southwest China, were collected and determined for the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cr, Cd, As, and Hg. The mean concentrations of these metals were lower than the national threshold values, but were slightly higher than their corresponding background values, indicating enrichment of these metals in soils in the valley, especially for Cu, Zn, and Hg. The topsoils in this area demonstrated moderate pollution and low potential ecological risk. Principal component analysis coupled with cluster analysis was applied to analyze the data and identified possible sources of these heavy metals; the results showed that soil Cd, Hg, As, Cu, and Zn were predominantly controlled by human activities, whereas Cr was mainly from the parent material. The spatial distribution of the heavy metals varied distinctly and was closely correlated to local anthropogenic activities. Furthermore, the concentrations of heavy metals in the industrial land demonstrated relatively higher levels than those of other land use patterns. Soil metal concentrations decreased with the distance increase from the traffic highway (0-1.0 km) and water system (0-2.0 km). Additionally, soil properties, especially pH and soil organic matter, were found to be important factors in the distribution and composition of metals.

  14. Field Scale Spatial Modelling of Surface Soil Quality Attributes in Controlled Traffic Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenette, Kris; Hernandez-Ramirez, Guillermo

    2017-04-01

    The employment of controlled traffic farming (CTF) can yield improvements to soil quality attributes through the confinement of equipment traffic to tramlines with the field. There is a need to quantify and explain the spatial heterogeneity of soil quality attributes affected by CTF to further improve our understanding and modelling ability of field scale soil dynamics. Soil properties such as available nitrogen (AN), pH, soil total nitrogen (STN), soil organic carbon (SOC), bulk density, macroporosity, soil quality S-Index, plant available water capacity (PAWC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (Km) were analysed and compared among trafficked and un-trafficked areas. We contrasted standard geostatistical methods such as ordinary kriging (OK) and covariate kriging (COK) as well as the hybrid method of regression kriging (ROK) to predict the spatial distribution of soil properties across two annual cropland sites actively employing CTF in Alberta, Canada. Field scale variability was quantified more accurately through the inclusion of covariates; however, the use of ROK was shown to improve model accuracy despite the regression model composition limiting the robustness of the ROK method. The exclusion of traffic from the un-trafficked areas displayed significant improvements to bulk density, macroporosity and Km while subsequently enhancing AN, STN and SOC. The ability of the regression models and the ROK method to account for spatial trends led to the highest goodness-of-fit and lowest error achieved for the soil physical properties, as the rigid traffic regime of CTF altered their spatial distribution at the field scale. Conversely, the COK method produced the most optimal predictions for the soil nutrient properties and Km. The use of terrain covariates derived from light ranging and detection (LiDAR), such as of elevation and topographic position index (TPI), yielded the best models in the COK method at the field scale.

  15. Geostatistical modeling of the spatial variability and risk areas of southern root-knot nematodes in relation to soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, B V; Perry, C; Goovaerts, P; Vellidis, G; Sullivan, D

    2010-05-01

    Identifying the spatial variability and risk areas for southern root-knot nematode [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood] (RKN) is key for site-specific management (SSM) of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fields. The objectives of this study were to: (i) determine the soil properties that influence RKN occurrence at different scales; and (ii) delineate risk areas of RKN by indicator kriging. The study site was a cotton field located in the southeastern coastal plain region of the USA. Nested semivariograms indicated that RKN samples, collected from a 50×50 m grid, exhibited a local and regional scale of variation describing small and large clusters of RKN population density. Factorial kriging decomposed RKN and soil properties variability into different spatial components. Scale dependent correlations between RKN data showed that the areas with high RKN population remained stable though the growing season. RKN data were strongly correlated with slope (SL) at local scale and with apparent soil electrical conductivity deep (EC(a-d)) at both local and regional scales, which illustrate the potential of these soil physical properties as surrogate data for RKN population. The correlation between RKN data and soil chemical properties was soil texture mediated. Indicator kriging (IK) maps developed using either RKN, the relation between RKN and soil electrical conductivity or a combination of both, depicted the probability for RKN population to exceed the threshold of 100 second stage juveniles/100 cm(3) of soil. Incorporating EC(a-d) as soft data improved predictions favoring the reduction of the number of RKN observations required to map areas at risk for high RKN population.

  16. Chromated copper arsenate-treated fence posts in the agronomic landscape: soil properties controlling arsenic speciation and spatial distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwer Iii, Donald R; McNear, David H

    2011-01-01

    Soils adjacent to chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated fence posts along a fence line transecting different soil series, parent material, drainage classes, and slope were used to determine which soil properties had the most influence on As spatial distribution and speciation. Metal distribution was evaluated at macroscopic (total metal concentration contour maps) and microscopic scales (micro-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence maps), As speciation was determined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and redox status and a myriad of other basic soil properties were elucidated. All geochemical parameters measured point to a condition in which the mobilization of As becomes more favorable moving down the topographic gradient, likely resulting through competition (Meh-P, SOM), neutral or slightly basic pH, and redox conditions that are favorable for As mobilization (higher Fe(II) and total-Fe concentrations in water extracts). On the landscape scale, with hundreds of kilometers of fence, the arsenic loading into the soil can be substantial (∼8-12 kg km). Although a significant amount of the As is stable, extended use of CCA-treated wood has resulted in elevated As concentrations in the local environment, increasing the risk of exposure and ecosystem perturbation. Therefore, a move toward arsenic-free alternatives in agricultural applications for which it is currently permitted should be considered. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Determining Critical Soil pH for Sunflower Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurba Sutradhar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil acidity has become a major yield-limiting factor in cropping systems of the Southern Great Plains, in which winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. is the predominant crop. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. is a strong rotational crop with winter wheat due to its draught and heat tolerance. However, the effects of low soil pH on sunflower productivity have not been explored. The objective of this study was to determine the critical soil pH and aluminum concentration (AlKCl for sunflower. Sunflower was grown in a randomized complete block design with three replications of a pH gradient ranging from 4.0 to 7.0 at three locations with varying soil types. Soil pH was altered using aluminum sulfate (Al2(SO43 and hydrated lime (Ca(OH2. Plant height, vigor, and survivability were all negatively affected by soil acidity. Sunflower yield was reduced by 10% at or below soil pH 4.7 to 5.3 dependent upon location and soil type. Levels of AlKCl above 6.35 mg kg−1 reduced seed yield by 10% or greater. We concluded that sunflower may serve as a better rotational crop with winter wheat under acidic conditions when compared to other adaptable crops.

  18. Spatial distribution of heavy metals density in cultivated soils of Central and East Parts of Black Sea Region in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Arif Ozyazici

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal contamination has caused serious environmental and health-related problems around the world. To identify the concentrations and sources of heavy metals, 3400 surface soil samples (0-20 cm depth were collected from the study area. Subsequently, the concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in the samples were measured. In order to evaluate natural or anthropogenic sources of heavy metal content and their spatial distribution in agricultural fields of Central and East Parts of Black Sea Region soil geostatistic approach were combined with geographic information system (GIS. GIS technology was employed to produce spatial distribution maps of the 6 elements in the study area. The results showed that the concentration of Ni and Co exceeded its threshold level. The local pollution from Ni was attributed to the natural influences. The concentrations of the other heavy metals are relatively lower than the critical values. The mean values of the heavy metal contents arranged in the following decreasing order: Ni > Zn > Cu >Pb> Co > Cd in the study area. On the other hand, according to distribution ratio of heavy metals in total soil samples, except for Co and Ni distribution in total soil samples, all other heavy metal element exceeded concentration in samples were determined about less than 10% total soil samples. However, in some regions of the study area, the Cd, Cu and Zn contents were also slightly raised, this case possibly stem from excessive P fertilization and field traffic.

  19. Spatial patterns and controls of soil chemical weathering rates along a transient hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, K.; Mudd, S.M.; Sanderman, J.; Amundson, Ronald; Blum, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hillslopes have been intensively studied by both geomorphologists and soil scientists. Whereas geomorphologists have focused on the physical soil production and transport on hillslopes, soil scientists have been concerned with the topographic variation of soil geochemical properties. We combined these differing approaches and quantified soil chemical weathering rates along a grass covered hillslope in Coastal California. The hillslope is comprised of both erosional and depositional sections. In the upper eroding section, soil production is balanced by physical erosion and chemical weathering. The hillslope then transitions to a depositional slope where soil accumulates due to a historical reduction of channel incision at the hillslope's base. Measurements of hillslope morphology and soil thickness were combined with the elemental composition of the soil and saprolite, and interpreted through a process-based model that accounts for both chemical weathering and sediment transport. Chemical weathering of the minerals as they moved downslope via sediment transport imparted spatial variation in the geochemical properties of the soil. Inverse modeling of the field and laboratory data revealed that the long-term soil chemical weathering rates peak at 5 g m- 2 yr- 1 at the downslope end of the eroding section and decrease to 1.5 g m- 2 yr- 1 within the depositional section. In the eroding section, soil chemical weathering rates appear to be primarily controlled by the rate of mineral supply via colluvial input from upslope. In the depositional slope, geochemical equilibrium between soil water and minerals appeared to limit the chemical weathering rate. Soil chemical weathering was responsible for removing 6% of the soil production in the eroding section and 5% of colluvial influx in the depositional slope. These were among the lowest weathering rates reported for actively eroding watersheds, which was attributed to the parent material with low amount of weatherable

  20. Determination and optimization of spatial samples for distributed measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Xiaoming (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Tran, Hy D.; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Kim, Heeyong (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2010-10-01

    There are no accepted standards for determining how many measurements to take during part inspection or where to take them, or for assessing confidence in the evaluation of acceptance based on these measurements. The goal of this work was to develop a standard method for determining the number of measurements, together with the spatial distribution of measurements and the associated risks for false acceptance and false rejection. Two paths have been taken to create a standard method for selecting sampling points. A wavelet-based model has been developed to select measurement points and to determine confidence in the measurement after the points are taken. An adaptive sampling strategy has been studied to determine implementation feasibility on commercial measurement equipment. Results using both real and simulated data are presented for each of the paths.

  1. High-resolution mapping and spatial variability of soil organic carbon storage of permafrost-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, Matthias; Hugelius, Gustaf

    2017-04-01

    Permafrost-affected soils store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC). Mapping of this SOC provides a first order spatial input variable for research that relates carbon stored in permafrost regions to carbon cycle dynamics. High-resolution satellite imagery is becoming increasingly available even in circum-polar regions. The presented research highlights findings of high-resolution mapping efforts of SOC from five study areas in the northern circum-polar permafrost region. These study areas are located in Siberia (Kytalyk, Spasskaya Pad /Neleger, Lena delta), Northern Sweden (Abisko) and Northwestern Canada (Herschel Island). Our high spatial resolution analyses show how geomorphology has a strong influence on the distribution of SOC. This is organized at different spatial scales. Periglacial landforms and processes dictate local scale SOC distribution due to patterned ground. Such landforms are non-sorted circles and ice-wedge polygons of different age and scale. Palsas and peat plateaus are formed and can cover larger areas in Sub-Arctic environments. Study areas that have not been affected by Pleistocene glaciation feature ice-rich Yedoma sediments that dominate the local relief through thermokarst formation and create landscape scale macro environments that dictate the distribution of SOC. A general trend indicates higher SOC storage in Arctic tundra soils compared to forested Boreal or Sub-Arctic taiga soils. Yet, due to the shallower active layer depth in the Arctic, much of the SOC may be permanently frozen and thus not be available to ecosystem processes. Significantly more SOC is stored in soils compared to vegetation, indicating that vegetation growth and incorporation of the carbon into the plant phytomass alone will not be able to offset SOC released from permafrost. This contribution also addresses advances in thematic mapping methods and digital soil mapping of SOC in permafrost terrain. In particular machine-learning methods, such as support

  2. Impact of Spatial Soil and Climate Input Data Aggregation on Regional Yield Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Holger; Zhao, Gang; Asseng, Senthold; Bindi, Marco; Biernath, Christian; Constantin, Julie; Coucheney, Elsa; Dechow, Rene; Doro, Luca; Eckersten, Henrik; Gaiser, Thomas; Grosz, Balázs; Heinlein, Florian; Kassie, Belay T; Kersebaum, Kurt-Christian; Klein, Christian; Kuhnert, Matthias; Lewan, Elisabet; Moriondo, Marco; Nendel, Claas; Priesack, Eckart; Raynal, Helene; Roggero, Pier P; Rötter, Reimund P; Siebert, Stefan; Specka, Xenia; Tao, Fulu; Teixeira, Edmar; Trombi, Giacomo; Wallach, Daniel; Weihermüller, Lutz; Yeluripati, Jagadeesh; Ewert, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We show the error in water-limited yields simulated by crop models which is associated with spatially aggregated soil and climate input data. Crop simulations at large scales (regional, national, continental) frequently use input data of low resolution. Therefore, climate and soil data are often generated via averaging and sampling by area majority. This may bias simulated yields at large scales, varying largely across models. Thus, we evaluated the error associated with spatially aggregated soil and climate data for 14 crop models. Yields of winter wheat and silage maize were simulated under water-limited production conditions. We calculated this error from crop yields simulated at spatial resolutions from 1 to 100 km for the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Most models showed yields biased by <15% when aggregating only soil data. The relative mean absolute error (rMAE) of most models using aggregated soil data was in the range or larger than the inter-annual or inter-model variability in yields. This error increased further when both climate and soil data were aggregated. Distinct error patterns indicate that the rMAE may be estimated from few soil variables. Illustrating the range of these aggregation effects across models, this study is a first step towards an ex-ante assessment of aggregation errors in large-scale simulations.

  3. Impact of Spatial Soil and Climate Input Data Aggregation on Regional Yield Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Hoffmann

    Full Text Available We show the error in water-limited yields simulated by crop models which is associated with spatially aggregated soil and climate input data. Crop simulations at large scales (regional, national, continental frequently use input data of low resolution. Therefore, climate and soil data are often generated via averaging and sampling by area majority. This may bias simulated yields at large scales, varying largely across models. Thus, we evaluated the error associated with spatially aggregated soil and climate data for 14 crop models. Yields of winter wheat and silage maize were simulated under water-limited production conditions. We calculated this error from crop yields simulated at spatial resolutions from 1 to 100 km for the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Most models showed yields biased by <15% when aggregating only soil data. The relative mean absolute error (rMAE of most models using aggregated soil data was in the range or larger than the inter-annual or inter-model variability in yields. This error increased further when both climate and soil data were aggregated. Distinct error patterns indicate that the rMAE may be estimated from few soil variables. Illustrating the range of these aggregation effects across models, this study is a first step towards an ex-ante assessment of aggregation errors in large-scale simulations.

  4. Spatial analysis of soil and shallow groundwater physicochemical parameters in El-Mujib Basin-central Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Abeer; Al-Qinna, Mohammed; Kuisi, Mustafa Al

    2014-01-01

    In this study statistical and geostatistical methods were applied to a monitoring data set in order to assess contamination risk in soil and shallow groundwater. The study covered an area within El-Mujib Basin in central Jordan, where the barren land is dominating with a small number of irrigated areas in the vicinity of Wadi El-Mujib and in the northern part of the basin. A total of 77 soil and 104 water samples were collected randomly and analyzed physically, chemically, statistically and spatially using ordinary and indicator kriging techniques. Phosphate, nitrate, organic matter and effective field capacity in the soil system were spatially investigated and correlated to current landuse. Maximum soil maximum nitrate (125.6 mg/L), phosphate (9.7 mg/L), and organic matter (3%) contents are encountered in the central area at Wadi El-Mujib, Qattrana and Umm Rasas due to the use of fertilizers and existence of solid landfill. The soil has low water holding capacity as it is dominated by coarse texture and therefore subjecting the groundwater for potential risks through the fast soil system. The major cations and anions in the groundwater were mainly concentrated in the Wadi El-Mujib and in the central part of the Basin increases along the groundwater flow direction. Spatial groundwater indicator maps of salinity; nitrate and sulfate contents proves the high susceptibility of the study area to be contaminated. By determining the impacts, more effective (specific to contamination sources) measures for preventing groundwater quality could be implemented.

  5. The role of spatial heterogeneity of the environment in soil fauna recovery after fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongalsky, K. B.; Zaitsev, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Forest fires are almost always heterogeneous, leaving less-disturbed sites that are potentially suitable as habitats for soil-dwelling creatures. The recovery of large soil animal communities after fires is therefore dependent on the spatial structure of the burned habitats. The role of locally less disturbed sites in the survival of soil macrofauna communities along with traditionally considered immigration from the surrounding undisturbed habitats is shown by the example of burnt areas located in three geographically distant regions of European Russia. Such unburned soil cover sites (perfugia) occupy 5-10% of the total burned habitats. Initially, perfugia are characterized by much higher (200-300% of the average across a burned area) diversity and abundance of soil fauna. A geostatistical method made it possible to estimate the perfugia size for soil macrofauna at 3-8 m.

  6. Spatial and temporal monitoring of soil moisture using surface electrical resistivity tomography in Mediterranean soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alamry, Abdulmohsen S.; van der Meijder, Mark; Noomen, Marleen; Addink, Elisabeth A.; van Benthem, Rik; de Jong, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    ERT techniques are especially promising in (semi-arid) areas with shallow and rocky soils where other methods fail to produce soil moisture maps and to obtain soil profile information. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) was performed in the Peyne catchment in southern France at four sites

  7. Spatial distribution of soil erosion and suspended sediment ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    International Master's Program of Soil and Water Engg., National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung, Taiwan. Department of Information Communication, University of Kang Ning, No. 188, Sec. 5, Anzhong Road, Tainan 70970, Taiwan. Department of Hydraulics and Ocean Engineering, National ...

  8. Spatial interaction of methylene blue stained soil pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, A.; Lieshout, van M.N.M.; Booltink, H.W.G.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we compare different types of patterns that emerge when applying methylene blue dye as a tracer on soils to detect preferential flow paths as a result of large cracks. Patterns on channels, vughs and cracks are analyzed with the J-function and with indicator variograms. By means of a

  9. Scenario studies on soil acidification at different spatial scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Kros, J.; Groenenberg, J.E.; Reinds, G.J.; Salm, van der C.; Posch, M.

    1995-01-01

    Three dynamic soil acidification models have been developed for application on local, national and continental (European) scales, namely NUCSAM, RESAM and SMART. This paper gives an overview of results of various model validation and scenario studies for the effects of SOx, NOx and NHx deposition on

  10. Spatial structure of soil properties at different scales of Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnel, Anna; Huwe, Bernd

    2013-04-01

    Soils of tropical mountain ecosystems provide important ecosystem services like water and carbon storage, water filtration and erosion control. As these ecosystems are threatened by global warming and the conversion of natural to human-modified landscapes, it is important to understand the implications of these changes. Within the DFG Research Unit "Kilimanjaro ecosystems under global change: Linking biodiversity, biotic interactions and biogeochemical ecosystem processes", we study the spatial heterogeneity of soils and the available water capacity for different land use systems. In the savannah zone of Mt. Kilimanjaro, maize fields are compared to natural savannah ecosystems. In the lower montane forest zone, coffee plantations, traditional home gardens, grasslands and natural forests are studied. We characterize the soils with respect to soil hydrology, emphasizing on the spatial variability of soil texture and bulk density at different scales. Furthermore soil organic carbon and nitrogen, cation exchange capacity and the pH-value are measured. Vis/Nir-Spectroscopy is used to detect small scale physical and chemical heterogeneity within soil profiles, as well as to get information of soil properties on a larger scale. We aim to build a spectral database for these soil properties for the Kilimanjaro region in order to get rapid information for geostatistical analysis. Partial least square regression with leave one out cross validation is used for model calibration. Results for silt and clay content, as well as carbon and nitrogen content are promising, with adjusted R² ranging from 0.70 for silt to 0.86 for nitrogen. Furthermore models for other nutrients, cation exchange capacity and available water capacity will be calibrated. We compare heterogeneity within and across the different ecosystems and state that spatial structure characteristics and complexity patterns in soil parameters can be quantitatively related to biodiversity and functional diversity

  11. Do stones modify the spatial distribution of fire-induced soil water repellency? Preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. García-Moreno

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Water repellency is a property of many fire-affected soils that contributes to delayed wetting rates and shows many hydrological and geomorphological consequences. Fire-induced soil water repellency (SWR may be modulated by pre-fire soil and vegetation properties. Many studies have been carried out to investigate the relationship between SWR and these properties. But, to our knowledge, no studies have considered the effect of surface stones in the spatial distribution of fire-induced SWR. In this research, we study the occurrence and spatial and vertical distribution of SWR and its consequences on soil structure after experimental burning in a previously wettable soil under different stone covers (0, 15, 30, 45 and 60%. In our experiment, burning induced critical or subcritical SWR in the upper millimetres of previously wettable soil. Fire-induced SWR did not vary with stone cover, but critical SWR was reached in inter-stone soil areas. At stone-covered soil areas, SWR was increased, but WDPTs remained mostly below the 5 s threshold.

  12. A spatially distributed model of pesticide movement in Dutch macroporous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiktak, A.; Hendriks, R. F. A.; Boesten, J. J. T. I.; van der Linden, A. M. A.

    2012-11-01

    SummaryIn the Netherlands, a spatially distributed version of the pesticide fate model PEARL is routinely used to assess the leaching potential of pesticides to groundwater. Recently, the model was modified to simulate the movement of pesticides to surface water. The peak concentration is considered to be the most important exposure endpoint for the ecotoxicological effect assessment for aquatic organisms. Macropore flow is an important driver for the peak concentration, so the leaching model PEARL was extended with a macropore module. Macropore parameters were derived from generally available soil data such as organic matter content and clay content using newly developed pedotransfer functions. These pedotransfer functions were constructed using a wide range of Dutch clayey soils. Results indicate a good correlation between these variables and soil structural parameters, which is due to the homogeneous mineralogical composition of Dutch clayey soils. Results of the spatially distributed modelling indicate that due to rapid transport through macropores, the concentration of pesticides in drainage water is generally higher in clayey soils than in light textured soils. In clayey soils, the boundary hydraulic conductivity and organic matter content were the most important drivers for the concentration in drainage water. Results further indicate that the concentration of pesticide in drainage water increases with increasing half-life and decreases with increasing sorption coefficient. However, the effect of these parameters is much less than obtained with the convection-dispersion equation because due to preferential flow most of the reactive part of the soil profile is bypassed.

  13. Spatial and temporal soil water variability in the plowing horizon of agriculturally used soils in two regions of Southwest Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltoradnev, Maxim; Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    Soil water dynamics plays an important role in soil-plant-atmosphere interactions. There is a lack of long-term continuous measurements of topsoil water content at the regional scale. The objective of the present study was to quantify and elucidate the seasonal dynamics of spatial soil water content variability in the plowing horizon (Ap) of agricultural soils at the regional scale. The study was conducted in the central part of the Kraichgau and the Mid Swabian Alb in Southwest Germany. In each region a soil water network embracing 21 stations was set up. All stations were installed on cropped agricultural sites and distributed across three spatial domains: an inner domain 3 km × 3 km (5 stations), a middle 9 km × 9 km (8 stations), and an outer domain 27 km × 27 km (8 stations). Each station consists of a TDT sensor (SI.99 Aquaflex Soil Moisture Sensor, Streat Instruments Ltd, New Zealand), which senses both soil water content and soil temperature, a rain gauge, and a remote transfer unit (RTU, datalogger + GSM modem), which stores and transfers data via GPRS modem to the central data server (Adcon Telemetry GmbH, Austria) located at the University of Hohenheim. The TDT sensors were installed at 0.15 m depth. A sensor consists of a three meter long and three centimeter wide flat transmission line. The relationship between the standard deviation (σθ) of the soil water content (SWC) and mean spatial soil water content () formed combinations of concave and convex hyperbolas. However, it strongly depended on SWC state and season. Generally, σθ was found to be changing along a convex trend during dry out and rewetting phases with a maximum in the intermediate SWC range. At the rain event scale, σθ() was either ascending or converging with decreasing . A concave shape was observed when approached to dry state. The majority of σθ() hysteresis loops were observed in intermediate and intermediate/wet state of SWC. All hysteretic loops were clockwise oriented

  14. Factors affecting spatial variation of annual apparent Q₁₀ of soil respiration in two warm temperate forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwei Luan

    Full Text Available A range of factors has been identified that affect the temperature sensitivity (Q₁₀ values of the soil-to-atmosphere CO₂ flux. However, the factors influencing the spatial distribution of Q₁₀ values within warm temperate forests are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the spatial variation of Q₁₀ values and its controlling factors in both a naturally regenerated oak forest (OF and a pine plantation (PP. Q₁₀ values were determined based on monthly soil respiration (R(S measurements at 35 subplots for each stand from Oct. 2008 to Oct. 2009. Large spatial variation of Q₁₀ values was found in both OF and PP, with their respective ranges from 1.7 to 5.12 and from 2.3 to 6.21. In PP, fine root biomass (FR (R = 0.50, P = 0.002, non-capillary porosity (NCP (R = 0.37, P = 0.03, and the coefficients of variation of soil temperature at 5 cm depth (CV of T₅ (R = -0.43, P = 0.01 well explained the spatial variance of Q₁₀. In OF, carbon pool lability reflected by light fractionation method (LLFOC well explained the spatial variance of Q₁₀ (R = -0.35, P = 0.04. Regardless of forest type, LLFOC and FR correlation with the Q₁₀ values were significant and marginally significant, respectively; suggesting a positive relationship between substrate availability and apparent Q₁₀ values. Parameters related to gas diffusion, such as average soil water content (SWC and NCP, negatively or positively explained the spatial variance of Q₁₀ values. Additionally, we observed significantly higher apparent Q₁₀ values in PP compared to OF, which might be partly attributed to the difference in soil moisture condition and diffusion ability, rather than different substrate availabilities between forests. Our results suggested that both soil chemical and physical characters contributed to the observed large Q₁₀ value variation.

  15. Development of effective methods for determination of boron in soils and soil solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мaruan Tanasheva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is related to serious ecological problem in agriculture: soil degradation in rice fields in South Kazakhstan and in particular, to boron toxicity in rice, which resulted in reduced crop yields. The following abiotic factors were studied to determine the ability of boron to accumulate in rice fields: soil type, soil properties like salinity and acidity', season (level of precipitation, water logging /water shortage. The results shows that the severity of boron excess for fertility of rice crop which depends on boron ionic composition in soil. Adverse impact of both boron deficiency and boron excess are discussed. The necessity of boron fertilizers is shown for soils with high boron mobility.

  16. Crop monoculture rather than agriculture reduces the spatial turnover of soil bacterial communities at a regional scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuerola, Eva L M; Guerrero, Leandro D; Türkowsky, Dominique; Wall, Luis G; Erijman, Leonardo

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the spatial turnover of soil bacterial communities in response to environmental changes introduced by the practices of soybean monoculture or crop rotations, relative to grassland soils. Amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to analyse bacterial diversity in producer fields through three successive cropping cycles within one and a half years, across a regional scale of the Argentinean Pampas. Unlike local diversity, which was not significantly affected by land use type, agricultural management had a strong influence on β-diversity patterns. Distributions of pairwise distances between all soils samples under soybean monoculture had significantly lower β-diversity and narrower breadth compared with distributions of pairwise distances between soils managed with crop rotation. Interestingly, good agricultural practices had similar degree of β-diversity as natural grasslands. The higher phylogenetic relatedness of bacterial communities in soils under monoculture across the region was likely determined by the observed loss of endemic species, and affected mostly to phyla with low regional diversity, such as Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and the candidates phyla SPAM and WS3. These results suggest that the implementation of good agricultural practices, including crop rotation, may be critical for the long-term conservation of soil biodiversity. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The spatial distribution pattern of heavy metal concentrations in urban soils — a study of anthropogenic effects in Berehove, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vince, Tímea; Szabó, György; Csoma, Zoltán; Sándor, Gábor; Szabó, Szilárd

    2014-09-01

    In the present study we examined the Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn contamination levels of the soils of Berehove, a small city in West-Ukraine. As a first step we determined the spatial distribution of the heavy metal contents of the urban soils; then, by studying the land use structure of the city and by statistical analysis we identified the major sources of contamination; we established a matrix of correlations between the heavy metal contents of the soils and the different types of land use; and finally, we drew a conclusion regarding the possible origin(s) of these heavy metals. By means of multivariate statistical analysis we established that of the investigated metals, Ba, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn accumulated in the city's soils primarily as a result of anthropogenic activity. In the most polluted urban areas (i.e. in the industrial zones and along the roads and highways with heavy traffic), in the case of several metals (Ba, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) we measured concentration levels even two or three times higher than the threshold limit values. Furthermore, Cr, Fe and Ni are primarily of lithogenic origin; therefore, the soil concentrations of these heavy metals depend mainly on the chemical composition of the soil-forming rocks.

  18. GEMAS: Molybdenum Spatial Distribution Patterns in European Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchella, Domenico; Zuzolo, Daniela; Demetriades, Alecos; De Vivo, Benedetto; Eklund, Mikael; Ladenberger, Anna; Negrel, Philippe; O'Connor, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Molybdenum is an essential trace element for both plants and animals as well as for human being. It is one such trace element for which potential health concerns have been raised but for which few data exist and little investigation or interpretation of distributions in soils has been made. The main goal of this study was to fill this gap. Molybdenum (Mo) concentrations are reported for the interesting anomalous patterns occur also in Italy in correspondence with alkaline volcanics, in Spain and Greece associated with sulfides mineralizations and in Slovenia and Croatia where are probably related to the long weathering history of karstic residual soils. Anomalous concentrations in some areas of Ireland represent a clear example of how an excess of molybdenum has produced potentially toxic pastures. In fact, these give rise to problems particularly in young cattle when excess molybdenum in the herbage acts as an antagonist, which militates against efficient copper absorption by the animal.

  19. Soil erosion evolution and spatial correlation analysis in a typical karst geomorphology using RUSLE with GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zeng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although some scholars have studied soil erosion in karst landforms, analyses of the spatial and temporal evolution of soil erosion and correlation analyses with spatial elements have been insufficient. The lack of research has led to an inaccurate assessment of environmental effects, especially in the mountainous area of Wuling in China. Soil erosion and rocky desertification in this area influence the survival and sustainability of a population of 0.22 billion people. This paper analyzes the spatiotemporal evolution of soil erosion and explores its relationship with rocky desertification using GIS technology and the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the relationship between soil erosion and major natural elements in southern China. The results are as follows: (1 from 2000 to 2013, the proportion of the area experiencing micro-erosion and mild erosion was at increasing risk in contrast to areas where moderate and high erosion are decreasing. The area changes in this time sequence reflect moderate to high levels of erosion tending to convert into micro-erosion and mild erosion. (2 The soil erosion area on the slope, at 15–35°, accounted for 60.59 % of the total erosion area, and the corresponding soil erosion accounted for 40.44 %. (3 The annual erosion rate in the karst region decreased much faster than in the non-karst region. Soil erosion in all of the rock outcrop areas indicates an improving trend, and dynamic changes in soil erosion significantly differ among the various lithological distribution belts. (4 The soil erosion rate decreased in the rocky desertification regions, to below moderate levels, but increased in the severe rocky desertification areas. The temporal and spatial variations in soil erosion gradually decreased in the study area. Differences in the spatial distribution between lithology and rocky desertification induced extensive soil loss. As rocky desertification

  20. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil. PMID:25538691

  1. Spatial variations of the soil of private gardens in the city: a case study of Tybee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah, Pariente; Zhevelev, Helena; Haj yahia, Shatha

    2017-04-01

    Gardens offer ecological, sociological and hydrological benefits. These gardens regulate temperature and energy conservation since the vegetation is an important factor in determining the microclimatic conditions. They function as sinks for runoff developed in paved areas, thus moderate runoff and flooding, and as sanctuaries for increasing species richness. Studies on soil properties of private gardens in cities are rare but no such study was done in an Arab city. The general aim of this study is to investigate the spatial changes in soil, vegetation and architecture characteristics in gardens of the city of Tybee. The city was divided into two regions: old- and new one. An abandoned agricultural field in the city margins was chosen to be as a control area. In each region 15 gardens were randomly chosen. In each, the soil was sampled, in one point, from three depth layers in the end of the dry season; in September 2016. In addition 15 points were sampled in the control. Soil samples were taken from areas with sparse herbaceous vegetation cover. Each of the soil samples was analyzed for color, organic matter, calcium carbonate, and sodium and chlorine contents, pH, electrical conductivity, texture and bulk density. The framework of the study included also observations to characterize the various land uses units of the gardens, and questionnaires to assess the gardening tradition of the owners and to indicate their motivations for maintaining their gardens. Preliminary results show that both the old and new areas in the city have higher number of soil colors (dry and wet) with respect to the control. The distribution of colors in the gardens of the old city area is different from that of the new one. Soils of the old area have a wider spectrum of colors than that of the new one. Penetration depth in the new and old areas is lower than the control (1.5, 2.0 and 2.4 cm, respectively) and the coefficients of variation in the city are higher than the control (77.6, 42

  2. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud eDechesne; Nora eBadawi; Jens eAamand; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found signifi...

  3. A fast TDR-inversion technique for the reconstruction of spatial soil moisture content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schlaeger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial moisture distribution in natural soil or other material is a valuably information for many applications. Standard measurement techniques give only mean or punctual results. Therefore a new inversion algorithm has been developed to derive moisture profiles along single TDR sensor-probes. The algorithm uses the full information content of TDR reflection data measured from one or both sides of an embedded probe. The system consisting of sensor probe and surrounded soil can be interpreted as a nonuniform transmission-line. The algorithm is based on the telegraph equations for nonuniform transmission-lines and an optimization approach to reconstruct the distribution of the capacitance and effective conductance along the transmission-line with high spatial resolution. The capacitance distribution can be converted into permittivity and water content by means of a capacitance model and dielectric mixing rules. Numerical investigations have been carried out to verify the accuracy of the inversion algorithm. Single- and double-sided time-domain reflection data were used to determine the capacitance and effective conductance profiles of lossless and lossy materials. The results show that single-sided reflection data are sufficient for lossless (or low-loss cases. In case of lossy material two independent reflection measurements are required to reconstruct a reliable capacitance profile. The inclusion of an additional effective conductivity profile leads to an improved capacitance profile. The algorithm converges very fast and yields a capacitance profile within a sufficiently short time. The additional transformation to the water content requires no significant calculation time.

  4. [Temporal-spatial distribution of agricultural diffuse nitrogen pollution and relationship with soil respiration and nitrification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ouyang; Cai, Guan-Qing; Huang, Hao-Bo; Geng, Xiao-Jun

    2014-06-01

    The soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification processes play an important role on soil nitrogen transformation and diffuse nitrogen loading. These processes are also the chains for soil circle. In this study, the Zhegao watershed located north of Chaohu Lake was selected to explore the interactions of these processes with diffuse nitrogen pollution. The BaPS (Barometric Process Separation) was applied to analyze the soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification processes in farmland and forest. The SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) simulated the temporal and spatial pattern of diffuse nitrogen loading. As the expanding of farmland and higher level of fertilization, the yearly mean loading of diffuse nitrogen increased sustainably from 1980-1995 to 1996-2012. The monthly loading in 1996-2012 was also higher than that in the period of 1980-1995, which closely related to the precipitation. The statistical analysis indicated that there was a significant difference between two periods. The yearly averaged loading of the whole watershed in 1996-2012 was 10.40 kg x hm(-2), which was 8.10 kg x hm(-2) in 1980-1995. The variance analysis demonstrated that there was also a big difference between the spatial distributions of two periods. The forest soil had much higher soil respiration than the farmland soil. But the farmland had higher nitrification and denitrification rates. The more intensive nitrogen transformation in the farmland contributed to the less diffuse nitrogen loading. As the nitrification rate of farmland was higher than denitrification rate, agricultural diffuse nitrate nitrogen loading would increase and organic nitrogen loading would reduce. The analysis of soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification is helpful for the study of soil nitrogen circle form the aspect of soil biology, which also benefits the control of agricultural diffuse nitrogen pollution.

  5. Using scaling factors for evaluating spatial and temporal variability of soil hydraulic properties within one elevation transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodem, Antonín; Kodešová, Radka; Jakšík, Ondřej; Fér, Miroslav; Klement, Aleš

    2016-04-01

    This study was carried out in Southern Moravia, in the Czech Republic. The original soil unit in the wider area is a Haplic Chernozem developed on loess. The intensive agricultural exploitation in combination with terrain morphology has resulted in a highly diversified soil spatial pattern. Nowadays the original soil unit is preserved only on top of relatively flat parts, and is gradually transformed by water erosion up to Regosols on the steepest slopes, while colluvial soils are formed in terrain depressions and at toe slopes due to sedimentation of previously eroded material. Soils within this area has been intensively investigated during the last several years (e.g. Jakšík et al., 2015; Vašát et al., 2014, 2015a,b). Soil sampling (disturbed and undisturbed 100-cm3 soil samples) was performed at 5 points of one elevation transect in November 2010 (after wheat sowing) and August 2011 (after wheat harvest). Disturbed soil samples were used to determine basic soil properties (grain size distribution and organic carbon content etc.). Undisturbed soil samples were used to determine the soil water retention curves and the hydraulic conductivity functions using the multiple outflow tests in Tempe cells and a numerical inversion with HYDRUS 1-D. Scaling factors (alpha-h for pressure head, alpha-theta for soil water contents and alpha-k for hydraulic conductivities) were used here to express soil hydraulic properties variability. Evaluated scaling factors reflected position within the elevation transect as well as time of soil sampling. In general large values of alpha-h, lower values of alpha-k and similar values of alpha-theta were obtained in 2010 in comparison to values obtained in 2011, which indicates development of soil structure during the vegetation season. Jakšík, O., Kodešová, R., Kubiš, A., Stehlíková, I., Drábek, O., Kapička, A. (2015): Soil aggregate stability within morphologically diverse areas. Catena, 127, 287-299. Vašát, R., Kode

  6. Spatial variability of δ18O-PO4 in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Steve; Blackwell, Martin; Tamburini, Federica; Guo, Rongrong; Peukert, Sabine; McGrath, Steve

    2014-05-01

    There is growing interest in the potential for using the δ18OPO4 values of different phosphate sources in the environment to enable identification of sources of phosphate in surface waters. The basis of the study is the belief that different sources of PO4 may have different δ18O values. One of the primary sources of PO4 in runoff from agricultural land is the soil itself. Therefore, in order to account for the PO4 derived from soils in surface waters, it is vital that the degree of spatial variability of its δ18O isotopic values are known, in order that suitable soil sampling approaches can be taken when assessing the soil as a source in future studies. A spatial study of the variability of the δ18OPO4 variability of soils collected from a grazed pasture on the North Wyke Farm Platform was carried out incorporating grid-sampling at a range of spatial scales. Results show that variability across a range of scales is minimal, meaning that, in this case, a relatively small number of samples would be required in order to identify accurately the mean δ18OPO4 value of the soil. This study represents an important contribution towards the methodological development studies required in this field of research in order that the full potential of the δ18OPO4 technique for biological and environmental research can be achieved.

  7. Spatial patterns of soil pathogens in declining Mediterranean forests: implications for tree species regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aparicio, Lorena; Ibáñez, Beatriz; Serrano, María S; De Vita, Paolo; Avila, José M; Pérez-Ramos, Ignacio M; García, Luis V; Esperanza Sánchez, M; Marañón, Teodoro

    2012-06-01

    Soil-borne pathogens are a key component of the belowground community because of the significance of their ecological and socio-economic impacts. However, very little is known about the complexity of their distribution patterns in natural systems. Here, we explored the patterns, causes and ecological consequences of spatial variability in pathogen abundance in Mediterranean forests affected by oak decline. We used spatially explicit neighborhood models to predict the abundance of soil-borne pathogen species (Phytophthora cinnamomi, Pythium spiculum and Pythium spp.) as a function of local abiotic conditions (soil texture) and the characteristics of the tree and shrub neighborhoods (species composition, size and health status). The implications of pathogen abundance for tree seedling performance were explored by conducting a sowing experiment in the same locations in which pathogen abundance was quantified. Pathogen abundance in the forest soil was not randomly distributed, but exhibited spatially predictable patterns influenced by both abiotic and, particularly, biotic factors (tree and shrub species). Pathogen abundance reduced seedling emergence and survival, but not in all sites or tree species. Our findings suggest that heterogeneous spatial patterns of pathogen abundance at fine spatial scale can be important for the dynamics and restoration of declining Mediterranean forests. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Understanding the spatial distribution of factors controlling topsoil organic carbon content in European soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rial, M; Martínez Cortizas, A; Rodríguez-Lado, L

    2017-12-31

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) constitutes the largest terrestrial carbon pool. The understanding of its dynamics and the environmental factors that influence its behaviour as sink or source of atmospheric CO2 is crucial to quantify the carbon budget at the global scale. At the European scale, most of the existing studies to account for SOC stocks are centred in the fitting of predictive model to ascertain the distribution of SOC. However, the development of methodologies for monitoring and identifying the environmental factors that control SOC storage in Europe remains a key research challenge. Here we present a modelling procedure for mapping and monitoring SOC contents that uses Visible-Near Infrared (VNIR) spectroscopic measurements and a series of environmental covariates to ascertain the key environmental processes that have a major contribution into SOC sequestration processes. Our results show that it follows a geographically non-stationary process in which the influencing environmental factors have different weights depending on the spatial location. This implies that SOC stock modelling should not rely on a single model but on a combination of different statistical models depending on the environmental characteristics of each area. A cluster classification of European soils in relation to those factors resulted in the determination of four groups for which specific models have been obtained. Differences in climate, soil pH, content of coarse fragments or land cover type are the main factors explaining the differences in SOC in topsoil from Europe. We found that climatic conditions are the main driver of SOC storage at the continental scale, but we also found that parameters like land cover type influence SOC content found at the local scales in certain areas. Our methodology developed at continental scale could be used in future research aimed to improve the predictive performance of SOC assessments at European scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  9. Determination of potential management zones from soil electrical conductivity, yield and crop data*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Shi, Zhou; Wu, Ci-fang; Li, Hong-yi; Li, Feng

    2008-01-01

    One approach to apply precision agriculture to optimize crop production and environmental quality is identifying management zones. In this paper, the variables of soil electrical conductivity (EC) data, cotton yield data and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data in an about 15 ha field in a coastal saline land were selected as data resources, and their spatial variabilities were firstly analyzed and spatial distribution maps constructed with geostatistics technique. Then fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm was used to define management zones, fuzzy performance index (FPI) and normalized classification entropy (NCE) were used to determine the optimal cluster numbers. Finally one-way variance analysis was performed on 224 georeferenced soil and yield sampling points to assess how well the defined management zones reflected the soil properties and productivity level. The results reveal that the optimal number of management zones for the present study area was 3 and the defined management zones provided a better description of soil properties and yield variation. Statistical analyses indicate significant differences between the chemical properties of soil samples and crop yield in each management zone, and management zone 3 presented the highest nutrient level and potential crop productivity, whereas management zone 1 the lowest. Based on these findings, we conclude that fuzzy c-means clustering approach can be used to delineate management zones by using the given three variables in the coastal saline soils, and the defined management zones form an objective basis for targeting soil samples for nutrient analysis and development of site-specific application strategies. PMID:18196615

  10. Spatial variability of some soil properties varies in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) plantations of west coastal area of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Sanjib Kumar; Suresh, Kancherla; Narsimha Rao, Bezawada; Mathur, Ravi Kumar; Shukla, Arvind Kumar; Manorama, Kamireddy; Ramachandrudu, Kummari; Harinarayana, Parasa; Prakash, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Mapping spatial variability of soil properties is the key to efficient soil resource management for sustainable crop yield. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the spatial variability of soil properties such as acidity (pH), salinity (electrical conductivity (EC)), organic carbon, available K, available P, exchangeable Ca2+, exchangeable Mg2+, available S and hot water soluble B in surface (0-20 cm) and subsurface (20-40 cm) soil layers of oil palm plantations in south Goa district of Goa located in west coastal area of India. A total of 128 soil samples were collected from 64 oil palm plantations of Goa located at an approximate interval of 1-2 km and analyzed. Soil was acidic to neutral in reaction. Other soil properties varied widely in both the soil layers. Correlations between soil pH and exchangeable Ca2+, between soil EC and available K, between available P and available S and between exchangeable Ca2+ and exchangeable Mg2+ in both the soil layers were found to be positive and significant (P < 0.01). Geostatistical analysis revealed a varied spatial distribution pattern for the measured soil properties. Best-fit models for measured soil properties were exponential, Gaussian, stable, K-Bessel and spherical with moderate to strong spatial dependency. The results revealed that site-specific fertilizer management options needed to be adopted in the oil palm plantations of the study area owing to variability in soil properties.

  11. Spatial prediction of soil texture in region Centre (France) from summary data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobarco, Mercedes Roman; Saby, Nicolas; Paroissien, Jean-Baptiste; Orton, Tom G.

    2015-04-01

    Soil texture is a key controlling factor of important soil functions like water and nutrient holding capacity, retention of pollutants, drainage, soil biodiversity, and C cycling. High resolution soil texture maps enhance our understanding of the spatial distribution of soil properties and provide valuable information for decision making and crop management, environmental protection, and hydrological planning. We predicted the soil texture of agricultural topsoils in the Region Centre (France) combining regression and area-to-point kriging. Soil texture data was collected from the French soil-test database (BDAT), which is populated with soil analysis performed by farmers' demand. To protect the anonymity of the farms the data was treated by commune. In a first step, summary statistics of environmental covariates by commune were used to develop prediction models with Cubist, boosted regression trees, and random forests. In a second step the residuals of each individual observation were summarized by commune and kriged following the method developed by Orton et al. (2012). This approach allowed to include non-linear relationships among covariates and soil texture while accounting for the uncertainty on areal means in the area-to-point kriging step. Independent validation of the models was done using data from the systematic soil monitoring network of French soils. Future work will compare the performance of these models with a non-stationary variance geostatistical model using the most important covariates and summary statistics of texture data. The results will inform on whether the later and statistically more-challenging approach improves significantly texture predictions or whether the more simple area-to-point regression kriging can offer satisfactory results. The application of area-to-point regression kriging at national level using BDAT data has the potential to improve soil texture predictions for agricultural topsoils, especially when combined with

  12. Assessment of Vegetation Density and Soil Macrofauna Relationship in Riparian Forest of Karkhe River for the Determination of Rivers Buffer Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH. Gholami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of soil organisms is influenced by the plant cover, thus resulting in a horizontal mosaic of areas subjected to gradients of nutrient availability and microclimatic conditions.This study was conducted to investigate the spatial variability of soil macrofauna in relation to vegetation density in the riparian forest landscape of Karkhe. The vegetation density was determined by calculating the NDVI index. Soil macrofauna were sampled using 200 sampling points along parallel transects (perpendicular to the river. The maximum distance between samples was 0.5 km. Soil macrofauna were extracted from 50 cm×50 cm×25 cm soil monolith by the hand-sorting procedure. Abundance, diversity (Shannon H’ index, richness (Menhinick index and evenness (Sheldon index were calculated. Soil macrofauna and NDVI data were analyzed using geostatistics (variogram in order to describe and quantify the spatial continuity. The variograms were spherical, revealing the presence of spatial autocorrelation. The range of influence was 1724 m for abundance, 1326 m for diversity, 1825 m for richness, 1450 for evenness and 1977 m for NDVI. The kriging maps showed that the NDVI Index and soil macrofauna had spatial variability. The spatial pattern of soil macrofauna abundance and biodiversity were similar to the spatial pattern of vegetation density as shown in the correlation.

  13. Spatial variability of soil pH and phosphorus in relation to soil run-off following slah-and-burn land clearing in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, J.; Stein, A.; Noordwijk, van M.; Ketterings, Q.M.

    2003-01-01

    Slash-and-burn land clearing on sloping land may lead to increased soil run-off following disappearance of the protective vegetative cover. In turn, soil run-off and redeposition affects soil fertility and spatial patterns of fertility parameters in a field. This study seeks to clarify the role of

  14. Using high-resolution soil moisture modelling to assess the uncertainty of microwave remotely sensed soil moisture products at the correct spatial and temporal support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/364253940; Karssenberg, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/241557119; Bierkens, M. F. P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125022794; Van Dam, J. C.; De Jong, S. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120221306

    Soil moisture is a key variable in the hydrological cycle and important in hydrological modelling. When assimilating soil moisture into flood forecasting models, the improvement of forecasting skills depends on the ability to accurately estimate the spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture

  15. Spatial distribution and source identification of heavy metals in surface soils in a typical coal mine city, Lianyuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Feng, Chunting; Zeng, Guangming; Gao, Xiang; Zhong, Minzhou; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Xin; He, Xinyue; Fang, Yilong

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the pollution degree and spatial distribution of heavy metals and determined their sources in topsoil in a typical coal mine city, Lianyuan, Hunan Province, China. We collected 6078 soil surface samples in different land use types. And the concentrations of Zn, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, Sb, As, Mo, V, Mn, Fe and Cr were measured. The average contents of all heavy metals were lower than their corresponding Grade II values of Chinese Soil Quality Standard with the exception of Hg. However, average contents of twelve heavy metals, except for Mn, exceeded their background level in soils in Hunan Province. Based on one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), the contents of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Hg, Mo and V were related to the anthropogenic source and there were statistically significant differences in their concentrations among different land use patterns. The spatial variation of heavy metal was visualized by GIS. The PMF model was used to ascertain contamination sources of twelve heavy metals and apportion their source contributions in Lianyuan soils. The results showed that the source contributions of the natural source, atmospheric deposition, industrial activities and agricultural activities accounted for 33.6%, 26.05%, 23.44% and 16.91%, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of spatial interpolation techniques to predict soil properties in the colombian piedmont eastern plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Castro Franco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Interpolating soil properties at field-scale in the Colombian piedmont eastern plains is challenging due to: the highly and complex variable nature of some processes; the effects of the soil; the land use; and the management. While interpolation techniques are being adapted to include auxiliary information of these effects, the soil data are often difficult to predict using conventional techniques of spatial interpolation. Method: In this paper, we evaluated and compared six spatial interpolation techniques: Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW, Spline, Ordinary Kriging (KO, Universal Kriging (UK, Cokriging (Ckg, and Residual Maximum Likelihood-Empirical Best Linear Unbiased Predictor (REML-EBLUP, from conditioned Latin Hypercube as a sampling strategy. The ancillary information used in Ckg and REML-EBLUP was indexes calculated from a digital elevation model (MDE. The “Random forest” algorithm was used for selecting the most important terrain index for each soil properties. Error metrics were used to validate interpolations against cross validation. Results: The results support the underlying assumption that HCLc captured adequately the full distribution of variables of ancillary information in the Colombian piedmont eastern plains conditions. They also suggest that Ckg and REML-EBLUP perform best in the prediction in most of the evaluated soil properties. Conclusions: Mixed interpolation techniques having auxiliary soil information and terrain indexes, provided a significant improvement in the prediction of soil properties, in comparison with other techniques.

  17. Analyzing existing conventional soil information sources to be incorporated in thematic Spatial Data Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Aguilar, J. A.; Rubio, J. L.; Domínguez, J.; Andreu, V.

    2012-04-01

    New information technologies give the possibility of widespread dissemination of spatial information to different geographical scales from continental to local by means of Spatial Data Infrastructures. Also administrative awareness on the need for open access information services has allowed the citizens access to this spatial information through development of legal documents, such as the INSPIRE Directive of the European Union, adapted by national laws as in the case of Spain. The translation of the general criteria of generic Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) to thematic ones is a crucial point for the progress of these instruments as large tool for the dissemination of information. In such case, it must be added to the intrinsic criteria of digital information, such as the harmonization information and the disclosure of metadata, the own environmental information characteristics and the techniques employed in obtaining it. In the case of inventories and mapping of soils, existing information obtained by traditional means, prior to the digital technologies, is considered to be a source of valid information, as well as unique, for the development of thematic SDI. In this work, an evaluation of existing and accessible information that constitutes the basis for building a thematic SDI of soils in Spain is undertaken. This information framework has common features to other European Union states. From a set of more than 1,500 publications corresponding to the national territory of Spain, the study was carried out in those documents (94) found for five autonomous regions of northern Iberian Peninsula (Asturias, Cantabria, Basque Country, Navarra and La Rioja). The analysis was performed taking into account the criteria of soil mapping and inventories. The results obtained show a wide variation in almost all the criteria: geographic representation (projections, scales) and geo-referencing the location of the profiles, map location of profiles integrated with edaphic

  18. The effect of spatial throughfall patterns on soil moisture patterns at the hillslope scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. J. Coenders-Gerrits

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Improving the understanding of the controls on subsurface stormflow generation has been the goal of numerous experimental and modeling studies. However, the effect of the spatial variability of throughfall on soil moisture patterns and subsurface stormflow (SSF generation has not yet been studied in detail. The objectives of this study are three-fold: (1 to investigate the influence of a spatially variable throughfall pattern on soil moisture; (2 to investigate if soil moisture patterns reflect a balance between a throughfall and bedrock topography patterns; and (3 to investigate how this balance changes when soil depth, storm size and slope angle are varied. Virtual experiments are used to address these questions. A virtual experiment is a numerical experiment driven by collective field intelligence. It provides a learning tool to investigate the effect of individual processes in a complex system. In our virtual experiment we combined spatial throughfall data from the Huewelerbach catchment in Luxembourg with the topography of a well-studied hillslope within the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia, USA. We used HYDRUS-3D as a modeling platform. The virtual experiment shows that throughfall patterns influence soil moisture patterns, but only during and shortly after a storm. With a semi-variogram analysis we showed how the effective range of the soil moisture pattern (i.e., the main descriptor of a spatial pattern in case of a small nugget to sill ratio, is similar to the effective range of the throughfall pattern during the storm and gradually returns to the effective range of the bedrock topography after throughfall has ceased. The same analysis was carried out to investigate how this balance changes due to changes in storm size, soil depth, and slope. The analysis showed that the throughfall pattern is more important during large storms on gentle slopes. For steeper slopes the bedrock topography becomes more important.

  19. Spatially distributed modeling of soil organic carbon across China with improved accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi-quan; Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Xin-ye; Luo, Youlin; Wang, Chang-quan; Yue, Tian-xiang; Li, Bing; Gao, Xue-song

    2017-06-01

    There is a need for more detailed spatial information on soil organic carbon (SOC) for the accurate estimation of SOC stock and earth system models. As it is effective to use environmental factors as auxiliary variables to improve the prediction accuracy of spatially distributed modeling, a combined method (HASM_EF) was developed to predict the spatial pattern of SOC across China using high accuracy surface modeling (HASM), artificial neural network (ANN), and principal component analysis (PCA) to introduce land uses, soil types, climatic factors, topographic attributes, and vegetation cover as predictors. The performance of HASM_EF was compared with ordinary kriging (OK), OK, and HASM combined, respectively, with land uses and soil types (OK_LS and HASM_LS), and regression kriging combined with land uses and soil types (RK_LS). Results showed that HASM_EF obtained the lowest prediction errors and the ratio of performance to deviation (RPD) presented the relative improvements of 89.91%, 63.77%, 55.86%, and 42.14%, respectively, compared to the other four methods. Furthermore, HASM_EF generated more details and more realistic spatial information on SOC. The improved performance of HASM_EF can be attributed to the introduction of more environmental factors, to explicit consideration of the multicollinearity of selected factors and the spatial nonstationarity and nonlinearity of relationships between SOC and selected factors, and to the performance of HASM and ANN. This method may play a useful tool in providing more precise spatial information on soil parameters for global modeling across large areas.

  20. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud eDechesne

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays nonrandom spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage, while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modelling and experimental systems that do not include soil’s full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil.

  1. Determinants of adoption of soil conservation practices in Oyo State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The truncated negative binomial Count Data model was used to identify factors influencing adoption of the practices. Factors identified as determinants of their adoption of soil conservation practices include: farm size, land tenure, extension contact, household net worth, awareness, perceived benefits. These variables are ...

  2. Determination of levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: Soil samples contaminated with spent motor engine oil collected from Abakaliki auto-mechanic site were analyzed to determine the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) components which are often targets in environmental check. Identification and quantification of the PAH components was ...

  3. Spatial aggregation for crop modelling at regional scales: the effects of soil variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coucheney, Elsa; Villa, Ana; Eckersten, Henrik; Hoffmann, Holger; Jansson, Per-Erik; Gaiser, Thomas; Ewert, Franck; Lewan, Elisabet

    2017-04-01

    Modelling agriculture production and adaptation to the environment at regional or global scale receives much interest in the context of climate change. Process-based soil-crop models describe the flows of mass (i.e. water, carbon and nitrogen) and energy in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. As such, they represent valuable tools for predicting agricultural production in diverse agro-environmental contexts as well as for assessing impacts on the environment; e.g. leaching of nitrates, changes in soil carbon content and GHGs emissions. However, their application at regional and global scales for climate change impact studies raises new challenges related to model input data, calibration and evaluation. One major concern is to take into account the spatial variability of the environmental conditions (e.g. climate, soils, management practices) used as model input and because the impacts of climate change on cropping systems depend strongly on the site conditions and properties (1). For example climate change effects on yield can be either negative or positive depending on the soil type (2). Additionally, the use of different methods of upscaling and downscaling adds new sources of modelling uncertainties (3). In the present study, the effect of aggregating soil input data by area majority of soil mapping units was explored for spatially gridded simulations with the soil-vegetation model CoupModel for a region in Germany (North Rhine-Westphalia, NRW). The data aggregation effect (DAE) was analysed for wheat yield, water drainage, soil carbon mineralisation and nitrogen leaching below the root zone. DAE was higher for soil C and N variables than for yield and drainage and were strongly related to the spatial coverage of specific soils within the study region. These 'key soils' were identified by a model sensitivity analysis to soils present in the NRW region. The spatial aggregation of the key soils additionally influenced the DAE. Our results suggest that a spatial

  4. Spatial distribution and concentration of sulfur in relation to vegetation cover and soil properties on a reclaimed sulfur mine site (Southern Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likus-Cieślik, Justyna; Pietrzykowski, Marcin; Szostak, Marta; Szulczewski, Melanie

    2017-02-01

    This work aims to assess the spatial distribution and concentration of sulfur in the topsoil layer and to determine the relationships between sulfur concentration, soil pH, soil electrical conductivity, and plant cover at the reforested site of the former sulfur mine (Southern Poland). Soil samples were collected from 0 to 20 cm (topsoil) from a total of 86 sampling points in a regular square grid with sides of 150 m. Plant cover was assayed in circular plots with an area of 100 m 2 , divided into a woody plant layer and herbaceous plant layer. Soil properties such as particle size distribution, pH in KCl and H 2 O, soil electrical conductivity (EC), soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (N T ), and total sulfur (S T ) were determined. The degree of soil contamination with sulfur was assessed based on the guidelines of the Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation (IUNG), Poland. The results indicate that remediation and application of lime were not fully effective in spatial variation, because 33 points with sulfur contamination above 500 mg kg -1 were observed. These spots occurred irregularly in the topsoil horizons. This high sulfur concentration in the soil did not result in severe acidification (below 4.5) in all cases, most likely due to neutralization from the application of high doses of flotation lime. High vegetative cover occurred at some points with high soil sulfur concentrations, with two points having S concentration above 40,000 mg kg -1 and tree cover about 60%. Numerous points with high soil EC above 1500 μS cm -1 as well as limited vegetation and high soil sulfur concentrations, however, indicate that the reclamation to forest is still not completely successful.

  5. Importance of soil and vineyard management in the determination of grapevine mineral composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likar, M; Vogel-Mikuš, K; Potisek, M; Hančević, K; Radić, T; Nečemer, M; Regvar, M

    2015-02-01

    The spatial variability of the mineral composition of grapevines in production vineyards along the east Adriatic coast was determined and compared between conventional and sustainable vineyard management. Cluster analysis shows a high level of spatial variability even within the individual locations. Factor analysis reveals three factors with strong loading for the macronutrients K and P and the micronutrient Mn, which explain 67% of the total variance in the mineral composition. Here, 26% to 34% of the variance of these three elements can be explained by abiotic and biotic soil parameters, with soil concentrations of K, Fe and Cu, organic matter content, and vesicular colonisation showing the strongest effects on the mineral composition of the grapevines. In addition, analysis of the mineral composition data shows significant differences between differently managed vineyards, with increased bioaccumulation of P and K in sustainable vineyards, while Zn bioaccumulation was increased in conventional vineyards. Our data confirm the importance of soil and vineyard management in the concept of terroir, and demonstrate the effects of sustainable management practices on the mineral nutrition of grapevines that result from modified nutrient availability related to changes in the abiotic and biotic characteristics of the soil. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Rapid method for plutonium-241 determination in soil samples

    OpenAIRE

    Piekarz, M.; Komosa, A.

    2014-01-01

    A simple and rapid procedure for the determination of plutonium isotopes in the environment is presented. The procedure combines alpha spectrometry, solvent extraction and liquid scintillation measurements to ensure that both alpha- and beta-emitting isotopes are determined. Of five tested extractants, bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid was found to be the best choice. The procedure was applied to soil samples contaminated with Chernobyl fallout.

  7. Spatial variation of peat soil properties in the oil-producing region of northeastern Sakhalin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, D. N.; Shcheglov, A. I.; Manakhov, D. V.; Zavgorodnyaya, Yu. A.; Rozanova, M. S.; Brekhov, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Morphology and properties of medium-deep oligotrophic peat, oligotrophic peat gley, pyrogenic oligotrophic peat gley, and peat gley soils on subshrub-cotton grass-sphagnum bogs and in swampy larch forests of northeastern Sakhalin have been studied. Variation in the thickness and reserves of litters in the studied bog and forest biogeocenoses has been analyzed. The profile distribution and spatial variability of moisture, density, ash, and pHKCl in separate groups of peat soils have been described. The content and spatial variability of petroleum hydrocarbons have been considered in relation to the accumulation of natural bitumoids by peat soils and the technogenic pressing in the oil-producing region. Variation of each parameter at different distances (10, 50, and 1000 m) has been estimated using a hierarchical sampling scheme. The spatial conjugation of soil parameters has been studied by factor analysis using the principal components method and Spearman correlation coefficients. Regression equations have been proposed to describe relationships of ash content with soil density and content of petroleum hydrocarbons in peat horizons.

  8. Spatial autocorrelation of denitrification and associated soil properties in a restored and a natural floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, C. H.; Predick, K. I.; Stanley, E. H.

    2009-12-01

    Floodplain wetlands have the potential to act as significant nitrogen (N) sinks, but restoration of these ecosystems does not necessarily increase in situ denitrification rates. We compared spatial heterogeneity of soil denitrification and its potential drivers (moisture, total N, nitrate and organic matter) in neighboring natural and restored floodplain systems of the Wisconsin and Baraboo Rivers in Wisconsin, USA. Specific hypotheses we evaluated were that restoration created soil conditions that were: (1) more uniform, (2) random, or (3) similar relative to the natural floodplain at two spatial scales (large 81 m2 plot, and small 5 m2 plot). At the larger scale, the range of autocorrelation was shorter at the restored site for 4 of the 5 soil parameters including denitrification (range = 9 m, vs. 21 m at the natural site). At the smaller spatial scale, significant autocorrelation was detected for 4 of the 5 variables at the natural site, but only 1 variable (NO3-N) at the restored site. Restoration was associated with fine-scale randomization of soil properties. We suggest that conversions in land cover, particularly if they are recent or rapid (such as restoration) may produce randomized distributions of soil resources or processes during a transition period following the conversion.

  9. County-Scale Spatial Variability of Macronutrient Availability Ratios in Paddy Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingkai Qu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macronutrients (N, P, and K are essential to plants but also can be harmful to the environment when their available concentrations in soil are excessive. Availability ratios (available concentration/total concentration of macronutrients may reflect their transforming potential between fixed and available forms in soil. Understanding their spatial distributions and impact factors can be, therefore, helpful to applying specific measures to modify the availability of macronutrients for agricultural and environmental management purposes. In this study, 636 topsoil samples (0–15 cm were collected from paddy fields in Shayang County, Central China, for measuring soil properties. Factors influencing macronutrient availability ratios were investigated, and total and available concentrations of macronutrients were mapped using geostatistical method. Spatial distribution maps of macronutrient availability ratios were further derived. Results show that (1 availability of macronutrients is controlled by multiple factors, and (2 macronutrient availability ratios are spatially varied and may not always have spatial patterns identical to those of their corresponding total and available concentrations. These results are more useful than traditional soil macronutrient average content data for guiding site-specific field management for agricultural production and environmental protection.

  10. Spatial Modeling of Industrial Windfall on Soils to Detect Woody Species with Potential for Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Salazar; M. Mendoza; A. M. Tejeda

    2006-01-01

    A spatial model is presented to explain the concentration of heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Co and Pb), in the soils around the industrial complex near the Port of Veracruz, Mexico. Unexpected low concentration sites where then tested to detect woody plant species that may have the capability to hiperacumulate these contaminants, hence having a potential for...

  11. Temporal and spatial dynamics of mineral levels of forage, soil and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we examined temporal and spatial dynamics of minerals of forage, soil and cattle serum in two savannas (valley and plain) of South Africa. The aims were to explore the relationships between ecosystem components, and plan communal grazing and fodder flow for sustainable livestock production. In each area ...

  12. A spatial Coherent Global Soil Moisture Product with Improved Temporal Resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jeu, R.A.M.; Holmes, T.R.H.; Parinussa, R.M.; Owe, M.

    2014-01-01

    Global soil moisture products that are completely independent of any type of ancillary data and solely rely on satellite observations are presented. Additionally, we further develop an existing downscaling technique that enhances the spatial resolution of such products to approximately 11. km. These

  13. Spatial evaluation of soil erosion risk in the West Usambara mountains, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, G.; Vrieling, A.; Vigiak, O.

    2006-01-01

    Effective soil and water conservation programmes require the concentration of resources on limited areas. For that purpose regional-scale assessments of erosion risk are required. However, availability of good-quality spatial data for such assessments is often poor, especially in regions like

  14. Cadmium Accumulation in Small Mammals: Species Traits, Soil Properties, and Spatial Habitat Use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den N.W.; Lammertsma, D.R.; Dimmers, W.J.; Boerwinkel, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the impact of species-specific spatial habitat use, diet preferences, and soil concentrations and properties on the accumulation of cadmium in small mammals was investigated. The results show that for the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus), a mobile species with a large range in diet

  15. Community structure and soil pH determine chemoautotrophic carbon dioxide fixation in drained paddy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xi-En; Yao, Huaiying; Wang, Juan; Huang, Ying; Singh, Brajesh K; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-06-16

    Previous studies suggested that microbial photosynthesis plays a potential role in paddy fields, but little is known about chemoautotrophic carbon fixers in drained paddy soils. We conducted a microcosm study using soil samples from five paddy fields to determine the environmental factors and quantify key functional microbial taxa involved in chemoautotrophic carbon fixation. We used stable isotope probing in combination with phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and molecular approaches. The amount of microbial (13)CO2 fixation was determined by quantification of (13)C-enriched fatty acid methyl esters and ranged from 21.28 to 72.48 ng of (13)C (g of dry soil)(-1), and the corresponding ratio (labeled PLFA-C:total PLFA-C) ranged from 0.06 to 0.49%. The amount of incorporationof (13)CO2 into PLFAs significantly increased with soil pH except at pH 7.8. PLFA and high-throughput sequencing results indicated a dominant role of Gram-negative bacteria or proteobacteria in (13)CO2 fixation. Correlation analysis indicated a significant association between microbial community structure and carbon fixation. We provide direct evidence of chemoautotrophic C fixation in soils with statistical evidence of microbial community structure regulation of inorganic carbon fixation in the paddy soil ecosystem.

  16. County-scale spatial distribution of soil enzyme activities and enzyme activity indices in agricultural land: implications for soil quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiangping; Xie, Baoni; Wang, Junxing; He, Wenxiang; Wang, Xudong; Wei, Gehong

    2014-01-01

    Here the spatial distribution of soil enzymatic properties in agricultural land was evaluated on a county-wide (567 km(2)) scale in Changwu, Shaanxi Province, China. The spatial variations in activities of five hydrolytic enzymes were examined using geostatistical methods. The relationships between soil enzyme activities and other soil properties were evaluated using both an integrated total enzyme activity index (TEI) and the geometric mean of enzyme activities (GME). At the county scale, soil invertase, phosphatase, and catalase activities were moderately spatially correlated, whereas urease and dehydrogenase activities were weakly spatially correlated. Correlation analysis showed that both TEI and GME were better correlated with selected soil physicochemical properties than single enzyme activities. Multivariate regression analysis showed that soil OM content had the strongest positive effect while soil pH had a negative effect on the two enzyme activity indices. In addition, total phosphorous content had a positive effect on TEI and GME in orchard soils, whereas alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen and available potassium contents, respectively, had negative and positive effects on these two enzyme indices in cropland soils. The results indicate that land use changes strongly affect soil enzyme activities in agricultural land, where TEI provides a sensitive biological indicator for soil quality.

  17. Characterization of spatial soil variability and its effect on Millet yield on Sudano-Sahelian coversands in SW Niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voortman, R.L.; Brouwer, J.; Albersen, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Very local spatial soil variability on Sudano-Sahelian coversands hampers the interpretation of agronomic research and is an obstacle for the dissemination of research findings. In an earlier paper, we specifically accounted for this spatial soil variability: Using novel tools for data exploration,

  18. Spatial and temporal variability of grass cover in two olive grove catchments on contrasting soil types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Laura; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Gimeno, Enrique; Gómez, José A.

    2013-04-01

    Mediterranean climate conditions -characterized by the concentration of the precipitation in the seasons of autumn and spring, the low temperatures in winter and extremely warm and dry summers- determine that ground cover by adventitious (or cover crop) vegetation shows significant seasonal and annual variability. In addition, its spatial variability associates also, partially, to water availability among the landscape. This is especially relevant in olive orchards, an agricultural system under high erosion risk in the region where the establishment of herbaceous cover has proved to improve soil protection reducing erosion risk, as well as the improvement of soil properties (Gómez et al., 2009). All these benefits are based on small scale studies where full ground cover by the cover crop is relatively easy to obtain. However, few information is available about the actual ground cover achieved at farm scale, although preliminary observations suggests that this might be extremely variable (Gómez and Giráldez, 2009). This study presents the preliminary results evaluating the spatial and temporal evolution of ground cover by adventitious vegetation (the preferred option by farmers to achieve a cover crop) in two commercial olive farms during 2 hydrological years (2011-2012). The study was conducted in two farms located in the province of Cordoba, Southern Spain. Both were olive orchards grown under deficit irrigation systems and present a gauge station where rainfall, runoff and sediment loads have been measured from the year 2005. The soil management in "La Conchuela" farm was based in the use of herbicide in the line of olive trees to keep the bare soil all year round, and the application of selective herbicide in the lane between the olive trees to promote the grown of graminaceae grasses . In addition, the grass is mechanically killed in June. In the another farm, "Arroyo Blanco", the grass spontaneous cover is allowed until mid-spring in which is also

  19. Designation of less favorable areas by the regionalization of soil degradation on various spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, L.; Szabó, J.; Bakacsi, Zs.; Laborczi, A.

    2009-04-01

    One of the main objectives of the EU's Common Agricultural Policy is to encourage maintaining agricultural production in less favorable areas (LFA) in order (among others) to sustain agricultural production and use natural resources, in such a way to secure both stable production and income to farmers and to protect the environment. LFA assignment has both ecological and severe economical aspects. Delimitation of LFAs can be carried out by using biophysical diagnostic criteria on low soil productivity and poor climate conditions. Identification of low-productivity areas requires regionalization of soil functions related to food and other biomass production. This process can be carried out in different scales from national to local level, but always requires map-based pedological and further environmental information with appropriate spatial resolution. For the regionalization of less productive areas in national scale a functional approach was used which integrates the knowledge on soil degradation processes in nationwide level. Specific soil threats were classified into ranked categories. Supposing (quasi)uniform distribution of vulnerability measure along these classes, we introduced a "standardized" value as a ratio of the class order to the maximum class order expressed in percentage. For the overall spatial characterization of degradation status, spatial information was integrated in a result map by summarizing the degradation specific "standardized" cell values. This map in one hand has been used for the delineation of soil degradation regions. On the other hand appropriate spatial aggregation of index values on geographical and administrative regions is suitable for their quantitative comparison thus they can be ranked and this feature can be used for the identification of less favorable areas. At the more detailed, county level the Digital Kreybig Soil Information System was used as a tool of the regionalization of soil functions related to soil

  20. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, N.; Aamand, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we...... critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates...... across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance...

  1. Cacao Crop Management Zones Determination Based on Soil Properties and Crop Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perla Silva Matos de Carvalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The use of management zones has ensured yield success for numerous agricultural crops. In spite of this potential, studies applying precision agricultural techniques to cacao plantations are scarce or almost nonexistent. The aim of the present study was to delineate management zones for cacao crop, create maps combining soil physical properties and cacao tree yield, and identify what combinations best fit within the soil chemical properties. The study was conducted in 2014 on a cacao plantation in a Nitossolo Háplico Eutrófico (Rhodic Paleudult in Bahia, Brazil. Soil samples were collected in a regular sampling grid with 120 sampling points in the 0.00-0.20 m soil layer, and pH(H2O, P, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, H+Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, SB, V, TOC, effective CEC, CEC at pH 7.0, coarse sand, fine sand, clay, and silt were determined. Yield was measured in all the 120 points every month and stratified into annual, harvest, and early-harvest cacao yields. Data were subjected to geostatistical analysis, followed by ordinary kriging interpolation. The management zones were defined through a Fuzzy K-Means algorithm for combinations between soil physical properties and cacao tree yield. Concordance analysis was carried out between the delineated zones and soil chemical properties using Kappa coefficients. The zones that best classified the soil chemical properties were defined from the early-harvest cacao yield map associated with the clay or sand fractions. Silt content proved to be an inadequate variable for defining management zones for cacao production. The delineated management zones described the spatial variability of the soil chemical properties, and are therefore important for site-specific management in the cacao crop.

  2. Determining and representing width of soil boundaries using electrical conductivity and MultiGrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Greve, Mette Balslev

    2004-07-01

    In classical soil mapping, map unit boundaries are considered crisp even though all experienced survey personnel are aware of the fact, that soil boundaries really are transition zones of varying width. However, classification of transition zone width on site is difficult in a practical survey. The objective of this study is to present a method for determining soil boundary width and a way of representing continuous soil boundaries in GIS. A survey was performed using the non-contact conductivity meter EM38 from Geonics Inc., which measures the bulk Soil Electromagnetic Conductivity (SEC). The EM38 provides an opportunity to classify the width of transition zones in an unbiased manner. By calculating the spatial rate of change in the interpolated EM38 map across the crisp map unit delineations from a classical soil mapping, a measure of transition zone width can be extracted. The map unit delineations are represented as transition zones in a GIS through a concept of multiple grid layers, a MultiGrid. Each layer corresponds to a soil type and the values in a layer represent the percentage of that soil type in each cell. As a test, the subsoil texture was mapped at the Vindum field in Denmark using both the classical mapping method with crisp representation of the boundaries and the new map with MultiGrid and continuous boundaries. These maps were then compared to an independent reference map of subsoil texture. The improvement of the prediction of subsoil texture, using continuous boundaries instead of crisp, was in the case of the Vindum field, 15%.

  3. Novel evaporation experiment to determine soil hydraulic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schneider

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel experimental approach to determine soil hydraulic material properties for the dry and very dry range is presented. Evaporation from the surface of a soil column is controlled by a constant flux of preconditioned air and the resulting vapour flux is measured by infrared absorption spectroscopy. The data are inverted under the assumptions that (i the simultaneous movement of water in the liquid and vapour is represented by Richards' equation with an effective hydraulic conductivity and that (ii the coupling between the soil and the well-mixed atmosphere can be modelled by a boundary layer with a constant transfer resistance. The optimised model fits the data exceptionally well. Remaining deviations during the initial phase of an experiment are thought to be well-understood and are attributed to the onset of the heat flow through the column which compensates the latent heat of evaporation.

  4. Spatial heterogeneity of aggregate stability and soil carbon in semi-arid rangeland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, S B; Herrick, J E; Wander, M M; Wright, S F

    2002-01-01

    To measure and manage for C sequestration in heterogeneous rangeland systems, we need to more fully understand spatial patterns of soil resources. Spatial distributions of aggregate stability and soil carbon were investigated in a semiarid rangeland in New Mexico, USA. Soil was analyzed from plant interspaces, black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda (Torr.) Torr.), and mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa Torr.) in a landscape-replicated study. Aggregate stability at the 250 microm scale, carbonate C, organic C and N, C:N ratio, and glomalin, were all highest under mesquite. Soil C:N ratio was the best predictor of aggregate stability. Estimates of metric tons of C per hectare in the top 10 cm were highly variable at patch and landscape scales, varying from 4.2 to 10.5 under mesquite and from 3.0 to 7.0 in interspaces. High variability of aggregate stability and soil C has important implications for C sequestration. We argue that this multi-scale soil heterogeneity must be considered when measuring and managing for C sequestration.

  5. Understanding spatial heterogeneity in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling in regenerating tropical dry forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, B. G.; Powers, J. S.; Branco, S.; Adams, R.; Schilling, E.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical dry forests (TDFs) currently store significant amounts of carbon in their biomass and soils, but these highly seasonal ecosystems may be uniquely sensitive to altered climates. The ability to quantitatively predict C cycling in TDFs under global change is constrained by tremendous spatial heterogeneity in soil parent material, land-use history, and plant community composition. To explore this variation, we examined soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics in 18 permanent plots spanning orthogonal gradients of stand age and soil fertility. Soil C and N pools, microbial biomass, and microbial extracellular enzyme activities were most variable at small (m2) spatial scales. However, the ratio of organic vs. inorganic N cycling was consistently higher in forest stands dominated by slow-growing, evergreen trees that associate with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Similarly, although bulk litter stocks and turnover rates varied greatly among plots, litter decomposition tended to be slower in ectomycorrhizae-dominated stands. Soil N cycling tended to be more conservative in older plots, although the relationship between stand age and element cycling was weak. Our results emphasize that microscale processes, particularly interactions between mycorrhizal fungi and free-living decomposers, are important controls on ecosystem-scale element cycling.

  6. Spatially resolved data on sediment transport: 1) field application examining fluorescent soil particle movement from tillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinton, John; Hardy, Robert; Pates, Jacqueline; James, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Understanding where sediment originates from and where it travels to, in what quantities and at which rate is at the heart of many questions surrounding sediment transport. Progress towards unravelling these questions and deepening our understanding has come from a wide range of approaches, including laboratory and field experiments conducted at a variety of scales. In seeking to understand the connectivity of sources and sinks of sediment scientists have spent considerable energy in developing tracing technologies. These have included numerous studies that have relied on the chemical properties of the soil and sediment to establish source-sink connectivity, and the use of 137Ceasium, from radioactive fall-out, to map sediment redistribution. More recently there has been an upsurge in interest in the use of artificially applied soil tracers, including rare earth element oxides and magnetic minerals. However all these tracing methods have a significant drawback: they rely on the collection of samples to assess their concentration. This means that their spatial distribution cannot easily be established in situ and that the environment that is being studied is damaged by the sampling process; nor can data be collected in real time which allows a dynamic understanding of erosion and transport processes to be developed. Here we report on the field application of a fluorescent sand sized tracer at the hillslope scale during a tillage erosion experiment. Here we trialled both intensity based and particle counting methodologies for tracer enumeration. After simulating seven years of tillage on a hillslope we were able to precisely determine the distribution of the fluorescent tracer and also its incorporation and distribution within the soil profile. Single grains of tracer could be found over 35 m from the insertion point. In a second abstract we report on an application that combines novel fluorescent videography techniques with custom image processing to trace the

  7. Spatial and Real Estate Management Determinants of Tourism Sector Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alina Źróbek-Różańska; Joanna Zielińska-Szczepkowska

    2014-01-01

    .... The realization of particular tasks is a very complex process, and requires rational and active spatial and real estate management, coherent with the principles of spatial order and sustainable development.

  8. Spatial Heterogeneity in Soil Microbes Alters Outcomes of Plant Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Karen C.; Karst, Justine; Biederman, Lori A.; Borrett, Stuart R.; Hastings, Alan; Walsh, Vonda; Bever, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Plant species vary greatly in their responsiveness to nutritional soil mutualists, such as mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia, and this responsiveness is associated with a trade-off in allocation to root structures for resource uptake. As a result, the outcome of plant competition can change with the density of mutualists, with microbe-responsive plant species having high competitive ability when mutualists are abundant and non-responsive plants having high competitive ability with low densities of mutualists. When responsive plant species also allow mutualists to grow to greater densities, changes in mutualist density can generate a positive feedback, reinforcing an initial advantage to either plant type. We study a model of mutualist-mediated competition to understand outcomes of plant-plant interactions within a patchy environment. We find that a microbe-responsive plant can exclude a non-responsive plant from some initial conditions, but it must do so across the landscape including in the microbe-free areas where it is a poorer competitor. Otherwise, the non-responsive plant will persist in both mutualist-free and mutualist-rich regions. We apply our general findings to two different biological scenarios: invasion of a non-responsive plant into an established microbe-responsive native population, and successional replacement of non-responders by microbe-responsive species. We find that resistance to invasion is greatest when seed dispersal by the native plant is modest and dispersal by the invader is greater. Nonetheless, a native plant that relies on microbial mutualists for competitive dominance may be particularly vulnerable to invasion because any disturbance that temporarily reduces its density or that of the mutualist creates a window for a non-responsive invader to establish dominance. We further find that the positive feedbacks from associations with beneficial soil microbes create resistance to successional turnover. Our theoretical results constitute an

  9. Spatial heterogeneity in soil microbes alters outcomes of plant competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen C Abbott

    Full Text Available Plant species vary greatly in their responsiveness to nutritional soil mutualists, such as mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia, and this responsiveness is associated with a trade-off in allocation to root structures for resource uptake. As a result, the outcome of plant competition can change with the density of mutualists, with microbe-responsive plant species having high competitive ability when mutualists are abundant and non-responsive plants having high competitive ability with low densities of mutualists. When responsive plant species also allow mutualists to grow to greater densities, changes in mutualist density can generate a positive feedback, reinforcing an initial advantage to either plant type. We study a model of mutualist-mediated competition to understand outcomes of plant-plant interactions within a patchy environment. We find that a microbe-responsive plant can exclude a non-responsive plant from some initial conditions, but it must do so across the landscape including in the microbe-free areas where it is a poorer competitor. Otherwise, the non-responsive plant will persist in both mutualist-free and mutualist-rich regions. We apply our general findings to two different biological scenarios: invasion of a non-responsive plant into an established microbe-responsive native population, and successional replacement of non-responders by microbe-responsive species. We find that resistance to invasion is greatest when seed dispersal by the native plant is modest and dispersal by the invader is greater. Nonetheless, a native plant that relies on microbial mutualists for competitive dominance may be particularly vulnerable to invasion because any disturbance that temporarily reduces its density or that of the mutualist creates a window for a non-responsive invader to establish dominance. We further find that the positive feedbacks from associations with beneficial soil microbes create resistance to successional turnover. Our theoretical

  10. Spatial distribution of water infiltration in erosion-affected arable soils of morainic landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájek, Daniel; Gerke, Horst H.; Deumlich, Detlef; Dumbrovský, Miroslav

    2017-04-01

    In heterogeneous morainic soil landscapes, the effect of soil erosion and compaction on water infiltration can be highly complex while the erosion and tillage history may depend on the slope position. The aim was to evaluate compaction effects on the water infiltration of cultivated soils at contrasting landscape positions for no-till and conventionally tilled plots of the eroded landscape. Infiltration was measured using use the Guelph permeameter in two depths (20 and 40 cm) at two different locations with more-or-less eroded Luvisols. The saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) was calculated from the steady infiltration rate of two pressure steps. Data from 4 locations at the arable soil of the CarboZalf-D field site Holzendorf (Uckermark) were characterized by relatively large spatial heterogeneity in top- and subsoil and without spatial trends. For the erosion plots in Müncheberg, infiltration data were obtained at 6 locations, 3 at a conventionally tilled and 3 at the neighboring no-till plot (i.e., one location each at the up-, mid-, and downslope positions). Here, the Kfs-values were always larger in the top- than in the subsoils and larger for the conventionally tilled than for the no-till plot. In contrast to expected tillage-induced subsoil compaction, the subsoil Kfs-values of the no-till plot were smaller than those of the tilled plot. The sampling time was before harvest of the Sudan grass crop in Müncheberg such that the plant root system was still intact while it was after harvest and soil tillage at the CarboZalf plots. The results suggest that the soil state at the time of infiltration measurement was more important for describing the soil hydraulic properties than the spatial distribution of compacted regions.

  11. Heterogeneity of gaseous emissions in soils-spatial vs temporal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Laura; Chadwick, David; Misselbrook, Tom; Donovan, Neil; Dunn, Rob; Griffith, Bruce; Orr, Robert; Smith, Keith; Rees, Robert M.; Bell, Madeleine; Watson, Catherine; McGeough, Karen; McNeill, Gavin; Williams, John; Cloy, Joanna; Thorman, Rachel; Dhanoa, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) plays a dual role in the atmosphere as a greenhouse gas and via its influence on stratospheric ozone chemistry. The main source of N2O is agricultural soil, with an estimated 96 kt emitted from this source in the UK in 2012 (ca. 83% of the total UK N2O emissions). Microbial transformations such as nitrification, denitrification and chemodenitrification are responsible for these emissions. Soil texture and structure and land management practices (including presence of livestock) -- soil wetness, aeration, temperature and mineral N content -- influence the magnitude of the emissions. Heterogeneity in nutrient distribution and moisture, i.e. hot spots, create spatial variations in the main drivers of these transformations. Studies at laboratory scale are aimed to minimize the variability encountered in the field but although they provide important information on the controlling factors of the soil processes, they are not useful for real quantification. Daily and seasonal variation (temporal) in soil conditions (chemistry, physics and biology) and thus in emissions also occurs. This variability makes it a difficult challenge to quantify emissions and currently makes the soil source the largest contributor to the overall uncertainty of the UK greenhouse gas inventory. Here we present results of a statistical study on the variability of N2O emissions from measurements using the static chamber technique for a variety of N sources. Results from measurements using automated chambers are also presented. Part of the work was funded by the UK government to improve the quantification of this source by measuring emissions from sites with contrasting soil, climate and land management combinations. We also include results from measurements carried out with automated chambers on the UK National Capability Farm Platform in the South West of England. The results show that spatial variability largely contributes to the uncertainty of emissions but temporal

  12. Soil moisture determination by means of the data driven models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisty, Milan; Suchar, Martin; Bajtek, Zbynek

    2010-05-01

    Information's about soil water content are in the planning of water resources and management very valuable. Modeling and predicting soil water transfer is very important in agriculture or hydrology - e.g. for purposes of the effective irrigation management. Many tried and proven methods of estimating or measuring soil moisture are available. The choice of the method which in particular case is eligible, depends on a variety of factors such as accuracy, cost, and ease of use. One of the most important hydro physical characteristics of soil is water retention curve (WRC), which is input to various hydraulic and hydrological models and reflects the energy dependence of soil water and the water content, e.g. the relationship between soil moisture and moisture potential. The method of determining the water retention curve points in laboratory conditions is very expensive, time consuming and labor intensive. In soil physics, therefore, were developed methods for determining soil hydro physical characteristics from easier obtained characteristics - soil granularity composition, organic matter content and bulk density. For these models (or relations) have been established title pedotransfer functions (PTF). These functions specify different soil characteristics and properties from relationship with another. The submitted work compares the creation of such functional dependencies using neural networks, hybrid self-organizing map (SOM) and support vector machines (SVM) model and standard multi-linear regression method. The SVMs formulate a quadratic optimization problem that avoids local minima problems, which makes them often superior to traditional (iterative) learning algorithms such as multi-layer perceptron (MLP) type of neural network. Input data are taken from Zahorská lowland in Slovakia. It was taken 140 soil samples from various localities of Zahorská lowland on finding soil characteristics and on the expression of water retention curve points. Sandy soils are

  13. Polychlorinated biphenyls in Nepalese surface soils: Spatial distribution, air-soil exchange, and soil-air partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ishwar Chandra; Devi, Ningombam Linthoingambi; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2017-10-01

    Regardless of the ban on the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) decade ago, significant measures of PCBs are still transmitted from essential sources in cities and are all inclusive ecological contaminants around the world. In this study, the concentrations of PCBs in soil, the air-soil exchange of PCBs, and the soil-air partitioning coefficient (K SA ) of PCBs were investigated in four noteworthy urban areas in Nepal. Overall, the concentrations of ∑ 30 PCBs ranged from 10 to 59.4ng/g dry weight; dw (mean 12.2ng/g ±11.2ng/g dw). The hexa-CBs (22-31%) was most dominant among several PCB-homologues, followed by tetra-CBs (20-29%), hepta-CBs (12-21%), penta-CBs (15-17%) and tri-CBs (9-19%). The sources of elevated level of PCBs discharge in Nepalese soil was identified as emission from transformer oil, lubricants, breaker oil, cutting oil and paints, and cable insulation. Slightly strong correlation of PCBs with TOC than BC demonstrated that amorphous organic matter (AOM) assumes a more critical part in holding of PCBs than BC in Nepalese soil. The fugacity fraction (ff) results indicated the soil being the source of PCB in air through volatilization and net transport from soil to air. The soil-air partitioning coefficient study suggests the absorption by soil organic matter control soil-air partitioning of PCBs. Slightly weak but positive correlation of measured Log K SA with Log K OA (R 2 = 0.483) and Log K BC-A (R 2 = 0.438) suggests that both Log K OA and Log K BC-A can predict soil-air partitioning to lesser extent for PCBs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of variable soil texture, metal saturation of soil organic matter (SOM) and tree species composition on spatial distribution of SOM in forest soils in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruba, Piotr; Socha, Jarosław; Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2015-07-15

    In this study we investigated the effect of fine (ϕsoils, site moisture, metal (Al and Fe) of soil organic matter (SOM) and forest species composition on the spatial distribution of carbon (C) pools in forest soils at the landscape scale. We established 275 plots in regular 200×200m grid in a forested area of 14.4km(2). Fieldwork included soil sampling of the organic horizon, mineral topsoil and subsoil down to 40cm deep. We analysed the vertical and horizontal distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks, as well as the quantity of physically separated fractions including the free light (fLF), occluded light (oLF) and mineral associated fractions (MAF) in the mineral topsoil (A, AE) horizons. Distribution of C in soils was predominantly affected by the variation in the FF content. In soils richer in the FF more SOC was accumulated in mineral horizons and less in the organic horizons. Accumulation of SOC in mineral soil was also positively affected by the degree of saturation of SOM with Al and Fe. The increasing share of beech influenced the distribution of C stock in soil profiles by reducing the depth of O horizon and increasing C stored in mineral soil. The content of FF was positively correlated with the content of C in MAF and fLF fractions. The content of oLF and MAF fractions was also positively influenced by a higher degree of metal saturation, particularly Al. Our results confirmed that Al plays an important role in the stabilization of SOM inside aggregates (CoLF) and as in CMAF fractions. We also found a significant, positive effect of beech on the CfLF and fir on the CoLF content. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison Of Selected Pedotransfer Functions For The Determination Of Soil Water Retention Curves

    OpenAIRE

    Kupec Michal; Stradiot Peter; Rehák Štefan

    2015-01-01

    Soil water retention curves were measured using a sandbox and the pressure plate extractor method on undisturbed soil samples from the Borská Lowland. The basic soil properties (e.g. soil texture, dry bulk density) of the samples were determined. The soil water retention curve was described using the van Genuchten model (Van Genuchten, 1980). The parameters of the model were obtained using the RETC program (Van Genuchten et al., 1991). For the determination of the soil water retention curve p...

  16. LAND – PRICE DETERMINANTS USING THE SPATIAL ECONOMETRICS MODELING IN THE MOLDAVIAN REAL ESTATE MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatol RACUL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to determine the factors which influence the land market in Republic of Moldova. The paper aims to discover the determinants for land pricing using the spatial econometrics modeling, as it is widely used when the spatial component is present. The country’s agricultural economy combined with the interest of international organizations and limited data availability directed the focus of this empirical study towards land for agricultural purposes. The factors which determine the land market (for agricultural purposes in Republic of Moldova are mainly related to economic characteristics of land, such as field productivity, the position on the local landscape (characterized by angle and soil quality, proximity to local or national roads (due to storage and transportation reasons, and economic characteristics of owners. Also, another important role in land market price creation is the pressure of urban space to transform land for agricultural use close to cities and villages in spaces for industrial or residential purposes. This is characterized by the financial pressure from the urban centers which has become significant in land transactions.

  17. Using 137Cs to study spatial patterns of soil erosion and soil organic carbon (SOC) in an agricultural catchment of the typical black soil region, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Haiyan; Li, Qiuyan; Sun, Liying; Cai, Qiangguo

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the spatial pattern of soil organic carbon (SOC) is of great importance because of global environmental concerns. Soil erosion and its subsequent redistribution contribute significantly to the redistribution of SOC in agricultural ecosystems. This study investigated the relationships between (137)Cs and SOC over an agricultural landscape, and SOC redistribution was conducted for an agricultural catchment of the black soil region in Northeast China. The spatial patterns of (137)Cs and SOC were greatly affected by the established shelterbelts and the developed ephemeral gullies. (137)Cs were significantly correlated with SOC when (137)Cs were >2000 Bq m(-2), while no relation was observed between them when (137)Cs were erosion such as vegetative productivity, mineralization of SOC, landscape position and management induced their spatial difference of (137)Cs and SOC. Using (137)Cs technique to directly study SOC dynamics must be cautious in the black soils. The net SOC loss rate across the entire catchment during 1954-2010 was 92.8 kg ha(-1) yr(-1), with around 42% of the eroded SOC being redeposited within the catchment. Such information can help guide shelterbelt establishment or other land management to reduce SOC loss in the agricultural ecosystems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spatial Pattern Determination of Biodiversity Threats at Landscape Level (Case Study: Golestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mirzaei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mapping spatial patterns of potential biodiversity threats is one of the important steps for effective conservation planning and activities. To determine the spatial patterns of threats in Golestan province, 12 criteria in four main groups including structural (fractal coefficient of perimeter, circularity ratio of area, average slope, compositional aspects of biodiversity (presence of species at risk, non-biological threats (distance to city, distance to village, distance to road, distance to infrastructure, distance to agricultural land, soil pollution, risk of fire and isolation (Nearest Neighbor Index were used. These data layers were digitized in GIS environment and were weighted through Analytical Hierarchy Process. A weighted linear combination was then used to map the spatial pattern of biodiversity threats in the province. Compositional aspect (0.59, non-biological threats (0.23, isolation (0.11, and structural aspect (0.07 were relatively weighted in the order of importance. Central parts of the province and patches in the northern and southern parts were recognized to be more exposed to biodiversity threats. The central parts of the province were mostly threatened by urban, industrial, road and agricultural development, whereas the northern and southern parts were recognized as areas of conservation importance having a variety of threatened birds.

  19. Spatial Data Mining for Estimating Cover Management Factor of Universal Soil Loss Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, F.; Lin, T. C.; Chiang, S. H.; Chen, W. W.

    2016-12-01

    Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) is a widely used mathematical model that describes long-term soil erosion processes. Among the six different soil erosion risk factors of USLE, the cover-management factor (C-factor) is related to land-cover/land-use. The value of C-factor ranges from 0.001 to 1, so it alone might cause a thousandfold difference in a soil erosion analysis using USLE. The traditional methods for the estimation of USLE C-factor include in situ experiments, soil physical parameter models, USLE look-up tables with land use maps, and regression models between vegetation indices and C-factors. However, these methods are either difficult or too expensive to implement in large areas. In addition, the values of C-factor obtained using these methods can not be updated frequently, either. To address this issue, this research developed a spatial data mining approach to estimate the values of C-factor with assorted spatial datasets for a multi-temporal (2004 to 2008) annual soil loss analysis of a reservoir watershed in northern Taiwan. The idea is to establish the relationship between the USLE C-factor and spatial data consisting of vegetation indices and texture features extracted from satellite images, soil and geology attributes, digital elevation model, road and river distribution etc. A decision tree classifier was used to rank influential conditional attributes in the preliminary data mining. Then, factor simplification and separation were considered to optimize the model and the random forest classifier was used to analyze 9 simplified factor groups. Experimental results indicate that the overall accuracy of the data mining model is about 79% with a kappa value of 0.76. The estimated soil erosion amounts in 2004-2008 according to the data mining results are about 50.39 - 74.57 ton/ha-year after applying the sediment delivery ratio and correction coefficient. Comparing with estimations calculated with C-factors from look-up tables, the soil erosion

  20. Environmental controls on the spatial variability of soil water dynamics in a small watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Chau, Henry Wai; Qiu, Weiwen; Si, Bingcheng

    2017-08-01

    Soil water content (SWC) in the root zone is controlled by a suite of environmental variables. Complication arises from the cross-correlation between these environmental variables. Therefore, there is still a poor understanding on the controls of root zone SWC dynamics due, in part, to a lack of an appropriate method to untangle the controls. The objective of this study was to reveal the dominant controls of root zone soil water dynamics in a small watershed using an appropriate method based on empirical orthogonal function (EOF). For this purpose, SWC of 0-0.8 m layer in a small watershed on the Chinese Loess Plateau was used. The space-variant temporal anomaly (Rtn) of SWC, which is responsible for the spatial variability of soil water dynamics, was decomposed using the EOF. Results indicated that 86% of the total variations of Rtn were explained by three significant spatial structures (EOFs). Sand content and grass yield dominated the EOF1 of Rtn and elevation and aspect dominated EOF2 and EOF3 of Rtn , respectively. Moreover, their effects on soil water dynamics were time-dependent. The EOF analysis showed that three independent groups of factors (i.e., soil and vegetation dominated earth surface condition, elevation related near surface air humidity, and aspect regulated energy input) may drive the variability in soil water dynamics. Traditional correlation analysis, however, indicated that SWC was greater at higher elevation and sun-facing slopes, which distorted the soil water dynamics controls. Although original SWC-based partial correlation basically supported our findings, the results highly depended on the controlling factors selected. This study implied that Rtn rather than original SWC should be preferred for understanding soil water dynamics controls.

  1. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stock in Moso bamboo forests in subtropical China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolu; Xia, Mingpeng; Pérez-Cruzado, César; Guan, Fengying; Fan, Shaohui

    2017-02-01

    Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla (Carr.) Mitford cv. Pubescens) is an important timber substitute in China. Site specific stand management requires an accurate estimate of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock for maintaining stand productivity and understanding global carbon cycling. This study compared ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW) approaches to study the spatial distribution of SOC stock within 0-60 cm using 111 soil samples in Moso bamboo forests in subtropical China. Similar spatial patterns but different spatial distribution ranges of SOC stock from OK and IDW highlighted the necessity to apply different approaches to obtain accurate and consistent results of SOC stock distribution. Different spatial patterns of SOC stock suggested the use of different fertilization treatments in Moso bamboo forests across the study area. SOC pool within 0-60 cm was 6.46 and 6.22 Tg for OK and IDW; results which were lower than that of conventional approach (CA, 7.41 Tg). CA is not recommended unless coordinates of the sampling locations are missing and the spatial patterns of SOC stock are not required. OK is recommended for the uneven distribution of sampling locations. Our results can improve methodology selection for investigating spatial distribution of SOC stock in Moso bamboo forests.

  2. High Spatial Resolution Soil Moisture with Passive Active Sensors Using a Change Detection Approach: Studies Using SMAPVEX12 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.; Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important variable in many areas of geosciences. The passive microwave sensors have been providing soil moisture of various spatial resolutions and are available for all-weather conditions. However, restricted by the antenna diameter of microwave radiometer, the spatial resolution of passive microwave soil moisture product is at tens of kilometers and needs to be improved for many applications. The SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) is set to be launched in late 2014 and will be the first mission to provide L-band radar/radiometer soil moisture retrievals at three resolutions. The SMAPVEX12 is a pre-launch field validation experiment for evaluating and testing the soil moisture retrievals acquired from SMAP satellite. Airborne data using PALS (Passive/Active L-band Sensor) at two along-track resolutions (650 m and 1590 m) and UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar) at 5 m spatial resolution as well as in-situ measurements were collected during the campaign. The study will implement a Single Channel Algorithm (SCA) to retrieve soil moisture from high/low altitude PALS L-band radiometer observations, as well as produce downscaled soil moisture change by combining low spatial resolution soil moisture retrievals and high spatial resolution PALS L-band radar observations through a change-detection algorithm, which models the relationship between change in radar backscatter and the change in soil moisture.

  3. Explaining Spatial Homogamy. Compositional, Spatial and Regional Cultural Determinants of Regional Patterns of Spatial Homogamy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haandrikman, Karen; van Wissen, Leo J. G.; Harmsen, Carel N.

    Spatial homogamy, or sharing a similarity in geographical origin, is an under-researched dimension in homogamy studies. In the Netherlands, people tend to choose spatially homogamous partners. Moreover, there is considerable regional variation in spatial homogamy, even when residential location and

  4. Explaining spatial homogamy: compositional, spatial and regional cultural determinants of regional patterns of spatial homogamy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haandrikman, K.; van Wissen, L.J.G.; Harmsen, C.N.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial homogamy, or sharing a similarity in geographical origin, is an under-researched dimension in homogamy studies. In the Netherlands, people tend to choose spatially homogamous partners. Moreover, there is considerable regional variation in spatial homogamy, even when residential location and

  5. Spatio-temporal dynamics of soil water in a semi-arid Mediterranean ecosystem: implications for plant dynamics and spatial pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, Yolanda; Moret-Fernández, David; Arroyo, Antonio I.; de Frutos, Ángel; Saiz, Hugo; Alados, Concepción L.

    2014-05-01

    Soil water presents high temporal and spatial variability in drylands. The temporal variability is determined by the heterogeneous and unpredictable rainfall pattern in these ecosystems. The spatial variability is associated to the well-known "source-sink" eco-hydrological dynamics occurring in drylands, related to the patchy vegetation and bare soil structure with water run-off generated on the bare soil patches and water infiltration preferentially into vegetated areas. These run-off - run-on systems has been extensively studied and the processes involved are well known, including the role of different plant types capturing the water run-on, increasing infiltration and reducing evaporation under plant canopies. However, integrative studies of hydrological and ecological processes in a whole ecosystem during a prolonged time period are scarce, despite the relevance of this approach to understand the role of hydrological processes (and what hydrological process are most important) determining plant dynamics and spatial pattern. We present an eco-hydrological study conducted in a semiarid Mediterranean ecosystem in the Middle Ebro Valley (NE Spain), where soil water content and patterns of plant establishment were followed during 30 months in 4 microsites: open bare areas, under two shrub species (Salsola vermiculata and Artemisia herba-alba) and one perennial grass species (Lygeum spartum). These 4 microsites represent the vast majority of the land in the ecosystem under study. Water infiltration, photosynthetic photon flux and soil temperature were also recorded in the 4 microsites. Simultaneously, seedling establishment and survival were recorded twice per year in the same microsites. Lygeum spartum was the microsite with the largest increment in water infiltration, and with the largest reduction in both solar radiation and soil temperature when compared with the measurement in the open bare areas. However, soil water content after rainfall under the canopy of

  6. Concentration and Spatial Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Surface Roadside Soils, Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhaoyu; Liu, Ying; He, Yao; Chen, Ling

    2010-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent organic pollutants that may lead to mutagenesis, carcinogenesis or teratogenesis. Vehicular traffic pollution is one of the important sources for PAHs in soils. Concentrations of 19 PAHs were detected in soils along nine roads in Shanghai by automatic Soxhlet extraction and high performance liquid chromatography. Concentration and spatial distribution of PAHs in surface soils beside nine target roads in Shanghai were investigated and a preliminary migration regularity of PAHs was proposed based on data analysis of Cheting Highway (NO.320 Chinese National Highway). The result showed that the total concentrations of PAHs in the target roadside soils ranged from undetectable to 34.6μg/g-dw, with a mean of 7.77μg/g-dw. In comparison with the level of PAHs in urban or suburban roadside soils, the results showed significantly that Σ PAHs concentration in roadside soils inside industrial areas was higher. The study on the migration regularity of PAHs in soils along roads demonstrated that surface runoff had a more significant effect on the PAHs transportation than air-borne transportation.

  7. Modelling shallow landslide susceptibility by means of a subsurface flow path connectivity index and estimates of soil depth spatial distribution

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    C. Lanni

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Topographic index-based hydrological models have gained wide use to describe the hydrological control on the triggering of rainfall-induced shallow landslides at the catchment scale. A common assumption in these models is that a spatially continuous water table occurs simultaneously across the catchment. However, during a rainfall event isolated patches of subsurface saturation form above an impeding layer and their hydrological connectivity is a necessary condition for lateral flow initiation at a point on the hillslope.

    Here, a new hydrological model is presented, which allows us to account for the concept of hydrological connectivity while keeping the simplicity of the topographic index approach. A dynamic topographic index is used to describe the transient lateral flow that is established at a hillslope element when the rainfall amount exceeds a threshold value allowing for (a development of a perched water table above an impeding layer, and (b hydrological connectivity between the hillslope element and its own upslope contributing area. A spatially variable soil depth is the main control of hydrological connectivity in the model. The hydrological model is coupled with the infinite slope stability model and with a scaling model for the rainfall frequency–duration relationship to determine the return period of the critical rainfall needed to cause instability on three catchments located in the Italian Alps, where a survey of soil depth spatial distribution is available. The model is compared with a quasi-dynamic model in which the dynamic nature of the hydrological connectivity is neglected. The results show a better performance of the new model in predicting observed shallow landslides, implying that soil depth spatial variability and connectivity bear a significant control on shallow landsliding.

  8. Scaling impacts on environmental controls and spatial heterogeneity of soil organic carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, U.; Riley, W. J.

    2015-07-01

    The spatial heterogeneity of land surfaces affects energy, moisture, and greenhouse gas exchanges with the atmosphere. However, representing the heterogeneity of terrestrial hydrological and biogeochemical processes in Earth system models (ESMs) remains a critical scientific challenge. We report the impact of spatial scaling on environmental controls, spatial structure, and statistical properties of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks across the US state of Alaska. We used soil profile observations and environmental factors such as topography, climate, land cover types, and surficial geology to predict the SOC stocks at a 50 m spatial scale. These spatially heterogeneous estimates provide a data set with reasonable fidelity to the observations at a sufficiently high resolution to examine the environmental controls on the spatial structure of SOC stocks. We upscaled both the predicted SOC stocks and environmental variables from finer to coarser spatial scales (s = 100, 200, and 500 m and 1, 2, 5, and 10 km) and generated various statistical properties of SOC stock estimates. We found different environmental factors to be statistically significant predictors at different spatial scales. Only elevation, temperature, potential evapotranspiration, and scrub land cover types were significant predictors at all scales. The strengths of control (the median value of geographically weighted regression coefficients) of these four environmental variables on SOC stocks decreased with increasing scale and were accurately represented using mathematical functions (R2 = 0.83-0.97). The spatial structure of SOC stocks across Alaska changed with spatial scale. Although the variance (sill) and unstructured variability (nugget) of the calculated variograms of SOC stocks decreased exponentially with scale, the correlation length (range) remained relatively constant across scale. The variance of predicted SOC stocks decreased with spatial scale over the range of 50 m to ~ 500 m, and remained

  9. Spectrophotometric flow-injection determination of sulphate in soil solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Silvia R P; Maniasso, Nelson; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2005-03-15

    A flow-injection procedure for spectrophotometric determination of sulphate in soil solutions is proposed. Samples are directly soaked from the soils under field conditions, in-line filtered through ceramic plates, and preserved with thymol. The method involves reaction with barium dimethylsulphonazo(III) (DMSA) in the presence of dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) with further measuring the decrease in absorbance at 668nm. A linear response is observed up to about 5mgl(-1) SO(4), and detection limit (3sigma criterion) is 0.1mgl(-1) SO(4). Only 4.5mug DMSA is consumed per determination. The system is rugged and baseline drift is not observed during extended operation periods. About 60 samples are injected per hour, and the results are precise (r.s.d. <2%) and in agreement with ion chromatography.

  10. Modelling the influence of plants on the spatial heterogeneity of soil water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchow, Melanie; van Schaik, Loes; Tietjen, Britta

    2015-04-01

    Plants are sessile organisms and as such depend on sufficient local water supply. At the same time, plants themselves directly influence the spatial water distribution in the soil. Thus, plants partly regulate their own water supply. Current ecohydrological models apply simplified approaches to assess infiltration and the spatial distribution of water. They often neglect the influence of the vegetation the spatial heterogeneity in soil water. For example, the shape of the leafage and the rooting system strongly impact the amount of water that reaches the soil and how it is spatially distributed. If rainfall hits the leafage only a fraction of the water falls trough directly. The remaining fraction is intercepted and firstly accumulates on the leaves. This water either runs down the stem (stem flow) or evaporates directly. As a result, more water is received in the local environment of the stem than under the remaining canopy. The rooting system additionally influences the amount of infiltrated water and its distribution in the soil: Roots lead to preferential flow paths and form small caverns that increase the water storage capacity. In our work we developed a simulation model (using Netlogo) to track the path of rainfall from its first contact with the leafage to its storage in the soil. Our model structure supports simulations for different morphological plant types that allow us to evaluate the effect of branch structure, leaf density and the rooting system on water fluxes and thus local availability. The parameterization of morphological traits is based on 2-D profiles derived by simple image processing of pictures. This provides a highly flexible framework to evaluate different scenarios, which we aim to couple with a dynamic vegetation model in the future.

  11. Spatially explicit analysis of metal transfer to biota: influence of soil contamination and landscape.

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    Clémentine Fritsch

    Full Text Available Concepts and developments for a new field in ecotoxicology, referred to as "landscape ecotoxicology," were proposed in the 1990s; however, to date, few studies have been developed in this emergent field. In fact, there is a strong interest in developing this area, both for renewing the concepts and tools used in ecotoxicology as well as for responding to practical issues, such as risk assessment. The aim of this study was to investigate the spatial heterogeneity of metal bioaccumulation in animals in order to identify the role of spatially explicit factors, such as landscape as well as total and extractable metal concentrations in soils. Over a smelter-impacted area, we studied the accumulation of trace metals (TMs: Cd, Pb and Zn in invertebrates (the grove snail Cepaea sp and the glass snail Oxychilus draparnaudi and vertebrates (the bank vole Myodes glareolus and the greater white-toothed shrew Crocidura russula. Total and CaCl(2-extractable concentrations of TMs were measured in soils from woody patches where the animals were captured. TM concentrations in animals exhibited a high spatial heterogeneity. They increased with soil pollution and were better explained by total rather than CaCl(2-extractable TM concentrations, except in Cepaea sp. TM levels in animals and their variations along the pollution gradient were modulated by the landscape, and this influence was species and metal specific. Median soil metal concentrations (predicted by universal kriging were calculated in buffers of increasing size and were related to bioaccumulation. The spatial scale at which TM concentrations in animals and soils showed the strongest correlations varied between metals, species and landscapes. The potential underlying mechanisms of landscape influence (community functioning, behaviour, etc. are discussed. Present results highlight the need for the further development of landscape ecotoxicology and multi-scale approaches, which would enhance our

  12. Temporal and spatial influences incur reconfiguration of Arctic heathland soil bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Richard; Saetnan, Eli R; Scullion, John; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan; Ostle, Nick; Edwards, Arwyn

    2016-06-01

    Microbial responses to Arctic climate change could radically alter the stability of major stores of soil carbon. However, the sensitivity of plot-scale experiments simulating climate change effects on Arctic heathland soils to potential confounding effects of spatial and temporal changes in soil microbial communities is unknown. Here, the variation in heathland soil bacterial communities at two survey sites in Sweden between spring and summer 2013 and at scales between 0-1 m and, 1-100 m and between sites (> 100 m) were investigated in parallel using 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP and amplicon sequencing. T-RFLP did not reveal spatial structuring of communities at scales structuring effects may not confound comparison between plot-scale treatments, temporal change is a significant influence. Moreover, the prominence of two temporally exclusive keystone taxa suggests that the stability of Arctic heathland soil bacterial communities could be disproportionally influenced by seasonal perturbations affecting individual taxa. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Tree species, spatial heterogeneity, and seasonality drive soil fungal abundance, richness, and composition in Neotropical rainforests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivlin, Stephanie N; Hawkes, Christine V

    2016-12-01

    Tropical ecosystems remain poorly understood and this is particularly true for belowground soil fungi. Soil fungi may respond to plant identity when, for example, plants differentially allocate resources belowground. However, spatial and temporal heterogeneity in factors such as plant inputs, moisture, or nutrients can also affect fungal communities and obscure our ability to detect plant effects in single time point studies or within diverse forests. To address this, we sampled replicated monocultures of four tree species and secondary forest controls sampled in the drier and wetter seasons over 2 years. Fungal community composition was primarily related to vegetation type and spatial heterogeneity in the effects of vegetation type, with increasing divergence partly reflecting greater differences in soil pH and soil moisture. Across wetter versus drier dates, fungi were 7% less diverse, but up to four-fold more abundant. The combined effects of tree species and seasonality suggest that predicted losses of tropical tree diversity and intensification of drought have the potential to cascade belowground to affect both diversity and abundance of tropical soil fungi. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Determination of spatial variability of aluminum according to the clay distribution in soils of Querência do Norte/Paraná State, BrazilDeterminação da variabilidade espacial de alumínio em função da distribuição de argila em solos de Querência do Norte/Paraná, Brasil

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    Marcelo Luiz Chicati

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The major part of Brazilian soils shows elevated aluminum contents and in several cases this element occurs in phytotoxic levels. Aluminum is a constituent of the soil´s clay minerals. Its release can occur to the exchangeable fraction or to the soil solution. The objective of this work was to demonstrate the relationship between the spatial variability of aluminum and the distribution of soil clay. In order to achieve that, a grid of soil samples was collected in field, defined by means of photointerpretation and observation of images. The results obtained in laboratory were submitted to statistical analyses to verify spatial dependence, which was proven later. The space continuity was studied by means of the semivariogram’s elaboration using different models. The best semivariograms were chosen by cross validation performed through "ordinary kriging". Thus, it could be observed that these variables showed structure of spatial dependence, with a positive correlation between them, besides it was possible to make maps in order to allow a better agricultural exploitation.A maior parte dos solos brasileiros possui altos teores de alumínio e, em muitos casos, este elemento ocorre em níveis fitotóxicos. Constituinte dos minerais de argila, pode ter sua liberação diretamente na forma trocável ou para a solução do solo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi demonstrar a relação entre a variabilidade espacial do alumínio e a distribuição de argila do solo. Para isto, foi coletada uma malha de amostras de solo em campo, definida por meio de fotointerpretação e observação de imagens. Os resultados obtidos em laboratório foram submetidos a análises estatísticas visando a verificação da dependência espacial, que foi comprovada posteriormente. A continuidade espacial foi estudada mediante a elaboração de semivariogramas utilizando-se diferentes modelos. Os melhores semivariogramas foram escolhidos mediante a validação cruzada executada

  15. Review and possible development direction of the methods for modeling of soil pollutants spatial distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, D. A.; Medvedev, A. N.; Sergeev, A. P.; Buevich, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    Forecasting of environmental pollutants spatial distribution is a significant field of research in view of the current concerns regarding environment all over the world. Due to the danger to health and environment associated with an increase in pollution of air, soil, water and biosphere, it is very important to have the models that are capable to describe the modern distribution of contaminants and to forecast the dynamic of their spreading in future at different territories. This article addresses the methods, which applied the most often in this field, with an accent on soil pollution. The possible direction of such methods further development is suggested.

  16. Alaskan soil carbon stocks: spatial variability and dependence on environmental factors

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    U. Mishra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The direction and magnitude of soil organic carbon (SOC changes in response to climate change depend on the spatial and vertical distributions of SOC. We estimated spatially resolved SOC stocks from surface to C horizon, distinguishing active-layer and permafrost-layer stocks, based on geospatial analysis of 472 soil profiles and spatially referenced environmental variables for Alaska. Total Alaska state-wide SOC stock was estimated to be 77 Pg, with 61% in the active-layer, 27% in permafrost, and 12% in non-permafrost soils. Prediction accuracy was highest for the active-layer as demonstrated by highest ratio of performance to deviation (1.5. Large spatial variability was predicted, with whole-profile, active-layer, and permafrost-layer stocks ranging from 1–296 kg C m−2, 2–166 kg m−2, and 0–232 kg m−2, respectively. Temperature and soil wetness were found to be primary controllers of whole-profile, active-layer, and permafrost-layer SOC stocks. Secondary controllers, in order of importance, were found to be land cover type, topographic attributes, and bedrock geology. The observed importance of soil wetness rather than precipitation on SOC stocks implies that the poor representation of high-latitude soil wetness in Earth system models may lead to large uncertainty in predicted SOC stocks under future climate change scenarios. Under strict caveats described in the text and assuming temperature changes from the A1B Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions scenario, our geospatial model indicates that the equilibrium average 2100 Alaska active-layer depth could deepen by 11 cm, resulting in a thawing of 13 Pg C currently in permafrost. The equilibrium SOC loss associated with this warming would be highest under continuous permafrost (31%, followed by discontinuous (28%, isolated (24.3%, and sporadic (23.6% permafrost areas. Our high-resolution mapping of soil carbon stock reveals the

  17. Spatial distribution of soil water repellency in a grassland located in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata

    2014-05-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) it is recognized to be very heterogeneous in time in space and depends on soil type, climate, land use, vegetation and season (Doerr et al., 2002). It prevents or reduces water infiltration, with important impacts on soil hydrology, influencing the mobilization and transport of substances into the soil profile. The reduced infiltration increases surface runoff and soil erosion. SWR reduce also the seed emergency and plant growth due the reduced amount of water in the root zone. Positive aspects of SWR are the increase of soil aggregate stability, organic carbon sequestration and reduction of water evaporation (Mataix-Solera and Doerr, 2004; Diehl, 2013). SWR depends on the soil aggregate size. In fire affected areas it was founded that SWR was more persistent in small size aggregates (Mataix-Solera and Doerr, 2004; Jordan et al., 2011). However, little information is available about SWR spatial distribution according to soil aggregate size. The aim of this work is study the spatial distribution of SWR in fine earth (Drop Penetration Method, which involves placing three drops of distilled water onto the soil surface and registering the time in seconds (s) required for the drop complete penetration (Wessel, 1988). Data did not respected Gaussian distribution, thus in order to meet normality requirements it was log-normal transformed. Spatial interpolations were carried out using Ordinary Kriging. The results shown that SWR was on average in fine earth 2.88 s (Coeficient of variation % (CV%)=44.62), 2-1mm 1.73 s (CV%=45.10), 1-0.5 mm 2.02 s (CV%=93.75), 0.5-0.25 mm 3.12 s (CV%=233.68) and in pattern was identified and the SWR was heterogeneously distributed. This suggests that the spatial distribution of SWR is very different according to the aggregate size. Future studies are needed in order to identify the causes and consequences of such dynamic. Acknowledgements The authors appreciated the support of the project "Litfire", Fire effects

  18. Rapid Determination Of Radiostrontium In Large Soil Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Shaw, Patrick J.

    2012-05-24

    A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in large soil samples has been developed at the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium in large soil samples for the measurement of strontium isotopes by gas flow proportional counting. The need for rapid analyses in the event of a Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD) or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) event is well-known. In addition, the recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid analyses for radionuclides in environmental samples in the event of a nuclear accident. The method employs a novel pre-concentration step that utilizes an iron hydroxide precipitation (enhanced with calcium phosphate) followed by a final calcium fluoride precipitation to remove silicates and other matrix components. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with a rapid Sr Resin separation using vacuum box technology, allow very large soil samples to be analyzed for {sup 89,90}Sr using gas flow proportional counting with a lower method detection limit. The calcium fluoride precipitation eliminates column flow problems typically associated with large amounts of silicates in large soil samples.

  19. Spatial distribution and controlling factors of heavy metals contents in paddy soil and crop grains of rice-wheat cropping system along highway in East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinfei; Zhao, Jian; Bian, Xinmin; Zhang, Weijian

    2012-10-01

    There is consensus concerning the heavy metal pollution from traffic emission on roadside agricultural land. However, few efforts have been paid on examining the contamination characteristics of heavy metals in roadside paddy-upland rotation field, and especially in combination with detailed quantitative analysis. In this study, we investigated the concentrations of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr and Zn) in soil and crop grains of the rice-wheat cropping system along a major highway in East China in 2008 and analyzed the spatial distribution characteristics of heavy metals and their influencing factors with GIS and Classification and Regression Trees (CART). Significantly elevated levels of heavy metals in soil, rice and wheat grains indicated the heavy metals contamination of traffic emission in roadside rice-wheat rotation field. The contamination levels of Cd, Cr and Zn in wheat grain were higher than rice grain, while that of Pb showed an opposite trend. Obvious dissimilarities in the spatial distributions of heavy metals contents were found between in the soil, rice and wheat grains, indicating that the heavy metals contents in the roadside crop grains were not only determined by the concentrations of heavy metals in the paddy soil. Results of CART analysis showed that the spatial variation of the heavy metals contents in crop grains was mainly affected by the soil organic matter or soil pH, followed by the distance from highway and wind direction. Our findings have important implications for the environmental assessment and crop planning for food security along the highway.

  20. Determination of the Content of Heavy Metals in Pyrite Contaminated Soil and Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Marić

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Determination of a pyrite contaminated soil texture, content of heavy metals in the soil and soil pH, was the aim in the investigation. Acidification of damaged soil was corrected by calcium carbonate. Mineral nutrients and organic matter (NPK, dung, earthworm cast, straw and coal dust were added to damaged soil. Afterwards, the soil was used for oat production. Determination of total heavy metal contents (Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe in soil was performed by atomic absorption spectrofotometry. Plant material (stems, seeds was analysed, too. Total concentration of the heavy metals in the plant material were greater than in crop obtained in unaffected soil.

  1. Determining disease intervention strategies using spatially resolved simulations.

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    Mark Read

    Full Text Available Predicting efficacy and optimal drug delivery strategies for small molecule and biological therapeutics is challenging due to the complex interactions between diverse cell types in different tissues that determine disease outcome. Here we present a new methodology to simulate inflammatory disease manifestation and test potential intervention strategies in silico using agent-based computational models. Simulations created using this methodology have explicit spatial and temporal representations, and capture the heterogeneous and stochastic cellular behaviours that lead to emergence of pathology or disease resolution. To demonstrate this methodology we have simulated the prototypic murine T cell-mediated autoimmune disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. In the simulation immune cell dynamics, neuronal damage and tissue specific pathology emerge, closely resembling behaviour found in the murine model. Using the calibrated simulation we have analysed how changes in the timing and efficacy of T cell receptor signalling inhibition leads to either disease exacerbation or resolution. The technology described is a powerful new method to understand cellular behaviours in complex inflammatory disease, permits rational design of drug interventional strategies and has provided new insights into the role of TCR signalling in autoimmune disease progression.

  2. Spatial distribution of selected heavy metals and soil fertility status in south-eastern Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saljnikov, E.; Mrvic, V.; Cakmak, D.; Nikoloski, M.; Perovic, V.; Kostic, L.; Brebanovic, B.

    2009-04-01

    Environmental pollution by heavy metals is one of the most powerful factors destroying biosphere components that directly affecting agricultural production quality and therefore health of human and animals. Regional soil contamination by heavy metals occurs mainly in industrial areas and in big cities. However, pollutants can be air-and/or water-transferred to big distances and may accumulated far from industrial zone what makes difficult to distinguish original background concentrations of heavy metals in soil. Our study covers south-eastern part of Serbia and is a part of a big project studying soil fertility and heavy metal contamination all around Serbia. Diverse natural characteristics and heterogeneity of soil cover, as well as, human activity greatly influenced soil fertility parameters, while, diverse geological substrate and human activity determined the level of potential geochemical pollution. There are number of industrial factories functioning from the last century on the studied area. Also, close to studied area, there was a mining in the middle of the last century. About 600 soil samples from surface 0-30 cm were investigated for main soil fertility characteristics (pH, humus, available K and P) and concentrations of selected heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb). Soils graded as very acidic cover 46% of the area, which are mainly mountains with acidic parent materials. Content of humus in 41% of soil samples were below 3%. The most of the soils (71%) are weakly supplied available phosphorus. While available potassium in more than 70% is presented in the concentrations enough for good soil quality. So, about 75% of studied area is characterized with unfavorable soil fertility properties (extremly low soil pH, very low content of available P, about half of the area maintained low soil humus) that is located under forests, meadows and pastures. Content of heavy metals on studied area in 80% of sampled soils was below maximum allowed concentrations

  3. Spatial Variability of Soil Characteristics along a Landscape Gradient in Bellanwila-Attidiya Area

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    S. Cooray

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are comprised of unique components of soil, water and biodiversity which are interconnected. Although water and biodiversity components of wetlands are being somewhat investigated, a very few research have been carried out to investigate soil properties.This study focused on spatial variability of soil chemical and physical parameters in a land use gradient around the Bellanwila-Attidiya Sanctuary, This study was carried out for a period of 3 months and several random soil samples were obtained from all land use areas. Selected physical and chemical properties of soil were analyzed according to the Standard Methods and the GIS maps were developed using ArcView GIS 3.2. The results indicated that all chemical and physical parameters of soil varied across the land use gradient, except for temperature. According to the GIS maps there are apparent variations in distribution of soil properties. On the surface, the highest level of each parameter was found as follows: - NO3- – industrial area, PO4 3- - functioning paddy fields, SO4 2- - residential area, Cl- - residential area, Fe3+ - functioning paddy fields, moisture content - wetland, pH – industrial area, salinity- residential area, electrical conductivity – residential area. At a 1 m depth the pattern was different: NO3- – abandoned paddy fields, PO4 3- – functioning paddy fields, SO4 2- - wetland, Cl- - wetland, Fe3+ - residential area, moisture content - wetland, pH – industrial area, salinity - wetland, electrical conductivity - wetland. The findings clearly exhibit the increases in anthropogenic pressure have resulted in wide-scale alternation of soil properties, at least in the surface soil, across a land use gradient. Managing land use in the watershed of the wetland thus needs adequate attention to conserve this natural ecosystem.

  4. Intrinsic Problems In Determination Of Soil Texture In Calcareous Soils Of Arid Zones

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    Mozna A. Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at studying the effect of removal of CaCO3 on the texture of the soil profile and that of the control section in some Aridisols of the Sudan. Sixty soil profiles were sampled from Shendi area latitude1636 and longitude 33 48 River Nile State Sudan. These soils were analyzed for CaCO3 and 20 of these profiles were found to be of relatively appreciable calcareousness and were therefore selected for this study. The following three weighted soil textures were determined 1 before any removal of the CaCO3 Texture1 2 after the removal of CaCO3 Texture2 3 after amending the texture by adding the clay sized CaCO3 to the silt fraction Texture 3. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences among soil separates in the three textures except between clay of T2 and clay of T3 and among sand fractions in the three textures. That was not unexpected because the first texture included both mineral separates plus their equivalent size of CaCO3 the second texture included only the mineral separates in complete absence of CaCO3 while texture 3 was an amended texture. The change in the textural class amounted to 72 of the profiles. Statistical analysis in the weighted texture of the control section revealed that this texture was not affected except in two profiles. That could be attributed to the fact that the clay content of the soils of the study area did not fall at or near the boundary between any two major textural classes used in the Soil Taxonomy. The size of the CaCO3 was found in the order of clay size silt size sand size.

  5. Spatial Distribution of Heavy Metals and the Environmental Quality of Soil in the Northern Plateau of Spain by Geostatistical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Francés, Fernando; Martínez-Graña, Antonio; Zarza, Carmelo Ávila; Sánchez, Antonio García; Rojo, Pilar Alonso

    2017-05-26

    The environmental quality of soil in the central part of the Northern Plateau of Spain has been analyzed by studying the heavy metal content of 166 samples belonging to the horizons A, B and C of 89 soil profiles. The analysis to assess the environmental risk of heavy metals in the soil was carried out by means of the spatial distribution of nine heavy metals and the use of several pollution indices. The results showed that the concentration values of heavy metals (x ± S) in the superficial soil horizons were the following: With a total of 6.71 ± 3.51 mg kg -1, the contents of Cd is 0.08 ± 0.06 mg kg-1, Co is 6.49 ± 3.21 mg kg-1, Cu is 17.19 ± 10.69 mg kg-1, Cr is 18.68 ± 12.28 mg kg-1, Hg is 0.083 ± 0.063 mg kg-1, Ni is 12.05 ± 6.76 mg kg-1, Pb is 14.10 ± 11.32 mg kg-1 and Zn is 35.31 ± 14.63 mg kg-1. These nine metals exceed the values of the natural geological background level of Tertiary period sediments and rocks that form part of the Northern Plateau in Spain. Nemerow and Potential Ecological Risk indices were calculated, with the "improved" Nemerow index allowing pollution within the soil superficial horizons to be determined. The data obtained indicated that the majority of the soil (54.61%) showed low to moderate contamination, 22.31% showed moderate contamination and 21.54% of the samples were not contaminated. If we consider the Potential of Ecological Risk Index (RI), the largest percentage of soil samples showed low (70.79%) to moderate (25.38%) ecological risk of potential contamination, where the rest of the soil presented a considerable risk of contamination. The nine trace elements were divided into three principal components: PC1 (Cu, Cr, Ni, Co and Zn), PC2 (As and Hg) and PC3 (Cd). All metals accumulated in the soil came from parent rock, agricultural practices and the run-off of residual waters towards rivers and streams caused by industrial development and an increase in population density. Finally, cartography of the spatial

  6. Spatial Distribution of Heavy Metals and the Environmental Quality of Soil in the Northern Plateau of Spain by Geostatistical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Francés, Fernando; Martínez-Graña, Antonio; Ávila Zarza, Carmelo; García Sánchez, Antonio; Alonso Rojo, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    The environmental quality of soil in the central part of the Northern Plateau of Spain has been analyzed by studying the heavy metal content of 166 samples belonging to the horizons A, B and C of 89 soil profiles. The analysis to assess the environmental risk of heavy metals in the soil was carried out by means of the spatial distribution of nine heavy metals and the use of several pollution indices. The results showed that the concentration values of heavy metals (x¯ ± S) in the superficial soil horizons were the following: With a total of 6.71 ± 3.51 mg·kg−1, the contents of Cd is 0.08 ± 0.06 mg·kg−1, Co is 6.49 ± 3.21 mg·kg−1, Cu is 17.19 ± 10.69 mg·kg−1, Cr is 18.68 ± 12.28 mg·kg−1, Hg is 0.083 ± 0.063 mg·kg−1, Ni is 12.05 ± 6.76 mg·kg−1, Pb is 14.10 ± 11.32 mg·kg−1 and Zn is 35.31 ± 14.63 mg·kg−1. These nine metals exceed the values of the natural geological background level of Tertiary period sediments and rocks that form part of the Northern Plateau in Spain. Nemerow and Potential Ecological Risk indices were calculated, with the “improved” Nemerow index allowing pollution within the soil superficial horizons to be determined. The data obtained indicated that the majority of the soil (54.61%) showed low to moderate contamination, 22.31% showed moderate contamination and 21.54% of the samples were not contaminated. If we consider the Potential of Ecological Risk Index (RI), the largest percentage of soil samples showed low (70.79%) to moderate (25.38%) ecological risk of potential contamination, where the rest of the soil presented a considerable risk of contamination. The nine trace elements were divided into three principal components: PC1 (Cu, Cr, Ni, Co and Zn), PC2 (As and Hg) and PC3 (Cd). All metals accumulated in the soil came from parent rock, agricultural practices and the run-off of residual waters towards rivers and streams caused by industrial development and an increase in population density. Finally

  7. Modelling the soil microclimate: does the spatial or temporal resolution of input parameters matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Carter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of predicting future impacts of environmental change on vulnerable populations is advancing the development of spatially explicit habitat models. Continental-scale climate and microclimate layers are now widely available. However, most terrestrial organisms exist within microclimate spaces that are very small, relative to the spatial resolution of those layers. We examined the effects of multi-resolution, multi-extent topographic and climate inputs on the accuracy of hourly soil temperature predictions for a small island generated at a very high spatial resolution (<1 m2 using the mechanistic microclimate model in NicheMapR. Achieving an accuracy comparable to lower-resolution, continental-scale microclimate layers (within about 2–3°C of observed values required the use of daily weather data as well as high resolution topographic layers (elevation, slope, aspect, horizon angles, while inclusion of site-specific soil properties did not markedly improve predictions. Our results suggest that large-extent microclimate layers may not provide accurate estimates of microclimate conditions when the spatial extent of a habitat or other area of interest is similar to or smaller than the spatial resolution of the layers themselves. Thus, effort in sourcing model inputs should be focused on obtaining high resolution terrain data, e.g., via LiDAR or photogrammetry, and local weather information rather than in situ sampling of microclimate characteristics.

  8. Stemflow affects spatial soil moisture fields differently in summer and winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Anke; Friesen, Jan; Kögler, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Stemflow is only a minor component of net precipitation, but because it acts as a point input, it has the potential to strongly shape the soil moisture patterns below trees and induce vertical fluxes as well as groundwater recharge. However, there is little research on the evolution of soil moisture patterns around trees over prolonged periods of time. In this paper we investigate in a beech dominated forest in central Germany the dynamics of surface soil moisture in proximal (Harz/Central German Lowland Observatory. We measured soil water content using a wireless sensor network (SoilNet) at over 130 locations. The measurement points were arranged in circles of increasing radius around the tree trunks. Data were collected over a nine months period, including 10 weeks of intensive event based throughfall and stemflow monitoring. During the growing season, water content near the tree trunks was almost always lower compared to greater distance from the tree, which may be related to both lower root water uptake and higher throughfall in regions with thinner crowns at mid-distance between trees. During the growing season, soil water content near the beech trees only exceeded levels at greater distance during few rain events with substantial stemflow (15-20% of rain). However, during the wintertime, soil moisture near the trees was higher than at greater distances, in particular in response to rain events after leaf senescence. The variance of soil moisture at tree-distant locations is highest at intermediate mean moisture levels, while variance is low at both very high and very low mean soil water content. No such pattern is evident for the region near the trees, where both the highest and lowest variances occur at intermediate soil water contents. Our results indicate that the areas near tree trunks are a source of substantial spatial variation in the soil moisture field below trees. The elevated soil moisture in fall and early winter suggests a strong role of stemflow

  9. Temperature sensitivity and basal rate of soil respiration and their determinants in temperate forests of North China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Zhou

    Full Text Available The basal respiration rate at 10°C (R10 and the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q10 are two premier parameters in predicting the instantaneous rate of soil respiration at a given temperature. However, the mechanisms underlying the spatial variations in R10 and Q10 are not quite clear. R10 and Q10 were calculated using an exponential function with measured soil respiration and soil temperature for 11 mixed conifer-broadleaved forest stands and nine broadleaved forest stands at a catchment scale. The mean values of R10 were 1.83 µmol CO2 m(-2 s(-1 and 2.01 µmol CO2 m(-2 s(-1, the mean values of Q10 were 3.40 and 3.79, respectively, for mixed and broadleaved forest types. Forest type did not influence the two model parameters, but determinants of R10 and Q10 varied between the two forest types. In mixed forest stands, R10 decreased greatly with the ratio of coniferous to broadleaved tree species; whereas it sharply increased with the soil temperature range and the variations in soil organic carbon (SOC, and soil total nitrogen (TN. Q10 was positively correlated with the spatial variances of herb-layer carbon stock and soil bulk density, and negatively with soil C/N ratio. In broadleaved forest stands, R10 was markedly affected by basal area and the variations in shrub carbon stock and soil phosphorus (P content; the value of Q10 largely depended on soil pH and the variations of SOC and TN. 51% of variations in both R10 and Q10 can be accounted for jointly by five biophysical variables, of which the variation in soil bulk density played an overwhelming role in determining the amplitude of variations in soil basal respiration rates in temperate forests. Overall, it was concluded that soil respiration of temperate forests was largely dependent on soil physical properties when temperature kept quite low.

  10. Exploring the Role of the Spatial Characteristics of Visible and Near-Infrared Reflectance in Predicting Soil Organic Carbon Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Guo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon stock plays a key role in the global carbon cycle and the precision agriculture. Visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (VNIRS can directly reflect the internal physical construction and chemical substances of soil. The partial least squares regression (PLSR is a classical and highly commonly used model in constructing soil spectral models and predicting soil properties. Nevertheless, using PLSR alone may not consider soil as characterized by strong spatial heterogeneity and dependence. However, considering the spatial characteristics of soil can offer valuable spatial information to guarantee the prediction accuracy of soil spectral models. Thus, this study aims to construct a rapid and accurate soil spectral model in predicting soil organic carbon density (SOCD with the aid of the spatial autocorrelation of soil spectral reflectance. A total of 231 topsoil samples (0–30 cm were collected from the Jianghan Plain, Wuhan, China. The spectral reflectance (350–2500 nm was used as auxiliary variable. A geographically-weighted regression (GWR model was used to evaluate the potential improvement of SOCD prediction when the spatial information of the spectral features was considered. Results showed that: (1 The principal components extracted from PLSR have a strong relationship with the regression coefficients at the average sampling distance (300 m based on the Moran’s I values. (2 The eigenvectors of the principal components exhibited strong relationships with the absorption spectral features, and the regression coefficients of GWR varied with the geographical locations. (3 GWR displayed a higher accuracy than that of PLSR in predicting the SOCD by VNIRS. This study aimed to help people realize the importance of the spatial characteristics of soil properties and their spectra. This work also introduced guidelines for the application of GWR in predicting soil properties by VNIRS.

  11. Experimental determinations of soil copper toxicity to lettuce (Lactuca sativa) growth in highly different copper spiked and aged soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Karen Søgaard; Borggaard, Ole K.; Holm, Peter Engelund

    2015-01-01

    Accurate knowledge about factors and conditions determining copper (Cu) toxicity in soil is needed for predicting plant growth in various Cu-contaminated soils. Therefore, effects of Cu on growth (biomass production) of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) were tested on seven selected, very different soils...

  12. Interference competition as a key determinant for spatial distribution of mangrove crabs

    KAUST Repository

    Cannicci, Stefano

    2018-02-15

    The spatial distribution of mangrove crabs has been commonly associated with tree zonation and abiotic factors such as ground temperature and soil granulometry. Conversely, no studies were designed to investigate the role of competition for resources and predation in shaping crab distribution in mangroves, despite these biotic factors are recognised as key determinants for spatial patterns observed in the communities colonising rocky and sandy intertidal habitats.We studied floral and faunal assemblages in two zones of a Sri Lankan mangrove, a man-made upper intertidal level and a natural eulittoral, mid-shore one. Leaf choice experiments were designed to study both feeding rate and intra and inter-specific interactions for food of sesarmid crabs in the two habitats in order to better understand crab spatial distribution.The two intertidal belts differed in terms of floral composition and crab species abundance. The eulittoral zone was strongly dominated by Neosarmatium smithi, while within the elevated littoral fringe four sesarmids (N. smithi, N. asiaticum, N. malabaricum and Muradium tetragonum) were more evenly distributed. At both levels, all sesarmids showed to collect significantly more Bruguiera spp. and Rhizophora apiculata leaves than Excoecaria agallocha ones. There was no temporal segregation in feeding activity among the four species, resulting in a high interference competition for leaves. Regardless of the habitat, N. smithi was always successful in winning inter-specific fights.Our results showed that the elevated littoral fringe was more crowded with crabs, but was less favourable in terms of food availability and environmental conditions. The dominance of N. smithi in gathering mangrove leaves suggests that this species may segregate the other sesarmids into less favourable habitats. The present data strongly suggest for the first time that interference competition for food can contribute to shape mangrove crab spatial distribution.

  13. [Soil Heavy Metal Spatial Distribution and Source Analysis Around an Aluminum Plant in Baotou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lian-ke; Li, Hai-peng; Huang, Xue-min; Li, Yu-mei; Jiao, Kun-ling; Sun, Peng; Wang, Wei-da

    2016-03-15

    The soil with 500 m distance from an aluminum plant in Baotou was studied. A total of 64 soil samples were taken from the 0-5 cm, 5-20 cm, 20-40 cm and 40-60 cm layers, and the contents of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Ni and Mn were tested, respectively. The correlation analysis and principal component analysis were used to identify the sources of these heavy metals in soils. The results suggested that the contents of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Ni and Mn in study area were 32.9, 50.35, 69.92, 43.78, 0.54, 554.42 and 36.65 mg · kg⁻¹ respectively. All seven heavy metals tested were overweight compared with the background values of soil in Inner Mongolia. The spatial distribution of heavy metals showed that the horizontal distribution of heavy metals was obviously enriched in the southwest, while in vertical distribution, the heavy metal content (0 to 5 cm) was highest in the surface soil, and the heavy metal content decreased with increasing depth and tended to be stabilized when the depth was over 20 cm. Source analysis showed that the source of Cu, Zn, Cr and Mn might be influenced by the aluminum plant and the surrounding industrial activity. The source of Pb and Cd might be mainly related to road transportation. The source of Ni may be affected by agricultural activities and soil parent material together.

  14. Spatial Distribution of PCB Dechlorinating Bacteria and Activities in Contaminated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birthe V. Kjellerup

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil samples contaminated with Aroclor 1260 were analyzed for microbial PCB dechlorination potential, which is the rate-limiting step for complete PCB degradation. The average chlorines per biphenyl varied throughout the site suggesting that different rates of in situ dechlorination had occurred over time. Analysis of PCB transforming (aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities and dechlorinating potential revealed spatial heterogeneity of both putative PCB transforming phylotypes and dechlorination activity. Some soil samples inhibited PCB dechlorination in active sediment from Baltimore Harbor indicating that metal or organic cocontaminants might cause the observed heterogeneity of in situ dechlorination. Bioaugmentation of soil samples contaminated with PCBs ranging from 4.6 to 265 ppm with a pure culture of the PCB dechlorinating bacterium Dehalobium chlorocoercia DF-1 also yielded heterologous results with significant dechlorination of weathered PCBs observed in one location. The detection of indigenous PCB dehalorespiring activity combined with the detection of putative dechlorinating bacteria and biphenyl dioxygenase genes in the soil aggregates suggests that the potential exists for complete mineralization of PCBs in soils. However, in contrast to sediments, the heterologous distribution of microorganisms, PCBs, and inhibitory cocontaminants is a significant challenge for the development of in situ microbial treatment of PCB impacted soils.

  15. Spatial and vertical distribution of short chain chlorinated paraffins in soils from wastewater irrigated farmlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lixi; Wang, Thanh; Han, Wenya; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Qian; Wang, Yawei; Jiang, Guibin

    2011-03-15

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are one of the most complex groups of halogenated contaminants in the environment. However, studies of short chain CPs (SCCPs) in China are very scarce. In this study, the concentrations and distribution of SCCPs in farm soils from a wastewater irrigated area in China were investigated. SCCPs were detected in all topsoil samples, with the sum of the concentrations (ΣSCCPs) in the range of 159.9-1450 ng/g (dry weight, dw). A noticeable spatial trend and specific congener distribution were observed in the wastewater irrigated farmland. Soil vertical profiles showed that ΣSCCP concentrations below the plowed layer decreased exponentially and had a significant positive relationship (R(2) > 0.83) with total organic carbon in soil cores. Furthermore, soil vertical distributions indicated that lower chlorinated (Cl(5-6)) and shorter chain (C(10-12)) congeners are more prone to migrate to deeper soil layers compared to highly chlorinated and longer chain congeners. This work demonstrated that effluents from sewage treatment plants (STPs) could be a significant source of SCCPs to the ambient environment and wastewater irrigation can lead to higher accumulation of SCCPs in farm soils.

  16. Standard guide for the determination of technetium-99 in Soil

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide is intended to serve as a reference for laboratories wishing to perform Tc-99 analyses in soil. Several options are given for selection of a tracer and for the method of extracting the Tc from the soil matrix. Separation of Tc from the sample matrix is performed using an extraction chromatography resin. Options are then given for the determination of the Tc-99 activity in the original sample. It is up to the user to determine which options are appropriate for use, and to generate acceptance data to support the chosen procedure. 1.2 Due to the various extraction methods available, various tracers used, variable detection methods used, and lack of certified reference materials for Tc-99 in soil, there is insufficient data to support a single method written as a standard method. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

  17. Spatial Variations of Soil Gas Geochemistry in the Tangshan Area of Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of Hg, Rn, H2, He and CO2 in soil gases at 756 sites were measured in the Tangshan area where Ms 7.8 earthquake occurred in 1976 and is characterized by complex tectonic structures and high seismic hazard. The results showed that, spatial variations of the gaseous anomalies, especially hydrogen and helium have spatial congruence along the tectonic lines, which can be attributed to their deep sources and the migration paths formed by the faults. A better congruence of radon and carbon dioxide is highlighted which indicates that carbon dioxide acts as the carrier gas for radon in this area. Two geochemical anomaly zones of soil gas were found in the area wherein all the studied gases exhibited anomalies or high values, related to the faults and earthquakes.

  18. Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of water soil erosion in a Mediterranean rain-fed crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vicente, M.; Quijano, L.; Gaspar, L.; Machín, J.; Navas, A.

    2012-04-01

    Fertile soil loss by raindrop impact and runoff processes in croplands presents significant variations at temporal and spatial scales. The combined use of advanced GIS techniques and detailed databases allows high resolution mapping of runoff and soil erosion processes. In this study the monthly values of soil loss are calculated in a medium size field of rain-fed winter barley and its drainage area located in the Central Spanish Pre-Pyrenees. The field is surrounded by narrow strips of dense Mediterranean vegetation (mainly holm oaks) and grass. Man-made infrastructures (paved trails and drainage ditches) modify the overland flow pathways and the study site appears hydrologically closed in its northern and western boundaries. This area has a continental Mediterranean climate with two humid periods, one in spring and a second in autumn and a dry summer with rainfall events of high intensity from July to October. The average annual rainfall is 495 mm and the average monthly rainfall intensity ranges from 1.1 mm / h in January to 7.4 mm / h in July. The predicted rates were obtained after running the RMMF model (Morgan, 2001) with the enhancements made to this model by Morgan and Duzant (2008) to the topographic module, and by López-Vicente and Navas (2010) to the hydrological module. A total of 613 soil samples were collected and all input and output maps were generated at high spatial resolution (1 x 1 m of cell size) with ArcMapTM 10.0. A map of effective cumulative runoff was calculated for each month of the year with a weighted multiple flow algorithm and four sub-catchments were distinguished within the field. The average soil erosion in the cultivated area is 1.32 Mg / ha yr and the corresponding map shows a high spatial variability (s.d. = 7.52 Mg / ha yr). The highest values of soil erosion appear in those areas where overland flow is concentrated and slope steepness is higher. The unpaved trail present the highest values of soil erosion with an average

  19. Effect of land use history and site factors on spatial variation of soil organic carbon across a physiographic region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulp, C.J.E.; Verburg, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Regional scale inventories of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks often use soil and land use maps as key determinants in the upscaling procedure. Although soil and land use are important determinants for SOC stocks, there are other determinants that could potentially improve regional estimates of SOC

  20. Spatial variability and stocks of soil organic carbon in the Gobi desert of Northwestern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Zhang

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon (SOC plays an important role in improving soil properties and the C global cycle. Limited attention, though, has been given to assessing the spatial patterns and stocks of SOC in desert ecosystems. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the spatial variability of SOC and its influencing factors and estimated SOC storage in a region (40 km2 of the Gobi desert. SOC exhibited a log-normal depth distribution with means of 1.6, 1.5, 1.4, and 1.4 g kg(-1 for the 0-10, 10-20, 20-30, and 30-40 cm layers, respectively, and was moderately variable according to the coefficients of variation (37-42%. Variability of SOC increased as the sampling area expanded and could be well parameterized as a power function of the sampling area. Significant correlations were detected between SOC and soil physical properties, i.e. stone, sand, silt, and clay contents and soil bulk density. The relatively coarse fractions, i.e. sand, silt, and stone contents, had the largest effects on SOC variability. Experimental semivariograms of SOC were best fitted by exponential models. Nugget-to-sill ratios indicated a strong spatial dependence for SOC concentrations at all depths in the study area. The surface layer (0-10 cm had the largest spatial dependency compared with the other layers. The mapping revealed a decreasing trend of SOC concentrations from south to north across this region of the Gobi desert, with higher levels close to an oasis and lower levels surrounded by mountains and near the desert. SOC density to depths of 20 and 40 cm for this 40 km2 area was estimated at 0.42 and 0.68 kg C m(-2, respectively. This study provides an important contribution to understanding the role of the Gobi desert in the global carbon cycle.

  1. Nested spatial biodiversity patterns of nematode genera in a New Zealand forest and pasture soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, C.H.; Yeates, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    Biodiversity has a spatial dimension, which we estimated by examining generic turnover (beta diversity) of nematodes in adjacent forest and pasture sites. Dissimilarity was estimated in small and intermediate scale transects, the distribution of sampling points being determined by spatial simulated

  2. Spatial correlation between the prevalence of transmissible spongiform diseases and British soil geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imrie, C E; Korre, A; Munoz-Melendez, G

    2009-02-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of fatal neurological conditions affecting a number of mammals, including sheep and goats (scrapie), cows (BSE), and humans (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The diseases are widely believed to be caused by the misfolding of the normal prion protein to a pathological isoform, which is thought to act as an infectious agent. Outbreaks of the disease are commonly attributed to contaminated feed and genetic susceptibility. However, the implication of copper and manganese in the pathology of the disease, and its apparent geographical clustering, have prompted suggestions of a link with trace elements in the environment. Nevertheless, studies of soils at regional scales have failed to provide evidence of an environmental risk factor. This study uses geostatistical techniques to investigate the correlations between the distribution of TSE prevalence and soil geochemical variables across the UK according to different spatial scales. A similar spatial pattern in scrapie and BSE occurrence is identified, which may be linked with increasing pH and total organic carbon, and decreasing iodine concentration. However, the pattern also resembles that of the density of dairy farming. Nevertheless, despite the low spatial resolution of the TSE data available for this study, the fact that significant correlations are detected indicates there is a possibility of a link between soil geochemistry, scrapie, and BSE. It is suggested that further investigations of the prevalence of TSE and environmental exposure to trace metals should take into account the factors affecting their bioavailability.

  3. Assessing scales of spatial & temporal variability in radiocarbon contents of soil organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, Tessa Sophia; Feng, Xiaojuan; Hagedorn, Frank; Eglinton, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) forms the largest terrestrial reservoir of carbon outside of sedimentary rocks and it provides the fundamental reservoir for nutrients that sustains vegetation and the microbial communities. With ongoing changes in land-use and climate, SOM is also subject to change, with potentially major consequences for soil as a resource and for global biogeochemical cycles. Radiocarbon is a powerful tool for assessing SOM dynamics and is increasingly used in studies of carbon turnover. However, due to the nature of the measurement, comprehensive 14C studies of soils systems are rare. In particular, information on spatial variability in the radiocarbon contents of soils is limited. The present study aims to develop and apply a comprehensive four-dimensional approach to explore heterogeneity in bulk SOM 14C, with a broader goal of assessing controls on organic matter stability and vulnerability in soils across Switzerland. Focusing on range of Swiss soil types, we examine lateral variability in 14C over plot (decimeter to meter) to regional scales, vertical variability from surface to deeper soil horizons, and temporal variability by comparing present-day with archived (legacy) samples. Preliminary results show that there are large differences in SOM 14C age across small lateral and vertical distances within soil systems. Ultimately, studies of bulk variability will be followed up with analyses of SOM sub-fractions, including 14C measurements at the molecular level. Investigating 14C variability over various space and time domains may shed light on the scales of processes that dictate the composition and vulnerability of SOM, and provide valuable constraints on models of SOM turnover.

  4. Spatial estimation of foliar phosphorus in different species of the genus Coffea based on soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel de Assis Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Information underlying analyses of coffee fertilization systems should consider both the soil and the nutritional status of plants. This study investigated the spatial relationship between phosphorus (P levels in coffee plant tissues and soil chemical and physical properties. The study was performed using two arabica and one canephora coffee variety. Sampling grids were established in the areas, and the points georeferenced. The assessed properties of the soil were levels of available phosphorus (P-Mehlich, remaining phosphorus (P-rem and particle size, and of the plant tissue, phosphorus levels (foliar P. The data were subjected to descriptive statistical analysis, correlation analysis, cluster analysis, and probability tests. Geostatistical and trend analyses were only performed for pairs of variables with significant linear correlation. The spatial variability for foliar P content was high for the variety Catuai and medium for the other evaluated plants. Unlike P-Mehlich, the variability in P-rem of the soil indicated the nutritional status of this nutrient in the plant.

  5. Quantifying Spatial Variability of Selected Soil Trace Elements and Their Scaling Relationships Using Multifractal Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fasheng; Yin, Guanghua; Wang, Zhenying; McLaughlin, Neil; Geng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Zuoxin

    2013-01-01

    Multifractal techniques were utilized to quantify the spatial variability of selected soil trace elements and their scaling relationships in a 10.24-ha agricultural field in northeast China. 1024 soil samples were collected from the field and available Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn were measured in each sample. Descriptive results showed that Mn deficiencies were widespread throughout the field while Fe and Zn deficiencies tended to occur in patches. By estimating single multifractal spectra, we found that available Fe, Cu and Zn in the study soils exhibited high spatial variability and the existence of anomalies ([α(q)max−α(q)min]≥0.54), whereas available Mn had a relatively uniform distribution ([α(q)max−α(q)min]≈0.10). The joint multifractal spectra revealed that the strong positive relationships (r≥0.86, Ptrace elements as well as their scaling relationships can be characterized by single and joint multifractal parameters. The findings presented in this study could be extended to predict selected soil trace elements at larger regional scales with the aid of geographic information systems. PMID:23874944

  6. Spatial patterns of preconsolidation pressure and soil moisture along transects in two directions under coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivoney Gontijo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Information on the spatial structure of soil physical and structural properties is needed to evaluate the soil quality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the spatial behavior of preconsolidation pressure and soil moisture in six transects, three selected along and three across coffee rows, at three different sites under different tillage management systems. The study was carried out on a farm, in Patrocinio, state of Minas Gerais, in the Southeast of Brazil (18 º 59 ' 15 '' S; 46 º 56 ' 47 '' W; 934 m asl. The soil type is a typic dystrophic Red Latosol (Acrustox and consists of 780 g kg-1 clay; 110 g kg-1 silt and 110 g kg-1 sand, with an average slope of 3 %. Undisturbed soil cores were sampled at a depth of 0.10-0.13 m, at three different points within the coffee plantation: (a from under the wheel track, where equipment used in farm operations passes; (b in - between tracks and (c under the coffee canopy. Six linear transects were established in the experimental area: three transects along and three across the coffee rows. This way, 161 samples were collected in the transect across the coffee rows, from the three locations, while 117 samples were collected in the direction along the row. The shortest sampling distance in the transect across the row was 4 m, and 0.5 m for the transect along the row. No clear patterns of the preconsolidation pressure values were observed in the 200 m transect. The results of the semivariograms for both variables indicated a high nugget value and short range for the studied parameters of all transects. A cyclic pattern of the parameters was observed for the across-rows transect. An inverse relationship between preconsolidation pressure and soil moisture was clearly observed in the samples from under the track, in both directions.

  7. Designing a sampling scheme to reveal correlations between weeds and soil properties at multiple spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, H; Milne, A E; Webster, R; Lark, R M; Murdoch, A J; Storkey, J

    2016-02-01

    Weeds tend to aggregate in patches within fields, and there is evidence that this is partly owing to variation in soil properties. Because the processes driving soil heterogeneity operate at various scales, the strength of the relations between soil properties and weed density would also be expected to be scale-dependent. Quantifying these effects of scale on weed patch dynamics is essential to guide the design of discrete sampling protocols for mapping weed distribution. We developed a general method that uses novel within-field nested sampling and residual maximum-likelihood (reml) estimation to explore scale-dependent relations between weeds and soil properties. We validated the method using a case study of Alopecurus myosuroides in winter wheat. Using reml, we partitioned the variance and covariance into scale-specific components and estimated the correlations between the weed counts and soil properties at each scale. We used variograms to quantify the spatial structure in the data and to map variables by kriging. Our methodology successfully captured the effect of scale on a number of edaphic drivers of weed patchiness. The overall Pearson correlations between A. myosuroides and soil organic matter and clay content were weak and masked the stronger correlations at >50 m. Knowing how the variance was partitioned across the spatial scales, we optimised the sampling design to focus sampling effort at those scales that contributed most to the total variance. The methods have the potential to guide patch spraying of weeds by identifying areas of the field that are vulnerable to weed establishment.

  8. Spatial and temporal variability of throughfall and soil moisture in a deciduous forest in the low mountain ranges (Hesse, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chifflard, Peter; Weishaupt, Philipp; Reiss, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of throughfall can affect the heterogeneity of ecological, biogeochemical and hydrological processes at a forest floor and further the underlying soil. Previous research suggests different factors controlling the spatial and temporal patterns of throughfall, but most studies focus on coniferous forest, where the vegetation coverage is more or less constant over time. In deciduous forests the leaf area index varies due to the leaf fall in autumn which implicates a specific spatial and temporal variability of throughfall and furthermore of the soil moisture. Therefore, in the present study, the measurements of throughfall and soil moisture in a deciduous forest in the low mountain ranges focused especially on the period of leaf fall. The aims of this study were: 1) to detect the spatial and temporal variability of both the throughfall and the soil moisture, 2) to examine the temporal stability of the spatial patterns of the throughfall and soil moisture and 3) relate the soil moisture patterns to the throughfall patterns and further to the canopy characteristics. The study was carried out in a small catchment on middle Hesse (Germany) which is covered by beech forest. Annual mean air temperature is 9.4°C (48.9˚F) and annual mean precipitation is 650 mm. Base materials for soil genesis is greywacke and clay shale from Devonian deposits. The soil type at the study plot is a shallow cambisol. The study plot covers an area of about 150 m2 where 77 throughfall samplers where installed. The throughfall and the soil moisture (FDR-method, 20 cm depth) was measured immediately after every rainfall event at the 77 measurement points. During the period of October to December 2015 altogether 7 events were investigated. The geostatistical method kriging was used to interpolate between the measurements points to visualize the spatial patterns of each investigated parameter. Time-stability-plots were applied to examine temporal scatters of each

  9. Autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration determined with trenching, soil CO2 fluxes and 13CO2/12CO2 concentration gradients in a boreal forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumpanen, Jukka; Shurpali, Narasinha; Kulmala, Liisa; Kolari, Pasi; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Soil CO2 efflux forms a substantial part of the ecosystem carbon balance, and it can contribute more than half of the annual ecosystem respiration. Recently assimilated carbon which has been fixed in photosynthesis during the previous days plays an important role in soil CO2 efflux, and its contribution is seasonally variable. Moreover, the recently assimilated C has been shown to stimulate the decomposition of recalcitrant C in soil and increase the mineralization of nitrogen, the most important macronutrient limiting gross primary productivity (GPP) in boreal ecosystems. Podzolic soils, typical in boreal zone, have distinctive layers with different biological and chemical properties. The biological activity in different soil layers has large seasonal variation due to vertical gradient in temperature, soil organic matter and root biomass. Thus, the source of CO2 and its components have a vertical gradient which is seasonally variable. The contribution of recently assimilated C and its seasonal as well as spatial variation in soil are difficult to assess without disturbing the system. The most common method of partitioning soil respiration into its components is trenching which entails the roots being cut or girdling where the flow of carbohydrates from the canopy to roots has been isolated by cutting of the phloem. Other methods for determining the contribution of autotrophic (Ra) and heterotrophic (Rh) respiration components in soil CO2 efflux are pulse labelling with 13CO2 or 14CO2 or the natural abundance of 13C and/or 14C isotopes. Also differences in seasonal and short-term temperature response of soil respiration have been used to separate Ra and Rh. We compared the seasonal variation in Ra and Rh using the trenching method and differences between seasonal and short-term temperature responses of soil respiration. I addition, we estimated the vertical variation in soil biological activity using soil CO2 concentration and the natural abundance of 13C and 12C

  10. Climate and soil attributes determine plant species turnover in global drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Fernando T.; Gotelli, Nicholas J.; Quero, José L.; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Bowker, Matthew A.; Eldridge, David J.; Ochoa, Victoria; Gozalo, Beatriz; Valencia, Enrique; Berdugo, Miguel; Escolar, Cristina; García-Gómez, Miguel; Escudero, Adrián; Prina, Aníbal; Alfonso, Graciela; Arredondo, Tulio; Bran, Donaldo; Cabrera, Omar; Cea, Alex; Chaieb, Mohamed; Contreras, Jorge; Derak, Mchich; Espinosa, Carlos I.; Florentino, Adriana; Gaitán, Juan; Muro, Victoria García; Ghiloufi, Wahida; Gómez-González, Susana; Gutiérrez, Julio R.; Hernández, Rosa M.; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Jankju, Mohammad; Mau, Rebecca L.; Hughes, Frederic Mendes; Miriti, Maria; Monerris, Jorge; Muchane, Muchai; Naseri, Kamal; Pucheta, Eduardo; Ramírez-Collantes, David A.; Raveh, Eran; Romão, Roberto L.; Torres-Díaz, Cristian; Val, James; Veiga, José Pablo; Wang, Deli; Yuan, Xia; Zaady, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Aim Geographic, climatic, and soil factors are major drivers of plant beta diversity, but their importance for dryland plant communities is poorly known. This study aims to: i) characterize patterns of beta diversity in global drylands, ii) detect common environmental drivers of beta diversity, and iii) test for thresholds in environmental conditions driving potential shifts in plant species composition. Location 224 sites in diverse dryland plant communities from 22 geographical regions in six continents. Methods Beta diversity was quantified with four complementary measures: the percentage of singletons (species occurring at only one site), Whittake’s beta diversity (β(W)), a directional beta diversity metric based on the correlation in species occurrences among spatially contiguous sites (β(R2)), and a multivariate abundance-based metric (β(MV)). We used linear modelling to quantify the relationships between these metrics of beta diversity and geographic, climatic, and soil variables. Results Soil fertility and variability in temperature and rainfall, and to a lesser extent latitude, were the most important environmental predictors of beta diversity. Metrics related to species identity (percentage of singletons and β(W)) were most sensitive to soil fertility, whereas those metrics related to environmental gradients and abundance ((β(R2)) and β(MV)) were more associated with climate variability. Interactions among soil variables, climatic factors, and plant cover were not important determinants of beta diversity. Sites receiving less than 178 mm of annual rainfall differed sharply in species composition from more mesic sites (> 200 mm). Main conclusions Soil fertility and variability in temperature and rainfall are the most important environmental predictors of variation in plant beta diversity in global drylands. Our results suggest that those sites annually receiving ~ 178 mm of rainfall will be especially sensitive to future climate changes. These

  11. Spatial heterogeneity of soil and substrate characteristics and its microscale hydrological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikel, H.; Poppe, U.; Schwanghart, W.; Straehl, S.; Beising, E.; Kuhn, N.

    2009-04-01

    Small-scale runoff patterns and infiltration are highly relevant for catchment hydrology in (semi-)arid regions. The extent and pattern of rock and soil surfaces are particularly important for runoff connectivity and thus vegetation growth and sediment dynamics. So far, most studies focused on the relationship between rainfall, runoff and sediment yield, on the plot and catchment scale. Less attention, however, has been paid to microscale processes where small differences in surface properties cause a high variability in runoff generation and connectivity. The aim of this study is to understand the role of microscale surface properties and their spatial constellation on infiltration and runoff patterns. We mapped six microcatchments in the study area near Sede Boqer, Israel. Mapping included the generation of high resolution DEMs using a laser scanner, soil thickness and vegetation patterns. In addition, soil properties (porosity, texture, nutrients, organic matter content) were analysed. These field data were used to model patterns of runoff generation and the redistribution of runoff water onto soil patches. The patterns of plant available water were then compared with the density of shrub plant cover in the different catchments. First results suggest a negative correlation between soil volume and vegetation density. Areas with low soil thickness are characterized by high plant density, plant diversity and nutrient availability in clefts and cracks. Microcatchments at upper and lower slope sections are controlled by dry conditions, characterised by a low vegetation heights and a low density of shrub plant cover. These patterns seem to be strongly dependent on water, sediment and nutrient fluxes from rocky to vegetated patches. We suggest that these dynamics are related to the spatial variance of rock soil-cover ratio which controls water concentration and allocation. Finally nutrient contents were compared between different microcatchments. The results indicate

  12. Spatial heterogeneity of plant-soil feedbacks increases per capita reproductive biomass of species at an establishment disadvantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jean H; Brandt, Angela J; Murphy, Jennifer E; Kaczowka, Angela M; Burke, David J

    2017-04-01

    Plant-soil feedbacks have been widely implicated as a driver of plant community diversity, and the coexistence prediction generated by a negative plant-soil feedback can be tested using the mutual invasibility criterion: if two populations are able to invade one another, this result is consistent with stable coexistence. We previously showed that two co-occurring Rumex species exhibit negative pairwise plant-soil feedbacks, predicting that plant-soil feedbacks could lead to their coexistence. However, whether plants are able to reproduce when at an establishment disadvantage ("invasibility"), or what drivers in the soil might correlate with this pattern, are unknown. To address these questions, we created experimental plots with heterogeneous and homogeneous soils using field-collected conditioned soils from each of these Rumex species. We then allowed resident plants of each species to establish and added invader seeds of the congener to evaluate invasibility. Rumex congeners were mutually invasible, in that both species were able to establish and reproduce in the other's resident population. Invaders of both species had twice as much reproduction in heterogeneous compared to homogeneous soils; thus the spatial arrangement of plant-soil feedbacks may influence coexistence. Soil mixing had a non-additive effect on the soil bacterial and fungal communities, soil moisture, and phosphorous availability, suggesting that disturbance could dramatically alter soil legacy effects. Because the spatial arrangement of soil patches has coexistence implications, plant-soil feedback studies should move beyond studies of mean effects of single patch types, to consider how the spatial arrangement of patches in the field influences plant communities.

  13. Determination of Spatial Chromium Contamination of the Environment around Industrial Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, Dereje; Haile, Ermias

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the spatial levels of chromium contamination of water, agricultural soil, and vegetables in the leather tanning industrial areas using spectrophotometric methods. The results showed elevated accumulation of total Cr ranging from 10.85 ± 0.885 mg/L to 39.696 ± 0.326 mg/L, 16.225 ± 0.12 mg/Kg to 1581.667 ± 0.122 mg/Kg, and 1.0758 ± 0.05348 mg/Kg to 11.75 ± 0.206 mg/Kg in water, agricultural soil, and vegetable samples, respectively. The highest levels of chromium (VI) found from the speciation study were 2.23 ± 0.032 mg/Kg and 0.322 ± 0.07 mg/L in soil and water samples, respectively, which decreased with distance from the tannery. Among the vegetables, the highest load of Cr(VI) was detected in onion root (0.048 ± 0.065 mg/Kg) and the lowest (0.004 ± 0.007 mg/Kg) in fruit of green pepper. The detected levels of Cr in all of the suggested samples were above the WHO permissible limits. The variations of the levels Cr(III) and Cr(VI) contamination of the environment with distance from the tannery were statistically significant (p = 0.05). Similarly, significant difference in the levels of Cr among the tested vegetables was recorded. The levels increased with decreasing distance from the effluent channel. PMID:28044079

  14. Determination of Spatial Chromium Contamination of the Environment around Industrial Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dereje Homa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the spatial levels of chromium contamination of water, agricultural soil, and vegetables in the leather tanning industrial areas using spectrophotometric methods. The results showed elevated accumulation of total Cr ranging from 10.85±0.885 mg/L to 39.696±0.326 mg/L, 16.225±0.12 mg/Kg to 1581.667±0.122 mg/Kg, and 1.0758±0.05348 mg/Kg to 11.75±0.206 mg/Kg in water, agricultural soil, and vegetable samples, respectively. The highest levels of chromium (VI found from the speciation study were 2.23±0.032 mg/Kg and 0.322±0.07 mg/L in soil and water samples, respectively, which decreased with distance from the tannery. Among the vegetables, the highest load of Cr(VI was detected in onion root (0.048±0.065 mg/Kg and the lowest (0.004±0.007 mg/Kg in fruit of green pepper. The detected levels of Cr in all of the suggested samples were above the WHO permissible limits. The variations of the levels Cr(III and Cr(VI contamination of the environment with distance from the tannery were statistically significant (p=0.05. Similarly, significant difference in the levels of Cr among the tested vegetables was recorded. The levels increased with decreasing distance from the effluent channel.

  15. Determination of traces of cobalt in soils: A field method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, H.

    1953-01-01

    The growing use of geochemical prospecting methods in the search for ore deposits has led to the development of a field method for the determination of cobalt in soils. The determination is based on the fact that cobalt reacts with 2-nitroso-1-naphthol to yield a pink compound that is soluble in carbon tetrachloride. The carbon tetrachloride extract is shaken with dilute cyanide to complex interfering elements and to remove excess reagent. The cobalt content is estimated by comparing the pink color in the carbon tetrachloride with a standard series prepared from standard solutions. The cobalt 2-nitroso-1-naphtholate system in carbon tetrachloride follows Beer's law. As little as 1 p.p.m. can be determined in a 0.1-gram sample. The method is simple and fast and requires only simple equipment. More than 40 samples can be analyzed per man-day with an accuracy within 30% or better.

  16. Geostatistical characterization of the soil of Aguascalientes, México, by using spatial estimation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdaleno-Márquez, Ricardo; de la Luz Pérez-Rea, María; Castaño, Víctor M

    2016-01-01

    Four spatial estimation techniques available in commercial computational packages are evaluated and compared, namely: regularized splines interpolation, tension splines interpolation, inverse distance weighted interpolation, and ordinary Kriging estimation, in order to establish the best representation for the shallow stratigraphic configuration in the city of Aguascalientes, in Central Mexico. Data from 478 sample points along with the software ArcGIS (Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI), ArcGIS, ver. 9.3, Redlands, California 2008) to calculate the spatial estimates. Each technique was evaluated based on the root mean square error, calculated from a validation between the generated estimates and measured data from 64 sample points which were not used in the spatial estimation process. The present study shows that, for the estimation of the hard-soil layer, ordinary Kriging offered the best performance among the evaluated techniques.

  17. SAMPLING ADAPTIVE STRATEGY AND SPATIAL ORGANISATION ESTIMATION OF SOIL ANIMAL COMMUNITIES AT VARIOUS HIERARCHICAL LEVELS OF URBANISED TERRITORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljuk J.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In work the algorithm of adaptive strategy of optimum spatial sampling for studying of the spatial organisation of communities of soil animals in the conditions of an urbanization have been presented. As operating variables the principal components obtained as a result of the analysis of the field data on soil penetration resistance, soils electrical conductivity and density of a forest stand, collected on a quasiregular grid have been used. The locations of experimental polygons have been stated by means of program ESAP. The sampling has been made on a regular grid within experimental polygons. The biogeocoenological estimation of experimental polygons have been made on a basis of A.L.Belgard's ecomorphic analysis. The spatial configuration of biogeocoenosis types has been established on the basis of the data of earth remote sensing and the analysis of digital elevation model. The algorithm was suggested which allows to reveal the spatial organisation of soil animal communities at investigated point, biogeocoenosis, and landscape.

  18. Global assessment of soil organic carbon stocks and spatial distribution of histosols: the Machine Learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengl, Tomislav

    2016-04-01

    Preliminary results of predicting distribution of soil organic soils (Histosols) and soil organic carbon stock (in tonnes per ha) using global compilations of soil profiles (about 150,000 points) and covariates at 250 m spatial resolution (about 150 covariates; mainly MODIS seasonal land products, SRTM DEM derivatives, climatic images, lithological and land cover and landform maps) are presented. We focus on using a data-driven approach i.e. Machine Learning techniques that often require no knowledge about the distribution of the target variable or knowledge about the possible relationships. Other advantages of using machine learning are (DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0125814): All rules required to produce outputs are formalized. The whole procedure is documented (the statistical model and associated computer script), enabling reproducible research. Predicted surfaces can make use of various information sources and can be optimized relative to all available quantitative point and covariate data. There is more flexibility in terms of the spatial extent, resolution and support of requested maps. Automated mapping is also more cost-effective: once the system is operational, maintenance and production of updates are an order of magnitude faster and cheaper. Consequently, prediction maps can be updated and improved at shorter and shorter time intervals. Some disadvantages of automated soil mapping based on Machine Learning are: Models are data-driven and any serious blunders or artifacts in the input data can propagate to order-of-magnitude larger errors than in the case of expert-based systems. Fitting machine learning models is at the order of magnitude computationally more demanding. Computing effort can be even tens of thousands higher than if e.g. linear geostatistics is used. Many machine learning models are fairly complex often abstract and any interpretation of such models is not trivial and require special multidimensional / multivariable plotting and data mining

  19. Soil and Waste Matrix Affects Spatial Heterogeneity of Bacteria Filtration during Unsaturated Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Unc

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Discontinuous flows resulting from discrete natural rain events induce temporal and spatial variability in the transport of bacteria from organic waste through soils in which the degree of saturation varies. Transport and continuity of associated pathways are dependent on structure and stability of the soil under conditions of variable moisture and ionic strength of the soil solution. Lysimeters containing undisturbed monoliths of clay, clay loam or sandy loam soils were used to investigate transport and pathway continuity for bacteria and hydrophobic fluorescent microspheres. Biosolids, to which the microspheres were added, were surface applied and followed by serial irrigation events. Microspheres, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Salmonella spp. and Clostridium perfringens were enumerated in drainage collected from 64 distinct collection areas through funnels installed in a grid pattern at the lower boundary of the monoliths. Bacteria-dependent filtration coefficients along pathways of increasing water flux were independent of flow volume, suggesting: (1 tracer or colloid dependent retention; and (2 transport depended on the total volume of contiguous pores accessible for bacteria transport. Management decisions, in this case resulting from the form of organic waste, induced changes in tortuosity and continuity of pores and modified the effective capacity of soil to retain bacteria. Surface application of liquid municipal biosolids had a negative impact on transport pathway continuity, relative to the solid municipal biosolids, enhancing retention under less favourable electrostatic conditions consistent with an initial increase in straining within inactive pores and subsequent by limited re-suspension from reactivated pores.

  20. Spatial variation in microbial processes controlling carbon mineralization within soils and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendorf, Scott [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Kleber, Markus [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Nico, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    Soils have a defining role in global carbon cycling, having one of the largest dynamic stocks of C on earth—3300 Pg of C are stored in soils, which is three-times the amount stored in the atmosphere and more than the terrestrial land plants. An important control on soil organic matter (SOM) quantities is the mineralization rate. It is well recognized that the rate and extent of SOM mineralization is affected by climatic factors and mineral-organic matter associations. What remained elusive is to what extent constraints on microbial metabolism induced by the respiratory pathway, and specifically the electron acceptor in respiration, control overall rates of carbon mineralization in soils. Therefore, physical factors limiting oxygen diffusion such as soil texture and aggregate size (soil structure) may therefore be central controls on C mineralization rates. The goal of our research was therefore to determine if variations in microbial metabolic rates induced by anaerobic microsites in soils are a major control on SOM mineralization rates and thus storage. We performed a combination of laboratory experiments and field investigations will be performed to fulfill our research objectives. We used laboratory studies to examine fundamental factors of respiratory constraints (i.e., electron acceptor) on organic matter mineralization rates. We ground our laboratory studies with both manipulation of field samples and in-field measurements. Selection of the field sites is guided by variation in soil texture and structure while having (other environmental/soil factors constant. Our laboratory studies defined redox gradients and variations in microbial metabolism operating at the aggregate-scale (cm-scale) within soils using a novel constructed diffusion reactor. We further examined micro-scale variation in terminal electron accepting processes and resulting C mineralization rates within re-packed soils. A major outcome of our research is the ability to quantitatively place

  1. Spatial Variation of Soil Lead in an Urban Community Garden: Implications for Risk-Based Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugdalski, Lauren; Lemke, Lawrence D; McElmurry, Shawn P

    2014-01-01

    Soil lead pollution is a recalcitrant problem in urban areas resulting from a combination of historical residential, industrial, and transportation practices. The emergence of urban gardening movements in postindustrial cities necessitates accurate assessment of soil lead levels to ensure safe gardening. In this study, we examined small-scale spatial variability of soil lead within a 15 × 30 m urban garden plot established on two adjacent residential lots located in Detroit, Michigan, USA. Eighty samples collected using a variably spaced sampling grid were analyzed for total, fine fraction (less than 250 μm), and bioaccessible soil lead. Measured concentrations varied at sampling scales of 1-10 m and a hot spot exceeding 400 ppm total soil lead was identified in the northwest portion of the site. An interpolated map of total lead was treated as an exhaustive data set, and random sampling was simulated to generate Monte Carlo distributions and evaluate alternative sampling strategies intended to estimate the average soil lead concentration or detect hot spots. Increasing the number of individual samples decreases the probability of overlooking the hot spot (type II error). However, the practice of compositing and averaging samples decreased the probability of overestimating the mean concentration (type I error) at the expense of increasing the chance for type II error. The results reported here suggest a need to reconsider U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampling objectives and consequent guidelines for reclaimed city lots where soil lead distributions are expected to be nonuniform. © 2013 Society for Risk Analysis.

  2. Spatial assessment of soil contamination by heavy metals from informal electronic waste recycling in Agbogbloshie, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Klaus; Atiemo, Sampson M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the spatial distribution and the extent of soil contamination by heavy metals resulting from primitive, unconventional informal electronic waste recycling in the Agbogbloshie e-waste processing site (AEPS) in Ghana. Methods A total of 132 samples were collected at 100 m intervals, with a handheld global position system used in taking the location data of the soil sample points. Observing all procedural and quality assurance measures, the samples were analyzed for barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn), using X-ray fluorescence. Using environmental risk indices of contamination factor and degree of contamination (Cdeg), we analyzed the individual contribution of each heavy metal contamination and the overall Cdeg. We further used geostatistical techniques of spatial autocorrelation and variability to examine spatial distribution and extent of heavy metal contamination. Results Results from soil analysis showed that heavy metal concentrations were significantly higher than the Canadian Environmental Protection Agency and Dutch environmental standards. In an increasing order, Pb>Cd>Hg>Cu>Zn>Cr>Co>Ba>Ni contributed significantly to the overall Cdeg. Contamination was highest in the main working areas of burning and dismantling sites, indicating the influence of recycling activities. Geostatistical analysis also revealed that heavy metal contamination spreads beyond the main working areas to residential, recreational, farming, and commercial areas. Conclusions Our results show that the studied heavy metals are ubiquitous within AEPS and the significantly high concentration of these metals reflect the contamination factor and Cdeg, indicating soil contamination in AEPS with the nine heavy metals studied. PMID:26987962

  3. Methods of determining the spatial response nonlinearities of radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, F A

    1970-09-01

    In many instances, a radiometer's responses are found to be nonuniform with respect to target positions within its field of view. This paper examines the effects of spatial nonuniformity for the case of a symmetrical uniform source boresighted in the radiometer's field of view and shows how these effects can be dealt with by relating the radiometer's output with its field of view unfilled to its output when its field of view is totally filled by a uniform source. By analysis of a Huggins Mark IX radiometer, it is shown that errors in excess of 18% can result through ignorance of the radiometer's nonlinearity caused by spatial response nonuniformity.

  4. Rangeland degradation in savannas of South Africa: spatial patterns of soil and vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhage-Hofmann, Alexandra; Löffler, Jörg; du Preez, Chris; Kotzé, Elmarie; Weijers, Stef; Wundram, Dirk; Zacharias, Maximilan; Amelung, Wulf

    2017-04-01

    Extensive bush encroachment by Acacia mellifera and associated woody species at semi-arid and arid sites are the most notable forms of rangeland degradation in savannas of South Africa. Concerns are growing over the threat of suppression and loss of nutritious perennial grass species. Grazing and different rangeland management systems (communal and freehold) are considered to be of major importance for degradation, but the process of encroachment is not restricted to communal land. A vegetation change is mostly accompanied by changes in soil properties, where soils in savanna systems can profit from woody species due to litter fall, root distribution, shadow and animal resting time. Savannas are very heterogeneous systems with high spatial variation of patches with wood, herbaceous species and bare ground. We hypothesized that the spatial patterns of soil properties in South Africás rangelands are controlled by present or past vegetation, modulated by the tenure systems with higher rangeland degradation in communal areas. To test this, we sampled soils at communal and commercial land in the Kuruman area of South Africa with the following design: three farms per tenure system, 6 randomly chosen plots (100x100m) per farm, and 25 soil samples (0-10 cm) per plot, each in a 5x5m sampling area. At every sampling point, information of overlying vegetation was recorded (species or bare soil, canopy size, height). For each sampling area, if present, trees/ shrubs were sampled and their ages estimated through the counting of annual growth rings. For each plot, high resolution UAV aerial photos were taken to evaluate the extent of bush encroachment. Analyses involved main physical and chemical soil parameters and isotopic analyses. The results of a rough aerial image classification (grass, woody species, bare ground) revealed significant differences between the tenure systems with higher coverage of bare ground and shrubs at communal farms, and higher grass cover at

  5. Factors determining soil nutrient distribution in a small-scaled watershed in the purple soil region of Sichuan Province, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.J.; Shi, X.Z.; Yu, D.S.; Weindorf, D.C.; Huang, B.; Sun, W.X.; Ritsema, C.J.; Milne, E.

    2009-01-01

    Determining soil nutrient distribution is critical to identify sites which are at risk of N and P loading. Equally important are determining factors that influence such distribution (e.g. land use, land management, topography, etc.). In this research, soil nutrient distribution and its influencing

  6. The effect of spatial soil variation on the hydrology of a semi-arid Rocky Mountains catchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diek, S.; Temme, A.J.A.M.; Teuling, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Soil properties can exhibit strong spatial variability, even at the small catchment scale. However, the hydrological implications of actual variability remain widely unknown since the required data are not easily collected. This is especially true for observations of covariation between local soil

  7. Soil salinity and acidity : spatial variabil[it]y and effects on rice production in West Africa's mangrove zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sylla, M.

    1994-01-01

    In the mangrove environment of West Africa, high spatial and temporal variability of soil constraints (salinity and acidity) to rice production is a problem for the transfer and adoption of new agronomic techniques, for land use planning, and for soil and water management. Recently, several

  8. Spatial patterns and determinants of fertility levels among women of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite aggressive measures to control the population in Nigeria, the population of Nigeria still remains worrisome. Increased birth rates have significantly contributed to Nigeria being referred to as the most populous country in Africa. This study analyses spatial patterns and contributory factors to fertility levels ...

  9. Spatial variation in soil properties and diffuse losses between and within grassland fields with similar short-term management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, S; Griffith, B A; Murray, P J; Macleod, C J A; Brazier, R E

    2016-07-01

    One of the major challenges for agriculture is to understand the effects of agricultural practices on soil properties and diffuse pollution, to support practical farm-scale land management. Three conventionally managed grassland fields with similar short-term management, but different ploughing histories, were studied on a long-term research platform: the North Wyke Farm Platform. The aims were to (i) quantify the between-field and within-field spatial variation in soil properties by geostatistical analysis, (ii) understand the effects of soil condition (in terms of nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon contents) on the quality of discharge water and (iii) establish robust baseline data before the implementation of various grassland management scenarios. Although the fields sampled had experienced the same land use and similar management for at least 6 years, there were differences in their mean soil properties. They showed different patterns of soil spatial variation and different rates of diffuse nutrient losses to water. The oldest permanent pasture field had the largest soil macronutrient concentrations and the greatest diffuse nutrient losses. We show that management histories affect soil properties and diffuse losses. Potential gains in herbage yield or benefits in water quality might be achieved by characterizing every field or by area-specific management within fields (a form of precision agriculture for grasslands). Permanent pasture per se cannot be considered a mitigation measure for diffuse pollution. The between- and within-field soil spatial variation emphasizes the importance of baseline characterization and will enable the reliable identification of any effects of future management change on the Farm Platform. Quantification of soil and water quality in grassland fields with contrasting management histories.Considerable spatial variation in soil properties and diffuse losses between and within fields.Contrasting management histories within and between

  10. Evaluation of Geostatistical Techniques for Mapping Spatial Distribution of Soil PH, Salinity and Plant Cover Affected by Environmental Factors in Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad ZARE-MEHRJARDI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presented in this paper attempts to evaluate some interpolation techniques for mapping spatial distribution of soil pH, salinity and plant cover in Hormozgan province, Iran. The relationships among environmental factors and distribution of vegetation types were also investigated. Plot sampling was applied in the study area. Landform parameters of each plot were recorded and canopy cover percentages of each species were measured while stoniness and browsing damage were estimated. Results indicated that there was a significant difference in vegetation cover for high and low slope steepness. Also, vegetation cover was greater than other cases in the mountains with calcareous lithology. In general, there were no significant relationships among vegetation cover and soil properties such as pH, EC, and texture. Other soil properties, such as soil depth and gravel percentage were significantly affected by vegetation cover. Moreover, the geostatistical results showed that kriging and cokriging methods were better than inverse distance weighting (IDW method for prediction of the spatial distribution of soil properties. Also, the results indicated that all the concerned soil and plant parameters were better determined by means of a cokriging method. Land elevation, which was highly correlated with studied parameters, was used as an auxiliary parameter.

  11. Difficulties Regarding Determination of Plasticity Index of Silty Soils by use of Casagrande and Fall Cone Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Rikke; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    Soil plasticity index and thereby the liquid limit and plastic limit are often used in order to classify the soil type and determine soil properties.......Soil plasticity index and thereby the liquid limit and plastic limit are often used in order to classify the soil type and determine soil properties....

  12. Diurnal spatial variability of soil respiration estimated by ordinary kriging and sequential Gaussian simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bortoli Teixeira, Daniel; Rodrigo Panosso, Alan; Tadeu Pereira, Gener; Pelegrino Cerri, Carlos Eduardo; La Scala, Newton, Jr.

    2010-05-01

    The role of greenhouse gases in the climate change is well know, however, the balance of greenhouse gases due to land use and management is still lacking. Hence it is important to characterize the main aspects of soil respiration (or soil CO2 emission) in agricultural areas, including its spatial variability, as quantitatively as possible. The objective of this work was to study the diurnal spatial variability of the soil respiration including their estimations by different methods: ordinary kriging and sequential Gaussian simulation. Evaluations were conducted in a regular grid having 64 points installed over a bare Eutrustox clay texture during the morning and afternoon periods. Measurements were conducted from 7:30 - 10:30 am (morning) and 13:30 - 16:30 pm (afternoon) using a portable soil respiration system (LI-8100), Lincoln, NE, USA. In order to estimate the best interpolation method it was applied the so-called external validation, where the respiration values of 5 points in grid were removed from interpolation process and after were estimated in the same points by kriging or sequential Gaussian simulation methods. This evaluation was also based on the sum of the square of residues, comparing observed with predicted respiration values in each of the 5 points selected for external validation. The highest CO2 emission was observed in the afternoon period, with mean value of 6.24 µmol m-2 s-1, when compared to the morning (4.54 µmol m-2 s-1). Our results indicate that the measurement period (morning or afternoon) did not interfere into the definition of emission spatial variability structure, as coefficient of variation, spatial variability models and their parameters were quite similar in morning and afternoon. However, despite the high correlation between kriging and sequential Gaussian simulation respiration maps (R2 =0.99) sequential Gaussian simulation showed to be more efficient into the estimations of non-sampled emissions in both periods, mornings and

  13. Effect of soil water content on spatial distribution of root exudates and mucilage in the rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Maire; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Water and nutrients are expected to become the major factors limiting food production. Plant roots employ various mechanisms to increase the access to these limited soil resources. Low molecular root exudates released into the rhizosphere increase nutrient availability, while mucilage improves water availability under low moisture conditions. However, studies on the spatial distribution and quantification of exudates in soil are scarce. Our aim was therefore to quantify and visualize root exudates and mucilage distribution around growing roots using neutron radiography and 14C imaging at different levels of water stress. Maize plants were grown in rhizotrons filled with a silty soil and were exposed to varying soil conditions, from optimal to dry. Mucilage distribution around the roots was estimated from the profiles of water content in the rhizosphere - note that mucilage increases the soil water content. The profiles of water content around different root types and root ages were measured with neutron radiography. Rhizosphere extension was approx. 0.7 mm and did not differ between wet and dry treatments. However, water content (i.e. mucilage concentration) in the rhizosphere of plants grown in dry soils was higher than for plants grown under optimal conditions. This effect was particularly pronounced near the tips of lateral roots. The higher water contents near the root are explained as the water retained by mucilage. 14C imaging of root after 14CO2 labeling of shoots (Pausch and Kuzyakov 2011) was used to estimate the distribution of all rhizodeposits. Two days after labelling, 14C distribution was measured using phosphor-imaging. To quantify 14C in the rhizosphere a calibration was carried out by adding given amounts of 14C-glucose to soil. Plants grown in wet soil transported a higher percentage of 14C to the roots (14Croot/14Cshoot), compared to plants grown under dry conditions (46 vs. 36 %). However, the percentage of 14C allocated from roots to

  14. Principal factors of soil spatial heterogeneity and ecosystem services at the Central Chernozemic Region of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasenev, Ivan; Valentini, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    The essential spatial heterogeneity is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central Chernozemic Region of Russia which is not only one of the biggest «food baskets» in RF but very important regulator of ecosystem principal services at the European territory of Russia. The original spatial heterogeneity of dominated here forest-steppe and steppe Chernozems and the other soils has been further complicated by a specific land-use history and different-direction soil successions due to environmental changes and more than 1000-year history of human impacts. The carried out long-term researches of representative natural, rural and urban landscapes in Kursk, Orel, Tambov and Voronezh oblasts give us the regional multi-factorial matrix of elementary soil cover patterns (ESCP) with different land-use practices and history, soil-geomorphologic features, environmental and microclimate conditions. The validation and ranging of the limiting factors of ESCP regulation and development, ecosystem principal services, land functional qualities and agroecological state have been done for dominating and most dynamical components of ESCP regional-typological forms - with application of regional and local GIS, soil spatial patterns mapping, traditional regression kriging, correlation tree models. The outcomes of statistical modeling show the essential amplification of erosion, dehumification and CO2 emission, acidification and alkalization, disaggregation and overcompaction processes due to violation of agroecologically sound land-use systems and traditional balances of organic matter, nutrients, Ca and Na in agrolandscapes. Due to long-term intensive and out-of-balance land-use practices the famous Russian Chernozems begin to lose not only their unique natural features of (around 1 m of humus horizon, 4-6% of Corg and favorable agrophysical features), but traditional soil cover patterns, ecosystem services and agroecological functions. Key-site monitoring

  15. The Node Deployment of Intelligent Sensor Networks Based on the Spatial Difference of Farmland Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Naisen; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Jingchao; Pang, Fangrong; Ni, Jun

    2015-11-11

    Considering that agricultural production is characterized by vast areas, scattered fields and long crop growth cycles, intelligent wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are suitable for monitoring crop growth information. Cost and coverage are the most key indexes for WSN applications. The differences in crop conditions are influenced by the spatial distribution of soil nutrients. If the nutrients are distributed evenly, the crop conditions are expected to be approximately uniform with little difference; on the contrary, there will be great differences in crop conditions. In accordance with the differences in the spatial distribution of soil information in farmland, fuzzy c-means clustering was applied to divide the farmland into several areas, where the soil fertility of each area is nearly uniform. Then the crop growth information in the area could be monitored with complete coverage by deploying a sensor node there, which could greatly decrease the deployed sensor nodes. Moreover, in order to accurately judge the optimal cluster number of fuzzy c-means clustering, a discriminant function for Normalized Intra-Cluster Coefficient of Variation (NICCV) was established. The sensitivity analysis indicates that NICCV is insensitive to the fuzzy weighting exponent, but it shows a strong sensitivity to the number of clusters.

  16. On the Critical Behaviour of Observed and Simulated Spatial Soil Moisture Fields during SGP97

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    Mekonnen Gebremichael

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aircraft-based ESTAR soil moisture fields from the Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97 Hydrology Experiment are compared to the simulated ones obtained by Bertoldi et al. [1] with the GEOtop model [2], with a particular focus on their capability in capturing the critical point behaviour in their space-time dynamics (see [3]. The critical point behaviour should denote the transition of soil moisture spatial patterns from an unorganized to organized appearance, as conditions become wetter. The study region is the Little Washita watershed, located in the southwest Oklahoma, in the Southern Great Plains region of the USA. The case study takes place from June 27 to July 16 and encompasses wetting and drying cycles allowing for exploring the behaviour under transient conditions. Results show that the critical probability value is 0.85 for GEOtop, and 0.80 for ESTAR. The GEOtop patterns appear more fragmented, being more reluctant to organization, as confirmed by the higher value of critical probability. Such behaviour is probably inherited by the model’s parameterization: land use and soil classes impose additional spatial structures to those related to the meteorological forcings and the hillslope morphology, driving to higher degrees of heterogeneity.

  17. Soil inoculation method determines the strength of plant-soil interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorde, van de T.F.J.; Ruijten, M.; Putten, van der W.H.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that interactions between plants and biotic components of the soil influence plant productivity and plant community composition. Many plant–soil feedback experiments start from inoculating relatively small amounts of natural soil to sterilized bulk soil. These soil

  18. Soil inoculation method determines the strength of plant–soil interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Voorde, T.F.J.; Van der Putten, W.H.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that interactions between plants and biotic components of the soil influence plant productivity and plant community composition. Many plant–soil feedback experiments start from inoculating relatively small amounts of natural soil to sterilized bulk soil. These soil

  19. A historical review of the methods of determination of soil properties for soil quality and land degradation assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Manuel; Schnabel, Susanne; Francisco Lavado Contador, Joaquín; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Álvaro; Miralles, Isabel; Lozano-Parra, Javier; Antoneli, Valdemir; Brevik, Eric C.; Cerdà, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    Properly assessing soil quality and land degradation is one of the main concerns of soil scientists in recent decades. Nowadays there are several available assessment systems based mainly on indicators, i.e. on soil-related parameters, that allow one to determine the current state of natural soils at different scales. These systems vary depending on ecosystem type and soil function studied as well as the accuracy of the methods (techniques and tools) historically used in the determination of several soil parameters. In this study, we show a historical review of many methods of determining soil properties used regularly as soil quality and land degradation indicators. We have considered 5 worldwide historical periods: [1] The pioneers: before 1889, [2] USDA impulse: 1889 - 1945, [3] Productivity paradigm: 1946 - 1972, [4] Conservationist paradigm: 1973 - 2001, and [5] Current methodologies: 2002 - present. The limits of each period have been determined according to some key milestones, for humanity in general and soil science in particular, such as the creation of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in 1889, the end of World War II in 1945 or the publication of relevant works such as The limits to growth in 1972. The development of the Soil Management Assessment Framework (SMAF) indexing tool by American soil scientists in 2001 marks a turning point from which new methodologies and paradigms began to be dominant among methods of determination. Finally, the methods historically used to determine more than 100 soil properties have been reviewed by consulting around 1,500 references published between 1305 and 2017. Approximately 10% of the references were key works to contextualize the first two historical periods, i.e. before 1945, and almost half of all references were published in the second half of the twentieth century (1946 - 2001). A logical tendency in gaining progressively accuracy in methods has been observed as well as a major boom in the

  20. Physically-based parameterization of spatially variable soil and vegetation using satellite multispectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Michael F.; Eagleson, Peter S.

    1989-01-01

    A stochastic-geometric landsurface reflectance model is formulated and tested for the parameterization of spatially variable vegetation and soil at subpixel scales using satellite multispectral images without ground truth. Landscapes are conceptualized as 3-D Lambertian reflecting surfaces consisting of plant canopies, represented by solid geometric figures, superposed on a flat soil background. A computer simulation program is developed to investigate image characteristics at various spatial aggregations representative of satellite observational scales, or pixels. The evolution of the shape and structure of the red-infrared space, or scattergram, of typical semivegetated scenes is investigated by sequentially introducing model variables into the simulation. The analytical moments of the total pixel reflectance, including the mean, variance, spatial covariance, and cross-spectral covariance, are derived in terms of the moments of the individual fractional cover and reflectance components. The moments are applied to the solution of the inverse problem: The estimation of subpixel landscape properties on a pixel-by-pixel basis, given only one multispectral image and limited assumptions on the structure of the landscape. The landsurface reflectance model and inversion technique are tested using actual aerial radiometric data collected over regularly spaced pecan trees, and using both aerial and LANDSAT Thematic Mapper data obtained over discontinuous, randomly spaced conifer canopies in a natural forested watershed. Different amounts of solar backscattered diffuse radiation are assumed and the sensitivity of the estimated landsurface parameters to those amounts is examined.

  1. he Role of Aspect on Spatial Variability of Soil Properties and Quantitative, Qualitative, and Vegetative Properties of Peach in Saman Region, Shahrekord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nargess keyvani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soils form from the interplay of five main factors namely parent material, time, climate, relief (topography and organisms. Topography is one of the local factors that has direct and indirect effects on soil formation, physical and chemical properties of soils. To understand the mutual relationship between topographic properties, soil properties and plant community (phytocoenosis, it is necessary to decide on the appropriate method for properly managing the soil resources. In addition to the soil properties, topography may affect the soil production indices as well. Soil production index and consequently its productivity will in turn affect the growth and fruiting. Insight about the pattern the spatial variability of soil properties can be used to manage the lands properly. This study was performed to investigate the spatial variability of soil properties regarding aspect and also the relationship of these changes with the quality and quantity of peach production in Saman region in Chaharmahal-Va-Bakhtiari province, Iran. Materials and Methods: The study area contained 1.5 hectare of 200-hectare peach gerdens belong to BaghGostaran Company located in Saman, Chaharmahal-Va-Bakhtiari Province. The soil moisture and temperature regimes are xeric and mesic, respectively. 136 soil samples were collected from 0-30 and 30-60 cm depths. Two peach trees around the soil samples were also selected. Then, soil physical and chemical properties including soil texture, percentage of calcium carbonate equivalent, organic carbon, plant available potassium, phosphorous, iron and zinc, pH and electrical conductivity were determined and fruit properties including branch length and diameter in the current year, number of fruits, total yield, average of fruit weight, TSS, tissue strength, pH, acid and extract percentage were measured. Finally, the dataset were analyzed using Statistica 6.0 software. Analysis of spatial data was calculated via variogram

  2. Isotope determination of sulfur by mass spectrometry in soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexssandra Luiza Rodrigues Molina Rossete

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulphur plays an essential role in plants and is one of the main nutrients in several metabolic processes. It has four stable isotopes (32S, 33S, 34S, and 36S with a natural abundance of 95.00, 0.76, 4.22, and 0.014 in atom %, respectively. A method for isotopic determination of S by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS in soil samples is proposed. The procedure involves the oxidation of organic S to sulphate (S-SO4(2-, which was determined by dry combustion with alkaline oxidizing agents. The total S-SO4(2- concentration was determined by turbidimetry and the results showed that the conversion process was adequate. To produce gaseous SO2 gas, BaSO4 was thermally decomposed in a vacuum system at 900 ºC in the presence of NaPO3. The isotope determination of S (atom % 34S atoms was carried out by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS. In this work, the labeled material (K2(34SO4 was used to validate the method of isotopic determination of S; the results were precise and accurate, showing the viability of the proposed method.

  3. Determining biological tissue optical properties via integrating sphere spatial measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Justin S [Knoxville, TN; Letzen, Brian S [Coral Springs, FL

    2011-01-11

    An optical sample is mounted on a spatial-acquisition apparatus that is placed in or on an enclosure. An incident beam is irradiated on a surface of the sample and the specular reflection is allowed to escape from the enclosure through an opening. The spatial-acquisition apparatus is provided with a light-occluding slider that moves in front of the sample to block portions of diffuse scattering from the sample. As the light-occluding slider moves across the front of the sample, diffuse light scattered into the area of the backside of the light-occluding slider is absorbed by back side surface of the light-occluding slider. By measuring a baseline diffuse reflectance without a light-occluding slider and subtracting measured diffuse reflectance with a light-occluding slider therefrom, diffuse reflectance for the area blocked by the light-occluding slider can be calculated.

  4. Spatial interactions determine temporal feature integration as revealed by unmasking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Herzog

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Feature integration is one of the most fundamental problems in neuroscience. In a recent contribution, we showed that a trailing grating can diminish the masking effects one vernier exerts on another, preceding vernier. Here, we show that this temporal unmasking depends on neural spatial interactions related to the trailing grating. Hence, our paradigm allows us to study the spatio-temporal interactions underlying feature integration.

  5. Simple sensors to achieve fine spatial resolution in continuous measurements of soil moisture and salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Konukcu

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly necessary to be able to measure, simultaneously, continuously and at fine spatial resolution, the salinity and water content of soil. This paper reports the design, construction, calibration and laboratory testing of two simple but robust instruments that enable this to be achieved. Salinity in solution was measured reliably, at 10-mm spacing, by multi-electrode resistivity probes up to saturation with NaCl (c. 6 mol l–1, though these probes required individual calibration and were unable to detect precipitated salt. Volumetric water content was measured with great sensitivity over a wide range, from air-dryness (0.06 m3m–3 to saturation (0.55 m3m–3 in a sandy loam, using thermal-conductivity probes that used a common calibration and were unaffected by the salinity of the soil solution, by temperature and by ageing. Keywords: soil moisture, soil salinity, thermal-conductivity moisture probe, four-electrode salinity probe

  6. Spatial variability and hotspots of soil N2O fluxes from intensively grazed grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, N. J.; Norman, P.; Famulari, D.; Levy, P. E.; Reay, D. S.; Skiba, U. M.

    2015-03-01

    One hundred N2O flux measurements were made from an area of intensively managed grazed grassland in central Scotland using a high-resolution dynamic chamber method. The field contained a variety of features from which N2O fluxes were measured including a manure heap, patches of decaying grass silage, and areas of increased sheep activity. Individual fluxes varied significantly across the field varying from 2 to 79 000 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1. Soil samples were collected at 55 locations to investigate relationships between soil properties and N2O flux. Fluxes of N2O correlated strongly with soil NO3- concentrations. Distribution of NO3- and the high spatial variability of N2O flux across the field are shown to be linked to the distribution of waste from grazing animals and the resultant reactive nitrogen compounds in the soil which are made available for microbiological processes. Features within the field such as shaded areas and manure heaps contained significantly higher available nitrogen than the rest of the field. Although these features only represented 1.1% of the area of the field, they contributed to over 55% of the total estimated daily N2O flux.

  7. A physically based hydrological connectivity algorithm for describing spatial patterns of soil moisture in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jonggun; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2017-02-01

    Hydrologic connectivity has been proposed as an important concept for understanding local processes in the context of catchment hydrology. It can be useful for characterizing the soil moisture variability in complex heterogeneous landscapes. The current land surface models (e.g., Community Land Model, CLM) could not completely account for flow path continuity and connected patterns of subsurface properties in the unsaturated zone. In this study, we developed a physically based hydrologic connectivity algorithm based on dominant physical controls (e.g., topography, soil texture, and vegetation) to better understand the spatially distributed subsurface flow and improve the parameterization of soil hydraulic properties in hydrological modeling. We investigated the effects of mixed physical controls on soil moisture spatial variability and developed hydrologic connectivity using various thresholds. The connectivity was used for identifying the soil moisture variability and applied in a distributed land surface model (CLM) for calibrating soil hydraulic properties and improving model performance for estimating spatially distributed soil moisture. The proposed concept was tested in two watersheds (Little Washita in Oklahoma and Upper South Skunk in Iowa) comparing estimated soil moisture with the airborne remote sensing data (Electronically Scanning Thinned Array Radiometer and Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer). Our finding demonstrated that the spatial variations of soil moisture could be described well using physically based hydrologic connectivity, and the land surface model performance was improved by using the calibrated (distributed) soil hydraulic parameters. In addition, we found that the calibrated soil hydraulic parameters significantly affect model outputs not only on the water cycle but also on surface energy budgets.

  8. Spatial distribution of metals in soil samples from Zona da Mata, Pernambuco, Brazil using XRF technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Zahily Herrero; Santos Junior, Jose Araujo dos; Amaral, Romilton dos Santos; Menezes, Romulo Simoes Cezar; Santos, Josineide Marques do Nascimento; Bezerra, Jairo Dias; Damascena, Kennedy Francys Rodrigues, E-mail: zahily1985@gmail.com, E-mail: jaraujo@ufpe.br, E-mail: romilton@ufpe.br, E-mail: rmenezes@ufpe.br, E-mail: neideden@hotmail.com, E-mail: jairo.dias@ufpe.br, E-mail: kennedy.eng.ambiental@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia e Geociencias. Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Alvarez, Juan Reinaldo Estevez, E-mail: jestevez@ceaden.cu [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), Havana (Cuba); Silva, Edvane Borges da, E-mail: edvane.borges@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Vitoria de Santo Antao, PE (Brazil). Nucleo de Biologia; Franca, Elvis Joacir de; Farias, Emerson Emiliano Gualberto de, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Silva, Alberto Antonio da, E-mail: alberto.silva@barreiros.ifpe.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Barreiros, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Soil contamination is today one of the most important environmental issues for society. In the past, soil pollution was not considered as important as air and water contamination, because this was more difficult to be controlled, becoming an important topic in studies of environmental protection worldwide. Based on this, this paper provides information on the determination of metals in soil samples collected in Zona da Mata, Pernambuco, Brazil, where normally the application of pesticides, insecticides and other agricultural additives are used in a disorderly manner and without control. A total of 24 sampling points were monitored. The analysis of Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Pb, Ti, La, Al, Si and P were performed using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence. In order to assess the development of analytical method, inorganic Certified Reference Materials (IAEA-SOIL-7 and SRM 2709) were analyzed. In each sampling site, the geoaccumulation index were calculated to estimate the level of metal contamination in the soil, this was made taking into account the resolution 460 of the National Environmental Council (CONAMA in Portuguese). The elemental distribution patterns obtained for each metal were associated with different pollution sources. This assessment provides an initial description of pollution levels presented by metals in soils from several areas of Zona da Mata, providing quantitative evidence and demonstrating the need to improve the regulation of agricultural and industrial activities. (author)

  9. Spatial variability of soil chemical properties and its effect on crop yields: a case study in maize (Zea mays L. on the Bogota Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez T. Jaiver D.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    To evaluate the effect of soil chemical properties on the crop yield of corn, in the context of site-specific fertilization, it was characterized the spatio-temporal variability of these properties and crop yield in a lot at the Centro Agropecuario Marengo of the Universidad Nacional de Colombia (Mosquera, Colombia. Using a systematic sampling grid of 32 points (25 x 25 m, soil samples were taken before crop sowing and 60 days after sowing (das to determine soil pH, N (%; Ca, K, Mg, Na, Al, H (cmol+ kg-1, P, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn and B (mg kg-1. At 162 das, harvest and yield components were evaluated by site. The data was processed using multivariate procedures, descriptive analysis and geostatistical analysis. Emergent properties were obtained from the original chemical variables using principal component analysis (PCA; these new variables were evaluated using geostatistical analysis to show spatial distribution and its correlation with crop yield. The PCA allowed the finding of three patterns of spatial variability in the soil corresponding to the variables related to soil fertility OC, Ca, Mg, K, CIC and B, the availability of nutrients by soil redox potential, and the variability associated with salinity explained by the Na content and soil electrical conductivity. The first group of variables largely explains the spatial variability of crop yield of corn.

  10. Spatial distribution of soil-transmitted helminths, including Strongyloides stercoralis, among children in Zanzibar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Knopp

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A programme periodically distributing anthelminthic drugs to school-aged children for the control of soiltransmitted helminthiasis was launched in Zanzibar in the early 1990s. We investigated the spatial distribution of soiltransmitted helminth infections, including Strongyloides stercoralis, in 336 children from six districts in Unguja, Zanzibar, in 2007. One stool sample per child was examined with the Kato-Katz, Koga agar plate and Baermann methods. The point prevalence of the different helminth infections was compared to the geological characteristics of the study sites. The observed prevalences for Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and S. stercoralis were 35.5%, 12.2%, 11.9% and 2.2%, respectively, with considerable spatial heterogeneity. Whilst T. trichiura and hookworm infections were found in all six districts, no A. lumbricoides infections were recorded in the urban setting and only a low prevalence (2.2% was observed in the South district. S. stercoralis infections were found in four districts with the highest prevalence (4.0% in the West district. The prevalence of infection with any soil-transmitted helminth was highest in the North A district (69.6% and lowest in the urban setting (22.4%. A. lumbricoides, hookworm and, with the exception of the North B district, S. stercoralis infections were observed to be more prevalent in the settings north of Zanzibar Town, which are characterized by alluvial clayey soils, moist forest regions and a higher precipitation. After a decade of large-scale administration of anthelminthic drugs, the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections across Unguja is still considerable. Hence, additional measures, such as improving access to adequate sanitation and clean water and continued health education, are warranted to successfully control soil-transmitted helminthiasis in Zanzibar.

  11. Predicting the spatial distribution of soil erodibility factor using USLE nomograph in an agricultural watershed, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailu Kendie Addis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion in the northwestern Amhara region, Ethiopia has been a subject of anxiety, resulting in a major environmental threat to the sustainability and productive capacity of agricultural areas. This study tried to estimate soil erodibility factor (K-factor using Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE nomograph, and evaluate the spatial distribution of the predicted K-factor in a mountainous agricultural watershed. To investigate the K-factor, the 54 km2 study watershed was divided into a 500 m by 500 m square grid and approximately at the center of each grid, topsoil samples (roughly 10 to 20 cm depth were collected over 234 locations. Sand, silt, clay and organic matter (OM percentage were analyzed, while soil permeability and structure class codes were obtained using the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA document. The resulting coefficient of variation (CV of the estimated K-factor was 0.31, suggesting a moderate variability. Meanwhile, the value of nugget to sill ratio of K-factor was 0.32, which categorized as moderate spatial autocorrelation. Prediction accuracy and model fitting effect of the Gaussian semivariogram approach was best, suggesting that the Gaussian ordinary Kriging model was more appropriate for predicting K-factor. The resulting value of the mean error (ME was 0 and the mean squared deviation ratio (MSDR was nearly 1, which indicates the Gaussian model was unbiased and reproduced the experimental variance sufficiently. The values of K-factor were smaller (0.0217 to 0.0188 in the northern part and gradually increased (0.0273 to 0.033 Mg h MJ−1 mm−1 towards the central and south of the study watershed.

  12. Spatial variation of urban soil geochemistry in a roadside sports ground in Galway, Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Ligang; Morrison, Liam; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2010-02-01

    Characterization of spatial variation of urban soil geochemistry especially heavy metal pollution is essential for a better understanding of pollution sources and potential risks. A total of 294 surface soil samples were collected from a roadside sports ground in Galway, Ireland, and were analysed by ICP-OES for 23 chemical elements (Al, Ca, Ce, Co, Cu, Fe, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sc, Sr, Th, Ti, V, Y and Zn). Strong variations in soil geochemistry were observed and most elements, with the exception of Cu, Pb, P, S and Zn, showed multi-modal features, indicating the existence of mixed populations which proved difficult to separate. To evaluate the pollution level of the study area, the pollution index (PI) values were calculated based on a comparison with the Dutch target and intervention values. None of the concentrations of metal pollutants exceeded their intervention values, indicating the absence of serious contaminated soil, and the ratios to target values were therefore employed to produce the hazard maps. The spatial distribution and hazard maps for Cu, Pb and Zn indicated relatively high levels of pollution along the southern roadside extending almost 30m into the sports ground, revealing the strong influence of pollution from local traffic. However, heavy metal pollution was alleviated along the eastern roadside of the study area by the presence of a belt of shrubs. Therefore, in order to prevent further contamination from traffic emissions, the planting of hedging or erection of low walls should be considered as shields against traffic pollution for roadside parks. The results in this study are useful for management practices in sports and parks in urban areas. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Simulating maize yield and bomass with spatial variability of soil field capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liwang; Ahuja, Lajpat; Trout, Thomas; Nolan, Bernard T.; Malone, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial variability in field soil properties is a challenge for system modelers who use single representative values, such as means, for model inputs, rather than their distributions. In this study, the root zone water quality model (RZWQM2) was first calibrated for 4 yr of maize (Zea mays L.) data at six irrigation levels in northern Colorado and then used to study spatial variability of soil field capacity (FC) estimated in 96 plots on maize yield and biomass. The best results were obtained when the crop parameters were fitted along with FCs, with a root mean squared error (RMSE) of 354 kg ha–1 for yield and 1202 kg ha–1 for biomass. When running the model using each of the 96 sets of field-estimated FC values, instead of calibrating FCs, the average simulated yield and biomass from the 96 runs were close to measured values with a RMSE of 376 kg ha–1 for yield and 1504 kg ha–1 for biomass. When an average of the 96 FC values for each soil layer was used, simulated yield and biomass were also acceptable with a RMSE of 438 kg ha–1 for yield and 1627 kg ha–1 for biomass. Therefore, when there are large numbers of FC measurements, an average value might be sufficient for model inputs. However, when the ranges of FC measurements were known for each soil layer, a sampled distribution of FCs using the Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) might be used for model inputs.

  14. Combining spatial distribution with oral bioaccessibility of metals in smelter-impacted soils: implications for human health risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelfrêne, Aurélie; Détriché, Sébastien; Douay, Francis

    2015-02-01

    Geostatistical analysis and GIS-based spatial mapping have been widely used for risk assessment of environmental pollution. The objectives of this study were to: (1) investigate the spatial variability of pseudototal concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Zn; (2) estimate the degree of contamination on the basis of pollution indexes; and (3) combine geostatistical analysis with oral bioaccessibility to better assess the population's exposure to metals in smelter-impacted soils. Implications for human health risks were assessed by considering soil as a contaminant source, a release mechanism of contaminated soil to the hands, ingestion as an exposure route, and metal bioaccessibility. The bioaccessibility data in the gastric (G) and gastrointestinal (GI) phases were integrated into the standard hazard quotient-based risk assessment method. Using pollution indices showed that the entire area studied was highly polluted in terms of soil metal concentrations. However, the spatial pattern of health risk levels did not coincide with the spatial distribution of the degree of soil contamination. Introducing the bioaccessible fraction of metals from soils into the exposure calculations resulted in a substantial decrease in calculated risk (HI, hazard index) and provided a more realistic estimate of exposure to the three metals. For the highly exposed population, 46% of the soils studied provided an HI-G > 1.0 and 15% provided an HI-GI > 1.0, suggesting probable adverse health effects in children. The present study highlights the importance of conducting studies taking into account metal bioaccessible values in risk assessment.

  15. Tracking changes in land-use and drainage status of organic soils using heterogeneous spatial datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untenecker, Johanna; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Freibauer, Annette; Laggner, Andreas; Luterbacher, Jürg

    2016-04-01

    Tracking land-use since 1990 is one of the major challenges in greenhouse gas (GHG) reporting under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol, as the data availability, especially for the base year 1990, is often poor. Even if data is available, spatial and thematic resolution will often change over time or differ even within one country. Such inconsistencies will cause a strong overestimation of land use change (LUC) if not adequately accounted for. Using different spatial datasets, we present a method that allows tracking changes in land-use and drainage status of organic soils. The drainage status is relevant for the Kyoto activities grazing land management (GM) and wetland drainage and rewetting (WDR) as the GHG emissions of organic soils strongly depend on the groundwater level. We used datasets that are already used for the German national inventory report (Digital Landscape Model of official cadastre data) and high resolution spatial datasets (CIR aerial photography) derived for biodiversity monitoring of six federal states in North and East Germany. This data is combined with the legal protection status such as nature conservation areas. To create a consistent time series, we developed a translation key which allows quantifying gross and net LUC in a spatially explicit manner. The developed method fills the lack of data for 1990 and allows GHG accounting on higher Tier levels as soon as detailed emission factors are ready to be implemented. LUC can be stratified by the protection status. Areas without a protection status show a trend towards both intensification of land-use and drier conditions. Highly protected areas show an opposite trend while a moderate protection level (e.g. by nature parks) did only have very weak effects. Furthermore, there are major differences between federal states. In Schleswig-Holstein, known as a federal state of high agricultural production, organic soils tend to become drier and

  16. Reconstructing spatial and temporal patterns of soil formation in an anthropogenic drift sand area in Northeastern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Anna; Hirsch, Florian; Raab, Thomas; Wechler, Klaus-Peter

    2015-04-01

    On the sandy deposits of the Weichselian glaciation, soils developed during periods of landscape stability are often conserved under windblown sand. The relatively diverse morphology of dune areas and the possibilities for dating the accumulation of windblown sediment offer good opportunities to improve the understanding of spatial and temporal patterns of soil formation. However, a mapping of the buried soils and surfaces is often limited to single outcrops. In the forefield of the open-cast mine Cottbus-Nord, archaeological excavations in an about 10 ha dune and drift sand area revealed widespread buried soils, mainly podzols, of different characteristics. Archaeological findings give evidence for the age of the buried surfaces. The densely spaced excavation trenches allow for reconstructing the distribution of fossil and recent soils in a high spatial resolution. We created and analyzed digital models of the recent surface and the buried soils using a combination of methods: To characterize the recent ground surface, we used microdrone-based photogrammetry, LIDAR-based elevation data and GPS. To create a digital model of the palaeosurface and the distribution of fossil soils, we used soil and sedimentological mapping along excavation trenches, mapping of the elevation of excavated palaeosurfaces, and prospection of the fossil soils by Ground Penetrating Radar. Our studies reveal a high vertical and horizontal heterogeneity of soils, with varying thicknesses of eluvial and illuvial horizons and varying degrees of organic compound and sesquioxide accumulation. First results reflect several phases of landscape development: i) the formation of a Late Pleistocene soil on fluvio-eolian deposits, ii) a fossilization by eolian sands which underwent intensive podsolization, and iii) a land use-induced eolian remobilization of the sands. The soil characteristics' spatial distribution in relation to surface morphology indicates a high relevance of lateral leachate

  17. Modelling spatial distribution of soil steady state infiltration rate in an urban park (Vingis Parkas, Vilnius, Lithuania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerda, Artemi; Depellegrin, Daniel; Misiune, Ieva; Bogunovic, Igor; Menchov, Oleksandr

    2016-04-01

    Within the hydrological process, infiltration is a key component as control the partitioning of the rainfall into runoff or soil water (Cerdà, 1997). And the infiltration process is determining the fate of the soil development and the human impact in the soil system (Brevik et al., 2015). On forest soils, the infiltration use to be high due to the macropore flow, which drainages the surface runoff usually generated by the hydrophobic response of soil reach in organic matter (Hewelke et al., 2015) or as a consequence of forest fires (Jordán et al., 2010; Pereira et al., 2014) due to the development of water repellent substances (Mao et al., 2015), which are mainly associated to the ash (Pereira et al., 2014; Pereira et al., 2015). To understand the role the infiltration plays in the soil development and the runoff generation is important, and also is necessary to understand how some factors such as vegetation, crust, stones, litter, mulches… play in the hydrological, erosional and pedological system (Cerdà, 2001; Keesstra, 2007; Liu et al., 2014; Bisantino et al., 2015; Cassinari et al., 2015, Cerdà et al., 2015; Mohawesh et al., 2015; Terribile et al., 2015). The well-know importance of the infiltration process did not resulted in the research on the infiltration on urban areas, although there is where the infiltration is more altered. Water infiltration is extremely important in urbanized areas, since the majority of the surfaces are sealed by concrete, asphalt and other materials. Soil sealing increases exponentially the impacts of flash floods and reduces soil infiltration capacity. This decreases importantly one of the most important services provided by soil: water storage and infiltration. In this context, the existence of green areas and urban parks are of major importance to mitigate the impact of human settlements in soil water infiltration. The aim of this work is to assess the spatial distribution of steady-state soil water infiltration in the

  18. Detecting small-scale spatial differences and temporal dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks: a comparison between automatic chamber-derived C budgets and repeated soil inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Jurisch, Nicole; Garcia Alba, Juana; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Schmidt, Marten; Huth, Vytas; Rogasik, Helmut; Rieckh, Helene; Verch, Gernot; Sommer, Michael; Augustin, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Carbon (C) sequestration in soils plays a key role in the global C cycle. It is therefore crucial to adequately monitor dynamics in soil organic carbon (ΔSOC) stocks when aiming to reveal underlying processes and potential drivers. However, small-scale spatial and temporal changes in SOC stocks, particularly pronounced on arable lands, are hard to assess. The main reasons for this are limitations of the well-established methods. On the one hand, repeated soil inventories, often used in long-term field trials, reveal spatial patterns and trends in ΔSOC but require a longer observation period and a sufficient number of repetitions. On the other hand, eddy covariance measurements of C fluxes towards a complete C budget of the soil-plant-atmosphere system may help to obtain temporal ΔSOC patterns but lack small-scale spatial resolution. To overcome these limitations, this study presents a reliable method to detect both short-term temporal as well as small-scale spatial dynamics of ΔSOC. Therefore, a combination of automatic chamber (AC) measurements of CO2 exchange and empirically modeled aboveground biomass development (NPPshoot) was used. To verify our method, results were compared with ΔSOC observed by soil resampling. AC measurements were performed from 2010 to 2014 under a silage maize/winter fodder rye/sorghum-Sudan grass hybrid/alfalfa crop rotation at a colluvial depression located in the hummocky ground moraine landscape of NE Germany. Widespread in large areas of the formerly glaciated Northern Hemisphere, this depression type is characterized by a variable groundwater level (GWL) and pronounced small-scale spatial heterogeneity in soil properties, such as SOC and nitrogen (Nt). After monitoring the initial stage during 2010, soil erosion was experimentally simulated by incorporating topsoil material from an eroded midslope soil into the plough layer of the colluvial depression. SOC stocks were quantified before and after soil manipulation and at the end

  19. Spatial probability of soil water repellency in an abandoned agricultural field in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Misiūnė, Ieva

    2015-04-01

    Water repellency is a natural soil property with implications on infiltration, erosion and plant growth. It depends on soil texture, type and amount of organic matter, fungi, microorganisms, and vegetation cover (Doerr et al., 2000). Human activities as agriculture can have implications on soil water repellency (SWR) due tillage and addition of organic compounds and fertilizers (Blanco-Canqui and Lal, 2009; Gonzalez-Penaloza et al., 2012). It is also assumed that SWR has a high small-scale variability (Doerr et al., 2000). The aim of this work is to study the spatial probability of SWR in an abandoned field testing several geostatistical methods, Organic Kriging (OK), Simple Kriging (SK), Indicator Kriging (IK), Probability Kriging (PK) and Disjunctive Kriging (DK). The study area it is located near Vilnius urban area at (54 49' N, 25 22', 104 masl) in Lithuania (Pereira and Oliva, 2013). It was designed a experimental plot with 21 m2 (07x03 m). Inside this area it was measured SWR was measured every 50 cm using the water drop penetration time (WDPT) (Wessel, 1998). A total of 105 points were measured. The probability of SWR was classified in 0 (No probability) to 1 (High probability). The methods accuracy was assessed with the cross validation method. The best interpolation method was the one with the lowest Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). The results showed that the most accurate probability method was SK (RMSE=0.436), followed by DK (RMSE=0.437), IK (RMSE=0.448), PK (RMSE=0.452) and OK (RMSE=0.537). Significant differences were identified among probability tests (Kruskal-Wallis test =199.7597 phydro-geomorphological significance. Earth-Science Reviews, 51, 33-65. Gonzalez-Penaloza, F.A., Cerda, A., Zavala, L.M., Jordan, A., Gimenez-Morera, A., Arcenegui, V. (2012) Do conservative agriculture practices increase soil water repellency? A case study in citrus-croped soils. Soil and Tillage Research, 124, 233-239. Pereira, P., Oliva, M. (2013) Modelling soil water

  20. Spatial modeling of soil salinity using remote sensing, GIS, and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldeiry, Ahmed Aly Mohamed

    In this study a new methodology was developed to generate accurate predicted soil salinity maps using remote sensing data. The techniques used include integrating field data, geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, and spatial modelling techniques. Corn and alfalfa crops were selected as indicators of soil salinity during 2001 and 2004 respectively. Five images were acquired from Aster, Ikonos, and Landsat to check the correlation between measured soil salinity and remote sensing data. Observed data from four corn fields during 2001 and four alfalfa fields during 2004 were used in conjunction with the Aster, Ikonos, and Landsat images. Three subsets of 75%, 50%, and 25% were randomly selected from each main set of observed data to be used in conjunction with the Ikonos and Landsat images. Three models were applied to predict soil salinity from remote sensing: the ordinary least squares model (OLS), spatial autoregressive model (SAR), and modified kriging model. The combination of satellite imagery bands that had the best correlation with measured soil salinity was used to predict soil salinity. A number of criteria were used to select the best model. The results show that the modified kriging model provides the best results over the OLS and the SAR models. The OLS model meets the model selection criteria, but, in most cases, it involves some autocorrelation among the residuals. The SAR model was able to remove some of the autocorrelation among the residuals, but the R2 was reduced. The R 2 values of the OLS model were 0.34, 0.47, 0.52, 0.26, and 0.37 for the 2001 Aster, Landsat, Ikonos images for corn, the 2004 Landsat and Ikonos image for alfalfa respectively. The R2 values of the SAR model were 0.05, 0.18, 0.25. 0.03, and 0.15 for the same images. The R2 values of the modified kriging model were 0.81, 0.83, 0.91, 0.60 and 0.68 for the same images. Also, the mean absolute error (MAE) improved significantly when using modified kriging over the OLS and

  1. Determination of radionuclide levels in soil and water around ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study of the radionuclide concentration levels in soil and water samples in Eagle, Atlas and rock cement companies in Port Harcourt was carried out. Soil and water samples collected from the respective premises were analyzed using the gamma -ray spectrometry. The average absorbed dose rates of the soil samples ...

  2. Validation of surface soil moisture from AMSR-E using auxiliary spatial data in the transboundary Indus Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, M. J. M.; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.; Rutten, M. M.

    2011-07-01

    SummaryInformation on soil moisture is vital to describe various hydrological processes. Soil moisture parameters are normally measured using buried sensors in the soil. Alternatively, spatial and temporal characteristics of surface soil moisture are estimated through satellites. Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) is one of such satellites that estimate surface soil moisture in an operational context. These estimates need validation prior to use in various hydrological and water management applications. Such validations are normally carried out using field measurements of soil moisture. This is not technically feasible in vast river basins such as the Indus Basin and for pixel sizes of 25 km × 25 km with non-homogeneous soils and land use. Therefore, AMSR-E data interpreted with Njoku model and posted by the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) for the Indus Basin is evaluated by comparing it against auxiliary spatial data. The auxiliary data exists of (i) land use, (ii) rainfall from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, (iii) seasonality of vegetation from SPOT-Vegetation and (iv) saturated water content ( θ sat) inferred from soil maps. A strong relationship was observed between rainfall and surface soil moisture in the land use class "rainfed". Spearman's rank correlation coefficient ( r s) between the soil moisture and rainfall ranged from 0.14 to 0.55 with a mean of 0.36. For irrigated land uses, r s ranged from -0.04 to 0.52 with a mean of 0.29 due to control of soil moisture by irrigation water supply. The temporal analysis of soil moisture data with vegetation time series showed resemblance with growth phenology. Higher Pearson's correlation coefficient ( r) between the soil moisture and vegetation development was found for time lags of a few weeks. The daily maximum values estimated by AMSR-E ranged from 0.08 to 0.38 cm 3 cm -3. The maximum values were near, but below θ sat limits for

  3. Topography and spatial variability of soil physical properties Topografia e variabilidade espacial de propriedades físicas do solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Bacis Ceddia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the soil formation factors, relief is one of the most used in soil mapping, because of its strong correlation with the spatial variability of soil attributes over a landscape. In this study the relationship between topography and the spatial variability of some soil physical properties was evaluated. The study site, a pasture with 2.84 ha, is located near Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, where a regular square grid with 20 m spacing was laid out and georreferenced. In each sampling point, altitude was measured and undisturbed soil samples were collected, at 0.0-0.1, 0.1-0.2, and 0.2-0.3 m depths. Organic carbon content, soil texture, bulk density, particle density, and soil water retention at 10 (Field Capacity, 80 (limit of tensiometer reading and 1500 kPa (Permanent Wilting Point were determined. Descriptive statistics was used to evaluate central tendency and dispersion parameters of the data. Semivariograms and cross semivariograms were calculated to evaluate the spatial variability of elevation and soil physical attributes, as well as, the relation between elevation and soil physical attributes. Except for silt fraction content (at the three depths, bulk density (at 0.2-0.3 m and particle density (at 0.0-0.1 m depth, all soil attributes showed a strong spatial dependence. Areas with higher elevation presented higher values of clay content, as well as soil water retention at 10, 80 and 1500 kPa. The correlation between altitude and soil physical attributes decreased as soil depth increased. The cross semivariograms demonstrated the viability in using altitude as an auxiliary variable to improve the interpolation of sand and clay contents at the depth of 0.0-0.3 m, and of water retention at 10, 80 and 1500 kPa at the depth of 0.0-0.2 m.O relevo é um dos fatores de formação do solo mais usados em mapeamento de solos devido sua forte correlação com a variabilidade espacial de atributos do solo na paisagem. O objetivo desse

  4. Spatial variability in soil organic carbon in a tropical montane landscape: associations between soil organic carbon and land use, soil properties, vegetation, and topography vary across plot to landscape scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blécourt, Marleen; Corre, Marife D.; Paudel, Ekananda; Harrison, Rhett D.; Brumme, Rainer; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2017-08-01

    Presently, the lack of data on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks in relation to land-use types and biophysical characteristics prevents reliable estimates of ecosystem carbon stocks in montane landscapes of mainland SE Asia. Our study, conducted in a 10 000 ha landscape in Xishuangbanna, SW China, aimed at assessing the spatial variability in SOC concentrations and stocks, as well as the relationships of SOC with land-use types, soil properties, vegetation characteristics and topographical attributes at three spatial scales: (1) land-use types within a landscape (10 000 ha), (2) sampling plots (1 ha) nested within land-use types (plot distances ranging between 0.5 and 12 km), and (3) subplots (10 m radius) nested within sampling plots. We sampled 27 one-hectare plots - 10 plots in mature forests, 11 plots in regenerating or highly disturbed forests, and 6 plots in open land including tea plantations and grasslands. We used a sampling design with a hierarchical structure. The landscape was first classified according to land-use types. Within each land-use type, sampling plots were randomly selected, and within each plot we sampled within nine subplots. SOC concentrations and stocks did not differ significantly across the four land-use types. However, within the open-land category, SOC concentrations and stocks in grasslands were higher than in tea plantations (P soil properties, vegetation characteristics, and topographical attributes varied across spatial scales. Variability in SOC within plots was determined by litter layer carbon stocks (P tree basal area (P effects on SOC need an appropriate sampling design reflecting the controlling factors of SOC so that land-use effects will not be masked by the variability between and within sampling plots.

  5. Spatial-Temporal Changes of Soil Organic Carbon Content in Wafangdian, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon (SOC plays an important role in soil fertility and the global carbon cycle. A better understanding of spatial-temporal changes of SOC content is essential for soil resource management, emission studies, and carbon accounting. In this study, we used a boosted regression trees (BRT model to map distributions of SOC content in the topsoil (0–20 cm and evaluated its temporal dynamics from 1990–2010 in Wafangdian City, northeast of China. A set of 110 (1990 and 127 (2010 soil samples were collected and nine environment variables (including topography and vegetation were used. A 10-fold cross-validation was used to evaluate model performance as well as predictive uncertainty. Accuracy assessments showed that R2 of 0.53 and RMSE (Root-mean-square error of 9.7 g∙kg−1 for 1990, and 0.55, and 5.2 g∙kg−1 for 2010. Elevation and NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index were the two important variables affecting SOC distribution. Results showed that mean SOC content decreased from 19 ± 14 to 18 ± 8 g∙kg−1 over a 20 year period. The maps of SOC represented a decreasing trend from south to north across the study area in both periods. Rapid urbanization and land-use changes were accountable for declining SOC levels. We believe predicted maps of SOC can help local land managers and government agencies to evaluate soil quality and assess carbon sequestration potential and carbon credits.

  6. Spatial Assessment of soil drought indicators at regional scale: hydrolimits and soil water storage capacity in Záhorská Nížina Lowland

    OpenAIRE

    Orfánus, Tomáš

    2005-01-01

    Serious attention is paid today to the problems of landscape regionalization with respect to its hydrological response. The quantification and the spatial pattern of soil drought indicators (SDI) are considered crucial for a correct hydrological zonation of agricultural lands with regard to water-related phenomena of practical importance, such as drought risk, runoff generation and soil erosion. The paper deals with regional estimation of hydrolimits (field capacity, point of limited availabi...

  7. Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm co-infection: spatial distribution and determinants in Preah Vihear Province, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrer, Armelle; Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Vounatsou, Penelope; Chammartin, Frédérique; Marti, Hanspeter; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2018-01-12

    Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm are two soil-transmitted helminths (STH) that are highly prevalent in Cambodia. Strongyloides stercoralis causes long-lasting infections and significant morbidity but is largely neglected, while hookworm causes the highest public health burden among STH. The two parasites have the same infection route, i.e. skin penetration. The extent of co-distribution, which could result in potential high co-morbidities, is unknown in highly endemic settings like Cambodia. The aim of this study was to predict the spatial distribution of S. stercoralis-hookworm co-infection risk and to investigate determinants of co-infection in Preah Vihear Province, North Cambodia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2010 in 60 villages of Preah Vihear Province. Diagnosis was performed on two stool samples, using combined Baermann technique and Koga agar culture plate for S. stercoralis and Kato-Katz technique for hookworm. Bayesian multinomial geostatistical models were used to assess demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioural determinants of S. stercoralis-hookworm co-infection and to predict co-infection risk at non-surveyed locations. Of the 2576 participants included in the study, 48.6% and 49.0% were infected with S. stercoralis and hookworm, respectively; 43.8% of the cases were co-infections. Females, preschool aged children, adults aged 19-49 years, and participants who reported regularly defecating in toilets, systematically boiling drinking water and having been treated with anthelmintic drugs had lower odds of co-infection. While S. stercoralis infection risk did not appear to be spatially structured, hookworm mono-infection and co-infection exhibited spatial correlation at about 20 km. Co-infection risk was positively associated with longer walking distances to a health centre and exhibited a small clustering tendency. The association was only partly explained by climatic variables, suggesting a role for underlying factors, such as

  8. Soil bioindicators as a usefull tools for land management and spatial planning processes: a case-study of prioritization of contaminated soil remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, Cécile; Pauget, Benjamin; Villenave, Cécile; Le Guédard, Marina; Piron, Denis; Nau, Jean-François; Pérès, Guénola

    2017-04-01

    When setting up new land management, contaminated site remediation or soil use change are sometimes necessary to ensure soil quality and the restoration of the ecosystem services. The biological characterization of the soil can be used as complementary information to chemical data in order to better define the conditions for operating. Then, in the context of urban areas, elements on the soil biological quality can be taken into consideration to guide the land development. To assess this "biological state of soil health", some biological tools, called bioindicators, could provide comprehensive information to understand and predict the functioning of the soil ecosystem. In this context, a city of 200 thousand inhabitants has decided to integrate soil bioindicators in their soil diagnostic for their soil urban management. This city had to elaborate a spatial soil management in urban areas which presented soil contamination linked to a complex industrial history associated with bad uses of gardens not always safe for the environment. The project will lead to establish a Natural Urban Park (PNU) in order to develop recreational and leisure activities in a quality environment. In order to complete the knowledge of soil contamination and to assess the transfer of contaminants to the terrestrial ecosystem, a biological characterization of soils located in different areas was carried out using six bioindicators: bioindicators of accumulation which allowed to evaluate the transfers of soil contaminants towards the first 2 steps of a trophic chain (plants and soil fauna, e.g. snails), bioindicators of effects (Omega 3 index was used to assess the effects of soil contamination and to measure their impact on plants), bioindicators of soil functioning (measurement of microbial biomass, nematodes and earthworm community) ; the interest of these last bioindicators is that they also act on the functioning of ecosystems as on the dynamics of organic matter (mineralization) but also

  9. Effect of Spatial Resolution for Characterizing Soil Properties from Imaging Spectrometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, D.; Kumar, P.; Greenberg, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The feasibility of quantifying soil constituents over large areas using airborne hyperspectral data [0.35 - 2.5 μm] in an ensemble bootstrapping lasso algorithmic framework has been demonstrated previously [1]. However the effects of coarsening the spatial resolution of hyperspectral data on the quantification of soil constituents are unknown. We use Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data collected at 7.6m resolution over Birds Point New Madrid (BPNM) floodway for up-scaling and generating multiple coarser resolution datasets including the 60m Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) like data. HyspIRI is a proposed visible shortwave/thermal infrared mission, which will provide global data over a spectral range of 0.35 - 2.5μm at a spatial resolution of 60m. Our results show that the lasso method, which is based on point scale observational data, is scalable. We found consistent good model performance (R2) values (0.79 10.1109/TGRS.2015.2417547.

  10. Evaluating of the spatial heterogeneity of soil loss tolerance and its effects on erosion risk in the carbonate areas of southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil loss tolerance (T value is one of the criteria in determining the necessity of erosion control measures and ecological restoration strategy. However, the validity of this criterion in subtropical karst regions is strongly disputed. In this study, T value is calculated based on soil formation rate by using a digital distribution map of carbonate rock assemblage types. Results indicated a spatial heterogeneity and diversity in soil loss tolerance. Instead of only one criterion, a minimum of three criteria should be considered when investigating the carbonate areas of southern China because the one region, one T value concept may not be applicable to this region. T value is proportionate to the amount of argillaceous material, which determines the surface soil thickness of the formations in homogenous carbonate rock areas. Homogenous carbonate rock, carbonate rock intercalated with clastic rock areas and carbonate/clastic rock alternation areas have T values of 20, 50 and 100 t/(km2 a, and they are extremely, severely and moderately sensitive to soil erosion. Karst rocky desertification (KRD is defined as extreme soil erosion and reflects the risks of erosion. Thus, the relationship between T value and erosion risk is determined using KRD as a parameter. The existence of KRD land is unrelated to the T value, although this parameter indicates erosion sensitivity. Erosion risk is strongly dependent on the relationship between real soil loss (RL and T value rather than on either erosion intensity or the T value itself. If RL > > T, then the erosion risk is high despite of a low RL. Conversely, if T > > RL, then the soil is safe although RL is high. Overall, these findings may clarify the heterogeneity of T value and its effect on erosion risk in a karst environment.

  11. Evaluating of the spatial heterogeneity of soil loss tolerance and its effects on erosion risk in the carbonate areas of southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Bai, Xiao Yong; Jie Wang, Shi; Qin, Luo Yi; Chao Tian, Yi; Jie Luo, Guang

    2017-05-01

    Soil loss tolerance (T value) is one of the criteria in determining the necessity of erosion control measures and ecological restoration strategy. However, the validity of this criterion in subtropical karst regions is strongly disputed. In this study, T value is calculated based on soil formation rate by using a digital distribution map of carbonate rock assemblage types. Results indicated a spatial heterogeneity and diversity in soil loss tolerance. Instead of only one criterion, a minimum of three criteria should be considered when investigating the carbonate areas of southern China because the one region, one T value concept may not be applicable to this region. T value is proportionate to the amount of argillaceous material, which determines the surface soil thickness of the formations in homogenous carbonate rock areas. Homogenous carbonate rock, carbonate rock intercalated with clastic rock areas and carbonate/clastic rock alternation areas have T values of 20, 50 and 100 t/(km2 a), and they are extremely, severely and moderately sensitive to soil erosion. Karst rocky desertification (KRD) is defined as extreme soil erosion and reflects the risks of erosion. Thus, the relationship between T value and erosion risk is determined using KRD as a parameter. The existence of KRD land is unrelated to the T value, although this parameter indicates erosion sensitivity. Erosion risk is strongly dependent on the relationship between real soil loss (RL) and T value rather than on either erosion intensity or the T value itself. If RL > > T, then the erosion risk is high despite of a low RL. Conversely, if T > > RL, then the soil is safe although RL is high. Overall, these findings may clarify the heterogeneity of T value and its effect on erosion risk in a karst environment.

  12. Spatial variability of soil magnetic susceptibility in an agricultural field located in Eastern Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshov, Oleksandr; Pereira, Paulo; Kruglov, Oleksandr

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) have been used to characterize soil properties. It gives an indirect information about heavy metals content and degree of human impacts on soil contamination derived from atmospheric pollution (Girault et al., 2011). This method is inexpensive in relation to chemical analysis and very useful to track soil pollution, since several toxic components deposited on soil surface are rich in particulates produced by oxidation processes (Boyko et al., 2004; Morton-Bernea et al., 2009). Thus, identify the spatial distribution of MS is of major importance, since can give an indirect information of high metals content (Dankoub et al., 2012). This allows also to distinguish the pedogenic and technogenic origin magnetic signal. For example Ukraine chernozems contain fine-grained oxidized magnetite and maghemite of pedogenic origin formed by weathering of the parent material (Jeleńska et al., 2004). However, to a correct understanding of variables distribution, the identification of the most accurate interpolation method is fundamental for a better interpretation of map information (Pereira et al., 2013). The objective of this work is to study the spatial variability of soil MS in an agricultural fields located in the Tcherkascy Tishki area (50.11°N, 36.43 °E, 162 m a.s.l), Ukraine. Soil MS was measured in 77 sampling points in a north facing slope. To estimate the best interpolation method, several interpolation methods were tested, as inverse distance to a weight (IDW) with the power of 1,2,3,4 and 5, Local Polynomial (LP) with the power of 1 and 2, Global Polynomial (GP), radial basis functions - spline with tension (SPT), completely regularized spline (CRS), multiquatratic (MTQ), inverse multiquatratic (IMTQ), and thin plate spline (TPS) - and some geostatistical methods as, ordinary kriging (OK), Simple Kriging (SK) and Universal Kriging (UK), used in previous works (Pereira et al., 2014). On average, the soil MS of the studied plot had 686

  13. Digital mapping of soil properties in Zala County, Hungary for the support of county-level spatial planning and land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, László; Laborczi, Annamária; Szatmári, Gábor; Fodor, Nándor; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Szabó, József; Illés, Gábor

    2014-05-01

    :100.000 Geological Map of Hungary and the map of groundwater depth were used as auxiliary environmental covariables. Various soil related information were mapped in three distinct sets: (i) basic soil properties determining agri-environmental conditions (soil type according to the Hungarian genetic classification, rootable depth, sand and clay content for the 1st and 2nd soil layers, pH, OM and carbonate content for the plough layer); (ii) biophysical criteria of natural handicaps defined by common European system and (iii) agro-meteorologically modelled yield values for different crops, meteorological and management scenarios. The applied method(s) for the spatial inference of specific themes was/were suitably selected: regression and classification trees for categorical data, indicator kriging for probabilistic management of criterion information; and typically regression kriging for quantitative data. Our paper will present the mapping processes themselves, the resulted maps and some conclusions drawn from the experiences. Acknowledgement: Our work was supported by the Hungarian National Scientific Research Foundation (OTKA, Grant No. K105167) and by the European Union with the co-financing of the European Social Fund (TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0013.).

  14. Fine-scale spatial distribution of orchid mycorrhizal fungi in the soil of host-rich grasslands.

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    Voyron, Samuele; Ercole, Enrico; Ghignone, Stefano; Perotto, Silvia; Girlanda, Mariangela

    2017-02-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are essential for the survival of orchid seedlings under natural conditions. The distribution of these fungi in soil can constrain the establishment and resulting spatial arrangement of orchids at the local scale, but the actual extent of occurrence and spatial patterns of orchid mycorrhizal (OrM) fungi in soil remain largely unknown. We addressed the fine-scale spatial distribution of OrM fungi in two orchid-rich Mediterranean grasslands by means of high-throughput sequencing of fungal ITS2 amplicons, obtained from soil samples collected either directly beneath or at a distance from adult Anacamptis morio and Ophrys sphegodes plants. Like ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycobionts, OrM fungi (tulasnelloid, ceratobasidioid, sebacinoid and pezizoid fungi) exhibited significant horizontal spatial autocorrelation in soil. However, OrM fungal read numbers did not correlate with distance from adult orchid plants, and several of these fungi were extremely sporadic or undetected even in the soil samples containing the orchid roots. Orchid mycorrhizal 'rhizoctonias' are commonly regarded as unspecialized saprotrophs. The sporadic occurrence of mycobionts of grassland orchids in host-rich stands questions the view of these mycorrhizal fungi as capable of sustained growth in soil. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Evaluating the effect of remote sensing image spatial resolution on soil exchangeable potassium prediction models in smallholder farm settings.

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    Xu, Yiming; Smith, Scot E; Grunwald, Sabine; Abd-Elrahman, Amr; Wani, Suhas P

    2017-09-15

    Major end users of Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) such as policy makers and agricultural extension workers are faced with choosing the appropriate remote sensing data. The objective of this research is to analyze the spatial resolution effects of different remote sensing images on soil prediction models in two smallholder farms in Southern India called Kothapally (Telangana State), and Masuti (Karnataka State), and provide empirical guidelines to choose the appropriate remote sensing images in DSM. Bayesian kriging (BK) was utilized to characterize the spatial pattern of exchangeable potassium (K ex ) in the topsoil (0-15 cm) at different spatial resolutions by incorporating spectral indices from Landsat 8 (30 m), RapidEye (5 m), and WorldView-2/GeoEye-1/Pleiades-1A images (2 m). Some spectral indices such as band reflectances, band ratios, Crust Index and Atmospherically Resistant Vegetation Index from multiple images showed relatively strong correlations with soil K ex in two study areas. The research also suggested that fine spatial resolution WorldView-2/GeoEye-1/Pleiades-1A-based and RapidEye-based soil prediction models would not necessarily have higher prediction performance than coarse spatial resolution Landsat 8-based soil prediction models. The end users of DSM in smallholder farm settings need select the appropriate spectral indices and consider different factors such as the spatial resolution, band width, spectral resolution, temporal frequency, cost, and processing time of different remote sensing images. Overall, remote sensing-based Digital Soil Mapping has potential to be promoted to smallholder farm settings all over the world and help smallholder farmers implement sustainable and field-specific soil nutrient management scheme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling Soil Carbon Dynamics in Northern Forests: Effects of Spatial and Temporal Aggregation of Climatic Input Data.

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    Dalsgaard, Lise; Astrup, Rasmus; Antón-Fernández, Clara; Borgen, Signe Kynding; Breidenbach, Johannes; Lange, Holger; Lehtonen, Aleksi; Liski, Jari

    2016-01-01

    Boreal forests contain 30% of the global forest carbon with the majority residing in soils. While challenging to quantify, soil carbon changes comprise a significant, and potentially increasing, part of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Thus, their estimation is important when designing forest-based climate change mitigation strategies and soil carbon change estimates are required for the reporting of greenhouse gas emissions. Organic matter decomposition varies with climate in complex nonlinear ways, rendering data aggregation nontrivial. Here, we explored the effects of temporal and spatial aggregation of climatic and litter input data on regional estimates of soil organic carbon stocks and changes for upland forests. We used the soil carbon and decomposition model Yasso07 with input from the Norwegian National Forest Inventory (11275 plots, 1960-2012). Estimates were produced at three spatial and three temporal scales. Results showed that a national level average soil carbon stock estimate varied by 10% depending on the applied spatial and temporal scale of aggregation. Higher stocks were found when applying plot-level input compared to country-level input and when long-term climate was used as compared to annual or 5-year mean values. A national level estimate for soil carbon change was similar across spatial scales, but was considerably (60-70%) lower when applying annual or 5-year mean climate compared to long-term mean climate reflecting the recent climatic changes in Norway. This was particularly evident for the forest-dominated districts in the southeastern and central parts of Norway and in the far north. We concluded that the sensitivity of model estimates to spatial aggregation will depend on the region of interest. Further, that using long-term climate averages during periods with strong climatic trends results in large differences in soil carbon estimates. The largest differences in this study were observed in central and northern regions with strongly

  17. Analyzing spatial patterns linked to the ecology of herbivores and their natural enemies in the soil

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    Raquel eCampos-Herrera

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern agricultural systems can benefit from the application of concepts and models from applied ecology. When understood, multitrophic interactions among plants, pests, diseases and their natural enemies can be exploited to increase crop production and reduce undesirable environmental impacts. Although the understanding of subterranean ecology is rudimentary compared to the perspective aboveground, technologies today vastly reduce traditional obstacles to studying cryptic communities. Here we emphasize advantages to integrating as much as possible the use of these methods in order to leverage the information gained from studying communities of soil organisms. PCR–based approaches to identify and quantify species (real time qPCR and new generation sequencing greatly expand the ability to investigate food web interactions because there is less need for wide taxonomic expertise within research programs. Improved methods to capture and measure volatiles in the soil atmosphere in situ make it possible to detect and study chemical cues that are critical to communication across trophic levels. The application of SADIE to directly assess rather than infer spatial patterns in belowground agroecosystems has improved the ability to characterize relationships between organisms in space and time. We review selected methodology and use of these tools and describe some of the ways they were integrated to study soil food webs in Florida citrus orchards with the goal of developing new biocontrol approaches.

  18. Effects of Spatial Sampling Interval on Roughness Parameters and Microwave Backscatter over Agricultural Soil Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Ernesto Barber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatial sampling interval, as related to the ability to digitize a soil profile with a certain number of features per unit length, depends on the profiling technique itself. From a variety of profiling techniques, roughness parameters are estimated at different sampling intervals. Since soil profiles have continuous spectral components, it is clear that roughness parameters are influenced by the sampling interval of the measurement device employed. In this work, we contributed to answer which sampling interval the profiles needed to be measured at to accurately account for the microwave response of agricultural surfaces. For this purpose, a 2-D laser profiler was built and used to measure surface soil roughness at field scale over agricultural sites in Argentina. Sampling intervals ranged from large (50 mm to small ones (1 mm, with several intermediate values. Large- and intermediate-sampling-interval profiles were synthetically derived from nominal, 1 mm ones. With these data, the effect of sampling-interval-dependent roughness parameters on backscatter response was assessed using the theoretical backscatter model IEM2M. Simulations demonstrated that variations of roughness parameters depended on the working wavelength and was less important at L-band than at C- or X-band. In any case, an underestimation of the backscattering coefficient of about 1-4 dB was observed at larger sampling intervals. As a general rule a sampling interval of 15 mm can be recommended for L-band and 5 mm for C-band.

  19. Fine-Scale Spatial Variability of Precipitation, Soil, and Plant Water Isotopes

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    Goldsmith, G. R.; Braun, S.; Romero, C.; Engbersen, N.; Gessler, A.; Siegwolf, R. T.; Schmid, L.

    2015-12-01

    Introduction: The measurement of stable isotope ratios of water has become fundamental in advancing our understanding of environmental patterns and processes, particularly with respect to understanding the movement of water within the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. While considerable research has explored the temporal variation in stable isotope ratios of water in the environment, our understanding of the spatial variability of these isotopes remains poorly understood. Methods: We collected spatially explicit samples of throughfall and soil water (n=150 locations) from a 1 ha plot delineated in a mixed deciduous forest in the northern Alps of Switzerland. We complemented this with fully sunlit branch and leaf samples (n = 60 individuals) collected from Picea abies and Fagus sylvatica between 14:00 and 16:00 on the same day by means of a helicopter. Soil and plant waters were extracted using cryogenic vacuum distillation and all samples were analyzed for δ18O using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Results: The mean δ18O of throughfall (-3.3 ± 0.8‰) indicated some evaporative enrichment associated with passage through the canopy, but this did not significantly differ from the precipitation collected in nearby open sites (-4.05‰). However, soil was depleted (-7.0 ± 1.8‰) compared to throughfall and there was no significant relationship between the two, suggesting that the sampling for precipitation inputs did not capture all the sources (e.g. stream water, which was -11.5‰) contributing to soil water δ18O ratios. Evaporative enrichment of δ18O was higher in leaves of Fagus (14.8 ± 1.8‰) than in leaves of Picea (11.8 ± 1.7‰). Sampling within crowns of each species (n = 5 branches each from 5 individuals) indicated that variability in a single individual is similar to that among individuals. Discussion: Stable isotopes of water are frequently engaged for studies of ecohydrology, plant ecophysiology, and paleoclimatology. Our results help

  20. Spatial variation in herbicide leaching from a marine clay soil via subsurface drains.

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    Ulén, Barbro M; Larsbo, Mats; Kreuger, Jenny K; Svanbäck, Annika

    2014-03-01

    Subsurface transport via tile drains can significantly contribute to pesticide contamination of surface waters. The spatial variation in subsurface leaching of normally applied herbicides was examined together with phosphorus losses in 24 experimental plots with water sampled flow-proportionally. The study site was a flat, tile-drained area with 60% marine clay in the topsoil in southeast Sweden. The objectives were to quantify the leaching of frequently used herbicides from a tile drained cracking clay soil and to evaluate the variation in leaching within the experimental area and relate this to topsoil management practices (tillage method and structure liming). In summer 2009, 0.14, 0.22 and 1.62%, respectively, of simultaneously applied amounts of MCPA, fluroxypyr and clopyralid were leached by heavy rain five days after spraying. In summer 2011, on average 0.70% of applied bentazone was leached by short bursts of intensive rain 12 days after application. Peak flow concentrations for 50% of the treated area for MCPA and 33% for bentazone exceeded the Swedish no-effect guideline values for aquatic ecosystems. Approximately 0.08% of the glyphosate applied was leached in dissolved form in the winters of 2008/2009 and 2010/2011. Based on measurements of glyphosate in particulate form, total glyphosate losses were twice as high (0.16%) in the second winter. The spatial inter-plot variation was large (72-115%) for all five herbicides studied, despite small variations (25%) in water discharge. The study shows the importance of local scale soil transport properties for herbicide leaching in cracking clay soils. © 2013 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.